WorldWideScience

Sample records for degraded non-intact fuel

  1. Indirect approach for estimation of forest degradation in non-intact dry forest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dons, Klaus; Bhattarai, Sushma; Meilby, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Background Implementation of REDD+ requires measurement and monitoring of carbon emissions from forest degradation in developing countries. Dry forests cover about 40 % of the total tropical forest area, are home to large populations, and hence often display high disturbance levels....... They are susceptible to gradual but persistent degradation and monitoring needs to be low cost due to the low potential benefit from carbon accumulation per unit area. Indirect remote sensing approaches may provide estimates of subsistence wood extraction, but sampling of biomass loss produces zero-inflated continuous...... data that challenges conventional statistical approaches. We introduce the use of Tweedie Compound Poisson distributions from the exponential dispersion family with Generalized Linear Models (CPGLM) to predict biomass loss as a function of distance to nearest settlement in two forest areas in Tanzania...

  2. Fuel cell catalyst degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arenz, Matthias; Zana, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Fuel cells are an important piece in our quest for a sustainable energy supply. Although there are several different types of fuel cells, the by far most popular is the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). Among its many favorable properties are a short start up time and a high power density...... increasing focus. Activity of the catalyst is important, but stability is essential. In the presented perspective paper, we review recent efforts to investigate fuel cell catalysts ex-situ in electrochemical half-cell measurements. Due to the amount of different studies, this review has no intention to give...

  3. A High Integrity Can Design for Degraded Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, P.A.

    1999-01-01

    A high integrity can (HIC), designed to meet the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (Section III, Div. 3, static conditions) is proposed for the interim storage and repository disposal of Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel. The HIC will be approximately 5 3/8 inches (134.38mm) in outside diameter with 1/4 inch (6.35mm) thick walls, and have a removable lid with a metallic seal that is capable of being welded shut. The opening of the can is approximately 4 3/8 inches (111.13mm). The HIC is primarily designed to contain items in the DOE SNF inventory that do not meet acceptance standards for direct disposal in a geologic repository. This includes fuel in the form of particulate dusts, sectioned pieces of fuel, core rubble, melted or degraded (non-intact) fuel elements, unclad uranium alloys, metallurgical specimens, and chemically reactive fuel components. The HIC is intended to act as a substitute cladding for the spent nuclear fuel, further isolate problematic materials, provide a long-term corrosion barrier, and add an extra internal pressure barrier to the waste package. The HIC will also delay potential fission product release and maintain geometry control for extended periods of time. For the entire disposal package to be licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, a HIC must effectively eliminate the disposal problems associated with problem SNF including the release of radioactive and/or reactive material and over pressurization of the HIC due to chemical reactions within the can. Two HICs were analyzed to envelop a range of can lengths between 42 and 101 inches. Using Abacus software, the HIC's were analyzed for end, side, and corner drops. Hastelloy C-22 was chosen based upon structural integrity, corrosion resistance, and neutron adsorption properties

  4. Non-intact zona improves development of murine preimplantation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl5

    2012-09-25

    Sep 25, 2012 ... 2College of Animal Science and Technology, Northwest A & F University, Yangling, ... Key words: Mouse, non-intact zona embryos, adenovirus vector with green fluorescent protein (pAd-GFP), .... Based on microscopic examination, the ZP of some ..... permeable structure of ZP that allowed penetration of.

  5. Degradation resistant fuel cladding materials and manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marlowe, M.O. [GE Nuclear Energy, Wilmington, NC (United States); Montes, J. [ENUSA, Madrid (Spain)

    1995-12-31

    GE has been producing the degradation resistant cladding (zirconium liner and zircaloy-2 surface larger) described here with the cooperation of its primary zirconium vendors since the beginning of 1994. Approximately 24 fuel reloads, or in excess of 250,000 fuel rods, have been produced using this material by GE. GE has also produced tubing for one reload of fuel that is currently being produced by its technology affiliate ENUSA. (orig./HP)

  6. Phenomenology of BWR fuel assembly degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurata, Masaki; Barrachin, Marc; Haste, Tim; Steinbrueck, Martin

    2018-03-01

    Severe accidents occurred at the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FDNPS) which required an immediate re-examination of fuel degradation phenomenology. The present paper reviews the updated knowledge on the phenomenology of the fuel degradation, focusing mainly on the BWR fuel assembly degradation at the macroscopic scale and that of the individual interactions at the meso-scale. Oxidation of boron carbide (B4C) control rods potentially generates far larger amounts of heat and hydrogen under BWR accident conditions. All integral tests with B4C control rods or control blades have shown early failure, liquefaction, relocation and oxidation of B4C starting at temperatures around 1250 °C, well below the significant interaction temperatures of UO2-Zry. These interactions or reactions potentially influence the progress of fuel degradation in the early phase. The steam-starved conditions, which are being discussed as a likely scenario at the FDNPS accident, highly influence the individual interactions and potentially lead the fuel degradation in non-prototypical directions. The detailed phenomenology of individual interactions and their influence on the transient and on the late phase of the severe accidents are also discussed.

  7. Fuel starvation. Irreversible degradation mechanisms in PEM fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangel, Carmen M.; Silva, R.A.; Travassos, M.A.; Paiva, T.I.; Fernandes, V.R. [LNEG, National Laboratory for Energy and Geology, Lisboa (Portugal). UPCH Fuel Cells and Hydrogen Unit

    2010-07-01

    PEM fuel cell operates under very aggressive conditions in both anode and cathode. Failure modes and mechanism in PEM fuel cells include those related to thermal, chemical or mechanical issues that may constrain stability, power and lifetime. In this work, the case of fuel starvation is examined. The anode potential may rise to levels compatible with the oxidization of water. If water is not available, oxidation of the carbon support will accelerate catalyst sintering. Diagnostics methods used for in-situ and ex-situ analysis of PEM fuel cells are selected in order to better categorize irreversible changes of the cell. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) is found instrumental in the identification of fuel cell flooding conditions and membrane dehydration associated to mass transport limitations / reactant starvation and protonic conductivity decrease, respectively. Furthermore, it indicates that water electrolysis might happen at the anode. Cross sections of the membrane catalyst and gas diffusion layers examined by scanning electron microscopy indicate electrode thickness reduction as a result of reactions taking place during hydrogen starvation. Catalyst particles are found to migrate outwards and located on carbon backings. Membrane degradation in fuel cell environment is analyzed in terms of the mechanism for fluoride release which is considered an early predictor of membrane degradation. (orig.)

  8. Pt/C Fuel Cell Catalyst Degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zana, Alessandro

    This thesis investigates the degradation behavior of Pt/C catalysts under simulated automotive conditions. By using the “tool box” synthesis method the Pt loading has been changed from low to high Pt loadings, therefore permitting to study the role of Pt on the degradation of high surface area (H...

  9. Fuel From Self-Degrading Bioengineering Packaging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gross, Richard A

    2005-01-01

    Research focused on developing an enzyme that could be embedded within a single-use plastic and convert the plastic after use to products of value such as fuel to troops in the field. Polylactic acid (PLA...

  10. High Temperature PEM Fuel Cells - Degradation and Durability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Araya, Samuel Simon

    for storage and distribution of hydrogen, it is more practical to use liquid alcohols as energy carriers for fuel cells. Among these, methanol is very attractive, as it can be obtained from a variety of renewable sources and has a relatively low reforming temperature for the production of hydrogen rich...... be stored in liquid alcohols such as methanol, which can be sources of hydrogen for fuel cell applications. In addition, fuel cells unlike other technologies can use a variety of other fuels that can provide a source of hydrogen, such as biogas, methane, butane, etc. More fuel flexibility combined....... On the other hand, CO and methanol-water vapor mixture degrade the fuel cell proportionally to the amounts in which they are tested. In this dissertation some of the mechanisms with which the impurities affect the fuel cell are discussed and interdependence among the effects is also studied. This showed...

  11. Degradation of nitrile rubber fuel hose by biodiesel use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coronado, Marcos; Montero, Gisela; Valdez, Benjamín; Stoytcheva, Margarita; Eliezer, Amir; García, Conrado; Campbell, Héctor; Pérez, Armando

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays biodiesel is becoming an increasingly important and popular fuel, obtained from renewable sources, and contributes to pollutant emissions reduction and decreasing fossil fuels dependence. However, its easier oxidation and faster degradation in comparison to diesel led to compatibility problems between biodiesel and various metallic and polymeric materials contacted. Therefore, the objective of this work is to investigate the effect of different mixtures diesel–biodiesel (fuel type B5, B10, B20) used in Baja California, Mexico on the resistance of nitrile rubber fuel hoses at temperatures of 25 °C and 70 °C applying gravimetric tests, tensile strength measurements and scanning electron microscopy analysis. The factors affecting the material mass change were identified using an experimental design analysis. It was found that the fuel temperature did not conduct to significant mass loss of nitrile rubber fuel hose, while biodiesel concentration affected the properties of the elastomer, causing the phenomenon of swelling. The exposure of hoses to fuel with increasing concentrations of biodiesel led to tensile strength decrease. - Highlights: • The biodiesel oxidation led to problems with polymeric materials. • The degradation of a nitrile rubber fuel hose in biodiesel blends was assessed. • The nitrile rubber showed greater affinity for biodiesel than diesel. • The elastomer swelled, cracked and lost its mechanical properties by biodiesel. • SEM analysis confirmed surface morphology changes in higher biodiesel blends

  12. Visual Speech Fills in Both Discrimination and Identification of Non-Intact Auditory Speech in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerger, Susan; Damian, Markus F.; McAlpine, Rachel P.; Abdi, Herve

    2018-01-01

    To communicate, children must discriminate and identify speech sounds. Because visual speech plays an important role in this process, we explored how visual speech influences phoneme discrimination and identification by children. Critical items had intact visual speech (e.g. baez) coupled to non-intact (excised onsets) auditory speech (signified…

  13. Degradation mechanisms and accelerated testing in PEM fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borup, Rodney L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    The durability of PEM fuel cells is a major barrier to the commercialization of these systems for stationary and transportation power applications. Although there has been recent progress in improving durability, further improvements are needed to meet the commercialization targets. Past improvements have largely been made possible because of the fundamental understanding of the underlying degradation mechanisms. By investigating component and cell degradation modes; defining the fundamental degradation mechanisms of components and component interactions new materials can be designed to improve durability. Various factors have been shown to affect the useful life of PEM fuel cells. Other issues arise from component optimization. Operational conditions (such as impurities in either the fuel and oxidant stream), cell environment, temperature (including subfreezing exposure), pressure, current, voltage, etc.; or transient versus continuous operation, including start-up and shutdown procedures, represent other factors that can affect cell performance and durability. The need for Accelerated Stress Tests (ASTs) can be quickly understood given the target lives for fuel cell systems: 5000 hours ({approx} 7 months) for automotive, and 40,000 hrs ({approx} 4.6 years) for stationary systems. Thus testing methods that enable more rapid screening of individual components to determine their durability characteristics, such as off-line environmental testing, are needed for evaluating new component durability in a reasonable turn-around time. This allows proposed improvements in a component to be evaluated rapidly and independently, subsequently allowing rapid advancement in PEM fuel cell durability. These tests are also crucial to developers in order to make sure that they do not sacrifice durability while making improvements in costs (e.g. lower platinum group metal [PGM] loading) and performance (e.g. thinner membrane or a GDL with better water management properties). To

  14. Transport and degradation of fuel compounds in the vadose zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christophersen, Mette; Broholm, Mette Martina; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Fuel has been spilled in the vadose zone at many sites. An artificial jet fuel source has been installed in a vadose zone at Airbase Værløse. The field experiment is conducted to investigate the natural attenuation potential in order to obtain better evaluations of the risk for groundwater...... contamination. Field data and calculations of mass in the pore air indicate a large loss within a short period of time. Laboratory experiments and isotopic analysis proves that biodegradation is occurring. The results indicate that for most compounds degradation is significant reducing the concentrations...

  15. Short-stack modeling of degradation in solid oxide fuel cells. Part I. Contact degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gazzarri, J.I. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of British Columbia, 2054-6250 Applied Science Lane, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4 (Canada); Kesler, O. [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, 5 King' s College Road, Toronto, ON M5S 3G8 (Canada)

    2008-01-21

    As the first part of a two paper series, we present a two-dimensional impedance model of a working solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) to study the effect of contact degradation on the impedance spectrum for the purpose of non-invasive diagnosis. The two dimensional modeled geometry includes the ribbed interconnect, and is adequate to represent co- and counter-flow configurations. Simulated degradation modes include: cathode delamination, interconnect oxidation, and interconnect-cathode detachment. The simulations show differences in the way each degradation mode impacts the impedance spectrum shape, suggesting that identification is possible. In Part II, we present a sensitivity analysis of the results to input parameter variability that reveals strengths and limitations of the method, as well as describing possible interactions between input parameters and concurrent degradation modes. (author)

  16. Short-stack modeling of degradation in solid oxide fuel cells. Part I. Contact degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzarri, J. I.; Kesler, O.

    As the first part of a two paper series, we present a two-dimensional impedance model of a working solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) to study the effect of contact degradation on the impedance spectrum for the purpose of non-invasive diagnosis. The two dimensional modeled geometry includes the ribbed interconnect, and is adequate to represent co- and counter-flow configurations. Simulated degradation modes include: cathode delamination, interconnect oxidation, and interconnect-cathode detachment. The simulations show differences in the way each degradation mode impacts the impedance spectrum shape, suggesting that identification is possible. In Part II, we present a sensitivity analysis of the results to input parameter variability that reveals strengths and limitations of the method, as well as describing possible interactions between input parameters and concurrent degradation modes.

  17. Tutorial review of spent-fuel degradation mechanisms under dry-storage conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einziger, R.E.

    1983-02-01

    This tutorial reviews our present understanding of fuel-rod degradation over a range of possible dry-storage environments. Three areas are covered: (1) why study fuel-rod degradation; (2) cladding-degradation mechanisms; and (3) the status of fuel-oxidation studies

  18. Degradation of solid oxide fuel cells with wood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    N Frank; M Saule; J Karl

    2006-01-01

    The Technical University of Munich investigates the degradation effects observed on SOFCs when fired with product gases from biomass gasification processes. The TUM has concentrated its research on tubular SOFCs. For this purpose tubular electrolyte-supported SOFCs have been manufactured using commercially available electrolyte tubes, anode foil and cathode paste. The tubular SOFCs were first run with hydrogen and synthetic fuels. Once stable and reproducible results were achieved, tests with product gas from four different biomass gasifiers have started. These gasifiers have been coupled to a gas cleaning device which includes sulphur and particle removal and pre-reforming. Different operation conditions of the gasifiers and the gas cleaning device have been realized and the corresponding fuel cell degradations have been analysed. (authors)

  19. Assessment of causes for degrading fuel performance at Darlington NGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Judah, J.; Goodchild, S.

    2013-01-01

    Fuel performance at the Darlington nuclear generating station has historically been excellent. Until recently, the majority of these few fuel defects have been attributed to fretting by heat transport system debris. The minority have been linked to manufacturing issues. Recently, Darlington has experienced an increase in the number of fuel defects. Although the defect rate remains low with respect to industry standards, this defect experience is considered to be unacceptable given current industry expectations and the OPG zero defect policy. Nine fuel defects have been discharged since 2007 from the four Darlington reactors. This represents a fuel defect rate of just 0.35 defects per year per reactor. At the time of this writing three additional defects are suspected to be in core. Although a definitive defect cause has yet to be identified, these fuel performance issues appear to be due to the coincidental degradation of manufacturing and operational factors, thereby decreasing the margins to fuel failure due to fuelling power ramps. All of the confirmed defected bundles have been long bundles and all experienced a relatively high power ramp when shifted from Position 2 to Position 6. High bundle uranium masses and low internal clearances are thought to be significant contributing factors. Bundle burnups at the time of the power ramps were low and these bundles were not identified by existing power ramp defect predictive tools. Our assessment has resulted in a number of recommendations which are designed to mitigate these adverse conditions by restoring the margins to power ramp failures. These recommendations impact broadly across a number of organizations including reactor physics, fuel design, fuel manufacturing, reactor design, inspections and PIE. (author)

  20. Degradation of solid oxide fuel cell metallic interconnects in fuels containing sulfur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2005-01-01

    Hydrogen is the main fuel for all types of fuel cells except direct methanol fuel cells. Hydrogen can be generated from all manner of fossil fuels, including coal, natural gas, diesel, gasoline, other hydrocarbons, and oxygenates (e.g., methanol, ethanol, butanol, etc.). Impurities in the fuel can cause significant performance problems and sulfur, in particular, can decrease the cell performance of fuel cells, including solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). In the SOFC, the high (800-1000°C) operating temperature yields advantages (e.g., internal fuel reforming) and disadvantages (e.g., material selection and degradation problems). Significant progress in reducing the operating temperature of the SOFC from ~1000 ºC to ~750 ºC may allow less expensive metallic materials to be used for interconnects and as balance of plant (BOP) materials. This paper provides insight on the material performance of nickel, ferritic steels, and nickel-based alloys in fuels containing sulfur, primarily in the form of H2S, and seeks to quantify the extent of possible degradation due to sulfur in the gas stream.

  1. Does rim microstructure formation degrade the fuel rod performance?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baron, D.; Spino, J.

    2002-01-01

    High burnup extension of LWR fuel is progressing to reduce the total process flow and eventually the costs of the nuclear fuel cycle. A particular fuel restructuring at high burnups, commonly observed at the periphery of LWR fuel pellets (rim structure), but also in FBR fuels to some extent and in the Plutonium rich clusters of the MOX Fuels, was considered a priori as a limitation for burnup extension. Since more than ten years this rim effect have been deeply investigated. Its causes and consequences are however not yet totally elucidated. The three steps actually identified of this phenomenon are first a progressive disappearing of the intra-granular Xenon, the outset of numerous 0.5 to 1 m pores and finally a grain subdivision around the pores. Penalty of the porosity increase on the thermal conductivity is obvious. One expect the fission gases to remain trapped in the rim porosity up to a 75 MWd/kgUO 2 local burnup. Above this threshold, 15 to 20 % of the fission gases seem to be quickly released. Microindentation tests conducted at ITU have shown the rim structure to resist fracture extension under punching. It is still open whether this implies certain ductility and viscosity of the material, or if it corresponds to stress relaxation by microcracking. Whatever the case be, it is suggested that the rim material would be able to decrease the interaction stresses and to equalise the cladding strains during a power ramp. Moreover, in the RIA tests, it was concluded so far that the grain de-cohesion caused by gas expansion at the grain boundaries was responsible for the cladding strain and failure. However, not the rim zone was affected by grain de-cohesion but the region adjacent to it. Therefore, in front of the question whether the rim structure degrades the fuel rod behaviour, we continue to argue on its benefit for fuel burnup extension. (author)

  2. High temperature PEM fuel cells - Degradation and durability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araya, S.S.

    2012-12-15

    This work analyses the degradation issues of a High Temperature Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (HT-PEMFC). It is based on the assumption that given the current challenges for storage and distribution of hydrogen, it is more practical to use liquid alcohols as energy carriers for fuel cells. Among these, methanol is very attractive, as it can be obtained from a variety of renewable sources and has a relatively low reforming temperature for the production of hydrogen rich gaseous mixture. The effects on HT-PEMFC of the different constituents of this gaseous mixture, known as a reformate gas, are investigated in the current work. For this, an experimental set up, in which all these constituents can be fed to the anode side of a fuel cell for testing, is put in place. It includes mass flow controllers for the gaseous species, and a vapor delivery system for the vapor mixture of the unconverted reforming reactants. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) is used to characterize the effects of these impurities. The effects of CO were tested up to 2% by volume along with other impurities. All the reformate impurities, including ethanol-water vapor mixture, cause loss in the performance of the fuel cell. In general, CO{sub 2} dilutes the reactants, if tested alone at high operating temperatures (180 C), but tends to exacerbate the effects of CO if they are tested together. On the other hand, CO and methanol-water vapor mixture degrade the fuel cell proportionally to the amounts in which they are tested. In this dissertation some of the mechanisms with which the impurities affect the fuel cell are discussed and interdependence among the effects is also studied. This showed that the combined effect of reformate impurities is more than the arithmetic sum of the individual effects of reformate constituents. The results of the thesis help to understand better the issues of degradation and durability in fuel cells, which can help to make them more durable and

  3. Chemical degradation mechanisms of membranes for alkaline membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choe, Yoong-Kee [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Umezono 1-1-1, Tsukuba (Japan); Henson, Neil J.; Kim, Yu Seung [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-12-31

    Chemical degradation mechanisms of membranes for alkaline membrane fuel cells have been investigated using density functional theory (DFT). We have elucidated that the aryl-ether moiety of membranes is one of the weakest site against attack of hydroxide ions. The results of DFT calculations for hydroxide initiated aryl-ether cleavage indicated that the aryl-ether cleavage occurred prior to degradation of cationic functional group. Such a weak nature of the aryl-ether group arises from the electron deficiency of the aryl group as well as the low bond dissociation energy. The DFT results suggests that removal of the aryl-ether group in the membrane should enhance the stability of membranes under alkaline conditions. In fact, an ether fee poly(phenylene) membrane exhibits excellent stability against the attack from hydroxide ions.

  4. Fuel and control rod failure behavior during degraded core accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, K.S.

    1984-01-01

    As a part of the pretest and posttest analyses of Light Water Reactor Source Term Experiments (STEP) which are conducted in the Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) facility, this paper investigates the thermodynamic and material behaviors of nuclear fuel pins and control rods during severe core degradation accidents. A series of four STEP tests are being performed to simulate the characteristics of the power reactor accidents and investigate the behavior of fission product release during these accidents. To determine the release rate of the fission products from the fuel pins and the control rod materials, information concerning the timing of the clad failure and the thermodynamic conditions of the fuel pins and control rods are needed to be evaluated. Because the phase change involves a large latent heat and volume expansion, and the phase change is a direct cause of the clad failure, the understanding of the phase change phenomena, particularly information regarding how much of the fuel pin and control rod materials are melted are very important. A simple energy balance model is developed to calculate the temperature profile and melt front in various heat transfer media considering the effects of natural convection phenomena on the melting and freezing front behavior

  5. Chromium related degradation of solid oxide fuel cells; Chrom-bezogene Degradation von Festoxid-Brennstoffzellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, Anita

    2011-05-04

    Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) offer a high potential for application as an auxiliary power unit (APU) for heavy goods vehicles as well as combined heat and power (CHP) systems. SOFCs are especially attractive due to their high efficiencies and the use of different fuel types. However, optimization in terms of long term stability and costs are still necessary. This work characterized the degradation of SOFCs with lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM) cathodes under chromium influence. Galvanostatic cell tests were carried out at 800 C with operation times from 250 - 3000 h and variation of the chromium source and current density. The current densities of j = 0 (A)/(cm{sup 2}), j = 0,3 (A)/(cm{sup 2}) and j = 0,5 (A)/(cm{sup 2}) were applied. The high temperature ferritic alloy Crofer22APU was used as a chromium source. Variation of the chromium source was realized by coating the Crofer22APU insert with the chromium retention layer Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} and the cathode contact layer LCC10. Cell degradation was analyzed with regard to cell voltage, current density and area specific resistance (ASR). Microstructural alterations of the cathode as well as chromium content and distribution across the cell were investigated after completion of the cell tests. For cells with a chromium source present and operation with a nonzero current density, the course of cell degradation was divided into three phases: a run-in, weak linear degradation and strong linear degradation. A decrease of the chromium release rate by means of different coatings stretched the course of degradation along the timescale. Strong degradation, which is characterized by a significant increase in ASR as well as a decrease of current density at the operating point, was only observed when a chromium source in the setup was comb ined with operation of the cell with a non-zero current density. Operation of the cell with a chromium source but no current density caused a degradation of current density at the

  6. Positive Youth Development, Life Satisfaction and Problem Behaviors of Adolescents in Intact and Non-Intact Families in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Tan Lei Shek

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated whether Chinese adolescents living in intact and non-intact families differed in their positive development, life satisfaction, and risk behavior. A total of 3,328 Secondary 1 students responded to measures of positive youth development (such as resilience and psychosocial competencies, life satisfaction, and risk behavior (substance abuse, delinquency, Internet addiction, consumption of pornographic materials, self-harm, and behavioral intention to engage in problem behavior. Findings revealed that adolescents growing up in intact families reported higher levels of positive developmental outcomes and life satisfaction as compared with adolescents from non-intact families. Adolescents in non-intact families also reported higher levels of risk behaviors than those growing up in intact families.

  7. Visual speech alters the discrimination and identification of non-intact auditory speech in children with hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerger, Susan; Damian, Markus F; McAlpine, Rachel P; Abdi, Hervé

    2017-03-01

    Understanding spoken language is an audiovisual event that depends critically on the ability to discriminate and identify phonemes yet we have little evidence about the role of early auditory experience and visual speech on the development of these fundamental perceptual skills. Objectives of this research were to determine 1) how visual speech influences phoneme discrimination and identification; 2) whether visual speech influences these two processes in a like manner, such that discrimination predicts identification; and 3) how the degree of hearing loss affects this relationship. Such evidence is crucial for developing effective intervention strategies to mitigate the effects of hearing loss on language development. Participants were 58 children with early-onset sensorineural hearing loss (CHL, 53% girls, M = 9;4 yrs) and 58 children with normal hearing (CNH, 53% girls, M = 9;4 yrs). Test items were consonant-vowel (CV) syllables and nonwords with intact visual speech coupled to non-intact auditory speech (excised onsets) as, for example, an intact consonant/rhyme in the visual track (Baa or Baz) coupled to non-intact onset/rhyme in the auditory track (/-B/aa or/-B/az). The items started with an easy-to-speechread/B/or difficult-to-speechread/G/onset and were presented in the auditory (static face) vs. audiovisual (dynamic face) modes. We assessed discrimination for intact vs. non-intact different pairs (e.g., Baa:/-B/aa). We predicted that visual speech would cause the non-intact onset to be perceived as intact and would therefore generate more same-as opposed to different-responses in the audiovisual than auditory mode. We assessed identification by repetition of nonwords with non-intact onsets (e.g.,/-B/az). We predicted that visual speech would cause the non-intact onset to be perceived as intact and would therefore generate more Baz-as opposed to az- responses in the audiovisual than auditory mode. Performance in the audiovisual mode showed more same

  8. Visual Speech Alters the Discrimination and Identification of Non-Intact Auditory Speech in Children with Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerger, Susan; Damian, Markus F.; McAlpine, Rachel P.; Abdi, Hervé

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Understanding spoken language is an audiovisual event that depends critically on the ability to discriminate and identify phonemes yet we have little evidence about the role of early auditory experience and visual speech on the development of these fundamental perceptual skills. Objectives of this research were to determine 1) how visual speech influences phoneme discrimination and identification; 2) whether visual speech influences these two processes in a like manner, such that discrimination predicts identification; and 3) how the degree of hearing loss affects this relationship. Such evidence is crucial for developing effective intervention strategies to mitigate the effects of hearing loss on language development. Methods Participants were 58 children with early-onset sensorineural hearing loss (CHL, 53% girls, M = 9;4 yrs) and 58 children with normal hearing (CNH, 53% girls, M = 9;4 yrs). Test items were consonant-vowel (CV) syllables and nonwords with intact visual speech coupled to non-intact auditory speech (excised onsets) as, for example, an intact consonant/rhyme in the visual track (Baa or Baz) coupled to non-intact onset/rhyme in the auditory track (/–B/aa or /–B/az). The items started with an easy-to-speechread /B/ or difficult-to-speechread /G/ onset and were presented in the auditory (static face) vs. audiovisual (dynamic face) modes. We assessed discrimination for intact vs. non-intact different pairs (e.g., Baa:/–B/aa). We predicted that visual speech would cause the non-intact onset to be perceived as intact and would therefore generate more same—as opposed to different—responses in the audiovisual than auditory mode. We assessed identification by repetition of nonwords with non-intact onsets (e.g., /–B/az). We predicted that visual speech would cause the non-intact onset to be perceived as intact and would therefore generate more Baz—as opposed to az— responses in the audiovisual than auditory mode. Results

  9. Summary report on the aerobic degradation of diesel fuel and the degradation of toluene under aerobic, denitrifying and sulfate reducing conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coyne, P.; Smith, G.

    1995-01-01

    This report contains a number of studies that were performed to better understand the technology of the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons. Topics of investigation include the following: diesel fuel degradation by Rhodococcus erythropolis; BTEX degradation by soil isolates; aerobic degradation of diesel fuel-respirometry; aerobic degradation of diesel fuel-shake culture; aerobic toluene degradation by A3; effect of HEPES, B1, and myo-inositol addition on the growth of A3; aerobic and anaerobic toluene degradation by contaminated soils; denitrifying bacteria MPNs; sulfate-reducing bacteria MPNs; and aerobic, DNB and SRB enrichments

  10. Long term performance degradation analysis and optimization of anode supported solid oxide fuel cell stacks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parhizkar, Tarannom; Roshandel, Ramin

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A degradation based optimization framework is developed. • The cost of electricity based on degradation of solid oxide fuel cells is minimized. • The effects of operating conditions on degradation mechanisms are investigated. • Results show 7.12% lower cost of electricity in comparison with base case. • Degradation based optimization is a beneficial concept for long term analysis. - Abstract: The main objective of this work is minimizing the cost of electricity of solid oxide fuel cell stacks by decelerating degradation mechanisms rate in long term operation for stationary power generation applications. The degradation mechanisms in solid oxide fuel cells are caused by microstructural changes, reactions between lanthanum strontium manganite and electrolyte, poisoning by chromium, carburization on nickel particles, formation of nickel sulfide, nickel coarsening, nickel oxidation, loss of conductivity and crack formation in the electrolyte. The rate of degradation mechanisms depends on the cell operating conditions (cell voltage and fuel utilization). In this study, the degradation based optimization framework is developed which determines optimum operating conditions to achieve a minimum cost of electricity. To show the effectiveness of the developed framework, optimization results are compared with the case that system operates at its design point. Results illustrate optimum operating conditions decrease the cost of electricity by 7.12%. The performed study indicates that degradation based optimization is a beneficial concept for long term performance degradation analysis of energy conversion systems.

  11. Performance Degradation Tests of Phosphoric Acid Doped PBI Membrane Based High Temperature PEM Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Fan; Araya, Samuel Simon; Grigoras, Ionela

    2014-01-01

    Degradation tests of two phosphoric acid (PA) doped PBI membrane based HT-PEM fuel cells were reported in this paper to investigate the effects of start/stop and the presence of methanol in the fuel to the performance degradation. Continuous tests with H2 and simulated reformate which was composed...... of H2, water steam and methanol as the fuel were performed on both single cells. 12-h-startup/12-h-shutdown dynamic tests were performed on the first single cell with pure dry H2 as the fuel and on the second single cell with simulated reformate as the fuel. Along with the tests electrochemical...... techniques such as polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were employed to study the degradation mechanisms of the fuel cells. Both single cells showed an increase in the performance in the H2 continuous tests, because of a decrease in the ORR kinetic resistance probably due...

  12. Thermal conductivity degradation analyses of LWR MOX fuel by the quasi-two phase material model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosaka, Yuji; Kurematsu, Shigeru; Kitagawa, Takaaki; Suzuki, Akihiro; Terai, Takayuki

    2012-01-01

    The temperature measurements of mixed oxide (MOX) and UO 2 fuels during irradiation suggested that the thermal conductivity degradation rate of the MOX fuel with burnup should be slower than that of the UO 2 fuel. In order to explain the difference of the degradation rates, the quasi-two phase material model is proposed to assess the thermal conductivity degradation of the MIMAS MOX fuel, which takes into account the Pu agglomerate distributions in the MOX fuel matrix as fabricated. As a result, the quasi-two phase model calculation shows the gradual increase of the difference with burnup and may expect more than 10% higher thermal conductivity values around 75 GWd/t. While these results are not fully suitable for thermal conductivity degradation models implemented by some industrial fuel manufacturers, they are consistent with the results from the irradiation tests and indicate that the inhomogeneity of Pu content in the MOX fuel can be one of the major reasons for the moderation of the thermal conductivity degradation of the MOX fuel. (author)

  13. Review: Durability and degradation issues of PEM fuel cell components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijn, de F.A.; Dam, V.A.T.; Janssen, G.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Besides cost reduction, durability is the most important issue to be solved before commercialisation of PEM Fuel Cells can be successful. For a fuel cell operating under constant load conditions, at a relative humidity close to 100% and at a temperature of maximum 75 °C, using optimal stack and flow

  14. Degradation of EBR-II driver fuel during wet storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pahl, R. G.

    2000-01-01

    Characterization data are reported for sodium bonded EBR-II reactor fuel which had been stored underwater in containers since the 1981--1982 timeframe. Ten stainless steel storage containers, which had leaked water during storage due to improper sealing, were retrieved from the ICPP-603 storage basin at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) in Idaho. In the container chosen for detailed destructive analysis, the stainless steel cladding on the uranium alloy fuel had ruptured and fuel oxide sludge filled the bottom of the container. Headspace gas sampling determined that greater than 99% hydrogen was present. Cesium 137, which had leached out of the fuel during the aqueous corrosion process, dominated the radionuclide source term of the water. The metallic sodium from the fuel element bond had reacted with the water, forming a concentrated caustic solution of NaOH

  15. Study on Thermal Degradation Characteristics and Regression Rate Measurement of Paraffin-Based Fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songqi Hu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Paraffin fuel has been found to have a regression rate that is higher than conventional HTPB (hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene fuel and, thus, presents itself as an ideal energy source for a hybrid rocket engine. The energy characteristics of paraffin-based fuel and HTPB fuel have been calculated by the method of minimum free energy. The thermal degradation characteristics were measured for paraffin, pretreated paraffin, HTPB and paraffin-based fuel in different working conditions by the using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA. The regression rates of paraffin-based fuel and HTPB fuel were tested by a rectangular solid-gas hybrid engine. The research findings showed that: the specific impulse of paraffin-based fuel is almost the same as that of HTPB fuel; the decomposition temperature of pretreated paraffin is higher than that of the unprocessed paraffin, but lower than that of HTPB; with the increase of paraffin, the initial reaction exothermic peak of paraffin-based fuel is reached in advance, and the initial reaction heat release also increases; the regression rate of paraffin-based fuel is higher than the common HTPB fuel under the same conditions; with the increase of oxidizer mass flow rate, the regression rate of solid fuel increases accordingly for the same fuel formulation.

  16. Performance Degradation Tests of Phosphoric Acid Doped Polybenzimidazole Membrane Based High Temperature Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Fan; Araya, Samuel Simon; Grigoras, Ionela

    2015-01-01

    Degradation tests of two phosphoric acid (PA) doped PBI membrane based HT-PEM fuel cells were reported in this paper to investigate the effects of start/stop and the presence of methanol in the fuel to the performance degradation of the HT-PEM fuel cell. Continuous tests with pure dry H2 and meth...

  17. Modelling the release behaviour of cesium during severe fuel degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, B.J.; Andre, B.; Morel, B.

    1995-01-01

    An analytical model has been applied to describe the diffusional release of fission product cesium from Zircaloy-clad fuel under high-temperature reactor accident conditions. The present treatment accounts for the influence of the atmosphere (i.e., changing oxygen potential) on the state of fuel oxidation and the release kinetics. The effects of fuel dissolution on the volatile release behaviour (under reducing conditions) is considered in terms of earlier crucible experiments and a simple model based on bubble coalescence and transport in metal pools. The model has been used to interpret the cesium release kinetics observed in steam and hydrogen experiments at the Vertical Irradiation (VI) Facility in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and at the HEVA/VERCORS Facility in the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique. (author)

  18. Optical coherence tomography for nondestructive evaluation of fuel rod degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renshaw, Jeremy B.; Jenkins, Thomas P.; Buckner, Benjamin D.; Friend, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear power plants regularly inspect fuel rods to ensure safe and reliable operation. Excessive corrosion can cause fuel failures which can have significant repercussions for the plant, including impacts on plant operation, worker exposure to radiation, and the plant's INPO rating. While plants typically inspect for fuel rod corrosion using eddy current techniques, these techniques have known issues with reliability in the presence of tenacious, ferromagnetic crud layers that can deposit during operation, and the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) inspection results can often be in error by a factor of 2 or 3. For this reason, alternative measurement techniques, such as Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), have been evaluated that are not sensitive to the ferromagnetic nature of the crud. This paper demonstrates that OCT has significant potential to characterize the thickness of crud layers that can deposit on the surfaces of fuel rods during operation. Physical trials have been performed on simulated crud samples, and the resulting data show an apparent correlation between the crud layer thickness and the OCT signal

  19. Optical coherence tomography for nondestructive evaluation of fuel rod degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renshaw, Jeremy B., E-mail: jrenshaw@epri.com [Electric Power Research Institute, 1300 West WT Harris Blvd., Charlotte, NC 28262 (United States); Jenkins, Thomas P., E-mail: tjenkins@metrolaserinc.com; Buckner, Benjamin D., E-mail: tjenkins@metrolaserinc.com [MetroLaser, Inc., 22941 Mill Creek Drive, Laguna Hills, CA 92653 (United States); Friend, Brian [AREVA, Inc., 3315 Old Forest Road, Lynchburg, VA 24501 (United States)

    2015-03-31

    Nuclear power plants regularly inspect fuel rods to ensure safe and reliable operation. Excessive corrosion can cause fuel failures which can have significant repercussions for the plant, including impacts on plant operation, worker exposure to radiation, and the plant's INPO rating. While plants typically inspect for fuel rod corrosion using eddy current techniques, these techniques have known issues with reliability in the presence of tenacious, ferromagnetic crud layers that can deposit during operation, and the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) inspection results can often be in error by a factor of 2 or 3. For this reason, alternative measurement techniques, such as Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), have been evaluated that are not sensitive to the ferromagnetic nature of the crud. This paper demonstrates that OCT has significant potential to characterize the thickness of crud layers that can deposit on the surfaces of fuel rods during operation. Physical trials have been performed on simulated crud samples, and the resulting data show an apparent correlation between the crud layer thickness and the OCT signal.

  20. Effects of accelerated degradation on metal supported thin film-based solid oxide fuel cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reolon, R. P.; Sanna, S.; Xu, Yu

    2018-01-01

    A thin film-based solid oxide fuel cell is deposited on a Ni-based metal porous support by pulsed laser deposition with a multi-scale-graded microstructure design. The fuel cell, around 1 μm in thickness, is composed of a stabilized-zirconia/doped-ceria bi-layered dense electrolyte and nanostruct......A thin film-based solid oxide fuel cell is deposited on a Ni-based metal porous support by pulsed laser deposition with a multi-scale-graded microstructure design. The fuel cell, around 1 μm in thickness, is composed of a stabilized-zirconia/doped-ceria bi-layered dense electrolyte......, electrochemical performances are steady, indicating the stability of the cell. Under electrical load, a progressive degradation is activated. Post-test analysis reveals both mechanical and chemical degradation of the cell. Cracks and delamination of the thin films promote a significant nickel diffusion and new...

  1. Evaluation of fuel cell system efficiency and degradation at development and during commercialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmen, R. S.; Johnson, C. D.

    Two primary parameters stand out for characterizing fuel cell system performance. The first and most important parameter is system efficiency. This parameter is relatively easy to define, and protocols for its assessment are already available. Another important parameter yet to be fully considered is system degradation. Degradation is important because customers desire to know how long their purchased fuel cell unit will last. The measure of degradation describes this performance factor by quantifying, for example, how the efficiency of the unit degrades over time. While both efficiency and degradation concepts are readily understood, the coupling between these two parameters must also be understood so that proper testing and evaluation of fuel cell systems is achieved. Tests not properly performed, and results not properly understood, may result in improper use of the evaluation data, producing improper R&D planning decisions and financial investments. This paper presents an analysis of system degradation, recommends an approach to its measurement, and shows how these two parameters are related and how one can be "traded-off" for the other.

  2. Degradation Mechanism in a Direct Carbon Fuel Cell Operated with Demineralised Brown Coal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rady, Adam C.; Giddey, Sarbjit; Kulkarni, Aniruddha; Badwal, Sukhvinder P.S.; Bhattacharya, Sankar

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Degradation mechanism studied for demineralised coal in a direct carbon fuel cell. • Diffusion limited processes dominate the electrode polarisation losses in pure N 2 . • Major fuel cell performance loss occurred due to loss of carbon/anode contacts. • The anode retained its phase structure with minor other phases formed in operation. - Abstract: The performance of a demineralised and devolatilised coal from the Morwell mine in the Latrobe Valley, Victoria, has been investigated in a direct carbon fuel cell (DCFC) operated at 850 °C. The focus of the investigation has been on understanding degradation issues as a function of time involving a sequence of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and voltage-current characteristic. Diffusion limited processes dominate the electrode polarisation losses in pure N 2 atmosphere, however, these decrease substantially in the presence of CO 2 as the anode chamber purge gas, due to in situ generation of fuel species by the reaction of CO 2 with carbon. Post-mortem analysis of anode by SEM and XRD revealed only a minor degradation due to its reduction, particle agglomeration as well as the formation of small quantity of new phases. However, major fuel cell performance degradation (increase of ohmic resistive and electrode polarisation losses) occurred due to loss of carbon/anode contacts and a reduction in the electron-conducting pathways as the fuel was consumed. The investigations revealed that the demineralised coal char can be used as a viable fuel for DCFC, however, further developments on anode materials and fuel feed mechanism would be required to achieve long-term sustained performance

  3. Use of nuclear fusion systems for spent nuclear fuel degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieto, M.; Ramos, G.; Herrera V, J. J. E.

    2009-10-01

    One of the severe problems of the nuclear industry that should be resolved to facilitate its acceptance like viable energy alternative is of the wastes. In spite of having alternative of fuel reprocessing, many of them have been abandoned by economic or security reasons. In the present work, the alternative is described for using reactors of nuclear fusion as sources of fast neutrons with two important applications in mind: the plutonium burning and the transmutation of the elements that contribute in way more important to their radioactivity, mainly the smaller actinides and the fission products of long half life. (Author)

  4. A Slurry Biocascade for the Enhanced Degradation of Fuels in Soils

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Apitz, Sabine

    1994-01-01

    .... In the first step of the cascade, the simplest fuel components (e.g., n-alkanes) are biodegraded. Then, the soil is transferred to the next steps in the cascade, in which different "microbial soups" degrade the next groups of hydrocarbons...

  5. Visual observations of a degraded bundle of irradiated fuel: the Phebus FPT1 test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrachin, M.; Bottomley, P.D.

    1999-01-01

    The international Phebus-FP (Fission Product) project is managed by the Institut de Protection et Surete Nucleaire in collaboration with Electricite de France (EDF), the European Commission (EC), the USNRC (USA), COG (Canada), NUPEC and JAERI (Japan), KAERI (South Korea), PSI and HSK (Switzerland). It is designed to measure the source-term and to study the degradation of irradiated UO 2 fuel in conditions typical of a severe loss of coolant accident in a pressurised water reactor (PWR). In the first test (FPT0), performed in December '93, a bundle of 20 fresh fuel rods and a central Ag-In-Cd control rod underwent a short 15-day irradiation to generate fission products before testing in the Phebus reactor in Cadarache. The second test (FPT1) was performed in July '96, in the same conditions and geometry, but using irradiated fuel (-23 GWd/tU). In the FPT1 test, the bundle was heated to an estimated 3000 K over a period of 30 minutes in order to induce a substantial liquefaction of the bundle. After the test, the bundle was embedded in epoxy and cut at different levels to investigate the mechanisms of the core degradation. This paper reports the visual observations of the degraded FPT1 bundle, very preliminary interpretations about the scenario of degradation and a comparison between the behaviour of the fuel in the FPT0 and FPT1 tests. (author)

  6. Experimental study and modelling of degradation phenomena in HTPEM fuel cell stacks for use in CHP systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl

    2009-01-01

    Degradation phenomena in HTPEM fuel cells for use in CHP systems were investigated experimentally and by modelling. It was found that the two main degradation mechanisms in HTPEM fuel cells are carbon corrosion and Pt agglomeration. On basis of this conclusion a mechanistic model, describing...

  7. Catalyst Degradation in High Temperature Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells Based on Acid Doped Polybenzimidazole Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cleemann, Lars Nilausen; Buazar, F.; Li, Qingfeng

    2013-01-01

    and multi‐walled carbon nanotubes were used as supports for electrode catalysts and evaluated in accelerated durability tests under potential cycling at 150 °C. Measurements of open circuit voltage, area specific resistance and hydrogen permeation through the membrane were carried out, indicating little...... contribution of the membrane degradation to the performance losses during the potential cycling tests. As the major mechanism of the fuel cell performance degradation, the electrochemical active area of the cathodic catalysts showed a steady decrease in the cyclic voltammetric measurements, which was also......Degradation of carbon supported platinum catalysts is a major failure mode for the long term durability of high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells based on phosphoric acid doped polybenzimidazole membranes. With Vulcan carbon black as a reference, thermally treated carbon black...

  8. Rates and products of degradation for MTBE and other oxygenate fuel additives in the subsurface environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tratnyek, P.G.; Church, C.D.; Pankow, J.F.

    1995-01-01

    The recent realization that oxygenated fuel additives such as MTBE are becoming widely distributed groundwater contaminants has created a sudden and pressing demand for data on the processes that control their environmental fate. Explaining and predicting the subsequent environmental fate of these compounds is going to require extrapolations over long time frames that will be very sensitive to the quality of input data on each compound. To provide such data, they have initiated a systematic study of the pathways and kinetics of fuel oxygenate degradation under subsurface conditions. Batch experiments in simplified model systems are being performed to isolate specific processes that may contribute to MTBE degradation. A variety of degradation pathways can be envisioned that lead to t-butyl alcohol (TBA) as the primary or secondary product. However, experiments to date with a facultative iron reducing bacteria showed no evidence for TBA formation. Continuing experiments include mixed cultures from a range of aquifer materials representative of NAWQA study sites

  9. Thermal degradation of ligno-cellulosic fuels. DSC and TGA studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leroy, V.; Cancellieri, D.; Leoni, E. [SPE-CNRS UMR 6134, University of Corsica, Campus Grossetti, BP 52, 20250 Corti (France)

    2006-12-01

    The scope of this work was to show the utility of thermal analysis and calorimetric experiments to study the thermal oxidative degradation of Mediterranean scrubs. We investigated the thermal degradation of four species; DSC and TGA were used under air sweeping to record oxidative reactions in dynamic conditions. Heat released and mass loss are important data to be measured for wildland fires modelling purpose and fire hazard studies on ligno-cellulosic fuels. Around 638 and 778K, two dominating and overlapped exothermic peaks were recorded in DSC and individualized using a experimental and numerical separation. This stage allowed obtaining the enthalpy variation of each exothermic phenomenon. As an application, we propose to classify the fuels according to the heat released and the rate constant of each reaction. TGA experiments showed under air two successive mass loss around 638 and 778K. Both techniques are useful in order to measure ignitability, combustibility and sustainability of forest fuels. (author)

  10. Factors affecting diesel fuel degradation using a bespoke high-pressure fuel system rig

    OpenAIRE

    Gopalan, Kesavan; Smith, Christopher; Pickering, Simon; Chuck, Christopher; Bannister, Christopher

    2018-01-01

    Recently, there has been automotive industry-wide impetus to reduce overall diesel vehicle emissions and fuel consumption by increasing fuel injection pressures within common rail systems. Many production fuel injection systems are now capable of delivering rail pressures of 1800-2000 bar with those able to achieve 3000 bar under development. In addition, there has been a gradual increase in the permitted FAME content in EN590 diesel from 5% to 7% with further increases to 10% proposed. With ...

  11. Local impact of humidification on degradation in polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Daniel G.; Ruiu, Tiziana; Biswas, Indro; Schulze, Mathias; Helmly, Stefan; Friedrich, K. Andreas

    2017-06-01

    The water level in a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) affects the durability as is seen from the degradation processes during operation a PEMFC with fully- and nonhumidified gas streams as analyzed using an in-situ segmented cell for local current density measurements during a 300 h test operating under constant conditions and using ex situ SEM/EDX and XPS post-test analysis of specific regions. The impact of the RH on spatial distribution of the degradation process results from different water distribution giving different chemical environments. Under nonhumidified gas streams, the cathode inlet region exhibits increased degradation, whereas with fully humidified gases the bottom of the cell had the higher performance losses. The degradation and the degree of reversibility produced by Pt dissolution, PTFE defluorination, and contaminants such as silicon (Si) and nickel (Ni) were locally evaluated.

  12. Fuel Wood Consumption and Species Degradation in South-Western Nigeria: The Ecological Relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orimoogunje Oluwagbenga O.I.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The continuous dependence of man on fuel and service wood has resulted in serious degradation of the fragile forest ecosystem. Therefore, this study evaluated the sources and patterns of fuel wood and examined the rate of consumption in the study area. This was with the aim to assess the ecological implications of fuelwood consumption on species degradation. The study utilized both, primary and secondary data. Information was extracted from topographic map on the scale of 1: 50,000 and satellites imageries that cover the study area. Questionnaire administration, field observation and weight measurement of fuel wood were carried out. The results showed that the sources of fuel wood for domestic cooking were forest, nearby bush and abandoned farm while the sources of domestic energy were fuel wood (61.17%, charcoal (27%, kerosene (10%, electricity (1.33% and gas (0.5%. Fuel wood for small scale industries were: forest (49.23%, farmland (34.62 and fallow land (16.15%. The trend of fuel wood consumption was on the high side from 1995 to 2011, it was 58% in 1995, 70% in 2000, 82% in 2005 and 92% in 2010 and 2011 respectively. Many valuable economic tree species such as Triplochiton scleroxylon, Nesogordonia papaverifera, and Cordia spp. are near their extinction. Animals such as antelope, wolf and fox are going into extinction while monkey, grasscutter, hare, rabbit were endemic in the study area. The study concluded that the patterns of fuel wood use and fuel wood saturation presents a great danger for biodiversity products and services.

  13. Experimental analysis of performance degradation of micro-tubular solid oxide fuel cells fed by different fuel mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calise, F.; Restucccia, G.; Sammes, N.

    This paper analyzes the thermodynamic and electrochemical dynamic performance of an anode supported micro-tubular solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) fed by different types of fuel. The micro-tubular SOFC used is anode supported, consisting of a NiO and Gd 0.2Ce 0.8O 2- x (GDC) cermet anode, thin GDC electrolyte, and a La 0.6Sr 0.4Co 0.2Fe 0.8O 3- y (LSCF) and GDC cermet cathode. The fabrication of the cells under investigation is briefly summarized, with emphasis on the innovations with respect to traditional techniques. Such micro-tubular cells were tested using a Test Stand consisting of: a vertical tubular furnace, an electrical load, a galvanostast, a bubbler, gas pipelines, temperature, pressure and flow meters. The tests on the micro-SOFC were performed using H 2, CO, CH 4 and H 2O in different combinations at 550 °C, to determine the cell polarization curves under several load cycles. Long-term experimental tests were also performed in order to assess degradation of the electrochemical performance of the cell. Results of the tests were analyzed aiming at determining the sources of the cell performance degradation. Authors concluded that the cell under investigation is particularly sensitive to the carbon deposition which significantly reduces cell performance, after few cycles, when fed by light hydrocarbons. A significant performance degradation is also detected when hydrogen is used as fuel. In this case, the authors ascribe the degradation to the micro-cracks, the change in materials crystalline structure and problems with electrical connections.

  14. Degradation mechanisms of sulfonated poly-aromatic membranes in fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrot, C.

    2006-11-01

    Fuel cell development requires an improvement in the electrode-membrane assembly durability which depends on both the polymer used and the fuel cell operating conditions. The origin of the degradation can be either electrochemical, chemical and/or mechanical. This study deals with the understanding of alternative membranes ageing mechanisms, i.e. non fluorinated membranes, such as sPEEK and sPI. For this kind of membranes, the first process is chemical. Understanding these mechanisms is the first essential step to develop more stable structures. An original approach is developed to overcome the analytical difficulties encountered with polymers. It consists in studying the degradation mechanism on model structures. Ageing are carried out in water, with H 2 O 2 in some cases (identified as a cause of membrane chemical ageing in the fuel cell system), and at different temperatures. The approach consists in separating the different products formed by chromatography. Then they are identified (NMR, IR, MS) and quantified. This method allows us to establish the ageing mechanism. We show that the ageing of a sPEEK structure mainly results from an attack by end chains which spreads to the whole. This mechanism is confirmed on ex-situ and in-situ aged membranes. These two kinds of ageing lead to an important decrease in polymerisation degree (determined by SEC). Formation of the same degradation products is observed. In fuel cells, a heterogeneous degradation is noticed. It takes place mainly on the cathode side. sPI are known for their high sensitivity to hydrolysis. Nevertheless, we highlight a limited degradation at 80 Celsius degrees due to the recombination of hydrolyzed species at this temperature. (author)

  15. Isolation and Characterization of Phenanthrene Degrading Bacteria from Diesel Fuel-Contaminated Antarctic Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Gran-Scheuch

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Antarctica is an attractive target for human exploration and scientific investigation, however the negative effects of human activity on this continent are long lasting and can have serious consequences on the native ecosystem. Various areas of Antarctica have been contaminated with diesel fuel, which contains harmful compounds such as heavy metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH. Bioremediation of PAHs by the activity of microorganisms is an ecological, economical, and safe decontamination approach. Since the introduction of foreign organisms into the Antarctica is prohibited, it is key to discover native bacteria that can be used for diesel bioremediation. By following the degradation of the PAH phenanthrene, we isolated 53 PAH metabolizing bacteria from diesel contaminated Antarctic soil samples, with three of these isolates exhibiting a high phenanthrene degrading capacity. In particular, the Sphingobium xenophagum D43FB isolate showed the highest phenanthrene degradation ability, generating up to 95% degradation of initial phenanthrene. D43FB can also degrade phenanthrene in the presence of its usual co-pollutant, the heavy metal cadmium, and showed the ability to grow using diesel-fuel as a sole carbon source. Microtiter plate assays and SEM analysis revealed that S. xenophagum D43FB exhibits the ability to form biofilms and can directly adhere to phenanthrene crystals. Genome sequencing analysis also revealed the presence of several genes involved in PAH degradation and heavy metal resistance in the D43FB genome. Altogether, these results demonstrate that S. xenophagum D43FB shows promising potential for its application in the bioremediation of diesel fuel contaminated-Antarctic ecosystems.

  16. Mechanisms of the initial stage of fuel elements degradation of BN reactor fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagorul'ko, Yu.I.; Kashcheev, M.V.; Ganichev, N.S.

    2015-01-01

    On the base of developed calculational technique numerical evaluation is carried out to the time of fuel element fracture in conditions of loss of sodium flow through fuel element jacket. Data on mechanical properties of steel EhK-164 is used in calculations. Calculations are carried out for different conditions of jacket outer surface cooling: by sodium of 1073 K temperature, by boiling sodium and by sodium in condition of film boiling. It is shown that time to jacket fracture under considered rupture mechanisms essentially depends on fuel element cooling conditions [ru

  17. Analysis of accelerated degradation of a HT-PEM fuel cell caused by cell reversal in fuel starvation condition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Fan; Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports an accelerated degradation test of a high temperature PEM fuel cell under repeated H2 starvation condition. The H2 stoichiometry is cycled between 3.0 and 0.8 every 2 min during the test. The experimental results show that the polarity of the fuel cell is reversed under H2......, there is only a slight decrease in open circuit voltage of the fuel cell which implies the membrane is not affected by the test. The electrochemical impedance spectrum measurement shows that the H2 starvation can cause significant increase in the ohmic resistance and charge transfer resistance. By looking...... starvation condition, and the cell performance indicated by cell voltage at H2 stoichiometry of 3.0 declines from 0.59 V to 0.41 V in 19 cycles. Since CO2 is detected in anode exhaust under H2 starvation condition, carbon corrosion is believed to be the reason for the degradation in this test. After the test...

  18. Effect of high surface area activated carbon on thermal degradation of jet fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gergova, K.; Eser, S.; Arumugam, R.; Schobert, H.H. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1995-05-01

    Different solid carbons added to jet fuel during thermal stressing cause substantial changes in pyrolytic degradation reactions. Activated carbons, especially high surface area activated carbons were found to be very effective in suppressing solid deposition on metal reactor walls during stressing at high temperatures (425 and 450{degrees}C). The high surface area activated carbon PX-21 prevented solid deposition on reactor walls even after 5h at 450{degrees}C. The differences seen in the liquid product composition when activated carbon is added indicated that the carbon surfaces affect the degradation reactions. Thermal stressing experiments were carried out on commercial petroleum-derived JPTS jet fuel. We also used n-octane and n-dodecane as model compounds in order to simplify the study of the chemical changes which take place upon activated carbon addition. In separate experiments, the presence of a hydrogen donor, decalin, together with PX-21 was also studied.

  19. The Effect of Platinum Electrocatalyst on Membrane Degradation in Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodner, Merit; Cermenek, Bernd; Rami, Mija; Hacker, Viktor

    2015-12-08

    Membrane degradation is a severe factor limiting the lifetime of polymer electrolyte fuel cells. Therefore, obtaining a deeper knowledge is fundamental in order to establish fuel cells as competitive product. A segmented single cell was operated under open circuit voltage with alternating relative humidity. The influence of the catalyst layer on membrane degradation was evaluated by measuring a membrane without electrodes and a membrane-electrode-assembly under identical conditions. After 100 h of accelerated stress testing the proton conductivity of membrane samples near the anode and cathode was investigated by means of ex situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The membrane sample near the cathode inlet exhibited twofold lower membrane resistance and a resulting twofold higher proton conductivity than the membrane sample near the anode inlet. The results from the fluoride ion analysis have shown that the presence of platinum reduces the fluoride emission rate; which supports conclusions drawn from the literature.

  20. Intact and Degraded Component Criticality Calculations of N Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L. Angers

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this calculation is to perform intact and degraded mode criticality evaluations of the Department of Energy's (DOE) N Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel codisposed in a 2-Defense High-Level Waste (2-DHLW)/2-Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) Waste Package (WP) and emplaced in a monitored geologic repository (MGR) (see Attachment I). The scope of this calculation is limited to the determination of the effective neutron multiplication factor (k eff ) for both intact and degraded mode internal configurations of the codisposal waste package. This calculation will support the analysis that will be performed to demonstrate the technical viability for disposing of U-metal (N Reactor) spent nuclear fuel in the potential MGR

  1. Short stack modeling of degradation in solid oxide fuel cells. Part II. Sensitivity and interaction analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzarri, J. I.; Kesler, O.

    In the first part of this two-paper series, we presented a numerical model of the impedance behaviour of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) aimed at simulating the change in the impedance spectrum induced by contact degradation at the interconnect-electrode, and at the electrode-electrolyte interfaces. The purpose of that investigation was to develop a non-invasive diagnostic technique to identify degradation modes in situ. In the present paper, we appraise the predictive capabilities of the proposed method in terms of its robustness to uncertainties in the input parameters, many of which are very difficult to measure independently. We applied this technique to the degradation modes simulated in Part I, in addition to anode sulfur poisoning. Electrode delamination showed the highest robustness to input parameter variations, followed by interconnect oxidation and interconnect detachment. The most sensitive degradation mode was sulfur poisoning, due to strong parameter interactions. In addition, we simulate several simultaneous two-degradation-mode scenarios, assessing the method's capabilities and limitations for the prediction of electrochemical behaviour of SOFC's undergoing multiple simultaneous degradation modes.

  2. Short stack modeling of degradation in solid oxide fuel cells. Part II. Sensitivity and interaction analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gazzarri, J.I. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of British Columbia, 2054-6250 Applied Science Lane, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4 (Canada); Kesler, O. [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, 5 King' s College Road, Toronto, ON M5S 3G8 (Canada)

    2008-01-21

    In the first part of this two-paper series, we presented a numerical model of the impedance behaviour of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) aimed at simulating the change in the impedance spectrum induced by contact degradation at the interconnect-electrode, and at the electrode-electrolyte interfaces. The purpose of that investigation was to develop a non-invasive diagnostic technique to identify degradation modes in situ. In the present paper, we appraise the predictive capabilities of the proposed method in terms of its robustness to uncertainties in the input parameters, many of which are very difficult to measure independently. We applied this technique to the degradation modes simulated in Part I, in addition to anode sulfur poisoning. Electrode delamination showed the highest robustness to input parameter variations, followed by interconnect oxidation and interconnect detachment. The most sensitive degradation mode was sulfur poisoning, due to strong parameter interactions. In addition, we simulate several simultaneous two-degradation-mode scenarios, assessing the method's capabilities and limitations for the prediction of electrochemical behaviour of SOFC's undergoing multiple simultaneous degradation modes. (author)

  3. Contribution to the study of the degradation of the solvent used in a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goasmat, F.

    1984-01-01

    The degradation of a mixed solvent (tributylphosphate - hydrocarbons) in a fuel reprocessing plant (UP 2 at La Hague, France) is studied in this thesis. Laboratory studies on degradation mechanisms, decomposition products and regeneration processes are reviewed in a bibliographic synthesis. Solvent degradation is investigated on a real solvent from a reprocessing plant. Influence of degradation on solvent performance is shown and regeneration processes should be improved. Many regeneration processes are tested on solvent from the plant and results are discussed. Separation and analysis of degradation products show the polyfunctional structure of compounds formed [fr

  4. Bio-Electron-Fenton (BEF) process driven by microbial fuel cells for triphenyltin chloride (TPTC) degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yong, Xiao-Yu; Gu, Dong-Yan; Wu, Yuan-Dong [College of Biotechnology and Pharmaceutical Engineering, Nanjing TECH University, Nanjing 211816 (China); Bioenergy Research Institute, Nanjing TECH University, Nanjing 211816 (China); Yan, Zhi-Ying [Key Laboratory of Environmental and Applied Microbiology, Environmental Microbiology, Key Laboratory of Sichuan Province, Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Science, Chengdu 610041 (China); Zhou, Jun; Wu, Xia-Yuan [College of Biotechnology and Pharmaceutical Engineering, Nanjing TECH University, Nanjing 211816 (China); Bioenergy Research Institute, Nanjing TECH University, Nanjing 211816 (China); Wei, Ping [College of Biotechnology and Pharmaceutical Engineering, Nanjing TECH University, Nanjing 211816 (China); Jia, Hong-Hua [College of Biotechnology and Pharmaceutical Engineering, Nanjing TECH University, Nanjing 211816 (China); Bioenergy Research Institute, Nanjing TECH University, Nanjing 211816 (China); Zheng, Tao, E-mail: zhengtao@ms.giec.ac.cn [Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversion, Chinese Academy of Science, Nengyuan Road, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Yong, Yang-Chun, E-mail: ycyong@ujs.edu.cn [Biofuels Institute, School of the Environment, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Chemical Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China)

    2017-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Schematic diagram of the Bio-Electron-Fenton (BEF) process for TPTC degradation. - Highlights: • A Bio-Electro-Fenton process was performed for TPTC degradation. • TPTC removal efficiency achieved 78.32 ± 2.07% within 100 h. • The TPTC degradation rate (0.775 ± 0.021 μmol L{sup −1} h{sup −1}) was much higher than previous reports. - Abstract: The intensive use of triphenyltin chloride (TPTC) has caused serious environmental pollution. In this study, an effective method for TPTC degradation was proposed based on the Bio-Electron-Fenton process in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The maximum voltage of the MFC with graphite felt as electrode was 278.47% higher than that of carbon cloth. The electricity generated by MFC can be used for in situ generation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} to a maximum of 135.96 μmol L{sup −1} at the Fe@Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3(*)}/graphite felt composite cathode, which further reacted with leached Fe{sup 2+} to produce hydroxyl radicals. While 100 μmol L{sup −1} TPTC was added to the cathodic chamber, the degradation efficiency of TPTC reached 78.32 ± 2.07%, with a rate of 0.775 ± 0.021 μmol L{sup −1} h{sup −1}. This Bio-Electron-Fenton driving TPTC degradation might involve in Sn−C bonds breaking and the main process is probably a stepwise dephenylation until the formation of inorganic tin and CO{sub 2}. This study provides an energy saving and efficient approach for TPTC degradation.

  5. Bio-Electron-Fenton (BEF) process driven by microbial fuel cells for triphenyltin chloride (TPTC) degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yong, Xiao-Yu; Gu, Dong-Yan; Wu, Yuan-Dong; Yan, Zhi-Ying; Zhou, Jun; Wu, Xia-Yuan; Wei, Ping; Jia, Hong-Hua; Zheng, Tao; Yong, Yang-Chun

    2017-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Schematic diagram of the Bio-Electron-Fenton (BEF) process for TPTC degradation. - Highlights: • A Bio-Electro-Fenton process was performed for TPTC degradation. • TPTC removal efficiency achieved 78.32 ± 2.07% within 100 h. • The TPTC degradation rate (0.775 ± 0.021 μmol L"−"1 h"−"1) was much higher than previous reports. - Abstract: The intensive use of triphenyltin chloride (TPTC) has caused serious environmental pollution. In this study, an effective method for TPTC degradation was proposed based on the Bio-Electron-Fenton process in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The maximum voltage of the MFC with graphite felt as electrode was 278.47% higher than that of carbon cloth. The electricity generated by MFC can be used for in situ generation of H_2O_2 to a maximum of 135.96 μmol L"−"1 at the Fe@Fe_2O_3_(_*_)/graphite felt composite cathode, which further reacted with leached Fe"2"+ to produce hydroxyl radicals. While 100 μmol L"−"1 TPTC was added to the cathodic chamber, the degradation efficiency of TPTC reached 78.32 ± 2.07%, with a rate of 0.775 ± 0.021 μmol L"−"1 h"−"1. This Bio-Electron-Fenton driving TPTC degradation might involve in Sn−C bonds breaking and the main process is probably a stepwise dephenylation until the formation of inorganic tin and CO_2. This study provides an energy saving and efficient approach for TPTC degradation.

  6. Study on hydrophobicity degradation of gas diffusion layer in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Shuchun; Li, Xiaojin; Li, Jin; Liu, Sa; Lu, Wangting; Shao, Zhigang; Yi, Baolian

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The hydrophobicity degradation mechanism of GDL was proposed thoroughly. • C-O and C=O groups appeared on the surfaces of GDL after immersion. • The relative content of PTFE in GDL decreased after immersion. • The surfaces and inner structure of GDL destroyed after immersion. - Abstract: As one of the essential components of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC), gas diffusion layer (GDL) is of importance on water management, as well on the performance and durability of PEMFC. In this paper, the hydrophobicity degradation of GDL was investigated by immersing it in the 1.0 mol L −1 H 2 SO 4 solution saturated by air for 1200 h. From the measurements of contact angle and water permeability, the hydrophobic characteristics of the pristine and immersed GDLs were compared. To investigate the causes for hydrophobicity degradation, the GDLs were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and thermogravimetry. Further, the chemical compositions of H 2 SO 4 solutions before and after immersion test were analyzed with infrared spectroscopy. Results showed that the hydrophobicity of immersed GDL decreased distinctly, which was caused by the damage of physical structure and surface characteristics. Moreover, the immersed GDL showed a worse fuel cell performance than the pristine GDL, especially under a low humidity condition

  7. Oxidative degradation of polybenzimidazole membranes as electrolytes for high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liao, J.H.; Li, Qingfeng; Rudbeck, H.C.

    2011-01-01

    the oxidative degradation of the polymer membrane was studied under the Fenton test conditions by the weight loss, intrinsic viscosity, size exclusion chromatography, scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. During the Fenton test, significant weight losses depending...... on the initial molecular weight of the polymer were observed. At the same time, viscosity and SEC measurements revealed a steady decrease in molecular weight. The degradation of acid doped PBI membranes under Fenton test conditions is proposed to start by the attack of hydroxyl radicals at the carbon atom......Polybenzimidazole membranes imbibed with acid are emerging as a suitable electrolyte material for high-temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells. The oxidative stability of polybenzimidazole has been identified as an important issue for the long-term durability of such cells. In this paper...

  8. Microstructural degradation of Ni-YSZ anodes for solid oxide fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thydén, Karl Tor Sune

    2008-01-01

    -reforming catalysis. In the context of electrochemically tested and technologically relevant cells, the majority of the microstructural work is performed on a cell tested at 850°C under relatively severe conditions for 17,500 hours. It is demonstrated that the major Ni rearrangements take place at the interface...... are of technological relevance, it is difficult to identify the effect from isolated parameters such as temperature, fuel gas composition and polarization. Model studies of high temperature aged Ni-YSZ cermets are generally performed in atmospheres containing relatively low concentrations of H2O. In this work......, the microstructural degradation in both electrochemically longterm tested cells and high-temperature aged model materials are studied. Since Ni particle sintering / coarsening is attributed to be the major cause of anode degradation, this subject attains the primary focus. A large part of the work is focused...

  9. Effect of humic acids on electricity generation integrated with xylose degradation in microbial fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Liping; Angelidaki, Irini

    2008-01-01

    Pentose and humic acids (HA) are the main components of hydrolysates, the liquid fraction produced during thermohydrolysis of lignocellulosic material. Electricity generation integrated with xylose (typical pentose) degradation as well as the effect of HA on electricity production in microbial fuel...... to controls where HAs were not added, addition of commercial HA resulted in increase of power density and coulombic efficiency, which ranged from 7.5% to 67.4% and 24% to 92.6%, respectively. Digested manure wastewater (DMW) was tested as potential mediator for power generation due to its content of natural...

  10. Electrochemical AC impedance model of a solid oxide fuel cell and its application to diagnosis of multiple degradation modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gazzarri, J.I.; Kesler, O. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of British Columbia, 2054-6250 Applied Science Lane, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4 (Canada)

    2007-05-01

    A finite element model of the impact of diverse degradation mechanisms on the impedance spectrum of a solid oxide fuel cell is presented as a tool for degradation mode identification. Among the degradation mechanisms that cause electrode active area loss, the attention is focused on electrode delamination and uniformly distributed surface area loss, which were found to cause distinct and specific changes in the impedance spectrum. Degradation mechanisms resulting in uniformly distributed reactive surface area loss include sintering, sulphur poisoning, and possibly incipient coke formation at the anode, and chromium deposition at the cathode. Parametric studies reveal the extent and limits of applicability of the model and detectability of the different degradation modes, as well as the influence of different cell geometries on the change in impedance behaviour resulting from the loss of active area. It is expected that this technique could form the basis of a useful diagnostic tool for both solid oxide fuel cell developers and users. (author)

  11. Degradation mechanisms of sulfonated poly-aromatic membranes in fuel cell; Mecanismes de degradation des membranes polyaromatiques sulfonees en pile a combustible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrot, C

    2006-11-15

    Fuel cell development requires an improvement in the electrode-membrane assembly durability which depends on both the polymer used and the fuel cell operating conditions. The origin of the degradation can be either electrochemical, chemical and/or mechanical. This study deals with the understanding of alternative membranes ageing mechanisms, i.e. non fluorinated membranes, such as sPEEK and sPI. For this kind of membranes, the first process is chemical. Understanding these mechanisms is the first essential step to develop more stable structures. An original approach is developed to overcome the analytical difficulties encountered with polymers. It consists in studying the degradation mechanism on model structures. Ageing are carried out in water, with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in some cases (identified as a cause of membrane chemical ageing in the fuel cell system), and at different temperatures. The approach consists in separating the different products formed by chromatography. Then they are identified (NMR, IR, MS) and quantified. This method allows us to establish the ageing mechanism. We show that the ageing of a sPEEK structure mainly results from an attack by end chains which spreads to the whole. This mechanism is confirmed on ex-situ and in-situ aged membranes. These two kinds of ageing lead to an important decrease in polymerisation degree (determined by SEC). Formation of the same degradation products is observed. In fuel cells, a heterogeneous degradation is noticed. It takes place mainly on the cathode side. sPI are known for their high sensitivity to hydrolysis. Nevertheless, we highlight a limited degradation at 80 Celsius degrees due to the recombination of hydrolyzed species at this temperature. (author)

  12. Environmental degradation of oxidation resistant and thermal barrier coatings for fuel-flexible gas turbine applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Prabhakar

    The development of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) has been undoubtedly the most critical advancement in materials technology for modern gas turbine engines. TBCs are widely used in gas turbine engines for both power-generation and propulsion applications. Metallic oxidation-resistant coatings (ORCs) are also widely employed as a stand-alone protective coating or bond coat for TBCs in many high-temperature applications. Among the widely studied durability issues in these high-temperature protective coatings, one critical challenge that received greater attention in recent years is their resistance to high-temperature degradation due to corrosive deposits arising from fuel impurities and CMAS (calcium-magnesium-alumino-silicate) sand deposits from air ingestion. The presence of vanadium, sulfur, phosphorus, sodium and calcium impurities in alternative fuels warrants a clear understanding of high-temperature materials degradation for the development of fuel-flexible gas turbine engines. Degradation due to CMAS is a critical problem for gas turbine components operating in a dust-laden environment. In this study, high-temperature degradation due to aggressive deposits such as V2O5, P2O 5, Na2SO4, NaVO3, CaSO4 and a laboratory-synthesized CMAS sand for free-standing air plasma sprayed (APS) yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ), the topcoat of the TBC system, and APS CoNiCrAlY, the bond coat of the TBC system or a stand-alone ORC, is examined. Phase transformations and microstructural development were examined by using x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. This study demonstrated that the V2O5 melt degrades the APS YSZ through the formation of ZrV2O7 and YVO 4 at temperatures below 747°C and above 747°C, respectively. Formation of YVO4 leads to the depletion of the Y2O 3 stabilizer and the deleterious transformation of the YSZ to the monoclinic ZrO2 phase. The investigation on the YSZ degradation by Na 2SO4 and a Na2SO4 + V2

  13. Performance and long term degradation of 7 W micro-tubular solid oxide fuel cells for portable applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrell, M.; Morata, A.; Kayser, P.; Kendall, M.; Kendall, K.; Tarancón, A.

    2015-07-01

    Micro-tubular SOFCs have shown an astonishing thermal shock resistance, many orders of magnitude larger than planar SOFCs, opening the possibility of being used in portable applications. However, only few studies have been devoted to study the degradation of large-area micro-tubular SOFCs. This work presents microstructural, electrochemical and long term degradation studies of single micro-tubular cells fabricated by high shear extrusion, operating in the intermediate range of temperatures (T∼700 °C). A maximum power of 7 W per cell has been measured in a wide range of fuel utilizations between 10% and 60% at 700 °C. A degradation rate of 360 mW/1000 h (8%) has been observed for cells operated over more than 1500 h under fuel utilizations of 40%. Higher fuel utilizations lead to strong degradations associated to nickel oxidation/reduction processes. Quick thermal cycling with heating ramp rates of 30 °C /min yielded degradation rates of 440 mW/100 cycles (9%). These reasonable values of degradation under continuous and thermal cycling operation approach the requirements for many portable applications including auxiliary power units or consumer electronics opening this typically forbidden market to the SOFC technology.

  14. Assessment of lubricating oil degradation in small motorcycle engine fueled with gasohol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakorn Tippayawong

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of the degradation of lubricating oil was performed on the lubricants which had been used in a small motorcycle engine fueled with gasohol in comparison with the lubricants from gasoline-run engine. The lubricant properties examined in the assessment were lubricating capacity, viscosity and stability to oxidation. Lubricating capacity was evaluated by accelerated wear test on the Timken tester. Lubricating oils from gasohol-run engine appeared to produce about 10% greater wear than that made in oils from gasoline-run engine. There was no significant difference between the effect of gasohol and gasoline on the viscosity of the used lubricating oils. Moreover, no oxidation products in any used oil samples could be detected.

  15. Microstructural degradation of Ni-YSZ anodes for solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thyden, K.

    2008-03-15

    Ni-YSZ cermets have been used as anode materials in SOFCs for more than 20 years. Despite this fact, the major cause of degradation within the Ni-YSZ anode, namely Ni sintering / coarsening, is still not fully understood. Even if microstructural studies of anodes in tested cells are of technological relevance, it is difficult to identify the effect from isolated parameters such as temperature, fuel gas composition and polarization. Model studies of high temperature aged Ni-YSZ cermets are generally performed in atmospheres containing relatively low concentrations of H2O. In this work, the microstructural degradation in both electrochemically longterm tested cells and high-temperature aged model materials are studied. Since Ni particle sintering / coarsening is attributed to be the major cause of anode degradation, this subject attains the primary focus. A large part of the work is focused on improving microstructural techniques and shows that the application of low acceleration voltages (<= 1 kV) in a FE-SEM makes it possible to obtain two useful types of contrast between the phases in Ni-YSZ composites. By changing between the ordinary lateral SE detector and the inlens detector, using similar microscope settings, two very different sample characteristics are probed: 1) The difference in secondary emission coefficient, delta, between the percolating and non-percolating Ni is maximized in the low-voltage range due to a high delta for the former and the suppression of delta by a positive charge for the latter. This difference yields a contrast between the two phases which is picked up by an inlens secondary electron detector. 2) The difference in backscatter coefficient, eta, between Ni and YSZ is shown to increase with decreasing voltage. The contrast is illustrated in images collected by the normal secondary detector since parts of the secondary signals are generated by backscattered electrons. High temperature aging experiments of model Ni-YSZ anode cermets show

  16. 3D Analysis of Fuel Cell Electrocatalyst Degradation on Alternate Carbon Supports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneed, Brian T; Cullen, David A; Reeves, Kimberly S; Dyck, Ondrej E; Langlois, David A; Mukundan, Rangachary; Borup, Rodney L; More, Karren L

    2017-09-06

    Understanding the mechanisms associated with Pt/C electrocatalyst degradation in proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) cathodes is critical for the future development of higher-performing materials; however, there is a lack of information regarding Pt coarsening under PEMFC operating conditions within the cathode catalyst layer. We report a direct and quantitative 3D study of Pt dispersions on carbon supports (high surface area carbon (HSAC), Vulcan XC-72, and graphitized carbon) with varied surface areas, graphitic character, and Pt loadings ranging from 5 to 40 wt %. This is accomplished both before and after catalyst-cycling accelerated stress tests (ASTs) through observations of the cathode catalyst layer of membrane electrode assemblies. Electron tomography results show Pt nanoparticle agglomeration occurs predominantly at junctions and edges of aggregated graphitized carbon particles, leading to poor Pt dispersion in the as-prepared catalysts and increased coalescence during ASTs. Tomographic reconstructions of Pt/HSAC show much better initial Pt dispersions, less agglomeration, and less coarsening during ASTs in the cathode. However, a large loss of the electrochemically active surface area (ECSA) is still observed and is attributed to accelerated Pt dissolution and nanoparticle coalescence. Furthermore, a strong correlation between Pt particle/agglomerate size and measured ECSA is established and is proposed as a more useful metric than average crystallite size in predicting degradation behavior across different catalyst systems.

  17. Review of recent ORNL studies in solvent cleanup and diluent degradation. Consolidated Fuel-Reprocessing Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mailen, J.C.; Tallent, O.K.

    1982-01-01

    Testing of solvent cleanup methods to replace the use of sodium carbonate in the Purex process has been ongoing for several years in order to reduce the quantity of waste sodium nitrate generated and to improve phase separation. Alternate solvent cleanup methods include the use of packed columns of base-treated silica gel or solvent scrubbing with hydrazine oxalate. Degradation of the diluent was shown to generate long-chain organic acids which appear to be the major culprits in the phase separation problems encountered in sodium carbonate scrubbers. Solvent scrubbing with hydrazine oxalate gives improved phase separations. Solvent cleanup in columns packed with base-treated silica gel avoids the phase separation problem since a dispersable aqueous phase is not present. Removals of TBP degradation products and metal-ion complexes by sodium carbonate, hydrazine salts, or by packed beds of base-treated silica gel are all satisfactory. Solvent scrubbing by hydrazine oxalate solutions is the prime candidate for solvent cleanup in fuel reprocessing plants

  18. Role of dissolved oxygen on the degradation mechanism of Reactive Green 19 and electricity generation in photocatalytic fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sin-Li; Ho, Li-Ngee; Ong, Soon-An; Wong, Yee-Shian; Voon, Chun-Hong; Khalik, Wan Fadhilah; Yusoff, Nik Athirah; Nordin, Noradiba

    2018-03-01

    In this study, a membraneless photocatalytic fuel cell with zinc oxide loaded carbon photoanode and platinum loaded carbon cathode was constructed to investigate the impact of dissolved oxygen on the mechanism of dye degradation and electricity generation of photocatalytic fuel cell. The photocatalytic fuel cell with high and low aeration rate, no aeration and nitrogen purged were investigated, respectively. The degradation rate of diazo dye Reactive Green 19 and the electricity generation was enhanced in photocatalytic fuel cell with higher dissolved oxygen concentration. However, the photocatalytic fuel cell was still able to perform 37% of decolorization in a slow rate (k = 0.033 h -1 ) under extremely low dissolved oxygen concentration (approximately 0.2 mg L -1 ) when nitrogen gas was introduced into the fuel cell throughout the 8 h. However, the change of the UV-Vis spectrum indicates that the intermediates of the dye could not be mineralized under insufficient dissolved oxygen level. In the aspect of electricity generation, the maximum short circuit current (0.0041 mA cm -2 ) and power density (0.00028 mW cm -2 ) of the air purged photocatalytic fuel cell was obviously higher than that with nitrogen purging (0.0015 mA cm -2 and 0.00008 mW cm -2 ). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Oxidative degradation of acid doped polybenzimidazole membranes and fuel cell durability in the presence of ferrous ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liao, Jianhui; Yang, Jingshuai; Li, Qingfeng

    2013-01-01

    Phosphoric acid doped polybenzimidazole membranes have been explored as proton exchange membranes for high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. Long-term durability of the membrane is of critical concern and has been evaluated by accelerated degradation tests under Fenton conditions...... of the polymer. Fuel cell durability tests with contaminations of ferrous ions did show considerable performance degradation, however, primarily due to the catalyst deterioration rather than the membrane degradation........ In this study effects of phosphoric acid and ferrous ions were investigated by measurements of the weight loss, intrinsic viscosity and size exclusion chromatography (SEC) of the polymer membranes. Ferrous ions resulted in, as expected, catalytic formation of peroxide radicals and hence the accelerated polymer...

  20. Control of degradation of spent LWR [light-water reactor] fuel during dry storage in an inert atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, M.E.; Simonen, E.P.; Allemann, R.T.; Levy, I.S.; Hazelton, R.F.

    1987-10-01

    Dry storage of Zircaloy-clad spent fuel in inert gas (referred to as inerted dry storage or IDS) is being developed as an alternative to water pool storage of spent fuel. The objectives of the activities described in this report are to identify potential Zircaloy degradation mechanisms and evaluate their applicability to cladding breach during IDS, develop models of the dominant Zircaloy degradation mechanisms, and recommend cladding temperature limits during IDS to control Zircaloy degradation. The principal potential Zircaloy cladding breach mechanisms during IDS have been identified as creep rupture, stress corrosion cracking (SCC), and delayed hydride cracking (DHC). Creep rupture is concluded to be the primary cladding breach mechanism during IDS. Deformation and fracture maps based on creep rupture were developed for Zircaloy. These maps were then used as the basis for developing spent fuel cladding temperature limits that would prevent cladding breach during a 40-year IDS period. The probability of cladding breach for spent fuel stored at the temperature limit is less than 0.5% per spent fuel rod. 52 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  1. Methyl phosphate formation as a major degradation mode of direct methanol fuel cells with phosphoric acid based electrolytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aili, David; Vassiliev, Anton; Jensen, Jens Oluf

    2015-01-01

    Phosphoric acid and phosphoric acid doped polymer membranes are widely used as electrolytes in hydrogen based fuel cells operating at elevated temperatures. Such electrolytes have been explored for direct oxidation of methanol to further increase the versatility of the systems, however......, with demonstrated lifetimes of only a few days to weeks. In this work the methyl phosphate formation from the acid and methanol is identified and proposed to be a major mechanism for the cell degradation. Proton conductivity and fuel cell durability tests validate the mechanism at high methanol contents....

  2. Effect of inlet fuel type on the degradation of Ni/YSZ anode of solid oxide fuel cell by carbon deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suttichai Assabumrungrat

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available According to the high operating temperature of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC (700-1100ºC, it is known that some hydrocarbon fuels can be directly used as inlet fuel instead of hydrogen by feeding straight to the anode. This operation is called a direct internal reforming SOFC (DIR-SOFC. However, the major difficulty of this operation is the possible degradation of anode by the carbon deposition, as the carbon species are easily formed. In the present work, the effect of inlet fuel (i.e. H2, synthesis gas (H2+CO, CH4, CH4+H2O, CH3OH+H2O, and C2H5OH+H2O on the degradation of nickel cermet (Ni/YSZ, which is the most common anode material of SOFC, was studied.It was found from the work that hydrogen and synthesis gas (CO+H2 are proper to be used as direct inlet fuels for DIR-SOFC with Ni/YSZ anode, since the carbon formation on Ni/YSZ occurred in the small quantity. The mixture of methane and steam (CH4+H2O can also be used as the inlet feed, but the H2O/CH4 ratio plays an important role. In contrast, pure methane (CH4, methanol with steam (CH3OH+H2O and ethanol with steam (C2H5OH+H2O are not suitable for using as direct inlet fuel for DIR-SOFC with Ni/YSZ anode even the higher H2O/CH3OH and H2O/C2H5OH ratios were applied.

  3. Degradation of some ceria electrolytes under hydrogen contact nearby anode in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malta Luiz Fernando Brum

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This work is concerned with thermodynamic analysis of the stability of some ceria electrolytes under contact with hydrogen gas nearby anode in fuel cells. It was considered the following types of ceria-electrolytes: pure ceria, strontium-doped ceria, calcium-doped ceria and calcium-bismuth-doped ceria. The equilibrium Log (pH2O/pH2 vs. T diagrams were constructed for x = 0.1 and 0.01, where x is the fraction of initial ceria converted to Ce2O3 (proportional to the ratio between activities of Ce3+ and Ce4+ in the ceria electrolyte, which is proportional to the fraction of electronic conduction in the electrolyte at a given temperature. The predictions of the diagrams are as follows: (a Ce1.9Ca0.1Bi0.8O5.1 and Ce0.9Sr0.1O1.9 are less stable than pure ceria for the whole temperature range (from 0 to 1000 °C; (b Ce0.9Ca0.1O1.9 is more stable than pure ceria below about 650 °C for x = 0.1 and below about 400 °C for x = 0.01; (c at each temperature in the considered range the pressure ratio pH2O(g/pH2(g has to be higher than thermodynamically predicted in order to keep CeO2 stable in the electrolyte contacting hydrogen gas. Thermodynamic predictions are entirely capable of explaining experimental data published on the subject (irreversible cell degradation in the case of SrO-doped ceria; weight loss from doped-ceria electrolyte above 700 °C; oxygen gas release during sintering of ceria.

  4. Mechanisms Underpinning Degradation of Protective Oxides and Thermal Barrier Coatings in High Hydrogen Content (HHC) - Fueled Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mumm, Daniel

    2013-08-31

    The overarching goal of this research program has been to evaluate the potential impacts of coal-derived syngas and high-hydrogen content fuels on the degradation of turbine hot-section components through attack of protective oxides and thermal barrier coatings. The primary focus of this research program has been to explore mechanisms underpinning the observed degradation processes, and connections to the combustion environments and characteristic non-combustible constituents. Based on the mechanistic understanding of how these emerging fuel streams affect materials degradation, the ultimate goal of the program is to advance the goals of the Advanced Turbine Program by developing materials design protocols leading to turbine hot-section components with improved resistance to service lifetime degradation under advanced fuels exposures. This research program has been focused on studying how: (1) differing combustion environments – relative to traditional natural gas fired systems – affect both the growth rate of thermally grown oxide (TGO) layers and the stability of these oxides and of protective thermal barrier coatings (TBCs); and (2) how low levels of fuel impurities and characteristic non-combustibles interact with surface oxides, for instance through the development of molten deposits that lead to hot corrosion of protective TBC coatings. The overall program has been comprised of six inter-related themes, each comprising a research thrust over the program period, including: (i) evaluating the role of syngas and high hydrogen content (HHC) combustion environments in modifying component surface temperatures, heat transfer to the TBC coatings, and thermal gradients within these coatings; (ii) understanding the instability of TBC coatings in the syngas and high hydrogen environment with regards to decomposition, phase changes and sintering; (iii) characterizing ash deposition, molten phase development and infiltration, and associated corrosive

  5. Overview of fuel behaviour and core degradation, based on modelling analyses. Overview of fuel behaviour and core degradation, on the basis of modelling results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massara, Simone

    2013-01-01

    Since the very first hours after the accident at Fukushima-Daiichi, numerical simulations by means of severe accident codes have been carried out, aiming at highlighting the key physical phenomena allowing a correct understanding of the sequence of events, and - on a long enough timeline - improving models and methods, in order to reduce the discrepancy between calculated and measured data. A last long-term objective is to support the future decommissioning phase. The presentation summarises some of the available elements on the role of the fuel/cladding-water interaction, which became available only through modelling because of the absence of measured data directly related to the cladding-steam interaction. This presentation also aims at drawing some conclusions on the status of the modelling capabilities of current tools, particularly for the purpose of the foreseen application to ATF fuels: - analyses with MELCOR, MAAP, THALES2 and RELAP5 are presented; - input data are taken from BWR Mark-I Fukushima-Daiichi Units 1, 2 and 3, completed with operational data published by TEPCO. In the case of missing or incomplete data or hypotheses, these are adjusted to reduce the calculation/measurement discrepancy. The behaviour of the accident is well understood on a qualitative level (major trends on RPV pressure and water level, dry-wet and PCV pressure are well represented), allowing a certain level of confidence in the results of the analysis of the zirconium-steam reaction - which is accessible only through numerical simulations. These show an extremely fast sequence of events (here for Unit 1): - the top of fuel is uncovered in 3 hours (after the tsunami); - the steam line breaks at 6.5 hours. Vessel dries at 10 hours, with a heat-up rate in a first moment driven by the decay heat only (∼7 K/min) and afterwards by the chemical heat from Zr-oxidation (over 30 K/min), associated with massive hydrogen production. It appears that the level of uncertainty increases with

  6. SOFC direct fuelling with high-methane gases: Optimal strategies for fuel dilution and upgrade to avoid quick degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldinelli, A.; Barelli, L.; Bidini, G.; Di Michele, A.; Vivani, R.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • SOFCs are operated on natural gas and biogas direct feeding. • Methane partial oxidation and dry reforming are compared. • The optimal oxygen-to-carbon stoichiometry to avoid degradation is determined for both natural gas and biogas. • NiYSZ anodes degradation mechanisms are investigated though SEM-EDX and XRD. - Abstract: In the outlook of the transition to the carbon-free society, low-carbon gases, such as natural gas or biogas, are very promising. The first is commonly used for stationary applications based on Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) equipped with external reformers. Similar installations are required when the SOFC is run on biogas. Yet, high SOFC operative temperature enables internal decomposition of light hydrocarbons, therefore allowing the suppression of external reforming. Evidently, this brings about benefits in terms of system complexity and cost reduction. Nonetheless, unlike reformate fuels, direct exposure to large amount of methane favours SOFC anodes degradation. Implementing a systematic experimental approach, this paper aims at determining a simple operative strategy to carry out direct feeding without meeting with quick degradation issues, producing interesting outcomes with regards to the management of SOFC-based systems. Particularly, the regulation of the oxygen-to-carbon (O/C) relative fraction of the fuel through air addition to natural gas and partial CO_2 separation from biogas is helpful in the prevention of those mechanisms. In this study, NiYSZ anode SOFCs are exposed to air-diluted natural gas and upgraded biogas, featuring O/C between 0.2 and 1.2. Tracing these cases, at 800 °C and 500 mA/cm"2 constant load, cell performances are measured over a time interval of 100 h. Finally, post-mortem analysis is performed on the specimens to investigate material morphological changes after the exposure to high-methane fuels. Results showed that O/C = 0.8 (+63% air) is the best case to employ air-diluted natural gas

  7. The state of the Primary Degradation Factors and Models of Concrete Cask in Spent Fuel Dry Storage System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J. S.; Lee, K. S.; Choi, J. W.; Kwon, S.

    2010-01-01

    In South Korea, a total of twenty nuclear reactors are in operation; the cumulative amount of spent fuel is estimated to be 10,490 MTU in 2009. The full capacity of the waste storage is expected to be saturated in around 2016. However, a national strategy for spent fuel management has not yet been set down and high level waste (HLW) such as spent fuel will have to be stored at-reactor (AR) by re-racking. Recently an worldwide interest on the dry storage has increased especially around U.S. With a perspective of the material of the spent fuel dry storage cask, the system can be divided into two types of metal and concrete casks. The concrete type cask is a very attractive option because of the cost competitiveness of concrete material and its relatively long-term durability. Although the type of metal cask is chosen, the use of cementitious material is inevitable at least for the cask foundation and the facilities for the protection of dry storage structures. Upon being placed, the performance of concrete begins to deteriorate from the intrinsic change of cement and the physical/ chemical environmental conditions. Thus it is necessary to evaluate the durability of a concrete for the increase of reliability and safety of the whole system during the designed life time. Considering the dry storage system of spent fuel is the item which can create a lot of added value, the development of a dry storage cask is usually initiated by private enterprises among developed countries. The detail research results and specific design criteria for the safety assessment of a concrete cask have not been revealed to the public well. In this paper, the major expected degradation factors and related degradation models of concrete casks were investigated as part of the safety assessment by taking account of the site where Korea industrial nuclear power plants are located

  8. End of project report on degradation processes in hydrogen fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells are one of the most popular types of fuel cells. They operate similarly to others with the electrolyte material inbetween the electrodes being a patented polymer called Nafion, made by DuPont. This polyelec...

  9. Assessment of degradation concerns for spent fuel, high-level wastes, and transuranic wastes in monitored retrievalbe storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenther, R.J.; Gilbert, E.R.; Slate, S.C.; Partain, W.L.; Divine, J.R.; Kreid, D.K.

    1984-01-01

    It has been concluded that there are no significant degradation mechanisms that could prevent the design, construction, and safe operation of monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facilities. However, there are some long-term degradation mechanisms that could affect the ability to maintain or readily retrieve spent fuel (SF), high-level wastes (HLW), and transuranic wastes (TRUW) several decades after emplacement. Although catastrophic failures are not anticipated, long-term degradation mechanisms have been identified that could, under certain conditions, cause failure of the SF cladding and/or failure of TRUW storage containers. Stress rupture limits for Zircaloy-clad SF in MRS range from 300 to 440 0 C, based on limited data. Additional tests on irradiated Zircaloy (3- to 5-year duration) are needed to narrow this uncertainty. Cladding defect sizes could increase in air as a result of fuel density decreases due to oxidation. Oxidation tests (3- to 5-year duration) on SF are also needed to verify oxidation rates in air and to determine temperatures below which monitoring of an inert cover gas would not be required. Few, if any, changes in the physical state of HLW glass or canisters or their performance would occur under projected MRS conditions. The major uncertainty for HLW is in the heat transfer through cracked glass and glass devitrification above 500 0 C. Additional study of TRUW is required. Some fraction of present TRUW containers would probably fail within the first 100 years of MRS, and some TRUW would be highly degraded upon retrieval, even in unfailed containers. One possible solution is the design of a 100-year container. 93 references, 28 figures, 17 tables

  10. Fuel rod analysis to respond to high burnup and demanding loading requirements. Probabilistic methodology recovers design margins narrowed by degrading fuel thermal conductivity and progressing FGR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberle, R; Heins, L; Sontheimer, F [Siemens AG Unternehmensbereich KWU, Erlangen (Germany)

    1997-08-01

    The proof that fuel rods will safely withstand all loads arising from inpile service conditions is generally achieved through the assessment of a number of design criteria by using a conservative analysis methodology in conjunction with design limits ``on the safe side``. The classical approach is the application of a fuel rod code to the Worst Case which is defined by the combination of most unfavorable conditions and assumptions with respect to the criterion under consideration. As it is evident that the deterministic construction of such Worst Cases imply an (unknown but) intuitively very high degree of conservatism, it is not surprising that this will develop to cause problems the more demanding fuel insertion conditions have to be anticipated (increased burnup, high efficiency loading schemes, etc.). A certain relief can be gained form cautious revisions of single design limits based on grown performance experience. But this increase of knowledge allows as well to change the established deterministic ``go/no-go`` conception into a better differentiating assessment methodology by which the quantification of the implied conservatism and the remaining design margins is possible: the Probabilistic Design Methodology (PDM). Principles and elements of the PDM are described. An essential prerequisite is a best-estimate fuel rod code which incorporates the latest state of knowledge about potential performance limiting phenomena (e.g. burnup degradation of fuel oxide thermal conductivity) as Siemens/KWU`s CARO-E does. An example is given how input distributions for rod data and model parameters transfer into a frequency distribution of maximum rod internal pressure, and indications are given how this is to be interpreted in view of a probabilistically re-formulated design criterion. The PDM provides a realistic conservative assessment of design criteria and will thus recover design margins for increasingly aggravated loading conditions. (author). 9 refs, 9 figs, 2 tabs.

  11. Fuel rod analysis to respond to high burnup and demanding loading requirements. Probabilistic methodology recovers design margins narrowed by degrading fuel thermal conductivity and progressing FGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberle, R.; Heins, L.; Sontheimer, F.

    1997-01-01

    The proof that fuel rods will safely withstand all loads arising from inpile service conditions is generally achieved through the assessment of a number of design criteria by using a conservative analysis methodology in conjunction with design limits ''on the safe side''. The classical approach is the application of a fuel rod code to the Worst Case which is defined by the combination of most unfavorable conditions and assumptions with respect to the criterion under consideration. As it is evident that the deterministic construction of such Worst Cases imply an (unknown but) intuitively very high degree of conservatism, it is not surprising that this will develop to cause problems the more demanding fuel insertion conditions have to be anticipated (increased burnup, high efficiency loading schemes, etc.). A certain relief can be gained form cautious revisions of single design limits based on grown performance experience. But this increase of knowledge allows as well to change the established deterministic ''go/no-go'' conception into a better differentiating assessment methodology by which the quantification of the implied conservatism and the remaining design margins is possible: the Probabilistic Design Methodology (PDM). Principles and elements of the PDM are described. An essential prerequisite is a best-estimate fuel rod code which incorporates the latest state of knowledge about potential performance limiting phenomena (e.g. burnup degradation of fuel oxide thermal conductivity) as Siemens/KWU's CARO-E does. An example is given how input distributions for rod data and model parameters transfer into a frequency distribution of maximum rod internal pressure, and indications are given how this is to be interpreted in view of a probabilistically re-formulated design criterion. The PDM provides a realistic conservative assessment of design criteria and will thus recover design margins for increasingly aggravated loading conditions. (author). 9 refs, 9 figs, 2 tabs

  12. Operational and environmental hazards of the quality degradation of fuels for power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szabo, I.

    1987-01-01

    Higher sulphur and other minerals content in coal increases hazardous emission and, simultaneously, the caloric efficiency of the fuel decreases. The basic production control aspect of coal mines should be to produce coal with lesser ash content and higher calorific value rather than the higher quantity output of mines. For testing purposes, continuous ash content and calorific value monitors and displays should be installed at the power plants before fuel combustion.

  13. Proton exchange membrane fuel cell operation and degradation in short-circuit.

    OpenAIRE

    Silva , R.E.; Harel , F.; Jemei , S.; Gouriveau , Rafael; Hissel , Daniel; Boulon , L.; Agbossou , K.

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Hybridization of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) and ultra capacitors (UC) are considered as an alternative way to implement high autonomy, high dynamic, and reversible energy sources. PEMFC allow high efficiency and high autonomy, however their dynamic response is limited and this source does not allow recovering energy. UC appears to be a complementary source to fuel cell systems (FCS) due to their high power density, fast dynamics, and reversibility. A d...

  14. Hydrocarbon degradation potential in reference soils and soils contaminated with jet fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, R.F.; Hoeppel, R.

    1991-01-01

    Petroleum degradation in surface and subsurface soils is affected by such factors as moisture content, pH, soil type, soil organics, temperature, and oxygen concentrations. In this paper, the authors determine the degradation rates of 14 C-labeled hydrocarbons added to soils collected from a contaminated surface site, contaminated subsurface sites, and a clean reference site. The radiolabeled hydrocarbons used include benzene, toluene, naphthalene, 1-methynaphthalene, phenanthrene, fluorene, anthracene, chrysene, and hexadecane. Microbial degradation rates were based on determination of mineralization rates (production of 14 CO 2 ) of hydrocarbons that were added to soil samples. Since water was added and oxygen was not limiting, the hydrocarbon rates determined are likely to be higher than those occurring in situ. Using radiolabeled hydrocarbons, information can be provided on differences in the degradation rates of various petroleum compounds in different types of soils at a site, on possible production of petroleum metabolites in the soil, and on the importance of anaerobic petroleum degradation and the effects of nutrient, water, and surfactant addition on biodegradation rates

  15. In situ fluorescence spectroscopy correlates ionomer degradation to reactive oxygen species generation in an operating fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakaran, Venkateshkumar; Arges, Christopher G; Ramani, Vijay

    2013-11-21

    The rate of generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) within the polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) of an operating proton exchange member fuel cell (PEMFC) was monitored using in situ fluorescence spectroscopy. A modified barrier layer was introduced between the PEM and the electrocatalyst layer to eliminate metal-dye interactions and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) effects during measurements. Standard fuel cell operating parameters (temperature, relative humidity, and electrode potential) were systematically varied to evaluate their influence on the rate of ROS generation during PEMFC operation. Independently, the macroscopic rate of PEM degradation was measured by monitoring the fluoride ion emission rate (FER) in the effluent stream at each operating condition. The ROS generation reaction rate constant (estimated from the in situ fluorescence experiments) correlated perfectly with the measured FER across all conditions, demonstrating unequivocally for the first time that a direct correlation exists between in situ ROS generation and PEM macroscopic degradation. The activation energy for ROS generation within the PEM was estimated to be 12.5 kJ mol(-1).

  16. Unraveling micro- and nanoscale degradation processes during operation of high-temperature polymer-electrolyte-membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hengge, K.; Heinzl, C.; Perchthaler, M.; Varley, D.; Lochner, T.; Scheu, C.

    2017-10-01

    The work in hand presents an electron microscopy based in-depth study of micro- and nanoscale degradation processes that take place during the operation of high-temperature polymer-electrolyte-membrane fuel cells (HT-PEMFCs). Carbon supported Pt particles were used as cathodic catalyst material and the bimetallic, carbon supported Pt/Ru system was applied as anode. As membrane, cross-linked polybenzimidazole was used. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of cross-sections of as-prepared and long-term operated membrane-electrode-assemblies revealed insight into micrometer scale degradation processes: operation-caused catalyst redistribution and thinning of the membrane and electrodes. Transmission electron microscopy investigations were performed to unravel the nanometer scale phenomena: a band of Pt and Pt/Ru nanoparticles was detected in the membrane adjacent to the cathode catalyst layer. Quantification of the elemental composition of several individual nanoparticles and the overall band area revealed that they stem from both anode and cathode catalyst layers. The results presented do not demonstrate any catastrophic failure but rather intermediate states during fuel cell operation and indications to proceed with targeted HT-PEMFC optimization.

  17. Assessment of the cathode contribution to the degradation of anode-supported solid oxide fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagen, Anke; Liu, Yi-Lin; Barfod, Rasmus

    2008-01-01

    The degradation of anode-supported cells was studied over 1500 h as a function of cell polarization either in air or oxygen on the cathode side. Based on impedance analysis, contributions of the anode and cathode to the increase of total resistance were assigned. Accordingly, the degradation rates...... of the cathode were strongly dependent on the pO(2). Microstructural analysis of the cathode/electrolyte interface carried out after removal of the cathode showed craters on the electrolyte surface where the lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM) particles had been located. The changes of shape and size...... of these craters observed after testing correlated with the cell voltage degradation rates. The results can be interpreted in terms of element redistribution at the cathode/electrolyte interface and formation of foreign phases giving rise to a weakening of local contact points of the LSM cathode and yttria...

  18. Anode Supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cells - Deconvolution of Degradation into Cathode and Anode Contributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagen, Anke; Liu, Yi-Lin; Barfod, Rasmus

    2007-01-01

    The degradation of anode supported cells was studied over 1500 h as function of cell polarization either in air or oxygen on the cathode. Based on impedance analysis, contributions of anode and cathode to the increase of total resistance were assigned. Accordingly, the degradation rates...... of the cathode were strongly dependent on the pO(2); they were significantly smaller when testing in oxygen compared to air. Microstructural analysis of the cathode/electrolyte interface of a not-tested reference cell carried out after removal of the cathode showed sharp craters on the electrolyte surface where...

  19. Determination of membrane degradation products in the product water of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zedda, Marco

    2011-05-12

    The predominant long term failure of polymer electrolyte membranes (PEM) is caused by hydroxyl radicals generated during fuel cell operation. These radicals attack the polymer, leading to chain scission, unzipping and consequently to membrane decomposition products. The present work has investigated decomposition products of novel sulfonated aromatic hydrocarbon membranes on the basis of a product water analysis. Degradation products from the investigated membrane type and the possibility to detect these compounds in the product water for diagnostic purposes have not been discovered yet. This thesis demonstrates the potential of solid phase extraction and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (SPE-LC-MS/MS) for the extraction, separation, characterization, identification and quantification of membrane degradation products in the product water of fuel cells. For this purpose, several polar aromatic hydrocarbons with different functional groups were selected as model compounds for the development of reliable extraction, separation and detection methods. The results of this thesis have shown that mixed mode sorbent materials with both weak anion exchange and reversed phase retention properties are well suited for reproducible extraction of both molecules and ions from the product water. The chromatographic separation of various polar aromatic hydrocarbons was achieved by means of phase optimized liquid chromatography using a solvent gradient and on a C18 stationary phase. Sensitive and selective detection of model compounds could be successfully demonstrated by the analysis of the product water using tandem mass spectrometry. The application of a hybrid mass spectrometer (Q Trap) for the characterization of unknown polar aromatic hydrocarbons has led to the identification and confirmation of 4-hydroxybenzoic acid in the product water. In addition, 4-HBA could be verified as a degradation product resulting from PEM decomposition by hydroxyl radicals using an

  20. Optimization of degradation of Reactive Black 5 (RB5) and electricity generation in solar photocatalytic fuel cell system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalik, Wan Fadhilah; Ho, Li-Ngee; Ong, Soon-An; Voon, Chun-Hong; Wong, Yee-Shian; Yusoff, NikAthirah; Lee, Sin-Li; Yusuf, Sara Yasina

    2017-10-01

    The photocatalytic fuel cell (PFC) system was developed in order to study the effect of several operating parameters in degradation of Reactive Black 5 (RB5) and its electricity generation. Light irradiation, initial dye concentration, aeration, pH and cathode electrode are the operating parameters that might give contribution in the efficiency of PFC system. The degradation of RB5 depends on the presence of light irradiation and solar light gives better performance to degrade the azo dye. The azo dye with low initial concentration decolorizes faster compared to higher initial concentration and presence of aeration in PFC system would enhance its performance. Reactive Black 5 rapidly decreased at higher pH due to the higher amount of OH generated at higher pH and Pt-loaded carbon (Pt/C) was more suitable to be used as cathode in PFC system compared to Cu foil and Fe foil. The rapid decolorization of RB5 would increase their voltage output and in addition, it would also increase their V oc , J sc and P max . The breakage of azo bond and aromatic rings was confirmed through UV-Vis spectrum and COD analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of in-pile degradation of the meat thermal conductivity on the maximum temperature of the plate-type U-Mo dispersion fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medvedev, Pavel G.

    2009-01-01

    Effect of in-pile degradation of thermal conductivity on the maximum temperature of the plate-type research reactor fuels has been assessed using the steady-state heat conduction equation and assuming convection cooling. It was found that due to very low meat thickness, characteristic for this type of fuel, the effect of thermal conductivity degradation on the maximum fuel temperature is minor. For example, the fuel plate featuring 0.635 mm thick meat operating at heat flux of 600 W/cm2 would experience only a 20 C temperature rise if the meat thermal conductivity degrades from 0.8 W/cm-s to 0.3 W/cm-s. While degradation of meat thermal conductivity in dispersion-type U-Mo fuel can be very substantial due to formation of interaction layer between the particles and the matrix, and development of fission gas filled porosity, this simple analysis demonstrates that this phenomenon is unlikely to significantly affect the temperature-based safety margin of the fuel during normal operation.

  2. The physical and chemical degradation of PWR fuel rods in severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsons, P.D.; Mowat, J.A.S.; Dewhurst, D.W.F.; Hughes, T.E.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental study of the interaction between Zircaloy-4 cladding and UO 2 in PWR fuel rods heated to high temperatures with a negligible differential pressure across the cladding wall is described. The fuel rods were of dimensions appropriate to the 17x17 PWR fuel sub-assembly and were heated in a non-oxidising environment (vacuum) up to approx. 1850 deg. C either isothermally or through heating ramps. Observations were made concerning the extent and nature of the reaction zone between Zircaloy-4 and UO 2 over the temperature range 1500-1850 deg. C for times ranging from 1 min to 125 min. The location, morphology and the chemical composition of the phases formed are described along with the kinetics of their formation. (author)

  3. Microbial degradation processes in radioactive waste repository and in nuclear fuel storage areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfram, J.H.; Rogers, R.D.; Gazso, L.G.

    1997-01-01

    The intent of the workshop organizers was to convene experts in the fields of corrosion and spent nuclear fuels. The major points which evolved from the interaction of microbiologists, material scientists, and fuel storage experts are as follows: Corrosion of basin components as well as fuel containers or cladding is occurring; Water chemistry monitoring, if done in the storage facility does not take into account the microbial component; Microbial influenced corrosion is an area that many have not considered to be an important contributor in the aging of metallurgical materials especially those exposed to a radiation field; Many observations indicate that there is a microbial or biological presence in the storage facilities but these observations have not been correlated with any deterioration or aging phenomena taking place in the storage facility; The sessions on the fundamentals of microbial influenced corrosion and biofilm pointed out that these phenomena are real, occurring on similar materials in other industries and probably are occurring in the wet storage of spent fuel; All agreed that more monitoring, testing, and education in the field of biological mediate processes be performed and financially supported; Loosing the integrity of fuel assemblies can only cause problems, relating to the future disposition of the fuel, safety concerns, and environmental issues; In other rad waste scenarios, biological processes may be playing a role, for instance in the mobility of radionuclides in soil, decomposition of organic materials of the rad waste, gas production, etc. The fundamental scientific presentations discussed the full gamut of microbial processes that relate to biological mediated effects on metallic and non-metallic materials used in the storage and containment of radioactive materials

  4. Catalytic degradation of waste high-density polyethylene into fuel products using BaCO{sub 3} as a catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jan, M. Rasul; Shah, Jasmin; Gulab, Hussain [Institute of Chemical Sciences, University of Peshawar, N.W.F.P. (Pakistan)

    2010-11-15

    Waste high-density polyethylene (HDPE) was degraded thermally and catalytically using BaCO{sub 3} as a catalyst under different conditions of temperature, cat/pol ratio and time. The oil collected at optimum conditions (450 C, 0.1 cat/pol ratio and 2 h reaction time) was fractionated at different temperatures and fuel property of the fractions and parent oil was evaluated by their physicochemical parameters for fuel tests. The results were compared with the standard values for gasoline, kerosene and diesel oil. Boiling point distribution (BPD) curves were plotted from the gas chromatographic study of the samples and compared with that of the standard gasoline, kerosene and diesel. The oil samples were analyzed using GC/MS in order to find out their composition. The physical parameters and the composition of the parent oil and its fractions support the resemblance of the samples with the standard fuel oils. The light fractions best match with gasoline, the middle fractions match with kerosene and the heavier fractions match with diesel oil in almost all of the characteristic properties. (author)

  5. Degradability of n-alkanes during ex situ natural bioremediation of soil contaminated by heavy residual fuel oil (mazut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ramadan Mohamed Muftah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that during biodegradation of oil in natural geological conditions, or oil pollutants in the environment, a degradation of hydrocarbons occurs according to the well defined sequence. For example, the major changes during the degradation process of n-alkanes occur in the second, slight and third, moderate level (on the biodegradation scale from 1 to 10. According to previous research, in the fourth, heavy level, when intensive changes of phenanthrene and its methyl isomers begin, n-alkanes have already been completely removed. In this paper, the ex situ natural bioremediation (unstimulated bioremediation, without addition of biomass, nutrient substances and biosurfactant of soil contaminated with heavy residual fuel oil (mazut was conducted during the period of 6 months. Low abundance of n-alkanes in the fraction of total saturated hydrocarbons in the initial sample (identification was possible only after concentration by urea adduction technique showed that the investigated oil pollutant was at the boundary between the third and the fourth biodegradation level. During the experiment, an intense degradation of phenanthrene and its methyl-, dimethyl-and trimethyl-isomers was not followed by the removal of the remaining n-alkanes. The abundance of n-alkanes remained at the initial low level, even at end of the experiment when the pollutant reached one of the highest biodegradation levels. These results showed that the unstimulated biodegradation of some hydrocarbons, despite of their high biodegradability, do not proceed completely to the end, even at final degradation stages. In the condition of the reduced availability of some hydrocarbons, microorganisms tend to opt for less biodegradable but more accessible hydrocarbons.

  6. Accelerated Degradation for Hardware in the Loop Simulation of Fuel Cell-Gas Turbine Hybrid System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abreu-Sepulveda, Maria A.; Harun, Nor Farida; Hackett, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) in Morgantown, WV has developed the hybrid performance (HyPer) project in which a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) one-dimensional (1D), real-time operating model is coupled to a gas turbine hardware system by utilizing...

  7. Degradation by radiation of the response of a thermocouple of a fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez V, A.

    1994-01-01

    In the TRIGA Mark III Reactor of the National Institute of Nuclear Research, is necessary to use an instrumented fuel element for measurement the fuel temperature during pulses of power. This fuel element is exposed to daily temperature gradient of order to 390 Centigrade degrees in normal condition of reactor operation at 1 MW. The experience which this instrumented fuel elements is that useful life of the thermocouples is less then the fuel, because they show important changes in their chemistry composition and electrical specifications, until the point they don't give any response. So is necessary to know the factors that influenced in the shortening of the thermocouples life. The change in composition affects the thermocouple calibration depends on where the changes take place relative to the temperature gradient. The change will be dependent on the neutron flux and so the value of the neutron flux may be used as a measure or the composition change. If there is no neutron flux within the temperature gradient, there will be no composition change, and so the thermocouple calibration will no change. If the neutron flux varies within the region in which a temperature gradients exists, the composition of the thermocouple will vary and the calibration will change. But the maximum change in calibration will occur if the neutron flux is high and constant within the region of the temperature gradient. In this case, a composition change takes place which is uniform throughout the gradient and so the emf output can be expected to change. In this reactor, the thermocouples are in the second case. Then, the relative position of the thermal and neutron flux gradients are the most important factor that explain the composition change after or 2,500 times of exposing the thermocouples to the temperature gradients of order to 390 Centigrade degrees. (Author)

  8. DOCUMENTATION OF NATIONAL WEATHER CONDITIONS AFFECTING LONG-TERM DEGRADATION OF COMMERCIAL SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL AND DOE SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL AND HIGH-LEVEL WASTE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    W. L. Poe, Jr.; P.F. Wise

    1998-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing a proposal to construct, operate 2nd monitor, and eventually close a repository at Yucca Mountain in Nye County, Nevada, for the geologic disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). As part of this effort, DOE has prepared a viability assessment and an assessment of potential consequences that may exist if the repository is not constructed. The assessment of potential consequences if the repository is not constructed assumes that all SNF and HLW would be left at the generator sites. These include 72 commercial generator sites (three commercial facility pairs--Salem and Hope Creek, Fitzpatrick and Nine Mile Point, and Dresden and Morris--would share common storage due to their close proximity to each other) and five DOE sites across the country. DOE analyzed the environmental consequences of the effects of the continued storage of these materials at these sites in a report titled Continued Storage Analysis Report (CSAR; Reference 1 ) . The CSAR analysis includes a discussion of the degradation of these materials when exposed to the environment. This document describes the environmental parameters that influence the degradation analyzed in the CSAR. These include temperature, relative humidity, precipitation chemistry (pH and chemical composition), annual precipitation rates, annual number of rain-days, and annual freeze/thaw cycles. The document also tabulates weather conditions for each storage site, evaluates the degradation of concrete storage modules and vaults in different regions of the country, and provides a thermal analysis of commercial SNF in storage

  9. Rapid Evaluation of Power Degradation in Series Connection of Single Feeding Microsized Microbial Fuel Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Rojas, Jhonathan Prieto; Alqarni, Wejdan Mohammed Mofleh; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a sustainable, single feeding, microsized, air-cathode and membrane-free microbial fuel cells with a volume of 40 mu L each, which we have used for rapid evaluation of power generation and viability of a series array of three cells seeking higher voltage levels. Contrary to expectations, the achieved power density was modest (45 mWm(-3)), limited due to non-uniformities in assembly and the single-channel feeding system.

  10. Rapid Evaluation of Power Degradation in Series Connection of Single Feeding Microsized Microbial Fuel Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Rojas, Jhonathan Prieto

    2014-07-08

    We have developed a sustainable, single feeding, microsized, air-cathode and membrane-free microbial fuel cells with a volume of 40 mu L each, which we have used for rapid evaluation of power generation and viability of a series array of three cells seeking higher voltage levels. Contrary to expectations, the achieved power density was modest (45 mWm(-3)), limited due to non-uniformities in assembly and the single-channel feeding system.

  11. Fault detection and isolation of high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell stack under the influence of degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Christian; Araya, Samuel Simon; Sahlin, Simon Lennart

    2017-01-01

    This study proposes a data-drive impedance-based methodology for fault detection and isolation of low and high cathode stoichiometry, high CO concentration in the anode gas, high methanol vapour concentrations in the anode gas and low anode stoichiometry, for high temperature PEM fuel cells....... The fault detection and isolation algorithm is based on an artificial neural network classifier, which uses three extracted features as input. Two of the proposed features are based on angles in the impedance spectrum, and are therefore relative to specific points, and shown to be independent of degradation......, contrary to other available feature extraction methods in the literature. The experimental data is based on a 35 day experiment, where 2010 unique electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements were recorded. The test of the algorithm resulted in a good detectability of the faults, except for high...

  12. Pyroprocessing of oxidized sodium-bonded fast reactor fuel - An experimental study of treatment options for degraded EBR-II fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermann, S.D.; Gese, N.J. [Separations Department, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Wurth, L.A. [Zinc Air Inc., 5314-A US Hwy 2 West, Columbia Falls, MT 59912 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    An experimental study was conducted to assess pyrochemical treatment options for degraded EBR-II fuel. As oxidized material, the degraded fuel would need to be converted back to metal to enable electrorefining within an existing electro-metallurgical treatment process. A lithium-based electrolytic reduction process was studied to assess the efficacy of converting oxide materials to metal with a particular focus on the impact of zirconium oxide and sodium oxide on this process. Bench-scale electrolytic reduction experiments were performed in LiCl-Li{sub 2}O at 650 C. degrees with combinations of manganese oxide (used as a surrogate for uranium oxide), zirconium oxide, and sodium oxide. In the absence of zirconium or sodium oxide, the electrolytic reduction of MnO showed nearly complete conversion to metal. The electrolytic reduction of a blend of MnO-ZrO{sub 2} in LiCl - 1 wt% Li{sub 2}O showed substantial reduction of manganese, but only 8.5% of the zirconium was found in the metal phase. The electrolytic reduction of the same blend of MnO-ZrO{sub 2} in LiCl - 1 wt% Li{sub 2}O - 6.2 wt% Na{sub 2}O showed substantial reduction of manganese, but zirconium reduction was even less at 2.4%. This study concluded that ZrO{sub 2} cannot be substantially reduced to metal in an electrolytic reduction system with LiCl - 1 wt% Li{sub 2}O at 650 C. degrees due to the perceived preferential formation of lithium zirconate. This study also identified a possible interference that sodium oxide may have on the same system by introducing a parasitic and cyclic reaction of dissolved sodium metal between oxidation at the anode and reduction at the cathode. When applied to oxidized sodium-bonded EBR-II fuel (e.g., U-10Zr), the prescribed electrolytic reduction system would not be expected to substantially reduce zirconium oxide, and the accumulation of sodium in the electrolyte could interfere with the reduction of uranium oxide, or at least render it less efficient.

  13. Degradation of graphene coated copper in simulated proton exchange membrane fuel cell environment: Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Y. J.; Anisur, M. R.; Qiu, W.; He, J. J.; Al-Saadi, S.; Singh Raman, R. K.

    2017-09-01

    Metallic materials are most suitable for bipolar plates of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) because they possess the required mechanical strength, durability, gas impermeability, acceptable cost and are suitable for mass production. However, metallic bipolar plates are prone to corrosion or they can passivate under PEMFC environment and interrupt the fuel cell operation. Therefore, it is highly attractive to develop corrosion resistance coating that is also highly conductive. Graphene fits these criteria. Graphene coating is developed on copper by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) with an aim to improving corrosion resistance of copper under PEMFC condition. The Raman Spectroscopy shows the graphene coating to be multilayered. The electrochemical degradation of graphene coated copper is investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in 0.5 M H2SO4 solution at room temperature. After exposure to the electrolyte for up to 720 h, the charge transfer resistance (Rt) of the graphene coated copper is ∼3 times greater than that of the bare copper, indicating graphene coatings could improve the corrosion resistance of copper bipolar plates.

  14. Study on performance simulation of polymer electrolyte fuel cell for preventing degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, T; Doi, M; Fukuda, T; Hashimoto, R; Kanematsu, H; Utsumi, Y

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, the distribution of water content in the membrane of PEFC was analyzed by using a numerical simulation as well as understanding the behavior of internal moisture of PEFC. Eight parameters were selected for the simulation then 18 combinations of the parameters were allocated by design of experiments, thus the data obtained were analyzed by multiple regression analysis to understand the influence factor of operating conditions quantitatively. As a result, the influence of the operating parameters on the dryness of the membrane for the anode side and the cathode side of PEFC was quantitatively shown by using the method of the multiple regression analysis. Further it was found that the area where cerium carbonate ought to be coated for preventing the degradation without decreasing performance.

  15. Characterization of two diesel fuel degrading microbial consortia enriched from a non acclimated, complex source of microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varese Giovanna C

    2010-02-01

    of bacteria and a fungus capable of extensively degrading a broad range of the hydrocarbons mainly composing diesel fuels. Given their remarkable biodegradation potential, stability and resistance to cryopreservation, both consortia appear very interesting candidates for bioaugmentation operations on Diesel fuel impacted soils and sites.

  16. Characterization of two diesel fuel degrading microbial consortia enriched from a non acclimated, complex source of microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanaroli, Giulio; Di Toro, Sara; Todaro, Daniela; Varese, Giovanna C; Bertolotto, Antonio; Fava, Fabio

    2010-02-16

    extensively degrading a broad range of the hydrocarbons mainly composing diesel fuels. Given their remarkable biodegradation potential, stability and resistance to cryopreservation, both consortia appear very interesting candidates for bioaugmentation operations on Diesel fuel impacted soils and sites.

  17. Durability and degradation analysis of hydrocarbon ionomer membranes in polymer electrolyte fuel cells accelerated stress evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Ryo; Tsuji, Junichi; Sato, Nobuyuki; Takano, Jun; Itami, Shunsuke; Kusakabe, Masato; Miyatake, Kenji; Iiyama, Akihiro; Uchida, Makoto

    2017-11-01

    The chemical durabilities of two proton-conducting hydrocarbon polymer electrolyte membranes, sulfonated benzophenone poly(arylene ether ketone) (SPK) semiblock copolymer and sulfonated phenylene poly(arylene ether ketone) (SPP) semiblock copolymer are evaluated under accelerated open circuit voltage (OCV) conditions in a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC). Post-test characterization of the membrane electrodes assemblies (MEAs) is carried out via gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. These results are compared with those of the initial MEAs. The SPP cell shows the highest OCV at 1000 h, and, in the post-test analysis, the SPP membrane retains up to 80% of the original molecular weight, based on the GPC results, and 90% of the hydrophilic structure, based on the NMR results. The hydrophilic structure of the SPP membrane is more stable after the durability evaluation than that of the SPK. From these results, the SPP membrane, with its simple hydrophilic structure, which does not include ketone groups, is seen to be significantly more resistant to radical attack. This structure leads to high chemical durability and thus impedes the chemical decomposition of the membrane.

  18. Bioelectricity generation from coconut husk retting wastewater in fed batch operating microbial fuel cell by phenol degrading microorganism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayashree, C.; Arulazhagan, P.; Adish Kumar, S.; Kaliappan, S.; Yeom, Ick Tae; Rajesh Banu, J.

    2014-01-01

    Dual chamber microbial fuel cell (MFC) operated at fed batch mode for the treatment of retting wastewater has potently achieved both current generation and phenol removal. Hydraulic retention time (HRT) of the reactor was varied from 40 days to 10 days. COD (chemical oxygen demand) removal was 91% at 40 days HRT, with an initial COD concentration of 530 ± 50 g m −3 . Retting wastewater with an initial phenol concentration of 320 ± 60 g m −3 procured a highest phenol removal of 93% at 40 days HRT of the microbial fuel cell. Maximum power density of 362 mW m −2 was achieved using retting wastewater at HRT of 20 days with an internal resistance of 150 Ω in a dual chambered MFC. The bacterial strains in anode region, reported to be responsible for potential phenol removal, were identified as Ochrobactrum sp. RA1 (KJ408266), Ochrobactrum sp. RA2 (KJ408267) and Pesudomonas aeruginosa RA3 (KJ408268) using phylogenetic analysis. The study reveals that, dual chambered MFC effectively removed the phenol from retting wastewater along with power generation. - Highlights: • Maximum power density of 362 mW m −2 (150 Ω) was achieved at HRT of 20 days. • 91% COD removal and 93% phenol removal was observed at HRT of 40 days. • 25% coulombic efficiency was achieved in treatment of retting wastewater with MFC. • Phylogenetic analysis detect phenol degrading Ochrobactrum sp.RA1 in anode biofilm. • In addition, Ochrobactrum sp.RA2 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa RA3 were also isolated

  19. Elucidation of oxidation and degradation products of oxygen containing fuel components by combined use of a stable isotopic tracer and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frauscher, Marcella; Besser, Charlotte; Allmaier, Günter; Dörr, Nicole

    2017-11-15

    In order to reveal the degradation products of oxygen-containing fuel components, in particular fatty acid methyl esters, a novel approach was developed to characterize the oxidation behaviour. Combination of artificial alteration under pressurized oxygen atmosphere, a stable isotopic tracer, and gas chromatography electron impact mass spectrometry (GC-EI-MS) was used to obtain detailed information on the formation of oxidation products of (9Z), (12Z)-octadecadienoic acid methyl ester (C18:2 ME). Thereby, biodiesel simulating model compound C18:2 ME was oxidized in a rotating pressurized vessel standardized for lubricant oxidation tests (RPVOT), i.e., artificially altered, under 16 O 2 as well as 18 O 2 atmosphere. Identification of the formed degradation products, mainly carboxylic acids of various chain lengths, alcohols, ketones, and esters, was performed by means of GC-EI-MS. Comparison of mass spectra of compounds under both atmospheres revealed not only the degree of oxidation and the origin of oxygen atoms, but also the sites of oxidative attack and bond cleavage. Hence, the developed and outlined strategy based on a gas-phase stable isotopic tracer and mass spectrometry provides insight into the degradation of oxygen-containing fuels and fuel components by means of the accurate differentiation of oxygen origin in a degradation product. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. EQ6 Calculations for Chemical Degradation Of N Reactor (U-Metal) Spent Nuclear Fuel Waste Packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    P. Bernot

    2001-01-01

    The Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) Waste Package Department of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor (CRWMS M and O) performed calculations to provide input for disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from the N Reactor, a graphite moderated reactor at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site (ref. 1). The N Reactor core was fueled with slightly enriched (0.947 wt% and 0.947 to 1.25 wt% 235 U in Mark IV and Mark IA fuels, respectively) U-metal clad in Zircaloy-2 (Ref. 1, Sec. 3). Both types of N Reactor SNF have been considered for disposal at the proposed Yucca Mountain site. For some WPs, the outer shell and inner shell may breach (Ref. 3) allowing the influx of water. Water in the WP will moderate neutrons, increasing the likelihood of a criticality event within the WP; and the water may, in time, gradually leach the fissile components from the WP, further affecting the neutronics of the system. This study presents calculations of the long-term geochemical behavior of WPs containing two multi-canister overpacks (MCO) with either six baskets of Mark IA or five baskets of Mark IV intact N Reactor SNF rods (Ref. 1, Sec. 4) and two high-level waste (HLW) glass pour canisters (GPCs) arranged according to the codisposal concept (Ref. 4). The specific study objectives were to determine: (1) The extent to which fissile uranium will remain in the WP after corrosion/dissolution of the initial WP configuration (2) The extent to which fissile uranium will be carried out of the degraded WP by infiltrating water (such that internal criticality is no longer possible, but the possibility of external criticality may be enhanced); and (3) The nominal chemical composition for the criticality evaluations of the WP design, and to suggest the range of parametric variations for additional evaluations. The scope of this calculation, the chemical compositions (and subsequent criticality evaluations) of the simulations, is limited to

  1. EQ6 Calculations for Chemical Degradation Of N Reactor (U-Metal) Spent Nuclear Fuel Waste Packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Bernot

    2001-02-27

    The Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) Waste Package Department of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management & Operating Contractor (CRWMS M&O) performed calculations to provide input for disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from the N Reactor, a graphite moderated reactor at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site (ref. 1). The N Reactor core was fueled with slightly enriched (0.947 wt% and 0.947 to 1.25 wt% {sup 235}U in Mark IV and Mark IA fuels, respectively) U-metal clad in Zircaloy-2 (Ref. 1, Sec. 3). Both types of N Reactor SNF have been considered for disposal at the proposed Yucca Mountain site. For some WPs, the outer shell and inner shell may breach (Ref. 3) allowing the influx of water. Water in the WP will moderate neutrons, increasing the likelihood of a criticality event within the WP; and the water may, in time, gradually leach the fissile components from the WP, further affecting the neutronics of the system. This study presents calculations of the long-term geochemical behavior of WPs containing two multi-canister overpacks (MCO) with either six baskets of Mark IA or five baskets of Mark IV intact N Reactor SNF rods (Ref. 1, Sec. 4) and two high-level waste (HLW) glass pour canisters (GPCs) arranged according to the codisposal concept (Ref. 4). The specific study objectives were to determine: (1) The extent to which fissile uranium will remain in the WP after corrosion/dissolution of the initial WP configuration (2) The extent to which fissile uranium will be carried out of the degraded WP by infiltrating water (such that internal criticality is no longer possible, but the possibility of external criticality may be enhanced); and (3) The nominal chemical composition for the criticality evaluations of the WP design, and to suggest the range of parametric variations for additional evaluations. The scope of this calculation, the chemical compositions (and subsequent criticality evaluations) of the simulations, is limited

  2. Anodic deposition-assisted photoelectrocatalytic degradation of bisphenol A at a cadmium sulfide modified electrode based on visible light-driven fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Jin-Yuan; Chen, Lin-Lin; Liang, Xing-Hui; Zhao, Qian-Wen; Li, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • CdS nanoparticles can largely promote anodic deposition of BPA in the dark. • Photoelectrocatalytic degradation of BPA is driven by photo-stimulated fuel cells. • CdS/ITO is regenerated in photoelectrocatalytic degradation process of BPA. • Visible light-driven BPA fuel cell exhibits several unique advantages. - Abstract: A novel photoelectrocatalytic oxidation method has been successfully developed to effectively degrade bisphenol A (BPA) using a visible light-sensitive CdS nanoparticle modified indium-tin oxide (ITO) electrode. In the present protocol, BPA is oxidized on the CdS/ITO electrode to produce a redox-active film (BPA AD ), which is subsequently degraded upon incorporation of visible light irradiation and anodic electric fields, making the CdS/ITO electrode cyclically regenerated and the BPA removed. The addition of CdS nanoparticles to the ITO electrode not only increases the anodic deposition of BPA in the dark, but also promotes the photoelectrocatalytic degradation of BPA under visible light irradiation. The CdS/ITO photoanode shows high regeneration ability, and the removal efficiency of BPA is high up to 94.1%. Meanwhile, a monopolar visible light-simulated BPA fuel cell vs. Ag/AgCl electrode with a salt bridge is fabricated to achieve the photoelectrocatalytic degradation of BPA, showing open-circuit photovoltage of 0.412 (±0.015) V and short-circuit photocurrent density of 20.52 (±1.02) μA cm −2 , respectively. The present study provides a new approach for efficient removal of phenolic pollutants and optimum utilization of renewable energy sources.

  3. Fault detection and isolation of high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell stack under the influence of degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeppesen, Christian; Araya, Samuel Simon; Sahlin, Simon Lennart; Thomas, Sobi; Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2017-08-01

    This study proposes a data-drive impedance-based methodology for fault detection and isolation of low and high cathode stoichiometry, high CO concentration in the anode gas, high methanol vapour concentrations in the anode gas and low anode stoichiometry, for high temperature PEM fuel cells. The fault detection and isolation algorithm is based on an artificial neural network classifier, which uses three extracted features as input. Two of the proposed features are based on angles in the impedance spectrum, and are therefore relative to specific points, and shown to be independent of degradation, contrary to other available feature extraction methods in the literature. The experimental data is based on a 35 day experiment, where 2010 unique electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements were recorded. The test of the algorithm resulted in a good detectability of the faults, except for high methanol vapour concentration in the anode gas fault, which was found to be difficult to distinguish from a normal operational data. The achieved accuracy for faults related to CO pollution, anode- and cathode stoichiometry is 100% success rate. Overall global accuracy on the test data is 94.6%.

  4. Elimination of pyraclostrobin by simultaneous microbial degradation coupled with the Fenton process in microbial fuel cells and the microbial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huanhuan; Kong, Chui-Hua

    2018-06-01

    The elimination of pyraclostrobin by simultaneous microbial degradation and Fenton oxidation was achieved in a microbial fuel cell (MFC) system. After 12 h of incubation, the removal rate of pyraclostrobin was 1.4 mg/L/h at the anode and 1.7 mg/L/h at the cathode. The pyraclostrobin concentration was less than the detection limit (0.1 mg/L) after 72 h at the anode and 24 h at the cathode. The air flow rate, temperature, and pH of the catholyte had significant effects on the generation of H 2 O 2 . The maximum production of H 2 O 2 was 1.2 mg/L after reaction for 20 h during the Fenton process. Microbial community analysis indicated that functional bacteria in the genera Chryseobacterium, Stenotrophomonas, Arcobacter, and Comamonas were predominant in the anodic biofilm. In conclusion, the MFC-Fenton system provides an effective approach for treating environmental contaminants. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Contribution to the study of degradation products of spent fuel reprocessing solvents using mass spectroscopy, its different linkages and by the use of stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesage, Denis

    1995-01-01

    Tributylphosphate (TBP) is used as an extraction solvent in nuclear fuel reprocessing. The presence of uranium fission products leads to the formation of a large variety of organic compounds resulting from radiolytic degradation of TBP. Some of these compounds can complex metallic cations, and as a result, to decrease nuclear fuel extraction yields. In this work we have studied by tandem mass spectrometry the fragmentation mechanisms of different TBP and their dimers. These molecules are interesting because of the similarity of their structures to other more complex molecules formed by irradiation (functionalized TBP and TBP dimers). This work allowed to identify mixtures of degradation products and relate their structures to radiolytic mechanisms. Ail these results, including structure determination and formation mechanisms, have been validated by using specifically labeled compounds (deuterium, oxygen 18, nitrogen 15). (author) [fr

  6. Waste degradation and mobilization in performance assessments for the Yucca Mountain disposal system for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rechard, Rob P.; Stockman, Christine T.

    2014-01-01

    This paper summarizes modeling of waste degradation and mobilization in performance assessments (PAs) conducted between 1984 and 2008 to evaluate feasibility, viability, and assess compliance of a repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain in southern Nevada. As understanding of the Yucca Mountain disposal system increased, the waste degradation module, or succinctly called the source-term, evolved from initial assumptions in 1984 to results based on process modeling in 2008. In early PAs, waste degradation had significant influence on calculated behavior but as the robustness of the waste container was increased and modeling of the container degradation improved, waste degradation had much less influence in later PAs. The variation of dissolved concentrations of radionuclides progressed from simple probability distributions in early PAs to functions dependent upon water chemistry in later PAs. Also, transport modeling of radionuclides in the waste, container, and invert were added in 1995; and, colloid-facilitated transport of radionuclides was added in 1998. - Highlights: • Progression of modeling of waste degradation in performance assessments is discussed for the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain. • Progression of evaluating dissolved concentrations of radionuclides in the source-term is discussed. • Radionuclide transport modeling in the waste, container, and invert in 1995 and thereafter is discussed. • Colloid-facilitated transport in the waste, container, and invert in 1998 and thereafter is discussed

  7. Identical location transmission electron microscopy in combination with rotating disc electrode measurements. The activity of fuel cell catalysts and their degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schloegl, Katrin G.

    2011-07-13

    As an alternative to conventional combustion engines, the Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) using hydrogen as a fuel is a promising concept owing to its potential independence from fossil fuels, high efficiency and zero emissions. Concerning its commercial viability, the fundamental problem of high system cost per power output and lifetime is closely related to finding more active and stable catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. In the presented work, several methods are combined to examine the parameters and processes responsible for both activity and degradation of platinum-based catalysts. Degradation mechanisms are scrutinized by means of electrochemical measurements with the rotating disc electrode in combination with a recently developed TEM technique, which allows for the comparison of identical locations before and after accelerated stress tests. (orig.) [German] Die mit Wasserstoff betriebene Proton Exchange Membrane Brennstoffzelle (PEMFC) stellt aufgrund ihrer potentiellen Unabhaengigkeit von fossilen Energietraegern, ihrem hohen Wirkungsgrad und fehlendem Schadstoffausstoss eine vielversprechende Alternative zum konventionellen Verbrennungsmotor dar. Das grundlegende Problem der zu hohen Systemkosten und zu geringen Lebensdauer fuer kommerzielle Anwendungen ist eng mit der Entwicklung aktiverer und stabiler Elektrokatalysatoren fuer die Sauerstoffreduktion verknuepft. In der vorliegenden Arbeit werden verschiedene Methoden kombiniert, um die Parameter und Prozesse zu untersuchen, welche fuer die Aktivitaet und Degradation platinbasierter Katalysatoren verantwortlich sind. Zur Aufklaerung vorliegender Degradationsmechanismen werden elektrochemische Messungen mit der rotierenden Scheibenelektrode in Kombination mit einer neu entwickelten TEM Methode eingesetzt, welche es ermoeglicht, identische Stellen vor und nach beschleunigten Degradationstests zu untersuchen.

  8. Degradation of H3PO4/PBI High Temperature Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell under Stressed Operating Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Fan

    performance loss caused by CO poisoning can be alleviated by the presence of water vapor. The CO oxidation via the water gas shift reaction is the main reason for the mitigated CO poisoning with the presence of water vapor. Meanwhile, the CO poisoning can deteriorate with the presence of CO2, although the CO2...... for HT-PEM fuel cell based micro-CHP units for households, the daily startup/shutdown operation is necessary. Moreover, the faults in the H2 supply system or in controlling the reformer can cause the H2 starvation of the HT-PEM fuel cell. The effects of these operating conditions to the degradation...... results in the degradation in cell performance of the HT-PEM fuel cell by increasing the charge transfer resistance and mass transfer resistance. The CO with volume fraction of 1% – 3% can cause significant performance loss to the HT-PEM fuel cell at the operating temperature of 150 oC. The cell...

  9. Yield degradation in inertial-confinement-fusion implosions due to shock-driven kinetic fuel-species stratification and viscous heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taitano, W. T.; Simakov, A. N.; Chacón, L.; Keenan, B.

    2018-05-01

    Anomalous thermonuclear yield degradation (i.e., that not describable by single-fluid radiation hydrodynamics) in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) implosions is ubiquitously observed in both Omega and National Ignition experiments. Multiple experimental and theoretical studies have been carried out to investigate the origin of such a degradation. Relative concentration changes of fuel-ion species, as well as kinetically enhanced viscous heating, have been among possible explanations proposed for certain classes of ICF experiments. In this study, we investigate the role of such kinetic plasma effects in detail. To this end, we use the iFP code to perform multi-species ion Vlasov-Fokker-Planck simulations of ICF capsule implosions with the fuel comprising various hydrodynamically equivalent mixtures of deuterium (D) and helium-3 (3He), as in the original Rygg experiments [J. R. Rygg et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 052702 (2006)]. We employ the same computational setup as in O. Larroche [Phys. Plasmas 19, 122706 (2012)], which was the first to simulate the experiments kinetically. However, unlike the Larroche study, and in partial agreement with experimental data, we find a systematic yield degradation in multi-species simulations versus averaged-ion simulations when the D-fuel fraction is decreased. This yield degradation originates in the fuel-ion species stratification induced by plasma shocks, which imprints the imploding system and results in the relocation of the D ions from the core of the capsule to its periphery, thereby reducing the yield relative to a non-separable averaged-ion case. By comparing yields from the averaged-ion kinetic simulations and from the hydrodynamic scaling, we also observe yield variations associated with ion kinetic effects other than fuel-ion stratification, such as ion viscous heating, which is typically neglected in hydrodynamic implosions' simulations. Since our kinetic simulations are driven by hydrodynamic boundary conditions at the

  10. Investigation of electrolyte leaching in the performance degradation of phosphoric acid-doped polybenzimidazole membrane-based high temperature fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Yeon Hun; Oh, Kyeongmin; Ahn, Sungha; Kim, Na Young; Byeon, Ayeong; Park, Hee-Young; Lee, So Young; Park, Hyun S.; Yoo, Sung Jong; Jang, Jong Hyun; Kim, Hyoung-Juhn; Ju, Hyunchul; Kim, Jin Young

    2017-09-01

    Precise monitoring of electrolyte leaching in high-temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (HT-PEMFC) devices during lifetime tests is helpful in making a diagnosis of their quality changes and analyzing their electrochemical performance degradation. Here, we investigate electrolyte leaching in the performance degradation of phosphoric acid (PA)-doped polybenzimidazole (PBI) membrane-based HT-PEMFCs. We first perform quantitative analyses to measure PA leakage during cell operation by spectrophotometric means, and a higher PA leakage rate is detected when the current density is elevated in the cell. Second, long-term degradation tests under various current densities of the cells and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) analysis are performed to examine the influence of PA loss on the membrane and electrodes during cell performance degradation. The combined results indicate that PA leakage affect cell performance durability, mostly due to an increase in charge transfer resistance and a decrease in the electrochemical surface area (ECSA) of the electrodes. Additionally, a three-dimensional (3-D) HT-PEMFC model is applied to a real-scale experimental cell, and is successfully validated against the polarization curves measured during various long-term experiments. The simulation results highlight that the PA loss from the cathode catalyst layer (CL) is a significant contributor to overall performance degradation.

  11. Fiscal 1994 survey report. Survey of factors causing degradation of phosphoric acid fuel cells; 1994 nendo rinsangata nenryo denchi no cell rekka yoin chosa hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    This survey aims to effectively promote studies for evaluating phosphoric acid fuel cell degradation. Data of time-dependent changes in voltage are collected from 58 plants now in operation (for 17,500 hours at the maximum). Half of them exhibit a degradation rate of 0.25-1%/1000 hours while degradation is abruptly accelerated midway in the other half. Causes for voltage drop are not known clearly. Since but a little systematically collected test data are available concerning the mechanism of cell degradation, it is decided that tests be conducted using small test model cells sharing the same specifications. Primary test conditions (combination of temperature, current, and pressure with test reference levels), performance evaluating methods (conditions of data collection), and methods of investigation by dismantling (items and frequency of investigations) are determined, and guidelines are provided for element tests for complementing the said test items and for studying their relations with the degradation mechanism. Based on acceleration-related factors to be obtained by common specification test cells, corporations involved will develop their own accelerated test methods. Small cells are fabricated for testing parameters, and model cells are specified. (NEDO)

  12. 1. The application of PIE techniques to the study of the corrosion of spent oxide fuel in deep-rock groundwaters. 2. Spent fuel degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsyth, R.S.

    1991-01-01

    During the autumn of 1990, papers summarizing work performed at Studsvik as part of the SKB research programme designed to study the corrosion behaviour of spent nuclear fuel in deep-rock groundwater were presented at two scientific meetings: The first paper presents results and observations of the study of the corrosion of spent oxide fuel in deep-rock ground-waters. The PIE techniques were applied to the detailed study of spent fuel both before and after water contact. The second paper represents an up-dated reporting of results obtained in the Swedish programme relevant to preferential dissolution effects, including interim results from recently stored experiments specifically designed to study possible correlations between corrosion behaviour and fuel properties conditioned by burnup and/or local power variations. Recent observations during the search for corrosion sites in fuel exposed to corrosion for about 4 years are also presented. (KAE)

  13. Degradation modeling and operational optimization for improving the lifetime of high-temperature PEM (proton exchange membrane) fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jintae; Kim, Minjin; Kang, Taegon; Sohn, Young-Jun; Song, Taewon; Choi, Kyoung Hwan

    2014-01-01

    High-temperature PEMFCs (proton exchange membrane fuel cells) using PA (phosphoric acid)-doped PBI (polybenzimidazole) membranes have received attention as a potential solution to several of the issues with traditional low-temperature PEMFCs. However, the durability of high-temperature PEMFCs deteriorates rapidly with increasing temperature, although its performance improves. This characteristic makes it difficult to select the proper operating temperature to achieve its target lifetime. In this paper, to resolve this problem, models were developed to predict the performance and durability of the high-temperature PEMFC as a function of operating temperature. The optimal operating temperature was then determined for a variety of lifetimes. Theoretical model to estimate cell performance and empirical model to predict the degradation rate of cell performance were constructed, respectively. The prediction results of the developed models agreed well with the experimental data. From the simulation, we could obtain higher average cell performances by optimizing the operating temperature for the given target lifetime compared to the cell performance at some temperatures determined using an existing rule of thumb. It is expected that the proposed methodologies will lead to the more rapid commercialization of this technology in such applications as stationary and automotive fuel cell systems. - Highlights: • High-temperature PEMFCs (proton exchange membrane fuel cells). • Operational optimization for improving the lifetime. • Development of the degradation modeling for high-temperature PEMFCs

  14. Catalyst Degradation Under Potential Cycling as an Accelerated Stress Test for PBI-Based High-Temperature PEM Fuel Cells - Effect of Humidification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Tonny; Cleemann, Lars Nilausen; Zhong, Lijie

    2018-01-01

    In the present work, high-temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells were subjected to accelerated stress tests of 30,000 potential cycles between 0.6 and 1.0 V at 160 textdegreeC (133 h cycling time). The effect that humidity has on the catalyst durability was studied by testing either...... with or without humidification of the nitrogen that was used as cathode gas during cycling segments. Pronounced degradation was seen from the polarization curves in both cases, though permanent only in the humidified case. In the unhumidified case, the performance loss was more or less recoverable following 24 h...

  15. EQ6 Calculation for Chemical Degradation of Shippingport LWBR (TH/U Oxide) Spent Nuclear Fuel Waste Packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S. Arthur

    2000-01-01

    The Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) Waste Package Department of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating contractor (CRWMS M and O) performed calculations to provide input for disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from the Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) (Ref. 1). The Shippingport LWBR SNF has been considered for disposal at the potential Yucca Mountain site. Because of the high content of fissile material in the SNF, the waste package (WP) design requires special consideration of the amount and placement of neutron absorbers and the possible loss of absorbers and SNF materials over geologic time. For some WPs, the outer shell corrosion-resistant material (CRM) and the corrosion-allowance inner shell may breach (Refs. 2 and 3), allowing the influx of water. Water in the WP will moderate neutrons, increasing the likelihood of a criticality event within the WP; and the water may, in time, gradually leach the fissile components and neutron absorbers from the WP, further affecting the neutronics of the system. This study presents calculations of the long-term geochemical behavior of WPs containing a Shippingport LWBR SNF seed assembly, and high-level waste (HLW) glass canisters arranged according to the codisposal concept (Ref. 4). The specific study objectives were to determine: (1) The extent to which criticality control material, suggested for this WP design, will remain in the WP after corrosion/dissolution of the initial WP configuration (such that it can be effective in preventing criticality); (2) The extent to which fissile uranium and fertile thorium will be carried out of the degraded WP by infiltrating water (such that internal criticality is no longer possible, but the possibility of external criticality may be enhanced); and (3) The nominal chemical composition for the criticality evaluations of the WP design, and to suggest the range of parametric variations for additional evaluations. The scope of this

  16. EQ6 Calculation for Chemical Degradation of Shippingport LWBR (TH/U Oxide) Spent Nuclear Fuel Waste Packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Arthur

    2000-09-14

    The Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) Waste Package Department of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management & Operating contractor (CRWMS M&O) performed calculations to provide input for disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from the Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) (Ref. 1). The Shippingport LWBR SNF has been considered for disposal at the potential Yucca Mountain site. Because of the high content of fissile material in the SNF, the waste package (WP) design requires special consideration of the amount and placement of neutron absorbers and the possible loss of absorbers and SNF materials over geologic time. For some WPs, the outer shell corrosion-resistant material (CRM) and the corrosion-allowance inner shell may breach (Refs. 2 and 3), allowing the influx of water. Water in the WP will moderate neutrons, increasing the likelihood of a criticality event within the WP; and the water may, in time, gradually leach the fissile components and neutron absorbers from the WP, further affecting the neutronics of the system. This study presents calculations of the long-term geochemical behavior of WPs containing a Shippingport LWBR SNF seed assembly, and high-level waste (HLW) glass canisters arranged according to the codisposal concept (Ref. 4). The specific study objectives were to determine: (1) The extent to which criticality control material, suggested for this WP design, will remain in the WP after corrosion/dissolution of the initial WP configuration (such that it can be effective in preventing criticality); (2) The extent to which fissile uranium and fertile thorium will be carried out of the degraded WP by infiltrating water (such that internal criticality is no longer possible, but the possibility of external criticality may be enhanced); and (3) The nominal chemical composition for the criticality evaluations of the WP design, and to suggest the range of parametric variations for additional evaluations. The scope of this

  17. Properties, degradation and high temperature fuel cell test of different types of PBI and PBI blend membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qingfeng; Rudbeck, Hans Christian; Chromik, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Polybenzimidazoles (PBIs) with synthetically modified structures and their blends with a partially fluorinated sulfonated aromatic polyether have been prepared and characterized for high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Significant improvement in the polymer chemical stability...

  18. Regularization of the degradation behavior and working zone of proton exchange membrane fuel cells with a five-constant ideal cell as prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, H.F.; Pei, P.C.; Yuan, X.; Chao, P.X.; Wang, X.Z.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Load-oriented cell lifetime endpoint definition to reveal two forms of lifetime. → Working zone representing the range of optimum operating endpoint candidates. → Ideal cell model to describe the commonness in PEM fuel cell specialties. → Ideal cell as prototype to regularize real cells. → Working zone of real cells uniformly characterized with five cell constants. - Abstract: This paper is to outline the working zone (the correlative assembly of all the practical steady-state operating points under all affordable constant power loads) of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells in united form. For this purpose, an ideal cell model is proposed to regularize the degradation behavior of real cells, and a load-oriented cell lifetime endpoint definition is made to reveal two forms of cell lifetime. As derived, the working zone of any cell is an enclosed region by three boundaries: one part of the initial steady-state polarization (SSP) curve, the lifetime end-curve and the zero current density line; and the ideal cell has three distinct shapes of working zone of the simplest expressions of lifetime end-curve. Practical data well support the ideal cell as a good prototype for the regularization, and thus the working zone of real cells can be approximately but uniformly and concisely outlined, with the boundaries characterized with five cell constants including two initial SSP constants, two degradation constants and the absolute lifetime.

  19. Structural and chemical degradation mechanisms of pure YSZ and its components ZrO2 and Y2O3 in carbon-rich fuel gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köck, Eva-Maria; Kogler, Michaela; Götsch, Thomas; Klötzer, Bernhard; Penner, Simon

    2016-05-25

    Structural and chemical degradation mechanisms of metal-free yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ-8, 8 mol% Y2O3 in ZrO2) in comparison to its pure oxidic components ZrO2 and Y2O3 have been studied in carbon-rich fuel gases with respect to coking/graphitization and (oxy)carbide formation. By combining operando electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), operando Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), the removal and suppression of CH4- and CO-induced carbon deposits and of those generated in more realistic fuel gas mixtures (syngas, mixtures of CH4 or CO with CO2 and H2O) was examined under SOFC-relevant conditions up to 1273 K and ambient pressures. Surface-near carbidization is a major problem already on the "isolated" (i.e. Nickel-free) cermet components, leading to irreversible changes of the conduction properties. Graphitic carbon deposition takes place already on the "isolated" oxides under sufficiently fuel-rich conditions, most pronounced in the pure gases CH4 and CO, but also significantly in fuel gas mixtures containing H2O and CO2. For YSZ, a comparative quantification of the total amount of deposited carbon in all gases and mixtures is provided and thus yields favorable and detrimental experimental approaches to suppress the carbon formation. In addition, the effectivity and reversibility of removal of the coke/graphite layers was comparably studied in the pure oxidants O2, CO2 and H2O and their effective contribution upon addition to the pure fuel gases CO and CH4 verified.

  20. The coupled kinetics of grain growth and fission product behavior in nuclear fuel under degraded-core accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rest, J.

    1985-01-01

    The theoretical FASTGRASS-VFP model has been used in the interpretation of fission gas, iodine, and cesium release from (1) irradiated high-burnup LWR fuel in a flowing steam atmosphere during high-temperature, in-cell heating tests (performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory) and (2) trace-irratiated LWR fuel during severe-fuel-damage (SFD) tests (performed in the PBF reactor in Idaho). A theory of grain boundary sweeping of gas bubbles has been included within the FASTGRASS-VFP formalism. This theory considers the interaction between the moving grain boundary and two distinct size classes of bubbles, those on grain faces and on grain edges, and provides a means of determining whether gas bubbles are caught up and moved along by a moving grain boundary or whether the grain boundary is only temporarily retarded by the bubbles and then breaks away. In addition, as FASTGRASS-VFP provides for a mechanistic calculation of intra- and intergranular fission product behavior, the coupled calculation between fission gas behavior and grain growth is kinetically comprehensive. Results of the analyses demonstrate that intragranular fission product behavior during both types of tests can be interpreted in terms of a grain-growth/grain-boundary-sweeping mechanism that enhances the flow of fission products from within the grains to the grain boundaries. The effect of fuel oxidation by steam on fission product and grain growth behavior is also considered. The FASTGRASS-VFP predictions, measured release rates from the above tests, and previously published release rates are compared and differences between fission product behavior in trace-irradiated and in high-burnup fuel are highlighted. (orig.)

  1. Preliminary calculations of stress change of fuel pin using SiC/SiC composites for GFR with changing of thermal conductivity degradation by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. K.; Naganuma, M.

    2006-01-01

    Gas cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) is being researched as a candidate concept of Generation IV international Forum. As a main feature of GFR, it should be maintained high temperature and pressure of coolant gas for heat transfer efficiency. Such a demanding environment requires high-temperature-resistant structural materials distinguished from traditional steel material. Consequently, ceramics are promising candidate material of core components. Especially, Silicon Carbide fiber reinforced Silicon Carbide composites (SiC/SiC) have encouraging characteristics such as refractoriness, low activation and toughness. Application of new material to core components must be explained by the viewpoint of engineering validity. Therefore, present study surveyed that current report for mechanical strength and thermal conductivity of SiC/SiC composites. According to the reports, neutron irradiation environment degraded mechanical properties of SiC/SiC composites. To confirm applicability to core components, model of fuel pin using SiC/SiC composites was assumed with feasible mechanical properties. Furthermore, it was calculated and estimated that the stress caused by temperature variation of inner and outer side of assumed model of cladding tube. Stress was calculated by changing of input date such as thickness of cladding tube, temperature variation, thermal conductivity and linear power. In the range of this study, the most important factor was identified as degradation of thermal conductivity by irradiation. It caused a significant stress and limited a geometrical design of fuel pin. It was discussed that the differences of heat transfer between isotropic and anisotropic materials like a metal and composites. These results should be helpful not only to determine a design factor of core component but also to indicate an improvement direction of SiC/SiC composites. Through these work, reliability and safety of GFR will be increased

  2. Multiscale Transient and Steady-State Study of the Influence of Microstructure Degradation and Chromium Oxide Poisoning on Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathode Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guanchen; von Spakovsky, Michael R.; Shen, Fengyu; Lu, Kathy

    2018-01-01

    Oxygen reduction in a solid oxide fuel cell cathode involves a nonequilibrium process of coupled mass and heat diffusion and electrochemical and chemical reactions. These phenomena occur at multiple temporal and spatial scales, making the modeling, especially in the transient regime, very difficult. Nonetheless, multiscale models are needed to improve the understanding of oxygen reduction and guide cathode design. Of particular importance for long-term operation are microstructure degradation and chromium oxide poisoning both of which degrade cathode performance. Existing methods are phenomenological or empirical in nature and their application limited to the continuum realm with quantum effects not captured. In contrast, steepest-entropy-ascent quantum thermodynamics can be used to model nonequilibrium processes (even those far-from equilibrium) at all scales. The nonequilibrium relaxation is characterized by entropy generation, which can unify coupled phenomena into one framework to model transient and steady behavior. The results reveal the effects on performance of the different timescales of the varied phenomena involved and their coupling. Results are included here for the effects of chromium oxide concentrations on cathode output as is a parametric study of the effects of interconnect-three-phase-boundary length, oxygen mean free path, and adsorption site effectiveness. A qualitative comparison with experimental results is made.

  3. Evaluation of Conditions for Hydrogen Induced Degradation of Zirconium Alloys during Fuel Operation and Storage. Final Report of a Coordinated Research Project 2011-2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-12-01

    This publication reports on the work carried out in 2011–2015 in the coordinated research project (CRP) on the evaluation of conditions for hydrogen induced degradation of zirconium alloys during fuel operation and storage. The CRP was carried out to evaluate the threshold condition for delayed hydride cracking (KIH) in pressurized water reactors and zircaloy-4 and E635M fuel claddings, with application to in-pile operation and spent fuel storage. The project consisted of adding hydrogen to samples of cladding and measuring K IH by one of four methods. The CRP was the third in the series, of which the results of the first two were published in IAEA-TECDOC-1410 and IAEA-TECDOC-1649, in 2004 and 2010, respectively. This publication includes all of the research work performed in the framework of the CRP, including details of the experimental procedures that led to a set of data for tested materials. The research was conducted by representatives from 13 laboratories from all over the world. In addition to the basic goal to transfer the technology of the testing techniques from experienced laboratories to those unfamiliar with the methods, the CRP was set up to develop experimental procedures to produce consistent sets of data, both within a single laboratory and among different laboratories. The material condition and temperature history were prescribed, and laboratories chose one or two of four methods of loading that were recommended in an attempt to develop standard sets of experimental protocols so that consistent results could be obtained. Experimental discrepancies were minimized through careful attention to details of microstructure, temperature history and stress state in the samples, with the main variation being the mode of loading

  4. On possibility of degradation of lava-like fuel-containing materials of the 4-th block of Chernobyl NPP under internal self-irradiation by alpha-particle sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pazukhin, Eh. M.; Borovoj, A.A.; Rudya, K.G.

    2002-01-01

    It is shown that internal self-irradiation by alpha-particle beam cannot be a cause of change of strength characteristics of silicate matrix and so a cause of degradation of Chernobyl lava-like materials. A new method is proposed for management with lava-like fuel-containing materials of the 4-th block: vitrification in smelter unit situated in bubbler-basin and storage of prepared immobilized compacts in corresponding depositories [ru

  5. PWR degraded core analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gittus, J.H.

    1982-04-01

    A review is presented of the various phenomena involved in degraded core accidents and the ensuing transport of fission products from the fuel to the primary circuit and the containment. The dominant accident sequences found in the PWR risk studies published to date are briefly described. Then chapters deal with the following topics: the condition and behaviour of water reactor fuel during normal operation and at the commencement of degraded core accidents; the generation of hydrogen from the Zircaloy-steam and the steel-steam reactions; the way in which the core deforms and finally melts following loss of coolant; debris relocation analysis; containment integrity; fission product behaviour during a degraded core accident. (U.K.)

  6. Durability Improvements Through Degradation Mechanism Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borup, Rodney L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Spernjak, Dusan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Baker, Andrew M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lujan, Roger W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Langlois, David Alan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ahluwalia, Rajesh [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Papadia, D. D. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Weber, Adam Z. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Kusoglu, Ahmet [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Shi, Shouwnen [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); More, K. L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Grot, Steve [Ion Power, New Castle, DE (United States)

    2015-08-03

    The durability of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells is a major barrier to the commercialization of these systems for stationary and transportation power applications. By investigating cell component degradation modes and defining the fundamental degradation mechanisms of components and component interactions, new materials can be designed to improve durability. To achieve a deeper understanding of PEM fuel cell durability and component degradation mechanisms, we utilize a multi-institutional and multi-disciplinary team with significant experience investigating these phenomena.

  7. TALSPEAK Solvent Degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leigh R. Martin; Bruce J. Mincher

    2009-09-01

    Understanding the radiolytic degradation behavior of organic molecules involved in new or existing schemes for the recycle of used nuclear fuels is of significant interest for sustaining a closed nuclear fuel cycle. Here we have conducted several lines of investigation to begin understanding the effects of radiolysis on the aqueous phase of the TALSPEAK process for the separation of the trivalent lanthanides from the trivalent actinides. Using the 60-Co irradiator at the INL, we have begun to quantify the effects of radiation on the aqueous phase complexants used in this separation technique, and how this will affect the actinide lanthanide separation factor. In addition we have started to develop methodologies for stable product identification, a key element in determining the degradation pathways. We have also introduced a methodology to investigate the effects of alpha radiolysis that has previously received limited attention.

  8. Household fuel consumption and resource use in rural-urban Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gebreegziabher, Z.

    2007-01-01

    Keywords: biofuels; land degradation; technology adoption; fuel-savings efficiency; stove R&D; household and community tree investments; fuelwood availability; animal dung; biogas; urban fuel demand; rural hinterlands; northern Ethiopia. Fuel scarcity and land degradation are intertwined

  9. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) degradation by laccase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-11-02

    Nov 2, 2009 ... Full Length Research Paper. Polycyclic aromatic ... production of paper, feeds, chemicals and fuels there is ... microbes with the production of lignin-modifying enzymes ... enable white rot fungi to degrade a variety of toxic.

  10. Photocatalytic degradation of H2S aqueous media using sulfide nanostructured solid-solution solar-energy-materials to produce hydrogen fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lashgari, Mohsen; Ghanimati, Majid

    2018-03-05

    H 2 S is a corrosive, flammable and noxious gas, which can be neutralized by dissolving in alkaline media and employed as H 2 -source by utilizing inside semiconductor-assisted/photochemical reactors. Herein, through a facile hydrothermal route, a ternary nanostructured solid-solution of iron, zinc and sulfur was synthesized in the absence and presence of Ag-dopant, and applied as efficient photocatalyst of hydrogen fuel production from H 2 S media. The effect of pH on the photocatalyst performance was scrutinized and the maximum activity was attained at pH=11, where HS - concentration is high. BET, diffuse reflectance and photoluminescence studies indicated that the ternary solid-solution photocatalyst, in comparison to its solid-solvent (ZnS), has a greater surface area, stronger photon absorption and less charge recombination, which justify its superiority. Moreover, the effect of silver-dopant on the photocatalyst performance was examined. The investigations revealed that although silver could boost the absorption of photons and increase the surface area, it could not appreciably enhance the photocatalyst performance due to its weak influence on retarding the charge-recombination process. Finally, the phenomenon was discussed in detail from mechanistic viewpoint. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Future automotive fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepik, M.

    1993-01-01

    There are several important factors which are fundamental to the choice of alternative automobile fuels: the chain of energetic efficiency of fuels; costs; environmental friendliness; suitability for usual engines or adapting easiness; existing reserves of crude oil, natural gas or the fossil energy sources; and, alternatively, agricultural potentiality. This paper covers all these factors. The fuels dealt with in this paper are alcohol, vegetable oil, gaseous fuel, hydrogen and ammonia fuels. Renewable fuels are the most valuable forms of renewable energy. In addition to that rank, they can contribute to three other problem areas: agricultural surpluses, environmental degradation, and conservation of natural resources. Due to the competitive utilization of biomass for food energy production, bio-fuels should mainly be produced in those countries where an energy shortage is combined with a food surplus. The fuels arousing the most interest are alcohol and vegetable oil, the latter for diesel engines, even in northern countries. (au)

  12. Evaluation of Pt/C catalyst degradation and H2O2 formation changes under simulated PEM fuel cell condition by a rotating ring-disk electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Kenshiro; Yasuda, Yuki; Sekizawa, Koshi; Takeuchi, Norimitsu; Yoshida, Toshihiko; Sudoh, Masao

    2013-01-01

    Potential cycling tests using 42.2 wt% and 19.1 wt% Pt/C catalysts were conducted by the RRDE technique to evaluate the changes in the electrochemical surface area (ECSA) and H 2 O 2 formation ability of the catalysts. As the typical operating conditions of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC), square wave potential cycling (0.7–0.9 V) was applied to the catalysts for 150,000 cycles in an O 2 -saturated 0.1 M HClO 4 electrolyte. During the potential cycling test, electrochemical measurements were carried out to characterize the ECSA, oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity and H 2 O 2 formation. After 150,000 potential cyclings, while the ECSA of the 42.2 wt% Pt/C dropped by 35%, the ECSA loss for the 19.1 wt% Pt/C was 55%. This result implies that the Pt content in the cathode catalyst affects the ECSA loss during the long-term PEMFC operation. Additionally, the H 2 O 2 formation ratio obviously increased with the potential cycling only in the case of the 19.1 wt% Pt/C. In order to verify the H 2 O 2 formation dependence on the ECSA, four types of catalysts, which included different Pt loading amounts (42.2, 28.1, 19.1 and 9.5 wt% Pt/C), were evaluated, and these results explained the relationship between the ECSA decay and H 2 O 2 formation increase in the durability tests

  13. DSNF AND OTHER WASTE FORM DEGRADATION ABSTRACTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CUNNANE, J.

    2004-01-01

    Several hundred distinct types of DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel (DSNF) may potentially be disposed in the Yucca Mountain repository. These fuel types represent many more types than can be viably individually examined for their effect on the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA). Additionally, for most of these fuel types, there is no known direct experimental test data for the degradation and dissolution of the waste form in repository groundwaters. The approach used in the TSPA-LA model is, therefore, to assess available information on each of 11 groups of DSNF, and to identify a model that can be used in the TSPA-LA model without differentiating between individual codisposal waste packages containing different DSNF types. The purpose of this report is to examine the available data and information concerning the dissolution kinetics of DSNF matrices for the purpose of abstracting a degradation model suitable for use in describing degradation of the DSNF inventory in the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application. The data and information and associated degradation models were examined for the following types of DSNF: Group 1--Naval spent nuclear fuel; Group 2--Plutonium/uranium alloy (Fermi 1 SNF); Group 3--Plutonium/uranium carbide (Fast Flux Test Facility-Test Fuel Assembly SNF); Group 4--Mixed oxide and plutonium oxide (Fast Flux Test Facility-Demonstration Fuel Assembly/Fast Flux Test Facility-Test Demonstration Fuel Assembly SNF); Group 5--Thorium/uranium carbide (Fort St. Vrain SNF); Group 6--Thorium/uranium oxide (Shippingport light water breeder reactor SNF); Group 7--Uranium metal (N Reactor SNF); Group 8--Uranium oxide (Three Mile Island-2 core debris); Group 9--Aluminum-based SNF (Foreign Research Reactor SNF); Group 10--Miscellaneous Fuel; and Group 11--Uranium-zirconium hydride (Training Research Isotopes-General Atomics SNF). The analyses contained in this document provide an ''upper-limit'' (i

  14. Operando and in situ X-ray spectroscopies of degradation in La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O(3-δ) thin film cathodes in fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Samson Y; Ding, Dong; Liu, Mingfei; Liu, Meilin; Alamgir, Faisal M

    2014-11-01

    Information from ex situ characterization can fall short in describing complex materials systems simultaneously exposed to multiple external stimuli. Operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was used to probe the local atomistic and electronic structure of specific elements in a La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O(3-δ) (LSCF) thin film cathode exposed to air contaminated with H2O and CO2 under operating conditions. While impedance spectroscopy showed that the polarization resistance of the LSCF cathode increased upon exposure to both contaminants at 750 °C, XAS near-edge and extended fine structure showed that the degree of oxidation for Fe and Co decreases with increasing temperature. Synchrotron-based X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy tracked the formation and removal of a carbonate species, a Co phase, and different oxygen moieties as functions of temperature and gas. The combined information provides insight into the fundamental mechanism by which H2O and CO2 cause degradation in the cathode of solid oxide fuel cells. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Experimental Study of Turbine Fuel Thermal Stability in an Aircraft Fuel System Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranos, A.; Marteney, P. J.

    1980-01-01

    The thermal stability of aircraft gas turbines fuels was investigated. The objectives were: (1) to design and build an aircraft fuel system simulator; (2) to establish criteria for quantitative assessment of fuel thermal degradation; and (3) to measure the thermal degradation of Jet A and an alternative fuel. Accordingly, an aircraft fuel system simulator was built and the coking tendencies of Jet A and a model alternative fuel (No. 2 heating oil) were measured over a range of temperatures, pressures, flows, and fuel inlet conditions.

  16. Clad Degradation - FEPs Screening Arguments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    E. Siegmann

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the screening of the cladding degradation features, events, and processes (FEPs) for commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF). This report also addresses the effect of some FEPs on both the cladding and the CSNF, DSNF, and HLW waste forms where it was considered appropriate to address the effects on both materials together. This report summarizes the work of others to screen clad degradation FEPs in a manner consistent with, and used in, the Total System Performance Assessment-License Application (TSPA-LA). This document was prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan for Waste Form Degradation Modeling, Testing, and Analyses in Support of LA'' (BSC 2004a [DIRS 167796])

  17. Fuel utilization in a progressive conversion reactor (PCR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leyse, C.F.; Judd, J.L.

    1981-05-01

    Preliminary studies indicate that for once-through fuel cycles, the PCR offers potential improvements over current LWRs in the following major areas: improved uranium utilization (reduced uranium demand), degraded plutonium product in spent fuel, reduced plutonium content of spent fuel, reduced amount of spent fuel, reduced fissile content of spent fuel, and reduced separative work

  18. Fuel Exhaling Fuel Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoor Bhat, Zahid; Thimmappa, Ravikumar; Devendrachari, Mruthyunjayachari Chattanahalli; Kottaichamy, Alagar Raja; Shafi, Shahid Pottachola; Varhade, Swapnil; Gautam, Manu; Thotiyl, Musthafa Ottakam

    2018-01-18

    State-of-the-art proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) anodically inhale H 2 fuel and cathodically expel water molecules. We show an unprecedented fuel cell concept exhibiting cathodic fuel exhalation capability of anodically inhaled fuel, driven by the neutralization energy on decoupling the direct acid-base chemistry. The fuel exhaling fuel cell delivered a peak power density of 70 mW/cm 2 at a peak current density of 160 mA/cm 2 with a cathodic H 2 output of ∼80 mL in 1 h. We illustrate that the energy benefits from the same fuel stream can at least be doubled by directing it through proposed neutralization electrochemical cell prior to PEMFC in a tandem configuration.

  19. Spent fuel characterization for the commercial waste and spent fuel packaging program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fish, R.L.; Davis, R.B.; Pasupathi, V.; Klingensmith, R.W.

    1980-03-01

    This document presents the rationale for spent fuel characterization and provides a detailed description of the characterization examinations. Pretest characterization examinations provide quantitative and qualitative descriptions of spent fuel assemblies and rods in their irradiated conditions prior to disposal testing. This information is essential in evaluating any subsequent changes that occur during disposal demonstration and laboratory tests. Interim examinations and post-test characterization will be used to identify fuel rod degradation mechanisms and quantify degradation kinetics. The nature and behavior of the spent fuel degradation will be defined in terms of mathematical rate equations from these and laboratory tests and incorporated into a spent fuel performance prediction model. Thus, spent fuel characterization is an essential activity in the development of a performance model to be used in evaluating the ability of spent fuel to meet specific waste acceptance criteria and in evaluating incentives for modification of the spent fuel assemblies for long-term disposal purposes

  20. Stimulated-healing of proton exchange membrane fuel cell catalyst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Latsuzbaia, R.; Negro, E.; Koper, G.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Platinum nanoparticles, which are used as catalysts in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFC), tend to degrade after long-term operation. We discriminate the following mechanisms of the degradation: poisoning, migration and coalescence, dissolution, and electrochemical Ostwald ripening. There

  1. Clad Degradation- Summary and Abstraction for LA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D. Stahl

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this model report is to develop the summary cladding degradation abstraction that will be used in the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA). Most civilian commercial nuclear fuel is encased in Zircaloy cladding. The model addressed in this report is intended to describe the postulated condition of commercial Zircaloy-clad fuel as a function of postclosure time after it is placed in the repository. Earlier total system performance assessments analyzed the waste form as exposed UO 2 , which was available for degradation at the intrinsic dissolution rate. Water in the waste package quickly became saturated with many of the radionuclides, limiting their release rate. In the total system performance assessments for the Viability Assessment and the Site Recommendation, cladding was analyzed as part of the waste form, limiting the amount of fuel available at any time for degradation. The current model is divided into two stages. The first considers predisposal rod failures (most of which occur during reactor operation and associated activities) and postdisposal mechanical failure (from static loading of rocks) as mechanisms for perforating the cladding. Other fuel failure mechanisms including those caused by handling or transportation have been screened out (excluded) or are treated elsewhere. All stainless-steel-clad fuel, which makes up a small percentage of the overall amount of fuel to be stored, is modeled as failed upon placement in the waste packages. The second stage of the degradation model is the splitting of the cladding from the reaction of water or moist air and UO 2 . The splitting has been observed to be rapid in comparison to the total system performance assessment time steps and is modeled to be instantaneous. After the cladding splits, the rind buildup inside the cladding widens the split, increasing the diffusion area from the fuel rind to the waste package interior. This model report summarizes the

  2. DSNF AND OTHER WASTE FORM DEGRADATION ABSTRACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. CUNNANE

    2004-11-19

    Several hundred distinct types of DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel (DSNF) may potentially be disposed in the Yucca Mountain repository. These fuel types represent many more types than can be viably individually examined for their effect on the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA). Additionally, for most of these fuel types, there is no known direct experimental test data for the degradation and dissolution of the waste form in repository groundwaters. The approach used in the TSPA-LA model is, therefore, to assess available information on each of 11 groups of DSNF, and to identify a model that can be used in the TSPA-LA model without differentiating between individual codisposal waste packages containing different DSNF types. The purpose of this report is to examine the available data and information concerning the dissolution kinetics of DSNF matrices for the purpose of abstracting a degradation model suitable for use in describing degradation of the DSNF inventory in the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application. The data and information and associated degradation models were examined for the following types of DSNF: Group 1--Naval spent nuclear fuel; Group 2--Plutonium/uranium alloy (Fermi 1 SNF); Group 3--Plutonium/uranium carbide (Fast Flux Test Facility-Test Fuel Assembly SNF); Group 4--Mixed oxide and plutonium oxide (Fast Flux Test Facility-Demonstration Fuel Assembly/Fast Flux Test Facility-Test Demonstration Fuel Assembly SNF); Group 5--Thorium/uranium carbide (Fort St. Vrain SNF); Group 6--Thorium/uranium oxide (Shippingport light water breeder reactor SNF); Group 7--Uranium metal (N Reactor SNF); Group 8--Uranium oxide (Three Mile Island-2 core debris); Group 9--Aluminum-based SNF (Foreign Research Reactor SNF); Group 10--Miscellaneous Fuel; and Group 11--Uranium-zirconium hydride (Training Research Isotopes-General Atomics SNF). The analyses contained in this document provide an &apos

  3. Proceedings of the 6. international conference on stability and handling of liquid fuels. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giles, H.N. [ed.] [Deputy Assistant Secretary for Strategic Petroleum Reserve, Washington, DC (United States). Operations and Readiness Office

    1998-12-01

    Volume 1 of these proceedings contain 29 papers related to aviation fuels and long term and strategic storage. Studies investigated fuel contamination, separation processes, measurement techniques, thermal stability, compatibility with fuel system materials, oxidation reactions, and degradation during storage.

  4. Fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukai, Hideyuki

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent bending of fuel rods caused by the difference of irradiation growth between coupling fuel rods and standards fuel rods thereby maintain the fuel rod integrity. Constitution: The f value for a fuel can (the ratio of pole of zirconium crystals in the entire crystals along the axial direction of the fuel can) of a coupling fuel rod secured by upper and lower tie plates is made smaller than the f value for the fuel can of a standard fuel rod not secured by the upper and the lower tie plates. This can make the irradiation growth of the fuel can of the coupling fuel rod greater than the irradiation growth of the fuel can of the standard fuel rod and, accordingly, since the elongation of the standard fuel rod can always by made greater, bending of the standard fuel rod can be prevented. (Yoshihara, M.)

  5. Low temperature chemical processing of graphite-clad nuclear fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Robert A.

    2017-10-17

    A reduced-temperature method for treatment of a fuel element is described. The method includes molten salt treatment of a fuel element with a nitrate salt. The nitrate salt can oxidize the outer graphite matrix of a fuel element. The method can also include reduced temperature degradation of the carbide layer of a fuel element and low temperature solubilization of the fuel in a kernel of a fuel element.

  6. HYDRIDE-RELATED DEGRADATION OF SNF CLADDING UNDER REPOSITORY CONDITIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCoy, K.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose and scope of this analysis/model report is to analyze the degradation of commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) cladding under repository conditions by the hydride-related metallurgical processes, such as delayed hydride cracking (DHC), hydride reorientation and hydrogen embrittlement, thereby providing a better understanding of the degradation process and clarifying which aspects of the process are known and which need further evaluation and investigation. The intended use is as an input to a more general analysis of cladding degradation

  7. Synthesis and characterization of partially fluorinated poly(acryl) ionomers for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells and ESR-spectroscopic investigation of the radically induced degradation of model compounds; Synthese und Charakterisierung teilfluorierter Poly(acryl)-Ionomere als Polymerelektrolytmembranen fuer Brennstoffzellen und ESR-spektroskopische Untersuchung der radikalinduzierten Degradation von Modellverbindungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenberger, Frank

    2008-07-09

    In the first part of this work different strategies for the design of sulfonated partially fluorinated poly(aryl)s are developed and synthetically realized. The applied concept is that partially fluorinated poly(aryl)s are distinguished from the nonfluorinated ones by an enhanced acidity. Moreover they possess higher bond dissociation energies of both the C-F bonds and any adjacent C-H bonds which should be associated with a gain in radical stability and thus in chemical and thermal stability. In order to investigate the influence of the chemical structure of (partially fluorinated) monomeric building blocks, homo-polymers with different structural units (with aromatic C-F bonds, C(CF3)2-bridged and/or CF3-substituted phenylene rings) are synthesized by polycondensation and structurally characterized (elemental analysis, NMR spectroscopy, gel permeation chromatography). Established organic reactions, such as the Balz-Schiemann reaction, Suzuki reaction and Ullmann's biaryl synthesis, are applied for the synthesis of the specific monomers. After sulfonation of the homo-polymers (ionically crosslinked) membranes are prepared and characterized in terms of suitability as polymer electrolyte membrane in fuel cells (ion-exchange capacity, proton conductivity, thermal and chemical stability, water uptake, dimensional change). Both the chemical nature of the monomers and their constitution in the ionomer are important for the properties of the resulting membranes. Therefore microphase-separated multiblock-co-ionomers based on hydrophilic (sulfonated) and hydrophobic (partially fluorinated) telechelic macromonomers are prepared and characterized. Both the influence of the block length and the chemical nature of the used monomers on the membrane properties are comparatively investigated. On the basis of the findings gained in this part of the work, the advantages and disadvantages of partially fluorinated ionomer membranes are analyzed and discussed. The second part of

  8. High density fuels using dispersion and monolithic fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Daniel S.; Silva, Antonio T.; Abe, Alfredo Y.; Muniz, Rafael O.R.; Giovedi, Claudia; Universidade de São Paulo

    2017-01-01

    Fuel plates used in high-performance research reactors need to be converted to low-enrichment uranium fuel; the fuel option based on a monolithic formulation requires alloys to contain 6 - 10 wt% Mo. In this case, the fuel plates are composed of the metallic alloy U-10Mo surrounded by a thin zirconium layer encapsulated in aluminum cladding. This study reviewed the physical properties of monolithic forms. The constraints produced during the manufacturing process were analyzed and compared to those of dispersed fuel. The bonding process used for dispersion fuels differs from the techniques applied to foil bonding used for pure alloys. The quality of monolithic plates depends on the fabrication method, which usually involves hot isostatic pressing and the thermal annealing effect of residual stress, which degrades the uranium cubic phase. The preservation of the metastable phase has considerable influence on fuel performance. The physical properties of the foil fuel under irradiation are superior to those of aluminum-dispersed fuels. The fuel meat, using zirconium as the diffusion barrier, prevents the interaction layer from becoming excessively thick. The problem with dispersed fuel is breakaway swelling with a medium fission rate. It has been observed that the fuel dispersed in aluminum was minimized in monolithic forms. The pure alloys exhibited a suitable response from a rate at least twice as much as the fission rate of dispersions. The foils can support fissile material concentration combined with a reduced swelling rate. (author)

  9. High density fuels using dispersion and monolithic fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Daniel S.; Silva, Antonio T.; Abe, Alfredo Y.; Muniz, Rafael O.R.; Giovedi, Claudia, E-mail: dsgomes@ipen.br, E-mail: teixeira@ipen.br, E-mail: alfredo@ctmsp.mar.mil.br, E-mail: rafael.orm@gmail.com, E-mail: claudia.giovedi@ctmsp.mar.mil.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Universidade de São Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Naval e Oceânica

    2017-07-01

    Fuel plates used in high-performance research reactors need to be converted to low-enrichment uranium fuel; the fuel option based on a monolithic formulation requires alloys to contain 6 - 10 wt% Mo. In this case, the fuel plates are composed of the metallic alloy U-10Mo surrounded by a thin zirconium layer encapsulated in aluminum cladding. This study reviewed the physical properties of monolithic forms. The constraints produced during the manufacturing process were analyzed and compared to those of dispersed fuel. The bonding process used for dispersion fuels differs from the techniques applied to foil bonding used for pure alloys. The quality of monolithic plates depends on the fabrication method, which usually involves hot isostatic pressing and the thermal annealing effect of residual stress, which degrades the uranium cubic phase. The preservation of the metastable phase has considerable influence on fuel performance. The physical properties of the foil fuel under irradiation are superior to those of aluminum-dispersed fuels. The fuel meat, using zirconium as the diffusion barrier, prevents the interaction layer from becoming excessively thick. The problem with dispersed fuel is breakaway swelling with a medium fission rate. It has been observed that the fuel dispersed in aluminum was minimized in monolithic forms. The pure alloys exhibited a suitable response from a rate at least twice as much as the fission rate of dispersions. The foils can support fissile material concentration combined with a reduced swelling rate. (author)

  10. Advanced thermally stable jet fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schobert, H.H.

    1999-01-31

    The Pennsylvania State University program in advanced thermally stable coal-based jet fuels has five broad objectives: (1) Development of mechanisms of degradation and solids formation; (2) Quantitative measurement of growth of sub-micrometer and micrometer-sized particles suspended in fuels during thermal stressing; (3) Characterization of carbonaceous deposits by various instrumental and microscopic methods; (4) Elucidation of the role of additives in retarding the formation of carbonaceous solids; (5) Assessment of the potential of production of high yields of cycloalkanes by direct liquefaction of coal. Future high-Mach aircraft will place severe thermal demands on jet fuels, requiring the development of novel, hybrid fuel mixtures capable of withstanding temperatures in the range of 400--500 C. In the new aircraft, jet fuel will serve as both an energy source and a heat sink for cooling the airframe, engine, and system components. The ultimate development of such advanced fuels requires a thorough understanding of the thermal decomposition behavior of jet fuels under supercritical conditions. Considering that jet fuels consist of hundreds of compounds, this task must begin with a study of the thermal degradation behavior of select model compounds under supercritical conditions. The research performed by The Pennsylvania State University was focused on five major tasks that reflect the objectives stated above: Task 1: Investigation of the Quantitative Degradation of Fuels; Task 2: Investigation of Incipient Deposition; Task 3: Characterization of Solid Gums, Sediments, and Carbonaceous Deposits; Task 4: Coal-Based Fuel Stabilization Studies; and Task 5: Exploratory Studies on the Direct Conversion of Coal to High Quality Jet Fuels. The major findings of each of these tasks are presented in this executive summary. A description of the sub-tasks performed under each of these tasks and the findings of those studies are provided in the remainder of this volume

  11. Charcoal production and environmental degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosier, R.H.

    1993-01-01

    This paper examines the environmental impacts of continued tree harvesting for charcoal production to supply the urban areas in Tanzania. Woodlands appear to recover relatively well following harvesting for charcoal production. Selective harvesting, where the high quality, low cost fuel production species and specimens are culled first from a piece of land, serves to maintain the viability of the woodlands resource while providing charcoal. This recovery period can be prolonged through any number of human induced activities, such as heavy grazing, multiple burns and extended cultivation periods. At the same time, post-harvest management techniques, such as coppice management, sprout protection and fertilization, can also improve the ability of woodlands to recover following harvesting. The environmental history of a given area determines why certain areas continue to be strong suppliers of woodfuel while others are not. For example, Shinyanga started from a low productivity base and has been degraded by successive waves of tree harvesting compounded by heavy grazing pressure. It is this multiple complex of pressures over a long period of time on land which is intrinsically of low productivity, and not the harvesting of woodlands for fuels, which has led to the environmental degradation in these areas. (author)

  12. Alternative Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alternative fuels include gaseous fuels such as hydrogen, natural gas, and propane; alcohols such as ethanol, methanol, and butanol; vegetable and waste-derived oils; and electricity. Overview of alternative fuels is here.

  13. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaki, Masao; Nishida, Koji; Karasawa, Hidetoshi; Kanazawa, Toru; Orii, Akihito; Nagayoshi, Takuji; Kashiwai, Shin-ichi; Masuhara, Yasuhiro

    1998-01-01

    The present invention concerns a fuel assembly, for a BWR type nuclear reactor, comprising fuel rods in 9 x 9 matrix. The inner width of the channel box is about 132mm and the length of the fuel rods which are not short fuel rods is about 4m. Two water rods having a circular cross section are arranged on a diagonal line in a portion of 3 x 3 matrix at the center of the fuel assembly, and two fuel rods are disposed at vacant spaces, and the number of fuel rods is 74. Eight fuel rods are determined as short fuel rods among 74 fuel rods. Assuming the fuel inventory in the short fuel rod as X(kg), and the fuel inventory in the fuel rods other than the short fuel rods as Y(kg), X and Y satisfy the relation: X + Y ≥ 173m, Y ≤ - 9.7X + 292, Y ≤ - 0.3X + 203 and X > 0. Then, even when the short fuel rods are used, the fuel inventory is increased and fuel economy can be improved. (I.N.)

  14. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Hajime.

    1995-01-01

    In a fuel assembly having fuel rods of different length, fuel pellets of mixed oxides of uranium and plutonium are loaded to a short fuel rod. The volume ratio of a pellet-loaded portion to a plenum portion of the short fuel rod is made greater than the volume ratio of a fuel rod to which uranium fuel pellets are loaded. In addition, the volume of the plenum portion of the short fuel rod is set greater depending on the plutonium content in the loaded fuel pellets. MOX fuel pellets are loaded on the short fuel rods having a greater degree of freedom relevant to the setting for the volume of the plenum portion compared with that of a long rod fuel, and the volume of the plenum portion is ensured greater depending on the plutonium content. Even if a large amount of FP gas and He gas are discharged from the MOX fuels compared with that from the uranium fuels, the internal pressure of the MOX fuel rod during operation is maintained substantially identical with that of the uranium fuel rod, so that a risk of generating excess stresses applied to the fuel cladding tubes and rupture of fuels are greatly reduced. (N.H.)

  15. CSNF WASTE FORM DEGRADATION: SUMMARY ABSTRACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.C. CUNNANE

    2004-08-31

    The purpose of this model report is to describe the development and validation of models that can be used to calculate the release of radionuclides from commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) following a hypothetical breach of the waste package and fuel cladding in the repository. The purpose also includes describing the uncertainties associated with modeling the radionuclide release for the range of CSNF types, exposure conditions, and durations for which the radionuclide release models are to be applied. This document was developed in accordance with Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169944]). This document considers radionuclides to be released from CSNF when they are available for mobilization by gas-phase mass transport, or by dissolution or colloid formation in water that may contact the fuel. Because other reports address limitations on the dissolved and colloidal radionuclide concentrations (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169944], Table 2-1), this report does not address processes that control the extent to which the radionuclides released from CSNF are mobilized and transported away from the fuel either in the gas phase or in the aqueous phase as dissolved and colloidal species. The scope is limited to consideration of degradation of the CSNF rods following an initial breach of the cladding. It considers features of CSNF that limit the availability of individual radionuclides for release into the gaseous or aqueous phases that may contact the fuel and the processes and events expected to degrade these CSNF features. In short, the purpose is to describe the characteristics of breached fuel rods and the degradation processes expected to influence radionuclide release.

  16. CSNF WASTE FORM DEGRADATION: SUMMARY ABSTRACTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CUNNANE, J.C.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this model report is to describe the development and validation of models that can be used to calculate the release of radionuclides from commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) following a hypothetical breach of the waste package and fuel cladding in the repository. The purpose also includes describing the uncertainties associated with modeling the radionuclide release for the range of CSNF types, exposure conditions, and durations for which the radionuclide release models are to be applied. This document was developed in accordance with Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169944]). This document considers radionuclides to be released from CSNF when they are available for mobilization by gas-phase mass transport, or by dissolution or colloid formation in water that may contact the fuel. Because other reports address limitations on the dissolved and colloidal radionuclide concentrations (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169944], Table 2-1), this report does not address processes that control the extent to which the radionuclides released from CSNF are mobilized and transported away from the fuel either in the gas phase or in the aqueous phase as dissolved and colloidal species. The scope is limited to consideration of degradation of the CSNF rods following an initial breach of the cladding. It considers features of CSNF that limit the availability of individual radionuclides for release into the gaseous or aqueous phases that may contact the fuel and the processes and events expected to degrade these CSNF features. In short, the purpose is to describe the characteristics of breached fuel rods and the degradation processes expected to influence radionuclide release

  17. Evaluation of the performance degradation at PAFC effect of catalyst degradation on electrode performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishizaki, K.; Uchida, H.; Watanabe, M. [Yamanashi Univ., Kofu (Japan)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Aiming commercialization of Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell (PAFC) power plant, many researches and developments have been contributed. Over 20000 hours operations have been demonstrated by many PAFC power plants. But there is no effective method for the estimation of lifetime of electrochemical cells without a practical long-term operation. Conducted by New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO), cooperative research projects aiming development of PAFC lifetime estimation method have started since 1995 FY in Japan. As part of this project, this work has been performed to clarify basic phenomena of the performance degradation at PAFCs jointly by Yamanashi University, Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell Technology Research Association (PAFC-TRA) and PAFC manufacturers (Toshiba Co., Mitsubishi Electric Co, Fuji Electric Co.). Among several main causes of the cell performance degradation, effects of catalyst degradation (reduction in metal surface area, dealloying, changes in catalyst support) on PAFC cathode performances are discussed in this work.

  18. Nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gangwani, Saloni; Chakrabortty, Sumita

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear fuel is a material that can be consumed to derive nuclear energy, by analogy to chemical fuel that is burned for energy. Nuclear fuels are the most dense sources of energy available. Nuclear fuel in a nuclear fuel cycle can refer to the fuel itself, or to physical objects (for example bundles composed of fuel rods) composed of the fuel material, mixed with structural, neutron moderating, or neutron reflecting materials. Long-lived radioactive waste from the back end of the fuel cycle is especially relevant when designing a complete waste management plan for SNF. When looking at long-term radioactive decay, the actinides in the SNF have a significant influence due to their characteristically long half-lives. Depending on what a nuclear reactor is fueled with, the actinide composition in the SNF will be different. The following paper will also include the uses. advancements, advantages, disadvantages, various processes and behavior of nuclear fuels

  19. Degradation of microbial polyesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokiwa, Yutaka; Calabia, Buenaventurada P

    2004-08-01

    Microbial polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs), one of the largest groups of thermoplastic polyesters are receiving much attention as biodegradable substitutes for non-degradable plastics. Poly(D-3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) is the most ubiquitous and most intensively studied PHA. Microorganisms degrading these polyesters are widely distributed in various environments. Although various PHB-degrading microorganisms and PHB depolymerases have been studied and characterized, there are still many groups of microorganisms and enzymes with varying properties awaiting various applications. Distributions of PHB-degrading microorganisms, factors affecting the biodegradability of PHB, and microbial and enzymatic degradation of PHB are discussed in this review. We also propose an application of a new isolated, thermophilic PHB-degrading microorganism, Streptomyces strain MG, for producing pure monomers of PHA and useful chemicals, including D-3-hydroxycarboxylic acids such as D-3-hydroxybutyric acid, by enzymatic degradation of PHB.

  20. Fuel and nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prunier, C.

    1998-01-01

    The nuclear fuel is studied in detail, the best choice and why in relation with the type of reactor, the properties of the fuel cans, the choice of fuel materials. An important part is granted to the fuel assembly of PWR type reactor and the performances of nuclear fuels are tackled. The different subjects for research and development are discussed and this article ends with the particular situation of mixed oxide fuels ( materials, behavior, efficiency). (N.C.)

  1. Zircaloy cladding degradation under repository conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santanam, L.; Raghavan, S.; Chin, B.A.

    1990-12-01

    Creep, a potential degradation mechanism of Zircaloy cladding after repository disposal of spent nuclear fuel, has been investigated. The deformation and fracture map methodology has been used to predict maximum allowable initial storage temperatures to achieve a thousand year life without rupture as a function of spent-fuel history. Maximum allowable temperatures are 340 degree C (613 K) for typically stressed rods (70--100 MPa) and 300 degree C (573 K) for highly stressed rods (140--160 MPa). 10 refs., 2 figs

  2. Hydrocarbon degradation, plant colonization and gene expression of alkane degradation genes by endophytic Enterobacter ludwigii strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousaf, Sohail; Afzal, Muhammad; Reichenauer, Thomas G.; Brady, Carrie L.; Sessitsch, Angela

    2011-01-01

    The genus Enterobacter comprises a range of beneficial plant-associated bacteria showing plant growth promotion. Enterobacter ludwigii belongs to the Enterobacter cloacae complex and has been reported to include human pathogens but also plant-associated strains with plant beneficial capacities. To assess the role of Enterobacter endophytes in hydrocarbon degradation, plant colonization, abundance and expression of CYP153 genes in different plant compartments, three plant species (Italian ryegrass, birdsfoot trefoil and alfalfa) were grown in sterile soil spiked with 1% diesel and inoculated with three endophytic E. ludwigii strains. Results showed that all strains were capable of hydrocarbon degradation and efficiently colonized the rhizosphere and plant interior. Two strains, ISI10-3 and BRI10-9, showed highest degradation rates of diesel fuel up to 68% and performed best in combination with Italian ryegrass and alfalfa. All strains expressed the CYP153 gene in all plant compartments, indicating an active role in degradation of diesel in association with plants. - Highlights: → E. ludwigii strains efficiently colonized plants in a non-sterile soil environment. → E. ludwigii strains efficiently expressed alkane degradation genes in plants. → E. ludwigii efficiently degraded alkane contaminations and promoted plant growth. → E. ludwigii interacted more effectively with Italian ryegrass than with other plants. → Degradation activity varied with plant and microbial genotype as well as with time. - Enterobacter ludwigii strains belonging to the E. cloacae complex are able to efficiently degrade alkanes when associated with plants and to promote plant growth.

  3. Hydrocarbon degradation, plant colonization and gene expression of alkane degradation genes by endophytic Enterobacter ludwigii strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yousaf, Sohail [AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Bioresources Unit, A-2444 Seibersdorf (Austria); Afzal, Muhammad [AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Bioresources Unit, A-2444 Seibersdorf (Austria); National Institute for Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering (NIBGE), Faisalabad (Pakistan); Reichenauer, Thomas G. [AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Environmental Resources and Technologies Unit, A-2444 Seibersdorf (Austria); Brady, Carrie L. [Forestry and Agricultural Biotechnology Institute, Department of Microbiology and Plant Pathology, University of Pretoria, Pretoria (South Africa); Sessitsch, Angela, E-mail: angela.sessitsch@ait.ac.at [AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Bioresources Unit, A-2444 Seibersdorf (Austria)

    2011-10-15

    The genus Enterobacter comprises a range of beneficial plant-associated bacteria showing plant growth promotion. Enterobacter ludwigii belongs to the Enterobacter cloacae complex and has been reported to include human pathogens but also plant-associated strains with plant beneficial capacities. To assess the role of Enterobacter endophytes in hydrocarbon degradation, plant colonization, abundance and expression of CYP153 genes in different plant compartments, three plant species (Italian ryegrass, birdsfoot trefoil and alfalfa) were grown in sterile soil spiked with 1% diesel and inoculated with three endophytic E. ludwigii strains. Results showed that all strains were capable of hydrocarbon degradation and efficiently colonized the rhizosphere and plant interior. Two strains, ISI10-3 and BRI10-9, showed highest degradation rates of diesel fuel up to 68% and performed best in combination with Italian ryegrass and alfalfa. All strains expressed the CYP153 gene in all plant compartments, indicating an active role in degradation of diesel in association with plants. - Highlights: > E. ludwigii strains efficiently colonized plants in a non-sterile soil environment. > E. ludwigii strains efficiently expressed alkane degradation genes in plants. > E. ludwigii efficiently degraded alkane contaminations and promoted plant growth. > E. ludwigii interacted more effectively with Italian ryegrass than with other plants. > Degradation activity varied with plant and microbial genotype as well as with time. - Enterobacter ludwigii strains belonging to the E. cloacae complex are able to efficiently degrade alkanes when associated with plants and to promote plant growth.

  4. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakuyama, Tadashi; Mukai, Hideyuki.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent the bending of a fuel rod caused by the difference in the elongation between a joined fuel rod and a standard fuel rod thereby maintain the fuel rod integrity. Constitution: A joined fuel rod is in a thread engagement at its lower end plug thereof with a lower plate, while passed through at its upper end plug into an upper tie plate and secured with a nut. Further, a standard fuel rod is engaged at its upper end plug and lower end plug with the upper tie plate and the lower tie plate respectively. Expansion springs are mounted to the upper end plugs of these bonded fuel rods and the standard fuel rods for preventing this lifting. Each of the fuel rods comprises a plurality of sintered pellets of nuclear fuel materials laminated in a zircaloy fuel can. The content of the alloy ingredient in the fuel can of the bonded fuel rod is made greater than that of the alloy ingredient of the standard fuel rod. this can increase the elongation for the bonded fuel rod, and the spring of the standard fuel rod is tightly bonded to prevent the bending. (Yoshino, Y.)

  5. Fuel processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allardice, R.H.

    1990-01-01

    The technical and economic viability of the fast breeder reactor as an electricity generating system depends not only upon the reactor performance but also on a capability to recycle plutonium efficiently, reliably and economically through the reactor and fuel cycle facilities. Thus the fuel cycle is an integral and essential part of the system. Fuel cycle research and development has focused on demonstrating that the challenging technical requirements of processing plutonium fuel could be met and that the sometimes conflicting requirements of the fuel developer, fuel fabricator and fuel reprocessor could be reconciled. Pilot plant operation and development and design studies have established both the technical and economic feasibility of the fuel cycle but scope for further improvement exists through process intensification and flowsheet optimization. These objectives and the increasing processing demands made by the continuing improvement to fuel design and irradiation performance provide an incentive for continuing fuel cycle development work. (author)

  6. Application of steric exclusion chromatography for the separation of degradation products of the solvent used for the reprocessing of the nuclear fuels; Application de la chromatographie d`exclusion sterique a la separation de produits de degradation du solvant du retraitement des combustibles nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pozo, C.

    1993-08-01

    The solvent, used in France in Purex reprocessing plants at La Hague is tributylphosphate (TBP) diluted to 30% with a mixture of branched alkanes, for which the main component is branched dodecane (70%). In order to minimize volumes of organic wastes, we have to maintain Purex solvent qualities and to get rid of degradation products. The subject of this memoir concerns among all the degradation products the heaviest molecules. The separation and the identification of these products have been carried out by preparative steric exclusion chromatography, followed by the analysis of the samples by various analytical methods. An inactive residue containing heavy degradation products was prepared according to the process used in the UP3 La Hague plant. The Analysis of this residue using steric exclusion chromatography and GPC/MS methods, shows the presence of three families of compounds heavier than TBP: the ``dimers of TBP`` (provided from the addition of two molecules of TBP), the ``TBP-alkanes`` (the main molecule is the result of the addition of dodecane with TBP), and ``the functionalized TBP`` (hydroxyled TBP, nitrous TBP, nitrated TBP). Plutonium (IV) retention tests were made on the various fractions generated by steric chromatography. They showed that ``the dimers of TBP`` and ``the functionalized TBP`` families are responsible for that retention. These results confirm the good efficiency of the solvent distillation system operated in UP3 plant which allow the elimination of heavy degradation products of the solvent with the residue and then restore excellent extracting properties for the recycled solvent. (author). 35 figs., 69 refs., 15 tabs.

  7. Increasing the lifetime of fuel cell catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Latsuzbaia, R.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, I discuss a novel idea of fuel cell catalyst regeneration to increase lifetime of the PEM fuel cell electrode/catalyst operation and, therefore, reduce the catalyst costs. As many of the catalyst degradation mechanisms are difficult to avoid, the regeneration is alternative option to

  8. Accident tolerant fuels for LWRs: A perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinkle, S.J., E-mail: zinklesj@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Terrani, K.A.; Gehin, J.C.; Ott, L.J.; Snead, L.L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    The motivation for exploring the potential development of accident tolerant fuels in light water reactors to replace existing Zr alloy clad monolithic (U, Pu) oxide fuel is outlined. The evaluation includes a brief review of core degradation processes under design-basis and beyond-design-basis transient conditions. Three general strategies for accident tolerant fuels are being explored: modification of current state-of-the-art zirconium alloy cladding to further improve oxidation resistance (including use of coatings), replacement of Zr alloy cladding with an alternative oxidation-resistant high-performance cladding, and replacement of the monolithic ceramic oxide fuel with alternative fuel forms.

  9. Accident tolerant fuels for LWRs: A perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinkle, S.J.; Terrani, K.A.; Gehin, J.C.; Ott, L.J.; Snead, L.L.

    2014-01-01

    The motivation for exploring the potential development of accident tolerant fuels in light water reactors to replace existing Zr alloy clad monolithic (U, Pu) oxide fuel is outlined. The evaluation includes a brief review of core degradation processes under design-basis and beyond-design-basis transient conditions. Three general strategies for accident tolerant fuels are being explored: modification of current state-of-the-art zirconium alloy cladding to further improve oxidation resistance (including use of coatings), replacement of Zr alloy cladding with an alternative oxidation-resistant high-performance cladding, and replacement of the monolithic ceramic oxide fuel with alternative fuel forms

  10. Scientific issues in fuel behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The current limits on discharge burnup in today's nuclear power stations have proven the fuel to be very reliable in its performance, with a negligibly small rate of failure. However, for reasons of economy, there are moves to increase the fuel enrichment in order to extend both the cycle time and the discharge burnup. But, longer periods of irradiation cause increased microstructural changes in the fuel and cladding, implying a larger degradation of physical and mechanical properties. This degradation may well limit the plant life, hence the NSC concluded that it is of importance to develop a predictive capability of fuel behaviour at extended burnup. This can only be achieved through an improved understanding of the basic underlying phenomena of fuel behaviour. The Task Force on Scientific Issues Related to Fuel Behaviour of the NEA Nuclear Science Committee has identified the most important scientific issues on the subject and has assigned priorities. Modelling aspects are listed in Appendix A and discussed in Part II. In addition, quality assurance process for performing and evaluating new integral experiments is considered of special importance. Main activities on fuel behaviour modelling, as carried out in OECD Member countries and international organisations, are listed in Part III. The aim is to identify common interests, to establish current coverage of selected issues, and to avoid any duplication of efforts between international agencies. (author). refs., figs., tabs

  11. DSNF AND OTHER WASTE FORM DEGRADATION ABSTRACTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornton, T.A.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis/model report (AMR) is to select and/or abstract conservative degradation models for DOE-(US. Department of Energy) owned spent nuclear fuel (DSNF) and the immobilized ceramic plutonium (Pu) disposition waste forms for application in the proposed monitored geologic repository (MGR) postclosure Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). Application of the degradation models abstracted herein for purposes other than TSPA should take into consideration the fact that they are, in general, very conservative. Using these models, the forward reaction rate for the mobilization of radionuclides, as solutes or colloids, away from the waste fondwater interface by contact with repository groundwater can then be calculated. This forward reaction rate generally consists of the dissolution reaction at the surface of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in contact with water, but the degradation models, in some cases, may also include and account for the physical disintegration of the SNF matrix. The models do not, however, account for retardation, precipitation, or inhibition of the migration of the mobilized radionuclides in the engineered barrier system (EBS). These models are based on the assumption that all components of the DSNF waste form are released congruently with the degradation of the matrix

  12. DSNF and other waste form degradation abstraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornton, Thomas A.

    2000-12-20

    The purpose of this analysis/model report (AMR) is to select and/or abstract conservative degradation models for DOE-(US. Department of Energy) owned spent nuclear fuel (DSNF) and the immobilized ceramic plutonium (Pu) disposition waste forms for application in the proposed monitored geologic repository (MGR) postclosure Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). Application of the degradation models abstracted herein for purposes other than TSPA should take into consideration the fact that they are, in general, very conservative. Using these models, the forward reaction rate for the mobilization of radionuclides, as solutes or colloids, away from the waste fondwater interface by contact with repository groundwater can then be calculated. This forward reaction rate generally consists of the dissolution reaction at the surface of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in contact with water, but the degradation models, in some cases, may also include and account for the physical disintegration of the SNF matrix. The models do not, however, account for retardation, precipitation, or inhibition of the migration of the mobilized radionuclides in the engineered barrier system (EBS). These models are based on the assumption that all components of the DSNF waste form are released congruently with the degradation of the matrix.

  13. Nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beauvy, M.; Berthoud, G.; Defranceschi, M.; Ducros, G.; Guerin, Y.; Limoge, Y.; Madic, Ch.; Santarini, G.; Seiler, J.M.; Sollogoub, P.; Vernaz, E.; Guillet, J.L.; Ballagny, A.; Bechade, J.L.; Bonin, B.; Brachet, J.Ch.; Delpech, M.; Dubois, S.; Ferry, C.; Freyss, M.; Gilbon, D.; Grouiller, J.P.; Iracane, D.; Lansiart, S.; Lemoine, P.; Lenain, R.; Marsault, Ph.; Michel, B.; Noirot, J.; Parrat, D.; Pelletier, M.; Perrais, Ch.; Phelip, M.; Pillon, S.; Poinssot, Ch.; Vallory, J.; Valot, C.; Pradel, Ph.; Bonin, B.; Bouquin, B.; Dozol, M.; Lecomte, M.; Vallee, A.; Bazile, F.; Parisot, J.F.; Finot, P.; Roberts, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    Fuel is one of the essential components in a reactor. It is within that fuel that nuclear reactions take place, i.e. fission of heavy atoms, uranium and plutonium. Fuel is at the core of the reactor, but equally at the core of the nuclear system as a whole. Fuel design and properties influence reactor behavior, performance, and safety. Even though it only accounts for a small part of the cost per kilowatt-hour of power provided by current nuclear power plants, good utilization of fuel is a major economic issue. Major advances have yet to be achieved, to ensure longer in-reactor dwell-time, thus enabling fuel to yield more energy; and improve ruggedness. Aside from economics, and safety, such strategic issues as use of plutonium, conservation of resources, and nuclear waste management have to be addressed, and true technological challenges arise. This Monograph surveys current knowledge regarding in-reactor behavior, operating limits, and avenues for R and D. It also provides illustrations of ongoing research work, setting out a few noteworthy results recently achieved. Content: 1 - Introduction; 2 - Water reactor fuel: What are the features of water reactor fuel? 9 (What is the purpose of a nuclear fuel?, Ceramic fuel, Fuel rods, PWR fuel assemblies, BWR fuel assemblies); Fabrication of water reactor fuels (Fabrication of UO 2 pellets, Fabrication of MOX (mixed uranium-plutonium oxide) pellets, Fabrication of claddings); In-reactor behavior of UO 2 and MOX fuels (Irradiation conditions during nominal operation, Heat generation, and removal, The processes involved at the start of irradiation, Fission gas behavior, Microstructural changes); Water reactor fuel behavior in loss of tightness conditions (Cladding, the first containment barrier, Causes of failure, Consequences of a failure); Microscopic morphology of fuel ceramic and its evolution under irradiation; Migration and localization of fission products in UOX and MOX matrices (The ceramic under irradiation

  14. Nuclear fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beauvy, M.; Berthoud, G.; Defranceschi, M.; Ducros, G.; Guerin, Y.; Limoge, Y.; Madic, Ch.; Santarini, G.; Seiler, J.M.; Sollogoub, P.; Vernaz, E.; Guillet, J.L.; Ballagny, A.; Bechade, J.L.; Bonin, B.; Brachet, J.Ch.; Delpech, M.; Dubois, S.; Ferry, C.; Freyss, M.; Gilbon, D.; Grouiller, J.P.; Iracane, D.; Lansiart, S.; Lemoine, P.; Lenain, R.; Marsault, Ph.; Michel, B.; Noirot, J.; Parrat, D.; Pelletier, M.; Perrais, Ch.; Phelip, M.; Pillon, S.; Poinssot, Ch.; Vallory, J.; Valot, C.; Pradel, Ph.; Bonin, B.; Bouquin, B.; Dozol, M.; Lecomte, M.; Vallee, A.; Bazile, F.; Parisot, J.F.; Finot, P.; Roberts, J.F

    2009-07-01

    Fuel is one of the essential components in a reactor. It is within that fuel that nuclear reactions take place, i.e. fission of heavy atoms, uranium and plutonium. Fuel is at the core of the reactor, but equally at the core of the nuclear system as a whole. Fuel design and properties influence reactor behavior, performance, and safety. Even though it only accounts for a small part of the cost per kilowatt-hour of power provided by current nuclear power plants, good utilization of fuel is a major economic issue. Major advances have yet to be achieved, to ensure longer in-reactor dwell-time, thus enabling fuel to yield more energy; and improve ruggedness. Aside from economics, and safety, such strategic issues as use of plutonium, conservation of resources, and nuclear waste management have to be addressed, and true technological challenges arise. This Monograph surveys current knowledge regarding in-reactor behavior, operating limits, and avenues for R and D. It also provides illustrations of ongoing research work, setting out a few noteworthy results recently achieved. Content: 1 - Introduction; 2 - Water reactor fuel: What are the features of water reactor fuel? 9 (What is the purpose of a nuclear fuel?, Ceramic fuel, Fuel rods, PWR fuel assemblies, BWR fuel assemblies); Fabrication of water reactor fuels (Fabrication of UO{sub 2} pellets, Fabrication of MOX (mixed uranium-plutonium oxide) pellets, Fabrication of claddings); In-reactor behavior of UO{sub 2} and MOX fuels (Irradiation conditions during nominal operation, Heat generation, and removal, The processes involved at the start of irradiation, Fission gas behavior, Microstructural changes); Water reactor fuel behavior in loss of tightness conditions (Cladding, the first containment barrier, Causes of failure, Consequences of a failure); Microscopic morphology of fuel ceramic and its evolution under irradiation; Migration and localization of fission products in UOX and MOX matrices (The ceramic under

  15. CLAD DEGRADATION - FEPS SCREENING ARGUMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R. Schreiner

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate and document the screening of the clad degradation features, events, and processes (FEPs) with respect to modeling used to support the Total System Performance Assessment-License Application (TSPA-LA). This report also addresses the effect of certain FEPs on both the cladding and the commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF), DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel (DSNF), and defense high-level waste (DHLW) waste forms, as appropriate to address the effects on multiple materials and both components (FEPs 2.1.09.09.0A, 2.1.09.11.0A, 2.1.11.05.0A, 2.1.12.02.0A, and 2.1.12.03.0A). These FEPs are expected to affect the repository performance during the postclosure regulatory period of 10,000 years after permanent closure. Table 1-1 provides the list of cladding FEPs, including their screening decisions (include or exclude). The primary purpose of this report is to identify and document the analysis, screening decision, and TSPA-LA disposition (for included FEPs) or screening argument (for excluded FEPs) for these FEPs related to clad degradation. In some cases, where a FEP covers multiple technical areas and is shared with other FEP reports, this report may provide only a partial technical basis for the screening of the FEP. The full technical basis for shared FEPs is addressed collectively by the sharing FEP reports. The screening decisions and associated TSPA-LA dispositions or screening arguments from all of the FEP reports are cataloged in a project-specific FEPs database

  16. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujibayashi, Toru.

    1970-01-01

    Herein disclosed is a fuel assembly in which a fuel rod bundle is easily detachable by rotating a fuel rod fastener rotatably mounted to the upper surface of an upper tie-plate supporting a fuel bundle therebelow. A locking portion at the leading end of each fuel rod protrudes through the upper tie-plate and is engaged with or separated from the tie-plate by the rotation of the fastener. The removal of a desired fuel rod can therefore be remotely accomplished without the necessity of handling pawls, locking washers and nuts. (Owens, K.J.)

  17. Nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D Hondt, P.

    1998-01-01

    The research and development programme on nuclear fuel at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK/CEN is described. The objective of this programme is to enhance the quantitative prediction of the operational limits of nuclear fuel and to assess the behaviour of fuel under incidental and accidental conditions. Progress is described in different domains including the modelling of fission gas release in LWR fuel, thermal conductivity, basic physical phenomena, post-irradiation examination for fuel performance assessment, and conceptual studies of incidental and accidental fuel experiments

  18. Degradation of automotive materials in palm biodiesel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazal, M.A.; Haseeb, A.S.M.A.; Masjuki, H.H.

    2012-01-01

    As compared to petroleum diesel, biodiesel is more corrosive for automotive materials. Studies on the characterization of corrosion products of fuel exposed automotive materials are scarce. Automotive fuel system and engine components are made from different ferrous and non-ferrous materials. The present study aims to investigate the corrosion products of different types of automotive materials such as copper, brass, aluminum and cast iron upon exposure to diesel and palm biodiesel. Changes in fuel properties due to exposure of different materials were also examined. Degradation of metal surface was characterized by digital camera, SEM/EDS and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Fuel properties were examined by measuring TAN (total acid number), density and viscosity. Among the metal investigated, copper is found to be least resistant in biodiesel and formed comparatively more corrosion products than other metals. Upon exposure of metals in biodiesel, TAN number crosses the limit given by standard while density and viscosity remain within the acceptable range of limit. -- Highlights: ► Order of incompatible metals in palm biodiesel: copper > brass > aluminum > cast iron. ► The possible reactions for the degradation of copper and cast iron have been discussed. ► For metal exposed biodiesel, only TAN number crosses the limit while density and viscosity remain within the limit. ► Copper and copper based alloy (brass) increase TAN number comparatively more than other metals.

  19. Enlarged Halden programme group meeting on high burn-up fuel performance, safety and reliability and degradation of in-core materials and water chemistry effects and man-machine systems research. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    An Enlarged Halden Programme Group Meeting on Fuel Performance and Materials Testing and Man-Machine Research was held at Loen, Norway 24 to 29 May, 1999. The papers presented covered work performed at the OECD Halden Reactor Project during the years up to April 1999 as well as studies conducted within organisations participating in the Halden Project. The Halden Boiling Water Reactor, HBWR, was built in the years 1955 - 1958 by the Norwegian Institutt for Atomenergi, and has since 1958 been operated internationally as one of the joint undertakings of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency. The experimental operation of the Halden Boiling Water Reactor and associated programmes are sponsored through an international agreement by Institute for energy technology, Norway, the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK/CEN, acting also on behalf of other public or private organisations in Belgium, the Risoe National Laboratory in Denmark, the Finnish Ministry of Trade and Industry, the Electricite de France, the Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, representing a German group of companies working in agreement with the German Federal Ministry for Education, Science, Research and Technology, the Italian Ente per le Nouve Tecnologie, l'Energia e l'Ambiente, the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, the Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute, the Spanish Centre de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologias, representing a group of national and industry organisations in Spain, the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate, representing also the Swiss nuclear utilities and the Paul Scherrer Institute, the Nuclear Electric pic, representing a group of nuclear research and industry organisations in the United Kingdom, and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and as associated parties: the Brazilian Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), the Czech Nuclear Research Institute, the Hungarian

  20. Degradations and Rearrangement Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianbo

    This section deals with recent reports concerning degradation and rearrangement reactions of free sugars as well as some glycosides. The transformations are classified in chemical and enzymatic ways. In addition, the Maillard reaction will be discussed as an example of degradation and rearrangement transformation and its application in current research in the fields of chemistry and biology.

  1. Computational Modeling of Degradation of Substituted Benzyltrimethyl Ammonium: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, H.; Pivovar, B. S.

    2014-09-01

    The degradation of cations on the alkaline exchange membranes is the major challenge for alkaline membrane fuel cells. In this paper, we investigated the degradation barriers by density functional theory for substituted benzyltrimethyl ammonium (BTMA+) cations, which is one of the most commonly used cations for alkaline exchange membranes. We found that substituted cations with electron-releasing substituent groups at meta-position of the benzyl ring could result in improved degradation barriers. However, after investigating more than thirty substituted BTMA+ cations with ten different substituent groups, the largest improvement of degradation barriers is only 1.6 kcal/mol. This implies that the lifetime of alkaline membrane fuel cells could increase from a few months to a few years by using substituted BTMA+ cations, an encouraging but still limited improvement for real-world applications.

  2. Fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, E.R.

    1975-01-01

    Description of the operation of power plants and the respective procurement of fuel to fulfil the needs of the grid. The operation of the plants shall be optimised with respect to the fuel cost. (orig./RW) [de

  3. Fuel gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    This paper gives a brief presentation of the context, perspectives of production, specificities, and the conditions required for the development of NGV (Natural Gas for Vehicle) and LPG-f (Liquefied Petroleum Gas fuel) alternative fuels. After an historical presentation of 80 years of LPG evolution in vehicle fuels, a first part describes the economical and environmental advantages of gaseous alternative fuels (cleaner combustion, longer engines life, reduced noise pollution, greater natural gas reserves, lower political-economical petroleum dependence..). The second part gives a comparative cost and environmental evaluation between the available alternative fuels: bio-fuels, electric power and fuel gases, taking into account the processes and constraints involved in the production of these fuels. (J.S.)

  4. Fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawley, N.J.

    1983-05-01

    AECL publications, from the open literature, on fuels and fuel cycles used in CANDU reactors are listed in this bibliography. The accompanying index is by subject. The bibliography will be brought up to date periodically

  5. Nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The nuclear fuel is one of the key component of a nuclear reactor. Inside it, the fission reactions of heavy atoms, uranium and plutonium, take place. It is located in the core of the reactor, but also in the core of the whole nuclear system. Its design and properties influence the behaviour, the efficiency and the safety of the reactor. Even if it represents a weak share of the generated electricity cost, its proper use represents an important economic stake. Important improvements remain to be made to increase its residence time inside the reactor, to supply more energy, and to improve its robustness. Beyond the economical and safety considerations, strategical questions have to find an answer, like the use of plutonium, the management of resources and the management of nuclear wastes and real technological challenges have to be taken up. This monograph summarizes the existing knowledge about the nuclear fuel, its behaviour inside the reactor, its limits of use, and its R and D tracks. It illustrates also the researches in progress and presents some key results obtained recently. Content: 1 - Introduction; 2 - The fuel of water-cooled reactors: aspect, fabrication, behaviour of UO 2 and MOX fuels inside the reactor, behaviour in loss of tightness situation, microscopic morphology of fuel ceramics and evolution under irradiation - migration and localisation of fission products in UOX and MOX matrices, modeling of fuels behaviour - modeling of defects and fission products in the UO 2 ceramics by ab initio calculations, cladding and assembly materials, pellet-cladding interaction, advanced UO 2 and MOX ceramics, mechanical behaviour of the fuel assembly, fuel during a loss of coolant accident, fuel during a reactivity accident, fuel during a serious accident, fuel management inside reactor cores, fuel cycle materials balance, long-term behaviour of the spent fuel, fuel of boiling water reactors; 3 - the fuel of liquid metal fast reactors: fast neutrons radiation

  6. Fuel pellet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, K.

    1980-01-01

    Fuel pellet for insertion into a cladding tube in order to form a fuel element or a fuel rod. The fuel pellet has got a belt-like projection around its essentially cylindrical lateral circumferential surface. The upper and lower edges in vertical direction of this belt-like projection are wave-shaped. The projection is made of the same material as the bulk pellet. Both are made in one piece. (orig.) [de

  7. Fossil Fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crank, Ron

    This instructional unit is one of 10 developed by students on various energy-related areas that deals specifically with fossil fuels. Some topics covered are historic facts, development of fuels, history of oil production, current and future trends of the oil industry, refining fossil fuels, and environmental problems. Material in each unit may…

  8. Fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    A new fuel can with a loose bottom and head is described. The fuel bar is attached to the loose bottom and head with two grid poles keeping the distance between bottom and head. A bow-shaped handle is attached to the head so that the fuel bar can be lifted from the can

  9. Intermittent degradation and schizotypy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew W. Roché

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent degradation refers to transient detrimental disruptions in task performance. This phenomenon has been repeatedly observed in the performance data of patients with schizophrenia. Whether intermittent degradation is a feature of the liability for schizophrenia (i.e., schizotypy is an open question. Further, the specificity of intermittent degradation to schizotypy has yet to be investigated. To address these questions, 92 undergraduate participants completed a battery of self-report questionnaires assessing schizotypy and psychological state variables (e.g., anxiety, depression, and their reaction times were recorded as they did so. Intermittent degradation was defined as the number of times a subject’s reaction time for questionnaire items met or exceeded three standard deviations from his or her mean reaction time after controlling for each item’s information processing load. Intermittent degradation scores were correlated with questionnaire scores. Our results indicate that intermittent degradation is associated with total scores on measures of positive and disorganized schizotypy, but unrelated to total scores on measures of negative schizotypy and psychological state variables. Intermittent degradation is interpreted as potentially derivative of schizotypy and a candidate endophenotypic marker worthy of continued research.

  10. LPG fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagnas, F.X.; Jeuland, N.; Fouquet, J.P.; Lauraire, S.; Coroller, P.

    2005-01-01

    LPG fuel has become frequently used through a distribution network with 2 000 service stations over the French territory. LPG fuel ranks number 3 world-wide given that it can be used on individual vehicles, professional fleets, or public transport. What is the environmental benefit of LPG fuel? What is the technology used for these engines? What is the current regulation? Government commitment and dedication on support to promote LPG fuel? Car makers projects? Actions to favour the use of LPG fuel? This article gathers 5 presentations about this topic given at the gas conference

  11. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Makoto; Ogiya, Shunsuke.

    1989-01-01

    For improving the economy of a BWR type reactor by making the operation cycle longer, the fuel enrichment degree has to be increased further. However, this makes the subcriticality shallower in the upper portion of the reactor core, to bring about a possibility that the reactor shutdown becomes impossible. In the present invention, a portion of fuel rod is constituted as partial length fuel rods (P-fuel rods) in which the entire stack length in the effective portion is made shorter by reducing the concentration of fissionable materials in the axial portion. A plurality of moderator rods are disposed at least on one diagonal line of a fuel assembly and P-fuel rods are arranged at a position put between the moderator rods. This makes it possible to reactor shutdown and makes the axial power distribution satisfactory even if the fuel enrichment degree is increased. (T.M.)

  12. Fuel Services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silberstein, A.

    1982-09-01

    FRAGEMA has developed most types of inspection equipments to work on irradiated fuel assemblies and on single fuel rods during reactor outages with an efficiency compatible with the utilities operating priorities. In order to illustrate this statement, two specific examples of inspection equipments are shortly described: the on-site removable fuel rod assembly examination stand, and the fuel assembly multiple examination device. FRAGEMA has developed techniques for the identifiction of the leaking fuel rods in the fuel assembly and the tooling necessary to perform the replacement of the faulted element. These examples of methods, techniques and equipments described and the experience accumulated through their use allow FRAGEMA to qualify for offering the supply of the corresponding software, hardware or both whenever an accurate understanding of the fuel behaviour is necessary and whenever direct intervention on the assembly and associated components is necessary due to safety, operating or economical reasons

  13. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Shoichi; Hirano, Yasushi.

    1998-01-01

    A one-half or more of entire fuel rods in a fuel assembly comprises MOX fuel rods containing less than 1wt% of burnable poisons, and at least a portion of the burnable poisons comprises gadolinium. Then, surplus reactivity at an initial stage of operation cycle is controlled to eliminate burnable poisons remained unburnt at a final stage, as well as increase thermal reactivity. In addition, the content of fission plutonium is determined to greater than the content of uranium 235, and fuel rods at corner portions are made not to incorporate burnable poisons. Fuel rods not containing burnable poisons are disposed at positions in adjacent with fuel rods facing to a water rod at one or two directions. Local power at radial center of the fuel assembly is increased to flatten the distortion of radial power distribution. (N.H.)

  14. How do polymers degrade?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Suping

    2011-03-01

    Materials derived from agricultural products such as cellulose, starch, polylactide, etc. are more sustainable and environmentally benign than those derived from petroleum. However, applications of these polymers are limited by their processing properties, chemical and thermal stabilities. For example, polyethylene terephthalate fabrics last for many years under normal use conditions, but polylactide fabrics cannot due to chemical degradation. There are two primary mechanisms through which these polymers degrade: via hydrolysis and via oxidation. Both of these two mechanisms are related to combined factors such as monomer chemistry, chain configuration, chain mobility, crystallinity, and permeation to water and oxygen, and product geometry. In this talk, we will discuss how these materials degrade and how the degradation depends on these factors under application conditions. Both experimental studies and mathematical modeling will be presented.

  15. Purex diluent degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tallent, O.K.; Mailen, J.C.; Pannell, K.D.

    1984-02-01

    The chemical degradation of normal paraffin hydrocarbon (NPH) diluents both in the pure state and mixed with 30% tributyl phosphate (TBP) was investigated in a series of experiments. The results show that degradation of NPH in the TBP-NPH-HNO 3 system is consistent with the active chemical agent being a radical-like nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) molecule, not HNO 3 as such. Spectrophotometric, gas chromatographic, mass spectrographic, and titrimetric methods were used to identify the degradation products, which included alkane nitro and nitrate compounds, alcohols, unsaturated alcohols, nitro alcohols, nitro alkenes, ketones, and carboxylic acids. The degradation rate was found to increase with increases in the HNO 3 concentration and the temperature. The rate was decreased by argon sparging to remove NO 2 and by the addition of butanol, which probably acts as a NO 2 scavenger. 13 references, 11 figures

  16. Radiation degradation and crosslinking of polytetrafluoroethylene and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Guozhong; Wang Mouhua; Tang Zhongfeng

    2009-01-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) is a high-performance engineering plastic and known as a typical material of radiation degradation. PTFE can be degraded by radiation under various conditions and PTFE micro-powder is usually fabricated by a combination of radiation and milling. PTFE can also be crosslinked by irradiation in the melt state (330∼340 degree C). The materials can be applied as a special additive due to its excellent wear resistance. Crosslinked PTFE may also be applied in lithography and fuel cell membrane in the future. In this paper, history and application of PTFE degradation and crosslinking products are reviewed. (authors)

  17. Recovery of acid-degraded tributyl phosphate by solvent extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, G.C.; Holladay, D.W.

    1981-01-01

    During nuclear fuel reprocessing the organic solvent becomes loaded with various acidic degradation products, which can be effectively removed through solvent extraction. Studies have been made with a small bench-scale solvent extraction system to optimize such parameters as pH of aqueous phase, phase ratio, residence time, flow rates, and temperature. The necessary decontamination factors have been obtained for various degradation products during continuous solvent extraction in one stage, with the aqueous phase being recycled. The aqueous phase contains compounds that can be degraded to gases to minimize waste disposal problems

  18. Bacteria and lignin degradation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing LI; Hongli YUAN; Jinshui YANG

    2009-01-01

    Lignin is both the most abundant aromatic (phenolic) polymer and the second most abundant raw material.It is degraded and modified by bacteria in the natural world,and bacteria seem to play a leading role in decomposing lignin in aquatic ecosystems.Lignin-degrading bacteria approach the polymer by mechanisms such as tunneling,erosion,and cavitation.With the advantages of immense environmental adaptability and biochemical versatility,bacteria deserve to be studied for their ligninolytic potential.

  19. Development of code SFINEL (Spent fuel integrity evaluator)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong Soo; Min, Chin Young; Ohk, Young Kil; Yang, Yong Sik; Kim, Dong Ju; Kim, Nam Ku [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea)

    1999-01-01

    SFINEL code, an integrated computer program for predicting the spent fuel rod integrity based on burn-up history and major degradation mechanisms, has been developed through this project. This code can sufficiently simulate the power history of a fuel rod during the reactor operation and estimate the degree of deterioration of spent fuel cladding using the recently-developed models on the degradation mechanisms. SFINEL code has been thoroughly benchmarked against the collected in-pile data and operating experiences: deformation and rupture, and cladding oxidation, rod internal pressure creep, then comprehensive whole degradation process. (author). 75 refs., 51 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Generic Degraded Configuration Probability Analysis for the Codisposal Waste Package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S.F.A. Deng; M. Saglam; L.J. Gratton

    2001-01-01

    In accordance with the technical work plan, ''Technical Work Plan For: Department of Energy Spent Nuclear Fuel Work Packages'' (CRWMS M and O 2000c), this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is developed for the purpose of screening out degraded configurations for U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) types. It performs the degraded configuration parameter and probability evaluations of the overall methodology specified in the ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2000, Section 3) to qualifying configurations. Degradation analyses are performed to assess realizable parameter ranges and physical regimes for configurations. Probability calculations are then performed for configurations characterized by k eff in excess of the Critical Limit (CL). The scope of this document is to develop a generic set of screening criteria or models to screen out degraded configurations having potential for exceeding a criticality limit. The developed screening criteria include arguments based on physical/chemical processes and probability calculations and apply to DOE SNF types when codisposed with the high-level waste (HLW) glass inside a waste package. The degradation takes place inside the waste package and is long after repository licensing has expired. The emphasis of this AMR is on degraded configuration screening and the probability analysis is one of the approaches used for screening. The intended use of the model is to apply the developed screening criteria to each DOE SNF type following the completion of the degraded mode criticality analysis internal to the waste package

  1. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatsuka, Masafumi; Matsuzuka, Ryuji.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To provide a fuel assembly which can decrease pressure loss of coolant to uniform temperature. Structure: A sectional area of a flow passage in the vicinity of an inner peripheral surface of a wrapper tube is limited over the entire length to prevent the temperature of a fuel element in the outermost peripheral portion from being excessively decreased to thereby flatten temperature distribution. To this end, a plurality of pincture-frame-like sheet metals constituting a spacer for supporting a fuel assembly, which has a plurality of fuel elements planted lengthwise and in given spaced relation within the wrapper tube, is disposed in longitudinal grooves and in stacked fashion to form a substantially honeycomb-like space in cross section. The fuel elements are inserted and supported in the space to form a fuel assembly. (Kamimura, M.)

  2. Fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagano, Mamoru; Yoshioka, Ritsuo

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To effectively utilize nuclear fuels by increasing the reactivity of a fuel assembly and reduce the concentration at the central region thereof upon completion of the burning. Constitution: A fuel assembly is bisected into a central region and a peripheral region by disposing an inner channel box within a channel box. The flow rate of coolants passing through the central region is made greater than that in the peripheral region. The concentration of uranium 235 of the fuel rods in the central region is made higher. In such a structure, since the moderating effect in the central region is improved, the reactivity of the fuel assembly is increased and the uranium concentration in the central region upon completion of the burning can be reduced, fuel economy and effective utilization of uranium can be attained. (Kamimura, M.)

  3. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bando, Masaru.

    1993-01-01

    As neutron irradiation progresses on a fuel assembly of an FBR type reactor, a strong force is exerted to cause ruptures if the arrangement of fuel elements is not displaced, whereas the fuel elements may be brought into direct contact with each other not by way of spacers to cause burning damages if the arrangement is displaced. In the present invention, the circumference of fuel elements arranged in a normal triangle lattice is surrounded by a wrapper tube having a hexagonal cross section, wire spacers are wound therearound, and deformable spacers are distributed to optional positions for fuel elements in the wrapper tube. Interaction between the fuel elements caused by irradiation is effectively absorbed, thereby enabling to delay the occurrence of the rupture and burning damages of the elements. (N.H.)

  4. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokota, Tokunobu.

    1990-01-01

    A fuel assembly used in a FBR type nuclear reactor comprises a plurality of fuel rods and a moderator guide member (water rod). A moderator exit opening/closing mechanism is formed at the upper portion of the moderator guide member for opening and closing a moderator exit. In the initial fuel charging operation cycle to the reactor, the moderator exit is closed by the moderator exit opening/closing mechanism. Then, voids are accumulated at the inner upper portion of the moderator guide member to harden spectrum and a great amount of plutonium is generated and accumulated in the fuel assembly. Further, in the fuel re-charging operation cycle, the moderator guide member is used having the moderator exit opened. In this case, voids are discharged from the moderator guide member to decrease the ratio, and the plutonium accumulated in the initial charging operation cycle is burnt. In this way, the fuel economy can be improved. (I.N.)

  5. Fuel spacer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishida, Koji; Yokomizo, Osamu; Kanazawa, Toru; Kashiwai, Shin-ichi; Orii, Akihito.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention concerns a fuel spacer for a fuel assembly of a BWR type reactor and a PTR type reactor. Springs each having a vane are disposed on the side surface of a circular cell which supports a fuel rods. A vortex streams having a vertical component are formed by the vanes in the flowing direction of a flowing channel between adjacent cylindrical cells. Liquid droplets carried by streams are deposited on liquid membrane streams flowing along the fuel rod at the downstream of the spacer by the vortex streams. In view of the above, the liquid droplets can be deposited to the fuel rod without increasing the amount of metal of the spacer. Accordingly, the thermal margin of the fuel assembly can be improved without losing neutron economy. (I.N.)

  6. Biochemistry of cellulose degradation and cellulose utilization for feeds and for protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadara, J C; Lachke, A H; Shewale, J G

    1979-01-01

    A review discussing production of single-cell protein, fuel, and glucose from cellulose decomposition; surface or solid fermentations of single-cell protein; production of cellulases; and the biochemistry of cellulose degradation was presented.

  7. Integrity of spent CANDU fuel during and following dry storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villagran, J.E.

    2004-01-01

    This report examines the issue of CANDU fuel integrity at the back end of the fuel cycle and outlines a program designed to provide assurance that used CANDU fuel will retain its integrity over an extended period. In specific terms, the program is intended to provide assurance that during and following extended dry storage the fuel will remain fit to undergo, without loss of integrity, the handling, packaging and transportation operations that might be necessary until it is placed in disposal containers. The first step in the development of the program was a review of the available technical information on phenomena relevant to fuel integrity. The major conclusions from that review were the following: Under normal storage conditions it is unlikely that the spent fuel will suffer significant degradation during a one-hundred year period and it should be possible to retrieve, repackage and transport the fuel as required, using methods and systems similar to those used today. However, to provide increased confidence regarding the above conclusion, investigations should be conducted in areas where there is higher uncertainty in the prediction of fuel condition and on some degradation processes to which the fuel appears to present higher vulnerability. The proposed program includes, among other tasks, irradiated fuel tests, analytical studies on the most relevant fuel degradation processes and the development of a long-term fuel verification program. (Author)

  8. Highly durable, coking and sulfur tolerant, fuel-flexible protonic ceramic fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Chuancheng; Kee, Robert J; Zhu, Huayang; Karakaya, Canan; Chen, Yachao; Ricote, Sandrine; Jarry, Angelique; Crumlin, Ethan J; Hook, David; Braun, Robert; Sullivan, Neal P; O'Hayre, Ryan

    2018-05-01

    Protonic ceramic fuel cells, like their higher-temperature solid-oxide fuel cell counterparts, can directly use both hydrogen and hydrocarbon fuels to produce electricity at potentially more than 50 per cent efficiency 1,2 . Most previous direct-hydrocarbon fuel cell research has focused on solid-oxide fuel cells based on oxygen-ion-conducting electrolytes, but carbon deposition (coking) and sulfur poisoning typically occur when such fuel cells are directly operated on hydrocarbon- and/or sulfur-containing fuels, resulting in severe performance degradation over time 3-6 . Despite studies suggesting good performance and anti-coking resistance in hydrocarbon-fuelled protonic ceramic fuel cells 2,7,8 , there have been no systematic studies of long-term durability. Here we present results from long-term testing of protonic ceramic fuel cells using a total of 11 different fuels (hydrogen, methane, domestic natural gas (with and without hydrogen sulfide), propane, n-butane, i-butane, iso-octane, methanol, ethanol and ammonia) at temperatures between 500 and 600 degrees Celsius. Several cells have been tested for over 6,000 hours, and we demonstrate excellent performance and exceptional durability (less than 1.5 per cent degradation per 1,000 hours in most cases) across all fuels without any modifications in the cell composition or architecture. Large fluctuations in temperature are tolerated, and coking is not observed even after thousands of hours of continuous operation. Finally, sulfur, a notorious poison for both low-temperature and high-temperature fuel cells, does not seem to affect the performance of protonic ceramic fuel cells when supplied at levels consistent with commercial fuels. The fuel flexibility and long-term durability demonstrated by the protonic ceramic fuel cell devices highlight the promise of this technology and its potential for commercial application.

  9. Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Anders; Pedersen, Allan Schrøder

    2014-01-01

    Fuel cells have been the subject of intense research and development efforts for the past decades. Even so, the technology has not had its commercial breakthrough yet. This entry gives an overview of the technological challenges and status of fuel cells and discusses the most promising applications...... of the different types of fuel cells. Finally, their role in a future energy supply with a large share of fluctuating sustainable power sources, e.g., solar or wind, is surveyed....

  10. Fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahm, W.

    1989-01-01

    The situation of the nuclear fuel cycle for LWR type reactors in France and in the Federal Republic of Germany was presented in 14 lectures with the aim to compare the state-of-the-art in both countries. In addition to the momentarily changing fuilds of fuel element development and fueling strategies, the situation of reprocessing, made interesting by some recent developmnts, was portrayed and differences in ultimate waste disposal elucidated. (orig.) [de

  11. Nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo, J.B.L. de.

    1980-01-01

    All stages of nuclear fuel cycle are analysed with respect to the present situation and future perspectives of supply and demand of services; the prices and the unitary cost estimation of these stages for the international fuel market are also mentioned. From the world resources and projections of uranium consumption, medium-and long term analyses are made of fuel availability for several strategies of use of different reactor types. Finally, the cost of nuclear fuel in the generation of electric energy is calculated to be used in the energetic planning of the electric sector. (M.A.) [pt

  12. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomata, Terumitsu.

    1993-01-01

    Among fuel pellets to be loaded to fuel cans of a fuel assembly, fuel pellets having a small thermal power are charged in a region from the end of each of spacers up to about 50mm on the upstream of coolants that flow vertically at the periphery of fuel rods. Coolants at the periphery of fuel rods are heated by the heat generation, to result in voids. However, since cooling effect on the upstream of the spacers is low due to influences of the spacers. Further, since the fuel pellets disposed in the upstream region have small thermal power, a void coefficient is not increased. Even if a thermal power exceeding cooling performance should be generated, there is no worry of causing burnout in the upstream region. Even if burnout should be caused, safety margin and reliability relative to burnout are improved, to increase an allowable thermal power, thereby enabling to improve integrity and reliability of fuel rods and fuel assemblies. (N.H.)

  13. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gjertsen, R.K.; Bassler, E.A.; Huckestein, E.A.; Salton, R.B.; Tower, S.N.

    1988-01-01

    A fuel assembly adapted for use with a pressurized water nuclear reactor having capabilities for fluid moderator spectral shift control is described comprising: parallel arranged elongated nuclear fuel elements; means for providing for axial support of the fuel elements and for arranging the fuel elements in a spaced array; thimbles interspersed among the fuel elements adapted for insertion of a rod control cluster therewithin; means for structurally joining the fuel elements and the guide thimbles; fluid moderator control means for providing a volume of low neutron absorbing fluid within the fuel assembly and for removing a substantially equivalent volume of reactor coolant water therefrom, a first flow manifold at one end of the fuel assembly sealingly connected to a first end of the moderator control tubes whereby the first ends are commonly flow connected; and a second flow manifold, having an inlet passage and an outlet passage therein, sealingly connected to a second end of the moderator control tubes at a second end of the fuel assembly

  14. Drift Degradation Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D. Kicker

    2004-01-01

    Degradation of underground openings as a function of time is a natural and expected occurrence for any subsurface excavation. Over time, changes occur to both the stress condition and the strength of the rock mass due to several interacting factors. Once the factors contributing to degradation are characterized, the effects of drift degradation can typically be mitigated through appropriate design and maintenance of the ground support system. However, for the emplacement drifts of the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, it is necessary to characterize drift degradation over a 10,000-year period, which is well beyond the functional period of the ground support system. This document provides an analysis of the amount of drift degradation anticipated in repository emplacement drifts for discrete events and time increments extending throughout the 10,000-year regulatory period for postclosure performance. This revision of the drift degradation analysis was developed to support the license application and fulfill specific agreement items between the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The earlier versions of ''Drift Degradation Analysis'' (BSC 2001 [DIRS 156304]) relied primarily on the DRKBA numerical code, which provides for a probabilistic key-block assessment based on realistic fracture patterns determined from field mapping in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) at Yucca Mountain. A key block is defined as a critical block in the surrounding rock mass of an excavation, which is removable and oriented in an unsafe manner such that it is likely to move into an opening unless support is provided. However, the use of the DRKBA code to determine potential rockfall data at the repository horizon during the postclosure period has several limitations: (1) The DRKBA code cannot explicitly apply dynamic loads due to seismic ground motion. (2) The DRKBA code cannot explicitly apply loads due to thermal stress. (3) The DRKBA

  15. Drift Degradation Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Kicker

    2004-09-16

    Degradation of underground openings as a function of time is a natural and expected occurrence for any subsurface excavation. Over time, changes occur to both the stress condition and the strength of the rock mass due to several interacting factors. Once the factors contributing to degradation are characterized, the effects of drift degradation can typically be mitigated through appropriate design and maintenance of the ground support system. However, for the emplacement drifts of the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, it is necessary to characterize drift degradation over a 10,000-year period, which is well beyond the functional period of the ground support system. This document provides an analysis of the amount of drift degradation anticipated in repository emplacement drifts for discrete events and time increments extending throughout the 10,000-year regulatory period for postclosure performance. This revision of the drift degradation analysis was developed to support the license application and fulfill specific agreement items between the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The earlier versions of ''Drift Degradation Analysis'' (BSC 2001 [DIRS 156304]) relied primarily on the DRKBA numerical code, which provides for a probabilistic key-block assessment based on realistic fracture patterns determined from field mapping in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) at Yucca Mountain. A key block is defined as a critical block in the surrounding rock mass of an excavation, which is removable and oriented in an unsafe manner such that it is likely to move into an opening unless support is provided. However, the use of the DRKBA code to determine potential rockfall data at the repository horizon during the postclosure period has several limitations: (1) The DRKBA code cannot explicitly apply dynamic loads due to seismic ground motion. (2) The DRKBA code cannot explicitly apply loads due to thermal

  16. Syndromes of dryland degradation in southern Africa | Scholes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dryland degradation (in other words, desertification) is defined for the purposes of this paper as a persistent decrease in the capacity of an arid or semiarid ecosystem to supply a range of services, including (but not restricted to) forage, fuel, timber, crops, fresh water, wild-harvested foods, biodiversity habitat and tourism ...

  17. Plant-Polysaccharide-Degrading Enzymes from Basidiomycetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rytioja, Johanna; Hildén, Kristiina; Yuzon, Jennifer; Hatakka, Annele; de Vries, Ronald P.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Basidiomycete fungi subsist on various types of plant material in diverse environments, from living and dead trees and forest litter to crops and grasses and to decaying plant matter in soils. Due to the variation in their natural carbon sources, basidiomycetes have highly varied plant-polysaccharide-degrading capabilities. This topic is not as well studied for basidiomycetes as for ascomycete fungi, which are the main sources of knowledge on fungal plant polysaccharide degradation. Research on plant-biomass-decaying fungi has focused on isolating enzymes for current and future applications, such as for the production of fuels, the food industry, and waste treatment. More recently, genomic studies of basidiomycete fungi have provided a profound view of the plant-biomass-degrading potential of wood-rotting, litter-decomposing, plant-pathogenic, and ectomycorrhizal (ECM) basidiomycetes. This review summarizes the current knowledge on plant polysaccharide depolymerization by basidiomycete species from diverse habitats. In addition, these data are compared to those for the most broadly studied ascomycete genus, Aspergillus, to provide insight into specific features of basidiomycetes with respect to plant polysaccharide degradation. PMID:25428937

  18. Spent nuclear fuel sampling strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergmann, D.W.

    1995-01-01

    This report proposes a strategy for sampling the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) stored in the 105-K Basins (105-K East and 105-K West). This strategy will support decisions concerning the path forward SNF disposition efforts in the following areas: (1) SNF isolation activities such as repackaging/overpacking to a newly constructed staging facility; (2) conditioning processes for fuel stabilization; and (3) interim storage options. This strategy was developed without following the Data Quality Objective (DQO) methodology. It is, however, intended to augment the SNF project DQOS. The SNF sampling is derived by evaluating the current storage condition of the SNF and the factors that effected SNF corrosion/degradation

  19. Developments in polymer degradation - 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grassie, N.

    1987-01-01

    A selection of topics which are representative of the continually expanding area of polymer degradation is presented. The aspects emphasised include the products of degradation of specific polymers, degradation by high energy radiation and mechanical forces, fire retardant studies and the special role of small radicals in degradation processes. (author)

  20. Motor degradation prediction methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, J.R.; Kelly, J.F.; Delzingaro, M.J.

    1996-12-01

    Motor Operated Valve (MOV) squirrel cage AC motor rotors are susceptible to degradation under certain conditions. Premature failure can result due to high humidity/temperature environments, high running load conditions, extended periods at locked rotor conditions (i.e. > 15 seconds) or exceeding the motor`s duty cycle by frequent starts or multiple valve stroking. Exposure to high heat and moisture due to packing leaks, pressure seal ring leakage or other causes can significantly accelerate the degradation. ComEd and Liberty Technologies have worked together to provide and validate a non-intrusive method using motor power diagnostics to evaluate MOV rotor condition and predict failure. These techniques have provided a quick, low radiation dose method to evaluate inaccessible motors, identify degradation and allow scheduled replacement of motors prior to catastrophic failures.

  1. Endocytic collagen degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Daniel H.; Jürgensen, Henrik J.; Ingvarsen, Signe Ziir

    2012-01-01

    it crucially important to understand both the collagen synthesis and turnover mechanisms in this condition. Here we show that the endocytic collagen receptor, uPARAP/Endo180, is a major determinant in governing the balance between collagen deposition and degradation. Cirrhotic human livers displayed a marked...... up-regulation of uPARAP/Endo180 in activated fibroblasts and hepatic stellate cells located close to the collagen deposits. In a hepatic stellate cell line, uPARAP/Endo180 was shown to be active in, and required for, the uptake and intracellular degradation of collagen. To evaluate the functional...... groups of mice clearly revealed a fibrosis protective role of uPARAP/Endo180. This effect appeared to directly reflect the activity of the collagen receptor, since no compensatory events were noted when comparing the mRNA expression profiles of the two groups of mice in an array system focused on matrix-degrading...

  2. Degradation of fluorotelomer alcohols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellis, David A; Martin, Jonathan W; De Silva, Amila O

    2004-01-01

    Human and animal tissues collected in urban and remote global locations contain persistent and bioaccumulative perfluorinated carboxylic acids (PFCAs). The source of PFCAs was previously unknown. Here we present smog chamber studies that indicate fluorotelomer alcohols (FTOHs) can degrade...... in the atmosphere to yield a homologous series of PFCAs. Atmospheric degradation of FTOHs is likely to contribute to the widespread dissemination of PFCAs. After their bioaccumulation potential is accounted for, the pattern of PFCAs yielded from FTOHs could account for the distinct contamination profile of PFCAs....... The significance of the gas-phase peroxy radical cross reactions that produce PFCAs has not been recognized previously. Such reactions are expected to occur during the atmospheric degradation of all polyfluorinated materials, necessitating a reexamination of the environmental fate and impact of this important...

  3. Motor degradation prediction methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, J.R.; Kelly, J.F.; Delzingaro, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    Motor Operated Valve (MOV) squirrel cage AC motor rotors are susceptible to degradation under certain conditions. Premature failure can result due to high humidity/temperature environments, high running load conditions, extended periods at locked rotor conditions (i.e. > 15 seconds) or exceeding the motor's duty cycle by frequent starts or multiple valve stroking. Exposure to high heat and moisture due to packing leaks, pressure seal ring leakage or other causes can significantly accelerate the degradation. ComEd and Liberty Technologies have worked together to provide and validate a non-intrusive method using motor power diagnostics to evaluate MOV rotor condition and predict failure. These techniques have provided a quick, low radiation dose method to evaluate inaccessible motors, identify degradation and allow scheduled replacement of motors prior to catastrophic failures

  4. Ecosystem degradation in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, B.N.

    1990-01-01

    Environmental and ecosystem studies have assumed greater relevance in the last decade of the twentieth century than even before. The urban settlements are becoming over-crowded and industries are increasingly polluting the air, water and sound in our larger metropolises. Degradation of different types of ecosystem are discussed in this book, Ecosystem Degradation in India. The book has been divided into seven chapters: Introduction, Coastal and Delta Ecosystem, River Basin Ecosystem, Mountain Ecosystem, Forest Ecosystem, Urban Ecosystem and the last chapter deals with the Environmental Problems and Planning. In the introduction the environmental and ecosystem degradation problems in India is highlighted as a whole while in other chapters mostly case studies by experts who know their respective terrain very intimately are included. The case study papers cover most part of India and deal with local problems, stretching from east coast to west coast and from Kashmir to Kanyakumari. (author)

  5. Antifoam degradation testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, D. P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Ecology Lab. (SREL); Zamecnik, J. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Ecology Lab. (SREL); Newell, D. D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Ecology Lab. (SREL); Williams, M. S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Ecology Lab. (SREL)

    2015-08-20

    This report describes the results of testing to quantify the degradation products resulting from the dilution and storage of Antifoam 747. Antifoam degradation is of concern to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) due to flammable decomposition products in the vapor phase of the Chemical Process Cell vessels, as well as the collection of flammable and organic species in the offgas condensate. The discovery that hexamethyldisiloxane is formed from the antifoam decomposition was the basis for a Potential Inadequacy in the Safety Analysis declaration by the DWPF.

  6. Detection of pump degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casada, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    There are a variety of stressors that can affect the operation of centrifugal pumps. These can generally be classified as: Mechanical; Hydraulic; Tribological; Chemical; and Other (including those associated with the pump driver). Although these general stressors are active in essentially all centrifugal pumps, the stressor level and the extent of wear and degradation can vary greatly. Parameters that affect the extent of stressor activity are manifold. In order to assure the long-term operational readiness of a pump, it is important to both understand the nature and magnitude of the specific degradation mechanisms and to monitor the performance of the pump

  7. Reactor fuel rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inui, Mitsuhiro; Mori, Kazuma.

    1990-01-01

    In a high burnup degree reactor core, a problem of fuel can corrosion caused by coolants occurs due to long stay in a reactor. Then, the use of fuel cladding tubes with improved corrosion resistance is now undertaken and use of corrosion resistant alloys is attempted. However, since the conventional TIG welding melts the entire portion, the welded portion does not remain only in the corrosive resistant alloy but it forms new alloys of the corrosion resistant alloy and zircaloy as the matrix material or inter-metallic compounds, which degrades the corrosion resistance. In the present invention, a cladding tube comprising a dual layer structure using a corrosion resistant alloy only for a required thickness and an end plug made of the same material as the corrosion resistant alloy are welded at the junction portion by using resistance welding. Then, they are joined under welding by the heat generated to the junction surfaces between both of them, to provide corrosion resistant alloys substantially at the outside of the welded portion as well. Accordingly, the corrosion resistance is not degradated. (T.M.)

  8. Microbial degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkering, F.; Breure, A.M.; Andel, J.G. van

    1992-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are hazardous compounds originating from oil, tar, creosote, or from incomplete combustion of fossil fuels. Application of biotechnological techniques for remediation of polluted soils from PAH demonstrated that the high molecular compounds are degraded very slowly, and that the residual concentration of PAH often is too high to permit application of the treated soil. Investigations were started to establish process parameters for optimal biodegradation of PAH. The aim is to achieve a relation between the physical properties of PAH and the biodegradation kinetics in different matrices, in order to identify applicability of biotechnological cleanup methods for waste streams and polluted soil. (orig.) [de

  9. Fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, S.T.

    1982-01-01

    A nuclear reactor fuel element wherein a stack of nuclear fuel is prevented from displacement within its sheath by a retainer comprising a tube member which is radially expanded into frictional contact with the sheath by means of a captive ball within a tapered bore. (author)

  10. Nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, H [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1976-10-01

    It is expected that nuclear power generation will reach 49 million kW in 1985 and 129 million kW in 1995, and the nuclear fuel having to be supplied and processed will increase in proportion to these values. The technical problems concerning nuclear fuel are presented on the basis of the balance between the benefit for human beings and the burden on the human beings. Recently, especially the downstream of nuclear fuel attracts public attention. Enriched uranium as the raw material for light water reactor fuel is almost monopolized by the U.S., and the technical information has not been published for fear of the diversion to nuclear weapons. In this paper, the present situations of uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication, transportation, reprocessing and waste disposal and the future problems are described according to the path of nuclear fuel cycle. The demand and supply of enriched uranium in Japan will be balanced up to about 1988, but afterwards, the supply must rely upon the early establishment of the domestic technology by centrifugal separation method. No problem remains in the fabrication of light water reactor fuel, but for the fabrication of mixed oxide fuel, the mechanization of the production facility and labor saving are necessary. The solution of the capital risk for the construction of the second reprocessing plant is the main problem. Japan must develop waste disposal techniques with all-out efforts.

  11. Fuel cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, van J.A.R.; Janssen, F.J.J.G.; Santen, van R.A.

    1999-01-01

    The principles and present-day embodiments of fuel cells are discussed. Nearly all cells are hydrogen/oxygen ones, where the hydrogen fuel is usually obtained on-site from the reforming of methane or methanol. There exists a tension between the promise of high efficiency in the conversion of

  12. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Akiyoshi; Bessho, Yasunori; Aoyama, Motoo; Koyama, Jun-ichi; Hirakawa, Hiromasa; Yamashita, Jun-ichi; Hayashi, Tatsuo

    1998-01-01

    In a fuel assembly of a BWR type reactor in which a water rod of a large diameter is disposed at the central portion, the cross sectional area perpendicular to the axial direction comprises a region a of a fuel rod group facing to a wide gap water region to which a control rod is inserted, a region b of a fuel rod group disposed on the side of the wide gap water region other than the region a, a region d of a fuel rod group facing to a narrow gap water region and a region c of a fuel rod group disposed on the side of the narrow gap water region other than the region d. When comparing an amount of fission products contained in the four regions relative to that in the entire regions and average enrichment degrees of fuel rods for the four regions, the relative amount and the average enrichment degree of the fuel rod group of the region a is minimized, and the relative amount and the average enrichment degree of the fuel rod group in the region b is maximized. Then, reactor shut down margin during cold operation can be improved while flattening the power in the cross section perpendicular to the axial direction. (N.H.)

  13. Nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinauk, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    Since 1985, Fragema has been marketing and selling the Advanced Fuel Assemby AFA whose main features are its zircaloy grids and removable top and bottom nozzles. It is this product, which exists for several different fuel assembly arrays and heights, that will be employed in the reactors at Daya Bay. Fragema employs gadolinium as the consumable poison to enable highperformance fuel management. More recently, the company has supplied fuel assemblies of the mixed-oxide(MOX) and enriched reprocessed uranium type. The reliability level of the fuel sold by Fragema is one of the highest in the world, thanks in particular to the excellence of the quality assurance and quality control programs that have been implemented at all stages of its design and manufacture

  14. Fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Echigoya, Hironori; Nomata, Terumitsu.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To render the axial distribution relatively flat. Constitution: First nuclear element comprises a fuel can made of zircalloy i.e., the metal with less neutron absorption, which is filled with a plurality of UO 2 pellets and sealed by using a lower end plug, a plenum spring and an upper end plug by means of welding. Second fuel element is formed by substituting a part of the UO 2 pellets with a water tube which is sealed with water and has a space for allowing the heat expansion. The nuclear fuel assembly is constituted by using the first and second fuel elements together. In such a structure, since water reflects neutrons and decrease their leakage to increase the temperature, reactivity is added at the upper portion of the fuel assembly to thereby flatten the axial power distribution. Accordingly, stable operation is possible only by means of deep control rods while requiring no shallow control rods. (Sekiya, K.)

  15. Approaches to bioremediation of fossil fuel contaminated soil: An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-06-25

    Jun 25, 2014 ... particular, emphasis is placed on bacteria as biocatalysts of choice and their ability to degrade waste coal and ... petroleum and the non-volatile materials composed ...... reduction and rheology for pipeline transportation. Fuel ...

  16. Criteria for recladding of spent light water reactor fuel before long term pool storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettersson, K.; Jansson, L.

    1979-01-01

    The question of the need for any special treatment of failed fuel elements prior to long term pool storage has been studied. It is concluded that the main problem appears to be hydride embrittlement of failed fuel rods, which may lead to increased damage during handling and transport of the failed fuel. Some mechanisms for the degradation of failed fuel rods have been identified. They can all be considered as relatively improbable, but further experimental evidence is needed before it can be concluded that these degradation mechanisms are insignificant during pool storage. The report also contains a review of methods for identification of leaking fuel bundles and fuel rods. (Auth.)

  17. Criteria for recladding of spent light water reactor fuel before long term pool storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettersson, K.; Jansson, L.

    1979-06-01

    The question of the need for any special treatment of failed fuel elements prior to long term pool storage has been studied. It is concluded that the main problem appears to be hydride embrittlement of failed fuel rods, which may lead to increased damage during handling and transport of the failed fuel. Some mechanisms for the degradation of failed fuel rods have been identified. They can all be considered as relatively improbable, but further experimental evidence is needed before it can be concluded that thede degradation mechanisms are insignificant during pool storage. The report also contains a review of methods for identification of leaking fuel bundles and fuel rods.(author)

  18. Oxidative degradation of toluene and limonene in air by pulsed corona technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeben, W.F.L.M.; Beckers, F.J.C.M.; Pemen, A.J.M.; Heesch, van E.J.M.; Kling, W.L.

    2012-01-01

    The oxidative degradation of two volatile organic compounds, i.e. toluene (fossil fuel based VOC) and limonene (biogenic VOC), has been studied. A hybrid pulsed power corona reactor with adjustable energy density has been utilized for degradation of ppm level target compounds in large air flows. The

  19. TRU transmutation using ThO2-UO2 and fully ceramic micro-encapsulated fuels in LWR fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Gonghoon; Hong, Sergi

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work is to design new LWR fuel assemblies which are able to efficiently destroy TRU (transuranics) nuclide without degradation of safety aspects by using ThO 2 -UO 2 fuel pins and FCM (Fully Ceramic Micro-encapsulated) fuel pins containing TRU fuel particles. Thorium was mixed to UO 2 in order to reduce the generation of plutonium nuclides and to save the uranium resources in the UO 2 pins. Additionally, the use of thorium contributes to the extension of the fuel cycle length. All calculations were performed by using DeCART (Deterministic Core Analysis based on Ray Tracing) code. The results show that the new concept of fuel assembly has the TRU destruction rates of ∼40% and ∼25% per 1200 EFPD (Effective Full Power Day) over the TRU FCM pins and the overall fuel assembly, respectively, without degradation of FTC and MTC

  20. Physical models for high burnup fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanyukova, V.; Khoruzhii, O.; Likhanskii, V.; Solodovnikov, G.; Sorokin, A.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper some models of processes in high burnup fuel developed in Src of Russia Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research are presented. The emphasis is on the description of the degradation of the fuel heat conductivity, radial profiles of the burnup and the plutonium accumulation, restructuring of the pellet rim, mechanical pellet-cladding interaction. The results demonstrate the possibility of rather accurate description of the behaviour of the fuel of high burnup on the base of simplified models in frame of the fuel performance code if the models are physically ground. The development of such models requires the performance of the detailed physical analysis to serve as a test for a correct choice of allowable simplifications. This approach was applied in the SRC of Russia TRINITI to develop a set of models for the WWER fuel resulting in high reliability of predictions in simulation of the high burnup fuel

  1. Drift Degradation Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G.H. Nieder-Westermann

    2005-01-01

    The outputs from the drift degradation analysis support scientific analyses, models, and design calculations, including the following: (1) Abstraction of Drift Seepage; (2) Seismic Consequence Abstraction; (3) Structural Stability of a Drip Shield Under Quasi-Static Pressure; and (4) Drip Shield Structural Response to Rock Fall. This report has been developed in accordance with ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling of Drift Degradation, Waste Package and Drip Shield Vibratory Motion and Seismic Consequences'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171520]). The drift degradation analysis includes the development and validation of rockfall models that approximate phenomenon associated with various components of rock mass behavior anticipated within the repository horizon. Two drift degradation rockfall models have been developed: the rockfall model for nonlithophysal rock and the rockfall model for lithophysal rock. These models reflect the two distinct types of tuffaceous rock at Yucca Mountain. The output of this modeling and analysis activity documents the expected drift deterioration for drifts constructed in accordance with the repository layout configuration (BSC 2004 [DIRS 172801])

  2. Bacterial Degradation of Pesticides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Berith Elkær

    could potentially improve bioremediation of BAM. An important prerequisite for bioaugmentation is the potential to produce the degrader strain at large quantities within reasonable time. The aim of manuscript II, was to optimize the growth medium for Aminobacter MSH1 and to elucidate optimal growth...

  3. Radiation degradation of silk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishida, Kazushige; Kamiishi, Youichi [Textile Research Institute of Gunma, Kiryu, Gunma (Japan); Takeshita, Hidefumi; Yoshii, Fumio; Kume, Tamikazu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    2001-03-01

    Silk fibroin powder was prepared from irradiated silk fibroin fiber by means of only physical treatment. Silk fibroin fiber irradiated with an accelerated electron beam in the dose range of 250 - 1000 kGy was pulverized by using a ball mill. Unirradiated silk fibroin fiber was not pulverized at all. But the more irradiation was increased, the more the conversion efficiency from fiber to powder was increased. The conversion efficiency of silk fibroin fiber irradiated 1000 kGy in oxygen was 94%. Silk fibroin powder shows remarkable solubility, which dissolved 57% into water of ambient temperature. It is a very interesting phenomenon that silk fibroin which did not treat with chemicals gets solubility only being pulverized. In order to study mechanism of solubilization of silk fibroin powder, amino acid component of soluble part of silk fibroin powder was analyzed. The more irradiation dose up, the more glycine or alanine degraded, but degradation fraction reached bounds about 50%. Other amino acids were degraded only 20% even at the maximum. To consider crystal construction of silk fibroin, it is suggested that irradiation on silk fibroin fiber selectively degrades glycine and alanine in amorphous region, which makes it possible to pulverize and to dissolve silk fibroin powder. (author)

  4. Detection of pump degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, R.H.; Casada, D.A.; Ayers, C.W.

    1995-08-01

    This Phase II Nuclear Plant Aging Research study examines the methods of detecting pump degradation that are currently employed in domestic and overseas nuclear facilities. This report evaluates the criteria mandated by required pump testing at U.S. nuclear power plants and compares them to those features characteristic of state-of-the-art diagnostic programs and practices currently implemented by other major industries. Since the working condition of the pump driver is crucial to pump operability, a brief review of new applications of motor diagnostics is provided that highlights recent developments in this technology. The routine collection and analysis of spectral data is superior to all other technologies in its ability to accurately detect numerous types and causes of pump degradation. Existing ASME Code testing criteria do not require the evaluation of pump vibration spectra but instead overall vibration amplitude. The mechanical information discernible from vibration amplitude analysis is limited, and several cases of pump failure were not detected in their early stages by vibration monitoring. Since spectral analysis can provide a wealth of pertinent information concerning the mechanical condition of rotating machinery, its incorporation into ASME testing criteria could merit a relaxation in the monthly-to-quarterly testing schedules that seek to verify and assure pump operability. Pump drivers are not included in the current battery of testing. Operational problems thought to be caused by pump degradation were found to be the result of motor degradation. Recent advances in nonintrusive monitoring techniques have made motor diagnostics a viable technology for assessing motor operability. Motor current/power analysis can detect rotor bar degradation and ascertain ranges of hydraulically unstable operation for a particular pump and motor set. The concept of using motor current or power fluctuations as an indicator of pump hydraulic load stability is presented

  5. Detection of pump degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, R.H.; Casada, D.A.; Ayers, C.W. [and others

    1995-08-01

    This Phase II Nuclear Plant Aging Research study examines the methods of detecting pump degradation that are currently employed in domestic and overseas nuclear facilities. This report evaluates the criteria mandated by required pump testing at U.S. nuclear power plants and compares them to those features characteristic of state-of-the-art diagnostic programs and practices currently implemented by other major industries. Since the working condition of the pump driver is crucial to pump operability, a brief review of new applications of motor diagnostics is provided that highlights recent developments in this technology. The routine collection and analysis of spectral data is superior to all other technologies in its ability to accurately detect numerous types and causes of pump degradation. Existing ASME Code testing criteria do not require the evaluation of pump vibration spectra but instead overall vibration amplitude. The mechanical information discernible from vibration amplitude analysis is limited, and several cases of pump failure were not detected in their early stages by vibration monitoring. Since spectral analysis can provide a wealth of pertinent information concerning the mechanical condition of rotating machinery, its incorporation into ASME testing criteria could merit a relaxation in the monthly-to-quarterly testing schedules that seek to verify and assure pump operability. Pump drivers are not included in the current battery of testing. Operational problems thought to be caused by pump degradation were found to be the result of motor degradation. Recent advances in nonintrusive monitoring techniques have made motor diagnostics a viable technology for assessing motor operability. Motor current/power analysis can detect rotor bar degradation and ascertain ranges of hydraulically unstable operation for a particular pump and motor set. The concept of using motor current or power fluctuations as an indicator of pump hydraulic load stability is presented.

  6. Diesel fuel stability; Estabilidade de oleo diesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Marcelo V.; Pinto, Ricardo R.C. [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Zotin, Fatima M.Z. [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The demand for the reduction of the pollutants emissions by diesel engines has led to the adoption of more advanced injection systems and concern about fuel stability. The degradation of the diesel fuel can happen during storage and distribution, according to the acid-catalysed condensation of aromatic compounds such phenalenones and indolic nitrogenated heterocyclic compounds. These precursors appear in several streams used in diesel fuel formulation. In this study the sediment formation in model and real, aromatic and paraffinic fuels, containing such precursors naturally or by addition was analysed. The fuels were submitted to accelerated (16 hours at 90 deg C) and long term (13 weeks at 43 deg C) storage stability tests. The model fuels responded positively to the storage stability tests with formation of sediments, concluding that these methods can be considered adequate to verify the occurrence of the studied degradation process. The real fuels response was even more due to their chemical complexity, composition and impurities. The formation of sediments showed to be affected by the hydrocarbon distribution of the fuels. (author)

  7. Fuel cells:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent

    2013-01-01

    A brief overview of the progress in fuel cell applications and basic technology development is presented, as a backdrop for discussing readiness for penetration into the marketplace as a solution to problems of depletion, safety, climate or environmental impact from currently used fossil and nucl......A brief overview of the progress in fuel cell applications and basic technology development is presented, as a backdrop for discussing readiness for penetration into the marketplace as a solution to problems of depletion, safety, climate or environmental impact from currently used fossil...... and nuclear fuel-based energy technologies....

  8. Fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatsuka, Masafumi.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent scattering of gaseous fission products released from fuel assemblies stored in an fbr type reactor. Constitution; A cap provided with means capable of storing gas is adapted to amount to the assembly handling head, for example, by way of threading in a storage rack of spent fuel assemblies consisting of a bottom plate, a top plate and an assembly support mechanism. By previously eliminating the gas inside of the assembly and the cap in the storage rack, gaseous fission products upon loading, if released from fuel rods during storage, are stored in the cap and do not scatter in the storage rack. (Horiuchi, T.)

  9. Advanced fuels for gas turbines: Fuel system corrosion, hot path deposit formation and emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seljak, Tine; Širok, Brane; Katrašnik, Tomaž

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Technical feasibility analysis of alternative fuels requires a holistic approach. • Fuel, combustion, corrosion and component functionality are strongly related. • Used approach defines design constraints for microturbines using alternative fuels. - Abstract: To further expand the knowledge base on the use of innovative fuels in the micro gas turbines, this paper provides insight into interrelation between specific fuel properties and their impact on combustion and emission formation phenomena in micro gas turbines for stationary power generation as well as their impact on material corrosion and deposit formation. The objective of this study is to identify potential issues that can be related to specific fuel properties and to propose counter measures for achieving stable, durable, efficient and low emission operation of the micro gas turbine while utilizing advanced/innovative fuels. This is done by coupling combustion and emission formation analyses to analyses of material degradation and degradation of component functionality while interpreting them through fuel-specific properties. To ensure sufficiently broad range of fuel properties to demonstrate the applicability of the method, two different fuels with significantly different properties are analysed, i.e. tire pyrolysis oil and liquefied wood. It is shown that extent of required micro gas turbine adaptations strongly correlates with deviations of the fuel properties from those of the baseline fuel. Through the study, these adaptations are supported by in-depth analyses of impacts of fuel properties on different components, parameters and subsystems and their quantification. This holistic approach is further used to propose methodologies and innovative approaches for constraining a design space of micro gas turbine to successfully utilize wide spectra of alternative/innovative fuels.

  10. The legacy of fossil fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armaroli, Nicola; Balzani, Vincenzo

    2011-03-01

    Currently, over 80% of the energy used by mankind comes from fossil fuels. Harnessing coal, oil and gas, the energy resources contained in the store of our spaceship, Earth, has prompted a dramatic expansion in energy use and a substantial improvement in the quality of life of billions of individuals in some regions of the world. Powering our civilization with fossil fuels has been very convenient, but now we know that it entails severe consequences. We treat fossil fuels as a resource that anyone anywhere can extract and use in any fashion, and Earth's atmosphere, soil and oceans as a dump for their waste products, including more than 30 Gt/y of carbon dioxide. At present, environmental legacy rather than consistence of exploitable reserves, is the most dramatic problem posed by the relentless increase of fossil fuel global demand. Harmful effects on the environment and human health, usually not incorporated into the pricing of fossil fuels, include immediate and short-term impacts related to their discovery, extraction, transportation, distribution, and burning as well as climate change that are spread over time to future generations or over space to the entire planet. In this essay, several aspects of the fossil fuel legacy are discussed, such as alteration of the carbon cycle, carbon dioxide rise and its measurement, greenhouse effect, anthropogenic climate change, air pollution and human health, geoengineering proposals, land and water degradation, economic problems, indirect effects on the society, and the urgent need of regulatory efforts and related actions to promote a gradual transition out of the fossil fuel era. While manufacturing sustainable solar fuels appears to be a longer-time perspective, alternatives energy sources already exist that have the potential to replace fossil fuels as feedstocks for electricity production. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. The legacy of fossil fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armaroli, N.; Balzani, V. [CNR, Bologna (Italy)

    2011-03-01

    Currently, over 80% of the energy used by mankind comes from fossil fuels. Harnessing coal, oil and gas, the energy resources contained in the store of our spaceship, Earth, has prompted a dramatic expansion in energy use and a substantial improvement in the quality of life of billions of individuals in some regions of the world. Powering our civilization with fossil fuels has been very convenient, but now we know that it entails severe consequences. We treat fossil fuels as a resource that anyone anywhere can extract and use in any fashion, and Earth's atmosphere, soil and oceans as a dump for their waste products, including more than 30 Gt/y of carbon dioxide. At present, environmental legacy rather than consistence of exploitable reserves, is the most dramatic problem posed by the relentless increase of fossil fuel global demand. Harmful effects on the environment and human health, usually not incorporated into the pricing of fossil fuels, include immediate and short-term impacts related to their discovery, extraction, transportation, distribution, and burning as well as climate change that are spread over time to future generations or over space to the entire planet. In this essay, several aspects of the fossil fuel legacy are discussed, such as alteration of the carbon cycle, carbon dioxide rise and its measurement, greenhouse effect, anthropogenic climate change, air pollution and human health, geoengineering proposals, land and water degradation, economic problems, indirect effects on the society, and the urgent need of regulatory efforts and related actions to promote a gradual transition out of the fossil fuel era. While manufacturing sustainable solar fuels appears to be a longer-time perspective, alternatives energy sources already exist that have the potential to replace fossil fuels as feedstocks for electricity production.

  12. Hetero-atom doped carbon nanotubes for dye degradation and oxygen reduction reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandan, Ravi, E-mail: aerawat27@gmail.com; Nanda, Karuna Kar [Materials Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore-560012 (India)

    2015-06-24

    We report the synthesis of nitrogen doped vertically aligned multi-walled (MWNCNTs) carbon nanotubes by pyrolysis and its catalytic performance for degradation of methylene blue (MB) dye & oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The degradation of MB was monitored spectrophotometrically with time. Kinetic studies show the degradation of MB follows a first order kinetic with rate constant k=0.0178 min{sup −1}. The present rate constant is better than that reported for various supported/non-supported semiconducting nanomaterials. Further ORR performance in alkaline media makes MWNCNTs a promising cost-effective, fuel crossover tolerance, metal-free, eco-friendly cathode catalyst for direct alcohol fuel cell.

  13. Fuel behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fodor, M.; Matus, L.; Vigassy, J.

    1987-11-01

    A short summary of the main critical points in fuel performance of nuclear power reactors from chemical and mechanical point of view is given. A schedule for a limited research program is included. (author) 17 refs

  14. Fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niederdoeckl, J.

    2001-01-01

    Europe has at present big hopes on the fuel cells technology, in comparison with other energy conversion technologies, this technology has important advantages, for example: high efficiency, very low pollution and parallel use of electric and thermal energy. Preliminary works for fuel cells developing and its commercial exploitation are at full speed; until now the European Union has invested approx. 1.7 billion Schillings, 60 relevant projects are being executed. The Austrian industry is interested in applying this technique to drives, thermal power stations and the miniature fuel cells as replacement of batteries in electronic products (Notebooks, mobile telephones, etc.). A general description of the historic development of fuel cells including the main types is given as well as what is the situation in Austria. (nevyjel)

  15. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishibashi, Yoko; Aoyama, Motoo; Oyama, Jun-ichi.

    1995-01-01

    Burnable poison-incorporating fuel rods of a first group are disposed in a region in adjacent with a water rod having a large diameter (neutron moderator rod) disposed to the central portion of a fuel assembly. Burnable poison-incorporating fuel rods of a second group are disposed to a region other than peripheral zone in adjacent with a channel box and corners positioned at an inner zone, in adjacent with the channel box. The average concentration of burnable poisons of the burnable poison-incorporating fuel rods of the first group is made greater than that of the second group. With such a constitution, when the burnable poisons of the first group are burnt out, the burnable poisons of the second group are also burnt out at the same time. Accordingly, an amount of burnable poisons left unburnt at the final stage of the operation cycle is reduced, to improve the reactivity. This can improve the economical property. (I.N.)

  16. Degradation of acrylonitrile butadiene rubber and fluoroelastomers in rapeseed biodiesel and hydrogenated vegetable oil

    OpenAIRE

    Akhlaghi, Shahin

    2017-01-01

    Biodiesel and hydrotreated vegetable oil (HVO) are currently viewed by the transportation sector as the most viable alternative fuels to replace petroleum-based fuels. The use of biodiesel has, however, been limited by the deteriorative effect of biodiesel on rubber parts in automobile fuel systems. This work therefore aimed at investigating the degradation of acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) and fluoroelastomers (FKM) on exposure to biodiesel and HVO at different temperatures and oxygen ...

  17. Fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armijo, J.S.

    1976-01-01

    A fuel element for nuclear reactors is proposed which has a higher corrosion resisting quality in reactor operations. The zirconium alloy coating around the fuel element (uranium or plutonium compound) has on its inside a protection layer of metal which is metallurgically bound to the substance of the coating. As materials are namned: Alluminium, copper, niobium, stainless steel, and iron. This protective metallic layer has another inner layer, also metallurgically bound to its surface, which consists usually of a zirconium alloy. (UWI) [de

  18. Current perceptions of spent nuclear fuel behavior in water pool storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.

    1977-06-01

    A survey was conducted of a cross section of U.S. and Canadian fuel storage pool operators to define the spent fuel behavior and to establish the range of pool storage environments. There is no evidence for significant corrosion degradation. Fuel handling causes only minimal damage. Most fuel bundles with defects generally are stored without special procedures. Successful fuel storage up to 18 years with benign water chemistry has been demonstrated. 2 tables

  19. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Sei; Ando, Ryohei; Mitsutake, Toru.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention concerns a fuel assembly suitable to a BWR-type reactor and improved especially with the nuclear characteristic, heat performance, hydraulic performance, dismantling or assembling performance and economical property. A part of poison rods are formed as a large-diameter/multi-region poison rods having a larger diameter than a fuel rod. A large number of fuel rods are disposed surrounding a large diameter water rod and a group of the large-diameter/multi-region poison rods in adjacent with the water rod. The large-diameter water rod has a burnable poison at the tube wall portion. At least a portion of the large-diameter poison rods has a coolant circulation portion allowing coolants to circulate therethrough. Since the large-diameter poison rods are disposed at a position of high neutron fluxes, a large neutron multiplication factor suppression effect can be provided, thereby enabling to reduce the number of burnable poison rods relative to fuels. As a result, power peaking in the fuel assembly is moderated and a greater amount of plutonium can be loaded. In addition the flow of cooling water which tends to gather around the large diameter water rod can be controlled to improve cooling performance of fuels. (N.H.)

  20. Rapidly Degradable Pyrotechnic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    material system (structural polymer and degradation agent ) for producing a high strength, non-corroding, highly inert, environmentally safe, extended...polymer sites in the active enzyme center differs dramatically between alkyl and aromatic polyesters. More specifically, as the degree of backbone...capped and centrifuged at 3,000 g. This procedure was repeated twice. To the remaining biomass pellet 15 mL of 1 mg/mL solution of N-ethyl-N- nitrosourea

  1. Radiation degradation of chitosan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norzita Yacob; Maznah Mahmud; Norhashidah Talip; Kamarudin Bahari; Kamaruddin Hashim; Khairul Zaman Dahlan

    2010-01-01

    In order to obtain an oligo chitosan, degradation of chitosan s were carried out in solid state and liquid state. The effects of an irradiation on the molecular weight and viscosity of the chitosan were investigated using Ubbelohde Capillary Viscometer and Brookfield Viscometer respectively. The molecular weight and viscosity of the chitosan s were decreased with an increase in the irradiation dose. In the presence of hydrogen peroxide, the molecular weight of chitosan can be further decreased. (author)

  2. Detection of pump degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casada, D.

    1994-01-01

    There are a variety of stressors that can affect the operation of centrifugal pumps. Although these general stressors are active in essentially all centrifugal pumps, the stressor level and the extent of wear and degradation can vary greatly. Parameters that affect the extent of stressor activity are manifold. In order to assure the long-term operational readiness of a pump, it is important to both understand the nature and magnitude of the specific degradation mechanisms and to monitor the performance of the pump. The most commonly applied method of monitoring the condition of not only pumps, but rotating machinery in general, is vibration analysis. Periodic or continuous spectral vibration analysis is a cornerstone of most pump monitoring programs. In the nuclear industry, non-spectral vibration monitoring of safety-related pumps is performed in accordance with the ASME code. Although vibration analysis has dominated the condition monitoring field for many years, there are other measures that have been historically used to help understand pump condition: advances in historically applied technologies and developing technologies offer improved monitoring capabilities. The capabilities of several technologies (including vibration analysis, dynamic pressure analysis, and motor power analysis) to detect the presence and magnitude of both stressors and resultant degradation are discussed

  3. Detection of pump degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casada, D.

    1995-01-01

    There are a variety of stressors that can affect the operation of centrifugal pumps. Although these general stressors are active in essentially all centrifugal pumps, the stressor level and the extent of wear and degradation can vary greatly. Parameters that affect the extent of stressor activity are manifold. In order to assure the long-term operational readiness of a pump, it is important to both understand the nature and magnitude of the specific degradation mechanisms and to monitor the performance of the pump. The most commonly applied method of monitoring the condition of not only pumps, but rotating machinery in general, is vibration analysis. Periodic or continuous special vibration analysis is a cornerstone of most pump monitoring programs. In the nuclear industry, non-spectral vibration monitoring of safety-related pumps is performed in accordance with the ASME code. Pump head and flow rate are also monitored, per code requirements. Although vibration analysis has dominated the condition monitoring field for many years, there are other measures that have been historically used to help understand pump condition; advances in historically applied technologies and developing technologies offer improved monitoring capabilities. The capabilities of several technologies (including vibration analysis, dynamic pressure analysis, and motor power analysis) to detect the presence and magnitude of both stressors and resultant degradation are discussed

  4. WEATHERABILITY OF ENHANCED DEGRADABLE PLASTICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The main objective of this study was to assess the performance and the asociated variability of several selected enhanced degradable plastic materials under a variety of different exposure conditions. Other objectives were to identify the major products formed during degradation ...

  5. Effect of concentration gradients on biodegradation in bench-scale sand columns with HYDRUS modeling of hydrocarbon transport and degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horel, Agota; Schiewer, Silke; Misra, Debasmita

    2015-09-01

    The present research investigated to what extent results obtained in small microcosm experiments can be extrapolated to larger settings with non-uniform concentrations. Microbial hydrocarbon degradation in sandy sediments was compared for column experiments versus homogenized microcosms with varying concentrations of diesel, Syntroleum, and fish biodiesel as contaminants. Syntroleum and fish biodiesel had higher degradation rates than diesel fuel. Microcosms showed significantly higher overall hydrocarbon mineralization percentages (p transport and degradation of the investigated fuels in vadose zone conditions similar to those in laboratory column experiments. The numerical model was used to evaluate the impact of different degradation rate constants from microcosm versus column experiments.

  6. Arrangement of fuel cell system for TNRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nojima, Takehiro; Yasuda, Ryo; Iikura, Hiroshi; Sakai, Takuro; Matsubayashi, Masahito; Takenaka, Nobuyuki; Hayashida, Hirotoshi

    2012-02-01

    Polymer electrolyte fuel cells (fuel cells) can be potentially employed as sources of clean energy because they discharge only water as by-products. Fuel cells generate electricity with supply of oxygen and hydrogen gases. However, the water produced by the fuel cells blocks the gas supply, thereby degrading their performances. Therefore, it is important to understand the behavior of the water produced by the fuel cells in order to facilitate their development. Neutron radiography is a useful tool for visualizing the distribution of water in fuel cells. We have designed fuel cell operation system for TNRF (Thermal Neutron Radiography Facility) at JRR-3. The fuel cell operation system consists of various components such as gas flow and humidification systems, hydrogen-diluting system, purge system, and safety system for hydrogen gas. We tested this system using a Japan Automobile Research Institute (JARI) standard cell. The system performed stably and efficiently. In addition, neutron radiography tests were carried out to visualize the water distribution. The water produced by the fuel cell was observed during the fuel cell operation. (author)

  7. Fuel Cell Power Plant Initiative. Volume 1; Solid Oxide Fuel Cell/Logistics Fuel Processor 27 kWe Power System Demonstration for ARPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veyo, S.E.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the successful testing of a 27 kWe Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) generator fueled by natural gas and/or a fuel gas produced by a brassboard logistics fuel preprocessor (LFP). The test period began on May 24, 1995 and ended on February 26, 1996 with the successful completion of all program requirements and objectives. During this time period, this power system produced 118.2 MWh of electric power. No degradation of the generator's performance was measured after 5582 accumulated hours of operation on these fuels: local natural gas - 3261 hours, jet fuel reformate gas - 766 hours, and diesel fuel reformate gas - 1555 hours. This SOFC generator was thermally cycled from full operating temperature to room temperature and back to operating temperature six times, because of failures of support system components and the occasional loss of test site power, without measurable cell degradation. Numerous outages of the LFP did not interrupt the generator's operation because the fuel control system quickly switched to local natural gas when an alarm indicated that the LFP reformate fuel supply had been interrupted. The report presents the measured electrical performance of the generator on all three fuel types and notes the small differences due to fuel type. Operational difficulties due to component failures are well documented even though they did not affect the overall excellent performance of this SOFC power generator. The final two appendices describe in detail the LFP design and the operating history of the tested brassboard LFP.

  8. Impact of Fuel Failure on Criticality Safety of Used Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, William J.; Wagner, John C.

    2012-01-01

    Commercial used nuclear fuel (UNF) in the United States is expected to remain in storage for considerably longer periods than originally intended (e.g., 45 GWd/t) may increase the potential for fuel failure during normal and accident conditions involving storage and transportation. Fuel failure, depending on the severity, can result in changes to the geometric configuration of the fuel, which has safety and regulatory implications. The likelihood and extent of fuel reconfiguration and its impact on the safety of the UNF is not well understood. The objective of this work is to assess and quantify the impact of fuel reconfiguration due to fuel failure on criticality safety of UNF in storage and transportation casks. This effort is primarily motivated by concerns related to the potential for fuel degradation during ES periods and transportation following ES. The criticality analyses consider representative UNF designs and cask systems and a range of fuel enrichments, burnups, and cooling times. The various failed-fuel configurations considered are designed to bound the anticipated effects of individual rod and general cladding failure, fuel rod deformation, loss of neutron absorber materials, degradation of canister internals, and gross assembly failure. The results quantify the potential impact on criticality safety associated with fuel reconfiguration and may be used to guide future research, design, and regulatory activities. Although it can be concluded that the criticality safety impacts of fuel reconfiguration during transportation subsequent to ES are manageable, the results indicate that certain configurations can result in a large increase in the effective neutron multiplication factor, k eff . Future work to inform decision making relative to which configurations are credible, and therefore need to be considered in a safety evaluation, is recommended.

  9. AAA-ATPases in Protein Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravikiran S. Yedidi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Proteolytic machineries containing multisubunit protease complexes and AAA-ATPases play a key role in protein quality control and the regulation of protein homeostasis. In these protein degradation machineries, the proteolytically active sites are formed by either threonines or serines which are buried inside interior cavities of cylinder-shaped complexes. In eukaryotic cells, the proteasome is the most prominent protease complex harboring AAA-ATPases. To degrade protein substrates, the gates of the axial entry ports of the protease need to be open. Gate opening is accomplished by AAA-ATPases, which form a hexameric ring flanking the entry ports of the protease. Protein substrates with unstructured domains can loop into the entry ports without the assistance of AAA-ATPases. However, folded proteins require the action of AAA-ATPases to unveil an unstructured terminus or domain. Cycles of ATP binding/hydrolysis fuel the unfolding of protein substrates which are gripped by loops lining up the central pore of the AAA-ATPase ring. The AAA-ATPases pull on the unfolded polypeptide chain for translocation into the proteolytic cavity of the protease. Conformational changes within the AAA-ATPase ring and the adjacent protease chamber create a peristaltic movement for substrate degradation. The review focuses on new technologies toward the understanding of the function and structure of AAA-ATPases to achieve substrate recognition, unfolding and translocation into proteasomes in yeast and mammalian cells and into proteasome-equivalent proteases in bacteria and archaea.

  10. AAA-ATPases in Protein Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yedidi, Ravikiran S; Wendler, Petra; Enenkel, Cordula

    2017-01-01

    Proteolytic machineries containing multisubunit protease complexes and AAA-ATPases play a key role in protein quality control and the regulation of protein homeostasis. In these protein degradation machineries, the proteolytically active sites are formed by either threonines or serines which are buried inside interior cavities of cylinder-shaped complexes. In eukaryotic cells, the proteasome is the most prominent protease complex harboring AAA-ATPases. To degrade protein substrates, the gates of the axial entry ports of the protease need to be open. Gate opening is accomplished by AAA-ATPases, which form a hexameric ring flanking the entry ports of the protease. Protein substrates with unstructured domains can loop into the entry ports without the assistance of AAA-ATPases. However, folded proteins require the action of AAA-ATPases to unveil an unstructured terminus or domain. Cycles of ATP binding/hydrolysis fuel the unfolding of protein substrates which are gripped by loops lining up the central pore of the AAA-ATPase ring. The AAA-ATPases pull on the unfolded polypeptide chain for translocation into the proteolytic cavity of the protease. Conformational changes within the AAA-ATPase ring and the adjacent protease chamber create a peristaltic movement for substrate degradation. The review focuses on new technologies toward the understanding of the function and structure of AAA-ATPases to achieve substrate recognition, unfolding and translocation into proteasomes in yeast and mammalian cells and into proteasome-equivalent proteases in bacteria and archaea.

  11. Fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Hajime; Ueda, Makoto

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a structure capable of measuring, in a non-destructive manner, the releasing amount of nuclear gaseous fission products from spent fuels easily and at a high accuracy. Constitution: In order to confirm the integrity and the design feasibility of a nuclear fuel rod, it is important to accurately determine the amount of gaseous nuclear fission products released from nuclear pellets. In a structure where a plurality of fuel pellets are charged in a fuel cladding tube and retained by an inconel spring, a hollow and no-sealed type spacer tube made of zirconium or the alloy thereof, for example, not containing iron, cobalt, nickel or manganese is formed between the spring and the upper end plug. In the fuel rod of such a structure, by disposing a gamma ray collimator and a gamma ray detector on the extension of the spacer pipe, the gamma rays from the gaseous nuclear fission products accumulated in the spacer pipe can be detected while avoiding the interference with the induction radioactivity from inconel. (Kamimura, M.)

  12. Fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Shinji; Kajiwara, Koichi.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To ensure the safety for the fuel rod failures by adapting plenum springs to function when small forces such as during transportation of fuel rods is exerted and not to function the resilient force when a relatively great force is exerted. Constitution: Between an upper end plug and a plenum spring in a fuel rod, is disposed an insertion member to the lower portion of which is mounted a pin. This pin is kept upright and causes the plenum spring to function resiliently to the pellets against the loads due to accelerations and mechanical vibrations exerted during transportation of the fuel rods. While on the other hand, if a compression force of a relatively high level is exerted to the plenum spring during reactor operation, the pin of the insertion member is buckled and the insertion member is inserted to the inside of the plenum spring, whereby the pellets are allowed to expand freely and the failures in the fuel elements can be prevented. (Moriyama, K.)

  13. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Hideaki; Sakai, Takao; Ishida, Tomio; Yokota, Norikatsu.

    1992-01-01

    The lower ends of a plurality of plate-like shape memory alloys are secured at the periphery of the upper inside of the handling head of a fuel assembly. As the shape memory alloy, a Cu-Zn alloy, a Ti-Pd alloy or a Fe-Ni alloy is used. When high temperature coolants flow out to the handling head, the shape memory alloy deforms by warping to the outer side more greatly toward the upper portion thereof with the temperature increase of the coolants. As the result, the shape of the flow channel of the coolants is changed so as to enlarge at the exit of the upper end of the fuel assembly. Then, the pressure loss of the coolants in the fuel assembly is decreased by the enlargement. Accordingly, the flow rate of the coolants in the fuel assembly is increased to lower the temperature of the coolants. Further, high temperature coolants and low temperature coolants are mixed sufficiently just above the fuel assembly. This can suppress the temperature fluctuation of the mixed coolants in the upper portion of the reactor core, thereby enabling to decrease a fatigue and failures of the structural components in the upper portion of the reactor core. (I.N.)

  14. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sano, Hiroki; Fushimi, Atsushi; Tominaga, Kenji; Aoyama, Motoo; Ishii, Kazuya.

    1997-01-01

    In burnable poison-incorporated uranium fuels of a BWR type reactor, the compositional ratio of isotopes of the burnable poisons is changed so as to increase the amount of those having a large neutron absorbing cross sectional area. For example, if the ratio of Gd-157 at the same burnable poison enrichment degree is made greater than the natural ratio, this gives the same effect as the increase of the enrichment degree per one fuel rod, thereby providing an effect of reducing a surplus reactivity. Gadolinium, hafnium and europium as burnable poisons have an absorbing cross sectional area being greater in odd numbered nuclei than in even numbered nuclei, on the contrary, boron has a cross section being greater in even numbered nucleus than odd numbered nuclei. Accordingly, if the ratio of isotopes having greater cross section at the same burnable poison enrichment degree is made greater than the natural ratio, surplus reactivity at the initial stage of the burning can be reduced without greatly increasing the amount of burnable poison-incorporated uranium fuels, fuel loading amount is not reduced and the fuel economy is not worsened. (N.H.)

  15. Canadian power reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Page, R.D.

    1976-03-01

    The following subjects are covered: the basic CANDU fuel design, the history of the bundle design, the significant differences between CANDU and LWR fuel, bundle manufacture, fissile and structural materials and coolants used in the CANDU fuel program, fuel and material behaviour, and performance under irradiation, fuel physics and management, booster rods and reactivity mechanisms, fuel procurement, organization and industry, and fuel costs. (author)

  16. PBF severe fuel damage program: results and comparison to analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, P.E.; Buescher, B.J.; Gruen, G.E.; Hobbins, R.R.; McCardell, R.K.

    1983-01-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission has initiated a severe fuel damage research program in the Power Burst Facility (PBF) to investigate fuel rod and core response, and fission product and hydrogen release and transport under degraded core cooling accident conditions. This paper presents a description of Phase I of the PBF Severe Fuel Damage Program, discusses the results of the first experiment, and compares those results with analysis performed using the TRAC-BD1 computer code

  17. Statistical modeling for degradation data

    CERN Document Server

    Lio, Yuhlong; Ng, Hon; Tsai, Tzong-Ru

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on the statistical aspects of the analysis of degradation data. In recent years, degradation data analysis has come to play an increasingly important role in different disciplines such as reliability, public health sciences, and finance. For example, information on products’ reliability can be obtained by analyzing degradation data. In addition, statistical modeling and inference techniques have been developed on the basis of different degradation measures. The book brings together experts engaged in statistical modeling and inference, presenting and discussing important recent advances in degradation data analysis and related applications. The topics covered are timely and have considerable potential to impact both statistics and reliability engineering.

  18. Fuel System Compatibility Issues for Prometheus-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DC-- Noe; KB Gibbard; MH Krohn

    2006-01-01

    Compatibility issues for the Prometheus-1 fuel system have been reviewed based upon the selection of UO 2 as the reference fuel material. In particular, the potential for limiting effects due to fuel- or fission product-component (cladding, liner, spring, etc) chemical interactions and clad-liner interactions have been evaluated. For UO 2 -based fuels, fuel-component interactions are not expected to significantly limit performance. However, based upon the selection of component materials, there is a potential for degradation due to fission products. In particular, a chemical liner may be necessary for niobium, tantalum, zirconium, or silicon carbide-based systems. Multiple choices exist for the configuration of a chemical liner within the cladding; there is no clear solution that eliminates all concerns over the mechanical performance of a clad/liner system. A series of tests to evaluate the performance of candidate materials in contact with real and simulated fission products is outlined

  19. Radiation degradation of cellulose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonhardt, J.; Arnold, G.; Baer, M.; Langguth, H.; Gey, M.; Huebert, S.

    1985-01-01

    The application of straw and other cellulose polymers as feedstuff for ruminants is limited by its low digestibility. During recent decades it was attempted to increase the digestibility of straw by several chemical and physical methods. In this work some results of the degradation of gamma and electron treated wheat straw are reported. Complex methods of treatment are taken into consideration. In vitro-experiments with radiation treated straw show that the digestibility can be increased from 20% up to about 80%. A high pressure liquid chromatography method was used to analyze the hydrolysates. The contents of certain species of carbohydrates in the hydrolysates in dependence on the applied dose are given. (author)

  20. Chemical degradation of pentachlorophenol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, S.S.; Shukla, A.; Chandrasekharaiah, M.S.

    1992-01-01

    Industry produces a large volume of hazardous wastes containing pentachlorophenol, a U.S. EPA priority hazardous organic material. The environmentally safe disposal of these PCP-contaminated wastes is a serious problem for the waste management authorities as the current treatment processes are unsatisfactory. In this paper, the results of a feasibility study of chemical degradation and/or solidification methods for PCP-containing wastes. The photochemical decomposition of the PCP in a microemulsion or in micellar media obtained with the help of SDS or CTAB show the greatest promise

  1. Radiation degradation of polymethacrylamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connor, D.J.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of radiation on polymers have been studied for many years. When polymers are subjected to ultraviolet light or ionizing radiation, chain scission and crosslinking are possible. The radiation degradations of several methacrylate type polymers were investigated. The primary polymer studied was polymethacrylamide (PMAAm). Ultraviolet irradiated PMAAm yielded a five line ESR spectrum with 22 gauss splitting which is believed to arise from a polymeric radical ending with a methacrylamide unit. The results obtained indicate that polymethacrylamide is a polymer which undergoes main chain cleavage upon irradiation. As such this polymer may have potential applicability as a positive resist for fabrication of microelectronic devices

  2. CANDU fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacEwan, J.R.; Notley, M.J.F.; Wood, J.C.; Gacesa, M.

    1982-09-01

    The direction of CANDU fuel development was set in 1957 with the decision to build pressure tube reactors. Short - 50 cm long - rodded bundles of natural UO 2 clad in Zircaloy were adopted to facilitate on-power fuelling to improve uranium utilization. Progressive improvements were made during 25 years of development, involving 650 man years and 180 million dollars. Today's CANDU bundle is based on the knowledge gained from extensive irradiation testing and experience in power reactors. The main thrust of future development is to demonstrate that the present bundle is suitable, with minor modifications, for thorium fuels

  3. Generic Degraded Congiguration Probability Analysis for DOE Codisposal Waste Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.F.A. Deng; M. Saglam; L.J. Gratton

    2001-05-23

    In accordance with the technical work plan, ''Technical Work Plan For: Department of Energy Spent Nuclear Fuel Work Packages'' (CRWMS M&O 2000c), this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is developed for the purpose of screening out degraded configurations for U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) types. It performs the degraded configuration parameter and probability evaluations of the overall methodology specified in the ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2000, Section 3) to qualifying configurations. Degradation analyses are performed to assess realizable parameter ranges and physical regimes for configurations. Probability calculations are then performed for configurations characterized by k{sub eff} in excess of the Critical Limit (CL). The scope of this document is to develop a generic set of screening criteria or models to screen out degraded configurations having potential for exceeding a criticality limit. The developed screening criteria include arguments based on physical/chemical processes and probability calculations and apply to DOE SNF types when codisposed with the high-level waste (HLW) glass inside a waste package. The degradation takes place inside the waste package and is long after repository licensing has expired. The emphasis of this AMR is on degraded configuration screening and the probability analysis is one of the approaches used for screening. The intended use of the model is to apply the developed screening criteria to each DOE SNF type following the completion of the degraded mode criticality analysis internal to the waste package.

  4. Microbial electricity generation enhances decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209 degradation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonggang Yang

    Full Text Available Due to environmental persistence and biotoxicity of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs, it is urgent to develop potential technologies to remediate PBDEs. Introducing electrodes for microbial electricity generation to stimulate the anaerobic degradation of organic pollutants is highly promising for bioremediation. However, it is still not clear whether the degradation of PBDEs could be promoted by this strategy. In this study, we hypothesized that the degradation of PBDEs (e.g., BDE-209 would be enhanced under microbial electricity generation condition. The functional compositions and structures of microbial communities in closed-circuit microbial fuel cell (c-MFC and open-circuit microbial fuel cell (o-MFC systems for BDE-209 degradation were detected by a comprehensive functional gene array, GeoChip 4.0, and linked with PBDE degradations. The results indicated that distinctly different microbial community structures were formed between c-MFCs and o-MFCs, and that lower concentrations of BDE-209 and the resulting lower brominated PBDE products were detected in c-MFCs after 70-day performance. The diversity and abundance of a variety of functional genes in c-MFCs were significantly higher than those in o-MFCs. Most genes involved in chlorinated solvent reductive dechlorination, hydroxylation, methoxylation and aromatic hydrocarbon degradation were highly enriched in c-MFCs and significantly positively correlated with the removal of PBDEs. Various other microbial functional genes for carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and sulfur cycling, as well as energy transformation process, were also significantly increased in c-MFCs. Together, these results suggest that PBDE degradation could be enhanced by introducing the electrodes for microbial electricity generation and by specifically stimulating microbial functional genes.

  5. Fuels characterization studies. [jet fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seng, G. T.; Antoine, A. C.; Flores, F. J.

    1980-01-01

    Current analytical techniques used in the characterization of broadened properties fuels are briefly described. Included are liquid chromatography, gas chromatography, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. High performance liquid chromatographic ground-type methods development is being approached from several directions, including aromatic fraction standards development and the elimination of standards through removal or partial removal of the alkene and aromatic fractions or through the use of whole fuel refractive index values. More sensitive methods for alkene determinations using an ultraviolet-visible detector are also being pursued. Some of the more successful gas chromatographic physical property determinations for petroleum derived fuels are the distillation curve (simulated distillation), heat of combustion, hydrogen content, API gravity, viscosity, flash point, and (to a lesser extent) freezing point.

  6. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure fueling stations by location or along a route. Infrastructure Development Learn about ethanol fueling infrastructure; codes, standards, and safety; and ethanol equipment options. Maps & Data E85 Fueling Station

  7. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locations Infrastructure Development Vehicles Laws & Incentives Biodiesel Fueling Stations Photo of a location or along a route. Infrastructure Development Learn about biodiesel fueling infrastructure codes Case Studies California Ramps Up Biofuels Infrastructure Green Fueling Station Powers Fleets in Upstate

  8. Fuels processing for transportation fuel cell systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, R.; Ahmed, S.

    Fuel cells primarily use hydrogen as the fuel. This hydrogen must be produced from other fuels such as natural gas or methanol. The fuel processor requirements are affected by the fuel to be converted, the type of fuel cell to be supplied, and the fuel cell application. The conventional fuel processing technology has been reexamined to determine how it must be adapted for use in demanding applications such as transportation. The two major fuel conversion processes are steam reforming and partial oxidation reforming. The former is established practice for stationary applications; the latter offers certain advantages for mobile systems and is presently in various stages of development. This paper discusses these fuel processing technologies and the more recent developments for fuel cell systems used in transportation. The need for new materials in fuels processing, particularly in the area of reforming catalysis and hydrogen purification, is discussed.

  9. Legacy Vehicle Fuel System Testing with Intermediate Ethanol Blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, G. W.; Hoff, C. J.; Borton, Z.; Ratcliff, M. A.

    2012-03-01

    The effects of E10 and E17 on legacy fuel system components from three common mid-1990s vintage vehicle models (Ford, GM, and Toyota) were studied. The fuel systems comprised a fuel sending unit with pump, a fuel rail and integrated pressure regulator, and the fuel injectors. The fuel system components were characterized and then installed and tested in sample aging test rigs to simulate the exposure and operation of the fuel system components in an operating vehicle. The fuel injectors were cycled with varying pulse widths during pump operation. Operational performance, such as fuel flow and pressure, was monitored during the aging tests. Both of the Toyota fuel pumps demonstrated some degradation in performance during testing. Six injectors were tested in each aging rig. The Ford and GM injectors showed little change over the aging tests. Overall, based on the results of both the fuel pump testing and the fuel injector testing, no major failures were observed that could be attributed to E17 exposure. The unknown fuel component histories add a large uncertainty to the aging tests. Acquiring fuel system components from operational legacy vehicles would reduce the uncertainty.

  10. Degradable polyphosphazene/poly(alpha-hydroxyester) blends: degradation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosio, Archel M A; Allcock, Harry R; Katti, Dhirendra S; Laurencin, Cato T

    2002-04-01

    Biomaterials based on the polymers of lactic acid and glycolic acid and their copolymers are used or studied extensively as implantable devices for drug delivery, tissue engineering and other biomedical applications. Although these polymers have shown good biocompatibility, concerns have been raised regarding their acidic degradation products, which have important implications for long-term implantable systems. Therefore, we have designed a novel biodegradable polyphosphazene/poly(alpha-hydroxyester) blend whose degradation products are less acidic than those of the poly(alpha-hydroxyester) alone. In this study, the degradation characteristics of a blend of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (50:50 PLAGA) and poly[(50% ethyl glycinato)(50% p-methylphenoxy) phosphazene] (PPHOS-EG50) were qualitatively and quantitatively determined with comparisons made to the parent polymers. Circular matrices (14mm diameter) of the PLAGA, PPHOS-EG50 and PLAGA-PPHOS-EG50 blend were degraded in non-buffered solutions (pH 7.4). The degraded polymers were characterized for percentage mass loss and molecular weight and the degradation medium was characterized for acid released in non-buffered solutions. The amounts of neutralizing base necessary to bring about neutral pH were measured for each polymer or polymer blend during degradation. The poly(phosphazene)/poly(lactide-co-glycolide) blend required significantly less neutralizing base in order to bring about neutral solution pH during the degradation period studied. The results indicated that the blend degraded at a rate intermediate to that of the parent polymers and that the degradation products of the polyphosphazene neutralized the acidic degradation products of PLAGA. Thus, results from these in vitro degradation studies suggest that the PLAGA-PPHOS-EG50 blend may provide a viable improvement to biomaterials based on acid-releasing organic polymers.

  11. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurihara, Kunitoshi; Azekura, Kazuo.

    1992-01-01

    In a reactor core of a heavy water moderated light water cooled pressure tube type reactor, no sufficient effects have been obtained for the transfer width to a negative side of void reactivity change in a region of a great void coefficient. Then, a moderation region divided into upper and lower two regions is disposed at the central portion of a fuel assembly. Coolants flown into the lower region can be discharged to the cooling region from an opening disposed at the upper end portion of the lower region. Light water flows from the lower region of the moderator region to the cooling region of the reactor core upper portion, to lower the void coefficient. As a result, the reactivity performance at low void coefficient, i.e., a void reaction rate is transferred to the negative side. Thus, this flattens the power distribution in the fuel assembly, increases the thermal margin and enables rapid operaiton and control of the reactor core, as well as contributes to the increase of fuel burnup ratio and reduction of the fuel cycle cost. (N.H.)

  12. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fushimi, Atsushi; Shimada, Hidemitsu; Aoyama, Motoo; Nakajima, Junjiro

    1998-01-01

    In a fuel assembly for an n x n lattice-like BWR type reactor, n is determined to 9 or greater, and the enrichment degree of plutonium is determined to 4.4% by weight or less. Alternatively, n is determined to 10 or greater, and the enrichment degree of plutonium is determined to 5.2% by weight or less. An average take-out burnup degree is determined to 39GWd/t or less, and the matrix is determined to 9 x 9 or more, or the average take-out burnup degree is determined to 51GWd/t, and the matrix is determined to 10 x 10 or more and the increase of the margin of the maximum power density obtained thereby is utilized for the compensation of the increase of distortion of power distribution due to decrease of the kinds of plutonium enrichment degree, thereby enabling to reduce the kind of the enrichment degree of MOX fuel rods to one. As a result, the manufacturing step for fuel pellets can be simplified to reduce the manufacturing cost for MOX fuel assemblies. (N.H.)

  13. Fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukushima, Kimichika.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the size of the reactor core upper mechanisms and the reactor container, as well as decrease the nuclear power plant construction costs in reactors using liquid metals as the coolants. Constitution: Isotope capturing devices comprising a plurality of pipes are disposed to the gas plenum portion of a nuclear fuel rod main body at the most downstream end in the flowing direction of the coolants. Each of the capturing devices is made of nickel, nickel alloys, stainless steel applied with nickel plating on the surface, nickel alloys applied with nickel plating on the surface or the like. Thus, radioactive nuclides incorporated in the coolants are surely captured by the capturing devices disposed at the most downstream end of the nuclear fuel main body as the coolants flow along the nuclear fuel main body. Accordingly, since discharging of radioactive nuclides to the intermediate fuel exchange system can be prevented, the maintenance or reparing work for the system can be facilitated. (Moriyama, K.)

  14. Transport fuel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronsse, Frederik; Jørgensen, Henning; Schüßler, Ingmar

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide, the use of transport fuel derived from biomass increased four-fold between 2003 and 2012. Mainly based on food resources, these conventional biofuels did not achieve the expected emission savings and contributed to higher prices for food commod - ities, especially maize and oilseeds...

  15. Thorium fuel cycle management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zajac, R.; Darilek, P.; Breza, J.; Necas, V.

    2010-01-01

    In this presentation author deals with the thorium fuel cycle management. Description of the thorium fuels and thorium fuel cycle benefits and challenges as well as thorium fuel calculations performed by the computer code HELIOS are presented.

  16. Thermal degradation of ethanolic biodiesel: Physicochemical and thermal properties evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Wellington Costa; Castro, Maria Priscila Pessanha; Perez, Victor Haber; Machado, Francisco A.; Mota, Leonardo; Sthel, Marcelo Silva

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to study the thermal degradation of soybean biodiesel attained by ethanolic route. The soybean biodiesel samples were subjected to heating treatment at 150 °C for 24 h in a closed oven under controlled atmosphere. During the experiments, samples were withdrawn at intervals of 3, 6, 9, 12, 15 and 24 h for physicochemical and thermophysical properties analysis. The biodiesel degradation was validated by Thermogravimetric analysis since their profiles for control and treated biodiesel were different. Also, "1H NMR confirmed this result due to a significant reduction at the signals related to the "1H located near to the double bonds in the unsaturated ethyl esters in agreement with an iodine index reduction and viscosity increase observed during degradation. Nevertheless, degraded biodiesel, under study conditions, preserved its thermophysical properties. These results may be relevant to qualify the produced biodiesel quality and collect physicochemical and thermophysical data important for applications in combustion studies including project of fuel injection systems. - Highlights: • Soybean biodiesel from ethanolic route was subjected to thermal degradation to verify its stability. • Thermal degradation of biodiesel was correlated with physicochemical properties. • Thermal effusivity, diffusivity and conductivity were estimate by photothermal techniques.

  17. Biofuel components change the ecology of bacterial volatile petroleum hydrocarbon degradation in aerobic sandy soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elazhari-Ali, Abdulmagid; Singh, Arvind K.; Davenport, Russell J.; Head, Ian M.; Werner, David

    2013-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the biodegradation of volatile petroleum hydrocarbons (VPHs) in aerobic sandy soil is affected by the blending with 10 percent ethanol (E10) or 20 percent biodiesel (B20). When inorganic nutrients were scarce, competition between biofuel and VPH degraders temporarily slowed monoaromatic hydrocarbon degradation. Ethanol had a bigger impact than biodiesel, reflecting the relative ease of ethanol compared to methyl ester biodegradation. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of bacterial 16S rRNA genes revealed that each fuel mixture selected for a distinct bacterial community, each dominated by Pseudomonas spp. Despite lasting impacts on soil bacterial ecology, the overall effects on VHP biodegradation were minor, and average biomass yields were comparable between fuel types, ranging from 0.40 ± 0.16 to 0.51 ± 0.22 g of biomass carbon per gram of fuel carbon degraded. Inorganic nutrient availability had a greater impact on petroleum hydrocarbon biodegradation than fuel composition. Highlights: ► The effect of 10% ethanol or 20% biodiesel on the biodegradability of volatile petroleum hydrocarbons in soil was investigated. ► Competition for scarce inorganic nutrients between biofuel and VPH degraders slowed monoaromatic hydrocarbon degradation. ► Biofuel effects were transitional. ► Each fuel selected for a distinct predominant bacterial community. ► All bacterial communities were dominated by Pseudomonas spp. - Blending of petroleum with ethanol or biodiesel changes the fuel degrading soil bacterial community structure, but the long-term effects on fuel biodegradability are minor.

  18. Repairing fuel for reinsertion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krukshenk, A.

    1986-01-01

    Eqiupment for nuclear reactor fuel assembly repairing produced by Westinghouse and Brawn Bovery companies is described. Repair of failed fuel assemblies replacement of defect fuel elements gives a noticeable economical effect. Thus if the cost of a new fuel assembly is 450-500 thousand dollars, the replacement of one fuel element in it costs approximately 40-60 thousand dollars. In simple cases repairing includes either removal of failed fuel elements from a fuel assembly and its reinsertion with the rest of fuel elements into the reactor core (reactor refueling), or replacement of unfailed fuel elements from one fuel assembly to a new one (fuel assembly overhaul and reconditioning)

  19. Radiation degradation of cellulose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonhardt, J.W.; Arnold, G.; Baer, M.; Gey, M.; Hubert, S.; Langguth, H.

    1984-01-01

    The application of straw and other cellulose polymers as feedstuff for ruminants is limited by its low digestibility. During recent decades it was attempted to increase the digestibility of straw by several chemical and physical methods. In this work some results of the degradation of gamma and electron treated wheat straw are reported. Complex methods of treatment (e.g. radiation influence and influence of lyes) are taken into consideration. In vitro-experiments with radiation treated straw show that the digestibility can be increased from 20% up to about 80%. A high pressure liquid chromatography method was used to analyze the hydrolysates. The contents of certain species of carbohydrates in the hydrolysates in dependence on the applied dose are given

  20. Exploring bacterial lignin degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Margaret E; Chang, Michelle C Y

    2014-04-01

    Plant biomass represents a renewable carbon feedstock that could potentially be used to replace a significant level of petroleum-derived chemicals. One major challenge in its utilization is that the majority of this carbon is trapped in the recalcitrant structural polymers of the plant cell wall. Deconstruction of lignin is a key step in the processing of biomass to useful monomers but remains challenging. Microbial systems can provide molecular information on lignin depolymerization as they have evolved to break lignin down using metalloenzyme-dependent radical pathways. Both fungi and bacteria have been observed to metabolize lignin; however, their differential reactivity with this substrate indicates that they may utilize different chemical strategies for its breakdown. This review will discuss recent advances in studying bacterial lignin degradation as an approach to exploring greater diversity in the environment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Soil degradation in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.R.

    2005-01-01

    This paper diagnoses the issues involved behind the current state, usage, interactions and linkages in the soils in Pakistan. The condition of soils is deteriorating due to developmental and environmental factors such as soil degradation, water pollution, fauna degeneration etc. Issues, problems and constraints faced in the management and usage of soils are diagnosed at different levels in the ecosystems predominant in Pakistan. The research questions propose effective solutions, types of instruments, methods or processes to resolve the issues within the various areas or ecosystems in the most sustainable and effective manner [23]. Biological solutions and methods can be applied at the sub-system level by private individuals or communities at a lower cost, and at a more localized level than engineering methods. Engineering methods may be suited for interventions at a system level rather than at a sub-system level; but even at this level they will be complementary with biological methods. (author)

  2. Nuclear power fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Havelka, S.; Jakesova, L.

    1982-01-01

    Economic problems are discussed of the fuel cycle (cost of the individual parts of the fuel cycle and the share of the fuel cycle in the price of 1 kWh), the technological problems of the fuel cycle (uranium ore mining and processing, uranium isotope enrichment, the manufacture of fuel elements, the building of long-term storage sites for spent fuel, spent fuel reprocessing, liquid and gaseous waste processing), and the ecologic aspects of the fuel cycle. (H.S.)

  3. Degraded Crater Rim

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 3 May 2002) The Science The eastern rim of this unnamed crater in Southern Arabia Terra is very degraded (beaten up). This indicates that this crater is very ancient and has been subjected to erosion and subsequent bombardment from other impactors such as asteroids and comets. One of these later (younger) craters is seen in the upper right of this image superimposed upon the older crater rim material. Note that this smaller younger crater rim is sharper and more intact than the older crater rim. This region is also mantled with a blanket of dust. This dust mantle causes the underlying topography to take on a more subdued appearance. The Story When you think of Arabia, you probably think of hot deserts and a lot of profitable oil reserves. On Mars, however, Southern Arabia Terra is a cold place of cratered terrain. This almost frothy-looking image is the badly battered edge of an ancient crater, which has suffered both erosion and bombardment from asteroids, comets, or other impacting bodies over the long course of its existence. A blanket of dust has also settled over the region, which gives the otherwise rugged landscape a soft and more subdued appearance. The small, round crater (upper left) seems almost gemlike in its setting against the larger crater ring. But this companionship is no easy romance. Whatever formed the small crater clearly whammed into the larger crater rim at some point, obliterating part of its edge. You can tell the small crater was formed after the first and more devastating impact, because it is laid over the other larger crater. How much younger is the small one? Well, its rim is also much sharper and more intact, which gives a sense that it is probably far more youthful than the very degraded, ancient crater.

  4. Scientific basis for storage criteria for interim dry storage of aluminum-clad fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sindelar, R.L.; Peacock, H.B. Jr.; Lam, P.S.; Iyer, N.C.; Louthan, M.R. Jr.; Murphy, J.R.

    1996-01-01

    An engineered system for dry storage of aluminum-clad foreign and domestic research reactor spent fuel owned by the US Department of Energy is being considered to store the fuel up to a nominal period of 40 years prior to ultimate disposition. Scientifically-based criteria for environmental limits to drying and storing the fuels for this system are being developed to avoid excessive degradation in sealed and non-sealed (open to air) dry storage systems. These limits are based on consideration of degradation modes that can cause loss of net section of the cladding, embrittlement of the cladding, distortion of the fuel, or release of fuel and fission products from the fuel/clad system. Potential degradation mechanisms include corrosion mechanisms from exposure to air and/or sources of humidity, hydrogen blistering of the aluminum cladding, distortion of the fuel due to creep, and interdiffusion of the fuel and fission products with the cladding. The aluminum-clad research reactor fuels are predominantly highly-enriched aluminum uranium alloy fuel which is clad with aluminum alloys similar to 1100, 5052, and 6061 aluminum. In the absence of corrodant species, degradation due to creep and diffusion mechanisms limit the maximum fuel storage temperature to 200 C. The results of laboratory scale corrosion tests indicate that this fuel could be stored under air up to 200 C at low relative humidity levels (< 20%) to limit corrosion of the cladding and fuel (exposed to the storage environment through assumed pre-existing pits in the cladding). Excessive degradation of fuels with uranium metal up to 200 C can be avoided if the fuel is sufficiently dried and contained in a sealed system; open storage can be achieved if the temperature is controlled to avoid excessive corrosion even in dry air

  5. Fuel substitution - poverty impacts on biomass fuel suppliers (Uganda, Kenya and Ethiopia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Many sub Saharan countries view the increasing use of traditional fuels (primarily charcoal and, to a lesser extent, wood) in urban areas as a major cause of environmental degradation. Governments are concerned about the effects of perceived rising costs of traditional fuels on poor households and seek to reduce those costs. Many are also concerned with the health impacts that using traditional fuels may have in households. In response to this, many governments have prompted a shift from traditional fuels for cooking to kerosene, gas and electricity as substitutes, and to energy-efficient charcoal and wood stoves to reduce these impacts. Such interventions can have major impacts on the livelihoods of people engaged in the production, transport and sale of traditional biomass supplies due to the decline in demand for wood-based fuels. This project will quantify the impact that fuel substitution will have on people engaged in traditional fuel supply, distribution and trade and develop a set of recommendations for Kenya, Ethiopia and Uganda that will recommend ways to mitigate the negative effects of fuel substitution on traditional biomass fuel suppliers. At the same time, it will address how this can be accomplished while mitigating the environmental and health impacts of continued use of traditional fuels. (author)

  6. Fuel substitution - poverty impacts on biomass fuel suppliers (Uganda, Kenya and Ethiopia)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    Many sub Saharan countries view the increasing use of traditional fuels (primarily charcoal and, to a lesser extent, wood) in urban areas as a major cause of environmental degradation. Governments are concerned about the effects of perceived rising costs of traditional fuels on poor households and seek to reduce those costs. Many are also concerned with the health impacts that using traditional fuels may have in households. In response to this, many governments have prompted a shift from traditional fuels for cooking to kerosene, gas and electricity as substitutes, and to energy-efficient charcoal and wood stoves to reduce these impacts. Such interventions can have major impacts on the livelihoods of people engaged in the production, transport and sale of traditional biomass supplies due to the decline in demand for wood-based fuels. This project will quantify the impact that fuel substitution will have on people engaged in traditional fuel supply, distribution and trade and develop a set of recommendations for Kenya, Ethiopia and Uganda that will recommend ways to mitigate the negative effects of fuel substitution on traditional biomass fuel suppliers. At the same time, it will address how this can be accomplished while mitigating the environmental and health impacts of continued use of traditional fuels. (author)

  7. Spent fuel and fuel pool component integrity. Annual report, FY 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Bailey, W.J.; Schreiber, R.E.; Kustas, F.M.

    1980-05-01

    International meetings under the BEFAST program and under INFCE Working Group No. 6 during 1978 and 1979 continue to indicate that no cases of fuel cladding degradation have developed on pool-stored fuel from water reactors. A section from a spent fuel rack stand, exposed for 1.5 y in the Yankee Rowe (PWR) pool had 0.001- to 0.003-in.-deep (25- to 75-μm) intergranular corrosion in weld heat-affected zones but no evidence of stress corrosion cracking. A section of a 304 stainless steel spent fuel storage rack exposed 6.67 y in the Point Beach reactor (PWR) spent fuel pool showed no significant corrosion. A section of 304 stainless steel 8-in.-dia pipe from the Three Mile Island No. 1 (PWR) spent fuel pool heat exchanger plumbing developed a through-wall crack. The crack was intergranular, initiating from the inside surface in a weld heat-affected zone. The zone where the crack occurred was severely sensitized during field welding. The Kraftwerk Union (Erlangen, GFR) disassembled a stainless-steel fuel-handling machine that operated for 12 y in a PWR (boric acid) spent fuel pool. There was no evidence of deterioration, and the fuel-handling machine was reassembled for further use. A spent fuel pool at a Swedish PWR was decontaminated. The procedure is outlined in this report

  8. Structural degradation of Thar lignite using MW1 fungal isolate: optimization studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Rizwan; Ghauri, Muhammad A.; Jones, Elizabeth J.; Orem, William H.; SanFilipo, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Biological degradation of low-rank coals, particularly degradation mediated by fungi, can play an important role in helping us to utilize neglected lignite resources for both fuel and non-fuel applications. Fungal degradation of low-rank coals has already been investigated for the extraction of soil-conditioning agents and the substrates, which could be subjected to subsequent processing for the generation of alternative fuel options, like methane. However, to achieve an efficient degradation process, the fungal isolates must originate from an appropriate coal environment and the degradation process must be optimized. With this in mind, a representative sample from the Thar coalfield (the largest lignite resource of Pakistan) was treated with a fungal strain, MW1, which was previously isolated from a drilled core coal sample. The treatment caused the liberation of organic fractions from the structural matrix of coal. Fungal degradation was optimized, and it showed significant release of organics, with 0.1% glucose concentration and 1% coal loading ratio after an incubation time of 7 days. Analytical investigations revealed the release of complex organic moieties, pertaining to polyaromatic hydrocarbons, and it also helped in predicting structural units present within structure of coal. Such isolates, with enhanced degradation capabilities, can definitely help in exploiting the chemical-feedstock-status of coal.

  9. Ordered bulk degradation via autophagy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dengjel, Jörn; Kristensen, Anders Riis; Andersen, Jens S

    2008-01-01

    During amino acid starvation, cells undergo macroautophagy which is regarded as an unspecific bulk degradation process. Lately, more and more organelle-specific autophagy subtypes such as reticulophagy, mitophagy and ribophagy have been described and it could be shown, depending on the experimental...... at proteasomal and lysosomal degradation ample cross-talk between the two degradation pathways became evident. Degradation via autophagy appeared to be ordered and regulated at the protein complex/organelle level. This raises several important questions such as: can macroautophagy itself be specific and what...

  10. Degradation of thiram in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raghu, K.; Murthy, N.B.K.; Kumarsamy, R.

    1975-01-01

    Determination of the residual 35 S labelled tetramethylthiuram disulfide showed that the fungicide persisted longer in sterilized than in unsterilized soil, while the chloroform extractable radioactivity decreased, the water extractable radioactivity increased with increase in time. However, in sterilized soil the water extractable radioactivity remained more or less constant. Degradation of the fungicide was further demonstrated by the release of C 35 S 2 from soil treated with labelled thiram. Dimethylamine was found to be one of the degradation products. A bacterium isolated from thiram-enriched soil could degrade the fungicide in shake culture. The degradation pathways of thiram in sterilized and unsterilized soils are discussed. (author)

  11. In vitro degradation of ribosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, G; Rivas, A

    1976-12-01

    The cytoplasmic ribosomes from Euglena gracilis var. bacillaris are found to be of two types taking into consideration their stability "in vitro". In the group of unstable ribosomes the large subunit is degraded. The other group apparently does not suffer any degradation under the conditions described. However the RNAs extracted from both types of ribosomes are degraded during sucrose density gradients. The degradation of the largest RNA species has been reported previously, but no comment has been made about the stability of the ribosome itself.

  12. The radiation degradation of polypropylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Hollain, G.

    1977-04-01

    Polypropylene is used extensively in the manufacture of disposable medical devices because of its superior properties. Unfortunately this polymer does not lend itself well to radiation sterilization, undergoing serious degradation which affects the mechanical properties of the polymer. In this paper the effects of radiation on the mechanical and physical properties of polypropylene are discussed. A programme of research to minimize the radiation degradation of this polymer through the addition of crosslinking agents to counteract the radiation degradation is proposed. It is furthermore proposed that a process of annealing of the irradiated polymer be investigated in order to minimize the post-irradiation degradation of the polypropylene [af

  13. Coating degradation at tank bottomdue to settled water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majeed, U.; Rizvi, M.A.; Khan, I.H.

    2008-01-01

    In the present work, coating degradation as a result of settled water on fuel storage tank bottoms has been reported with the help of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), blister analysis and gravimetric analysis (water uptake). Blistering occurs underneath the coating at the tank bottom due to direct contact with settled water. Degradation behavior of polyamide epoxy coatings on mild steel has been reported in term of coating resistance at the start of the experiments, after 96 hours and at the end of EIS experiments. Coating degradation in terms of shift in phase angle (theta) at high frequency as a function of exposure time has also been reported. The blister formation and gravimetric analysis data has also been reported in support of EIS result. (author)

  14. Investigation of the degradation of LSM-YSZ SOFC cathode by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torres da Silva, Iris Maura

    The aim of this PhD study was to investigate degradation of the LSM-YSZ cathode of anode supported Ni-YSZ/YSZ/LSM-YSZ solid oxide fuel cells. The chosen cathode materials LSM25 and 8YSZ were investigated for their compatibility and stability, to confirm that expansion/contraction or decreasing......, at different operating conditions. An equivalent circuit was developed for the symmetrical cell, describing the processes taking place at the LSM-YSZ cathode. This equivalent circuit was applied in degradation studies, where the processes affected by degradation over time could be pinpointed. Furthermore......, it was discovered that impurities in air cause significant degradation of the cathode. Humidity was found to increase the degradation rate, but other impurities might also be present and increasing degradation. Then the anode supported Ni-YSZ/YSZ/LSM-YSZ single cells were prepared and tested. It was found...

  15. Fuel trading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    A first part of this report proposes an overview of trends and predictions. After a synthesis on the sector changes and trends, it indicates and comments the most recent predictions for the consumption of refined oil products and for the turnover of the fuel wholesale market, reports the main highlights concerning the sector's life, and gives a dashboard of the sector activity. The second part proposes the annual report on trends and competition. It presents the main operator profiles and fuel categories, the main determining factors of the activity, the evolution of the sector context between 2005 and 2015 (consumptions, prices, temperature evolution). It analyses the evolution of the sector activity and indicators (sales, turnovers, prices, imports). Financial performances of enterprises are presented. The economic structure of the sector is described (evolution of the economic fabric, structural characteristics, French foreign trade). Actors are then presented and ranked in terms of turnover, of added value, and of result

  16. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Makoto.

    1991-01-01

    In a fuel assembly in which spectral shift type moderator guide members are arranged, the moderator guide member has a flow channel resistance member, that provides flow resistance against the moderators, in the upstream of a moderator flowing channel, by which the ratio of removing coolants is set greater at the upstream than downstream. With such a constitution, the void distribution increasing upward in the channel box except for the portion of the moderator guide member is moderated by the increase of the area of the void region that expands downward in the guide member. Accordingly, the axial power distribution is flattened throughout the operation cycle and excess distortion is eliminated to improve the fuel integrity. (T.M.)

  17. Fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, Yasuo.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To increase the plenum space in a fuel element used for a liquid metal cooled reactor. Constitution: A fuel pellet is secured at one end with an end plug and at the other with a coil spring in a tubular container. A mechanism for fixing the coil spring composed of a tubular unit is mounted by friction with the inner surface of the tubular container. Accordingly, the recoiling force of the coil spring can be retained by fixing mechanism with a small volume, and since a large amount of plenum space can be obtained, the internal pressure rise in the cladding tube can be suppressed even if large quantities of fission products are discharged. (Kamimura, M.)

  18. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Mitsuo.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the corrosion rate and suppress the increase of radioactive corrosion products in reactor water of nuclear fuel assemblies for use in BWR type reactors having spacer springs made of nickel based deposition reinforced type alloys. Constitution: Spacer rings made of nickel based deposition reinforced type alloy are incorporated and used as fuel assemblies after applying treatment of dipping and maintaining at high temperature water followed by heating in steams. Since this can remove the nickel leaching into reactor water at the initial stage, Co-58 as the radioactive corrosion products in the reactor water can be reduced, and the operation at in-service inspection or repairement can be facilitated to improve the working efficiency of the nuclear power plant. The dipping time is desirably more than 10 hours and more desirably more than 30 hours. (Horiuchi, T. )

  19. Fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Ritsuo.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the operation performance of a BWR type reactor by improving the distribution of the uranium enrichment and the incorporation amount of burnable poisons in fuel assemblies. Constitution: The average enrichment of uranium 235 is increased in the upper portion as compared with that in the lower portion, while the incorporation amount of burnable poisons is increased in an upper portion as compared with that in the lower portion. The difference in the incorporation amount of the burnable poisons between the upper and lower portions is attained by charging two kinds of fuel rods; the ones incorporated with the burnable poisons over the entire length and the others incorporated with the burnable poisons only in the upper portions. (Seki, T.)

  20. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirukawa, Koji; Sakurada, Koichi.

    1992-01-01

    In a fuel assembly for a BWR type reactor, water rods or water crosses are disposed between fuel rods, and a value with a spring is disposed at the top of the coolant flow channel thereof, which opens a discharge port when pressure is increased to greater than a predetermined value. Further, a control element for the amount of coolant flow rate is inserted retractable to a control element guide tube formed at the lower portion of the water rod or the water cross. When the amount of control elements inserted to the control element guide tube is small and the inflown coolant flow rate is great, the void coefficient at the inside of the water rod is less than 5%. On the other hand, when the control elements are inserted, the flow resistance is increased, so that the void coefficient in the water rod is greater than 80%. When the pressure in the water rod is increased, the valve with the spring is raised to escape water or steams. Then, since the variation range of the change of the void coefficient can be controlled reliably by the amount of the control elements inserted, and nuclear fuel materials can be utilized effectively. (N.H.)

  1. BWR fuel experience with zinc injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, H.A.; Garcia, S.E.

    1995-01-01

    In 1982 a correlation between low primary recirculation system dose rates in BWR's and the presence of ionic zinc in reactor water was identified. The source of the zinc was primarily from Admiralty brass condensers. Plants with brass condensers are called ''natural zinc'' plants. Brass condensers were also a source of copper that was implicated in crude induced localized corrosion (CILC) fuel failures. In 1986 the first BWR intentionally injected zinc for the benefits of dose rate control. Although zinc alone was never implicated in fuel degradation of failures, a comprehensive fuel surveillance program was initiated to monitor fuel performance. Currently there are 14 plants that are injecting zinc. Six of these plants are also on hydrogen water chemistry. This paper describes the effect on both Zircaloy corrosion and the cruding characteristics as a result of these changes in water chemistry. Fuel rod corrosion was found to be independent of the specific water chemistry of the plants. The corrosion behavior was the same with the additions of zinc alone or zinc plus hydrogen and well within the operating experience for fuel without either of these additions. No change was observed in the amounts of crude deposited on the fuel rods, both for the adherent and loosely held deposits. One of the effects of the zinc addition was the trend to form more of the zinc rich iron spinel in the fuel deposits rather than the hematite deposits that are predominantly formed with non additive water chemistry

  2. Operation of real landfill gas fueled solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) using internal dry reforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langnickel, Hendrik; Hagen, Anke

    2017-01-01

    Biomass is one renewable energy source, which is independent from solar radiation and wind effect. Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC’s) are able to convert landfill gas derived from landfill directly into electricity and heat with a high efficiency. In the present work a planar 16cm2 SOFC cell...... was necessary to prevent poisoning and thereby to decrease the degradation rate....

  3. Hydrogen fuel injection - the bridge to fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilchrist, J.S.

    2004-01-01

    'Full text:' For over a century, industry has embraced a wide variety of applications for hydrogen. Since the mid-1970's, the focus of the bulk of hydrogen research has been in the area of fuel cells. Unfortunately, there is limited awareness of more immediate applications for hydrogen as a catalyst designed to improve the performance of existing hydro-carbon fuelled internal combustion engines. Canadian Hydrogen Energy Company manufactures a patented Hydrogen Fuel Injection System (HFI) that produces hydrogen and oxygen from distilled water and injects them, in measured amounts, into the air intake system on any heavy-duty diesel or gasoline application including trucks, buses, stationary generators, etc. In use on over 30 fleets, research is supported by over 40 million miles of field data. The hydrogen acts as a catalyst to promote more complete combustion, with remarkable results. Dramatically reduce emissions, particularly Carbon Monoxide and Particulate Matter. Increase horsepower and torque. Improved fuel efficiency (a minimum 10% improvement is guaranteed). Reduced oil degradation The HFI system offers the first large-scale application of the use of hydrogen and an excellent bridge to the fuel-cell technologies of the future. (author)

  4. Solid TRU fuels and fuel cycle technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Toru; Suzuki, Yasufumi

    1997-01-01

    Alloys and nitrides are candidate solid fuels for transmutation. However, the nitride fuels are preferred to the alloys because they have more favorable thermal properties which allows to apply a cold-fuel concept. The nitride fuel cycle technology is briefly presented

  5. Degradation of tetraethyllead during the degradation of leaded gasoline hydrocarbons in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulroy, P.T.; Ou, L.T.

    1998-01-01

    For over 50 years, leaded gasoline was the only fuel for automobiles, and tetraethyllead (TEL) was the major octane number enhancer used in leaded gasoline. Ample information is available on the fate and remediation of gasoline hydrocarbons in contaminated subsoils and groundwater. However, little is known regarding the fate of TEL in leaded gasoline-contaminated subsoils and groundwater. In soil not contaminated with gasoline, TEL was rapidly degraded and completely disappeared in 14 d. In gasoline-contaminated soil, TEL degradation was slower; after 77 d, 4 to 17% of the applied TEL still remained in the contaminated soil. Disappearance of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) was initially rapid but slowed appreciably after 7 to 14 d. As a result, after 77 d, 33 to 51% of the applied gasoline still remained in soil. The retardation of TEL degradation in leaded gasoline-contaminated soil is due to the presence of gasoline hydrocarbons. As long as gasoline hydrocarbons remain in soil, TEL may also remain in soil, most likely in the gasoline hydrocarbon phase

  6. Development of a code and models for high burnup fuel performance analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, M; Kitajima, S [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-08-01

    First the high burnup LWR fuel behavior is discussed and necessary models for the analysis are reviewed. These aspects of behavior are the changes of power history due to the higher enrichment, the temperature feedback due to fission gas release and resultant degradation of gap conductance, axial fission gas transport in fuel free volume, fuel conductivity degradation due to fission product solution and modification of fuel micro-structure. Models developed for these phenomena, modifications in the code, and the benchmark results mainly based on Risoe fission gas project is presented. Finally the rim effect which is observe only around the fuel periphery will be discussed focusing into the fuel conductivity degradation and swelling due to the porosity development. (author). 18 refs, 13 figs, 3 tabs.

  7. Used fuel packing plant for CANDU fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menzies, I.; Thayer, B.; Bains, N., E-mail: imenzies@atsautomation.com [ATS Automation, Cambridge, ON (Canada); Murchison, A., E-mail: amurchison@nwmo.ca [NWMO, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    Large forgings have been selected to containerize Light Water Reactor used nuclear fuel. CANDU fuel, which is significantly smaller in size, allows novel approaches for containerization. For example, by utilizing commercially available extruded ASME pipe a conceptual design of a Used Fuel Packing Plant for containerization of used CANDU fuel in a long lived metallic container has been developed. The design adopts a modular approach with multiple independent work cells to transfer and containerize the used fuel. Based on current technologies and concepts from proven industrial systems, the Used Fuel Packing Plant can assemble twelve used fuel containers per day considering conservative levels of process availability. (author)

  8. Modeling of Zircaloy cladding degradation under repository conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santanam, L.; Raghavan, S.; Chin, B.A.

    1989-07-01

    Two potential degradation mechanisms, creep and stress corrosion cracking, of Zircaloy cladding during repository storage of spent nuclear fuel have been investigated. The deformation and fracture map methodology has been used to predict maximum allowable initial storage temperatures to achieve a thousand year life without rupture as a function of spent-fuel history. A stress analysis of fuel rods has been performed. Stresses in the outer zirconium oxide layer and the inner Zircaloy tube have been predicted for typical internal pressurization, oxide layer thickness, volume expansion from formation of the oxide layer and thermal expansion coefficients of the cladding and oxide. Stress relaxation occurring in-reactor has also been taken into account. The calculations indicate that for the anticipated storage conditions investigated, the outer zirconium oxide layer is in a state of compression thus making it unlikely that stress corrosion cracking of the exterior surface will occur. 20 refs., 6 figs., 9 tabs

  9. Polycarbonate radiolytic degradation and stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, E.S. de

    1994-01-01

    Polycarbonate Durolon, useful for medical supplies fabrication, is submitted to gamma radiation for sterilization purposes. Scissions in main chain occur, in carbonyl groups, producing molecular degradations and yellowness. The radiolytic stabilization is obtained through additive to the polymer. In this work some degradation and stabilization aspects are presented. (L.C.J.A.). 7 refs, 7 figs, 2 tabs

  10. Degradation of copepod fecal pellets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Louise K.; Iversen, Morten

    2008-01-01

    amount of fecal pellets. The total degradation rate of pellets by the natural plankton community of Oresund followed the phytoplankton biomass, with maximum degradation rate during the spring bloom (2.5 +/- 0.49 d(-1)) and minimum (0.52 +/- 0.14 d(-1)) during late winter. Total pellet removal rate ranged...

  11. Degradable polymers for tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijkhuizen-Radersma, Riemke; Moroni, Lorenzo; van Apeldoorn, Aart A.; Zhang, Zheng; Grijpma, Dirk W.; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A.

    2008-01-01

    This chapter elaborates the degradable polymers for tissue engineering and their required scaffold material in tissue engineering. It recognizes the examples of degradable polymers broadly used in tissue engineering. Tissue engineering is the persuasion of the body to heal itself through the

  12. MOSFET Degradation Under RF Stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sasse, G.T.; Kuper, F.G.; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    2008-01-01

    We report on the degradation of MOS transistors under RF stress. Hot-carrier degradation, negative-bias temperature instability, and gate dielectric breakdown are investigated. The findings are compared to established voltage- and field-driven models. The experimental results indicate that the

  13. Designs for degraded Trbovlje

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naja Marot

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available As an introduction, two degraded urban areas are presented. The first, planning unit seven, is situated in the southeastern part of Trbovlje town. The other, called Speke, lies to the south of Liverpool. The basis for the concept and context of urban renewal model are given by comparison between the newest Slovene and British spatial planning legislation, analyses of the Design management plan Nasipi and Supplementary Planning Document Edge Lane West, and review of different approaches to local communities’ involvement. Based on all the thus far collected data, a questionnaire about quality of living, knowledge of planning system and area perception was produced. Initially, it was used in a pilot residential area Žabjek, and afterwards, a shortened version was carried out in units lying in other parts of the town. Other stakeholders also expressed their ideas about how to develop planning unit seven. Speke Garston as another example of successful urban renewal is given. In conclusion guidelines for method and context development of urban renewal are given for planning unit seven, with emphasis on the Žabjek estate.

  14. Effect of water chemistry and fuel operation parameters on Zr + 1% Nb cladding corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kritsky, V G; Petrik, N G; Berezina, I G; Doilnitsina, V V [VNIPIET, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1997-02-01

    In-pile corrosion of Zr + 1%Nb fuel cladding has been studied. Zr-oxide and hydroxide solubilities at various temperatures and pH values have been calculated and correlations obtained between post-transition corrosion and the solubilities nodular corrosion and fuel operation parameters, as well as between the rate of fuel cladding degradation and water chemistry. Extrapolations of fuel assemblies behaviour to higher burnups have also performed. (author). 12 refs, 11 figs.

  15. Technical Issues in the development of high burnup and long cycle fuel pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Joo; Yang, Jae Ho; Oh, Jang Soo; Kim, Keon Sik; Rhee, Young Woo; Kim, Jong Hun; Nam, Ik Hui [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Over the last half century, a nuclear fuel cycle, a fuel discharged burnup and a uranium enrichment of the LWR (Light Water Reactor) fuel have continuously increased. It was the efforts to reduce the LWR fuel cycle cost, and to make reactor operation more efficiently. Improved fuel and reactor performance contribute further to the reduction and management efficiency of spent fuels. The primary incentive for operating nuclear reactor fuel to higher burnup and longer cycle is the economic benefits. The fuel cycle costs could be reduced by extending fuel discharged burnup and fuel cycle length. The higher discharged burnup can increase the energy production per unit fuel mass or fuel assembly. The longer fuel cycle can increase reactor operation flexibility and reduce the fuel changing operation and the spent fuel management burden. The margin to storage capacity limits would be also increased because high burnup and long cycle fuel reduces the mass of spent fuels. However, increment of fuel burnup and cycle length might result in the acceleration of material aging consisting fuel assembly. Then, the safety and integrity of nuclear fuel will be degraded. Therefore, to simultaneously enhance the safety and economics of the LWR fuel through the fuel burnup and cycle extension, it is indispensable to develop the innovative nuclear fuel material concepts and technologies which can overcome degradation of fuel safety. New fuel research project to extend fuel discharged burnup and cycle length has been launched in KAERI. Main subject is to develop innovative LWR fuel pellets which can provide required fuel performance and safety at extended fuel burnup and cycle length. In order to achieve the mission, we need to know that what the impediments are and how to break through current limit of fuel pellet properties. In this study, the technical issues related to fuel pellets at high burnup were surveyed and summarized. We have collected the technical issues in the literatures

  16. Technical Issues in the development of high burnup and long cycle fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Joo; Yang, Jae Ho; Oh, Jang Soo; Kim, Keon Sik; Rhee, Young Woo; Kim, Jong Hun; Nam, Ik Hui

    2012-01-01

    Over the last half century, a nuclear fuel cycle, a fuel discharged burnup and a uranium enrichment of the LWR (Light Water Reactor) fuel have continuously increased. It was the efforts to reduce the LWR fuel cycle cost, and to make reactor operation more efficiently. Improved fuel and reactor performance contribute further to the reduction and management efficiency of spent fuels. The primary incentive for operating nuclear reactor fuel to higher burnup and longer cycle is the economic benefits. The fuel cycle costs could be reduced by extending fuel discharged burnup and fuel cycle length. The higher discharged burnup can increase the energy production per unit fuel mass or fuel assembly. The longer fuel cycle can increase reactor operation flexibility and reduce the fuel changing operation and the spent fuel management burden. The margin to storage capacity limits would be also increased because high burnup and long cycle fuel reduces the mass of spent fuels. However, increment of fuel burnup and cycle length might result in the acceleration of material aging consisting fuel assembly. Then, the safety and integrity of nuclear fuel will be degraded. Therefore, to simultaneously enhance the safety and economics of the LWR fuel through the fuel burnup and cycle extension, it is indispensable to develop the innovative nuclear fuel material concepts and technologies which can overcome degradation of fuel safety. New fuel research project to extend fuel discharged burnup and cycle length has been launched in KAERI. Main subject is to develop innovative LWR fuel pellets which can provide required fuel performance and safety at extended fuel burnup and cycle length. In order to achieve the mission, we need to know that what the impediments are and how to break through current limit of fuel pellet properties. In this study, the technical issues related to fuel pellets at high burnup were surveyed and summarized. We have collected the technical issues in the literatures

  17. Lysosomal degradation of membrane lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolter, Thomas; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2010-05-03

    The constitutive degradation of membrane components takes place in the acidic compartments of a cell, the endosomes and lysosomes. Sites of lipid degradation are intralysosomal membranes that are formed in endosomes, where the lipid composition is adjusted for degradation. Cholesterol is sorted out of the inner membranes, their content in bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate increases, and, most likely, sphingomyelin is degraded to ceramide. Together with endosomal and lysosomal lipid-binding proteins, the Niemann-Pick disease, type C2-protein, the GM2-activator, and the saposins sap-A, -B, -C, and -D, a suitable membrane lipid composition is required for degradation of complex lipids by hydrolytic enzymes. Copyright 2009 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Materials for solar fuels and chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, Joseph H; Seitz, Linsey C; Chakthranont, Pongkarn; Vojvodic, Aleksandra; Jaramillo, Thomas F; Nørskov, Jens K

    2016-12-20

    The conversion of sunlight into fuels and chemicals is an attractive prospect for the storage of renewable energy, and photoelectrocatalytic technologies represent a pathway by which solar fuels might be realized. However, there are numerous scientific challenges in developing these technologies. These include finding suitable materials for the absorption of incident photons, developing more efficient catalysts for both water splitting and the production of fuels, and understanding how interfaces between catalysts, photoabsorbers and electrolytes can be designed to minimize losses and resist degradation. In this Review, we highlight recent milestones in these areas and some key scientific challenges remaining between the current state of the art and a technology that can effectively convert sunlight into fuels and chemicals.

  19. Degradation in steam of 60 cm-long B{sub 4}C control rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominguez, C., E-mail: christina.dominguez@irsn.fr; Drouan, D.

    2014-08-01

    In the framework of nuclear reactor core meltdown accident studies, the degradation of boron carbide control rod segments exposed to argon/steam atmospheres was investigated up to about 2000 °C in IRSN laboratories. The sequence of the phenomena involved in the degradation has been found to take place as expected. Nevertheless, the ZrO{sub 2} oxide layer formed on the outer surface of the guide tube was very protective, significantly delaying and limiting the guide tube failure and therefore the boron carbide pellet oxidation. Contrary to what was expected, the presence of the control rod decreases the hydrogen release instead of increasing it by additional oxidation of boron compounds. Boron contents up to 20 wt.% were measured in metallic mixtures formed during degradation. It was observed that these metallic melts are able to attack the surrounding fuel rods, which could have consequences on fuel degradation and fission product release kinetics during severe accidents.

  20. High temperature PEM fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jianlu; Xie, Zhong; Zhang, Jiujun; Tang, Yanghua; Song, Chaojie; Navessin, Titichai; Shi, Zhiqing; Song, Datong; Wang, Haijiang; Wilkinson, David P.; Liu, Zhong-Sheng; Holdcroft, Steven [Institute for Fuel Cell Innovation, National Research Council Canada, Vancouver, BC (Canada V6T 1W5)

    2006-10-06

    There are several compelling technological and commercial reasons for operating H{sub 2}/air PEM fuel cells at temperatures above 100{sup o}C. Rates of electrochemical kinetics are enhanced, water management and cooling is simplified, useful waste heat can be recovered, and lower quality reformed hydrogen may be used as the fuel. This review paper provides a concise review of high temperature PEM fuel cells (HT-PEMFCs) from the perspective of HT-specific materials, designs, and testing/diagnostics. The review describes the motivation for HT-PEMFC development, the technology gaps, and recent advances. HT-membrane development accounts for {approx}90% of the published research in the field of HT-PEMFCs. Despite this, the status of membrane development for high temperature/low humidity operation is less than satisfactory. A weakness in the development of HT-PEMFC technology is the deficiency in HT-specific fuel cell architectures, test station designs, and testing protocols, and an understanding of the underlying fundamental principles behind these areas. The development of HT-specific PEMFC designs is of key importance that may help mitigate issues of membrane dehydration and MEA degradation. (author)

  1. Nuclear fuel preheating system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrea, C.

    1975-01-01

    A nuclear reactor new fuel handling system which conveys new fuel from a fuel preparation room into the reactor containment boundary is described. The handling system is provided with a fuel preheating station which is adaptd to heat the new fuel to reactor refueling temperatures in such a way that the fuel is heated from the top down so that fuel element cladding failure due to thermal expansions is avoided. (U.S.)

  2. Fuel element loading system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arya, S.P; s.

    1978-01-01

    A nuclear fuel element loading system is described which conveys a plurality of fuel rods to longitudinal passages in fuel elements. Conveyor means successively position the fuel rods above the longitudinal passages in axial alignment therewith and adapter means guide the fuel rods from the conveyor means into the longitudinal passages. The fuel elements are vibrated to cause the fuel rods to fall into the longitudinal passages through the adapter means

  3. Linear equations on thermal degradation products of wood chips in alkaline glycerol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demirbas, Ayhan

    2004-01-01

    Wood chips of 0.3 and 2 mm depth from poplar and spruce wood samples, respectively, were degraded by using glycerol as a solvent and alkaline glycerol with and without Na 2 CO 3 and NaOH catalysts at different degradation temperatures: 440, 450, 460, 470, 480, 490 and 500 K. By products from the degradation processes of the ligno celluloses include lignin degradation products. Lignin and its degradation products have fuel values. The total degradation degree and cellulose degradation of the wood chips were determined to find the relationship, if any, between the yields of total degradation degree (YTD) and degradation temperature (T). There is a good linear relationship between YTD or the yields of cellulose degradation (YCD) and T (K). For the wood samples, the regression equations from NaOH (10%) catalytic runs for 0.3 mm x 15 mm x 15 mm chip size are: For poplar wood: (YTD=0.7250T-267.507) (YCD=0.1736T-71.707) For spruce wood: (YTD=0.2650T-105.979) (YCD=0.0707T-27.507) For Eqs., the square of the correlation coefficient (r 2 ) were 0.9841, 0.9496, 0.9839 and 0.9447, respectively

  4. Artificial fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamon, L L.W.

    1918-08-20

    Lignite, peat, sud, leaf-mold, or shale, or two or more of these raw carbonaceous materials are mixed with cellulose material, such as sawdust, silica, alkali, and tar or pitch, or residues from tar or pitch, or residues from the distillation of oils, and the mixture is molded into blocks. Other carbonaceous materials, such as graphite, anthracite, or coal-dust, coke, breeze, or culm, and mineral substances, such as iron and manganese ores, may be added. A smokeless fuel can be obtained by coking the blocks in the usual way in retorts.

  5. Drift Degradation Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwayne C. Kicker

    2001-09-28

    A statistical description of the probable block sizes formed by fractures around the emplacement drifts has been developed for each of the lithologic units of the repository host horizon. A range of drift orientations with the drift azimuth varied in 15{sup o} increments has been considered in the static analysis. For the quasi-static seismic analysis, and the time-dependent and thermal effects analysis, two drift orientations have been considered: a drift azimuth of 105{sup o} and the current emplacement drift azimuth of 75{sup o}. The change in drift profile resulting from progressive deterioration of the emplacement drifts has been assessed both with and without backfill. Drift profiles have been determined for four different time increments, including static (i.e., upon excavation), 200 years, 2,000 years, and 10,000 years. The effect of seismic events on rock fall has been analyzed. Block size distributions and drift profiles have been determined for three seismic levels, including a 1,000-year event, a 5,000-year event, and a 10,000-year event. Data developed in this modeling and analysis activity have been entered into the TDMS (DTN: MO0109RDDAAMRR.003). The following conclusions have resulted from this drift degradation analysis: (1) The available fracture data are suitable for supporting a detailed key block analysis of the repository host horizon rock mass. The available data from the north-south Main Drift and the east-west Cross Drift provide a sufficient representative fracture sample of the repository emplacement drift horizon. However, the Tptpln fracture data are only available from a relatively small section of the Cross Drift, resulting in a smaller fracture sample size compared to the other lithologic units. This results in a lower degree of confidence that the key block data based on the Tptpln data set is actually representative of the overall Tptpln key block population. (2) The seismic effect on the rock fall size distribution for all events

  6. Judgement on the data for fuel assembly outlet temperatures of WWER fuel assemblies in power reactors based on measurements with experimental fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, F.

    1986-01-01

    In the period from 1980 to 1985, in the Rheinsberg nuclear power plant experimental fuel assemblies were used on lattices at the periphery of the core. These particular fuel assemblies dispose of an extensive in-core instrumentation with different sensors. Besides this, they are fit out with a device to systematically thottle the coolant flow. The large power gradient present at the core position of the experimental fuel assembly causes a temperature profile along the fuel assemblies which is well provable at the measuring points of the outlet temperature. Along the direction of flow this temperature profile in the coolant degrades only slowly. This effect is to be taken into account when measuring the fuel assembly outlet temperature of WWER fuel assemblies. Besides this, the results of the measurements hinted both at a γ-heating of the temperature measuring points and at tolerances in the calculation of the micro power density distribution. (author)

  7. Degradation and contamination of perfluorinated sulfonic acid membrane due to swelling-dehydration cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Shuang Ma; Morgen, Per; Skou, Eivind Morten

    Formation of sulfonic anhydride S-O-S (from the condensation of sulfonic acids) was known one of the important degradation mechanisms [i] for Nafion membrane under hydrothermal aging condition, which is especially critical for hydrogen fuel cells. Similar mechanism would also have be desirable...... to the membrane degradation in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs), where liquid water has direct contact with the electrolyte. An ex-situ experiment was established with swelling-dehydration cycles on the membrane. However, formation of sulfonic anhydride was not detected during the entire treatment; instead...

  8. Nuclear Fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirakawa, Hiromasa.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the stress gradient resulted in the fuel can in fuel rods adapted to control the axial power distribution by the combination of fuel pellets having different linear power densities. Constitution: In a fuel rod comprising a first fuel pellet of a relatively low linear power density and a second fuel pellet of a relatively high linear power density, the second fuel pellet is cut at its both end faces by an amount corresponding to the heat expansion of the pellet due to the difference in the linear power density to the adjacent first fuel pellet. Thus, the second fuel pellet takes a smaller space than the first fuel pellet in the fuel can. This can reduce the stress produced in the portion of the fuel can corresponding to the boundary between the adjacent fuel pellets. (Kawakami, Y.)

  9. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraiwa, Koji; Ueda, Makoto

    1989-01-01

    In a fuel assembly used for a light water cooled reactor such as a BWR type reactor, a water rod is divided axially into an upper outer tube and a lower outer tube by means of a plug disposed from the lower end of a water rod to a position 1/4 - 1/2 of the entire length for the water rod. Inlet apertures and exit apertures for moderators are respectively perforated for the divided outer tube and upper and lower portions. Further, an upper inner tube with less neutron irradiation growing amount than the outer tube is perforated on the plug in the outer tube, while a lower inner tube with greater neutron irradiation growing amount than the outer tube is suspended from the lower surface of the plug in the outer tube. Then, the opening area for the exit apertures disposed to the upper outer tube and the lower outer tube is controlled depending on the difference of the neutron irradiation growing amount between the upper inner tube and the upper outer tube, and the difference of the neutron irradiation growing amount between the lower inner tube and the lower outer tube. This enables effective spectral shift operation and improve the fuel economy. (T.M.)

  10. Fuel Burn Estimation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterji, Gano

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions: Validated the fuel estimation procedure using flight test data. A good fuel model can be created if weight and fuel data are available. Error in assumed takeoff weight results in similar amount of error in the fuel estimate. Fuel estimation error bounds can be determined.

  11. Intrinsic immunogenicity of rapidly-degradable polymers evolves during degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andorko, James I; Hess, Krystina L; Pineault, Kevin G; Jewell, Christopher M

    2016-03-01

    Recent studies reveal many biomaterial vaccine carriers are able to activate immunostimulatory pathways, even in the absence of other immune signals. How the changing properties of polymers during biodegradation impact this intrinsic immunogenicity is not well studied, yet this information could contribute to rational design of degradable vaccine carriers that help direct immune response. We use degradable poly(beta-amino esters) (PBAEs) to explore intrinsic immunogenicity as a function of the degree of polymer degradation and polymer form (e.g., soluble, particles). PBAE particles condensed by electrostatic interaction to mimic a common vaccine approach strongly activate dendritic cells, drive antigen presentation, and enhance T cell proliferation in the presence of antigen. Polymer molecular weight strongly influences these effects, with maximum stimulation at short degradation times--corresponding to high molecular weight--and waning levels as degradation continues. In contrast, free polymer is immunologically inert. In mice, PBAE particles increase the numbers and activation state of cells in lymph nodes. Mechanistic studies reveal that this evolving immunogenicity occurs as the physicochemical properties and concentration of particles change during polymer degradation. This work confirms the immunological profile of degradable, synthetic polymers can evolve over time and creates an opportunity to leverage this feature in new vaccines. Degradable polymers are increasingly important in vaccination, but how the inherent immunogenicity of polymers changes during degradation is poorly understood. Using common rapidly-degradable vaccine carriers, we show that the activation of immune cells--even in the absence of other adjuvants--depends on polymer form (e.g., free, particulate) and the extent of degradation. These changing characteristics alter the physicochemical properties (e.g., charge, size, molecular weight) of polymer particles, driving changes in

  12. Consequences of Fuel Failure on Criticality Safety of Used Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, William J.; Wagner, John C.

    2012-09-01

    This report documents work performed for the Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy (DOENE) Fuel Cycle Technologies Used Fuel Disposition Campaign to assess the impact of fuel reconfiguration due to fuel failure on the criticality safety of used nuclear fuel (UNF) in storage and transportation casks. This work was motivated by concerns related to the potential for fuel degradation during extended storage (ES) periods and transportation following ES, but has relevance to other potential causes of fuel reconfiguration. Commercial UNF in the United States is expected to remain in storage for longer periods than originally intended. Extended storage time and irradiation of nuclear fuel to high-burnup values (>45 GWd/t) may increase the potential for fuel failure during normal and accident conditions involving storage and transportation. Fuel failure, depending on the severity, can result in changes to the geometric configuration of the fuel, which has safety and regulatory implications for virtually all aspects of a UNF storage and transport system's performance. The potential impact of fuel reconfiguration on the safety of UNF in storage and transportation is dependent on the likelihood and extent of the fuel reconfiguration, which is not well understood and is currently an active area of research. The objective of this work is to assess and quantify the impact of postulated failed fuel configurations on the criticality safety of UNF in storage and transportation casks. Although this work is motivated by the potential for fuel degradation during ES periods and transportation following ES, it has relevance to fuel reconfiguration due to the effects of high burnup. Regardless of the ultimate disposition path, UNF will need to be transported at some point in the future. To investigate and quantify the impact of fuel reconfiguration on criticality safety limits, which are given in terms of the effective neutron multiplication factor, a set of failed fuel

  13. Operationalizing measurement of forest degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dons, Klaus; Smith-Hall, Carsten; Meilby, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    . In Tanzania, charcoal production is considered a major cause of forest degradation, but is challenging to quantify due to sub-canopy biomass loss, remote production sites and illegal trade. We studied two charcoal production sites in dry Miombo woodland representing open woodland conditions near human......Quantification of forest degradation in monitoring and reporting as well as in historic baselines is among the most challenging tasks in national REDD+ strategies. However, a recently introduced option is to base monitoring systems on subnational conditions such as prevalent degradation activities...

  14. Analysis of possibilities for functional capacity for work rise of reactor fuel elements at nuclear engine regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deryavko, I.I.; Perepelkin, I.G.; Pivovarov, O.S.; Storozhenko, A.N.; Tarasov, V.I.

    2000-01-01

    The principle results of carbide fuel rods testing during series of IVG.1 reactor starts up at regime simulating nuclear engine regime of nuclear moving power unit are given. Considerable degradation of initial fuel elements status increasing from start up to start up and which could resulted fail of separate technological channels is shown. Origin case of extreme degradation of fuel elements status are insufficient thermal strength of fuel elements operation in the field brittle state of sintered carbide material, Possible ways of artificial reinforce of fuel elements of low temperature sections, increasing its thermal strength up to required level

  15. Constant strength fuel-fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaseen, V.A.

    1980-01-01

    A fuel cell is an electrochemical apparatus composed of both a nonconsumable anode and cathode; and electrolyte, fuel oxidant and controls. This invention guarantees the constant transfer of hydrogen atoms and their respective electrons, thus a constant flow of power by submergence of the negative electrode in a constant strength hydrogen furnishing fuel; when said fuel is an aqueous absorbed hydrocarbon, such as and similar to ethanol or methnol. The objective is accomplished by recirculation of the liquid fuel, as depleted in the cell through specific type membranes which pass water molecules and reject the fuel molecules; thus concentrating them for recycle use

  16. Prevention of nuclear fuel cladding materials corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, K.R.; Yang, J.C.; Lee, I.C.; Kang, H.D.; Cho, S.W.; Whang, C.K.

    1983-01-01

    The only way which could be performed by the operator of nuclear power plant to minimizing the degradation of nuclear fuel cladding material is to control the water quality of primary coolant as specified standard conditions which dose not attack the cladding material. If the water quality of reactor coolant does not meet far from the specification, the failure will occure not only cladding material itself but construction material of primary system which contact with the coolant. The corrosion product of system material are circulate through the whole primary system with the coolant and activated by the neutron near the reactor core. The activated corrosion products and fission products which released from fuel rod to the coolant, so called crud, will repeate deposition and redeposition continuously on the fuel rod and construction material surface. As a result we should consider heat transfer problem. In this study following activities were performed; 1. The crud sample was taken from the spent fuel rod surface of Kori unit one and analized for radioactive element and non radioactive chemical species. 2. The failure mode of nuclear fuel cladding material was estimated by the investigation of releasing type of fission products from the fuel rod to the reactor coolant using the iodine isotopes concentration of reactor coolants. 3. A study was carried out on the sipping test results of spent fuel and a discussion was made on the water quality control records through the past three cycle operation period of Kori unit one plant. (Author)

  17. Corrosion of spent Advanced Test Reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundberg, L.B.; Croson, M.L.

    1994-01-01

    The results of a study of the condition of spent nuclear fuel elements from the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) currently being stored underwater at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are presented. This study was motivated by a need to estimate the corrosion behavior of dried, spent ATR fuel elements during dry storage for periods up to 50 years. The study indicated that the condition of spent ATR fuel elements currently stored underwater at the INEL is not very well known. Based on the limited data and observed corrosion behavior in the reactor and in underwater storage, it was concluded that many of the fuel elements currently stored under water in the facility called ICPP-603 FSF are in a degraded condition, and it is probable that many have breached cladding. The anticipated dehydration behavior of corroded spent ATR fuel elements was also studied, and a list of issues to be addressed by fuel element characterization before and after forced drying of the fuel elements and during dry storage is presented

  18. Ecosystemic approaches to land degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puigdefabregas, J.; Barrio, G. del; Hill, J.

    2009-07-01

    Land degradation is recognized as the main outcome of desertification. However available procedures for its assessment are still unsatisfactory because are often too costly for surveying large areas and rely on specific components of the degradation process without being able to integrate them in a unique process. One of the objectives of De Survey project is designing and implementing operational procedures for desertification surveillance, including land degradation. A strategic report was compiled and reproduced here for selecting the most appropriate approaches to the project conditions. The report focuses on using attributes of ecosystem maturity as a natural way to integrate the different drivers of land degradation in simple indices. The review surveys different families of attributes concerned with water and energy fluxes through the ecosystem, its capacity to sustain biomass and net primary productivity, and its capacity to structure the space. Finally, some conclusions are presented about the choice criteria of the different approaches in the framne of operational applications. (Author) 20 refs.

  19. Ecosystemic approaches to land degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puigdefabregas, J.; Barrio, G. del; Hill, J.

    2009-01-01

    Land degradation is recognized as the main outcome of desertification. However available procedures for its assessment are still unsatisfactory because are often too costly for surveying large areas and rely on specific components of the degradation process without being able to integrate them in a unique process. One of the objectives of De Survey project is designing and implementing operational procedures for desertification surveillance, including land degradation. A strategic report was compiled and reproduced here for selecting the most appropriate approaches to the project conditions. The report focuses on using attributes of ecosystem maturity as a natural way to integrate the different drivers of land degradation in simple indices. The review surveys different families of attributes concerned with water and energy fluxes through the ecosystem, its capacity to sustain biomass and net primary productivity, and its capacity to structure the space. Finally, some conclusions are presented about the choice criteria of the different approaches in the framne of operational applications. (Author) 20 refs.

  20. Chitin Degradation In Marine Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Sara; Machado, Henrique; Gram, Lone

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Chitin is the most abundant polymer in the marine environment and the second most abundant in nature. Chitin does not accumulate on the ocean floor, because of microbial breakdown. Chitin degrading bacteria could have potential in the utilization of chitin as a renewable carbon...... and nitrogen source in the fermentation industry.Methods: Here, whole genome sequenced marine bacteria were screened for chitin degradation using phenotypic and in silico analyses.Results: The in silico analyses revealed the presence of three to nine chitinases in each strain, however the number of chitinases...... chitin regulatory system.Conclusions: This study has provided insight into the ecology of chitin degradation in marine bacteria. It also served as a basis for choosing a more efficient chitin degrading production strain e.g. for the use of chitin waste for large-scale fermentations....

  1. Predicting degradability of organic chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finizio, A; Vighi, M [Milan Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Entomologia Agraria

    1992-05-01

    Degradability, particularly biodegradability, is one of the most important factors governing the persistence of pollutants in the environment and consequently influencing their behavior and toxicity in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. The need for reliable persistence data in order to assess the environmental fate and hazard of chemicals by means of predictive approaches, is evident. Biodegradability tests are requested by the EEC directive on new chemicals. Neverthless, degradation tests are not easy to carry out and data on existing chemicals are very scarce. Therefore, assessing the fate of chemicals in the environment from the simple study of their structure would be a useful tool. Rates of degradation are a function of the rates of a series of processes. Correlation between degradation rates and structural parameters are will be facilitated if one of the processes is rate determining. This review is a survey of studies dealing with relationships between structure and biodegradation of organic chemicals, to identify the value and limitations of this approach.

  2. Modeling the degradation of a metallic waste form intended for geologic disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, T.H.; Morris, E.E.

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear reactors operating with metallic fuels have led to development of robust metallic waste forms intended to immobilize hazardous constituents in oxidizing environments. Release data from a wide range of tests where small waste form samples have been immersed in a variety of oxidizing solutions have been analyzed and fit to a mechanistically-derived 'logarithmic growth' form for waste form degradation. A bounding model is described which plausibly extrapolates these fits to long-term degradation in a geologic repository. The resulting empirically-fit degradation model includes dependence on solution pH, temperature, and chloride concentration as well as plausible estimates of statistical uncertainty. (authors)

  3. KMRR fuel design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, D.S.; Sim, B.S.; Kim, T.R.; Hwang, W.; Kim, B.G.; Ku, Y.H.; Lee, C.B.; Lim, I.C.

    1992-06-01

    KMRR fuel rod design criteria on fuel swelling, blistering and oxide spallation have been reexamined. Fuel centerline temperature limit of 250deg C in normal operation condition and fuel swelling limit of 12 % at the end of life have been proposed to prevent fuel failure due to excessive fuel swelling. Fuel temperature limit of 485deg C has been proposed to exclude the possibility of fuel failures during transients or under accident condition. Further analyses are needed to decide the fuel cladding temperature limit to preclude the oxide spallation. Design changes in fuel assembly structure and their effects on related systems have been reviewed from a structural integrity viewpoint. The remained works in fuel mechanical design area have been identified and further efforts of fuel design group will be focused on these aspects. (Author)

  4. Fuel Property Blend Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitz, William J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mehl, Marco [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wagnon, Scott J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zhang, Kuiwen [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kukkadapu, Goutham [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Westbrook, Charles K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-01-12

    The object of this project is to develop chemical models and associated correlations to predict the blending behavior of bio-derived fuels when mixed with conventional fuels like gasoline and diesel fuels.

  5. Logistic Fuel Processor Development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Salavani, Reza

    2004-01-01

    The Air Base Technologies Division of the Air Force Research Laboratory has developed a logistic fuel processor that removes the sulfur content of the fuel and in the process converts logistic fuel...

  6. Fuel pellet loading apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Apparatus is described for loading a predetermined amount of nuclear fuel pellets into nuclear fuel elements and particularly for the automatic loading of fuel pellets from within a sealed compartment. (author)

  7. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wataumi, Kazutoshi; Tajiri, Hiroshi.

    1992-01-01

    In a fuel assembly of a BWR type reactor, a pellet to be loaded comprises an external layer of fissile materials containing burnable poisons and an internal layer of fissile materials not containing burnable poison. For example, there is provided a dual type pellet comprising an external layer made of UO 2 incorporated with Gd 2 O 3 at a predetermined concentration as the burnable poisons and an internal layer made of UO 2 not containing Gd 2 O 3 . The amount of the burnable poisons required for predetermined places is controlled by the thickness of the ring of the external layer. This can dissipate an unnecessary poisoning effect at the final stage of the combustion cycle. Further, since only one or a few kinds of powder mixture of the burnable poisons and the fissile materials is necessary, production and product control can be facilitated. (I.N.)

  8. Fuel storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palacios, C.; Alvarez-Miranda, A.

    2009-01-01

    ENSA is a well known manufacturer of multi-system primary components for the nuclear industry and is totally prepared to satisfy future market requirements in this industry. At the same time that ENSA has been gaining a reputation world wider for the supply of primary components, has been strengthening its commitment and experience in supplying spent fuel components, either pool racks or storage and transportation casks, and offers not only fabrication but also design capabilities for its products. ENSA has supplied Spent Fuel Pool Racks, in spain, Finland, Taiwan, Korea, China, and currently it is in the process of licensing its own rack design in the United States of America for the ESBWR along with Ge-Hitachi. ENSA has supplied racks for 20 pools and 22 different reactors and it has also manufactured racks under all available technologies and developed a design known as Interlock Cell Matrix whose main features are outlined in this article. Another ENSA achievement in rack technology is the use of remote control for re-racking activities instead of using divers, which improves the ALARA requirements. Regarding casks for storage and transportation, ENSA also has al leading worldwide position, with exports prevailing over the Spanish market where ENSA has supplied 16 storage and transportation casks to the Spanish nuclear power Trillo. In some cases, ENSA acts as subcontractor for other clients. Foreign markets are still a major challenge for ENSA. ENSA-is well known for its manufacturing capabilities in the nuclear industry, but has been always involved in design activities through its engineering division, which carries out different tasks: components Design; Tooling Design; Engineering and Documentation; Project Engineering; Calculations, Design and Development Engineering. (Author)

  9. Working session 1: Tubing degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharshafdjian, G.; Turluer, G.

    1997-01-01

    A general introductory overview of the purpose of the group and the general subject area of SG tubing degradation was given by the facilitator. The purpose of the session was described as to open-quotes develop conclusions and proposals on regulatory and technical needs required to deal with the issues of SG tubing degradation.close quotes Types, locations and characteristics of tubing degradation in steam generators were briefly reviewed. The well-known synergistic effects of materials, environment, and stress and strain/strain rate, subsequently referred to by the acronym open-quotes MESSclose quotes by some of the group members, were noted. The element of time (i.e., evolution of these variables with time) was emphasized. It was also suggested that the group might want to consider the related topics of inspection capabilities, operational variables, degradation remedies, and validity of test data, and some background information in these areas was provided. The presentation given by Peter Millet during the Plenary Session was reviewed; Specifically, the chemical aspects and the degradation from the secondary side of the steam generator were noted. The main issues discussed during the October 1995 EPRI meeting on secondary side corrosion were reported, and a listing of the potential SG tube degradations was provided and discussed

  10. Abiotic degradation of plastic films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ángeles-López, Y. G.; Gutiérrez-Mayen, A. M.; Velasco-Pérez, M.; Beltrán-Villavicencio, M.; Vázquez-Morillas, A.; Cano-Blanco, M.

    2017-01-01

    Degradable plastics have been promoted as an option to mitigate the environmental impacts of plastic waste. However, there is no certainty about its degradability under different environmental conditions. The effect of accelerated weathering (AW), natural weathering (NW) and thermal oxidation (TO) on different plastics (high density polyethylene, HDPE; oxodegradable high density polyethylene, HDPE-oxo; compostable plastic, Ecovio ® metalized polypropylene, PP; and oxodegradable metalized polypropylene, PP-oxo) was studied. Plastics films were exposed to AW per 110 hours; to NW per 90 days; and to TO per 30 days. Plastic films exposed to AW and NW showed a general loss on mechanical properties. The highest reduction in elongation at break on AW occurred to HDPE-oxo (from 400.4% to 20.9%) and was higher than 90% for HDPE, HDPE-oxo, Ecovio ® and PP-oxo in NW. No substantial evidence of degradation was found on plastics exposed to TO. Oxo-plastics showed higher degradation rates than their conventional counterparts, and the compostable plastic was resistant to degradation in the studied abiotic conditions. This study shows that degradation of plastics in real life conditions will vary depending in both, their composition and the environment.

  11. Nuclear fuel replacement device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritz, W.C.; Robey, R.M.; Wett, J.F.

    1984-01-01

    A fuel handling arrangement for a liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a single rotating plug eccentric to the fuel core and a fuel handling machine radially movable along a slot in the plug with a transfer station disposed outside the fuel core but covered by the eccentric plug and within range of movement of said fuel handling machine to permit transfer of fuel assemblies between the core and the transfer station. (author)

  12. CANDU fuel performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanoff, N.V.; Bazeley, E.G.; Hastings, I.J.

    1982-01-01

    CANDU fuel has operated successfully in Ontario Hydro's power reactors since 1962. In the 19 years of experience, about 99.9% of all fuel bundles have performed as designed. Most defects occurred before 1979 and subsequent changes in fuel design, fuel management, reactor control, and manufacturing quality control have reduced the current defect rate to near zero. Loss of power production due to defective fuel has been negligible. The outstanding performance continues while maintaining a low unit energy cost for fuel

  13. Fuels Combustion Research: Supercritical Fuel Pyrolysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Glassman, Irvin

    2001-01-01

    .... The focus during the subject period was directed to understanding the pyrolysis and combustion of endothermic fuels under subcritical conditions and the pyrolysis of these fuels under supercritical conditions...

  14. Fuels Combustion Research: Supercritical Fuel Pyrolysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Glassman, Irvin

    2000-01-01

    .... The focus during the subject period was directed to understanding the pyrolysis and combustion of endothermic fuels under subcritical conditions and the pyrolysis of these fuels under supercritical conditions...

  15. Current status of IAEA activities in spent fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danker, W.J.

    2003-01-01

    Spent fuel storage is a common issue in all IAEA Member States with nuclear reactors. Whatever strategy is selected for the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle, the storage of spent fuel will be an increasingly significant consideration. Notwithstanding considerable efforts to increase the efficient use of nuclear fuel and to optimize storage capacity, delays in plans for geological repositories or in implementing reprocessing result in increased spent fuel storage capacity needs in combination with longer storage durations over the foreseeable future. As storage inventories and durations increase, issues associated with long term storage compel more attention...monitoring for potential degradation mechanisms, records retention, maintenance, efficiencies through burnup credit. Since the IAEA contribution to ICNC'99 focused exclusively on IAEA burnup credit activities including requirements and methods, this paper provides a broader perspective on IAEA activities in response to the above trends in spent fuel management, while also describing efforts to disseminate information regarding burnup credit applications. (author)

  16. Fuel cell using a hydrogen generation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dentinger, Paul M.; Crowell, Jeffrey A. W.

    2010-10-19

    A system is described for storing and generating hydrogen and, in particular, a system for storing and generating hydrogen for use in an H.sub.2/O.sub.2 fuel cell. The hydrogen storage system uses beta particles from a beta particle emitting material to degrade an organic polymer material to release substantially pure hydrogen. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, beta particles from .sup.63Ni are used to release hydrogen from linear polyethylene.

  17. GSPEL - Fuel Cell Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Fuel Cell Lab (FCL)Established to investigate, integrate, testand verifyperformance and technology readiness offuel cell systems and fuel reformers for use with...

  18. Fuel performance experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sofer, G.A.

    1986-01-01

    The history of LWR fuel supply has been characterized by a wide range of design developments and fuel cycle cost improvements. Exxon Nuclear Company, Inc. has pursued an aggressive fuel research and development program aimed at improved fuel performance. Exxon Nuclear has introduced many design innovations which have improved fuel cycle economics and operating flexibility while fuel failures remain at very low levels. The removable upper tie plate feature of Exxon Nuclear assemblies has helped accelerate this development, enabling repeated inspections during successive plant outages. Also, this design feature has made it possible to repair damaged fuel assemblies during refueling outages, thereby minimizing the economic impact of fuel failure from all causes

  19. Catalytic Fuel Conversion Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility enables unique catalysis research related to power and energy applications using military jet fuels and alternative fuels. It is equipped with research...

  20. HTGR fuel reprocessing technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, L.H.; Heath, C.A.; Shefcik, J.J.

    1976-01-01

    The following aspects of HTGR reprocessing technology are discussed: characteristics of HTGR fuels, criteria for a fuel reprocessing flowsheet; selection of a reference reprocessing flowsheet, and waste treatment

  1. Degraded core studies at INEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buescher, B.J.; Howe, T.M.; Miller, R.W.

    1982-01-01

    During 1980, planning of prototypical severe fuel damage tests to be conducted in the Power Burst Facility (PBF) to investigate fuel behavior in severe accidents up to temperatures of 2400 0 K was initiated. This first series of tests is designated Phase I. Also, a code development effort was initiated to provide a reliable predictive tool for core behavior during severe accidents. During 1981, an assessment of capabilities and preliminary planning were begun for an in-pile experimental program to investigate the behavior of larger arrays of previously irradiated fuel rods at temperatures through UO 2 melting. This latter series of tests is designated Phase II

  2. A study of the stabilities, microstructures and fuel characteristics of tri-fuel (diesel-biodiesel-ethanol) using various fuel preparation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K. H.; Mukhtar, N. A. M.; Yohaness Hagos, Ftwi; Noor, M. M.

    2017-10-01

    In this study, the work was carried out to investigate the effects of ethanol proportions on the stabilities and physicochemical characteristics of tri-fuel (Diesel-Biodiesel-Ethanol). For the first time, tri-fuel emulsions and blended were compared side by side. The experiment was done with composition having 5%, 10%, 15%, 20% and 25 % of ethanol with fixed 10% of biodiesel from palm oil origin on a volume basis into diesel. The results indicated that the phase stabilities of the emulsified fuels were higher compared to the blended fuels. In addition, tri-fuel composition with higher proportion of ethanol were found unstable with high tendency to form layer separation. It was found that tri-fuel emulsion with 5% ethanol content (D85B10E5) was of the best in stability with little separation. Furthermore, tri-fuel with lowest ethanol proportion indicated convincing physicochemical characteristics compared to others. Physicochemical characteristics of tri-fuel blending yield almost similar results to tri-fuel emulsion but degrading as more proportion ethanol content added. Emulsion category had cloudy look but on temporarily basis. Under the microscope, tri-fuel emulsion and blending droplet were similar for its active moving about micro-bubble but distinct in term of detection of collision, average disperse micro-bubble size, the spread and organization of the microstructure.

  3. Innovative nuclear fuels and applications. Part 1: limits of today's fuels and concepts for innovative fuels. Part 2: materials properties, irradiation performance and gaps in our knowledge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matzke, H.

    2000-01-01

    Part I of this contribution on innovative nuclear fuels gives a summary of current developments and problems of today's fuels, i.e. enriched UO 2 and UO 2 with a few % of PUO 2 (MOX fuel) or Gd 2 O 3 (as burnable neutron poison). The problems and property changes caused by high burnups (e.g. degradation of the thermal conductivity, polygonization or formation of the rim-structure) are discussed. Subsequently, the concepts for new fuels to burn excess Pu and to achieve an effective transmutation of the minor actinides Np, Am and Cm are treated. The criteria for the choice of suitable fuels and different fuel types (high Pu-content fuels, nitrides, U-free fuels, inert matrix supported fuels, cercers, cermets, etc.) are discussed. Part II of this contribution on innovative nuclear fuels deals with the properties of relevance of the different materials suggested to be used in innovative fuels which range from pure actinide fuel such as PuN and AmO 2 to spinel MgAl 2 O 4 and zircon ZrSiO 4 for inert matrix-based fuels, etc. The available knowledge on materials research aspects is summarized with emphasis on the physics of radiation damage. It is shown that significant gaps in the present knowledge exist, e.g. for the minor actinide compounds, and suggestions are made to fill these gaps in order to achieve a sufficient data base to design and operate suitable innovative fuels in a near future. (author)

  4. Nuclear fuel production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randol, A.G.

    1985-01-01

    The production of new fuel for a power plant reactor and its disposition following discharge from the power plant is usually referred to as the ''nuclear fuel cycle.'' The processing of fuel is cyclic in nature since sometime during a power plant's operation old or ''depleted'' fuel must be removed and new fuel inserted. For light water reactors this step typically occurs once every 12-18 months. Since the time required for mining of the raw ore to recovery of reusable fuel materials from discharged materials can span up to 8 years, the management of fuel to assure continuous power plant operation requires simultaneous handling of various aspects of several fuel cycles, for example, material is being mined for fuel to be inserted in a power plant 2 years into the future at the same time fuel is being reprocessed from a discharge 5 years prior. Important aspects of each step in the fuel production process are discussed

  5. Materials Degradation in Light Water Reactors: Life After 60,

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busby, Jeremy T; Nanstad, Randy K; Stoller, Roger E; Feng, Zhili; Naus, Dan J

    2008-01-01

    susceptibility for most components and may introduce new degradation modes. While all components (except perhaps the reactor vessel) can be replaced, it may not be economically favorable. Therefore, understanding, controlling, and mitigating materials degradation processes are key priorities for reactor operation, power uprate considerations, and life extensions. This document is written to give an overview of some of the materials degradation issues that may be key for extend reactor service life. A detailed description of all the possible forms of degradation is beyond the scope of this short paper and has already been described in other documents (for example, the NUREG/CR-6923). The intent of this document is to present an overview of current materials issues in the existing reactor fleet and a brief analysis of the potential impact of extending life beyond 60 years. Discussion is presented in six distinct areas: (1) Reactor pressure vessel; (2) Reactor core and primary systems; (3) Reactor secondary systems; (4) Weldments; (5) Concrete; and (6) Modeling and simulations. Following each of these areas, some research thrust directions to help identify and mitigate lifetime extension issues are proposed. Note that while piping and cabling are important for extended service, these components are discussed in more depth in a separate paper. Further, the materials degradation issues associated with fuel cladding and fuel assemblies are not discussed in this section as these components are replaced periodically and will not influence the overall lifetime of the reactor

  6. MELCOR Modeling of Air-Cooled PWR Spent Fuel Assemblies in Water empty Fuel Pools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herranz, L. E.; Lopez, C.

    2013-07-01

    The OECD Spent Fuel Project (SFP) investigated fuel degradation in case of a complete Loss-Of- Coolant-Accident in a PWR spent fuel pool. Analyses of the SFP PWR ignition tests have been conducted with the 1.86.YT.3084.SFP MELCOR version developed by SNL. The main emphasis has been placed on assessing the MELCOR predictive capability to get reasonable estimates of time-to-ignition and fire front propagation under two configurations: hot neighbor (i.e., adiabatic scenario) and cold neighbor (i.e., heat transfer to adjacent fuel assemblies). A detailed description of hypotheses and approximations adopted in the MELCOR model are provided in the paper. MELCOR results accuracy was notably different between both scenarios. The reasons are highlighted in the paper and based on the results understanding a set of remarks concerning scenarios modeling is given.

  7. CORA-13 experiment on severe fuel damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firnhaber, M.; Trambauer, K.; Hagen, S.; Hofmann, P.; Schanz, G.; Sepold, L.

    1993-07-01

    The major objectives of the experiment were to investigate the behavior of PWR fuel elements during early core degradation and fast cooldown due to refill. Measured quantities are boundary conditions, bundle temperatures, hydrogen generation and the final bundle configuration. Boundary conditions which could not be measured, but which are necessary for simplified test simulation (axial power profile, shroud insulation temperature, bundle refill flow) were estimated using ATHLET-CD. The capability of the codes in calculating the main degradation phenomena has been clearly illustrated and weaknesses concerning the modelling of some degradation processes have been identified. Among the degradation phenomena involved in the test, the more severe limitations concern the UO 2 -ZrO 2 dissolution by molten Zr, the solubility limits in the resulting U-Zr-O mixture and the cladding failure by the molten mixture. There is a lack concerning the Inconel spacer-grid interactions with the rods, the material interaction between control rod material and fuel rods, and in the modelling of hydrogen generation during cooldown. (orig./DG)

  8. Fuel manufacturing and utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The efficient utilisation of nuclear fuel requires manufacturing facilities capable of making advanced fuel types, with appropriate quality control. Once made, the use of such fuels requires a proper understanding of their behaviour in the reactor environment, so that safe operation for the design life can be achieved. The International Atomic Energy Agency supports Member States to improve in-pile fuel performance and management of materials; and to develop advanced fuel technologies for ensuring reliability and economic efficiency of the nuclear fuel cycle. It provides assistance to Member States to support fuel-manufacturing capability, including quality assurance techniques, optimization of manufacturing parameters and radiation protection. The IAEA supports the development fuel modelling expertise in Member States, covering both normal operation and postulated and severe accident conditions. It provides information and support for the operation of Nuclear Power Plant to ensure that the environment and water chemistry is appropriate for fuel operation. The IAEA supports fuel failure investigations, including equipment for failed fuel detection and for post-irradiation examination and inspection, as well as fuel repair, it provides information and support research into the basic properties of fuel materials, including UO 2 , MOX and zirconium alloys. It further offers guidance on the relationship with back-end requirement (interim storage, transport, reprocessing, disposal), fuel utilization and management, MOX fuels, alternative fuels and advanced fuel technology

  9. Spent Fuel Working Group Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Toole, T.

    1993-11-01

    The Department of Energy is storing large amounts of spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials (herein referred to as RINM). In the past, the Department reprocessed RINM to recover plutonium, tritium, and other isotopes. However, the Department has ceased or is phasing out reprocessing operations. As a consequence, Department facilities designed, constructed, and operated to store RINM for relatively short periods of time now store RINM, pending decisions on the disposition of these materials. The extended use of the facilities, combined with their known degradation and that of their stored materials, has led to uncertainties about safety. To ensure that extended storage is safe (i.e., that protection exists for workers, the public, and the environment), the conditions of these storage facilities had to be assessed. The compelling need for such an assessment led to the Secretary's initiative on spent fuel, which is the subject of this report. This report comprises three volumes: Volume I; Summary Results of the Spent Fuel Working Group Evaluation; Volume II, Working Group Assessment Team Reports and Protocol; Volume III; Operating Contractor Site Team Reports. This volume presents the overall results of the Working Group's Evaluation. The group assessed 66 facilities spread across 11 sites. It identified: (1) facilities that should be considered for priority attention. (2) programmatic issues to be considered in decision making about interim storage plans and (3) specific vulnerabilities for some of these facilities

  10. Instrumentation of fuel elements and fuel plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, J.P.; Fanjas, Y.

    1993-01-01

    When controlling the behaviour of a reactor or developing a new fuel concept, it is of utmost interest to have the possibility to confirm the thermohydraulic calculations by actual measurements in the fuel elements or in the fuel plates. For years, CERCA has developed the technology and supplied its customers with fuel elements equipped with pressure or temperature measuring devices according to the requirements. Recent customer projects have led to the development of a new method to introduce thermocouples directly into the fuel plate meat instead of the cladding. The purpose of this paper is to review the various instrumentation possibilities available at CERCA. (author)

  11. Instrumentation of fuel elements and fuel plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, J.P.; Fanjas, Y.

    1994-01-01

    When controlling the behaviour of a reactor or developing a new fuel concept, it is of utmost interest to have the possibility to confirm the thermohydraulic calculations by actual measurements in the fuel elements or in the fuel plates. For years, CERCA has developed the technology and supplied its customers with fuel elements equipped with pressure or temperature measuring devices according to the requirements. Recent customer projects have lead to the development of a new method to introduce thermocouples directly into the fuel plate meat instead of the cladding. The purpose of this paper is to review the various instrumentation possibilities available at CERCA. (author)

  12. Upgraded HFIR Fuel Element Welding System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sease, John D.

    2010-01-01

    The welding of aluminum-clad fuel plates into aluminum alloy 6061 side plate tubing is a unique design feature of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) fuel assemblies as 101 full-penetration circumferential gas metal arc welds (GMAW) are required in the fabrication of each assembly. In a HFIR fuel assembly, 540 aluminum-clad fuel plates are assembled into two nested annular fuel elements 610 mm (24-inches) long. The welding process for the HFIR fuel elements was developed in the early 1960 s and about 450 HFIR fuel assemblies have been successfully welded using the GMAW process qualified in the 1960 s. In recent years because of the degradation of the electronic and mechanical components in the old HFIR welding system, reportable defects in plate attachment or adapter welds have been present in almost all completed fuel assemblies. In October 2008, a contract was awarded to AMET, Inc., of Rexburg, Idaho, to replace the old welding equipment with standard commercially available welding components to the maximum extent possible while maintaining the qualified HFIR welding process. The upgraded HFIR welding system represents a major improvement in the welding system used in welding HFIR fuel elements for the previous 40 years. In this upgrade, the new inner GMAW torch is a significant advancement over the original inner GMAW torch previously used. The innovative breakthrough in the new inner welding torch design is the way the direction of the cast in the 0.762 mm (0.030-inch) diameter aluminum weld wire is changed so that the weld wire emerging from the contact tip is straight in the plane perpendicular to the welding direction without creating any significant drag resistance in the feeding of the weld wire.

  13. Thermogravimetric assessment of thermal degradation in asphaltenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barneto, Agustín García, E-mail: agustin.garcia@diq.uhu.es [Department of Chemical Engineering, Physical Chemistry and Organic Chemistry, University of Huelva, Huelva (Spain); Carmona, José Ariza [Department of Chemical Engineering, Physical Chemistry and Organic Chemistry, University of Huelva, Huelva (Spain); Garrido, María José Franco [CEPSA, RDI Centre, Madrid (Spain)

    2016-03-20

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Asphaltenes content of visbreaking streams in oil refinery can be measured by using TGA. • Deconvoluting TGA curves allows the thermal-based composition of asphaltenes to be elucidated. • Asphaltenes cracking involves acceleratory stages compatible with autocatalytic kinetic. • Activation energy during asphaltenes pyrolysis increased with increasing temperature. • Activation energy remained almost constant at 200–225 kJ/mol during oxidative cracking. - Abstract: Monitoring asphaltenes is very important with a view to optimizing visbreaking units in oil refineries. Current analyses based on selective dissolution in different solvents are slow, so new, more expeditious methods for measuring asphaltenes are required to facilitate fuel-oil production. In this work, we studied the thermal degradation of asphaltenes as the potential basis for a thermogravimetric method for their monitoring in visbreaking streams. The thermal degradation of asphaltenes occurs largely from 400 to 500 °C; the process is quite smooth in an inert environment but involves several fast mass loss events in the air. Kinetic parameters for characterizing the process were determined by using two model-free methods and the modified Prout–Tompkins kinetic equation to examine asphaltene thermolysis. Both types of methods showed the activation energy to increase during pyrolysis but to remain almost constant during cracking in the presence of oxygen or even diminish during char oxidation. Deconvoluting the thermogravimetric profiles revealed that asphaltene thermolysis in the air cannot be accurately described in terms of an nth order kinetic model because it involves some acceleratory phases. Also, thermogravimetric analyses of visbreaking streams revealed that char production in them is proportional to their asphaltene content. This relationship enables the thermogravimetric measurement of asphaltenes.

  14. Physical degradation assessment of generator station cables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stonkus, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    Preliminary studies of fossil-fired and nuclear generator station cables indicate that the low voltage PVC insulated cables are in relatively good condition. The insulation is flexible and in the case of nuclear cables can withstand a design basis event after nearly 15 years of service. Cables insulated with styrene butadiene rubber have been found embrittled and cables insulated with SBR should be closely inspected in any plant assurance program. Thermal analysis using oxidative induction technique shows promise to indicate cable insulation degradation. Long term reliability assurance and plant life extension studies are being actively pursued at Ontario Hydro. A major study is currently underway to extend the life of the oldest operating fossil-fuel station, the 8-unit, 2400 MW Lakeview TGS in operation since the 1960s. Plant life assurance programs have been initiated at the 2000 MW Lambton TGS in operation since 1969, and for the oldest operating nuclear plant, Pickering NGS A in operation since the early 1970s. As cables are considered one of the critical components in a generator station due to the extreme difficulty and cost of cable replacement, test programs have been initiated to evaluate the physical degradation of the cables and relate the results to electrical diagnostic tests and to chemical changes. The decommissioning of two small nuclear stations, the 20 MW Nuclear Power Demonstration (NPD) and the 200 MW Douglas Point NGS, which were placed in service in 1962 and 1967 respectively, will provide an opportunity to perform destructive electrical and physical evaluation on field aged cables

  15. Thermogravimetric assessment of thermal degradation in asphaltenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barneto, Agustín García; Carmona, José Ariza; Garrido, María José Franco

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Asphaltenes content of visbreaking streams in oil refinery can be measured by using TGA. • Deconvoluting TGA curves allows the thermal-based composition of asphaltenes to be elucidated. • Asphaltenes cracking involves acceleratory stages compatible with autocatalytic kinetic. • Activation energy during asphaltenes pyrolysis increased with increasing temperature. • Activation energy remained almost constant at 200–225 kJ/mol during oxidative cracking. - Abstract: Monitoring asphaltenes is very important with a view to optimizing visbreaking units in oil refineries. Current analyses based on selective dissolution in different solvents are slow, so new, more expeditious methods for measuring asphaltenes are required to facilitate fuel-oil production. In this work, we studied the thermal degradation of asphaltenes as the potential basis for a thermogravimetric method for their monitoring in visbreaking streams. The thermal degradation of asphaltenes occurs largely from 400 to 500 °C; the process is quite smooth in an inert environment but involves several fast mass loss events in the air. Kinetic parameters for characterizing the process were determined by using two model-free methods and the modified Prout–Tompkins kinetic equation to examine asphaltene thermolysis. Both types of methods showed the activation energy to increase during pyrolysis but to remain almost constant during cracking in the presence of oxygen or even diminish during char oxidation. Deconvoluting the thermogravimetric profiles revealed that asphaltene thermolysis in the air cannot be accurately described in terms of an nth order kinetic model because it involves some acceleratory phases. Also, thermogravimetric analyses of visbreaking streams revealed that char production in them is proportional to their asphaltene content. This relationship enables the thermogravimetric measurement of asphaltenes.

  16. Degradation of shape memory effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandermeer, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    An important parameter for deciding whether or not a SME alloy is suitable for practical applications is the magnitude of the strain reversal accompanying martensite reversion. This research is concerned with elucidating metallurgical factors that cause degradation of this heat-activated recovery strain, E/sub R/. After explaining what is meant by degradation, two manifestations of degradation recently identified in near-monotectoid uranium-niobium alloys are described. The first was associated with the onset of plastic deformation of the martensite beyond the reversible strain limit, E/sub L/; a reduction of E/sub R/ from 5.25% at 8% total strain, i.e. E/sub L/, to 2.9% at 12% total strain was observed. A second type of degradation depended strongly on the heating rate during reversion; the E/sub R/ for an imposed strain of 6.95% was reduced from a value of 5.25% to 1.3% when the heating rate was decreased from 40 0 /sec to 0.05 0 /sec. Degradation was attributed to a change in the transformation path and the interjection of time-dependent, low temperature aging reactions

  17. HTGR fuel and fuel cycle technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotts, A.L.; Coobs, J.H.

    1976-08-01

    The status of fuel and fuel cycle technology for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) is reviewed. The all-ceramic core of the HTGRs permits high temperatures compared with other reactors. Core outlet temperatures of 740 0 C are now available for the steam cycle. For advanced HTGRs such as are required for direct-cycle power generation and for high-temperature process heat, coolant temperatures as high as 1000 0 C may be expected. The paper discusses the variations of HTGR fuel designs that meet the performance requirements and the requirements of the isotopes to be used in the fuel cycle. Also discussed are the fuel cycle possibilities, which include the low-enrichment cycle, the Th- 233 U cycle, and plutonium utilization in either cycle. The status of fuel and fuel cycle development is summarized

  18. Ni-YSZ solid oxide fuel cell anode behavior upon redox cycling based on electrical characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemensø, Trine; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2006-01-01

    Ni-YSZ cermets are a prevalent material used for solid oxide fuel cells. However, the cermet degrades upon redox cycling. The degradation is related to microstructural changes, but knowledge of the mechanisms has been limited. DC conductivity measurements were performed on cermets and cermets...

  19. Ni-YSZ solid oxide fuel cell anode behavior upon redox cycling based on electrical characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemensø, Trine; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2007-01-01

    Nickel (Ni)—yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) cermets are a prevalent material used for solid oxide fuel cells. The cermet degrades upon redox cycling. The degradation is related to microstructural changes, but knowledge of the mechanisms has been limited. Direct current conductivity measurements...

  20. Survey on aging on electrodes and electrocatalysts in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stonehart, P.; Hochmuth, J.

    1981-01-01

    The processes which contribute to the decay in performance of electrodes used in phosphoric acid fuel cell systems are discussed. Loss of catalytic surface area, corrosion of the carbon support, electrode structure degradation, electrolyte degradation, and impurities in the reactant streams are identified as the major areas for concern.

  1. Investigation of Ruthenium Dissolution in Advanced Membrane Electrode Assemblies for Direct Methanol Based Fuel Cells Stacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, T. I.; Firdosy, S.; Koel, B. E.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives a detailed review of the Direct Methanol Based Fuel Cell (DMFC) stack and investigates the Ruthenium that was found at the exit of the stack. The topics include: 1) Motivation; 2) Pathways for Cell Degradation; 3) Cell Duration Testing; 4) Duration Testing, MEA Analysis; and 5) Stack Degradation Analysis.

  2. On the mechanisms of the radiation-induced degradation of cellulosic substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tissot, Chanel; Grdanovska, Slavica; Barkatt, Aaron; Silverman, Joseph; Al-Sheikhly, Mohamad

    2013-03-01

    Much interest has been generated in utilizing ionizing radiation for the production of bio-fuels from cellulosic plant materials. It is well known that exposure of cellulose to ionizing radiation causes significant breakdown of the polysaccharide. Radiation-induced degradation of cellulose may reduce or replace ecologically hazardous chemical steps in addition to reducing the number of processing stages and decreasing energy consumption.

  3. Experimental and modeling study of Portland cement paste degradation in boric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benakli, A.; Chomat, L.; Le Bescop, P.; Wall, J.

    2015-01-01

    In the framework of Spent Fuel Pools (SFP) lifetime studies, an investigation of the Portland cement degradation in boric acid has been requested by the Electric Power Research Institute. The main goal of this study is to identify the physico-chemical degradation mechanisms involved in boric acid media. Both experimental and modeling approaches are considered. Concerning degradation experiments, sample of cement paste are immersed during three and nine months in a boric acid solution at 2400 ppm that is periodically renewed. Boric acid concentration has been chosen to be representative of SFP solution. Results will be confronted with reactive transport numerical calculations performed by the reactive transport code HYTEC associated with a dedicated extended database called Thermoddem. The analysis of degradation solution revealed a main ions release mechanism driven by diffusion especially for calcium, nitrate, sodium and sulfate. Leaching behavior of magnesium seems to be more complex. Decalcification is the major degradation process involved, even if a non-negligible contribution of further cations (Mg 2+ , Na + ) and anions (SO 4 2- ) has been noticed. Analysis of degradation soution also revealed that kinetic of Portland cement paste degradation in boric acid is higher than in pure water, regarding the degraded depths measured and calcium leaching rate. This observation has been confirmed by solid characterization. Microstructure analysis of degraded Portland cement paste showed a global porosity increase in the degraded zone that might be mainly attributed to Portlandite dissolution. An Ettringite reprecipitation in the degraded zone has been suspected but could also be Ettringite-like phases containing boron. The analysis techniques used did not allow us to differentiate it, and no others specific mineral phases containing boron has been identified. Profile pattern by XRD analysis allowed us to identify four zones composing the degraded Portland cement paste

  4. Multi-Objective Optimization Considering Battery Degradation for a Multi-Mode Power-Split Electric Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuerui Ma

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A multi-mode power-split (MMPS hybrid electric vehicle (HEV has two planetary gearsets and clutches/grounds which results in several operation modes with enhanced electric drive capability and better fuel economy. Basically, the battery storage system is involved in different operation modes to satisfy the power demand and minimize the fuel consumption, whereas the complicated operation modes with frequent charging/discharging will absolutely influence the battery life because of degradation. In this paper, firstly, we introduce the solid electrolyte interface (SEI film growth model based on the previous study of the battery degradation principles and was verified according to the test data. We consider both the fuel economy and battery degradation as a multi-objective problem for MMPS HEV by normalization with a weighting factor. An instantaneous optimization is implemented based on the equivalent fuel consumption concept. Then the control strategy is implemented on a simulation framework integrating the MMPS powertrain model and the SEI film growth map model over some typical driving cycles, such as New European Driving Cycle (NEDC and Urban Dynamometer Driving Schedule (UDDS. Finally, the result demonstrates that these two objectives are conflicting and the trade-off reduces the battery degradation with fuel sacrifice. Additionally, the analysis reveals how the mode selection will reflect the battery degradation.

  5. Materials testing for molten carbonate fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Mario, F.; Frangini, S.

    1995-01-01

    Unlike conventional generation systems fuel cells use an electrochemical reaction between a fossil fuel and an oxidant to produce electricity through a flame less combustion process. As a result, fuel cells offer interesting technical and operating advantages in terms of conversion efficiencies and environmental benefits due to very low pollutant emissions. Among the different kinds of fuel cells the molten carbonate fuel cells are currently being developed for building compact power generation plants to serve mainly in congested urban areas in virtue of their higher efficiency capabilities at either partial and full loads, good response to power peak loads, fuel flexibility, modularity and, potentially, cost-effectiveness. Starting from an analysis of the most important degradative aspects of the corrosion of the separator plate, the main purpose of this communication is to present the state of the technology in the field of corrosion control of the separator plate in order to extend the useful lifetime of the construction materials to the project goal of 40,000 hours

  6. Polymer degradation rate control of hybrid rocket combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickler, D. B.; Ramohalli, K. N. R.

    1970-01-01

    Polymer degradation to small fragments is treated as a rate controlling step in hybrid rocket combustion. Both numerical and approximate analytical solutions of the complete energy and polymer chain bond conservation equations for the condensed phase are obtained. Comparison with inert atmosphere data is very good. It is found that the intersect of curves of pyrolysis rate versus interface temperature for hybrid combustors, with the thermal degradation theory, falls at a pyrolysis rate very close to that for which a pressure dependence begins to be observable. Since simple thermal degradation cannot give sufficient depolymerization at higher pyrolysis rates, it is suggested that oxidative catalysis of the process occurs at the surface, giving a first order dependence on reactive species concentration at the wall. Estimates of the ratio of this activation energy and interface temperature are in agreement with best fit procedures for hybrid combustion data. Requisite active species concentrations and flux are shown to be compatible with turbulent transport. Pressure dependence of hybrid rocket fuel regression rate is thus shown to be describable in a consistent manner in terms of reactive species catalysis of polymer degradation.

  7. HTGR fuel and fuel cycle technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotts, A.L.; Homan, F.J.; Balthesen, E.; Turner, R.F.

    1977-01-01

    Significant advances have occurred in the development of HTGR fuel and fuel cycle. These accomplishments permit a wide choice of fuel designs, reactor concepts, and fuel cycles. Fuels capable of providing helium outlet temperatures of 750 0 C are available, and fuels capable of 1000 0 C outlet temperatures may be expected from extension of present technology. Fuels have been developed for two basic HTGR designs, one using a spherical (pebble bed) element and the other a prismatic element. Within each concept a number of variations of geometry, fuel composition, and structural materials are permitted. Potential fuel cycles include both low-enriched and high-enriched Th- 235 U, recycle Th- 233 U, and Th-Pu or U-Pu cycles. This flexibility offered by the HTGR is of great practical benefit considering the rapidly changing economics of power production. The inflation of ore prices has increased optimum conversion ratios, and increased the necessity of fuel recycle at an early date. Fuel element makeup is very similar for prismatic and spherical designs. Both use spherical fissile and fertile particles coated with combinations of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide. Both use carbonaceous binder materials, and graphite as the structural material. Weak-acid resin (WAR) UO 2 -UC 2 fissile fuels and sol-gel-derived ThO 2 fertile fuels have been selected for the Th- 233 U cycle in the prismatic design. Sol-gel-derived UO 2 UC 2 is the reference fissile fuel for the low-enriched pebble bed design. Both the United States and Federal Republic of Germany are developing technology for fuel cycle operations including fabrication, reprocessing, refabrication, and waste handling. Feasibility of basic processes has been established and designs developed for full-scale equipment. Fuel and fuel cycle technology provide the basis for a broad range of applications of the HTGR. Extension of the fuels to higher operating temperatures and development and commercial demonstration of fuel

  8. Study of Operating Parameters for Accelerated Anode Degradation in SOFCs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ploner, Alexandra; Hagen, Anke; Hauch, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications require lifetimes of several years on the system level. A big challenge is to demonstrate such exceptionally long lifetimes in ongoing R&D projects. Accelerated or compressed testing are alternative methods to obtain this. Activities in this area have been...... carried out without arriving at a generally accepted methodology. This is mainly due to the complexity of degradation mechanisms on the single SOFC components as function of operating parameters. In this study, we present a detailed analysis of approx. 180 durability tests regarding degradation of single...... SOFC components as function of operating conditions. Electrochemical impedance data were collected on the fresh and long-term tested SOFCs and used to de-convolute the individual losses of single SOFC cell components – electrolyte, cathode and anode. The main findings include a time-dependent effect...

  9. Treat upgrade fuel fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, K.V.; Schell, D.H.

    1979-01-01

    An extrusion and thermal treatment process was developed to produce graphite fuel rods containing a dispersion of enriched UO 2 . These rods will be used in an upgraded version of the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT). The improved fuel provides a higher graphite matrix density, better fuel dispersion and higher thermal capabilities than the existing fuel

  10. Integrated fuel processor development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, S.; Pereira, C.; Lee, S. H. D.; Krumpelt, M.

    2001-01-01

    The Department of Energy's Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies has been supporting the development of fuel-flexible fuel processors at Argonne National Laboratory. These fuel processors will enable fuel cell vehicles to operate on fuels available through the existing infrastructure. The constraints of on-board space and weight require that these fuel processors be designed to be compact and lightweight, while meeting the performance targets for efficiency and gas quality needed for the fuel cell. This paper discusses the performance of a prototype fuel processor that has been designed and fabricated to operate with liquid fuels, such as gasoline, ethanol, methanol, etc. Rated for a capacity of 10 kWe (one-fifth of that needed for a car), the prototype fuel processor integrates the unit operations (vaporization, heat exchange, etc.) and processes (reforming, water-gas shift, preferential oxidation reactions, etc.) necessary to produce the hydrogen-rich gas (reformate) that will fuel the polymer electrolyte fuel cell stacks. The fuel processor work is being complemented by analytical and fundamental research. With the ultimate objective of meeting on-board fuel processor goals, these studies include: modeling fuel cell systems to identify design and operating features; evaluating alternative fuel processing options; and developing appropriate catalysts and materials. Issues and outstanding challenges that need to be overcome in order to develop practical, on-board devices are discussed

  11. Methanol Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voecks, G. E.

    1985-01-01

    In proposed fuel-cell system, methanol converted to hydrogen in two places. External fuel processor converts only part of methanol. Remaining methanol converted in fuel cell itself, in reaction at anode. As result, size of fuel processor reduced, system efficiency increased, and cost lowered.

  12. Significant incidents in nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    In contrast to nuclear power plants, events in nuclear fuel cycle facilities are not well documented. The INES database covers all the nuclear fuel cycle facilities; however, it was developed in the early 1990s and does not contain information on events prior to that. The purpose of the present report is to collect significant events and analyze them in order to give a safety related overview of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Significant incidents were selected using the following criteria: release of radioactive material or exposure to radiation; degradation of items important to safety; and deficiencies in design, quality assurance, etc. which include criticality incidents, fire, explosion, radioactive release and contamination. This report includes an explanation, where possible, of root causes, lessons learned and action taken. 4 refs, 4 tabs.

  13. Significant incidents in nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-03-01

    In contrast to nuclear power plants, events in nuclear fuel cycle facilities are not well documented. The INES database covers all the nuclear fuel cycle facilities; however, it was developed in the early 1990s and does not contain information on events prior to that. The purpose of the present report is to collect significant events and analyze them in order to give a safety related overview of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Significant incidents were selected using the following criteria: release of radioactive material or exposure to radiation; degradation of items important to safety; and deficiencies in design, quality assurance, etc. which include criticality incidents, fire, explosion, radioactive release and contamination. This report includes an explanation, where possible, of root causes, lessons learned and action taken. 4 refs, 4 tabs

  14. Radiation degradation of silk protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pewlong, W.; Sudatis, B.; Takeshita, Hidefumi; Yoshii, Fumio; Kume, Tamikazu

    2000-01-01

    Silk fibroin fiber from the domesticated silkworm Bombyx mori was irradiated using an electron beam accelerator to investigate the application of the radiation degradation technique as a means to solubilize fibroin. The irradiation caused a significant degradation of the fiber. The tensile strength of fibroin fiber irradiated up to 2500 kGy decreased rapidly with increasing dose. The presence of oxygen in the irradiation atmosphere enhanced degradation of the tensile strength. The solubilization of irradiated fibroin fiber was evaluated using the following three kinds of solutions: a calcium chloride solution(CaCl 2 /C 2 H 5 OH/H 2 O=1:2:8 in mole ratio), a hydrochloric acid (0.5 N) and a distilled water. Dissolution of fibroin fiber into these solutions was significantly enhanced by irradiation. Especially, an appreciable amount of water soluble proteins was extracted by a distilled water. (author)

  15. Radiation degradation of silk protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pewlong, W; Sudatis, B [Office of Atomic Energy for Peace, Bangkok (Thailand); Takeshita, Hidefumi; Yoshii, Fumio; Kume, Tamikazu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    2000-03-01

    Silk fibroin fiber from the domesticated silkworm Bombyx mori was irradiated using an electron beam accelerator to investigate the application of the radiation degradation technique as a means to solubilize fibroin. The irradiation caused a significant degradation of the fiber. The tensile strength of fibroin fiber irradiated up to 2500 kGy decreased rapidly with increasing dose. The presence of oxygen in the irradiation atmosphere enhanced degradation of the tensile strength. The solubilization of irradiated fibroin fiber was evaluated using the following three kinds of solutions: a calcium chloride solution(CaCl{sub 2}/C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH/H{sub 2}O=1:2:8 in mole ratio), a hydrochloric acid (0.5 N) and a distilled water. Dissolution of fibroin fiber into these solutions was significantly enhanced by irradiation. Especially, an appreciable amount of water soluble proteins was extracted by a distilled water. (author)

  16. An assessment of temperature history on concrete silo dry storage system for CANDU spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dong-Gyu; Sung, Nak-Hoon; Park, Jea-Ho; Chung, Sung-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We performed thermal analysis to predict the temperature distribution in the concrete silo. • Thermal analysis of the concrete silo was based on CFD code. • Temperature distribution and history for storage period was presented. • Thermal analysis results and test results agreed well. • The correlations can predict the maximum fuel temperature over storage period. - Abstract: Concrete silo is a dry storage system for spent fuel generated from CANDU reactors. The silo is designed to remove passively the decay heat from spent fuel, as well as to secure the integrity of spent fuel during storage period. Dominant heat transfer mechanisms must be characterized and validated for the thermal analysis model of the silo, and the temperature history along storage period could be determined by using the validated thermal analysis model. Heat transfer characteristics on the interior and exterior of fuel basket in the silo were assessed to determine the temperature history of silo, which is necessary for evaluating the long-term degradation behavior of CANDU spent fuel stored in the silo. Also a methodology to evaluate the temperature history during dry storage period was proposed in this study. A CFD model of fuel basket including fuel bundles was suggested and temperature difference correlation between fuel bundles and silo’s internal member, as a function of decay heat of fuel basket considering natural convection and radiation heat transfer, was deduced. Temperature difference between silo’s internal cavity and ambient air was determined by using a concept of thermal resistance, which was validated by CFD analysis. Fuel temperature was expressed as a function of ambient temperature and decay heat of fuel basket in the correlation, and fuel temperature along storage period was determined. Therefore, it could be used to assess the degradation behavior of spent fuel by applying the degradation mechanism expressed as a function of spent fuel

  17. Reactor fueling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Noriaki; Hirano, Haruyoshi.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To optimally position a fuel catcher by mounting a television camera to a fuel catching portion and judging video images by the use of a computer or the like. Constitution: A television camera is mounted to the lower end of a fuel catching mechanism for handling nuclear fuels and a fuel assembly disposed within a reactor core or a fuel storage pool is observed directly from above to judge the position for the fuel assembly by means of video signals. Then, the relative deviation between the actual position of the fuel catcher and that set in a memory device is determined and the positional correction is carried out automatically so as to reduce the determined deviation to zero. This enables to catch the fuel assembly without failure and improves the efficiency for the fuel exchange operation. (Moriyama, K.)

  18. Nuclear fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakai, Keiichi

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To decrease the tensile stresses resulted in a fuel can as well as prevent decladding of fuel pellets into the bore holes by decreasing the inner pressure within the nuclear fuel element. Constitution: A fuel can is filled with hollow fuel pellets, inserted with a spring for retaining the hollow fuel pellets with an appropriate force and, thereafter, closely sealed at the both ends with end plugs. A cylindrical body is disposed into the bore holes of the hollow fuel pellets. Since initial sealing gases and/or gaseous nuclear fission products can thus be excluded from the bore holes where the temperature is at the highest level, the inner pressure of the nuclear fuel element can be reduced to decrease the tensile strength resulted to the fuel can. Furthermore, decladding of fuel pellets into the bore holes can be prevented. (Moriyama, K.)

  19. Failed fuel rod detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, Katsuya; Matsuda, Yasuhiko

    1984-05-02

    The purpose of the project is to enable failed fuel rod detection simply with no requirement for dismantling the fuel assembly. A gamma-ray detection section is arranged so as to attend on the optional fuel rods in the fuel assembly. The fuel assembly is adapted such that a gamma-ray shielding plate is detachably inserted into optional gaps of the fuel rods or, alternatively, the fuel assembly can detachably be inserted to the gamma-ray shielding plate. In this way, amount of gaseous fission products accumulated in all of the plenum portions in the fuel rods as the object of the measurement can be determined without dismantling the fuel assembly. Accordingly, by comparing the amounts of the gaseous fission products, the failed fuel rod can be detected.

  20. 77 FR 13009 - Regulation of Fuels and Fuel Additives: Identification of Additional Qualifying Renewable Fuel...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-05

    ... Regulation of Fuels and Fuel Additives: Identification of Additional Qualifying Renewable Fuel Pathways Under the Renewable Fuel Standard Program AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Withdrawal... Renewable Fuel Standard program regulations. Because EPA received adverse comment, we are withdrawing the...

  1. The Science of Battery Degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, John P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Materials Physics; El Gabaly Marquez, Farid [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Materials Physics; McCarty, Kevin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Materials Physics; Sugar, Joshua Daniel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Materials Physics; Talin, Alec A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Materials Physics; Fenton, Kyle R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Power Sources Design and Development; Nagasubramanian, Ganesan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Power Sources Design and Development; Harris, Charles Thomas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Nanosystems Synthesis/Analysis; Jungjohann, Katherine Leigh [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Nanosystems Synthesis/Analysis; Hayden, Carl C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Chemistry Dept.; Kliewer, Christopher Jesse [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Chemistry Dept.; Hudak, Nicholas S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Power Sources Research and Development; Leung, Kevin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Nanostructure Physics; McDaniel, Anthony H. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Hydrogen and Combustion Technology; Tenney, Craig M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Chemical and Biological Systems; Zavadil, Kevin R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Advanced Materials Lab.

    2015-01-01

    This report documents work that was performed under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development project, Science of Battery Degradation. The focus of this work was on the creation of new experimental and theoretical approaches to understand atomistic mechanisms of degradation in battery electrodes that result in loss of electrical energy storage capacity. Several unique approaches were developed during the course of the project, including the invention of a technique based on ultramicrotoming to cross-section commercial scale battery electrodes, the demonstration of scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) to probe lithium transport mechanisms within Li-ion battery electrodes, the creation of in-situ liquid cells to observe electrochemical reactions in real-time using both transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and STXM, the creation of an in-situ optical cell utilizing Raman spectroscopy and the application of the cell for analyzing redox flow batteries, the invention of an approach for performing ab initio simulation of electrochemical reactions under potential control and its application for the study of electrolyte degradation, and the development of an electrochemical entropy technique combined with x-ray based structural measurements for understanding origins of battery degradation. These approaches led to a number of scientific discoveries. Using STXM we learned that lithium iron phosphate battery cathodes display unexpected behavior during lithiation wherein lithium transport is controlled by nucleation of a lithiated phase, leading to high heterogeneity in lithium content at each particle and a surprising invariance of local current density with the overall electrode charging current. We discovered using in-situ transmission electron microscopy that there is a size limit to lithiation of silicon anode particles above which particle fracture controls electrode degradation. From electrochemical entropy measurements, we discovered that entropy

  2. Isolation and characterization of diesel degrading bacteria, Sphingomonas sp. and Acinetobacter junii from petroleum contaminated soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiuzhuo; Wang, Duanchao; Li, Mengmeng; Xiang, Wei-Ning; Achal, Varenyam

    2014-03-01

    Two indigenous bacteria of petroleum contaminated soil were characterized to utilize diesel fuel as the sole carbon and energy sources in this work. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis identified these bacteria as Sphingomonas sp. and Acinetobacter junii. The ability to degrade diesel fuel has been demonstrated for the first time by these isolates. The results of IR analyses showed that Sphingomonas sp. VA1 and A. junii VA2 degraded up to 82.6% and 75.8% of applied diesel over 15 days, respectively. In addition, Sphingomonas sp. VA1 possessed the higher cellular hydrophobicities of 94% for diesel compared to 81% by A. junii VA2. The isolates Sphingomonas sp. VA1 and A. junii VA2 exhibited 24% and 18%, respectively emulsification activity. This study reports two new diesel degrading bacterial species, which can be effectively used for bioremediation of petroleum contaminated sites.

  3. Secondary degradation mechanisms - A theoretical approach to remedial actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudling, P.

    2001-04-01

    A failed BWR fuel rod may degrade either by developing long axial cracks and/or transversal breaks. The tendency of failed BWR rods to degrade depends on the fuel design and reactor operation of the failed rod. The knowledge of the degradation mechanisms may be used to develop secondary degradation resistant fuel and/or to mitigate the degradation tendencies during operation of failed fuel. Literature data from three different categories has been analysed: Open literature data on failed BWR rods that have and have not degraded; Data generated in experimental reactors where primary failures have been simulated either by drilling a hole in the intact cladding before the test or by letting water/steam into the rod from a capsule connected to the otherwise intact rod. In addition data related to hydrogen production in the pellet-cladding gap in a failed rod and the subsequent hydrogen ingress and finally the hydride formation in zirconium alloys; Open literature data out-of-pile material tests to improve the knowledge of the secondary degradation mechanisms. To get an idea of the degradation mechanisms one may first characterise the failed fuel rods in commercial BWRs that form axial splits, transversal breaks and also failed rods that do not degrade at all. Considering axial splits in BWRs, they seem to occur mostly for failed fuel rods with intermediate and high burnups, i.e., in rods with small pellet-cladding gaps, that have been subjected to a power ramp. Such data indicate that the axial crack propagation rate is larger than 0.16 mm/h. It is also clear that the axial cracks formed in commercial reactors show mostly brittle cleavage features at reactor operating temperature even though the hydrogen content in the fuel cladding is low, 150-300 wtppm. Macroscopically the brittle cleavage fractures are characterised by: a fracture surface that is perpendicular to the main tensile stress direction i.e., in the cladding circumferential direction, no or very little clad

  4. Re-activation of degraded nickel cermet anodes - Nano-particle formation via reverse current pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauch, A.; Marchese, M.; Lanzini, A.; Graves, C.

    2018-02-01

    The Ni/yttria-stabilized-zirconia (YSZ) cermet is the most commonly applied fuel electrode for solid oxide cells (SOCs). Loss of Ni/YSZ electrode activity is a key life-time limiting factor of the SOC. Developing means to mitigate this loss of performance or re-activate a fuel electrode is therefore important. In this work, we report a series of five tests on state-of-the-art Ni/YSZ-YSZ-CGObarrier-LSC/CGO cells. All cells were deliberately degraded via gas stream impurities in CO2/CO or harsh steam electrolysis operation. The cells were re-activated via a variety of reverse current treatments (RCTs). Via electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, we found that the Ni/YSZ electrode performance could be recovered via RCT, but not via constant fuel cell operation. For optimized RCT, we obtained a lower Ni/YSZ electrode resistance than the initial resistance. E.g. at 700 °C we measured fuel electrode resistance of 180 mΩ cm2, 390 mΩ cm2, and 159 mΩ cm2 before degradation, after degradation and after re-activation via RCT, respectively. Post-test SEM revealed that the RCT led to formation of nano-particles in the fuel electrode. Besides the remarkable improvement, the results also showed that RCTs can weaken Ni/YSZ interfaces and the electrode/electrolyte interface. This indicates that finding an optimum RCT profile is crucial for achieving maximum benefit.

  5. Open-source FCPEM-Performance & Durability Model Consideration of Membrane Properties on Cathode Degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knights, Shanna [Ballard Fuel Cell Systems, Bend, OR (United States); Harvey, David [Ballard Fuel Cell Systems, Bend, OR (United States)

    2017-01-20

    The durability of PEM fuel cells is a primary requirement for large scale commercialization of these power systems in transportation and stationary market applications which target operational lifetimes of 5,000 hours and 60,000 hours by 2020, respectively. Key degradation modes contributing to fuel cell lifetime limitations have been largely associated with the platinum-based cathode catalyst layer. Furthermore, as fuel cells are driven to low cost materials and lower catalyst loadings in order to meet the cost targets for commercialization, the catalyst durability has become even more important. While over the past few years significant progress has been made in identifying the underlying causes of fuel cell degradation and key parameters that greatly influence the degradation rates, many gaps with respect to knowledge of the driving mechanisms still exist; in particular, the acceleration of the mechanisms due to different membrane compositions remains an area not well understood. The focus of this project extension was to enhance the predictive capability of the PEM Fuel Cell Performance & Durability Model called FC-APOLLO (Application Package for Open-source Long Life Operation) by including interaction effects of membrane transport properties such as water transport, changes in proton conductivity, and overall water uptake/adsorption and the state of the catalyst layer local conditions to further understand the driving forces for platinum dissolution.

  6. Materials for fuel cells

    OpenAIRE

    Haile, Sossina M

    2003-01-01

    Because of their potential to reduce the environmental impact and geopolitical consequences of the use of fossil fuels, fuel cells have emerged as tantalizing alternatives to combustion engines. Like a combustion engine, a fuel cell uses some sort of chemical fuel as its energy source but, like a battery, the chemical energy is directly converted to electrical energy, without an often messy and relatively inefficient combustion step. In addition to high efficiency and low emissions, fuel cell...

  7. Advanced fuels safety comparisons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grolmes, M.A.

    1977-01-01

    The safety considerations of advanced fuels are described relative to the present understanding of the safety of oxide fueled Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBR). Safety considerations important for the successful implementation of advanced fueled reactors must early on focus on the accident energetics issues of fuel coolant interactions and recriticality associated with core disruptive accidents. It is in these areas where the thermal physical property differences of the advanced fuel have the greatest significance

  8. Development of oxygen scavenger additives for jet fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaver, B.D.; Demunshi, R.; Sharief, V.; Tian, D.; Teng, Y. [Duquesne Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1995-05-01

    Our current research program is in response to the US Air Force`s FY93 New Initiative entitled {open_quotes}Advanced Fuel Composition and Use.{close_quotes} The critical goal of this initiative is to develop aircraft fuels which can operate at supercritical conditions. This is a vital objective since future aircraft designs will transfer much higher heat loads into the fuel as compared with current heat loads. In this paper it is argued that the thermal stability of most jet fuels would be dramatically improved by the efficient in flight-removal of a fuel`s dissolved oxygen. It is proposed herein to stabilize the bulk fuel by the addition of an additive which will be judiciously designed and programmed to react with oxygen and produce an innocuous product. It is envisioned that a thermally activated reaction will occur, between the oxygen scavenging additive and dissolved oxygen, in a controlled and directed manner. Consequently formation of insoluble thermal degradation products will be limited. It is believed that successful completion of this project will result in the development of a new type of jet fuel additive which will enable current conventional jet fuels to obtain sufficient thermal stability to function in significantly higher temperature regimes. In addition, it is postulated that the successful development of thermally activated oxygen scavengers will also provide the sub-critical thermal stability necessary for future development of endothermic fuels.

  9. Hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation process for in situ destruction of chlorinated hydrocarbon and fuel hydrocarbon contaminants in water and soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knauss, Kevin G.; Copenhaver, Sally C.; Aines, Roger D.

    2000-01-01

    In situ hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation process is useful for in situ degradation of hydrocarbon water and soil contaminants. Fuel hydrocarbons, chlorinated hydrocarbons, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, petroleum distillates and other organic contaminants present in the soil and water are degraded by the process involving hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation into non-toxic products of the degradation. The process uses heat which is distributed through soils and water, optionally combined with oxygen and/or hydrocarbon degradation catalysts, and is particularly useful for remediation of solvent, fuel or other industrially contaminated sites.

  10. Nuclear fuel storage facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Takashi; Isaka, Shinji.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To increase the spent fuel storage capacity and reduce the installation cost in a nuclear fuel storage facility. Constitution: Fuels handled in the nuclear fuel storage device of the present invention include the following four types: (1) fresh fuels, (2) 100 % reactor core charged fuels, (3) spent fuels just after taking out and (4) fuels after a certain period (for example one half-year) from taking out of the reactor. Reactivity is high for the fuels (1), and some of fuels (2), while low in the fuels (3) (4), Source intensity is strong for the fuels (3) and some of the fuels (2), while it is low for the fuels (1) and (4). Taking notice of the fact that the reactivity, radioactive source intensity and generated after heat are different in the respective fuels, the size of the pool and the storage capacity are increased by the divided storage control. While on the other hand, since the division is made in one identical pool, the control method becomes important, and the working range is restricted by means of a template, interlock, etc., the operation mode of the handling machine is divided into four, etc. for preventing errors. (Kamimura, M.)

  11. Fuel pattern recognition device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Tomomi.

    1995-01-01

    The device of the present invention monitors normal fuel exchange upon fuel exchanging operation carried out in a reactor of a nuclear power plant. Namely, a fuel exchanger is movably disposed to the upper portion of the reactor and exchanges fuels. An exclusive computer receives operation signals of the fuel exchanger during operation as inputs, and outputs reactor core fuel pattern information signals to a fuel arrangement diagnosis device. An underwater television camera outputs image signals of a fuel pattern in the reactor core to an image processing device. If there is any change in the image signals for the fuel pattern as a result of the fuel exchange operation of the fuel exchanger, the image processing device outputs the change as image signals to the fuel pattern diagnosis device. The fuel pattern diagnosis device compares the pattern information signals from the exclusive computer with the image signals from the image processing device, to diagnose the result of the fuel exchange operation performed by the fuel exchanger and inform the diagnosis by means of an image display. (I.S.)

  12. Chemical degradation of proton conducting perflurosulfonic acid ionomer membranes studied by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghassemzadeh, L. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Heisenbergstrasse 1, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie, Universitaet Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 55, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Marrony, M. [European Institute for Energy Research, Emmy-Noether-Strasse 11, D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Barrera, R. [Edison, Via Giorgio La Pira, 2, I-10028 Trofarello (Italy); Kreuer, K.D.; Maier, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Heisenbergstrasse 1, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Mueller, K. [Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie, Universitaet Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 55, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2009-01-15

    The degradation of two different types of perfluorinated polymer membranes, Nafion and Hyflon Ion, has been examined by solid-state {sup 19}F and {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy. This spectroscopic technique is demonstrated to be a valuable tool for the study of the membrane structure and its alterations after in situ degradation in a fuel cell. The structural changes in different parts of the polymers are clearly distinguished, which provides unique insight into details of the degradation processes. The experimental NMR spectra prove that degradation mostly takes place within the polymer side chains, as reflected by the intensity losses of NMR signals associated with SO{sub 3}H, CF{sub 3}, OCF{sub 2} and CF groups. The integral degree of degradation is found to decrease with increasing membrane thickness while for a given thickness, Hyflon Ion appears to degrade less than Nafion. (author)

  13. Degradation of materials and passivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meisel, W.

    1997-01-01

    Demanding for a reduction in materials degradation is a serious problem all over the world. Moessbauer spectroscopy (MS) is, among others, a very valuable tool to follow many degradation processes. Evidently, Fe is the most important Moessbauer element considering the overall presence of iron in everyday life. MS may contribute to our knowledge about nearly all fields of materials degradation, chemical, mechanical, thermal, irradiative, etc. Following some general lines, corrosion is considered in particular. MS is applicable to investigate the bulk of materials as well as their surface layers with an information depth of ca. 250 nm. In general, it has to be applied as a surface sensitive method in combination with other relevant methods in order to get a detailed insight into ongoing processes. Some examples have been selected to elucidate the application of MS in this field. Another class of examples concerns attempts to prevent corrosion, i.e., the application of coatings and transforming chemicals. A very effective and most natural way to reduce corrosion is the passivation of materials. The effect of passive layers and their destruction by environmental influences are discussed using results of MS and related methods. It is outlined that passivity is not restricted to chemically treated metals but can be considered as a general concept for preventing different kinds of materials from degradation. (orig.)

  14. Land degradation and property regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul M. Beaumont; Robert T. Walker

    1996-01-01

    This paper addresses the relationship between property regimes and land degradation outcomes, in the context of peasant agriculture. We consider explicitly whether private property provides for superior soil resource conservation, as compared to common property and open access. To assess this we implement optimization algorithms on a supercomputer to address resource...

  15. Degradation of CIGS solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theelen, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Large scale commercial introduction of CIGS photovoltaics (PV) requires modules with low costs, high efficiencies and long and predictable lifetimes. Unfortunately,knowledge about the lifetime of CIGS PV is limited, which is reflected in the results of field studies: degradation rates varying from

  16. The Degradation of a Nation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozova, Galina Fedorouna

    1995-01-01

    Maintains that the process of national degradation is a real danger and concern of all Russian society. Discusses environmental concerns, such as water, soil, and air pollution; falling birth rates; aging of the population; crime; and decline in moral values. Concludes that it is imperative for all citizens to stop and reverse these trends. (CFR)

  17. Polymeric Materials - introduction and degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kontogeorgis, Georgios

    1999-01-01

    These notes support the polymer part of the courses 91742 and 91762 (Materials and Corrosion/degradation of materials) taught in IFAKthey contain a short introduction on group contribution methods for estimating properties of polymers, polymer thermodynamics, viscoelasticity models as well...

  18. Abiotic degradation of antibiotic ionophores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohn, Pernille; Bak, Søren A; Björklund, Erland

    2013-01-01

    Hydrolytic and photolytic degradation were investigated for the ionophore antibiotics lasalocid, monensin, salinomycin, and narasin. The hydrolysis study was carried out by dissolving the ionophores in solutions of pH 4, 7, and 9, followed by incubation at three temperatures of 6, 22, and 28 °C f...... because they absorb light of environmentally irrelevant wavelengths....

  19. Simulation with GOTHIC of experiments Oxidation of fuel in Air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez-Murillo Mendez, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    In the present work has been addressed for the first time la simulation with the GOTHIC code, experiments oxidation and ignition of SFP in phase 1. This work represents a solid starting point for analysis of specific degradation of fuel in the pools of our facilities.

  20. Durability Issues and Status of PBI-Based Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Mark Tonny Dalsgaard; Jensen, Jens Oluf; Cleemann, Lars Nilausen

    2016-01-01

    This chapter briefly reviews durability and stability issues with key materials and components for HT-PEMFCs, including the polymer membrane, the doping acid, the electrocatalyst, the catalyst support and bipolar plates. Degradation mechanisms and their dependence on fuel cell operating condition...

  1. Secondary degradation mechanisms - A theoretical approach to remedial actions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudling, P. [Advanced Nuclear Technology, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2001-04-01

    A failed BWR fuel rod may degrade either by developing long axial cracks and/or transversal breaks. The tendency of failed BWR rods to degrade depends on the fuel design and reactor operation of the failed rod. The knowledge of the degradation mechanisms may be used to develop secondary degradation resistant fuel and/or to mitigate the degradation tendencies during operation of failed fuel. Literature data from three different categories has been analysed: Open literature data on failed BWR rods that have and have not degraded; Data generated in experimental reactors where primary failures have been simulated either by drilling a hole in the intact cladding before the test or by letting water/steam into the rod from a capsule connected to the otherwise intact rod. In addition data related to hydrogen production in the pellet-cladding gap in a failed rod and the subsequent hydrogen ingress and finally the hydride formation in zirconium alloys; Open literature data out-of-pile material tests to improve the knowledge of the secondary degradation mechanisms. To get an idea of the degradation mechanisms one may first characterise the failed fuel rods in commercial BWRs that form axial splits, transversal breaks and also failed rods that do not degrade at all. Considering axial splits in BWRs, they seem to occur mostly for failed fuel rods with intermediate and high burnups, i.e., in rods with small pellet-cladding gaps, that have been subjected to a power ramp. Such data indicate that the axial crack propagation rate is larger than 0.16 mm/h. It is also clear that the axial cracks formed in commercial reactors show mostly brittle cleavage features at reactor operating temperature even though the hydrogen content in the fuel cladding is low, 150-300 wtppm. Macroscopically the brittle cleavage fractures are characterised by: a fracture surface that is perpendicular to the main tensile stress direction i.e., in the cladding circumferential direction, no or very little clad

  2. PBF Severe Fuel-Damage Program: results and comparison to analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonald, P.E.; Buescher, B.J.; Hobbins, R.R.; McCardell, R.K.; Gruen, G.E.

    1983-01-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission has initiated a severe fuel-damage research program in the Power Burst Facility (PBF) to investigate fuel-rod and core response, and fission-product and hydrogen release and transport under degraded-core-cooling accident conditions. This paper presents a description of Phase I of the PBF Severe Fuel Damage Program, discusses the results of the first experiment, and compares those results with analysis performed using the TRAC-BD1 computer code

  3. BWR fuel performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baily, W.E.; Armijo, J.S.; Jacobson, J.; Proebstle, R.A.

    1979-01-01

    The General Electric experience base on BWR fuel includes over 29,000 fuel assemblies which contain 1,600,000 fuel rods. Over the last five years, design, process and operating changes have been introduced which have had major effects in improving fuel performance. Monitoring this fuel performance in BWRs has been accomplished through cooperative programs between GE and utilities. Activities such as plant fission product monitoring, fuel sipping and fuel and channel surveillance programs have jointly contributed to the value of this extensive experience base. The systematic evaluation of this data has established well-defined fuel performance trends which provide the assurance and confidence in fuel reliability that only actual operating experience can provide

  4. Dual Tank Fuel System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Richard William; Burkhard, James Frank; Dauer, Kenneth John

    1999-11-16

    A dual tank fuel system has primary and secondary fuel tanks, with the primary tank including a filler pipe to receive fuel and a discharge line to deliver fuel to an engine, and with a balance pipe interconnecting the primary tank and the secondary tank. The balance pipe opens close to the bottom of each tank to direct fuel from the primary tank to the secondary tank as the primary tank is filled, and to direct fuel from the secondary tank to the primary tank as fuel is discharged from the primary tank through the discharge line. A vent line has branches connected to each tank to direct fuel vapor from the tanks as the tanks are filled, and to admit air to the tanks as fuel is delivered to the engine.

  5. HTGR Fuel performance basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamasundar, B.I.; Stansfield, O.M.; Jensen, D.D.

    1982-05-01

    The safety characteristics of the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) during normal and accident conditions are determined in part by HTGR fuel performance. During normal operation, less than 0.1% fuel failure occurs, primarily from defective particles. This low fuel failure fraction limits circulating activity to acceptable levels. During severe accidents, the radiological consequence is influenced by high-temperature fuel particle behavior. An empirical fuel failure model, supported by recent experimental data, is presented. The onset of significant fuel particle failure occurs at temperatures in excess of 1600 0 C, and complete fuel failure occurs at 2660 0 C. This indicates that the fuel is more retentive at higher temperatures than previously assumed. The more retentive nature of the fuel coupled with the high thermal capacitance of the core results in slow release of fission products from the core during severe accidents

  6. Elongated fuel road

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, A.E.; Linkison, W.S.

    1977-01-01

    A fuel rod is proposed where a reorientation of the fuel in case of a considerable temperature increase, causing the melting of the densified fuel powder, will be avoided. For this purpose, in longitudinal direction of the fuel rod, a number of diameter reductions of the can are applied of certain distances. In the reduction zone the cross-sectional area of the fuel is reduced, as compared to the one of the remaining fuel material in the regions without diameter reduction, but not the density of the fuel. The recess is chosen to that in case of melting of the fuel in the center of the not contracted zone the fuel in the center of the narrowed area will remain solid and keep the molten material in position. (HR) [de

  7. Improved Accelerated Stress Tests Based on Fuel Cell Vehicle Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patterson, Timothy [Research Engineer; Motupally, Sathya [Research Engineer

    2012-06-01

    UTC will led a top-tier team of industry and national laboratory participants to update and improve DOE’s Accelerated Stress Tests (AST’s) for hydrogen fuel cells. This in-depth investigation will focused on critical fuel cell components (e.g. membrane electrode assemblies - MEA) whose durability represented barriers for widespread commercialization of hydrogen fuel cell technology. UTC had access to MEA materials that had accrued significant load time under real-world conditions in PureMotion® 120 power plant used in transit buses. These materials are referred to as end-of-life (EOL) components in the rest of this document. Advanced characterization techniques were used to evaluate degradation mode progress using these critical cell components extracted from both bus power plants and corresponding materials tested using the DOE AST’s. These techniques were applied to samples at beginning-of-life (BOL) to serve as a baseline. These comparisons advised the progress of the various failure modes that these critical components were subjected to, such as membrane degradation, catalyst support corrosion, platinum group metal dissolution, and others. Gaps in the existing ASTs predicted the degradation observed in the field in terms of these modes were outlined. Using the gaps, new AST’s were recommended and tested to better reflect the degradation modes seen in field operation. Also, BOL components were degraded in a test vehicle at UTC designed to accelerate the bus field operation.

  8. Modelling of some high burnup phenomena in nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsberg, K; Lindstroem, F; Massih, A R [ABB Atom AB, Vaesteraas (Sweden)

    1997-08-01

    In this paper the results of some modelling efforts carried out by ABB Atom to describe certain light water reactor fuel high burnup effects are presented. In particular the degradation of fuel thermal conductivity with burnup and its impact on fuel temperature is briefly discussed. The formation of a porous rim and its effect on a thermal fission gas release has been modelled and the model has been used to predict the release of pressurized water reactor fuel rods that were operated at low power densities. Furthermore, a mathematical model which combines the diffusion and re-solution controlled thermal release with grain boundary movement has been briefly described. The model is used to compare release with diffusion only and release caused by diffusion and grain boundary sweeping (due to grain growth). Finally, analytical expressions are obtained for the calculation of fuel stoichiometry as a function of burnup. (author). 20 refs, 10 figs, 1 tab.

  9. Power Burst Facility severe-fuel-damage test program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCardell, R.K.; MacDonald, P.E.

    1982-01-01

    As a result of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident, the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) has initiated a severe fuel damage research program to investigate fuel rod and core response, and fission product and hydrogen release and transport during degraded core cooling accidents. This paper presents a discussion of the expected benefits of the PBF severe fuel damage tests to the nuclear industry, a description of the first five planned experiments, the results of pretest analysis performed to predict the fuel bundle heatup for the first two experiments, and a discussion of Phase II severe fuel damage experiments. Modifications to the fission product detection system envisioned for the later experiments are also described

  10. Dry storage assessment of LWR fuel in Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goll, W [AREVA NP GmbH (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Germany's revised energy act, dated 2002, prohibits the shipment of spent nuclear fuel to reprocessing plants and restricts its disposal to a final repository. To comply with this law and to ensure further nuclear plant operation, the reactor operators had to construct on-site facilities for dry cask storage, to keep spent fuel assemblies for 40 years until a final repository is available. Twelve facilities went into operation during the last years. The amount of spent fuel in store is continuously increasing and has reached a level of about 1700 t HM by end of 2007. The central sites Ahaus and Gorleben remain in operation but shall be used for special purposes in future. The objectives are: Review of main features of facilities with an emphasis on associated monitoring; Review of degradation mechanisms in the context of fuel types and design (PWR, BWR, UO2, MOX) relative to fuel burn-up, structural materials and long term behaviour.

  11. Consolidated fuel reprocessing program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-04-01

    A survey of electrochemical methods applications in fuel reprocessing was completed. A dummy fuel assembly shroud was cut using the remotely operated laser disassembly equipment. Operations and engineering efforts have continued to correct equipment operating, software, and procedural problems experienced during the previous uranium compaigns. Fuel cycle options were examined for the liquid metal reactor fuel cycle. In high temperature gas cooled reactor spent fuel studies, preconceptual designs were completed for the concrete storage cask and open field drywell storage concept. These and other tasks operating under the consolidated fuel reprocessing program are examined.

  12. Nuclear fuel storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bevilacqua, F.

    1979-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the storage of fuel in a stainless steel egg crate structure within a storage pool are described. Fuel is initially stored in a checkerboard pattern or in each opening if the fuel is of low enrichment. Additional fuel (or fuel of higher enrichment) is later stored by adding stainless steel angled plates within each opening, thereby forming flux traps between the openings. Still higher enrichment fuel is later stored by adding poison plates either with or without the stainless steel angles. 8 claims

  13. BNFL Springfields Fuel Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarkiainen, S.; Plit, H.

    1998-01-01

    The Fuel Division of British Nuclear Fuels Ltd (BNFL) manufactures nuclear fuel elements for British Magnox and AGR power plants as well as for LWR plants. The new fuel factory - Oxide Fuel Complex (OFC), located in Springfields, is equipped with modern technology and the automation level of the factory is very high. With their quality products, BNFL aims for the new business areas. A recent example of this expansion was shown, when BNFL signed a contract to design and license new VVER-440 fuel for Finnish Loviisa and Hungarian Paks power plants. (author)

  14. Geochemistry Model Validation Report: Material Degradation and Release Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. Stockman

    2001-09-28

    The purpose of this Analysis and Modeling Report (AMR) is to validate the Material Degradation and Release (MDR) model that predicts degradation and release of radionuclides from a degrading waste package (WP) in the potential monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. This AMR is prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan for: Waste Package Design Description for LA'' (Ref. 17). The intended use of the MDR model is to estimate the long-term geochemical behavior of waste packages (WPs) containing U. S . Department of Energy (DOE) Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) codisposed with High Level Waste (HLW) glass, commercial SNF, and Immobilized Plutonium Ceramic (Pu-ceramic) codisposed with HLW glass. The model is intended to predict (1) the extent to which criticality control material, such as gadolinium (Gd), will remain in the WP after corrosion of the initial WP, (2) the extent to which fissile Pu and uranium (U) will be carried out of the degraded WP by infiltrating water, and (3) the chemical composition and amounts of minerals and other solids left in the WP. The results of the model are intended for use in criticality calculations. The scope of the model validation report is to (1) describe the MDR model, and (2) compare the modeling results with experimental studies. A test case based on a degrading Pu-ceramic WP is provided to help explain the model. This model does not directly feed the assessment of system performance. The output from this model is used by several other models, such as the configuration generator, criticality, and criticality consequence models, prior to the evaluation of system performance. This document has been prepared according to AP-3.10Q, ''Analyses and Models'' (Ref. 2), and prepared in accordance with the technical work plan (Ref. 17).

  15. Anaerobic degradation of benzene by marine sulfate-reducing bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musat, Florin; Wilkes, Heinz; Musat, Niculina; Kuypers, Marcel; Widdel, Friedrich

    2010-05-01

    Benzene, the archetypal aromatic hydrocarbon is a common constituent of crude oil and oil-refined products. As such, it can enter the biosphere through natural oil seeps or as a consequence of exploitation of fossil fuel reservoirs. Benzene is chemically very stable, due to the stabilizing aromatic electron system and to the lack of functional groups. Although the anaerobic degradation of benzene has been reported under denitrifying, sulfate-reducing and methanogenic conditions, the microorganisms involved and the initial biochemical steps of degradation remain insufficiently understood. Using marine sediment from a Mediterranean lagoon a sulfate-reducing enrichment culture with benzene as the sole organic substrate was obtained. Application of 16S rRNA gene-based methods showed that the enrichment was dominated (more than 85% of total cells) by a distinct phylotype affiliated with a clade of Deltaproteobacteria that include degraders of other aromatic hydrocarbons, such as naphthalene, ethylbenzene and m-xylene. Using benzoate as a soluble substrate in agar dilution series, several pure cultures closely related to Desulfotignum spp. and Desulfosarcina spp. were isolated. None of these strains was able to utilize benzene as a substrate and hybridizations with specific oligonucleotide probes showed that they accounted for as much as 6% of the total cells. Incubations with 13C-labeled benzene followed by Halogen in situ Hybridization - Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (HISH-SIMS) analysis showed that cells of the dominant phylotype were highly enriched in 13C, while the accompanying bacteria had little or no 13C incorporation. These results demonstrate that the dominant phylotype was indeed the apparent benzene degrader. Dense-cell suspensions of the enrichment culture did not show metabolic activity toward added phenol or toluene, suggesting that benzene degradation did not proceed through anaerobic hydroxylation or methylation. Instead, benzoate was identified in

  16. Geochemistry Model Validation Report: Material Degradation and Release Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stockman, H.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this Analysis and Modeling Report (AMR) is to validate the Material Degradation and Release (MDR) model that predicts degradation and release of radionuclides from a degrading waste package (WP) in the potential monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. This AMR is prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan for: Waste Package Design Description for LA'' (Ref. 17). The intended use of the MDR model is to estimate the long-term geochemical behavior of waste packages (WPs) containing U. S . Department of Energy (DOE) Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) codisposed with High Level Waste (HLW) glass, commercial SNF, and Immobilized Plutonium Ceramic (Pu-ceramic) codisposed with HLW glass. The model is intended to predict (1) the extent to which criticality control material, such as gadolinium (Gd), will remain in the WP after corrosion of the initial WP, (2) the extent to which fissile Pu and uranium (U) will be carried out of the degraded WP by infiltrating water, and (3) the chemical composition and amounts of minerals and other solids left in the WP. The results of the model are intended for use in criticality calculations. The scope of the model validation report is to (1) describe the MDR model, and (2) compare the modeling results with experimental studies. A test case based on a degrading Pu-ceramic WP is provided to help explain the model. This model does not directly feed the assessment of system performance. The output from this model is used by several other models, such as the configuration generator, criticality, and criticality consequence models, prior to the evaluation of system performance. This document has been prepared according to AP-3.10Q, ''Analyses and Models'' (Ref. 2), and prepared in accordance with the technical work plan (Ref. 17)

  17. Sonochemical degradation of perfluorooctanesulfonate in aqueous film-forming foams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecitis, Chad D; Wang, Yajuan; Cheng, Jie; Park, Hyunwoong; Mader, Brian T; Hoffmann, Michael R

    2010-01-01

    Aqueous film-forming foams (AFFFs) are fire extinguishing agents developed by the Navy to quickly and effectively combat fires occurring close to explosive materials and are utilized today at car races, airports, oil refineries, and military locations. Fluorochemical (FC) surfactants represent 1-5% of the AFFF composition, which impart properties such as high spreadability, negligible fuel diffusion, and thermal stability to the foam. FC's are oxidatively recalcitrant, persistent in the environment, and have been detected in groundwater at AFFF training sites. Ultrasonic irradiation of aqueous FCs has been reported to degrade and subsequently mineralize the FC surfactants perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) and perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS). Here we present results of the sonochemical degradation of aqueous dilutions of FC-600, a mixture of hydrocarbon (HC) and fluorochemical components including cosolvents, anionic hydrocarbon surfactants, fluorinated amphiphilic surfactants, anionic fluorinated surfactants, and thickeners such as starch. The primary FC surfactant in FC-600, PFOS, was sonolytically degraded over a range of FC-600 aqueous dilutions, 65 ppb or = 1, indicating that bubble-water interfacial pyrolytic cleavage of the C-S bond in PFOS is the initial degradation step, in agreement with previous studies done in Milli-Q water. Sonochemical fluoride production is significantly below quantitative expectations, delta[F-]/delta[PFOS] 4 vs 17, suggesting that in the AFFF matrix, PFOS' fluorochemical tail is not completely degraded, whereas Milli-Q studies yielded quantitative F- production. Measurements of time-dependent methylene blue active substances and total organic carbon indicate that the other FC-600 components were also sonolytically decomposed.

  18. Management of experimental and exotic fuels by Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyle, J.R.

    1999-01-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada (AECL) has been engaged in nuclear research and development at its Chalk River Laboratories since the 1940's. During this time, a wide variety of irradiated research reactor and experimental fuels have been stored in a variety of storage facilities. Some of these fuels are of unique composition and configuration, and some fuels have been degraded as a result of research activities. In preparing decommissioning plans for these storage facilities, AECL has developed a strategy that identifies how each type of fuel will be dispositioned in the future. The goal of this strategy is to ensure that the fuels are maintained in a safe stable state until a repository for these fuels becomes available. This paper describes the current storage facilities, options considered for long-term fuel management, and the strategy selected to manage these fuels. (author)

  19. Nuclear fuel activities in Belgium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bairiot, H

    1997-12-01

    In his presentation on nuclear fuel activities in belgium the author considers the following directions of this work: fuel fabrication, NPP operation, fuel performance, research and development programmes.

  20. Acid Distribution and Durability of HT-PEM Fuel Cells with Different Electrode Supports

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kannan, A.; Li, Q.; Cleemann, L. N.

    2018-01-01

    made from carbon black took up much more acid than materials with a more coarse apparent structure made from graphitized carbon. The same trend was evident from thermally accelerated fuel cell tests at 180 °C under constant load where degradation rates depended strongly on the choice of GDL material......, especially on the cathode side. Acid was collected from the fuel cell exhaust at rates clearly correlated to the fuel cell degradation rates, but amounted to less than 6% of the total acid content in the cell even after significant degradation. Long-term durability of more than 5,500 h with a degradation...... long-term operation. The effect of the gas diffusion layers (GDL) on acid loss was studied. Four different commercially available GDLs were subjected to passive ex situ acid uptake by capillary forces and the acid distribution mapped over the cross-section. Materials with an apparent fine structure...

  1. Advanced fuel development at AECL: What does the future hold for CANDU fuels/fuel cycles?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupferschmidt, W.C.H. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    This paper outlines advanced fuel development at AECL. It discusses expanding the limits of fuel utilization, deploy alternate fuel cycles, increase fuel flexibility, employ recycled fuels; increase safety and reliability, decrease environmental impact and develop proliferation resistant fuel and fuel cycle.

  2. 76 FR 37703 - Regulation of Fuels and Fuel Additives: 2012 Renewable Fuel Standards; Public Hearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-28

    ... Regulation of Fuels and Fuel Additives: 2012 Renewable Fuel Standards; Public Hearing AGENCY: Environmental... hearing to be held for the proposed rule ``Regulation of Fuels and Fuel Additives: 2012 Renewable Fuel... be proposing amendments to the renewable fuel standard program regulations to establish annual...

  3. Material degradation analysis and maintenance decisions based on material condition monitoring during in-service inspections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yacout, A.M.; Orechwa, Y.

    1996-03-01

    The degradation of the material in critical components is shown to be an effective measure which can be used to compute the risk adjusted economic penalty associated with different maintenance decisions. The approach of estimating the probability, with confidence interval, of the time that a prescribed degradation level is exceeded is shown to be practical, as demonstrated in the analysis of irradiated fuel cladding. The methodology for the estimation of the probability is predicated on the existence of a parsimonious and robust mixed-effects model of the evolution of the degradation. This model, in general, relates measured surrogates of the degradation level to computed or measured variables, which characterize the environment during the operating history of the component. We propose and demonstrate the efficacy of using an artificial neural network, constructed via a genetic supervisor, as an aid in developing the requisite mixed-effects model and testing its continued validity as new data are obtained

  4. DUPIC fuel compatibility assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hang Bok; Rho, G. H.; Park, J. W. [and others

    2000-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the compatibility of DUPIC(Direct Use of Spent PWR Fuel in CANDU Reactors) fuel with the current CANDU 6 reactor, which is one of the technology being developed to utilize the spent PWR fuel in CANDU reactors. The phase 1 study of this project includes the feasibility analysis on applicability of the current core design method, the feasibility analysis on operation of the DUPIC fuel core, the compatibility analysis on individual reactor system, the sensitivity analysis on the fuel composition, and the economic analysis on DUPIC fuel cycle. The results of the validation calculations have confirmed that the current core analysis system is acceptable for the feasibility study of the DUPIC fuel compatibility analysis. The results of core simulations have shown that both natural uranium and DUPIC fuel cores are almost the same from the viewpoint of the operational performance. For individual reactor system including reactively devices, the functional requirements of each system are satisfied in general. However, because of the pronounced power flattening in the DUPIC core, the radiation damage on the critical components increases, which should be investigated more in the future. The DUPIC fuel composition heterogeneity dose not to impose any serious effect on the reactor operation if the fuel composition is adjusted. The economics analysis has been performed through conceptual design studies on the DUPIC fuel fabrication, fuel handling in a plant, and spent fuel disposal, which has shown that the DUPIC fuel cycle is comparable to the once-trough fuel cycle considering uncertainties associated with unit costs of the fuel cycle components. The results of Phase 1 study have shown that it is feasible to use the DUPIC fuel in CANDU reactors without major changes in hardware. However further studies are required to confirm the safety of the reactor under accident condition.

  5. DUPIC fuel compatibility assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hang Bok; Rho, G. H.; Park, J. W. and others

    2000-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the compatibility of DUPIC(Direct Use of Spent PWR Fuel in CANDU Reactors) fuel with the current CANDU 6 reactor, which is one of the technology being developed to utilize the spent PWR fuel in CANDU reactors. The phase 1 study of this project includes the feasibility analysis on applicability of the current core design method, the feasibility analysis on operation of the DUPIC fuel core, the compatibility analysis on individual reactor system, the sensitivity analysis on the fuel composition, and the economic analysis on DUPIC fuel cycle. The results of the validation calculations have confirmed that the current core analysis system is acceptable for the feasibility study of the DUPIC fuel compatibility analysis. The results of core simulations have shown that both natural uranium and DUPIC fuel cores are almost the same from the viewpoint of the operational performance. For individual reactor system including reactively devices, the functional requirements of each system are satisfied in general. However, because of the pronounced power flattening in the DUPIC core, the radiation damage on the critical components increases, which should be investigated more in the future. The DUPIC fuel composition heterogeneity dose not to impose any serious effect on the reactor operation if the fuel composition is adjusted. The economics analysis has been performed through conceptual design studies on the DUPIC fuel fabrication, fuel handling in a plant, and spent fuel disposal, which has shown that the DUPIC fuel cycle is comparable to the once-trough fuel cycle considering uncertainties associated with unit costs of the fuel cycle components. The results of Phase 1 study have shown that it is feasible to use the DUPIC fuel in CANDU reactors without major changes in hardware. However further studies are required to confirm the safety of the reactor under accident condition

  6. The Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-08-01

    This brochure describes the nuclear fuel cycle, which is an industrial process involving various activities to produce electricity from uranium in nuclear power reactors. The cycle starts with the mining of uranium and ends with the disposal of nuclear waste. The raw material for today's nuclear fuel is uranium. It must be processed through a series of steps to produce an efficient fuel for generating electricity. Used fuel also needs to be taken care of for reuse and disposal. The nuclear fuel cycle includes the 'front end', i.e. preparation of the fuel, the 'service period' in which fuel is used during reactor operation to generate electricity, and the 'back end', i.e. the safe management of spent nuclear fuel including reprocessing and reuse and disposal. If spent fuel is not reprocessed, the fuel cycle is referred to as an 'open' or 'once-through' fuel cycle; if spent fuel is reprocessed, and partly reused, it is referred to as a 'closed' nuclear fuel cycle.

  7. The plutonium fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pigford, T.H.; Ang, K.P.

    1975-01-01

    The quantities of plutonium and other fuel actinides have been calculated for equilibrium fuel cycles for 1000-MW water reactors fueled with slightly enriched uranium, water reactors fueled with plutonium and natural uranium, fast-breder reactors, gas-cooled reactors fueled with thorium and highly enriched uranium, and gas-cooled reactors fueled with thorium, plutonium and recycled uranium. The radioactivity quantities of plutonium, americium and curium processed yearly in these fuel cycles are greatest for the water reactors fueled with natural uranium and recycled plutonium. The total amount of actinides processed is calculated for the predicted future growth of the U.S. nuclear power industry. For the same total installed nuclear power capacity, the introduction of the plutonium breeder has little effect upon the total amount of plutonium in this century. The estimated amount of plutonium in the low-level process wastes in the plutonium fuel cycles is comparable to the amount of plutonium in the high-level fission product wastes. The amount of plutonium processed in the nuclear fuel cycles can be considerably reduced by using gas-cooled reactors to consume plutonium produced in uranium-fueled water reactors. These, and other reactors dedicated for plutonium utilization, could be co-located with facilities for fuel reprocessing ad fuel fabrication to eliminate the off-site transport of separated plutonium. (author)

  8. Fuel Assembly Damping Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kanghee; Kang, Heungseok; Oh, Dongseok; Yoon, Kyungho; Kim, Hyungkyu; Kim, Jaeyong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    This paper summary the fuel assembly damping data in air/in still water/under flow, released from foreign fuel vendors, compared our data with the published data. Some technical issues in fuel assembly damping measurement testing are also briefly discussed. Understanding of each fuel assembly damping mechanisms according to the surrounding medium and flow velocity can support the fuel design improvement in fuel assembly dynamics and structural integrity aspect. Because the upgraded requirements of the newly-developed advanced reactor system will demands to minimize fuel design margin in integrity evaluation, reduction in conservatism of fuel assembly damping can contribute to alleviate the fuel design margin for sure. Damping is an energy dissipation mechanism in a vibrating mechanical structure and prevents a resonant structure from having infinite vibration amplitudes. The sources of fuel assembly damping are various from support friction to flow contribution, and it can be increased by the viscosity or drag of surrounding fluid medium or the average velocity of water flowing. Fuel licensing requires fuel design evaluation in transient or accidental condition. Dynamic response analysis of fuel assembly is to show fuel integrity and requires information on assembly-wise damping in dry condition and under wet or water flowing condition. However, damping measurement test for the full-scale fuel assembly prototype is not easy to carry out because of the scale (fuel prototype, test facility), unsteadiness of test data (scattering, random sampling and processing), instrumentation under water flowing (water-proof response measurement), and noise. LWR fuel technology division in KAERI is preparing the infra structure for damping measurement test of full-scale fuel assembly, to support fuel industries and related research activities. Here is a preliminary summary of fuel assembly damping, published in the literature. Some technical issues in fuel assembly damping

  9. Romanian nuclear fuel program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budan, O.

    1999-01-01

    The paper presents and comments the policy adopted in Romania for the production of CANDU-6 nuclear fuel before and after 1990. The CANDU-6 nuclear fuel manufacturing started in Romania in December 1983. Neither AECL nor any Canadian nuclear fuel manufacturer were involved in the Romanian industrial nuclear fuel production before 1990. After January 1990, the new created Romanian Electricity Authority (RENEL) assumed the responsibility for the Romanian Nuclear Power Program. It was RENEL's decision to stop, in June 1990, the nuclear fuel production at the Institute for Nuclear Power Reactors (IRNE) Pitesti. This decision was justified by the Canadian specialists team findings, revealed during a general, but well enough technically founded analysis performed at IRNE in the spring of 1990. All fuel manufactured before June 1990 was quarantined as it was considered of suspect quality. By that time more than 31,000 fuel bundles had already been manufactured. This fuel was stored for subsequent assessment. The paper explains the reasons which provoked this decision. The paper also presents the strategy adopted by RENEL after 1990 regarding the Romanian Nuclear Fuel Program. After a complex program done by Romanian and Canadian partners, in November 1994, AECL issued a temporary certification for the Romanian nuclear fuel plant. During the demonstration manufacturing run, as an essential milestone for the qualification of the Romanian fuel supplier for CANDU-6 reactors, 202 fuel bundles were produced. Of these fuel bundles, 66 were part of the Cernavoda NGS Unit 1 first fuel load (the balance was supplied by Zircatec Precision Industries Inc. ZPI). The industrial nuclear fuel fabrication re-started in Romania in January 1995 under AECL's periodical monitoring. In December 1995, AECL issued a permanent certificate, stating the Romanian nuclear fuel plant as a qualified and authorised CANDU-6 fuel supplier. The re-loading of the Cernavoda NGS Unit 1 started in the middle

  10. Durability of PEM Fuel Cell Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xinyu; Reifsnider, Ken

    Durability is still a critical limiting factor for the commercialization of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells, a leading energy conversion technology for powering future hydrogen fueled automobiles, backup power systems (e.g., for base transceiver station of cellular networks), portable electronic devices, etc. Ionic conducting polymer (ionomer) electrolyte membranes are the critical enabling materials for the PEM fuel cells. They are also widely used as the central functional elements in hydrogen generation (e.g., electrolyzers), membrane cell for chlor-alkali production, etc. A perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) polymer with the trade name Nafion® developed by DuPont™ is the most widely used PEM in chlor-alkali cells and PEM fuel cells. Similar PFSA membranes have been developed by Dow Chemical, Asahi Glass, and lately Solvay Solexis. Frequently, such membranes serve the dual function of reactant separation and selective ionic conduction between two otherwise separate compartments. For some applications, the compromise of the "separation" function via the degradation and mechanical failure of the electrolyte membrane can be the life-limiting factor; this is particularly the case for PEM in hydrogen/oxygen fuel cells.

  11. Fuel Cell Electric Bus Evaluations | Hydrogen and Fuel Cells | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bus Evaluations Fuel Cell Electric Bus Evaluations NREL's technology validation team evaluates fuel cell electric buses (FCEBs) to provide comprehensive, unbiased evaluation results of fuel cell bus early transportation applications for fuel cell technology. Buses operate in congested areas where

  12. Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies Program | Hydrogen and Fuel Cells |

    Science.gov (United States)

    NREL Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies Program Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies Program Through its Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies Program, NREL researches, develops, analyzes, and validates fuel cell and hydrogen production, delivery, and storage technologies for transportation

  13. Oxy-fuel combustion of pulverized fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Chungen; Yan, Jinyue

    2016-01-01

    Oxy-fuel combustion of pulverized fuels (PF), as a promising technology for CO2 capture from power plants, has gained a lot of concerns and also advanced considerable research, development and demonstration in the last past years worldwide. The use of CO2 or the mixture of CO2 and H2O vapor as th...

  14. Thorium fuel for light water reactors - reducing proliferation potential of nuclear power fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galperin, A; Radkowski, A [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beersheba (Israel)

    1996-12-01

    The proliferation potential of the light water reactor fuel cycle may be significantly reduced by utilization of thorium as a fertile component of the nuclear fuel. The main challenge of Th utilization is to design a core and a fuel cycle, which would be proliferation-resistant and economically feasible. This challenge is met by the Radkowsky Thorium Reactor (RTR) concept. So far the concept has been applied to a Russian design of a 1,000 MWe pressurized water reactor, known as a WWER-1000, and designated as VVERT. The following are the main results of the preliminary reference design: * The amount of Pu contained in the RTR spent fuel stockpile is reduced by 80% in comparison with a VVER of a current design. * The isotopic composition of the RTR-Pu greatly increases the probability of pre-initiation and yield degradation of a nuclear explosion. An extremely large Pu-238 content causes correspondingly large heat emission, which would complicate the design of an explosive device based on RTR-Pu. The economic incentive to reprocess and reuse the fissile component of the RTR spent fuel is decreased. The once-through cycle is economically optimal for the RTR core and cycle. To summarize all the items above: the replacement of a standard (U-based) fuel for nuclear reactors of current generation by the RTR fuel will provide an inherent barrier for nuclear weapon proliferation. This inherent barrier, in combination with existing safeguard measures and procedures is adequate to unambiguously disassociate civilian nuclear power from military nuclear power. * The RTR concept is applied to existing power plants to assure its economic feasibility. Reductions in waste disposal requirements, as well as in natural U and fabrication expenses, as compared to a standard WWER fuel, provide approximately 20% reduction in fuel cycle (authors).

  15. The degradation of zirconium alloys in nuclear reactors - a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, D.; Graham, N.A.

    1986-01-01

    This report presents the findings of a survey of available non-Canadian literature on the oxidation and hydriding of zirconium alloys. Much of the literature was found to address the Zircaloys, particularly when used as fuel cladding subjected to a radioactive and oxidizing environment. Hydriding of Zircaloys is mainly attributed to oxidation. The survey revealed that Zr-Nb alloys have been included in some investigations; however, data on the long-term degradation of Zr-2.5 wt% Nb, in particular, were scarce. The reviewed literature did not lead to conclusions regarding the potential for accelerated hydriding due to corrosion at crevices and/or second-phase particles, nor did it lead to conclusions as to the potential for a 'breakaway' in oxidation and hydrogen acquisition in long service life of Zr-Nb alloys. Specific information on service experience in U.S.S.R. power reactors could not be obtained; however, most of the information surveyed leads to the conclusion that fuel channels having Zr-2.5 wt% Nb pressure tubes should perform satisfactorily with respect to degradation from corrosion and hydriding provided they are installed correctly and are not operated under conditions that are far removed from those anticipated in design. 91 refs

  16. Hydrogen degradation of the 26H2MF alloy steel in H2SO4 and hydrocarbon environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielinski, A.; Swieczko-Zurek, B.; Michaliak, P.

    2004-01-01

    The Polish 26H2M alloy steel has been subjected to different heat treatment resulting in different microstructure and fracture appearance. The slow strain rate tests have been made on smooth round specimens in diluted sulphuric acid, boiler fuel and used mineral machine oil. The 26H2MF steel has become relatively immune in neutral boiler fuel and mineral oil and been heavily suffered from hydrogen degradation in acidic environment. The results demonstrate that the 26H2MF steel is highly susceptible to hydrogen degradation but in absence of stress raisers the increased hydrogen absorption in hydrocarbons can cause only small loss of its plasticity. (author) >>>

  17. Advanced Oxidation Degradation of Diclofenac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, William J., E-mail: wcooper@uci.edu [Urban Water Research Center, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Song Weihua, E-mail: wsong@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Environmental Science & Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2012-07-01

    Advanced oxidation/reduction processes (AO/RPs), utilize free radical reactions to directly degrade chemical contaminants as an alternative to traditional water treatment. This study reports the absolute rate constants for reaction of diclofenac sodium and the model compound (2, 6-dichloraniline) with the two major AO/RP radicals; the hydroxyl radical (•OH) and hydrated electron (e{sup -}{sub aq}). The bimolecular reaction rate constants (M{sup -1} s{sup -1}) for diclofenac for •OH was (9.29 ± 0.11) x 10{sup 9}, and, for e- aq was (1.53 ± 0.03) x10{sup 9}. Preliminary degradation mechanisms are suggested based on product analysis using {sup 60}Co γ-irradiation and LC-MS for reaction by-product identification. The toxicity of products was evaluated using the Vibrio fischeri luminescent bacteria method. (author)

  18. Advanced Oxidation Degradation of Diclofenac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, William J.; Song Weihua

    2012-01-01

    Advanced oxidation/reduction processes (AO/RPs), utilize free radical reactions to directly degrade chemical contaminants as an alternative to traditional water treatment. This study reports the absolute rate constants for reaction of diclofenac sodium and the model compound (2, 6-dichloraniline) with the two major AO/RP radicals; the hydroxyl radical (•OH) and hydrated electron (e - aq ). The bimolecular reaction rate constants (M -1 s -1 ) for diclofenac for •OH was (9.29 ± 0.11) x 10 9 , and, for e- aq was (1.53 ± 0.03) x10 9 . Preliminary degradation mechanisms are suggested based on product analysis using 60 Co γ-irradiation and LC-MS for reaction by-product identification. The toxicity of products was evaluated using the Vibrio fischeri luminescent bacteria method. (author)

  19. Fungal degradation of organophosphorous insecticides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bumpus, J.A. [Notre Dame Univ., IN (United States); Kakar, S.N.; Coleman, R.D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1992-07-01

    Organophosphorous insecticides are used extensively to treat a variety of pests and insects. Although as a group they are easily degraded by bacteria in the environment, a number of them have half-lives of several months. Little is known about their biodegradation by fungi. We have shown that Phanerochaete chrysosporium can substantially degrade chlorpyrifos, fonofos, and terbufos (27.5%, 12.2%, and 26.6%, respectively) during 18-day incubation in nitrogen-limited stationary cultures. The results demonstrate that the clorinated pyridinyl ring of chlorpyrifos and the phenyl ring of fonofos undergo ring cleavage during biodegradation by the fungus. The usefulness of the fungus system for bioremediation is discussed. 16 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Fungal degradation of organophosphorous insecticides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bumpus, J.A. (Notre Dame Univ., IN (United States)); Kakar, S.N.; Coleman, R.D. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Organophosphorous insecticides are used extensively to treat a variety of pests and insects. Although as a group they are easily degraded by bacteria in the environment, a number of them have half-lives of several months. Little is known about their biodegradation by fungi. We have shown that Phanerochaete chrysosporium can substantially degrade chlorpyrifos, fonofos, and terbufos (27.5%, 12.2%, and 26.6%, respectively) during 18-day incubation in nitrogen-limited stationary cultures. The results demonstrate that the clorinated pyridinyl ring of chlorpyrifos and the phenyl ring of fonofos undergo ring cleavage during biodegradation by the fungus. The usefulness of the fungus system for bioremediation is discussed. 16 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.