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Sample records for degrade host-derived reactive

  1. Investigations of Reactive Carbohydrates in Glycosidic Bond Formation and Degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heuckendorff, Mads

    The overall objective of the research described in this thesis was to explore the field of glycosidic bond formation and degradation. In more detail, the objective was to do further research in the field of highly reactive glycosyl donors. New ways of making highly reactive donors were explored...

  2. Effect of chemical degradation on fluxes of reactive compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Rinne

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In the analyses of VOC fluxes measured above plant canopies, one usually assumes the flux above canopy to equal the emission at the surface. Thus one assumes the chemical degradation to be much slower than the turbulent transport. We used a stochastic Lagrangian transport model in which the chemical degradation was described as first order decay in order to study the effect of the chemical degradation on above canopy fluxes of chemically reactive species. With the model we explored the sensitivity of the ratio of the above canopy flux to the surface emission on several parameters such as chemical lifetime of the compound, friction velocity, stability, and canopy density. Our results show that friction velocity and chemical lifetime affected the loss during transport the most. The canopy density had a significant effect if the chemically reactive compound was emitted from the forest floor. We used the results of the simulations together with oxidant data measured during HUMPPA-COPEC-2010 campaign at a Scots pine site to estimate the effect of the chemistry on fluxes of three typical biogenic VOCs, isoprene, α-pinene, and β-caryophyllene. Of these, the chemical degradation had a~major effect on the fluxes of the most reactive species β-caryophyllene, while the fluxes of α-pinene were affected during nighttime. For these two compounds representing the mono- and sesquiterpenes groups, the effect of chemical degradation had also a significant diurnal cycle with the highest chemical loss at night. The different day and night time loss terms need to be accounted for, when measured fluxes of reactive compounds are used to reveal relations between primary emission and environmental parameters.

  3. The Role of Host-derived Dentinal Matrix Metalloproteinases in Reducing Dentin Bonding of Resin Adhesives

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Shan-chuan; Kern, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    Dentin matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of host-derived proteolytic enzymes trapped within mineralized dentin matrix, which have the ability to hydrolyze the organic matrix of demineralized dentin. After bonding with resins to dentin there are usually some exposed collagen fibrils at the bottom of the hybrid layer owing to imperfect resin impregnation of the demineralized dentin matrix. Exposed collagen fibrils might be affected by MMPs inducing hydrolytic degradation, which migh...

  4. The role of host-derived dentinal matrix metalloproteinases in reducing dentin bonding of resin adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shan-chuan; Kern, Matthias

    2009-12-01

    Dentin matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of host-derived proteolytic enzymes trapped within mineralized dentin matrix, which have the ability to hydrolyze the organic matrix of demineralized dentin. After bonding with resins to dentin there are usually some exposed collagen fibrils at the bottom of the hybrid layer owing to imperfect resin impregnation of the demineralized dentin matrix. Exposed collagen fibrils might be affected by MMPs inducing hydrolytic degradation, which might result in reduced bond strength. Most MMPs are synthesized and released from odontoblasts in the form of proenzymes, requiring activation to degrade extracellular matrix components. Unfortunately, they can be activated by modem self-etch and etch-and-rinse adhesives. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge of the role of dentinal host-derived MMPs in dentin matrix degradation. We also discuss various available MMP inhibitors, especially chlorhexidine, and suggest that they could provide a potential pathway for inhibiting collagen degradation in bonding interfaces thereby increasing dentin bonding durability.

  5. Photocatalytic Degradation of Two Commercial Reactive Dyes in Aqueous Phase Using Nanophotocatalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Kansal SushilKumar; Kaur Navjeet; Singh Sukhmehar

    2009-01-01

    Abstract This study involves the photocatalytic degradation of Reactive Black 5 (RB5) and Reactive Orange 4 (RO4) dyes, employing heterogeneous photocatalytic process. Photocatalytic activity of different semiconductors such as titanium dioxide (TiO2) and zinc oxide (ZnO) has been investigated. An attempt has been made to study the effect of process parameters through amount of catalyst, concentration of dye, and pH on photocatalytic degradation of RB5 and RO4. The experiments were carried ou...

  6. Review of Abiotic Degradation of Chlorinated Solvents by Reactive Iron Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abiotic degradation of chlorinated solvents by reactive iron minerals such as iron sulfides, magnetite, green rust, and other Fe(II)-containing minerals has been observed in both laboratory and field conditions. These reactive iron minerals typically form under iron and sulfate ...

  7. Electrochemical degradation of reactive dyes at different DSA compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Rodrigo G. da; Aquino Neto, Sydney; Andrade, Adalgisa R. de, E-mail: ardandra@ffclrp.usp.b [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FFCLRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Filosofia Ciencias e Letras. Dept. de Quimica

    2011-07-01

    This paper investigates the electrochemical oxidation of the reactive dyes reactive blue 4 (RB-4) and reactive orange 16 (RO-16) on RuO{sub 2} dimensionally stable anode (DSA) electrodes. Electrolysis was achieved under galvanostatic control as a function of supporting electrolyte and electrode composition. The electrolyses, performed in either the presence or absence of NaCl, were able to promote efficient color removal; moreover, at low chloride concentration (0.01 mol L{sup -1}), total color removal was obtained after just 10 min of electrolysis, and a significant increase in total dye combustion was achieved for all the studied anodes in chloride medium (reaching ca. 80% - chemical oxygen demand - COD removal). No significant enhancement in dye color removal or mineralization was observed upon increasing chloride concentration. The influence of oxide composition on dye elimination seems to be significant in both media (with or without chloride), being Ti/Ru{sub 0.30}Ti{sub 0.70}O{sub 2}, the most active material for organic compound oxidation. The oxygen evolution reaction was shown to be a limiting reaction in both supporting electrolytes; i.e., NaCl and Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, and its competition with organic compound oxidation remained an obstacle. The adsorbable organo halogens formation study revealed that there is slight consumption of the undesirable species formed within the first minutes of the electrolysis, being Ti/(RuO{sub 2}){sub 0.70}(Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}){sub 0.30} the most environmentally friendly composition. Both anode composition and chloride concentration affect the formation of these undesirable compounds. (author)

  8. Extracellular superoxide dismutase protects Histoplasma yeast cells from host-derived oxidative stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian H Youseff

    Full Text Available In order to establish infections within the mammalian host, pathogens must protect themselves against toxic reactive oxygen species produced by phagocytes of the immune system. The fungal pathogen Histoplasma capsulatum infects both neutrophils and macrophages but the mechanisms enabling Histoplasma yeasts to survive in these phagocytes have not been fully elucidated. We show that Histoplasma yeasts produce a superoxide dismutase (Sod3 and direct it to the extracellular environment via N-terminal and C-terminal signals which promote its secretion and association with the yeast cell surface. This localization permits Sod3 to protect yeasts specifically from exogenous superoxide whereas amelioration of endogenous reactive oxygen depends on intracellular dismutases such as Sod1. While infection of resting macrophages by Histoplasma does not stimulate the phagocyte oxidative burst, interaction with polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs and cytokine-activated macrophages triggers production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Histoplasma yeasts producing Sod3 survive co-incubation with these phagocytes but yeasts lacking Sod3 are rapidly eliminated through oxidative killing similar to the effect of phagocytes on Candida albicans yeasts. The protection provided by Sod3 against host-derived ROS extends in vivo. Without Sod3, Histoplasma yeasts are attenuated in their ability to establish respiratory infections and are rapidly cleared with the onset of adaptive immunity. The virulence of Sod3-deficient yeasts is restored in murine hosts unable to produce superoxide due to loss of the NADPH-oxidase function. These results demonstrate that phagocyte-produced ROS contributes to the immune response to Histoplasma and that Sod3 facilitates Histoplasma pathogenesis by detoxifying host-derived reactive oxygen thereby enabling Histoplasma survival.

  9. Degradation of reactive dyes by ozonation and oxalic acid-assimilating bacteria isolated from soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosumi, Akihiro; Kaneko, Erika; Nakamura, Yoshitoshi

    2008-07-01

    Ozonation and treatment of wastewaters with oxalic acid-assimilating bacterium was attempted for the complete degradation of reactive dyes. Oxalic acid-assimilating bacterium, Pandoraea sp. strain EBR-01, was newly isolated from soil under bamboo grove and was identified to be a member of the genus Pandoraea by physicochemical and biochemical tests including 16S rDNA sequence analysis. The bacterium was grown optimally at pH 7 and temperature of 30 degrees C under the laboratory conditions. Reactive Red 120 (RR120), Reactive Green 19 (RG19), Reactive Black 5 (RB5) and Remazol Brilliant Blue R (RBBR) were used in degradation experiments. At the initial reactive dye concentrations of 500 mg/l and the ozonation time of 80 min, it was confirmed that 75-90 mg/l oxalic acid was generated from reactive dyes by ozonation. Microbial treatment using EBR-01 greatly decreased the amount of oxalic acid in the mixture after 48 h, but it was not removed completely. TOC/TOC(0) of reactive dye solutions was also decreased to 80-90% and 20-40% by ozonation and microbial treatment using EBR-01, respectively. The study confirmed that consecutive treatments by ozone and microorganisms are efficient methods to mineralize reactive dyes.

  10. The roles of reactive species in micropollutant degradation in the UV/free chlorine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jingyun; Fu, Yun; Shang, Chii

    2014-01-01

    The UV/free chlorine process forms reactive species such as hydroxyl radicals (HO(•)), chlorine atoms (Cl(•)), Cl2(•-), and O(•-). The specific roles of these reactive species in aqueous micropollutant degradation in the UV/chlorine process under different conditions were investigated using a steady-state kinetic model. Benzoic acid (BA) was chosen as the model micropollutant. The steady-state kinetic model developed fitted the experimental data well. The results showed that HO(•) and Cl(•) contributed substantially to BA degradation, while the roles of the other reactive species such as Cl2(•-) and O(•-) were negligible. The overall degradation rate of BA decreased as the pH increased from 6 to 9. In particular, the relative contributions of HO(•) and Cl(•) to the degradation changed from 34.7% and 65.3% respectively at pH 6 to 37.9% and 62% respectively at pH 9 under the conditions evaluated. Their relative contributions also changed slightly with variations in chlorine dosage, BA concentration and chloride concentration. The scavenging effect of natural organic matter (NOM) on Cl(•) was relatively small compared to that on HO(•), while bicarbonate preferentially reduced the contribution of Cl(•). This study is the first to demonstrate the contributions of different reactive species to the micropollutant degradation in the UV/chlorine system under environmentally relevant conditions.

  11. Catabolism of host-derived compounds during extracellular bacterial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, Jamie A; Wargo, Matthew J

    2014-02-01

    Efficient catabolism of host-derived compounds is essential for bacterial survival and virulence. While these links in intracellular bacteria are well studied, such studies in extracellular bacteria lag behind, mostly for technical reasons. The field has identified important metabolic pathways, but the mechanisms by which they impact infection and in particular, establishing the importance of a compound's catabolism versus alternate metabolic roles has been difficult. In this review we will examine evidence for catabolism during extracellular bacterial infections in animals and known or potential roles in virulence. In the process, we point out key gaps in the field that will require new or newly adapted techniques.

  12. Investigations of Reactive Carbohydrates in Glycosidic Bond Formation and Degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heuckendorff, Mads

    was to develop new synthetic methods to evolve the field of synthetic carbohydrate chemistry. In addition, easy methods for obtaining complex oligosaccharides are needed to accommodate biochemical research and drug development. Furthermore, the aim was to shed light on the complex mechanisms of glycosylation...... and hy rolysis of glycosides. This mechanistic insight can then be used to develop new synthetic methods and obtain a better understanding of already existing methods. In Chapter 1 general aspects of synthetic carbohydrate chemistry is described with an emphasis on elements that affects reactivity...... and their properties in glycosylations were carefully examined. The physical chemistry aspects of conformationally changed donors were investigated with emphasis on the anomeric effect. Finally, neighboring group effects in glycosylations and hydrolysis of glycosides were investigated. The goal of this research...

  13. Hemoglobin fructation promotes heme degradation through the generation of endogenous reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodarzi, M; Moosavi-Movahedi, A A; Habibi-Rezaei, M; Shourian, M; Ghourchian, H; Ahmad, F; Farhadi, M; Saboury, A A; Sheibani, N

    2014-09-15

    Protein glycation is a cascade of nonenzymatic reactions between reducing sugars and amino groups of proteins. It is referred to as fructation when the reducing monosaccharide is fructose. Some potential mechanisms have been suggested for the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by protein glycation reactions in the presence of glucose. In this state, glucose autoxidation, ketoamine, and oxidative advance glycation end products (AGEs) formation are considered as major sources of ROS and perhaps heme degradation during hemoglobin glycation. However, whether fructose mediated glycation produces ROS and heme degradation is unknown. Here we report that ROS (H2O2) production occurred during hemoglobin fructation in vitro using chemiluminescence methods. The enhanced heme exposure and degradation were determined using UV-Vis and fluorescence spectrophotometry. Following accumulation of ROS, heme degradation products were accumulated reaching a plateau along with the detected ROS. Thus, fructose may make a significant contribution to the production of ROS, glycation of proteins, and heme degradation during diabetes.

  14. Hemoglobin fructation promotes heme degradation through the generation of endogenous reactive oxygen species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodarzi, M.; Moosavi-Movahedi, A. A.; Habibi-Rezaei, M.; Shourian, M.; Ghourchian, H.; Ahmad, F.; Farhadi, M.; Saboury, A. A.; Sheibani, N.

    2014-09-01

    Protein glycation is a cascade of nonenzymatic reactions between reducing sugars and amino groups of proteins. It is referred to as fructation when the reducing monosaccharide is fructose. Some potential mechanisms have been suggested for the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by protein glycation reactions in the presence of glucose. In this state, glucose autoxidation, ketoamine, and oxidative advance glycation end products (AGEs) formation are considered as major sources of ROS and perhaps heme degradation during hemoglobin glycation. However, whether fructose mediated glycation produces ROS and heme degradation is unknown. Here we report that ROS (H2O2) production occurred during hemoglobin fructation in vitro using chemiluminescence methods. The enhanced heme exposure and degradation were determined using UV-Vis and fluorescence spectrophotometry. Following accumulation of ROS, heme degradation products were accumulated reaching a plateau along with the detected ROS. Thus, fructose may make a significant contribution to the production of ROS, glycation of proteins, and heme degradation during diabetes.

  15. Reactive Black 5 dye degradation using filters of smuggled cigarette modified with Fe(3.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glugoski, Letícia Polli; de Jesus Cubas, Paloma; Fujiwara, Sérgio Toshio

    2016-05-14

    This study presents an attempt to solve two serious environmental problems: the generation of toxic effluents and solid waste disposal. The work proposes recycling cigarette filters with the purpose of degrading reactive dyes, which are used in the textile industry. Filters of smuggled cigarettes were recycled through Fe(3+) immobilization on their surface. The material obtained was characterized through Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis). The factorial design revealed that the most suitable conditions for the degradation of Reactive Black 5 dye were obtained by using 1 g of material at pH 3.0 in a 100 mg L(-1) hydrogen peroxide solution. The material showed excellent performance in the Reactive Black 5 dye degradation process; in 60 min, 99.09 % dye was removed. At pH 7.0, the dye degradation was 72.67 %, indicating that the material prepared can be used at pH values greater than 3.0 without the occurrence of hydrated Fe(3+) oxide precipitation. Furthermore, the material showed no loss of catalytic activity after three degradation studies.

  16. Degradation of Reactive Black 5 dye by a newly isolated bacterium Pseudomonas entomophila BS1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sana; Malik, Abdul

    2016-03-01

    The textile and dye industries are considered as one of the major sources of environmental pollution. The present study was conducted to investigate the degradation of the azo dye Reactive Black 5 (RB 5) using a bacterium isolated from soil samples collected around a textile industry. The bacterial strain BS1 capable of degrading RB 5 was isolated and identified as Pseudomonas entomophila on the basis of 16S rDNA sequencing. The effects of different parameters on the degradation of RB 5 were studied to find out the optimal conditions required for maximum degradation, which was 93% after 120 h of incubation. Static conditions with pH in the range of 5-9 and a temperature of 37 °C were found to be optimum for degrading RB 5. Enzyme assays demonstrated that P. entomophila possessed azoreductase, which played an important role in degradation. The enzyme was dependent on flavin mononucleotide and NADH for its activity. Furthermore, a possible degradation pathway of the dye was proposed through gas chromatography - mass spectrometry analysis, which revealed that the metabolic products were naphthalene-1,2-diamine and 4-(methylsulfonyl) aniline. Thus the ability of this indigenous bacterial isolate for simultaneous decolorization and degradation of the azo dye signifies its potential application for treatment of industrial wastewaters containing azo dyes.

  17. Semiconductor-assisted photocatalytic degradation of reactive dyes in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouvêa, C A; Wypych, F; Moraes, S G; Durán, N; Nagata, N; Peralta-Zamora, P

    2000-02-01

    This work reports the semiconductor-assisted photochemical degradation of reactive dyes. In an oxygenated-UV-ZnO system almost total decolorization of Remazol Brilliant Blue R, Remazol Black B, Reactive Blue 221 and Reactive Blue 222 was observed in reaction times of about 60 min. Extending the photochemical treatment up to 120 min, mineralization higher than 80% for all the dyes was observed. During the same period, the residual acute toxicity was significantly reduced only for Remazol Black B. A systematic optimization study carried out by factorial design showed that for the reactive dyes tested, the ZnO semiconductor exhibits a better efficiency than that observed with anatase TiO2. A synergistic effect in the coupled TiO2-ZnO system was not observed.

  18. Green synthesized conditions impacting on the reactivity of Fe NPs for the degradation of malachite green

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lanlan; Luo, Fang; Chen, Zuliang; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Naidu, Ravendra

    2015-02-01

    This study investigates green tea extract synthesized conditions impacting on the reactivity of iron nanoparticles (Fe NPs) used for the degradation of malachite green (MG), including the volume ratio of Fe2+ and tea extract, the solution pH and temperature. Results indicated that the reactivity of Fe NPs increased with higher temperature, but fell with increasing pH and the volume ratio of Fe2+ and tea extract. Scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscope (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) indicated that Fe NPs were spherical in shape, their diameter was 70-80 nm and they were mainly composed of iron oxide nanoparticles. UV-visible (UV-vis) indicated that reactivity of Fe NPs used in degradation of MG significantly depended on the synthesized conditions of Fe NPs. This was due to their impact on the reactivity and morphology of Fe NPs. Finally, degradation of MG showed that 90.56% of MG was removed using Fe NPs.

  19. Nanoassemblies of Tissue-Reactive, Polyoxazoline Graft-Copolymers Restore the Lubrication Properties of Degraded Cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgese, Giulia; Cavalli, Emma; Müller, Mischa; Zenobi-Wong, Marcy; Benetti, Edmondo M

    2017-03-13

    Osteoarthritis leads to an alteration in the composition of the synovial fluid, which is associated with an increase in friction and the progressive and irreversible destruction of the articular cartilage. In order to tackle this degenerative disease, there has been a growing interest in the medical field to establish effective, long-term treatments to restore cartilage lubrication after damage. Here we develop a series of graft-copolymers capable of assembling selectively on the degraded cartilage, resurfacing it, and restoring the lubricating properties of the native tissue. These comprise a polyglutamic acid backbone (PGA) coupled to brush-forming, poly-2-methyl-2-oxazoline (PMOXA) side chains, which provide biopassivity and lubricity to the surface, and to aldehyde-bearing tissue-reactive groups, for the anchoring on the degenerated cartilage via Schiff bases. Optimization of the graft-copolymer architecture (i.e., density and length of side chains and amount of tissue-reactive functions) allowed a uniform passivation of the degraded cartilage surface. Graft-copolymer-treated cartilage showed very low coefficients of friction within synovial fluid, reestablishing and in some cases improving the lubricating properties of the natural cartilage. Due to these distinctive properties and their high biocompatibility and stability under physiological conditions, cartilage-reactive graft-copolymers emerge as promising injectable formulations to slow down the progression of cartilage degradation, which characterizes the early stages of osteoarthritis.

  20. Degradation of C.I. Reactive Red 2 through photocatalysis coupled with water jet cavitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoning; Jia, Jinping; Wang, Yalin

    2011-01-15

    The decolorization of an azo dye, C.I. Reactive Red 2 was investigated using TiO(2) photocatalysis coupled with water jet cavitation. Experiments were performed in a 4.0 L solution under ultraviolet power of 9 W. The effects of TiO(2) loading, initial dye concentration, solution pH, geometry of cavitation tube, and the addition of anions on the degradation of the dye were evaluated. Degradation of the dye followed a pseudo-first order reaction. The photocatalysis coupled with water jet cavitation elevated degradation of the dye by about 136%, showing a synergistic effect compared to the individual photocatalysis and water jet cavitation. The enhancement of photocatalysis by water jet cavitation could be due to the deagglomeration of catalyst particles as well as the better contact between the catalyst surfaces and the reactants. Venturi tube with smaller diameter and shorter length of throat tube favored the dye decolorization. The degradation efficiency was found to increase with decreasing initial concentration and pH. The presence of NO(3)(-) and SO(4)(2-) enhanced the degradation of RR2, while Cl(-), and especially HCO(3)(-) significantly reduced dye decolorization. The results of this study indicated that the coupled photocatalysis and water jet cavitation is effective in degrading dye in wastewater and provides a promising alternative for treatment of dye wastewater at a large scale. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Degradation analysis of Reactive Red 198 by hairy roots of Tagetes patula L. (Marigold).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Pratibha; Desai, Neetin; Govindwar, Sanjay; Jadhav, Jyoti Prafulla; Bapat, Vishwas

    2009-09-01

    Tagetes patula L. (Marigold) hairy roots were selected among few hairy root cultures from other plants tested for the decolorization of Reactive Red 198. Hairy roots of Tagetes were able to remove dye concentrations up to 110 mg L(-l) and could be successively used at least for five consecutive decolorization cycles. The hairy roots of Tagetes decolorized six different dyes, viz. Golden Yellow HER, Methyl Orange, Orange M2RL, Navy Blue HE2R, Reactive Red M5B and Reactive Red 198. Significant induction of the activity of biotransformation enzymes indicated their crucial role in the dye metabolism. UV-vis spectroscopy, HPLC and FTIR spectroscopy analyses confirmed the degradation of Reactive Red 198. A possible pathway for the biodegradation of Reactive Red 198 has been proposed with the help of GC-MS and metabolites identified as 2-aminonaphthol, p-aminovinylsulfone ethyl disulfate and 1-aminotriazine, 3-pyridine sulfonic acid. The phytotoxicity study demonstrated the non-toxic nature of the extracted metabolites. The use of such hairy root cultures with a high ability for bioremediation of dyes is discussed.

  2. Theoretical investigation of loratadine reactivity in order to understand its degradation properties: DFT and MD study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armaković, Stevan; Armaković, Sanja J; Abramović, Biljana F

    2016-10-01

    Antihistamines are frequently used pharmaceuticals that treat the symptoms of allergic reactions. Loratadine (LOR) is an active component of the second generation of selective antihistaminic pharmaceutical usually known as Claritin. Frequent usage of this type of pharmaceuticals imposes the need for understanding their fundamental reactive properties. In this study we have theoretically investigated reactive properties of LOR using both density functional theory (DFT) calculations and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. DFT study is used for collecting information related to the molecule stability, structure, frontier molecular orbitals, quantum molecular descriptors, charge distribution, molecular electrostatic potential surfaces, charge polarization, and local reactivity properties according to average local ionization energy surfaces. Based on these results, N24 atom of pyridine ring and oxygen atom O1 were identified with nucleophilic nature. In order to collect the information necessary for the proposition of degradation compounds we also calculated bond dissociation energies (BDE) for hydrogen abstraction and single acyclic bonds as well. According to BDE, the oxidation is likely to occur in the piperidine and cycloheptane rings. MD simulations were used in order to understand the interactions with water through radial distribution functions (RDF). Based on RDFs the most important interactions with solvent are determined for carbon atom C5, chlorine atom Cl15, and oxygen atom O1. Collected results based on DFT calculations and MD simulations provided information important for suggestion of possible degradation compounds. Covalent and noncovalent interactions between LOR and (•)OH have also been investigated.

  3. Electrochemical degradation of reactive dye in the presence of water jet cavitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoning; Jia, Jinping; Wang, Yalin

    2010-03-01

    Degradation of a reactive dye, Brilliant Red X-3B, induced by electrolysis coupled with water jet cavitation was studied. The experiment was performed in 4.5L of aqueous solution containing X-3B concentrations ranging from 40 to 120mg/L by applying Ti-IrO(2) as anode and graphite as cathode. The water jet cavitation process decreased the diffusion layer thickness and consequently increased the current density. Compared to water jet cavitation and electrolysis alone, the combination of the two methods enhanced X-3B removal and showed a synergistic effect. The azo bond of the dye molecule was broken down and the naphthalene ring was transformed to multi-substituted benzene during the combined process. The dye degradation rate increased with increasing concentration. Acidic conditions (e.g., pH 1) favored the decolorization of the reactive dye. The use of TiO(2) coated with IrO(2) as anode and graphite as cathode showed the best performance for the dye removal efficiency, compared to other electrode pairs. Addition of SO(4)(2-), NO(3)(-), and especially Cl(-) ions into solution significantly enhanced the degradation. However, CO(3)(2-) inhibited the dye decolorization. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Electrolytic manipulation of persulfate reactivity by iron electrodes for trichloroethylene degradation in groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Songhu; Liao, Peng; Alshawabkeh, Akram N

    2014-01-01

    Activated persulfate oxidation is an effective in situ chemical oxidation process for groundwater remediation. However, reactivity of persulfate is difficult to manipulate or control in the subsurface causing activation before reaching the contaminated zone and leading to a loss of chemicals. Furthermore, mobilization of heavy metals by the process is a potential risk. An effective approach using iron electrodes is thus developed to manipulate the reactivity of persulfate in situ for trichloroethylene (TCE) degradation in groundwater and to limit heavy metals mobilization. TCE degradation is quantitatively accelerated or inhibited by adjusting the current applied to the iron electrode, following k1 = 0.00053·Iv + 0.059 (-122 A/m(3) ≤ Iv ≤ 244 A/m(3)) where k1 and Iv are the pseudo first-order rate constant (min(-1)) and volume normalized current (A/m(3)), respectively. Persulfate is mainly decomposed by Fe(2+) produced from the electrochemical and chemical corrosion of iron followed by the regeneration via Fe(3+) reduction on the cathode. SO4(•-) and ·OH cocontribute to TCE degradation, but ·OH contribution is more significant. Groundwater pH and oxidation-reduction potential can be restored to natural levels by the continuation of electrolysis after the disappearance of contaminants and persulfate, thus decreasing adverse impacts such as the mobility of heavy metals in the subsurface.

  5. Photocatalytic Degradation of Two Commercial Reactive Dyes in Aqueous Phase Using Nanophotocatalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kansal SushilKumar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study involves the photocatalytic degradation of Reactive Black 5 (RB5 and Reactive Orange 4 (RO4 dyes, employing heterogeneous photocatalytic process. Photocatalytic activity of different semiconductors such as titanium dioxide (TiO2 and zinc oxide (ZnO has been investigated. An attempt has been made to study the effect of process parameters through amount of catalyst, concentration of dye, and pH on photocatalytic degradation of RB5 and RO4. The experiments were carried out by varying pH (3–11, amount of catalyst (0.25–1.5 g/L, and initial concentration of dye (10–100 mg/L. The optimum catalyst dose was found to be 1.25 and 1 g/L for RB5 and RO4, respectively. In the case of RB5, maximum rate of decolorization was observed in acidic medium at pH 4, whereas the decolorization of RO4 reached maximum in basic region at pH 11. The performance of photocatalytic system employing ZnO/UV light was observed to be better than TiO2/UV system. The complete decolorization of RB5 was observed after 7 min with ZnO, whereas with TiO2, only 75% dye degraded in 7 min. In the case of RO4, 92 and 62% decolorization was noticed in the same duration.

  6. Photocatalytic Degradation of Two Commercial Reactive Dyes in Aqueous Phase Using Nanophotocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansal, Sushil Kumar; Kaur, Navjeet; Singh, Sukhmehar

    2009-07-01

    This study involves the photocatalytic degradation of Reactive Black 5 (RB5) and Reactive Orange 4 (RO4) dyes, employing heterogeneous photocatalytic process. Photocatalytic activity of different semiconductors such as titanium dioxide (TiO2) and zinc oxide (ZnO) has been investigated. An attempt has been made to study the effect of process parameters through amount of catalyst, concentration of dye, and pH on photocatalytic degradation of RB5 and RO4. The experiments were carried out by varying pH (3-11), amount of catalyst (0.25-1.5 g/L), and initial concentration of dye (10-100 mg/L). The optimum catalyst dose was found to be 1.25 and 1 g/L for RB5 and RO4, respectively. In the case of RB5, maximum rate of decolorization was observed in acidic medium at pH 4, whereas the decolorization of RO4 reached maximum in basic region at pH 11. The performance of photocatalytic system employing ZnO/UV light was observed to be better than TiO2/UV system. The complete decolorization of RB5 was observed after 7 min with ZnO, whereas with TiO2, only 75% dye degraded in 7 min. In the case of RO4, 92 and 62% decolorization was noticed in the same duration.

  7. Degradation of Textile Dye Reactive Navy – Blue Rx (Reactive blue–59 by an Isolated Actinomycete Streptomyces krainskii SUK – 5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mane, U. V.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The isolated Actinomycete, Streptomyces krainskii, SUK -5 was found to decolorize and degrade textile dye Reactive blue–59.This azo dye was decolorized and degraded completely by Streptomyces krainskii SUK–5 at 24 h in shaking condition in the nutrient medium at pH 8. Induction in the activity of Lignin Peroxidase,and NADH-DCIP Reductase and MR reductase represents their role in degradation .The biodegradation was monitored by TLC, UV vis spectroscopy, FTIR. and GCMS analysis. Microbial and phytotoxicity studies of the product were carried out.

  8. Laccase-conjugated amino-functionalized nanosilica for efficient degradation of Reactive Violet 1 dye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahlout, Mayur; Rudakiya, Darshan M.; Gupte, Shilpa; Gupte, Akshaya

    2017-08-01

    Immobilization of enzyme with nanostructures enhances its ideal characteristics, which may allow the enzyme to become more stable and resistant. The present investigation deals with the formulation of laccase nanosilica conjugates to overcome the problems associated with its stability and reusability. Synthesized nanosilica and laccase nanoparticles were spherical shaped, with the mean size of 220 and 615 nm, respectively. Laccase nanoparticles had an optimum temperature of 55 °C and pH 4.0 for the oxidation of ABTS. Laccase nanoparticle retained 79% of residual activity till 20th cycle. It also showed 91% of its initial activity at lower temperatures even after 60 days. Laccase nanoparticles were applied for Reactive Violet 1 degradation wherein 96.76% of decolourization was obtained at pH 5.0 and 30 °C within 12 h. Toxicity studies on microbes and plants suggested that the degraded metabolites were less toxic than control dye. Thus, the method applied for immobilization increased storage stability and reusability of laccase, and therefore, it can be utilized for efficient degradation of azo dyes.

  9. Heterogeneous photo-catalysis system for the degradation of azo dye Reactive Black 5 (RB5).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yao-Hui; Wei, Hau-Cheng; Chen, Hung-Ta

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated a heterogeneous photo-catalysis system by introducing a novel brick supported iron oxide (denoted as B1) for the heterogeneous photoassisted degradation of Reactive Black 5 (RB5) at pH value from 3 to 7 in a three-phase (gas-liquid-solid) fluidized bed reactor (3P-FBR). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and N(2) adsorption/desorption were used to characterize the B1 catalyst. The in situ formation of hydrogen peroxide and the depletion of oxalic acid by photochemical cycle of Fe(III)-oxalate complex under UVA light (λ = 365 nm) were studied. The effects of the solution pH and the concentration of oxalic acid on the degradation of RB5 are elucidated. About 90% decolourization was measured and 80% of the total organic carbon (TOC) was eliminated at pH 5.0 after 120 min for 20 mg/L RB5 in presence of 10 g/L B1 catalyst, 30 mg/L oxalic acid under 15 W UVA light. A mechanism for the photocatalytic degradation of RB5 over B1 catalyst is proposed.

  10. Decolorization and degradation of reactive yellow HF aqueous solutions by electrochemical advanced oxidation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedolla-Guzman, A; Feria-Reyes, R; Gutierrez-Granados, S; Peralta-Hernández, Juan M

    2017-05-01

    Textile manufacturing is the one responsible for water bodies' contamination through the discharge of colored wastes. This work presents the study of reactive yellow HF (RYHF) dye degradation under two different electrochemical advanced oxidation processes (EAOP), namely anodic oxidation (AO) and electro-Fenton (EF)/boron-doped diamond (BDD) process. For the AO, 100 and 300 mg/L solutions using Pt and BDD as anodes in a 100 mL stirred tank cell were used, with a supporting electrolyte of 0.05 mol/L of Na2SO4 at pH 3 under 30 and 50 mA/cm(2) current density. The EF/BDD process was carried out in a flow reactor at 4 and 7 L/min to degrade 100, 200, and 300 mg/L RYHF solutions under 50 and 80 mA/cm(2). UV-Vis determinations were used for decolorization evaluation, while high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method provided information on dye degradation rate.

  11. Optimization of integrated chemical-biological degradation of a reactive azo dye using response surface methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudarjanto, Gatut [Advanced Wastewater Management Centre, The University of Queensland, Qld 4072 (Australia); Keller-Lehmann, Beatrice [Advanced Wastewater Management Centre, The University of Queensland, Qld 4072 (Australia); Keller, Jurg [Advanced Wastewater Management Centre, The University of Queensland, Qld 4072 (Australia)]. E-mail: j.keller@awmc.uq.edu.au

    2006-11-02

    The integrated chemical-biological degradation combining advanced oxidation by UV/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} followed by aerobic biodegradation was used to degrade C.I. Reactive Azo Red 195A, commonly used in the textile industry in Australia. An experimental design based on the response surface method was applied to evaluate the interactive effects of influencing factors (UV irradiation time, initial hydrogen peroxide dosage and recirculation ratio of the system) on decolourisation efficiency and optimizing the operating conditions of the treatment process. The effects were determined by the measurement of dye concentration and soluble chemical oxygen demand (S-COD). The results showed that the dye and S-COD removal were affected by all factors individually and interactively. Maximal colour degradation performance was predicted, and experimentally validated, with no recirculation, 30 min UV irradiation and 500 mg H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/L. The model predictions for colour removal, based on a three-factor/five-level Box-Wilson central composite design and the response surface method analysis, were found to be very close to additional experimental results obtained under near optimal conditions. This demonstrates the benefits of this approach in achieving good predictions while minimising the number of experiments required.

  12. Degradation of reactive, acid and basic textile dyes in the presence of ultrasound and rare earths [Lanthanum and Praseodymium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Pankaj; Goyal, Shikha; Patnala, Prem Kishore

    2014-11-01

    Degradation of five textile dyes, namely Reactive Red 141 (RR 141), Reactive Blue 21 (RB 21), Acid Red 114 (AR 114), Acid Blue 113 (AB 113) and Basic Violet 16 (BV 16) in aqueous solution has been carried out with ultrasound (US) and in combination with rare earth ions (La(3+) and Pr(3+)). Kinetic analysis of the data showed a pseudo-first order degradation reaction for all the dyes. The rate constant (k), half life (t1/2) and the process efficiency (φ) for various processes in degradation of dyes under different experimental conditions have been calculated. The influence of concentrations of dyes (16-40mg/L), pH (5, 7 and 9) and rare earth ion concentration (4, 12 and 20mg/L) on the degradation of dyes have also been studied. The degradation percentage increased with increasing rare earth amount and decreased with increasing concentration of dyes. Both horn and bath type sonicators were used at 20kHz and 250W for degradation. The sonochemical degradation rate of dyes in the presence of rare earths was related to the type of chromophoric groups in the dye molecule. Degradation sequence of dyes was further examined through LCMS and Raman spectroscopic techniques, which confirmed the sonochemical degradation of dyes to non-toxic end products. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. High-temperature thermal degradation of polyethylene from reactive molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, J. Matthew D.; Moore, Nathan W.

    Thermal degradation of polyethylene is studied under extremely high-rate temperature ramp rates from 1014 to 1010 K/s in isochoric, condensed phases. The molecular evolution and macroscopic state variables are extracted as a function of density from reactive molecular dynamics simulations using the ReaxFF potential. These results are used to parameterize a kinetic rate model for the dissociation and coalescence of hydrocarbons as a function of temperature, temperature ramp rate, and density. The results are contrasted to first-order random-scission macrokinetic models often assumed for pyrolysis of linear polyethylene under ambient conditions. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04- 94AL85000.

  14. Enhanced heterogeneous ferrioxalate photo-fenton degradation of reactive orange 4 by solar light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selvam, K.; Muruganandham, M.; Swaminathan, M. [Department of Chemistry, Annamalai University, Annamalai Nagar-608 002 (India)

    2005-10-14

    A combined homogeneous and heterogeneous photocatalytic decolourisation and degradation of a chlorotriazine Reactive azo dye Reactive Orange 4 (RO4) have been carried out using ferrous sulphate/ ferrioxalate with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and TiO{sub 2}-P25 particles. Solar/ferrous/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2}-P25 and solar/ferrioxalate/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2}-P25 processes are found to be more efficient than the individual photo-Fenton and solar/TiO{sub 2}-P25 processes. A comparison of these two processes with UV/ferrous/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2}-P25 and UV/ferrioxalate/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2}-P25 reveals that ferrioxalate is more efficient in solar light whereas ferrous ion is more efficient in UV light. The experimental parameters such as pH, initial H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, Fe{sup 2+}, ferrioxalate and TiO{sub 2}-P25 concentration strongly influenced the dye removal rate in solar processes. The optimum operating conditions of these two combined processes are reported.

  15. Photocatalytic degradation of reactive black-5 dye using TiO2 impregnated ZSM-5

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    O K Mahadwad; P A Parikh; R V Jasra; C Patil

    2011-06-01

    In the present study, photocatalytic degradation of reactive black-5 (RB-5) dye was investigated using supported TiO2 photocatalyst based adsorbent as a semiconductor photocatalyst in a batch reactor. The synthesized photocatalyst composition was developed using TiO2 as photoactive component and zeolite (ZSM-5) as the adsorbents. Attempts were also made to optimize the composition of the supported catalyst and to study the reliability of prepared catalyst. The optimum formulation of supported catalyst was found to be (TiO2: ZSM-5 = 0.15:1) which gave the highest efficiency with 98% degradation of 50 mg/L RB-5 solution in 90 min. Effect of different parameters such as initial concentration of dye solution, catalyst amount on the rate of photodegradation was also studied. The reduction in the chemical oxygen demand (COD, 88%) proves the mineralization of the RB-5 dye along with the colour removal. The supported TiO2 was found to be stable for repeated use.

  16. Degradation of anthraquinone dye reactive blue 4 in pyrite ash catalyzed Fenton reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becelic-Tomin, Milena; Dalmacija, Bozo; Rajic, Ljiljana; Tomasevic, Dragana; Kerkez, Djurdja; Watson, Malcolm; Prica, Miljana

    2014-01-01

    Pyrite ash (PA) is created by burning pyrite in the chemical production of sulphuric acid. The high concentration of iron oxide, mostly hematite, present in pyrite ash, gives the basis for its application as a source of catalytic iron in a modified Fenton process for anthraquinone dye reactive blue 4 (RB4) degradation. The effect of various operating variables such as catalyst and oxidant concentration, initial pH and RB4 concentration on the abatement of total organic carbon, and dye has been assessed in this study. Here we show that degradation of RB4 in the modified Fenton reaction was efficient under the following conditions: pH=2.5; [PA]0=0.2 g L(-1); [H2O2]0=5 mM and initial RB4 concentration up to 100 mg L(-1). The pyrite ash Fenton reaction can overcome limitations observed from the classic Fenton reaction, such as the early termination of the Fenton reaction. Metal (Pb, Zn, and Cu) content of the solution after the process suggests that an additional treatment step is necessary to remove the remaining metals from the water. These results provide basic knowledge to better understand the modified, heterogeneous Fenton process and apply the PA Fenton reaction for the treatment of wastewaters which contains anthraquinone dyes.

  17. Degradation of Anthraquinone Dye Reactive Blue 4 in Pyrite Ash Catalyzed Fenton Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Becelic-Tomin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyrite ash (PA is created by burning pyrite in the chemical production of sulphuric acid. The high concentration of iron oxide, mostly hematite, present in pyrite ash, gives the basis for its application as a source of catalytic iron in a modified Fenton process for anthraquinone dye reactive blue 4 (RB4 degradation. The effect of various operating variables such as catalyst and oxidant concentration, initial pH and RB4 concentration on the abatement of total organic carbon, and dye has been assessed in this study. Here we show that degradation of RB4 in the modified Fenton reaction was efficient under the following conditions: pH=2.5; [PA]0=0.2 g L−1; [H2O2]0=5 mM and initial RB4 concentration up to 100 mg L−1. The pyrite ash Fenton reaction can overcome limitations observed from the classic Fenton reaction, such as the early termination of the Fenton reaction. Metal (Pb, Zn, and Cu content of the solution after the process suggests that an additional treatment step is necessary to remove the remaining metals from the water. These results provide basic knowledge to better understand the modified, heterogeneous Fenton process and apply the PA Fenton reaction for the treatment of wastewaters which contains anthraquinone dyes.

  18. Anomalous behavior of visible light active TiO2 for the photocatalytic degradation of different Reactive dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Navneet; Shahi, Satwant Kaur; Singh, Vasundhara

    2015-11-01

    Nanocrystalline undoped, N-doped, N and metal codoped titania with different particle size, surface area, anatase phase content, crystallinity, band gap and zeta potential were synthesized by the sol-gel method. The photocatalytic activities of the synthesized TiO2 powders were compared by employing four different Reactive dyes. The order of photocatalytic activity observed for Reactive Red 198 dye (RR 198) was undoped = N,Cu codoped = N-doped > N,Fe codoped TiO2, Reactive Blue 4 dye (RB 4) was N,Cu codoped > N,Fe codoped > N-doped > undoped TiO2, Reactive Black 5 dye (RB 5) was N,Cu codoped* > undoped > N-doped > N,Fe codoped TiO2 and negligible degradation was observed for Reactive Orange 16 dye (RO 16). In this paper, the anomalous trend of the photocatalytic activity of various photocatalysts for the degradation of a particular class of dyes has been observed and accounted for based upon three parameters: mechanism of degradation, physicochemical properties of the catalyst and adsorption behavior based on the zeta potential. It was concluded that apart from these parameters, the substrate-specificity of the catalyst is also of equal importance in developing new catalysts for the photodegradation of dyes present in textile effluents.

  19. Structural, thermal and dielectric studies of polypyrrole nanotubes synthesized by reactive self degrade template method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhyay, J.; Kumar, A., E-mail: ask@tezu.ernet.in

    2013-09-01

    Highlights: • Polypyrrole nanotubes of different diameters have been synthesized. • More nanotubes are formed at higher concentration of CTAB. • Decomposition rate of nanotubes decreases with decrease in tube diameter. • DC conductivity decreases with increasing concentration of CTAB. • Quicker relaxation of charge carriers is observed at lower concentration of CTAB. -- Abstract: In this work we investigate the structural, thermal and dielectric properties of polypyrrole nanotubes synthesized by in situ chemical oxidative polymerization method. Cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) modified Methyl Orange (MO)-FeCl{sub 3} reactive self degrade template is used to support the growth of PPy nanotubes. The diameter of the tubes decreased with increase in CTAB concentration and found to be 140–52 nm. The synthesized polypyrrole nanotubes are investigated by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), FTIR, UV–vis, conductivity measurements, TGA and impedance analysis. TGA analysis shows decrease in decomposition rate with decrease in tube diameter. The response of the charge carriers to the ac field is also carried out in the frequency range of 42 Hz–5 MHz. The shifting of peak towards higher frequency in imaginary modulus formalism with decrease in CTAB concentration suggests faster relaxation.

  20. Decolorization and degradation of xenobiotic azo dye Reactive Yellow-84A and textile effluent by Galactomyces geotrichum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindwar, Sanjay P; Kurade, Mayur B; Tamboli, Dhawal P; Kabra, Akhil N; Kim, Pil Joo; Waghmode, Tatoba R

    2014-08-01

    Galactomyces geotrichum MTCC 1360 exhibited 86% decolorization of azo dye Reactive Yellow-84A (50mgL(-1)) within 30h at 30°C and pH 7.0 under static condition. Examination of azoreductase, laccase and tyrosinase enzyme activities confirmed their prominent role in Reactive Yellow-84A degradation. Considerable reduction of COD (73%) and TOC (62%) during degradation of the dye was indicative of conversion of complex dye into simple products, which were further analyzed by HPLC, FTIR, GC-MS and HPTLC. The degradation products were identified as 4(5-hydroxy, 4-amino cyclopentane) sulfobenzene and 4(5-hydroxy cyclopentane) sulfobenzene by GC-MS. In addition, when G. geotrichum was applied to decolorize textile effluent, it showed 85% of true color removal (ADMI removal) within 72h, along with a significant reduction in TOC and COD. Phytotoxicity studies revealed the less toxic nature of degraded Reactive Yellow-84A as compared to original dye.

  1. Experimental Study on Decolorization and Degradation of Reactive Brilliant Red X—3B in a White Rot Fungal Biofilm Reacor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANGMin-sheng; HUANGRong; 等

    2001-01-01

    Experimental results of an azo dye(reactive brilliant red X-3B,RBR X-3B) decolorization and degradation in a white rot fungal biofilm reactor were introduced and discussed.The fungal biofilm reactor is highly potential for dye decolorization and degradation with the highest decoloring rate of 95% within 96 hours reaction time at initial pH 4.5 under high nirogen level (HN) (24mmol/L ammonium tartrate)condition.Experimental conditions.such as nutrient nitrogen levels in reaction mixture and initial pH,significantly affected dye decolorization and degradation.Effluents from this bioilm reactor can be well treated to meet the discharging requirements by use of chemical flocculation.RBR X-3B was first absorbed onto fungal biomass and then degraded gradually,The SH-13 fungus monopolized the biofilm throughout the experiments,though the reactor was exposed to open air for 4 months.

  2. Effect of chemical degradation on fluxes of reactive compounds – a study with a stochastic Lagrangian transport model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Rinne

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In the analyses of VOC fluxes measured above plant canopies, one usually assumes the flux above canopy to equal the exchange at the surface. Thus one assumes the chemical degradation to be much slower than the turbulent transport. We used a stochastic Lagrangian transport model in which the chemical degradation was described as first order decay in order to study the effect of the chemical degradation on above canopy fluxes of chemically reactive species. With the model we explored the sensitivity of the ratio of the above canopy flux to the surface emission on several parameters such as chemical lifetime of the compound, friction velocity, stability, and canopy density. Our results show that friction velocity and chemical lifetime affected the loss during transport the most. The canopy density had a significant effect if the chemically reactive compound was emitted from the forest floor. We used the results of the simulations together with oxidant data measured during HUMPPA-COPEC-2010 campaign at a Scots pine site to estimate the effect of the chemistry on fluxes of three typical biogenic VOCs, isoprene, α-pinene, and β-caryophyllene. Of these, the chemical degradation had a major effect on the fluxes of the most reactive species β-caryophyllene, while the fluxes of α-pinene were affected during nighttime. For these two compounds representing the mono- and sesquiterpenes groups, the effect of chemical degradation had also a significant diurnal cycle with the highest chemical loss at night. The different day and night time loss terms need to be accounted for, when measured fluxes of reactive compounds are used to reveal relations between primary emission and environmental parameters.

  3. Antagonism between lipid-derived reactive carbonyls and phenolic compounds in the Strecker degradation of amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Rosa M; Hidalgo, Francisco J; Zamora, Rosario

    2016-03-01

    The Strecker-type degradation of phenylalanine in the presence of 2-pentanal and phenolic compounds was studied to investigate possible interactions that either promote or inhibit the formation of Strecker aldehydes in food products. Phenylacetaldehyde formation was promoted by 2-pentenal and also by o- and p-diphenols, but not by m-diphenols. This is consequence of the ability of phenolic compounds to be converted into reactive carbonyls and produce the Strecker degradation of the amino acid. When 2-pentenal and phenolic compounds were simultaneously present, an antagonism among them was observed. This antagonism is suggested to be a consequence of the ability of phenolic compounds to either react with both 2-pentenal and phenylacetaldehyde, or compete with other carbonyl compounds for the amino acids, a function that is determined by their structure. All these results suggest that carbonyl-phenol reactions may be used to modulate flavor formation produced in food products by lipid-derived reactive carbonyls.

  4. Daylight-driven photocatalytic degradation of ionic dyes with negatively surface-charged In2S3 nanoflowers: dye charge-dependent roles of reactive species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Suxiang; Cai, Lejuan; Li, Dapeng; Fa, Wenjun; Zhang, Yange; Zheng, Zhi

    2015-12-01

    Even though dye degradation is a successful application of semiconductor photocatalysis, the roles of reactive species in dye degradation have not received adequate attention. In this study, we systematically investigated the degradation of two cationic dyes (rhodamine B and methylene blue) and two anionic dyes (methyl orange and orange G) over negatively surface-charged In2S3 nanoflowers synthesized at 80 °C under indoor daylight lamp irradiation. It is notable to find In2S3 nanoflowers were more stable in anionic dyes degradation compared to that in cationic dyes removal. The active species trapping experiments indicated photogenerated electrons were mainly responsible for cationic dyes degradation, but holes were more important in anionic dyes degradation. A surface-charge-dependent role of reactive species in ionic dye degradation was proposed for revealing such interesting phenomenon. This study would provide a new insight for preparing highly efficient daylight-driven photocatalyst for ionic dyes degradation.

  5. Mechanistic overview of reactive species-induced degradation of the endothelial glycocalyx during hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Golen, Rowan F; van Gulik, Thomas M; Heger, Michal

    2012-04-15

    Endothelial cells are covered by a delicate meshwork of glycoproteins known as the glycocalyx. Under normophysiological conditions the glycocalyx plays an active role in maintaining vascular homeostasis by deterring primary and secondary hemostasis and leukocyte adhesion and by regulating vascular permeability and tone. During (micro)vascular oxidative and nitrosative stress, which prevails in numerous metabolic (diabetes), vascular (atherosclerosis, hypertension), and surgical (ischemia/reperfusion injury, trauma) disease states, the glycocalyx is oxidatively and nitrosatively modified and degraded, which culminates in an exacerbation of the underlying pathology. Consequently, glycocalyx degradation due to oxidative/nitrosative stress has far-reaching clinical implications. In this review the molecular mechanisms of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species-induced destruction of the endothelial glycocalyx are addressed in the context of hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury as a model disease state. Specifically, the review focuses on (i) the mechanisms of glycocalyx degradation during hepatic ischemia/reperfusion, (ii) the molecular and cellular players involved in the degradation process, and (iii) its implications for hepatic pathophysiology. These topics are projected against a background of liver anatomy, glycocalyx function and structure, and the biology/biochemistry and the sources/targets of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. The majority of the glycocalyx-related mechanisms elucidated for hepatic ischemia/reperfusion are extrapolatable to the other aforementioned disease states.

  6. Differential Expression of Antioxidant Enzymes During Degradation of Azo Dye Reactive black 8 in Hairy roots of Physalis minima L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Pamela; Modi, Nikita; Jobby, Renitta; Desai, Neetin

    2015-01-01

    The enzymes involved in the protection of plant metabolism in presence of azo dye was characterized by studying activities of the role of antioxidant enzymes in the hairy roots (HRs) of Physalis minima L. during degradation of an azo dye, Reactive Black 8 (RB8). When the HRs were exposed to RB8 (30 mg L(-1)), a  nine fold increase in SOD activity was observed after 24 h, while 22 and 50 fold increase in activity was observed for POX and APX respectively after 72 h, whereas there was no significant change in activity of CAT. The activation of different antioxidant enzymes at different time intervals under dye stress suggests the synchronized functioning of antioxidant machinery to protect the HRs from oxidative damage. FTIR analysis confirmed the degradation of dye and the non-toxic nature of metabolites formed after dye degradation was confirmed by phytotoxicity study.

  7. Optimisation for enhanced decolourization and degradation of Reactive Red BS C.I. 111 by Pseudomonas aeruginosa NGKCTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, N T; Dave, S R

    2009-11-01

    Soil samples collected from dye contaminated sites of Vatva, Gujarat, India were studied for the screening and isolation of organisms capable of decolourizing textile dyes. The most efficient isolate, which showed decolourization zone of 48 mm on 300 ppm Reactive Red BS (C.I.111) containing plate, was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Reactive Red BS (C.I.111) was used as a model dye for the study. The isolated culture exhibited 91% decolourization of 300 ppm dye within 5.5 h over a wide pH range from 5.0 to 10.5 and temperature ranging from 30 to 40 degrees C. The culture was able to decolourize more than 91% of Reactive Red BS under static conditions in presence of either glucose, peptone or yeast extract. Addition of 300 ppm of Reactive Red BS, in each step, in ongoing dye decolourization flask, gave more than 90% decolourization within 2 h corresponding to 136 mg l(-1) h(-1) dye removal rate. The isolate had the ability to decolourize six different reactive dyes tested as well as the actual dye manufacturing industry's effluent. The degradation of the dye was confirmed by HPTLC.

  8. Degradation of methyl and ethyl mercury into inorganic mercury by other reactive oxygen species besides hydroxyl radical

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suda, Ikuo; Takahashi, Hitoshi (Kumamoto Univ. Medical School (Japan). Inst. for Medical Immunology)

    1992-01-01

    Degradation of methyl mercury (MeHg) and ethyl Hg (EtHg) with reactive oxygens was studied in vitro by using peroxidase-hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2})-halide and rose bengal-ultraviolet light A systems. For this purpose, the direct determination method for inorganic Hg was employed. Both systems could effectively degrade EtHg, and MeHg to some extent. Degradation of MeHg and EtHg with the myeloperoxidase (MPO)-H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-chloride system was inhibited by MPO inhibitors (cyanide and azide), catalase, hypochlorous acid (HOCl) scavengers (glycine, alanine, serine and taurine), 1,4-diazabicyclo(2,2,2)octane and 2,5-dimethylfuran, but not by hydroxyl radical scavengers (ethanol and mannitol). Iodide was more effective than chloride as the halide component. Lactoperoxidase (LPO) could substitute for MPO in the iodide, but not the chloride system. With MPO-H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-chloride, MPO-H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-iodide and LPO-H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-iodide systems, we observed the increased degradation of EtHg in deuterium oxide (D{sub 2}O) medium better than that in H{sub 2}O medium. The D{sub 2}O effect upon MeHg degradation was extremely weak. These results suggested that HOCl (or HOI) might be also capable of degrading MeHg and EtHg, besides the hydroxyl radical already reported by us. Singlet oxygen could degrade EtHg but not MeHg. (orig.).

  9. Evaluation of phytoremediation potential of Tagetes patula L. for the degradation of textile dye Reactive Blue 160 and assessment of the toxicity of degraded metabolites by cytogenotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Asmita V; Jadhav, Jyoti P

    2013-06-01

    Tagetes patula is an annual flowering plant belonging to family Asteraceae. The present study deals with in vitro decolorization and remediation of a textile dye Reactive Blue 160 by T. patula. There was considerable (∼90%) decolorization of the dye within 4d of incubation, as confirmed by UV-vis, HPLC and FTIR analysis. The enzymes responsible for the remediation were lignin peroxidase, tyrosinase, laccase and NADH-DCIP reductase which were found in root tissues of the plantlets. GC-MS analysis of the products revealed formation of six metabolites such as sodium benzenesulfonate, 6-chloro 1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine, disodium benzene-1,4-disulfonate, sodium 3-amino-4-hydroxybenzenesulfonate, 1-phenylmethanediamine and sodium 4-amino-3-carboxybenzenesulfonate after phytoremediation of Reactive Blue 160. Based on the FTIR and GC-MS results, the possible pathway for the biodegradation of Reactive Blue 160 has been traced. The non-toxic nature of the degraded products was confirmed by performing cytogenotoxicity tests on root tip cells of growing Allium cepa.

  10. Optimization of degradation of Reactive Black 5 (RB5) and electricity generation in solar photocatalytic fuel cell system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalik, Wan Fadhilah; Ho, Li-Ngee; Ong, Soon-An; Voon, Chun-Hong; Wong, Yee-Shian; Yusoff, NikAthirah; Lee, Sin-Li; Yusuf, Sara Yasina

    2017-10-01

    The photocatalytic fuel cell (PFC) system was developed in order to study the effect of several operating parameters in degradation of Reactive Black 5 (RB5) and its electricity generation. Light irradiation, initial dye concentration, aeration, pH and cathode electrode are the operating parameters that might give contribution in the efficiency of PFC system. The degradation of RB5 depends on the presence of light irradiation and solar light gives better performance to degrade the azo dye. The azo dye with low initial concentration decolorizes faster compared to higher initial concentration and presence of aeration in PFC system would enhance its performance. Reactive Black 5 rapidly decreased at higher pH due to the higher amount of OH generated at higher pH and Pt-loaded carbon (Pt/C) was more suitable to be used as cathode in PFC system compared to Cu foil and Fe foil. The rapid decolorization of RB5 would increase their voltage output and in addition, it would also increase their Voc, Jsc and Pmax. The breakage of azo bond and aromatic rings was confirmed through UV-Vis spectrum and COD analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Cerium dioxide as a new reactive sorbent for fast degradation of parathion methyl and some other organophosphates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pavel Janos; Lubos Vrtoch; Pavel Kuran; Martin Kormunda; Vaclav Stengl; Tomas Matys Grygar; Marek Dosek; Martin Stastny; Jakub Ederer; Vera Pilarova

    2014-01-01

    Cerium dioxide was used for the first time as reactive sorbent for the degradation of the organophosphate pesticides para-thion methyl, chlorpyrifos, dichlofenthion, fenchlorphos, and prothiofos, as well as of some chemical warfare agents-nerve gases soman and O-ethyl S-[2-(diisopropylamino) ethyl] methylphosphonothioate (VX). CeO2 specimens were prepared by calcination of basic cerous carbonate obtained by precipitation from an aqueous solution. The CeO2 samples containing certain amounts (1 wt.%-5 wt.%) of the neighboring lanthanides (La, Pr, Nd) were prepared in a similar way from pure lanthanide salts. It was shown that ceria accelerated markedly the decomposition of parathion methyl causing the cleavage of the P-O-aryl bond in the pesticide molecule. A similar reaction mechanism was proposed for the degradation of other organophosphate pesticides and nerve agents. The degradation times (reaction half-times) were in an order of minutes in the presence of CeO2, compared to hours or days under common environ-mental conditions. The reaction in suitable organic solvents allowed conversions of about 90%for parathion methyl loading of 20 mg pesticide/g CeO2 within 2 h with a reactant half-life in the order of 0.1 min. The key parameter governing the degradation efficiency of CeO2 was the temperature during calcination. At optimum calcination temperature (about 773.15 K), the produced ceria retained a sufficiently high surface area, and attained an optimum degree of crystallinity (related to a number of crystal defects, and thus poten-tial reactive sites). The presence of other lanthanides somewhat decreased the reaction rate, but this effect was not detrimental and permitted the possible use of chemically impure ceria as a reactive sorbent. A fast organophosphate degradation was demonstrated not only in non-polar solvents (such as heptane), but also in polar aprotic solvents (acetonitrile, acetone) that are miscible with water. This opens new possibilities for

  12. Roles of reactive chlorine species in trimethoprim degradation in the UV/chlorine process: Kinetics and transformation pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zihao; Fang, Jingyun; Xiang, Yingying; Shang, Chii; Li, Xuchun; Meng, Fangang; Yang, Xin

    2016-11-01

    The UV/chlorine process, which forms several reactive species including hydroxyl radicals (HO) and reactive chlorine species (RCS) to degrade contaminants, is being considered to be an advanced oxidation process. This study investigated the kinetics and mechanism of the degradation of trimethoprim (TMP) by the UV/chlorine process. The degradation of TMP was much faster by UV/chlorine compared to UV/H2O2. The degradation followed pseudo first-order kinetics, and the rate constant (k') increased linearly as the chlorine dosage increased from 20 μM to 200 μM and decreased as pH rose from 6.1 to 8.8. k' was not affected by chloride and bicarbonate but decreased by 50% in the presence of 1-mg/L NOM. The contribution of RCS, including Cl, Cl2(-) and ClO, to the degradation removal rate was much higher than that of HO and increased from 67% to 87% with increasing pH from 6.1 to 8.8 under the experimental condition. The increasing contribution of RCS to the degradation with increasing pH was attributable to the increase in the ClO concentration. Kinetic modeling and radical scavenging tests verified that ClO mainly attacked the trimethoxybenzyl moiety of TMP. RCS reacted with TMP much faster than HOCl/OCl(-) to form chlorinated products (i.e., m/z 325) and chlorinated disinfection byproducts such as chloroform, chloral hydrate, dichloroacetonitrile and trichloronitromethane. The hydroxylation and demethylation of m/z 325 driven by HO generated m/z 327 and m/z 341. Meanwhile, reactions of m/z 325 with HO and RCS/HOCl/OCl(-) generated dichlorinated and hydroxylated products (i.e., m/z 377). All the chlorinated products could be further depleted to produce products with less degree of halogenation in the UV/chlorine process, compared to dark chlorination. The acute toxicity to Vibrio fischeri by UV/chlorine was lower than chlorination at the same removal rate of TMP. This study demonstrated the importance of RCS, in particular, ClO, in the degradation of micropollutants

  13. CRITICALITY CALCULATION FOR THE MOST REACTIVE DEGRADED CONFIGURATIONS OF THE FFTF SNF CODISPOSAL WP CONTAINING AN INTACT IDENT-69 CONTAINER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.R. Moscalu

    2002-08-28

    The objective of this calculation is to perform additional degraded mode criticality evaluations of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) codisposed in a 5-Defense High-Level Waste (5-DHLW) Waste Package (WP). The scope of this calculation is limited to the most reactive degraded configurations of the codisposal WP with an almost intact Ident-69 container (breached and flooded but otherwise non-degraded) containing intact FFTF SNF pins. The configurations have been identified in a previous analysis (CRWMS M&O 1999a) and the present evaluations include additional relevant information that was left out of the original calculations. The additional information describes the exact distribution of fissile material in each container (DOE 2002a). The effects of the changes that have been included in the baseline design of the codisposal WP (CRWMS M&O 2000) are also investigated. The calculation determines the effective neutron multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) for selected degraded mode internal configurations of the codisposal waste package. These calculations will support the demonstration of the technical viability of the design solution adopted for disposing of MOX (FFTF) spent nuclear fuel in the potential repository. This calculation is subject to the Quality Assurance Requirements and Description (QARD) (DOE 2002b) per the activity evaluation under work package number P6212310M2 in the technical work plan TWP-MGR-MD-000010 REV 01 (BSC 2002).

  14. Assessing degradation rates of chlorinated ethylenes in column experiments with commercial iron materials used in permeable reactive barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Markus; Köber, Ralf; Parbs, Anika; Plagentz, Volkmar; Schäfer, Dirk; Dahmke, Andreas

    2006-03-15

    Multiple column experiments were performed using two commercial iron materials to evaluate the necessity and usefulness of preliminary investigations in permeable reactive barrier (PRB) design for chlorinated organics. Experiments were performed with contaminated groundwater and involved fresh iron granules or altered iron material excavated from PRBs. The determination of first-order rate coefficients by global nonlinear least-squares fittings indicated a variability in rate coefficients on 1 or 2 orders of magnitude. Geometric mean values of surface area normalized rate coefficients (in 10(-5) L m(-2) h(-1)) for fresh gray cast iron and iron sponge, respectively, are: tetrachloroethene (4.5, 2.6), trichloroethene (8.1, 3.3), cis-1,2-dichloroethene (3.1, 2.9), trans-1,2-dichloroethene (9.5, 5.3), 1,1-dichloroethene (4.0, 4.4), and vinyl chloride (1.6, 6.1). The increasing rate coefficients with decreasing grade of chlorination, which characterize degradation at iron sponge are linearly related to diffusion coefficients in water, suggesting diffusion limitation in the degradation process for this particular material, possibly due to a high inner surface. The variability in rate coefficients seems to be too high to use mean rate coefficients from published studies in the design procedure of PRBs, and variabilities cannot be related to groundwater characteristics, waterflow through the reactive cells, or secondary corrosion reactions.

  15. OPTIMIZATION OF OPERATIONAL PARAMETERS FOR DECOLORIZATION AND DEGRADATION OF C.I.REACTIVE BLUE 29 BY OZONE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Mesdaghinia

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Because conventional wastewater treatment of effluent containing anthraquinone dye causes notable environmental problems, it is important to find effective alternative methods for dye removal. This study evaluated the efficacy of ozonation for dye removal and Chemical Oxygen Demand reduction and identified optimal operational conditions for parameters such as pH, contact time and concentration of C.I. Reactive Blue 29 dye in a semi-batch reactor. Values of pH between 3 and 11 and contact times between 15 and 120 minutes were investigated. Dye concentrations were based on the American Dye Manufacture Institute standards and ranged from 1000 to 5000. Although results showed that Chemical Oxygen Demand removal by ozone alone was not very efficient (58%, ozonation proved to be an efficient method for decolorizing Reactive Blue 29 (96%. pH was found to significantly influence the effectiveness of Chemical Oxygen Demand removal, and optimal pH conditions (95% confidence interval were between 9 and 11. For decolorization, pH adjustment was not necessary. Degradation and decolorization of dye were found to be strongly influenced by the contact time, optimal conditions (95% confidence interval for degradation and decolorization were 60 and 30 minutes, respectively. The optimal dye concentration was 1000 American Dye Manufacture Institute.

  16. Dioxygen reactivity of meso-hydroxylated hemes: intermediates in heme degradation process catalyzed by heme oxygenase

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sankar Prasad Rath

    2006-11-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) is the only enzyme in mammals known to catalyse the physiological degradation of unwanted heme into biliverdin, Fe ion and CO. The process involves introduction of the hydroxyl group at one of its meso-positions as the first fundamental step of the heme cleavage process. It was also found that meso-amino heme undergoes similar ring-cleavage process while reacting with dioxygen in presence of pyridine as an axial ligand. The present paper briefly reviews the reactions of model meso-hydroxylated heme and its analogues with dioxygen, and their relevance in the heme degradation process.

  17. Integrated Stable Isotope - Reactive Transport Model Approach for Assessment of Chlorinated Solvent Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    in the Deep Plume. .................................................... 25 Figure 6.4. C Isotope Ratios for TCE (red circles ), cDCE (light blue...Order Integral Degradation Rate Constants for TCE ( circles ), DCE (grey bars), and CEs Mineralization (black bars...for various CEs under different biogeochemical conditions • Isotope enrichment factors (ε) Contaminant Data • Decay chain for the contaminants of

  18. Isolation and Characterization of Paracoccus sp. GSM2 Capable of Degrading Textile Azo Dye Reactive Violet 5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallikarjun C. Bheemaraddi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A potential bacterial strain GSM2, capable of degrading an azo dye Reactive Violet 5 as a sole source of carbon, was isolated from textile mill effluent from Solapur, India. The 16S rDNA sequence and phenotypic characteristics indicated an isolated organism as Paracoccus sp. GSM2. This strain exhibited complete decolorization of Reactive Violet 5 (100 mg/L within 16 h, while maximally it could decolorize 800 mg/L of dye within 38 h with 73% decolorization under static condition. For color removal, the most suitable pH and temperature were pH 6.0–9.0 and 25–40°C, respectively. The isolate was able to decolorize more than 70% of five structurally different azo dyes within 38 h. The isolate is salt tolerant as it can bring out more than 90% decolorization up to a salt concentration of 2% (w/v. UV-Visible absorption spectra before and after decolorization suggested that decolorization was due to biodegradation and was further confirmed by FT-IR spectroscopy. Overall results indicate the effectiveness of the strain GSM2 explored for the treatment of textile industry effluents containing various azo dyes. To our knowledge, this could be the first report on biodegradation of Reactive Violet 5 by Paracoccus sp. GSM2.

  19. Degradation State, Sources, and Reactivity of Dissolved Organic Matter from an Amino Acid Time Series in an Agricultural Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matiasek, S. J.; Pellerin, B. A.; Spencer, R. G.; Bergamaschi, B. A.; Hernes, P.

    2015-12-01

    A detailed time series of dissolved amino acids was obtained in an agricultural watershed in the northern Central Valley, California, USA to investigate the roles of hydrologic and seasonal changes on the composition of dissolved organic matter (DOM). Total hydrolysable amino acid (THAA) concentrations ranged from 0.55 to 9.96 μM (mean 3.76 ± 1.80 μM) and not only peaked with discharge during winter storms, but also remained elevated throughout the irrigation season when discharge was low. Summer irrigation was a critical hydrologic regime for DOM cycling, since it mobilized DOM similar in concentration and reactivity to DOM released during winter storms for an extended period of time, with the largest amino acid contributions to the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and the dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) pools (3.4 ‒ 3.7 % DOC-AA, 17.4 ‒ 22.5 % DON-AA), the largest proportion of basic amino acids (B/(B+A) = 0.19 ‒ 0.22), and the largest degradation index values (mean 1.37 ± 0.96). The mole percent of non-protein amino acids, commonly considered as an indicator of microbial degradation, decreased with DOM processing and was highest during summer (mean 4.1 ± 1.1%). A lack of correlation between THAA concentrations and UV-Vis absorbance and fluorescence proxies (including "protein-like" fluorophores B and T) indicated that optical properties may be limited in representing amino acid dynamics in this system. A new parameter for DOM processing derived from trends in individual amino acids demonstrated strong potential for inferring the extent of DOM degradation in freshwater systems. The biogeochemical relevance of irrigation practices is heightened by timing, since the additional export of reactive DOM coincides with enhanced downstream DOM processing in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, a critical habitat for endangered species serving as water source for 25 million Californians.

  20. Sonochemical Degradation of Reactive Black 5 with a Composite Catalyst of TiO2/Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Eunju; Choi, Jongbok; Lee, Yonghyeon; Park, Jeong Min; Khim, Jeehyeong

    2013-07-01

    In the sonocatalytic process, composites of TiO2-carbon were used because carbon provides more adsorption sites and acts like an electron sink to prevent the recombination of an electron/hole. Therefore, in the present study, the characteristics of a TiO2/single-walled carbon nanotubes catalyst (TiO2/SWCNTs) have been investigated, and the optimal weight ratio of SWCNTs and the dose for degradation of reactive black 5 (RB5) were also evaluated. TiO2/SWCNT composite was characterized using Brunauer-Emmett-Teller analysis, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction microanalysis and spectra, and X-ray diffraction patterns. The degradation rate constants of RB5 with the ratio of SWCNTs were found to depend on the adsorption phenomenon of a surface catalyst, light absorbance, and the recombination of electrons and holes. As a result, the optimal ratio of carbon in the sono-TiO2/SWCNTs process for degradation of RB5 was TiO2:SWCNTs= 200:1. Additionally, the optimal dose of the catalyst was 0.5 g/L.

  1. Evaluation of cellobiose dehydrogenase and laccase containing culture fluids of Termitomyces sp. OE147 for degradation of Reactive blue 21

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rishabh Gangwar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates culture filtrate, rich in cellobiose dehydrogenase and laccases, of Termitomyces sp. OE 147, in decolouration and degradation of Reactive blue (RB 21. About 35% decolouration was achieved at low volumes of the culture supernatant without addition of external redox mediators. An optimized dye to culture fluid ratio (75 ppm: 0.1 ml at a pH of 4–5 resulted in removal of colour by 60%. The degradation products of RB21 were analysed by Electron Spray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry and several small molecules (of m/z 106–199 were detected. These were concluded to be o-Xylene, 2,3-Dihydro-1H-isoindole, Isoindole-1,3-dione, 2,Benzenesulfonyl-ethanol, (4-Hydroxy-phenyl-sulfamic acid, 2,3-Dihydro-1H-isoindole-5-sulfonic acid and proposed to result from joint action of cellobiose dehydrogenase, laccase, peroxidases and unidentified oxidoreductases present in the culture fluids. Based on the products formed and the known reactions of these enzymes, a degradation pathway was proposed for RB21. The culture fluid was also effective in decolouration (by about 50% and detoxification (by ∼25% of the combined effluent collected from a local mill indicating a treatment process that bypasses use of H2O2 and toxic mediators.

  2. Immobilized/P25/DSAT and Immobilized/Kronos/DSAT on Photocatalytic Degradation of Reactive Red 4 Under Fluorescent Light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azami M. S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, photocatalytic degradation of Reactive Red 4 (RR4 using immobilized P25 and kronos were performed under fluorescent light sources. The photocatalysis activity for both catalysts was investigated under fluorescent lamp source which consist UV and Visible light. The effect of various parameters such as initial concentration, initial pH and strenght of immobilized plate were studied. The result showed that 90% of RR4 dye was degrade in 1 hr using immobilized/kronos/DSAT at 100 mg L-1 of RR4 dye while 81% degradation was achieved by immobilized/P25/DSAT at the same condition. The lowest pH showed the higher photocatalytic activity. Hence, the effect of dye concentration and pH on the photocatalysis study can be related with the behavior of environmental pollution. The low strength showed by immobilized/P25/DSAT where it remain 37 % as compared with strength of immobilized/kronos/DSAT (52 wt.%. For the future work, the polymer binder like Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA, Polyethylene glycol (PEG, and others polymers can be apply in immobilized study to overcome the strength problem.

  3. Influence of electrochemical reduction and oxidation processes on the decolourisation and degradation of C.I. Reactive Orange 4 solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Río, A I; Molina, J; Bonastre, J; Cases, F

    2009-06-01

    The electrochemical treatment of wastewaters from textile industry is a promising treatment technique for substances which are resistant to biodegradation. This paper presents the results of the electrochemical decolourisation and degradation of C.I. Reactive Orange 4 synthetic solutions (commercially known as Procion Orange MX2R). Electrolyses were carried out under galvanostatic conditions in a divided or undivided electrolytic cell. Therefore, oxidation, reduction or oxido-reduction experiences were tested. Ti/SnO(2)-Sb-Pt and stainless steel electrodes were used as anode and cathode, respectively. Degradation of the dye was followed by TOC, total nitrogen, COD and BOD(5) analyses. TOC removal after an oxidation process was higher than after oxido-reduction while COD removal after this last process was about 90%. Besides, the biodegradability of final samples after oxido-reduction process was studied and an improvement was observed. UV-Visible spectra revealed the presence of aromatic structures in solution when an electro-reduction was carried out while oxido-reduction process degraded both azo group and aromatic structures. HPLC analyses indicated the presence of a main intermediate after the reduction process with a chemical structure closely similar to 2-amine-1, 5-naphthalenedisulfonic acid. The lowest decolourisation rate corresponded to electrochemical oxidation. In these experiences a higher number of intermediates were generated as HPLC analysis demonstrated. The decolourisation process for the three electrochemical processes studied presented a pseudo-first order kinetics.

  4. Host-Derived Smooth Muscle Cells Accumulate in Cardiac Allografts: Role of Inflammation and Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein 1

    OpenAIRE

    Piotr Religa; Grudzinska, Monika K; Krzysztof Bojakowski; Joanna Soin; Jerzy Nozynski; Michal Zakliczynski; Zbigniew Gaciong; Marian Zembala; Cecilia Söderberg-Nauclér

    2009-01-01

    Transplant arteriosclerosis is characterized by inflammation and intimal thickening caused by accumulation of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) both from donor and recipient. We assessed the relationship between clinical factors and the presence of host-derived SMCs in 124 myocardial biopsies from 26 consecutive patients who received hearts from opposite-sex donors. Clinical and demographic information was obtained from the patients' medical records. Host-derived SMCs accounted for 3.35+/-2.3% of ce...

  5. [Kinetics and Reactive Species Analysis of Dimetridazole Degradation by TiO2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong-mei; Yu, Ze-bin; Sun, Lei; Huang, Jun; Gao, Li-hong; Li, Ming-jie

    2015-11-01

    Dimetridazole is considered as an emerging pollutant in waterbodies, which can potentially impact ecosystem and human health. Heterogeneous photocatalytic decomposition of dimetridazole by TiO2 was investigated under 365 nm UV light and effects of initial pH, TiO2 content and dimetridazole concentration on photocatalytic process were discussed. The results indicated that the optimized experiment condition is that the TiO2 content of 1 g x L(-1), dimetridazole concentration of 40 mg x L (-1), pH of 11, dimetridazole can be removed 90%. The photocatalytic degradation kinetics of dimetridazole could be fitted to the quasi-first-order equation. Photocatalytic degradation of dimetridazole can take place via two pathways: oxidation by *OH and reduction by e -.

  6. Reactivity of NiO for 2,4-D degradation with ozone: XPS studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Julia L; Valenzuela, Miguel A; Poznyak, Tatiana; Lartundo, Luis; Chairez, Isaac

    2013-11-15

    2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) is usually used as a refractory model compound that requires a prolonged reaction time for mineralization. In this study, we found that nickel oxide (NiO) significantly improved 2,4-D degradation and mineralization in reaction with ozone. Other metal oxides, such as titania, silica and alumina, were also tested in this reaction, so that, the mineralization degree was almost the same for all of them (ca. 25%), whereas NiO showed more than 60% in 1h. These outstanding results led us to study in more depth the role of NiO as catalyst in the degradation of 2,4-D. For instance, the optimum NiO loading amount was 0.3 g L(-1). The catalytic ozonation showed a high stability after three reaction cycles. With the aim of identifying the surface species responsible for the high activity of NiO, besides knowing the byproducts during the degradation of 2,4-D, XPS and HPLC were mainly used as analytical tools. According to the results, the mineralization of 2,4-D was directly influenced by the adsorbed chlorate organic compounds and oxalate group onto NiO. Therefore, NiO plays a true role as a catalyst forming surface compounds which are subsequently decomposed causing an increase in the mineralization efficiency. In addition, it was possible to identify several degradation byproducts (2,4-diclorophenol, glycolic, fumaric, maleic and oxalic acids) that were included in a rational reaction pathway. It was proposed that 2,4-D elimination in presence of NiO as catalyst is a combination of processes such as: conventional ozonation, indirect mechanism (OH) and surface complex formation.

  7. 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine reactivates gene expression via degradation of pRb pocket proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhixing; Li, Lian; Liu, Xiangyu; Wang, Donglai; Tu, Bo; Wang, Lina; Wang, Haiying; Zhu, Wei-Guo

    2012-01-01

    Not only does 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-CdR) induce the reexpression of silenced genes through the demethylation of CpG islands, but it increases the expression of unmethylated genes. However, the mechanism by which 5-aza-CdR activates the expression of genes is not completely understood. Here, we report that the pRb pocket proteins pRb, p107, and p130 were degraded in various cancer cell lines in response to 5-aza-CdR treatment, and this effect was dependent on the proteasome pathway. Mouse double minute 2 (MDM2) played a critical role in this 5-aza-CdR-induced degradation of pRb. Furthermore, PP2A phosphatase-induced MDM2 dephosphorylation at S260 was found to be essential for MDM2 binding to pRb in the presence of 5-aza-CdR. pRb degradation resulted in the significant reexpression of several genes, including methylated CDKN2A, RASFF1A, and unmethylated CDKN2D. Finally, knockdown of pRb pocket proteins by either RNAi or 5-aza-CdR treatment induced a significant decrease in the recruitment of SUV39H1 and an increase in the enrichment of KDM3B and KDM4A to histones around the promoter of RASFF1A and thus reduced H3K9 di- and trimethylation, by which RASFF1A expression is activated. Our data reveal a novel mechanism by which 5-aza-CdR induces the expression of both methylated and unmethylated genes by degrading pRb pocket proteins.

  8. Host-derived smooth muscle cells accumulate in cardiac allografts: role of inflammation and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Religa

    Full Text Available Transplant arteriosclerosis is characterized by inflammation and intimal thickening caused by accumulation of smooth muscle cells (SMCs both from donor and recipient. We assessed the relationship between clinical factors and the presence of host-derived SMCs in 124 myocardial biopsies from 26 consecutive patients who received hearts from opposite-sex donors. Clinical and demographic information was obtained from the patients' medical records. Host-derived SMCs accounted for 3.35+/-2.3% of cells in arterioles (range, 0.08-12.51%. As shown by linear regression analysis, an increased number of SMCs was associated with rejection grade (mean, 1.41+/-1.03, p = 0.034 and the number of leukocytes (19.1+/-12.7 per 20 high-power fields, p = 0.01. The accumulation of host-derived SMCs was associated with an increased number of leukocytes in the allografts. In vitro, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1 released from leukocytes was crucial for SMC migration. After heart allotransplantation, mice treated with MCP-1-specific antibodies had significantly fewer host-derived SMCs in the grafts than mice treated with isotypic antibody controls. We conclude that the number of host-derived SMCs in human cardiac allografts is associated with the rejection grade and that MCP-1 may play pivotal role in recruiting host-derived SMCs into cardiac allografts.

  9. Host-Derived Smooth Muscle Cells Accumulate in Cardiac Allografts: Role of Inflammation and Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojakowski, Krzysztof; Soin, Joanna; Nozynski, Jerzy; Zakliczynski, Michal; Gaciong, Zbigniew; Zembala, Marian; Söderberg-Nauclér, Cecilia

    2009-01-01

    Transplant arteriosclerosis is characterized by inflammation and intimal thickening caused by accumulation of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) both from donor and recipient. We assessed the relationship between clinical factors and the presence of host-derived SMCs in 124 myocardial biopsies from 26 consecutive patients who received hearts from opposite-sex donors. Clinical and demographic information was obtained from the patients' medical records. Host-derived SMCs accounted for 3.35±2.3% of cells in arterioles (range, 0.08–12.51%). As shown by linear regression analysis, an increased number of SMCs was associated with rejection grade (mean, 1.41±1.03, p = 0.034) and the number of leukocytes (19.1±12.7 per 20 high-power fields, p = 0.01). The accumulation of host-derived SMCs was associated with an increased number of leukocytes in the allografts. In vitro, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) released from leukocytes was crucial for SMC migration. After heart allotransplantion, mice treated with MCP-1-specific antibodies had significantly fewer host-derived SMCs in the grafts than mice treated with isotypic antibody controls. We conclude that the number of host-derived SMCs in human cardiac allografts is associated with the rejection grade and that MCP-1 may play pivotal role in recruiting host-derived SMCs into cardiac allografts. PMID:19142231

  10. Structure, surface reactivity and physico-chemical degradation of fluoride containing phospho-silicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kansal, Ishu; Goel, Ashutosh; Tulyaganov, Dilshat U.; Santos, Luis F.; Ferreira, Jose M.

    2011-03-28

    We report on the structure, apatite-forming ability and physicochemical degradation of glasses along fluorapatite [FA; Ca5(PO4)3F] - diopside (Di; CaMgSi2O6) join. A series of glasses with varying FA/Di ratio have been synthesised by melt-quenching technique. The amorphous glasses could be obtained only for compositions up to 40 wt.% of FA. The detailed structural analysis of glasses has been made by infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy and magic angle spinning-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MAS-NMR). Silicon was predominantly present as Q2 (Si) species while phosphorus was found in orthophosphate type environment in all the investigated glasses. The apatite forming ability of glasses was investigated by immersion of glass powders in simulated body fluid (SBF) for time durations varying between 1 h – 28 days. An extensive precipitation of calcite (CaCO3) after immersion in SBF was found in all the glasses which considerably masked the formation of hydroxyapatite [HA; Ca5(PO4)3OH] as depicted by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and FTIR. The possible mechanism favouring formation of calcite instead of HA has been explained on the basis of experimental results obtained for structure of glasses, leaching profile of glass powders in SBF solution and pH variation in SBF solution. Further, physico-chemical degradation of glasses has been studied in accordance with ISO 10993-14 “Biological evaluation of medical devices – Part 14: Identification and quantification of degradation products from ceramics” in Tris HCl and citric acid buffer. All the FA containing glasses exhibited a weight gain (instead of weight loss) after immersion in citric acid buffer due to the formation of different crystalline products.

  11. Lattice distortion mechanism study of TiO2 nanoparticles during photocatalysis degradation and reactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenhui; Xue, Xudong; Jiang, Xudong; Zhang, Yupeng; Wu, Yichu; Pan, Chunxu

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, the photocatalytic process of TiO2 (P25) is directly characterized by using a positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL) and UV Raman spectroscopy (Raman). The experimental results reveal that: 1) From PALS measurements, because τ1 and τ2 values and their intensity (I1 and I2) assigned to the different size and amounts of defects, respectively, their variations indicate the formation of different types and amounts of defects during the absorption and degradation. 2) HRTEM observations show that the lattice images become partly blurring when the methylene blue is fully degradated, and clear again after exposed in the air for 30 days. According to the results, we propose a mechanism that the lattice distortion induces the defects as electron capture sites and provides energy for improving photocatalytic process. Meanwhile, the lattice distortion relaxation after exposing in the air for 30 days perfectly explains the gradual deactivation of TiO2, because the smaller vacancy defects grow and agglomerate through the several photocatalytic processes. The instrumental PL and Raman are also used to analyze the samples and approved the results of PALS and HRTEM.

  12. Lattice distortion mechanism study of TiO2 nanoparticles during photocatalysis degradation and reactivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenhui Wu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the photocatalytic process of TiO2 (P25 is directly characterized by using a positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM, Photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL and UV Raman spectroscopy (Raman. The experimental results reveal that: 1 From PALS measurements, because τ1 and τ2 values and their intensity (I1 and I2 assigned to the different size and amounts of defects, respectively, their variations indicate the formation of different types and amounts of defects during the absorption and degradation. 2 HRTEM observations show that the lattice images become partly blurring when the methylene blue is fully degradated, and clear again after exposed in the air for 30 days. According to the results, we propose a mechanism that the lattice distortion induces the defects as electron capture sites and provides energy for improving photocatalytic process. Meanwhile, the lattice distortion relaxation after exposing in the air for 30 days perfectly explains the gradual deactivation of TiO2, because the smaller vacancy defects grow and agglomerate through the several photocatalytic processes. The instrumental PL and Raman are also used to analyze the samples and approved the results of PALS and HRTEM.

  13. Efficacy of the Reactive Oxygen Species Generated by Immobilized TiO2 in the Photocatalytic Degradation of Diclofenac

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Di Credico

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on the photodegradation of diclofenac (DCF by hydrothermal anatase nanocrystals either free or immobilized in porous silica matrix (TS in connection to the type and amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS, in order to have deeper insight into their role in the photocatalysis and to provide an effective tool to implement the DCF mineralization. TiO2 and TS exhibit a remarkable efficiency in the DCF abatement, supporting that the utilization of anatase nanoparticles with the highly reactive {001}, {010}, and {101} exposed surfaces can be an effective way for enhancing the photooxidation even of the persistent pollutants. Furthermore, the hydrothermal TiO2, when immobilized in silica matrix, preserves its functional properties, combining high photoactivity with an easy technical use and recovery of the catalyst. The catalysts performances have been related to the presence of OH•, O21, and O2-• species by electron paramagnetic resonance spin-trap technique. The results demonstrated that the ROS concentration increases with the increase of photoactivity and indicated a significant involvement of O21 in the DCF degradation. The efficacy of TiO2 when immobilized on a silica matrix was associated with the high ROS life time and with the presence of singlet oxygen, which contributes to the complete photomineralization of DCF.

  14. Catalytic Activity of Porous Phosphate Heterostructures-Fe towards Reactive Black 5 Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco S. Lucas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fenton’s reaction is often used to decompose stable substances in wastewater. In this study, experiments based on the effect of porous phosphate heterostructures as catalyst sorbent of Fe2+ synthesised by different procedures were planned. The examined PPH-Fe/H2O2 as oxidant in a heterogeneous process under mild conditions at pH 5 was found to be very efficient for discoloration of a simulated wastewater containing 50 mg L−1 of a commercial azo dye (Reactive Black 5 reaching 95% of decolourization. Under the described conditions total visual decolourization was achieved after 360 min. This study can provide a simple, effective, and economic system ideal for the treatment of toxic and nonbiodegradable azo dyes.

  15. Novel activated alumina-supported iron oxide-composite as a heterogeneous catalyst for photooxidative degradation of reactive black 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsueh, C.L. [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan City 701, Taiwan (China); Huang, Y.H. [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan City 701, Taiwan (China); Chen, C.Y. [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan City 701, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: ccy7@ccmail.ncku.edu.tw

    2006-02-28

    A novel activated alumina-supported iron oxide-composite (denoted as FeAA-500) was prepared by so-called fluidized-bed reactor (FBR) crystallization. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) were used to characterize the FeAA-500. The photo-catalytic activity of the FeAA-500 was evaluated in the photooxidative degradation of 0.1 mM azo-dye reactive black 5 (RB5) in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and UVA light ({lambda} = 365 nm) in a solution with a pH of 2.5. Complete decolorization of the model pollutant RB5 was achieved; the total organic carbon (TOC) removal ratio was 95%, and a trace amount of leached ferric ion was detected following 75 min of reaction when 2.0 g/L FeAA-500 was used as a catalyst. FeAA-500 has high photo-catalytic activity; it is therefore a promising heterogeneous photocatalysis of the degradation of organic compounds.

  16. Degradation of Reactive Black 5 dye using anaerobic/aerobic membrane bioreactor (MBR) and photochemical membrane reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Sheng-Jie, E-mail: sjyou@cycu.edu.tw [Department of Bioenvironmental Engineering and R and D Center for Membrane Technology, Chung Yuan Christian University, 200 Chung Pei Road, Chungli 32023, Taiwan (China); Damodar, Rahul A. [Department of Bioenvironmental Engineering and R and D Center for Membrane Technology, Chung Yuan Christian University, 200 Chung Pei Road, Chungli 32023, Taiwan (China); Hou, Sheng-Chon [Department of Civil Engineering, Chung Yuan Christian University, 200 Chung Pei Road, Chungli 32023, Taiwan (China)

    2010-05-15

    Three different types of advance treatment methods were evaluated for the degradation of Reactive Black 5 (RB5). The performance of two stage anaerobic SBR-aerobic MBR, anaerobic MBR with immobilized and suspended biocells and an integrated membrane photocatalytic reactor (MPR) using slurry UV/TiO{sub 2} system were investigated. The results suggest that, nearly 99.9% color removal and 80-95% organic COD and TOC removal can be achieved using different reactor systems. Considering the Taiwan EPA effluent standard discharge criteria for COD/TOC, the degree of treatment achieved by combining the anaerobic-aerobic system was found to be acceptable. Anew, Bacilluscereus, high color removal bacterium was isolated from Anaerobic SBR. Furthermore, when this immobilized into PVA-calcium alginate pellets, and suspended in the anaerobic MBR was able to achieve high removal efficiencies, similar to the suspended biocells system. However, the immobilized cell Anaerobic MBR was found to be more advantageous, due to lower fouling rates in the membrane unit. Results from slurry type MPR system showed that this system was capable of mineralizing RB5 dyes with faster degradation rate as compared to other systems. The reactor was also able to separate the catalyst effectively and perform efficiently without much loss of catalyst activity.

  17. Decolorization and degradation of reactive dye during the dyed cotton fabric rinsing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Deng-Hong; Zheng, Qing-Kang; Chen, Sheng; Liu, Qing-Shu; Wang, Xiu-Xing; Guan, Yu; Pu, Zong-Yao

    2010-01-01

    Dyeing process of textile consumes large quantities of water, which results in huge amounts of colored wastewater. Most of the dye wastewater treating methods focused on the treatment of wastewater after the rinsing process of dyed textile. In this paper, tetraacetylethylenediamine/hydrogen peroxide (TAED/H₂O₂) active oxidation (AO) system was developed to rinse dyed textile and decolorize the rinsing wastewater simultaneously. The results indicated that the decolorization ratio of the rinse effluent obtained by AO method were in the range of 51.72%-84.15% according to different dyes and the COD value decreased more than 30% compared with that of traditional rinsing process. The decolorization kinetics investigation showed that the decolorization of dyes during AO rinsing process followed the law of pseudo-first order kinetics. The result of UV-Vis and UPLC-MS analysis demonstrated that the dye was degraded into colorless organic molecular fragments and partly mineralized during the AO rinsing process.

  18. DECOLORIZATION AND BIOLOGICAL DEGRADATION OF AZO DYE REACTIVE RED2 BY ANAEROBIC/AEROBIC SEQUENTIAL PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Naimabadi ، H. Movahedian Attar ، A. Shahsavani

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the anaerobic treatability of reactive Red2 in an anaerobic/aerobic sequential process. Laboratory scale anaerobic baffled reactor and fixed activated sludge reactor were operated at different organic loadings and hydraulic retention times. The effects of shock dye concentration on the chemical oxygen demand and color removal efficiencies were investigated in the anaerobic baffled reactor. The effect of hydraulic retention time on the color and chemical oxygen demand removal efficiencies were also investigated in the aerobic reactor. The studies were carried out in continuous mode and the effluent of the anaerobic baffled reactor was used as feed for the fixed activated sludge reactor. Chemical oxygen demand removal efficiency of 54.5% was obtained at HRT =1 day in the anaerobic reactor. The average color removal was 89.5%. Chemical oxygen demand removal efficiency of 69% was obtained at HRT =7 h in the aerobic fixed activated sludge reactor. A slight decrease of the color was also observed in the aerobic reactor. This investigation has shown that successful treatment of a highly colored wastewater is possible in the anaerobic baffled reactor. Also the results showed that, anaerobic biological system has higher efficiency in dye removal than fixed activated sludge system, while aerobic system has higher efficiency in chemical oxygen demand removal comparing with the anaerobic baffled reactor.

  19. The role of reactive oxygen species in the degradation of lignin derived dissolved organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waggoner, Derek C.; Wozniak, Andrew S.; Cory, Rose M.; Hatcher, Patrick G.

    2017-07-01

    Evidence suggests that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important in transforming the chemical composition of the large pool of terrestrially-derived dissolved organic matter (DOM) exported from land to water annually. However, due to the challenges inherent in isolating the effects of individual ROS on DOM composition, the role of ROS in the photochemical alteration of DOM remains poorly characterized. In this work, terrestrial DOM was independently exposed to singlet oxygen (1O2), and superoxide (O2-rad under controlled laboratory conditions). Using ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry to track molecular level alterations of DOM by ROS, these findings suggest exposure to 1O2 (generated using Rose Bengal and visible light) removed formulas with an O/C > 0.3, and primarily resulted in DOM comprised of formulas with higher oxygen content, while O2-rad exposure (from KO2 in DMSO) removed formulas with O/C 1.5). Comparison of DOM altered by ROS in this study to riverine and coastal DOM showed that (20-80%) overlap in formulas, providing evidence for the role of ROS in shaping the composition of DOM exported from rivers to oceans.

  20. Synthesis of iron-doped TiO2 for degradation of reactive Orange16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Mojtaba; Talebi, Rasoul; Rostami, Mohammad Hossein; Nikazar, Manouchehr; Dadvar, Mitra

    2014-01-09

    In this study the optimum conditions for preparing the iron-doped TiO2 nanoparticles were investigated. Samples were synthesized by sol-gel impregnation method. Three effective parameters were optimized using Taguchi method, consisted of: (i) atomic ratios of Fe to Ti; (ii) sintering temperature; (iii) sintering time. The characterization of samples was determined using X-ray diffraction, BET- specific surface area, UV- Vis reflectance spectra (DRS) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The XRD patterns of the samples indicated the existence of anatase crystal phase in structure. UV- Vis reflectance spectra showed an enhancement in light absorbance in the visible region (wavelength > 400 nm) for iron-doped samples. The photocatalytic activity of samples was investigated by the degradation of RO 16 (RO 16) dye under UV irradiation. The results illustrated that the photocatalytic activity of iron-doped TiO2 was more than pure TiO2, because of the smaller crystal size, grater BET surface area and higher light absorption ability.

  1. Advanced Chemical Reduction of Reduced Graphene Oxide and Its Photocatalytic Activity in Degrading Reactive Black 5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christelle Pau Ping Wong

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Textile industries consume large volumes of water for dye processing, leading to undesirable toxic dyes in water bodies. Dyestuffs are harmful to human health and aquatic life, and such illnesses as cholera, dysentery, hepatitis A, and hinder the photosynthetic activity of aquatic plants. To overcome this environmental problem, the advanced oxidation process is a promising technique to mineralize a wide range of dyes in water systems. In this work, reduced graphene oxide (rGO was prepared via an advanced chemical reduction route, and its photocatalytic activity was tested by photodegrading Reactive Black 5 (RB5 dye in aqueous solution. rGO was synthesized by dispersing the graphite oxide into the water to form a graphene oxide (GO solution followed by the addition of hydrazine. Graphite oxide was prepared using a modified Hummers’ method by using potassium permanganate and concentrated sulphuric acid. The resulted rGO nanoparticles were characterized using ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry (UV-Vis, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD, Raman, and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM to further investigate their chemical properties. A characteristic peak of rGO-48 h (275 cm−1 was observed in the UV spectrum. Further, the appearance of a broad peak (002, centred at 2θ = 24.1°, in XRD showing that graphene oxide was reduced to rGO. Based on our results, it was found that the resulted rGO-48 h nanoparticles achieved 49% photodecolorization of RB5 under UV irradiation at pH 3 in 60 min. This was attributed to the high and efficient electron transport behaviors of rGO between aromatic regions of rGO and RB5 molecules.

  2. Enhanced photocatalytic-electrolytic degradation of Reactive Brilliant Red X-3B in the presence of water jet cavitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoning; Jia, Jinping; Wang, Yalin

    2015-03-01

    Photocatalysis, electrolysis, water jet cavitation (WJC), alone and in combinations were applied to degrade an azo dye, Reactive Brilliant Red X-3B (X-3B). Experiments were conducted in a 4.0 L aqueous solution with different initial dye concentrations, TiO₂ dose, and solution pH. WJC substantially increased the photocatalytic, electrolytic and photocatalytic-electrolytic rates of the dye removal. The observed first-order rate of X-3B decolorization in the process of combined photocatalysis and electrolysis coupled with WJC was 1.6-2.9 times of that in the process of combined photocatalysis and electrolysis coupled with mechanical stirring. The rate enhancements may be attributed primarily to the reduced diffusion layer thickness on the electrodes and the deagglomeration of photocatalyst particles due to the chemical and physical effects of WJC. Under the conditions of 80 mg/L X-3B solution, 100 mg/L TiO₂ dose and solution pH 6.3, 97% and 71% of color and chemical oxygen demand (CODCr) were removed, respectively, within 90-min photocatalytic-electrolytic treatment coupled with WJC. During this process, azo groups and naphthalene, benzene and triazine structures of the dye can be destroyed. Industrial textile effluent was also investigated, and a positive synergistic effect between photocatalytic-electrolytic system and WJC was observed considering color removal. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Synthesis of bismuth (III oxide films based anodes for electrochemical degradation of reactive blue 19 and crystal violet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Milica M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Bi2O3 films-based anodes were synthesized by electrodeposition of Bi on stainless steel substrate at constant current density and during different deposition times, fallowed by calcination, forming Bi2O3. The thickness of the films was determined by two methods: the observation under the microscope and by calculation from mass difference. Electrochemical proceses at the anodes were ivestigated by linear sweep voltammetry. At the anodes obtained within 2, 5, 10 and 15 minutes of deposition, two dyes, namely: Reactive Blue 19 and Crystal Violet, were decolorized by oxidation with •OH radical, generated from H2O2 decomposition at the anodes. Decoloration times of the anodes varied, and the shortest one was achieved with the anode obtained during 5 minutes of deposition, with the film thickness of 2.5±0.3 μm. The optimal H2O2 concentration for the dyes degradation was found to be 10 mmol dm-3. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. ТR 34008

  4. Optimisation of decolourisation and degradation of Reactive Black 5 dye under electro-Fenton process using Fe alginate gel beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias, O; Fernández de Dios, M A; Rosales, E; Pazos, M; Sanromán, M A

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this work was to improve the ability of the electro-Fenton process using Fe alginate gel beads for the remediation of wastewater contaminated with synthetic dyes and using a model diazo dye such as Reactive Black 5 (RB5). Batch experiments were conducted to study the effects of main parameters, such as voltage, pH and iron concentration. Dye decolourisation, reduction of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and energy consumption were studied. Central composite face-centred experimental design matrix and response surface methodology were applied to design the experiments and to evaluate the interactive effects of the three studied parameters. A total of 20 experimental runs were set, and the kinetic data were analysed using first-order and second-order models. In all cases, the experimental data were fitted to the empirical second-order model with a suitable degree for the maximum decolourisation of RB5, COD reduction and energy consumption by electro-Fenton-Fe alginate gel beads treatment. Working with the obtained empirical model, the optimisation of the process was carried out. The second-order polynomial regression model suggests that the optimum conditions for attaining maximum decolourisation, COD reduction and energy consumption are voltage, 5.69 V; pH 2.24 and iron concentration, 2.68 mM. Moreover, the fixation of iron on alginate beads suggests that the degradation process can be developed under this electro-Fenton process in repeated batches and in a continuous mode.

  5. Photocatalytic degradation of organic reactive dyes over MnTiO3/TiO2 heterojunction composites under UV-visible irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumar, Santhanam; Selvaraj, Ayyasamy; Ramasamy, Anaipalayam Kandasamy

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the photocatalytic degradation of organic reactive dyes have been investigated using MnTiO3/TiO2 heterojunction composites in the presence of electron acceptors under UV-Visible light irradiation. This MnTiO3/TiO2 heterojunction composites were prepared by annealing different mass ratios of pyrophanite MnTiO3 (3-11 wt%) and TiO2 at 300°C. All the MnTiO3/TiO2 heterojunction composites were characterized by spectral techniques like X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and diffused reflectance UV-visible spectroscopic analysis (DRS). Among them, 9 wt% MnTiO3/TiO2 heterojunction composites exhibited higher photocatalytic activity for the degradation of Reactive Blue 4 (RB 4). The photocatalytic efficiency of 9 wt% MnTiO3/TiO2 heterojunction composites was further enhanced by the addition of substantial amount of electron acceptors like hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and ammonium peroxydisulfate ([NH4]2S2O8). The presence of oxidants (electron acceptors) facilitates the fast degradation of dye solution even in higher concentration upto 200 mg/L. The photocatalytic activity of MnTiO3/TiO2 heterojunction composites was also studied for the degradation of other four different structured reactive dyes. The extent of mineralization of these organic reactive dyes during photocatalytic degradation was estimated from COD analysis. MnTiO3/TiO2 heterojunction composites was also found to have good photostability in the presence of oxidants.

  6. Xanthan exopolysaccharide: Acid-base reactivity related to structure and conformation. A model for understanding the reactivity of degraded and colloidal soil organic matter

    OpenAIRE

    Causse, Benjamin; HEYRAUD, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial cells and bacterial exopolysaccharides differ strongly in their respective colloidal and polymeric habits. This suggests different reactivities toward metals and protons, although recent studies point to the similarity of such substrates in terms of site density and metal complexation strength. The aim of this paper is to investigate the causes of this surprising uniqueness by studying the reactivity of a model exopolysaccharide, xanthan. NMR and molecular analysis were used to unam...

  7. Application of non-thermal plasma reactor for degradation and detoxification of high concentrations of dye Reactive Black 5 in water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dojčinović Biljana P.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Degradation and detoxification efficiency of high concentrations of commercially available reactive textile dye Reactive Black 5 solution (40, 80, 200, 500, 1000 mg L-1, were studied. Advanced oxidation processes in water falling film based dielectric barrier discharge as a non-thermal plasma reactor were used. For the first time, this reactor was used for the treatment of high concentrations of organic pollutants such as reactive textile dye Reactive Black 5 in water. Solution of the dye is treated by plasma as thin water solution film that is constantly regenerated. Basically, the reactor works as a continuous flow reactor and the electrical discharge itself takes place at the gas-liquid interphase. The dye solution was recirculated through the reactor with an applied energy density of 0-374 kJ L-1. Decolorization efficiency (% was monitored by UV-VIS spectrophotometric technique. Samples were taken after every recirculation (~ 22 kJ L-1 and decolorization percent was measured after 5 min and 24 h of plasma treatment. The efficiency of degradation (i.e. mineralization and possible degradation products were also tracked by determination of the chemical oxygen demand (COD and by ion chromatography (IC. Initial toxicity and toxicity of solutions after the treatment were studied with Artemia salina test organisms. Efficiency of decolorization decreased with the increase of the dye concentration. Complete decolorization, high mineralization and non-toxicity of the solution (<10 % were acomplished after plasma treatment using energy density of 242 kJ L-1, while the initial concentrations of Reactive Black 5 were 40 and 80 mg L-1. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172030 i br. 171034

  8. Phosphate Shifted Oxygen Reduction Pathway on Fe@Fe2O3 Core-Shell Nanowires for Enhanced Reactive Oxygen Species Generation and Aerobic 4-Chlorophenol Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Yi; Ai, Zhihui; Zhang, Lizhi

    2017-07-18

    Phosphate ions widely exist in the environment. Previous studies revealed that the adsorption of phosphate ions on nanoscale zerovalent iron would generate a passivating oxide shell to block reactive sites and thus decrease the direct pollutant reduction reactivity of zerovalent iron. Given that molecular oxygen activation process is different from direct pollutant reduction with nanoscale zerovalent iron, it is still unclear how phosphate ions will affect molecular oxygen activation and reactive oxygen species generation with nanoscale zerovalent iron. In this study, we systematically studied the effect of phosphate ions on molecular oxygen activation with Fe@Fe2O3 nanowires, a special nanoscale zerovalent iron, taking advantages of rotating ring disk electrochemical analysis. It was interesting to find that the oxygen reduction pathway on Fe@Fe2O3 nanowires was gradually shifted from a four-electron reduction pathway to a sequential one-electron reduction one, along with increasing the phosphate ions concentration from 0 to 10 mmol·L(-1). This oxygen reduction pathway change greatly enhanced the molecular oxygen activation and reactive oxygen species generation performances of Fe@Fe2O3 nanowires, and thus increased their aerobic 4-chlorophenol degradation rate by 10 times. These findings shed insight into the possible roles of widely existed phosphate ions in molecular oxygen activation and organic pollutants degradation with nanoscale zerovalent iron.

  9. Sonochemical degradation of methyl orange in the presence of Bi2WO6: Effect of operating parameters and the generated reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ling-Ling; Liu, Xian-Ping; Wang, Yong-Xia; Wang, Zhi-Xin; Yang, Yan-Jie; Gao, Yan-Ping; Liu, Bin; Wang, Xin

    2016-11-01

    The Bi2WO6 was prepared by the hydrothermal method and its sonocatalytic activity was studied in the degradation of methyl orange (MO) solutions. The effects of catalytic activity of Bi2WO6 on dye were inspected by the change in absorbance of dye with UV-vis spectrometer. The influences of operational parameters such as the addition amount of Bi2WO6, pH, the initial concentration of dyes, ultrasonic power and irradiation time on the degradation ratio were investigated. In addition, the obtained results indicated that the kinetics of sonochemical reactions of MO were consistent with the pseudo first-order kinetics and Bi2WO6 had excellent reusability and stability during the sonochemical degradation processes. The generation and kinds of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and their influence on the sonochemical degradation of MO were determined by the methods of oxidation-extraction spectrophotometry and ROS scavengers. The results indicate that the degradation of MO in the presence of Bi2WO6 under ultrasonic irradiation is related to the generation of ROS, in which both singlet molecular oxygen ((1)O2) and hydroxyl radical (OH) play important roles in the sonochemical degradation of MO. These experimental results provide a sound foundation for the further development of Bi2WO6 as a sonocatalyst in wastewater treatment.

  10. Magnetic and photocatalytic response of Ag-doped ZnFeO nano-composites for photocatalytic degradation of reactive dyes in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmood, Asif, E-mail: ahayat@ksu.edu.sa [College of Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, King Saud University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Ramay, Shahid Mahmood [College of Science, Department of Physics and Astronomy, King Saud University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Al-Zaghayer, Yousef S. [College of Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, King Saud University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Industrial Catalysts Research Chair, King Saud University, Riyadh 11421 (Saudi Arabia); Imran, Muhammad [College of Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, King Saud University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Atiq, Shahid [Centre of Excellence in Solid State Physics, University of the Punjab, New Campus, Lahore 54590 (Pakistan); Al-Johani, Meshal S. [Energy Research Institute, King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST), Riyadh 11442 (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-11-25

    Highlights: • Self-consistent sol–gel based auto-combustion route was used. • Photocatalytic degradation of reactive dyes in aqueous solution was investigated. • Due to Ag doping, band gap reduced. • Activity of Ag-doped samples was higher than that of un-doped ones. - Abstract: To investigate the photocatalytic degradation of reactive dyes in aqueous solution, pure ZnO and Fe/Ag-doped magnetic photocatalysts having nominal compositions of Zn{sub 0.95−x}Fe{sub 0.05}Ag{sub x}O (x = 0.0, 0.05 and 0.1) have been synthesized via self-consistent sol–gel based auto-combustion route. Thermally stable samples were subsequently confirmed to exhibit wurtzite type hexagonal structure, characteristic of ZnO. The nature of chemical bonding was elaborated by Fourier transform analysis. Electron microscopic techniques were employed to investigate the structural morphology and to evaluate the particle size. Ferromagnetic nature of the Fe/Ag doped samples was revealed by vibrating sample magnetometry, enabling the photocatalytic samples to be re-collected magnetically for repeated usage. The enhanced photocatalytic activity in the degradation of methylene blue under UV light irradiation with 5 and 10 wt.% Ag/ZnFeO has been observed validating the potential applications of these materials in the field of photo-degradation of organic pollutants.

  11. Glucosinolate degradation products, isothiocyanates, nitriles, and thiocyanates, induce stomatal closure accompanied by peroxidase-mediated reactive oxygen species production in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Mohammad Shakhawat; Ye, Wenxiu; Hossain, Mohammad Anowar; Okuma, Eiji; Uraji, Misugi; Nakamura, Yoshimasa; Mori, Izumi C; Murata, Yoshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    Isothiocyanates, nitriles, and thiocyanates are degradation products of glucosinolates in crucifer plants. In this study, we investigated the stomatal response to allyl isothiocyanate (AITC), 3-butenenitrile (3BN), and ethyl thiocyanate (ESCN) in Arabidopsis. AITC, 3BN, and ESCN induced stomatal closure in the wild type and the atrbohD atrbohF mutant. Stomatal closure was inhibited by catalase and salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM). The degradation products induced extracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in the rosette leaves, and intracellular ROS accumulation, NO production, and cytosolic free calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]cyt) oscillations in guard cells, which were inhibited by SHAM. These results suggest that glucosinolate degradation products induce stomatal closure accompanied by extracellular ROS production mediated by SHAM-sensitive peroxidases, intracellular ROS accumulation, and [Ca(2+)]cyt oscillation in Arabidopsis.

  12. Reactive transport modeling of chemical and isotope data to identify degradation processes of chlorinated ethenes in a diffusion-dominated media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chambon, Julie Claire Claudia; Damgaard, Ida; Jeannottat, Simon

    . Degradation and transport processes of chlorinated ethenes are not well understood in such geological settings, therefore risk assessment and remediation at these sites are particularly challenging. In this work, a combined approach of chemical and isotope analysis on core samples, and reactive transport...... modeling has been used to identify the degradation processes occurring at the core scale. The field data was from a site located at Vadsby, Denmark, where chlorinated solvents were spilled during the 1960-70’s, resulting in contamination of the clay till and the underlying sandy layer (15 meters below...... is an important finding, that is further supported by microbial and chemical data. Improved understanding of degradation processes in clay tills is useful for improving the reliability of risk assessment and the design of remediation schemes for chlorinated solvents....

  13. Generic reactive transport codes as flexible tools to integrate soil organic matter degradation models with water, transport and geochemistry in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, Diederik; Gérard, Fréderic; Mayer, Uli; Simunek, Jirka; Leterme, Bertrand

    2016-04-01

    A large number of organic matter degradation, CO2 transport and dissolved organic matter models have been developed during the last decades. However, organic matter degradation models are in many cases strictly hard-coded in terms of organic pools, degradation kinetics and dependency on environmental variables. The scientific input of the model user is typically limited to the adjustment of input parameters. In addition, the coupling with geochemical soil processes including aqueous speciation, pH-dependent sorption and colloid-facilitated transport are not incorporated in many of these models, strongly limiting the scope of their application. Furthermore, the most comprehensive organic matter degradation models are combined with simplified representations of flow and transport processes in the soil system. We illustrate the capability of generic reactive transport codes to overcome these shortcomings. The formulations of reactive transport codes include a physics-based continuum representation of flow and transport processes, while biogeochemical reactions can be described as equilibrium processes constrained by thermodynamic principles and/or kinetic reaction networks. The flexibility of these type of codes allows for straight-forward extension of reaction networks, permits the inclusion of new model components (e.g.: organic matter pools, rate equations, parameter dependency on environmental conditions) and in such a way facilitates an application-tailored implementation of organic matter degradation models and related processes. A numerical benchmark involving two reactive transport codes (HPx and MIN3P) demonstrates how the process-based simulation of transient variably saturated water flow (Richards equation), solute transport (advection-dispersion equation), heat transfer and diffusion in the gas phase can be combined with a flexible implementation of a soil organic matter degradation model. The benchmark includes the production of leachable organic matter

  14. Sonophotolytic degradation of azo dye reactive black 5 in an ultrasound/UV/ferric system and the roles of different organic ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tao; Lim, Teik-Thye; Wu, Xiaohui

    2011-04-01

    The sonophotolytic advance oxidation system (US/UV/Fe(3+)) could achieve synergistic degradation of reactive black 5 (RB5), as compared to UV/Fe(3+) and US/Fe(3+) systems. A synergy factor of 2.5 based on the pseudo-first-order degradation rate constant (k(obs)) was found, along with enhancements in organic detoxification and mineralization. The presence of organic ligands could affect the US/UV/Fe(3+) system differently. Oxalate, citrate, tartrate and succinate could enhance the RB5 degradation, while NTA and EDTA exhibited strong inhibitions. The influence of these ligands on k(obs)(RB5) in the US/UV/Fe(III)-ligand systems followed the sequence of oxalate > tartrate > succinate > citrate > without ligand > NTA > EDTA, while they could be degraded simultaneously with the k(obs)(ligand) order of oxalate > citrate > tartrate > succinate > NTA > EDTA. Monitoring of iron species and the generated H(2)O(2) and •OH revealed that the ligands in the US/UV/Fe(III)-ligand system could play different mechanistic roles: (1) promoting H(2)O(2) production, (2) accelerating Fenton reaction, and (3) competing with RB5 for reacting with •OH. Among the ligands, oxalate exhibited the most significant enhancement of RB5 oxidation in the sonophotolytic system, and the process was pH-dependent. An initial reaction lag in RB5 degradation was observed when Fe(2+) was used in lieu of Fe(3+) as the catalyst in the sonophotolytic system.

  15. Recovery of Cerium Dioxide from Spent Glass-Polishing Slurry and Its Utilization as a Reactive Sorbent for Fast Degradation of Toxic Organophosphates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Janoš

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The recovery of cerium (and possibly other rare earth elements from the spent glass-polishing slurries is rather difficult because of a high resistance of polishing-grade cerium oxide toward common digestion agents. It was shown that cerium may be extracted from the spent polishing slurries by leaching with strong mineral acids in the presence of reducing agents; the solution may be used directly for the preparation of a ceria-based reactive sorbent. A mixture of concentrated nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide was effective in the digestion of partially dewatered glass-polishing slurry. After the removal of undissolved particles, cerous carbonate was precipitated by gaseous NH3 and CO2. Cerium oxide was prepared by a thermal decomposition of the carbonate precursor in an open crucible and tested as reactive sorbent for the degradation of highly toxic organophosphate compounds. The samples annealed at the optimal temperature of approximately 400°C exhibited a good degradation efficiency toward the organophosphate pesticide fenchlorphos and the nerve agents soman and VX. The extraction/precipitation procedure recovers approximately 70% of cerium oxide from the spent polishing slurry. The presence of minor amounts of lanthanum does not disturb the degradation efficiency.

  16. Degradation of Reactive Black 5 dye by CWPO using Fe/mining sand under photo-Fenton process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amri, Nurulhuda; Nasuha, Norhaslinda; Halim, Siti Fatimah Abdul; Ngah, Khairuddin

    2015-05-01

    This present study was conducted to investigate the effectiveness of catalytic wet peroxide oxidation (CWPO) process using photo-Fenton method and the used of mining sand as support catalyst as well as to determine the optimum parameters and effect of catalyst wt%, pH, H2O2 concentration, initial dye concentration and catalyst dosage on RB 5 degradation. The Fe/mining sand was prepared by impregnation technique and a solar degradation of RB 5 carried out by mean photo-Fenton reaction promoted by solar energy. The dye degradation was monitored during the experimental runs through UV/Vis spectrophotometer. In this process, the reaction condition were optimized at 0.4 of catalyst wt%, pH 2, 4 mM of H2O2 concentration and 0.5 g of catalyst dosage which achieved degradation efficiency at 100% for the three experiments except catalyst dosage which achieved 97.54% respectively within 180 min. The degradation of RB 5 also decreased with the increasing of dye concentration with 10 mg/L achieved the optimum degradation of 99.93%. The results demonstrated that photo-Fenton method could effectively degrade RB 5 and reduce the operating cost by conducting the experiment at optimum conditions.

  17. A Single Host-Derived Glycan Impacts Key Regulatory Nodes of Symbiont Metabolism in a Coevolved Mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Min; Schwartzman, Julia A; Dunn, Anne K; Lu, Zuhong; Ruby, Edward G

    2015-07-14

    Most animal-microbe mutualistic associations are characterized by nutrient exchange between the partners. When the host provides the nutrients, it can gain the capacity to shape its microbial community, control the stability of the interaction, and promote its health and fitness. Using the bioluminescent squid-vibrio model, we demonstrate how a single host-derived glycan, chitin, regulates the metabolism of Vibrio fischeri at key points in the development and maintenance of the symbiosis. We first characterized the pathways for catabolism of chitin sugars by V. fischeri, demonstrating that the Ccr-dependent phosphoenolpyruvate-pyruvate phosphotransferase system (PTS) prioritizes transport of these sugars in V. fischeri by blocking the uptake of non-PTS carbohydrates, such as glycerol. Next, we found that PTS transport of chitin sugars into the bacterium shifted acetate homeostasis toward a net excretion of acetate and was sufficient to override an activation of the acetate switch by AinS-dependent quorum sensing. Finally, we showed that catabolism of chitin sugars decreases the rate of cell-specific oxygen consumption. Collectively, these three metabolic functions define a physiological shift that favors fermentative growth on chitin sugars and may support optimal symbiont luminescence, the functional basis of the squid-vibrio mutualism. Host-derived glycans have recently emerged as a link between symbiont nutrition and innate immune function. Unfortunately, the locations at which microbes typically access host-derived glycans are inaccessible to experimentation and imaging, and they take place in the context of diverse microbe-microbe interactions, creating a complex symbiotic ecology. Here we describe the metabolic state of a single microbial symbiont in a natural association with its coevolved host and, by doing so, infer key points at which a host-controlled tissue environment might regulate the physiological state of its symbionts. We show that the presence of

  18. INVESTIGATION OF UV/TiO2-ZnO-Co PHOTOCATALITIC DEGRADATION OF AZO DYE (REACTIVE RED 120 BY RESPONSE SURFACE METHODOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOHSEN MANSOURI

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs are the most attractive methods to degrade diferent organic pollutants. The AOPs have grown extensively because water quality control and regulations have become very strict in many countries. Optimizing the photocatalytic degradation of azo dye (Reactive Red 120 was our goal of research for applying the experimental design methodology. pH (X1, concentration of dye (X2 and TiO2-ZnO-Co nanoparticles volume (X3 in reactions were described mathematically as the function of parameters and were designed by using response surface methodology (RSM. Results were in agreement with empirical values and the sensitivity analysis showed above parameters as the most efficient variables in decolorization efficiency. Analysis of variance (ANOVA revealed highly determination coefficient value (R2 = 0.9996 and adjusted-R2 = 0.999 and satisfactory prediction second-order regression model. The desirable quantities were obtained at the pH = 7, TiO2-ZnO-Co concentration = 0.1 g·L-1, and the initial Reactive Red 120 (RR 120 concentration = 16.4 mg·L-1. Finally, kinetics reaction of degradtion RR 120 was carried in the optimum conditions.

  19. Solar photocatalytic degradation of mono azo methyl orange and diazo reactive green 19 in single and binary dye solutions: adsorbability vs photodegradation rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Soon-An; Min, Ohm-Mar; Ho, Li-Ngee; Wong, Yee-Shian

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of adsorbability and number of sulfonate group on solar photocatalytic degradation of mono azo methyl orange (MO) and diazo Reactive Green 19 (RG19) in single and binary dye solutions. The adsorption capacity of MO and RG19 onto the TiO₂ was 16.9 and 26.8 mg/g, respectively, in single dye solution, and reduced to 5.0 and 23.1 mg/g, respectively, in the binary dye solution. The data obtained for photocatalytic degradation of MO and RG19 in single and binary dye solution were well fitted with the Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic model. The pseudo-first-order rate constants of diazo RG19 were significant higher than the mono azo MO either in single or binary dye solutions. The higher number of sulfonate group in RG19 contributed to better adsorption capacity onto the surface of TiO₂ than MO indicating greater photocatalytic degradation rate.

  20. Influence of the reactive diluent on electron beam curable funtionalized N-(4-hydroxyl phenyl) maleimide derivatives – Studies on thermal degradation kinetics using model free approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitchaimari, G. [Department of Polymer Technology, Kamaraj College of Engineering and Technology, S.P.G.C. Nagar, K. Vellakulam, Tamil Nadu 625 701 (India); Sarma, K.S.S.; Varshney, Lalit [Radiation Technology Development Section, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Vijayakumar, C.T., E-mail: ctvijay22@yahoo.com [Department of Polymer Technology, Kamaraj College of Engineering and Technology, S.P.G.C. Nagar, K. Vellakulam, Tamil Nadu 625 701 (India)

    2014-12-10

    Highlights: • Materials with maleimide and NVP ratio of 80:20 show better thermal stability. • The initial degradation temperatures are high at higher NVP concentration. • The E{sub a} values for ENVP are low compared to other materials investigated. • Polymers derived from DCNX needs highest E{sub a} value. • Cyanate ester functionalized materials offers better thermal stability. - Abstract: Electron beam curing of N-(4-acryloyloxy phenyl) maleimide, N-(4-methacryloyloxy phenyl) maleimide, and N-(4-cyanato phenyl) maleimide with different concentrations (80:20, 60:40, 40:60, and 20:80) of the reactive diluent N-vinylpyrrolidone (NVP) and pure NVP were investigated. The structures of all the polymers prepared were confirmed by FTIR studies and to understand the effect of the diluent concentration on the thermal stabilities of the E-beam cured polymers detailed thermogravimetric analyses were carried out. The thermal degradation kinetics is investigated using Vyazovkin, Flynn–Wall–Ozawa and Friedman methods. Of all the liquid compositions investigated materials with functionalized maleimide to NVP concentration in the ratio of 80:20 need highest activation energies for the thermal degradation and are found to have better thermal stabilities. The composition N-(4-cyanato phenyl) maleimide (80%) and NVP (20%) cured by E-beam radiation (400 kGy) lead to thermoset which showed the highest char value (30%) at 600 °C in nitrogen atmosphere.

  1. Host-derived Loss of Dentin Matrix Stiffness Associated with Solubilization of Collagen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrilho, Marcela R.; Tay, Franklin R.; Donnelly, Adam M.; Agee, Kelli A.; Tjäderhane, Leo; Mazzoni, Annalisa; Breschi, Lorenzo; Foulger, Stephen; Pashley, David H.

    2009-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) bound to dentin matrices are activated during adhesive bonding procedures and are thought to contribute to the progressive degradation of resin-dentin bonds over time. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the changes in mechanical, biochemical and structural properties of demineralized dentin treated with or without chlorhexidine (CHX), a known MMP-inhibitor. After demineralizing dentin beams in EDTA or phosphoric acid (PA), the baseline modulus of elasticity (E) of each beam was measured by 3-point flexure. Specimens were pretreated with water (control) or with 2% CHX (experimental) and then incubated in artificial saliva (AS) at 37°C for 4 weeks. The E of each specimen was remeasured weekly and, the media was analyzed for solubilized dentin collagen at first and fourth week of incubation. Some specimens were processed for electron microscopy (TEM) immediately after demineralization and after 4 weeks of incubation. In EDTA and PA-demineralized specimens, the E of the control specimens fell (p<0.05) after incubation in AS, while there were no changes in E in the CHX-pretreated specimens over time. More collagen was solubilized from PA-demineralized controls (p<0.05) than from EDTA-demineralized matrices after 1 or 4 weeks. Less collagen (p<0.05) was solubilized from CHX-pretreated specimens demineralized in EDTA compared to PA. TEM examination of control beams revealed that prolonged demineralization of dentin in 10% PA (12 h) did not denature the collagen fibrils. PMID:19090493

  2. Host-derived loss of dentin matrix stiffness associated with solubilization of collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrilho, Marcela R; Tay, Franklin R; Donnelly, Adam M; Agee, Kelli A; Tjäderhane, Leo; Mazzoni, Annalisa; Breschi, Lorenzo; Foulger, Stephen; Pashley, David H

    2009-07-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) bound to dentin matrices are activated during adhesive bonding procedures and are thought to contribute to the progressive degradation of resin-dentin bonds over time. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the changes in mechanical, biochemical, and structural properties of demineralized dentin treated with or without chlorhexidine (CHX), a known MMP-inhibitor. After demineralizing dentin beams in EDTA or phosphoric acid (PA), the baseline modulus of elasticity (E) of each beam was measured by three-point flexure. Specimens were pretreated with water (control) or with 2% CHX (experimental) and then incubated in artificial saliva (AS) at 37 degrees C for 4 weeks. The E of each specimen was remeasured weekly and, the media was analyzed for solubilized dentin collagen at first and fourth week of incubation. Some specimens were processed for electron microscopy (TEM) immediately after demineralization and after 4 weeks of incubation. In EDTA and PA-demineralized specimens, the E of the control specimens fell (p < 0.05) after incubation in AS, whereas there were no changes in E of the CHX-pretreated specimens over time. More collagen was solubilized from PA-demineralized controls (p < 0.05) than from EDTA-demineralized matrices after 1 or 4 weeks. Less collagen (p < 0.05) was solubilized from CHX-pretreated specimens demineralized in EDTA compared with PA. TEM examination of control beams revealed that prolonged demineralization of dentin in 10% PA (12 h) did not denature the collagen fibrils.

  3. 水溶液中活性染料的紫外光降解脱色%Degradation of reactive dyes by UV-light in aqueous solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    章燕琴; 许红梅; 祝贺; 石鑫; 王小雪; 龙家杰

    2012-01-01

    Taking a low-pressure mercury violet lamp as light source, the photodegradation characteristics and parameters of reactive dyes in oxygenated aqueous solution without any photocatalyst and promoters is discussed. The degradation of reactive dyes with different molecular structures is investigated. The results show that the pH value, dye concentration and parent structure, and the light radiation time has significantly effect on decolorization rate of Reactive Yellow X-R. The decolorization rate decreases with the increase of pH value and concentration (50 ~ 120 mg/L), and the acidic medium is more helpful. High decoloration rate is observed in initial degradation stage, and the efficiency of color degradation increases with time. The decolorization rate is fast at the beginning, and getting higher with reaction time. The azo reactive dyes with aromatic group and het-erocyclic rings in the parent structure degrade readily by UV-light, but their decolorization rate decreases significantly after the introduction of coordination metal ion Cu( Ⅱ) into the parent structure. The more complex and more substitutes the diazo component and/or coupling component has, the lower the decolorization rate is, but the reactive groups have little effect on the decolorization rate.%以低压紫外汞灯为光源,在无光催化剂及促进剂条件下,探讨紫外光对通氧水溶液中活性染料的光降解脱色特性和主要影响因素,以及不同结构类型活性染料的紫外光脱色降解性能.结果表明,溶液pH值、染料浓度、光照时间及母体结构类型对活性黄X-R染料溶液的脱色率有较大影响;染料的光降解脱色率随溶液pH值增大而降低,酸性条件有助于染料母体结构的降解消色;活性黄X-R染料的光降解脱色率随其质量浓度增加(50 mg/L增大到120 mg/L),呈线性降低;染料的光降解脱色速率在起始阶段较快,并随一定范围内处理时间的延长,其脱色率增大;染料结

  4. Reactive calcium-phosphate-containing poly(ester-co-ether) methacrylate bone adhesives: setting, degradation and drug release considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin; Olsen, Irwin; Pratten, Jonathan; Knowles, Jonathan C; Young, Anne M

    2011-09-01

    This study has investigated novel bone adhesives consisting of fluid photo-polymerizable poly(lactide-co-propylene glycol-co-lactide)dimethacrylate (PGLA-DMA) mixed with systematically varying fillers of β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) and monocalcium phosphate monohydrate (MCPM), for the delivery of an antibacterial drug chlorhexidine (CHX). All formulations were found to polymerize fully within 200 s after exposure to blue light. In addition, water sorption by the polymerized materials catalyzed varying filler conversion to dicalcium phosphate (DCP) (i.e. brushite and monetite). With greater DCP levels, faster degradation was observed. Moreover, increase in total filler content enhanced CHX release, associated with higher antibacterial activity. These findings thus suggest that such rapid-setting and degradable adhesives with controllable drug delivery property could have potential clinical value as bone adhesives with antibacterial activity.

  5. Comprehensive Reactive Receiver Modeling for Diffusive Molecular Communication Systems: Reversible Binding, Molecule Degradation, and Finite Number of Receptors

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmadzadeh, Arman; Burkovski, Andreas; Schober, Robert

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies the problem of receiver modeling in molecular communication systems. We consider the diffusive molecular communication channel between a transmitter nano-machine and a receiver nano-machine in a fluid environment. The information molecules released by the transmitter nano-machine into the environment can degrade in the channel via a first-order degradation reaction and those that reach the receiver nano-machine can participate in a reversible bimolecular reaction with receiver receptor proteins. Thereby, we distinguish between two scenarios. In the first scenario, we assume that the entire surface of the receiver is covered by receptor molecules. We derive a closed-form analytical expression for the expected received signal at the receiver, i.e., the expected number of activated receptors on the surface of the receiver. Then, in the second scenario, we consider the case where the number of receptor molecules is finite and the uniformly distributed receptor molecules cover the receiver surfa...

  6. Strength degradation mechanisms in h-BN/NiAl coated sapphire fibres with a reactive Hf or Y interlayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajas, D.E. [Materials Chemistry, RWTH-Aachen University, Kopernikusstr. 16, 52074 Aachen (Germany)], E-mail: hajas@mch.rwth-aachen.de; Kyrsta, S. [Materials Chemistry, RWTH-Aachen University, Kopernikusstr. 16, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Richter, S.; Mayer, J. [Central Facility of Electron Microscopy, RWTH-Aachen University, Ahornstrasse 55, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Schneider, J.M. [Materials Chemistry, RWTH-Aachen University, Kopernikusstr. 16, 52074 Aachen (Germany)

    2008-09-15

    NiAl strengthened with ceramic fibres is considered as a load-bearing component in the combustion zone turbine blades. Sapphire fibres coated with hexagonal-boron nitride (h-BN) and Y (or Hf) interlayers and NiAl were investigated to strengthen the fibre matrix interface by compound formation with the transition metals introduced. Our goal is to identify strength degradation relevant mechanisms active during composite formation and application. Therefore, the tensile strength of coated fibres before and after annealing was measured to simulate the effect of composite fabrication. Strength degradation mechanisms were identified by electron microscopy. Chemical reactions between Y or Hf and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, as well as surface diffusion of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} into irregularities in the adjacent coating, alter the surface morphology and may act as crack initiation sites. Based on these results, future strategies for avoiding or minimizing strength degradation during production of intermetallic matrix composites (IMCs) can be compiled.

  7. Energy Taxis toward Host-Derived Nitrate Supports a Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1-Independent Mechanism of Invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Chávez, Fabian; Lopez, Christopher A; Zhang, Lillian F; García-Pastor, Lucía; Chávez-Arroyo, Alfredo; Lokken, Kristen L; Tsolis, Renée M; Winter, Sebastian E; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2016-07-19

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium can cross the epithelial barrier using either the invasion-associated type III secretion system (T3SS-1) or a T3SS-1-independent mechanism that remains poorly characterized. Here we show that flagellum-mediated motility supported a T3SS-1-independent pathway for entering ileal Peyer's patches in the mouse model. Flagellum-dependent invasion of Peyer's patches required energy taxis toward nitrate, which was mediated by the methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein (MCP) Tsr. Generation of nitrate in the intestinal lumen required inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), which was synthesized constitutively in the mucosa of the terminal ileum but not in the jejunum, duodenum, or cecum. Tsr-mediated invasion of ileal Peyer's patches was abrogated in mice deficient for Nos2, the gene encoding iNOS. We conclude that Tsr-mediated energy taxis enables S Typhimurium to migrate toward the intestinal epithelium by sensing host-derived nitrate, thereby contributing to invasion of Peyer's patches. Nontyphoidal Salmonella serovars, such as S. enterica serovar Typhimurium, are a common cause of gastroenteritis in immunocompetent individuals but can also cause bacteremia in immunocompromised individuals. While the invasion-associated type III secretion system (T3SS-1) is important for entry, S Typhimurium strains lacking a functional T3SS-1 can still cross the intestinal epithelium and cause a disseminated lethal infection in mice. Here we observed that flagellum-mediated motility and chemotaxis contributed to a T3SS-1-independent pathway for invasion and systemic dissemination to the spleen. This pathway required the methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein (MCP) Tsr and energy taxis toward host-derived nitrate, which we found to be generated by inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in the ileal mucosa prior to infection. Collectively, our data suggest that S Typhimurium enhances invasion by actively migrating toward the intestinal epithelium

  8. Chemical, modulus and cell attachment studies of reactive calcium phosphate filler-containing fast photo-curing, surface-degrading, polymeric bone adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Neel, E A; Palmer, G; Knowles, J C; Salih, V; Young, A M

    2010-07-01

    The initial structure, setting and degradation processes of a poly(lactide-co-propylene glycol-co-lactide) dimethacrylate adhesive filled with 50, 60 or 70 wt.% reactive calcium phosphates (monocalcium phosphate monohydrate (MCPM)/beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP)) have been assessed using nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman, X-ray powder diffraction and gravimetric studies. Filler incorporation reduced the rapid light-activated monomer polymerization rates slightly, but not the final levels. Upon immersion in water for 24h, the set composite mass and volume increased due to water sorption. This promoted initial soluble MCPM loss from the composite surfaces, but also its reaction and monetite precipitation within the specimen bulk. After 48 h, composite gravimetric and chemical studies were consistent with surface erosion of polymer with reacted/remaining filler. The filled formulations exhibited more rapid early water sorption and subsequent surface erosion than the unfilled polymer. Calcium and phosphate release profiles and solution pH measurements confirmed early loss of surface MCPM with protons from polymer degradation products. At later times, the slower release of monetite/beta-TCP buffered composite storage solutions at approximately 5 instead of 3.2 for the unfilled polymer. Incorporation of filler increased both the early and later time material modulus. At intermediate times this effect was lost, presumably as a result of enhanced water sorption. The early modulus values obtained fell within the range reported for cancellous bone. Despite surface degradation, initial human mesenchymal cell attachment to both composites and polymer could be comparable with a non-degrading positive Thermanox control. These studies indicate that the filled formulations may be good candidates for bone repair. Release of calcium and phosphate ions provides components essential for such repair.

  9. Host-derived probiotics Enterococcus casseliflavus improves resistance against Streptococcus iniae infection in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) via immunomodulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Safari, Reza; Adel, Milad; Lazado, Carlo Cabacang

    2016-01-01

    The present study evaluated the benefits of dietary administration of host-derived candidate probiotics Enterococcus casseliflavus in juvenile rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. Experimental diets were prepared by incorporating the microorganisms in the basal feed at 3 inclusion levels (i.e. 107...... CFU g-1 of feed [T1], 108 CFU g-1 of feed [T2], 109 CFU g-1 of feed [T3]). The probiotic feeds were administered for 8 weeks, with a group fed with the basal diet serving as control. The effects on growth performance, gut health, innate immunity and disease resistance were evaluated.Results showed...... that growth performance parameters were significantly improved in T2 and T3 groups. Activities of digestive enzymes such as trypsin and lipase were significantly higher in these two groups as well. Gut micro-ecology was influenced by probiotic feeding as shown by the significant increase in intestinal lactic...

  10. Daylight-driven photocatalytic degradation of ionic dyes with negatively surface-charged In{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanoflowers: dye charge-dependent roles of reactive species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge, Suxiang [Xuchang University, Key Laboratory of Micro-Nano Materials for Energy Storage and Conversion of Henan Province, Institute of Surface Micro and Nano Materials, and School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering (China); Cai, Lejuan, E-mail: 494169965@qq.com [Central China Normal University, Key Laboratory of Pesticide and Chemical Biology of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry (China); Li, Dapeng, E-mail: lidapengabc@126.com; Fa, Wenjun; Zhang, Yange; Zheng, Zhi [Xuchang University, Key Laboratory of Micro-Nano Materials for Energy Storage and Conversion of Henan Province, Institute of Surface Micro and Nano Materials, and School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering (China)

    2015-12-15

    Even though dye degradation is a successful application of semiconductor photocatalysis, the roles of reactive species in dye degradation have not received adequate attention. In this study, we systematically investigated the degradation of two cationic dyes (rhodamine B and methylene blue) and two anionic dyes (methyl orange and orange G) over negatively surface-charged In{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanoflowers synthesized at 80 °C under indoor daylight lamp irradiation. It is notable to find In{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanoflowers were more stable in anionic dyes degradation compared to that in cationic dyes removal. The active species trapping experiments indicated photogenerated electrons were mainly responsible for cationic dyes degradation, but holes were more important in anionic dyes degradation. A surface-charge-dependent role of reactive species in ionic dye degradation was proposed for revealing such interesting phenomenon. This study would provide a new insight for preparing highly efficient daylight-driven photocatalyst for ionic dyes degradation.

  11. Highly photocatalytic activity of novel Fe-MIL-88B/GO nanocomposite in the degradation of reactive dye from aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Tuan A.; Le, Giang H.; Vu, Hoa T.; Nguyen, Kien T.; Quan, Trang T. T.; Nguyen, Quang K.; Tran, Hoa T. K.; Dang, Phuong T.; Vu, Loi D.; Lee, Gun D.

    2017-03-01

    An Fe-MIL-88B/graphene oxide (GO) composite was successfully synthesized by the hydrofluoric acid (HF) free-solvothermal method. The sample was characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), N2 adsorption-desorption Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) method, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). BET shows that Fe-MIL-88B/GO is of a mesoporous structure, while XRD and XPS results reveal that besides the Fe-MIL-88B phase, a new α-FeOOH phase in the novel Fe-MIL-88B/GO composite is formed. The as-prepared Fe-MIL-88B/GO nanocomposite was used to test the photocatalytic degradation of reactive dye (reactive red-RR195) from aqueous solution. This novel metal-organic framework (MOF)/GO composite exhibited excellent photocatalytic activity. Thus, after 25 min of reaction under simulated sunlight irradiation, removal efficiency reached 98%. Moreover, this composite still maintained high photocatalytic activity after three cycles of reaction runs, indicating its high stability and reusability. This opens a new application potential for MOF/GO as a highly efficient photo-Fenton catalyst.

  12. Highly organic natural media as permeable reactive barriers: TCE partitioning and anaerobic degradation profile in eucalyptus mulch and compost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, Zuhal; Tansel, Berrin; Katsenovich, Yelena; Sukop, Michael; Laha, Shonali

    2012-10-01

    Batch and column experiments were conducted with eucalyptus mulch and commercial compost to evaluate suitability of highly organic natural media to support anaerobic decomposition of trichloroethylene (TCE) in groundwater. Experimental data for TCE and its dechlorination byproducts were analyzed with Hydrus-1D model to estimate the partitioning and kinetic parameters for the sequential dechlorination reactions during TCE decomposition. The highly organic natural media allowed development of a bioactive zone capable of decomposing TCE under anaerobic conditions. The first order TCE biodecomposition reaction rates were 0.23 and 1.2d(-1) in eucalyptus mulch and compost media, respectively. The retardation factors in the eucalyptus mulch and compost columns for TCE were 35 and 301, respectively. The results showed that natural organic soil amendments can effectively support the anaerobic bioactive zone for remediation of TCE contaminated groundwater. The natural organic media are effective environmentally sustainable materials for use in permeable reactive barriers.

  13. Inhibition of dentin collagen degradation by hesperidin: an in situ study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Strijp, A.J.P.; Takatsuka, T.; Sono, R.; Iijima, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Dentine caries is a process of demineralization and subsequent degradation of the collagenous matrix. Host-derived proteolytic enzymes, such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), play a role in this process of dentine collagen degradation. Hampering this degradation retards the caries process. Dietar

  14. Decolorization of azo dye C.I. Reactive Black 5 by ozonation in aqueous solution: influencing factors, degradation products, reaction pathway and toxicity assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qing; Dai, Yong; Han, Xiangyun

    2016-01-01

    In this study, ozonation treatment of C.I. Reactive Black 5 (RB5) was investigated at various operating parameters. The results showed that the aqueous solution initially containing 200 mg/L RB5 was quickly decolorized at pH 8.0 with an ozone dose of 3.2 g/h. Reaction intermediates with m/z 281, 546, 201, 350, 286 and 222 were elucidated using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, while sulfate ion, nitrate ion and three carboxylic acids (i.e., oxalic acid, formic acid, and acetic acid) were identified by ion exchange chromatography. Thus, the cleavage of the azo bond and the introduction of OH groups in the corresponding positions were proposed as the predominant reaction pathway. The detachment of sulfonic groups was also commonly observed during the ozonation treatment. The proposed degradation mechanism was confirmed by frontier electron density calculations, suggesting the feasibility of predicting the major events in the whole ozonation process with the computational method. Compared with RB5 degradation, the reduction of total organic carbon (TOC) proceeded much more slowly, and approximately 54% TOC was removed after 4 h of ozonation. Acute toxicity tests with Photobacterium phosphoreum showed that the toxicity of reaction solution was firstly increased and then decreased to a negligible level after 160 min.

  15. Biosynthesis of titanium dioxide nanoparticles using Bacillus amyloliquefaciens culture and enhancement of its photocatalytic activity for the degradation of a sulfonated textile dye Reactive Red 31.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Razia; Fulekar, M H

    2016-08-01

    The present study aims at exploiting Bacillus amyloliquefaciens for the biosynthesis of titanium dioxide nanoparticles and also investigates role of bacterial enzymes in the biosynthesis of titanium dioxide nanoparticles. Bacterial synthesized as well as metal doped titanium dioxide nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffractometer (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDAX). Amylase activity (43.37IU) in culture supernatant evinced a potential involvement of extracellular enzyme in TiO2 nanoparticle biosynthesis. Crystallite size of bio-synthesized nanoparticles was found to be in the range of 15.23-87.6nm. FTIR spectroscopy and native-PAGE (Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis) clearly indicated involvement of alpha amylase in biosynthesis of TiO2 nanoparticles and in their stabilization. TEM micrographs of the synthesized titanium dioxide nanoparticles revealed the formation of spherical nanoparticles with a size range of 22.11-97.28nm. Photocatalytic degradation of Reactive Red 31 (RR31) dye was carried out using bio-synthesized TiO2 nanoparticles under UV radiation. Photocatalytic activity of synthesized nanoparticles was enhanced by Ag, La, Zn and Pt doping. Platinum doped TiO2 showed highest potential (90.98%) in RR31 degradation as compared to undoped (75.83%).

  16. A highly efficient immobilized ZnO/Zn photoanode for degradation of azo dye Reactive Green 19 in a photocatalytic fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sin-Li; Ho, Li-Ngee; Ong, Soon-An; Wong, Yee-Shian; Voon, Chun-Hong; Khalik, Wan Fadhilah; Yusoff, Nik Athirah; Nordin, Noradiba

    2017-01-01

    Photocatalytic fuel cell (PFC) is a potential wastewater treatment technology that can generate electricity from the conversion of chemical energy of organic pollutants. An immobilized ZnO/Zn fabricated by sonication and heat attachment method was applied as the photoanode and Pt/C plate was used as the cathode of the PFC in this study. Factors that affect the decolorization efficiency and electricity generation of the PFC such as different initial dye concentrations and pH were investigated. Results revealed that the degradation of Reactive Green 19 (RG19) was enhanced in a closed circuit PFC compared with that of a opened circuit PFC. Almost 100% decolorization could be achieved in 8 h when 250 mL of 30 mg L(-1) of RG19 was treated in a PFC without any supporting electrolyte. The highest short circuit current of 0.0427 mA cm(-2) and maximum power density of 0.0102 mW cm(-2) was obtained by PFC using 30 mg L(-1) of RG19. The correlation between dye degradation, conductivity and voltage output were also investigated and discussed.

  17. Toxaphene, but not beryllium, induces human neutrophil chemotaxis and apoptosis via reactive oxygen species (ROS): involvement of caspases and ROS in the degradation of cytoskeletal proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavastre, Valérie; Roberge, Charles J; Pelletier, Martin; Gauthier, Marc; Girard, Denis

    2002-07-01

    Chemicals of environmental concern are known to alter the immune system. Recent data indicate that some contaminants possess proinflammatory properties by activating neutrophils, an area of research that is still poorly investigated. We have previously documented that toxaphene activates human neutrophils to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) and accelerates apoptosis by a yet unknown mechanism. In this study, we found that toxaphene induces another neutrophil function, chemotaxis. Furthermore, we found that toxaphene induces both chemotaxis and apoptosis via a ROS-dependent mechanism, since these responses were blocked by the addition of catalase to the culture. In addition, toxaphene was found to induce the degradation of the cytoskeletal proteins gelsolin, paxillin, and vimentin during apoptosis, and this was reversed by the addition of z-VAD-FMK (caspase inhibitor) or catalase, demonstrating the importance of caspases and ROS in this process. In contrast to toxaphene, we found that beryllium does not induce superoxide production, and, this correlates with its inability to induce chemotaxis and apoptosis. We conclude that toxaphene induces chemotaxis and apoptosis via ROS and that caspases and ROS are involved in the degradation of cytoskeletal proteins.

  18. Degradation of a textile reactive azo dye by a combined biological-photocatalytic process: Candida tropicalis Jks2 -Tio2/Uv

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narjes Jafari

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the decolorization and degradation of Reactive Black 5 (RB5 azo dye was investigated by biological, photocatalytic (UV/TiO2 and combined processes.Application of Candida tropicalis JKS2 in treatment of the synthetic medium containing RB5 indicated complete decolorization of the dye with 200 mg/L in less than 24 h. Degradation ofthe aromatic rings, resulting from the destruction of the dye, did not occur during the biological treatment. Mineralization of 50 mg/L RB5 solution was obtained after 80 min by photocatalytic process (in presence of 0.2 g/L TiO2. COD (chemical oxygen demand wasnot detectable after complete decolorization of 50 mg/L RB5 solution. However,photocatalytic process was not effective in the removal of the dye at high concentrations (≥200 mg/L. With 200 mg/L concentration, 74.9% of decolorization was achieved after 4 hillumination under photocatalytic process and the absorbance peak in UV region (attributed to aromatic rings was not completely removed. A two-step treatment process, namely,biological treatment by yeast followed by photocatalytic degradation, was also assessed. In the combined process (with 200 mg/L RB5, absorbance peak in UV region significantly disappeared after 2 h illumination and about 60 % COD removal was achieved in the biological step. It is suggested that the combined process is more effective than the biological and photocatalytic treatments in the remediation of aromatic rings.

  19. Degradation of a textile reactive azo dye by a combined biological-photocatalytic process: Candida tropicalis Jks2 -Tio2/Uv

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafari Narjes

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the present study, the decolorization and degradation of Reactive Black 5 (RB5 azo dye was investigated by biological, photocatalytic (UV/TiO2 and combined processes. Application of Candida tropicalis JKS2 in treatment of the synthetic medium containing RB5 indicated complete decolorization of the dye with 200 mg/L in less than 24 h. Degradation of the aromatic rings, resulting from the destruction of the dye, did not occur during the biological treatment. Mineralization of 50 mg/L RB5 solution was obtained after 80 min by photocatalytic process (in presence of 0.2 g/L TiO2. COD (chemical oxygen demand was not detectable after complete decolorization of 50 mg/L RB5 solution. However, photocatalytic process was not effective in the removal of the dye at high concentrations (≥200 mg/L. With 200 mg/L concentration, 74.9% of decolorization was achieved after 4 h illumination under photocatalytic process and the absorbance peak in UV region (attributed to aromatic rings was not completely removed. A two-step treatment process, namely, biological treatment by yeast followed by photocatalytic degradation, was also assessed. In the combined process (with 200 mg/L RB5, absorbance peak in UV region significantly disappeared after 2 h illumination and about 60% COD removal was achieved in the biological step. It is suggested that the combined process is more effective than the biological and photocatalytic treatments in the remediation of aromatic rings.

  20. Acetaminophen analog N-acetyl-m-aminophenol, but not its reactive metabolite, N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine induces CYP3A activity via inhibition of protein degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoh, Masataka; Sanoh, Seigo; Ohtsuki, Yuya; Ejiri, Yoko; Kotake, Yaichiro; Ohta, Shigeru

    2017-05-06

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A subfamily members are known to metabolize various types of drugs, highlighting the importance of understanding drug-drug interactions (DDI) depending on CYP3A induction or inhibition. While transcriptional regulation of CYP3A members is widely understood, post-translational regulation needs to be elucidated. We previously reported that acetaminophen (APAP) induces CYP3A activity via inhibition of protein degradation and proposed a novel DDI concept. N-Acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI), the reactive metabolite of APAP formed by CYP, is known to cause adverse events related to depletion of intracellular reduced glutathione (GSH). We aimed to inspect whether NAPQI rather than APAP itself could cause the inhibitory effects on protein degradation. We found that N-acetyl-l-cysteine, the precursor of GSH, and 1-aminobenzotriazole, a nonselective CYP inhibitor, had no effect on CYP3A1/23 protein levels affected by APAP. Thus, we used APAP analogs to test CYP3A1/23 mRNA levels, protein levels, and CYP3A activity. We found N-acetyl-m-aminophenol (AMAP), a regioisomer of APAP, has the same inhibitory effects of CYP3A1/23 protein degradation, while p-acetamidobenzoic acid (PAcBA), a carboxy-substituted form of APAP, shows no inhibitory effects. AMAP and PAcBA cannot be oxidized to quinone imine forms such as NAPQI, so the inhibitory effects could depend on the specific chemical structure of APAP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Electrochemical degradation of reactive brilliant red X-3B with the (CeO2/C)-β-PbO2-PTFE composite electrode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙鹏哲; 陈东辉

    2016-01-01

    The (CeO2/C)-β-PbO2-PTFE composite electrodes modified by graphite powder, cerium oxide powder, polytetrafluoro-ethylene (PTFE) and the homemadeβ-PbO2 powder were prepared by the high pressure molding technique. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to test the purity of the homemadeβ-PbO2 powder. The surface structure and electrical property of electrodes were characterized by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the cyclic voltammetry curves (CV). Those images indicated that in electrolysis the (CeO2/C)-β-PbO2-PTFE composite electrodes had higher activity than theβ-PbO2-PTFE electrodes, as good as the excellent catalytic performance. In the electrode system the composite electrodes were applied to treat reactive brilliant red (RBR) X-3B solution and we studied the degradation influence factors and the reaction mechanism. The results showed that the electrode system was well in treating RBR X-3B solution with the 20%(CeO2/C)-β-PbO2-PTFE composite electrodes at the initial 100 mg/L RBR X-3B concentration, Na2SO4concentration of 0.35 mol/L, the constant current density of 30 mA/cm2 and electrolyte pH=2. Af-ter electrolytic time of 90 min, the maximum decolorization and chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal rates reached 88.92% and 54.54%. And the decolorization rate of RBR X-3B was in conformity with pseudo-first-order kinetics equation. The RBR X-3B deg-radation mechanism in the electrochemical oxidation system was used with LC-MS to analyze the possible intermediates and degra-dation pathway.

  2. Photocatalytic Study of New Immobilized TiO2 Technique Towards Degradation of Reactive Red 4 Dye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ain S. K.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The study on TiO2 for wastewater remediation has gained interest among researchers. However, the application of this photocatalyst is limited due to non-recyclability of conventional TiO2. Thus, immobilization technique has been developed to solve this issue. Hence, a comparison study between two types of immobilized photocatalysts namely titanium dioxide (TiO2 and TiO2 mixed with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA has been conducted in this work to observe the significant effect of PVA polymer in photocatalysis reaction of reactive red 4 (RR4 dye. Double sided adhesive tape (DSAT was used as thin layer binder in this immobilization system. The result shows that the photocatalytic performance of TiO2-PVA/DSAT was higher than that of TiO2/DSAT under both normal UV and visible light irradiations due to the conjugated unsaturated polymer from PVA serve as electron donor for TiO2 thus increase the photocatalysis process. Besides, TiO2-PVA/DSAT was also found to possess much better adhesion strength to the support material compared to TiO2/DSAT. Based on the findings, this TiO2 immobilization system is expected to be beneficial in the industrial wastewater treatment. Thus, further study to improve the photocatalytic activity of this immobilized TiO2 will be in our future work.

  3. Nanostructured AgBr loaded TiO2: An efficient sunlight active photocatalyst for degradation of Reactive Red 120

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreedhar Bojja

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The AgBr loaded TiO2 catalyst was prepared by a feasible approach with AgBr and tetraisopropyl orthotitanate and characterized by BET surface area measurement, diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS, scanning electron microscope (SEM, energy dispersive spectra (EDS, X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscope (TEM and atomic force microscope (AFM analysis. The results of characterization reveal that AgBr loaded TiO2 has a nanostructure. Formation of the nanostructure in AgBr loaded TiO2 results in substantial shifting of the absorption edge of TiO2 to red and enhancement of visible light absorption. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements reveal that AgBr loaded TiO2 has a higher photoconductivity than prepared TiO2 due to higher separation efficiency of electron-hole pairs. Cyclic voltammetric studies reveal enhanced conductivity in AgBr loaded TiO2, which causes an increase in its photocatalytic activity. AgBr loaded TiO2 exhibited a higher photocatalytic activity than TiO2-P25 and prepared TiO2 in the photodegradation of Reactive Red 120 (RR 120.

  4. Degradação de corantes reativos pelo sistema ferro metálico/peróxido de hidrogênio Degradation of reactive dyes by the metallic iron/ hydrogen peroxide system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio Roberto Lima de Souza

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work the degradation of aqueous solutions of reactive azo-dyes is reported using a combined reductive/advanced oxidative process based in the H2O2/zero-valent iron system. At optimized experimental conditions (pH 7, H2O2 100 mg L-1, iron 7 g L-1 and using a continuous system containing commercial iron wool, the process afforded almost total discolorization of aqueous solutions of three reactive azo-dyes (reactive orange 16, reactive black 5 and brilliant yellow 3G-P at a hydraulic retention time of 2.5 min. At these conditions the hydrogen peroxide is almost totally consumed while the released total soluble iron reaches a concentration compatible with the current Brazilian legislation (15 mg L-1.

  5. Reactive-oxygen-species-mediated Cdc25C degradation results in differential antiproliferative activities of vanadate, tungstate, and molybdate in the PC-3 human prostate cancer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tong-Tong; Liu, Yan-Jun; Wang, Qin; Yang, Xiao-Gai; Wang, Kui

    2012-02-01

    The differential antiproliferative effects of vanadate, tungstate, and molybdate on human prostate cancer cell line PC-3 were compared and the underlying mechanisms were investigated. The results demonstrate that all of the three oxoanions can cause G(2)/M cell cycle arrest, which is evidenced by the increase in the level of phosphorylated Cdc2 at its inactive Tyr-15 site. Moreover, even if the difference in cellular uptake among the three oxoanions is excluded from the possible factors affecting their antiproliferative activity, vanadate exerted a much more potent effect in PC-3 cells than the other two oxoanions. Our results also reveal that reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated degradation of Cdc25C rather than Cdc25A or Cdc25B is responsible for vanadate-induced G(2)/M cell cycle arrest. We propose a possible mechanism to clarify the differential effect of the three oxoanions in biological systems beyond just considering that they are structural analogs of phosphate. We suggest that ROS formation is unlikely to be involved in the biological function of tungstate and molybdate, whereas the redox properties of vanadium may be important factors for it to exert pharmacological effects. Further, given the evidence from epidemiology studies of the association between diabetes and prostate cancer, the possibility of vanadate as a good candidate as both an antidiabetic and an anticancer agent or a chemopreventive agent is indicated.

  6. Isolation, development and identification of salt-tolerant bacterial consortium from crude-oil-contaminated soil for degradation of di-azo dye Reactive Blue 220.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vipul R; Bhatt, Nikhil

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was development and characterization of a halophilic bacterial consortium for rapid decolorization and degradation of a wide range of dyes and their mixtures. The 16S rRNA gene analysis of developed halophilic consortium VN.1 showed that the bacterial consortium contained six bacterial strains, which were identified as Pseudomonas fluorescens HM480360, Enterobacter aerogenes HM480361, Shewanella sp. HM589853, Arthrobacter nicotianae HM480363, Bacillus beijingensis HM480362 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa JQ659549. Halophilic consortium VN.1 was able to decolorize up to 2,500 mg/L RB220 with >85% chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction under static condition at 30 °C and pH 8.0 in the presence of 7% NaCl. VN.1 also exhibited more than 85% COD reduction with >25 mg/(L h) rate of decolorization in the case of different reactive dye mixtures. We propose the symmetric cleavage of RB220 using Fourier transform infrared, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), nuclear magnetic resonance and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis, and confirmed the formation of sodium-4-aminobenzenesulfonate, sodium-6-aminonepthalenesulfonate, and sodiumbenzene/nepthalenesulfonate. Toxicity studies confirm that the biodegraded products of RB220 effluent stimulate the growth of plants as well as the bacterial community responsible for soil fertility.

  7. Host-derived probiotics Enterococcus casseliflavus improves resistance against Streptococcus iniae infection in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) via immunomodulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Reza; Adel, Milad; Lazado, Carlo C; Caipang, Christopher Marlowe A; Dadar, Maryam

    2016-05-01

    The present study evaluated the benefits of dietary administration of host-derived candidate probiotics Enterococcus casseliflavus in juvenile rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. Experimental diets were prepared by incorporating the microorganisms in the basal feed at 3 inclusion levels (i.e. 10(7) CFU g(-1) of feed [T1], 10(8) CFU g(-1) of feed [T2], 10(9) CFU g(-1) of feed [T3]). The probiotic feeds were administered for 8 weeks, with a group fed with the basal diet serving as control. The effects on growth performance, gut health, innate immunity and disease resistance were evaluated. Results showed that growth performance parameters were significantly improved in T2 and T3 groups. Activities of digestive enzymes such as trypsin and lipase were significantly higher in these two groups as well. Gut micro-ecology was influenced by probiotic feeding as shown by the significant increase in intestinal lactic acid bacteria and total viable aerobic counts in T2 and T3. Humoral immunity was impacted by dietary probiotics as total serum protein and albumin were significantly elevated in T3. The levels of serum IgM significantly increased in all probiotic fed groups at week 8; with the T3 group registering the highest increment. Respiratory burst activity of blood leukocytes were significantly improved in T2 and T3. Hematological profiling further revealed that neutrophil counts significantly increased in all probiotic fed groups. Challenge test showed that probiotic feeding significantly improved host resistance to Streptococcus iniae infection, specifically in T2 and T3 where a considerable modulation of immune responses was observed. Taken together, this study demonstrated E. casseliflavus as a potential probiotics for rainbow trout with the capability of improving growth performance and enhancing disease resistance by immunomodulation.

  8. Host-Derived Sialic Acids Are an Important Nutrient Source Required for Optimal Bacterial Fitness In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan D. McDonald

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A major challenge facing bacterial intestinal pathogens is competition for nutrient sources with the host microbiota. Vibrio cholerae is an intestinal pathogen that causes cholera, which affects millions each year; however, our knowledge of its nutritional requirements in the intestinal milieu is limited. In this study, we demonstrated that V. cholerae can grow efficiently on intestinal mucus and its component sialic acids and that a tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic SiaPQM strain, transporter-deficient mutant NC1777, was attenuated for colonization using a streptomycin-pretreated adult mouse model. In in vivo competition assays, NC1777 was significantly outcompeted for up to 3 days postinfection. NC1777 was also significantly outcompeted in in vitro competition assays in M9 minimal medium supplemented with intestinal mucus, indicating that sialic acid uptake is essential for fitness. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that the ability to utilize sialic acid was distributed among 452 bacterial species from eight phyla. The majority of species belonged to four phyla, Actinobacteria (members of Actinobacillus, Corynebacterium, Mycoplasma, and Streptomyces, Bacteroidetes (mainly Bacteroides, Capnocytophaga, and Prevotella, Firmicutes (members of Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, Clostridium, and Lactobacillus, and Proteobacteria (including Escherichia, Shigella, Salmonella, Citrobacter, Haemophilus, Klebsiella, Pasteurella, Photobacterium, Vibrio, and Yersinia species, mostly commensals and/or pathogens. Overall, our data demonstrate that the ability to take up host-derived sugars and sialic acid specifically allows V. cholerae a competitive advantage in intestinal colonization and that this is a trait that is sporadic in its occurrence and phylogenetic distribution and ancestral in some genera but horizontally acquired in others.

  9. Host-derived, pore-forming toxin-like protein and trefoil factor complex protects the host against microbial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Yang; Yan, Chao; Guo, Xiaolong; Zhou, Kaifeng; Li, Sheng'an; Gao, Qian; Wang, Xuan; Zhao, Feng; Liu, Jie; Lee, Wen-Hui; Zhang, Yun

    2014-05-06

    Aerolysins are virulence factors belonging to the bacterial β-pore-forming toxin superfamily. Surprisingly, numerous aerolysin-like proteins exist in vertebrates, but their biological functions are unknown. βγ-CAT, a complex of an aerolysin-like protein subunit (two βγ-crystallin domains followed by an aerolysin pore-forming domain) and two trefoil factor subunits, has been identified in frogs (Bombina maxima) skin secretions. Here, we report the rich expression of this protein, in the frog blood and immune-related tissues, and the induction of its presence in peritoneal lavage by bacterial challenge. This phenomena raises the possibility of its involvement in antimicrobial infection. When βγ-CAT was administrated in a peritoneal infection model, it greatly accelerated bacterial clearance and increased the survival rate of both frogs and mice. Meanwhile, accelerated Interleukin-1β release and enhanced local leukocyte recruitments were determined, which may partially explain the robust and effective antimicrobial responses observed. The release of interleukin-1β was potently triggered by βγ-CAT from the frog peritoneal cells and murine macrophages in vitro. βγ-CAT was rapidly endocytosed and translocated to lysosomes, where it formed high molecular mass SDS-stable oligomers (>170 kDa). Lysosomal destabilization and cathepsin B release were detected, which may explain the activation of caspase-1 inflammasome and subsequent interleukin-1β maturation and release. To our knowledge, these results provide the first functional evidence of the ability of a host-derived aerolysin-like protein to counter microbial infection by eliciting rapid and effective host innate immune responses. The findings will also largely help to elucidate the possible involvement and action mechanisms of aerolysin-like proteins and/or trefoil factors widely existing in vertebrates in the host defense against pathogens.

  10. Preparation of TiO2/activated carbon with Fe ions doping photocatalyst and its application to photocatalytic degradation of reactive brilliant red K2G

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI YouJi; LI Jing; MA MingYuan; OUYANG YuZhu; YAN WenBin

    2009-01-01

    Titanium dioxide coated on activated carbon(AC)with Fe ions doping(Fe-TiO2/AC)composite was prepared by an improved sol-gel method.The photocatalytic activities were tested by photocatalytic degradation of reactive brilliant red K2G in solution.The results show that in comparison with the agglomeration of pure TiO2,the TiO2 nanoparticles are well dispersed in the AC matrix,of which sizes are decreased with Fe ions doping.Additionally,the iron species on TiO2 of composite are Fe2O3 and FeO,which do not affect the crystalline structures of TiO2 nanopanicles.The AC matrix and iron doping content influence the fluorescence intensity of composite due to their effects on recombination prob ability of hole-electron paire.Compared with TiO2,0.3%Fe-TiO2,TiO2/AC,0.5% Fe-TiO2/AC and 0.1% Fe-TiO2/AC,the 0.3%Fe-TiO2/AC shows the highest photoactivity with the complete mineralization of K2G for finite time due to the optimum Fe ions content and AC matrix.Furthermore,the kinetic constant(K=0.0229 min-1)of 0.3% Fe-TiO2/AC composite is more than the sum of both TiO2/AC(0.0154 min-1)and 0.3% Fe-TiO2(0.0057 min-1)because coexistence of the AC end Fe ions has an enlarging effect on improving the photoactivity of TiO2.

  11. Preparation of TiO2/activated carbon with Fe ions doping photocatalyst and its application to photocatalytic degradation of reactive brilliant red K2G

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Titanium dioxide coated on activated carbon(AC) with Fe ions doping(Fe-TiO2/AC) composite was prepared by an improved sol-gel method.The photocatalytic activities were tested by photocatalytic degradation of reactive brilliant red K2G in solution.The results show that in comparison with the agglomeration of pure TiO2,the TiO2 nanoparticles are well dispersed in the AC matrix,of which sizes are decreased with Fe ions doping.Additionally,the iron species on TiO2 of composite are Fe2O3 and FeO,which do not affect the crystalline structures of TiO2 nanoparticles.The AC matrix and iron doping content influence the fluorescence intensity of composite due to their effects on recombination probability of hole-electron pairs.Compared with TiO2,0.3% Fe-TiO2,TiO2/AC,0.5% Fe-TiO2/AC and 0.1% Fe-TiO2/AC,the 0.3% Fe-TiO2/AC shows the highest photoactivity with the complete mineralization of K2G for finite time due to the optimum Fe ions content and AC matrix.Furthermore,the kinetic constant(k=0.0229 min-1) of 0.3% Fe-TiO2/AC composite is more than the sum of both TiO2/AC(0.0154 min-1) and 0.3% Fe-TiO2(0.0057 min-1) because coexistence of the AC and Fe ions has an enlarging effect on improving the photoactivity of TiO2.

  12. Assessment of the roles of reactive oxygen species in the UV and visible light photocatalytic degradation of cyanotoxins and water taste and odor compounds using C-TiO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotiou, Theodora; Triantis, Theodoros M; Kaloudis, Triantafyllos; O'Shea, Kevin E; Dionysiou, Dionysios D; Hiskia, Anastasia

    2016-03-01

    Visible light (VIS) photocatalysis has large potential as a sustainable water treatment process, however the reaction pathways and degradation processes of organic pollutants are not yet clearly defined. The presence of cyanobacteria cause water quality problems since several genera can produce potent cyanotoxins, harmful to human health. In addition, cyanobacteria produce taste and odor compounds, which pose serious aesthetic problems in drinking water. Although photocatalytic degradation of cyanotoxins and taste and odor compounds have been reported under UV-A light in the presence of TiO2, limited studies have been reported on their degradation pathways by VIS photocatalysis of these problematic compounds. The main objectives of this work were to study the VIS photocatalytic degradation process, define the reactive oxygen species (ROS) involved and elucidate the reaction mechanisms. We report carbon doped TiO2 (C-TiO2) under VIS leads to the slow degradation of cyanotoxins, microcystin-LR (MC-LR) and cylindrospermopsin (CYN), while taste and odor compounds, geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol, were not appreciably degraded. Further studies were carried-out employing several specific radical scavengers (potassium bromide, isopropyl alcohol, sodium azide, superoxide dismutase and catalase) and probes (coumarin) to assess the role of different ROS (hydroxyl radical OH, singlet oxygen (1)O2, superoxide radical anion [Formula: see text] ) in the degradation processes. Reaction pathways of MC-LR and CYN were defined through identification and monitoring of intermediates using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for VIS in comparison with UV-A photocatalytic treatment. The effects of scavengers and probes on the degradation process under VIS, as well as the differences in product distributions under VIS and UV-A, suggested that the main species in VIS photocatalysis is [Formula: see text] , with OH and (1)O2 playing minor roles in the degradation

  13. CFS氧化降解偶氮染料活性黑RB5%Degradation of azo dye C.I. Reactive Black 5 by composite ferrate solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张彦平; 许国仁; 李圭白

    2008-01-01

    研究了复合高铁酸盐溶液(CFS)氧化降解活性黑(RB5)染料废水的反应条件和降解机理.结果表明:CFS氧化降解RB5的最佳pH范围为pH<10,并且在该范围内Fe(VI)的反应速率较快.当pH=8~9,CFS投加量为20 mg·L-1时,氧化反应5 min和20 min时,RB5的脱色率分别为80%和95%.对TOC和COD的去除实验表明,在氧化反应过程中存在有机分子的矿化反应,但矿化速率远低于脱色反应速率.UV-Vis和FTIR结果表明,染料分子中的偶氮基团能被Fe(VI)氧化破坏,并且处理后样品中RB5的特征红外吸收峰消失,说明了染料分子中部分苯环和萘环被破坏,从而使得染料废水的毒性降低、可生化性提高.因此,CFS作为一种高效、低廉的强氧化剂,为染料工业废水的处理提供了一个可行的方法.%Composite ferrate solution(CFS)was used directly in oxidation of ago dye wastewater of C.I.Reactive Black 5(RB5).The optimal oxidation conditions and degradation mechanism were investigated.The results indicated that the optimal pH for the oxidation was pH<10,and Fe(VI)had higher reactivity in this pH range.For example.with the CFS dosage of 20 mg·L-1 at pH=8~9,about 80% and 95% RB5 had been discolored at 5 min and 20 min.respectively.TOC and COD removal experiments indicated that the organic molecules could be mineralized, but the mineralization rate was much slower than the decolorization rate.UV-Vis and FT-IR results showed that the azo groups could be broken by the oxidation of Fe(VI),and almost all the characteristic absorption bands of RB5 disappeared which indicates the benzene and naphthalene structure had been destructed.The azo dye wastewater treated by CFS has lower toxicity and improved biodegradability.As a strong oxidant with lower cost,CFS has supplied a feasible choice for the treatment of ago dye in industrial wastewater.

  14. GRIZZLY Model of Multi-Reactive Species Diffusion, Moisture/Heat Transfer and Alkali-Silica Reaction for Simulating Concrete Aging and Degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Hai [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Spencer, Benjamin W. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cai, Guowei [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Concrete is widely used in the construction of nuclear facilities because of its structural strength and its ability to shield radiation. The use of concrete in nuclear power plants for containment and shielding of radiation and radioactive materials has made its performance crucial for the safe operation of the facility. As such, when life extension is considered for nuclear power plants, it is critical to have accurate and reliable predictive tools to address concerns related to various aging processes of concrete structures and the capacity of structures subjected to age-related degradation. The goal of this report is to document the progress of the development and implementation of a fully coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical model in GRIZZLY code with the ultimate goal to reliably simulate and predict long-term performance and response of aged NPP concrete structures subjected to a number of aging mechanisms including external chemical attacks and volume-changing chemical reactions within concrete structures induced by alkali-silica reactions and long-term exposure to irradiation. Based on a number of survey reports of concrete aging mechanisms relevant to nuclear power plants and recommendations from researchers in concrete community, we’ve implemented three modules during FY15 in GRIZZLY code, (1) multi-species reactive diffusion model within cement materials; (2) coupled moisture and heat transfer model in concrete; and (3) anisotropic, stress-dependent, alkali-silica reaction induced swelling model. The multi-species reactive diffusion model was implemented with the objective to model aging of concrete structures subjected to aggressive external chemical attacks (e.g., chloride attack, sulfate attack, etc.). It considers multiple processes relevant to external chemical attacks such as diffusion of ions in aqueous phase within pore spaces, equilibrium chemical speciation reactions and kinetic mineral dissolution/precipitation. The moisture

  15. FD&C Yellow No. 5 (tartrazine) degradation via reactive oxygen species triggered by TiO2 and Au/TiO2 nanoparticles exposed to simulated sunlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng; He, Weiwei; Liu, Yi; Wu, Haohao; Wamer, Wayne G; Lo, Y Martin; Yin, Jun-Jie

    2014-12-10

    When exposed to light, TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) become photoactivated and create electron/hole pairs as well as reactive oxygen species (ROS). We examined the ROS production and degradation of a widely used azo dye, FD&C Yellow No. 5 (tartrazine), triggered by photoactivated TiO2 NPs. Degradation was found to follow pseudo-first order reaction kinetics where the rate constant increased with TiO2 NP concentration. Depositing Au on the surface of TiO2 largely enhanced electron transfer and ROS generation, which consequently accelerated dye degradation. Alkaline conditions promoted ROS generation and dye degradation. Results from electron spin resonance spin-trap spectroscopy suggested that at pH 7.4, both hydroxyl radical (•OH) and singlet oxygen ((1)O2) were responsible for dye discoloration, whereas at pH 5, the consumption of (1)O2 became dominant. Implications for dye degradation in foods and other consumer products that contain both TiO2 and FD&C Yellow No. 5 as ingredients are discussed.

  16. Nature of insulating-phase transition and degradation of structure and electrochemical reactivity in an olivine-structured material, LiFePO4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Min-Sang; Kang, Yong-Mook; Kim, Yong-Il; Park, Kyu-Sung; Kwon, Hyuk-Sang

    2009-09-07

    Synthesis time using microwave irradiation was varied to elucidate the electrochemical degradation mechanism of LiFePO(4) related to the evolution of Fe(2)P. When the amount of Fe(2)P was above a critical level, LiFePO(4) tended to change into an insulating phase, Li(4)P(2)O(7). The correlation between structural analysis and electrochemical analysis attributed the initial degradation of LiFePO(4) to the low electronic conductivity of Li(4)P(2)O(7), whereas the deficiency of P and O evolved by Li(4)P(2)O(7) resulted in the cyclic degradation of LiFePO(4). This kind of correlation between structure and electrochemical performance in intercalation materials will significantly contribute to an explanation of their degradation mechanism for their application.

  17. Reactive transport modeling of chemical and isotope data to identify degradation processes of chlorinated ethenes in a diffusion-dominated media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chambon, Julie Claire Claudia; Damgaard, Ida; Jeannottat, Simon;

    zones in the low-permeability media. Previous studies have shown that degradation might be limited to high permeability zones in clay tills, thus limiting the applicability of remediation strategies based on enhanced biodegradation. Therefore the occurrence of degradation inside the clay matrix......Chlorinated ethenes are among the most widespread contaminants in the subsurface and a major threat to groundwater quality at numerous contaminated sites. Many of these contaminated sites are found in low-permeability media, such as clay tills, where contaminant transport is controlled by diffusion...

  18. Degradation of concrete-based barriers by Mg-containing brines: From laboratory experiments via reactive transport modelling to overall safety analysis in repository scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemeyer, Matthias; Wilhelm, Stefan; Hagemann, Sven; Xie, Mingliang; Wollrath, Jürgen; Preuss, Jürgen

    2010-05-01

    initial hydraulic permeability and possibly on inhomogeneities like fractures and the hydraulic behaviour of the excavation damage zone (EDZ). Experimentally, the corrosion capacity of the brines to the concrete cannot be directly determined by throughflow experiments because the initial hydraulic permeability of the original building material is far too low. Instead, the decrease of magnesium, the main corroding agent in the brines, has been measured in cascade experiments with grounded cement mortar. The results of these experiments have been reproduced with geochemical modelling. However, those model calculations reveal that the stoichiometry of this reaction strongly depends on the assumptions about the relative stability of the potentially formed mineral phases, especially the various magnesium-silicate-hydrate-phases. As a pragmatic approach, the probability density function of the corrosion capacity has been estimated by stochastic calculations including the variation within a reasonable bandwidth of the chemical composition of each mortar components and the thermodynamic data of the critical mineral phases. Subsequently, the corrosion of the sealed access drifts in repository scale has been simulated by a reactive transport model, combining advective / dispersive transport and variable hydraulic permeability as function of the reaction progress. In the model, the chemistry of the corrosion process has been abstracted to one single equation. This allowed a fine discretisation - more than 10'000 nodes in an auto-adapting 2D-FE-mesh with axial symmetry. The parameter for the reaction rate was chosen on basis of experimental observations and turned out to be non-sensitive. The calculations show that the reaction zone is quite narrow - less than 5 m in a seal of 130 m length - as the reaction rate is much faster than the transport processes. With this model, the influence of a persistent EDZ in the host rock on the degradation of the hydraulic seal was studied

  19. Efficient degradation of Methylene Blue dye over highly reactive Cu doped strontium titanate (SrTiO3) nanoparticles photocatalyst under visible light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Qazi Inamur; Ahmad, Musheer; Misra, Sunil Kumar; Lohani, Minaxi

    2012-09-01

    Visible light induced photocatalysts of Cu doped SrTiO3 (Cu/SrTiO3) nanoparticles with the size -60-75 nm were prepared via facile sol-gel method. The morphological, optical, crystalline properties and compositions of synthesized Cu/SrTiO3 nanoparticles were thoroughly characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), ultra violet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX). A significant red shift in the UV-diffused reflectance spectrum was observed and the absorption edge shifted to visible region by the Cu doping. Surprisingly, the band gap of SrTiO3 was changed from 3.2 eV drop to 2.96 eV. The photocatalytic activity of the synthesized Cu/SrTiO3 nanoparticles was demonstrated for the degradation of Methylene Blue dye under visible light irradiation. The formation of new acceptor region in Cu/SrTiO3 was responsible for high photocatalytic activity of Cu/SrTiO3 nanoparticles. The results showed that the Methylene Blue dye was degraded by -66% within time span of 2 h over the Cu/SrTiO3 nanoparticles. This dye degradation reaction followed the Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetics and also exhibited first order reaction rate. The calculated rate constant for the degradation reaction following first order kinetics was k = 0.0016 min(-1).

  20. Degradation efficacy and mechanism of reactive black KBR with ferrate solution%高铁酸盐溶液降解活性黑KBR的效果及机理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张彦平; 李一兵; 李芬; 李静; 李娟

    2013-01-01

    The degradation efficacy of reactive black KBR with ferrate solution has been studied,and degradation mechanism has been analyzed by UV-Vis and FFIR methods.The experimental results show that ferrate solution has effects of good decolorizing efficacy and fast decolorizing velocity on KBR.When the optimal range of pH ≤ 8,dosage of Fe (Ⅵ) 25 mg/L,and reaction time 60 min,the effects of decolorizing rate and COD removing rate on KBR are 80.3% and 62.5%,respectively.During oxidation degradation process,Fe (Ⅵ) and C1O-in ferrate solution have synergistic effect.The analysis by UV-Vis and FTIR methods shows that during the degradation process,the azo bonds of dye molecules are damaged,benzene ring and heterocyclic of dye molecules are opened,dye macromolecules could be oxidized to small molecule intermediates.%研究了高铁酸盐溶液对活性黑KBR的降解效果,并采用UV-Vis、FTIR对降解机理进行分析.结果表明,高铁酸盐溶液对KBR脱色效果较好,脱色速率较快,最佳pH范围≤8.Fe(Ⅵ)最佳投加量为25 mg/L,反应60 min时,对KBR的色度和COD去除率分别为80.3%、62.5%.在氧化降解过程中,Fe(Ⅵ)和C1O-表现出协同作用.UV-Vis和FTIR分析表明,降解过程中染料分子的偶氮键被破坏,苯环和杂环被打开,染料大分子被氧化为小分子中间产物.

  1. Heterogeneous fenton-like degradation of an azo dye reactive brilliant orange by the combination of activated carbon-FeOOH catalyst and H 2O2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Jinhua; Lin, Guanghui; Li, Ping;

    2013-01-01

    The decoloration of an azo dye reactive brilliant orange (X-GN) by a heterogeneous Fenton system using activated carbon-FeOOH catalyst (AC-FeOOH) and H2O2 was studied. Under typical conditions (pH 7.0, H2O2 10 mmol/L, AC-FeOOH 1.0g/L and 30°C), 98% decoloration rate of X-GN was achieved in 240 mm...... that the decoloration of X-GN followed a pseudo-first order reaction and the activation energy was 17.2 kJ/mol. Iron leaching from AC-FeOOH occurred during the reaction, but the decoloration efficiency of X-GN was still higher than 80% after four runs. The AC-FeOOH has a good stability and can be reused. Besides...

  2. Synthesis, crystal structure analysis, molecular docking studies and density functional theory predictions of the local reactive properties and degradation properties of a novel halochalcone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, Suhana; Pillai, Renjith Raveendran; Zainuri, Dian Alwani; Khalib, Nuridayanti Che; Razak, Ibrahim Abdul; Armaković, Stevan; Armaković, Sanja J.

    2017-09-01

    In the present study, single crystals of E)-3-(3,5-dichlorophenyl)-1-(4-fluorophenyl)prop-2-en-1-one, were prepared and structurally characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The molecular structure crystallized in monoclinic crystal system with P21/c space group. Sensitivity of the title molecule towards electrophilic attacks has been examined by calculations of average localized ionization energies (ALIE) and their mapping to electron density surface. Further determination of atoms that could be important reactive centres has been performed by calculations of Fukui functions. Sensitivity of title molecule towards autoxidation and hydrolysis mechanisms has been assessed by calculations of bond dissociation energies and radial distribution functions (RDF), respectively. Also, in order to explore possible binding mode of the title compound towards Dihydrofolate reductase enzyme, we have utilized in silico molecular docking to explore possible binding modes of the title compound with the DHFR enzyme.

  3. Shift of the reactive species in the Sb-SnO2-electrocatalyzed inactivation of e. coli and degradation of phenol: effects of nickel doping and electrolytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, So Young; Kim, Dongseog; Park, Hyunwoong

    2014-01-01

    The electrocatalytic behavior and anodic performance of Sb-SnO2 and nickel-doped Sb-SnO2 (Ni-Sb-SnO2) in sodium sulfate and sodium chloride electrolytes were compared. Nickel-doping increased the service lifetime by a factor of 9 and decreased the charge transfer resistance of the Sb-SnO2 electrodes by 65%. More importantly, Ni doping improved the electrocatalytic performance of Sb-SnO2 for the remediation of aqueous phenol and the inactivation of E. coli by a factor of more than 600% and ∼20%, respectively. In the sulfate electrolyte, the primary reactive oxygen species (ROS) identified were OH radicals (Faradaic efficiency η = 2.4%) with trace levels of ozone and hydrogen peroxide (η Sb-SnO2. In contrast, the primary ROS at Ni-Sb-SnO2 was ozone (η = 9.3%) followed by OH radicals (η = 3.7%). In the chloride electrolyte, the production of hypochlorite (OCl(-)) was higher (η = 0.73%) than that of ozone (η = 0.13%) at Sb-SnO2, whereas the level of ozone (η = 13.6%) was much higher than that of hypochlorite (η = 0.24%) at Ni-Sb-SnO2. Based on the shift of the reactive species, the primary effect of Ni doping is to catalyze the six-electron oxidation of water to ozone and inhibit the competing one or two-electron oxidation of water (generation of OH radicals, hydrogen peroxides, and hypochlorites). A range of electrochemical and surface analyses were performed, and a detailed mechanism was proposed.

  4. Enhancing reactive species generation upon photo-activation of CdTe quantum dots for the chemiluminometric determination of unreacted reagent in UV/S2O8(2-) drug degradation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Rodolfo M M; Oliveira, Thaís D; Rodrigues, S Sofia M; Frigerio, Christian; Santos, João L M; Korn, Mauro

    2015-04-01

    A new chemiluminescence (CL) flow method for persulfate determination was developed based on luminol oxidation by in-line generated radicals. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by CdTe quantum dots (QDs) under a low energetic radiation (visible light emitted by LEDs) promoted the decomposition of persulfate ion (S2O8(2-)) into sulfate radical (SO4(∙-)), leading to subsequent radical chain reactions that yield the emission of light. Due to the inherent radical short lifetimes and the transient behavior of CL phenomena an automated multi-pumping flow system (MPFS) was proposed to improve sample manipulation and reaction zone implementation ensuring reproducible analysis time and high sampling rate. The developed approach allowed up to 60 determinations per hour and determine S2O8(2-) concentrations between 0.1 and 1 mmol with good linearity (R=0.9999). The method has shown good repeatability with relative standard deviations below 2.5% (n=3) for different persulfate concentrations (0.1 and 0.625 mmol L(-1)). Limits of detection (3σ) and quantification (10σ) were 2.7 and 9.1 µmol L(-1), respectively. The MPFS system was applied to persulfate determination in bench scale UV/S2O8(2-) drug degradation processes of model samples showing good versatility and providing real time information on the persulfate consumption in photo-chemical degradation methodologies.

  5. Cobalt ferrite nano-composite coated on glass by Doctor Blade method for photo-catalytic degradation of an azo textile dye Reactive Red 4: XRD, FESEM and DRS investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Mohammad Hossein; Parhizkar, Janan

    2015-11-05

    Cobalt ferrite nano-composite was prepared by hydrothermal route using cobalt nitrate, iron nitrate and ethylene glycol as chelating agent. The nano-composite was coated on glass by Doctor Blade method and annealed at 300 °C. The structural, optical, and photocatalytic properties have been studied by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and UV-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis DRS). Powder XRD analysis confirmed formation of CoFe2O4 spinel phase. The estimated particle size from FESEM data was 50 nm. The calculated energy band gaps, obtained by Tauc relation from UV-Vis absorption spectra was 1.3 eV. Photocatalytic degradation of Reactive Red 4 as an azo textile was investigated in aqueous solution under irradiation showed 68.0% degradation of the dye within 100 min. The experimental enhanced activity compare to pure Fe2O3 can be ascribed to the formation of composite, which was mainly attributable to the transfer of electron and hole to the surface of composite and hinder the electron hole recombination. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluating the degradation of the herbicides picloram and 2,4-D in a compartmentalized reactive biobarrier with internal liquid recirculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordaz-Guillén, Yolanda; Galíndez-Mayer, Cutberto Juvencio; Ruiz-Ordaz, Nora; Juárez-Ramírez, Cleotilde; Santoyo-Tepole, Fortunata; Ramos-Monroy, Oswaldo

    2014-01-01

    Tordon is a widely used herbicide formulation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 4-amino-3,5,6-trichloropicolinic acid (picloram), and it is considered a toxic herbicide. The purposes of this work were to assess the feasibility of a microbial consortium inoculated in a lab-scale compartmentalized biobarrier, to remove these herbicides, and isolate, identify, and evaluate their predominant microbial constituents. Volumetric loading rates of herbicides ranging from 31.2 to 143.9 g m(-3) day(-1), for 2,4-D, and 12.8 to 59.3 g m(-3) day(-1) for picloram were probed; however, the top operational limit of the biobarrier, detected by a decay in the removal efficiency, was not reached. At the highest loading rates probed, high average removal efficiencies of 2,4-D, 99.56 ± 0.44; picloram, 94.58 ± 2.62; and chemical oxygen demand (COD), 89.42 ± 3.68, were obtained. It was found that the lab-scale biofilm reactor efficiently removed both herbicides at dilution rates ranging from 0.92 to 4.23 day(-1), corresponding to hydraulic retention times from 1.087 to 0.236 days. On the other hand, few microbial strains able to degrade picloram are reported in the literature. In this work, three of the nine bacterial strains isolated cometabolically degrade picloram. They were identified as Hydrocarboniphaga sp., Tsukamurella sp., and Cupriavidus sp.

  7. A Systems Biology Approach to Reveal Putative Host-Derived Biomarkers of Periodontitis by Network Topology Characterization of MMP-REDOX/NO and Apoptosis Integrated Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidán-Chuliá, Fares; Gürsoy, Mervi; Neves de Oliveira, Ben-Hur; Özdemir, Vural; Könönen, Eija; Gürsoy, Ulvi K

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis, a formidable global health burden, is a common chronic disease that destroys tooth-supporting tissues. Biomarkers of the early phase of this progressive disease are of utmost importance for global health. In this context, saliva represents a non-invasive biosample. By using systems biology tools, we aimed to (1) identify an integrated interactome between matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-REDOX/nitric oxide (NO) and apoptosis upstream pathways of periodontal inflammation, and (2) characterize the attendant topological network properties to uncover putative biomarkers to be tested in saliva from patients with periodontitis. Hence, we first generated a protein-protein network model of interactions ("BIOMARK" interactome) by using the STRING 10 database, a search tool for the retrieval of interacting genes/proteins, with "Experiments" and "Databases" as input options and a confidence score of 0.400. Second, we determined the centrality values (closeness, stress, degree or connectivity, and betweenness) for the "BIOMARK" members by using the Cytoscape software. We found Ubiquitin C (UBC), Jun proto-oncogene (JUN), and matrix metalloproteinase-14 (MMP14) as the most central hub- and non-hub-bottlenecks among the 211 genes/proteins of the whole interactome. We conclude that UBC, JUN, and MMP14 are likely an optimal candidate group of host-derived biomarkers, in combination with oral pathogenic bacteria-derived proteins, for detecting periodontitis at its early phase by using salivary samples from patients. These findings therefore have broader relevance for systems medicine in global health as well.

  8. Optimization of culture condition for enhanced decolorization and degradation of azo dye reactive violet 1 with concomitant production of ligninolytic enzymes by Ganoderma cupreum AG-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahlout, Mayur; Gupte, Shilpa; Gupte, Akshaya

    2013-04-01

    The strain Ganoderma cupreum AG-1 (Genbank accession no. HQ328947) isolated from the decayed wood was evaluated for its ability to decolorize azo dye reactive violet 1 as well as for the production of ligninolytic enzymes. In the initial decolorization study, the strain was capable of decolorizing 19 different azo dyes. The strain was capable of decolorizing dye over a pH range of 4.5-6 at 30 °C. The optimum pH was found to be 4.5. Various other process parameters like additional carbon and nitrogen source and initial dye concentration were also optimized. The decolorization medium was supplemented with appropriate nitrogen source (yeast extract, 5 g l(-1)) and carbon source (mannose, 2 g l(-1)); the decolorization obtained was 98 %. The pattern of enzymes involved in the biodegradation was studied and laccase and MnP were found to be the major enzymes. High laccase activity shown by G. cupreum AG-1 and its ability to decolorize dyes are a good indication of its possible use in the treatment of textile effluents.

  9. Enhanced photo-catalytic activity of Sr and Ag co-doped TiO2 nanoparticles for the degradation of Direct Green-6 and Reactive Blue-160 under UV & visible light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naraginti, Saraschandra; Thejaswini, T V L; Prabhakaran, D; Sivakumar, A; Satyanarayana, V S V; Arun Prasad, A S

    2015-10-05

    This work is focused on sol-gel synthesis of silver and strontium co-doped TiO2 nanoparticles and their utilization as photo-catalysts in degradation of two textile dyes. Effect of pH, intensity of light, amount of photo-catalyst, concentration of dye, sensitizers, etc., were studied to optimize conditions for obtaining enhanced photo-catalytic activity of synthesized nanoparticles. XRD, BET, HR-TEM, EDAX and UV-Vis (diffused reflectance mode) techniques were used to characterize the nanoparticles. Interestingly, band gap of Sr and Ag co-doped TiO2 nanoparticles showed considerable narrowing (2.6 eV) when compared to Ag doped TiO2 (2.7 eV) and undoped TiO2 (3.17 eV) nanoparticles. Incorporation of Ag and Sr in the lattice of TiO2 could bring isolated energy levels near conduction and valence bands thus narrowing band gap. The XRD analysis shows that both Ag and Sr nanoparticles are finely dispersed on the surface of titania framework, without disturbing its crystalline structure. TEM images indicate that representative grain sizes of Ag-doped TiO2 & Sr and Ag co-doped TiO2 nanoparticles are in the range of 8-20 nm and 11-25 nm, respectively. Effective degradation of Direct Green-6 (DG-6) and Reactive Blue-160 (RB-160) under UV and visible light has been achieved using the photo-catalysts. Sr and Ag co-doped TiO2 photo-catalysts showed higher catalytic activity during degradation process in visible region when compared to Ag-doped and undoped TiO2 nanoparticles which could be attributed to the interactive effect caused by band gap narrowing and enhancement in charge separation. For confirming degradation of the dyes, total organic carbon (TOC) content was monitored periodically. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. β-amyloid fibrils in Alzheimer disease are not inert when bound to copper ions but can degrade hydrogen peroxide and generate reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Jennifer; Tinker-Mill, Claire; Kolosov, Oleg; Zhang, Hao; Tabner, Brian J; Allsop, David

    2014-04-25

    According to the "amyloid cascade" hypothesis of Alzheimer disease, the formation of Aβ fibrils and senile plaques in the brain initiates a cascade of events leading to the formation of neurofibrillary tangles, neurodegeneration, and the symptom of dementia. Recently, however, emphasis has shifted away from amyloid fibrils as the predominant toxic form of Aβ toward smaller aggregates, referred to as "soluble oligomers." These oligomers have become one of the prime suspects for involvement in the early oxidative damage that is evident in this disease. This raises the question whether or not Aβ fibrils are actually "inert tombstones" present at the end of the aggregation process. Here we show that, when Aβ(1-42) aggregates, including fibrils, are bound to Cu(II) ions, they retain their redox activity and are able to degrade hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) with the formation of hydroxyl radicals and the consequent oxidation of the peptide (detected by formation of carbonyl groups). We find that this ability increases as the Cu(II):peptide ratio increases and is accompanied by changes in aggregate morphology, as determined by atomic force microscopy. When aggregates are prepared in the copresence of Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions, the ratio of Cu(II):Zn(II) becomes an important factor in the degeneration of H2O2, the formation of carbonyl groups in the peptide, and in aggregate morphology. We believe, therefore, that Aβ fibrils can destroy H2O2 and generate damaging hydroxyl radicals and, so, are not necessarily inert end points.

  11. UV/H_2O_2降解活性黑5动力学研究%Degradation Kinetics and Mechanics of Reactive Black 5 by UV/H_2O_2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐航; 李国芝

    2012-01-01

    建立一种双曲线模型对UV/H2O2降解偶氮染料活性黑5过程进行描述,考察不同H2O2初始浓度对活性黑5去除率、瞬态.OH浓度和反应速率的影响,并利用液相色谱质谱联用分析降解中间产物。结果表明:最佳的H2O2投加量是8.824 mM,50 min后活性黑5的去除率可达94%以上。双曲线模型能较好地描述UV/H2O2降解活性黑5过程,利用该模型可估算反应过程中瞬时.OH的浓度和瞬时反应速率。%Hyperbolic model could be established to describe the degradation performance of Reactive Black 5(RB5) using UV/H2O2 process.The effects of initial H2O2 dosage on RB5 removal,instant ·OH concentration and reaction rate were investigated.The results showed that the optimal H2O2 dosage was 8.824 mM and after 50 min,the RB5 removal was around 94%.The RB5 degradation process was followed the hyperbolic model which can calculate instant ·OH concentration and reaction rate.

  12. Co-precipitation synthesis of nano-composites consists of zinc and tin oxides coatings on glass with enhanced photocatalytic activity on degradation of Reactive Blue 160 KE2B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Mohammad Hossein; Mardani, Maryam

    2015-02-25

    Nano-composite containing zinc oxide-tin oxide was obtained by a facile co-precipitation route using tin chloride tetrahydrate and zinc chloride as precursors and coated on glass by Doctor Blade deposition. The crystalline structure and morphology of composites were evaluated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The XRD results showed peaks relative to zinc oxide with hexagonal wurtzite structure and tin oxide with tetragonal structure. FESEM observations showed that the nano-composite consisted of aggregates of particles with an average particle size of 18 nm. The photocatalytic activity of the pure SnO2, pure ZnO, ZnSnO3-Zn2SnO4 and ZnO-SnO2 nano-structure thin films was examined using the degradation of a textile dye Reactive Blue 160 (KE2B). ZnO-SnO2 nano-composite showed enhanced photo-catalytic activity than the pure zinc oxide and tin oxide. The enhanced photo-catalytic activity of the nano-composite was ascribed to an improved charge separation of the photo-generated electron-hole pairs.

  13. 白腐真菌生物膜反应器中活性艳红 X-3B脱色与降解的实验研究%Experimental Study on Decolorization and Degradation of Reactive Brilliant Red X-3B in a White Rot Fungal Biofilm Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄民生; 黄荣; 程永前; 张国莹

    2001-01-01

    Experimental results of an azo dye(reactive brilliant red X-3B, RBR X-3B) decolorization and degradation in a white rot fungal biofilm reactor were introduced and discussed. The fungal biofilm reactor is highly potential for dye decolorization and degradation with the highest decoloring rate of 95% within 96 hours reaction time at initial pH 4.5 under high nitrogen level (HN) (24 mmol/L ammonium tartrate) condition. Experimental conditions, such as nutrient nitrogen levels in reaction mixture and initial pH, significantly affected dye decolorization and degradation. Effluents from this biofilm reactor can be well treated to meet the discharging requirements by use of chemical flocculation. RBR X-3B was first absorbed onto fungal biomass and then degraded gradually. The SH-13 fungus monopolized the biofilm throughout the experiments, though the reactor was exposed to open air for 4 months.

  14. Degradação de corantes reativos por processo foto-fenton envolvendo o uso de peneira molecular 4A modificada com Fe3+ Degradation of reactive dyes by photo-fenton process using Fe3+ immobilized in molecular sieve 4A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franciély Ignachewski

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work the preparation and characterization of a supported catalyst intended for degradation of reactive dyes by Fenton-like processes is described. The photocatalyst was prepared by immobilization of Fe3+ into the molecular sieve (4A type surface and characterized by x-ray diffractometry and infrared, Mössbauer and EPR spectroscopy. The solid containing 0.94% (w/w of ferric ions was used in degradation studies of aqueous reactive-dyes samples with really promissory results. Generally, Vis-assisted photochemical processes leads to almost total decolorization of all tested dyes at reaction times lower than 30 min. It was also observed that the iron-molecular sieve matrix can be reused.

  15. Host-derived pentapeptide affecting adhesion, proliferation, and local pH in biofilm communities composed of Streptococcus and Actinomyces species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drobni, M.; Li, T.; Krüger, C.

    2006-01-01

    Salivary proline-rich proteins (PRPs) attach commensal Actinomyces and Streptococcus species to teeth. Here, gel filtration, mass spectrometry and Edman degradation were applied to show the release of a pentapeptide, RGRPQ, from PRP-1 upon proteolysis by Streptococcus gordonii. Moreover, synthetic...

  16. Reactive Hypoglycemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) that occurs while fasting. Signs and symptoms of reactive hypoglycemia may include ... and very important. It's also important to include physical activity in your daily routine. Your doctor can help ...

  17. Reactive Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eren Erken

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Reactive arthritis is an acute, sterile, non-suppurative and inflammatory arthropaty which has occured as a result of an infectious processes, mostly after gastrointestinal and genitourinary tract infections. Reiter syndrome is a frequent type of reactive arthritis. Both reactive arthritis and Reiter syndrome belong to the group of seronegative spondyloarthropathies, associated with HLA-B27 positivity and characterized by ongoing inflammation after an infectious episode. The classical triad of Reiter syndrome is defined as arthritis, conjuctivitis and urethritis and is seen only in one third of patients with Reiter syndrome. Recently, seronegative asymmetric arthritis and typical extraarticular involvement are thought to be adequate for the diagnosis. However, there is no established criteria for the diagnosis of reactive arthritis and the number of randomized and controlled studies about the therapy is not enough. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(3.000: 283-299

  18. Reactive Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aceto, Luca; Ingolfsdottir, Anna; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand

    A reactive system comprises networks of computing components, achieving their goals through interaction among themselves and their environment. Thus even relatively small systems may exhibit unexpectedly complex behaviours. As moreover reactive systems are often used in safety critical systems......, the need for mathematically based formal methodology is increasingly important. There are many books that look at particular methodologies for such systems. This book offers a more balanced introduction for graduate students and describes the various approaches, their strengths and weaknesses, and when...... they are best used. Milner's CCS and its operational semantics are introduced, together with the notions of behavioural equivalences based on bisimulation techniques and with recursive extensions of Hennessy-Milner logic. In the second part of the book, the presented theories are extended to take timing issues...

  19. What Is Reactive Arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Arthritis PDF Version Size: 69 KB November 2014 What is Reactive Arthritis? Fast Facts: An Easy-to- ... Information About Reactive Arthritis and Other Related Conditions What Causes Reactive Arthritis? Sometimes, reactive arthritis is set ...

  20. Single gene retrieval from thermally degraded DNA

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lianwen Zhang; Lianwen Zhang

    2005-12-01

    To simulate single gene retrieval from ancient DNA, several related factors have been investigated. By monitoring a 889 bp polymerase chain reaction (PCR) product and genomic DNA degradation, we find that heat and oxygen (especially heat) are both crucial factors influencing DNA degradation. The heat influence, mainly represented by temperature and heating time, affects the DNA degradation via DNA depurination followed by cleavage of nearby phosphodiesters. The heating time influence is temperature-dependent. By reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging and 1,3-diphenyl-isobenzofuran (DPBF) bleaching experiments the influence of oxygen on DNA thermal degradation was shown to occur via a singlet oxygen pathway. A comparative study of the thermal degradation of cellular DNA and isolated DNA showed that cellular lipids can aggravate DNA thermal degradation. These results confirm the possibility of gene amplification from thermally degraded DNA. They can be used to evaluate the feasibility of the retrieval of single gene from ancient remains.

  1. Protease-degradable electrospun fibrous hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Ryan J.; Bassin, Ethan J.; Rodell, Christopher B.; Burdick, Jason A.

    2015-03-01

    Electrospun nanofibres are promising in biomedical applications to replicate features of the natural extracellular matrix (ECM). However, nearly all electrospun scaffolds are either non-degradable or degrade hydrolytically, whereas natural ECM degrades proteolytically, often through matrix metalloproteinases. Here we synthesize reactive macromers that contain protease-cleavable and fluorescent peptides and are able to form both isotropic hydrogels and electrospun fibrous hydrogels through a photoinitiated polymerization. These biomimetic scaffolds are susceptible to protease-mediated cleavage in vitro in a protease dose-dependent manner and in vivo in a subcutaneous mouse model using transdermal fluorescent imaging to monitor degradation. Importantly, materials containing an alternate and non-protease-cleavable peptide sequence are stable in both in vitro and in vivo settings. To illustrate the specificity in degradation, scaffolds with mixed fibre populations support selective fibre degradation based on individual fibre degradability. Overall, this represents a novel biomimetic approach to generate protease-sensitive fibrous scaffolds for biomedical applications.

  2. Review of reactive kinetic models describing reductive dechlorination of chlorinated ethenes in soil and groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chambon, Julie Claire Claudia; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Scheutz, Charlotte;

    2013-01-01

    Reductive dechlorination is a major degradation pathway of chlorinated ethenes in anaerobic subsurface environments, and reactive kinetic models describing the degradation process are needed in fate and transport models of these contaminants. However, reductive dechlorination is a complex biologi...

  3. Catalytic degradation of reactive yellow dye using ash fly supported iron ion%粉煤灰负载铁离子催化氧化活性黄染料废水

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    商丹红; 张志生; 胡晨爽

    2013-01-01

    以粉煤灰为载体,制备铁/粉煤灰负载型催化剂,并利用该催化剂催化H2O2氧化降解活性黄染料废水,探讨了H2O2投加量、催化剂投加量、染料初始浓度和初始pH值等因素对染料废水COD去除率和脱色率的影响.结果表明,当染料废水COD初始浓度为200 mg/L,初始pH值为1.7,投加0.5 g/100 mL催化剂及加入1.0 mL浓度为1.13 mol/L的H2O2溶液时,处理效果最好,此时染料废水的COD去除率和脱色率分别达到63%和99%,并且废水的可生化性得到很大的提高.利用该负载催化剂能够有效地减少活性黄染料废水中Fe3+的残留量.%Ash fly supported iron ion catalyst was prepared by using ash fly as a carrier. Its catalysis effect on oxidizing reactive yellow dye by H2O2 was studied. And the effects of dosage of H2O2, catalyst loading, initial reactive yellow concentration and solution pH on the removal rate of COD and the discoloration rate were investigated. The results show that the removal rate of COD and the discoloration rate can reach 63% and 99% , respectively under the optimal conditions of initial COD concentration of 200 mg/L, pH of 1. 7, catalyst of 0. 5 g/ 100 mL and 1. 13 mol/L H2O2 of 1. 0 mL,and the biodegradability of the wastewater can be greatly improved. The residues of Fe3+ in aqueous solutions can be reduced effectively when using the supported catalysts.

  4. Epidermal growth factor reactivity in rat milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raaberg, Lasse; Nexø, Ebba; Tollund, L

    1990-01-01

    overnight at 37 degrees C, the 80 kDa EGF is degraded and elutes as a peak with a Stokes radius of 2.7 nm, corresponding to a molecular weight of approximately 35 kDa EGF and as a peak corresponding to 6 kDa EGF. Also, after partial purification by immuno-affinity chromatography, the EGF-reactive material...

  5. Polysaccharide Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Bruce A.; Svensson, Birte; Collins, Michelle E.; Rastall, Robert A.

    An overview of current and potential enzymes used to degrade polysaccharides is presented. Such depolymerases are comprised of glycoside hydrolases, glycosyl transferases, phosphorylases and lyases, and their classification, active sites and action patterns are discussed. Additionally, the mechanisms that these enzymes use to cleave glycosidic linkages is reviewed as are inhibitors of depolymerase activity; reagents which react with amino acid residues, glycoside derivatives, transition state inhibitors and proteinaceous inhibitors. The characterization of various enzymes of microbial, animal or plant origin has led to their widespread use in the production of important oligosaccharides which can be incorporated into food stuffs. Sources of polysaccharides of particular interest in this chapter are those from plants and include inulin, dextran, xylan and pectin, as their hydrolysis products are purported to be functional foods in the context of gastrointestinal health. An alternative use of degraded polysaccharides is in the treatment of disease. The possibility exists to treat bacterial exopolysaccharide with lyases from bacteriophage to produce oligosaccharides exhibiting bioactive sequences. Although this area is currently in its infancy the knowledge is available to investigate further.

  6. Isolation and identification of halophilic bacteria strain Halomonas elogata and its application on degradation of an azo dye Reactive Blue BRF%极端嗜盐菌Halomonas elogata的分离鉴定及其降解偶氮染料活性兰BRF的条件优化研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韦娜; 张前前; 杜宗军; 张栋梅

    2012-01-01

    An extremely halophilic bacterial strain was acclimated,isolated and purified from the saline-alkali soil obtained from the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region.It was identified as Halomonas elogata based on its morphology,physiological-biochemical characteristics and 16S rDNA sequence analysis.Subsequently,the influencing factors on the azo dye degradation were explored.Degradation effects in a series of salt concentrations were compared.In single factor experiments,the influencing factors of inoculation volume,initial azo dye concentration and pH were tested respectively under inoculation conditions of 30℃ and 5% salinity.The orthogonal experiments L9(33) were designed to obtain the optimal experiment conditions.Finally,the degradation products were estimated by the UV-vis spectra.The results indicated that the strain Halomonas elogata was tolerant to a wide salinity ranging from 0 to 32%,while the optimal salinity for its cell growth was from 5% to 20%.Among salinity range of 3% to 25%,the degradation rate increased initially and then decreased with the salinity increasing,and the best degradation effect happened when the salinity was 5%.At 30℃ and salinity of 5%,the optimal conditions for degradation of azo dye Reactive Blue BRF were found as follows:initial concentration of 100 mg · L-1 for azo dye,pH 7 and initial inoculation volume of 5% for the strain.Under these conditions,an 88.62% degradation of azo dye was achieved over a time period of 72 hours.The UV-vis spectra revealed that the degradation products were quite different from Reactive Blue BRF.There was no peak in visible region and its n-hexane extraction,while its dichloromethane extracts exhibited two UV absorption peaks implying that degradation products might be polar aromatic amines and heterocyclic compounds.Mass spectrometry results revealed that the degradation products included polar compounds such as benzyl diamine and 2,6-diamino-phenol.%从新疆地区土壤中经驯化、分离

  7. Analysis of thermally-degrading, confined HMX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, M.L.; Schmitt, R.G.; Renlund, A.M.

    1996-12-01

    The response of a thermally-degrading, confined HMX pellet is analyzed using a Reactive Elastic-Plastic (REP) constitutive model which is founded on the collapse and growth of internal inclusions resulting from physical and chemical processes such as forced displacement, thermal expansion, and/or decomposition. Axial stress predictions compare adequately to data. Deficiencies in the model and future directions are discussed.

  8. Reactive oxygen species production by catechol stabilized copper nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cheng; Ahmed, Ishtiaq; Fruk, Ljiljana

    2013-11-01

    Stable Cu nanoparticles (NPs) prepared using catechol containing dopamine-based linkers could generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) that can activate peroxidase enzymes and catalyze the degradation of fluorescent dye pollutants.Stable Cu nanoparticles (NPs) prepared using catechol containing dopamine-based linkers could generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) that can activate peroxidase enzymes and catalyze the degradation of fluorescent dye pollutants. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of the synthesis of dopamine linkers and Cu NPs, peroxidase activity tests, H2O2 calibration and degradation tests for resorufin, RB and MB. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr03563h

  9. Reactive dispersive contaminant transport in coastal aquifers: numerical simulation of a reactive Henry problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nick, H M; Raoof, A; Centler, F; Thullner, M; Regnier, P

    2013-02-01

    The reactive mixing between seawater and terrestrial water in coastal aquifers influences the water quality of submarine groundwater discharge. While these waters come into contact at the seawater groundwater interface by density driven flow, their chemical components dilute and react through dispersion. A larger interface and wider mixing zone may provide favorable conditions for the natural attenuation of contaminant plumes. It has been claimed that the extent of this mixing is controlled by both, porous media properties and flow conditions. In this study, the interplay between dispersion and reactive processes in coastal aquifers is investigated by means of numerical experiments. Particularly, the impact of dispersion coefficients, the velocity field induced by density driven flow and chemical component reactivities on reactive transport in such aquifers is studied. To do this, a hybrid finite-element finite-volume method and a reactive simulator are coupled, and model accuracy and applicability are assessed. A simple redox reaction is considered to describe the degradation of a contaminant which requires mixing of the contaminated groundwater and the seawater containing the terminal electron acceptor. The resulting degradation is observed for different scenarios considering different magnitudes of dispersion and chemical reactivity. Three reactive transport regimes are found: reaction controlled, reaction-dispersion controlled and dispersion controlled. Computational results suggest that the chemical components' reactivity as well as dispersion coefficients play a significant role on controlling reactive mixing zones and extent of contaminant removal in coastal aquifers. Further, our results confirm that the dilution index is a better alternative to the second central spatial moment of a plume to describe the mixing of reactive solutes in coastal aquifers.

  10. Reactive dispersive contaminant transport in coastal aquifers: Numerical simulation of a reactive Henry problem

    KAUST Repository

    Nick, H.M.

    2013-02-01

    The reactive mixing between seawater and terrestrial water in coastal aquifers influences the water quality of submarine groundwater discharge. While these waters come into contact at the seawater groundwater interface by density driven flow, their chemical components dilute and react through dispersion. A larger interface and wider mixing zone may provide favorable conditions for the natural attenuation of contaminant plumes. It has been claimed that the extent of this mixing is controlled by both, porous media properties and flow conditions. In this study, the interplay between dispersion and reactive processes in coastal aquifers is investigated by means of numerical experiments. Particularly, the impact of dispersion coefficients, the velocity field induced by density driven flow and chemical component reactivities on reactive transport in such aquifers is studied. To do this, a hybrid finite-element finite-volume method and a reactive simulator are coupled, and model accuracy and applicability are assessed. A simple redox reaction is considered to describe the degradation of a contaminant which requires mixing of the contaminated groundwater and the seawater containing the terminal electron acceptor. The resulting degradation is observed for different scenarios considering different magnitudes of dispersion and chemical reactivity. Three reactive transport regimes are found: reaction controlled, reaction-dispersion controlled and dispersion controlled. Computational results suggest that the chemical components\\' reactivity as well as dispersion coefficients play a significant role on controlling reactive mixing zones and extent of contaminant removal in coastal aquifers. Further, our results confirm that the dilution index is a better alternative to the second central spatial moment of a plume to describe the mixing of reactive solutes in coastal aquifers. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  11. Mechanisms regulating the degradation of dentin matrices by endogenous dentin proteases and their role in dental adhesion. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatini, Camila; Pashley, David H

    2014-08-01

    This systematic review provides an overview of the different mechanisms proposed to regulate the degradation of dentin matrices by host-derived dentin proteases, particularly as it relates to their role in dental adhesion. Significant developments have taken place over the last few years that have contributed to a better understanding of all the factors affecting the durability of adhesive resin restorations. The complexity of dentin-resin interfaces mandates a thorough understanding of all the mechanical, physical and biochemical aspects that play a role in the formation of hybrid layers. The ionic and hydrophilic nature of current dental adhesives yields permeable, unstable hybrid layers susceptible to water sorption, hydrolytic degradation and resin leaching. The hydrolytic activity of host-derived proteases also contributes to the degradation of the resin-dentin bonds. Preservation of the collagen matrix is critical to the improvement of resin-dentin bond durability. Approaches to regulate collagenolytic activity of dentin proteases have been the subject of extensive research in the last few years. A shift has occurred from the use of proteases inhibitors to the use of collagen cross-linking agents. Data provided by 51 studies published in peer-reviewed journals between January 1999 and December 2013 were compiled in this systematic review. Appraisal of the data provided by the studies included in the present review yielded a summary of the mechanisms which have already proven to be clinically successful and those which need further investigation before new clinical protocols can be adopted.

  12. Reactive Kripke semantics

    CERN Document Server

    Gabbay, Dov M

    2013-01-01

    This text offers an extension to the traditional Kripke semantics for non-classical logics by adding the notion of reactivity. Reactive Kripke models change their accessibility relation as we progress in the evaluation process of formulas in the model. This feature makes the reactive Kripke semantics strictly stronger and more applicable than the traditional one. Here we investigate the properties and axiomatisations of this new and most effective semantics, and we offer a wide landscape of applications of the idea of reactivity. Applied topics include reactive automata, reactive grammars, rea

  13. Dentin matrix degradation by host Matrix Metalloproteinases: inhibition and clinical perspectives towards regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine eChaussain

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial enzymes have long been considered solely accountable for the degradation of the dentin matrix during the carious process. However, the emerging literature suggests that host-derived enzymes, and in particular the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs contained in dentin and saliva can play a major role in this process by their ability to degrade the dentin matrix from within. These findings are important since they open new therapeutic options for caries prevention and treatment. The possibility of using MMP inhibitors to interfere with dentin caries progression is discussed. Furthermore, the potential release of bioactive peptides by the enzymatic cleavage of dentin matrix proteins by MMPs during the carious process is discussed. These peptides, once identified, may constitute promising therapeutical tools for tooth and bone regeneration.

  14. Reactive Attachment Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Reactive Attachment Disorder and Disinhibited Social Engagement Disorder. Reactive Attachment Disorder (RAD) Children with RAD are less likely to interact with other people because of negative experiences with adults in their early years. They have difficulty calming ...

  15. Reactive perforating collagenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadav Mukesh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive perforating collagenosis is a rare cutaneous disorder of unknown etiology. We hereby describe a case of acquired reactive perforating collagenosis in a patient of diabetes and chronic renal failure.

  16. Monadic Functional Reactive Programming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ploeg, A.J. van der; Shan, C

    2013-01-01

    Functional Reactive Programming (FRP) is a way to program reactive systems in functional style, eliminating many of the problems that arise from imperative techniques. In this paper, we present an alternative FRP formulation that is based on the notion of a reactive computation: a monadic computatio

  17. Sonophotocatalytic Degradation of Amines in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verman, Mayank; Pankaj

    Hazardous effects of various amines, produced in the environment from the partial degradation of azo dyes and amino acids, adversely affect the quality of human life through water, soil and air pollution and therefore needed to be degraded. A number of such studies are already available in the literature, with or without the use of ultrasound, which have been summarized briefly. The sonochemical degradation of amines and in the combination with a photocatalyst, TiO2 has also been discussed. Similar such degradation studies for ethylamine (EA), aniline (A), diphenylamine (DPA) and naphthylamine (NA) in the presence of ultrasound, TiO2 and rare earths (REs); La, Pr, Nd, Sm and Gd, in aqueous solutions at 20 kHz and 250 W power have been carried out and reported, to examine the combinatorial efficacy of ultrasound in the presence of a photocatalyst and rare earth ions with reactive f-electrons.

  18. Sunlight induced photo reactivity of drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dallera, R.; Dondi, D.; Ricci, A.; Fasani, E.; Albini, A.

    2003-07-01

    The reactivity under natural light of some UVA-UVB photol able drugs belonging to the classes of fluoroquinolones, glucocortocosteroids, sunscreens and nitrophenyldihydropyridines has been investigated. The data suggest that exposition to sunlight for times ranging from some minutes to few hours at PSA is sufficient for promoting a high degradation in the drugs investigated. the chemical reactions are the same as observed under artificial UV light. (Author) 28 refs.

  19. Reactive Programming in Java

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Reactive Programming in gaining a lot of excitement. Many libraries, tools, and frameworks are beginning to make use of reactive libraries. Besides, applications dealing with big data or high frequency data can benefit from this programming paradigm. Come to this presentation to learn about what reactive programming is, what kind of problems it solves, how it solves them. We will take an example oriented approach to learning the programming model and the abstraction.

  20. PEM fuel cell degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borup, Rodney L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    The durability of PEM fuel cells is a major barrier to the commercialization of these systems for stationary and transportation power applications. While significant progress has been made in understanding degradation mechanisms and improving materials, further improvements in durability are required to meet commercialization targets. Catalyst and electrode durability remains a primary degradation mode, with much work reported on understanding how the catalyst and electrode structure degrades. Accelerated Stress Tests (ASTs) are used to rapidly evaluate component degradation, however the results are sometimes easy, and other times difficult to correlate. Tests that were developed to accelerate degradation of single components are shown to also affect other component's degradation modes. Non-ideal examples of this include ASTs examining catalyst degradation performances losses due to catalyst degradation do not always well correlate with catalyst surface area and also lead to losses in mass transport.

  1. Degradation of microbial polyesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokiwa, Yutaka; Calabia, Buenaventurada P

    2004-08-01

    Microbial polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs), one of the largest groups of thermoplastic polyesters are receiving much attention as biodegradable substitutes for non-degradable plastics. Poly(D-3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) is the most ubiquitous and most intensively studied PHA. Microorganisms degrading these polyesters are widely distributed in various environments. Although various PHB-degrading microorganisms and PHB depolymerases have been studied and characterized, there are still many groups of microorganisms and enzymes with varying properties awaiting various applications. Distributions of PHB-degrading microorganisms, factors affecting the biodegradability of PHB, and microbial and enzymatic degradation of PHB are discussed in this review. We also propose an application of a new isolated, thermophilic PHB-degrading microorganism, Streptomyces strain MG, for producing pure monomers of PHA and useful chemicals, including D-3-hydroxycarboxylic acids such as D-3-hydroxybutyric acid, by enzymatic degradation of PHB.

  2. Solvent effects on the AIBN forced degradation of cumene: Implications for forced degradation practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Eric D; Thompson, Gina M; Yao, Ye; Flanagan, Holly M; Harmon, Paul A

    2009-03-01

    Solvent effects on the AIBN and ACVA forced degradation of cumene are explored. The degradant formation rates of the three cumene oxidative degradants, cumene hydroperoxide, acetophenone, and 2-phenyl-2-propanol are reported. The relative abundance and ratios of these three degradants provide insight into the fate of the peroxy radical oxidants generated by the forced stress system, and suggest that alkoxy radicals are actually a significant source of the observed reactivity. The presence of even 1% methanol in the forced stress solvent significantly quenches this alkoxy radical reactivity, dramatically reducing the overall degradation rate and leaving cumene hydroperoxide as the major product of the oxidation reaction. The origin of this significant solvent effect on the oxidation product distribution is shown to be related to the preferential H-atom abstraction from methanol and its trace impurities by any alkoxy radicals present in the reaction solution. The implications for these observations are explored with the intent of producing more predictive oxidative forced stress experiments.

  3. Reactive Power Compensation Method Considering Minimum Effective Reactive Power Reserve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yiyu; Zhang, Kai; Pu, Zhang; Li, Xuenan; Zuo, Xianghong; Zhen, Jiao; Sudan, Teng

    2017-05-01

    According to the calculation model of minimum generator reactive power reserve of power system voltage stability under the premise of the guarantee, the reactive power management system with reactive power compensation combined generator, the formation of a multi-objective optimization problem, propose a reactive power reserve is considered the minimum generator reactive power compensation optimization method. This method through the improvement of the objective function and constraint conditions, when the system load growth, relying solely on reactive power generation system can not meet the requirement of safe operation, increase the reactive power reserve to solve the problem of minimum generator reactive power compensation in the case of load node.

  4. Reactive standard deontic logic

    OpenAIRE

    Gabbay, Dov M.; Straßer, Christian

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a reactive variant of SDL (standard deontic logic): SDLR1 (reactive standard deontic logic). Given a Kripkean view on the semantics of SDL in terms of directed graphs where arrows -> represent the accessibility relation between worlds, reactive models add two elements: arrows -> are labelled as 'active' or 'inactive', and double arrows a dagger connect arrows, e.g. (x(1) -> x(2)) a dagger (x(3) -> x(4)). The idea is that passing through x(1) -> x(2) activates a switch represented...

  5. Chemical stability and in chemico reactivity of 24 fragrance ingredients of concern for skin sensitization risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avonto, Cristina; Wang, Mei; Chittiboyina, Amar G; Vukmanovic, Stanislav; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2017-09-16

    Twenty-four pure fragrance ingredients have been identified as potential concern for skin sensitization. Several of these compounds are chemically unstable and convert into reactive species upon exposure to air or light. In the present work, a systematic investigation of the correlation between chemical stability and reactivity has been undertaken. The compounds were subjected to forced photodegradation for three months and the chemical changes were studied with GC-MS. At the end of the stability study, two-thirds of the samples were found to be unstable. The generation of chemically reactive species was investigated using the in chemico HTS-DCYA assay. Eleven and fourteen compounds were chemically reactive before and after three months, respectively. A significant increase in reactivity upon degradation was found for isoeugenol, linalool, limonene, lyral, citronellol and geraniol; in the same conditions, the reactivity of hydroxycitronellal decreased. The non-reactive compounds α-isomethyl ionone, benzyl alcohol, amyl cinnamal and farnesol became reactive after photo-oxidative degradation. Overall, forced degradation resulted in four of non-reactive fragrance compounds to display in chemico thiol reactivity, while ten out of 24 compounds remained inactive. Chemical degradation thus not necessarily occurs with generation of reactive species. Non-chemical activation may be involved for the 10 stable unreactive compounds. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Nonquaternary Cholinesterase Reactivators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-08-30

    1978, 34, 523. 30. Lehninger , A. L., " Biochemistry ," Worth Publ. Inc., New York, 1970, p. 161. 31. Green, A. L.; Smith, H. J.; Biochem. J., 1958, 68...nerve agent antidotes focuses on nonquaternary cholinesterase reactivators. In principle , it should be possible to find nonquaternary hydroximic acid...elicit pronounced physiological responses. In principle , it should be possible to develop nonquaternary AChE reactivators that would not only equal

  7. Reactive sputter deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Mahieu, Stijn

    2008-01-01

    In this valuable work, all aspects of the reactive magnetron sputtering process, from the discharge up to the resulting thin film growth, are described in detail, allowing the reader to understand the complete process. Hence, this book gives necessary information for those who want to start with reactive magnetron sputtering, understand and investigate the technique, control their sputtering process and tune their existing process, obtaining the desired thin films.

  8. Investigation of polymer electrolyte membrane chemical degradation and degradation mitigation using in situ fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakaran, Venkateshkumar; Arges, Christopher G; Ramani, Vijay

    2012-01-24

    A fluorescent molecular probe, 6-carboxy fluorescein, was used in conjunction with in situ fluorescence spectroscopy to facilitate real-time monitoring of degradation inducing reactive oxygen species within the polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) of an operating PEM fuel cell. The key requirements of suitable molecular probes for in situ monitoring of ROS are presented. The utility of using free radical scavengers such as CeO(2) nanoparticles to mitigate reactive oxygen species induced PEM degradation was demonstrated. The addition of CeO(2) to uncatalyzed membranes resulted in close to 100% capture of ROS generated in situ within the PEM for a period of about 7 h and the incorporation of CeO(2) into the catalyzed membrane provided an eightfold reduction in ROS generation rate.

  9. Bacterial Degradation of Pesticides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Berith Elkær

    . Bioaugmentation i.e. addition of specific degrader organisms, has been suggested as an environmentally friendly and economically competitive strategy for cleaning polluted sites. Several organisms have been isolated, capable of degrading different compounds. However the capacity to degrade the desired compound...... SRS2, Variovorax SRS16 and Arthrobacter globiformis D47. The degradation capacity of each strain individually as well as two- and three-member consortia was studied in a sand column set up. Glass beads were added to the set up to create a dry patch, separating the organisms and the diuron-spiked sand...

  10. Accelerated degradation studies of encapsulation polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Karl-Anders; Huelsmann, Jan Philip; Kaltenbach, Thomas; Philipp, Daniel; Schuhmacher, Tanja; Wirth, Jochen; Koehl, Michael

    2008-08-01

    The estimation of PV-modules lifetime facilitates the further development and helps to lower risks for producers and investors. One base for this extensive testing and simulation work is the knowledge of the chemical degradation processes and their kinetics, as well as of the permeation of water and oxygen into the module, especially of the encapsulant. Besides ethylen-vinylacetate copolymer (EVA), which is the dominant material for encapsulation, new materials become available and need the assessment of their properties and the durability impact. Accelerated durability tests were performed on different EVA materials. The paper reports on several measurement methods for analysis of the polymers that were used, FT-IR with attenuated total reflection (ATR), and Raman microscopy, e.g. It is very important to identify degradation products and intermediates in order to identify the leading degradation processes and their kinetics as well as potential interactions between different processes. Another important factor for the degradation of the PV-modules and the concerned polymers in particular is the permeation of reactive substances, especially of water vapor, into and inside the modules. The paper shows results of permeation measurements of the new materials, as well as FEM-based numerical simulations of the humidity diffusion within a PV-module what is an important step towards the calculation of the chemical degradation using numerical simulation tools in the future.

  11. Group B Streptococcus Evades Host Immunity by Degrading Hyaluronan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolar, Stacey L; Kyme, Pierre; Tseng, Ching Wen; Soliman, Antoine; Kaplan, Amber; Liang, Jiurong; Nizet, Victor; Jiang, Dianhua; Murali, Ramachandran; Arditi, Moshe; Underhill, David M; Liu, George Y

    2015-12-09

    In response to tissue injury, hyaluronan (HA) polymers are cleaved by host hyaluronidases, generating small fragments that ligate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) to elicit inflammatory responses. Pathogenic bacteria such as group B Streptococcus (GBS) express and secrete hyaluronidases as a mechanism for tissue invasion, but it is not known how this activity relates to immune detection of HA. We found that bacterial hyaluronidases secreted by GBS and other Gram-positive pathogens degrade pro-inflammatory HA fragments to their component disaccharides. In addition, HA disaccharides block TLR2/4 signaling elicited by both host-derived HA fragments and other TLR2/4 ligands, including lipopolysaccharide. Application of GBS hyaluronidase or HA disaccharides reduced pulmonary pathology and pro-inflammatory cytokine levels in an acute lung injury model. We conclude that breakdown of host-generated pro-inflammatory HA fragments to disaccharides allows bacterial pathogens to evade immune detection and could be exploited as a strategy to treat inflammatory diseases.

  12. Simulation of reactive processes related to biodegradation in aquifers. 1. Structure of the three-dimensional reactive transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Dirk; Schäfer, Wolfgang; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang

    1998-05-01

    The reactive transport model TBC (transport, biochemistry, and chemistry) numerically solves the equations for reactive transport in three-dimensional saturated groundwater flow. A finite element approximation and a standard Galerkin method are used. Solute transport is coupled to microbially mediated organic carbon degradation. Microbial growth is assumed to follow Monod-type kinetics. Substrate consumption and release of metabolic products is coupled to microbial growth via yield coefficients and stoichiometric relations. Additionally, the effects of microbial activity on selected inorganic chemical species in the aquifer can be considered. TBC allows the user to specify a wide range of possible biochemical and chemical reactions in the input file. This makes TBC a powerful and flexible simulation tool. It was developed to simulate reactive processes related to in situ bioremediation, but further fields of application are laboratory column studies on redox processes coupled to organic carbon degradation, field cases of intrinsic biodegradation, and early diagenetic processes in sediments.

  13. Use of an adipocyte model to study the transcriptional adaptation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to store and degrade host fat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivangi Rastogi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During its persistence in the infected host, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb accumulates host-derived fatty acids in intracytoplasmic lipid inclusions as triacylglycerols which serve primarily as carbon and energy reserves. The Mtb genome codes for more than 15 triacylglycerol synthases, 24 lipase/esterases, and seven cutinase-like proteins. Hence, we looked at the expression of the corresponding genes in intracellular bacilli persisting amidst the host triacylglycerols. We used the Mtb infected murine adipocyte model to ensure persistence and transcripts were quantified using real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Dormancy and glyoxylate metabolism was confirmed by the upregulated expression of dosR and icl, respectively, by intra-adipocyte bacilli compared with in vitro growing bacilli. The study revealed that tgs1, tgs2, Rv3371, and mycolyltransferase Ag85A are the predominant triacylglycerol synthases, while lipF, lipH, lipJ, lipK, lipN, lipV, lipX, lipY, culp5, culp7, and culp6 are the predominant lipases/esterases used by Mtb for the storage and degradation of host-derived fat. Moreover, it was observed that many of these enzymes are used by Mtb during active replication rather than during nonreplicating persistence, indicating their probable function in cell wall synthesis.

  14. Total OH reactivity study from VOC photochemical oxidation in the SAPHIR chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Z.; Tillmann, R.; Hohaus, T.; Fuchs, H.; Novelli, A.; Wegener, R.; Kaminski, M.; Schmitt, S. H.; Wahner, A.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that hydroxyl radicals (OH) act as a dominant reactive species in the degradation of VOCs in the atmosphere. In recent field studies, directly measured total OH reactivity often showed poor agreement with OH reactivity calculated from VOC measurements (e.g. Nölscher et al., 2013; Lu et al., 2012a). This "missing OH reactivity" is attributed to unaccounted biogenic VOC emissions and/or oxidation products. The comparison of total OH reactivity being directly measured and calculated from single component measurements of VOCs and their oxidation products gives us a further understanding on the source of unmeasured reactive species in the atmosphere. This allows also the determination of the magnitude of the contribution of primary VOC emissions and their oxidation products to the missing OH reactivity. A series of experiments was carried out in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR in Jülich, Germany, to explore in detail the photochemical degradation of VOCs (isoprene, ß-pinene, limonene, and D6-benzene) by OH. The total OH reactivity was determined from the measurement of VOCs and their oxidation products by a Proton Transfer Reaction Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS) with a GC/MS/FID system, and directly measured by a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) at the same time. The comparison between these two total OH reactivity measurements showed an increase of missing OH reactivity in the presence of oxidation products of VOCs, indicating a strong contribution to missing OH reactivity from uncharacterized oxidation products.

  15. [Low reactive laser therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeki, Shigeru

    2012-07-01

    The type, characteristics and effect of low reactive laser equipment used for pain treatment in Japan are described in this section. Currently, low reactive laser therapy equipments marketed and used in Japan include diode laser therapeutic device with semiconductor as a medium consisting of aluminum, gallium and arsenic. Low reactive laser equipment comes in three models, the first type has a capacity of generating 1,000 mW output, and the second type has a capacity of generating 10 W output. The third type has four channels of output, 60, 100, 140 and 180 mW and we can select one channel out of the four channels. This model is also used as a portable device because of its light weight, and we can carry it to wards and to the outside of the hospital. Semiconductor laser has the capacity of deepest penetration and the effect tends to increase proportionally to the increasing output. Low reactive laser therapy is less invasive and lower incidence of complications. Although low reactive laser therapy might be effective for various pain disorders, the effect is different depending on the type of pain. We should keep in mind that this therapy will not give good pain relief equally in all patients with pain.

  16. Batteries: Imaging degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearing, Paul R.

    2016-11-01

    The degradation and failure of Li-ion batteries is strongly associated with electrode microstructure change upon (de)lithiation. Now, an operando X-ray tomography approach is shown to correlate changes in the microstructure of electrodes to cell performance, and thereby predict degradation pathways.

  17. Syntrophy in Methanogenic Degradation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Worm, P.; Müller, N.; Plugge, C.M.; Stams, A.J.M.; Schink, B.

    2010-01-01

    This chapter deals with microbial communities of bacteria and archaea that closely cooperate in methanogenic degradation and perform metabolic functions in this community that neither one of them could carry out alone. The methanogenic degradation of fatty acids, alcohols, most aromatic compounds, a

  18. Rate of NDF degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weisbjerg, Martin Riis; Koukolová, V; Lund, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Degradation profiles for NDF were estimated for 83 samples of grass/grass-clover, 27 samples of cereal whole crop and 14 samples of maize whole crop.......Degradation profiles for NDF were estimated for 83 samples of grass/grass-clover, 27 samples of cereal whole crop and 14 samples of maize whole crop....

  19. Interactive chemical reactivity exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haag, Moritz P; Vaucher, Alain C; Bosson, Maël; Redon, Stéphane; Reiher, Markus

    2014-10-20

    Elucidating chemical reactivity in complex molecular assemblies of a few hundred atoms is, despite the remarkable progress in quantum chemistry, still a major challenge. Black-box search methods to find intermediates and transition-state structures might fail in such situations because of the high-dimensionality of the potential energy surface. Here, we propose the concept of interactive chemical reactivity exploration to effectively introduce the chemist's intuition into the search process. We employ a haptic pointer device with force feedback to allow the operator the direct manipulation of structures in three dimensions along with simultaneous perception of the quantum mechanical response upon structure modification as forces. We elaborate on the details of how such an interactive exploration should proceed and which technical difficulties need to be overcome. All reactivity-exploration concepts developed for this purpose have been implemented in the samson programming environment. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Interactive Chemical Reactivity Exploration

    CERN Document Server

    Haag, Moritz P; Bosson, Mael; Redon, Stephane; Reiher, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Elucidating chemical reactivity in complex molecular assemblies of a few hundred atoms is, despite the remarkable progress in quantum chemistry, still a major challenge. Black-box search methods to find intermediates and transition-state structures might fail in such situations because of the high-dimensionality of the potential energy surface. Here, we propose the concept of interactive chemical reactivity exploration to effectively introduce the chemist's intuition into the search process. We employ a haptic pointer device with force-feedback to allow the operator the direct manipulation of structures in three dimensions along with simultaneous perception of the quantum mechanical response upon structure modification as forces. We elaborate on the details of how such an interactive exploration should proceed and which technical difficulties need to be overcome. All reactivity-exploration concepts developed for this purpose have been implemented in the Samson programming environment.

  1. Local Control of Reactive Power by Distributed Photovoltaic Generators

    CERN Document Server

    Turitsyn, Konstantin S; Backhaus, Scott; Chertkov, Misha

    2010-01-01

    High penetration levels of distributed photovoltaic (PV) generation on an electrical distribution circuit may severely degrade power quality due to voltage sags and swells caused by rapidly varying PV generation during cloud transients coupled with the slow response of existing utility compensation and regulation equipment. Although not permitted under current standards for interconnection of distributed generation, fast-reacting, VAR-capable PV inverters may provide the necessary reactive power injection or consumption to maintain voltage regulation under difficult transient conditions. As side benefit, the control of reactive power injection at each PV inverter provides an opportunity and a new tool for distribution utilities to optimize the performance of distribution circuits, e.g. by minimizing thermal losses. We suggest a local control scheme that dispatches reactive power from each PV inverter based on local instantaneous measurements of the real and reactive components of the consumed power and the re...

  2. Protein degradation during reconsolidation as a mechanism for memory reorganization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bong-Kiun Kaang

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Memory is a reference formed from a past experience that is used to respond to present situations. However, the world is dynamic and situations change, so it is important to update the memory with new information each time it is reactivated in order to adjust the response in the future. Recent researches indicate that memory may undergo a dynamic process that could work as an updating mechanism. This process which is called reconsolidation involves destabilization of the memory after it is reactivated, followed by restabilization. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the initial destabilization process of reconsolidation requires protein degradation. Using protein degradation inhibition as a method to block reconsolidation, recent researches suggest that reconsolidation, especially the protein degradation-dependent destabilization process is necessary for memory reorganization.

  3. In silico prediction of acyl glucuronide reactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Tim; Lewis, Richard; Luker, Tim; Bonnert, Roger; Bernstein, Michael A.; Birkinshaw, Timothy N.; Thom, Stephen; Wenlock, Mark; Paine, Stuart

    2011-11-01

    Drugs and drug candidates containing a carboxylic acid moiety, including many widely used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are often metabolized to form acyl glucuronides (AGs). NSAIDs such as Ibuprofen are amongst the most widely used drugs on the market, whereas similar carboxylic acid drugs such as Suprofen have been withdrawn due to adverse events. Although the link between these AG metabolites and toxicity is not proven, there is circumstantial literature evidence to suggest that more reactive acyl glucuronides may, in some cases, present a greater risk of exhibiting toxic effects. We wished therefore to rank the reactivity of potential new carboxylate-containing drug candidates, and performed kinetic studies on synthetic acyl glucuronides to benchmark our key compounds. Driven by the desire to quickly rank the reactivity of compounds without the need for lengthy synthesis of the acyl glucuronide, a correlation was established between the degradation half-life of the acyl glucuronide and the half life for the hydrolysis of the more readily available methyl ester derivative. This finding enabled a considerable broadening of chemical property space to be investigated. The need for kinetic measurements was subsequently eliminated altogether by correlating the methyl ester hydrolysis half-life with the predicted 13C NMR chemical shift of the carbonyl carbon together with readily available steric descriptors in a PLS model. This completely in silico prediction of acyl glucuronide reactivity is applicable within the earliest stages of drug design with low cost and acceptable accuracy to guide intelligent molecular design. This reactivity data will be useful alongside the more complex additional pharmacokinetic exposure and distribution data that is generated later in the drug discovery process for assessing the overall toxicological risk of acidic drugs.

  4. Intermittent degradation and schizotypy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew W. Roché

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent degradation refers to transient detrimental disruptions in task performance. This phenomenon has been repeatedly observed in the performance data of patients with schizophrenia. Whether intermittent degradation is a feature of the liability for schizophrenia (i.e., schizotypy is an open question. Further, the specificity of intermittent degradation to schizotypy has yet to be investigated. To address these questions, 92 undergraduate participants completed a battery of self-report questionnaires assessing schizotypy and psychological state variables (e.g., anxiety, depression, and their reaction times were recorded as they did so. Intermittent degradation was defined as the number of times a subject’s reaction time for questionnaire items met or exceeded three standard deviations from his or her mean reaction time after controlling for each item’s information processing load. Intermittent degradation scores were correlated with questionnaire scores. Our results indicate that intermittent degradation is associated with total scores on measures of positive and disorganized schizotypy, but unrelated to total scores on measures of negative schizotypy and psychological state variables. Intermittent degradation is interpreted as potentially derivative of schizotypy and a candidate endophenotypic marker worthy of continued research.

  5. Silk structure and degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Song, Yu-wei; Jin, Li; Wang, Zhi-jian; Pu, De-yong; Lin, Shao-qiang; Zhou, Chan; You, Hua-jian; Ma, Yan; Li, Jin-min; Yang, Li; Sung, K L Paul; Zhang, Yao-guang

    2015-07-01

    To investigate the structure of silk and its degradation properties, we have monitored the structure of silk using scanning electron microscopy and frozen sections. Raw silk and degummed raw silk were immersed in four types of degradation solutions for 156 d to observe their degradation properties. The subcutaneous implants in rats were removed after 7, 14, 56, 84, 129, and 145 d for frozen sectioning and subsequent staining with hematoxylin and eosin (H.E.), DAPI, Beta-actin and Collagen I immunofluorescence staining. The in vitro weight loss ratio of raw silk and degummed raw silk in water, PBS, DMEM and DMEM containing 10% FBS (F-DMEM) were, respectively, 14%/11%, 12.5%/12.9%, 11.1%/14.3%, 8.8%/11.6%. Silk began to degrade after 7 d subcutaneous implantation and after 145 d non-degraded silk was still observed. These findings suggest the immunogenicity of fibroin and sericin had no essential difference. In the process of in vitro degradation of silk, the role of the enzyme is not significant. The in vivo degradation of silk is related to phagocytotic activity and fibroblasts may be involved in this process to secrete collagen. This study also shows the developing process of cocoons and raw silk.

  6. Reactive Turing machines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baeten, J.C.M.; Luttik, B.; Tilburg, P.J.A. van

    2013-01-01

    We propose reactive Turing machines (RTMs), extending classical Turing machines with a process-theoretical notion of interaction, and use it to define a notion of executable transition system. We show that every computable transition system with a bounded branching degree is simulated modulo diverge

  7. A Universal Reactive Machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Henrik Reif; Mørk, Simon; Sørensen, Morten U.

    1997-01-01

    Turing showed the existence of a model universal for the set of Turing machines in the sense that given an encoding of any Turing machine asinput the universal Turing machine simulates it. We introduce the concept of universality for reactive systems and construct a CCS processuniversal...

  8. Spring 5 & reactive streams

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Clozel, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Spring is a framework widely used by the world-wide Java community, and it is also extensively used at CERN. The accelerator control system is constituted of 10 million lines of Java code, spread across more than 1000 projects (jars) developed by 160 software engineers. Around half of this (all server-side Java code) is based on the Spring framework. Warning: the speakers will assume that people attending the seminar are familiar with Java and Spring’s basic concepts. Spring 5.0 and Spring Boot 2.0 updates (45 min) This talk will cover the big ticket items in the 5.0 release of Spring (including Kotlin support, @Nullable and JDK9) and provide an update on Spring Boot 2.0, which is scheduled for the end of the year. Reactive Spring (1h) Spring Framework 5.0 has been released - and it now supports reactive applications in the Spring ecosystem. During this presentation, we'll talk about the reactive foundations of Spring Framework with the Reactor project and the reactive streams specification. We'll al...

  9. Clojure reactive programming

    CERN Document Server

    Borges, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    If you are a Clojure developer who is interested in using Reactive Programming to build asynchronous and concurrent applications, this book is for you. Knowledge of Clojure and Leiningen is required. Basic understanding of ClojureScript will be helpful for the web chapters, although it is not strictly necessary.

  10. Chemical Reactivity Test (CRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaka, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-12-13

    The Chemical Reactivity Test (CRT) is used to determine the thermal stability of High Explosives (HEs) and chemical compatibility between (HEs) and alien materials. The CRT is one of the small-scale safety tests performed on HE at the High Explosives Applications Facility (HEAF).

  11. SPECIFIC DEGRADATION OF WATERSHEDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Boubacar KANE; Pierre Y.JULIEN

    2007-01-01

    An extensive database of reservoir sedimentation surveys throughout continental United States is compiled and analyzed to determine specific degradation SD relationships as function of mean annual rainfall R, drainage area A, and watershed slope S. The database contains 1463 field measurements and specific degradation relationships are defined as function of A, R and S. Weak trends and significant variability in the data are noticeable. Specific degradation measurements are log normally distributed with respect to R, A, and S and 95% confidence intervals are determined accordingly. The accuracy of the predictions does not significantly increase as more independent variables are added to the regression analyses.

  12. Thraustochytrid protists degrade hydrocarbons

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Raikar, M.T.; Raghukumar, S.; Vani, V.; David, J.J.; Chandramohan, D.

    Although thraustochytrid protists are known to be of widespread occurrence in the sea, their hydrocarbon-degrading abilities have never been investigated. We isolated thraustochytrids from coastal waters and sediments of Goa coast by enriching MPN...

  13. How do polymers degrade?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Suping

    2011-03-01

    Materials derived from agricultural products such as cellulose, starch, polylactide, etc. are more sustainable and environmentally benign than those derived from petroleum. However, applications of these polymers are limited by their processing properties, chemical and thermal stabilities. For example, polyethylene terephthalate fabrics last for many years under normal use conditions, but polylactide fabrics cannot due to chemical degradation. There are two primary mechanisms through which these polymers degrade: via hydrolysis and via oxidation. Both of these two mechanisms are related to combined factors such as monomer chemistry, chain configuration, chain mobility, crystallinity, and permeation to water and oxygen, and product geometry. In this talk, we will discuss how these materials degrade and how the degradation depends on these factors under application conditions. Both experimental studies and mathematical modeling will be presented.

  14. Degradation of implant materials

    CERN Document Server

    Eliaz, Noam

    2012-01-01

    This book surveys the degradation of implant materials, reviewing in detail such failure mechanisms as corrosion, fatigue and wear, along with monitoring techniques. Surveys common implant biomaterials, as well as procedures for implant retrieval and analysis.

  15. Environmental degradation in biocomposites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    John, Maya J

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available molecular chain scission, surface oxidation, and breakdown of molecules to form active radicals. The main degradation processes occurring by weathering includes photoradiation, thermal degradation, photooxidation, and hydrolysis [22,23]. The effect... which exhibits transitions from glassy stage to a rubbery stage at its glass transition temperature. ● Weathering Composites commonly used in automotive and aerospace applications are subjected to varying conditions of sunlight, rain, moisture...

  16. Bacteria and lignin degradation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing LI; Hongli YUAN; Jinshui YANG

    2009-01-01

    Lignin is both the most abundant aromatic (phenolic) polymer and the second most abundant raw material.It is degraded and modified by bacteria in the natural world,and bacteria seem to play a leading role in decomposing lignin in aquatic ecosystems.Lignin-degrading bacteria approach the polymer by mechanisms such as tunneling,erosion,and cavitation.With the advantages of immense environmental adaptability and biochemical versatility,bacteria deserve to be studied for their ligninolytic potential.

  17. Polyanhydride degradation and erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göpferich, A; Tessmar, J

    2002-10-16

    It was the intention of this paper to give a survey on the degradation and erosion of polyanhydrides. Due to the multitude of polymers that have been synthesized in this class of material in recent years, it was not possible to discuss all polyanhydrides that have gained in significance based on their application. It was rather the intention to provide a broad picture on polyanhydride degradation and erosion based on the knowledge that we have from those polymers that have been intensively investigated. To reach this goal this review contains several sections. First, the foundation for an understanding of the nomenclature are laid by defining degradation and erosion which was deemed necessary because many different definitions exist in the current literature. Next, the properties of major classes of anhydrides are reviewed and the impact of geometry on degradation and erosion is discussed. A complicated issue is the control of drug release from degradable polymers. Therefore, the aspect of erosion-controlled release and drug stability inside polyanhydrides are discussed. Towards the end of the paper models are briefly reviewed that describe the erosion of polyanhydrides. Empirical models as well as Monte-Carlo-based approaches are described. Finally it is outlined how theoretical models can help to answer the question why polyanhydrides are surface eroding. A look at the microstructure and the results from these models lead to the conclusion that polyanhydrides are surface eroding due to their fast degradation. However they switch to bulk erosion once the device dimensions drop below a critical limit.

  18. Advanced oxidation of acid and reactive dyes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arslan-Alaton, I.; Gursoy, B.H.; Schmidt, Jens Ejbye

    2008-01-01

    M) for 10:hsp sp="0.25" min Fenton treatment at pH 3, resulting in reduced chemical oxygen demand and dissolved organic carbon removal efficiencies; only acetate was detected as a stable dye oxidation end product. During anaerobic digestion, 100, 29% and no inhibition in methane production was observed...... for the untreated blue, red and orange dyes, respectively. The inhibitory effect of the blue reactive dye on methane production was ∼21% after Fenton treatment. Neither untreated nor treated dyes exhibited an inhibitory effect on denitrification. Aerobic glucose degradation was inhibited by 23-29% by untreated dyes......The effect of untreated and Fenton-treated acid dyes (C.I. Acid Red 183 and C.I. Acid Orange 51) and a reactive dye (C.I. Reactive Blue 4) on aerobic, anoxic and anaerobic processes was investigated. The optimum Fe2+:H2O2 molar ratio was selected as 1:5 (4:hsp sp="0.25" mM:20:hsp sp="0.25"m...

  19. DDE remediation and degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, John E; Ou, Li-Tse; All-Agely, Abid

    2008-01-01

    DDT and its metabolites, DDD and DDE, have been shown to be recalcitrant to degradation. The parent compound, DDT, was used extensively worldwide starting in 1939 and was banned in the United States in 1973. The daughter compound, DDE, may result from aerobic degradation, abiotic dehydrochlorination, or photochemical decomposition. DDE has also occurred as a contaminant in commercial-grade DDT. The p,p'-DDE isomer is more biologically active than the o,p-DDE, with a reported half-life of -5.7 years. However, when DDT was repeatedly applied to the soil, the DDE concentration may remain unchanged for more than 20 yr. Remediation of DDE-contaminated soil and water may be done by several techniques. Phytoremediation involves translocating DDT, DDD, and DDE from the soil into the plant, although some aquatic species (duckweed > elodea > parrot feather) can transform DDT into predominantly DDD with some DDE being formed. Of all the plants that can uptake DDE, Cucurbita pepo has been the most extensively studied, with translocation values approaching "hyperaccumulation" levels. Soil moisture, temperature, and plant density have all been documented as important factors in the uptake of DDE by Cucurbita pepo. Uptake may also be influenced positively by amendments such as biosurfactants, mycorrhizal inoculants, and low molecular weight organic acids (e.g., citric and oxalic acids). DDE microbial degradation by dehalogenases, dioxygenases, and hydrolases occurs under the proper conditions. Although several aerobic degradation pathways have been proposed, none has been fully verified. Very few aerobic pure cultures are capable of fully degrading DDE to CO2. Cometabolism of DDE by Pseudomonas sp., Alicaligens sp., and Terrabacter sp. grown on biphenyl has been reported; however, not all bacterial species that produce biphenyl dioxygenase degraded DDE. Arsenic and copper inhibit DDE degradation by aerobic microorganisms. Similarly, metal chelates such as EDTA inhibit the

  20. Decolorization and biodegradation of azo dye, reactive blue 59 by aerobic granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolekar, Yogesh M; Nemade, Harshal N; Markad, Vijay L; Adav, Sunil S; Patole, Milind S; Kodam, Kisan M

    2012-01-01

    The present study deals with development of aerobic granules from textile wastewater sludge and challenged with different concentration of reactive blue 59 (RB59) to test their dye degradation potential. The granules efficiently degraded reactive blue 59 and also sustained higher dye loading of up to 5.0 g l(-1). The significant induction of enzymes azoreductase and cytochrome P-450 indicated their prominent role in the dye degradation while genotoxicity studies demonstrated that the biotransformed product of the dye as non-toxic. The microbial community of the textile dyes degrading aerobic sludge granules analyzed by polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE), revealed significantly diverse dye degrading microbial community belonging to alpha-, beta-, and gamma-proteobacteria.

  1. Reactive Air Aluminization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jung-Pyung; Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2011-10-28

    Ferritic stainless steels and other alloys are of great interest to SOFC developers for applications such as interconnects, cell frames, and balance of plant components. While these alloys offer significant advantages (e.g., low material and manufacturing cost, high thermal conductivity, and high temperature oxidation resistance), there are challenges which can hinder their utilization in SOFC systems; these challenges include Cr volatility and reactivity with glass seals. To overcome these challenges, protective coatings and surface treatments for the alloys are under development. In particular, aluminization of alloy surfaces offers the potential for mitigating both evaporation of Cr from the alloy surface and reaction of alloy constituents with glass seals. Commercial aluminization processes are available to SOFC developers, but they tend to be costly due to their use of exotic raw materials and/or processing conditions. As an alternative, PNNL has developed Reactive Air Aluminization (RAA), which offers a low-cost, simpler alternative to conventional aluminization methods.

  2. Photo-cross-linked poly(ethylene carbonate) elastomers: synthesis, in vivo degradation, and determination of in vivo degradation mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornacchione, L A; Qi, B; Bianco, J; Zhou, Z; Amsden, B G

    2012-10-01

    Low-molecular-weight poly(ethylene carbonate) diols of varying molecular weight were generated through catalyzed thermal degradation of high-molecular-weight poly(ethylene carbonate). These polymers were then end functionalized with acrylate groups. The resulting α,ω-diacrylates were effectively photo-cross-linked upon exposure to long-wave UV light in the presence of a photoinitiator to yield rubbery networks of low sol content. The degree of cross-linking effectively controlled the in vivo degradation rate of the networks by adherent macrophages; higher cross-link densities yielded slower degradation rates. The cross-link density did not affect the number of adherent macrophages at the elastomer/tissue interface, indicating that cross-linking affected the susceptibility of the elastomer to degradative species released by the macrophages. The reactive species likely responsible for in vivo degradation appears to be superoxide anion, as the in vivo results were in agreement with in vitro degradation via superoxide anion, while cholesterol esterase, known to degrade similar poly(alkylene carbonate)s, had no affect on elastomer degradation.

  3. Drift Degradation Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Kicker

    2004-09-16

    Degradation of underground openings as a function of time is a natural and expected occurrence for any subsurface excavation. Over time, changes occur to both the stress condition and the strength of the rock mass due to several interacting factors. Once the factors contributing to degradation are characterized, the effects of drift degradation can typically be mitigated through appropriate design and maintenance of the ground support system. However, for the emplacement drifts of the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, it is necessary to characterize drift degradation over a 10,000-year period, which is well beyond the functional period of the ground support system. This document provides an analysis of the amount of drift degradation anticipated in repository emplacement drifts for discrete events and time increments extending throughout the 10,000-year regulatory period for postclosure performance. This revision of the drift degradation analysis was developed to support the license application and fulfill specific agreement items between the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The earlier versions of ''Drift Degradation Analysis'' (BSC 2001 [DIRS 156304]) relied primarily on the DRKBA numerical code, which provides for a probabilistic key-block assessment based on realistic fracture patterns determined from field mapping in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) at Yucca Mountain. A key block is defined as a critical block in the surrounding rock mass of an excavation, which is removable and oriented in an unsafe manner such that it is likely to move into an opening unless support is provided. However, the use of the DRKBA code to determine potential rockfall data at the repository horizon during the postclosure period has several limitations: (1) The DRKBA code cannot explicitly apply dynamic loads due to seismic ground motion. (2) The DRKBA code cannot explicitly apply loads due to thermal

  4. Microbial diversity in a continuous system based on rice husks for biodegradation of the azo dyes Reactive Red 2 and Reactive Black 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forss, Jörgen; Pinhassi, Jarone; Lindh, Markus; Welander, Ulrika

    2013-02-01

    In the present study the degradation of two common azo dyes used in dye houses today, Reactive Black 5 and Reactive Red 2 was evaluated in biofilters. In two experiments, bioreactors performed over 80% decolorization at a hydraulic retention time of only 28.4h with little production of metabolites. Molecular analyses showed a diverse and dynamic bacterial community composition in the bioreactors, including members of the Bacteroidetes, Acinetobacter (Gammaproteobacteria) and Clostridium (Firmicutes) that possess the capacity to reduce azo dyes. Collectively, the results indicate that the development of mixed bacterial communities from natural biomaterials contributes to an efficient and robust degradation performance in bioreactors even at high concentration of dyes.

  5. Microbial degradation of herbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Baljinder; Singh, Kashmir

    2016-01-01

    Herbicides remain the most effective, efficient and economical way to control weeds; and its market continues to grow even with the plethora of generic products. With the development of herbicide-tolerant crops, use of herbicides is increasing around the world that has resulted in severe contamination of the environment. The strategies are now being developed to clean these substances in an economical and eco-friendly manner. In this review, an attempt has been made to pool all the available literature on the biodegradation of key herbicides, clodinafop propargyl, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, atrazine, metolachlor, diuron, glyphosate, imazapyr, pendimethalin and paraquat under the following objectives: (1) to highlight the general characteristic and mode of action, (2) to enlist toxicity in animals, (3) to pool microorganisms capable of degrading herbicides, (4) to discuss the assessment of herbicides degradation by efficient microbes, (5) to highlight biodegradation pathways, (6) to discuss the molecular basis of degradation, (7) to enlist the products of herbicides under degradation process, (8) to highlight the factors effecting biodegradation of herbicides and (9) to discuss the future aspects of herbicides degradation. This review may be useful in developing safer and economic microbiological methods for cleanup of soil and water contaminated with such compounds.

  6. Programming Reactive Extensions and LINQ

    CERN Document Server

    Liberty, Jesse

    2011-01-01

    Pro Reactive Extensions and LINQ is a deep dive into the next important technology for .NET developers: Reactive Extensions. This in-depth tutorial goes beyond what is available anywhere else to teach how to write WPF, Silverlight, and Windows Phone applications using the Reactive Extensions (Rx) to handle events and asynchronous method calls. Reactive programming allows you to turn those aspects of your code that are currently imperative into something much more event-driven and flexible. For this reason, it's sometimes referred to as LINQ for Events. Reactive programming hinges on the concep

  7. Motor degradation prediction methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, J.R.; Kelly, J.F.; Delzingaro, M.J.

    1996-12-01

    Motor Operated Valve (MOV) squirrel cage AC motor rotors are susceptible to degradation under certain conditions. Premature failure can result due to high humidity/temperature environments, high running load conditions, extended periods at locked rotor conditions (i.e. > 15 seconds) or exceeding the motor`s duty cycle by frequent starts or multiple valve stroking. Exposure to high heat and moisture due to packing leaks, pressure seal ring leakage or other causes can significantly accelerate the degradation. ComEd and Liberty Technologies have worked together to provide and validate a non-intrusive method using motor power diagnostics to evaluate MOV rotor condition and predict failure. These techniques have provided a quick, low radiation dose method to evaluate inaccessible motors, identify degradation and allow scheduled replacement of motors prior to catastrophic failures.

  8. Antifoam degradation testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, D. P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Ecology Lab. (SREL); Zamecnik, J. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Ecology Lab. (SREL); Newell, D. D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Ecology Lab. (SREL); Williams, M. S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Ecology Lab. (SREL)

    2015-08-20

    This report describes the results of testing to quantify the degradation products resulting from the dilution and storage of Antifoam 747. Antifoam degradation is of concern to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) due to flammable decomposition products in the vapor phase of the Chemical Process Cell vessels, as well as the collection of flammable and organic species in the offgas condensate. The discovery that hexamethyldisiloxane is formed from the antifoam decomposition was the basis for a Potential Inadequacy in the Safety Analysis declaration by the DWPF.

  9. Photovoltaic Degradation Risk: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, D. C.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2012-04-01

    The ability to accurately predict power delivery over the course of time is of vital importance to the growth of the photovoltaic (PV) industry. Important cost drivers include the efficiency with which sunlight is converted into power, how this relationship changes over time, and the uncertainty in this prediction. An accurate quantification of power decline over time, also known as degradation rate, is essential to all stakeholders - utility companies, integrators, investors, and researchers alike. In this paper we use a statistical approach based on historical data to quantify degradation rates, discern trends and quantify risks related to measurement uncertainties, number of measurements and methodologies.

  10. Nonquaternary Cholinesterase Reactivators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-26

    C2H5O(e)P(O)OX + H20 - products (15) K BOX __a__ OX + H+ (16) Equations (7) and (8) show the reaction of enzyme (EOH) with EPMP to yield ethyl ...kinetics. The reactivation of ethyl methylphosphonyl-AChE proceeds via the mechanism shown in equation (14): K rr OX + EOP [OX°EOP] - EOP + products (14... ether eluant. The crude product was dissolved in a minimal amount of ether and placed on a silica-gel column. Fractions of 40 mL were collected and

  11. Bacterial Degradation of Pesticides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Berith Elkær

    could potentially improve bioremediation of BAM. An important prerequisite for bioaugmentation is the potential to produce the degrader strain at large quantities within reasonable time. The aim of manuscript II, was to optimize the growth medium for Aminobacter MSH1 and to elucidate optimal growth...

  12. Options for Control of Reactive Power by Distributed Photovoltaic Generators

    CERN Document Server

    Sulc, Petr; Backhaus, Scott; Chertkov, Michael

    2010-01-01

    High penetration levels of distributed photovoltaic(PV) generation on an electrical distribution circuit present several challenges and opportunities for distribution utilities. Rapidly varying irradiance conditions may cause voltage sags and swells that cannot be compensated by slowly responding utility equipment resulting in a degradation of power quality. Although not permitted under current standards for interconnection of distributed generation, fast-reacting, VAR-capable PV inverters may provide the necessary reactive power injection or consumption to maintain voltage regulation under difficult transient conditions. As side benefit, the control of reactive power injection at each PV inverter provides an opportunity and a new tool for distribution utilities to optimize the performance of distribution circuits, e.g. by minimizing thermal losses. We discuss and compare via simulation various design options for control systems to manage the reactive power generated by these inverters. An important design de...

  13. Detection of pump degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, R.H.; Casada, D.A.; Ayers, C.W. [and others

    1995-08-01

    This Phase II Nuclear Plant Aging Research study examines the methods of detecting pump degradation that are currently employed in domestic and overseas nuclear facilities. This report evaluates the criteria mandated by required pump testing at U.S. nuclear power plants and compares them to those features characteristic of state-of-the-art diagnostic programs and practices currently implemented by other major industries. Since the working condition of the pump driver is crucial to pump operability, a brief review of new applications of motor diagnostics is provided that highlights recent developments in this technology. The routine collection and analysis of spectral data is superior to all other technologies in its ability to accurately detect numerous types and causes of pump degradation. Existing ASME Code testing criteria do not require the evaluation of pump vibration spectra but instead overall vibration amplitude. The mechanical information discernible from vibration amplitude analysis is limited, and several cases of pump failure were not detected in their early stages by vibration monitoring. Since spectral analysis can provide a wealth of pertinent information concerning the mechanical condition of rotating machinery, its incorporation into ASME testing criteria could merit a relaxation in the monthly-to-quarterly testing schedules that seek to verify and assure pump operability. Pump drivers are not included in the current battery of testing. Operational problems thought to be caused by pump degradation were found to be the result of motor degradation. Recent advances in nonintrusive monitoring techniques have made motor diagnostics a viable technology for assessing motor operability. Motor current/power analysis can detect rotor bar degradation and ascertain ranges of hydraulically unstable operation for a particular pump and motor set. The concept of using motor current or power fluctuations as an indicator of pump hydraulic load stability is presented.

  14. Radiolysis of Reactive Azo Dyes in Aqueous Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustin N.M. Bagyo

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available The effects of radiation on aerated reactive dye solutions i.e Cibacron Violet, Cibacron Orange and Cibacron Yellow solutions have been studied. Parameters analysis were the change of pH after radiation, the change of absorption, degradation products and effects of pH on the radiolysis. The uv-vis absorption of solutions were observed before and after irradiation. pH variation was done from pHs 3, 5, 7, 9 and 12. Irradiation was done at doses of 0, 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 kGy with dose rate of 5 kGy/h and was determined by a Fricke dosimeter. HPLC with UV detector was used to analyze the degradation products. Oxalic acid was the main degradation product and small amount of succinic acid was also detected.

  15. Introducing new reactivity descriptors: "Bond reactivity indices." Comparison of the new definitions and atomic reactivity indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Márquez, Jesús

    2016-11-01

    A new methodology to obtain reactivity indices has been defined. This is based on reactivity functions such as the Fukui function or the dual descriptor and makes it possible to project the information of reactivity functions over molecular orbitals instead of the atoms of the molecule (atomic reactivity indices). The methodology focuses on the molecule's natural bond orbitals (bond reactivity indices) because these orbitals (with physical meaning) have the advantage of being very localized, allowing the reaction site of an electrophile or nucleophile to be determined within a very precise molecular region. This methodology gives a reactivity index for every Natural Bond Orbital (NBO), and we have verified that they have equivalent information to the reactivity functions. A representative set of molecules has been used to test the new definitions. Also, the bond reactivity index has been related with the atomic reactivity one, and complementary information has been obtained from the comparison. Finally, a new atomic reactivity index has been defined and compared with previous definitions.

  16. Familial reactive perforating collagenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhat Yasmeen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reactive perforating collagenosis (RPC is one of the rare forms of transepidermal elimination in which genetically altered collagen is extruded from the epidermis. This disease usually starts in early childhood as asymptomatic umbilicated papules on extremities, and the lesions become more conspicuous with age. Aims: The objective of our study was to determine the clinico-pathological features of RPC and the response to various treatment modalities. Methods: Ten patients of RPC, belonging to five different families, were studied clinically. Various laboratory investigations were carried out and diagnosis was made by histopathology of the lesions. Patients were given various topical and oral treatments. Results: RPC is familial in most cases without any definite inheritance pattern. It begins in childhood and the lesions are usually recurrent and become profuse and large with age. Systemic diseases have no role in the onset of lesions. Conclusion: Oral and topical retinoids in combination with emollients is the best treatment option.

  17. Decolorization and degradation of textile dyes with biosulfidogenic hydrogenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutambanengwe, C C Z; Togo, C A; Whiteley, C G

    2007-01-01

    Successful decolorization of azo dyes (Orange II, Amido Black 10, Reactive Black 5, and Reactive Red 120) and industrial textile dye influents and effluents with sulfate-reducing bacteria from within a biosulfidogenic reactor was achieved with decolorizations ranging from 96% to 49% over 144 h. Concomitant with the decrease in absorbance of the dye in the visible region (480-620 nm) was an increase in the absorbance at 280 nm, over 48 h, suggesting an increase in concentration of single aromatic amines. With an extended period of time there was a subsequent decrease in the absorbance at 280 nm indicating that the aromatic amines had been degraded. The anthraquinone dye, Reactive Blue 2, remained unchanged after 144 h of incubation in the biosulfidogenic reactor and was only rapidly decolored at 192 h, implying that certain factors are induced in the reactor to break down this non-azo dye. The fastest decolorization/degradation rates and highest hydrogenase enzyme production were observed with Orange II, while the slowest decolorization/degradation rate and least enzyme production were with Reactive Blue 2, suggesting that these processes are controlled, to a certain degree, by an enzymatic mechanism. With sulfate-reducing bacteria that had been cultured on a lactate medium, there was complete decolorization of both authentic dyes and industrial influents and effluents as monitored by the decrease of absorbance in the visible region (480-620 nm). There was, however, very little breakdown of the single aromatic compounds as the absorbance at 280 nm remained fairly significant. This supports the suggestion that, within the biosulfidogenic reactor, there are factors other than the identified hydrogenases that are responsible for degradation of the aromatic compounds.

  18. Endocytic collagen degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Daniel H.; Jürgensen, Henrik J.; Ingvarsen, Signe;

    2012-01-01

    it crucially important to understand both the collagen synthesis and turnover mechanisms in this condition. Here we show that the endocytic collagen receptor, uPARAP/Endo180, is a major determinant in governing the balance between collagen deposition and degradation. Cirrhotic human livers displayed a marked......Fibrosis of the liver and its end-stage, cirrhosis, represent major health problems worldwide. In these fibrotic conditions, activated fibroblasts and hepatic stellate cells display a net deposition of collagen. This collagen deposition is a major factor leading to liver dysfunction, thus making...... up-regulation of uPARAP/Endo180 in activated fibroblasts and hepatic stellate cells located close to the collagen deposits. In a hepatic stellate cell line, uPARAP/Endo180 was shown to be active in, and required for, the uptake and intracellular degradation of collagen. To evaluate the functional...

  19. Nylon separators. [thermal degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, H. S.

    1977-01-01

    A nylon separator was placed in a flooded condition in K0H solution and heated at various high temperatures ranging from 60 C to 110 C. The weight decrease was measured and the molecular weight and decomposition product were analyzed to determine: (1) the effect of K0H concentration on the hydrolysis rate; (2) the effect of K0H concentration on nylon degradation; (3) the activation energy at different K0H concentrations; and (4) the effect of oxygen on nylon degradation. The nylon hydrolysis rate is shown to increase as K0H concentration is decreased 34%, giving a maximum rate at about 16%. Separator hydrolysis is confirmed by molecular weight decrease in age of the batteries, and the reaction of nylon with molecular oxygen is probably negligible, compared to hydrolysis. The extrapolated rate value from the high temperature experiment correlates well with experimental values at 35 degrees.

  20. TALSPEAK Solvent Degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leigh R. Martin; Bruce J. Mincher

    2009-09-01

    Understanding the radiolytic degradation behavior of organic molecules involved in new or existing schemes for the recycle of used nuclear fuels is of significant interest for sustaining a closed nuclear fuel cycle. Here we have conducted several lines of investigation to begin understanding the effects of radiolysis on the aqueous phase of the TALSPEAK process for the separation of the trivalent lanthanides from the trivalent actinides. Using the 60-Co irradiator at the INL, we have begun to quantify the effects of radiation on the aqueous phase complexants used in this separation technique, and how this will affect the actinide lanthanide separation factor. In addition we have started to develop methodologies for stable product identification, a key element in determining the degradation pathways. We have also introduced a methodology to investigate the effects of alpha radiolysis that has previously received limited attention.

  1. Detection of pump degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casada, D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-04-01

    There are a variety of stressors that can affect the operation of centrifugal pumps. Although these general stressors are active in essentially all centrifugal pumps, the stressor level and the extent of wear and degradation can vary greatly. Parameters that affect the extent of stressor activity are manifold. In order to assure the long-term operational readiness of a pump, it is important to both understand the nature and magnitude of the specific degradation mechanisms and to monitor the performance of the pump. The most commonly applied method of monitoring the condition of not only pumps, but rotating machinery in general, is vibration analysis. Periodic or continuous special vibration analysis is a cornerstone of most pump monitoring programs. In the nuclear industry, non-spectral vibration monitoring of safety-related pumps is performed in accordance with the ASME code. Pump head and flow rate are also monitored, per code requirements. Although vibration analysis has dominated the condition monitoring field for many years, there are other measures that have been historically used to help understand pump condition; advances in historically applied technologies and developing technologies offer improved monitoring capabilities. The capabilities of several technologies (including vibration analysis, dynamic pressure analysis, and motor power analysis) to detect the presence and magnitude of both stressors and resultant degradation are discussed.

  2. Biogeochemical Cycles in Degraded Lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Eric A.; Vieira, Ima Celia G.; ReisdeCarvalho, Claudio Jose; DeanedeAbreuSa, Tatiana; deSouzaMoutinho, Paulo R.; Figueiredo, Ricardo O.; Stone, Thomas A.

    2004-01-01

    The objectives of this project were to define and describe the types of landscapes that fall under the broad category of "degraded lands" and to study biogeochemical cycles across this range of degradation found in secondary forests. We define degraded land as that which has lost part of its capacity of renovation of a productive ecosystem, either in the context of agroecosystems or as native communities of vegetation. This definition of degradation permits evaluation of biogeochemical constraints to future land uses.

  3. Ordered bulk degradation via autophagy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dengjel, Jörn; Kristensen, Anders Riis; Andersen, Jens S

    2008-01-01

    at proteasomal and lysosomal degradation ample cross-talk between the two degradation pathways became evident. Degradation via autophagy appeared to be ordered and regulated at the protein complex/organelle level. This raises several important questions such as: can macroautophagy itself be specific and what...

  4. Reactive Programming of Cellular Automata

    OpenAIRE

    Boussinot, Frédéric

    2004-01-01

    Implementation of cellular automata using reactive programming gives a way to code cell behaviors in an abstract and modular way. Multiprocessing also becomes possible. The paper describes the implementation of cellular automata with the reactive programming language LOFT, a thread-based extension of C. Self replicating loops considered in artificial life are coded to show the interest of the approach.

  5. Degradation and toxicity reduction of textile dyestuff by ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezcanli-Guyer, G; Ince, N H

    2003-07-01

    Degradability of four textile dyes was investigated in deionized water solutions during 520 kHz ultrasonic irradiation. It was found that for all dyes, the rate of color decay was first order in the visible absorption of the dye, and related to the type of functional groups that characterized the chromophore in the dye molecules. The destruction of aromatic/olefinic carbons in azo dyes was slower than that of color--to be attributed to the priority of hydroxyl radical attack on the N=N bonds, and to the formation of numerous oxidation intermediates of organic character during the course of dye degradation. Toxicity analysis of the dye solutions prior to sonolysis revealed that "reactive" dyes were non-toxic, but "basic" ones were toxic at the test concentrations employed in the study. Significant degrees of toxicity reduction were accomplished along with color and aromatic carbon degradation.

  6. Photooxidation of cellulose nitrate: new insights into degradation mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthumeyrie, Sebastien; Collin, Steeve; Bussiere, Pierre-Olivier; Therias, Sandrine

    2014-05-15

    Cellulose nitrate (or nitrocellulose) has received considerable interest due to its uses in various applications, such as paints, photographic films and propellants. However, it is considered as one of the primary pollutants in the energetic material industries because it can be degraded to form polluting chemical species. In this work, the UV light degradation of cellulose nitrate films was studied under conditions of artificially accelerated photooxidation. To eliminate the reactivity of nitro groups, the degradation of ethylcellulose was also investigated. Infrared spectroscopy analyses of the chemical modifications caused by the photooxidation of cellulose nitrate films and the resulting formation of volatile products revealed the occurrence of de-nitration and the formation of oxidation photoproducts exhibiting lactone and anhydride functions. The impact of these chemical modifications on the mechanical and thermal properties of cellulose nitrate films includes embrittlement and lower temperatures of ignition when used as a propellant.

  7. A Tariff for Reactive Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kueck, John D [ORNL; Kirby, Brendan J [ORNL; Li, Fangxing [ORNL; Tufon, Christopher [Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Isemonger, Alan [California Independent System Operator

    2008-07-01

    Two kinds of power are required to operate an electric power system: real power, measured in watts, and reactive power, measured in volt-amperes reactive or VARs. Reactive power supply is one of a class of power system reliability services collectively known as ancillary services, and is essential for the reliable operation of the bulk power system. Reactive power flows when current leads or lags behind voltage. Typically, the current in a distribution system lags behind voltage because of inductive loads such as motors. Reactive power flow wastes energy and capacity and causes voltage droop. To correct lagging power flow, leading reactive power (current leading voltage) is supplied to bring the current into phase with voltage. When the current is in phase with voltage, there is a reduction in system losses, an increase in system capacity, and a rise in voltage. Reactive power can be supplied from either static or dynamic VAR sources. Static sources are typically transmission and distribution equipment, such as capacitors at substations, and their cost has historically been included in the revenue requirement of the transmission operator (TO), and recovered through cost-of-service rates. By contrast, dynamic sources are typically generators capable of producing variable levels of reactive power by automatically controlling the generator to regulate voltage. Transmission system devices such as synchronous condensers can also provide dynamic reactive power. A class of solid state devices (called flexible AC transmission system devices or FACTs) can provide dynamic reactive power. One specific device has the unfortunate name of static VAR compensator (SVC), where 'static' refers to the solid state nature of the device (it does not include rotating equipment) and not to the production of static reactive power. Dynamic sources at the distribution level, while more costly would be very useful in helping to regulate local voltage. Local voltage regulation would

  8. Degradation of p-Nitrophenol on Biochars: Role of Persistent Free Radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; Pan, Bo; Li, Hao; Liao, Shaohua; Zhang, Di; Wu, Min; Xing, Baoshan

    2016-01-19

    Generation of environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFRs) on solid particles has recently attracted increasing research interest. EPFRs potentially have high reactivity and toxicity. However, the impact of EPFRs on organic contaminant behavior is unclear. We hypothesized that EPFRs in biochars can degrade organic contaminants and play an important role in organic contaminant behavior. We observed obvious degradation of p-nitrophenol (PNP) in the presence of biochars, through the detection of NO3(-) as well as organic byproducts. The extent of PNP degradation was correlated to the intensity of EPR signals of biochar particles. tert-Butanol (a •OH scavenger) did not completely inhibit PNP degradation, indicating that •OH could not fully explain PNP degradation. The decreased PNP degradation after tert-butanol addition was better correlated with reduced PNP sorption on biochars. PNP degradation through the direct contact with EPFRs in biochar particles could be an important contribution to the PNP concentration reduction in the aqueous phase. The coating of natural organic matter analogue (tannic acid) on biochars did not considerably inhibit PNP degradation, suggesting the ability of biochars to degrade PNP in soil and natural water. Similar EPFR-promoted degradation was observed for five different types of biochars and one activated carbon, as well as one additional chemical (p-aminophenol). Therefore, organic chemical degradation by EPFRs in biochars can be a common process in the environment and should be incorporated in organic chemical fate and risk studies.

  9. Statistical modeling for degradation data

    CERN Document Server

    Lio, Yuhlong; Ng, Hon; Tsai, Tzong-Ru

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on the statistical aspects of the analysis of degradation data. In recent years, degradation data analysis has come to play an increasingly important role in different disciplines such as reliability, public health sciences, and finance. For example, information on products’ reliability can be obtained by analyzing degradation data. In addition, statistical modeling and inference techniques have been developed on the basis of different degradation measures. The book brings together experts engaged in statistical modeling and inference, presenting and discussing important recent advances in degradation data analysis and related applications. The topics covered are timely and have considerable potential to impact both statistics and reliability engineering.

  10. Bacterial degradation of detergent compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodnow, R A; Harrison, A P

    1972-10-01

    A survey for surfactant degradation among aerobic bacteria has been undertaken. Tests have been made in peptone medium where such a degradation, if it occurs, will be gratuitous. Tallow-alkyl-sulfate, alkyl-ethoxylate-sulfate, and linear-alkyl-benzene-sulfonate were used. Forty-five strains of 34 species in 19 genera degrade one or more of these detergent compounds. With some species, the surfactant inhibits degradation without inhibiting growth, whereas with one species slight degradation took place even at a toxic concentration of surfactant.

  11. Generalized Reactive Manufacturing System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李蓓智

    2001-01-01

    Generalized reactive manufacturing system named GRMS is introduced. GRMS is a human-centered system based on Multi-agent. Its management and control organization is made up of three types of agents named device agent,task agent and shop-floor agent. GRMS adopts a top down and bottom- up competition and cooperation strategy based on the dynamic sifter and funnel To constrain the behavior of agents, a reward and penaity policy is introduced into the system and the closed-loop adjustment of GRMS is realized through such policy.Agents for the same task should be cooperated with each other and agents for different tasks should compete for survival in the dynamic changing environment. A distributed-hierarchical architecture with three levels of master-slave relationships among agents are proposed.Self-propelled process planning is also discussed. In order to evaluate GRMS, a time-driven simulation system-GRMOSS is developed to check the physical consistency of GRMS.

  12. Preparation, Cell Compatibility and Degradability of Collagen-Modified Poly(lactic acid)

    OpenAIRE

    Miaomiao Cui; Leili Liu; Ning Guo; Ruixia Su; Feng Ma

    2015-01-01

    Poly(lactic acid) (PLA) was modified using collagen through a grafting method to improve its biocompatibility and degradability. The carboxylic group at the open end of PLA was transferred into the reactive acylchlorided group by a reaction with phosphorus pentachloride. Then, collagen-modified PLA (collagen-PLA) was prepared by the reaction between the reactive acylchlorided group and amino/hydroxyl groups on collagen. Subsequently, the structure of collagen-PLA was confirmed by Fourier t...

  13. Degradation of copepod fecal pellets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Louise K.; Iversen, Morten

    2008-01-01

    Copepod fecal pellets are often degraded at high rates within the upper part of the water column. However, the identity of the degraders and the processes governing the degradation remain unresolved. To identify the pellet degraders we collected water from Oresund (Denmark) approximately every...... second month from July 2004 to July 2005. These water samples were divided into 5 fractions (pellet degradation rate and species composition of the plankton from triplicate incubations of each fraction and a known, added...... amount of fecal pellets. The total degradation rate of pellets by the natural plankton community of Oresund followed the phytoplankton biomass, with maximum degradation rate during the spring bloom (2.5 +/- 0.49 d(-1)) and minimum (0.52 +/- 0.14 d(-1)) during late winter. Total pellet removal rate ranged...

  14. Photothermal degradation studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    Key reaction intermediates of photooxidation identified and characterized by laser flash Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectroscopy were discussed. Effects of temperature and ultraviolet intensity were studied in order to develop meaningful accelerated testing procedures for encapsulant evaluation. In a program to study the failure of Tedlar/ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA)/stainless steel modules, failure modes similar to those observed outdoors in real-time conditions were simulated in accelerated testing. An experimental technique was developed to quantitatively assess the extent of degradation.

  15. Photocatalytic Degradation of Methylene Blue using ZnO Nano-Particles

    OpenAIRE

    Rezaee, A.; H Masombaigi; Nasiri, A

    2009-01-01

    "nBackgrounds and Objectives: Textile industrial wastewaters are one of the important sources of environmental contaminants. In the recent years, use of advanced oxidation processes, by producing highly active and reactive components such as hydroxyl radicals has been proposed. The aim of this research is photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue dye using the ZnO-nanoparticle with UVA irradiation. "nMaterials and Methods: photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue color using the ZnO- n...

  16. Investigation of Monoterpene Degradation in the Atmospheric Simulation Chamber SAPHIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Martin; Acir, Ismail-Hakki; Bohn, Birger; Brauers, Theo; Dorn, Hans-Peter; Fuchs, Hendrik; Haeseler, Rolf; Hofzumahaus, Andreas; Li, Xin; Lutz, Anna; Nehr, Sascha; Rohrer, Franz; Tillmann, Ralf; Wegener, Robert; Wahner, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    Monoterpenes are the volatile organic compound (VOC) species with the highest emission rates on a global scale beside isoprene. In the atmosphere these compounds are rapidly oxidized. Due to their high reactivity towards hydroxyl radicals (OH) they determine the radical chemistry under biogenic conditions if monoterpene concentration is higher than isoprene concentration. Recent field campaigns showed large discrepancies between measured and modeled OH concentration at low NOx conditions together with high reactivity of VOC towards OH (Hofzumahaus et al. 2009) especially in tropical forest areas (Lelieveld et al. 2008). These discrepancies were partly explained by new reaction pathways in the isoprene degradation mechanism (Whalley et al 2011). However, even an additional recycling rate of 2.7 was insufficient to explain the measured OH concentration. So other VOC species could be involved in a nonclassical OH recycling. Since the discrepancies in OH also occurred in the morning hours when the OH chemistry was mainly dominated by monoterpenes, it was assumed that also the degradation of monoterpenes may lead to OH recycling in the absence of NO. (Whalley et al 2011). The photochemical degradation of four monoterpene species was studied under high VOC reactivity and low NOx conditions in a dedicated series of experiments in the atmospheric simulation chamber SAPHIR from August to September 2012 to overcome the lack of mechanistic information for monoterpene degradation schemes. α-Pinene, β-pinene and limonene were chosen as most prominent representatives of this substance class. Moreover the degradation of myrcene was investigated due to its structural analogy to isoprene. The SAPHIR chamber was equipped with instrumentation to measure all important OH precursors (O3, HONO, HCHO), the parent VOC and their main oxidation products, radicals (OH, HO2, RO2), the total OH reactivity, and photolysis frequencies to investigate the degradation mechanism of monoterpenes in

  17. Reatividade animal Confinement reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walsiara Estanislau Maffei

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available A reatividade é definida como a reação do animal quando contido num ambiente de contenção móvel. Ela é quantificada por meio do teste de reatividade animal em ambiente de contenção móvel - REATEST®. Este teste consiste num dispositivo eletrônico acoplado à balança e num software específico. O dispositivo capta a movimentação que o animal provoca na balança, durante 20 segundos e a envia para o software que a processa determinando a reatividade do animal numa escala contínua de pontos. Pontuações maiores são de animais mais reativos (mais agressivo. A reatividade foi criada com os objetivos de solucionar os problemas até então existentes na seleção para temperamento e de permitir estimação de parâmetros genéticos mais confiáveis. Ela é uma característica objetiva que tem grande variabilidade fenotípica e é de quantificação rápida, fácil e segura, além de poder ser quantificada em qualquer tipo de balança, o que permite maior aplicabilidade. Ela não interfere nas práticas de manejo das fazendas porque é quantificada no momento da pesagem dos animais. Sua herdabilidade na raça Nelore é de 0,39 ao ano e 0,23 ao sobreano e suas correlações genéticas com ganho de peso diário são de -0,28 do nascimento até desmama e de -0,49 do desmame até ano. Já suas correlações genéticas com desenvolvimento do perímetro escrotal do ano ao sobreano variam de -0,25 e -0,41.The confinement reactivity (CR has been used as a measure of temperament in Brazil and it is defined as the animal reaction when contained in the scale. It is quantified through the animal reactivity test - REATEST®. This test consists of an electronic device coupled to the scale and of specific software. The device captures the movement that the animal provokes in the scale, during 20 seconds and sends it for the software that processes this movement and determines the animal CR in a continuous scale of points. Higher punctuations belong to

  18. Rat myocardial protein degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steer, J H; Hopkins, B E

    1981-07-01

    1. Myocardial protein degradation rates were determined by following tyrosine release from rat isolated left hemi-atria in vitro. 2. After two 20 min preincubations the rate of tyrosine release from hemi-atria was constant for 4 h. 3. Skeletal muscle protein degradation was determined by following tyrosine release from rat isolated hemi-diaphragm (Fulks, Li & Goldberg, 1975). 4. Insulin (10(-7) M) inhibited tyrosine release from hemi-atria and hemi-diaphragm to a similar extent. A 48 h fast increased tyrosine release rate from hemi-diaphragm and decreased tyrosine release rate from hemi-atria. Hemi-diaphragm tyrosine release was inhibited by 15 mmol/l D-glucose but a variety of concentrations of D-glucose (0, 5, 15 mmol/l) had no effect on tyrosine release from hemi-atria. Five times the normal plasma levels of the branched-chain amino acids leucine, isoleucine and valine had no effect on tyrosine release from either hemi-atria or hemi-diaphragm.

  19. Degradability of dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anusavice, K J

    1992-09-01

    The degradation of dental ceramics generally occurs because of mechanical forces or chemical attack. The possible physiological side-effects of ceramics are their tendency to abrade opposing dental structures, the emission of radiation from radioactive components, the roughening of their surfaces by chemical attack with a corresponding increase in plaque retention, and the release of potentially unsafe concentrations of elements as a result of abrasion and dissolution. The chemical durability of dental ceramics is excellent. With the exception of the excessive exposure to acidulated fluoride, ammonium bifluoride, or hydrofluoric acid, there is little risk of surface degradation of virtually all current dental ceramics. Extensive exposure to acidulated fluoride is a possible problem for individuals with head and/or neck cancer who have received large doses of radiation. Such fluoride treatment is necessary to minimize tooth demineralization when saliva flow rates have been reduced because of radiation exposure to salivary glands. Porcelain surface stains are also lost occasionally when abraded by prophylaxis pastes and/or acidulated fluoride. In each case, the solutes are usually not ingested. Further research that uses standardized testing procedures is needed on the chemical durability of dental ceramics. Accelerated durability tests are desirable to minimize the time required for such measurements. The influence of chemical durability on surface roughness and the subsequent effect of roughness on wear of the ceramic restorations as well as of opposing structures should also be explored on a standardized basis.

  20. Conservation of reactive electromagnetic energy in reactive time

    CERN Document Server

    Kaiser, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    The complex Poynting theorem (CPT) is extended to a canonical time-scale domain $(t,s)$. Time-harmonic phasors are replaced by the positive-frequency parts of general fields, which extend analytically to complex time $t+is$, with $s>0$ interpreted as a time resolution scale. The real part of the extended CPT gives conservation in $t$ of a time-averaged field energy, and its imaginary part gives conservation in $s$ of a time-averaged reactive energy. In both cases, the averaging windows are determined by a Cauchy kernel of width $\\Delta t\\sim \\pm s$. This completes the time-harmonic CPT, whose imaginary part is generally supposed to be vaguely `related to' reactive energy without giving a conservation law, or even an expression, for the latter. The interpretation of $s$ as reactive time, tracking the leads and lags associated with stored capacitative and inductive energy, gives a simple explanation of the volt-ampere reactive (var) unit measuring reactive power: a var is simply one Joule per reactive second. T...

  1. Sulphur mustard degradation on zirconium doped Ti-Fe oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stengl, Vaclav, E-mail: stengl@iic.cas.cz [Department of Solid State Chemistry, Institute of Inorganic Chemistry AS CR v.v.i 250 68 Husinec-Rez (Czech Republic); Grygar, Tomas Matys [Department of Solid State Chemistry, Institute of Inorganic Chemistry AS CR v.v.i 250 68 Husinec-Rez (Czech Republic); Oplustil, Frantisek; Nemec, Tomas [Military Technical Institute of Protection Brno Veslarska 230, 628 00 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: {yields} New stechiometric materials for sulphur mustard degradation. {yields} High degree of degradation, more then 95% h{sup -1}. {yields} One-pot synthesis procedure. - Abstract: Zirconium doped mixed nanodispersive oxides of Ti and Fe were prepared by homogeneous hydrolysis of sulphate salts with urea in aqueous solutions. Synthesized nanodispersive metal oxide hydroxides were characterised as the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and Barrett-Joiner-Halenda porosity (BJH), X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared (IR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) microanalysis, and acid-base titration. These oxides were taken for an experimental evaluation of their reactivity with sulphur mustard (chemical warfare agent HD or bis(2-chloroethyl)sulphide). The presence of Zr{sup 4+} dopant tends to increase both the surface area and the surface hydroxylation of the resulting doped oxides in such a manner that it can contribute to enabling the substrate adsorption at the oxide surface and thus accelerate the rate of degradation of warfare agents. The addition of Zr{sup 4+} to the hydrolysis of ferric sulphate with urea shifts the reaction route and promotes formation of goethite at the expense of ferrihydrite. We discovered that Zr{sup 4+} doped oxo-hydroxides of Ti and Fe exhibit a higher degradation activity towards sulphur mustard than any other yet reported reactive sorbents. The reaction rate constant of the slower parallel reaction of the most efficient reactive sorbents is increased with the increasing amount of surface base sites.

  2. Guanosine radical reactivity explored by pulse radiolysis coupled with transient electrochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latus, A; Alam, M S; Mostafavi, M; Marignier, J-L; Maisonhaute, E

    2015-06-04

    We follow the reactivity of a guanosine radical created by a radiolytic electron pulse both by spectroscopic and electrochemical methods. This original approach allows us to demonstrate that there is a competition between oxidation and reduction of these intermediates, an important result to further analyse the degradation or repair pathways of DNA bases.

  3. Hydrothermal Reactivity of Amines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, K.; Shock, E.; Hartnett, H. E.; Williams, L. B.; Gould, I.

    2013-12-01

    The reactivity of aqueous amines depends on temperature, pH, and redox state [1], all of which are highly variable in hydrothermal systems. Temperature and pH affect the ratio of protonated to unprotonated amines (R-NH2 + H+ = R-NH3+), which act as nucleophiles and electrophiles, respectively. We hypothesize that this dual nature can explain the pH dependence of reaction rates, and predict that rates will approach a maximum at pH = pKa where the ratio of protonated and unprotonated amines approaches one and the two compounds are poised to react with one another. Higher temperatures in hydrothermal systems allow for more rapid reaction rates, readily reversible reactions, and unique carbon-nitrogen chemistry in which water acts as a reagent in addition to being the solvent. In this study, aqueous benzylamine was used as a model compound to explore the reaction mechanisms, kinetics, and equilibria of amines under hydrothermal conditions. Experiments were carried out in anoxic silica glass tubes at 250°C (Psat) using phosphate-buffered solutions to observe changes in reaction rates and product distributions as a function of pH. The rate of decomposition of benzylamine was much faster at pH 4 than at pH 9, consistent with the prediction that benzylamine acts as both nucleophile and an electrophile, and our estimate that the pKa of benzylamine is ~5 at 250°C and Psat. Accordingly, dibenzylamine is the primary product of the reaction of two benzylamine molecules, and this reaction is readily reversible under hydrothermal conditions. Extremely acidic or basic pH can be used to suppress dibenzylamine production, which also suppresses the formation of all other major products, including toluene, benzyl alcohol, dibenzylimine, and tribenzylamine. This suggests that dibenzylamine is the lone primary product that then itself reacts as a precursor to produce the above compounds. Analog experiments performed with ring-substituted benzylamine derivatives and chiral

  4. Thermal battery degradation mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Missert, Nancy A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brunke, Lyle Brent [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Diffuse reflectance IR spectroscopy (DRIFTS) was used to investigate the effect of accelerated aging on LiSi based anodes in simulated MC3816 batteries. DRIFTS spectra showed that the oxygen, carbonate, hydroxide and sulfur content of the anodes changes with aging times and temperatures, but not in a monotonic fashion that could be correlated to phase evolution. Bands associated with sulfur species were only observed in anodes taken from batteries aged in wet environments, providing further evidence for a reaction pathway facilitated by H2S transport from the cathode, through the separator, to the anode. Loss of battery capacity with accelerated aging in wet environments was correlated to loss of FeS2 in the catholyte pellets, suggesting that the major contribution to battery performance degradation results from loss of active cathode material.

  5. NUC-1, a caenorhabditis elegans DNase II homolog, functions in an intermediate step of DNA degradation during apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y C; Stanfield, G M; Horvitz, H R

    2000-03-01

    One hallmark of apoptosis is the degradation of chromosomal DNA. We cloned the Caenorhabditis elegans gene nuc-1, which is involved in the degradation of the DNA of apoptotic cells, and found that nuc-1 encodes a homolog of mammalian DNase II. We used the TUNEL technique to assay DNA degradation in nuc-1 and other mutants defective in programmed cell death and discovered that TUNEL labels apoptotic cells only during a transient intermediate stage. Mutations in nuc-1 allowed the generation of TUNEL-reactive DNA but blocked the conversion of TUNEL-reactive DNA to a subsequent TUNEL-unreactive state. Completion of DNA degradation did not occur in the absence of cell-corpse engulfment. Our data suggest that the process of degradation of the DNA of a cell corpse occurs in at least three distinct steps and requires activities provided by both the dying and the engulfing cell.

  6. DEGRADATION OF SHAPE MEMORY EFFECT

    OpenAIRE

    VanderMeer, R.

    1982-01-01

    An important parameter for deciding whether or not a SME alloy is suitable for practical applications is the magnitude of the strain reversa1 accompanying martensite reversion. This research is concerned with elucidating metallurgical factors that cause degradation of this heat-activated recovery strain, ER. After explaining what is meant by degradation, two manifestations of degradation recently identified in near-monotectoid uranium-niobium alloys will be described. The first was associated...

  7. Transcellular degradation of axonal mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Chung-ha O; Kim, Keun-Young; Bushong, Eric A; Mills, Elizabeth A; Boassa, Daniela; Shih, Tiffany; Kinebuchi, Mira; Phan, Sebastien; Zhou, Yi; Bihlmeyer, Nathan A; Nguyen, Judy V; Jin, Yunju; Ellisman, Mark H; Marsh-Armstrong, Nicholas

    2014-07-01

    It is generally accepted that healthy cells degrade their own mitochondria. Here, we report that retinal ganglion cell axons of WT mice shed mitochondria at the optic nerve head (ONH), and that these mitochondria are internalized and degraded by adjacent astrocytes. EM demonstrates that mitochondria are shed through formation of large protrusions that originate from otherwise healthy axons. A virally introduced tandem fluorophore protein reporter of acidified mitochondria reveals that acidified axonal mitochondria originating from the retinal ganglion cell are associated with lysosomes within columns of astrocytes in the ONH. According to this reporter, a greater proportion of retinal ganglion cell mitochondria are degraded at the ONH than in the ganglion cell soma. Consistently, analyses of degrading DNA reveal extensive mtDNA degradation within the optic nerve astrocytes, some of which comes from retinal ganglion cell axons. Together, these results demonstrate that surprisingly large proportions of retinal ganglion cell axonal mitochondria are normally degraded by the astrocytes of the ONH. This transcellular degradation of mitochondria, or transmitophagy, likely occurs elsewhere in the CNS, because structurally similar accumulations of degrading mitochondria are also found along neurites in superficial layers of the cerebral cortex. Thus, the general assumption that neurons or other cells necessarily degrade their own mitochondria should be reconsidered.

  8. Aerobic degradation of polychlorinated biphenyls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pieper, D.H. [Dept. of Environmental Microbiology, German Research Center for Biotechnology, Braunschweig (Germany)

    2005-04-01

    The microbial degradation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) has been extensively studied in recent years. The genetic organization of biphenyl catabolic genes has been elucidated in various groups of microorganisms, their structures have been analyzed with respect to their evolutionary relationships, and new information on mobile elements has become available. Key enzymes, specifically biphenyl 2,3-dioxygenases, have been intensively characterized, structure/sequence relationships have been determined and enzymes optimized for PCB transformation. However, due to the complex metabolic network responsible for PCB degradation, optimizing degradation by single bacterial species is necessarily limited. As PCBs are usually not mineralized by biphenyl-degrading organisms, and cometabolism can result in the formation of toxic metabolites, the degradation of chlorobenzoates has received special attention. A broad set of bacterial strategies to degrade chlorobenzoates has recently been elucidated, including new pathways for the degradation of chlorocatechols as central intermediates of various chloroaromatic catabolic pathways. To optimize PCB degradation in the environment beyond these metabolic limitations, enhancing degradation in the rhizosphere has been suggested, in addition to the application of surfactants to overcome bioavailability barriers. However, further research is necessary to understand the complex interactions between soil/sediment, pollutant, surfactant and microorganisms in different environments. (orig.)

  9. Photochemical degradation of marbofloxacin and enrofloxacin in natural waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturini, Michela; Speltini, Andrea; Maraschi, Federica; Profumo, Antonella; Pretali, Luca; Fasani, Elisa; Albini, Angelo

    2010-06-15

    The photochemical fate of Marbofloxacin (MAR) and Enrofloxacin (ENR), two Fluoroquinolones (FQs) largely used as veterinary bactericides known to be present in surface waters, was investigated in aqueous solution. The degradation of these pollutants (5-50 microg L(-1) starting concentration) was complete in about 1 h by exposure to solar light (summer) and obeyed a first-order kinetics. The structure of the primary photoproducts was determined. Those from ENR arose through three paths, namely, oxidative degradation of the piperazine side-chain, reductive defluorination, and fluorine solvolysis. More heavily degraded products that had been previously reported were rationalized as secondary photoproducts from the present ones. As for MAR, this underwent homolytic cleavage of the tetrahydrooxadiazine moiety to give two quinolinols. All of the primary products were themselves degraded in about 1 h. The photoreactions rates were scarcely affected by Ca(2+) (200 mg L(-1)), Mg(2+) (30 mg L(-1)), Cl(-) (30 mg L(-1)), and humic acid (1 mg L(-1)), but increased in the presence of phosphate (20 mg L(-1)). The fastest degradation of ENR occurred at pH about 8 where the zwitterionic form was present, while in the case of MAR the cationic form was the most reactive.

  10. Nitrogen acquisition in Agave tequilana from degradation of endophytic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltran-Garcia, Miguel J; White, James F; Prado, Fernanda M; Prieto, Katia R; Yamaguchi, Lydia F; Torres, Monica S; Kato, Massuo J; Medeiros, Marisa H G; Di Mascio, Paolo

    2014-11-06

    Plants form symbiotic associations with endophytic bacteria within tissues of leaves, stems, and roots. It is unclear whether or how plants obtain nitrogen from these endophytic bacteria. Here we present evidence showing nitrogen flow from endophytic bacteria to plants in a process that appears to involve oxidative degradation of bacteria. In our experiments we employed Agave tequilana and its seed-transmitted endophyte Bacillus tequilensis to elucidate organic nitrogen transfer from (15)N-labeled bacteria to plants. Bacillus tequilensis cells grown in a minimal medium with (15)NH4Cl as the nitrogen source were watered onto plants growing in sand. We traced incorporation of (15)N into tryptophan, deoxynucleosides and pheophytin derived from chlorophyll a. Probes for hydrogen peroxide show its presence during degradation of bacteria in plant tissues, supporting involvement of reactive oxygen in the degradation process. In another experiment to assess nitrogen absorbed as a result of endophytic colonization of plants we demonstrated that endophytic bacteria potentially transfer more nitrogen to plants and stimulate greater biomass in plants than heat-killed bacteria that do not colonize plants but instead degrade in the soil. Findings presented here support the hypothesis that some plants under nutrient limitation may degrade and obtain nitrogen from endophytic microbes.

  11. Degradation of the benzoxazolinone class of phytoalexins is important for virulence of Fusarium pseudograminearum towards wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettle, Andrew J; Batley, Jacqueline; Benfield, Aurelie H; Manners, John M; Kazan, Kemal; Gardiner, Donald M

    2015-12-01

    Wheat, maize, rye and certain other agriculturally important species in the Poaceae family produce the benzoxazolinone class of phytoalexins on pest and pathogen attack. Benzoxazolinones can inhibit the growth of pathogens. However, certain fungi can actively detoxify these compounds. Despite this, a clear link between the ability to detoxify benzoxazolinones and pathogen virulence has not been shown. Here, through comparative genome analysis of several Fusarium species, we have identified a conserved genomic region around the FDB2 gene encoding an N-malonyltransferase enzyme known to be involved in benzoxazolinone degradation in the maize pathogen Fusarium verticillioides. Expression analyses demonstrated that a cluster of nine genes was responsive to exogenous benzoxazolinone in the important wheat pathogen Fusarium pseudograminearum. The analysis of independent F. pseudograminearum FDB2 knockouts and complementation of the knockout with FDB2 homologues from F. graminearum and F. verticillioides confirmed that the N-malonyltransferase enzyme encoded by this gene is central to the detoxification of benzoxazolinones, and that Fdb2 contributes quantitatively to virulence towards wheat in head blight inoculation assays. This contrasts with previous observations in F. verticillioides, where no effect of FDB2 mutations on pathogen virulence towards maize was observed. Overall, our results demonstrate that the detoxification of benzoxazolinones is a strategy adopted by wheat-infecting F. pseudograminearum to overcome host-derived chemical defences. © 2015 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  12. Contribution of ethylamine degrading bacteria to atrazine degradation in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Daniel; Crowley, David E

    2006-11-01

    Bacterial communities that cooperatively degrade atrazine commonly consist of diverse species in which the genes for atrazine dechlorination and dealkylation are variously distributed among different species. Normally, the first step in degradation of atrazine involves dechlorination mediated by atzA, followed by stepwise dealkylation to yield either N-ethylammelide or N-isopropylammelide. As the liberated alkylamine moieties are constituents of many organic molecules other than atrazine, it is possible that a large number of alkylamine-degrading bacteria other than those previously described might contribute to this key step in atrazine degradation. To examine this hypothesis, we isolated 82 bacterial strains from soil by plating soil water extracts on agar media with ethylamine as a sole carbon source. Among the relatively large number of isolates, only 3 were able to degrade N-ethylammelide, and in each case were shown to carry the atzB gene and atzC genes. The isolates, identified as Rhizobium leguminosarum, Flavobacterium sp., and Arthrobacter sp., were all readily substituted into an atrazine-degrading consortium to carry out N-ethylammelide degradation. The distribution of these genes among many different species in the soil microbial population suggests that these genes are highly mobile and over time may lead to generation of various atrazine-degrading consortia.

  13. Enhanced biodecolorization of reactive dyes by basidiomycetes under static conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibi, Ismat; Bhatti, Haq Nawaz

    2012-04-01

    This study presents the biodecolorization potential of basidiomycete fungi Trametes hirsuta, Pycnoporus sp., and Irpex sp. for different reactive dyes viz. Reactive Red 120, Remazol Brilliant Blue R (RBBR), Reactive Orange G, and Reactive Orange 16 under static and shaking conditions. The screening trials revealed that T. hirsuta exhibited maximum potential (83.75 %) for biodecolorization of RBBR dye under static conditions after the fifth day of incubation. However, the rate of biodecolorization of RBBR dye by Pycnoporus sp. was much slow and reached maximum (81.25 %) after 15 days of incubation under shaking conditions. By process optimization, enhanced decolorization (91.2 %) of RBBR by T. hirsuta was achieved at pH 5.5 within 24 h using a defined salt medium amended with p-coumaric acid under static conditions. pH was found to be an important parameter for the enzymatic system involved in RBBR dye decolorization by T. hirsuta and Pycnoporus sp. Biodecolorization of RBBR dye was determined by a reduction in optical density at the wavelength of maximum absorbance (λ, 578 nm) by UV-vis spectrophotometer. The shift in maximum wavelength toward shorter/longer wavelength in UV-vis scanning spectrum revealed the degradation of RBBR dye into different transformation products.

  14. Intensification of sonochemical degradation of malachite green by bromide ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moumeni, Ouarda; Hamdaoui, Oualid

    2012-05-01

    Sonochemical oxidation has been investigated as a viable advanced oxidation process (AOP) for the destruction of various pollutants in water. Ultrasonic irradiation generates ()OH radicals that can recombine, react with other gaseous species present in the cavity, or diffuse out of the bubble into the bulk liquid medium where they are able to react with solute molecules. The extent of degradation of an organic dye such as malachite green (MG) is limited by the quantity of hydroxyl radicals diffused from cavitation bubbles. In this work, the effect of bromide ions on sonolytic degradation of MG was investigated. The obtained results clearly demonstrated the considerable enhancement of sonochemical destruction of MG in the presence of bromide. No significant differences were observed in the presence of chloride and sulfate, excluding the salting-out effect. Positive effect of bromide ions, which increases with increasing bromide level and decreasing MG concentration, is due to the generation of dibromine radical anion (Br(2)(-)) formed by reaction of Br(-) with ()OH radicals followed by rapid complexation with another anion. The generated Br(2)(-) radicals, reactive but less than ()OH, are likely able to migrate far from the cavitation bubbles towards the solution bulk and are suitable for degradation of an organic dye such as MG. Additionally, Br(2)(-) radicals undergo radical-radical recombination at a lesser extent than hydroxyl radicals and would be more available than ()OH for substrate degradation, both at the bubble surface and in the solution bulk. This effect compensates for the lower reactivity of Br(2)(-) compared to ()OH toward organic substrate. Addition of bromide to natural and sea waters induces a slight positive effect on MG degradation. In the absence of bromide, ultrasonic treatment for the removal of MG was promoted in complex matrices such as natural and sea waters.

  15. Research of Isolation and Degradation Conditions of Petroleum Degrading Marine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fangrui, Guo

    2017-01-01

    A novel petroleum-degrading microbial strain was isolated from sediment samples in estuary of Bohai Sea estuary beaches. The strain was primarily identified as Alcanivorax sp. and named Alcanivorax sp. H34. Effect of PH values, temperature, nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations on degradation of H34 were investigated. The paraffinic components average degradation rate of H34 ungrowth cells under optimized conditions was studied. The results showed that the optimal growth conditions of H34 are were temperature of 30°C, initial PH of 7.0, nitrogen concentration of 3g/L, phosphorus concentration of 3g/L, and paraffinic components average degradation rates of H34 ungrowth cells was 41.6%, while total degradation rate was 45.5%.

  16. Deciphering effects of functional groups and electron density on azo dyes degradation by graphene loaded TiO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Liang, Xiao; Chen, Bor-Yann; Chang, Chang-Tang

    2015-12-01

    This study tended to decipher the mechanism of photo degradation of azo dyes, which bond was favorable to be broken for application of wastewater decolorization. That is, from chemical structure perspective, the critical substituents to affect electron donor/acceptor for dye degradation would be identified in this research. The model reactive blacks (RB5), reactive blue 171 (RB171) and reactive red 198 (RR198) were degraded by graphene loaded TiO2, indicating how the electron withdrawing and releasing groups affect azo dye degradability. The byproducts and intermediate products were analyzed by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and ion chromatography (IC). Furthermore, the radicals involved in the reaction were found by electron paramagnetic resonance (ESR) to confirm the main oxidized species of hydroxyl radicals rather than the light generated positive holes. The finding revealed that the breakages of the bonds were due to the electron density changes around the bonds. This principle can be applicable not only for RB5 degradation, but also for reactive blue 171 (RB171), reactive red 198 (RR198) and some other textile dyes.

  17. Sulphur mustard degradation on zirconium doped Ti-Fe oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štengla, Václav; Grygar, Tomáš Matys; Opluštil, František; Němec, Tomáš

    2011-09-15

    Zirconium doped mixed nanodispersive oxides of Ti and Fe were prepared by homogeneous hydrolysis of sulphate salts with urea in aqueous solutions. Synthesized nanodispersive metal oxide hydroxides were characterised as the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and Barrett-Joiner-Halenda porosity (BJH), X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared (IR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) microanalysis, and acid-base titration. These oxides were taken for an experimental evaluation of their reactivity with sulphur mustard (chemical warfare agent HD or bis(2-chloroethyl)sulphide). The presence of Zr(4+) dopant tends to increase both the surface area and the surface hydroxylation of the resulting doped oxides in such a manner that it can contribute to enabling the substrate adsorption at the oxide surface and thus accelerate the rate of degradation of warfare agents. The addition of Zr(4+) to the hydrolysis of ferric sulphate with urea shifts the reaction route and promotes formation of goethite at the expense of ferrihydrite. We discovered that Zr(4+) doped oxo-hydroxides of Ti and Fe exhibit a higher degradation activity towards sulphur mustard than any other yet reported reactive sorbents. The reaction rate constant of the slower parallel reaction of the most efficient reactive sorbents is increased with the increasing amount of surface base sites.

  18. Catalytical degradation of relevant pollutants from waters using magnetic nanocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadejde, C.; Neamtu, M.; Schneider, R. J.; Hodoroaba, V.-D.; Ababei, G.; Panne, U.

    2015-10-01

    The catalytic efficiency of two magnetically responsive nanocatalysts was evaluated for the degradation of Reactive Black 5 (RB5) and Reactive Yellow 84 (RY84) azo dyes using hydrogen peroxide as oxidant under very mild conditions (atmospheric pressure, room temperature). In order to obtain the nanocatalysts, the surface of magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles, prepared by a co-precipitation method, was further modified with ferrous oxalate, a highly sensitive non-hazardous reducing agent. The sensitized nanomaterials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometry, and used in the catalytic wet hydrogen peroxide oxidation (CWHPO) of RB5 and RY84, in laboratory-scale experiments. The effect of important variables such as catalyst dosage, H2O2 concentration, and contact time was studied in the dye degradation kinetics. The results showed that it was possible to remove up to 99.7% dye in the presence of 20 mM H2O2 after 240 min of oxidation for a catalyst concentration of 10 g L-1 at 25 °C and initial pH value of 9.0. CWHPO of reactive dyes using sensitized magnetic nanocatalysts can be a suitable pre-treatment method for complete decolorization of effluents from textile dyeing and finishing processes, once the optimum operating conditions are established.

  19. Sonocatalytic Degradation of Antibiotics Tetracycline by Mn-Modified Diatomite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiping Guo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mn-modified diatomite was prepared by wet impregnation and subsequent calcinations processes. It was used as catalyst for sonocatalytic degradation of antibiotics tetracycline. Characterizations by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction pattern showed that the morphology and crystal structure of the modified diatomite were similar to these of raw diatomite. Despite containing very limited amount of Mn oxides, the Mn-modified diatomite showed much higher sonocatalytic activity than the raw diatomite. The increases in both MnSO4 concentration of the wet impregnation solution and the catalyst dosage could enhance the degradation of antibiotics tetracycline significantly. Kapp values for ultrasonication, catalyst adsorption, and both processes combined (0.10 mol/L MnSO4-modified diatomite were 1.22 × 10−4, 0.00193, and 0.00453 min−1, respectively, while the corresponding values of R2 were 0.956, 0.986, and 0.953, respectively. These results demonstrated the significant synergetic effect by combining ultrasonication and catalyst adsorption processes. The presence of isopropanol, KBr, and NaN3 quenched a series of reactive oxygen species sharply, indicating the dominant role of reactive oxygen species in the sonocatalytic process. In contrast, the addition of Fe(II enhanced the degradation due to the generation of more OH∙ radicals in the concurrent Fenton reaction. All the results indicated that Mn-modified diatomite had the great potential for water treatment by sonocatalytic oxidation.

  20. Degradation of artificial sweeteners via direct and indirect photochemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkola, Noora; Vaalgamaa, Sanna; Jernberg, Joonas; Vähätalo, Anssi V

    2016-07-01

    We studied the direct and indirect photochemical reactivity of artificial sweeteners acesulfame, saccharin, cyclamic acid and sucralose in environm entally relevant dilute aqueous solutions. Aqueous solutions of sweeteners were irradiated with simulated solar radiation (>290 nm; 96 and 168 h) or ultraviolet radiation (UVR; up to 24 h) for assessing photochemical reactions in surface waters or in water treatment, respectively. The sweeteners were dissolved in deionised water for examination of direct photochemical reactions. Direct photochemical reactions degraded all sweeteners under UVR but only acesulfame under simulated solar radiation. Acesulfame was degraded over three orders of magnitude faster than the other sweeteners. For examining indirect photochemical reactions, the sweeteners were dissolved in surface waters with indigenous dissolved organic matter or irradiated with aqueous solutions of nitrate (1 mg N/L) and ferric iron (2.8 mg Fe/L) introduced as sensitizers. Iron enhanced the photodegradation rates but nitrate and dissolved organic matter did not. UVR transformed acesulfame into at least three products: iso-acesulfame, hydroxylated acesulfame and hydroxypropanyl sulfate. Photolytic half-life was one year for acesulfame and more than several years for the other sweeteners in surface waters under solar radiation. Our study shows that the photochemical reactivity of commonly used artificial sweeteners is variable: acesulfame may be sensitive to photodegradation in surface waters, while saccharin, cyclamic acid and sucralose degrade very slowly even under the energetic UVR commonly used in water treatment.

  1. Evaluation on degradation of cable in nuclear power plant by boric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Munhwan; Song, Geundong; Kim, Yeonku; Maeng, Wanyoung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    Exposures to these conditions for long periods of times can cause a degradation of cable. Borated water is used in the primary systems of PWR plants to control the reactivity during normal plant operation and refueling, and under potential accident conditions. If borated water leaks from primary and secondary systems, significant corrosion problems can develop. However, little research has been carried out on the effects of cable degradation by borated water. In this experiment, TGA, indenting test, and FT-IR were performed to evaluate the degradation of cable by borated water. An evaluation of cable degradation by borated water was carried out. A TGA analysis, the measurement of cable microhardness and an FT-IR analysis before and after spraying with boric acid (B:170,000ppm). It is considered that there is no significant degradation of cables due to spraying with boric acid. More studies on long-term experiments for severe conditions are now progressing.

  2. Reactivity to nicotine cues over repeated cue reactivity sessions

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaRowe, Steven D.; Saladin, Michael E.; Carpenter, Matthew J.; Upadhyaya, Himanshu P.

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigated whether reactivity to nicotine-related cues would attenuate across four experimental sessions held one week apart. Participants were nineteen non-treatment seeking, nicotine-dependent males. Cue reactivity sessions were performed in an outpatient research center using in vivo cues consisting of standardized smoking-related paraphernalia (e.g., cigarettes) and neutral comparison paraphernalia (e.g., pencils). Craving ratings were collected before and after both cue presentations while physiological measures (heart rate, skin conductance) were collected before and during the cue presentations. Although craving levels decreased across sessions, smoking-related cues consistently evoked significantly greater increases in craving relative to neutral cues over all four experimental sessions. Skin conductance was higher in response to smoking cues, though this effect was not as robust as that observed for craving. Results suggest that, under the described experimental parameters, craving can be reliably elicited over repeated cue reactivity sessions. PMID:17537583

  3. Reactivity to nicotine cues over repeated cue reactivity sessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaRowe, Steven D; Saladin, Michael E; Carpenter, Matthew J; Upadhyaya, Himanshu P

    2007-12-01

    The present study investigated whether reactivity to nicotine-related cues would attenuate across four experimental sessions held 1 week apart. Participants were nineteen non-treatment seeking, nicotine-dependent males. Cue reactivity sessions were performed in an outpatient research center using in vivo cues consisting of standardized smoking-related paraphernalia (e.g., cigarettes) and neutral comparison paraphernalia (e.g., pencils). Craving ratings were collected before and after both cue presentations while physiological measures (heart rate, skin conductance) were collected before and during the cue presentations. Although craving levels decreased across sessions, smoking-related cues consistently evoked significantly greater increases in craving relative to neutral cues over all four experimental sessions. Skin conductance was higher in response to smoking cues, though this effect was not as robust as that observed for craving. Results suggest that, under the described experimental parameters, craving can be reliably elicited over repeated cue reactivity sessions.

  4. ASSAYING OF AUTOPHAGIC PROTEIN DEGRADATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Bauvy; A.J. Meijer; P. Codogno

    2009-01-01

    Macroautophagy is a three-step process: (1) autophagosomes form and mature, (2) the autophagosomes fuse with lysosomes, and (3) the autophagic cargo is degraded in the lysosomes. It is this lysosomal degradation of the autophagic cargo that constitutes the autophagic flux. As in the case of metaboli

  5. MOSFET Degradation Under RF Stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sasse, G.T.; Kuper, F.G.; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    2008-01-01

    We report on the degradation of MOS transistors under RF stress. Hot-carrier degradation, negative-bias temperature instability, and gate dielectric breakdown are investigated. The findings are compared to established voltage- and field-driven models. The experimental results indicate that the

  6. Degradation of carbofuran by ozonation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suneethi, S; Joseph, Kurian

    2009-04-01

    Degradation of commercial grade carbofuran (2, 3 dihydro-2, 2-dimethyl-7 benzo furanyl-N-methyl carbamate) in aqueous solution by ozone oxidation was investigated using bench scale experiments. The degradation rate was strongly influenced by the ozone dosage, pH, initial concentration of carbofuran and contact time of ozonation. Carbofuran solution of 200ppm concentration was degraded by 79% within 10 minutes consuming 87 mg of ozone at pH 4. The associated TOC reduction was observed to be 53%. Ammonium (20 mg/L) and nitrate (30 mg/L) ions were detected in the effluent as degradation products of ozonation. The results support the effectiveness of ozonation for degradation of organic pesticides such as carbofuran.

  7. Enzymatic degradation of endomorphins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janecka, Anna; Staniszewska, Renata; Gach, Katarzyna; Fichna, Jakub

    2008-11-01

    Centrally acting plant opiates, such as morphine, are the most frequently used analgesics for the relief of severe pain, even though their undesired side effects are serious limitation to their usefulness. The search for new therapeutics that could replace morphine has been mainly focused on the development of peptide analogs or peptidomimetics with high selectivity for one receptor type and high bioavailability, that is good blood-brain barrier permeability and enzymatic stability. Drugs, in order to be effective, must be able to reach the target tissue and to remain metabolically stable to produce the desired effects. The study of naturally occurring peptides provides a rational and powerful approach in the design of peptide therapeutics. Endogenous opioid peptides, endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2, are two potent and highly selective mu-opioid receptor agonists, discovered only a decade ago, which display potent analgesic activity. However, extensive studies on the possible use of endomorphins as analgesics instead of morphine met with failure due to their instability. This review deals with the recent investigations that allowed determine degradation pathways of endomorphins in vitro and in vivo and propose modifications that will lead to more stable analogs.

  8. Bacterial degradation of aminopyrine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blecher, H; Blecher, R; Wegst, W; Eberspaecher, J; Lingens, F

    1981-11-01

    1. Four strains of bacteria growing with aminopyrine as sole source of carbon were isolated from soil and were identified as strains of Phenylobacterium immobilis. 2. Strain M13 and strain E, the type species of Phenylobacterium immobilis (DSM 1986), which had been isolated by enrichment with chloridazon (5-amino-4-chloro-2-phenyl-2H-pyridazin-3-one) were used to investigate the bacterial degradation of aminopyrine. 3. Three metabolites were isolated and identified as: 4-(dimethylamino)-1,2-dihydro-1,5-dimethyl-2-(2,3-dihydro-2,3-dihydroxy-4,6-cyc lohexadien-1-yl)-3H-pyrazol-3-one, 4-(dimethylamino)-1,2-dihydro-1,5-dimethyl-2-(2,3-dihydroxyphenyl)-3H-pyrazol-3 -one and 4-(dimethylamino)-1,2-dihydro-1,5-dimethyl-3H-pyrazol-3-one. 4. An enzyme extract from cells of strain m13 was shown to further metabolize the catechol derivative of aminopyrine, with the formation of 2-pyrone-6-carboxylic acid. 5. Results indicate that the benzene ring of aminopyrine is the principal site of microbial metabolism.

  9. Neurobehavioral foundation of environmental reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Sarah R; Depue, Richard A

    2016-02-01

    Sensitivity to environmental context has been of interest for many years, but the nature of individual differences in environmental sensitivity has become of particular focus over the past 2 decades. What is particularly uncertain are the neural variables and processes that mediate the effects of environment on developmental outcomes. Accordingly, we provide a neurobehavioral foundation of reactivity to the environment in several steps. First, the different patterns of environmental sensitivity are defined to identify the significant factors involved in the manifestation of these patterns. Second, we focus on neurobiological reactivity as the construct underlying variation in sensitivity to the environment by (a) providing an organizing threshold model of elicitation of neurobiology by environmental context; and (b) integrating the literature on 2 sets of neuromodulators in terms of each modulator's (a) contribution to neural and behavioral reactivity to stimulation, and (b) relation to emotional-motivational systems (dopamine, opiates and oxytocin, corticotropin-releasing hormone) or the general modulation of those systems (serotonin, norepinephrine, and GABA). Discussion concludes with (a) a comprehensive neurobehavioral framework of environmental reactivity based on a combinatorial model of a supertrait, (b) methodological implications of the model, and (c) a developmental perspective on environmental reactivity.

  10. Bortezomib Induced Hepatitis B Reactivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salwa Hussain

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. It has recently been reported that hepatitis B (HBV reactivation often occurs after the use of rituximab and stem cell transplantation in patients with lymphoma who are hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg negative. However, clinical data on HBV reactivation in multiple myeloma (MM is limited to only a few reported cases. Bortezomib and lenalidomide have remarkable activity in MM with manageable toxicity profiles, but reactivation of viral infections may emerge as a problem. We present a case of MM that developed HBV reactivation after bortezomib and lenalidomide therapy. Case Report. A 73-year-old female with a history of marginal cell lymphoma was monitored without requiring therapy. In 2009, she developed MM, presenting as a plasmacytoma requiring vertebral decompression and focal radiation. While receiving radiation she developed renal failure and was started on bortezomib and liposomal doxorubicin. After a transient response to 5 cycles, treatment was switched to lenalidomide. Preceding therapy initiation, her serology indicated resolved infection. Serial monitoring for HBV displayed seroconversion one month after change in therapy. Conclusion. Bortezomib associated late HBV reactivation appears to be a unique event that requires further confirmation and brings to discussion whether hepatitis B core positive individuals would benefit from monitoring of HBV activation while on therapy.

  11. The role of oxidation and enzymatic hydrolysis on the in vivo degradation of trimethylene carbonate based photocrosslinkable elastomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapanian, Rafi; Tse, M Yat; Pang, Stephen C; Amsden, Brian G

    2009-01-01

    The in vivo degradation of trimethylene carbonate (TMC) containing elastomers was investigated, and the mechanism of degradation explored through in vitro degradation under enzymatic and oxidative conditions. The elastomers were prepared via UV initiated crosslinking of prepolymers of TMC and equimolar amounts of TMC and epsilon-caprolactone (CL). The degradation process was followed by investigating the changes in the mechanical properties, mass loss, water uptake, sol content, differential scanning calorimetry, and surface chemistry through attenuated total reflectance infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. During in vivo degradation, TMC and TMCCL elastomers exhibited surface erosion. The tissue response was of greater intensity in the case of the TMC elastomer. Both elastomers exhibited degradation in cholesterol esterase containing solutions in vitro, but no parallels were found between the rate of in vivo degradation and the rate of in vitro degradation. Only the TMCCL elastomer degraded in lipase. Degradation in a stable superoxide anion in vitro medium was consistent with the observed in vivo degradation results, indicating a dominant role of oxidation through the secretion of this reactive oxygen species by adherent phagocytic cells in the degradation of these elastomers.

  12. Degradation of DEET and Caffeine under UV/Chlorine and Simulated Sunlight/Chlorine Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Peizhe; Lee, Wan-Ning; Zhang, Ruochun; Huang, Ching-Hua

    2016-12-20

    Photoactivation of aqueous chlorine could promote degradation of chlorine-resistant and photochemically stable chemicals accumulated in swimming pools. This study investigated the degradation of two such chemicals, N,N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide (DEET) and caffeine, by low pressure ultraviolet (UV) light and simulated sunlight (SS) activated free chlorine (FC) in different water matrices. Both DEET and caffeine were rapidly degraded by UV/FC and SS/FC but exhibited different kinetic behaviors. The degradation of DEET followed pseudo-first-order kinetics, whereas the degradation of caffeine accelerated with reaction. Mechanistic study revealed that, under UV/FC, ·OH and Cl· were responsible for degradation of DEET, whereas ClO· related reactive species (ClOrrs), generated by the reaction between FC and ·OH/Cl·, played a major role in addition to ·OH and Cl· in degrading caffeine. Reaction rate constants of DEET and caffeine with the respective radical species were estimated. The imidazole moiety of caffeine was critical for the special reactivity with ClOrrs. Water matrix such as pH had a stronger impact on the UV/FC process than the SS/FC process. In saltwater matrix under UV/FC and SS/FC, the degradation of DEET was significantly inhibited, but the degradation of caffeine was much faster than that in nonsalty solutions. The interaction between Br(-) and Cl(-) may play an important role in the degradation of caffeine by UV/FC in saltwater. Reaction product analysis showed similar product patterns by UV/FC and SS/FC and minimal formation of chlorinated intermediates and disinfection byproducts.

  13. Sheets of branched poly(lactic acid obtained by one step reactive extrusion calendering process: Melt rheology analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Cailloux

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available One-step reactive extrusion-calendering process (REX-Calendering was used in order to obtain sheets of 1mm from two PD,L-LA extrusion grades modified with a styrene-acrylic multifunctional oligomeric agent. In a preliminary internal mixer study, torque versus time was monitored in order to determine chain extender ratios and reaction time. Once all parameters were optimized, reactive extrusion experiments were performed. Independently of the processing method employed, under the same processing conditions, PD,L-LA with the lower D enantiomer molar content revealed a higher reactivity towards the reactive agent, induced by its higher thermal sensitivity. REXCalendering process seemed to minimize the degradations reactions during processing, although a competition between degradation and chain extension/branching reactions took place in both processes. Finally, the rheological characterization revealed a higher degree of modification in the melt rheological behaviour for REX-Calendered samples.

  14. Surface Reactivity of Quasicrystalline Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenks, Cynthia J.

    1997-03-01

    A fundamental knowledge and understanding of the reactivity of quasicrystalline materials is of great interest because of certain practical properties these materials possess, namely low coefficients of friction and oxidation resistance. A recent "hierarchical cluster" model proposed by Janot(C. Janot Phys. Rev. B 56 (1996) 181.) predicts that quasicrystal surfaces should be intrinsically inert and rough, and is useful in explaining their interesting properties. Surface structure and preparation may play a role in the applicability of this model. In this talk, we examine these factors and present experimental measurements of the surface reactivity of some Al-based quasicrystalline materials under ultra-high vacuum conditions (less than 2 x 10-10 Torr). To gain an understanding of what properties are unique to quasicrystals, we make comparisons with the surface reactivity of crystalline alloys of similar composition and pure, crystalline aluminum. note number.

  15. Improving degradation of emerging organic compounds by applying chaotic advection in Managed Aquifer Recharge in randomly heterogeneous porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Escales, P.; Fernà ndez-Garcia, D.; Drechsel, J.; Folch, A.; Sanchez-Vila, X.

    2017-05-01

    Improving degradation rates of emerging organic compounds (EOCs) in groundwater is still a challenge. Although their degradation is not fully understood, it has been observed that some substances are preferably degraded under specific redox conditions. The coupling of Managed Aquifer Recharge with soil aquifer remediation treatment, by placing a reactive layer containing organic matter at the bottom of the infiltration pond, is a promising technology to improve the rate of degradation of EOCs. Its success is based on assuming that recharged water and groundwater get well mixed, which is not always true. It has been demonstrated that mixing can be enhanced by inducing chaotic advection through extraction-injection-engineering. In this work, we analyze how chaotic advection might enhance the spreading of redox conditions with the final aim of improving degradation of a mix of benzotriazoles: benzotriazole, 5-methyl-benzotriazole, and 5-chloro-benzotriazole. The degradation of the first two compounds was fastest under aerobic conditions whereas the third compound was best degraded under denitrification conditions. We developed a reactive transport model that describes how a recharged water rich in organic matter mixes with groundwater, how this organic matter is oxidized by different electron acceptors, and how the benzotriazoles are degraded attending for the redox state. The model was tested in different scenarios of recharge, both in homogenous and in heterogenous media. It was found that chaotic flow increases the spreading of the plume of recharged water. Consequently, different redox conditions coexist at a given time, facilitating the degradation of EOCs.

  16. Microstructure and Strain Rate Effects on the Mechanical Behavior of Particle Reinforced Epoxy-Based Reactive Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    245 6.10 Dependence of E on LAlH for composites containing 50µm diameter alu - minum particles...polymer (unfluorinated) mixtures [14, 15], and linear cellular alloy /reactive material mixtures [16]. While all of these energetic materials are non... degradation of the polymer surface. They then varied which metal they were using (Cu, Ni, and Al) in order to change the reactivity of the metal with

  17. Photoassisted Fenton degradation of polystyrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Hui-Min; Zheng, Jia-Chuan; Lei, Ngai-Yu; Yu, Lei; Kong, Karen Hoi-Kuan; Yu, Han-Qing; Lau, Tai-Chu; Lam, Michael H W

    2011-01-15

    Fenton and photoassisted Fenton degradation of ordinary hydrophobic cross-linked polystyrene microspheres and sulfonated polystyrene beads (DOWEX 50WX8) have been attempted. While the Fenton process was not able to degrade these polystyrene materials, photoassisted Fenton reaction (mediated by broad-band UV irradiation from a 250 W Hg(Xe) light source) was found to be efficient in mineralizing cross-linked sulfonated polystyrene materials. The optimal loadings of the Fe(III) catalyst and the H(2)O(2) oxidant for such a photoassisted Fenton degradation were found to be 42 μmol-Fe(III) and 14.1 mmol-H(2)O(2) per gram of the sulfonated polystyrene material. The initial pH for the degradation was set at pH 2.0. This photoassisted Fenton degradation process was also able to mineralize commonly encountered polystyrene wastes. After a simple sulfonation pretreatment, a mineralization efficiency of >99% (by net polymer weight) was achieved within 250 min. The mechanism of this advanced oxidative degradation process was investigated. Sulfonate groups introduced to the surface of the treated polystyrene polymer chains were capable of rapidly binding the cationic Fe(III) catalyst, probably via a cation-exchange mechanism. Such a sorption of the photoassisted Fenton catalyst was crucial to the heterogeneous degradation process.

  18. Degradation and detoxification of three textile Azo dyes by mixed fungal cultures from semi-arid region of Brazilian Northeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Nascimento

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the degradation and detoxification of three textile azo dyes (Reactive Red 198, Reactive Red 141 and Reactive Blue 214 by mixed fungal cultures from semi-arid region of Brazilian Northeast. Sediment samples of twenty water reservoirs in the surroundings of Serra da Capivara National Park, area of environmental preservation in the caatinga in the State of Piauí, with semi-arid climate, were evaluated in order to select the consortia of fungi capable to degrade and detoxify these dyes. The mixed fungal culture from Caldeirão Escuridão (CE reservoir was the most efficient in the degradation and detoxification of the dyes tested.

  19. Performance Degradation of LSCF Cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alinger, Matthew

    2013-09-30

    This final report summarizes the progress made during the October 1, 2008 - September 30, 2013 period under Cooperative Agreement DE-NT0004109 for the U. S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (USDOE/NETL) entitled “Performance Degradation of LSCF Cathodes”. The primary objective of this program is to develop a performance degradation mitigation path for high performing, cost-effective solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Strategies to mitigate performance degradation are developed and implemented. In addition, thermal spray manufacturing of SOFCs is explored. Combined, this work establishes a basis for cost-effective SOFC cells.

  20. Alkylaminopyridine-Modified Aluminum Aminoterephthalate Metal-Organic Frameworks as Components of Reactive Self-Detoxifying Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-07

    hydrolytic decomposition of an organophosphorous stimulant of chemical warfare agents. 4-MAP possesses a secondary amino group readily amenable to...and (3) possessed residual porosity that enabled sufficient access of the organophosphorous (OP) compound to the reactive 4-MAP sites. The resulting...evaluating the performance of materials designed for the degradation of the organophosphorous chemical threat agents.27,35,36 Degradation of DFP (Figure 9

  1. Session-based concurrency, reactively

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Cano (Mauricio); J. Arias (Jaime); J.A. Pérez Parra (Jorge)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThis paper concerns formal models for the analysis of communication-centric software systems that feature declarative and reactive behaviors. We focus on session-based concurrency, the interaction model induced by session types, which uses (variants of) the Π-calculus as specification

  2. Separability of local reactivity descriptors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Akhilesh Tanwar; Sourav Pal

    2005-09-01

    The size-dependence of different local reactivity descriptors of dimer A2 and AB type of systems is discussed. We derive analytic results of these descriptors calculated using finite difference approximation. In particular, we studied Fukui functions, relative electrophilicity and relative nucleophilicity, local softness and local philicity. The results are explained using the example of the dimer of BH3NH3.

  3. Towards a Reactive Virtual Trainer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruttkay, Zsófia; Zwiers, Job; Welbergen, van Herwin; Reidsma, Dennis; Gratch, J.; Young, M.; Aylett, R.; Ballin, D.; Olivier, P.

    2006-01-01

    A Reactive Virtual Trainer (RVT) is an Intelligent Virtual Agent (IVA) capable of presenting physical exercises that are to be performed by a human, monitoring the user and providing feedback at different levels. Depending on the motivation and the application context, the exercises may be general o

  4. Permeable Reactive Barrier: Technology Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    Reactivity of Partially Reduced Arylhydroxylamine and Nitrosoarene Metabolites of 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene (TNT) Towards Biomass and Humic Acids...Electron micrograph of bone- char phosphate pellets illustrating morphology and microporosity of apatite materials...groundwater velocity of approximately threefold indicate partial clogging due to the formation of mineral precipitates. Monitoring results from a large

  5. Ecosystemic approaches to land degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puigdefabregas, J.; Barrio, G. del; Hill, J.

    2009-07-01

    Land degradation is recognized as the main outcome of desertification. However available procedures for its assessment are still unsatisfactory because are often too costly for surveying large areas and rely on specific components of the degradation process without being able to integrate them in a unique process. One of the objectives of De Survey project is designing and implementing operational procedures for desertification surveillance, including land degradation. A strategic report was compiled and reproduced here for selecting the most appropriate approaches to the project conditions. The report focuses on using attributes of ecosystem maturity as a natural way to integrate the different drivers of land degradation in simple indices. The review surveys different families of attributes concerned with water and energy fluxes through the ecosystem, its capacity to sustain biomass and net primary productivity, and its capacity to structure the space. Finally, some conclusions are presented about the choice criteria of the different approaches in the framne of operational applications. (Author) 20 refs.

  6. Plant biomass degradation by fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkelä, Miia R; Donofrio, Nicole; de Vries, Ronald P

    2014-11-01

    Plant biomass degradation by fungi has implications for several fields of science. The enzyme systems employed by fungi for this are broadly used in various industrial sectors such as food & feed, pulp & paper, detergents, textile, wine, and more recently biofuels and biochemicals. In addition, the topic is highly relevant in the field of plant pathogenic fungi as they degrade plant biomass to either gain access to the plant or as carbon source, resulting in significant crop losses. Finally, fungi are the main degraders of plant biomass in nature and as such have an essential role in the global carbon cycle and ecology in general. In this review we provide a global view on the development of this research topic in saprobic ascomycetes and basidiomycetes and in plant pathogenic fungi and link this to the other papers of this special issue on plant biomass degradation by fungi. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Bacterial isolates degrading aliphatic polycarbonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suyama, T; Hosoya, H; Tokiwa, Y

    1998-04-15

    Bacteria that degrade an aliphatic polycarbonate, poly(hexamethylene carbonate), were isolated from river water in Ibaraki. Prefecture, Japan, after enrichment in liquid medium containing poly(hexamethylene carbonate) suspensions as carbon source, and dilution to single cells. Four of the strains, 35L, WFF52, 61A and 61B2, degraded poly(hexamethylene carbonate) on agar plate containing suspended poly(hexamethylene carbonate). Degradation of poly(hexamethylene carbonate) was confirmed by gel permeation chromatography. Besides poly(hexamethylene carbonate), the strains were found to degrade poly(tetramethylene carbonate). The strains were characterized morphologically, physiologically, and by 16S rDNA sequence analysis. Strains 35L and WFF52 were tentatively identified as Pseudomonas sp. and Variovorax sp., respectively, while strains 61A and 61B2 constitute an unidentified branch within the beta subclass of the Proteobacteria.

  8. Chitin Degradation In Marine Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Sara; Machado, Henrique; Gram, Lone

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Chitin is the most abundant polymer in the marine environment and the second most abundant in nature. Chitin does not accumulate on the ocean floor, because of microbial breakdown. Chitin degrading bacteria could have potential in the utilization of chitin as a renewable carbon...... and nitrogen source in the fermentation industry.Methods: Here, whole genome sequenced marine bacteria were screened for chitin degradation using phenotypic and in silico analyses.Results: The in silico analyses revealed the presence of three to nine chitinases in each strain, however the number of chitinases...... chitin regulatory system.Conclusions: This study has provided insight into the ecology of chitin degradation in marine bacteria. It also served as a basis for choosing a more efficient chitin degrading production strain e.g. for the use of chitin waste for large-scale fermentations....

  9. Mathematical modelling of paper degradation in books

    OpenAIRE

    Nimmo, A J

    2015-01-01

    Paper cannot be prevented from degrading and does not necessarily degrade uniformly across its volume. It has been established that as paper degrades, VOCs (Volatile Organic Compounds) are produced. This body of work studies paper degradation with respect to the role VOCs play. The thesis investigates how a VOC a ecting the paper's acidity can in turn a ect the degradation rate and through modelling the VOC concentration pro le, the degradation pro le is found. To create the model from a chem...

  10. Atmospheric OH reactivity in central London: observations, model predictions and estimates of in situ ozone production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalley, Lisa K.; Stone, Daniel; Bandy, Brian; Dunmore, Rachel; Hamilton, Jacqueline F.; Hopkins, James; Lee, James D.; Lewis, Alastair C.; Heard, Dwayne E.

    2016-02-01

    Near-continuous measurements of hydroxyl radical (OH) reactivity in the urban background atmosphere of central London during the summer of 2012 are presented. OH reactivity behaviour is seen to be broadly dependent on air mass origin, with the highest reactivity and the most pronounced diurnal profile observed when air had passed over central London to the east, prior to measurement. Averaged over the entire observation period of 26 days, OH reactivity peaked at ˜ 27 s-1 in the morning, with a minimum of ˜ 15 s-1 during the afternoon. A maximum OH reactivity of 116 s-1 was recorded on one day during morning rush hour. A detailed box model using the Master Chemical Mechanism was used to calculate OH reactivity, and was constrained with an extended measurement data set of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) derived from a gas chromatography flame ionisation detector (GC-FID) and a two-dimensional GC instrument which included heavier molecular weight (up to C12) aliphatic VOCs, oxygenated VOCs and the biogenic VOCs α-pinene and limonene. Comparison was made between observed OH reactivity and modelled OH reactivity using (i) a standard suite of VOC measurements (C2-C8 hydrocarbons and a small selection of oxygenated VOCs) and (ii) a more comprehensive inventory including species up to C12. Modelled reactivities were lower than those measured (by 33 %) when only the reactivity of the standard VOC suite was considered. The difference between measured and modelled reactivity was improved, to within 15 %, if the reactivity of the higher VOCs (⩾ C9) was also considered, with the reactivity of the biogenic compounds of α-pinene and limonene and their oxidation products almost entirely responsible for this improvement. Further improvements in the model's ability to reproduce OH reactivity (to within 6 %) could be achieved if the reactivity and degradation mechanism of unassigned two-dimensional GC peaks were estimated. Neglecting the contribution of the higher VOCs (⩾ C

  11. Deciphering effects of functional groups and electron density on azo dyes degradation by graphene loaded TiO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qian [College of Chemical Engineering, HuaQiao University, Xiamen 361021 (China); Liang, Xiao [School of Environment and Architecture, University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, Shanghai 200093 (China); Chen, Bor-Yann [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National I-Lan University, 26047, Taiwan (China); Chang, Chang-Tang, E-mail: ctchang@niu.edu.tw [Department of Environmental Engineering, National I-Lan University, 26047, Taiwan (China)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • The degradation pathways of RB5, RB171 and RR198 have been identified. • The favorable bond to be broken under photo degradation was deciphered in this research. • The breakages of the bonds were due to the electron density changes around the bonds. • The hydroxyl radicals as the main oxidized species were confirmed by positive hole trapper and ESR. - Abstract: This study tended to decipher the mechanism of photo degradation of azo dyes, which bond was favorable to be broken for application of wastewater decolorization. That is, from chemical structure perspective, the critical substituents to affect electron donor/acceptor for dye degradation would be identified in this research. The model reactive blacks (RB5), reactive blue 171 (RB171) and reactive red 198 (RR198) were degraded by graphene loaded TiO{sub 2}, indicating how the electron withdrawing and releasing groups affect azo dye degradability. The byproducts and intermediate products were analyzed by ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy (UV–vis), gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS) and ion chromatography (IC). Furthermore, the radicals involved in the reaction were found by electron paramagnetic resonance (ESR) to confirm the main oxidized species of hydroxyl radicals rather than the light generated positive holes. The finding revealed that the breakages of the bonds were due to the electron density changes around the bonds. This principle can be applicable not only for RB5 degradation, but also for reactive blue 171 (RB171), reactive red 198 (RR198) and some other textile dyes.

  12. Working session 1: Tubing degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kharshafdjian, G. [Atomic Energy of Canada, Mississauga, Ontario (Canada); Turluer, G. [IPSN, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    1997-02-01

    A general introductory overview of the purpose of the group and the general subject area of SG tubing degradation was given by the facilitator. The purpose of the session was described as to {open_quotes}develop conclusions and proposals on regulatory and technical needs required to deal with the issues of SG tubing degradation.{close_quotes} Types, locations and characteristics of tubing degradation in steam generators were briefly reviewed. The well-known synergistic effects of materials, environment, and stress and strain/strain rate, subsequently referred to by the acronym {open_quotes}MESS{close_quotes} by some of the group members, were noted. The element of time (i.e., evolution of these variables with time) was emphasized. It was also suggested that the group might want to consider the related topics of inspection capabilities, operational variables, degradation remedies, and validity of test data, and some background information in these areas was provided. The presentation given by Peter Millet during the Plenary Session was reviewed; Specifically, the chemical aspects and the degradation from the secondary side of the steam generator were noted. The main issues discussed during the October 1995 EPRI meeting on secondary side corrosion were reported, and a listing of the potential SG tube degradations was provided and discussed.

  13. Sonolytic degradation of 2-chlorobiphenyl

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张光明; 华天星; 常爱敏

    2004-01-01

    The sonolytic degradation of 2-chlorobiphenyl was investigated. Mass spectroscopy was used to detect the products of sonolytic degradation of 2-chlorobiphenyl. The results show that the products of sonolytic degradation, such as biphenyl, ethyl benzene, diethylbiphenyl, dibutylbiphenyl, phenol, propylphenol and di-tert-butyl phenol are produced by thermolysis and hydroxyl free radical reactions, in which biphenyl counts for almost 40%(mole fraction) of the mother compound and others are at trace level. Rapid accumulation of chloride ion shows quick dechlorination, and 78% organic chlorine is converted into chloride ion. Free radical scavengers, bicarbonate and carbonate, decrease the reaction rate of sonolytic degradation of 2-chlorobiphenyl significantly, and the pseudo 1st order rate constant of sonolytic degradation of 2-chlorobiphenyl decreases linearly with the natural logarithm of the concentration of the added free radical scavenger, showing that the pyrolysis and hydroxyl free radical reaction are the two major pathways for the sonolytic degradation of 2-chlorobiphenyl, in which the hydroxyl radical concentration is estimated to be 1 × 10 10mol/L.

  14. Sheets of branched poly(lactic acid) obtained by one step reactive extrusion calendering process: Physical Aging and Fracture Behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Cailloux, Jonathan; Santana Pérez, Orlando Onofre; FRANCO URQUIZA, EDGAR ADRIAN; Bou Serra, Jordi; Carrasco Alonso, Félix Ángel; Maspoch Rulduà, Mª Lluïsa

    2014-01-01

    The architectural modifications of a linear poly(D,L-Lactide) acid (PD,L-LA) commercial grade were induced by a one-step reactive extrusion-calendering process using a styrene-glycidyl acrylate copolymer as reactive agent. The melt degradation was counteracted by chain extension and branching reactions, leading to a stabilization of the melt properties and an increase in the molecular weight. For such modified samples [poly(lactic acid) (PLA)-reactive extrusion (REX)], the rate of physical ag...

  15. Sonolytic, sonocatalytic and sonophotocatalytic degradation of chitosan in the presence of TiO2 nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghizadeh, Mohammad Taghi; Abdollahi, Reza

    2011-01-01

    The degradation of chitosan by means of ultrasound irradiation and its combination with heterogeneous (TiO(2)) was investigated. Emphasis was given on the effect of additives on degradation rate constants. Ultrasound irradiation (24 kHz) was provided by a sonicator, while an ultraviolet source of 16 W was used for UV irradiation. The extent of sonolytic degradation increased with increasing ultrasound power (in the range 30-90 W), while the presence of TiO(2) in the dark generally had little effect on degradation. On the other hand, TiO(2) sono-photocatalysis led to complete chitosan degradation in 60 min with increasing catalyst loading. TiO(2) sonophotocatalysis was always faster than the respective individual processes due to the enhanced formation of reactive radicals as well as the possible ultrasound-induced increase of the active surface area of the catalyst. The degraded chitosans were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and average molecular weight of ultrasonicated chitosan was determined by measurements of relative viscosity of samples. The results show that the total degree of deacetylation (DD) of chitosan did not change after degradation and the decrease of molecular weight led to transformation of crystal structure. A negative order for the dependence of the reaction rate on total molar concentration of chitosan solution within the degradation process was suggested. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A REVIEW ON EFFICACIOUS METHODS TO DECOLORIZE REACTIVE AZO DYE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagadeesan Vijayaraghavan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the intensive review of reactive azo dye, Reactive Black 5. Various physicochemical methods namely photo catalysis, electrochemical, adsorption, hydrolysis and biological methods like microbial degradation, biosorption and bioaccumulation have been analyzed thoroughly along with the merits and demerits of each method. Among these various methods, biological treatment methods are found to be the best for decolorization of Reactive Black 5. With respect to dye biosorption, microbial biomass (bacteria, fungi, microalgae, etc, and outperformed macroscopic materials (seaweeds, crab shell, etc. are used for decolorization process. The use of living organisms may not be an option for the continuous treatment of highly toxic organic/inorganic contaminants. Once the toxicant concentration becomes too high or the process operated for a long time, the amount of toxicant accumulated will reach saturation. Beyond this point, an organism's metabolism may be interrupted, resulting in death of the organism. This scenario is not existed in the case of dead biomass, which is flexible to environmental conditions and toxicant concentrations. Thus, owing to its favorable characteristics, biosorption has received much attention in recent years.

  17. A REVIEW ON EFFICACIOUS METHODS TO DECOLORIZE REACTIVE AZO DYE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagadeesan Vijayaraghavan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the intensive review of reactive azo dye, Reactive Black 5. Various physicochemical methods namely photo catalysis, electrochemical, adsorption, hydrolysis and biological methods like microbial degradation, biosorption and bioaccumulation have been analyzed thoroughly along with the merits and demerits of each method. Among these various methods, biological treatment methods are found to be the best for decolorization of Reactive Black 5. With respect to dye biosorption, microbial biomass (bacteria, fungi, microalgae, etc, and outperformed macroscopic materials (seaweeds, crab shell, etc. are used for decolorization process. The use of living organisms may not be an option for the continuous treatment of highly toxic organic/inorganic contaminants. Once the toxicant concentration becomes too high or the process operated for a long time, the amount of toxicant accumulated will reach saturation. Beyond this point, an organism's metabolism may be interrupted, resulting in death of the organism. This scenario is not existed in the case of dead biomass, which is flexible to environmental conditions and toxicant concentrations. Thus, owing to its favorable characteristics, biosorption has received much attention in recent years.

  18. Redox regulation of insulin degradation by insulin-degrading enzyme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crystal M Cordes

    Full Text Available Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE is a thiol sensitive peptidase that degrades insulin and amyloid β, and has been linked to type 2 diabetes mellitus and Alzheimer's disease. We examined the thiol sensitivity of IDE using S-nitrosoglutathione, reduced glutathione, and oxidized glutathione to distinguish the effects of nitric oxide from that of the redox state. The in vitro activity of IDE was studied using either partially purified cytosolic enzyme from male Sprague-Dawley rats, or purified rat recombinant enzyme. We confirm that nitric oxide inhibits the degrading activity of IDE, and that it affects proteasome activity through this interaction with IDE, but does not affect the proteasome directly. Oxidized glutathione inhibits IDE through glutathionylation, which was reversible by dithiothreitol but not by ascorbic acid. Reduced glutathione had no effect on IDE, but reacted with partially degraded insulin to disrupt its disulfide bonds and accelerate its breakdown to trichloroacetic acid soluble fragments. Our results demonstrate the sensitivity of insulin degradation by IDE to the redox environment and suggest another mechanism by which the cell's oxidation state may contribute to the development of, and the link between, type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer's disease.

  19. Photovoltaic failure and degradation modes: PV failure and degradation modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, Dirk C. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden Colorado 80401 USA; Silverman, Timothy J. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden Colorado 80401 USA; Wohlgemuth, John H. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden Colorado 80401 USA; Kurtz, Sarah R. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden Colorado 80401 USA; VanSant, Kaitlyn T. [Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois Street Golden Colorado 8040 USA

    2017-01-30

    The extensive photovoltaic field reliability literature was analyzed and reviewed. Future work is prioritized based upon information assembled from recent installations, and inconsistencies in degradation mode identification are discussed to help guide future publication on this subject. Reported failure rates of photovoltaic modules fall mostly in the range of other consumer products; however, the long expected useful life of modules may not allow for direct comparison. In general, degradation percentages are reported to decrease appreciably in newer installations that are deployed after the year 2000. However, these trends may be convoluted with varying manufacturing and installation quality world-wide. Modules in hot and humid climates show considerably higher degradation modes than those in desert and moderate climates, which warrants further investigation. Delamination and diode/j-box issues are also more frequent in hot and humid climates than in other climates. The highest concerns of systems installed in the last 10 years appear to be hot spots followed by internal circuitry discoloration. Encapsulant discoloration was the most common degradation mode, particularly in older systems. In newer systems, encapsulant discoloration appears in hotter climates, but to a lesser degree. Thin-film degradation modes are dominated by glass breakage and absorber corrosion, although the breadth of information for thin-film modules is much smaller than for x-Si.

  20. Interaction of nanoparticles with proteins: relation to bio-reactivity of the nanoparticle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saptarshi, Shruti R; Duschl, Albert; Lopata, Andreas L

    2013-07-19

    Interaction of nanoparticles with proteins is the basis of nanoparticle bio-reactivity. This interaction gives rise to the formation of a dynamic nanoparticle-protein corona. The protein corona may influence cellular uptake, inflammation, accumulation, degradation and clearance of the nanoparticles. Furthermore, the nanoparticle surface can induce conformational changes in adsorbed protein molecules which may affect the overall bio-reactivity of the nanoparticle. In depth understanding of such interactions can be directed towards generating bio-compatible nanomaterials with controlled surface characteristics in a biological environment. The main aim of this review is to summarise current knowledge on factors that influence nanoparticle-protein interactions and their implications on cellular uptake.

  1. Radiation-induced decomposition and decoloration of reactive dyes in the presence of H 2O 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Min; Yang, Ruiyuan; Wang, Wenfeng; Shen, Zhongqun; Bian, Shaowei; Zhu, Zhiyuan

    2006-02-01

    The dyeing wastewaters represent a large input of hazardous compounds to the environment and these compounds are usually non-biodegradable. In this study, electron beam irradiation-induced decoloration and decomposition of reactive dyes in aqueous solution were investigated. Two different reactive dyes (reactive red KE-3B and reactive blue XBR) solutions were irradiated with electron beam at different doses in the absence and presence of H 2O 2. The changes of absorption spectra and pH value were described and analyzed as well as the degree of decoloration and COD removal. The influences of absorbed doses, H 2O 2 additions and initial dye concentrations are discussed. The experimental results show that reactive dyes in aqueous solutions can be effectively degraded by electron beam irradiation, especially in the presence of hydrogen peroxide.

  2. Biodegradability of degradable plastic waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agamuthu, P; Faizura, Putri Nadzrul

    2005-04-01

    Plastic waste constitutes the third largest waste volume in Malaysian municipal solid waste (MSW), next to putrescible waste and paper. The plastic component in MSW from Kuala Lumpur averages 24% (by weight), whereas the national mean is about 15%. The 144 waste dumps in the country receive about 95% of the MSW, including plastic waste. The useful life of the landfills is fast diminishing as the plastic waste stays un-degraded for more than 50 years. In this study the compostability of polyethylene and pro-oxidant additive-based environmentally degradable plastics (EDP) was investigated. Linear low-density polyethylene (LLDPE) samples exposed hydrolytically or oxidatively at 60 degrees C showed that the abiotic degradation path was oxidative rather than hydrolytic. There was a weight loss of 8% and the plastic has been oxidized as shown by the additional carbonyl group exhibited in the Fourier transform infra red (FTIR) Spectrum. Oxidation rate seemed to be influenced by the amount of pro-oxidant additive, the chemical structure and morphology of the plastic samples, and the surface area. Composting studies during a 45-day experiment showed that the percentage elongation (reduction) was 20% for McD samples [high-density polyethylene, (HDPE) with 3% additive] and LL samples (LLDPE with 7% additive) and 18% reduction for totally degradable plastic (TDP) samples (HDPE with 3% additive). Lastly, microbial experiments using Pseudomonas aeroginosa on carbon-free media with degradable plastic samples as the sole carbon source, showed confirmatory results. A positive bacterial growth and a weight loss of 2.2% for degraded polyethylene samples were evident to show that the degradable plastic is biodegradable.

  3. Engine combustion control via fuel reactivity stratification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reitz, Rolf Deneys; Hanson, Reed M.; Splitter, Derek A.; Kokjohn, Sage L.

    2016-06-28

    A compression ignition engine uses two or more fuel charges having two or more reactivities to control the timing and duration of combustion. In a preferred implementation, a lower-reactivity fuel charge is injected or otherwise introduced into the combustion chamber, preferably sufficiently early that it becomes at least substantially homogeneously dispersed within the chamber before a subsequent injection is made. One or more subsequent injections of higher-reactivity fuel charges are then made, and these preferably distribute the higher-reactivity matter within the lower-reactivity chamber space such that combustion begins in the higher-reactivity regions, and with the lower-reactivity regions following thereafter. By appropriately choosing the reactivities of the charges, their relative amounts, and their timing, combustion can be tailored to achieve optimal power output (and thus fuel efficiency), at controlled temperatures (and thus controlled NOx), and with controlled equivalence ratios (and thus controlled soot).

  4. C-Reactive Protein (CRP) Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities C-Reactive Protein (CRP) Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: CRP Formal name: C-Reactive Protein Related tests: ESR , Complement , Procalcitonin , ANA , Rheumatoid Factor ...

  5. Engine combustion control via fuel reactivity stratification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reitz, Rolf Deneys; Hanson, Reed M.; Splitter, Derek A.; Kokjohn, Sage L.

    2015-07-14

    A compression ignition engine uses two or more fuel charges having two or more reactivities to control the timing and duration of combustion. In a preferred implementation, a lower-reactivity fuel charge is injected or otherwise introduced into the combustion chamber, preferably sufficiently early that it becomes at least substantially homogeneously dispersed within the chamber before a subsequent injection is made. One or more subsequent injections of higher-reactivity fuel charges are then made, and these preferably distribute the higher-reactivity matter within the lower-reactivity chamber space such that combustion begins in the higher-reactivity regions, and with the lower-reactivity regions following thereafter. By appropriately choosing the reactivities of the charges, their relative amounts, and their timing, combustion can be tailored to achieve optimal power output (and thus fuel efficiency), at controlled temperatures (and thus controlled NOx), and with controlled equivalence ratios (and thus controlled soot).

  6. Engine combustion control via fuel reactivity stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, Rolf Deneys; Hanson, Reed M; Splitter, Derek A; Kokjohn, Sage L

    2013-12-31

    A compression ignition engine uses two or more fuel charges having two or more reactivities to control the timing and duration of combustion. In a preferred implementation, a lower-reactivity fuel charge is injected or otherwise introduced into the combustion chamber, preferably sufficiently early that it becomes at least substantially homogeneously dispersed within the chamber before a subsequent injection is made. One or more subsequent injections of higher-reactivity fuel charges are then made, and these preferably distribute the higher-reactivity matter within the lower-reactivity chamber space such that combustion begins in the higher-reactivity regions, and with the lower-reactivity regions following thereafter. By appropriately choose the reactivities of the charges, their relative amounts, and their timing, combustion can be tailored to achieve optimal power output (and thus fuel efficiency), at controlled temperatures (and thus controlled NOx), and with controlled equivalence ratios (and thus controlled soot).

  7. the Study of Hepatitis B Virus Reactivation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation after chemotherapy or immunosuppressive therapy is a cause of liver-related morbidity and mortality. Not all chronic hepatitis B patients will lead to HBV reactivation. The incidence is 0.3%-30.2%according to the reports. The mechanism of HBV reactivation is still unclear, but it is believed that the viral load is increasing due to the suppression of immune response. No uniform diagnostic criteria are available. HBV reactivation can be confirmed by an increase of serum HBV DNA level. Recently, awareness of reactivation of occult HBV has been improved, especially in HBV endemic area. Preemptive antiviral therapy was the best approach to prevent the HBV reactivation. HBV reactivation can lead to acute hepatitis, severe hepatitis and acute liver failure. Therefore, it is worthy of great attention and further study. Antiviral therapy is safe and effective to prevent HBV reactivation.

  8. Particle Swarm Optimization Based Reactive Power Optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Sujin, P R; Linda, M Mary

    2010-01-01

    Reactive power plays an important role in supporting the real power transfer by maintaining voltage stability and system reliability. It is a critical element for a transmission operator to ensure the reliability of an electric system while minimizing the cost associated with it. The traditional objectives of reactive power dispatch are focused on the technical side of reactive support such as minimization of transmission losses. Reactive power cost compensation to a generator is based on the incurred cost of its reactive power contribution less the cost of its obligation to support the active power delivery. In this paper an efficient Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) based reactive power optimization approach is presented. The optimal reactive power dispatch problem is a nonlinear optimization problem with several constraints. The objective of the proposed PSO is to minimize the total support cost from generators and reactive compensators. It is achieved by maintaining the whole system power loss as minimum...

  9. Perceptual basis for reactive teleoperation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Y. S.; Ewing, T. F.; Boyle, J. M.; Yule, T. J.

    2001-08-28

    To enhance task performance in partially structured environment, enhancement of teleoperation was proposed by introducing autonomous behaviors. Such autonomy is implemented based on reactive robotic architecture, where reactive motor agents that directly couples sensory inputs and motor actions become the building blocks. To this end, presented in this paper is a perceptual basis for the motor agents. The perceptual basis consists of perceptual agents that extracts environmental information from a structured light vision system and provide action oriented perception for the corresponding motor agents. Rather than performing general scene reconstruction, a perceptual agent directly provides the motion reference for the motor behavior. Various sensory mechanisms--sensor fission, fusion, and fashion--becomes basic building blocks of the perception process. Since perception is a process deeply intertwined with the motor actions, active perception may also incorporate motor behaviors as an integral perceptual process.

  10. A Search of Reactivated Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Quan-Zhi

    2017-05-01

    Dormant or near-dormant short-period comets can unexpectedly regain the ability to eject dust. In many known cases, the resurrection is short-lived and lasts less than one orbit. However, it is possible that some resurrected comets can remain active in later perihelion passages. We search the archival images of various facilities to look for these “reactivated” comets. We identify two candidates, 297P/Beshore and 332P/Ikeya-Murakami, both of which were found to be inactive or weakly active in the previous orbit before their discovery. We derive a reactivation rate of ˜ 0.007 {{comet}}-1 {{orbit}}-1, which implies that typical short-period comets only become temporarily dormant a few times or less. Smaller comets are prone to rotational instability and may undergo temporary dormancy more frequently. Next generation high-cadence surveys may find more reactivation events of these comets.

  11. Reactive polymer fused deposition manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunc, Vlastimil; Rios, Orlando; Love, Lonnie J.; Duty, Chad E.; Johs, Alexander

    2017-05-16

    Methods and compositions for additive manufacturing that include reactive or thermosetting polymers, such as urethanes and epoxies. The polymers are melted, partially cross-linked prior to the depositing, deposited to form a component object, solidified, and fully cross-linked. These polymers form networks of chemical bonds that span the deposited layers. Application of a directional electromagnetic field can be applied to aromatic polymers after deposition to align the polymers for improved bonding between the deposited layers.

  12. Performance and dye-degrading bacteria isolation of a hybrid membrane process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Sheng-Jie, E-mail: sjyou@cycu.edu.tw [Department of Bioenvironmental Engineering and R and D Center for Membrane Technology, Chung Yuan Christian University, No. 200, Rd. Chung-Pei, Chungli 320, Taiwan (China); Teng, Jun-Yu, E-mail: nickprometheus@yahoo.com.tw [Department of Civil Engineering, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chungli 320, Taiwan (China)

    2009-12-15

    Textile dyeing wastewater contains harmful compounds, which are toxic to both marine organisms and human beings if it discharged into an aquatic environmental without suitable treatment. In this study, the wastewater containing the azo dye, Reactive Black 5 (RB5), was partially treated in an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor which was further treated either in an aerobic membrane bioreactors (AOMBR) or in combined aerobic membrane bioreactor/reverse osmosis (AOMBR/RO) process. The results showed that in the anaerobic sequencing batch reactor the RB5 dye was degraded to form aromatic amine intermediate metabolites, which were further mineralized in the AOMBR. It was also observed that although all effluents from the AOMBR and AOMBR/RO processes met the Taiwan EPA's effluent criteria, irrespective of which membranes were used in the aerobic tank, the effluent from the AOMBR/RO process met the criteria for reuse for toilet flushing, landscaping, irrigation, and cooling water purposes, where as the AOMBR effluent only met the criteria for cooling water due to incomplete color removal. Five anaerobic high dye-degrading bacteria were isolated, which were identified to be the same species of Lactococcus lactis by 16S rRNA sequencing. The L. lactis showed complete degradation of RB5 and further studies showed that it can also able to degrade Reactive Red 120 and Reactive Yellow 84 efficiently within 6 h.

  13. Reactive Transport Modeling and Changes in Porosity at Reactive Interfaces in a HLW repository in Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samper, J.; Mon, A.; Montenegro, L.; Naves, A.; Fernández, J.

    2016-12-01

    High-level radioactive waste disposal in a deep geological repository is based on a multibarrier concept which combines natural barriers such as the geological formation and artificial barriers such as metallic containers, bentonite and concrete buffers and sealing materials. The stability and performance of the bentonite barrier could be affected by the corrosion products at the canister-bentonite interface and the hyperalkaline conditions caused by the degradation of concrete at the bentonite-concrete interface. Additionally, the host clay formation could also be affected by the hyperalkaline plume at the concrete-clay interface. Here we present a nonisothermal reactive transport model of the long-term interactions of the compacted bentonite with the corrosion products of a carbon-steel canister and the concrete liner of the engineered barrier of a high-level radioactive waste repository in clay. This problem involves large pH changes with a hyperalkaline high-pH plume, complex mineral dissolution/precipitation patterns, cation exchange reactions and proton surface complexation. These reactions lead to large changes in porosity which can even lead to pore clogging. Model results show that magnetite, the main corrosion product, precipitates and reduces significantly the porosity of the bentonite near the canister. The degradation of the concrete liner leads to the precipitation of secondary minerals and the reduction of the porosity of the bentonite and the clay formation at their interfaces with the concrete liner. The zones affected by pore clogging at the canister-bentonite, bentonite-concrete and concrete-clay interfaces at 1 Ma are equal to 10, 25 and 25 mm thick, respectively. The results of our simulations share many of the features of the models reported by others for engineered barrier systems at similar chemical conditions, including: 1) Narrow alteration zones; and 2) Pore clogging at the canister-bentonite, bentonite-concrete and concrete

  14. Quadratic reactivity fuel cycle model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewins, J.D.

    1985-11-01

    For educational purposes it is highly desirable to provide simple yet realistic models for fuel cycle and fuel economy. In particular, a lumped model without recourse to detailed spatial calculations would be very helpful in providing the student with a proper understanding of the purposes of fuel cycle calculations. A teaching model for fuel cycle studies based on a lumped model assuming the summability of partial reactivities with a linear dependence of reactivity usefully illustrates fuel utilization concepts. The linear burnup model does not satisfactorily represent natural enrichment reactors. A better model, showing the trend of initial plutonium production before subsequent fuel burnup and fission product generation, is a quadratic fit. The study of M-batch cycles, reloading 1/Mth of the core at end of cycle, is now complicated by nonlinear equations. A complete account of the asymptotic cycle for any order of M-batch refueling can be given and compared with the linear model. A complete account of the transient cycle can be obtained readily in the two-batch model and this exact solution would be useful in verifying numerical marching models. It is convenient to treat the parabolic fit rho = 1 - tau/sup 2/ as a special case of the general quadratic fit rho = 1 - C/sub tau/ - (1 - C)tau/sup 2/ in suitably normalized reactivity and cycle time units. The parabolic results are given in this paper.

  15. Cyclic Degradation Behavior of < 001 \\rangle -Oriented Fe-Mn-Al-Ni Single Crystals in Tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, M.; Kriegel, M. J.; Krooß, P.; Martin, S.; Klemm, V.; Weidner, A.; Chumlyakov, Y.; Biermann, H.; Rafaja, D.; Niendorf, T.

    2017-08-01

    In the present study, functional fatigue behavior of a near 〈001〉-oriented Fe-Mn-Al-Ni single crystal was investigated under tensile load. An incremental strain test up to 3.5% strain and cyclic tests up to 25 cycles revealed rapid pseudoelastic degradation. Progressive microstructural degradation was studied by in situ scanning electron microscopy. The results show a partially inhibited reactivation of previously formed martensite and proceeding activation of untransformed areas in subsequent cycles. The preferentially formed martensite variants were identified by means of Schmid factor calculation and the Kurdjumov-Sachs relationship. Post mortem transmission electron microscopy investigations shed light on the prevailing degradation mechanisms. Different types of dislocations were found promoting the progressive degradation during cyclic loading.

  16. Structure–efficiency relationships of cyclodextrin scavengers in the hydrolytic degradation of organophosphorus compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Letort

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available New derivatives of cyclodextrins were prepared in order to determine the relative importance of the structural key elements involved in the degradation of organophosphorus nerve agents. To avoid a competitive inclusion between the organophosphorus substrate and the iodosobenzoate group, responsible for its degradation, the latter group had to be covalently bound to the cyclodextrin scaffold. Although the presence of the α nucleophile iodosobenzoate was a determinant in the hydrolysis process, an imidazole group was added to get a synergistic effect towards the degradation of the agents. The degradation efficiency was found to be dependent on the relative position of the heterocycle towards the reactive group as well as on the nature of the organophosphorus derivative.

  17. Determination of degradation products of squalamine lactate using LC/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cong-Jun; Kari, U Prasad; Noecker, Lincoln A; Jones, Stephen R; Sabo, Andrew M; McCormick, Timothy J; Johnston, Sean M

    2003-04-24

    Heat, acid and base stress methods were applied to study the stability of squalamine lactate. Liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry was used to analyze the degraded samples and tentative structural identifications were assigned based on their molecular weight measurements, reactivity and MS/MS fragmentation. Solid squalamine lactate generated a new amide, namely lactyl squalamide, when heated to 80 degrees C. Chemical structure for this new compound has been established by NMR and MS data interpretation and confirmed by direct comparison between the degradant and the synthesized compound. Squalamine lactate in pH 4 acetate buffer solution produced more degradants under stressed conditions. These degradants are formed due to the loss of the sulfate functionality. Squalamine lactate is stable in refrigerated conditions as well as in basic solution.

  18. Compendium of photovoltaic degradation rates: Photovoltaic degradation rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, Dirk C. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden CO 80401 USA; Kurtz, Sarah R. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden CO 80401 USA; VanSant, Kaitlyn [Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois Street Golden CO 8040 USA; Newmiller, Jeff [DNV GL, 2420 Camino Ramon, Suite 300 San Ramon CA 95483 USA

    2016-02-07

    Published data on photovoltaic (PV) degradation measurements were aggregated and re-examined. The subject has seen an increased interest in recent years resulting in more than 11 000 degradation rates in almost 200 studies from 40 different countries. As studies have grown in number and size, we found an impact from sampling bias attributable to size and accuracy. Because of the correlational nature of this study we examined the data in several ways to minimize this bias. We found median degradation for x-Si technologies in the 0.5-0.6%/year range with the mean in the 0.8-0.9%/year range. Hetero-interface technology (HIT) and microcrystalline silicon (..mu..c-Si) technologies, although not as plentiful, exhibit degradation around 1%/year and resemble thin-film products more closely than x-Si. Several studies showing low degradation for copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) have emerged. Higher degradation for cadmium telluride (CdTe) has been reported, but these findings could reflect a convolution of less accurate studies and longer stabilization periods for some products. Significant deviations for beginning-of-life measurements with respect to nameplate rating have been documented over the last 35 years. Therefore, degradation rates that use nameplate rating as reference may be significantly impacted. Studies that used nameplate rating as reference but used solar simulators showed less variation than similar studies using outdoor measurements, even when accounting for different climates. This could be associated with confounding effects of measurement uncertainty and soiling that take place outdoors. Hotter climates and mounting configurations that lead to sustained higher temperatures may lead to higher degradation in some, but not all, products. Wear-out non-linearities for the worst performing modules have been documented in a few select studies that took multiple measurements of an ensemble of modules during the lifetime of the system. However, the majority

  19. Hydrocarbon degradation by antarctic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavanagh, J.A.E.; Nichols, P.D.; McMeekin, T.A.; Franzmann, P.D. [Univ. of Tasmania (Australia)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Bacterial cultures obtained from sediment samples collected during a trial oil spill experiment conducted at Airport beach, Eastern Antarctica were selectively enriched for n-alkane-degrading and phenanthrenedegrading bacteria. Samples were collected from a control site and sites treated with different hydrocarbon mixtures - Special Antarctic blend (SAB), BP-Visco and orange roughy oils. One set of replicate sites was also treated with water from Organic Lake which had previously been shown to contain hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria. No viable bacteria were obtained from samples collected from sites treated with orange roughy oil. Extensive degradation of n-alkanes by enrichment cultures obtained from sites treated with SAB and BP-Visco occurred at both 25{degrees}C and 10{degrees}C. Extensive degradation of phenanthrene also occurred in enrichment cultures from these sites grown at 25{degrees}C. Concurrent increases of polar lipid in these cultures were also observed. The presence of 1,4-naphthaquinone and 1-naphthol during the growth of the cultures on phenanthrene is unusual and warrants further investigation of the mechanism of phenanthrene-degradation by these Antarctic bacteria.

  20. Event-based modularization of reactive systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malakuti, Somayeh; Aksit, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    There is a large number of complex software systems that have reactive behavior. As for any other software system, reactive systems are subject to evolution demands. This paper defines a set requirements that must be fulfilled so that reuse of reactive software systems can be increased. Detailed ana

  1. Lipid-derived aldehyde degradation under thermal conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, Rosario; Navarro, José L; Aguilar, Isabel; Hidalgo, Francisco J

    2015-05-01

    Nucleophilic degradation produced by reactive carbonyls plays a major role in food quality and safety. Nevertheless, these reactions are complex because reactive carbonyls are usually involved in various competitive reactions. This study describes the thermal degradation of 2-alkenals (2-pentenal and 2-octenal) and 2,4-alkadienals (2,4-heptadienal and 2,4-decadienal) in an attempt to both clarify the stability of aldehydes and determine new compounds that might also play a role in nucleophile/aldehyde reactions. The obtained results showed that alkenals and alkadienals decomposed rapidly in the presence of buffer and air to produce formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and the aldehydes corresponding to the breakage of the carboncarbon double bonds: propanal, hexanal, 2-pentenal, 2-octenal, glyoxal, and fumaraldehyde. The activation energy of double bond breakage was relatively low (∼ 25 kJ/mol) and the yield of alkanals (10-18%) was higher than that of 2-alkenals (∼ 1%). All these results indicate that these reactions should be considered in order to fully understand the range of nucleophile/aldehyde adducts produced.

  2. Transformation of reactive iron minerals in a permeable reactive barrier (biowall) used to treat TCE in groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Y Thomas; Wilson, John T; Wilkin, Richard T

    2008-09-01

    Iron and sulfur reducing conditions generally develop in permeable reactive barrier systems (PRB) constructed to treat contaminated groundwater. These conditions allow formation of FeS mineral phases. FeS readily degrades TCE, but a transformation of FeS to FeS2 could dramatically slow the rate of TCE degradation in the PRB. This study uses acid volatile sulfide (AVS) and chromium reducible sulfur (CRS) as probes for FeS and FeS2 to investigate iron sulfide formation and transformation in a column study and PRB field study dealing with TCE degradation. Solid phase iron speciation shows that most of the iron is reduced and sulfur partitioning measurements show that AVS and CRS coexist in all samples, with the conversion of AVS to CRS being most significant in locations with potential oxidants available. In the column study, 54% of FeS was transformed to FeS2 after 2.4 years. In the field scale PRB, 43% was transformed after 5.2 years. Microscopy reveals FeS, Fe3S4 and FeS2 formation in the column system; however, only pyrite formation was confirmed byX-ray diffraction. The polysulfide pathway is most likely the primary mechanism of FeS transformation in the system, with S0 as an intermediate species formed through H2S oxidation.

  3. Enhanced degradation of organic contaminants in water by peroxydisulfate coupled with bisulfite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Chengdu, E-mail: qichengdu@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Water Environment Simulation, School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control (SKLESPC), Beijing Key Laboratory for Emerging Organic Contaminants Control, School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Liu, Xitao, E-mail: liuxt@bnu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Water Environment Simulation, School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Li, Yang; Lin, Chunye; Ma, Jun; Li, Xiaowan; Zhang, Huijuan [State Key Laboratory of Water Environment Simulation, School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • S(IV)/PDS system showed synergistic degradation of BPA than S(IV) and PDS. • BPA degradation involved hydroxyl and oxysulfur radicals in the S(IV)/PDS system. • Based on the identified intermediates, the BPA degradation pathway was proposed. - Abstract: In this study, the bisulfite-peroxydisulfate system (S(IV)/PDS) widely used in polymerization was innovatively applied for organic contaminants degradation in water. The addition of S(IV) into PDS system remarkably enhanced the degradation efficiency of bisphenol A (BPA, a frequently detected endocrine disrupting chemical in the environments) from 17.0% to 84.7% within 360 min. The degradation efficiency of BPA in the S(IV)/PDS system followed pseudo-first-order kinetics, with rate constant values ranging from 0.00005 min{sup −1} to 0.02717 min{sup −1} depending on the operating parameters, such as the initial S(IV) and PDS dosage, solution pH, reaction temperature, chloride and water type. Furthermore, nitrogen purging experiment, radical scavenging experiment and electron spin resonance (ESR) analysis were used to elucidate the possible mechanism. The results revealed that sulfate radical was the dominant reactive species in the S(IV)/PDS system. Finally, based on the results of liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC–MS) and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS), the BPA degradation pathway was proposed to involve β-scission (C−C), hydroxylation, dehydration, oxidative skeletal rearrangement, and ring opening. This study helps to characterize the combination of PDS and inorganic S(IV), a common industrial contaminant, to generate reactive species to enhance organic contaminants degradation in water.

  4. Interfacial Degradation of Planar Lead Halide Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Antonio; You, Jingbi; Aranda, Clara; Kang, Yong Soo; Garcia-Belmonte, Germà; Zhou, Huanping; Bisquert, Juan; Yang, Yang

    2016-01-26

    The stability of perovskite solar cells is one of the major challenges for this technology to reach commercialization, with water believed to be the major degradation source. In this work, a range of devices containing different cathode metal contacts in the configuration ITO/PEDOT:PSS/MAPbI3/PCBM/Metal are fully electrically characterized before and after degradation caused by steady illumination during 4 h that induces a dramatic reduction in power conversion efficiency from values of 12 to 1.8%. We show that a decrease in performance and generation of the S-shape is associated with chemical degradation of the metal contact. Alternatively, use of Cr2O3/Cr as the contact enhances the stability, but modification of the energetic profile during steady illumination takes place, significantly reducing the performance. Several techniques including capacitance-voltage, X-ray diffraction, and optical absorption results suggest that the properties of the bulk perovskite layer are little affected in the device degradation process. Capacitance-voltage and impedance spectroscopy results show that the electrical properties of the cathode contact are being modified by generation of a dipole at the cathode that causes a large shift of the flat-band potential that modifies the interfacial energy barrier and impedes efficient extraction of electrons. Ionic movement in the perovskite layer changes the energy profile close to the contacts, modifying the energy level stabilization at the cathode. These results provide insights into the degradation mechanisms of perovskite solar cells and highlight the importance to further study the use of protecting layers to avoid the chemical reactivity of the perovskite with the external contacts.

  5. Clad Degradation - FEPs Screening Arguments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Siegmann

    2004-03-17

    The purpose of this report is to document the screening of the cladding degradation features, events, and processes (FEPs) for commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF). This report also addresses the effect of some FEPs on both the cladding and the CSNF, DSNF, and HLW waste forms where it was considered appropriate to address the effects on both materials together. This report summarizes the work of others to screen clad degradation FEPs in a manner consistent with, and used in, the Total System Performance Assessment-License Application (TSPA-LA). This document was prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan for Waste Form Degradation Modeling, Testing, and Analyses in Support of LA'' (BSC 2004a [DIRS 167796]).

  6. Radiation degradation of silk protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pewlong, W.; Sudatis, B. [Office of Atomic Energy for Peace, Bangkok (Thailand); Takeshita, Hidefumi; Yoshii, Fumio; Kume, Tamikazu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    2000-03-01

    Silk fibroin fiber from the domesticated silkworm Bombyx mori was irradiated using an electron beam accelerator to investigate the application of the radiation degradation technique as a means to solubilize fibroin. The irradiation caused a significant degradation of the fiber. The tensile strength of fibroin fiber irradiated up to 2500 kGy decreased rapidly with increasing dose. The presence of oxygen in the irradiation atmosphere enhanced degradation of the tensile strength. The solubilization of irradiated fibroin fiber was evaluated using the following three kinds of solutions: a calcium chloride solution(CaCl{sub 2}/C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH/H{sub 2}O=1:2:8 in mole ratio), a hydrochloric acid (0.5 N) and a distilled water. Dissolution of fibroin fiber into these solutions was significantly enhanced by irradiation. Especially, an appreciable amount of water soluble proteins was extracted by a distilled water. (author)

  7. Photocatalytic degradation investigation of dicofol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Photocatalytic degradation of dicofol was investigated on TiO2 nano particles(TiO2-NPs)under UV light irradiation.It was shown that dicofol could be completely degraded into inorganic chloride ion under the condition of 0.25 mg/mL TiO2-NPs,2 h irradiation of 400 W high pressure mercury lamp with a wavelength of 365 nm and air at a rate of 100 mL/min.The effects of the experimental conditions,including the amount of TiO2-NPs,irradiation time and the intensity of light,were studied.The apparent photodegradation rate constant was 0.167/min under the optimal condition.The photocatalytic degradation mechanism of dicofol was also discussed.

  8. Operationalizing measurement of forest degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dons, Klaus; Smith-Hall, Carsten; Meilby, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Quantification of forest degradation in monitoring and reporting as well as in historic baselines is among the most challenging tasks in national REDD+ strategies. However, a recently introduced option is to base monitoring systems on subnational conditions such as prevalent degradation activities....... In Tanzania, charcoal production is considered a major cause of forest degradation, but is challenging to quantify due to sub-canopy biomass loss, remote production sites and illegal trade. We studied two charcoal production sites in dry Miombo woodland representing open woodland conditions near human...... settlements and remote forest with nearly closed canopies. Supervised classification and adaptive thresholding were applied on a pansharpened QuickBird (QB) image to detect kiln burn marks (KBMs). Supervised classification showed reasonable detection accuracy in the remote forest site only, while adaptive...

  9. Redox-active media for permeable reactive barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivavec, T.M. [General Electric Corp. Research and Development Center, Schenectady, NY (United States); Mackenzie, P.D.; Horney, D.P.; Baghel, S.S.

    1997-12-31

    In this paper, three classes of redox-active media are described and evaluated in terms of their long-term effectiveness in treating TCE-contaminated groundwater in permeable reactive zones. Zero-valent iron, in the form of recycled cast iron filings, the first class, has received considerable attention as a reactive media and has been used in about a dozen pilot- and full-scale subsurface wall installations. Criteria used in selecting commercial sources of granular iron, will be discussed. Two other classes of redox-active media that have not yet seen wide use in pilot- or full-scale installations will also be described: Fe(II) minerals and bimetallic systems. Fe(II) minerals, including magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}), and ferrous sulfide (troilite, FeS), are redox-active and afford TCE reduction rates and product distributions that suggest that they react via a reductive mechanism similar to that which operates in the FeO system. Fe(II) species within the passive oxide layer coating the iron metal may act as electron transfer mediators, with FeO serving as the bulk reductant. Bimetallic systems, the third class of redox-active media, are commonly prepared by plating a second metal onto zero-valent iron (e.g., Ni/Fe and Pd/Fe) and have been shown to accelerate solvent degradation rates relative to untreated iron metal. The long-term effectiveness of this approach, however, has not yet been determined in groundwater treatability tests. The results of a Ni-plated iron column study using site groundwater indicate that a change in reduction mechanism (to catalytic dehydrohalogenation/hydrogenation) accounts for the observed rate enhancement. A significant loss in media reactivity was observed over time, attributable to Ni catalyst deactivation or poisoning. Zero-valent iron systems have not shown similar losses in reactivity in long-term laboratory, pilot or field investigations.

  10. Photoassisted Electrochemical Treatment of Azo and Phtalocyanine Reactive Dyes in the Presence of Surfactants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mireia Sala

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available An electrochemical treatment (EC was applied at different intensities to degrade the chromophoric groups of dyes C.I. Reactive Black 5 (RB5 and C.I. Reactive Blue 7 (Rb7 until uncolored species were obtained. Decolorization rate constants of the azo dye RB5 were higher than the phtalocyanine Rb7 ones. In addition, the EC treatment was more efficient at higher intensities, but these conditions significantly increased the generation of undesirable by-products such as chloroform. The combination of EC with UV irradiation (UVEC drastically minimized the generation of chloroform. The photo-assisted electrochemical treatment was also able to achieve decolorization values of 99%. Finally, mixtures of dyes and surfactants were treated by EC and UVEC. In the presence of surfactants, the decolorization kinetic of dyes was slowed due to the competitive reactions of surfactants degradation. Both methods achieved total decolorization and in both cases, the generation of haloforms was negligible.

  11. Reactive dyes decolouration by TiO2 photo-assisted catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizama, C; Yeber, M C; Freer, J; Baeza, J; Mansilla, H D

    2001-01-01

    The photocatalytic degradation of three reactive azo dyes (yellow-2, orange-16 and red-2) and one anthraquinone reactive dye (blue-19) was studied. The reactions were carried out in a reactor with recirculation using TiO2 immobilised on glass Raschig rings (system A) and compared with a batch system using the catalyst in aqueous suspension (system B). Both reaction systems were irradiated with a 125 W, lambda > 254 nm lamp. The suspended TiO2 system was also studied using a 125 W 360 nm lamp (system C). Kinetic studies indicated a rapid colour removal, following the order B > A > C. The same trend was observed in COD and TOC removal profiles. The energy consumption per order of magnitude of catalytic degradation of the dyes was lower in the batch reactor (system B) than in the reactor with recirculation and immobilised TiO2 (system A).

  12. The Science of Battery Degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, John P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Materials Physics; El Gabaly Marquez, Farid [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Materials Physics; McCarty, Kevin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Materials Physics; Sugar, Joshua Daniel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Materials Physics; Talin, Alec A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Materials Physics; Fenton, Kyle R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Power Sources Design and Development; Nagasubramanian, Ganesan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Power Sources Design and Development; Harris, Charles Thomas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Nanosystems Synthesis/Analysis; Jungjohann, Katherine Leigh [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Nanosystems Synthesis/Analysis; Hayden, Carl C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Chemistry Dept.; Kliewer, Christopher Jesse [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Chemistry Dept.; Hudak, Nicholas S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Power Sources Research and Development; Leung, Kevin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Nanostructure Physics; McDaniel, Anthony H. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Hydrogen and Combustion Technology; Tenney, Craig M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Chemical and Biological Systems; Zavadil, Kevin R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Advanced Materials Lab.

    2015-01-01

    This report documents work that was performed under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development project, Science of Battery Degradation. The focus of this work was on the creation of new experimental and theoretical approaches to understand atomistic mechanisms of degradation in battery electrodes that result in loss of electrical energy storage capacity. Several unique approaches were developed during the course of the project, including the invention of a technique based on ultramicrotoming to cross-section commercial scale battery electrodes, the demonstration of scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) to probe lithium transport mechanisms within Li-ion battery electrodes, the creation of in-situ liquid cells to observe electrochemical reactions in real-time using both transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and STXM, the creation of an in-situ optical cell utilizing Raman spectroscopy and the application of the cell for analyzing redox flow batteries, the invention of an approach for performing ab initio simulation of electrochemical reactions under potential control and its application for the study of electrolyte degradation, and the development of an electrochemical entropy technique combined with x-ray based structural measurements for understanding origins of battery degradation. These approaches led to a number of scientific discoveries. Using STXM we learned that lithium iron phosphate battery cathodes display unexpected behavior during lithiation wherein lithium transport is controlled by nucleation of a lithiated phase, leading to high heterogeneity in lithium content at each particle and a surprising invariance of local current density with the overall electrode charging current. We discovered using in-situ transmission electron microscopy that there is a size limit to lithiation of silicon anode particles above which particle fracture controls electrode degradation. From electrochemical entropy measurements, we discovered that entropy

  13. The Science of Battery Degradation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, John P; Fenton, Kyle R [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; El Gabaly Marquez, Farid; Harris, Charles Thomas [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; Hayden, Carl C.; Hudak, Nicholas [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; Jungjohann, Katherine Leigh [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; Kliewer, Christopher Jesse; Leung, Kevin [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; McDaniel, Anthony H.; Nagasubramanian, Ganesan [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; Sugar, Joshua Daniel; Talin, Albert Alec; Tenney, Craig M [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; Zavadil, Kevin R. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM

    2015-01-01

    This report documents work that was performed under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development project, Science of Battery Degradation. The focus of this work was on the creation of new experimental and theoretical approaches to understand atomistic mechanisms of degradation in battery electrodes that result in loss of electrical energy storage capacity. Several unique approaches were developed during the course of the project, including the invention of a technique based on ultramicrotoming to cross-section commercial scale battery electrodes, the demonstration of scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) to probe lithium transport mechanisms within Li-ion battery electrodes, the creation of in-situ liquid cells to observe electrochemical reactions in real-time using both transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and STXM, the creation of an in-situ optical cell utilizing Raman spectroscopy and the application of the cell for analyzing redox flow batteries, the invention of an approach for performing ab initio simulation of electrochemical reactions under potential control and its application for the study of electrolyte degradation, and the development of an electrochemical entropy technique combined with x-ray based structural measurements for understanding origins of battery degradation. These approaches led to a number of scientific discoveries. Using STXM we learned that lithium iron phosphate battery cathodes display unexpected behavior during lithiation wherein lithium transport is controlled by nucleation of a lithiated phase, leading to high heterogeneity in lithium content at each particle and a surprising invariance of local current density with the overall electrode charging current. We discovered using in-situ transmission electron microscopy that there is a size limit to lithiation of silicon anode particles above which particle fracture controls electrode degradation. From electrochemical entropy measurements, we discovered that entropy

  14. Bacterial degradation of fungicide captan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megadi, Veena B; Tallur, Preeti N; Mulla, Sikandar I; Ninnekar, Harichandra Z

    2010-12-22

    The phthalimide fungicide captan has been widely used to control plant pathogenic fungi. A strain of Bacillus circulans utilized the fungicide captan as sole source of carbon and energy. The organism degraded captan by a pathway involving its initial hydrolysis to yield cis-1,2,3,6-tetrahydrophthalimide, a compound without fungicidal activity. The formation of this compound was confirmed by HPLC, IR, NMR, and mass spectral analysis. The results also revealed that cis-1,2,3,6-tetrahydrophthalimide was further degraded to o-phthalic acid by a protocatechuate pathway. These findings indicated that there was a complete mineralization of fungicide captan by B. circulans.

  15. On the Construction of Sorted Reactive Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkedal, Lars; Debois, Søren; Hildebrandt, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    We develop a theory of sorted bigraphical reactive systems. Every application of bigraphs in the literature has required an extension, a sorting, of pure bigraphs. In turn, every such application has required a redevelopment of the theory of pure bigraphical reactive systems for the sorting at hand...... bigraphs. Technically, we give our construction for ordinary reactive systems, then lift it to bigraphical reactive systems. As such, we give also a construction of sortings for ordinary reactive systems. This construction is an improvement over previous attempts in that it produces smaller and much more...

  16. Efficient transformation of DDT by peroxymonosulfate activated with cobalt in aqueous systems: Kinetics, products, and reactive species identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Wenxiu; Fang, Guodong; Wang, Yujun; Wu, Tongliang; Zhu, Changyin; Zhou, Dongmei

    2016-04-01

    Recently, sulfate radical ( [Formula: see text] ) based-advanced oxidation technologies (AOTs) have been attracted great attention in the remediation of contaminated soil and groundwater. In the present study, Co(2+) ions activated peroxymonosulfate (PMS) system was used to degrade 1, 1, 1-trichloro-2, 2'bis(p-chlorophenyl) ethane (DDT) in aqueous solutions. It was found that DDT was efficiently degraded in the PMS/Co(II) solutions within several hours, and the degradation efficiency of DDT was dependent on the concentrations of PMS and Co(II), and the optimum molar ratio of PMS and Co(II) was 50:1. The degradation kinetics of DDT were well described with pseudo-first-order equations over a range of temperature (10-40 °C), and the activation energy that was calculated with Arrhenius equation was 72.3 ± 2.6 kJ/mol. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and GC-MS techniques were applied to identify the intermediates and reactive species for DDT degradation. The results indicated that [Formula: see text] and OH were the main reactive species accounting for DDT degradation. Dichlorobenzophenone, 4-chlorobenzoic acid and benzylalcohol were the dominant intermediates for DDT degradation, and the likely degradation pathway of DDT was proposed on the basis of these identified products. Increasing pH inhibited the formation of [Formula: see text] and OH, and thus decreased the catalytic degradation of DDT. Cl(-) ion was found to significantly inhibit, while [Formula: see text] and dissolved oxygen had limited effects on DDT degradation.

  17. Degradation of polyethylene induced by plasma in oxidizing atmospheres; Degradacion de polietileno inducido por plasma en atmosferas oxidantes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colin, E.; Olayo, M.G.; Cruz, G.J. [Facultad de Quimica, UAEM, Av. Tollocan y Colon, 50000 Toluca (Mexico)

    2002-07-01

    The garbage of polyethylene is not easily degradable in normal environmental conditions . The indiscriminate use of this polymer and the enormous quantity of garbage which is generated carries a damage to the environment due to its long life as waste. The objective of this work is to study the conditions in which can be carried out the degradation of polyethylene. A form of accelerating the degradation is exposing it to plasma with reactive atmospheres. In this work a study of surface modification of polyethylene by plasmas with discharges of direct current of oxygen and nitrogen is presented. (Author)

  18. Monod kinetics rather than a first-order degradation model explains atrazine fate in soil mini-columns: implications for pesticide fate modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheyns, K; Mertens, J; Diels, J; Smolders, E; Springael, D

    2010-05-01

    Pesticide transport models commonly assume first-order pesticide degradation kinetics for describing reactive transport in soil. This assumption was assessed in mini-column studies with associated batch degradation tests. Soil mini-columns were irrigated with atrazine in two intermittent steps of about 30 days separated by 161 days application of artificial rain water. Atrazine concentration in the effluent peaked to that of the influent concentration after initial break-through but sharply decreased while influx was sustained, suggesting a degradation lag phase. The same pattern was displayed in the second step but peak height and percentage of atrazine recovered in the effluent were lower. A Monod model with biomass decay was successfully calibrated to this data. The model was successfully evaluated against batch degradation data and mini-column experiments at lower flow rate. The study suggested that first-order degradation models may underestimate risk of pesticide leaching if the pesticide degradation potential needs amplification during degradation.

  19. Reductive Dechlorination of Trichloroethene by Zero-valent Iron Nanoparticles: Reactivity Enhancement through Sulfidation Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yanlai; Yan, Weile

    2016-12-06

    Zero-valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI) synthesized in the presence of reduced sulfur compounds have been shown to degrade trichloroethene (TCE) at significantly higher rates. However, the applicability of sulfidation as a general means to enhance nZVI reactivity under different particle preparation conditions and the underlying cause for this enhancement effect are not well understood. In this study, the effects of sulfidation reagent, time point of sulfidation, and sulfur loading on the resultant particles were assessed through TCE degradation experiments. Up to 60-fold increase in TCE reaction rates was observed upon sulfidation treatment, with products being fully dechlorinated hydrocarbons. While the reactivity of these sulfur-treated nZVI (S-nZVI) was relatively unaffected by the sulfidation reagent (viz., sodium sulfide, dithionite, or thiosulfate) or the sequence of sulfidation relative to iron reduction, TCE reaction rates were found to depend strongly on sulfur to iron ratio. At a low sulfur loading, TCE degradation was accelerated with increasing sulfur dose. The rate constant reached a limiting value, however, as the sulfur to iron mole ratio was greater than 0.025. Different from previous propositions that iron sulfidation leads to more efficient TCE or tetrachloroethene (PCE) degradation by enabling depassivation of iron surface, affording catalytic pathways, or facilitating electron transfer, we show that the role of sulfur in nZVI lies essentially in its ability to poison hydrogen recombination, which drives surface reactions to favor reduction by atomic hydrogen. This implies that the reactivity of S-nZVI is contaminant-specific and is selective against the background reaction of water reduction. As the effect of sulfur manifests through surface processes, sulfidation represents a broadly applicable surface modification approach to modulate or increase the reactivity of nZVI for treating TCE and other related contaminants.

  20. Integrating Stable Isotope - Reactive Transport Model Approach for Assessment of Chlorinated Solvent Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) University of Oklahoma, 100 E. Boyd St., SEC 810 Norman , OK 73019-2115 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER Delft...cost added by basic 0-D modeling of CSIA data is relatively low in comparison to the complete cost of sample collection and CSIA analytical work; and...Section 5.6. Given relatively low concentrations of the contaminants in a number of monitoring wells at the Demonstration Site, further optimization

  1. Integrated Stable Isotope - Reactive Transport Model Approach for Assessment of Chlorinated Solvent Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-16

    WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) University of Oklahoma, 100 E. Boyd St., SEC 810 Norman , OK 73019-2115 8... low in comparison to the complete cost of sample collection and CSIA analytical work; and (ii) the only requirement for implementation of CSIA...Science and Technology (Kuder and Philp, 2013). A description of the methods is included in Section 5.6. Given relatively low concentrations of the

  2. Spectroscopic investigation and direct comparison of the reactivities of iron pyridyl oxidation catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yang; Mayes, Howard G.; Queensen, Matthew J.; Bauer, Eike B.; Dupureur, Cynthia M.

    2017-03-01

    The growing interest in green chemistry has fueled attention to the development and characterization of effective iron complex oxidation catalysts. A number of iron complexes are known to catalyze the oxidation of organic substrates utilizing peroxides as the oxidant. Their development is complicated by a lack of direct comparison of the reactivities of the iron complexes. To begin to correlate reactivity with structural elements, we compare the reactivities of a series of iron pyridyl complexes toward a single dye substrate, malachite green (MG), for which colorless oxidation products are established. Complexes with tetradentate, nitrogen-based ligands with cis open coordination sites were found to be the most reactive. While some complexes reflect sensitivity to different peroxides, others are similarly reactive with either H2O2 or tBuOOH, which suggests some mechanistic distinctions. [Fe(S,S-PDP)(CH3CN)2](SbF6)2 and [Fe(OTf)2(tpa)] transition under the oxidative reaction conditions to a single intermediate at a rate that exceeds dye degradation (PDP = bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl) bipyrrolidine; tpa = tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine). For the less reactive [Fe(OTf)2(dpa)] (dpa = dipicolylamine), this reaction occurs on a timescale similar to that of MG oxidation. Thus, the spectroscopic method presented herein provides information about the efficiency and mechanism of iron catalyzed oxidation reactions as well as about potential oxidative catalyst decomposition and chemical changes of the catalyst before or during the oxidation reaction.

  3. Cost based reactive power participation for voltage control in multi units based isolated hybrid power system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Kumar Saxena

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Multi units of wind and diesel based generators in isolated hybrid power system have technical and operational advantages over single units system. They require dynamic reactive power compensation for fast recovery of voltage under load and input changes. In developing countries like India, investors’ prime concern is to provide continuous electricity at low rate while quality degradation can be permitted within pre defined acceptable range. The use of static compensator along with dynamic compensator may give cost effective reactive power participation for system. This paper presented pricing of reactive power compensation under steady state and transient conditions of system with fixed capacitor and STATCOM. The main contributions of the paper are; (i evaluating reactive power balance equation for generalized multi units of wind and diesel based isolated hybrid power system, (ii reactive power compensation using fixed capacitor and STATCOM in presence of composite load model, (ii fast recovery of voltage response using genetic algorithm based tuning of STATCOM controller, (iii evaluation of reactive power compensation cost for steady and dynamic conditions due to probabilistic change in load and/or input demand and (iv comparison of results with existing reference compensation method.

  4. Redox modulation of cellular metabolism through targeted degradation of signaling proteins by the proteasome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Squier, Thomas C.

    2006-02-01

    Under conditions of oxidative stress, the 20S proteasome plays a critical role in maintaining cellular homeostasis through the selective degradation of oxidized and damaged proteins. This adaptive stress response is distinct from ubiquitin-dependent pathways in that oxidized proteins are recognized and degraded in an ATP-independent mechanism, which can involve the molecular chaperone Hsp90. Like the regulatory complexes 19S and 11S REG, Hsp90 tightly associates with the 20S proteasome to mediate the recognition of aberrant proteins for degradation. In the case of the calcium signaling protein calmodulin, proteasomal degradation results from the oxidation of a single surface exposed methionine (i.e., Met145); oxidation of the other eight methionines has a minimal effect on the recognition and degradation of calmodulin by the proteasome. Since cellular concentrations of calmodulin are limiting, the targeted degradation of this critical signaling protein under conditions of oxidative stress will result in the downregulation of cellular metabolism, serving as a feedback regulation to diminish the generation of reactive oxygen species. The targeted degradation of critical signaling proteins, such as calmodulin, can function as sensors of oxidative stress to downregulate global rates of metabolism and enhance cellular survival.

  5. Preparation of ZnO Photocatalyst for the Efficient and Rapid Photocatalytic Degradation of Azo Dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoqing; Wu, Zhansheng; Liu, Dandan; Gao, Zhenzhen

    2017-02-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) photocatalysts were synthesized by sol-gel method using zinc acetate as precursor for degradation of azo dyes under UV irradiation. The resultant samples were characterized by different techniques, such as XRD, SEM, and EDX. The influence of preparation conditions such as calcination temperature and composite ratio on the degradation of methyl orange (MO) was investigated. ZnO prepared with a composite ratio of 4:1 and calcination temperature of 400 °C exhibited 99.70% removal rate for MO. The effect of operation parameters on the degradation was also studied. Results showed that the removal rate of azo dyes increased with the increased dosage of catalyst and decreased initial concentration of azo dyes and the acidic condition is favorable for degradation. Furthermore, the kinetics and scavengers of the reactive species during the degradation were also investigated. It was found that the degradation of azo dyes fitted the first-order kinetics and superoxide ions were the main species. The proposed photocatalyst can efficiently and rapidly degrade azo dyes; thus, this economical and environment-friendly photocatalyst can be applied to the treatment of wastewater contaminated with synthetic dyes.

  6. Xanthine oxidase mediates hypoxia-inducible factor-2α degradation by intermittent hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayasri Nanduri

    Full Text Available Sleep-disordered breathing with recurrent apnea produces chronic intermittent hypoxia (IH. We previously reported that IH leads to down-regulation of HIF-2α protein via a calpain-dependent signaling pathway resulting in oxidative stress. In the present study, we delineated the signaling pathways associated with calpain-dependent HIF-2α degradation in cell cultures and rats subjected to chronic IH. Reactive oxygen species (ROS scavengers prevented HIF-2α degradation by IH and ROS mimetic decreased HIF-2α protein levels in rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cell cultures, suggesting that ROS mediate IH-induced HIF-2α degradation. IH activated xanthine oxidase (XO by increased proteolytic conversion of xanthine dehydrogenase to XO. ROS generated by XO activated calpains, which contributed to HIF-2α degradation by IH. Calpain-induced HIF-2α degradation involves C-terminus but not the N-terminus of the HIF-2α protein. Pharmacological blockade as well as genetic knock down of XO prevented IH induced calpain activation and HIF-2α degradation in PC12 cells. Systemic administration of allopurinol to rats prevented IH-induced hypertension, oxidative stress and XO activation in adrenal medulla. These results demonstrate that ROS generated by XO activation mediates IH-induced HIF-2α degradation via activation of calpains.

  7. Introduction to Reactive Gas Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Brun, Raymond

    2009-01-01

    In high energy gas flows, at high velocities and high temperatures, physical and chemical processes such as molecular vibrational excitation, dissociation, ionisation or various reactions take place and deeply influence the structure of the flows. The characteristic times of these processes have the same order of magnitude as aerodynamic characteristic times, so that these reactive media are generally in thermodynamic and chemical non-equilibrium. This book presents a generalintroductory study of these media. In the first part their fundamental statistical aspects are described, starting from

  8. Trends in reactivity of oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftelund, Anja

    , and I) and OH on a wide range of rutile oxide surfaces. Furthermore, Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi (BEP) relations are found for the adsorption of a large number of molecules (including Cl, Br and I) on transition metal oxides. In these relations the activation energies scale linearly with the dissociative...... chemisorption energies. It turns out that the BEP relation for rutile oxides is almost coinciding with the dissociation line, i.e. no barrier exists for the reactive surfaces. The heterogeneous catalytic oxidation of hydrogen halides (HCl, HBr, and HI) is investigated. A micro-kinetic model is solved...

  9. Menstrual cycle and skin reactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agner, T; Damm, P; Skouby, S O

    1991-01-01

    The hypothesis was tested that a cyclic variation exists in skin reactivity to irritant stimuli. Twenty-nine healthy women with regular menstrual cycles were challenged with sodium lauryl sulfate as an irritant patch test at day 1 and at days 9 through 11 of the menstrual cycle. The skin response...... in the menstrual cycle as evaluated by visual scoring (p less than 0.05) as well as by measurement of transepidermal water loss (p less than 0.05) and edema formation (p less than 0.005)....

  10. Menstrual cycle and skin reactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agner, T; Damm, P; Skouby, S O

    1991-01-01

    The hypothesis was tested that a cyclic variation exists in skin reactivity to irritant stimuli. Twenty-nine healthy women with regular menstrual cycles were challenged with sodium lauryl sulfate as an irritant patch test at day 1 and at days 9 through 11 of the menstrual cycle. The skin response...... to the applied irritant stimulus was evaluated by visual scoring and also quantified by measurements of transepidermal water loss, edema formation, and blood flow in the skin. The skin response to challenge with sodium lauryl sulfate was found to be significantly stronger at day 1 than at days 9 through 11...

  11. REACTIVE EXTRACTION OF TARTARIC ACID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Marchitan

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The present paper describes the results of reactive extraction of tartaric acid in model systems, which can be used for its separation from secondary wine products. As extractant have been used a normal/isododecyl mixed secondary amine Amberlite LA-2. The following parameters of the separation process have been varied: nature of diluent and modifier; modifier concentration; concentration, temperature and pH of the tartaric acid solution and the stirring time, and the work intervals have been established. It was concluded that in determinated conditions the extent of tartaric acid extraction attains value 85-95%.

  12. Framework for reactive mass transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Mønster; Johannesson, Björn; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2014-01-01

    description is coupled to the system. The mass transport is solved by using the finite element method where the chemical equilibrium is solved explicitly by an operator splitting method. The IPHREEQC library is used as chemical equilibrium solver. The equation system, solved by IPHREEQC, is explained...... simulation, showing multi-species ingress with formation of new solid phases in the domain is described and calculated. It is shown that the numerical solution method is capable of solving the reactive mass transport system for the examples considered. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  13. Plant biomass degradation by fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mäkelä, Miia R; Donofrio, Nicole; de Vries, Ronald P; van den Brink, J.

    2014-01-01

    Plant biomass degradation by fungi has implications for several fields of science. The enzyme systems employed by fungi for this are broadly used in various industrial sectors such as food & feed, pulp & paper, detergents, textile, wine, and more recently biofuels and biochemicals. In addition, the

  14. Polymeric Materials - introduction and degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kontogeorgis, Georgios

    1999-01-01

    These notes support the polymer part of the courses 91742 and 91762 (Materials and Corrosion/degradation of materials) taught in IFAKthey contain a short introduction on group contribution methods for estimating properties of polymers, polymer thermodynamics, viscoelasticity models as well...

  15. Methods of degrading napalm B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyndall, Richard L.; Vass, Arpad

    1995-01-01

    Methods of degrading napalm and/or trinitrotoluene involve contacting the waste with specific intra-amoebic isolates of ATCC 40908 and/or dispersants derived therefrom. Useful isolates include is deposited as ATCC 77529, NAP-1 deposited as ATCC 77526 and 13 deposited as ATCC 77527.

  16. Photothermal degradation studies of encapsulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, R. H.

    1984-01-01

    The reliability physics program at JPL is outlined. The overall objectives and approaches are given in the program. The objectives, approaches and conclusions are given for two specific parts of the programs. These two parts are mechanistic studies of photothermal degradation and performance characteristics of materials with respect to photothermal stresses.

  17. Photoelectrocatalytic degradation of Rose Bengal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hui-ling; ZHOU Ding; LI Xiang-zhong; YUE Ping-tao

    2003-01-01

    An innovative photoelectrode, TiO2/Ti mesh electrode, was prepared by galvanostaticanodisation. The morphology and the crystalline texture of the TiO2 film on mesh electrode were examined by scanning electronic microscopy and Raman spectroscopy respectively. The examination results indicated that the structure and properties of the film depended on anodisation rate, and the anatase was the dominant component under the controlled experimental conditions. Degradation of Rose Bengal(RB) in photocatalytic(PC) and photoelectrocatalytic(PEC) reaction was investigated, the results demonstrated that electric biasing could improve the efficiency of photocatalytic reaction. The measurement results of TOC in photoelectrocatalytic degradation showed that the mineralisation of RB was complete relatively. The comparison between the degradation efficiency of RB in PEC process and that in aqueous TiO2 dispersion was conducted. The results showed that the apparent first-order rate constant of RB degradation in PEC process was larger than that in aqueous dispersion with 0.1%-0.3% TiO2 powder, but was smaller than that in aqueous dispersion with 1.0% TiO2.

  18. Environmental Degradation of Solar Reflectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouquet, F. L.

    1985-01-01

    Report presents results of study of atmospheric degradation of large solar reflectors for power generators. Three general types of reflective surfaces investigated. Report also describes computer buildup and removal (by rain and dew) of contamination from reflectors. Data used to determine effects of soil buildup and best method and frequency of washing at various geographic locations.

  19. Abiotic degradation of antibiotic ionophores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohn, Pernille; Bak, Søren A; Björklund, Erland

    2013-01-01

    Hydrolytic and photolytic degradation were investigated for the ionophore antibiotics lasalocid, monensin, salinomycin, and narasin. The hydrolysis study was carried out by dissolving the ionophores in solutions of pH 4, 7, and 9, followed by incubation at three temperatures of 6, 22, and 28 °C f...... because they absorb light of environmentally irrelevant wavelengths....

  20. Polymeric Materials - introduction and degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kontogeorgis, Georgios

    1999-01-01

    These notes support the polymer part of the courses 91742 and 91762 (Materials and Corrosion/degradation of materials) taught in IFAKthey contain a short introduction on group contribution methods for estimating properties of polymers, polymer thermodynamics, viscoelasticity models as well...

  1. Plant biomass degradation by fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mäkelä, Miia R; Donofrio, Nicole; de Vries, Ronald P; van den Brink, J.

    2014-01-01

    Plant biomass degradation by fungi has implications for several fields of science. The enzyme systems employed by fungi for this are broadly used in various industrial sectors such as food & feed, pulp & paper, detergents, textile, wine, and more recently biofuels and biochemicals. In addition, the

  2. Photo-Fenton oxidation of azo dye Reactive Black B using an immobilized iron oxide as heterogeneous catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Yu-Jen; Ho, Chien-Hung; Huang, Yao-Hui

    2013-04-01

    The heterogeneous oxidation of azo dye Reactive Black B (RBB) by the photo-Fenton system catalyzed with an immobilized iron oxide, B1 (supported with SiO2 grain), was investigated. Reactive Black B oxidation was carried out in an expended-bed reactor in which the effect of B1 dosage on the decolorization and degradation of RBB was examined. Through pseudo-first-order kinetic studies, decolorization was found to be faster than degradation with a fixed rate constant ratio. By determining the iron dissolution from B1, RBB oxidation was supposed to mainly occur on the B1 surface, which catalyzed the generation of hydroxyl radicals in the photo-Fenton reaction. Accordingly, the efficiency of photo-Fenton could reach 100% and 91.2% of decolorization and degradation, respectively, in 300 minutes.

  3. [Reductive degradation of chlorophenols in aqueous solution by gamma irradiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yun-Xia; He, Shi-Jun; Gong, Wen-Qi; Wang, Jian-Long

    2013-04-01

    Because chlorine is an electron withdrawing group, the highly chlorinated phenols may react quickly with hydrated electrons rather than with hydroxyl radicals. The process of reactions of four chlorophenols (4-CP, 2-CP, 2,4-DCP, 2,4,6-TCP) with e(aq)(-) was investigated in aqueous solutions by detecting the concentration of CPs, Cl- and intermediates. In the e(aq)(-) reductive system, the experimental results showed that the order of four kinds of chlorophenol degradation and dechlorination was 2,4,6-TCP > 2,4-DCP > 2-CP > 4-CP. The greater the chlorine content was the higher reactivity of hydrated electrons towards chlorophenols was. Furthermore, hydrated electrons may preferentially attack the ortho-position of chlorine atom rather than the para-position of chlorine atom. Phenol and Cl- were detected as the final product of the reductive reaction. Additionally, processes of degradation and dechlorination of CPs were observed as the pseudo-first-order kinetics. The reaction constant of degradation of 4-CP, 2-CP, 2,4-DCP and 2,4,6-TCP were 0.154, 0.253, 0.750 and 1.188 kGy(-1), respectively. Meanwhile, the dechlorination of 4-CP, 2-CP, 2,4-DCP and 2,4,6-TCP were 0.137, 0.219, 0.251 and 0.306 kGy(-1), respectively.

  4. Decolorization and biodegradation of reactive dyes and dye wastewater by a developed bacterial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saratale, R G; Saratale, G D; Chang, J S; Govindwar, S P

    2010-11-01

    A bacterial consortium (consortium GR) consisting of Proteus vulgaris NCIM-2027 and Micrococcus glutamicus NCIM-2168 could rapidly decolorize and degrade commonly-used sulfonated reactive dye Green HE4BD and many other reactive dyes. Consortium GR shows markedly higher decolorization activity than that of the individual strains. The preferable physicochemical parameters were identified to achieve higher dye degradation and decolorization efficiency. The supplementation of cheap co-substrates (e.g., extracts of agricultural wastes) could enhance the decolorization performance of consortium GR. Extent of mineralization was determined with TOC and COD measurements, showing nearly complete mineralization of Green HE4BD by consortium GR (up to 90% TOC and COD reduction) within 24 h. Oxidoreductive enzymes seemed to be involved in fast decolorization/degradation process with the evidence of enzymes induction in the bacterial consortium. Phytotoxicity and microbial toxicity studies confirm that the biodegraded products of Green HE4BD by consortium GR are non-toxic. Consortium GR also shows significant biodegradation and decolorization activities for mixture of reactive dyes as well as the effluent from actual dye manufacturing industry. This confers the possibility of applying consortium GR for the treatment of industrial wastewaters containing dye pollutants.

  5. Quantum Entanglement and Chemical Reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Espíritu, M; Esquivel, R O; López-Rosa, S; Dehesa, J S

    2015-11-10

    The water molecule and a hydrogenic abstraction reaction are used to explore in detail some quantum entanglement features of chemical interest. We illustrate that the energetic and quantum-information approaches are necessary for a full understanding of both the geometry of the quantum probability density of molecular systems and the evolution of a chemical reaction. The energy and entanglement hypersurfaces and contour maps of these two models show different phenomena. The energy ones reveal the well-known stable geometry of the models, whereas the entanglement ones grasp the chemical capability to transform from one state system to a new one. In the water molecule the chemical reactivity is witnessed through quantum entanglement as a local minimum indicating the bond cleavage in the dissociation process of the molecule. Finally, quantum entanglement is also useful as a chemical reactivity descriptor by detecting the transition state along the intrinsic reaction path in the hypersurface of the hydrogenic abstraction reaction corresponding to a maximally entangled state.

  6. What Happens after Activation of Ascaridole? Reactive Compounds and Their Implications for Skin Sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chittiboyina, Amar G; Avonto, Cristina; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2016-09-19

    To replace animal testing and improve the prediction of skin sensitization, significant attention has been directed to the use of alternative methods. The direct peptide reactivity assay (DPRA), the regulatory agencies' approved alternative in chemico method, has been applied for understanding the sensitization capacity of activated ascaridole. Ascaridole, the oxidative metabolite of α-terpinene, is considered to be one of the components responsible for the contact allergy associated with essential oils derived from Chenopodium and Melaleuca species. The recently developed high-throughput screening based on the dansyl cysteamine (HTS-DCYA) method was applied to understand the reported enhanced reactivity of activated ascaridole and possibly to identify the resulting elusive radical or other reactive species. For the first time, a substituted cyclohexenone was identified as a potential electrophilic intermediate resulting in higher depletion of nucleophilic DCYA, along with several nonreactive byproducts of ascaridole via a radical degradation mechanism. Formation of electrophilic species via radical degradation is one of the possible pathways should be considered for the peptide reactivity of in aged tea tree oil or oils rich in terpinenes along with commonly believed reactants, allylic-epoxides and allylic-peroxides.

  7. REACTIVITY OF RESORCINOL FORMALDEHYDE RESIN WITH NITRIC ACID

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, W; Fernando Fondeur, F; Bill Wilmarth, B; Myra Pettis, M; Shirley Mccollum, S

    2006-06-14

    Solid-state infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and elemental analysis have been used to evaluate the reactivity of resorcinol formaldehyde resin with nitric acid and characterize the solid product. Two distinct reactions were identified within the temperature range 25-55 C. The first reaction is primarily associated with resin nitration, while the second involves bulk oxidation and degradation of the polymer network leading to dissolution and off-gassing. Reaction was confirmed with nitric acid concentrations as low as 3 M at 25 C applied temperature and 0.625 M at 66 C. Although a nitrated resin product can be isolated under appropriate experimental conditions, calorimetry testing indicates no significant hazard associated with handling the dry material.

  8. Reactivity of Resorcinol Formaldehyde Resin with Nitric Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, William D.; Fondeur, Fernando F.; Wilmarth, William R.; Pettis, Myra E.

    2005-10-25

    Solid-state infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and elemental analysis have been used to evaluate the reactivity of resorcinol formaldehyde resin with nitric acid and characterize the solid product. Two distinct reactions were identified within the temperature range 25-55 C. The first reaction is primarily associated with resin nitration, while the second involves bulk oxidation and degradation of the polymer network leading to dissolution and off-gassing. The threshold conditions promoting reaction have been identified. Reaction was confirmed with nitric acid concentrations as low as 3 M at 25 C applied temperature and 0.625 M at 66 C. Although a nitrated resin product can be isolated under appropriate experimental conditions, calorimetry testing indicates no significant hazard associated with handling the dry material.

  9. Layered reactive particles with controlled geometries, energies, and reactivities, and methods for making the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritz, Gregory M.; Weihs, Timothy P.; Grzyb, Justin A.

    2016-07-05

    An energetic composite having a plurality of reactive particles each having a reactive multilayer construction formed by successively depositing reactive layers on a rod-shaped substrate having a longitudinal axis, dividing the reactive-layer-deposited rod-shaped substrate into a plurality of substantially uniform longitudinal segments, and removing the rod-shaped substrate from the longitudinal segments, so that the reactive particles have a controlled, substantially uniform, cylindrically curved or otherwise rod-contoured geometry which facilitates handling and improves its packing fraction, while the reactant multilayer construction controls the stability, reactivity and energy density of the energetic composite.

  10. REGULATION OF COAL POLYMER DEGRADATION BY FUNGI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John A. Bumpus

    1998-11-30

    A variety of lignin degrading fungi mediate solubilization and subsequent biodegradation of coal macromolecules (a.k.a. coal polymer) from highly oxidized low rank coals such as leonardites. It appears that oxalate or possibly other metal chelators (i.e., certain Krebs Cycle intermediates) mediate solubilization of low rank coals while extracellular oxidases have a role in subsequent oxidation of solubilized coal macromolecule. These processes are under nutritional control. For example, in the case of P. chrysosporium, solubilization of leonardite occurred when the fungi were cultured on most but not all nutrient agars tested and subsequent biodegradation occurred only in nutrient nitrogen limited cultures. Lignin peroxidases mediate oxidation of coal macromolecule in a reaction that is dependent on the presence of veratryl alcohol and hydrogen peroxide. Kinetic evidence suggests that veratryl alcohol is oxidized to the veratryl alcohol cation radical which then mediates oxidation of the coal macromolecule. Results by others suggest that Mn peroxidases mediate formation of reactive Mn{sup 3+} complexes which also mediate oxidation of coal macromolecule. A biomimetic approach was used to study solubilization of a North Dakota leonardite. It was found that a concentration {approximately}75 mM sodium oxalate was optimal for solubilization of this low rank coal. This is important because this is well above the concentration of oxalate produced by fungi in liquid culture. Higher local concentrations probably occur in solid agar cultures and thus may account for the observation that greater solubilization occurs in agar media relative to liquid media. The characteristics of biomimetically solubilized leonardite were similar to those of biologically solubilized leonardite. Perhaps our most interesting observation was that in addition to oxalate, other common Lewis bases (phosphate/hydrogen phosphate/dihydrogen phosphate and bicarbonate/carbonate ions) are able to mediate

  11. Reactive power compensation a practical guide

    CERN Document Server

    Hofmann, Wolfgang; Just, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    The comprehensive resource on reactive power compensation, presenting the design, application and operation of reactive power equipment and installations The area of reactive power compensation is gaining increasing importance worldwide. If suitably designed, it is capable of improving voltage quality significantly, meaning that losses in equipment and power systems are reduced, the permissible loading of equipment can be increased, and the over-all stability of system operation improved. Ultimately, energy use and CO2 emisson are reduced. This unique guide discusses the

  12. Implementing a teleo-reactive programming system

    OpenAIRE

    Webb, Robert

    2015-01-01

    This thesis explores the teleo-reactive programming paradigm for controlling autonomous agents, such as robots. Teleo-reactive programming provides a robust, opportunistic method for goal-directed programming that continuously reacts to the sensed environment. In particular, the TR and TeleoR systems are investigated. They influence the design of a teleo-reactive system programming in Python, for controlling autonomous agents via the Pedro communications architecture. To demonstrate the syste...

  13. Green chemical engineering aspects of reactive distillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Michael F; Huss, Robert S; Doherty, Michael F

    2003-12-01

    Reactive or catalytic distillation technology combines chemical synthesis steps with separations by distillation. This combination can lead to intensified, high-efficiency process systems with significant green engineering attributes. New applications and understanding have prompted growth in the use of reactive distillation for a variety of chemical syntheses, especially esterifications and etherifications involving oxygenated hydrocarbons. We describe several applications and the potential and tradeoffs for reactive distillation technology in the context of green engineering principles.

  14. Free-radical-induced oxidative and reductive degradation of fluoroquinolone pharmaceuticals: kinetic studies and degradation mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoke, Hanoz; Song, Weihua; Cooper, William J; Greaves, John; Miller, George E

    2009-07-09

    Fluoroquinolones, as a class of broad-spectrum antibiotics, have been detected in both surface and ground waters, and advanced oxidation/reduction processes (AO/RPs) are currently in development to remove these and other pharmaceuticals from wastewater because currently utilized treatment methods have proven to be ineffective. This article reports the reaction kinetics of six common fluoroquinolones with hydroxyl radicals and hydrated electrons, which are the major reactive species involved in AO/RPs. The bimolecular reaction rate constants (M(-1) s(-1)) for orbifloxacin, flumequine, marbofloxacin, danofloxacin, enrofloxacin, and the model compound, 6-fluoro-4-oxo-1,4-dihydro-3-quinoline carboxylic acid, with *OH are (6.94 +/- 0.08) x 10(9), (8.26 +/- 0.28) x 10(9), (9.03 +/- 0.39) x 10(9), (6.15 +/- 0.11) x 10(9), (7.95 +/- 0.23) x 10(9), (7.65 +/- 0.20) x 10(9), and with e(aq)(-), (2.25 +/- 0.02) x 10(10), (1.83 +/- 0.01) x 10(10), (2.41 +/- 0.02) x 10(10), (1.68 +/- 0.02) x 10(10), (1.89 +/- 0.02) x 10(10), and (1.49 +/- 0.01) x 10(10). These rate constants are related to the functional groups attached to the quinolone core, particularly the steric hindrance of the piperazine ring, making it possible to obtain a preliminary estimate of the *OH rate constant of an arbitrary fluoroquinolone by observing the ring constituents. In addition, the products of gamma-irradiation degradation of fluoroquinolones were analyzed by LC-MS to elucidate the probable pathways of AO/RPs degradation. Results indicate that preliminary degradation pathways include hydroxyl radical attack on the aromatic ring with subsequent hydroxylation, the substitution of a fluorine atom with a hydroxyl group, and the removal of the piperazine-derived side chain.

  15. Xylan utilization in human gut commensal bacteria is orchestrated by unique modular organization of polysaccharide-degrading enzymes

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Meiling

    2014-08-18

    Enzymes that degrade dietary and host-derived glycans represent the most abundant functional activities encoded by genes unique to the human gut microbiome. However, the biochemical activities of a vast majority of the glycan-degrading enzymes are poorly understood. Here, we use transcriptome sequencing to understand the diversity of genes expressed by the human gut bacteria Bacteroides intestinalis and Bacteroides ovatus grown in monoculture with the abundant dietary polysaccharide xylan. The most highly induced carbohydrate active genes encode a unique glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 10 endoxylanase (BiXyn10A or BACINT-04215 and BACOVA-04390) that is highly conserved in the Bacteroidetes xylan utilization system. The BiXyn10A modular architecture consists of a GH10 catalytic module disrupted by a 250 amino acid sequence of unknown function. Biochemical analysis of BiXyn10A demonstrated that such insertion sequences encode a new family of carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) that binds to xy-lose- configured oligosaccharide/polysaccharide ligands, the substrate of the BiXyn10A enzymatic activity. The crystal structures of CBM1 from BiXyn10A (1.8 Å), a cocomplex of BiXyn10A CBM1 with xylohexaose (1.14 Å), and the CBM fromits homolog in the Prevotella bryantii B 14 Xyn10C (1.68 Å) reveal an unanticipated mode for ligand binding. Aminimal enzyme mix, composed of the gene products of four of the most highly up-regulated genes during growth on wheat arabinoxylan, depolymerizes the polysaccharide into its component sugars. The combined biochemical and biophysical studies presented here provide a framework for understanding fiber metabolism by an important group within the commensal bacterial population known to influence human health.

  16. Learner intuitions about energy degradation

    CERN Document Server

    Daane, Abigail R; Vokos, Stamatis

    2013-01-01

    A primary learning goal for energy in K-12 science instruction is that energy cannot be created or destroyed. However, learners' everyday ideas about energy often involve energy being "used up" or "wasted." In physics, the concept of energy degradation can connect those everyday ideas to the principle of energy conservation. Learners' spontaneous discussions of aspects of energy degradation and the second law of thermodynamics include ideas concerning the inaccessibility, usefulness and dispersion of energy. These ideas have motivated us to introduce new learning goals into our K-12 teacher professional development courses. We identify alignments between these learning goals and learners' informal ideas and discuss instructional implications created by these alignments. Our aim is to create stronger ties between formal physics knowledge and sociopolitical issues by making these learning goals a priority in our professional development.

  17. Radiation degradation of silk protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wachiraporn Pewlong; Boonya Sudatis [Office of Atomic Energy for Peace, Bangkok (Thailand); Takeshita, Hidefumi; Yoshii, Fumio; Kume, Tamikazu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    2000-09-01

    Silk fibroin fiber from the domesticated silkworm Bombyx mori was irradiated in the dose range up to 2500 kGy using an electron beam accelerator to apply the radiation degradation technique as a means to solubilize fibroin. The tensile strength of irradiated fibroin fiber decreased with increasing dose and the presence of oxygen in the irradiation atmosphere enhanced the degradation. The solubilization of irradiated fibroin fiber was evaluated using the following three kinds of solutions: calcium chloride solution (CaCl{sub 2}/C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH/H{sub 2}O = 1 : 2 : 8 in mole ratio), hydrochloric acid (0.5N) and distilled water. Dissolution of fibroin fiber into these solutions was significantly enhanced by irradiation. Especially, an appreciable amount of water-soluble protein was extracted by distilled water. (author)

  18. Microstructural degradation in compound tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salonen, J.; Auerkari, P. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    In order to quantify microstructural degradation at high temperatures, samples of SA 210 / AISI 304 L compound tube material were annealed in the temperature range 540-720 deg C for 1 to 1 000 hours. The hardness of the annealed material was measured and the micro structure of the samples was investigated with optical and scanning electron microscopy. Microstructural degradation was characterised by the carbide structure in the ferritic-pearlitic base material and by the depth of decarburised and carburised zones of the compound tube interface. The observed changes were quantified in terms of their time and temperature dependence and diffusion coefficients of the process. The results can be used in estimating the extent of thermal exposure of high-temperature components after long-term service or after incidences of overheating. (orig.) (4 refs.)

  19. Textile dye degradation using nano zero valent iron: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Chandra Devi; Kanmani, S

    2016-07-15

    Water soluble unfixed dyes and inorganic salts are the major pollutants in textile dyeing industry wastewater. Existing treatment methods fail to degrade textile dyes and have limitations too. The inadequate treatment of textile dyeing wastewater is a major concern when effluent is directly discharged into the nearby environment. Long term disposal threatens the environment, which needs reclamation. This article reviews the current knowledge of nano zero valent iron (nZVI) technique in the degradation of textile dyes. The application of nZVI on textile dye degradation is receiving great attention in the recent years because nZVI particles are highly reactive towards the pollutant, less toxic, and economical. The nZVI particles aggregate quickly with respect to time and the addition of supports such as resin, nickel, zinc, bentonite, biopolymer, kaolin, rectorite, nickel-montmorillonite, bamboo, cellulose, biochar, graphene, and clinoptilolite enhanced the stability of iron nanoparticles. Inclusion of supports may in turn introduce additional toxic pollutants, hence green supports are recommended. The majority of investigations concluded dye color removal as textile dye compound removal, which is not factual. Very few studies monitored the removal of total organic carbon and observed the products formed. The results revealed that partial mineralization of the textile dye compound was achieved. Instead of stand alone technique, nZVI can be integrated with other suitable technique to achieve complete degradation of textile dye and also to treat multiple pollutants in the real textile dyeing wastewater. It is highly recommended to perform more bench-scale and pilot-scale studies to apply this technique to the textile effluent contaminated sites.

  20. Reactive Hydrocarbons in the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Roger

    The emissions of reactive volatile organic compounds into the atmosphere from biogenic and anthropogenic sources and the subsequent interaction of these organic compounds with oxides of nitrogen in the presence of sunlight lead to the formation of photochemical air pollution, now recognized to affect much of Europe, the United States, and many regions and urban areas elsewhere around the world. The past decade has seen the realization that emissions of organic compounds from biogenic sources (principally from vegetation) may be comparable to, or even dominate over, emissions of organic compounds from anthropogenic sources. Biogenic organics therefore play an important role in the chemistry of the troposphere and influence control strategies aimed at reducing the exposure of human populations to ozone and other manifestations of photochemical air pollution. Organic compounds also are involved in the formation of secondary organic aerosol, the formation of acids in the atmosphere, the potential for global warming, and, for chlorine- and bromine-containing compounds, stratospheric ozone depletion.

  1. Self-reactive T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becker, Jürgen C; thor Straten, Per; Andersen, Mads Hald

    2014-01-01

    -proteins expressed in regulatory immune cells have been reported, especially in patients with cancer. The seemingly lack of tolerance toward such proteins is interesting, as it suggests a regulatory function of self-reactive T (srT) cells, which may be important for the fine tuning of the immune system....... In particular, surprising has been the description of cytotoxic srT cells that are able to eliminate normal regulatory immune cells. Such srT cells may be important as effector cells that suppress regulatory suppressor cells. The current knowledge of the nature and function of srT cells is still limited. Still......, the therapeutic targeting of srT cells offers a novel approach to harness immune-regulatory networks in cancer....

  2. PEM Degradation Investigation Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dan Stevenson; Lee H Spangler

    2010-10-18

    This project conducted fundamental studies of PEM MEA degradation. Insights gained from these studies were disseminated to assist MEA manufacturers in understanding degradation mechanisms and work towards DOE 2010 fuel cell durability targets.

  3. Assessment of Land Degradation and Soil Conservation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessment of Land Degradation and Soil Conservation Management Practices ... Journal of Environmental Extension ... chemical and biological perspectives: The farmers are aware of the effects of land degradation on crop production.

  4. Experimental studies on urea degradation in seawater

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rajendran, A.; Joseph, T.; Reddy, C.V.G.

    The rate of urea degradation in seawater was studied under various conditions and the kinetics of urea degradation was evaluated. Urea decomposition experiments showed that the rates and quantity of ammonium oxidation were slower in the relatively...

  5. Synthesis and novel reactivity of halomethyldimethylsulfonium salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu; Fletcher; Dolbier Jr WR

    2000-06-02

    Iodomethyl-, chloromethyl-, and fluoromethyldimethylsulfonium salts, 4b-d, have been synthesized and are observed to be highly reactive molecules that exhibit extraordinary diversity with respect to the nature of their reactivity, undergoing facile direct substitution (S(N)2) reactions, but also being highly susceptible to electron-transfer reactions. Cyclic voltametry experiments indicated that the iodomethyldimethylsulfonium compound, 4b, is a potent electron acceptor, even surpassing the reactivity of perfluoro-n-alkyl iodides in that capacity. The iodo- and chloromethyldimethylsulfonium salts, 4b,c, as well as the analogous iodomethyltrimethylammonium salt, 3a, are shown to be reactive SET acceptors.

  6. Photo-assisted electrochemical degradation of simulated textile effluent coupled with simultaneous chlorine photolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mello Florêncio, Thaíla; de Araújo, Karla Santos; Antonelli, Raissa; de Toledo Fornazari, Ana Luiza; da Cunha, Paula Cordeiro Rodrigues; da Silva Bontempo, Letícia Helena; de Jesus Motheo, Artur; Granato, Ana Claudia; Malpass, Geoffroy Roger Pointer

    2016-10-01

    The influence of chloride ion concentration during the photo-assisted electrochemical degradation of simulated textile effluent, using a commercial Ti/Ru0.3Ti0.7O2 anode, was evaluated. Initially, the effect of applied current and supporting electrolyte concentration on the conversion of chloride ions to form reactive chlorine species in 90 min of experiment was analyzed in order to determine the maximum production of reactive chlorine species. The optimum conditions encountered (1.5 A and 0.3 mol dm(-3) NaCl) were subsequently employed for the degradation of simulated textile effluent. The efficiency of the process was determined through the analysis of chemical oxygen demand (COD), total organic carbon (TOC), of the presence of organochlorine products and phytotoxicity. Photo-assisted electrochemical degradation was more efficient for COD and TOC removal than the electrochemical technique alone. With simultaneous UV irradiation, a reduced quantity of reactive chlorine was produced, indicating that photolysis of the chlorine species led to the formation of hydroxyl radicals. This fact turns a simple electrochemical process into an advanced oxidation process.

  7. Microstructure-reactivity relationship of Ti + C reactive nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manukyan, Khachatur V.; Lin, Ya-Cheng; Rouvimov, Sergei; McGinn, Paul J.; Mukasyan, Alexander S.

    2013-01-01

    The influence of short-term (≤10 min) high energy ball milling (HEBM) on the microstructure and reactivity of a titanium-carbon powder mixture is reported. It is proved that the mechanism of microstructural transformation in a Ti-C mixture during HEBM defines the reaction mechanism in the produced Ti/C structural energetic materials. More specifically, it is shown that after the first two minutes of dry milling (DM) in an inert (argon) atmosphere the initially crystalline graphite flakes were almost completely amorphized and uniformly distributed on the surface of the deformed titanium particles. A subsequent "cold-welding" leads to formation of Ti-(C-rich/Ti)-Ti agglomerates. TEM studies reveal that the (C-rich/Ti) composite layers consist of nano-size (20 nm) Ti particles distributed in the matrix of the amorphous carbon and thus are characterized by extremely high surface area contacts between the reagents. A rapid self-ignition of the material during DM occurs just after 9.5 min of mechanical treatment, resulting in formation of pure cubic TiC. Wet grinding (WG) of a Ti-C mixture in hexane, under otherwise identical parameters, provides more "soft" conditions, which do not allow the rapid amorphization of carbon during the first stage of grinding. As a result graphite and titanium form sandwich-like Ti/C composite particles, in which the reagents contact primarily along the boundaries of the layers. Such particles gradually transform to the TiC phase without a spontaneous reaction during the HEBM process. The reactivity, i.e., self-ignition temperature and ignition delay time, of different milling-induced microstructures, were also studied. It was found that the ignition temperature in Ti-C structural energetic material prepared under optimized HEBM conditions is ˜600 K, which is more than three times lower than that of the initial reaction mixture (Tig ˜ 1900 K). A significant decrease of the effective activation energy for interaction in the Ti-C system

  8. Reactive Membrane Barriers for Containment of Subsurface Contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William A. Arnold; Edward L. Cussler

    2007-02-26

    The overall goal of this project was to develop reactive membrane barriers--a new and flexible technique to contain and stabilize subsurface contaminants. Polymer membranes will leak once a contaminant is able to diffuse through the membrane. By incorporating a reactive material in the polymer, however, the contaminant is degraded or immobilized within the membrane. These processes increase the time for contaminants to breakthrough the barrier (i.e. the lag time) and can dramatically extend barrier lifetimes. In this work, reactive barrier membranes containing zero-valent iron (Fe{sup 0}) or crystalline silicotitanate (CST) were developed to prevent the migration of chlorinated solvents and cesium-137, respectively. These studies were complemented by the development of models quantifying the leakage/kill time of reactive membranes and describing the behavior of products produced via the reactions within the membranes. First, poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) membranes containing Fe{sup 0} and CST were prepared and tested. Although PVA is not useful in practical applications, it allows experiments to be performed rapidly and the results to be compared to theory. For copper ions (Cu{sup 2+}) and carbon tetrachloride, the barrier was effective, increasing the time to breakthrough over 300 times. Even better performance was expected, and the percentage of the iron used in the reaction with the contaminants was determined. For cesium, the CST laden membranes increased lag times more than 30 times, and performed better than theoretical predictions. A modified theory was developed for ion exchangers in reactive membranes to explain this result. With the PVA membranes, the effect of a groundwater matrix on barrier performance was tested. Using Hanford groundwater, the performance of Fe{sup 0} barriers decreased compared to solutions containing a pH buffer and high levels of chloride (both of which promote iron reactivity). For the CST bearing membrane, performance improved by a

  9. Flow accelerated organic coating degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qixin

    Applying organic coatings is a common and the most cost effective way to protect metallic objects and structures from corrosion. Water entry into coating-metal interface is usually the main cause for the deterioration of organic coatings, which leads to coating delamination and underfilm corrosion. Recently, flowing fluids over sample surface have received attention due to their capability to accelerate material degradation. A plethora of works has focused on the flow induced metal corrosion, while few studies have investigated the flow accelerated organic coating degradation. Flowing fluids above coating surface affect corrosion by enhancing the water transport and abrading the surface due to fluid shear. Hence, it is of great importance to understand the influence of flowing fluids on the degradation of corrosion protective organic coatings. In this study, a pigmented marine coating and several clear coatings were exposed to the laminar flow and stationary immersion. The laminar flow was pressure driven and confined in a flow channel. A 3.5 wt% sodium chloride solution and pure water was employed as the working fluid with a variety of flow rates. The corrosion protective properties of organic coatings were monitored inline by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) measurement. Equivalent circuit models were employed to interpret the EIS spectra. The time evolution of coating resistance and capacitance obtained from the model was studied to demonstrate the coating degradation. Thickness, gloss, and other topography characterizations were conducted to facilitate the assessment of the corrosion. The working fluids were characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTIR) and conductivity measurement. The influence of flow rate, fluid shear, fluid composition, and other effects in the coating degradation were investigated. We conclude that flowing fluid on the coating surface accelerates the transport of water, oxygen, and ions into the coating, as

  10. Nylon biodegradation by lignin-degrading fungi.

    OpenAIRE

    Deguchi, T; Kakezawa, M; Nishida, T

    1997-01-01

    The biodegradation of nylon by lignin-degrading fungi was investigated. The fungus IZU-154 significantly degraded nylon-66 membrane under ligninolytic conditions. Nuclear magnetic resonance analysis showed that four end groups, CHO, NHCHO, CH3, and CONH2, were formed in the biodegraded nylon-66 membranes, suggesting that nylon-66 was degraded oxidatively.

  11. Applications and extensions of degradation modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, F.; Subudhi, M.; Samanta, P.K. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Vesely, W.E. (Science Applications International Corp., Columbus, OH (United States))

    1991-01-01

    Component degradation modeling being developed to understand the aging process can have many applications with potential advantages. Previous work has focused on developing the basic concepts and mathematical development of a simple degradation model. Using this simple model, times of degradations and failures occurrences were analyzed for standby components to detect indications of aging and to infer the effectiveness of maintenance in preventing age-related degradations from transforming to failures. Degradation modeling approaches can have broader applications in aging studies and in this paper, we discuss some of the extensions and applications of degradation modeling. The application and extension of degradation modeling approaches, presented in this paper, cover two aspects: (1) application to a continuously operating component, and (2) extension of the approach to analyze degradation-failure rate relationship. The application of the modeling approach to a continuously operating component (namely, air compressors) shows the usefulness of this approach in studying aging effects and the role of maintenance in this type component. In this case, aging effects in air compressors are demonstrated by the increase in both the degradation and failure rate and the faster increase in the failure rate compared to the degradation rate shows the ineffectiveness of the existing maintenance practices. Degradation-failure rate relationship was analyzed using data from residual heat removal system pumps. A simple linear model with a time-lag between these two parameters was studied. The application in this case showed a time-lag of 2 years for degradations to affect failure occurrences. 2 refs.

  12. Applications and extensions of degradation modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, F.; Subudhi, M.; Samanta, P.K. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Vesely, W.E. [Science Applications International Corp., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1991-12-31

    Component degradation modeling being developed to understand the aging process can have many applications with potential advantages. Previous work has focused on developing the basic concepts and mathematical development of a simple degradation model. Using this simple model, times of degradations and failures occurrences were analyzed for standby components to detect indications of aging and to infer the effectiveness of maintenance in preventing age-related degradations from transforming to failures. Degradation modeling approaches can have broader applications in aging studies and in this paper, we discuss some of the extensions and applications of degradation modeling. The application and extension of degradation modeling approaches, presented in this paper, cover two aspects: (1) application to a continuously operating component, and (2) extension of the approach to analyze degradation-failure rate relationship. The application of the modeling approach to a continuously operating component (namely, air compressors) shows the usefulness of this approach in studying aging effects and the role of maintenance in this type component. In this case, aging effects in air compressors are demonstrated by the increase in both the degradation and failure rate and the faster increase in the failure rate compared to the degradation rate shows the ineffectiveness of the existing maintenance practices. Degradation-failure rate relationship was analyzed using data from residual heat removal system pumps. A simple linear model with a time-lag between these two parameters was studied. The application in this case showed a time-lag of 2 years for degradations to affect failure occurrences. 2 refs.

  13. Degradation analysis of thin film photovoltaic modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radue, C., E-mail: chantelle.radue@nmmu.ac.z [Department of Physics, PO Box 77000, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa); Dyk, E.E. van [Department of Physics, PO Box 77000, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa)

    2009-12-01

    Five thin film photovoltaic modules were deployed outdoors under open circuit conditions after a thorough indoor evaluation. Two technology types were investigated: amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS). Two 14 W a-Si:H modules, labelled Si-1 and Si-2, were investigated. Both exhibited degradation, initially due to the well-known light-induced degradation described by Staebler and Wronski [Applied Physics Letters 31 (4) (1977) 292], and thereafter due to other degradation modes such as cell degradation. The various degradation modes contributing to the degradation of the a-Si:H modules will be discussed. The initial maximum power output (P{sub MAX}) of Si-1 was 9.92 W, with the initial light-induced degradation for Si-1 approx30% and a total degradation of approx42%. For Si-2 the initial P{sub MAX} was 7.93 W, with initial light-induced degradation of approx10% and a total degradation of approx17%. Three CIGS modules were investigated: two 20 W modules labelled CIGS-1 and CIGS-2, and a 40 W module labelled CIGS-3. CIGS-2 exhibited stable performance while CIGS-1 and CIGS-3 exhibited degradation. CIGS is known to be stable over long periods of time, and thus the possible reasons for the degradation of the two modules are discussed.

  14. Advanced hydraulic fracturing methods to create in situ reactive barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murdoch, L. [FRx Inc., Cincinnati, OH (United States)]|[Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Siegrist, B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Vesper, S. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States)] [and others

    1997-12-31

    Many contaminated areas consist of a source area and a plume. In the source area, the contaminant moves vertically downward from a release point through the vadose zone to an underlying saturated region. Where contaminants are organic liquids, NAPL may accumulate on the water table, or it may continue to migrate downward through the saturated region. Early developments of permeable barrier technology have focused on intercepting horizontally moving plumes with vertical structures, such as trenches, filled with reactive material capable of immobilizing or degrading dissolved contaminants. This focus resulted in part from a need to economically treat the potentially large volumes of contaminated water in a plume, and in part from the availability of construction technology to create the vertical structures that could house reactive compounds. Contaminant source areas, however, have thus far remained largely excluded from the application of permeable barrier technology. One reason for this is the lack of conventional construction methods for creating suitable horizontal structures that would place reactive materials in the path of downward-moving contaminants. Methods of hydraulic fracturing have been widely used to create flat-lying to gently dipping layers of granular material in unconsolidated sediments. Most applications thus far have involved filling fractures with coarse-grained sand to create permeable layers that will increase the discharge of wells recovering contaminated water or vapor. However, it is possible to fill fractures with other compounds that alter the chemical composition of the subsurface. One early application involved development and field testing micro-encapsulated sodium percarbonate, a solid compound that releases oxygen and can create aerobic conditions suitable for biodegradation in the subsurface for several months.

  15. Method for reactivating catalysts and a method for recycling supercritical fluids used to reactivate the catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Thompson, David N.; Anderson, Raymond P.

    2008-08-05

    A method of reactivating a catalyst, such as a solid catalyst or a liquid catalyst. The method comprises providing a catalyst that is at least partially deactivated by fouling agents. The catalyst is contacted with a fluid reactivating agent that is at or above a critical point of the fluid reactivating agent and is of sufficient density to dissolve impurities. The fluid reactivating agent reacts with at least one fouling agent, releasing the at least one fouling agent from the catalyst. The at least one fouling agent becomes dissolved in the fluid reactivating agent and is subsequently separated or removed from the fluid reactivating agent so that the fluid reactivating agent may be reused. A system for reactivating a catalyst is also disclosed.

  16. Sonoelectrochemical oxidation for decolorization of Reactive Red 195.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somayajula, Anusha; Asaithambi, P; Susree, Modepalli; Matheswaran, Manickam

    2012-07-01

    The decolorization and degradation of Reactive Red 195 (RR 195) is studied using sonoelectrochemical and electrochemical oxidation. Sonoelectrochemical oxidation was found to be more efficient than electrochemical oxidation. The efficiency of decolorization was found to be 91% and 99% in the case of electrochemical and sonoelectrochemical process, respectively. The effect of different supporting electrolytes and ultrasonic power on decolorization and COD removal has been studied. The decolorization was found to be maximum in the KCl and NaCl as electrolytes. The color removal decreased with increasing ultrasonic power. Response surface methodology was used to assess optimal condition for decolorization and COD removal of RR 195. A Central Composite Design in five most important operating variables; current density, electrolyte concentration, dye concentration, time and sonication power was employed for experimental design and optimization of results. The significance of independent variables and their interactions were tested by means of the analysis of variance with 95% confidence limits. There was good agreement between the experimental and predicated values. Sonoelectrochemical degradation was found to be efficient in decolorizing simulated textile effluent. The results show that ultrasound was significantly enhanced in the electrochemical oxidation.

  17. First OH reactivity measurements in Harvard Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herdlinger-Blatt, I. S.; Martin, S. T.; Hansel, A.; McKinney, K. A.

    2013-12-01

    The OH reactivity provides critical insight into the HOx budget under actual atmospheric conditions, and has implications for the production of ozone and the formation of secondary organic material. Previous studies have indicated that the OH reactivity measured at field sites often exceeds model estimations, but current experiments remain inconclusive about the origin of the discrepancy between the modeled and measured OH reactivity (Lou et al., 2010). As of now there are only a limited number of atmospheric studies of total OH reactivity available, so to improve understanding of the OH reactivity more studies are needed. The first OH reactivity measurements in the northeastern United States are being performed during the summer of 2013 at Harvard Forest. Harvard forest, is located about 100 km west of the Boston metropolitan area, is one of the most intensively studied forests in North America. The main biogenic VOC emitted from Harvard Forest is isoprene followed by monoterpenes and methanol. Sampling for the OH reactivity measurements will be conducted from a 30m tall meteorological tower at the Harvard Forest site. The air is drawn into a reaction cell where the OH reactivity is determined using the Comparative Reactivity Method (Sinha et al., 2008) employing a High-Sensitivity Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (Lindinger et al., 1998, Hansel et al., 1998). In addition to the OH reactivity measurements, the most abundant compounds present in the air sample will be quantified using PTR-MS. The quantification of these compounds is needed to compare the theoretical calculated OH reactivity with the measured OH reactivity data. The measurements will be used to evaluate our understanding of the OH budget at Harvard Forest. References: A. Hansel, A. Jordan, C. Warneke, R. Holzinger, and W. Lindinger.: Improved Detection Limit of the Proton-transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer: On-line Monitoring of Volatile Organic Compounds at Mixing Ratios of a Few PPTV

  18. Catalytic effect of transition metals on microwave-induced degradation of atrazine in mineral micropores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Erdan; Cheng, Hefa

    2014-06-15

    With their high catalytic activity for redox reactions, transition metal ions (Cu(2+) and Fe(3+)) were exchanged into the micropores of dealuminated Y zeolites to prepare effective microporous mineral sorbents for sorption and microwave-induced degradation of atrazine. Due to its ability to complex with atrazine, loading of copper greatly increased the sorption of atrazine. Atrazine sorption on iron-exchanged zeolites was also significantly enhanced, which was attributed to the hydrolysis of Fe(3+) polycations in mineral micropores and electrostatic interactions of protonated atrazine molecules with the negatively charged pore wall surface. Copper and iron species in the micropores also significantly accelerated degradation of the sorbed atrazine (and its degradation intermediates) under microwave irradiation. The catalytic effect was attributed to the easy reducibility and high oxidation activity of Cu(2+) and Fe(3+) species stabilized in the micropores of the zeolites. It was postulated that the surface species of transition metals (monomeric Cu(2+), Cu(2+)-O-Cu(2+) complexes, FeO(+), and dinuclear Fe-O-Fe-like species) in the mineral micropores were thermally activated under microwave irradiation, and subsequently formed highly reactive sites catalyzing oxidative degradation of atrazine. The transition metal-exchanged zeolites, particularly the iron-exchanged ones, were relatively stable when leached under acidic conditions, which suggests that they are reusable in sorption and microwave-induced degradation. These findings offer valuable insights on designing of effective mineral sorbents that can selectively uptake atrazine from aqueous solutions and catalyze its degradation under microwave irradiation.

  19. Kinetics of textile dye degradation by UV/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gueltekin, I.; Ince, N.H. [Bogazici Univ., Inst. of Environmental Sciences, Bebek, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2003-07-01

    The degradation of a reactive-azo dye by an ultraviolet light (UV)/hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) advanced oxidation process (AOP) was studied using Procion Red HE-7B as a model dye. It was found that the degradation of Procion Red followed first order kinetics and was fastest at pH=7. Application of the UV/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} system resulted in complete decolorization in the first 15 minutes of treatment, which corresponded to 49.8 percent aromatic degradation. Increasing H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration enhanced color degradation up to a level (8.18 mM), beyond which the rate was inhibited. It was further found that hydrogen peroxide was removed from solution at a faster rate (1.55 times) in the absence of Procion Red than in its presence. Furthermore, aromatic degradation was found to follow first order kinetics and 91.7 percent removal was achieved in 60 minutes. Moreover, a simple kinetic model was proposed to describe the kinetics of dye degradation. (orig.)

  20. Photocatalytic degradation kinetics and mechanism of phenobarbital in TiO(2) aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hua; Lin, Xiulian; Zhan, Haiying; Zhang, Hong; Lin, Jingxin

    2013-01-01

    5-Ethyl-5-phenylpyrimidine-2,4,6(1H, 3H, 5H)-trione is an anti-convulsant used to treat disorders of movement, e.g. tremors. This work deals with the transformation of phenobarbital by UV/TiO(2) heterogeneous photocatalysis, to assess the decomposition of the pharmaceutical compound, to identify intermediates, as well as to elucidate some mechanistic details of the degradation. The photocatalytic removal efficiency of 100 μm phenobarbital is about 80% within 60 min, while the degradation efficiency of phenobarbital was better in alkaline solution. The study on contribution of reactive oxidative species (ROSs) has shown that ()OH is responsible for the major degradation of phenobarbital, while the photohole, photoelectrons and the other ROSs have the minor contribution to the degradation. Finally, based on the identification of degradation intermediates, two main photocatalytic degradation pathways have been tentatively proposed, including the hydroxylation and cleavage of pyrimidine ring in the phenobarbital molecule respectively. Certainly, the phenobarbital can be mineralized when the photocatalytic reaction time prolongs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. In vitro kinetics of nerve agent degradation by fresh frozen plasma (FFP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wille, Timo; Thiermann, Horst; Worek, Franz

    2014-02-01

    Great efforts have been undertaken in the last decades to develop new oximes to reactivate acetylcholinesterase inhibited by organophosphorus compounds (OP). So far, a broad-spectrum oxime effective against structurally diverse OP is still missing, and alternative approaches, e.g. stoichiometric and catalytic scavengers, are under investigation. Fresh frozen plasma (FFP) has been used in human OP pesticide poisoning which prompted us to investigate the in vitro kinetics of OP nerve agent degradation by FFP. Degradation was rapid and calcium-dependent with the G-type nerve agents tabun, sarin, soman and cyclosarin with half-lives from 5 to 28 min. Substantially longer and calcium-independent degradation half-lives of 23-33 h were determined with the V-type nerve agents CVX, VR and VX. However, at all the tested conditions, the degradation of V-type nerve agents was several-fold faster than spontaneous hydrolysis. Albumin did not accelerate the degradation of nerve agents. In conclusion, the fast degradation of G-type nerve agents by FFP might be a promising tool, but would require transfusion shortly after poisoning. FFP does not seem to be suitable for detoxifying relevant agent concentrations in case of human poisoning by V-type nerve agents.

  2. Photocatalytic Degradation of Methylene Blue using ZnO Nano-Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Rezaee

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available "nBackgrounds and Objectives: Textile industrial wastewaters are one of the important sources of environmental contaminants. In the recent years, use of advanced oxidation processes, by producing highly active and reactive components such as hydroxyl radicals has been proposed. The aim of this research is photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue dye using the ZnO-nanoparticle with UVA irradiation. "nMaterials and Methods: photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue color using the ZnO- nanoparticles excited with UVA irradiation. In this research, photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue dye was study using different concentration of ZnO-nanoparticles under UVA irradiation in a batch reactor. "nResults: The results of this research show that removal of methylene blue dye has direct correlation with UVA intensity. The best results of dye degradation were reported in concentration of 150 mg/L ZnO nano-particles and the radiation intensity of 240 µW/cm2. Rate of dye removal was decrease with increasing of color concentration. Subsequent of color degradation, the initial COD were decresed by %60. "nConclusion: The photocatalytic degradation process using ZnO nano-particles under UVA irradiation could be remove the methylene blue dye and 60% of COD.

  3. Suite of Activity-Based Probes for Cellulose-Degrading Enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chauvigne-Hines, Lacie M.; Anderson, Lindsey N.; Weaver, Holly M.; Brown, Joseph N.; Koech, Phillip K.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Hofstad, Beth A.; Smith, Richard D.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Callister, Stephen J.; Wright, Aaron T.

    2012-12-19

    Microbial glycoside hydrolases play a dominant role in the biochemical conversion of cellulosic biomass to high-value biofuels. Anaerobic cellulolytic bacteria are capable of producing multicomplex catalytic subunits containing cell-adherent cellulases, hemicellulases, xylanases, and other glycoside hydrolases to facilitate the degradation of highly recalcitrant cellulose and other related plant cell wall polysaccharides. Clostridium thermocellum is a cellulosome producing bacterium that couples rapid reproduction rates to highly efficient degradation of crystalline cellulose. Herein, we have developed and applied a suite of difluoromethylphenyl aglycone, N-halogenated glycosylamine, and 2-deoxy-2-fluoroglycoside activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) probes to the direct labeling of the C. thermocellum cellulosomal secretome. These activity-based probes (ABPs) were synthesized with alkynes to harness the utility and multimodal possibilities of click chemistry, and to increase enzyme active site inclusion for LC-MS analysis. We directly analyzed ABP-labeled and unlabeled global MS data, revealing ABP selectivity for glycoside hydrolase (GH) enzymes in addition to a large collection of integral cellulosome-containing proteins. By identifying reactivity and selectivity profiles for each ABP, we demonstrate our ability to widely profile the functional cellulose degrading machinery of the bacterium. Derivatization of the ABPs, including reactive groups, acetylation of the glycoside binding groups, and mono- and disaccharide binding groups, resulted in considerable variability in protein labeling. Our probe suite is applicable to aerobic and anaerobic cellulose degrading systems, and facilitates a greater understanding of the organismal role associated within biofuel development.

  4. A Suite of Activity-Based Probes for Cellulose Degrading Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvigné-Hines, Lacie M.; Anderson, Lindsey N.; Weaver, Holly M.; Brown, Joseph N.; Koech, Phillip K.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Hofstad, Beth A.; Smith, Richard D.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Callister, Stephen J.; Wright, Aaron T.

    2012-01-01

    Microbial glycoside hydrolases play a dominant role in the biochemical conversion of cellulosic biomass to high-value biofuels. Anaerobic cellulolytic bacteria are capable of producing multicomplex catalytic subunits containing cell-adherent cellulases, hemicellulases, xylanases, and other glycoside hydrolases to facilitate the degradation of highly recalcitrant cellulose and other related plant cell wall polysaccharides. Clostridium thermocellum is a cellulosome producing bacterium that couples rapid reproduction rates to highly efficient degradation of crystalline cellulose. Herein, we have developed and applied a suite of difluoromethylphenyl aglycone, N-halogenated glycosylamine, and 2-deoxy-2-fluoroglycoside activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) probes to the direct labeling of the C. thermocellum cellulosomal secretome. These activity-based probes (ABPs) were synthesized with alkynes to harness the utility and multimodal possibilities of click chemistry, and to increase enzyme active site inclusion for LC-MS analysis. We directly analyzed ABP-labeled and unlabeled global MS data, revealing ABP selectivity for glycoside hydrolase (GH) enzymes, in addition to a large collection of integral cellulosome-containing proteins. By identifying reactivity and selectivity profiles for each ABP, we demonstrate our ability to widely profile the functional cellulose degrading machinery of the bacterium. Derivatization of the ABPs, including reactive groups, acetylation of the glycoside binding groups, and mono- and disaccharide binding groups, resulted in considerable variability in protein labeling. Our probe suite is applicable to aerobic and anaerobic microbial cellulose degrading systems, and facilitates a greater understanding of the organismal role associated with biofuel development. PMID:23176123

  5. Degradation and toxicity depletion of RB19 anthraquinone dye in water by ozone-based technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovato, María E; Fiasconaro, María L; Martín, Carlos A

    2017-02-01

    This research investigated the discoloration and mineralization of Reactive Blue 19 (RB19) anthraquinone dye by single ozonation, single UV radiation and ozonation jointed with UV radiation (O3/UV). The problem was approached from two points of view: with the objective of color removal or the mineralization of solution. In each case, the optimum operating conditions were different. Ozonation was the most effective treatment for color removal, while the combined O3/UV treatment was for mineralization. Major intermediates of the dye degradation were identified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and a degradation pathway was proposed. In addition, a clear decrease of the toxicity of the dye was achieved at the end of the experiments. The effect of initial dye concentration, pH, ozone dose, and UV radiation on the degradation of the dye and decrease of total organic carbon was investigated, in order to establish the optimal operating conditions to achieve discoloration, mineralization or a combination of both.

  6. Identification by CI-mass spectrometry of an unexpected benzodiazepine degradation product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buret, D.; Breton, D.; Clair, P.; Lafosse, M.

    2006-01-01

    The French Military Health Service (SSA) has developed an innovative drug product, as a treatment against neurotoxic organophosphate poisoning (NOP). It contains three drug substances: an anticholinergic, an anticonvulsant and a cholinesterase reactivator. Testing stability study, in normal conditions, over 18 months, for this speciality, has given unexpected results. Indeed, one of the drug substances, avizafone (pro-drug of diazepam), breaks down partially into a compound which migrates into the plastic container where this degradation product is demethylated after absorption. Mass spectrometry with negative chemical ionisation (negative CI-MS) was used, to monitor decomposition of the drug substance. This method first showed migration of the degradation product and has been used to monitor its evolution during the stability testing study. The demethylation seems to be due to an additive product present in the plastic. The degradation products remain trapped in the container holding the pharmaceutical formulation.

  7. Florid reactive periostitis of the hands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jambhekar, Nirmala A; Desai, Saral S; Puri, Ajay; Agarwal, Manish

    2004-11-01

    Reactive periostitis of the hand can be a confounding lesion on both radiological and histological grounds. An erroneous diagnosis of a malignant tumor, particularly an osteosarcoma, is a possibility. Two cases of florid reactive periostitis of the hand mistaken for osteosarcoma are reported here to illustrate this entity and caution against a diagnostic pitfall.

  8. Florid reactive periostitis of the hands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jambhekar, Nirmala A.; Desai, Saral S. [Tata Memorial Hospital, Department of Pathology, Mumbai, Maharashtra (India); Puri, Ajay; Agarwal, Manish [Tata Memorial Hospital, Department of Orthopedics, Mumbai, Maharashtra (India)

    2004-11-01

    Reactive periostitis of the hand can be a confounding lesion on both radiological and histological grounds. An erroneous diagnosis of a malignant tumor, particularly an osteosarcoma, is a possibility. Two cases of florid reactive periostitis of the hand mistaken for osteosarcoma are reported here to illustrate this entity and caution against a diagnostic pitfall. (orig.)

  9. The reactive extrusion of thermoplastic polyurethane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, Vincent Wilhelmus Andreas

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this thesis was to increase the understanding of the reactive extrusion of thermoplastic polyurethane. Overall, several issues were identified: • Using a relative simple extrusion model, the reactive extrusion process can be described. This model can be used to further investigate a

  10. Adolescents' Emotional Reactivity across Relationship Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Emily C.; Buehler, Cheryl; Blair, Bethany L.

    2013-01-01

    Adolescents' emotional reactivity in family, close friendships, and romantic relationships was examined in a community-based sample of 416 two-parent families. Six waves of annual data were analyzed using structural equation modeling. Emotional reactivity to interparental conflict during early adolescence was associated prospectively with…

  11. Adolescents' Emotional Reactivity across Relationship Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Emily C.; Buehler, Cheryl; Blair, Bethany L.

    2013-01-01

    Adolescents' emotional reactivity in family, close friendships, and romantic relationships was examined in a community-based sample of 416 two-parent families. Six waves of annual data were analyzed using structural equation modeling. Emotional reactivity to interparental conflict during early adolescence was associated prospectively with…

  12. Second Reactivation of Neurocysticercosis: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Young Sup; Hwang, Hee Young; Choi, Hye Young; Kim, Jee Eun; Kim, Hyung Sik [Gil Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-02-15

    This report describes the first case involving a second reactivation of neurocysticercosis. There was peripheral enhancement and surrounding edema at multiple calcified lesions in both cerebral hemispheres on the brain MRI. One must be aware of the possibility of reactivation of neurocysticercosis to make the correct diagnosis

  13. REACT: A simple framework for reactive systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holenderski, L.

    2008-01-01

    Many software/hardware systems developed in Philips Research, especially those that serve as demonstrators for research ideas or product proposals developed in the Lifestyle sector, are so-called reactive systems. A reactive system consists of sensors, actuators and a control module. Sensors and act

  14. On the reactivity of methylbenzenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Gabriel da [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Bozzelli, Joseph W. [Department of Chemistry and Environmental Science, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ 07102 (United States)

    2010-11-15

    Alkylated aromatic hydrocarbons, including the methylbenzenes, are a major and growing component of liquid transportation fuels. Reactivity (or lack thereof) for the methylbenzenes in combustion systems, measured by octane rating, ignition delay, and laminar flame speed, varies widely with the number and position of methyl substituents. At present this behaviour is not fully understood. This study demonstrates how the low temperature and ignition reactivity of methylbenzenes is controlled by the presence of isolated methyl groups and adjacent methyl pairs (the ortho effect); this allows for the development of octane number correlations. Introduction of an isolated methyl group, adjacent only to CH ring sites, consistently increases the research octane number (RON) by around 26. This phenomenon is explained by the formation of relatively unreactive benzyl free radicals. When an adjacent pair of methyl substituents is present the RON consistently decreases by between 8 and 26, compared to the case when these methyl groups are isolated from each other (this effect generally diminishes with increasing degree of substitution). Research octane numbers for all aromatics with zero to three methyl substituents are accurately described by the empirical relationship RON = 98 + 24.2n{sub m} - 25.8n{sub p}, where n{sub m} is the total number of methyl groups and n{sub p} is the number of contiguous adjacent methyl pairs. The ortho effect is attributed to the unique oxidation chemistry of o-methylbenzyl, o-methylbenzoxyl, and o-methylphenyl type radicals here we provide a preliminary exploration of this chemistry and highlight areas requiring further research. It is shown that the o-methylbenzyl radical can react with two oxygen molecules to form 1,2-diformylbenzene + 2OH + H, a highly chain-branching process. This chemistry is expected to largely explain the two-stage ignition and negative temperature coefficient (NTC) behavior witnessed for polymethylbenzenes with adjacent

  15. Degradation of phenols by microorganisms. Abbau von Phenolen durch Mikroorganismen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klapp, K.U.; Wachtendonk, D. von (Lebensmittel- und chemisches Untersuchungsamt Aachen (Germany))

    1994-11-01

    Aerobic degradation of phenols is via oxidations, dealkylation and hydrolysis. These reactions are catalysed by enzymes. Upon completion of the reactions and elimation of eventual nitro, amino or sulfate acid residues, protocatechuate, catechol and gentisic acid remain as main intermediate products. There then follows ring splitting, which may take the form of a meta or para splitting. The end products are acetaldehyde, pyruvate, 3-oxo-adipate and fumarate, which are transferred into the citrate cycle. Protocatechuate is hard to analyse because of its reactivity. Searching for a phenol-metabolizing micro-organisms, Pseudomonas putida was insolated following a short adaptation time. Exotoxicity for Pseudomonads is at 350 mg/l phenol, but under optimized conditions it may be higher. (orig./EF)

  16. STRUCTURAL PERFORMANCE OF DEGRADED REINFORCED CONCRETE MEMBERS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braverman, J.I.; Miller, C.A.; Ellingwood, B.R.; Naus, D.J.; Hofmayer, C.H.; Bezler, P.; Chang, T.Y.

    2001-03-22

    This paper describes the results of a study to evaluate, in probabilistic terms, the effects of age-related degradation on the structural performance of reinforced concrete members at nuclear power plants. The paper focuses on degradation of reinforced concrete flexural members and shear walls due to the loss of steel reinforcing area and loss of concrete area (cracking/spalling). Loss of steel area is typically caused by corrosion while cracking and spalling can be caused by corrosion of reinforcing steel, freeze-thaw, or aggressive chemical attack. Structural performance in the presence of uncertainties is depicted by a fragility (or conditional probability of failure). The effects of degradation on the fragility of reinforced concrete members are calculated to assess the potential significance of various levels of degradation. The fragility modeling procedures applied to degraded concrete members can be used to assess the effects of degradation on plant risk and can lead to the development of probability-based degradation acceptance limits.

  17. Serological studies on chloridazon-degrading bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layh, G; Böhm, R; Eberspächer, J; Lingens, F

    1983-01-01

    Agglutination tests and immunofluorescence tests with antisera against four strains of chloridazon-degrading bacteria revealed the serological uniformity of a group of 22 chloridazon-degrading bacterial strains. No serological relationship could be found between chloridazon-degrading bacteria and representatives of other Gram-negative bacteria. This was demonstrated by agglutination tests, including testing of the antiserum against Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, and by immunofluorescence tests, including testing of the sera against Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter strains. The tests were performed with 31 representatives of different Gram-negative bacteria, and with 22 strains of chloridazon-degrading bacteria as antigens. Differences in the extent of agglutination reactions and antibody titres among chloridazon-degrading bacterial strains together with cross-adsorption xperiments, suggest a rough classification of chloridazon-degrading bacteria into two subgroups. On the basis of immunofluorescence data, a linkage-map was worked out to represent serological relationships in the group of chloridazon-degrading strains.

  18. Degradation of Victoria Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Sharon A.; Grant, John A.; Cohen, Barbara A.; Golombek, Mathew P.; Geissler, Paul E.; Sullivan, Robert J.; Kirk, Randolph L.; Parker, Timothy J.

    2008-01-01

    The $\\sim$750 m diameter and $\\sim$75 m deep Victoria crater in Meridiani Planum, Mars, presents evidence for significant degradation including a low, serrated, raised rim characterized by alternating alcoves and promontories, a surrounding low relief annulus, and a floor partially covered by dunes. The amount and processes of degradation responsible for the modified appearance of Victoria crater were evaluated using images obtained in situ by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity in concert with a digital elevation model created using orbital HiRISE images. Opportunity traversed along the north and northwest rim and annulus, but sufficiently characterized features visible in the DEM to enable detailed measurements of rim relief, ejecta thickness, and wall slopes around the entire degraded, primary impact structure. Victoria retains a 5 m raised rim consisting of 1-2 m of uplifted rocks overlain by 3 m of ejecta at the rim crest. The rim is $\\sim$120 to 220 m wide and is surrounded by a dark annulus reaching an average of 590 m beyond the raised rim. Comparison between observed morphology and that expected for pristine craters 500 to 750 m across indicate the original, pristine crater was close to 600 m in diameter. Hence, the crater has been erosionally widened by approximately 150 m and infilled by about 50 m of sediments. Eolian processes are responsible for modification at Victoria, but lesser contributions from mass wasting or other processes cannot be ruled out. Erosion by prevailing winds is most significant along the exposed rim and upper walls and accounts for $\\sim$50 m widening across a WNW-ESE diameter. The volume of material eroded from the crater walls and rim is $\\sim$20% less than the volume of sediments partially filling the crater, indicating eolian infilling from sources outside the crater over time. The annulus formed when $\\sim$1 m deflation of the ejecta created a lag of more resistant hematite spherules that trapped darker, regional

  19. Starch-degrading polysaccharide monooxygenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Van V; Marletta, Michael A

    2016-07-01

    Polysaccharide degradation by hydrolytic enzymes glycoside hydrolases (GHs) is well known. More recently, polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMOs, also known as lytic PMOs or LPMOs) were found to oxidatively degrade various polysaccharides via a copper-dependent hydroxylation. PMOs were previously thought to be either GHs or carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs), and have been re-classified in carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZY) database as auxiliary activity (AA) families. These enzymes include cellulose-active fungal PMOs (AA9, formerly GH61), chitin- and cellulose-active bacterial PMOs (AA10, formerly CBM33), and chitin-active fungal PMOs (AA11). These PMOs significantly boost the activity of GHs under industrially relevant conditions, and thus have great potential in the biomass-based biofuel industry. PMOs that act on starch are the latest PMOs discovered (AA13), which has expanded our perspectives in PMOs studies and starch degradation. Starch-active PMOs have many common structural features and biochemical properties of the PMO superfamily, yet differ from other PMO families in several important aspects. These differences likely correlate, at least in part, to the differences in primary and higher order structures of starch and cellulose, and chitin. In this review we will discuss the discovery, structural features, biochemical and biophysical properties, and possible biological functions of starch-active PMOs, as well as their potential application in the biofuel, food, and other starch-based industries. Important questions regarding various aspects of starch-active PMOs and possible economical driving force for their future studies will also be highlighted.

  20. Degradation of carbamazepine by UV/chlorine advanced oxidation process and formation of disinfection by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shiqing; Xia, Ying; Li, Ting; Yao, Tian; Shi, Zhou; Zhu, Shumin; Gao, Naiyun

    2016-08-01

    Pharmaceuticals in water are commonly found and are not efficiently removed by current treatment processes. Degradation of antiepileptic drug carbamazepine (CBZ) by UV/chlorine advanced oxidation process was systematically investigated in this study. The results showed that the UV/chlorine process was more effective at degrading CBZ than either UV or chlorination alone. The CBZ degradation followed pseudo-first order reaction kinetics, and the degradation rate constants (kobs) were affected by the chlorine dose, solution pH, and natural organic matter concentration to different degrees. Degradation of CBZ greatly increased with increasing chlorine dose and decreasing solution pH during the UV/chlorine process. Additionally, the presence of natural organic matter in the solution inhibited the degradation of CBZ. UV photolysis, chlorination, and reactive species (hydroxyl radical •OH and chlorine atoms •Cl) were identified as responsible for CBZ degradation in the UV/chlorine process. Finally, a degradation pathway for CBZ in the UV/chlorine process was proposed and the formation potentials of carbonaceous and nitrogenous disinfection by-products were evaluated. Enhanced formation of trichloroacetic acid, dichloroacetonitrile, and trichloronitromethane precursors should be considered when applying UV/chlorine advanced oxidation process to drinking water.

  1. Development of Reactivity Calculation Code for HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, B. G.; Kim, M. S. [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Reactivity of the reactor core is measured by a multi-channel wide range reactivity computer (or called reactivity meter), which uses current signals from the compensated ion chamber (CIC) mounted on the courtside wall of the reflector tank in the pool [1]. Because there were a few difficulties in operating the reactivity meter in the MS-DOS environment, some researches have been carried out to improve and upgrade it on the Windows environment [2]. Nevertheless, it is still hard for reactor operators to immediately check the time-dependent reactivity in case of power excursion because of some limitations such as aging of devices and compatibility issues. In this study, a simple off-line tool which can estimate the timedependent reactivity by using the fission chamber signals has been developed, and utilized to the case of loose parts of dummy rod in the 86-2th cycles of HANARO. In order to check the reactivity quickly for reactor operators, the inverse kinetic quations have been incorporated, and several useful functions have been implemented to the code. in the case of 86-2th cycles of HANARO, the developed code showed good performance to estimate time dependent reactivity. In the future, the on line analysis modules will be implanted to the code with upgrade of the measrement equipment such as current meters and data acquisition devices. Additionally, reactivity will be estimated by using the reactivity meter in the MS-DOS enviroment, and the new Windows version, for the verification of the developed code.

  2. Simulations of highly reactive fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fried, L E; Manaa, M R; Reed, E J

    2005-07-21

    We report density functional molecular dynamics simulations to determine the early chemical events of hot (T = 3000 K) and dense (1.97 g/cm{sup 3}, V/V{sub 0} = 0.68) nitromethane (CH{sub 3}NO{sub 2}). The first step in the decomposition process is an intermolecular proton abstraction mechanism that leads to the formation of CH{sub 3}NO{sub 2}H and the aci ion H{sub 2}CNO{sub 2}{sup -}, in support of evidence from static high-pressure and shock experiments. An intramolecular hydrogen transfer that transforms nitromethane into the aci acid form, CH{sub 2}NO{sub 2}H, accompanies this event. This is the first confirmation of chemical reactivity with bond selectivity for an energetic material near the condition of fully reacted specimen. We also report the decomposition mechanism followed up to the formation of H{sub 2}O as the first stable product.

  3. Degradable conjugates from oxanorbornadiene reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kislukhin, Alexander A; Higginson, Cody J; Hong, Vu P; Finn, M G

    2012-04-11

    Oxanorbornadienedicarboxylate (OND) reagents were explored for purposes of binding and releasing drugs from serum albumins as representative macromolecular carriers. Being highly reactive Michael acceptors, ONDs form adducts with thiols and amines, which then undergo retro-Diels-Alder fragmentation. A study of more than 30 model adducts revealed a number of modifications that can be used to influence adduct stability. For the most reactive OND linkers, the labeling of the single available bovine serum albumin (BSA) cysteine residue was complete within minutes at a mid-micromolar concentration of reactants. While a selectivity of greater than 1000-fold for thiol over amine was observed with model amino acids, the labeling of protein amines with ONDs is fast enough to be practical, as demonstrated by the reaction with thiol-depleted BSA. The OND-amine adducts were found to be up to 15 times more stable than OND-thiol adducts, and to be sensitive to acid by virtue of a stereochemically dependent acceleration of cycloreversion. The release rate of fluorescent cargo from serum albumins was tuned by selecting the coupling partners: the available half-lives ranged from 40 min to 7 days at 37 °C. Such versatility of release profiles from protein carriers, controlled by the nature of the OND linkage, is a useful addition to the drug delivery toolbox.

  4. Environmental Degradation: Causes and Consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Tyagi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The subject of environmental economics is at the forefront of the green debate: the environment can no longer be viewed as an entity separate from the economy. Environmental degradation is of many types and have many consequences. To address this challenge a number of studies have been conducted in both developing and developed countries applying different methods to capture health benefits from improved environmental quality. Minimizing exposure to environmental risk factors by enhancing air quality and access to improved sources of drinking and bathing water, sanitation and clean energy is found to be associated with significant health benefits and can contribute significantly to the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals of environmental sustainability, health and development. In this paper, I describe the national and global causes and consequences of environmental degradation and social injustice. This paper provides a review of the literature on studies associated with reduced environmental risk and in particular focusing on reduced air pollution, enhanced water quality and climate change mitigation.

  5. Commensal ocular bacteria degrade mucins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, M; Harris, A; Lumb, R; Powell, K

    2002-12-01

    Antimicrobial activity in tears prevents infection while maintaining a commensal bacterial population. The relation between mucin and commensal bacteria was assessed to determine whether commensals possess mucinolytic activity, how degradation depends on mucin integrity, and whether mucins affect bacterial replication. Bacteria were sampled from healthy eyes and contact lenses from asymptomatic wearers. Intracellular mucins were extracted and purified from cadaver conjunctivas, and surface mucins from extended wear contact lenses. After exposure to bacteria, changes in mucin hydrodynamic volume (proteolytic cleavage) and subunit charge (oligosaccharide degradation) were assayed by size exclusion and ion exchange chromatography. The effect of mucin on bacterial replication was followed for up to 24 hours from the end of incubation with purified ocular mucins. Ocular bacteria decreased the hydrodynamic volume of intracellular and contact lens adherent mucins, irrespective of glycosylation density. A decrease in mucin sialylation was observed after exposure to commensal bacteria. Subunit charge distributions were generally shifted to lesser negative charge, consistent with loss of charged epitopes. Subunits with high negative charge, observed after digesting lightly adhering contact lens mucins with bacteria, suggest preferential cleavage sites in the mucin molecule. The presence of purified ocular mucin in the medium inhibited bacterial growth. Bacteria in the healthy ocular surface possess mucinolytic activity on both intact and surface processed mucins, targeted to discrete sites in the mucin molecule. Inhibition of bacterial growth by ocular mucins can be seen as part of the mucosal control of microbiota.

  6. Early detection of materials degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyendorf, Norbert

    2017-02-01

    Lightweight components for transportation and aerospace applications are designed for an estimated lifecycle, taking expected mechanical and environmental loads into account. The main reason for catastrophic failure of components within the expected lifecycle are material inhomogeneities, like pores and inclusions as origin for fatigue cracks, that have not been detected by NDE. However, material degradation by designed or unexpected loading conditions or environmental impacts can accelerate the crack initiation or growth. Conventional NDE methods are usually able to detect cracks that are formed at the end of the degradation process, but methods for early detection of fatigue, creep, and corrosion are still a matter of research. For conventional materials ultrasonic, electromagnetic, or thermographic methods have been demonstrated as promising. Other approaches are focused to surface damage by using optical methods or characterization of the residual surface stresses that can significantly affect the creation of fatigue cracks. For conventional metallic materials, material models for nucleation and propagation of damage have been successfully applied for several years. Material microstructure/property relations are well established and the effect of loading conditions on the component life can be simulated. For advanced materials, for example carbon matrix composites or ceramic matrix composites, the processes of nucleation and propagation of damage is still not fully understood. For these materials NDE methods can not only be used for the periodic inspections, but can significantly contribute to the material scientific knowledge to understand and model the behavior of composite materials.

  7. Degradation of Acenaphthene by Ozone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective To investigate the oxidation of acenaphthene (Ace), a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) with a saturated C-C bond by ozone and to characterize the intermediate products of ozonation. Methods Ozone was generated from filtered dry oxygen by an ozone generator and continually bubbled into a reactor containing 1g/L Ace dissolved in an acetonitrile/water solvent mixture (90/10, v/v) at a rate of 0.5 mg/s. HPLC was used to analyze the Ace concentration. Total organic carbon (TOC) was used to measure the amount of water soluble organic compounds. GC-MS was used to identify the ozonized products. Oxygen uptake rate (OUR) of activated sludge was used to characterize the biodegradability of ozonized products. Results During the ozonation process, Ace was degraded, new organic compounds were produced and these intermediate products were difficult mineralize by ozone, with increasing TOC of soluble organics. The ozonized products were degraded by activated sludge more easily than Ace. Conclusion Ozonation decomposes the Ace and improves its biodegradability. The ozonation combined with biological treatment is probably an efficient and economical way to mineralize acenaphthene in wastewater.

  8. Reactive modelling of 1,2-DCA and DOC near the shoreline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombani, N; Pantano, A; Mastrocicco, M; Petitta, M

    2014-11-15

    1,2-Dichloroethane (1,2-DCA) was found to be the most abundant compound among chlorinated hydrocarbons detected in a petrochemical plant in southern Italy. This site is located near the coastline, and it is set above an unconfined coastal aquifer, where seawater intrusion is present. The presence of organic and inorganic contaminants at this site has required the implementation of remediation strategies, consisting of pumping wells (hydraulic barrier) and a horizontal flow barrier. The purpose of this work was to assess the influence of salt water intrusion on the degradation rate of 1,2-DCA. This was done on a three-dimensional domain relative to a limited portion of a well characterized field site, accounting for density-dependent flow and reactive transport modelling of 1,2-DCA and Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC). The modelling procedure was performed employing SEAWAT-4.0 and PHT3D, to reproduce the complex three-dimensional flow and transport domain. In order to determine the fate of 1,2-DCA, detailed field investigations provided intensive depth profile information. Different, kinetically controlled degradation rates were simulated to explain the observed, selective degradation of pollutants in groundwater. Calibration of the model was accomplished by comparison with the two different sets of measurements obtained from the MLS devices and from pumping wells. With the calibrated model, it was possible to distinguish between dispersive non-reactive processes and bacterially mediated reactions. In the non-reactive model, 1,2-DCA sorption was simulated using linear sorption coefficient determined with field data and 1,2-DCA degradation was simulated using a first order decay coefficient using literature data as initial guess. Finally, on the reactive transport model, where a two-step approach with partial equilibrium approach was implemented, the effects of neglecting the cation exchange capacity, omitting density-dependent flow, and refining the vertical

  9. SPECTROSCOPIC STUDIES OF STRUCTURE, DYNAMICS AND REACTIVITY IN IONIC LIQUIDS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WISHART,J.F.

    2007-11-30

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are a rapidly expanding family of condensed-phase media with important applications in energy production, nuclear fuel and waste processing, improving the efficiency and safety of industrial chemical processes, and pollution prevention. ILs are generally nonvolatile, noncombustible, highly conductive, recyclable and capable of dissolving a wide variety of materials. They are finding new uses in chemical synthesis, catalysis, separations chemistry, electrochemistry and other areas. Ionic liquids have dramatically different properties compared to conventional molecular solvents, and they provide a new and unusual environment to test our theoretical understanding of charge transfer and other reactions. We are interested in how IL properties influence physical and dynamical processes that determine the stability and lifetimes of reactive intermediates and thereby affect the courses of chemical reactions and product distributions. Successful use of ionic liquids in radiation-filled environments, where their safety advantages could be significant, requires an understanding of ionic liquid radiation chemistry. For example, characterizing the primary steps of IL radiolysis will reveal radiolytic degradation pathways and suggest ways to prevent them or mitigate their effects on the properties of the material. An understanding of ionic liquid radiation chemistry will also facilitate pulse radiolysis studies of general chemical reactivity in ILs, which will aid in the development of applications listed above. Very early in our radiolysis studies it became evident that slow solvation dynamics of the excess electron in ILs (which vary over a wide viscosity range) increases the importance of pre-solvated electron reactivity and consequently alters product distributions. Parallel studies of IL solvation phenomena using coumarin-153 dynamic Stokes shifts and polarization anisotropy decay rates are done to compare with electron solvation studies and to evaluate

  10. Microbial Enzymatic Degradation of Biodegradable Plastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roohi; Bano, Kulsoom; Kuddus, Mohammed; Zaheer, Mohammed R; Zia, Qamar; Khan, Mohammed F; Ashraf, Ghulam Md; Gupta, Anamika; Aliev, Gjumrakch

    2017-01-01

    The renewable feedstock derived biodegradable plastics are important in various industries such as packaging, agricultural, paper coating, garbage bags and biomedical implants. The increasing water and waste pollution due to the available decomposition methods of plastic degradation have led to the emergence of biodegradable plastics and biological degradation with microbial (bacteria and fungi) extracellular enzymes. The microbes utilize biodegradable polymers as the substrate under starvation and in unavailability of microbial nutrients. Microbial enzymatic degradation is suitable from bioremediation point of view as no waste accumulation occurs. It is important to understand the microbial interaction and mechanism involved in the enzymatic degradation of biodegradable plastics under the influence of several environmental factors such as applied pH, thermo-stability, substrate molecular weight and/or complexity. To study the surface erosion of polymer film is another approach for hydrolytic degradation characteristion. The degradation of biopolymer is associated with the production of low molecular weight monomer and generation of carbon dioxide, methane and water molecule. This review reported the degradation study of various existing biodegradable plastics along with the potent degrading microbes (bacteria and fungi). Patents available on plastic biodegradation with biotechnological significance is also summarized in this paper. This paper assesses that new disposal technique should be adopted for the degradation of polymers and further research is required for the economical production of biodegradable plastics along with their enzymatic degradation. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  11. Reactivity of Alkyldibenzothiophenes Using Theoretical Descriptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Luis Rivera

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical calculations of the reactivity of dibenzothiophene and its methyl, dimethyl, and trimethyl derivatives show that local reactivity descriptors reproduce their experimental desulfurization reactivity trend if the first desulfurization step involves directly the sulfur atom, which only occurs if the sulfur atom is blocked at most by one methyl group. In the series of molecules {4,7-dimethyldibenzothiophene, x,4,7-trimethyldibenzothiophene (x=1,2,3}, the most reactive molecule is 2,4,7-trimethyldibenzothiophene, and local descriptors show that the reactivity is linked to the activity of the sulfur atom, which is higher in 2,4,7-trimethyldibenzothiophene due to the position of the third methyl substitute, located in the para position with respect to the carbon bonded to the sulfur atom. The electrostatic potential of 2,4,7-trimethyldibenzothiophene shows one effective adsorption site, while 1,4,7-trimethyldibenzothiophene and 3,4,7-trimethyldibenzothiophene have more sites, contributing to the higher reactivity of 2,4,7-trimethyldibenzothiophene. The index of reactivity of other descriptors was evaluated and the effect of the position of the methyl substituents on adsorption parameters, as the dipole moment and the atomic charges were also studied.

  12. Enhanced degradation of azo dye by a stacked microbial fuel cell-biofilm electrode reactor coupled system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xian; Wang, Hui; Li, Xiao-Qi; Fang, Zhou; Li, Xian-Ning

    2017-03-01

    In this study, a microbial fuel cell (MFC)-biofilm electrode reactor (BER) coupled system was established for degradation of the azo dye Reactive Brilliant Red X-3B. In this system, electrical energy generated by the MFC degrades the azo dye in the BER without the need for an external power supply, and the effluent from the BER was used as the inflow for the MFC, with further degradation. The results indicated that the X-3B removal efficiency was 29.87% higher using this coupled system than in a control group. Moreover, a method was developed to prevent voltage reversal in stacked MFCs. Current was the key factor influencing removal efficiency in the BER. The X-3B degradation pathway and the types and transfer processes of intermediate products were further explored in our system coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

  13. Adaptive Reactive Rich Internet Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Kay-Uwe; Stühmer, Roland; Dörflinger, Jörg; Rahmani, Tirdad; Thomas, Susan; Stojanovic, Ljiljana

    Rich Internet Applications significantly raise the user experience compared with legacy page-based Web applications because of their highly responsive user interfaces. Although this is a tremendous advance, it does not solve the problem of the one-size-fits-all approach1 of current Web applications. So although Rich Internet Applications put the user in a position to interact seamlessly with the Web application, they do not adapt to the context in which the user is currently working. In this paper we address the on-the-fly personalization of Rich Internet Applications. We introduce the concept of ARRIAs: Adaptive Reactive Rich Internet Applications and elaborate on how they are able to adapt to the current working context the user is engaged in. An architecture for the ad hoc adaptation of Rich Internet Applications is presented as well as a holistic framework and tools for the realization of our on-the-fly personalization approach. We divided both the architecture and the framework into two levels: offline/design-time and online/run-time. For design-time we explain how to use ontologies in order to annotate Rich Internet Applications and how to use these annotations for conceptual Web usage mining. Furthermore, we describe how to create client-side executable rules from the semantic data mining results. We present our declarative lightweight rule language tailored to the needs of being executed directly on the client. Because of the event-driven nature of the user interfaces of Rich Internet Applications, we designed a lightweight rule language based on the event-condition-action paradigm.2 At run-time the interactions of a user are tracked directly on the client and in real-time a user model is built up. The user model then acts as input to and is evaluated by our client-side complex event processing and rule engine.

  14. Investigation of thermal and electrochemical degradation of fuel cell catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Mei; Ruthkosky, Martin S.; Merzougui, Belabbes; Swathirajan, Swathy; Balogh, Michael P.; Oh, Se H.

    A significant problem hindering large-scale implementation of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell technology is the loss of performance during extended operation and automotive cycling. Recent investigations of the deterioration of cell performance have revealed that a considerable part of the performance loss is due to the degradation of the electrocatalyst. In this study, an attempt is made to experimentally simulate the degradation processes such as carbon corrosion and platinum (Pt) surface area loss using an accelerated thermal sintering protocol. Two types of Tanaka fuel cell catalyst samples were heat-treated at 250 °C in humidified helium (He) gas streams and several oxygen (O 2) concentrations. The catalysts were then cycled electrochemically in pellet electrodes to determine the hydrogen adsorption (HAD) area and its evolution in subsequent electrochemical cycling. Samples that had undergone different degrees of carbon corrosion and Pt sintering were characterized for changes in carbon mass, active Pt surface area, BET (Brunauer, Emmett and Teller) surface area, and Pt crystallite size. Studies of the effect of oxygen and water concentration on two Tanaka catalysts, dispersed on carbon supports with varying BET areas, revealed that carbon oxidation in the presence of Pt follows two pathways: an oxygen pathway that leads to mass loss due to formation of gaseous products, and a water pathway that results in mass gains, especially for high BET area supports. These processes may be assisted by the formation of highly reactive OH and OOH type radicals. Platinum surface area loss, measured at varying oxygen concentrations and as a function of sintering time using X-ray diffraction (XRD), CO chemisorption, and electrochemical hydrogen adsorption, reveal an important role for carbon corrosion rather than an increase in Pt particle size for the surface area loss. Platinum surface area loss during 10 h of thermal degradation was equivalent to electrochemical

  15. Investigation of PAA/PVDF-NZVI hybrids for metronidazole removal: synthesis, characterization, and reactivity characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiacheng; Wang, Xiangyu; Zhu, Minping; Liu, Huiling; Ma, Jun

    2014-01-15

    For the first time, the removal process of metronidazole (MNZ) from aqueous solutions over nano zerovalent iron (NZVI) encapsulated within poly(acrylic acid) (PAA)/poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) membranes was reported. The resultant composite (PPN) demonstrated high reactivity, excellent stability and reusability over the reaction course. Such excellent performance might be attributed to the presence of the charged carboxyl groups in PVDF membrane support, which could enhance NZVI dispersion and improve its longevity. Results showed that a lower initial concentration and higher reaction temperature facilitated the removal of MNZ by PPN, and that the acidic and neutral conditions generally exhibited more favorable effect on MNZ removal than the alkaline ones. Kinetics of the MNZ removal by PPN was found to follow a two-parameter pseudo-first-order decay model well, and the activation energy of the MNZ degradation by PPN was determined to be 30.49kJ/mol. The presence of chloride ions slightly enhanced the reactivity of PPN with MNZ, whereas sulfate ions inhibited its reactivity. In addition, MNZ degradation pathways by PPN were proposed based on the identified intermediates. This study suggests that PPN composite possessing excellent performance may be a promising functional material to pretreat antibiotic wastewaters.

  16. Molecular Composition and Photochemical Reactivity of Size-Fractionated Dissolved Organic Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maizel, Andrew C; Remucal, Christina K

    2017-02-21

    The photochemical production of reactive species, such as triplet dissolved organic matter ((3)DOM) and singlet oxygen ((1)O2), contributes to the degradation of aquatic contaminants and is related to an array of DOM structural characteristics, notably molecular weight. In order to relate DOM molecular weight, optical properties, and reactive species production, Suwannee River (SRFA) and Pony Lake fulvic acid (PLFA) isolates are fractionated by sequential ultrafiltration, and the resultant fractions are evaluated in terms of molecular composition and photochemical reactivity. UV-visible measurements of aromaticity increase with molecular weight in both fulvic acids, while PLFA molecular weight fractions are shown to be structurally similar by Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. In addition, Bray-Curtis dissimilarity analysis of formulas identified in the isolates and their size fractions reveal that SRFA and PLFA have distinct molecular compositions. Quantum yields of (3)DOM, measured by electron and energy transfer probes, and (1)O2 decreased with molecular weight. Decreasing [(3)DOM]ss with molecular weight is shown to derive from elevated quenching in high molecular weight fractions, rather than increased (3)DOM formation. This work has implications for the photochemistry of waters undergoing natural or engineered treatment processes that alter DOM molecular weight, such as photooxidation and biological degradation.

  17. Biodegradation of C.I. Reactive Red 195 by Enterococcus faecalis strain YZ66.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mate, Madhuri Sahasrabudhe; Pathade, Girish

    2012-03-01

    Synthetic dyes are extensively used in textile dyeing, paper, printing, colour photography, pharmaceutics, cosmetics and other industries. Among these, azodyes represents the largest and most versatile class of synthetic dyes. As high as 50% of the dyes are released into the environment during manufacture and usage. Traditional methods of treatment are found to be expensive and have operational problems. Biological decolourization has been investigated as a method to transform, degrade or mineralize azo dyes. In the present studies bacteria from soil from dye waste area, dye waste, sewage and dung were subjected to acclimatization with C.I. Reactive Red 195 an azo dye, in the basal nutrient media. The most promising bacterial isolate was used for further dye degradation studies. The 16s rRNA gene sequencing and biochemical characteristics revealed the isolated organism as Enterococcus faecalis strain YZ66. The strain showed 99.5% decolourization of the selected dye (Reactive Red 195-50 mg/l) within one and half hour in static anoxic condition. The optimum pH and temperature for the decolourization was 5.0 and 40°C respectively. The biodegradation was monitored by UV-Vis, FTIR, TLC and HPLC. The final products were characterized by Gas chromatography and Mass Spectrophotometry. Toxicity study demonstrated no toxicity of the biodegradation product. The results suggest that the isolated organism E. faecalis strain YZ 66 can be used as a useful tool to treat waste water containing reactive dyes.

  18. Low aggregation state diminishes ferrihydrite reactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braunschweig, Juliane; Heister, Katja; Meckenstock, Rainer U.

    2013-04-01

    Ferrihydrite is an abundant iron(oxy)hydroxide in soils and sediments and plays an important role in microbial iron cycling due to its high reactivity. Therefore, it is often synthesized and used in geomicrobiological and mineralogical studies. The reactivities of synthetic ferrihydrites vary between different studies and synthesis protocols. Hence, we synthesized five different ferrihydrites and characterized them with XRD, FTIR, XPS, and BET specific surface area. The reactivity of the ferrihydrite samples towards ascorbic acid was examined and compared with microbial reduction rates by Geobacter sulfurreducens. FTIR and XRD results show the presence of secondary, higher crystalline iron oxide phases like goethite and akaganeite for two samples. Consequently, those samples revealed lower biotic and abiotic reduction rates compared to pure ferrihydrite. Comparison of reduction rates with the specific surface area of all ferrihydrites showed neither correlation with abiotic reductive dissolution nor with microbial reduction. Especially one sample, characterized by a very low aggregation state and presence of secondary minerals, revealed a poor reactivity. We speculate that apart from the occurring secondary minerals also the low aggregation state played an important role. Decreasing aggregation diminishes the amount of kinks and edges on the surfaces, which are produced at contact sites in aggregates. According to dissolution theories, dissolution mainly starts at those surface defects and slows down with decreasing amount of defects. Furthermore, the non-aggregated ferrihydrite is free of micropores, a further stimulant for dissolution. Independent repetitions of experiments and syntheses according to the same protocol but without formation of secondary minerals, confirmed the low reactivity of the non-aggregated ferrihydrite. In summary, our results indicate that a decreasing aggregation state of ferrihydrite to a certain size does increase the reactivity

  19. Case study of the sonochemical decolouration of textile azo dye Reactive Black 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vajnhandl, Simona [University of Maribor, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Smetanova 17, 2000 Maribor (Slovenia)]. E-mail: simona.vajnhandl@uni-mb.si; Le Marechal, Alenka Majcen [University of Maribor, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Smetanova 17, 2000 Maribor (Slovenia)

    2007-03-06

    The decolouration and mineralization of reactive dye C.I. Reactive Black 5, a well-known representative of non-biodegradable azo dyes, by means of ultrasonic irradiation at 20, 279 and 817 kHz has been investigated with emphasis on the effect of various parameters on decolouration and degradation efficiency. Characterization of the used ultrasound systems was performed using calorimetric measurements and oxidative species monitoring using Fricke and iodine dosimeter. Experiments were carried out with low frequency probe type, and a high-frequency plate type transducer at 50, 100 and 150 W of acoustic power and within the 5-300 mg/L initial dye concentration range. Decolouration, as well as radical production, increased with increasing frequency, acoustic power, and irradiation time. Any increase in initial dye concentration results in decreased decolouration rates. Sonochemical decolouration was substantially depressed by the addition of 2-methyl-2-propanol as a radical scavenger, which suggests radical-induced reactions in the solution. Acute toxicity to marine bacteria Vibrio fischeri was tested before and after ultrasound irradiation. Under the conditions employed in this study, no toxic compounds were detected after 6 h of irradiation. Mineralization of the dye was followed by TOC measurements. Relatively low degradation efficiency (50% after 6 h of treatment) indicates that ultrasound is rather inefficient in overall degradation, when used alone.

  20. Reactive multiphase flow simulation workshop summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VanderHeyden, W.B.

    1995-09-01

    A workshop on computer simulation of reactive multiphase flow was held on May 18 and 19, 1995 in the Computational Testbed for Industry at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, New Mexico. Approximately 35 to 40 people attended the workshop. This included 21 participants from 12 companies representing the petroleum, chemical, environmental and consumer products industries, two representatives from the DOE Office of Industrial Technologies and several from Los Alamos. The dialog at the meeting suggested that reactive multiphase flow simulation represents an excellent candidate for government/industry/academia collaborative research. A white paper on a potential consortium for reactive multiphase flow with input from workshop participants will be issued separately.

  1. Modeling and simulation of reactive flows

    CERN Document Server

    Bortoli, De AL; Pereira, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    Modelling and Simulation of Reactive Flows presents information on modeling and how to numerically solve reactive flows. The book offers a distinctive approach that combines diffusion flames and geochemical flow problems, providing users with a comprehensive resource that bridges the gap for scientists, engineers, and the industry. Specifically, the book looks at the basic concepts related to reaction rates, chemical kinetics, and the development of reduced kinetic mechanisms. It considers the most common methods used in practical situations, along with equations for reactive flows, and va

  2. Degradation of TBC Systems in Environments Relevant to Advanced Gas Turbines for IGCC Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gleeson, Brian [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2014-09-30

    Air plasma sprayed (APS) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are used to provide thermal insulation for the hottest components in gas turbines. Zirconia stabilized with 7wt% yttria (7YSZ) is the most common ceramic top coat used for turbine blades. The 7YSZ coating can be degraded from the buildup of fly-ash deposits created in the power-generation process. Fly ash from an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) system can result from coal-based syngas. TBCs are also exposed to harsh gas environments containing CO2, SO2, and steam. Degradation from the combined effects of fly ash and harsh gas atmospheres has the potential to severely limit TBC lifetimes. The main objective of this study was to use lab-scale testing to systematically elucidate the interplay between prototypical deposit chemistries (i.e., ash and its constituents, K2SO4, and FeS) and environmental oxidants (i.e., O2, H2O and CO2) on the degradation behavior of advanced TBC systems. Several mechanisms of early TBC failure were identified, as were the specific fly-ash constituents responsible for degradation. The reactivity of MCrAlY bondcoats used in TBC systems was also investigated. The specific roles of oxide and sulfate components were assessed, together with the complex interplay between gas composition, deposit chemistry and alloy reactivity. Bondcoat composition design strategies to mitigate corrosion were established, particularly with regard to controlling phase constitution and the amount of reactive elements the bondcoat contains in order to achieve optimal corrosion resistance.

  3. Ametryne degradation by ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Debora Cristina de; Mori, Manoel Nunes; Duarte, Celina Lopes [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mails: deboracandrade@globo.com; mnmori@ipen.br; clduarte@ipen.br; Melo, Rita Paiva [Technological and Nuclear Institute (ITN), Sacavem (Portugal)]. E-mail: ritamelo@itn.pt

    2007-07-01

    Ametryne may be released to the environment during its manufacture, transport, storage, formulation and use as selective herbicide for the control of annual broadleaf and grass weeds. It is applied as an aqueous suspension for preemergence or post-directed applications on crops. Depending on the pesticide formulation and type of application, ametryne residues may be detectable in water, soil and on the surfaces for months or years. The herbicide used to this study was Ametryne (commercial name, Gesapax 500), commonly used on field crops and on corn and commercialized since 1975. Ametryne was analyzed by gas chromatography (GC Shimadzu 17A), after extraction with hexane/dichloromethane (1:1 v/v) solution. The calibration curve was obtained with a regression coefficient of 0.9871. In addition, the relative standard deviation was lower than 10%. The radiation-processing yield was evaluated by the destruction G-value (Gd) (Eq. 1), that is defined by the number of destroyed molecules by absorption of 100 eV of energy from ionizing radiation. Different concentrations of the herbicide (11.4 mol L{sup -1}; 22.7 mol L{sup -1}; 34.1 mol L{sup -1} and 45.5 mol L{sup -1}) were irradiated at the AECL 'Gammacell 220' {sup 60}Co source, with 1 kGy, 3 kGy, 6 kGy, 9 kGy, 12 kGy, 15 kGy and 30 kGy absorbed doses. After irradiation processing, the ametryne highest reduction rate occurs at low doses of radiation: at 6 kGy more than 85-90% of all ametryne compounds were removed. Two products of incomplete degradation of ametryne were identified as s-triazyne isomers. However, further work is needed in order to fully understand the ametryne degradation mechanisms the degradation yield of ametryne depends on its initial concentration and the process seems to be more efficient at higher concentrations. (author)

  4. Electrochemical degradation of bisphenol A on different anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yu-hong; Li, Xiao-yan; Chen, Guohua

    2009-04-01

    Laboratory experiments were carried out on the kinetics, pathways and mechanisms of electrochemical (EC) degradation of bisphenol A (BPA) on four types of anodes, Ti/boron-doped diamond (BDD), Ti/Sb-SnO(2), Ti/RuO(2) and Pt. There were considerable differences among the anodes in their effectiveness and performance of BPA electrolysis. BPA was readily destructed at the Ti/Sb-SnO(2) and Ti/BDD anodes, the Pt anode had a moderate ability to remove BPA, and the Ti/RuO(2) anode was incapable of effectively oxidising BPA. The intermediate products of EC degradation of BPA were detected and quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and a general BPA degradation pathway was proposed based on the analytical results. It was suggested that OH radicals produced by water electrolysis attacked BPA to form hydroxylated BPA derivatives that were then transformed into one-ring aromatic compounds. These compounds underwent ring breakage, which led to the formation of aliphatic acids that were eventually mineralised by electrolysis to CO(2). Compared to the Pt and Ti/RuO(2) anodes, the Ti/Sb-SnO(2) and Ti/BDD anodes were found to have higher oxygen evolution potentials and higher anodic potentials for BPA electrolysis under the same current condition. However, the stability and durability of the Ti/Sb-SnO(2) anode still needs to be greatly improved for actual application. In comparison, with its high durability and good reactivity for organic oxidation, the Ti/BDD anode appears to be the more promising one for the effective EC treatment of BPA and similar endocrine disrupting chemical (EDC) pollutants.

  5. Amyloid precursor protein modulates β-catenin degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yuzhi

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The amyloid precursor protein (APP is genetically associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD. Elucidating the function of APP should help understand AD pathogenesis and provide insights into therapeutic designs against this devastating neurodegenerative disease. Results We demonstrate that APP expression in primary neurons induces β-catenin phosphorylation at Ser33, Ser37, and Thr41 (S33/37/T41 residues, which is a prerequisite for β-catenin ubiquitinylation and proteasomal degradation. APP-induced phosphorylation of β-catenin resulted in the reduction of total β-catenin levels, suggesting that APP expression promotes β-catenin degradation. In contrast, treatment of neurons with APP siRNAs increased total β-catenin levels and decreased β-catenin phosphorylation at residues S33/37/T41. Further, β-catenin was dramatically increased in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells from APP knockout animals. Acute expression of wild type APP or of familial AD APP mutants in primary neurons downregulated β-catenin in membrane and cytosolic fractions, and did not appear to affect nuclear β-catenin or β-catenin-dependent transcription. Conversely, in APP knockout CA1 pyramidal cells, accumulation of β-catenin was associated with the upregulation of cyclin D1, a downstream target of β-catenin signaling. Together, these data establish that APP downregulates β-catenin and suggest a role for APP in sustaining neuronal function by preventing cell cycle reactivation and maintaining synaptic integrity. Conclusion We have provided strong evidence that APP modulates β-catenin degradation in vitro and in vivo. Future studies may investigate whether APP processing is necessary for β-catenin downregulation, and determine if excessive APP expression contributes to AD pathogenesis through abnormal β-catenin downregulation.

  6. Bacteria-mediated bisphenol A degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weiwei; Yin, Kun; Chen, Lingxin

    2013-07-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an important monomer in the manufacture of polycarbonate plastics, food cans, and other daily used chemicals. Daily and worldwide usage of BPA and BPA-contained products led to its ubiquitous distribution in water, sediment/soil, and atmosphere. Moreover, BPA has been identified as an environmental endocrine disruptor for its estrogenic and genotoxic activity. Thus, BPA contamination in the environment is an increasingly worldwide concern, and methods to efficiently remove BPA from the environment are urgently recommended. Although many factors affect the fate of BPA in the environment, BPA degradation is mainly depended on the metabolism of bacteria. Many BPA-degrading bacteria have been identified from water, sediment/soil, and wastewater treatment plants. Metabolic pathways of BPA degradation in specific bacterial strains were proposed, based on the metabolic intermediates detected during the degradation process. In this review, the BPA-degrading bacteria were summarized, and the (proposed) BPA degradation pathway mediated by bacteria were referred.

  7. Nanoparticles from Degradation of Biodegradable Plastic Mulch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flury, Markus; Sintim, Henry; Bary, Andy; English, Marie; Schaefer, Sean

    2017-04-01

    Plastic mulch films are commonly used in crop production. They provide multiple benefits, including control of weeds and insects, increase of soil and air temperature, reduction of evaporation, and prevention of soil erosion. The use of plastic mulch film in agriculture has great potential to increase food production and security. Plastic mulch films must be retrieved and disposed after usage. Biodegradable plastic mulch films, who can be tilled into the soil after usage offer great benefits as alternative to conventional polyethylene plastic. However, it has to be shown that the degradation of these mulches is complete and no micro- and nanoparticles are released during degradation. We conducted a field experiment with biodegradable mulches and tested mulch degradation. Mulch was removed from the field after the growing season and composted to facilitate degradation. We found that micro- and nanoparticles were released during degradation of the mulch films in compost. This raises concerns about degradation in soils as well.

  8. Kinetic study and mechanism of Niclosamide degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaazaa, Hala E.; Abdelrahman, Maha M.; Ali, Nouruddin W.; Magdy, Maimana A.; Abdelkawy, M.

    2014-11-01

    A spectrophotometric kinetic study of Niclosamide alkaline degradation as a function of drug concentration, alkaline concentration and temperature has been established utilizing double divisor-ratio spectra spectrophotometric method. The developed method allowed determination of Niclosamide in presence of its alkaline degradation products; namely; 2-chloro-4-nitro aniline (DEG I) and 5-chloro salicylic acid (DEG II) with characterization of its degradation mechanism. It was found that degradation kinetic of Niclosamide followed pseudo-first order under the established experimental conditions with a degradation rate constant (k) of 0.0829 mol/h and half life (t1/2) of 8.35 h. The overall degradation rate constant as a function of the temperature under the given conditions obeyed Arrhenius equation where the activation energy was calculated to be 3.41 kcal/mol.

  9. Y-Irradiation Degradation of Methamidophos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Renbang; BAO Huaying; XIA Lingyun

    2009-01-01

    The irradiation degradation of methamidophos in aqueous solutions by 60Co-γ rays was investigated.The effects of absorbed doses,saturated gas,and the additive of H2O2 on the degradation were also studied.The results showed that the increased with the increase of the irradiation dosage.At certain irradiation dosage,methamidophos could be degraded completely.The degradation rate of methamidophos in the solution saturated with oxygen was higher than those saturated with other gases,which reached 100% when the absorbed dose was 8 kGy.H2O2 degraded methamidophos slowly when it was used alone,but could accelerate the degradation obviously when it was used with irradiation together.

  10. Recovering of images degraded by atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Guang; Feng, Huajun; Xu, Zhihai; Li, Qi; Chen, Yueting

    2017-08-01

    Remote sensing images are seriously degraded by multiple scattering and bad weather. Through the analysis of the radiative transfer procedure in atmosphere, an image atmospheric degradation model considering the influence of atmospheric absorption multiple scattering and non-uniform distribution is proposed in this paper. Based on the proposed model, a novel recovering method is presented to eliminate atmospheric degradation. Mean-shift image segmentation and block-wise deconvolution are used to reduce time cost, retaining a good result. The recovering results indicate that the proposed method can significantly remove atmospheric degradation and effectively improve contrast compared with other removal methods. The results also illustrate that our method is suitable for various degraded remote sensing, including images with large field of view (FOV), images taken in side-glance situations, image degraded by atmospheric non-uniform distribution and images with various forms of clouds.

  11. Microbial degradation of pyridine using Pseudomonas sp. and isolation of plasmid responsible for degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, S Venkata; Sistla, Srinivas; Guru, R Kumar; Prasad, K Krishna; Kumar, C Suresh; Ramakrishna, S V; Sarma, P N

    2003-01-01

    Pseudomonas (PI2) capable of degrading pyridine was isolated from the mixed population of the activated sludge unit which was being used for treating complex effluents, the strain was characterized. Aerobic degradation of pyridine was studied with the isolated strain and the growth parameters were evaluated. Pyridine degradation was further conformed by chromatography (HPLC) analysis. The process parameters like biomass growth and dissolved oxygen consumption were monitored during pyridine degradation. In order to conform with the plasmid capability to degrade pyridine, the requisite plasmid was isolated and transferred to DH 5alpha Escherichia coli. The subsequent biodegradation studies revealed the ability of the transformed plasmid capability to degrade the pyridine.

  12. ENHANCEMENT OF RESISTANCE TO OXIDATIVE DEGRADATION OF NATURAL RUBBER THROUGH LATEX DEGRADATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    A fully characterised natural rubber latex was subjected to mechanical degradation by stirring at intervals. The resistance to oxidative degradation of the different samples were studied by measuring the Plasticity retention indices (PRI).The results show that there is an enhancement of the PRI from 57% for the undegraded rubber to 79% for the one-hour degraded sample. Further degradation resulted in decrease of PRI as time of degradation increased. Therefore, the one-hour degraded sample is a special rubber with high oxidation resistance which is of great importance in engineering.

  13. Peroxidase-induced degradation of single-walled carbon nanotubes: hypochlorite is a major oxidant capable of in vivo degradation of carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlasova, I I; Vakhrusheva, T V; Sokolov, A V; Kostevich, V A [Research Institute for Physico-Chemical Medicine, FMBA, M. Pirogovskaya Str. 1a, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ragimov, A A, E-mail: irina.vlasova@yahoo.com [National Research Centre of Surgery, RAMS, Abrikosovskiy per. 2, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-04-01

    Due to their extraordinary properties, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have a tremendous potential for medical applications such as clinical diagnostics, targeted drug (or gene) delivery and cancer therapy. Hence, effects of SWNTs on living systems as well as mechanisms for biodegradation of SWTNs are of great importance and must be studied before starting to explore SWNTs for medical use. This study was undertaken to compare the potential of different peroxidases in degrading carboxylated SWNT (c-SWNT) and to elucidate the role of peroxidase-generated reactive products in this process. A detailed study showed that neither reactive intermediate products nor free radicals generated via peroxidase cycle can considerably oxidize c-SWNT. Biodegradation of c-SWNT in model system can be induced by free radicals generated as a result of heme degradation. The latter explains why hemoglobin, which is a pseudo-peroxidase possessing low peroxidase activity, is able to oxidize carbon nanotubes with a higher efficiency than horseradish peroxidase. However, c-SWNT in the presence of blood plasma (15 vol %) demonstrated no degradation even at high concentrations of hemoglobin and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The comparison of the ability of various peroxidases to degrade SWNTs in vitro revealed that MPO, due to its ability to produce hypochlorite, and lactoperoxidase, due to its ability to produce hypobromite, are extremely efficient in degrading carbon nanotubes. Since neutrophils are a main source of human MPO, we tested the effect of SWNTs on these cells. SWNTs were unable to stimulate neutrophils. On the other hand, they dose-dependently enhanced opsonized zymosan-induced cell stimulation as detected by measuring the amount of hypochlorite produced. This finding may be relevant to the in vivo situation, for example, at inflammatory sites. In order to imitate conditions characteristic of phagosomes and inflammatory sites, we titrated the suspension of c-SWNT in the presence of

  14. CELLULOSE DEGRADATION BY OXIDATIVE ENZYMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Dimarogona

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Enzymatic degradation of plant biomass has attracted intensive research interest for the production of economically viable biofuels. Here we present an overview of the recent findings on biocatalysts implicated in the oxidative cleavage of cellulose, including polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMOs or LPMOs which stands for lytic PMOs, cellobiose dehydrogenases (CDHs and members of carbohydrate-binding module family 33 (CBM33. PMOs, a novel class of enzymes previously termed GH61s, boost the efficiency of common cellulases resulting in increased hydrolysis yields while lowering the protein loading needed. They act on the crystalline part of cellulose by generating oxidized and non-oxidized chain ends. An external electron donor is required for boosting the activity of PMOs. We discuss recent findings concerning their mechanism of action and identify issues and questions to be addressed in the future.

  15. Permafrost degradation in West Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Niels Nielsen; Ingeman-Nielsen, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Important aspects of civil engineering in West Greenland relate to the presence of permafrost and mapping of the annual and future changes in the active layer due to the ongoing climatically changes in the Arctic. The Arctic Technology Centre (ARTEK) has worked more than 10 years on this topic......, Kangerlussuaq, Sisimiut and Nuuk. They are situated in continuous, discontinuous and sporadic permafrost zones. We will show examples of detoriation of permafrost related to present local scale climate observations and large scale climate and permafrost simulations modeled numerically with the GIPL model driven...... by HIRHAM climate projections for Greenland up to 2075. The engineering modelling is based on a risk assessment methodology based on a flow diagram which classify the risk of permafrost degradation causing settlement and stability problems for buildings and infrastructures based on relatively simple...

  16. Bacterial Degradation of Aromatic Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing X. Li

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aromatic compounds are among the most prevalent and persistent pollutants in the environment. Petroleum-contaminated soil and sediment commonly contain a mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs and heterocyclic aromatics. Aromatics derived from industrial activities often have functional groups such as alkyls, halogens and nitro groups. Biodegradation is a major mechanism of removal of organic pollutants from a contaminated site. This review focuses on bacterial degradation pathways of selected aromatic compounds. Catabolic pathways of naphthalene, fluorene, phenanthrene, fluoranthene, pyrene, and benzo[a]pyrene are described in detail. Bacterial catabolism of the heterocycles dibenzofuran, carbazole, dibenzothiophene, and dibenzodioxin is discussed. Bacterial catabolism of alkylated PAHs is summarized, followed by a brief discussion of proteomics and metabolomics as powerful tools for elucidation of biodegradation mechanisms.

  17. The Degraded Poisson Wiretap Channel

    CERN Document Server

    Laourine, Amine

    2010-01-01

    Providing security guarantees for wireless communication is critically important for today's applications. While previous work in this area has concentrated on radio frequency (RF) channels, providing security guarantees for RF channels is inherently difficult because they are prone to rapid variations due small scale fading. Wireless optical communication, on the other hand, is inherently more secure than RF communication due to the intrinsic aspects of the signal propagation in the optical and near-optical frequency range. In this paper, secure communication over wireless optical links is examined by studying the secrecy capacity of a direct detection system. For the degraded Poisson wiretap channel, a closed-form expression of the secrecy capacity is given. A complete characterization of the general rate-equivocation region is also presented. For achievability, an optimal code is explicitly constructed by using the structured code designed by Wyner for the Poisson channel. The converse is proved in two dif...

  18. Oils degradation in agricultural machinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojtěch Kumbár

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Evaluating of oils condition in agricultural machinery is very important. With monitoring and evaluating we can prevent technical and economic losses. In this paper there were monitored the liquid lubricants taken from mobile thresher New Holland CX 860. Chemical and viscosity degradation of the lubricants were evaluated. Temperature dependence dynamic viscosity was observed in the range of temperature from −10 °C to 80 °C (for all oils. Considerable temperature dependence dynamic viscosity was found and demonstrated in case of all samples, which is in accordance with theoretical assumptions and literature data. Mathematical models were developed and tested. Temperature dependence dynamic viscosity was modeled using a polynomial 6th degree. The proposed models can be used for prediction of flow behavior of oils.

  19. Microbial degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varjani, Sunita J

    2017-01-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbon pollutants are recalcitrant compounds and are classified as priority pollutants. Cleaning up of these pollutants from environment is a real world problem. Bioremediation has become a major method employed in restoration of petroleum hydrocarbon polluted environments that makes use of natural microbial biodegradation activity. Petroleum hydrocarbons utilizing microorganisms are ubiquitously distributed in environment. They naturally biodegrade pollutants and thereby remove them from the environment. Removal of petroleum hydrocarbon pollutants from environment by applying oleophilic microorganisms (individual isolate/consortium of microorganisms) is ecofriendly and economic. Microbial biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbon pollutants employs the enzyme catalytic activities of microorganisms to enhance the rate of pollutants degradation. This article provides an overview about bioremediation for petroleum hydrocarbon pollutants. It also includes explanation about hydrocarbon metabolism in microorganisms with a special focus on new insights obtained during past couple of years. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Soil physical land degradation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Rainer

    2017-04-01

    According to the European Soil Framework Directive (2006) soil compaction is besides water and wind erosion one of the main physical reasons and threats of soil degradation. It is estimated, that 32% of the subsoils in Europe are highly degraded and 18% moderately vulnerable to compaction. The problem is not limited to crop land or forest areas (especially because of non-site adjusted harvesting machines) but is also prevalent in rangelands and grassland, and even in so called natural non-disturbed systems. The main reasons for an intense increase in compacted agricultural or forested regions are the still increasing masses of the machines as well the increased frequency of wheeling under non favorable site conditions. Shear and vibration induced soil deformation enhances the deterioration of soil properties especially if the soil water content is very high and the internal soil strength very low. The same is true for animal trampling in combination with overgrazing of moist to wet pastures which subsequently causes a denser (i.e. reduced proportion of coarse pores with smaller continuity) but still structured soil horizons and will finally end in a compacted platy structure. In combination with high water content and shearing due to trampling therefore results in a complete muddy homogeneous soil with no structure at all. (Krümmelbein et al. 2013) Site managements of arable, forestry or horticulture soils requires a sufficiently rigid pore system which guarantees water, gas and heat exchange, nutrient transport and adsorption as well as an optimal rootability in order to avoid subsoil compaction. Such pore system also guarantees a sufficient microbial activity and composition in order to also decompose the plant etc. debris. It is therefore essential that well structured horizons dominate in soils with at best subangular blocky structure or in the top A- horizons a crumbly structure due to biological activity. In contrast defines the formation of a platy

  1. Cellulose degradation by oxidative enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Dimarogona

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Enzymatic degradation of plant biomass has attracted intensive research interest for the production of economically viable biofuels. Here we present an overview of the recent findings on biocatalysts implicated in the oxidative cleavage of cellulose, including polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMOs or LPMOs which stands for lytic PMOs, cellobiose dehydrogenases (CDHs and members of carbohydrate-binding module family 33 (CBM33. PMOs, a novel class of enzymes previously termed GH61s, boost the efficiency of common cellulases resulting in increased hydrolysis yields while lowering the protein loading needed. They act on the crystalline part of cellulose by generating oxidized and non-oxidized chain ends. An external electron donor is required for boosting the activity of PMOs. We discuss recent findings concerning their mechanism of action and identify issues and questions to be addressed in the future.

  2. Controlled enzyme catalyzed heteropolysaccharide degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Louise Enggaard

    The work presented in this PhD thesis has provided a better understanding of the enzyme kinetics and quantitative phenomena of the hydrolysis of xylan substrates by selected pure enzyme preparations. Furthermore, the options for producing specific substituted xylooligosaccharides from selected...... substrates by specific xylanase treatment have been examined. The kinetics of the enzymatic degradation of water-extractable wheat arabinoxylan (WE-AX) during designed treatments with selected monocomponent enzymes was investigated by monitoring the release of xylose and arabinose. The results of different...... between -xylosidase and the α-L-arabinofuranosidases on the xylose release were low as compared to the effect of xylanase addition with β-xylosidase, which increased the xylose release by ~25 times in 30 minutes. At equimolar addition levels of the four enzymes, the xylanase activity was thus rate...

  3. Monopoly quality degradation in cable television

    OpenAIRE

    Crawford, Gregory S; Shum, Matthew

    2003-01-01

    Using an empirical framework derived from models of nonlinear pricing, we estimate the degree of quality degradation in cable television markets. We find lower bounds on quality degradation ranging from 11% to 45% of observed service qualities. Furthermore, cable operators in markets with local regulatory oversight tend to offer significantly higher quality products, and engage in less quality degradation. While prices are also higher in markets with local regulatory oversight, we find that c...

  4. Durability Improvements Through Degradation Mechanism Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borup, Rodney L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Spernjak, Dusan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Baker, Andrew M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lujan, Roger W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Langlois, David Alan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ahluwalia, Rajesh [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Papadia, D. D. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Weber, Adam Z. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Kusoglu, Ahmet [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Shi, Shouwnen [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); More, K. L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Grot, Steve [Ion Power, New Castle, DE (United States)

    2015-08-03

    The durability of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells is a major barrier to the commercialization of these systems for stationary and transportation power applications. By investigating cell component degradation modes and defining the fundamental degradation mechanisms of components and component interactions, new materials can be designed to improve durability. To achieve a deeper understanding of PEM fuel cell durability and component degradation mechanisms, we utilize a multi-institutional and multi-disciplinary team with significant experience investigating these phenomena.

  5. Thermal degradation of organo-soluble polyimides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄俐研; 史燚; 金熹高

    1999-01-01

    The thermal degradation behavior of two organo-soluble polyimides was investigated by high resolution pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The pyrolyzates of the polymers at various temperatures were identified and characterized quantitatively. The relationship between the polymer structure and pyrolyzate distribution was discussed. The kinetic parameters of the thermal degradation were calculated based on thermogravimetric measurements. Finally, the thermal degradation mechanism for the polymers was suggested.

  6. CLAD DEGRADATION - FEPS SCREENING ARGUMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Schreiner

    2004-10-21

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate and document the screening of the clad degradation features, events, and processes (FEPs) with respect to modeling used to support the Total System Performance Assessment-License Application (TSPA-LA). This report also addresses the effect of certain FEPs on both the cladding and the commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF), DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel (DSNF), and defense high-level waste (DHLW) waste forms, as appropriate to address the effects on multiple materials and both components (FEPs 2.1.09.09.0A, 2.1.09.11.0A, 2.1.11.05.0A, 2.1.12.02.0A, and 2.1.12.03.0A). These FEPs are expected to affect the repository performance during the postclosure regulatory period of 10,000 years after permanent closure. Table 1-1 provides the list of cladding FEPs, including their screening decisions (include or exclude). The primary purpose of this report is to identify and document the analysis, screening decision, and TSPA-LA disposition (for included FEPs) or screening argument (for excluded FEPs) for these FEPs related to clad degradation. In some cases, where a FEP covers multiple technical areas and is shared with other FEP reports, this report may provide only a partial technical basis for the screening of the FEP. The full technical basis for shared FEPs is addressed collectively by the sharing FEP reports. The screening decisions and associated TSPA-LA dispositions or screening arguments from all of the FEP reports are cataloged in a project-specific FEPs database.

  7. REMOVAL OF ADDED NITRATE IN THE SINGLE, BINARY, AND TERNARY SYSTEMS OF COTTON BURR COMPOST, ZEROVALENT IRON, AND SEDIMENT: IMPLICATIONS FOR GROUNDWATER NITRATE REMEDIATION USING PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent research has shown that carbonaceous solid materials and zerovalent iron (Fe0) may potentially be used as media in permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) to degrade groundwater nitrate via heterotrophic denitrification in the solid carbon system, and via abiotic reduction and ...

  8. REMOVAL OF ADDED NITRATE IN THE SINGLE, BINARY, AND TERNARY SYSTEMS OF COTTON BURR COMPOST, ZEROVALENT IRON, AND SEDIMENT: IMPLICATIONS FOR GROUNDWATER NITRATE REMEDIATION USING PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent research has shown that carbonaceous solid materials and zerovalent iron (Fe0) may potentially be used as media in permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) to degrade groundwater nitrate via heterotrophic denitrification in the solid carbon system, and via abiotic reduction and ...

  9. PDF methods for turbulent reactive flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Andrew T.

    1995-01-01

    Viewgraphs are presented on computation of turbulent combustion, governing equations, closure problem, PDF modeling of turbulent reactive flows, validation cases, current projects, and collaboration with industry and technology transfer.

  10. Modelling Reactive and Proactive Behaviour in Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Majid, Mazlina Abdul; Aickelin, Uwe

    2010-01-01

    This research investigated the simulation model behaviour of a traditional and combined discrete event as well as agent based simulation models when modelling human reactive and proactive behaviour in human centric complex systems. A departmental store was chosen as human centric complex case study where the operation system of a fitting room in WomensWear department was investigated. We have looked at ways to determine the efficiency of new management policies for the fitting room operation through simulating the reactive and proactive behaviour of staff towards customers. Once development of the simulation models and their verification had been done, we carried out a validation experiment in the form of a sensitivity analysis. Subsequently, we executed a statistical analysis where the mixed reactive and proactive behaviour experimental results were compared with some reactive experimental results from previously published works. Generally, this case study discovered that simple proactive individual behaviou...

  11. Reactive transport codes for subsurface environmental simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steefel, C.I.; Appelo, C.A.J.; Arora, B.; Kalbacher, D.; Kolditz, O.; Lagneau, V.; Lichtner, P.C.; Mayer, K.U.; Meeussen, J.C.L.; Molins, S.; Moulton, D.; Shao, D.; Simunek, J.; Spycher, N.; Yabusaki, S.B.; Yeh, G.T.

    2015-01-01

    A general description of the mathematical and numerical formulations used in modern numerical reactive transport codes relevant for subsurface environmental simulations is presented. The formulations are followed by short descriptions of commonly used and available subsurface simulators that conside

  12. Dynamic reactive astrocytes after focal ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shinghua Ding

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes are specialized and most numerous glial cell type in the central nervous system and play important roles in physiology. Astrocytes are also critically involved in many neural disor-ders including focal ischemic stroke, a leading cause of brain injury and human death. One of the prominent pathological features of focal ischemic stroke is reactive astrogliosis and glial scar for-mation associated with morphological changes and proliferation. This review paper discusses the recent advances in spatial and temporal dynamics of morphology and proliferation of reactive astrocytes after ischemic stroke based on results from experimental animal studies. As reactive astrocytes exhibit stem cell-like properties, knowledge of dynamics of reactive astrocytes and glial scar formation will provide important insights for astrocyte-based cell therapy in stroke.

  13. Reactive Capture of Carbon Dioxide Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Phase I SBIR, Reactive Innovations, LLC (RIL) proposes to develop a compact and lightweight electrochemical to capture carbon dioxide in the martian...

  14. Reactive navigational controller for autonomous mobile robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Scott

    1993-12-01

    Autonomous mobile robots must respond to external challenges and threats in real time. One way to satisfy this requirement is to use a fast low level intelligence to react to local environment changes. A fast reactive controller has been implemented which performs the task of real time local navigation by integrating primitive elements of perception, planning, and control. Competing achievement and constraint behaviors are used to allow abstract qualitative specification of navigation goals. An interface is provided to allow a higher level deliberative intelligence with a more global perspective to set local goals for the reactive controller. The reactive controller's simplistic strategies may not always succeed, so a means to monitor and redirect the reactive controller is provided.

  15. Gas-Phase Reactivity of Microsolvated Anions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Ditte Linde

    Gas-phase studies of ion-molecule reactions shed light on the intrinsic factors that govern reactivity; and even solvent effects can be examined in the gasphase environment by employing microsolvated ions. An area that has received considerable attention with regard to the interplay between...... intrinsic factors and solvent effects is the enhanced reactivity of α-nucleophiles – nucleophiles with a lone-pair adjacent to the attacking site – referred to as the α-effect. This thesis concerns the reactivity of microsolvated anions and in particular how the presence of a single solvent molecule affects...... the gas-phase α-effect. The experimental studies are performed by means of the flowing after glow selected ion flow tube technique, and these are supplemented by electronic structure calculations. The α-nucleophile employed is the microsolvated hydrogen peroxide anion whose reactivity is compared...

  16. On-Orbit Degradation of Solar Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    BenMoussa, A.; Gissot, S.; Schühle, U.; Del Zanna, G.; Auchère, F.; Mekaoui, S.; Jones, A. R.; Walton, D.; Eyles, C. J.; Thuillier, G.; Seaton, D.; Dammasch, I. E.; Cessateur, G.; Meftah, M.; Andretta, V.; Berghmans, D.; Bewsher, D.; Bolsée, D.; Bradley, L.; Brown, D. S.; Chamberlin, P. C.; Dewitte, S.; Didkovsky, L. V.; Dominique, M.; Eparvier, F. G.; Foujols, T.; Gillotay, D.; Giordanengo, B.; Halain, J. P.; Hock, R. A.; Irbah, A.; Jeppesen, C.; Judge, D. L.; Kretzschmar, M.; McMullin, D. R.; Nicula, B.; Schmutz, W.; Ucker, G.; Wieman, S.; Woodraska, D.; Woods, T. N.

    2013-11-01

    We present the lessons learned about the degradation observed in several space solar missions, based on contributions at the Workshop about On-Orbit Degradation of Solar and Space Weather Instruments that took place at the Solar Terrestrial Centre of Excellence (Royal Observatory of Belgium) in Brussels on 3 May 2012. The aim of this workshop was to open discussions related to the degradation observed in Sun-observing instruments exposed to the effects of the space environment. This article summarizes the various lessons learned and offers recommendations to reduce or correct expected degradation with the goal of increasing the useful lifespan of future and ongoing space missions.

  17. On-Orbit Degradation of Solar Instruments

    CERN Document Server

    BenMoussa, A; Schühle, U; Del Zanna, G; Auchère, F; Mekaoui, S; Jones, A R; Walton, D; Eyles, C J; Thuillier, G; Seaton, D; Dammasch, I E; Cessateur, G; Meftah, M; Andretta, V; Berghmans, D; Bewsher, D; Bolsée, D; Bradley, L; Brown, D S; Chamberlin, P C; Dewitte, S; Didkovsky, L V; Dominique, M; Eparvier, F G; Foujols, T; Gillotay, D; Giordanengo, B; Halain, J -P; Hock, R A; Irbah, A; Jeppesen, C; Judge, D L; Kretzschmar, M; McMullin, D R; Nicula, B; Schmutz, W; Ucker, G; Wieman, S; Woodraska, D; Woods, T N; 10.1007/s11207-013-0290-z

    2013-01-01

    We present the lessons learned about the degradation observed in several space solar missions, based on contributions at the Workshop about On-Orbit Degradation of Solar and Space Weather Instruments that took place at the Solar Terrestrial Centre of Excellence (Royal Observatory of Belgium) in Brussels on 3 May 2012. The aim of this workshop was to open discussions related to the degradation observed in Sun-observing instruments exposed to the effects of the space environment. This article summarizes the various lessons learned and offers recommendations to reduce or correct expected degradation with the goal of increasing the useful lifespan of future and ongoing space missions.

  18. Antimisting kerosene: Low temperature degradation and blending

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavrouian, A.; Parikh, P.; Sarohia, V.

    1988-01-01

    The inline filtration characteristics of freshly blended and degraded antimisting fuels (AMK) at low temperature are examined. A needle valve degrader was modified to include partial recirculation of degraded fuel and heat addition in the bypass loop. A pressure drop across the needle valve of up to 4,000 psi was used. The pressure drop across a 325 mesh filter screen placed inline with the degrader and directly downstream of the needle valve was measured as a function of time for different values of pressure drop across the needle valve. A volume flux of 1 gpm/sq in was employed based on the frontal area of the screen. It was found that, at ambient temperatures, freshly blended AMK fuel could be degraded using a single pass degradation at 4,000 psi pressure drop across the needle valve to give acceptable filterability performance. At fuel temperatures below -20 C, degradation becomes increasingly difficult and a single pass technique results in unacceptable filtration performance. Recirculation of a fraction of the degraded fuel and heat addition in the bypass loop improved low temperature degradation performance. The problem is addressed of blending the AMK additive with Jet A at various base fuel temperatures.

  19. Handbook of environmental degradation of materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kutz, Myer

    2012-01-01

    Divided into sections which deal with analysis, types of degradation, protection and surface engineering respectively, the reader is introduced to the wide variety of environmental effects and what...

  20. Simulating Degradation Data for Prognostic Algorithm Development

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — PHM08 Challenge Dataset is now publicly available at the NASA Prognostics Respository + Download INTRODUCTION - WHY SIMULATE DEGRADATION DATA? Of various challenges...