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Sample records for degeneration amd trial

  1. Subfoveal choroidal thickness predicts macular atrophy in age-related macular degeneration: results from the TREX-AMD trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wenying; Abdelfattah, Nizar Saleh; Uji, Akihito; Lei, Jianqin; Ip, Michael; Sadda, SriniVas R; Wykoff, Charles C

    2018-03-01

    Our purpose was to evaluate the relationship between subfoveal choroidal thickness (SCT) and development of macular atrophy (MA) in eyes with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). This was a prospective, multicenter study. Sixty participants (120 eyes) in the TREX-AMD trial (NCT01648292) with treatment-naïve neovascular AMD (NVAMD) in at least one eye were included. SCT was measured by certified reading center graders at baseline using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT). The baseline SCT was correlated with the presence of MA at baseline and development of incident MA by month 18. Generalized estimating equations were used to account for information from both eyes. Baseline SCT in eyes with MA was statistically significantly less than in those without MA in both the dry AMD (DAMD) (P = 0.04) and NVAMD (P = 0.01) groups. Comparison of baseline SCT between MA developers and non-MA developers revealed a statistically significant difference (P = 0.03). Receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis showed the cut-off threshold of SCT for predicting the development of MA in cases without MA at baseline was 124 μm (AUC = 0.772; Sensitivity = 0.923; Specificity = 0.5). Among eyes without MA at baseline, those with baseline SCT ≤124 μm were 4.3 times more likely to develop MA (Odds ratio: 4.3, 95% confidence interval: 1.6-12, P = 0.005) than those with baseline SCT >124 μm. Eyes with AMD and MA had less SCT than those without MA. Eyes with less baseline SCT also appear to be at higher risk to develop MA within 18 months.

  2. Age-related macular degeneration in a randomized controlled trial of low-dose aspirin: Rationale and study design of the ASPREE-AMD study

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    Liubov Robman

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion: The study findings will be of significant clinical and public interest due to a potential to identify a possible low cost therapy for preventing AMD worldwide and to determine risk/benefit balance of the aspirin usage by the AMD-affected elderly. The ASPREE-AMD study provides a unique opportunity to determine the effect of aspirin on AMD incidence and progression, by adding retinal imaging to an ongoing, large-scale primary prevention randomized clinical trial.

  3. Age-Related Macular Degeneration: New Paradigms for Treatment and Management of AMD

    OpenAIRE

    Hernández-Zimbrón, Luis Fernando; Zamora-Alvarado, Ruben; Ochoa-De la Paz, Lenin; Velez-Montoya, Raul; Zenteno, Edgar; Gulias-Cañizo, Rosario; Quiroz-Mercado, Hugo; Gonzalez-Salinas, Roberto

    2018-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a well-characterized and extensively studied disease. It is currently considered the leading cause of visual disability among patients over 60 years. The hallmark of early AMD is the formation of drusen, pigmentary changes at the macula, and mild to moderate vision loss. There are two forms of AMD: the “dry” and the “wet” form that is less frequent but is responsible for 90% of acute blindness due to AMD. Risk factors have been associated with AMD pro...

  4. Age-Related Macular Degeneration: New Paradigms for Treatment and Management of AMD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Fernando Hernández-Zimbrón

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a well-characterized and extensively studied disease. It is currently considered the leading cause of visual disability among patients over 60 years. The hallmark of early AMD is the formation of drusen, pigmentary changes at the macula, and mild to moderate vision loss. There are two forms of AMD: the “dry” and the “wet” form that is less frequent but is responsible for 90% of acute blindness due to AMD. Risk factors have been associated with AMD progression, and they are taking relevance to understand how AMD develops: (1 advanced age and the exposition to environmental factors inducing high levels of oxidative stress damaging the macula and (2 this damage, which causes inflammation inducing a vicious cycle, altogether causing central vision loss. There is neither a cure nor treatment to prevent AMD. However, there are some treatments available for the wet form of AMD. This article will review some molecular and cellular mechanisms associated with the onset of AMD focusing on feasible treatments for each related factor in the development of this pathology such as vascular endothelial growth factor, oxidative stress, failure of the clearance of proteins and organelles, and glial cell dysfunction in AMD.

  5. Age-Related Macular Degeneration: New Paradigms for Treatment and Management of AMD.

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    Hernández-Zimbrón, Luis Fernando; Zamora-Alvarado, Ruben; Ochoa-De la Paz, Lenin; Velez-Montoya, Raul; Zenteno, Edgar; Gulias-Cañizo, Rosario; Quiroz-Mercado, Hugo; Gonzalez-Salinas, Roberto

    2018-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a well-characterized and extensively studied disease. It is currently considered the leading cause of visual disability among patients over 60 years. The hallmark of early AMD is the formation of drusen, pigmentary changes at the macula, and mild to moderate vision loss. There are two forms of AMD: the "dry" and the "wet" form that is less frequent but is responsible for 90% of acute blindness due to AMD. Risk factors have been associated with AMD progression, and they are taking relevance to understand how AMD develops: (1) advanced age and the exposition to environmental factors inducing high levels of oxidative stress damaging the macula and (2) this damage, which causes inflammation inducing a vicious cycle, altogether causing central vision loss. There is neither a cure nor treatment to prevent AMD. However, there are some treatments available for the wet form of AMD. This article will review some molecular and cellular mechanisms associated with the onset of AMD focusing on feasible treatments for each related factor in the development of this pathology such as vascular endothelial growth factor, oxidative stress, failure of the clearance of proteins and organelles, and glial cell dysfunction in AMD.

  6. The genetics of age-related macular degeneration (AMD)--Novel targets for designing treatment options?

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    Grassmann, Felix; Fauser, Sascha; Weber, Bernhard H F

    2015-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a progressive disease of the central retina and the main cause of legal blindness in industrialized countries. Risk to develop the disease is conferred by both individual as well as genetic factors with the latter being increasingly deciphered over the last decade. Therapeutically, striking advances have been made for the treatment of the neovascular form of late stage AMD while for the late stage atrophic form of the disease, which accounts for almost half of the visually impaired, there is currently no effective therapy on the market. This review highlights our current knowledge on the genetic architecture of early and late stage AMD and explores its potential for the discovery of novel, target-guided treatment options. We reflect on current clinical and experimental therapies for all forms of AMD and specifically note a persisting lack of efficacy for treatment in atrophic AMD. We further explore the current insight in AMD-associated genes and pathways and critically question whether this knowledge is suited to design novel treatment options. Specifically, we point out that known genetic factors associated with AMD govern the risk to develop disease and thus may not play a role in its severity or progression. Treatments based on such knowledge appear appropriate rather for prevention than treatment of manifest disease. As a consequence, future research in AMD needs to be greatly focused on approaches relevant to the patients and their medical needs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The value of radiotherapy in the treatment of aged-related macular degeneration (AMD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarzycka, M.; Ziolkowska, E.; Slonina, A.

    2007-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in patients older then 65 years. There are two forms of AMD: exudative wet and nonexudative dry. Most of the lesions are not amenable to laser therapy because of their vicinity to the fovea. Earlier studies suggested that radiotherapy may inhibit further loss of visual acuity but following studies rendered contradictory results. In recent years, treatment of benign disease has again attracted the interest of the radiation oncology community in the Western part of the world. Radiotherapy has been given successfully to patients suffering from a wide variety diseases and AMD is one of them. The present article extensively reviews the clinical studies to define the role of radiotherapy in the treatment of AMD. (authors)

  8. What effects has the cataract surgery on the development and progression of Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willich, Stefan N.

    2006-12-01

    significance despite a large number of participants. Only one out of two clinical studies looked at further impairment in late stages of AMD and could not find an interrelation with cataract extraction. Thus the available evidence was not sufficient to come to a conclusion on the contribution of cataract extractions to the first manifestation of AMD and to the further impairment in late stages. Discussion: The presentation of the evaluated literature made clear that only a small number of publications dealt with the development of age related macula degeneration in consequence of a cataract extraction. The overall scientific level of evidence of these articles was not very high. Therefore it was not possible to obtain a well-defined conclusion on the effect of a cataract extraction on the development or progression of an age related macula degeneration. Conclusion: Additional well conducted clinical trials, that offer a sufficient number of patients, length of study period and adequate control for confounding variables like age and severity of cataract, are urgently needed. Health economic, ethical, social and legal aspect of the problem could and should be investigated after clarification of the mentioned medical issues.

  9. Potential of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSCs for Treating Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD

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    Mark Fields

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The field of stem cell biology has rapidly evolved in the last few decades. In the area of regenerative medicine, clinical applications using stem cells hold the potential to be a powerful tool in the treatment of a wide variety of diseases, in particular, disorders of the eye. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs are promising technologies that can potentially provide an unlimited source of cells for cell replacement therapy in the treatment of retinal degenerative disorders such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD, Stargardt disease, and other disorders. ESCs and iPSCs have been used to generate retinal pigment epithelium (RPE cells and their functional behavior has been tested in vitro and in vivo in animal models. Additionally, iPSC-derived RPE cells provide an autologous source of cells for therapeutic use, as well as allow for novel approaches in disease modeling and drug development platforms. Clinical trials are currently testing the safety and efficacy of these cells in patients with AMD. In this review, the current status of iPSC disease modeling of AMD is discussed, as well as the challenges and potential of this technology as a viable option for cell replacement therapy in retinal degeneration.

  10. Potential of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSCs) for Treating Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD).

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    Fields, Mark; Cai, Hui; Gong, Jie; Del Priore, Lucian

    2016-12-08

    The field of stem cell biology has rapidly evolved in the last few decades. In the area of regenerative medicine, clinical applications using stem cells hold the potential to be a powerful tool in the treatment of a wide variety of diseases, in particular, disorders of the eye. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are promising technologies that can potentially provide an unlimited source of cells for cell replacement therapy in the treatment of retinal degenerative disorders such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), Stargardt disease, and other disorders. ESCs and iPSCs have been used to generate retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells and their functional behavior has been tested in vitro and in vivo in animal models. Additionally, iPSC-derived RPE cells provide an autologous source of cells for therapeutic use, as well as allow for novel approaches in disease modeling and drug development platforms. Clinical trials are currently testing the safety and efficacy of these cells in patients with AMD. In this review, the current status of iPSC disease modeling of AMD is discussed, as well as the challenges and potential of this technology as a viable option for cell replacement therapy in retinal degeneration.

  11. Development of Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD) in the Fellow Eye of Patients with AMD Treated by Treat-and-Extend Intravitreal Therapy with Aflibercept.

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    Mimura, Kensuke; Matsumoto, Hidetaka; Morimoto, Masahiro; Akiyama, Hideo

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the development of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) in the fellow eye in patients with unilateral nAMD treated by a treat-and-extend (TAE) regimen with intravitreal aflibercept injections. We retrospectively studied 104 patients with treatment-naïve unilateral nAMD. We assessed best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and exudative changes in the treated eyes and development of nAMD in the fellow eye for 2 years. The subjects included 46 patients with typical AMD (tAMD), 44 with polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (PCV), and 14 with retinal angiomatous proliferation (RAP). BCVA was significantly improved after the loading phase in all subtypes. Forty-six patients (44.2%) had no recurrence within 2 years after the loading phase, including 12 (26.1%) with tAMD, 23 (52.2%) with PCV, and 11 (78.6%) with RAP (p < 0.01). Eleven patients (10.6%) developed nAMD in the fellow eye within 2 years, including 4 (8.7%) with tAMD, 0 (0%) with PCV, and 7 (50.0%) with RAP (p < 0.001). Patients with RAP had significantly more frequent development of nAMD in the fellow eye compared to other subtypes, while they showed significantly less recurrence during the TAE regimen with intravitreal aflibercept injections. Development of nAMD in the fellow eye should be monitored in RAP when the injection interval is extended. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Five-year progression of unilateral age-related macular degeneration to bilateral involvement: the Three Continent AMD Consortium report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joachim, N.; Colijn, J.M.; Kifley, A.; Lee, K.E.; Buitendijk, G.H.; Klein, B.E.; Myers, C.E.; Meuer, S.M.; Tan, A.G.; Holliday, E.G.; Attia, J.; Liew, G.; Iyengar, S.K.; Jong, p de; Hofman, A.; Vingerling, J.R.; Mitchell, P.; Klaver, C.C.W.; Klein, R.; Wang, J.J.

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the 5-year progression from unilateral to bilateral age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and associated risk factors. DESIGN: Pooled data analyses of three prospective population-based cohorts, the Blue Mountains Eye Study, Beaver Dam Eye Study and Rotterdam Study. METHODS:

  13. Five-year progression of unilateral age-related macular degeneration to bilateral involvement: the Three Continent AMD Consortium report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joachim, Nichole; Colijn, Johanna Maria; Kifley, Annette; Lee, Kristine E.; Buitendijk, Gabriëlle H. S.; Klein, Barbara E. K.; Myers, Chelsea E.; Meuer, Stacy M.; Tan, Ava G.; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Attia, John; Liew, Gerald; Iyengar, Sudha K.; de Jong, Paulus T. V. M.; Hofman, Albert; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Mitchell, Paul; Klaver, Caroline C. W.; Klein, Ronald; Wang, Jie Jin

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To assess the 5-year progression from unilateral to bilateral age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and associated risk factors. Design Pooled data analyses of three prospective population-based cohorts, the Blue Mountains Eye Study, Beaver Dam Eye Study and Rotterdam Study. Methods Retinal

  14. Five-year progression of unilateral age-related macular degeneration to bilateral involvement : the Three Continent AMD Consortium report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joachim, Nichole; Colijn, Johanna Maria; Kifley, Annette; Lee, Kristine E; Buitendijk, Gabriëlle H S; Klein, Barbara E K; Myers, Chelsea E; Meuer, Stacy M; Tan, Ava G; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Attia, John; Liew, Gerald; Iyengar, Sudha K; de Jong, Paulus T V M; Hofman, Albert; Vingerling, Johannes R; Mitchell, Paul; Klaver, Caroline C W; Klein, Ronald; Wang, Jie Jin

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the 5-year progression from unilateral to bilateral age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and associated risk factors. DESIGN: Pooled data analyses of three prospective population-based cohorts, the Blue Mountains Eye Study, Beaver Dam Eye Study and Rotterdam Study. METHODS:

  15. A 5-year multicenter prospective cohort study on the long-term visual prognosis and predictive factors for visual outcome in Japanese patients with age-related macular degeneration: the AMD2000 study.

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    Akagi-Kurashige, Yumiko; Tsujikawa, Akitaka; Yuzawa, Mitsuko; Ishibashi, Tatsuro; Nakanishi, Hideo; Nakatani, Eiji; Teramukai, Satoshi; Fukushima, Masanori; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2018-03-01

    In this study (AMD2000), we aimed to determine the visual prognosis of Japanese patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). This was a multicenter prospective observational cohort study. In total, 460 patients with AMD were recruited from April 2006 to March 2009 from 18 clinical trial sites in Japan. They were followed up for 5 years, as they continued to receive medical treatment. Of the 409 study eyes followed up for at least 1 year, 243 eyes (59.4%) were treated with photodynamic therapy (PDT) using verteporfin, and 58 eyes (14.2%) were treated with intravitreal injections of antivascular endothelial growth factor agents as the initial treatment. The mean best-corrected visual acuities (BCVA) for typical AMD (tAMD; 0.688 ± 0.498) and polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (PCV; 0.451 ± 0.395) were significantly less at 2 years (tAMD, 0.779 ± 0.632, P macular edema as well as the lesion size was associated with 5-year maintenance of the baseline BCVA. In some patients, the diagnosis changed: of the 192 eyes initially diagnosed with typical AMD, 19 were newly diagnosed with PCV during follow-up. Maintaining the baseline BCVA over the long term is difficult in Japanese eyes with wet AMD.

  16. Role of antioxidant enzymes and small molecular weight antioxidants in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD).

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    Tokarz, Paulina; Kaarniranta, Kai; Blasiak, Janusz

    2013-10-01

    Cells in aerobic condition are constantly exposed to reactive oxygen species (ROS), which may induce damage to biomolecules, including proteins, nucleic acids and lipids. In normal circumstances, the amount of ROS is counterbalanced by cellular antioxidant defence, with its main components-antioxidant enzymes, DNA repair and small molecular weight antioxidants. An imbalance between the production and neutralization of ROS by antioxidant defence is associated with oxidative stress, which plays an important role in the pathogenesis of many age-related and degenerative diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD), affecting the macula-the central part of the retina. The retina is especially prone to oxidative stress due to high oxygen pressure and exposure to UV and blue light promoting ROS generation. Because oxidative stress has an established role in AMD pathogenesis, proper functioning of antioxidant defence may be crucial for the occurrence and progression of this disease. Antioxidant enzymes play a major role in ROS scavenging and changes of their expression or/and activity are reported to be associated with AMD. Therefore, the enzymes in the retina along with their genes may constitute a perspective target in AMD prevention and therapy.

  17. The Role of mf-ERG in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Electrophysiological Features of AMD.

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    Moschos, Marilita M; Nitoda, Eirini

    2018-01-01

    Age-related macular cegeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of visual dysfunction worldwide, affecting 9-25% of individuals between 65 and 75 years old. We have reviewed the published articles investigating the role of multifocal electroretinogram (mf-ERG) in the diagnosis and treatment of AMD. Visual evoked potentials have revealed decreased amplitudes and higher latencies in patients with AMD, while the degeneration of photoreceptors and abnormalities of retinal pigment epithelium can be identified by electro-oculogram recordings. Moreover, ERG can detect the functional abnormalities observed in AMD and evaluate each therapeutic approach. The record of local electrophysiological responses coming from different retinal areas can be accurately performed by mfERG. The accuracy of mfERG in detecting the degeneration of photoreceptors, as well the disturbances of macular function, could be useful both in the early diagnosis of AMD and the assessment of treatment efficacy.

  18. Radiotherapy of macular lesions in age-related macular degeneration (A.M.D.): preliminary results of a clinical study conducted in Lyon, France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, P.; Mauget, M.; Gerard, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate irradiation effects on functional signs and choroidal neo-vascular lesions in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) that does not respond to laser therapy. Since 1994, 250 consecutive AMD patients were treated by two radiotherapy teams for sub-foveal neo-vascular lesions. At the end of september 1996, 52 patients were evaluable with a 1-year follow-up. Group 1 (Department de Radiotherapie Oncologie, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire Lyon Sud) included 26 patients who were treated with a lateral beam of 6 MV photons. The irradiation dose were 20 Gy in five fractions for small lesions and 28.8 Gy in eight fractions for larger lesions. Group 2 (Centre Oncologie Radiotherapie Saint-Jean) was composed of 26 patients treated with a mini-beam of 25 MV photons via lateral arc-therapy. Beam diameters (14 and 18 mm) were adapted to the lesion size. The total dose was 16 Gy in four fractions or 20 Gy in five fractions. Functional and anatomical results were assessed at 3, 6, 9 months and 1 year after radiation therapy. Stable visual acuity was observed in 44 % (23/52) of the patients and visual acuity was improved in 35 % (18/52) of the patients at 6 months. Good functional results reached 79 % (41/52) at 6 months and 74 % (17/23) at 12 months. There was no statistical difference between the two groups and dose levels. All severe complications (1 cataract, 3 dilated choroidal vessels, and 2 papillitis) occurred in group 1. Though it is too early to conclude on the best dose level, radiotherapy of sub-foveal neo-vascular lesions of AMD that cannot be treated via laser therapy provides encouraging results. The technique used must be very precise to adequately irradiate the fovea and spare surrounding sensitive areas. Further studies and trials involving patients' randomization are necessary to confirm these preliminary results. (author)

  19. Association of HTRA1 rs11200638 with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in Brazilian patients.

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    Lana, Tamires Prates; da Silva Costa, Sueli Matilde; Ananina, Galina; Hirata, Fábio Endo; Rim, Priscila Hae Hyun; Medina, Flávio MacCord; de Vasconcellos, José Paulo Cabral; de Melo, Mônica Barbosa

    2018-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is a multifactorial disease that can lead to vision impairment in older individuals. Although the etiology of age-related macular degeneration remains unknown, risk factors include age, ethnicity, smoking, hypertension, obesity, and genetic factors. Two main loci have been identified through genome-wide association studies, on chromosomes 1 and 10. Among the variants located at the 10q26 region, rs11200638, located at the HTRA1 gene promoter, has been associated with age-related macular degeneration in several populations and is considered the main polymorphism. We conducted a replication case-control study to analyze the frequency and participation of rs11200638 in the etiology of age-related macular degeneration in a sample of patients and controls from the State of São Paulo, Brazil, through polymerase chain reaction and enzymatic digestion. The frequency of the A allele was 57.60% in patients with age-related macular degeneration and 36.45% in controls (p value age-related macular degeneration group compared to the control group (p = 1.21 e-07 and 0.0357, respectively). No statistically significant results were observed after stratification in dry versus wet types or advanced versus non-advanced forms. To our knowledge, this is the first time the association between rs11200638 and overall age-related macular degeneration has been reported in South America.

  20. Baseline data from a multicenter, 5-year, prospective cohort study of Japanese age-related macular degeneration: an AMD2000 report.

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    Tsujikawa, Akitaka; Akagi-Kurashige, Yumiko; Yuzawa, Mitsuko; Ishibashi, Tatsuro; Nakanishi, Hideo; Nakatani, Eiji; Teramukai, Satoshi; Fukushima, Masanori; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2018-03-01

    To report research participants' baseline characteristics in the AMD2000 study, a prospective, multicenter, 5-year, observational cohort study of Japanese age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The characteristics were determined using multimodal imaging. Patients with AMD were recruited at 18 clinical sites in Japan between April 2006 and March 2009. Each patient underwent a complete ophthalmic examination, including measurement of best-corrected visual acuity (Landolt chart), indirect ophthalmoscopy, slit-lamp biomicroscopy with a contact lens, optical coherence tomography imaging, fundus photography, and fluorescein and indocyanine green angiography. Four hundred sixty participants (326 men [70.9%]) were included in the study. At enrollment, 131 eyes (28.5%) had hard drusen and 125 eyes (27.2%) had soft drusen in the macular area. A total of 455 eyes (98.9%) were diagnosed as having wet AMD, and 5 eyes (1.1%), as having dry AMD. Of the 455 eyes with wet AMD, 209 eyes (45.4%) had typical AMD, 228 eyes (49.6%) had polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (PCV), and 18 eyes (3.9%) had retinal angiomatous proliferation. The size of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) was significantly smaller with indocyanine green angiography than with fluorescein angiography (P macular edema, older age, scar, extrafoveal macular edema, subfoveal CNV, large branching vascular network, and hard exudates. Japanese patients with AMD are predominantly male, lack drusen, and have a high rate of PCV.

  1. Five-year follow-up of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD)

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    Koev, K.; Avramov, L.; Borissova, E.

    2018-03-01

    The objective of this study was to examine long-term effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The research was implemented for a period of five years. For LLLT, a He-Ne Laser with continuous emission at 633 nm (0.1 mW/cm2) was used in patients with AMD of all stages (dry to wet exudative forms were included). In total, 33 patients (16 men and 17 women – 66 eyes) with AMD of various stages and a mean age of 68.7 ± 4.2 years were included in the study. Progressive, exudative AMD was diagnosed in 8 eyes. 58 eyes had drusen or were depigmented. Laser radiation was applied transpupillary to the macula for six times for three minutes once in two days; 22 patients with AMD (44 eyes) were randomly selected to receive mock treatment (control group 10 men and 12 women with a mean age of 69.3 ± 4.8 years). The visual acuity was followed for a five-year period. The perimetry and Amsler test were used to screen central scotomas. The fluorescein angiography of AMD and the control groups was examined. The visual acuity remained unchanged in all patients in the control group. There was a statistically significant increase in the visual acuity (p<0.001, end of study versus baseline) for AMD patients for the period of five years after the treatment. The edema and hemorrhage in the patients with progressive, exudative AMD significantly decreased. No side effects were observed during the therapy. The prevalence of metamorphopsia, scotoma in AMD group was reduced. In conclusion, this study shows that LLLT may be a novel long-lasting therapeutic option for both forms of AMD. It is a highly-effective treatment that results in a long-term improvement of the visual acuity.

  2. Oral docosahexaenoic acid in the prevention of exudative age-related macular degeneration: the Nutritional AMD Treatment 2 study.

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    Souied, Eric H; Delcourt, Cécile; Querques, Giuseppe; Bassols, Ana; Merle, Bénédicte; Zourdani, Alain; Smith, Theodore; Benlian, Pascale

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-enriched oral supplementation in preventing exudative age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The Nutritional AMD Treatment 2 study was a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel, comparative study. Two hundred sixty-three patients 55 years of age or older and younger than 85 years with early lesions of age-related maculopathy and visual acuity better than 0.4 logarithm of minimum angle of resolution units in the study eye and neovascular AMD in the fellow eye. Patients were assigned randomly to receive either 840 mg/day DHA and 270 mg/day eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) from fish oil capsules or the placebo (olive oil capsules) for 3 years. The primary outcome measure was time to occurrence of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in the study eye. Secondary outcome measures in the study eye were: incidence of CNV developing in patients, changes in visual acuity, occurrence and progression of drusen, and changes in EPA plus DHA level in red blood cell membrane (RBCM). Time to occurrence and incidence of CNV in the study eye were not significantly different between the DHA group (19.5±10.9 months and 28.4%, respectively) and the placebo group (18.7±10.6 months and 25.6%, respectively). In the DHA group, EPA plus DHA levels increased significantly in RBCM (+70%; P<0.001), suggesting that DHA easily penetrated cells, but this occurred unexpectedly also in the placebo group (+9%; P = 0.007). In the DHA-allocated group, patients steadily achieving the highest tertile of EPA plus DHA levels in RBCM had significantly lower risk (-68%; P = 0.047; hazard ratio, 0.32; 95% confidence interval, 0.10-0.99) of CNV developing over 3 years. No marked changes from baseline in best-corrected visual acuity, drusen progression, or geographic atrophy in the study eye were observed throughout the study in either group. In patients with unilateral exudative AMD, 3 years of oral DHA-enriched supplementation had the same

  3. Regression of Some High-risk Features of Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD in Patients Receiving Intensive Statin Treatment

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    Demetrios G. Vavvas

    2016-03-01

    Conclusions: High-dose statins may result in resolution of drusenoid pigment epithelial detachments (PEDs and improvement in VA, without atrophy or neovascularization in a high-risk subgroup of AMD patients. Confirmation from larger studies is warranted.

  4. Association between Antiplatelet or Anticoagulant Drugs and Retinal/subretinal Hemorrhage in the Comparison of AMD Treatments Trials (CATT)

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    Ying, Gui-shuang; Maguire, Maureen G.; Daniel, Ebenezer; Grunwald, Juan E; Ahmed, Osama; Martin, Daniel F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association between use of antiplatelet (AP) or anticoagulant (AC) drugs and retinal/subretinal hemorrhage in participants with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in the Comparison of AMD Treatments Trials (CATT). Design Cohort study within CATT. Methods 1185 CATT participants with untreated active neovascular AMD were interviewed for use of AP/AC drugs. Trained readers evaluated photographs for the presence and size of retinal/subretinal hemorrhage associated with the neovascular lesion at baseline and years 1 and 2. Associations between use of AP/AC drugs and hemorrhage were evaluated among all participants and by baseline hypertension status using Fisher exact test and multivariate logistic regression models. Main Outcome Measures Odds ratio for association with AP/AC use. Results Among 1165 participants with gradable photographs, 724 (62.1%) had retinal/subretinal hemorrhage at baseline, 84.4% of hemorrhages were ≤ 1 DA, 8.1% were 1 to 2 DA, and 7.5% were >2 DA. 608 (52.2%) participants used AP/AC drugs at baseline, including 514 (44.1%) AP only, 77 (6.6%) AC only, and 17 (1.5%) both AP and AC. Participants with retinal/subretinal hemorrhage at baseline were comparable to those without retinal/subretinal hemorrhage except that they were older (80 vs. 78 years, phemorrhage was present in 64.5% of AP/AC users and in 59.6% of non-users (p=0.09), the adjusted odds ratio (OR) was 1.18 (95% CI: 0.91–1.51, p=0.21). Neither presence nor size of baseline retinal/subretinal hemorrhage was associated with the type, dose or duration of AP/AC use. Forty-four (4.08%) of 1078 participants had retinal/subretinal hemorrhage detected on 1-year or 2-year photographs; these hemorrhages were not associated with AP/AC use at baseline (p=0.28) or during follow-up (p=0.64). Among participants with hypertension (N=807), AP/AC use was associated with higher rate of retinal/subretinal hemorrhage at baseline (66.8% vs. 56.4%, adjusted OR=1

  5. The emotional and physical impact of wet age-related macular degeneration: findings from the wAMD Patient and Caregiver Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varano M

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Monica Varano,1 Nicole Eter,2 Steve Winyard,3 Kim U Wittrup-Jensen,4 Rafael Navarro,5 Julie Heraghty6 On behalf of the wAMD Patient and Caregiver Survey Committee members 1Department of Ophthalmology, Fondazione GB Bietti-IRCCS, Rome, Italy; 2Department of Ophthalmology, University of Münster, Münster, Germany; 3Department of Policy and Campaigns, Royal National Institute of Blind People, London, UK; 4Bayer Pharma AG, Berlin, Germany; 5Instituto de Microcirugia Ocular, Barcelona, Spain; 6Macular Disease Foundation Australia, Sydney, NSW, Australia Objectives: This was a cross-sectional survey to evaluate the physical and emotional impact of wet age-related macular degeneration (wAMD on a global cohort of patients who were receiving (or had previously received antivascular endothelial growth factor injections, and caregivers (paid and unpaid.Methods: The survey was performed in nine countries using an ophthalmologist-devised questionnaire.Results: A total of 910 patients and 890 caregivers completed the questionnaire. Most patients had been diagnosed and receiving antivascular endothelial growth factor injections for more than 1 year (74.7% and 63.8%, respectively, and many patients (82.1% received support from a caregiver (usually a child/grandchild [47.3%] or partner [23.3%]. wAMD had a negative impact on most patients (71.6%; many rated fear (44.9%, sadness (39.9%, frustration (37.3%, and depression (34.0% as common. It was linked to physical consequences, such as difficulty in reading (61.1%. Many effects were significantly greater in patients with a longer duration of disease or with wAMD in both eyes. Some caregivers (unpaid also reported that caregiving had a negative impact on them (31.1%; many reported emotions such as sadness (34.9% and depression (24.4%, but many also felt useful (48.4%. Overall, 27.2% of caregivers (unpaid rated caregiving as inconvenient; this was linked to days of employment/personal obligations missed

  6. Complement pathway biomarkers and age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemenetzi, M; Lotery, A J

    2016-01-01

    In the age-related macular degeneration (AMD) ‘inflammation model', local inflammation plus complement activation contributes to the pathogenesis and progression of the disease. Multiple genetic associations have now been established correlating the risk of development or progression of AMD. Stratifying patients by their AMD genetic profile may facilitate future AMD therapeutic trials resulting in meaningful clinical trial end points with smaller sample sizes and study duration. PMID:26493033

  7. Update on Clinical Trials in Dry Age-related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taskintuna, Ibrahim; Elsayed, M. E. A. Abdalla; Schatz, Patrik

    2016-01-01

    This review article summarizes the most recent clinical trials for dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the most common cause of vision loss in the elderly in developed countries. A literature search through websites https://www.pubmed.org and https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/, both accessed no later than November 04, 2015, was performed. We identified three Phase III clinical trials that were completed over the recent 5 years Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2 (AREDS2), implantable miniature telescope and tandospirone, and several other trials targeting a variety of mechanisms including, oxidative stress, complement inhibition, visual cycle inhibition, retinal and choroidal blood flow, stem cells, gene therapy, and visual rehabilitation. To date, none of the biologically oriented therapies have resulted in improved vision. Vision improvement was reported with an implantable mini telescope. Stem cells therapy holds a potential for vision improvement. The AREDS2 formulas did not add any further reduced risk of progression to advanced AMD, compared to the original AREDS formula. Several recently discovered pathogenetic mechanisms in dry AMD have enabled development of new treatment strategies, and several of these have been tested in recent clinical trials and are currently being tested in ongoing trials. The rapid development and understanding of pathogenesis holds promise for the future. PMID:26957835

  8. Low vision depression prevention trial in age-related macular degeneration: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovner, Barry W; Casten, Robin J; Hegel, Mark T; Massof, Robert W; Leiby, Benjamin E; Ho, Allen C; Tasman, William S

    2014-11-01

    To compare the efficacy of behavior activation (BA) + low vision rehabilitation (LVR) with supportive therapy (ST) + LVR to prevent depressive disorders in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Single-masked, attention-controlled, randomized, clinical trial with outcome assessment at 4 months. Patients with AMD and subsyndromal depressive symptoms attending retina practices (n = 188). Before randomization, all subjects had 2 outpatient LVR visits, and were then randomized to in-home BA+LVR or ST+LVR. Behavior activation is a structured behavioral treatment that aims to increase adaptive behaviors and achieve valued goals. Supportive therapy is a nondirective, psychological treatment that provides emotional support and controls for attention. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual IV defined depressive disorder based on the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (primary outcome), Activities Inventory, National Eye Institute Vision Function Questionnaire-25 plus Supplement (NEI-VFQ), and NEI-VFQ quality of life (secondary outcomes). At 4 months, 11 BA+LVR subjects (12.6%) and 18 ST+LVR subjects (23.4%) developed a depressive disorder (relative risk [RR], 0.54; 95% CI, 0.27-1.06; P = 0.067). In planned adjusted analyses the RR was 0.51 (95% CI, 0.27-0.98; P = 0.04). A mediational analysis suggested that BA+LVR prevented depression to the extent that it enabled subjects to remain socially engaged. In addition, BA+LVR was associated with greater improvements in functional vision than ST+LVR, although there was no significant between-group difference. There was no significant change or between-group difference in quality of life. An integrated mental health and low vision intervention halved the incidence of depressive disorders relative to standard outpatient LVR in patients with AMD. As the population ages, the number of persons with AMD and the adverse effects of comorbid depression will increase. Promoting interactions between ophthalmology, optometry

  9. Improved Adherence to Vision Self-monitoring with the Vision and Memory Stimulating (VMS) Journal for Non-neovascular Age-related Macular Degeneration during a Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Bittner, Ava K; Torr-Brown, Sheryl; Arnold, Ellen; Nwankwo, Antonia; Beaton, Patricia; Rampat, Radhika; Dagnelie, Gislin; Roser, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Objective An educational, interactive journal [Vision and Memory Stimulating (VMS) journal] was developed to boost patient confidence and promote long-term adherence with weekly vision self-monitoring in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) patients at risk for vision loss from new-onset neovascularization. Methods In a multicenter randomized controlled trial, 198 subjects with intermediate stage, non-neovascular AMD received the VMS journal or followed usual care (e.g. their doctor’s instr...

  10. TU-F-CAMPUS-T-02: Monte Carlo Evaluation of Kilovoltage Radiosurgery with AuNPs for Age Related Macular Degeneration (AMD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brivio, D; Zygmanski, P; Sajo, E; Makrigiorgos, G; Ngwa, W

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the benefit of gold nanoparticles (AuNP) in radiosurgery of Age related Macular Degeneration (AMD) using Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. AMD disease causes vision loss due to a leaky vasculature of the endothelial cells. Radiosurgical therapy aims to destroy this vasculature while minimizing the delivered dose to healthy tissues of the eye. AuNP known to enhance local dose have been targeted to the macular choroidal endothelial cells to increase the therapeutic efficacy. Methods: Dose enhancement ratio (DER) in macula endothelial cells due to a thin layer of AuNP has been calculated by a MC radiation transport simulation. AuNP layer (10–100nm) has been placed on the bottom of the macula at 2.4cm depth in a water parallelepiped 3×3×6cm3. This layer has been modeled considering various concentrations of AuNP ranging from 5.5–200mg per gram of endothelial cell (volume 10×10×2um3). The x-ray source is 100kVp 4mm diameter beam tilted 0°-30° with respect to the lens. Results: DER in endothelial cell for AuNP concentration of 31mg/g (shown experimentally feasible) and 10–100nm sizes is about 1.8. Tilting 4mm-beam does not reduce the enhancement but allows to avoid the surrounding tissues. Dose distribution in the AuNP vicinity has a significant increase within 30um, peaked at AuNP interface. DER inside and outside of the irradiation 4mm-field are the same while the actual delivered dose is more than one order of magnitude lower outside the field. Compared to 100kVp, usage of filtered spectra with enhanced flux in the region 20keV-40keV shows further increase of DER by about 20%. Dose to the neighboring organs such as retina/optic nerve are reduced accordingly. Conclusion: The results of this MC simulation provide further confirmation of the potential to enhance DER with AuNP from previous analytical calculations. This study provides impetus to improve treatment effectiveness of AMD disease with radiotherapy

  11. TU-F-CAMPUS-T-02: Monte Carlo Evaluation of Kilovoltage Radiosurgery with AuNPs for Age Related Macular Degeneration (AMD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brivio, D; Zygmanski, P [Brigham & Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Sajo, E [Univ Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA (United States); Makrigiorgos, G [Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Ngwa, W [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the benefit of gold nanoparticles (AuNP) in radiosurgery of Age related Macular Degeneration (AMD) using Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. AMD disease causes vision loss due to a leaky vasculature of the endothelial cells. Radiosurgical therapy aims to destroy this vasculature while minimizing the delivered dose to healthy tissues of the eye. AuNP known to enhance local dose have been targeted to the macular choroidal endothelial cells to increase the therapeutic efficacy. Methods: Dose enhancement ratio (DER) in macula endothelial cells due to a thin layer of AuNP has been calculated by a MC radiation transport simulation. AuNP layer (10–100nm) has been placed on the bottom of the macula at 2.4cm depth in a water parallelepiped 3×3×6cm3. This layer has been modeled considering various concentrations of AuNP ranging from 5.5–200mg per gram of endothelial cell (volume 10×10×2um3). The x-ray source is 100kVp 4mm diameter beam tilted 0°-30° with respect to the lens. Results: DER in endothelial cell for AuNP concentration of 31mg/g (shown experimentally feasible) and 10–100nm sizes is about 1.8. Tilting 4mm-beam does not reduce the enhancement but allows to avoid the surrounding tissues. Dose distribution in the AuNP vicinity has a significant increase within 30um, peaked at AuNP interface. DER inside and outside of the irradiation 4mm-field are the same while the actual delivered dose is more than one order of magnitude lower outside the field. Compared to 100kVp, usage of filtered spectra with enhanced flux in the region 20keV-40keV shows further increase of DER by about 20%. Dose to the neighboring organs such as retina/optic nerve are reduced accordingly. Conclusion: The results of this MC simulation provide further confirmation of the potential to enhance DER with AuNP from previous analytical calculations. This study provides impetus to improve treatment effectiveness of AMD disease with radiotherapy.

  12. Kilovoltage radiosurgery with gold nanoparticles for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD): a Monte Carlo evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brivio, D.; Zygmanski, P.; Arnoldussen, M.; Hanlon, J.; Chell, E.; Sajo, E.; Makrigiorgos, G. M.; Ngwa, W.

    2015-12-01

    This work uses Monte Carlo radiation transport simulation to assess the potential benefits of gold nanoparticles (AuNP) in the treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration with stereotactic radiosurgery. Clinically, a 100 kVp x-ray beam of 4 mm diameter is aimed at the macula to deliver an ablative dose in a single fraction. In the transport model, AuNP accumulated at the bottom of the macula are targeted with a source representative of the clinical beam in order to provide enhanced dose to the diseased macular endothelial cells. It is observed that, because of the AuNP, the dose to the endothelial cells can be significantly enhanced, allowing for greater sparing of optic nerve, retina and other neighboring healthy tissue. For 20 nm diameter AuNP concentration of 32 mg g-1, which has been shown to be achievable in vivo, a dose enhancement ratio (DER) of 1.97 was found to be possible, which could potentially be increased through appropriate optimization of beam quality and/or AuNP targeting. A significant enhancement in dose is seen in the vicinity of the AuNP layer within 30 μm, peaked at the AuNP-tissue interface. Different angular tilting of the 4 mm beam results in a similar enhancement. The DER inside and in the penumbra of the 4 mm irradiation-field are almost the same while the actual delivered dose is more than one order of magnitude lower outside the field leading to normal tissue sparing. The prescribed dose to macular endothelial cells can be delivered using almost half of the radiation allowing reduction of dose to the neighboring organs such as retina/optic nerve by 49% when compared to a treatment without AuNP.

  13. Kilovoltage radiosurgery with gold nanoparticles for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD): a Monte Carlo evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brivio, D; Zygmanski, P; Makrigiorgos, G M; Ngwa, W; Arnoldussen, M; Hanlon, J; Chell, E; Sajo, E

    2015-01-01

    This work uses Monte Carlo radiation transport simulation to assess the potential benefits of gold nanoparticles (AuNP) in the treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration with stereotactic radiosurgery. Clinically, a 100 kVp x-ray beam of 4 mm diameter is aimed at the macula to deliver an ablative dose in a single fraction. In the transport model, AuNP accumulated at the bottom of the macula are targeted with a source representative of the clinical beam in order to provide enhanced dose to the diseased macular endothelial cells. It is observed that, because of the AuNP, the dose to the endothelial cells can be significantly enhanced, allowing for greater sparing of optic nerve, retina and other neighboring healthy tissue. For 20 nm diameter AuNP concentration of 32 mg g −1 , which has been shown to be achievable in vivo, a dose enhancement ratio (DER) of 1.97 was found to be possible, which could potentially be increased through appropriate optimization of beam quality and/or AuNP targeting. A significant enhancement in dose is seen in the vicinity of the AuNP layer within 30 μm, peaked at the AuNP-tissue interface. Different angular tilting of the 4 mm beam results in a similar enhancement. The DER inside and in the penumbra of the 4 mm irradiation-field are almost the same while the actual delivered dose is more than one order of magnitude lower outside the field leading to normal tissue sparing. The prescribed dose to macular endothelial cells can be delivered using almost half of the radiation allowing reduction of dose to the neighboring organs such as retina/optic nerve by 49% when compared to a treatment without AuNP. (paper)

  14. Analysis of the association between CFH Y402H polymorphism and response to intravitreal ranibizumab in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Afiqah Mohamad

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacogenetic studies indicate that a variable response to anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF therapy in patients with neovascular form of AMD (nAMD may be due to polymorphisms in the complement factor H gene (CFH. This study is the first to investigate the association between CFH Y402H polymorphism and the response to ranibizumab therapy in Malaysian patients with nAMD. We included 134 patients with nAMD, examined between September 2014 and February 2016. The diagnosis of nAMD was confirmed by ophthalmologic examination, before ranibizumab therapy was started. Each patient received an intravitreal injection of 0.5 mg/0.05 ml ranibizumab following a treat-and-extend (TE regimen. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA and central retinal thickness (CRT were recorded after 3 and 6 months following the first injection and compared with the baseline values. Genotyping of Y402H (rs1061170 polymorphism was performed using PCR-RFLP and the amplified product was digested with MluCI restriction enzyme. Association between the Y402H genotypes and response to treatment was determined by a logistic regression analysis of responder (n = 49 and non-responder (n = 84 group. Significantly worse mean BCVA was observed for the CC genotype compared to the TT + CT genotype in the total sample after 6-month follow-up (p = 0.018. Comparing the baseline and 6-month point measurements, improved mean BCVA was observed in responder group, while worse mean BCVA was recorded for non-responder group. However, our regression analysis, adjusted for confounding factors, showed no significant association between the Y402H genotypes and response to treatment in nAMD patients under the recessive model (p > 0.05. Overall, our results suggest that factors other than Y402H polymorphism may be involved in the progression of nAMD after treatment with anti-VEGF agents, in Malaysian population.

  15. Low Vision Depression Prevention Trial in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovner, Barry W.; Casten, Robin J.; Hegel, Mark T.; Massof, Robert W.; Leiby, Benjamin E.; Ho, Allen C.; Tasman, William S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To compare the efficacy of behavior activation (BA) + low vision rehabilitation (LVR) with supportive therapy (ST) + LVR to prevent depressive disorders in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Design Single-masked, attention-controlled, randomized, clinical trial with outcome assessment at 4 months. Participants Patients with AMD and subsyndromal depressive symptoms attending retina practices (n = 188). Interventions Before randomization, all subjects had 2 outpatient LVR visits, and were then randomized to in-home BA+LVR or ST+LVR. Behavior activation is a structured behavioral treatment that aims to increase adaptive behaviors and achieve valued goals. Supportive therapy is a nondirective, psychological treatment that provides emotional support and controls for attention. Main Outcome Measures The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual IV defined depressive disorder based on the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (primary outcome), Activities Inventory, National Eye Institute Vision Function Questionnaire–25 plus Supplement (NEI-VFQ), and NEI-VFQ quality of life (secondary outcomes). Results At 4 months, 11 BA+LVR subjects (12.6%) and 18 ST+LVR subjects (23.4%) developed a depressive disorder (relative risk [RR], 0.54; 95% CI, 0.27–1.06; P = 0.067). In planned adjusted analyses the RR was 0.51 (95% CI, 0.27–0.98; P = 0.04). A mediational analysis suggested that BA+LVR prevented depression to the extent that it enabled subjects to remain socially engaged. In addition, BA+LVR was associated with greater improvements in functional vision than ST+LVR, although there was no significant between-group difference. There was no significant change or between-group difference in quality of life. Conclusions An integrated mental health and low vision intervention halved the incidence of depressive disorders relative to standard outpatient LVR in patients with AMD. As the population ages, the number of persons with AMD and the adverse effects of comorbid

  16. Functional Outcomes of the Low Vision Depression Prevention Trial in Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deemer, Ashley D; Massof, Robert W; Rovner, Barry W; Casten, Robin J; Piersol, Catherine V

    2017-03-01

    To compare the efficacy of behavioral activation (BA) plus low vision rehabilitation with an occupational therapist (OT-LVR) with supportive therapy (ST) on visual function in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Single-masked, attention-controlled, randomized clinical trial with AMD patients with subsyndromal depressive symptoms (n = 188). All subjects had two outpatient low vision rehabilitation optometry visits, then were randomized to in-home BA + OT-LVR or ST. Behavioral activation is a structured behavioral treatment aiming to increase adaptive behaviors and achieve valued goals. Supportive therapy is a nondirective, psychological treatment that provides emotional support and controls for attention. Functional vision was assessed with the activity inventory (AI) in which participants rate the difficulty level of goals and corresponding tasks. Participants were assessed at baseline and 4 months. Improvements in functional vision measures were seen in both the BA + OT-LVR and ST groups at the goal level (d = 0.71; d = 0.56 respectively). At the task level, BA + OT-LVR patients showed more improvement in reading, inside-the-home tasks and outside-the-home tasks, when compared to ST patients. The greatest effects were seen in the BA + OT-LVR group in subjects with a visual acuity ≥20/70 (d = 0.360 reading; d = 0.500 inside the home; d = 0.468 outside the home). Based on the trends of the AI data, we suggest that BA + OT-LVR services, provided by an OT in the patient's home following conventional low vision optometry services, are more effective than conventional optometric low vision services alone for those with mild visual impairment. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00769015.).

  17. NLRP3 Inflammasome and Pathobiology in AMD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Celkova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the leading cause of central vision loss and blindness in the elderly. It is characterized by a progressive loss of photoreceptors in the macula due to damage to the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE. Clinically, it is manifested by drusen deposition between the RPE and underlying choroid and accumulation of lipofuscin in the RPE. End-stage disease is characterized by geographic atrophy (dry AMD or choroidal neovascularization (wet AMD. The NLRP3 inflammasome has recently been implicated in the disease pathology. Here we review the current knowledge on the involvement of this multiprotein complex and its effector cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β and IL-18 in AMD progression. We also describe cell death mechanisms that have been proposed to underlie RPE degeneration in AMD and discuss the role of autophagy in the regulation of disease progression.

  18. Radiotherapy of macular lesions in age-related macular degeneration (A.M.D.): preliminary results of a clinical study conducted in Lyon, France; Radiotherapie des degenerescences maculaires liees a l`age (DMLA): resultats preliminaires d`une etude lyonnaise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, P. [Centre oncologie radiotherapie Saint-Jean, 69 - Lyon (France); Mauget, M. [Centre ophtalmologique d`imagerie, laser, 69 - Lyon (France); Gerard, J.P. [Service de radiotherapie-oncologie, CHU Lyon Sud, 69 - Pierre-Benite (France) (and others)

    1997-06-01

    To evaluate irradiation effects on functional signs and choroidal neo-vascular lesions in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) that does not respond to laser therapy. Since 1994, 250 consecutive AMD patients were treated by two radiotherapy teams for sub-foveal neo-vascular lesions. At the end of september 1996, 52 patients were evaluable with a 1-year follow-up. Group 1 (Department de Radiotherapie Oncologie, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire Lyon Sud) included 26 patients who were treated with a lateral beam of 6 MV photons. The irradiation dose were 20 Gy in five fractions for small lesions and 28.8 Gy in eight fractions for larger lesions. Group 2 (Centre Oncologie Radiotherapie Saint-Jean) was composed of 26 patients treated with a mini-beam of 25 MV photons via lateral arc-therapy. Beam diameters (14 and 18 mm) were adapted to the lesion size. The total dose was 16 Gy in four fractions or 20 Gy in five fractions. Functional and anatomical results were assessed at 3, 6, 9 months and 1 year after radiation therapy. Stable visual acuity was observed in 44 % (23/52) of the patients and visual acuity was improved in 35 % (18/52) of the patients at 6 months. Good functional results reached 79 % (41/52) at 6 months and 74 % (17/23) at 12 months. There was no statistical difference between the two groups and dose levels. All severe complications (1 cataract, 3 dilated choroidal vessels, and 2 papillitis) occurred in group 1. Though it is too early to conclude on the best dose level, radiotherapy of sub-foveal neo-vascular lesions of AMD that cannot be treated via laser therapy provides encouraging results. The technique used must be very precise to adequately irradiate the fovea and spare surrounding sensitive areas. Further studies and trials involving patients` randomization are necessary to confirm these preliminary results. (author) 13 refs.

  19. The role of free-radical processes in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration. Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Kolesnikov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available the modern ideas of the role of free radical processes in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD are consid- ered. Data of large randomized clinical trials on application of antioxidants for prevention and therapy AMD are provided. Possibility of the differential application of antioxidants depending on the genetic status of patients is discussed.

  20. Overview of clinical trials for dry age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Sheng Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The overall goal of treating age-related macular degeneration (AMD is to target the underlying cause of the disease and prevent, or at least slow down, the loss of vision, which requires the preservation of the choroid, retinal pigment epithelium (RPE, and photoreceptors. At present, there is no proven drug treatment for dry AMD; however, the cessation of smoking and treatments based on the age-related eye diseases study vitamin formula combined with a healthy diet are considered the only options for slowing disease progression. A number of pharmaceutical agents are currently under evaluation for the treatment of dry AMD using strategies such as reduction RPE and photoreceptor loss, neuroprotection, visual cycle modulators, suppression of inflammation, prevention of oxidative damage, and choroidal perfusion enhancers. The hope is that some of these therapies will achieve significant improvement to current management and prevent future loss of vision in this devastating eye condition.

  1. Two-Year Outcome of Aflibercept in Patients with Pigment Epithelial Detachment due to Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration (nAMD) Refractory to Ranibizumab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Stéphane; Coscas, Florence

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the response of intravitreal aflibercept injection (IAI) in eyes with detachment of retinal pigment epithelium (DEP) secondary to nAMD refractory to monthly ranibizumab. Patients and Methods This is a retrospective, multicenter study. All patients received 3 IAI then treated as needed every 4 weeks for 12 months. During the second year, the eyes were treated with a treat- and-extend regimen. Results Forty-four eyes were included. Best-corrected visual acuity improved significantly after the loading phase (3.1 ± 6.4 letters) and at 6 months (2.8 ± 6.4 letters), but change was not significant at 1 year and 2 years. The height of the DEP was significantly decreased at 3 months and 6 months, but the difference did not reach statistical difference at 1 and 2 years. Rate of eyes with complete resolution of exudation was 59% after the loading phase and 34.3% at 2 years. Mean interval of anti-VEGF injection was extended from 31 ± 2.6 days to 61 ± 5 days after conversion. Conclusions Aflibercept intravitreal injection in patients with fibrovascular DEP due to nAMD who respond poorly to monthly ranibizumab led to short-term functional and anatomical improvement. Reduction of intravitreal injection frequency was obtained until 2 years of follow-up. PMID:29093970

  2. Incidence of choroidal neovascularization in the fellow eye in the comparison of age-related macular degeneration treatments trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Maureen G; Daniel, Ebenezer; Shah, Ankoor R; Grunwald, Juan E; Hagstrom, Stephanie A; Avery, Robert L; Huang, Jiayan; Martin, Revell W; Roth, Daniel B; Castellarin, Alessandro A; Bakri, Sophie J; Fine, Stuart L; Martin, Daniel F

    2013-10-01

    To assess the influence of drug; dosing regimen; and traditional, nontraditional, and genetic risk factors on the incidence of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in the fellow eye of patients treated for CNV with ranibizumab or bevacizumab. Cohort study of patients enrolled in a multicenter, randomized clinical trial. Patients with no CNV in the fellow eye at the time of enrollment in the Comparison of Age-Related Macular Degeneration Treatments Trials (CATT). Eligibility criteria for the clinical trial required that study eyes have evidence on fluorescein angiography and optical coherence tomography of CNV secondary to age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and visual acuity between 20/25 and 20/320. Treatment for the study eye was assigned randomly to either ranibizumab or bevacizumab and to 3 different regimens for dosing over a 2-year period. The genotypes for 4 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with risk of AMD were determined. Only patients without CNV in the fellow eye at baseline were considered at risk. The CATT ophthalmologists examined patients every 4 weeks through 2 years and recorded treatment for CNV in the fellow eye. Development of CNV in the fellow eye. Among 1185 CATT participants, 727 (61%) had no CNV in the fellow eye at enrollment. At 2 years, CNV had developed in 75 (20.6%) of 365 patients treated with ranibizumab and in 60 (16.6%) of 362 patients treated with bevacizumab (absolute difference, 4.0%; 95% confidence interval [CI], -1.7% to 9.6%; P = 0.17). The risk ratio for pro re nata dosing relative to monthly dosing was 1.1 (95% CI, 0.8-1.6). Greater elevation of the retinal pigment epithelium and fluid in the foveal center of the study eye were associated with increased incidence of CNV in the fellow eye. Incidence was not associated with genotype on rs1061170 (CFH), rs10490924 (ARMS2), rs11200638 (HTRA1), and rs2230199 (C3; P>0.35). Through 2 years, there was no statistically significant difference between ranibizumab and

  3. Angiographic Cystoid Macular Edema and Outcomes in the Comparison of Age-Related Macular Degeneration Treatments Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Neepa; Maguire, Maureen G; Martin, Daniel F; Shaffer, James; Ying, Gui-Shuang; Grunwald, Juan E; Toth, Cynthia A; Jaffe, Glenn J; Daniel, Ebenezer

    2016-04-01

    To describe morphologic and visual outcomes in eyes with angiographic cystoid macular edema (CME) treated with ranibizumab or bevacizumab for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD). Prospective cohort study within a randomized clinical trial. A total of 1185 CATT study subjects. Baseline fluorescein angiography (FA) images of all CATT study eyes were evaluated for CME. Grading of other characteristics on optical coherence tomography (OCT) and photographic images at baseline and during 2-year follow-up was completed by readers at the CATT Reading Centers. Three groups were created on the basis of baseline CME and intraretinal fluid (IRF) status: (1) CME, (2) IRF without CME, (3) neither CME nor IRF. Visual acuity (VA) and total central retinal thickness (CRT) on OCT at baseline, year 1, and year 2. Among 1131 participants with images of sufficient quality for determining CME and IRF at baseline, 92 (8.1%) had CME, 766 (67.7%) had IRF without CME, and 273 (24.1%) had neither. At baseline, eyes with CME had worse mean VA (letters) than eyes with IRF without CME and eyes with neither CME nor IRF (52 vs. 60 vs. 66 letters, P macular edema seems to be a marker for poorer visual outcomes in nAMD because of underlying baseline retinal dysfunction and subsequent scarring. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Macular degeneration - age-related

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AMD occurs when the blood vessels under the macula become thin and brittle. Small yellow deposits, called drusen, form. Almost all people with macular degeneration start with the dry form. Wet AMD occurs ...

  5. Stem cells in clinical trials for treatment of retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klassen, Henry

    2016-01-01

    After decades of basic science research involving the testing of regenerative strategies in animal models of retinal degenerative diseases, a number of clinical trials are now underway, with additional trials set to begin shortly. These efforts will evaluate the safety and preliminary efficacy of cell-based products in the eyes of patients with a number of retinal conditions, notably including age-related macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa and Stargardt's disease. This review considers the scientific work and early trials with fetal cells and tissues that set the stage for the current clinical investigatory work, as well the trials themselves, specifically those either now completed, underway or close to initiation. The cells of interest include retinal pigment epithelial cells derived from embryonic stem or induced pluripotent stem cells, undifferentiated neural or retinal progenitors or cells from the vascular/bone marrow compartment or umbilical cord tissue. Degenerative diseases of the retina represent a popular target for emerging cell-based therapeutics and initial data from early stage clinical trials suggest that short-term safety objectives can be met in at least some cases. The question of efficacy will require additional time and testing to be adequately resolved.

  6. Macular xanthophylls and ω-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in age-related macular degeneration: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Christin; Winter, Lisa; Fröhlich, Kati; Jentsch, Susanne; Dawczynski, Jens; Jahreis, Gerhard; Böhm, Volker

    2013-05-01

    It has been shown that the functionality of the macula lutea depends on the nutritional uptake of lutein and zeaxanthin and that it is inversely associated with the risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Additionally, ω-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs) may also be protective. To investigate the effect of a 12-month intervention with macular xanthophylls and ω-3 LC-PUFAs on xanthophylls and fatty acids in plasma, antioxidant capacity, and optical density of the macular pigment of patients with nonexudative AMD. The LUTEGA study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel clinical trial that was conducted for 12 months. University Eye Hospital and Institute of Nutrition, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Germany. A total of 172 individuals with nonexudative AMD. Individuals were enrolled and randomly divided as follows: placebo group, group 1 (a capsule containing 10 mg of lutein, 1 mg of zeaxanthin, 100 mg of docosahexaenoic acid, and 30 mg of eicosapentaenoic acid administered each day), and group 2 (same substances but twice the dose used in group 1). One hundred forty-five participants completed the study successfully. Plasma xanthophyll concentrations and fatty acid profiles, optical density of the macular pigment, and antioxidant capacity in plasma (6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid [Trolox] equivalent antioxidant capacity and photochemiluminescence). The concentrations of the administered carotenoids in plasma as well as the optical density of the macular pigment increased significantly in the groups randomized to receive supplementary macular xanthophylls and ω-3 LC-PUFAs after 1 month of intervention and remained at this level through the end of the study. Use of the double dose resulted in a beneficial alteration of the fatty acid profile in the plasma of patients with AMD in comparison with the dose in group 1. The lipophilic antioxidant capacity in plasma was significantly elevated

  7. Development of a risk score for geographic atrophy in complications of the age-related macular degeneration prevention trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Gui-Shuang; Maguire, Maureen G

    2011-02-01

    To develop a risk score for developing geographic atrophy (GA) involving easily obtainable information among patients with bilateral large drusen. Cohort study within a multicenter randomized clinical trial. We included 1052 participants with ≥ 10 large (>125 μm) drusen and visual acuity ≥ 20/40 in each eye. In the Complications of Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) Prevention Trial (CAPT), 1 eye of each participant was randomly assigned to laser treatment and the contralateral eye was assigned to observation to evaluate whether laser treatment of drusen could prevent vision loss. Gradings by a reading center were used to identify: CAPT end point GA (total area of GA [>250 μm] > 1 disc area), GA (>175 μm) involving the foveal center (CGA), and GA of any size and location (any GA). Established risk factors (age, smoking status, hypertension, Age-related Eye Disease Study simple severity scale score), both with and without a novel risk factor (night vision score), were used in assigning risk points. The risk scores were evaluated for the ability to discriminate and calibrate GA risk. Development of end point GA, CGA, and any GA. Among 942 CAPT participants who completed 5 years of follow-up and did not have any GA at baseline, 6.8% participants developed CAPT end point GA, 9.6% developed CGA, and 34.4% developed any GA. The 5-year incidence of end point GA in 1 or both eyes of a participant increased with the 15-point GA risk score, from 0.6% for prevention of GA and for clinical assessment of GA risk in early AMD patients. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Tapping Stem Cells to Target AMD: Challenges and Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Brandl

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs are increasingly gaining attention in biomedicine as valuable resources to establish patient-derived cell culture models of the cell type known to express the primary pathology. The idea of “a patient in a dish” aims at basic, but also clinical, applications with the promise to mimic individual genetic and metabolic complexities barely reflected in current invertebrate or vertebrate animal model systems. This may particularly be true for the inherited and complex diseases of the retina, as this tissue has anatomical and physiological aspects unique to the human eye. For example, the complex age-related macular degeneration (AMD, the leading cause of blindness in Western societies, can be attributed to a large number of genetic and individual factors with so far unclear modes of mutual interaction. Here, we review the current status and future prospects of utilizing hPSCs, specifically induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs, in basic and clinical AMD research, but also in assessing potential treatment options. We provide an outline of concepts for disease modelling and summarize ongoing and projected clinical trials for stem cell-based therapy in late-stage AMD.

  9. Nutritional Modulation of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weikel, Karen A; Taylor, Allen

    2012-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly worldwide. It affects 30–50 million individuals and clinical hallmarks of AMD are observed in at least one third of persons over the age of 75 in industrialized countries (Gehrs et al., 2006). Costs associated with AMD are in excess of $340 billion US (American-Health-Assistance-Foundation, 2012). The majority of AMD patients in the United States are not eligible for clinical treatments (Biarnes et al., 2011; Klein et al., 2011). Preventive interventions through dietary modulation are attractive strategies because many studies suggest a benefit of micro and macronutrients with respect to AMD, as well as other age-related debilities, and with few, if any, adverse effects (Chiu, 2011). Preservation of vision would enhance quality of life for millions of elderly people, and alleviate the personal and public health financial burden of AMD (Frick et al., 2007; Wood et al., 2011). Observational studies indicate that maintaining adequate levels of omega-3 fatty acids (i.e. with 2 servings/wk of fish) or a low glycemic index diet may be particularly beneficial for early AMD and that higher levels of carotenoids may be protective, most probably, against neovascular AMD. Intervention trials are needed to better understand the full effect of these nutrients and/or combinations of nutrients on retinal health. Analyses that describe effects of a nutrient on onset and/or progress of AMD are valuable because they indicate the value of a nutrient to arrest AMD at the early stages. This comprehensive summary provides essential information about the value of nutrients with regard to diminishing risk for onset or progress of AMD and can serve as a guide until data from ongoing intervention trials are available. PMID:22503690

  10. Inherited Retinal Degenerative Clinical Trial Network. Addendum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    inherited orphan retinal degenerative diseases and dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD) through the conduct of clinical trials and other...design and conduct of effective and efficient clinical trials for inherited orphan retinal degenerative diseases and dry AMD; • Limited number and...linica l trial in the NEER network for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa, and the ProgSTAR studies for Stargardt disease ) . As new interventions b

  11. Prevention and treatment of age-related macular degeneration: an update for pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Leisa L; Roach, J Michael

    2013-11-01

    Review the current recommendations for the prevention and treatment of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Articles indexed in PubMed (National Library of Medicine), the Cochrane Reviews and Trials, Dynamed, and Iowa Drug Information Service (IDIS) in the last 10 years using the key words macular degeneration, agerelated macular degeneration (AMD), AMD and treatment, AMD and prevention. Sixty-nine published papers were reviewed, and criteria supporting the primary objective were used to identify useful resources. The literature included practice guidelines, original research articles, review articles, product prescribing information, and supplement product information for the prevention and treatment of AMD. AMD is a leading cause of visual impairment in older adults. At present there is no cure for advanced AMD, but intravitreal vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors minimize and even reverse vision loss in patients with AMD of the neovascular type. In the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS), participants with intermediate AMD who received a supplement combination of vitamins C and E, beta-carotene, and zinc had a greater delay in progression to advanced AMD than those participants who received a portion of these supplements. In the second AREDS, AREDS2, the addition of lutein + zeaxanthin, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) + eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), or lutein + zeaxanthin and DHA + EPA to the complete AREDS formulation did not further reduce the risk of progression to advanced AMD. Subgroup analyses indicated that additional research with lutein + zeaxanthin supplementation is warranted as it was beneficial in participants with low dietary intake of lutein + zeaxanthin. A formulation without beta-carotene may be best for most patients, especially smokers or former smokers. Health care professionals will want to consider patient-specific information before recommending ocular health supplements.

  12. Recent advances in the management of dry age-related macular degeneration: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandello, Francesco; Sacconi, Riccardo; Querques, Lea; Corbelli, Eleonora; Cicinelli, Maria Vittoria; Querques, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the most important cause of vision loss in elderly people, is a degenerative disorder of the central retina with a multifactorial etiopathology. AMD is classified in dry AMD (d-AMD) or neovascular AMD depending on the presence of choroidal neovascularization. Currently, no therapy is approved for geographic atrophy, the late form of d-AMD, because no treatment can restore the damage of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) or photoreceptors. For this reason, all treatment approaches in d-AMD are only likely to prevent and slow down the progression of existing atrophy. This review focuses on the management of d-AMD and especially on current data about potential targets for therapies evaluated in clinical trials. Numerous examinations are available in clinics to monitor morphological changes in the retina, RPE and choroid of d-AMD patients. Fundus autofluorescence and optical coherence tomography (OCT) are considered the most useful tools in the diagnosis and follow-up of d-AMD alterations, including the monitoring of atrophy area progression. Instead, OCT-angiography is a novel imaging tool that may add further information in patients affected by d-AMD. Several pathways, including oxidative stress, deposits of lipofuscin, chronic inflammation and choroidal blood flow insufficiency, seem to play an important role in the pathogenesis of d-AMD and represent possible targets for new therapies. A great number of treatments for d-AMD are under investigation with promising results in preliminary studies. However, only few of these drugs will enter the market, offering a therapeutic chance to patients affected by the dry form of AMD and help them to preserve a good visual acuity. Further studies with a long-term follow-up would be important to test the real safety and efficacy of drugs under investigation.

  13. Cellular models and therapies for age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L. Forest

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a complex neurodegenerative visual disorder that causes profound physical and psychosocial effects. Visual impairment in AMD is caused by the loss of retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE cells and the light-sensitive photoreceptor cells that they support. There is currently no effective treatment for the most common form of this disease (dry AMD. A new approach to treating AMD involves the transplantation of RPE cells derived from either human embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells. Multiple clinical trials are being initiated using a variety of cell therapies. Although many animal models are available for AMD research, most do not recapitulate all aspects of the disease, hampering progress. However, the use of cultured RPE cells in AMD research is well established and, indeed, some of the more recently described RPE-based models show promise for investigating the molecular mechanisms of AMD and for screening drug candidates. Here, we discuss innovative cell-culture models of AMD and emerging stem-cell-based therapies for the treatment of this vision-robbing disease.

  14. A randomised, double-masked phase III/IV study of the efficacy and safety of Avastin® (Bevacizumab intravitreal injections compared to standard therapy in subjects with choroidal neovascularisation secondary to age-related macular degeneration: clinical trial design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bunce Catey

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The management of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD has been transformed by the introduction of agents delivered by intravitreal injection which block the action of vascular endothelial growth factor-A (anti-VEGF agents. One such agent in widespread use is bevacizumab which was initially developed for use in oncology. Most of the evidence supporting the use of bevacizumab for nAMD has come from interventional case series and this clinical trial was initiated because of the increasing and widespread use of this agent in the treatment of nAMD (an off-label indication despite a lack of definitive unbiased safety and efficacy data. Methods and design The Avastin® (bevacizumab for choroidal neovascularisation (ABC trial is a double-masked randomised controlled trial comparing intravitreal bevacizumab injections to standard therapy in the treatment of nAMD. Patients are randomised to intravitreal bevacizumab or standard therapy available at the time of trial initiation (verteporfin photodynamic therapy, intravitreal pegaptanib or sham treatment. Ranibizumab treatment was not included in the control arm as it had not been licensed for use at the start of recruitment for this trial. The primary outcome is the proportion of patients gaining ≥ 15 letters of visual acuity at 1 year and secondary outcomes include the proportion of patients with stable vision and mean visual acuity change. Discussion The ABC Trial is the first double-masked randomised control trial to investigate the efficacy and safety of intravitreal bevacizumab in the treatment of nAMD. This trial fully recruited in November 2007 and results should be available in early 2009. Important design issues for this clinical trial include (a defining the control group (b use of gain in vision as primary efficacy end-point and (c use of pro re nata treatment using intravitreal bevacizumab rather than continuous therapy. Trial registration Current controlled

  15. AMD genetics in India: The missing links

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akshay eAnand

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Age related macular degeneration is a disease condition which occurs in aged peoples. There are various changes occurs at the cellular, molecular and physiological levels with age (Kaushal et al, 2013; Samiec et al 1988. Drusen deposition between RPE and Bruch’s membrane is one of the key features in AMD patients (Mullins RF et al, 2000; Hagemana et al, 2001 as Aβ/tau aggregates in AD patients. The primary goal of this review is to discuss whether the various candidate genes and associated biomarkers, that are supposed to play an independent role in progression of AMD, exert deleterious effect on phenotype, alone or in combination, in Indian AMD patients from the same ethnic group. A statistical model for probable interaction between genes could also be derived from such analysis. We can use multiple modalities to identify and enrol AMD patients based on established clinical criteria and examine the risk factors to determine if these genes are associated with risk factors, biomarkers or disease by Mendelian randomization. Similarly, there are large numbers of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs identified in human population. Even non-synonymous SNPs (nsSNPs are believed to induce deleterious effects on the functionality of various proteins. The study of such snSNPs could provide a better genetic insight for diverse phenotypes of AMD patients, predicting significant risk factors for the disease. Therefore, the prediction of biological effect of nsSNPs in the candidate genes is highly solicited.Therefore, genotyping and levels of protein expression of various genes would provide bigger canvas in genetic complexity of AMD pathology which should be evaluated by valid statistical and bioinformatics’ tools. Longitudinal follow up of Indian AMD patients to evaluate the temporal effect of SNPs and biomarkers on progression of disease could also provide unique strategy in the field.

  16. Dry age-related macular degeneration: mechanisms, therapeutic targets, and imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowes Rickman, Catherine; Farsiu, Sina; Toth, Cynthia A; Klingeborn, Mikael

    2013-12-13

    Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of irreversible visual dysfunction in individuals over 65 in Western Society. Patients with AMD are classified as having early stage disease (early AMD), in which visual function is affected, or late AMD (generally characterized as either "wet" neovascular AMD, "dry" atrophic AMD or both), in which central vision is severely compromised or lost. Until recently, there have been no therapies available to treat the disorder(s). Now, the most common wet form of late-stage AMD, choroidal neovascularization, generally responds to treatment with anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapies. Nevertheless, there are no current therapies to restore lost vision in eyes with advanced atrophic AMD. Oral supplementation with the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) or AREDS2 formulation (antioxidant vitamins C and E, lutein, zeaxanthin, and zinc) has been shown to reduce the risk of progression to advanced AMD, although the impact was in neovascular rather than atrophic AMD. Recent findings, however, have demonstrated several features of early AMD that are likely to be druggable targets for treatment. Studies have established that much of the genetic risk for AMD is associated with complement genes. Consequently, several complement-based therapeutic treatment approaches are being pursued. Potential treatment strategies against AMD deposit formation and protein and/or lipid deposition will be discussed, including anti-amyloid therapies. In addition, the role of autophagy in AMD and prevention of oxidative stress through modulation of the antioxidant system will be explored. Finally, the success of these new therapies in clinical trials and beyond relies on early detection, disease typing, and predicting disease progression, areas that are currently being rapidly transformed by improving imaging modalities and functional assays.

  17. Dry Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Mechanisms, Therapeutic Targets, and Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowes Rickman, Catherine; Farsiu, Sina; Toth, Cynthia A.; Klingeborn, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of irreversible visual dysfunction in individuals over 65 in Western Society. Patients with AMD are classified as having early stage disease (early AMD), in which visual function is affected, or late AMD (generally characterized as either “wet” neovascular AMD, “dry” atrophic AMD or both), in which central vision is severely compromised or lost. Until recently, there have been no therapies available to treat the disorder(s). Now, the most common wet form of late-stage AMD, choroidal neovascularization, generally responds to treatment with anti–vascular endothelial growth factor therapies. Nevertheless, there are no current therapies to restore lost vision in eyes with advanced atrophic AMD. Oral supplementation with the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) or AREDS2 formulation (antioxidant vitamins C and E, lutein, zeaxanthin, and zinc) has been shown to reduce the risk of progression to advanced AMD, although the impact was in neovascular rather than atrophic AMD. Recent findings, however, have demonstrated several features of early AMD that are likely to be druggable targets for treatment. Studies have established that much of the genetic risk for AMD is associated with complement genes. Consequently, several complement-based therapeutic treatment approaches are being pursued. Potential treatment strategies against AMD deposit formation and protein and/or lipid deposition will be discussed, including anti-amyloid therapies. In addition, the role of autophagy in AMD and prevention of oxidative stress through modulation of the antioxidant system will be explored. Finally, the success of these new therapies in clinical trials and beyond relies on early detection, disease typing, and predicting disease progression, areas that are currently being rapidly transformed by improving imaging modalities and functional assays. PMID:24335072

  18. Recent advances in the management of dry age-related macular degeneration: A review [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Bandello

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD, the most important cause of vision loss in elderly people, is a degenerative disorder of the central retina with a multifactorial etiopathology. AMD is classified in dry AMD (d-AMD or neovascular AMD depending on the presence of choroidal neovascularization. Currently, no therapy is approved for geographic atrophy, the late form of d-AMD, because no treatment can restore the damage of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE or photoreceptors. For this reason, all treatment approaches in d-AMD are only likely to prevent and slow down the progression of existing atrophy. This review focuses on the management of d-AMD and especially on current data about potential targets for therapies evaluated in clinical trials. Numerous examinations are available in clinics to monitor morphological changes in the retina, RPE and choroid of d-AMD patients. Fundus autofluorescence and optical coherence tomography (OCT are considered the most useful tools in the diagnosis and follow-up of d-AMD alterations, including the monitoring of atrophy area progression. Instead, OCT-angiography is a novel imaging tool that may add further information in patients affected by d-AMD. Several pathways, including oxidative stress, deposits of lipofuscin, chronic inflammation and choroidal blood flow insufficiency, seem to play an important role in the pathogenesis of d-AMD and represent possible targets for new therapies. A great number of treatments for d-AMD are under investigation with promising results in preliminary studies. However, only few of these drugs will enter the market, offering a therapeutic chance to patients affected by the dry form of AMD and help them to preserve a good visual acuity. Further studies with a long-term follow-up would be important to test the real safety and efficacy of drugs under investigation.

  19. CFH Y402H confers similar risk of soft drusen and both forms of advanced AMD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristinn P Magnusson

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the most common cause of irreversible visual impairment in the developed world. The two forms of advanced AMD, geographic atrophy and neovascular AMD, represent different pathological processes in the macula that lead to loss of central vision. Soft drusen, characterized by deposits in the macula without visual loss, are considered to be a precursor of advanced AMD. Recently, it has been proposed that a common missense variant, Y402H, in the Complement Factor H (CFH gene increases the risk for advanced AMD. However, its impact on soft drusen, GA, or neovascular AMD--or the relationship between them--is unclear.We genotyped 581 Icelandic patients with advanced AMD (278 neovascular AMD, 203 GA, and 100 with mixed neovascular AMD/GA, and 435 with early AMD (of whom 220 had soft drusen. A second cohort of 431 US patients from Utah, 322 with advanced AMD (244 neovascular AMD and 78 GA and 109 early-AMD cases with soft drusen, were analyzed. We confirmed that the CFH Y402H variant shows significant association to advanced AMD, with odds ratio of 2.39 in Icelandic patients (p = 5.9 x 10(-12 and odds ratio of 2.14 in US patients from Utah (p = 2.0 x 10(-9 with advanced AMD. Furthermore, we show that the Y402H variant confers similar risk of soft drusen and both forms of advanced AMD (GA or neovascular AMD.Soft drusen occur prior to progression to advanced AMD and represent a histological feature shared by neovascular AMD and GA. Our results suggest that CFH is a major risk factor of soft drusen, and additional genetic factors and/or environmental factors may be required for progression to advanced AMD.

  20. Vitamin A-aldehyde adducts: AMD risk and targeted therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, Janet R

    2016-04-26

    Although currently available treatment options for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are limited, particularly for atrophic AMD, the identification of predisposing genetic variations has informed clinical studies addressing therapeutic options such as complement inhibitors and anti-inflammatory agents. To lower risk of early AMD, recommended lifestyle interventions such as the avoidance of smoking and the intake of low glycemic antioxidant-rich diets have largely followed from the identification of nongenetic modifiable factors. On the other hand, the challenge of understanding the complex relationship between aging and cumulative damage leading to AMD has fueled investigations of the visual cycle adducts that accumulate in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and are a hallmark of aging retina. These studies have revealed properties of these compounds that provide insights into processes that may compromise RPE and could contribute to disease mechanisms in AMD. This work has also led to the design of targeted therapeutics that are currently under investigation.

  1. Macular Morphology and Visual Acuity in the Second Year of the Comparison of Age-Related Macular Degeneration Treatments Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sumit; Toth, Cynthia A; Daniel, Ebenezer; Grunwald, Juan E; Maguire, Maureen G; Ying, Gui-Shuang; Huang, Jiayan; Martin, Daniel F; Jaffe, Glenn J

    2016-04-01

    To describe the association between morphologic features on fundus photography (FP), fluorescein angiography (FA), and optical coherence tomography (OCT) and visual acuity (VA) in the second year of the Comparison of Age-related Macular Degeneration Treatments Trials (CATT). Prospective cohort study within a randomized clinical trial. Participants in the CATT. Study eye eligibility required angiographic and OCT evidence of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) secondary to age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and VA between 20/25 and 20/320. Treatment was assigned randomly to ranibizumab or bevacizumab with 3 different dosing regimens over a 2-year period. Fluid type, location, and thickness; retina and subretinal tissue complex thickness on OCT; size and lesion composition on FP and FA; and VA. Among 1185 CATT participants, 993 (84%) had fluid on OCT at baseline and completed 2 years of follow-up. At 2 years, intraretinal fluid (IRF), subretinal fluid (SRF), sub-retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) fluid, and subretinal tissue complex thickness decreased in all treatment groups. Ranibizumab monthly was best able to resolve each type of fluid. Eyes with SRF in the foveal center on OCT had better mean VA than eyes with no SRF (72.8 vs. 66.6 letters; P = 0.006). Eyes with IRF in the foveal center had worse mean VA than eyes without IRF (59.9 vs. 70.9 letters; P 212 μm (59.4 vs. 71.3 vs. 70.3 letters; P < 0.0001). At 2 years, the mean VA (letters) of eyes varied substantially by the type of subfoveal pathology on FP and FA: 70.6 for no pathology; 74.1 for fluid only; 73.3 for CNV or pigment epithelial (RPE) detachment; 68.4 for nongeographic atrophy; and 62.9 for geographic atrophy, hemorrhage, RPE tear, or scar (P < 0.0001). The associations between VA and morphologic features identified through year 1 were maintained or strengthened during year 2. Eyes with foveal IRF, abnormally thin retina, greater thickness of the subretinal tissue complex on OCT, and subfoveal

  2. Aflibercept in wet AMD: specific role and optimal use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semeraro F

    2013-08-01

    performed using the following terms (or combination of terms: vascular endothelial growth factors, VEGF, age-related macular degeneration, VEGF-Trap eye in wet AMD, VEGF-Trap eye in diabetic retinopathy, VEGF-Trap eye in retinal vein occlusions, aflibercept. Studies were limited to those published in English.Results and conclusion: Two Phase III clinical trials, VEGF Trap-eye Investigation of Efficacy and Safety in Wet AMD (VIEW 1 and 2, comparing VEGF Trap-eye to ranibizumab demonstrated the noninferiority of this novel compound. The clinical equivalence of this compound against ranibizumab is maintained even when the injections are administered at 8-week intervals, which indicates the potential to reduce the risk of monthly intravitreal injections and the burden of monthly monitoring.Keywords: aflibercept, AMD, neovascularization, VEGF, VEGF inhibition, VEGF-Trap eye

  3. Immunology of age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambati, Jayakrishna; Atkinson, John P.; Gelfand, Bradley D.

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of blindness in aged individuals. Recent advances have highlighted the essential role of immune processes in the development, progression and treatment of AMD. In this Review we discuss recent discoveries related to the immunological aspects of AMD pathogenesis. We outline the diverse immune cell types, inflammatory activators and pathways that are involved. Finally, we discuss the future of inflammation-directed therapeutics to treat AMD in the growing aged population. PMID:23702979

  4. Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Sonia

    2015-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss in the elderly. AMD is diagnosed based on characteristic retinal findings in individuals older than 50. Early detection and treatment are critical in increasing the likelihood of retaining good and functional vision. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. AMD and the alternative complement pathway: genetics and functional implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Perciliz L; Bowes Rickman, Catherine; Katsanis, Nicholas

    2016-06-21

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is an ocular neurodegenerative disorder and is the leading cause of legal blindness in Western societies, with a prevalence of up to 8 % over the age of 60, which continues to increase with age. AMD is characterized by the progressive breakdown of the macula (the central region of the retina), resulting in the loss of central vision including visual acuity. While its molecular etiology remains unclear, advances in genetics and genomics have illuminated the genetic architecture of the disease and have generated attractive pathomechanistic hypotheses. Here, we review the genetic architecture of AMD, considering the contribution of both common and rare alleles to susceptibility, and we explore the possible mechanistic links between photoreceptor degeneration and the alternative complement pathway, a cascade that has emerged as the most potent genetic driver of this disorder.

  6. Diminishing Risk for Age-Related Macular Degeneration with Nutrition: A Current View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen Taylor

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. Clinical hallmarks of AMD are observed in one third of the elderly in industrialized countries. Preventative interventions through dietary modification are attractive strategies, because they are more affordable than clinical therapies, do not require specialists for administration and many studies suggest a benefit of micro- and macro-nutrients with respect to AMD with few, if any, adverse effects. The goal of this review is to provide information from recent literature on the value of various nutrients, particularly omega-3 fatty acids, lower glycemic index diets and, perhaps, some carotenoids, with regard to diminishing risk for onset or progression of AMD. Results from the upcoming Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS II intervention trial should be particularly informative.

  7. Diminishing Risk for Age-Related Macular Degeneration with Nutrition: A Current View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleicher, Molly; Weikel, Karen; Garber, Caren; Taylor, Allen

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. Clinical hallmarks of AMD are observed in one third of the elderly in industrialized countries. Preventative interventions through dietary modification are attractive strategies, because they are more affordable than clinical therapies, do not require specialists for administration and many studies suggest a benefit of micro- and macro-nutrients with respect to AMD with few, if any, adverse effects. The goal of this review is to provide information from recent literature on the value of various nutrients, particularly omega-3 fatty acids, lower glycemic index diets and, perhaps, some carotenoids, with regard to diminishing risk for onset or progression of AMD. Results from the upcoming Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) II intervention trial should be particularly informative. PMID:23820727

  8. What Is Age-Related Macular Degeneration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Age-Related Macular Degeneration Sections What Is Macular Degeneration? How is AMD ... What Does Macular Degeneration Look Like? What Is Macular Degeneration? Leer en Español: ¿Qué es la degeneración macular ...

  9. Risk assessment model for development of advanced age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Michael L; Francis, Peter J; Ferris, Frederick L; Hamon, Sara C; Clemons, Traci E

    2011-12-01

    To design a risk assessment model for development of advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD) incorporating phenotypic, demographic, environmental, and genetic risk factors. We evaluated longitudinal data from 2846 participants in the Age-Related Eye Disease Study. At baseline, these individuals had all levels of AMD, ranging from none to unilateral advanced AMD (neovascular or geographic atrophy). Follow-up averaged 9.3 years. We performed a Cox proportional hazards analysis with demographic, environmental, phenotypic, and genetic covariates and constructed a risk assessment model for development of advanced AMD. Performance of the model was evaluated using the C statistic and the Brier score and externally validated in participants in the Complications of Age-Related Macular Degeneration Prevention Trial. The final model included the following independent variables: age, smoking history, family history of AMD (first-degree member), phenotype based on a modified Age-Related Eye Disease Study simple scale score, and genetic variants CFH Y402H and ARMS2 A69S. The model did well on performance measures, with very good discrimination (C statistic = 0.872) and excellent calibration and overall performance (Brier score at 5 years = 0.08). Successful external validation was performed, and a risk assessment tool was designed for use with or without the genetic component. We constructed a risk assessment model for development of advanced AMD. The model performed well on measures of discrimination, calibration, and overall performance and was successfully externally validated. This risk assessment tool is available for online use.

  10. The results of randomized controlled trial of low-dose radiation for wet-type age-related macular degeneration on a 1 year term basis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-06-01

    Evaluation of low dose radiation therapy to the wet-type age-related macular degeneration (AMD) located at the fovea centralis. Patients were irradiated with 10 fractions of 2 Gy external beam or just observed. Between the treated (39) and untreated (31) cases, there was no significant difference in gender, age, initial visual acuity, or size of the neovascular membrane. With the follow-up of 12 months, the visual acuity was significantly well preserved and the size of the neovascular membrane was decreased. These results indicate that low dose irradiation is effective for the wet-type AMD of the stage we treated in the present study. (author)

  11. Epidemiological and Clinical Baseline Characteristics as Predictive Biomarkers of Response to Anti-VEGF Treatment in Patients with Neovascular AMD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miltiadis K. Tsilimbaris

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To review the current literature investigating patient response to antivascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF therapy in the treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD and to identify baseline characteristics that might predict response. Method. A literature search of the PubMed database was performed, using the keywords: AMD, anti-VEGF, biomarker, optical coherence tomography, treatment outcome, and predictor. The search was limited to articles published from 2006 to date. Exclusion criteria included phase 1 trials, case reports, studies focusing on indications other than nAMD, and oncology. Results. A total of 1467 articles were identified, of which 845 were excluded. Of the 622 remaining references, 47 met all the search criteria and were included in this review. Conclusion. Several baseline characteristics correlated with anti-VEGF treatment response, including best-corrected visual acuity, age, lesion size, and retinal thickness. The majority of factors were associated with disease duration, suggesting that longer disease duration before treatment results in worse treatment outcomes. This highlights the need for early treatment for patients with nAMD to gain optimal treatment outcomes. Many of the identified baseline characteristics are interconnected and cannot be evaluated in isolation; therefore multivariate analyses will be required to determine any specific relationship with treatment response.

  12. A New System for Measuring Auto-Fluorescence Changes in Neovascular-AMD after Intravitreal Injection of Bavecizumab

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Norouzifard; Ali Soleymani; Jamshid Shanbehzadeh

    2011-01-01

    Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD) is the second disease diabetes which causes blindness in aged people. The only remedy for AMD is intravenous injection of bavecizumab. To prove the efficiency of remedy, the degenerated cells in Macula should be measured. In this article, a modern system is introduced to measure Auto-Fluorescence in Macula part of retina in order to obtain number of degenerated cells. The system consists of three main parts: Pre-processing stage is omission of margins an...

  13. Blood Pressure Drugs and AMD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Stories Español Eye Health / News Research News: Blood Pressure Drugs and AMD Leer en Español: Noticias de ... also found an association between AMD and high blood pressure, but this has been inconsistent. To help clarify ...

  14. Complement inhibitors for age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Michael A; McKay, Gareth J; Chakravarthy, Usha

    2014-01-15

    Given the relatively high prevalence of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and the increased incidence of AMD as populations age, the results of trials of novel treatments are awaited with much anticipation. The complement cascade describes a series of proteolytic reactions occurring throughout the body that generate proteins with a variety of roles including the initiation and promotion of immune reactions against foreign materials or micro-organisms. The complement cascade is normally tightly regulated, but much evidence implicates complement overactivity in AMD and so it is a logical therapeutic target in the treatment of AMD. To assess the effects and safety of complement inhibitors in the prevention or treatment of advanced AMD. We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (The Cochrane Library 2013, Issue 11), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to November 2013), EMBASE (January 1980 to November 2013), Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED) (January 1985 to November 2013), Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS) (January 1982 to November 2013), OpenGrey (System for Information on Grey Literature in Europe) (www.opengrey.eu/), Web of Science Conference Proceedings Citation Index - Science (CPCI-S) (January 1990 to November 2013), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 21 November 2013. We also performed handsearching of proceedings, from 2012 onwards, of meetings and conferences of specific professional organisations. We planned to include randomised controlled trials (RCTs) with

  15. Validated automatic segmentation of AMD pathology including drusen and geographic atrophy in SD-OCT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Stephanie J; Izatt, Joseph A; O'Connell, Rachelle V; Winter, Katrina P; Toth, Cynthia A; Farsiu, Sina

    2012-01-05

    To automatically segment retinal spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) images of eyes with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and various levels of image quality to advance the study of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)+drusen complex (RPEDC) volume changes indicative of AMD progression. A general segmentation framework based on graph theory and dynamic programming was used to segment three retinal boundaries in SD-OCT images of eyes with drusen and geographic atrophy (GA). A validation study for eyes with nonneovascular AMD was conducted, forming subgroups based on scan quality and presence of GA. To test for accuracy, the layer thickness results from two certified graders were compared against automatic segmentation results for 220 B-scans across 20 patients. For reproducibility, automatic layer volumes were compared that were generated from 0° versus 90° scans in five volumes with drusen. The mean differences in the measured thicknesses of the total retina and RPEDC layers were 4.2 ± 2.8 and 3.2 ± 2.6 μm for automatic versus manual segmentation. When the 0° and 90° datasets were compared, the mean differences in the calculated total retina and RPEDC volumes were 0.28% ± 0.28% and 1.60% ± 1.57%, respectively. The average segmentation time per image was 1.7 seconds automatically versus 3.5 minutes manually. The automatic algorithm accurately and reproducibly segmented three retinal boundaries in images containing drusen and GA. This automatic approach can reduce time and labor costs and yield objective measurements that potentially reveal quantitative RPE changes in longitudinal clinical AMD studies. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00734487.).

  16. Awareness, Knowledge, and Concern about Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimarolli, Verena R.; Laban-Baker, Allie; Hamilton, Wanda S.; Stuen, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD)--a common eye disease causing vision loss--can be detected early through regular eye-health examinations, and measures can be taken to prevent visual decline. Getting eye examinations requires certain levels of awareness, knowledge, and concern related to AMD. However, little is known about AMD-related…

  17. Current drug and molecular therapies for the treatment of atrophic age-related macular degeneration: phase I to phase III clinical development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huiling; Chintalapudi, Sumana R; Jablonski, Monica M

    2017-10-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss among the elderly. Atrophic AMD, including early, intermediate and geographic atrophy (GA), accounts for ~90% of all cases. It is a multifactorial degeneration characterized by chronic inflammation, oxidative stress and aging components. Although no FDA-approved treatment yet exists for the late stage of atrophic AMD, multiple pathological mechanisms are partially known and several promising therapies are in various stages of development. Areas covered: Underlying mechanisms that define atrophic AMD will help provide novel therapeutic targets that will address this largely unmet clinical need. The purpose of this paper is to review current promising drugs that are being evaluated in clinical trials. Because no pharmacological treatments are currently available for late stage of atrophic AMD, any new therapy would have extensive market potential. Expert opinion: The number of AMD patients is predicted to increase to ~30 million worldwide by 2020. In response to this enormous unmet clinical need, new promising therapies are being developed and evaluated in clinical trials. We propose that the assessment of novel interventions will also need to consider the genotypes of participants, as the benefit may be determined by polymorphisms in an individual's genetic background.

  18. Improved Adherence to Vision Self-monitoring with the Vision and Memory Stimulating (VMS) Journal for Non-neovascular Age-related Macular Degeneration during a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittner, Ava K; Torr-Brown, Sheryl; Arnold, Ellen; Nwankwo, Antonia; Beaton, Patricia; Rampat, Radhika; Dagnelie, Gislin; Roser, Mark

    2014-01-22

    An educational, interactive journal [Vision and Memory Stimulating (VMS) journal] was developed to boost patient confidence and promote long-term adherence with weekly vision self-monitoring in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) patients at risk for vision loss from new-onset neovascularization. In a multicenter randomized controlled trial, 198 subjects with intermediate stage, non-neovascular AMD received the VMS journal or followed usual care (e.g. their doctor's instructions for vision monitoring; Amsler grid). At 6 and/or 12 months post-enrollment, 157 subjects completed a questionnaire on vision self-monitoring. At 6 and 12 months, respectively, 85% and 80% of the VMS journal subjects reported vision monitoring at least weekly, which represent statistically significant 7.1 and 4.2 times greater odds than the 50% of controls who monitored weekly at both follow-up times (pself-monitoring. At 6 and 12 months, respectively, only 15% and 13% of the VMS journal subjects vs. 53% and 44% of the controls reported that they did not feel confident that they were taking care of their sight by self-monitoring (pself-monitoring between the groups (p=0.68), with 81% of all subjects reporting no change in frequency between 6 and 12 months. These findings support the efficacy of the VMS journal for increasing vision self-monitoring adherence and confidence, in addition to promoting persistence in weekly monitoring over the course of a year in AMD subjects at risk for exudative retinal changes.

  19. Improved Adherence to Vision Self-monitoring with the Vision and Memory Stimulating (VMS) Journal for Non-neovascular Age-related Macular Degeneration during a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittner, Ava K; Torr-Brown, Sheryl; Arnold, Ellen; Nwankwo, Antonia; Beaton, Patricia; Rampat, Radhika; Dagnelie, Gislin; Roser, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Objective An educational, interactive journal [Vision and Memory Stimulating (VMS) journal] was developed to boost patient confidence and promote long-term adherence with weekly vision self-monitoring in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) patients at risk for vision loss from new-onset neovascularization. Methods In a multicenter randomized controlled trial, 198 subjects with intermediate stage, non-neovascular AMD received the VMS journal or followed usual care (e.g. their doctor’s instructions for vision monitoring; Amsler grid). At 6 and/or 12 months post-enrollment, 157 subjects completed a questionnaire on vision self-monitoring. Results At 6 and 12 months, respectively, 85% and 80% of the VMS journal subjects reported vision monitoring at least weekly, which represent statistically significant 7.1 and 4.2 times greater odds than the 50% of controls who monitored weekly at both follow-up times (psight by self-monitoring (p<0.001). Usual care controls had statistically significant 6.7 and 5.0 times greater odds of reporting non-confidence at 6 and 12 months, respectively. There was no statistically significant change in weekly vs. less frequent self-monitoring between the groups (p=0.68), with 81% of all subjects reporting no change in frequency between 6 and 12 months. Conclusions These findings support the efficacy of the VMS journal for increasing vision self-monitoring adherence and confidence, in addition to promoting persistence in weekly monitoring over the course of a year in AMD subjects at risk for exudative retinal changes. PMID:24791222

  20. Randomized trial of the ForeseeHome monitoring device for early detection of neovascular age-related macular degeneration. The HOme Monitoring of the Eye (HOME) study design - HOME Study report number 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Emily Y; Clemons, Traci E; Bressler, Susan B; Elman, Michael J; Danis, Ronald P; Domalpally, Amitha; Heier, Jeffrey S; Kim, Judy E; Garfinkel, Richard A

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate the effects of a home-monitoring device with tele-monitoring compared with standard care in detection of progression to choroidal neovascularization (CNV) associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of blindness in the US. Participants, aged 55 to 90 years, at high risk of developing CNV associated with AMD were recruited to the HOme Monitoring of Eye (HOME) Study, an unmasked, multi-center, randomized trial of the ForeseeHome (FH) device plus standard care vs. standard care alone. The FH device utilizes preferential hyperacuity perimetry and tele-monitoring to detect changes in vision function associated with development of CNV, potentially prior to symptom and visual acuity loss. After establishing baseline measurements, subsequent changes on follow-up are detected by the device, causing the monitoring center to alert the clinical center to recall participants for an exam. Standard care consists of instructions for self-monitoring visual changes with subsequent self-report to the clinical center. The primary objective of this study is to determine whether home monitoring plus standard care in comparison with standard care alone, results in earlier detection of incident CNV with better present visual acuity. The primary outcome is the decline in visual acuity at CNV diagnosis from baseline. Detection of CNV prior to substantial vision loss is critical as vision outcome following anti-angiogenic therapy is dependent on the visual acuity at initiation of treatment. HOME Study is the first large scale study to test the use of home tele-monitoring system in the management of AMD patients. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. How does age-related macular degeneration affect real-world visual ability and quality of life? A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Deanna J; Hobby, Angharad E; Binns, Alison M; Crabb, David P

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To review systematically the evidence of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) affecting real-world visual ability and quality of life (QoL). To explore trends in specific topics within this body of the literature. Design Systematic review. Methods A systematic literature search was carried out using MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, PsychARTICLES and Health and Psychosocial Instruments for articles published up to January 2015 for studies including people diagnosed with AMD, assessing real-world visual ability or QoL as an outcome. Two researchers screened studies for eligibility. Details of eligible studies including study design, characteristics of study population and outcomes measured were recorded in a data extraction table. All included studies underwent quality appraisal using the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool 2011 Version (MMAT). Results From 5284 studies, 123 were eligible for inclusion. A range of approaches were identified, including performance-based methods, quantitative and qualitative patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs). AMD negatively affects tasks including mobility, face recognition, perception of scenes, computer use, meal preparation, shopping, cleaning, watching TV, reading, driving and, in some cases, self-care. There is evidence for higher rates of depression among people with AMD than among community dwelling elderly. A number of adaptation strategies have been associated with AMD of varying duration. Much of the research fails to report the type of AMD studied (59% of included studies) or the duration of disease in participants (74%). Of those that do report type studied, the breakdown is as follows: wet AMD 20%, dry AMD 4% and both types 17%. Conclusions There are many publications highlighting the negative effects of AMD in various domains of life. Future research should focus on delivering some of this research knowledge into patient management and clinical trials and differentiating between the types of AMD. PMID

  2. Cost-effectiveness of anti-oxidant vitamins plus zinc treatment to prevent the progression of intermediate age-related macular degeneration. A Singapore perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Nakul; George, Pradeep Paul; Heng, Bee Hoon; Lim, Tock Han; Yong, Shao Onn

    2015-06-01

    To determine if providing high dose anti-oxidant vitamins and zinc treatment age-related eye disease study (AREDS formulation) to patients with intermediate age-related macular degeneration (AMD) aged 40-79 years from Singapore is cost-effective in preventing progression to wet AMD. A hypothetical cohort of category 3 and 4 AMD patients from Singapore was followed for 5 calendar years to determine the number of patients who would progress to wet AMD given the following treatment scenarios: (a) AREDS formulation or placebo followed by ranibizumab (as needed) for wet AMD. (b) AREDS formulation or placebo followed by bevacizumab (monthly) for wet AMD. (c) AREDS formulation or placebo followed by aflibercept (VIEW I and II trial treatment regimen). Costs were estimated for the above scenarios from the providers' perspective, and cost-effectiveness was measured by cost per disability-adjusted life year (DALY) averted with a disability weight of 0.22 for wet AMD. The costs were discounted at an annual rate of 3%. Over 5400 patients could be prevented from progressing to wet AMD cumulatively if AREDS formulation were prescribed. AREDS formulation followed by ranibizumab was cost-effective compared to placebo-ranibizumab or placebo-aflibercept combinations (cost per DALY averted: SGD$23,662.3 and SGD$21,138.8, respectively). However, bevacizumab (monthly injections) alone was more cost-effective compared to AREDS formulation followed by bevacizumab. Prophylactic treatment with AREDS formulation for intermediate AMD patients followed by ranibizumab or for patients who progressed to wet AMD was found to be cost-effective. These findings have implications for intermediate AMD screening, treatment and healthcare planning in Singapore.

  3. Prevalence of age-related macular degeneration in elderly Caucasians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erke, Maja G; Bertelsen, Geir; Peto, Tunde

    2012-01-01

    To describe the sex- and age-specific prevalence of drusen, geographic atrophy, and neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD).......To describe the sex- and age-specific prevalence of drusen, geographic atrophy, and neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD)....

  4. Incidence of legal blindness from age-related macular degeneration in denmark: year 2000 to 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloch, Sara Brandi; Larsen, Michael; Munch, Inger Christine

    2012-01-01

    To report incidence rates of legal blindness from age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and other causes in Denmark from years 2000 to 2010 in the age group at risk of AMD aged 50 years and older.......To report incidence rates of legal blindness from age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and other causes in Denmark from years 2000 to 2010 in the age group at risk of AMD aged 50 years and older....

  5. Radiation therapy for neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Petrarca

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Robert Petrarca, Timothy L JacksonDepartment of Ophthalmology, King’s College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, UKAbstract: Antivascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF therapies represent the standard of care for most patients presenting with neovascular (wet age-related macular degeneration (neovascular AMD. Anti-VEGF drugs require repeated injections and impose a considerable burden of care, and not all patients respond. Radiation targets the proliferating cells that cause neovascular AMD, including fibroblastic, inflammatory, and endothelial cells. Two new neovascular AMD radiation treatments are being investigated: epimacular brachytherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery. Epimacular brachytherapy uses beta radiation, delivered to the lesion via a pars plana vitrectomy. Stereotactic radiosurgery uses low voltage X-rays in overlapping beams, directed onto the lesion. Feasibility data for epimacular brachytherapy show a greatly reduced need for anti-VEGF therapy, with a mean vision gain of 8.9 ETDRS letters at 12 months. Pivotal trials are underway (MERLOT, CABERNET. Preliminary stereotactic radiosurgery data suggest a mean vision gain of 8 to 10 ETDRS letters at 12 months. A large randomized sham controlled stereotactic radiosurgery feasibility study is underway (CLH002, with pivotal trials to follow. While it is too early to conclude on the safety and efficacy of epimacular brachytherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery, preliminary results are positive, and these suggest that radiation offers a more durable therapeutic effect than intraocular injections.Keywords: wet age-related macular degeneration, neovascular, radiation therapy, epimacular brachytherapy, stereotactic radiosurgery, anti-VEGF

  6. AMD study of unstable nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiuchi, Hisashi; Dote, Akinobu; Kimura, Masaaki

    2000-01-01

    The formulation of AMD which can describe both mean-field states and clustering states is briefly explained. The results of the application of the AMD model to various isotopes are given. Many problems are discussed which include formation of molecular orbits, new-type of clustering near neutron drip-line, opposite deformation of neutron and proton density distributions, breaking of the neutron magic numbers N=8 and N=20, and so on. The discussions are not necessarily only for the ground states or ground rotational bands but also for the excited states or excited rotational bands in the case of Be isotopes. (author)

  7. AMD study of unstable nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horiuchi, Hisashi; Dote, Akinobu; Kimura, Masaaki [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Kanada-En' yo, Yoshiko [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2000-01-01

    The formulation of AMD which can describe both mean-field states and clustering states is briefly explained. The results of the application of the AMD model to various isotopes are given. Many problems are discussed which include formation of molecular orbits, new-type of clustering near neutron dripline, opposite deformation of neutron and proton density distributions, breaking of the neutron magic numbers N=8 and N=20, and so on. The discussions are not necessarily only for the ground states or ground rotational bands but also for the excited states or excited rotational bands in the case of Be isotopes. (author)

  8. Influence of UV and blue-light sun radiation to developing of age-related macular degeneration on Croatian Island Rab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vojnikovic, Bozo; Coklo, Miran; Ranogajec-Komor, Maria

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Croatian island Rab has one of the highest solar radiation in geographical area of Europe. The aim of this clinical trial was to estimate correlation between incidence of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and the exposure to sunlight in different population on island Rab. In the first group agriculturists and fishermen were collected, in the second group members of the urban population were involved. 1753 individuals were investigated. The age in this population was between 40 and 73 years. The incidence of AMD in the first group was 19% while in the urban population only 2% showed AMD. It can be concluded that a very significant incidence exists between chronic exposure to sunlight and appearance of age-related macular degeneration. (author)

  9. Why AMD is a disease of ageing and not of development: mechanisms and insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushal eSharma

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Age related macular degeneration (AMD is retinal degenerative disorder which starts with the progression of age. Metabolism plays important role in initiation of ageing related diseases. The cholesterol metabolism components and their oxidized products like 7-ketocholesterol have been shown impact on RPE cells degeneration. These molecules can initiate the mitochondrial apoptotic process and also influenced the complements factors and expression of angiogenic proteins like VEGF etc. In this review we have suggested that AMD is ageing disorder not developmental which has been substantiated with disrupted cholesterol metabolism as described in several age related degenerative diseases.

  10. Elusive drusen and changing terminology of AMD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, P. T. V. M.

    2018-01-01

    The first descriptions of ageing macula disorder (AMD), be it under other names, appeared in 1855 and 1868. The earliest accounts of AMD linked the presence of drusen with visual loss. It took a century before these connections between drusen and AMD were generally accepted by medical science and in

  11. AMD ja ATI kolivad kokku / Kalle Kose

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kose, Kalle

    2006-01-01

    Maailma suuruselt teise personaalarvutite protsessorite valmistaja Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) liitumisest graafikakaartide tootja ATI Technologies'iga (ATI). Vt. ka: 5 küsimust AMD-le. Küsimustele vastab AMD regiooni esindaja Stockholmis Martin Sjögren

  12. AMD's 64-bit Opteron processor

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2003-01-01

    This talk concentrates on issues that relate to obtaining peak performance from the Opteron processor. Compiler options, memory layout, MPI issues in multi-processor configurations and the use of a NUMA kernel will be covered. A discussion of recent benchmarking projects and results will also be included.BiographiesDavid RichDavid directs AMD's efforts in high performance computing and also in the use of Opteron processors...

  13. New developments in age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyndon da Cruz

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The World Health Organization (WHO estimates that over 3 million people (9% of global blindness are blinded by age-related macular degeneration (AMD. AMD affects people over the age of 55. There are two main types of AMD, dry and wet. In dry AMD, patients slowly lose vision through progressive atrophy of the macular tissue. Wet, or exudative, AMD, is associated with new blood vessels called subretinal neovascular membranes (or SRNVM and affected patients lose vision more rapidly due to fluid leakage and haemorrhage at the macula.

  14. Nutritional and Lifestyle Interventions for Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ângela Carneiro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the leading cause of blindness in the developed world. In this narrative review, we will summarize the nutritional interventions evaluated in numerous observational studies and a few randomized clinical trials. The AREDS and AREDS2 studies demonstrated that supplements including vitamins C and E, beta-carotene, and zinc may reduce the progression to advanced AMD, in some patients, by 25% in five years. This is one of the few nutritional supplements known to have beneficial effects in any eye disease. Lutein/zeaxanthin supplementation may have beneficial effects in some individuals whereas omega-3 fatty acids supplementation needs to be further investigated and supported by more evidence. Genetic factors may explain the different patterns of response and explain differences found among individuals. More importantly, a combination of lifestyle behaviors such as the avoidance of smoking, physical activity, and the adoption of a healthy dietary pattern like the Mediterranean diet was associated with a lower prevalence of AMD. The adoption of these lifestyles may reduce the prevalence of the early stages of AMD and decrease the number of individuals who develop advanced AMD and consequently the onerous and climbing costs associated with the treatment of this disease.

  15. Characteristics of choroidal neovascularization in the complications of age-related macular degeneration prevention trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Maureen G; Alexander, Judith; Fine, Stuart L

    2008-09-01

    To describe the characteristics of incident choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in observed and treated eyes in the Complications of Age-related Macular Degeneration Prevention Trial (CAPT). Cross-sectional descriptive study within a multicenter, randomized clinical trial. Patients who developed CNV during CAPT follow-up. Inclusion criteria for CAPT specified bilateral large drusen (>or=10 drusen at least 125 micro), visual acuity >or=20/40 in each eye, and age >or=50. Exclusion criteria included CNV and geographic atrophy >1 Macular Photocoagulation Study (MPS) disc area or within 500 micro of the foveal center. One eye of each person was selected randomly for low-intensity laser treatment and the contralateral eye was observed. Fluorescein angiography was performed at baseline, annually for >or=5 years, and whenever there were symptoms of CNV. Trained readers at the CAPT Photograph Reading Center assessed color stereo photographs and angiogram negatives to identify CNV. Choroidal neovascularization was classified by type (predominantly classic CNV, minimally classic CNV, occult only CNV, or scar), location, and area. Visual acuity was measured by certified examiners. Symmetry of characteristics between eyes of bilaterally affected patients was examined. Choroidal neovascularization developed in 282 eyes of 225 patients. At the time of detection, 192 (68%) of the lesions were occult only, 153 (54%) were subfoveal, and 157 (56%) were or=20/40 in 123 (69%) of 179 eyes with visual acuity measured at the time of detection. Choroidal neovascularization developed in both eyes in 57 patients (25%) during CAPT follow-up. Lesions in eyes of bilaterally affected patients were no more similar to each other than affected eyes in 2 different patients. When patients are monitored closely, many CNV lesions can be detected outside of the fovea and when they are relatively small. Early detection may lead to improved long-term visual acuity.

  16. Memantine in frontotemporal lobar degeneration: A multicenter, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boxer, Adam L.; Knopman, David S.; Kaufer, Daniel I.; Grossman, Murray; Onyike, Chiadi; Graf-Radford, Neill; Mendez, Mario; Kerwin, Diana; Lerner, Alan; Wu, Chuang-Kuo; Koestler, Mary; Shapira, Jill; Sullivan, Kathryn; Klepac, Kristen; Lipowski, Kristine; Ullah, Jerin; Fields, Scott; Kramer, Joel H.; Merrilees, Jennifer; Neuhaus, John; Mesulam, M. Marsel; Miller, Bruce L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Memantine has been used off-label to treat frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTD). A previous 26 week open label study suggested a transient, modest benefit on neuropsychiatric symptoms as measured by the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI). Methods We performed a randomized, parallel group, double blind, placebo controlled trial of 20 mg memantine taken orally daily for 26 weeks in FTD. Participants met Neary criteria for behavioral variant (bvFTD) or semantic dementia (SD) and had characteristic brain atrophy. Use of cholinesterase inhibitors was prohibited. The objective of the study was to determine whether memantine is an effective treatment for FTD. Individuals were randomized to memantine or matched placebo tablets in blocks of two and four. Primary endpoints were the change in total NPI score and Clinical Global Impression of Change (CGIC) scores after 26 weeks. Secondary outcomes included a neuropsychological battery, and other cognitive, global and activity of daily living measures. Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00545974 Findings 100 subjects were screened, 81 were randomized, 5 (6%) discontinued and 76 completed all visits. Enrollment numbers were lower than planned due to many subjects’ preference to take memantine or cholinesterase inhibitors off-label rather than participate in a clinical trial. 39 memantine and 42 placebo subjects entered the primary intent to treat analysis. There was no effect of memantine treatment on either the NPI (mean difference [MD] 2.2, 95%CI: −3.9, 8.3, p = 0.47) or CGIC (MD 0, 95%CI: −0.4, 0.4, p = 0.90) after 26 weeks of treatment. Memantine was generally well tolerated, however there were more frequent cognitive adverse events in the memantine group. Interpretation There was no benefit of memantine treatment in bvFTD or SD. These data do not support memantine use in FTD. Funding Forest Research Institute PMID:23290598

  17. HISTORY OF SUNLIGHT EXPOSURE IS A RISK FACTOR FOR AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schick, T.; Ersoy, L.; Lechanteur, Y.T.; Saksens, N.T.; Hoyng, C.B.; Hollander, A.I. den; Kirchhof, B.; Fauser, S.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate effects of current and past sunlight exposure and iris color on early and late age-related macular degeneration (AMD). METHODS: Of 3,701 individuals from the EUGENDA database, 752 (20.3%) showed early AMD, 1,179 (31.9%) late AMD, and 1,770 (47.8%) were controls. Information

  18. Physical activity patterns in patients with early and late age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Subhi, Yousif; Sørensen, Torben Lykke

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) leads to visual impairment that affects visual functioning and thereby the ability to be physically active. We investigated physical activity patterns in patients with AMD. METHODS: Patients with early and late AMD and elderly controls were...

  19. Three Studies Point to Same Risk Gene for Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... point to same risk gene for age-related macular degeneration NIH-funded research helps unravel the biology of ... rare, but powerful risk factor for age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a common cause of vision loss in ...

  20. Statins for age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehlbach, Peter; Li, Tianjing; Hatef, Elham

    2015-02-11

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a progressive late onset disorder of the macula affecting central vision. Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of blindness in people over 65 years in industrialized countries. Recent epidemiologic, genetic, and pathological evidence has shown AMD shares a number of risk factors with atherosclerosis, leading to the hypothesis that statins may exert protective effects in AMD. The objective of this review was to examine the effectiveness of statins compared with other treatments, no treatment, or placebo in delaying the onset and progression of AMD. We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (2014, Issue 6), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to June 2014), EMBASE (January 1980 to June 2014), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS) (January 1982 to June 2014), PubMed (January 1946 to June 2014), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov), and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 5 June 2014. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared statins with other treatments, no treatment, or placebo in participants who were either susceptible to or diagnosed as having early stages of AMD. We used standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. Two authors independently evaluated the search results against the selection criteria, abstracted data, and assessed risk of bias. We did not perform meta-analysis due to heterogeneity in the interventions and outcomes among the included studies. Two RCTs with 144 total participants met the selection criteria

  1. Cost-effectiveness of age-related macular degeneration study supplements in the UK: combined trial and real-world outcomes data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Aaron Y; Butt, Thomas; Chew, Emily; Agron, Elvira; Clemons, Traci E; Egan, Catherine A; Lee, Cecilia S; Tufail, Adnan

    2018-04-01

    To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) 1 & 2 supplements in patients with either bilateral intermediate age-related macular degeneration, AREDS category 3, or unilateral neovascular age-related macular degeneration AMD (nAMD), AREDS category 4. A patient-level health state transition model based on levels of visual acuity in the better-seeing eye was constructed to simulate the costs and consequences of patients taking AREDS vitamin supplements. UK National Health Service (NHS). The model was populated with data from AREDS and real-world outcomes and resource use from a prospective multicentre national nAMD database study containing 92 976 ranibizumab treatment episodes. Two treatment approaches were compared: immediate intervention with AREDS supplements or no supplements. quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) and healthcare costs were accrued for each strategy, and incremental costs and QALYs were calculated for the lifetime of the patient. One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were employed to test the uncertainty of the model. For AREDS category 3, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was £30 197. For AREDS category 4 compared with no intervention, AREDS supplements are more effective (10.59 vs 10.43 QALYs) and less costly (£52 074 vs 54 900) over the lifetime of the patient. The recommendation to publicly fund AREDS supplements to category 3 patients would depend on the healthcare system willingness to pay. In contrast, initiating AREDS supplements in AREDS category 4 patients is both cost saving and more effective than no supplement use and should therefore be considered in public health policy. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  2. Automatic age-related macular degeneration detection and staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Grinsven, Mark J. J. P.; Lechanteur, Yara T. E.; van de Ven, Johannes P. H.; van Ginneken, Bram; Theelen, Thomas; Sánchez, Clara I.

    2013-03-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a degenerative disorder of the central part of the retina, which mainly affects older people and leads to permanent loss of vision in advanced stages of the disease. AMD grading of non-advanced AMD patients allows risk assessment for the development of advanced AMD and enables timely treatment of patients, to prevent vision loss. AMD grading is currently performed manually on color fundus images, which is time consuming and expensive. In this paper, we propose a supervised classification method to distinguish patients at high risk to develop advanced AMD from low risk patients and provide an exact AMD stage determination. The method is based on the analysis of the number and size of drusen on color fundus images, as drusen are the early characteristics of AMD. An automatic drusen detection algorithm is used to detect all drusen. A weighted histogram of the detected drusen is constructed to summarize the drusen extension and size and fed into a random forest classifier in order to separate low risk from high risk patients and to allow exact AMD stage determination. Experiments showed that the proposed method achieved similar performance as human observers in distinguishing low risk from high risk AMD patients, obtaining areas under the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve of 0.929 and 0.934. A weighted kappa agreement of 0.641 and 0.622 versus two observers were obtained for AMD stage evaluation. Our method allows for quick and reliable AMD staging at low costs.

  3. Prevalence of Age-Related Macular Degeneration in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colijn, Johanna M.; Buitendijk, Gabriëlle H. S.; Prokofyeva, Elena; Alves, Dalila; Cachulo, Maria L.; Khawaja, Anthony P.; Cougnard-Gregoire, Audrey; Merle, Bénédicte M. J.; Korb, Christina; Erke, Maja G.; Bron, Alain; Anastasopoulos, Eleftherios; Meester-Smoor, Magda A.; Segato, Tatiana; Piermarocchi, Stefano; de Jong, Paulus T. V. M.; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Topouzis, Fotis; Creuzot-Garcher, Catherine; Bertelsen, Geir; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Fletcher, Astrid E.; Foster, Paul J.; Silva, Rufino; Korobelnik, Jean-François; Delcourt, Cécile; Klaver, Caroline C. W.; Ajana, Soufiane; Arango-Gonzalez, Blanca; Arndt, Verena; Bhatia, Vaibhav; Bhattacharya, Shomi S.; Biarnés, Marc; Borrell, Anna; Bühren, Sebastian; Calado, Sofia M.; Cougnard-Grégoire, Audrey; Dammeier, Sascha; de Jong, Eiko K.; de la Cerda, Berta; den Hollander, Anneke I.; Diaz-Corrales, Francisco J.; Diether, Sigrid; Emri, Eszter; Endermann, Tanja; Ferraro, Lucia L.; Garcia, Míriam; Heesterbeek, Thomas J.; Honisch, Sabina; Bergen, Arthur

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a frequent, complex disorder in elderly of European ancestry. Risk profiles and treatment options have changed considerably over the years, which may have affected disease prevalence and outcome. We determined the prevalence of early and late AMD in

  4. Gene-diet interactions in age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a prevalent blinding disease, accounting for roughly 50% of blindness in developed nations. Very significant advances have been made in terms of discovering genetic susceptibilities to AMD as well as dietary risk factors. To date, nutritional supplementation...

  5. Prevalence of Age-Related Macular Degeneration in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colijn, Johanna M; Buitendijk, Gabriëlle H S; Prokofyeva, Elena

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a frequent, complex disorder in elderly of European ancestry. Risk profiles and treatment options have changed considerably over the years, which may have affected disease prevalence and outcome. We determined the prevalence of early and late AMD...

  6. Nutritional modulation of age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly worldwide. It affects 30-50 million individuals and clinical hallmarks of AMD are observed in at least one third of persons over the age of 75 in industrialized countries (Gehrs et al., 2006). Costs associated wi...

  7. Gut microbiota modify risk for dietary glycemia-induced age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, Sheldon; Taylor, Allen

    2018-03-21

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of blindness world-wide. Although the etiology of AMD is multifactorial, diet and nutrition have strong epidemiologic associations with disease onset and progression. Recent studies indicate a role for gut microbiota in development of AMD in mouse models and in some forms of human AMD. We previously found that consuming lower glycemia diets is associated with protection against AMD in humans and switching from higher to lower glycemia diets arrests AMD phenotypes in mice. Gut microbiota populations and circulating microbial cometabolites were altered in response to dietary carbohydrates, indicating a gut-retina axis. Here we explore additional gut microbiota-AMD interactions that point toward pathogenic roles for some gut microbiota families, including Ruminococcaceae and Lachnospiraceae, and individual members of Turicibacteraceae, Clostridiaceae, and Mogibacteriaceae. We also speculate on potential mechanisms by which gut microbiota influence AMD, with the objective of devising new AMD diagnoses and treatments.

  8. Age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Morten; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Nissen, Mogens Holst

    2002-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common macular disease affecting elderly people in the Western world. It is characterised by the appearance of drusen in the macula, accompanied by choroidal neovascularisation (CNV) or geographic atrophy. The disease is more common in Caucasian....... Smoking is probably also a risk factor. Preventive strategies using macular laser photocoagulation are under investigation, but their efficacy in preventing visual loss is as yet unproven. There is no treatment with proven efficacy for geographic atrophy. Optimal treatment for exudative AMD requires...

  9. Management of neovascular age-related macular degeneration: current state-of-the-art care for optimizing visual outcomes and therapies in development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Aniruddha; Rhoades, William R; Hanout, Mostafa; Soliman, Mohamed Kamel; Sarwar, Salman; Sadiq, Mohammad Ali; Sepah, Yasir Jamal; Do, Diana V; Nguyen, Quan Dong

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary management of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) has evolved significantly over the last few years. The goal of treatment is shifting from merely salvaging vision to maintaining a high quality of life. There have been significant breakthroughs in the identification of viable drug targets and gene therapies. Imaging tools with near-histological precision have enhanced our knowledge about pathophysiological mechanisms that play a role in vision loss due to AMD. Visual, social, and vocational rehabilitation are all important treatment goals. In this review, evidence from landmark clinical trials is summarized to elucidate the optimum modern-day management of neovascular AMD. Therapeutic strategies currently under development, such as gene therapy and personalized medicine, are also described. PMID:26089632

  10. Association of Htra1 gene polymorphisms with the risk of developing AMD in Iranian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askari, Mohammad; Nikpoor, Amin Reza; Gorjipour, Fazel; Mazidi, Mohsen; Sanati, Mohammad Hosein; Aryan, Hajar; Irani, Alireza; Ghasemi Falavarjani, Khalil; Nazari, Hossein; Mousavizadeh, Kazem

    2015-10-01

    Half of the cases of vision loss in people under 60 years of age have been attributed to age-related macular degeneration (AMD). This is a multifactorial disease with late onset. It has been demonstrated that many different genetic loci are implicated in the risk of developing AMD in different populations. In the current study, we investigated the association of high-temperature ‎requirement A-1 (HTRA1) gene polymorphisms with the risk of developing AMD in the Iranian population. Genomic DNA samples were extracted from 120 patients with AMD and 120 healthy age- and sex-matched controls. A 385 base-pair fragment of the HTRA1 gene promoter region was amplified using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique and sequenced. The frequencies of the alleles were calculated and statistical analysis was performed using SPSS software. Our study demonstrated that the rate of polymorphisms rs11200638 -625 G>A and rs2672598 -487T>C were significantly greater in AMD patients than in healthy controls from the Iranian population. The results of our study indicate that HTRA1 gene promoter region polymorphisms are associated with the risk of developing AMD in the Iranian population.

  11. Assessing individual risk for AMD with genetic counseling, family history, and genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascella, R; Strafella, C; Longo, G; Manzo, L; Ragazzo, M; De Felici, C; Gambardella, S; Marsella, L T; Novelli, G; Borgiani, P; Sangiuolo, F; Cusumano, A; Ricci, F; Giardina, E

    2018-02-01

    PurposeThe goal was to develop a simple model for predicting the individual risk profile for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) on the basis of genetic information, disease family history, and smoking habits.Patients and methodsThe study enrolled 151 AMD patients following specific clinical and environmental inclusion criteria: age >55 years, positive family history for AMD, presence of at least one first-degree relative affected by AMD, and smoking habits. All of the samples were genotyped for rs1061170 (CFH) and rs10490924 (ARMS2) with a TaqMan assay, using a 7500 Fast Real Time PCR device. Statistical analysis was subsequently employed to calculate the real individual risk (OR) based on the genetic data (ORgn), family history (ORf), and smoking habits (ORsm).Results and conclusionThe combination of ORgn, ORf, and ORsm allowed the calculation of the Ort that represented the realistic individual risk for developing AMD. In this report, we present a computational model for the estimation of the individual risk for AMD. Moreover, we show that the average distribution of risk alleles in the general population and the knowledge of parents' genotype can be decisive to assess the real disease risk. In this contest, genetic counseling is crucial to provide the patients with an understanding of their individual risk and the availability for preventive actions.

  12. Association of Htra1 Gene Polymorphisms with the Risk of Developing AMD in Iranian Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Askari

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Half of the cases of vision loss in people under 60 years of age have been attributed to age-related macular degeneration (AMD. This is a multifactorial disease with late onset. It has been demonstrated that many different genetic loci are implicated in the risk of developing AMD in different populations. In the current study, we investigated the association of high-temperature requirement A-1 (HTRA1 gene polymorphisms with the risk of developing AMD in the Iranian population. Methods: Genomic DNA samples were extracted from 120 patients with AMD and 120 healthy age- and sex-matched controls. A 385 base-pair fragment of the HTRA1 gene promoter region was amplified using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR technique and sequenced. The frequencies of the alleles were calculated and statistical analysis was performed using SPSS software. Results: Our study demonstrated that the rate of polymorphisms rs11200638 -625 G>A and rs2672598 -487T>C were significantly greater in AMD patients than in healthy controls from the Iranian population. Conclusions: The results of our study indicate that HTRA1 gene promoter region polymorphisms are associated with the risk of developing AMD in the Iranian population

  13. Comparing humans and deep learning performance for grading AMD: A study in using universal deep features and transfer learning for automated AMD analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlina, Philippe; Pacheco, Katia D; Joshi, Neil; Freund, David E; Bressler, Neil M

    2017-03-01

    When left untreated, age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss in people over fifty in the US. Currently it is estimated that about eight million US individuals have the intermediate stage of AMD that is often asymptomatic with regard to visual deficit. These individuals are at high risk for progressing to the advanced stage where the often treatable choroidal neovascular form of AMD can occur. Careful monitoring to detect the onset and prompt treatment of the neovascular form as well as dietary supplementation can reduce the risk of vision loss from AMD, therefore, preferred practice patterns recommend identifying individuals with the intermediate stage in a timely manner. Past automated retinal image analysis (ARIA) methods applied on fundus imagery have relied on engineered and hand-designed visual features. We instead detail the novel application of a machine learning approach using deep learning for the problem of ARIA and AMD analysis. We use transfer learning and universal features derived from deep convolutional neural networks (DCNN). We address clinically relevant 4-class, 3-class, and 2-class AMD severity classification problems. Using 5664 color fundus images from the NIH AREDS dataset and DCNN universal features, we obtain values for accuracy for the (4-, 3-, 2-) class classification problem of (79.4%, 81.5%, 93.4%) for machine vs. (75.8%, 85.0%, 95.2%) for physician grading. This study demonstrates the efficacy of machine grading based on deep universal features/transfer learning when applied to ARIA and is a promising step in providing a pre-screener to identify individuals with intermediate AMD and also as a tool that can facilitate identifying such individuals for clinical studies aimed at developing improved therapies. It also demonstrates comparable performance between computer and physician grading. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Lily K; Eaton, Angie

    2013-08-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly, and the prevalence of the disease increases exponentially with every decade after age 50 years. It is a multifactorial disease involving a complex interplay of genetic, environmental, metabolic, and functional factors. Besides smoking, hypertension, obesity, and certain dietary habits, a growing body of evidence indicates that inflammation and the immune system may play a key role in the development of the disease. AMD may progress from the early form to the intermediate form and then to the advanced form, where two subtypes exist: the nonneovascular (dry) type and the neovascular (wet) type. The results from the Age-Related Eye Disease Study have shown that for the nonneovascular type of AMD, supplementation with high-dose antioxidants (vitamin C, vitamin E, and β-carotene) and zinc is recommended for those with the intermediate form of AMD in one or both eyes or with advanced AMD or vision loss due to AMD in one eye. As for the neovascular type of the advanced AMD, the current standard of therapy is intravitreal injections of vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors. In addition, lifestyle and dietary modifications including improved physical activity, reduced daily sodium intake, and reduced intake of solid fats, added sugars, cholesterol, and refined grain foods are recommended. To date, no study has demonstrated that AMD can be cured or effectively prevented. Clearly, more research is needed to fully understand the pathophysiology as well as to develop prevention and treatment strategies for this devastating disease. © 2013 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  15. Comparison of Mouse and Human Retinal Pigment Epithelium Gene Expression Profiles: Potential Implications for Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennis, A.; Gorgels, T.G.M.F.; ten Brink, J.B.; van der Spek, P.J.; Bossers, K.; Heine, V.M.; Bergen, A.A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of age related macular degeneration (AMD). AMD is the leading cause of blindness worldwide. There is currently no effective treatment available. Preclinical studies in AMD mouse models are essential to

  16. Comparison of Mouse and Human Retinal Pigment Epithelium Gene Expression Profiles : Potential Implications for Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennis, Anna; Gorgels, Theo G M F; Ten Brink, Jacoline B; van der Spek, Peter J; Bossers, Koen; Heine, Vivi M; Bergen, Arthur A

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of age related macular degeneration (AMD). AMD is the leading cause of blindness worldwide. There is currently no effective treatment available. Preclinical studies in AMD mouse models are essential to

  17. Comparison of Mouse and Human Retinal Pigment Epithelium Gene Expression Profiles: Potential Implications for Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennis, Anna; Gorgels, Theo G. M. F.; ten Brink, Jacoline B.; van der Spek, Peter J.; Bossers, Koen; Heine, Vivi M.; Bergen, Arthur A.

    2015-01-01

    The human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of age related macular degeneration (AMD). AMD is the leading cause of blindness worldwide. There is currently no effective treatment available. Preclinical studies in AMD mouse models are essential to develop new

  18. Involvement of a gut-retina axis in protection against dietary glycemia induced age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the major cause of blindness in developed nations. AMD is characterized by retinal pigmented epithelial cell (RPE) dysfunction and loss of photoreceptor cells. Epidemiologic studies indicate important contributions of dietary patterns on risk for AMD, but th...

  19. The Association of Statin Use with Age-Related Macular Degeneration Progression: The Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2 Report Number 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Holou, Shaza N; Tucker, William R; Agrón, Elvira; Clemons, Traci E; Cukras, Catherine; Ferris, Frederick L; Chew, Emily Y

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the association of statin use with progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Preplanned, prospective cohort study within a controlled clinical trial of oral supplementation for age-related eye diseases. Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2 (AREDS2) participants, aged 50 to 85 years. Factors, including age, gender, smoking status, aspirin use, and history of diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, angina, and stroke-all known to be associated with statin use-were included in a logistic regression model to estimate propensity scores for each participant. Age-adjusted proportional hazards regression models, with and without propensity score matching, were performed to evaluate the association of statin use with progression to late AMD. Analyses adjusting for the competing risk of death were also performed. Baseline and annual stereoscopic fundus photographs were assessed centrally by masked graders for the development of late AMD, either neovascular AMD or geographic atrophy (GA). Of the 3791 participants (2462 with bilateral large drusen and 1329 with unilateral late AMD at baseline), 1659 (43.8%) were statin users. The overall analysis, with no matching of propensity scores and no adjustment for death as a competing risk, showed that statin use was not associated with progression to late AMD (hazard ratio [HR], 1.08; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.83-1.41; P = 0.56). When matched for propensity scores and adjusted for death as a competing risk, the result was not statistically significant (HR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.55-1.20; P = 0.29). Furthermore, subgroup analyses of persons with or without late AMD at baseline and the various components of late AMD (neovascular AMD, central GA, or any GA) also showed no statistically significant association of statin use with progression to AMD. Statin use was not statistically significantly associated with progression to late AMD in the AREDS2 participants, and these findings are consistent with findings in the

  20. Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Advances in Management and Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Yonekawa

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the most common cause of irreversible visual impairment in older populations in industrialized nations. AMD is a late-onset deterioration of photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium in the central retina caused by various environmental and genetic factors. Great strides in our understanding of AMD pathogenesis have been made in the past several decades, which have translated into revolutionary therapeutic agents in recent years. In this review, we describe the clinical and pathologic features of AMD and present an overview of current diagnosis and treatment strategies.

  1. Figure ground discrimination in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Thi Ha Chau; Guyader, Nathalie; Guerin, Anne; Despretz, Pascal; Boucart, Muriel

    2011-03-01

    To investigate impairment in discriminating a figure from its background and to study its relation to visual acuity and lesion size in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Seventeen patients with neovascular AMD and visual acuity Figure/ground segregation is impaired in patients with AMD. A white space surrounding an object is sufficient to improve the object's detection and to facilitate figure/ground segregation. These results may have practical applications to the rehabilitation of the environment in patients with AMD.

  2. Age related macular degeneration - modern diagnostic and therapeutic preventive approach

    OpenAIRE

    Gogelová, Blanka

    2009-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a disease associated with aging that gradually destroys sharp, central vision. Central vision is needed for seeing objects clearly and for common daily tasks such as reading and driving. AMD affects the macula, the part of the eye that alows seeing of fine details. AMD occurs in two form: dry and wet. In dry AMD, the light sensitive cells in the macula slowly break down. As fewer cells in the macula are able to function, people will see details less c...

  3. Recent advances in treatment of wet age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Li

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration(AMDis one of the important eye diseases of the WHO present three big blindness, is one of the main blinding eye disease in people over the age of 50, people over the age of 65, about 2% of the disease caused by monocular blindness, as the population ages, AMD prevalence is increasing in our country. AMD with respect to its clinical manifestations can be divided into dry AMD and wet AMD, wet AMD is the most harmful for the vision of patients, at present there are many treatments for AMD(mainly for wet age-related macular degeneration, mainly including laser treatment, drug therapy, surgical treatment, gene therapy,etc. The treatments of AMD would be illuminated in this article.

  4. In vitro circumvention of cisplatin resistance by the novel sterically hindered platinum complex AMD473.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holford, J.; Sharp, S. Y.; Murrer, B. A.; Abrams, M.; Kelland, L. R.

    1998-01-01

    A novel sterically hindered platinum complex, AMD473 [cis-aminedichloro(2-methylpyridine) platinum (II)], has been selected for phase I clinical trials due to commence in 1997. AMD473 was rationally designed to react preferentially with nucleic acids over sulphur ligands such as glutathione. This report documents the in vitro circumvention of acquired cisplatin resistance mechanisms in human ovarian carcinoma (HOC) cell lines by AMD473. In a panel of 11 HOC cell lines, AMD473 showed intermediate growth inhibition potency (mean IC50 of 8.1 microM) in comparison to cisplatin (mean IC50 of 2.6 microM) and carboplatin (mean IC50 of 20.3 microM). AMD473 showed only a 30.7-fold increase in IC50 value from the most sensitive to the most resistant HOC cell line, whereas for cisplatin it was 117.9-fold and for carboplatin 119.7-fold. AMD473 also showed significantly (P or = 14 h for AMD473) after equitoxic doses were exposed to HOC cells for 2 h. AMD473 ICLs in the CH1 HOC cell line were slowly formed and showed no visible signs of being repaired 24 h after removal of drug. This was paralleled by a slower, longer lasting induction of p53 protein by equitoxic doses of AMD473 in HOC cell lines with wild-type p53. This new class of sterically hindered platinum compound, selected for clinical trial in 1997, may therefore elicit improved clinical response in intrinsically and acquired cisplatin-resistant tumours in the clinic. Images Figure 9 PMID:9472630

  5. Omics in Ophthalmology: Advances in Genomics and Precision Medicine for Leber Congenital Amaurosis and Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hollander, Anneke I

    2016-03-01

    The genomic revolution has had a huge impact on our understanding of the genetic defects and disease mechanisms underlying ophthalmic diseases. Two examples are discussed here. The first is Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), a severe inherited retinal dystrophy leading to severe vision loss in children, and the second is age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the most common cause of vision loss in the elderly. Twenty years ago, the genetic causes of these diseases were unknown. Currently, more than 20 LCA genes have been identified, and genetic testing can now successfully identify the genetic defects in at least 75% of all LCA cases. Gene-specific treatments have entered the clinical trial phase for three LCA genes, and for seven LCA genes gene-specific therapies have been tested in model systems. Age-related macular degeneration is a multifactorial disease caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Currently, more than 40 loci have been identified for AMD, accounting for 15%-65% of the total genetic contribution to AMD. Despite the progress that has been made so far, genetic testing is not yet recommended for AMD, but this may change if we move to clinical trials or treatments that are dependent on an individual's genotype. The identification of serum or plasma biomarkers using other "-omics" technologies may further improve predictive tests and our understanding of the disease mechanisms of AMD. Ultimately, it is anticipated that predictive tests will help to stratify patients for the most suitable therapy, which will enable the development of precision medicine, tailored to individual needs.

  6. Update on the role of genetics in the onset of age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Peter James; Klein, Michael L

    2011-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), akin to other common age-related diseases, has a complex pathogenesis and arises from the interplay of genes, environmental factors, and personal characteristics. The past decade has seen very significant strides towards identification of those precise genetic variants associated with disease. That genes encoding proteins of the (alternative) complement pathway (CFH, C2, CFB, C3, CFI) are major players in etiology came as a surprise to many but has already lead to the development of therapies entering human clinical trials. Other genes replicated in many populations ARMS2, APOE, variants near TIMP3, and genes involved in lipid metabolism have also been implicated in disease pathogenesis. The genes discovered to date can be estimated to account for approximately 50% of the genetic variance of AMD and have been discovered by candidate gene approaches, pathway analysis, and latterly genome-wide association studies. Next generation sequencing modalities and meta-analysis techniques are being employed with the aim of identifying the remaining rarer but, perhaps, individually more significant sequence variations, linked to disease status. Complementary studies have also begun to utilize this genetic information to develop clinically useful algorithms to predict AMD risk and evaluate pharmacogenetics. In this article, contemporary commentary is provided on rapidly progressing efforts to elucidate the genetic pathogenesis of AMD as the field stands at the end of the first decade of the 21st century. PMID:21887094

  7. Molecular pharmacodynamics of emixustat in protection against retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianye; Kiser, Philip D; Badiee, Mohsen; Palczewska, Grazyna; Dong, Zhiqian; Golczak, Marcin; Tochtrop, Gregory P; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2015-07-01

    Emixustat is a visual cycle modulator that has entered clinical trials as a treatment for age-related macular degeneration (AMD). This molecule has been proposed to inhibit the visual cycle isomerase RPE65, thereby slowing regeneration of 11-cis-retinal and reducing production of retinaldehyde condensation byproducts that may be involved in AMD pathology. Previously, we reported that all-trans-retinal (atRAL) is directly cytotoxic and that certain primary amine compounds that transiently sequester atRAL via Schiff base formation ameliorate retinal degeneration. Here, we have shown that emixustat stereoselectively inhibits RPE65 by direct active site binding. However, we detected the presence of emixustat-atRAL Schiff base conjugates, indicating that emixustat also acts as a retinal scavenger, which may contribute to its therapeutic effects. Using agents that lack either RPE65 inhibitory activity or the capacity to sequester atRAL, we assessed the relative importance of these 2 modes of action in protection against retinal phototoxicity in mice. The atRAL sequestrant QEA-B-001-NH2 conferred protection against phototoxicity without inhibiting RPE65, whereas an emixustat derivative incapable of atRAL sequestration was minimally protective, despite direct inhibition of RPE65. These data indicate that atRAL sequestration is an essential mechanism underlying the protective effects of emixustat and related compounds against retinal phototoxicity. Moreover, atRAL sequestration should be considered in the design of next-generation visual cycle modulators.

  8. Drusen Volume and Retinal Pigment Epithelium Abnormal Thinning Volume Predict 2-Year Progression of Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folgar, Francisco A; Yuan, Eric L; Sevilla, Monica B; Chiu, Stephanie J; Farsiu, Sina; Chew, Emily Y; Toth, Cynthia A

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the value of novel measures of retinal pigment epithelium-drusen complex (RPEDC) volume to predict 2-year disease progression of intermediate age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Prospective, observational study. Three hundred forty-five AMD and 122 non-AMD participants enrolled in the Age Related Eye Disease Study 2 Ancillary Spectral-Domain (SD) Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) study. High-density SD OCT macular volumes were obtained at yearly study visits. The RPEDC abnormal thickening (henceforth, OCT drusen) and RPEDC abnormal thinning (RAT) volumes were generated by semiautomated segmentation of total RPEDC within a 5-mm-diameter macular field. Volume change and odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for progression to advanced AMD with choroidal neovascularization (CNV) or central geographic atrophy (GA). Complete volumes were obtained in 265 and 266 AMD eyes and in 115 and 97 control eyes at baseline and at year 2, respectively. In AMD eyes, mean (standard deviation) OCT drusen volume increased from 0.08 mm(3) (0.16 mm(3)) to 0.10 mm(3) (0.23 mm(3); P < 0.001), and RAT volume increased from 8.3 × 10(-4) mm(3) (20.8 × 10(-4) mm(3)) to 18.4 × 10(-4) mm(3) (46.6 × 10(-4) mm(3); P < 0.001). Greater baseline OCT drusen volume was associated with 2-year progression to CNV (P = 0.002). Odds of developing CNV increased by 31% for every 0.1-mm(3) increase in baseline OCT drusen volume (OR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.06-1.63; P = 0.013). Greater baseline RAT volume was associated with significant 2-year increase in RAT volume (P < 0.001), noncentral GA (P < 0.001), and progression to central GA (P < 0.001). Odds of developing central GA increased by 32% for every 0.001-mm(3) increase in baseline RAT volume (OR, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.14-1.53; P < 0.001). In non-AMD eyes, all volumes were significantly lower than AMD eyes and showed no significant 2-year change. Macular OCT drusen and RAT volumes increased significantly in AMD eyes over 2 years

  9. Predictors of Visual Response to Intravitreal Bevacizumab for Treatment of Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Fang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To identify the predictors of visual response to the bevacizumab treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD. Design. A cohort study within the Neovascular AMD Treatment Trial Using Bevacizumab (NATTB. Methods. This was a multicenter trial including 144 participants from the NATTB study. Visual outcomes measured by change in visual acuity (VA score, proportion gaining ≥15 letters, and change in central retinal thickness (CRT were compared among groups according to the baseline, demographic, and ocular characteristics and genotypes. Results. Mean change in the VA score was 9.2 ± 2.3 SD letters with a total of 46 participants (31.9% gaining ≥15 letters. Change in median CRT was −81.5 μm. Younger age, lower baseline VA score, shorter duration of neovascular AMD, and TT genotype in rs10490924 were significantly associated with greater VA score improvement (P=0.028, P<0.001, P=0.02, and P=0.039, resp.. Lower baseline VA score and TT genotype in rs10490924 were significantly associated with a higher likelihood of gaining ≥15 letters (P=0.028, and P=0.021, resp.. Conclusions. Baseline VA and genotype of rs10490924 were both important predictors for visual response to bevacizumab at 6 months. This trial is registered with the Registration no. NCT01306591.

  10. Association of OCT derived drusen measurements with AMD associated-genotypic SNPs in Amish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavali, Venkata Ramana Murthy; Diniz, Bruno; Huang, Jiayan; Ying, Gui-Shuang; Sadda, SriniVas R; Stambolian, Dwight

    To investigate the association of OCT derived drusen measures in Amish age-related macular degeneration (AMD) patients with known loci for macular degeneration. Members of the Old Order Amish community in Pennsylvania ages 50 and older were assessed for drusen area, volume and regions of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) atrophy using a Cirrus High- Definition-OCT. Measurements were obtained in the macula region within a central circle (CC) of 3 mm diameter and a surrounding perifoveal ring (PR) of 3 to 5 mm diameter using the Cirrus OCT RPE analysis software. Other demographic information including age, gender and smoking status were collected. Study subjects were further genotyped to determine their risk for the AMD associated SNPs in SYN3, LIPC, ARMS2, C3, CFB, CETP, CFI and CFH genes using TaqMan genotyping assays. The association of genotypes with OCT measures were assessed using linear trend p-values calculated from univariate and multivariate generalized linear models. 432 eyes were included in the analysis. Multivariate analysis (adjusted by age, gender and smoking status) confirmed the known significant association between AMD and macular drusen with the number of CFH risk alleles for drusen area (area increased 0.12 mm 2 for a risk allele increase, pAmish AMD population.

  11. The Association of Statin Use with Age-Related Macular Degeneration Progression The Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2 Report Number 9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Holou, Shaza N.; Tucker, William R.; Agrón, Elvira; Clemons, Traci E.; Cukras, Catherine; Ferris, Frederick L.; Chew, Emily Y.

    2015-01-01

    Objective/purpose To evaluate the association of statin use with progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Design Preplanned, prospective cohort study within a controlled clinical trial of oral supplementation for age-related eye diseases. Subjects Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2 participants, aged 50 to 85 years. Methods Factors, including age, gender, smoking status, aspirin use, and history of diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, angina, and stroke, all known to be associated with statin use, were included in a logistic regression model to estimate propensity scores for each participant. Age-adjusted proportional hazards regression models, with and without propensity score matching, were performed to evaluate the association of statin use with progression to late AMD. Analyses were also performed adjusting for the competing risk of death. Main Outcome Measures Baseline and annual stereoscopic fundus photographs were assessed centrally by masked graders for the development of late AMD, either neovascular AMD or geographic atrophy (GA). Results Of the 3791 participants (2462 with bilateral large drusen and 1329 with unilateral late AMD at baseline), 1659 (43.8%) were statin users. The overall analysis, with no matching of propensity scores and no adjustment for death as a competing risk, showed that statin use was not associated with progression to late AMD (hazard ratios [HR] of 1.08, 95% confidence intervals [CI] of 0.83–1.41, P=0.56). When matched for propensity scores and adjusted for death as a competing risk, the result was not statistically significant with HR: 0.81, 95% CI: 0.55–1.20, P=0.29. Further subgroup analyses of persons with or without late AMD at baseline to the various components of late AMD (neovascular, central geographic atrophy, or any geographic atrophy) also showed no statistically significant association of statin use with progression to AMD. Conclusions Statin use was not statistically significantly associated with the

  12. Intakes of Lutein, Zeaxanthin, and Other Carotenoids and Age-Related Macular Degeneration During 2 Decades of Prospective Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Juan; Cho, Eunyoung; Willett, Walter C; Sastry, Srinivas M; Schaumberg, Debra A

    2015-12-01

    Despite strong biological plausibility, evidence from epidemiologic studies and clinical trials on the relations between intakes of lutein and zeaxanthin and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) has been inconsistent. The roles of other carotenoids are less thoroughly investigated. To investigate the associations between intakes of carotenoids and AMD. Prospective cohort study, with cohorts from the Nurses' Health Study and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study in the United States. A total of 63,443 women and 38,603 men were followed up, from 1984 until May 31, 2010, in the Nurses' Health Study and from 1986 until January 31, 2010, in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. All participants were aged 50 years or older and were free of diagnosed AMD, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and cancer at baseline. Predicted plasma carotenoid scores were computed directly from food intake, assessed by repeated food frequency questionnaires at baseline and follow-up, using validated regression models to account for bioavailability and reporting validity of different foods, and associations between predicted plasma carotenoid scores and AMD were determined. We confirmed 1361 incident intermediate and 1118 advanced AMD cases (primarily neovascular AMD) with a visual acuity of 20/30 or worse by medical record review. Comparing extreme quintiles of predicted plasma lutein/zeaxanthin score, we found a risk reduction for advanced AMD of about 40% in both women and men (pooled relative risk comparing extreme quintiles = 0.59; 95% CI, 0.48-0.73; P for trend carotenoid scores for other carotenoids, including β-cryptoxanthin, α-carotene, and β-carotene, were associated with a 25% to 35% lower risk of advanced AMD when comparing extreme quintiles. The relative risk comparing extreme quintiles for the predicted plasma total carotenoid index was 0.65 (95% CI, 0.53-0.80; P for trend carotenoids, either as predicted plasma score or calculated intake, with

  13. Association of OCT-Derived Drusen Measurements with AMD-Associated Genotypic SNPs in the Amish Population

    OpenAIRE

    Chavali, Venkata Ramana Murthy; Diniz, Bruno; Huang, Jiayan; Ying, Gui-Shuang; Sadda, SriniVas R.; Stambolian, Dwight

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the association of optical coherence tomography (OCT)-derived drusen measures in Amish age-related macular degeneration (AMD) patients with known loci for macular degeneration. Methods: Members of the Old Order Amish community in Pennsylvania ages 50 and older were assessed for drusen area, volume and regions of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) atrophy using a Cirrus High-Definition OCT. Measurements were obtained in the macula region within a central circle (CC) of 3...

  14. Prevalence of anti-retinal autoantibodies in different stages of Age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamus, Grazyna; Chew, Emily Y; Ferris, Frederick L; Klein, Michael L

    2014-12-08

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of central vision loss in older adults. Anti-retinal autoantibodies (AAbs) have been found in individuals with AMD. The goal of the study was to determine the AAb specificity in different stages of AMD, and determine whether there is a prevalent AAb signature. Sera of 134 participants in the Age-related Eye Disease Study were analyzed for anti-retinal AAbs by western blotting. The subjects were classified by diagnostic subgroups based upon their clinical classification: No AMD, Intermediate AMD, and Late AMD - geographic atrophy (GA) and Late AMD - neovascular (NV). The presence of anti-retinal AAb was detected in 58% patients with Intermediate and Late AMD, and 54% of those with no AMD. AAbs bound to fifteen different retinal antigens. Most individuals had 1 specific AAbs (67%), with the remainder having 2 to 4 different AAbs. Over 40% of patients with Intermediate AMD, and 46% of those with GA had anti-enolase AAbs, compared with 29% of individuals with NV and 29% with no AMD. Different AAbs signatures related to NV as compared to GA and/or Intermediate AMD were distinguished. Anti-40-kDa (10%) and 42-kDa (16%) autoantibodies were associated with Intermediate AMD, while anti-30-kDa AAbs (23%) were primarily present in GA. Anti-32-kDa (12%), 35-kDa (21%), and 60-kDa (8%) AAbs were more frequent in NV AMD. A unique AAb pattern for each of the disease subgroups was present when AMD progressed from the intermediate to the late forms of severity. Differences in the frequency of specific AAbs between AMD subgroups suggested that they may participate in pathogenicity of AMD. Further studies are necessary to confirm these observations in the larger cohort and individual AMD patients over time.

  15. Genetics of Unilateral and Bilateral Age-Related Macular Degeneration Severity Stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schick, Tina; Altay, Lebriz; Viehweger, Eva; Hoyng, Carel B; den Hollander, Anneke I; Felsch, Moritz; Fauser, Sascha

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common disease causing visual impairment and blindness. Various gene variants are strongly associated with late stage AMD, but little is known about the genetics of early forms of the disease. This study evaluated associations of genetic factors and different AMD stages depending on unilateral and bilateral disease severity. In this case-control study, participants were assigned to nine AMD severity stages based on the characteristics of each eye. 18 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped and attempted to correlate with AMD severity stages by uni- and multivariate logistic regression analyses and trend analyses. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC) were calculated. Of 3444 individuals 1673 were controls, 379 had early AMD, 333 had intermediate AMD and 989 showed late AMD stages. With increasing severity of disease and bilateralism more SNPs with significant associations were found. Odds ratios, especially for the main risk polymorphisms in ARMS2 (rs10490924) and CFH (rs1061170), gained with increasing disease severity and bilateralism (exemplarily: rs1061170: unilateral early AMD: OR = 1.18; bilateral early AMD: OR = 1.20; unilateral intermediate AMD: OR = 1.28; bilateral intermediate AMD: OR = 1.39, unilateral geographic atrophy (GA): OR = 1.50; bilateral GA: OR = 1.71). Trend analyses showed pstages was lowest for unilateral early AMD (AUC = 0.629) and showed higher values in more severely and bilaterally affected individuals being highest for late AMD with GA in one eye and neovascular AMD in the other eye (AUC = 0.957). The association of known genetic risk factors with AMD became stronger with increasing disease severity, which also led to an increasing discriminative ability of AMD cases and controls. Genetic predisposition was also associated with the disease severity of the fellow-eye, highlighting the importance of both eyes in AMD patients.

  16. Management of neovascular age-related macular degeneration: current state-of-the-art care for optimizing visual outcomes and therapies in development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agarwal A

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aniruddha Agarwal, William R Rhoades, Mostafa Hanout, Mohamed Kamel Soliman, Salman Sarwar, Mohammad Ali Sadiq, Yasir Jamal Sepah, Diana V Do, Quan Dong Nguyen Stanley M Truhlsen Eye Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, USA Abstract: Contemporary management of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD has evolved significantly over the last few years. The goal of treatment is shifting from merely salvaging vision to maintaining a high quality of life. There have been significant breakthroughs in the identification of viable drug targets and gene therapies. Imaging tools with near-histological precision have enhanced our knowledge about pathophysiological mechanisms that play a role in vision loss due to AMD. Visual, social, and vocational rehabilitation are all important treatment goals. In this review, evidence from landmark clinical trials is summarized to elucidate the optimum modern-day management of neovascular AMD. Therapeutic strategies currently under development, such as gene therapy and personalized medicine, are also described. Keywords: AMD, neovascular AMD, choroidal neovascular membrane, pharmacogenomics, VEGF, low-vision rehabilitation, gene therapy

  17. Prevention of age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ian Yat Hin; Koo, Simon Chi Yan; Chan, Clement Wai Nang

    2011-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is one of the leading causes of blindness in the developed world. Although effective treatment modalities such as anti-VEGF treatment have been developed for neovascular AMD, there is still no effective treatment for geographical atrophy, and therefore the most cost-effective management of AMD is to start with prevention. This review looks at current evidence on preventive measures targeted at AMD. Modalities reviewed include (1) nutritional supplements such as the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) formula, lutein and zeaxanthin, omega-3 fatty acid, and berry extracts, (2) lifestyle modifications, including smoking and body-mass-index, and (3) filtering sunlight, i.e. sunglasses and blue-blocking intraocular lenses. In summary, the only proven effective preventive measures are stopping smoking and the AREDS formula.

  18. Animal models of age related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennesi, Mark E.; Neuringer, Martha; Courtney, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss of those over the age of 65 in the industrialized world. The prevalence and need to develop effective treatments for AMD has lead to the development of multiple animal models. AMD is a complex and heterogeneous disease that involves the interaction of both genetic and environmental factors with the unique anatomy of the human macula. Models in mice, rats, rabbits, pigs and non-human primates have recreated many of the histological features of AMD and provided much insight into the underlying pathological mechanisms of this disease. In spite of the large number of models developed, no one model yet recapitulates all of the features of human AMD. However, these models have helped reveal the roles of chronic oxidative damage, inflammation and immune dysregulation, and lipid metabolism in the development of AMD. Models for induced choroidal neovascularization have served as the backbone for testing new therapies. This article will review the diversity of animal models that exist for AMD as well as their strengths and limitations. PMID:22705444

  19. Genome-wide analysis of disease progression in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Qi; Ding, Ying; Liu, Yi; Sun, Tao; Fritsche, Lars G; Clemons, Traci; Ratnapriya, Rinki; Klein, Michael L; Cook, Richard J; Liu, Yu; Fan, Ruzong; Wei, Lai; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Swaroop, Anand; Chew, Emily Y; Weeks, Daniel E; Chen, Wei

    2018-03-01

    Family- and population-based genetic studies have successfully identified multiple disease-susceptibility loci for Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), one of the first batch and most successful examples of genome-wide association study. However, most genetic studies to date have focused on case-control studies of late AMD (choroidal neovascularization or geographic atrophy). The genetic influences on disease progression are largely unexplored. We assembled unique resources to perform a genome-wide bivariate time-to-event analysis to test for association of time-to-late-AMD with ∼9 million variants on 2721 Caucasians from a large multi-center randomized clinical trial, the Age-Related Eye Disease Study. To our knowledge, this is the first genome-wide association study of disease progression (bivariate survival outcome) in AMD genetic studies, thus providing novel insights to AMD genetics. We used a robust Cox proportional hazards model to appropriately account for between-eye correlation when analyzing the progression time in the two eyes of each participant. We identified four previously reported susceptibility loci showing genome-wide significant association with AMD progression: ARMS2-HTRA1 (P = 8.1 × 10-43), CFH (P = 3.5 × 10-37), C2-CFB-SKIV2L (P = 8.1 × 10-10) and C3 (P = 1.2 × 10-9). Furthermore, we detected association of rs58978565 near TNR (P = 2.3 × 10-8), rs28368872 near ATF7IP2 (P = 2.9 × 10-8) and rs142450006 near MMP9 (P = 0.0006) with progression to choroidal neovascularization but not geographic atrophy. Secondary analysis limited to 34 reported risk variants revealed that LIPC and CTRB2-CTRB1 were also associated with AMD progression (P < 0.0015). Our genome-wide analysis thus expands the genetics in both development and progression of AMD and should assist in early identification of high risk individuals.

  20. Current and emerging therapies for the treatment of age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Vaughn Emerson

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available M Vaughn Emerson, Andreas K LauerCasey Eye Institute, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR, USAAbstract: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the leading cause of vision loss in the industrialized world. In the last few decades, the mainstay of treatment for choroidal neovascularization (CNV due to AMD has been thermal laser photocoagulation. In the last decade, photodynamic therapy with verteporfin extended treatment for more patients. While both of these treatments have prevented further vision loss in a subset of patients, improvement in visual acuity is rare. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF therapy has revolutionized the treatment of AMD-related CNV. Pegaptanib, an anti-VEGF aptamer prevents vision loss in CNV, although the performance is similar to that of photodynamic therapy. Ranibizumab, an antibody fragment and bevacizumab, a full-length humanized monoclonal antibody against VEGF have both shown promising results with improvements in visual acuity with either agent. VEGF trap, a modified soluble VEGF receptor analogue, binds VEGF more tightly than all other anti-VEGF agents and has also shown promising results in early trials. Other treatment strategies to decrease the effect of VEGF have used small interfering ribonucleic acid (RNA to inhibit VEGF production and VEGF receptor production. Steroids, including anecortave acetate in the treatment and prevention of CNV, have shown promise in controlled trials. Receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, such as vatalanib, inhibit downstream effects of VEGF, and have been effective in the treatment of CNV in early studies. Squalamine lactate inhibits plasma membrane ion channels with downstream effects on VEGF, and has shown promising results with systemic administration. Other growth factors, including pigment epithelium-derived growth factor that has been administered via an adenoviral vector has shown promising initial results. In some patients ciliary

  1. Relationship between macular pigment and visual function in subjects with early age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akuffo, Kwadwo Owusu; Nolan, John M; Peto, Tunde; Stack, Jim; Leung, Irene; Corcoran, Laura; Beatty, Stephen

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the relationship between macular pigment (MP) and visual function in subjects with early age-related macular degeneration (AMD). 121 subjects with early AMD enrolled as part of the Central Retinal Enrichment Supplementation Trial (CREST; ISRCTN13894787) were assessed using a range of psychophysical measures of visual function, including best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), letter contrast sensitivity (CS), mesopic and photopic CS, mesopic and photopic glare disability (GD), photostress recovery time (PRT), reading performance and subjective visual function, using the National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire-25 (NEI VFQ-25). MP was measured using customised heterochromatic flicker photometry. Letter CS, mesopic and photopic CS, photopic GD and mean reading speed were each significantly (p0.05, for all). MP relates positively to many measures of visual function in unsupplemented subjects with early AMD. The CREST trial will investigate whether enrichment of MP influences visual function among those afflicted with this condition. ISRCTN13894787. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  2. Outcomes in Eyes with Retinal Angiomatous Proliferation in the Comparison of Age-Related Macular Degeneration Treatments Trials (CATT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Ebenezer; Shaffer, James; Ying, Gui-shuang; Grunwald, Juan E; Martin, Daniel F; Jaffe, Glenn J; Maguire, Maureen G

    2016-03-01

    To compare baseline characteristics, visual acuity (VA), and morphologic outcomes between eyes with retinal angiomatous proliferation (RAP) and all other eyes among patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (NVAMD) treated with anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) drugs. Prospective cohort study within the Comparison of Age-Related Macular Degeneration Treatments Trials (CATT). Patients with NVAMD. Reading center staff evaluated digital color fundus photographs, fluorescein angiography (FA) images, and optical coherence tomography (OCT) scans of eyes with NVAMD treated with either ranibizumab or bevacizumab over a 2-year period. Retinal angiomatous proliferation was identified by the intense intra-retinal leakage of fluorescein in combination with other associated features. Visual acuity; fluorescein leakage; scar; geographic atrophy (GA) on FA; retinal thickness, fluid, and subretinal hyperreflective material (SHRM) on OCT; and the number of intravitreal anti-VEGF injections at 1 and 2 years. Retinal angiomatous proliferation was present in 126 of 1183 (10.7%) study eyes at baseline. Mean VA improvement from baseline was greater (10.6 vs. 6.9 letters; P = 0.01) at 1 year, but similar at 2 years (7.8 vs. 6.2 letters; P = 0.34). At 1 year, eyes with RAP were more likely to have no fluid (46% vs. 26%; P treatment in CATT, eyes with RAP were less likely to have fluid, FA leakage, scar, and SHRM and more likely to have GA than eyes without RAP. Mean improvement in VA was similar at 2 years. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Nutritional Supplementation Inhibits the Increase in Serum Malondialdehyde in Patients with Wet Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Matsuura

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To compare serum levels of malondialdehyde (MDA in patients with wet age-related macular degeneration (wAMD, patients with dry AMD (dAMD, and patients without AMD and to evaluate the efficacy of nutritional supplementation for treating elevated serum MDA in patients with wAMD. Methods. MDA levels were measured in sera from 20 patients with wAMD, 20 with dAMD, and 24 without AMD. Patients with wAMD were randomized to receive or not receive nutritional supplementation (10 patients in each group, and MDA levels were measured after 3 months of treatment. Results. MDA levels in patients with wAMD were significantly greater compared with patients without AMD. In eyes with wAMD, there was a significant correlation between MDA levels and choroidal neovascularization lesion area. Serum MDA levels decreased in most patients that received supplementation and significantly increased in those who did not. Conclusion. Baseline serum MDA levels were elevated in patients with wAMD, and MDA levels were directly correlated with choroidal neovascularization lesion area. In addition, nutritional supplementation appeared to exert a protective effect against oxidative stress in patients with wAMD.

  4. Ocular Surface Temperature in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Sodi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of this study is to investigate the ocular thermographic profiles in age-related macular degeneration (AMD eyes and age-matched controls to detect possible hemodynamic abnormalities, which could be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. Methods. 32 eyes with early AMD, 37 eyes with atrophic AMD, 30 eyes affected by untreated neovascular AMD, and 43 eyes with fibrotic AMD were included. The control group consisted of 44 healthy eyes. Exclusion criteria were represented by any other ocular diseases other than AMD, tear film abnormalities, systemic cardiovascular abnormalities, diabetes mellitus, and a body temperature higher than 37.5°C. A total of 186 eyes without pupil dilation were investigated by infrared thermography (FLIR A320. The ocular surface temperature (OST of three ocular points was calculated by means of an image processing technique from the infrared images. Two-sample t-test and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA test were used for statistical analyses. Results. ANOVA analyses showed no significant differences among AMD groups (P value >0.272. OST in AMD patients was significantly lower than in controls (P>0.05. Conclusions. Considering the possible relationship between ocular blood flow and OST, these findings might support the central role of ischemia in the pathogenesis of AMD.

  5. Evaluation of the siRNA PF-04523655 versus ranibizumab for the treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (MONET Study)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Quan Dong; Schachar, Ronald A; Nduaka, Chudy I

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of different dosing paradigms of PF-04523655 (PF) versus ranibizumab (comparator) in subjects with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD).......To evaluate the efficacy of different dosing paradigms of PF-04523655 (PF) versus ranibizumab (comparator) in subjects with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD)....

  6. HTRA1 variant confers similar risks to geographic atrophy and neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, D Joshua; Yang, Zhenglin; Gibbs, Daniel; Chen, Haoyu; Kaminoh, Yuuki; Jorgensen, Adam; Zeng, Jiexi; Luo, Ling; Brinton, Eric; Brinton, Gregory; Brand, John M; Bernstein, Paul S; Zabriskie, Norman A; Tang, Shibo; Constantine, Ryan; Tong, Zongzhong; Zhang, Kang

    2007-05-02

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of irreversible visual impairment in the developed world. The two forms of advanced AMD, geographic atrophy (GA) and choroidal neovascularization (wet AMD), represent two types of degenerative processes in the macula that lead to loss of central vision. Soft confluent drusen, characterized by deposits in macula without visual loss are considered a precursor of advanced AMD. A single nucleotide polymorphism, rs11200638, in the promoter of HTRA1 has been shown to increases the risk for wet AMD. However, its impact on soft confluent drusen and GA or the relationship between them is unclear. To better understand the role the HTRA1 polymorphism plays in AMD subtypes, we genotyped an expanded Utah population with 658 patients having advanced AMD or soft confluent drusen and 294 normal controls and found that the rs11200638 was significantly associated with GA. This association remains significant conditional on LOC387715 rs10490924. In addition, rs11200638 was significantly associated with soft confluent drusen, which are strongly immunolabeled with HTRA1 antibody in an AMD eye with GA similar to wet AMD. Two-locus analyses were performed for CFH Y402H variant at 1q31 and the HTRA1 polymorphism. Together CFH and HTRA1 risk variants increase the odds of having AMD by more than 40 times. These findings expand the role of HTRA1 in AMD. Understanding the underlying molecular mechanism will provide an important insight in pathogenesis of AMD.

  7. Genetics of Unilateral and Bilateral Age-Related Macular Degeneration Severity Stages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schick, T.; Altay, L.; Viehweger, E.; Hoyng, C.B.; Hollander, A.I. den; Felsch, M.; Fauser, S.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common disease causing visual impairment and blindness. Various gene variants are strongly associated with late stage AMD, but little is known about the genetics of early forms of the disease. This study evaluated associations of genetic

  8. Automatic Drusen Quantification and Risk Assessment of Age-related Macular Degeneration on Color Fundus Images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grinsven, M.J.J.P. van; Lechanteur, Y.T.E.; Ven, J.P.H. van de; Ginneken, B. van; Hoyng, C.B.; Theelen, T.; Sanchez, C.I.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate a machine learning algorithm that allows for computer aided diagnosis (CAD) of non-advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD) by providing an accurate detection and quantification of drusen location, area and size. METHODS: Color fundus photographs of 407 eyes without AMD

  9. Immunological Factors in the Pathogenesis and Treatment of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kijlstra, A.; Heij, La E.C.; Hendrikse, F.

    2005-01-01

    Recent findings indicate that immunological factors are involved not only in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), but also in its treatment. Earlier data showing the presence of inflammatory cells in affected areas of AMD retinas support this statement. Although a possible

  10. The association between Neovascular Age-related Macular Degeneration and Regulatory T cells in peripheral blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madelung, Christopher Fugl; Falk, Mads; Sørensen, Torben Lykke

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate regulatory T cells (Tregs) and subsets of the Treg population in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Twenty-one neovascular AMD cases and 12 age-matched controls without retinal pathology were selected. Patients were...

  11. Cataract surgery and age-related macular degeneration. An evidence-based update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessel, Line; Erngaard, Ditte; Flesner, Per

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and cataract often coexist in patients and concerns that cataract surgery is associated with an increased risk of incidence or progression of existing AMD has been raised. This systematic review and meta-analysis is focused on presenting the evidence...

  12. Cardiovascular risk factors associated with age-related macular degeneration: the Tromso Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erke, M. G.; Bertelsen, G.; Peto, T.

    2014-01-01

    PurposeTo examine associations between cardiovascular risk factors and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). MethodsA population-based, cross-sectional study of Caucasians aged 65-87years was conducted in Norway in 2007/2008. Retinal photographs were graded for AMD. Multivariable logistic...

  13. Laser treatment in patients with bilateral large drusen: the complications of age-related macular degeneration prevention trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of low-intensity laser treatment in the prevention of visual acuity (VA) loss among participants with bilateral large drusen. Multicenter randomized clinical trial. One eye of each participant was assigned to treatment, and the contralateral eye was assigned to observation. A total of 1052 participants who had > or =10 large (>125 microm) drusen and VA> or =20/40 in each eye enrolled through 22 clinical centers. The initial laser treatment protocol specified 60 barely visible burns applied in a grid pattern within an annulus between 1500 and 2500 mum from the foveal center. At 12 months, eyes assigned to treatment that had sufficient drusen remaining were retreated with 30 burns by targeting drusen within an annulus between 1000 and 2000 mum from the foveal center. Proportion of eyes at 5 years with loss of > or =3 lines of VA from baseline. Secondary outcome measures included the development of choroidal neovascularization or geographic atrophy (GA), change in contrast threshold, change in critical print size, and incidence of ocular adverse events. At 5 years, 188 (20.5%) treated eyes and 188 (20.5%) observed eyes had VA scores > or = 3 lines worse than at the initial visit (P = 1.00). Cumulative 5-year incidence rates for treated and observed eyes were 13.3% and 13.3% (P = 0.95) for choroidal neovascularization and 7.4% and 7.8% (P = 0.64) for GA, respectively. The contrast threshold doubled in 23.9% of treated eyes and in 20.5% of observed eyes (P = 0.40). The critical print size doubled in 29.6% of treated eyes and in 28.4% of observed eyes (P = 0.70). Seven treated eyes and 14 observed eyes had an adverse event of a > or =6-line loss in VA in the absence of late age-related macular degeneration or cataract. As applied in the Complications of Age-Related Macular Degeneration Prevention Trial, low-intensity laser treatment did not demonstrate a clinically significant benefit for vision in eyes of people with bilateral large

  14. Transcriptome changes in age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whitmore S Scott

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a debilitating, common cause of visual impairment. While the last decade has seen great progress in understanding the pathophysiology of AMD, the molecular changes that occur in eyes with AMD are still poorly understood. In the current issue of Genome Medicine, Newman and colleagues present the first systematic transcriptional profile analysis of AMD-affected tissues, providing a comprehensive set of expression data for different regions (macula versus periphery, tissues (retina versus retinal pigment epithelium (RPE/choroid, and disease state (control versus early or advanced AMD. Their findings will serve as a foundation for additional systems-level research into the pathogenesis of this blinding disease. Please see related article: http://genomemedicine.com/content/4/2/16

  15. Cataract surgery in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessel, Line; Theil, Pernille Koefoed; Sørensen, Torben Lykke

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To examine the outcome after cataract surgery in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) treated with intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) injections in routine clinical practice. Methods We extracted information about patients recorded...

  16. Antioxidant vitamin and mineral supplements for slowing the progression of age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Jennifer R; Lawrenson, John G

    2012-11-14

    It has been proposed that antioxidants may prevent cellular damage in the retina by reacting with free radicals that are produced in the process of light absorption. Higher dietary levels of antioxidant vitamins and minerals may reduce the risk of progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The objective of this review was to assess the effects of antioxidant vitamin or mineral supplementation on the progression of AMD in people with AMD. We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 8), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to August 2012), EMBASE (January 1980 to August 2012), Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED) (January 1985 to August 2012), OpenGrey (System for Information on Grey Literature in Europe) (www.opengrey.eu/), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 20 August 2012. We searched the reference lists of identified reports and the Science Citation Index. We contacted investigators and experts in the field for details of unpublished studies. We also searched for systematic reviews of harms of vitamin supplements. We included randomised trials comparing antioxidant vitamin or mineral supplementation (alone or in combination) to placebo or no intervention in people with AMD. Two authors assessed risk of bias and extracted data from the included trials. Where appropriate, we pooled data using a random-effects model unless three or fewer trials were available in which case we used a fixed-effect model. Thirteen trials (6150 participants) were included in this review. Over

  17. Use of a twin dataset to identify AMD-related visual patterns controlled by genetic factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quellec, Gwénolé; Abràmoff, Michael D.; Russell, Stephen R.

    2010-03-01

    The mapping of genotype to the phenotype of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is expected to improve the diagnosis and treatment of the disease in a near future. In this study, we focused on the first step to discover this mapping: we identified visual patterns related to AMD which seem to be controlled by genetic factors, without explicitly relating them to the genes. For this purpose, we used a dataset of eye fundus photographs from 74 twin pairs, either monozygotic twins, who have the same genotype, or dizygotic twins, whose genes responsible for AMD are less likely to be identical. If we are able to differentiate monozygotic twins from dizygotic twins, based on a given visual pattern, then this pattern is likely to be controlled by genetic factors. The main visible consequence of AMD is the apparition of drusen between the retinal pigment epithelium and Bruch's membrane. We developed two automated drusen detectors based on the wavelet transform: a shape-based detector for hard drusen, and a texture- and color- based detector for soft drusen. Forty visual features were evaluated at the location of the automatically detected drusen. These features characterize the texture, the shape, the color, the spatial distribution, or the amount of drusen. A distance measure between twin pairs was defined for each visual feature; a smaller distance should be measured between monozygotic twins for visual features controlled by genetic factors. The predictions of several visual features (75.7% accuracy) are comparable or better than the predictions of human experts.

  18. Treatments for dry age-related macular degeneration and Stargardt disease: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waugh, Norman; Loveman, Emma; Colquitt, Jill; Royle, Pamela; Yeong, Jian Lee; Hoad, Geraldine; Lois, Noemi

    2018-05-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of visual loss in older people. Advanced AMD takes two forms, neovascular (wet) and atrophic (dry). Stargardt disease (STGD) is the commonest form of inherited macular dystrophy. To carry out a systematic review of treatments for dry AMD and STGD, and to identify emerging treatments where future NIHR research might be commissioned. Systematic review. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science and The Cochrane Library from 2005 to 13 July 2017 for reviews, journal articles and meeting abstracts. We looked for studies of interventions that aim to preserve or restore vision in people with dry AMD or STGD. The most important outcomes are those that matter to patients: visual acuity (VA), contrast sensitivity, reading speed, ability to drive, adverse effects of treatment, quality of life, progression of disease and patient preference. However, visual loss is a late event and intermediate predictors of future decline were accepted if there was good evidence that they are strong predictors of subsequent visual outcomes. These include changes detectable by investigation, but not necessarily noticed by people with AMD or STGD. ClinicalTrials.gov, the World Health Organization search portal and the UK Clinical Trials gateway were searched for ongoing and recently completed clinical trials. The titles and abstracts of 7948 articles were screened for inclusion. The full text of 398 articles were obtained for further screening and checking of references and 112 articles were included in the final report. Overall, there were disappointingly few good-quality studies (including of sufficient size and duration) reporting useful outcomes, particularly in STGD. However we did identify a number of promising research topics, including drug treatments, stem cells, new forms of laser treatment, and implantable intraocular lens telescopes. In many cases, research is already under way, funded by industry or governments. In AMD

  19. Tear film proteome in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winiarczyk, Mateusz; Kaarniranta, Kai; Winiarczyk, Stanisław; Adaszek, Łukasz; Winiarczyk, Dagmara; Mackiewicz, Jerzy

    2018-06-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the main reason for blindness in elderly people in the developed countries. Current screening protocols have limitations in detecting the early signs of retinal degeneration. Therefore, it would be desirable to find novel biomarkers for early detection of AMD. Development of novel biomarkers would help in the prevention, diagnostics, and treatment of AMD. Proteomic analysis of tear film has shown promise in this research area. If an optimal set of biomarkers could be obtained from accessible body fluids, it would represent a reliable way to monitor disease progression and response to novel therapies. Tear films were collected on Schirmer strips from a total of 22 patients (8 with wet AMD, 6 with dry AMD, and 8 control individuals). 2D electrophoresis was used to separate tear film proteins prior to their identification with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight spectrometer (MALDI-TOF/TOF) and matching with functional databases. A total of 342 proteins were identified. Most of them were previously described in various proteomic studies concerning AMD. Shootin-1, histatin-3, fidgetin-like protein 1, SRC kinase signaling inhibitor, Graves disease carrier protein, actin cytoplasmic 1, prolactin-inducible protein 1, and protein S100-A7A were upregulated in the tear film samples isolated from AMD patients and were not previously linked with this disease in any proteomic analysis. The upregulated proteins supplement our current knowledge of AMD pathogenesis, providing evidence that certain specific proteins are expressed into the tear film in AMD. As far we are aware, this is the first study to have undertaken a comprehensive in-depth analysis of the human tear film proteome in AMD patients.

  20. Research status of conbercept treating age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Yan He

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration(AMDis one of the major reasons of blindness among the elderly in the developed countries. As AMD patients are increasing year by year, AMD has become one of the important topics of ophthalmic research to prevent blindness. Its pathogenesis is not fully understood, but many studies have shown that vascular endothelial growth factor(VEGFplays an important role in the pathogenesis. With the development and application of anti-VEGF drugs, there are a variety of drugs applied to the disease. This article introduces conbercept for the treatment of AMD.

  1. The Association between Plasma 25-Hydroxyvitamin D and Subgroups in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Amardeep; Falk, Mads Krüger; Subhi, Yousif

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate potential differences in plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin in subtypes of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and in patients in Clinical Age-Related Maculopathy Staging (CARMS) group 5 with or without subretinal fibrosis.......To evaluate potential differences in plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin in subtypes of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and in patients in Clinical Age-Related Maculopathy Staging (CARMS) group 5 with or without subretinal fibrosis....

  2. Lower cognitive function in patients with age-related macular degeneration: a meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li-Xiao; Sun, Cheng-Lin; Wei, Li-Juan; Gu, Zhi-Min; Lv, Liang; Dang, Yalong

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the cognitive impairment in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods Relevant articles were identified through a search of the following electronic databases through October 2015, without language restriction: 1) PubMed; 2) the Cochrane Library; 3) EMBASE; 4) ScienceDirect. Meta-analysis was conducted using STATA 12.0 software. Standardized mean differences with corresponding 95% confidence intervals were calculated. All of the included studies met the following four criteria: 1) the study design was a case–control or randomized controlled trial (RCT) study; 2) the study investigated cognitive function in the patient with AMD; 3) the diagnoses of AMD must be provided; 4) there were sufficient scores data to extract for evaluating cognitive function between cases and controls. The Newcastle–Ottawa Scale criteria were used to assess the methodological quality of the studies. Results Of the initial 278 literatures, only six case–control and one RCT studies met all of the inclusion criteria. A total of 794 AMD patients and 1,227 controls were included in this study. Five studies were performed with mini-mental state examination (MMSE), two studies with animal fluency, two studies with trail making test (TMT)-A and -B, one study with Mini-Cog. Results of the meta-analysis revealed lower cognitive function test scores in patients with AMD, especially with MMSE and Mini-Cog test (P≤0.001 for all). The results also showed that differences in the TMT-A (except AMD [total] vs controls) and TMT-B test had no statistical significance (P>0.01). The Newcastle–Ottawa Scale score was ≥5 for all of the included studies. Based on the sensitivity analysis, no single study influenced the overall pooled estimates. Conclusion This meta-analysis suggests lower cognitive function test scores in patients with AMD, especially with MMSE and Mini-Cog test. The other cognitive impairment screening tests, such as animal fluency test and

  3. The effect of normal aging and age-related macular degeneration on perceptual learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astle, Andrew T; Blighe, Alan J; Webb, Ben S; McGraw, Paul V

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether perceptual learning could be used to improve peripheral word identification speed. The relationship between the magnitude of learning and age was established in normal participants to determine whether perceptual learning effects are age invariant. We then investigated whether training could lead to improvements in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Twenty-eight participants with normal vision and five participants with AMD trained on a word identification task. They were required to identify three-letter words, presented 10° from fixation. To standardize crowding across each of the letters that made up the word, words were flanked laterally by randomly chosen letters. Word identification performance was measured psychophysically using a staircase procedure. Significant improvements in peripheral word identification speed were demonstrated following training (71% ± 18%). Initial task performance was correlated with age, with older participants having poorer performance. However, older adults learned more rapidly such that, following training, they reached the same level of performance as their younger counterparts. As a function of number of trials completed, patients with AMD learned at an equivalent rate as age-matched participants with normal vision. Improvements in word identification speed were maintained at least 6 months after training. We have demonstrated that temporal aspects of word recognition can be improved in peripheral vision with training across a range of ages and these learned improvements are relatively enduring. However, training targeted at other bottlenecks to peripheral reading ability, such as visual crowding, may need to be incorporated to optimize this approach.

  4. Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Clinical Findings following Treatment with Antiangiogenic Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Casaroli-Marano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To survey the management of patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nvAMD in Spain. Methods. An observational retrospective multicenter study was conducted. The variables analyzed were sociodemographic characteristics, foveal and macular thickness, visual acuity (VA, type of treatment, number of injections, and the initial administration of a loading dose of an antiangiogenic drug. Results. 208 patients were followed up during 23.4 months in average. During the first and second years, patients received a mean of 4.5±1.8 and 1.6±2.1 injections of antiangiogenic drugs, and 5.4±2.8 and 3.6±2.2 follow-up visits were performed, respectively. The highest improvement in VA was observed at 3 months of follow-up, followed by a decrease in the response that stabilized above baseline values until the end of the study. Patients who received an initial loading dose presented greater VA gains than those without. Conclusions. Our results suggest the need for a more standardized approach in the management and diagnosis of nvAMD receiving VEGF inhibitors. To achieve the visual outcomes reported in pivotal trials, an early diagnosis, proactive approach (more treating than follow-up visits, and a close monitoring might be the key to successfully manage nvAMD.

  5. A New System for Measuring Auto-Fluorescence Changes in Neovascular-AMD after Intravitreal Injection of Bavecizumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Norouzifard

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD is the second disease diabetes which causes blindness in aged people. The only remedy for AMD is intravenous injection of bavecizumab. To prove the efficiency of remedy, the degenerated cells in Macula should be measured. In this article, a modern system is introduced to measure Auto-Fluorescence in Macula part of retina in order to obtain number of degenerated cells. The system consists of three main parts: Pre-processing stage is omission of margins and reversion of images in retina. Analysis stage is in charge of classification of images and elicitation of their features. In classification the target areas are identified by methods like morphology, dynamic threshold and connected comportments and the features of target area including Euclidean distance to the center of image and density. In the stage of understanding by gathering the features of each class, we will get the measurable parameter of evaluating Auto Fluorescence by the help of which we can count the number of degenerated cells of Macula area. The results are coming from statistical analysis, including linear regression and correlation of data. Experiments have been done on a database of 34 retina images of AMD patients. The average statistical error rate is equal to76 percent. In clinical reviews, the founded relation to disinflation of Macula has been proved, while there were no proved relations to the vision decreasing or increasing of patients.

  6. Antioxidant vitamin and mineral supplements for slowing the progression of age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Jennifer R; Lawrenson, John G

    2017-07-31

    It has been proposed that antioxidants may prevent cellular damage in the retina by reacting with free radicals that are produced in the process of light absorption. Higher dietary levels of antioxidant vitamins and minerals may reduce the risk of progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The objective of this review was to assess the effects of antioxidant vitamin or mineral supplementation on the progression of AMD in people with AMD. We searched CENTRAL (2017, Issue 2), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to March 2017), Embase Ovid (1947 to March 2017), AMED (1985 to March 2017), OpenGrey (System for Information on Grey Literature in Europe, the ISRCTN registry (www.isrctn.com/editAdvancedSearch), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 29 March 2017. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared antioxidant vitamin or mineral supplementation (alone or in combination) to placebo or no intervention, in people with AMD. Both review authors independently assessed risk of bias in the included studies and extracted data. One author entered data into RevMan 5; the other author checked the data entry. We graded the certainty of the evidence using GRADE. We included 19 studies conducted in USA, Europe, China, and Australia. We judged the trials that contributed data to the review to be at low or unclear risk of bias.Nine studies compared multivitamins with placebo (7 studies) or no treatment (2 studies) in people with early and moderate AMD. The duration of supplementation and follow-up ranged from nine months to six years; one trial followed up beyond two years. Most evidence came from the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) in the USA. People taking antioxidant vitamins were less likely to progress to late AMD (odds ratio

  7. Antioxidant vitamin and mineral supplements for preventing age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Jennifer R; Lawrenson, John G

    2017-07-30

    There is inconclusive evidence from observational studies to suggest that people who eat a diet rich in antioxidant vitamins (carotenoids, vitamins C, and E) or minerals (selenium and zinc) may be less likely to develop age-related macular degeneration (AMD). To determine whether or not taking antioxidant vitamin or mineral supplements, or both, prevent the development of AMD. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Trials Register) (2017, Issue 2), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 29 March 2017), Embase Ovid (1947 to 29 March 2017), AMED (Allied and Complementary Medicine Database) (1985 to 29 March 2017), OpenGrey (System for Information on Grey Literature in Europe) (www.opengrey.eu/); searched 29 March 2017, the ISRCTN registry (www.isrctn.com/editAdvancedSearch); searched 29 March 2017, ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov); searched 29 March 2017 and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en); searched 29 March 2017. We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We included all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing an antioxidant vitamin or mineral supplement (alone or in combination) to control. Both review authors independently assessed risk of bias in the included studies and extracted data. One author entered data into RevMan 5; the other author checked the data entry. We pooled data using a fixed-effect model. We graded the certainty of the evidence using GRADE. We included a total of five RCTs in this review with data available for 76,756 people. The trials were conducted in Australia, Finland, and the USA, and investigated vitamin C, vitamin E, beta-carotene, and multivitamin supplements. All trials were judged to be at low risk of bias.Four studies reported the comparison of vitamin E with placebo. Average treatment and follow-up duration ranged from 4 to 10 years. Data were

  8. Bevasiranib for the Treatment of Wet, Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adinoyi O. Garba

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Age- related Macular Degeneration (AMD is the leading cause of severe visual impairment in people 65 years and older in industrialized nations. Exudative, or “wet”, AMD is a late form of AMD (as distinguished from atrophic, so-called dry, AMD and is responsible for over 60% of all cases of blindness due to AMD. It is widely accepted that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF is a key component in the pathogenesis of choroidal neo-vascularization (CNV, which is a precursor to wet AMD. The current gold-standard for treating wet AMD is the monoclonal antibody fragment ranibizumab (trade name Lucentis, which targets VEGF. Other agents used to treat wet AMD include pegaptanib (Macugen, bevacizumab (Avastin; off-label use, and several other experimental agents. The advent of small interfering RNA (siRNA has presented a whole new approach to inhibiting VEGF. This article reviews the status of a novel siRNA-based therapeutic, bevasiranib, for the treatment of wet AMD. Bevasiranib is believed to work by down regulating VEGF production in the retina. Studies in human cell-lines and animal models have shown that VEGF siRNAs are effective in inhibiting VEGF production. Although there is a lack of sufficient published data on human studies supporting the use of bevasiranib for wet AMD, available data indicates that due to its unique mechanism of action, bevasiranib might hold some promise as a primary or adjunct treatment for wet AMD.

  9. Clinical Characteristics and Current Treatment of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonekawa, Yoshihiro; Kim, Ivana K.

    2015-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a multifactorial degeneration of photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium. The societal impact is significant, with more than 2 million individuals in the United States alone affected by advanced stages of AMD. Recent progress in our understanding of this complex disease and parallel developments in therapeutics and imaging have translated into new management paradigms in recent years. However, there are many unanswered questions, and diagnostic and prognostic precision and treatment outcomes can still be improved. In this article, we discuss the clinical features of AMD, provide correlations with modern imaging and histopathology, and present an overview of treatment strategies. PMID:25280900

  10. Strategies for improving early detection and diagnosis of neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keane PA

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Pearse A Keane,1 Gabriella de Salvo,2 Dawn A Sim,1 Srini Goverdhan,2 Rupesh Agrawal,1 Adnan Tufail1 1NIHR Biomedical Research Centre for Ophthalmology, Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust and UCL Institute of Ophthalmology, London, 2Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, UK Abstract: Treatment of the neovascular form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD has been revolutionized by the introduction of such agents as ranibizumab, bevacizumab, and aflibercept. As a result, the incidence of legal blindness occurring secondary to AMD has fallen dramatically in recent years in many countries. While these agents have undoubtedly been successful in reducing visual impairment and blindness, patients with neovascular AMD typically lose some vision over time, and often lose the ability to read, drive, or perform other important activities of daily living. Efforts are therefore under way to develop strategies that allow for earlier detection and treatment of this disease. In this review, we begin by providing an overview of the rationale for, and the benefits of, early detection and treatment of neovascular AMD. To achieve this, we begin by providing an overview of the pathophysiology and natural history of choroidal neovascularization, before reviewing the evidence from both clinical trials and “real-world” outcome studies. We continue by highlighting an area that is often overlooked: the importance of patient education and awareness for early AMD detection. We conclude the review by reviewing an array of both established and emerging technologies for early detection of choroidal neovascularization, ranging from Amsler chart testing, to hyperacuity testing, to advanced imaging techniques, such as optical coherence tomography. Keywords: Amsler, detection, choroidal neovascularization, hyperacuity, optical coherence tomography

  11. Optical coherence tomography-based decision making in exudative age-related macular degeneration: comparison of time- vs spectral-domain devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukras, C; Wang, Y D; Meyerle, C B; Forooghian, F; Chew, E Y; Wong, W T

    2010-05-01

    To determine whether optical coherence tomography (OCT) device-type influences clinical grading of OCT imaging in the context of exudative age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Ninety-six paired OCT scans from 49 patients with active exudative AMD were obtained on both the time-domain Stratus OCT system and the spectral-domain Cirrus OCT system at the same visit. Three independent graders judged each scan for the presence of intraretinal fluid (IRF) or subretinal fluid (SRF). The degree of grader consensus was evaluated and the ability of the systems to detect the presence of disease activity was analysed. Cirrus OCT generated a higher degree of inter-grader consensus than Stratus OCT with higher intraclass correlation coefficients for all parameters analysed. A pair-wise comparison of Cirrus OCT with Stratus OCT systems revealed that Cirrus-based gradings more frequently reported the presence of SRF and IRF and detected overall neovascular activity at a higher rate (P<0.05) compared with Stratus-based gradings. The choice of time-domain (Stratus) vs spectra-domain (Cirrus) OCT systems has a measurable impact on clinical decision making in exudative AMD. Spectral-domain OCT systems may be able to generate more consensus in clinical interpretation and, in particular cases, detect disease activity not detected by time-domain systems. Clinical trials using OCT-based clinical evaluations of exudative AMD may need to account for these inter-system differences in planning and analysis.

  12. Estrogen signalling in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaarniranta, Kai; Machalińska, Anna; Veréb, Zoltán; Salminen, Antero; Petrovski, Goran; Kauppinen, Anu

    2015-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a multifactorial eye disease that is associated with aging, family history, smoking, obesity, cataract surgery, arteriosclerosis, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia and unhealthy diet. Gender has commonly been classified as a weak or inconsistent risk factor for AMD. This disease is characterized by degeneration of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, Bruch's membrane, and choriocapillaris, which secondarily lead to damage and death of photoreceptor cells and central visual loss. Pathogenesis of AMD involves constant oxidative stress, chronic inflammation, and increased accumulation of lipofuscin and drusen. Estrogen has both anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory capacity and it regulates signaling pathways that are involved in the pathogenesis of AMD. In this review, we discuss potential cellular signaling targets of estrogen in retinal cells and AMD pathology.

  13. Progress of stem/progenitor cell-based therapy for retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhimin; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Yuyao; Zhang, Dandan; Shen, Bingqiao; Luo, Min; Gu, Ping

    2017-05-10

    Retinal degeneration (RD), such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and retinitis pigmentosa, is one of the leading causes of blindness. Presently, no satisfactory therapeutic options are available for these diseases principally because the retina and retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) do not regenerate, although wet AMD can be prevented from further progression by anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy. Nevertheless, stem/progenitor cell approaches exhibit enormous potential for RD treatment using strategies mainly aimed at the rescue and replacement of photoreceptors and RPE. The sources of stem/progenitor cells are classified into two broad categories in this review, which are (1) ocular-derived progenitor cells, such as retinal progenitor cells, and (2) non-ocular-derived stem cells, including embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, and mesenchymal stromal cells. Here, we discuss in detail the progress in the study of four predominant stem/progenitor cell types used in animal models of RD. A short overview of clinical trials involving the stem/progenitor cells is also presented. Currently, stem/progenitor cell therapies for RD still have some drawbacks such as inhibited proliferation and/or differentiation in vitro (with the exception of the RPE) and limited long-term survival and function of grafts in vivo. Despite these challenges, stem/progenitor cells represent the most promising strategy for RD treatment in the near future.

  14. Effect of In Vitro Exposure of Corticosteroid Drugs, Conventionally Used in AMD Treatment, on Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Nuzzi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a leading cause of legal blindness in individuals over 60 years of age, characterized by the dysfunction of retinal pigmented epithelium cells, specifically in the macular area. Despite several treatment options, AMD therapy remains difficult, especially for exudative AMD. Multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, with great plasticity and immunomodulant properties, are a promising cell source for cellular therapy and tissue engineering. We evaluated the effects of steroid drugs, often used to treat AMD, in association with MSCs, in view of a possible application together to treat AMD. Morphology, viability, growth kinetics, and immunophenotype were evaluated on healthy donors’ MSCs, treated with triamcinolone acetonide, alcohol-free triamcinolone acetonide, micronized intravitreal triamcinolone and dexamethasone at different concentrations, and in a human retinal pigment epithelial cell line supernatant (ARPE-19. The morphological analysis of MSCs in their standard medium showed a negative correlation with drug concentrations, due to the numerous crystals. Dexamethasone was the least toxic corticosteroid used in this study. ARPE-19 seemed to help cells preserve the typical MSC morphology. In conclusion, this in vitro study demonstrated that high doses of corticosteroid drugs have a negative effect on MSCs, reduced in the presence of a conditioned media.

  15. Striatonigral Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... See More About Research The NINDS supports and conducts research on disorders of the brain and nervous system such as striatonigral degeneration. This research ... Publications Definition Striatonigral ...

  16. Autologous Translocation of the Retinal Pigment Epithelium and Choroid in the Treatment of Exudative Age-related Macular Degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.J.M. Maaijwee (Kristel Johanna Maria)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractAge-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most important cause of irreversible legal blindness in elderly persons in industrialized countries. AMD has two forms: atrophic (dry) and exudative (wet). In the wet form, abnormal blood vessels, arising from the choriocapillaris (choroidal

  17. Extramacular drusen are highly associated with age-related macular degeneration, but not with CFH and ARMS2 genotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ersoy, L.; Schick, T.; Graft, D. de; Felsch, M.; Hoyng, C.B.; Hollander, A.I. den; Kirchhof, B.; Fauser, S.; Liakopoulos, S.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To evaluate the association of extramacular drusen (EMD) with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and with complement factor H (CFH rs1061170) and age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2 (ARMS2 rs10490924) polymorphisms in individuals with and without AMD. METHODS: In this

  18. The complement system in age-related macular degeneration: A review of rare genetic variants and implications for personalized treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerlings, M.J.; Jong, E.K.; Hollander, A.I. den

    2017-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a progressive retinal disease and the major cause of irreversible vision loss in the elderly. Numerous studies have found both common and rare genetic variants in the complement pathway to play a role in the pathogenesis of AMD. In this review we provide an

  19. Dietary compound score and risk of age-related macular degeneration in the Age-Related Eye Disease Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purpose: Because foods provide many nutrients, which may interact with each other to modify risk for multifactorial diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), we sought to develop a composite scoring system to summarize the combined effect of multiple dietary nutrients on AMD risk. Th...

  20. Cfh genotype interacts with dietary glycemic index to modulate age-related macular degeneration-like features in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of visual impairment worldwide. Genetics and diet contribute to the relative risk for developing AMD, but their interactions are poorly understood. Genetic variations in Complement Factor H (CFH), and dietary glycemic index (GI) are major ris...

  1. Predictors of 1-year visual outcome in neovascular age-related macular degeneration following intravitreal ranibizumab treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloch, Sara Brandi; la Cour, Morten; Sander, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To describe predictors of visual outcome in patients treated with intravitreal ranibizumab for choroidal neovascularisation (CNV) in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods: Retrospective review of 279 patients with CNV in AMD who fulfilled MARINA/ANCHOR study eligibility criteria...

  2. Long-term longitudinal study of patients treated with ranibizumab for neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Annette; Sander, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To review the current literature regarding long-term treatment beyond 2 years with anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibition for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nv-AMD). RECENT FINDINGS: Only few studies of anti-VEGF treatment for nv-AMD exist beyond...

  3. Efficacy and Safety of Monthly versus Quarterly Ranibizumab Treatment in Neovascular Age-related Macular Degeneration: The EXCITE Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula; Eldem, Bora; Guymer, Robyn; Korobelnik, Jean-Franc̦ois; Schlingemann, Reinier O.; Axer-Siegel, Ruth; Wiedemann, Peter; Simader, Christian; Gekkieva, Margarita; Weichselberger, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To demonstrate noninferiority of a quarterly treatment regimen to a monthly regimen of ranibizumab in patients with subfoveal choroidal neovascularization (CNV) secondary to age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Design: A 12-month, multicenter, randomized, double-masked,

  4. Vision Rehabilitation is Part of AMD Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    August Colenbrander

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available AMD does not just affect the retina. It severely affects people’s lives. Paying attention to this aspect will only become more important as the population ages and more otherwise healthy individuals become affected. This paper will discuss the need for teamwork to overcome the difference between medical care, which addresses the causes of AMD, and rehabilitative care, which addresses the consequences. Different aspects and different degrees of vision loss ask for different interventions. Loss of detailed vision can be addressed by a wide variety of magnification devices. The means to address this aspect are well recognized. Surround vision is largely processed pre-attentively. Its loss cannot be remediated by devices, but must be addressed through patient education to bring previously subconscious reactions to conscious awareness. Loss of contrast vision is an aspect that is not sufficiently studied. It is important for early detection, and for the safety of the patient. When the eye condition cannot be modified, environmental modifications provide the most effective remediation.

  5. Superoxide Dismutase1 Levels in North Indian Population with Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akshay Anand

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of the study was to estimate the levels of superoxide dismutase1 (SOD1 in patients of age-related macular degeneration (AMD and examine the role of oxidative stress, smoking, hypertension, and other factors involved in the pathogenesis of AMD. Methods. 115 AMD patients and 61 healthy controls were recruited for this study. Serum SOD1 levels were determined by ELISA and were correlated to various risk factors. Logistic regression model of authenticity, by considering SOD1 as independent variable, has been developed along with ROC curve. Results. The SOD1 levels were significantly higher in AMD patients as compared to those of the controls. The difference was not significant for wet and dry AMD. However, the difference was significant between wet AMD subtypes. Nonsignificance of the Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness of fit statistic (χ2=10.516, df=8, P=0.231 indicates the appropriateness of logistic regression model to predict AMD. Conclusion. Oxidative stress in AMD patients may mount compensatory response resulting in increased levels of SOD1 in AMD patients. To predict the risk of AMD on the basis of SOD1, a logistic regression model shows authenticity of 78%, and area under the ROC curve (0.827, P=.0001 with less standard error of 0.033 coupled with 95% confidence interval of 0.762–0.891 further validates the model.

  6. A 4-Year Longitudinal Study of 555 Patients Treated with Ranibizumab for Neovascular Age-related Macular Degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Annette; Bloch, Sara B; Fuchs, Josefine

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the visual outcome, pattern of discontinuation, ocular complications, and mortality of patients treated with a variable ranibizumab dosing regimen for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) for 4 years.......To investigate the visual outcome, pattern of discontinuation, ocular complications, and mortality of patients treated with a variable ranibizumab dosing regimen for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) for 4 years....

  7. Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Insights into Inflammatory Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaella Cascella

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects approximately 8.7% of elderly people worldwide (>55 years old. AMD is characterized by a multifactorial aetiology that involves several genetic and environmental risk factors (genes, ageing, smoking, family history, dietary habits, oxidative stress, and hypertension. In particular, ageing and cigarette smoking (including oxidative compounds and reactive oxygen species have been shown to significantly increase susceptibility to the disease. Furthermore, different genes (CFH, CFI, C2, C3, IL-6, IL-8, and ARMS2 that play a crucial role in the inflammatory pathway have been associated with AMD risk. Several genetic and molecular studies have indicated the participation of inflammatory molecules (cytokines and chemokines, immune cells (macrophages, and complement proteins in the development and progression of the disease. Taking into consideration the genetic and molecular background, this review highlights the genetic role of inflammatory genes involved in AMD pathogenesis and progression.

  8. Risk Factors and Biomarkers of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Nathan G.; Singh, Malkit K.; ElShelmani, Hanan; Mansergh, Fiona C.; Wride, Michael A.; Padilla, Maximilian; Keegan, David; Hogg, Ruth E.; Ambati, Balamurali K.

    2016-01-01

    A biomarker can be a substance or structure measured in body parts, fluids or products that can affect or predict disease incidence. As age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the developed world, much research and effort has been invested in the identification of different biomarkers to predict disease incidence, identify at risk individuals, elucidate causative pathophysiological etiologies, guide screening, monitoring and treatment parameters, and predict disease outcomes. To date, a host of genetic, environmental, proteomic, and cellular targets have been identified as both risk factors and potential biomarkers for AMD. Despite this, their use has been confined to research settings and has not yet crossed into the clinical arena. A greater understanding of these factors and their use as potential biomarkers for AMD can guide future research and clinical practice. This article will discuss known risk factors and novel, potential biomarkers of AMD in addition to their application in both academic and clinical settings. PMID:27156982

  9. Nutritional supplements in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidl, Doreen; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2015-03-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most frequent cause of blindness in the Western World. While with new therapies that are directed towards vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a potentially efficient treatment option for the wet form of the disease has been introduced, a therapeutic regimen for dry AMD is still lacking. There is evidence from several studies that oral intake of supplements is beneficial in preventing progression of the disease. Several formulations of micronutrients are currently available. The present review focuses on the role of supplements in the treatment and prevention of AMD and sums up the current knowledge about the most frequently used micronutrients. In addition, regulatory issues are discussed, and future directions for the role of supplementation in AMD are highlighted. © 2015 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Genetic association of apolipoprotein E with age-related macular degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Kliffen (Mike); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); M. Cruts (Marc); D.E. Grobbee (Diederick); P.T.V.M. de Jong (Paulus); C.C.W. Klaver (Caroline); C. van Broeckhoven (Christine); A. Hofman (Albert)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractAge-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common geriatric eye disorder leading to blindness and is characterized by degeneration of the neuroepithelium in the macular area of the eye. Apolipoprotein E (apoE), the major apolipoprotein of the CNS and an

  11. Aflibercept: a review of its use in the treatment of choroidal neovascularization due to age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balaratnasingam C

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Chandrakumar Balaratnasingam,1–3 Elona Dhrami-Gavazi,1,2,4 Jesse T McCann,1,2,4,5 Quraish Ghadiali,1,2 K Bailey Freund1,2,4,5 1Vitreous-Retina-Macula Consultants of New York, NY, USA; 2LuEsther T Mertz Retinal Research Center, Manhattan Eye, Ear and Throat Hospital, New York, NY, USA; 3Centre for Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Lions Eye Institute, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA, Australia; 4Department of Ophthalmology, Edward S Harkness Eye Institute, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY, USA; 5Department of Ophthalmology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA Abstract: Choroidal neovascularization (CNV due to age-related macular degeneration (AMD is an important cause of visual morbidity globally. Modern treatment strategies for neovascular AMD achieve regression of CNV by suppressing the activity of key growth factors that mediate angiogenesis. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF has been the major target of neovascular AMD therapy for almost two decades, and there have been several intravitreally-administered agents that have enabled anatomical restitution and improvement in visual function with continual dosing. Aflibercept (EYLEA®, initially named VEGF Trap-eye, is the most recent anti-VEGF agent to be granted US Food and Drug Administration approval for the treatment of neovascular AMD. Biologic advantages of aflibercept include its greater binding affinity for VEGF, a longer intravitreal half-life relative to other anti-VEGF agents, and the capacity to antagonize growth factors other than VEGF. This paper provides an up-to-date summary of the molecular mechanisms mediating CNV. The structural, pharmacodynamic, and pharmacokinetic advantages of aflibercept are also reviewed to rationalize the utility of this agent for treating CNV. Results of landmark clinical investigations, including VIEW 1 and 2 trials, and other important studies are then summarized and used to

  12. Circulating vitamin D concentration and age-related macular degeneration: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annweiler, Cedric; Drouet, Morgane; Duval, Guillaume T; Paré, Pierre-Yves; Leruez, Stephanie; Dinomais, Mickael; Milea, Dan

    2016-06-01

    Vitamin D may be involved in ocular function in older adults, but there is no current consensus on a possible association between circulating concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) and the occurrence of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Our objective was to systematically review and quantitatively assess the association of circulating 25OHD concentration with AMD. A Medline search was conducted in November 2015, with no date limit, using the MeSH terms "Vitamin D" OR "Vitamin D deficiency" OR "Ergocalciferols" OR 'Cholecalciferol' combined with "Age-related macular degeneration" OR "Macular degeneration" OR "Retinal degeneration" OR "Macula lutea" OR "Retina". Fixed and random-effects meta-analyses were performed to compute (i) standard mean difference in 25OHD concentration between AMD and non-AMD patients; (ii) AMD risk according to circulating 25OHD concentration. Of the 243 retrieved studies, 11 observational studies-10 cross-sectional studies and 1 cohort study-met the selection criteria. The number of participants ranged from 65 to 17,045 (52-100% women), and the number with AMD ranged from 31 to 1440. Circulating 25OHD concentration was 15% lower in AMD compared with non-AMD on average. AMD was inversely associated with the highest 25OHD quintile compared with the lowest (summary odds ratio (OR)=0.83 [95%CI:0.71-0.97]), notably late AMD (summary OR=0.47 [95%CI:0.28-0.79]). Circulating 25OHD<50nmol/L was also associated with late-stage AMD (summary OR=2.18 [95%CI:1.34-3.56]), an association that did not persist when all categories of AMD were considered (summary OR=1.26 [95%CI:0.90-1.76]). In conclusion, this meta-analysis provides evidence that high 25OHD concentrations may be protective against AMD, and that 25OHD concentrations below 50nmol/L are associated with late AMD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Gene Therapy with Endogenous Inhibitors of Angiogenesis for Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Beyond Anti-VEGF Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selwyn M. Prea

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the leading cause of substantial and irreversible vision loss amongst elderly populations in industrialized countries. The advanced neovascular (or “wet” form of the disease is responsible for severe and aggressive loss of central vision. Current treatments aim to seal off leaky blood vessels via laser therapy or to suppress vessel leakage and neovascular growth through intraocular injections of antibodies that target vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. However, the long-term success of anti-VEGF therapy can be hampered by limitations such as low or variable efficacy, high frequency of administration (usually monthly, potentially serious side effects, and, most importantly, loss of efficacy with prolonged treatment. Gene transfer of endogenous antiangiogenic proteins is an alternative approach that has the potential to provide long-term suppression of neovascularization and/or excessive vascular leakage in the eye. Preclinical studies of gene transfer in a large animal model have provided impressive preliminary results with a number of transgenes. In addition, a clinical trial in patients suffering from advanced neovascular AMD has provided proof-of-concept for successful gene transfer. In this mini review, we summarize current theories pertaining to the application of gene therapy for neovascular AMD and the potential benefits when used in conjunction with endogenous antiangiogenic proteins.

  14. Age-related macular degeneration in Onitsha, Nigeria | Nwosu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine the incidence, pattern and ocular morbidity associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) at the Guinness Eye Center Onitsha Nigeria. Materials and Methods: The case files of all new patients aged 50 years and above seen between January 1997 and December 2004 were reviewed.

  15. Ranibizumab vs. aflibercept for wet age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szabo, Shelagh M; Hedegaard, Morten; Chan, Keith

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Although a reduced aflibercept (2.0 mg) injection frequency relative to the approved dosing posology is included in national treatment guidelines for wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD), there is limited evidence of its comparative efficacy. The objective was to compare...

  16. Pathogenesis and prophylaxis of AMD: focus on oxidative stress and antioxidants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Wiktorowska-Owczarek

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the leading cause of severe visual loss and blindness in people over 55. Its pathogenesis – likely multifactorial, involving a complex interaction of metabolic, functional, genetic and environmental factors – remains poorly understood. Among molecular links in pathogenesis of AMD is the oxidative stress in the retina, a structure that is particularly susceptible to damage by reactive oxygen species (ROS since photoreceptor outer segment (POS membranes are rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids which can be readily oxidized and can initiate a cytotoxic chain reaction. Occurring in the neighborhood of photoreceptors, the retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE actively contribute to both the retinoid cycle and catabolism of constantly shed and phagocytized parts of photoreceptor outer segments. Enzymatic degradation of photoreceptor fragments occurring in RPE phagolysosomes is not complete and undigested material in the form of insoluble aggregates, called lipofuscin, is deposited in lysosomes of RPE cells. Lipofuscin contains a mixture of diverse molecular components including retinoid-derived compounds, some of which displaying potent photoinducible properties, contributing to an enhancement and propagation of the oxidative stress. The retina possesses defense mechanisms against the oxidative stress that effectively neutralize the consequences of reactive oxygen species actions under normal conditions. A key role in the antioxidant defense plays an array of substances, including: xanthophylls (lutein and zeaxanthin, vitamin C and E, and glutathione. This paper surveys the current concepts on the role of the oxidative stress in pathophysiology of AMD, and describes major components of the antioxidant defense system, including their use in AMD prophylaxis and therapy.

  17. Lipids, lipid genes, and incident age-related macular degeneration: the three continent age-related macular degeneration consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, Ronald; Myers, Chelsea E.; Buitendijk, Gabriëlle H. S.; Rochtchina, Elena; Gao, Xiaoyi; de Jong, Paulus T. V. M.; Sivakumaran, Theru A.; Burlutsky, George; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Hofman, Albert; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Lee, Kristine E.; Stricker, Bruno H.; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Mitchell, Paul; Klein, Barbara E. K.; Klaver, Caroline C. W.; Wang, Jie Jin

    2014-01-01

    To describe associations of serum lipid levels and lipid pathway genes to the incidence of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Meta-analysis. setting: Three population-based cohorts. population: A total of 6950 participants from the Beaver Dam Eye Study (BDES), Blue Mountains Eye Study (BMES),

  18. Pigment epithelial detachment followed by retinal cystoid degeneration leads to vision loss in treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula; Waldstein, Sebastian M; Deak, Gabor-Gyoergy; Kundi, Michael; Simader, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Intravitreal antiangiogenic therapy is the major therapeutic breakthrough in neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is the leading diagnostic tool, but solid criteria for optimal therapeutic outcomes are lacking. A comprehensive analysis of structure/function correlations using Food and Drug Administration- and European Medicines Agency-approved substances and fixed and flexible regimens was performed. Post hoc analysis of a prospective, randomized multicenter clinical trial including 189 study sites. A total of 1240 patients with active neovascular AMD. Participants received intravitreal ranibizumab or aflibercept. A fixed regimen was used for 48 weeks followed by a flexible regimen until week 96. At monthly intervals, best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was measured and retinal morphology was assessed by standardized OCT, including intraretinal cysts (IRCs), subretinal fluid (SRF), and pigment epithelial detachment (PED), presenting with a width ≥400 μm or a height of ≥200 μm. Results were correlated for each regimen, feature, and time. The BCVA outcomes in relation to retinal pathomorphology based on noninferiority for all treatment arms. In neovascular AMD, only IRC at baseline and persistent through week 12 had a negative impact on BCVA. With therapeutic intervention, exudative features such as IRC and SRF resolved rapidly in 74% of eyes, whereas PED responded only slowly with 38%. Independent of the type of regimen, fixed or flexible, retinal morphology correlated tightly with visual function. Intraretinal cysts consistently showed the lowest BCVA gains with either regimen or substance. With the switch from a fixed to a flexible pro re nata (PRN) regimen, progressive visual loss occurred exclusively in the group with primary PED presenting as the hallmark of neovascular activity and was induced by secondary formation of IRC in the neurosensory retina. The efficacy of antiangiogenic therapy in neovascular

  19. Cerebellar Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FARA) National Ataxia Foundation (NAF) National Multiple Sclerosis Society See all related organizations Publications Degeneración cerebelosa Order NINDS Publications Definition Cerebellar degeneration is a process in which neurons ( ...

  20. Macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    The macula is the part of the retina that distinguishes fine details at the center of the field of vision. Macular degeneration results from a partial breakdown of the insulating layer between the retina and the choroid layer of ...

  1. Early and exudative age-related macular degeneration is associated with increased plasma levels of soluble TNF receptor II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, Carsten; Jehs, Tina; Juel, Helene Baek

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: We have recently identified homeostatic alterations in the circulating T cells of patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In cultures of retinal pigment epithelial cells, we have demonstrated that T-cell-derived cytokines induced the upregulation of complement, chemokines...... and other proteins implicated in AMD pathogenesis. The purpose of this study was to test whether increased plasma levels of cytokines were present in patients with AMD. METHODS: We conducted a case-control study. Age-related macular degeneration status was assessed using standardized multimodal imaging...

  2. A seeded ambient temperature ferrite process for treatment of AMD ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A seeded ambient temperature ferrite process for treatment of AMD waters: magnetite formation in the presence and absence of calcium ions under steady state operation. ... promising for AMD treatment. Keywords: Ferrite process, Magnetite seed, Calcium interference, Acid mine drainage (WaterSA: 2003 29(2): 117-124) ...

  3. Combination of ranibizumab with photodynamic therapy vs ranibizumab monotherapy in the treatment of age-related macular degeneration:a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Kang Si

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To compare the efficacy and safety of combination of ranibizumab with photodynamic therapy (PDT vs ranibizumab monotherapy in the treatment of age-related macular degeneration (AMD.METHODS:The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL in the Cochrane Library, Pubmed, and Embase were searched. There were no language or data restrictions in the search for trials. Only randomized controlled trials (RCTs were included. Methodological quality of the literatures was evaluated according to the Jadad Score. RevMan 5.2.6 software was used to do the meta-analysis.RESULTS:Seven studies were included in our systematic review, among which four of them were included in quantitative analysis. The result shows that the ranibizumab monotherapy group had a better mean best corrected visual acuity (BCVA change vs baseline at month 12 compared with that of the combination treatment group, and the statistical difference was significant (WMD, -2.61; 95% CI, -5.08 to -0.13; P=0.04. However, after the removal of one study, the difference between the two groups showed no significant difference (WMD, -2.29; 95% CI, -4.81 to 0.23; P=0.07. Meanwhile, no significant central retinal thickness (CRT reduction was found in the combination treatment group and the ranibizumab monotherapy group at 12 months follow-up. Nevertheless, the combination group tended to have a greater reduction in CRT (WMD, -4.13μm; 95%CI, -25.88 to 17.63, P=0.71. The proportion of patients gaining more than 3 lines at month 12 in the ranibizumab group was higher than in the combination group and there was a significant difference (RR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.54 to 0.95; P=0.02. Whereas there was no significant difference for the proportion of patients gaining more than 0 line at month 12 between the two groups (RR, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.76 to 1.15; P=0.52. The general tendency shows a reduction in ranibizumab retreatment number in the combination treatment group compared with the ranibizumab

  4. Oxidative stress, innate immunity, and age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Peter X.; Stiles, Travis; Douglas, Christopher; Ho, Daisy; Fan, Wei; Du, Hongjun; Xiao, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of vision loss affecting tens of millions of elderly worldwide. Early AMD is characterized by the appearance of soft drusen, as well as pigmentary changes in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). These soft, confluent drusen can progress into two forms of advanced AMD: geographic atrophy (GA, or dry AMD) or choroidal neovascularization (CNV, or wet AMD). Both forms of AMD result in a similar clinical progression in terms of loss of central vision. The exact mechanism for developing early AMD, as well as triggers responsible for progressing to advanced stage of disease, is still largely unknown. However, significant evidence exists demonstrating a complex interplay of genetic and environmental factors as causes of AMD progression. Multiple genes and/or single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been found associated with AMD, including various genes involved in the complement pathway, lipid metabolism and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. Of the known genetic contributors to disease risk, the CFH Y402H and HTRA1/ARMS polymorphisms contribute to more than 50% of the genetic risk for AMD. Environmentally, oxidative stress plays a critical role in many aging diseases including cardiovascular disease, cancer, Alzheimer’s disease and AMD. Due to the exposure to sunlight and high oxygen concentration, the oxidative stress burden is higher in the eye than other tissues, which can be further complicated by additional oxidative stressors such as smoking. Increasingly, evidence is accumulating suggesting that functional abnormalities of the innate immune system incurred via high risk genotypes may be contributing to the pathogenesis of AMD by altering the inflammatory homeostasis in the eye, specifically in the handling of oxidation products. As the eye in non-pathological instances maintains a low level of inflammation despite the presence of a relative abundance of potentially inflammatory molecules, we have

  5. Systemic complement activation in age-related macular degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrik P N Scholl

    Full Text Available Dysregulation of the alternative pathway (AP of complement cascade has been implicated in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD, the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. To further test the hypothesis that defective control of complement activation underlies AMD, parameters of complement activation in blood plasma were determined together with disease-associated genetic markers in AMD patients. Plasma concentrations of activation products C3d, Ba, C3a, C5a, SC5b-9, substrate proteins C3, C4, factor B and regulators factor H and factor D were quantified in patients (n = 112 and controls (n = 67. Subjects were analyzed for single nucleotide polymorphisms in factor H (CFH, factor B-C2 (BF-C2 and complement C3 (C3 genes which were previously found to be associated with AMD. All activation products, especially markers of chronic complement activation Ba and C3d (p<0.001, were significantly elevated in AMD patients compared to controls. Similar alterations were observed in factor D, but not in C3, C4 or factor H. Logistic regression analysis revealed better discriminative accuracy of a model that is based only on complement activation markers Ba, C3d and factor D compared to a model based on genetic markers of the complement system within our study population. In both the controls' and AMD patients' group, the protein markers of complement activation were correlated with CFH haplotypes.This study is the first to show systemic complement activation in AMD patients. This suggests that AMD is a systemic disease with local disease manifestation at the ageing macula. Furthermore, the data provide evidence for an association of systemic activation of the alternative complement pathway with genetic variants of CFH that were previously linked to AMD susceptibility.

  6. Modelling the genetic risk in age-related macular degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Grassmann

    Full Text Available Late-stage age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a common sight-threatening disease of the central retina affecting approximately 1 in 30 Caucasians. Besides age and smoking, genetic variants from several gene loci have reproducibly been associated with this condition and likely explain a large proportion of disease. Here, we developed a genetic risk score (GRS for AMD based on 13 risk variants from eight gene loci. The model exhibited good discriminative accuracy, area-under-curve (AUC of the receiver-operating characteristic of 0.820, which was confirmed in a cross-validation approach. Noteworthy, younger AMD patients aged below 75 had a significantly higher mean GRS (1.87, 95% CI: 1.69-2.05 than patients aged 75 and above (1.45, 95% CI: 1.36-1.54. Based on five equally sized GRS intervals, we present a risk classification with a relative AMD risk of 64.0 (95% CI: 14.11-1131.96 for individuals in the highest category (GRS 3.44-5.18, 0.5% of the general population compared to subjects with the most common genetic background (GRS -0.05-1.70, 40.2% of general population. The highest GRS category identifies AMD patients with a sensitivity of 7.9% and a specificity of 99.9% when compared to the four lower categories. Modeling a general population around 85 years of age, 87.4% of individuals in the highest GRS category would be expected to develop AMD by that age. In contrast, only 2.2% of individuals in the two lowest GRS categories which represent almost 50% of the general population are expected to manifest AMD. Our findings underscore the large proportion of AMD cases explained by genetics particularly for younger AMD patients. The five-category risk classification could be useful for therapeutic stratification or for diagnostic testing purposes once preventive treatment is available.

  7. DNA damage and repair in age-related macular degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szaflik, Jacek P. [Department of Ophthalmology, Medical University of Warsaw and Samodzielny Publiczny Szpital Okulistyczny, Sierakowskiego 13, 03-710 Warsaw (Poland); Janik-Papis, Katarzyna; Synowiec, Ewelina; Ksiazek, Dominika [Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, 90-237 Lodz (Poland); Zaras, Magdalena [Department of Ophthalmology, Medical University of Warsaw and Samodzielny Publiczny Szpital Okulistyczny, Sierakowskiego 13, 03-710 Warsaw (Poland); Wozniak, Katarzyna [Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, 90-237 Lodz (Poland); Szaflik, Jerzy [Department of Ophthalmology, Medical University of Warsaw and Samodzielny Publiczny Szpital Okulistyczny, Sierakowskiego 13, 03-710 Warsaw (Poland); Blasiak, Janusz, E-mail: januszb@biol.uni.lodz.pl [Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, 90-237 Lodz (Poland)

    2009-10-02

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a retinal degenerative disease that is the main cause of vision loss in individuals over the age of 55 in the Western world. Clinically relevant AMD results from damage to the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells thought to be mainly caused by oxidative stress. The stress also affects the DNA of RPE cells, which promotes genome instability in these cells. These effects may coincide with the decrease in the efficacy of DNA repair with age. Therefore individuals with DNA repair impaired more than average for a given age may be more susceptible to AMD if oxidative stress affects their RPE cells. This may be helpful in AMD risk assessment. In the present work we determined the level of basal (measured in the alkaline comet assay) endogenous and endogenous oxidative DNA damage, the susceptibility to exogenous mutagens and the efficacy of DNA repair in lymphocytes of 100 AMD patients and 110 age-matched individuals without visual disturbances. The cells taken from AMD patients displayed a higher extent of basal endogenous DNA damage without differences between patients of dry and wet forms of the disease. DNA double-strand breaks did not contribute to the observed DNA damage as checked by the neutral comet assay and pulsed field gel electrophoresis. The extent of oxidative modification to DNA bases was grater in AMD patients than in the controls, as probed by DNA repair enzymes NTH1 and Fpg. Lymphocytes from AMD patients displayed a higher sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide and UV radiation and repaired lesions induced by these factors less effectively than the cells from the control individuals. We postulate that the impaired efficacy of DNA repair may combine with enhanced sensitivity of RPE cells to blue and UV lights, contributing to the pathogenesis of AMD.

  8. DNA damage and repair in age-related macular degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szaflik, Jacek P.; Janik-Papis, Katarzyna; Synowiec, Ewelina; Ksiazek, Dominika; Zaras, Magdalena; Wozniak, Katarzyna; Szaflik, Jerzy; Blasiak, Janusz

    2009-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a retinal degenerative disease that is the main cause of vision loss in individuals over the age of 55 in the Western world. Clinically relevant AMD results from damage to the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells thought to be mainly caused by oxidative stress. The stress also affects the DNA of RPE cells, which promotes genome instability in these cells. These effects may coincide with the decrease in the efficacy of DNA repair with age. Therefore individuals with DNA repair impaired more than average for a given age may be more susceptible to AMD if oxidative stress affects their RPE cells. This may be helpful in AMD risk assessment. In the present work we determined the level of basal (measured in the alkaline comet assay) endogenous and endogenous oxidative DNA damage, the susceptibility to exogenous mutagens and the efficacy of DNA repair in lymphocytes of 100 AMD patients and 110 age-matched individuals without visual disturbances. The cells taken from AMD patients displayed a higher extent of basal endogenous DNA damage without differences between patients of dry and wet forms of the disease. DNA double-strand breaks did not contribute to the observed DNA damage as checked by the neutral comet assay and pulsed field gel electrophoresis. The extent of oxidative modification to DNA bases was grater in AMD patients than in the controls, as probed by DNA repair enzymes NTH1 and Fpg. Lymphocytes from AMD patients displayed a higher sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide and UV radiation and repaired lesions induced by these factors less effectively than the cells from the control individuals. We postulate that the impaired efficacy of DNA repair may combine with enhanced sensitivity of RPE cells to blue and UV lights, contributing to the pathogenesis of AMD.

  9. Genetic mechanisms and age-related macular degeneration: common variants, rare variants, copy number variations, epigenetics, and mitochondrial genetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Melissa M

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a complex and multifaceted disease involving contributions from both genetic and environmental influences. Previous work exploring the genetic contributions of AMD has implicated numerous genomic regions and a variety of candidate genes as modulators of AMD susceptibility. Nevertheless, much of this work has revolved around single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, and it is apparent that a significant portion of the heritability of AMD cannot be explained through these mechanisms. In this review, we consider the role of common variants, rare variants, copy number variations, epigenetics, microRNAs, and mitochondrial genetics in AMD. Copy number variations in regulators of complement activation genes (CFHR1 and CFHR3 and glutathione S transferase genes (GSTM1 and GSTT1 have been associated with AMD, and several additional loci have been identified as regions of potential interest but require further evaluation. MicroRNA dysregulation has been linked to the retinal pigment epithelium degeneration in geographic atrophy, ocular neovascularization, and oxidative stress, all of which are hallmarks in the pathogenesis of AMD. Certain mitochondrial DNA haplogroups and SNPs in mitochondrially encoded NADH dehydrogenase genes have also been associated with AMD. The role of these additional mechanisms remains only partly understood, but the importance of their further investigation is clear to elucidate more completely the genetic basis of AMD.

  10. The complex model of risk and progression of AMD estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Akopyan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to develop a method and a statistical model to estimate individual risk of AMD and the risk for progression to advanced AMD using clinical and genetic risk factors.Methods: A statistical risk assessment model was developed using stepwise binary logistic regression analysis. to estimate the population differences in the prevalence of allelic variants of genes and for the development of models adapted to the population of Moscow region genotyping and assessment of the influence of other risk factors was performed in two groups: patients with differ- ent stages of AMD (n = 74, and control group (n = 116. Genetic risk factors included in the study: polymorphisms in the complement system genes (C3 and CFH, genes at 10q26 locus (ARMS2 and HtRA1, polymorphism in the mitochondrial gene Mt-ND2. Clinical risk factors included in the study: age, gender, high body mass index, smoking history.Results: A comprehensive analysis of genetic and clinical risk factors for AMD in the study group was performed. Compiled statis- tical model assessment of individual risk of AMD, the sensitivity of the model — 66.7%, specificity — 78.5%, AUC = 0.76. Risk factors of late AMD, compiled a statistical model describing the probability of late AMD, the sensitivity of the model — 66.7%, specificity — 78.3%, AUC = 0.73. the developed system allows determining the most likely version of the current late AMD: dry or wet.Conclusion: the developed test system and the mathematical algorhythm for determining the risk of AMD, risk of progression to advanced AMD have fair diagnostic informative and promising for use in clinical practice.

  11. Do Nutritional Supplements Have a Role in Age Macular Degeneration Prevention?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria D. Pinazo-Durán

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To review the proposed pathogenic mechanisms of age macular degeneration (AMD, as well as the role of antioxidants (AOX and omega-3 fatty acids (ω-3 supplements in AMD prevention. Materials and Methods. Current knowledge on the cellular/molecular mechanisms of AMD and the epidemiologic/experimental studies on the effects of AOX and ω-3 were addressed all together with the scientific evidence and the personal opinion of professionals involved in the Retina Group of the OFTARED (Spain. Results. High dietary intakes of ω-3 and macular pigments lutein/zeaxanthin are associated with lower risk of prevalence and incidence in AMD. The Age-Related Eye Disease study (AREDS showed a beneficial effect of high doses of vitamins C, E, beta-carotene, and zinc/copper in reducing the rate of progression to advanced AMD in patients with intermediate AMD or with one-sided late AMD. The AREDS-2 study has shown that lutein and zeaxanthin may substitute beta-carotene because of its potential relationship with increased lung cancer incidence. Conclusion. Research has proved that elder people with poor diets, especially with low AOX and ω-3 micronutrients intake and subsequently having low plasmatic levels, are more prone to developing AMD. Micronutrient supplementation enhances antioxidant defense and healthy eyes and might prevent/retard/modify AMD.

  12. Lack of association of CFD polymorphisms with advanced age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jiexi; Chen, Yuhong; Tong, Zongzhong; Zhou, Xinrong; Zhao, Chao; Wang, Kevin; Hughes, Guy; Kasuga, Daniel; Bedell, Matthew; Lee, Clara; Ferreyra, Henry; Kozak, Igor; Haw, Weldon; Guan, Jean; Shaw, Robert; Stevenson, William; Weishaar, Paul D; Nelson, Mark H; Tang, Luosheng; Zhang, Kang

    2010-11-03

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of irreversible central vision loss worldwide. Research has linked AMD susceptibility with dysregulation of the complement cascade. Typically, complement factor H (CFH), complement factor B (CFB), complement component 2 (C2), and complement component 3 (C3) are associated with AMD. In this paper, we investigated the association between complement factor D (CFD), another factor of the complement system, and advanced AMD in a Caucasian population. Six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs1683564, rs35186399, rs1683563, rs3826945, rs34337649, and rs1651896, across the region covering CFD, were chosen for this study. One hundred and seventy-eight patients with advanced AMD and 161 age-matched normal controls were genotyped. Potential positive signals were further tested in another independent 445 advanced AMD patients and 190 controls. χ2 tests were performed to compare the allele frequencies between case and control groups. None of the six SNPs of CFD was found to be significantly associated with advanced AMD in our study. Our findings suggest that CFD may not play a major role in the genetic susceptibility to AMD because no association was found between the six SNPs analyzed in the CFD region and advanced AMD.

  13. Endophenotypes for Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Extending Our Reach into the Preclinical Stages of Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorin, Michael B; Weeks, Daniel E; Baron, Robert V; Conley, Yvette P; Ortube, Maria C; Nusinowitz, Steven

    2014-11-28

    The key to reducing the individual and societal burden of age-related macular degeneration (AMD)-related vision loss, is to be able to initiate therapies that slow or halt the progression at a point that will yield the maximum benefit while minimizing personal risk and cost. There is a critical need to find clinical markers that, when combined with the specificity of genetic testing, will identify individuals at the earliest stages of AMD who would benefit from preventive therapies. These clinical markers are endophenotypes for AMD, present in those who are likely to develop AMD, as well as in those who have clinical evidence of AMD. Clinical characteristics associated with AMD may also be possible endophenotypes if they can be detected before or at the earliest stages of the condition, but we and others have shown that this may not always be valid. Several studies have suggested that dynamic changes in rhodopsin regeneration (dark adaptation kinetics and/or critical flicker fusion frequencies) may be more subtle indicators of AMD-associated early retinal dysfunction. One can test for the relevance of these measures using genetic risk profiles based on known genetic risk variants. These functional measures may improve the sensitivity and specificity of predictive models for AMD and may also serve to delineate clinical subtypes of AMD that may differ with respect to prognosis and treatment.

  14. Endophenotypes for Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Extending Our Reach into the Preclinical Stages of Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B. Gorin

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The key to reducing the individual and societal burden of age-related macular degeneration (AMD-related vision loss, is to be able to initiate therapies that slow or halt the progression at a point that will yield the maximum benefit while minimizing personal risk and cost. There is a critical need to find clinical markers that, when combined with the specificity of genetic testing, will identify individuals at the earliest stages of AMD who would benefit from preventive therapies. These clinical markers are endophenotypes for AMD, present in those who are likely to develop AMD, as well as in those who have clinical evidence of AMD. Clinical characteristics associated with AMD may also be possible endophenotypes if they can be detected before or at the earliest stages of the condition, but we and others have shown that this may not always be valid. Several studies have suggested that dynamic changes in rhodopsin regeneration (dark adaptation kinetics and/or critical flicker fusion frequencies may be more subtle indicators of AMD-associated early retinal dysfunction. One can test for the relevance of these measures using genetic risk profiles based on known genetic risk variants. These functional measures may improve the sensitivity and specificity of predictive models for AMD and may also serve to delineate clinical subtypes of AMD that may differ with respect to prognosis and treatment.

  15. Retinal Structure Measurements as Inclusion Criteria for Stem Cell-Based Therapies of Retinal Degenerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Samuel G; Matsui, Rodrigo; Sumaroka, Alexander; Cideciyan, Artur V

    2016-04-01

    We reviewed and illustrated the most optimal retinal structural measurements to make in stem cell clinical trials. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and autofluorescence (AF) imaging were used to evaluate patients with severe visual loss from nonsyndromic and syndromic retinitis pigmentosa (RP), ABCA4-Stargardt disease, and nonneovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Outer nuclear layer (ONL), rod outer segment (ROS) layer, inner retina, ganglion cell layer (GCL), and nerve fiber layer (NFL) thicknesses were quantified. All patients had severely reduced visual acuities. Retinitis pigmentosa patients had limited visual fields; maculopathy patients had central scotomas with retained peripheral function. For the forms of RP illustrated, there was detectable albeit severely reduced ONL across the scanned retina, and normal or hyperthick GCL and NFL. Maculopathy patients had no measurable ONL centrally; it became detectable with eccentricity. Some maculopathy patients showed unexpected GCL losses. Autofluorescence imaging illustrated central losses of RPE integrity. A hypothetical scheme to relate patient data with different phases of retinal remodeling in animal models of retinal degeneration was presented. Stem cell science is advancing, but it is not too early to open the discussion of criteria for patient selection and monitoring. Available clinical tools, such as OCT and AF imaging, can provide inclusion/exclusion criteria and robust objective outcomes. Accepting that early trials may not lead to miraculous cures, we should be prepared to know why-scientifically and clinically-so we can improve subsequent trials. We also must determine if retinal remodeling is an impediment to efficacy.

  16. Age-related macular degeneration is associated with increased proportion of CD56(+) T cells in peripheral blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, Carsten; Singh, Amardeep; Krüger Falk, Mads

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: To examine the association between age-related changes in the T-cell compartment and prevalence of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). DESIGN: Case-control study. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 117 AMD cases and 106 controls were included prospectively. METHODS: Fresh-drawn peripheral blood...... samples were processed for flow cytometric analysis of T-cell populations. Plasma samples were analyzed for anti-cytomegalovirus (CMV) immunoglobulin (Ig)G and complement factor H (CFH) Y402H genotype. The diagnosis of AMD was made according to the Clinical Age-Related Maculopathy Staging System. MAIN...... OUTCOME MEASURES: Association between frequency of aged T cells and prevalence of AMD. RESULTS: The prevalence of AMD was associated with distinct age-related changes in the T-cell compartment. Specifically, the patients with AMD had an increased frequency of CD28(-) T cells that expressed the CD56...

  17. Optimizing Anti-VEGF Treatment Outcomes for Patients with Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wykoff, Charles C; Clark, W Lloyd; Nielsen, Jared S; Brill, Joel V; Greene, Laurence S; Heggen, Cherilyn L

    2018-02-01

    The introduction of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) drugs to ophthalmology has revolutionized the treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD). Despite this significant progress, gaps and challenges persist in the diagnosis of nAMD, initiation of treatment, and management of frequent intravitreal injections. Thus, nAMD remains a leading cause of blindness in the United States. To present current knowledge, evidence, and expert perspectives on anti-VEGF therapies in nAMD to support managed care professionals and providers in decision making and collaborative strategies to overcome barriers to optimize anti-VEGF treatment outcomes among nAMD patients. Three anti-VEGF therapies currently form the mainstay of treatment for nAMD, including 2 therapies approved by the FDA for treatment of nAMD (aflibercept and ranibizumab) and 1 therapy approved by the FDA for oncology indications and used off-label for treatment of nAMD (bevacizumab). In clinical trials, each of the 3 agents maintained visual acuity (VA) in approximately 90% or more of nAMD patients over 2 years. However, in long-term and real-world settings, significant gaps and challenges in diagnosis, treatment, and management pose barriers to achieving optimal outcomes for patients with nAMD. Many considerations, including individual patient characteristics, on-label versus off-label treatment, repackaging, and financial considerations, add to the complexity of nAMD decision making and management. Many factors may contribute to additional challenges leading to suboptimal long-term outcomes among nAMD patients, such as delays in diagnosis and/or treatment approval and initiation, individual patient response to different anti-VEGF therapies, lapses in physician regimentation of anti-VEGF injection and monitoring, and inadequate patient adherence to treatment and monitoring. These latter factors highlight the considerable logistical, emotional, and financial burdens of long

  18. Evaluation of Two Systems for Fundus-Controlled Scotopic and Mesopic Perimetry in Eye with Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Julia S; Saßmannshausen, Marlene; Pfau, Maximilian; Fleckenstein, Monika; Finger, Robert P; Holz, Frank G; Schmitz-Valckenberg, Steffen

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the MP-1S (Nidek Technologies, Padova, Italy) and the S-MAIA (CenterVue, Padova, Italy) for mesopic and scotopic fundus-controlled perimetry (FCP) in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Eleven eyes from 11 patients underwent mesopic and, after 30 minutes of dark adaptation, scotopic (MP-1S: Goldmann V, 200 ms, background luminance 0.0032 cd/m 2 ; S-MAIA: Goldman III, 200 ms, background luminance grid of 56 stimulus points covering 16° of the central macula was used. Examination time, fixation stability, and threshold values were analyzed. The upper end of the dynamic range (≤4 dB of lowest threshold) was frequently reached by the MP-1S for mesopic testing (median 34 of 56 stimuli), while threshold values within the lower 4 dB of the dynamic range were occasionally found with the S-MAIA for scotopic testing (median 3 for cyan, median 2 for red). After correction of the stimulus intensity for the S-MAIA results, the median difference for all stimuli between both devices for mesopic testing was -2.0 dB (interquartile range [-4;0], range -14 to 6). The results indicate that robust testing of mesopic and scotopic function is feasible with both devices in patients with AMD, although both devices are susceptible to floor and ceiling effects. The interpretation and particularly the comparison of both scotopic and mesopic FCP results between the MP-1S and the S-MAIA in AMD eyes need to consider variable susceptibility of floor and ceiling effects. Further software updates are desirable as FCP captures visual functional loss that is not noted with best-corrected central visual acuity and is important for clinical trials in AMD.

  19. Guidelines for the management of neovascular age-related macular degeneration by the European Society of Retina Specialists (EURETINA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula; Chong, Victor; Loewenstein, Anat; Larsen, Michael; Souied, Eric; Schlingemann, Reinier; Eldem, Bora; Monés, Jordi; Richard, Gisbert; Bandello, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is still referred to as the leading cause of severe and irreversible visual loss world-wide. The disease has a profound effect on quality of life of affected individuals and represents a major socioeconomic challenge for societies due to the exponential increase in life expectancy and environmental risks. Advances in medical research have identified vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as an important pathophysiological player in neovascular AMD and intraocular inhibition of VEGF as one of the most efficient therapies in medicine. The wide introduction of anti-VEGF therapy has led to an overwhelming improvement in the prognosis of patients affected by neovascular AMD, allowing recovery and maintenance of visual function in the vast majority of patients. However, the therapeutic benefit is accompanied by significant economic investments, unresolved medicolegal debates about the use of off-label substances and overwhelming problems in large population management. The burden of disease has turned into a burden of care with a dissociation of scientific advances and real-world clinical performance. Simultaneously, ground-breaking innovations in diagnostic technologies, such as optical coherence tomography, allows unprecedented high-resolution visualisation of disease morphology and provides a promising horizon for early disease detection and efficient therapeutic follow-up. However, definite conclusions from morphologic parameters are still lacking, and valid biomarkers have yet to be identified to provide a practical base for disease management. The European Society of Retina Specialists offers expert guidance for diagnostic and therapeutic management of neovascular AMD supporting healthcare givers and doctors in providing the best state-of-the-art care to their patients. Trial registration number NCT01318941. PMID:25136079

  20. Analysis of rare variants in the CFH gene in patients with the cuticular drusen subtype of age-related macular degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duvvari, M.R.; Saksens, N.T.M.; Ven, J.P.H. van de; Jong-Hesse, Y. de; Schick, T.; Nillesen, W.M.; Fauser, S.; Hoefsloot, L.H.; Hoyng, C.B.; Jong, E.K.; Hollander, A.I. den

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and cuticular drusen (CD), a clinical subtype of AMD, have been linked to genetic variants in the complement factor H (CFH) gene. In this study, we aimed to investigate the frequency of rare variants in the CFH gene in 180 cases with CD. In addition,

  1. The Societal Impact of Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Use of Social Support Resources Differs by the Severity of the Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Mark; Horowitz, Amy; Reinhardt, Joann P.; Stuen, Cynthia; Rubio, Roman; Oestreicher, Nina

    2011-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of legal blindness among persons aged 50 years and older and is most prevalent among individuals of European descent aged 65 and older (Friedman et al., 2004; Rosenthal & Thompson, 2003). By affecting central vision, AMD interferes with such tasks as reading, driving, and activities…

  2. Systemic frequencies of T helper 1 and T helper 17 cells in patients with age-related macular degeneration: A case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Amardeep; Subhi, Yousif; Nielsen, Marie Krogh

    2017-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a degenerative disease of the retina and a leading cause of irreversible vision loss. We investigated the systemic differences in the frequency of T helper (Th) 1 and Th17 cells in patients with non-exudative and exudative AMD and compared to age...

  3. Anker Energy battles AMD in West Virginia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frey, T.J.

    1998-01-01

    To comply with the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977, Anker Energy has a number of reclamation projects in progress in northern West Virginia to fight acid mine drainage (AMD), the number one reclamation problem in the region. Anker's reclamation activities range from water treatment systems to the backhaul and use of coal ash from its customers. The article describes the passive treatment system - successive alkalinity producing system (SAPS) used at the Ankar subsidiary Upshur Property Inc., in Upshur Country, W.Va., and a similar passive system used at the Green Run site in Albright, W.Va. A backhaul and ash utilization water treatment system is used by Anker subsidiary Patriot Mining Co. Inc., for water discharged from a surface mine into the Cheat River in Albright. In another ash project, the Stacks Run Refuse Reprocessing Project in Preston County, W.Va., refuse placed 10 years ago in abandoned pits is excavated, mixed with coal, burned with limestone and the CFB ash used in reclamation. At Patriot's Osaga surface mine ditches are filled with slag from old steel mills to generate alkalinity. At Pete Dye a golf course has been built on land mined by Consolidation Coal. 7 photos

  4. The effect of non-neovascular age-related macular degeneration on face recognition performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Deanna J; Smith, Nicholas D; Binns, Alison M; Crabb, David P

    2018-04-01

    There is a well-established research base surrounding face recognition in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, much of this existing research does not differentiate between results obtained for 'wet' AMD and 'dry' AMD. Here, we test the hypothesis that face recognition performance is worse in patients with dry AMD compared with visually healthy peers. Patients (>60 years of age, logMAR binocular visual acuity 0.7 or better) with dry AMD of varying severity and visually healthy age-related peers (controls) completed a modified version of the Cambridge Face Memory Test (CFMT). Percentage of correctly identified faces was used as an outcome measure for performance for each participant. A 90% normative reference limit was generated from the distribution of CFMT scores recorded in the visually healthy controls. Scores for AMD participants were then specifically compared to this limit, and comparisons between average scores in the AMD severity groups were investigated. Thirty patients (median [interquartile range] age of 76 [70, 79] years) and 34 controls (median age of 70 [64, 75] years) were examined. Four, seventeen and nine patients were classified as having early, intermediate and late AMD (geographic atrophy) respectively. Five (17%) patients recorded a face recognition performance worse than the 90% limit (Fisher's exact test, p = 0.46) set by controls; four of these had geographic atrophy. Patients with geographic atrophy identified fewer faces on average (±SD) (61% ± 22%) than those with early and intermediate AMD (75 ± 11%) and controls (74% ± 11%). People with dry AMD may not suffer from problems with face recognition until the disease is in its later stages; those with late AMD (geographic atrophy) are likely to have difficulty recognising faces. The results from this study should influence the management and expectations of patients with dry AMD in both community practice and hospital clinics.

  5. Hypomethylation of the IL17RC Promoter Associates with Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai Wei

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the leading cause of irreversible blindness in the elderly population worldwide. Although recent studies have demonstrated strong genetic associations between AMD and SNPs in a number of genes, other modes of regulation are also likely to play a role in the etiology of this disease. We identified a significantly decreased level of methylation on the IL17RC promoter in AMD patients. Furthermore, we showed that hypomethylation of the IL17RC promoter in AMD patients led to an elevated expression of its protein and messenger RNA in peripheral blood as well as in the affected retina and choroid, suggesting that the DNA methylation pattern and expression of IL17RC may potentially serve as a biomarker for the diagnosis of AMD and likely plays a role in disease pathogenesis.

  6. Hypomethylation of IL17RC Promoter Associates with Age-related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lai; Liu, Baoying; Tuo, Jingsheng; Shen, Defen; Chen, Ping; Li, Zhiyu; Liu, Xunxian; Ni, Jia; Dagur, Pradeep; Sen, H. Nida; Jawad, Shayma; Ling, Diamond; Park, Stanley; Chakrabarty, Sagarika; Meyerle, Catherine; Agron, Elvira; Ferris, Frederick L.; Chew, Emily Y.; McCoy, J. Philip; Blum, Emily; Francis, Peter J.; Klein, Michael L.; Guymer, Robyn H.; Baird, Paul N.; Chan, Chi-Chao; Nussenblatt, Robert B.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of irreversible blindness in the elderly population worldwide. While recent studies have demonstrated strong genetic associations of single nucleotide polymorphisms within a number of genes and AMD, other modes of regulation are also likely to play a role in its etiology. We identified a significantly decreased level of methylation on the IL17RC promoter in AMD patients. Further, we showed that hypomethylation of the IL17RC promoter in AMD patients led to an elevated expression of its protein and mRNA in peripheral blood as well as in the affected retina and choroid, suggesting that the DNA methylation pattern and expression of IL17RC may potentially serve as a biomarker for the diagnosis of AMD and likely plays a role in disease pathogenesis. PMID:23177625

  7. Efficacy of vitrectomy and epiretinal membrane peeling in eyes with dry age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, John O; Patel, Shyam A

    2015-01-01

    To study the efficacy of epiretinal membrane (ERM) peeling in eyes with dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD). We retrospectively analyzed patient charts on 17 eyes (16 patients) that underwent ERM peeling with a concurrent diagnosis of dry AMD. Eyes with concurrent dry AMD and with a good preoperative best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) (better than or equal to 20/50) had a statistically significant mean BCVA improvement at 6 months after ERM peeling. There was a statistical increase in mean BCVA from 20/95 to 20/56 in dry AMD eyes, and no eyes showed worsening in BCVA at 6 months or at most recent follow-up. Five/seventeen (29.4%) eyes had cataract formation or progression. There were no other complications, reoperations, or reoccurrences. ERM peeling in eyes with dry AMD may show significant improvement, especially in eyes with good preoperative BCVA. The procedure is relatively safe with low complications and reoccurrences.

  8. Genetics of Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Current Concepts, Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeAngelis, Margaret M.; Silveira, Alexandra C.; Carr, Elizabeth A.; Kim, Ivana K.

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a progressive degenerative disease which leads to blindness, affecting the quality of life of millions of Americans. More than 1.75 million individuals in the United States are affected by the advanced form of AMD. The etiological pathway of AMD is not yet fully understood, but there is a clear genetic influence on disease risk. To date, the 1q32 (CFH) and 10q26 (PLEKHA1/ARMS2/HTRA1) loci are the most strongly associated with disease; however, the variation in these genomic regions alone is unable to predict disease development with high accuracy. Therefore, current genetic studies are aimed at identifying new genes associated with AMD and their modifiers, with the goal of discovering diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers. Moreover, these studies provide the foundation for further investigation into the pathophysiology of AMD by utilizing a systems-biology-based approach to elucidate underlying mechanistic pathways. PMID:21609220

  9. Gene therapy with recombinant adeno-associated vectors for neovascular age-related macular degeneration: 1 year follow-up of a phase 1 randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakoczy, Elizabeth P; Lai, Chooi-May; Magno, Aaron L; Wikstrom, Matthew E; French, Martyn A; Pierce, Cora M; Schwartz, Steven D; Blumenkranz, Mark S; Chalberg, Thomas W; Degli-Esposti, Mariapia A; Constable, Ian J

    2015-12-12

    Neovascular, or wet, age-related macular degeneration causes central vision loss and represents a major health problem in elderly people, and is currently treated with frequent intraocular injections of anti-VEGF protein. Gene therapy might enable long-term anti-VEGF therapy from a single treatment. We tested the safety of rAAV.sFLT-1 in treatment of wet age-related macular degeneration with a single subretinal injection. In this single-centre, phase 1, randomised controlled trial, we enrolled patients with wet age-related macular degeneration at the Lions Eye Institute and the Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital (Nedlands, WA, Australia). Eligible patients had to be aged 65 years or older, have age-related macular degeneration secondary to active subfoveal choroidal neovascularisation, with best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) of 3/60-6/24 and 6/60 or better in the other eye. Patients were randomly assigned (3:1) to receive either 1 × 10(10) vector genomes (vg; low-dose rAAV.sFLT-1 group) or 1 × 10(11) vg (high-dose rAAV.sFLT-1 group), or no gene-therapy treatment (control group). Randomisation was done by sequential group assignment. All patients and investigators were unmasked. Staff doing the assessments were masked to the study group at study visits. All patients received ranibizumab at baseline and week 4, and rescue treatment during follow-up based on prespecified criteria including BCVA measured on the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (EDTRS) scale, optical coherence tomography, and fluorescein angiography. The primary endpoint was ocular and systemic safety. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01494805. From Dec 16, 2011, to April 5, 2012, we enrolled nine patients of whom eight were randomly assigned to receive either intervention (three patients in the low-dose rAAV.sFLT-1 group and three patients in the high-dose rAAV.sFLT-1 group) or no treatment (two patients in the control group). Subretinal injection of r

  10. Current knowledge and trends in age-related macular degeneration: today's and future treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez-Montoya, Raul; Oliver, Scott C N; Olson, Jeffrey L; Fine, Stuart L; Mandava, Naresh; Quiroz-Mercado, Hugo

    2013-09-01

    To address the most dynamic and current issues concerning today's treatment options and promising research efforts regarding treatment for age-related macular degeneration. This review is aimed to serve as a practical reference for more in-depth reviews on the subject. An online review of the database PubMed and Ovid were performed, searching for the key words age-related macular degeneration, AMD, VEGF, treatment, PDT, steroids, bevacizumab, ranibizumab, VEGF-trap, radiation, combined therapy, as well as their compound phrases. The search was limited to articles published since 1985. All returned articles were carefully screened, and their references were manually reviewed for additional relevant data. The web page www.clinicaltrials.gov was also accessed in search of relevant research trials. A total of 363 articles were reviewed, including 64 additional articles extracted from the references. At the end, only 160 references were included in this review. Treatment for age-related macular degeneration is a very dynamic research field. While current treatments are mainly aimed at blocking vascular endothelial growth factor, future treatments seek to prevent vision loss because of scarring. Promising efforts have been made to address the dry form of the disease, which has lacked effective treatment.

  11. Efficacy of vitrectomy and epiretinal membrane peeling in eyes with dry age-related macular degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Mason, III, John; Patel,Shyam

    2015-01-01

    John O Mason III,1,2 Shyam A Patel11Department of Ophthalmology, University of Alabama School of Medicine, Birmingham, AL, USA; 2Retina Consultants of Alabama, Callahan Eye Foundation Hospital, Birmingham, AL, USAObjective: To study the efficacy of epiretinal membrane (ERM) peeling in eyes with dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD).Methods: We retrospectively analyzed patient charts on 17 eyes (16 patients) that underwent ERM peeling with a concurrent diagnosis of dry AMD.Results: Eyes w...

  12. Device for fluorescent control and photodynamic therapy of age-related macula degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loschenov, Victor B.; Meerovich, Gennadii A.; Budzinskaya, M. V.; Ermakova, N. A.; Shevchik, S. A.; Kharnas, Sergey S.

    2004-07-01

    Age-related macula degeneration (AMD) is a wide spread disease the appearance of which leads to poor eyesight and blindness. A method of treatment is not determined until today. Traditional methods, such as laser coagulation and surgical operations are rather traumatic for eye and often bring to complications. That's why recently a photodynamic method of AMD treatment is studied. Based on photodynamic occlusion of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) with minimal injury to overlying neurosensory retina what increases the efficiency.

  13. Mechanism of Inflammation in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Parmeggiani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a multifactorial disease that represents the most common cause of irreversible visual impairment among people over the age of 50 in Europe, the United States, and Australia, accounting for up to 50% of all cases of central blindness. Risk factors of AMD are heterogeneous, mainly including increasing age and different genetic predispositions, together with several environmental/epigenetic factors, that is, cigarette smoking, dietary habits, and phototoxic exposure. In the aging retina, free radicals and oxidized lipoproteins are considered to be major causes of tissue stress resulting in local triggers for parainflammation, a chronic status which contributes to initiation and/or progression of many human neurodegenerative diseases such as AMD. Experimental and clinical evidences strongly indicate the pathogenetic role of immunologic processes in AMD occurrence, consisting of production of inflammatory related molecules, recruitment of macrophages, complement activation, microglial activation and accumulation within those structures that compose an essential area of the retina known as macula lutea. This paper reviews some attractive aspects of the literature about the mechanisms of inflammation in AMD, especially focusing on those findings or arguments more directly translatable to improve the clinical management of patients with AMD and to prevent the severe vision loss caused by this disease.

  14. Mechanism of Inflammation in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmeggiani, Francesco; Romano, Mario R.; Costagliola, Ciro; Semeraro, Francesco; Incorvaia, Carlo; D'Angelo, Sergio; Perri, Paolo; De Palma, Paolo; De Nadai, Katia; Sebastiani, Adolfo

    2012-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a multifactorial disease that represents the most common cause of irreversible visual impairment among people over the age of 50 in Europe, the United States, and Australia, accounting for up to 50% of all cases of central blindness. Risk factors of AMD are heterogeneous, mainly including increasing age and different genetic predispositions, together with several environmental/epigenetic factors, that is, cigarette smoking, dietary habits, and phototoxic exposure. In the aging retina, free radicals and oxidized lipoproteins are considered to be major causes of tissue stress resulting in local triggers for parainflammation, a chronic status which contributes to initiation and/or progression of many human neurodegenerative diseases such as AMD. Experimental and clinical evidences strongly indicate the pathogenetic role of immunologic processes in AMD occurrence, consisting of production of inflammatory related molecules, recruitment of macrophages, complement activation, microglial activation and accumulation within those structures that compose an essential area of the retina known as macula lutea. This paper reviews some attractive aspects of the literature about the mechanisms of inflammation in AMD, especially focusing on those findings or arguments more directly translatable to improve the clinical management of patients with AMD and to prevent the severe vision loss caused by this disease. PMID:23209345

  15. Recent developments in age-related macular degeneration: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zamil, Waseem M; Yassin, Sanaa A

    2017-01-01

    Background Visual impairment in elderly people is a considerable health problem that significantly affects quality of life of millions worldwide. The magnitude of this issue is becoming more evident with an aging population and an increasing number of older individuals. Objective The objective of this article was to review the clinical and pathological aspects of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), diagnostic tools, and therapeutic modalities presently available or underway for both atrophic and wet forms of the disease. Methods An online review of the PubMed database was performed, searching for the key words. The search was limited to articles published since 1980 to date. Results Several risk factors have been linked to AMD, such as age (>60 years), lifestyle (smoking and diet), and family history. Although the pathogenesis of AMD remains unclear, genetic factors have been implicated in the condition. Treatment for atrophic AMD is mainly close observation, coupled with nutritional supplements such as zinc and antioxidants, whereas treatment of wet AMD is based on targeting choroidal neovascular membranes. Conclusion Identification of modifiable risk factors would improve the possibilities of preventing the progression of AMD. The role of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) agents has transformed the therapeutic approach of the potentially blinding disease “wet AMD” into a more favorable outcome. PMID:28860733

  16. Designing clinical trials for age-related geographic atrophy of the macula: enrollment data from the geographic atrophy natural history study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunness, Janet S; Applegate, Carol A; Bressler, Neil M; Hawkins, Barbara S

    2007-02-01

    To derive information from the Geographic Atrophy (GA) Natural History Study that is relevant to recruiting patients and designing clinical trials for GA. A prospective natural history study with annual follow-up enrolled patients with GA and no choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in at least one eye. Characteristics of recruited and enrolled patients are analyzed, in the context of progression data from the study. The data show that GA from age-related macular degeneration (AMD) was seen in 82% of the referred patients, there was an attrition rate of 14%, and 60% of the patients with GA from AMD had bilateral GA without CNV. Within the 83 patients in the bilateral GA group with follow-up, 50 patients (60%) met both the proposed visual acuity and the proposed GA area criteria for a treatment trial in one or both eyes. These data should be helpful in planning future treatment trials for GA.

  17. Cigarette smoke induced autophagy-impairment regulates AMD pathogenesis mechanisms in ARPE-19 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viren Kumar Govindaraju

    Full Text Available Age related macular degeneration (AMD is one of the leading causes of blindness. Genetics, environmental insult, and age-related factors all play a key role in altering proteostasis, the homeostatic process regulating protein synthesis, degradation and processing. These factors also play a role in the pathogenesis of AMD and it has been well established that cigarette smoking (CS initiates AMD pathogenic mechanisms. The primary goal of this study is to elucidate whether CS can induce proteostasis/autophagy-impairment in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells. In our preliminary analysis, it was found that cigarette smoke extract (CSE induces accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins in the insoluble protein fraction (p < 0.01, which was subsequently mitigated through cysteamine (p < 0.01 or fisetin (p < 0.05 treatment. Further, it was verified that these CSE induced ubiquitinated proteins accumulated in the peri-nuclear spaces (p<0.05 that were cleared- off with cysteamine (p < 0.05 or fisetin (p < 0.05. Moreover, CSE-induced aggresome-formation (LC3B-GFP and Ub-RFP co-localization and autophagy-flux impairment was significantly (p<0.01 mitigated by cysteamine (p<0.05 or fisetin (p<0.05 treatment, indicating the restoration of CSE-mediated autophagy-impairment. CSE treatment was also found to induce intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS, p < 0.001 while impacting cell viability (p < 0.001, which was quantified using CMH2DCFDA-dye (ROS and MTS (proliferation or propodium iodide staining (cell viability assays, respectively. Moreover, cysteamine and fisetin treatment ameliorated CS-mediated ROS production (p < 0.05 and diminished cell viability (p < 0.05. Lastly, CSE was found to induce cellular senescence (p < 0.001, which was significantly ameliorated by cysteamine (p < 0.001 or fisetin (p < 0.001. In conclusion, our study indicates that CS induced proteostasis/autophagy-impairment regulates mechanisms associated with AMD pathogenesis. Moreover

  18. Role of ranibizumab in management of macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Rishi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is one of the most common causes of severe vision loss in the western world. Both animal and human studies have established that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF plays an important role in the pathogenesis of this process. Ranibizumab (Lucentis™, Genentech, South San Francisco, CA is a monoclonal antibody fragment (Fab directed toward all isoforms of VEGF-A that was specifically designed to target wet AMD. The human antibody fragment is produced by an E. coli expression system and has a molecular weight of 48kD allowing for excellent retinal penetration. The most common ocular complaints of patients receiving ranibizumab injections in randomized clinical trials were transient conjunctival hemorrhage, vitreous floaters, intraocular inflammation, increased intraocular pressure and eye pain. The rates of serious adverse events such as retinal detachment, cataract and endophthalmitis were similar to those that have been reported with other intravitreal injections and patients should always be treated under strict aseptic conditions to reduce this risk. There were no significant non-ocular events found during any study so far and the risk of thromboembolic events was less than 4% and not different than sham. The MARINA, ANCHOR and PIER studies validated the safety and efficacy of ranibizumab amongst a large population with different choroidal neovascular membrane lesion types against sham or standard of care treatment. These studies recommended monthly intravitreal ranibizumab for patients. However, the PIER study reported that an alternative dosing of every three months is acceptable but less effective than monthly injections.

  19. Age-related macular degeneration: epidemiology and optimal treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Morten; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Nissen, Mogens Holst

    2002-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common macular disease affecting elderly people in the Western world. It is characterised by the appearance of drusen in the macula, accompanied by choroidal neovascularisation (CNV) or geographic atrophy. The disease is more common in Caucasian....... Smoking is probably also a risk factor. Preventive strategies using macular laser photocoagulation are under investigation, but their efficacy in preventing visual loss is as yet unproven. There is no treatment with proven efficacy for geographic atrophy. Optimal treatment for exudative AMD requires...

  20. Small, hard macular drusen and peripheral drusen: associations with AMD genotypes in the Inter99 Eye Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, Inger Christine; Ek, Jakob; Kessel, Line

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To study associations of small, hard macular drusen and peripheral drusen with genotypes associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). METHODS: Digital grayscale fundus photographs recorded in red-free illumination were graded for the presence of drusen in 1107 subjects aged 30...... to 66 years. Participants were genotyped for AMD-related polymorphisms in complement factor H (CFH), in LOC387715, and in complement factor B (CFB). RESULTS: The prevalence of 20 or more small, hard macular drusen per eye was 14%, with no association to the investigated polymorphisms. Peripheral drusen...... were associated with CFHY402H (odds ratio [OR], 4.3; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.4-13, for CC versus TT genotypes) as was macular drusen >63 microm (OR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.1-3.1, for CC versus TT genotypes). Macular drusen >63 microm were associated with the presence of 20 or more small, hard...

  1. Effect of lutein intervention on visual function in patients with early age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Li

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To study the effect of lutein intervention on visual function of patients with early age-related macular degeneration(AMD. METHODS: Totally 200 early AMD patients were divided into lutein intervention group(20mg/dand placebo group by a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trail. Questionnaire investigation, serum lutein concentration and visual function were conducted at baseline, 12, 24, 36 and 48wk respectively. RESULTS: The serum lutein concentration in lutein intervention group was higher than the baseline(PPPPP>0.05. CONCLUSION: Lutein intervention can improve the visual function of patients with early AMD.

  2. Prevalence of age-related maculopathy and age-related macular degeneration among the inuit in Greenland. The Greenland Inuit Eye Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Varis Nis; Rosenberg, Thomas; la Cour, Morten

    2008-01-01

    To examine the age- and gender-specific prevalence and describe the common phenotype of early age-related maculopathy (ARM) and late-stage age-related macular degeneration (AMD) among the Inuit in Greenland.......To examine the age- and gender-specific prevalence and describe the common phenotype of early age-related maculopathy (ARM) and late-stage age-related macular degeneration (AMD) among the Inuit in Greenland....

  3. A prospective study of treatment patterns and 1-year outcome of Asian age-related macular degeneration and polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chui Ming Gemmy Cheung

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To study the treatment patterns and visual outcome over one year in Asian patients with choroidal neovascular membrane secondary to age-related macular degeneration (AMD-CNV and polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (PCV. DESIGN: Prospective cohort, non-interventional study. METHODS: 132 treatment-naïve patients who received treatment for AMD-CNV and PCV were included. All patients underwent standardized examination procedures including retinal imaging at baseline and follow-up. AMD-CNV and PCV were defined on fundus fluorescein angiography and indocyanine green angiography at baseline. Patients were treated according to standard of care.We report the visual acuity (VA and optical coherence tomography (OCT measurements at baseline, month 3 and month 12 The factors influencing month 12 outcomes were analyzed. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Type of treatment, number of Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF treatments, visual outcome over one year. RESULTS: Anti-VEGF monotherapy was the initial treatment in 89.1% of AMD-CNV, but only 15.1% of PCV. The mean number of anti-VEGF injections up to month 12 was 3.97 (4.51 AMD-CNV, 3.43 PCV, p = 0.021. Baseline OCT, month 3 OCT and month 3 VA were significant in determining continuation of treatment after month 3. At month 12, mean VA improved from 0.82 (∼20/132 at baseline to 0.68 (∼20/96 at month 12 (mean gain 6.5 ETDRS letters, p = 0.002. 34.2% of eyes (38/113 eyes gained ≥15 ETDRS letters and 14.4% (16/113 eyes lost ≥15 ETDRS letters. There were no significant differences in visual outcome between AMD-CNV and PCV (p = 0.51. Factors predictive of month 12 visual outcome were baseline VA, baseline OCT central macular thickness, month 3 VA and age. CONCLUSIONS: There is significant variation in treatment patterns in Asian eyes with exudative maculopathy. There is significant visual improvement in all treatment groups at one year. These data highlight the need for high quality

  4. Aging Is Not a Disease: Distinguishing Age-Related Macular Degeneration from Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardeljan, Daniel; Chan, Chi-Chao

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a disease of the outer retina, characterized most significantly by atrophy of photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium accompanied with or without choroidal neovascularization. Development of AMD has been recognized as contingent on environmental and genetic risk factors, the strongest being advanced age. In this review, we highlight pathogenic changes that destabilize ocular homeostasis and promote AMD development. With normal aging, photoreceptors are steadily lost, Bruch's membrane thickens, the choroid thins, and hard drusen may form in the periphery. In AMD, many of these changes are exacerbated in addition to the development of disease-specific factors such as soft macular drusen. Para-inflammation, which can be thought of as an intermediate between basal and robust levels of inflammation, develops within the retina in an attempt to maintain ocular homeostasis, reflected by increased expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 coupled with shifts in macrophage plasticity from the pro-inflammatory M1 to the anti-inflammatory M2 polarization. In AMD, imbalances in the M1 and M2 populations together with activation of retinal microglia are observed and potentially contribute to tissue degeneration. Nonetheless, the retina persists in a state of chronic inflammation and increased expression of certain cytokines and inflammasomes is observed. Since not everyone develops AMD, the vital question to ask is how the body establishes a balance between normal age-related changes and the pathological phenotypes in AMD. PMID:23933169

  5. Systems-level analysis of age-related macular degeneration reveals global biomarkers and phenotype-specific functional networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of blindness that affects the central region of the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE), choroid, and neural retina. Initially characterized by an accumulation of sub-RPE deposits, AMD leads to progressive retinal degeneration, and in advanced cases, irreversible vision loss. Although genetic analysis, animal models, and cell culture systems have yielded important insights into AMD, the molecular pathways underlying AMD's onset and progression remain poorly delineated. We sought to better understand the molecular underpinnings of this devastating disease by performing the first comparative transcriptome analysis of AMD and normal human donor eyes. Methods RPE-choroid and retina tissue samples were obtained from a common cohort of 31 normal, 26 AMD, and 11 potential pre-AMD human donor eyes. Transcriptome profiles were generated for macular and extramacular regions, and statistical and bioinformatic methods were employed to identify disease-associated gene signatures and functionally enriched protein association networks. Selected genes of high significance were validated using an independent donor cohort. Results We identified over 50 annotated genes enriched in cell-mediated immune responses that are globally over-expressed in RPE-choroid AMD phenotypes. Using a machine learning model and a second donor cohort, we show that the top 20 global genes are predictive of AMD clinical diagnosis. We also discovered functionally enriched gene sets in the RPE-choroid that delineate the advanced AMD phenotypes, neovascular AMD and geographic atrophy. Moreover, we identified a graded increase of transcript levels in the retina related to wound response, complement cascade, and neurogenesis that strongly correlates with decreased levels of phototransduction transcripts and increased AMD severity. Based on our findings, we assembled protein-protein interactomes that highlight functional networks likely to be

  6. Choice of Cell Source in Cell-Based Therapies for Retinal Damage due to Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhakar John

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a complex disorder that affects primarily the macula involving the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE but also to a certain extent the photoreceptor layer and the retinal neurons. Cell transplantation is a promising option for AMD and clinical trials are underway using different cell types. Methods. We hypothesize that instead of focusing on a particular cell source for concurrent regeneration of all the retinal layers and also to prevent exhaustive research on an array of cell sources for regeneration of each layer, the choice should depend on, precisely, which layer is damaged. Results. Thus, for a damage limited to the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE layer, the choice we suggest would be RPE cells. When the damage extends to rods and cones, the choice would be bone marrow stem cells and when retinal neurons are involved, relatively immature stem cell populations with an inherent capacity to yield neuronal lineage such as hematopoietic stem cells, embryonic stem cells, or induced pluripotent stem cells can be tried. Conclusion. This short review will prove to be a valuable guideline for those working on cell therapy for AMD to plan their future directions of research and therapy for this condition.

  7. A Longitudinal Follow-Up Study of Saffron Supplementation in Early Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Sustained Benefits to Central Retinal Function

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    M. Piccardi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. In a previous randomized clinical trial (Falsini et al. (2010, it was shown that short-term Saffron supplementation improves retinal flicker sensitivity in early age-related macular degeneration (AMD. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the observed functional benefits from Saffron supplementation may extend over a longer follow-up duration. Design. Longitudinal, interventional open-label study. Setting. Outpatient ophthalmology setting. Participants. Twenty-nine early AMD patients (age range: 55–85 years with a baseline visual acuity >0.3. Intervention. Saffron oral supplementation (20 mg/day over an average period of treatment of 14 (±2 months. Measurements. Clinical examination and focal-electroretinogram-(fERG- derived macular (18° flicker sensitivity estimate (Falsini et al. (2010 every three months over a followup of 14 (±2 months. Retinal sensitivity, the reciprocal value of the estimated fERG amplitude threshold, was the main outcome measure. Results. After three months of supplementation, mean fERG sensitivity improved by 0.3 log units compared to baseline values (P<0.01, and mean visual acuity improved by two Snellen lines compared to baseline values (0.75 to 0.9, P<0.01. These changes remained stable over the follow-up period. Conclusion. These results indicate that in early AMD Saffron supplementation induces macular function improvements from baseline that are extended over a long-term followup.

  8. External beam radiotherapy for subretinal neovascularization in age-related macular degeneration: is this treatment efficient?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staar, Susanne; Krott, Ralf; Mueller, Rolf-Peter; Bartz-Schmidt, Karl U.; Heimann, Klaus

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Control of the natural course of sub retinal neovascularization (SRNV) in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is difficult. Only a subset of patients is suitable for laser coagulation. This prospective study aimed to determine the efficacy and individual benefit of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: The prospective trial included 287 patients with subfoveal neovascularization due to AMD which was verified by fluorescein angiography. Patients have been treated between January 1996 and October 1997. All patients received a total dose of 16 Gy in 2-Gy daily fractions with 5-6 MeV photons based on computerized treatment planning in individual head mask fixation. This first analysis is based on 73 patients (50 women, 23 men, median age 74.3 years), with a median follow-up of 13.3 months and a minimum follow-up of 11 months. Results: All patients completed therapy and tolerability was good. First clinical control with second angiography was performed 6 weeks after irradiation, then in 3-month intervals. Eighteen patients with SRNV refusing radiotherapy served as a control group and were matched with 18 irradiated patients. After 7 months median visual acuity (VA) was 20/160 for the irradiated and 20/400 for the untreated patients. One year after radiotherapy final median VA was 20/400 in both groups. Conclusion: These results suggest that 16 Gy of conventionally fractionated external beam irradiation slows down the visual loss in exudative AMD for only a few months. Patients' reading vision could not be saved for a long-term run

  9. Intravitreous injection of AAV2-sFLT01 in patients with advanced neovascular age-related macular degeneration: a phase 1, open-label trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heier, Jeffrey S; Kherani, Saleema; Desai, Shilpa; Dugel, Pravin; Kaushal, Shalesh; Cheng, Seng H; Delacono, Cheryl; Purvis, Annie; Richards, Susan; Le-Halpere, Annaig; Connelly, John; Wadsworth, Samuel C; Varona, Rafael; Buggage, Ronald; Scaria, Abraham; Campochiaro, Peter A

    2017-07-01

    Long-term intraocular injections of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-neutralising proteins can preserve central vision in many patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration. We tested the safety and tolerability of a single intravitreous injection of an AAV2 vector expressing the VEGF-neutralising protein sFLT01 in patients with advanced neovascular age-related macular degeneration. This was a phase 1, open-label, dose-escalating study done at four outpatient retina clinics in the USA. Patients were assigned to each cohort in order of enrolment, with the first three patients being assigned to and completing the first cohort before filling positions in the following treatment groups. Patients aged 50 years or older with neovascular age-related macular degeneration and a baseline best-corrected visual acuity score of 20/100 or less in the study eye were enrolled in four dose-ranging cohorts (cohort 1, 2 × 10 8 vector genomes (vg); cohort 2, 2 × 10 9 vg; cohort 3, 6 × 10 9 vg; and cohort 4, 2 × 10 10 vg, n=3 per cohort) and one maximum tolerated dose cohort (cohort 5, 2 × 10 10 vg, n=7) and followed up for 52 weeks. The primary objective of the study was to assess the safety and tolerability of a single intravitreous injection of AAV2-sFLT01, through the measurement of eye-related adverse events. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01024998. 19 patients with advanced neovascular age-related macular degeneration were enrolled in the study between May 18, 2010, and July 14, 2014. All patients completed the 52-week trial period. Two patients in cohort 4 (2 × 10 10 vg) experienced adverse events that were possibly study-drug related: pyrexia and intraocular inflammation that resolved with a topical steroid. Five of ten patients who received 2 × 10 10 vg had aqueous humour concentrations of sFLT01 that peaked at 32·7-112·0 ng/mL (mean 73·7 ng/mL, SD 30·5) by week 26 with a slight decrease to

  10. Prevalence of Age-Related Macular Degeneration in Europe: The Past and the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colijn, Johanna M; Buitendijk, Gabriëlle H S; Prokofyeva, Elena; Alves, Dalila; Cachulo, Maria L; Khawaja, Anthony P; Cougnard-Gregoire, Audrey; Merle, Bénédicte M J; Korb, Christina; Erke, Maja G; Bron, Alain; Anastasopoulos, Eleftherios; Meester-Smoor, Magda A; Segato, Tatiana; Piermarocchi, Stefano; de Jong, Paulus T V M; Vingerling, Johannes R; Topouzis, Fotis; Creuzot-Garcher, Catherine; Bertelsen, Geir; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Fletcher, Astrid E; Foster, Paul J; Silva, Rufino; Korobelnik, Jean-François; Delcourt, Cécile; Klaver, Caroline C W

    2017-12-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a frequent, complex disorder in elderly of European ancestry. Risk profiles and treatment options have changed considerably over the years, which may have affected disease prevalence and outcome. We determined the prevalence of early and late AMD in Europe from 1990 to 2013 using the European Eye Epidemiology (E3) consortium, and made projections for the future. Meta-analysis of prevalence data. A total of 42 080 individuals 40 years of age and older participating in 14 population-based cohorts from 10 countries in Europe. AMD was diagnosed based on fundus photographs using the Rotterdam Classification. Prevalence of early and late AMD was calculated using random-effects meta-analysis stratified for age, birth cohort, gender, geographic region, and time period of the study. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was compared between late AMD subtypes; geographic atrophy (GA) and choroidal neovascularization (CNV). Prevalence of early and late AMD, BCVA, and number of AMD cases. Prevalence of early AMD increased from 3.5% (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.1%-5.0%) in those aged 55-59 years to 17.6% (95% CI 13.6%-21.5%) in those aged ≥85 years; for late AMD these figures were 0.1% (95% CI 0.04%-0.3%) and 9.8% (95% CI 6.3%-13.3%), respectively. We observed a decreasing prevalence of late AMD after 2006, which became most prominent after age 70. Prevalences were similar for gender across all age groups except for late AMD in the oldest age category, and a trend was found showing a higher prevalence of CNV in Northern Europe. After 2006, fewer eyes and fewer ≥80-year-old subjects with CNV were visually impaired (P = 0.016). Projections of AMD showed an almost doubling of affected persons despite a decreasing prevalence. By 2040, the number of individuals in Europe with early AMD will range between 14.9 and 21.5 million, and for late AMD between 3.9 and 4.8 million. We observed a decreasing prevalence of AMD and an improvement

  11. DNA sequence variants in PPARGC1A, a gene encoding a coactivator of the ω-3 LCPUFA sensing PPAR-RXR transcription complex, are associated with NV AMD and AMD-associated loci in genes of complement and VEGF signaling pathways.

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    John Paul SanGiovanni

    Full Text Available Increased intake of ω-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs and use of peroxisome proliferator activator receptor (PPAR-activating drugs are associated with attenuation of pathologic retinal angiogenesis. ω-3 LCPUFAs are endogenous agonists of PPARs. We postulated that DNA sequence variation in PPAR gamma (PPARG co-activator 1 alpha (PPARGC1A, a gene encoding a co-activator of the LCPUFA-sensing PPARG-retinoid X receptor (RXR transcription complex, may influence neovascularization (NV in age-related macular degeneration (AMD.We applied exact testing methods to examine distributions of DNA sequence variants in PPARGC1A for association with NV AMD and interaction of AMD-associated loci in genes of complement, lipid metabolism, and VEGF signaling systems. Our sample contained 1858 people from 3 elderly cohorts of western European ancestry. We concurrently investigated retinal gene expression profiles in 17-day-old neonatal mice on a 2% LCPUFA feeding paradigm to identify LCPUFA-regulated genes both associated with pathologic retinal angiogenesis and known to interact with PPARs or PPARGC1A.A DNA coding variant (rs3736265 and a 3'UTR-resident regulatory variant (rs3774923 in PPARGC1A were independently associated with NV AMD (exact P = 0.003, both SNPs. SNP-SNP interactions existed for NV AMD (P<0.005 with rs3736265 and a AMD-associated variant in complement factor B (CFB, rs512559. PPARGC1A influences activation of the AMD-associated complement component 3 (C3 promoter fragment and CFB influences activation and proteolysis of C3. We observed interaction (P ≤ 0.003 of rs3736265 with a variant in vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA, rs3025033, a key molecule in retinal angiogenesis. Another PPARGC1A coding variant (rs8192678 showed statistical interaction with a SNP in the VEGFA receptor fms-related tyrosine kinase 1 (FLT1, rs10507386; P ≤ 0.003. C3 expression was down-regulated 2-fold in retinas of ω-3 LCPUFA-fed mice

  12. Dietary fatty acids and lipoproteins on progression of age-related macular degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montserrat-de la Paz, S.; Naranjo, M.C.; Bermúdez, B.; López, S.; Abia, R.; Muriana, F.J.G.

    2017-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a medical condition of central loss vision and blindness. Numerous studies have revealed that changes on certain dietary fatty acids (FAs) could have useful for AMD management. This review summarizes the effects of dietary omega-3 long-chain PUFAs, MUFAs, and SFAs, and lipoproteins on AMD. Findings are consistent with the beneficial role of dietary omega-3 long-chain PUFAs, while the effects of dietary MUFAs and SFAs appeared to be ambiguous with respect to the possible protection from MUFAs and to the possible adverse impact from SFAs on AMD. Some of the pathological mechanisms associated with lipoproteins on AMD share those observed previously in cardiovascular diseases. It was also noticed that the effects of FAs in the diet and lipoprotein on AMD could be modulated by genetic variants. From a population health perspective, the findings of this review are in favour of omega-3 long-chain FAs recommendations in a preventive and therapeutic regimen to attain lower AMD occurrence and progression rates. Additional long-term and short-term nutrigenomic studies are required to clearly establish the role and the relevance of interaction of dietary FAs, lipoproteins, and genes in the genesis and progression of AMD. [es

  13. Dietary fatty acids and lipoproteins on progression of age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Montserrat-de la Paz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a medical condition of central loss vision and blindness. Numerous studies have revealed that changes on certain dietary fatty acids (FAs could have useful for AMD management. This review summarizes the effects of dietary omega-3 long-chain PUFAs, MUFAs, and SFAs, and lipoproteins on AMD. Findings are consistent with the beneficial role of dietary omega-3 long-chain PUFAs, while the effects of dietary MUFAs and SFAs appeared to be ambiguous with respect to the possible protection from MUFAs and to the possible adverse impact from SFAs on AMD. Some of the pathological mechanisms associated with lipoproteins on AMD share those observed previously in cardiovascular diseases. It was also noticed that the effects of FAs in the diet and lipoprotein on AMD could be modulated by genetic variants. From a population health perspective, the findings of this review are in favour of omega-3 long-chain FAs recommendations in a preventive and therapeutic regimen to attain lower AMD occurrence and progression rates. Additional long-term and short-term nutrigenomic studies are required to clearly establish the role and the relevance of interaction of dietary FAs, lipoproteins, and genes in the genesis and progression of AMD.

  14. The Association between the Lipids Levels in Blood and Risk of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

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    Yafeng Wang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Lipid metabolism may be involved in the pathogenic mechanism of age-related macular degeneration (AMD. However, conflicting results have been reported in the associations of AMD with blood lipids. We performed a meta-analysis including a total of 19 studies to evaluate associations between blood lipids and this disease. The result reported that the high level of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C obtained with an increment of 1 mmol/L could result in a significantly increase in the AMD risk of approximately 18% (relative risk (RR, 1.18; 95% confidence interval (CI, 1.01 to 1.35; I2 = 53.8%; p = 0.007. High levels of total cholesterol (TC, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C, and triglycerides (TG were significantly associated with a decreased risk of AMD (RRs ranging from 0.92 to 0.95; all p < 0.05. The stratified analysis based on AMD subtypes showed that these blood lipids were only significantly associated with the risk of early AMD (all p < 0.05. The association between the blood lipids and AMD risk did not differ substantially based on the other characteristics of the participants. A high HDL-C level was associated with an increased AMD risk, whereas participants with high TC, LDL-C, and TG concentrations may show a decreased risk for this disease. Further well-designed large studies are warranted to confirm the conclusions.

  15. Guidelines for the Management of Wet Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Recommendations from a Panel of Greek Experts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Androudi, Sofia; Dastiridou, Anna; Pharmakakis, Nikolaos; Stefaniotou, Maria; Kalogeropoulos, Christos; Symeonidis, Chrysanthos; Charonis, Alexandros; Tsilimbaris, Miltiadis

    2016-05-01

    To propose guidelines for the management of patients with wet age-related macular degeneration (wAMD), taking into account the results of large multicenter studies and clinical experience of retina experts. A team of retina experts developed a consensus paper after three consecutive meetings. The group was focused on guidelines to help clinical decision-making around the definition of successful treatment and the definition of non-response to therapy. Parameters suggestive of a successful response to treatments included: any gain in best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) or vision loss that is less than 5-10 Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) letters, reduction of central retinal thickness, partial or complete absorption of subretinal fluid (SRF), reduction of intraretinal fluid, reduction of pigment epithelial detachment or restoration of the anatomy of outer retinal layers. Non-response to current treatment was considered in the case of loss of BCVA greater than 10 ETDRS letters, increased retinal edema or increase of SRF as evidenced by optical coherence tomography or new bleeding in biomicroscopy. The introduction of anti-VEGF agents revolutionized the treatment of wAMD. Given the complexity of the disease, the emerging new agents and the difference of cases recruited in clinical trials compared to those appearing in every-day practice, it is essential to individualize treatment options taking into account the results of clinical trials.

  16. Identification of pathogenic genes and upstream regulators in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bin; Wang, Mengya; Xu, Jing; Li, Min; Yu, Yuhui

    2017-06-26

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of irreversible blindness in older individuals. Our study aims to identify the key genes and upstream regulators in AMD. To screen pathogenic genes of AMD, an integrated analysis was performed by using the microarray datasets in AMD derived from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database. The functional annotation and potential pathways of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were further discovered by Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) enrichment analysis. We constructed the AMD-specific transcriptional regulatory network to find the crucial transcriptional factors (TFs) which target the DEGs in AMD. Quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was performed to verify the DEGs and TFs obtained by integrated analysis. From two GEO datasets obtained, we identified 1280 DEGs (730 up-regulated and 550 down-regulated genes) between AMD and normal control (NC). After KEGG analysis, steroid biosynthesis is a significantly enriched pathway for DEGs. The expression of 8 genes (TNC, GRP, TRAF6, ADAMTS5, GPX3, FAP, DHCR7 and FDFT1) was detected. Except for TNC and GPX3, the other 6 genes in qRT-PCR played the same pattern with that in our integrated analysis. The dysregulation of these eight genes may involve with the process of AMD. Two crucial transcription factors (c-rel and myogenin) were concluded to play a role in AMD. Especially, myogenin was associated with AMD by regulating TNC, GRP and FAP. Our finding can contribute to developing new potential biomarkers, revealing the underlying pathogenesis, and further raising new therapeutic targets for AMD.

  17. Serum levels of lipid metabolites in age-related macular degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Orban, Tivadar; Johnson, William M.; Dong, Zhiqian; Maeda, Tadao; Maeda, Akiko; Sakai, Tsutomu; Tsuneoka, Hiroshi; Mieyal, John J.; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a neurodegenerative disease that causes adult-onset blindness. There are 2 forms of this progressive disease: wet and dry. Currently there is no cure for AMD, but several treatment options have started to emerge making early detection critical for therapeutic success. Analysis of the eyes of Abca4−/−Rdh8−/− mice that display light-induced retinal degeneration indicates that 11-cis-retinal and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) levels were significantly decrea...

  18. Microglia in the mouse retina alter the structure and function of retinal pigmented epithelial cells: a potential cellular interaction relevant to AMD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenxin Ma

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a leading cause of legal blindness in the elderly in the industrialized word. While the immune system in the retina is likely to be important in AMD pathogenesis, the cell biology underlying the disease is incompletely understood. Clinical and basic science studies have implicated alterations in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE layer as a locus of early change. Also, retinal microglia, the resident immune cells of the retina, have been observed to translocate from their normal position in the inner retina to accumulate in the subretinal space close to the RPE layer in AMD eyes and in animal models of AMD.In this study, we examined the effects of retinal microglia on RPE cells using 1 an in vitro model where activated retinal microglia are co-cultured with primary RPE cells, and 2 an in vivo mouse model where retinal microglia are transplanted into the subretinal space. We found that retinal microglia induced in RPE cells 1 changes in RPE structure and distribution, 2 increased expression and secretion of pro-inflammatory, chemotactic, and pro-angiogenic molecules, and 3 increased extent of in vivo choroidal neovascularization in the subretinal space.These findings share similarities with important pathological features found in AMD and suggest the relevance of microglia-RPE interactions in AMD pathogenesis. We speculate that the migration of retinal microglia into the subretinal space in early stages of the disease induces significant changes in RPE cells that perpetuate further microglial accumulation, increase inflammation in the outer retina, and fosters an environment conducive for the formation of neovascular changes responsible for much of vision loss in advanced AMD.

  19. Development of a Candida glabrata dominant nutritional transformation marker utilizing the Aspergillus nidulans acetamidase gene (amdS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jianmin; Blaylock, Morganne; Wickes, Cameron F; Welte, William; Mehrtash, Adrian; Wiederhold, Nathan; Wickes, Brian L

    2016-05-01

    The gene encoding Aspergillus nidulans acetamidase (amdS) was placed under control of Candida albicans ACT1 promoter and terminator sequences and then cloned into a plasmid containing C. glabrata ARS10,CEN8 or ARS10+CEN8 sequences. All plasmids transformed C. glabrata wild-type cells to acetamide+, with the ARS-only containing plasmid transforming cells at the highest frequencies (>1.0 × 10(4) transformants μg(-1)). Plasmids were rapidly lost under non-selective conditions with the frequency dependent on chromosomal element, thus recycling the acetamide- phenotype. The amdS plasmid was used to transform a set of clinical isolates resistant to a variety of antifungal drugs. All strains were successfully transformed to the acetamide+ phenotype at high frequency, confirming that this plasmid construct could be used as a simple dominant marker on virtually any strain. Gap repair experiments demonstrated that just as in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, gap repair functions efficiently inC. glabrata, suggesting that C. glabrata has numerous similarities toS. cerevisiae with regard to ease of molecular manipulation. The amdS system is inexpensive and efficient, and combined with existing C. glabrata plasmid elements, confers a high transformation frequency for C. glabrata with a phenotype that can be easily recycled. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Retinal vascular caliber, iris color, and age-related macular degeneration in the Irish Nun Eye Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Amy; Silvestri, Giuliana; Moore, Evelyn; Silvestri, Vittorio; Patterson, Christopher C; Maxwell, Alexander P; McKay, Gareth J

    2014-12-18

    To evaluate the relationship between retinal vascular caliber (RVC), iris color, and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in elderly Irish nuns. Data from 1233 participants in the cross-sectional observational Irish Nun Eye Study were assessed from digital photographs with a standardized protocol using computer-assisted software. Macular images were graded according to the modified Wisconsin Age-related Maculopathy Grading System. Regression models were used to assess associations, adjusting for age, mean arterial blood pressure, body mass index, refraction, and fellow RVC. In total, 1122 (91%) participants had gradable retinal images of sufficient quality for vessel assessment (mean age: 76.3 years [range, 56-100 years]). In an unadjusted analysis, we found some support for a previous finding that individuals with blue iris color had narrower retinal venules compared to those with brown iris color (P < 0.05), but this was no longer significant after adjustment. Age-related macular degeneration status was categorized as no AMD, any AMD, and late AMD only. Individuals with any AMD (early or late AMD) had significantly narrower arterioles and venules compared to those with no AMD in an unadjusted analysis, but this was no longer significant after adjustment. A nonsignificant reduced risk of any AMD or late AMD only was observed in association with brown compared to blue iris color, in both unadjusted and adjusted analyses. Retinal vascular caliber was not significantly associated with iris color or early/late AMD after adjustment for confounders. A lower but nonsignificant AMD risk was observed in those with brown compared to blue iris color. Copyright 2015 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  1. Vitamin D and Age-Related Macular Degeneration

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    Alfredo Garcia Layana

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the relationship between vitamin D and health has received growing attention from the scientific and medical communities. Vitamin D deficiencies have been repeatedly associated with various acute and chronic diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD. Its active metabolite, 1α,25-dihydoxy vitamin D, acts as a modulator of cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis, and cumulative data from experimental and observational studies suggest that relatively a lower vitamin D status could be a potential risk factor for the development of early and/or late AMD. Herein, we made a narrative review of the mechanisms linking a potential role of vitamin D with the current concepts of AMD pathophysiology.

  2. Vitamin D and Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layana, Alfredo Garcia; Minnella, Angelo Maria; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Aslam, Tariq; Holz, Frank G; Leys, Anita; Silva, Rufino; Delcourt, Cécile; Souied, Eric; Seddon, Johanna M

    2017-10-13

    In recent years, the relationship between vitamin D and health has received growing attention from the scientific and medical communities. Vitamin D deficiencies have been repeatedly associated with various acute and chronic diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Its active metabolite, 1α,25-dihydoxy vitamin D, acts as a modulator of cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis, and cumulative data from experimental and observational studies suggest that relatively a lower vitamin D status could be a potential risk factor for the development of early and/or late AMD. Herein, we made a narrative review of the mechanisms linking a potential role of vitamin D with the current concepts of AMD pathophysiology.

  3. Hot Topics in Pharmacogenetics of Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Stephen G; Brantley, Milam A; Kovach, Jaclyn L; Grzybowski, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of irreversible visual loss and is primarily treated with nutritional supplementation as well as with anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) agents for certain patients with neovascular disease. AMD is a complex disease with both genetic and environmental risk factors. In addition, treatment outcomes from nutritional supplementation and anti-VEGF agents vary considerably. Therefore, it is reasonable to suspect that there may be pharmacogenetic influences on these treatments. Many series have reported individual associations with variants in complement factor H (CFH), age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2 (ARMS2), and other loci. However, at this time there are no validated associations. With respect to AMD, pharmacogenetics remains an intriguing area of research but is not helpful for routine clinical management. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  4. Serum levels of lipid metabolites in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orban, Tivadar; Johnson, William M; Dong, Zhiqian; Maeda, Tadao; Maeda, Akiko; Sakai, Tsutomu; Tsuneoka, Hiroshi; Mieyal, John J; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2015-11-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a neurodegenerative disease that causes adult-onset blindness. There are 2 forms of this progressive disease: wet and dry. Currently there is no cure for AMD, but several treatment options have started to emerge making early detection critical for therapeutic success. Analysis of the eyes of Abca4(-/-)Rdh8(-/-) mice that display light-induced retinal degeneration indicates that 11-cis-retinal and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) levels were significantly decreased as compared with the eyes of control dark-adapted C57BL/6J mice. In addition, exposure to intense light correlated with higher levels of prostaglandin G2 in the eyes of Abca4(-/-)Rdh8(-/-) mice. Intense light exposure also lowered DHA levels in the eyes of wild-type C57BL/6J mice without discernible retinal degeneration. Analysis of human serum from patients with AMD recapitulated these dysregulated DHA levels and revealed dysregulation of arachidonic acid (AA) levels as well (∼32% increase in patients with AMD compared with average levels in healthy individuals). From these observations, we then built a statistical model that included levels of DHA and AA from human serum. This model had a 74% probability of correctly identifying patients with AMD from controls. Addition of a genetic analysis for one of the most prevalent amino acid substitutions in the age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2 gene linked to AMD, Ala(69)→Ser, did not improve the statistical model. Thus, we have characterized a reliable method with the potential to detect AMD without a genetic component, paving the way for a larger-scale clinical evaluation. Our studies on mouse models along with the analysis of human serum suggest that our small molecule-based model may serve as an effective tool to estimate the risk of developing AMD. © FASEB.

  5. Interim Results of a Multicenter Trial with the New Electronic Subretinal Implant Alpha AMS in 15 Patients Blind from Inherited Retinal Degenerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stingl, Katarina; Schippert, Ruth; Bartz-Schmidt, Karl U; Besch, Dorothea; Cottriall, Charles L; Edwards, Thomas L; Gekeler, Florian; Greppmaier, Udo; Kiel, Katja; Koitschev, Assen; Kühlewein, Laura; MacLaren, Robert E; Ramsden, James D; Roider, Johann; Rothermel, Albrecht; Sachs, Helmut; Schröder, Greta S; Tode, Jan; Troelenberg, Nicole; Zrenner, Eberhart

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: We assessed the safety and efficacy of a technically advanced subretinal electronic implant, RETINA IMPLANT Alpha AMS, in end stage retinal degeneration in an interim analysis of two ongoing prospective clinical trials. The purpose of this article is to describe the interim functional results (efficacy). Methods: The subretinal visual prosthesis RETINA IMPLANT Alpha AMS (Retina Implant AG, Reutlingen, Germany) was implanted in 15 blind patients with hereditary retinal degenerations at four study sites with a follow-up period of 12 months (www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT01024803 and NCT02720640). Functional outcome measures included (1) screen-based standardized 2- or 4-alternative forced-choice (AFC) tests of light perception, light localization, grating detection (basic grating acuity (BaGA) test), and Landolt C-rings; (2) gray level discrimination; (3) performance during activities of daily living (ADL-table tasks). Results: Implant-mediated light perception was observed in 13/15 patients. During the observation period implant mediated localization of visual targets was possible in 13/15 patients. Correct grating detection was achieved for spatial frequencies of 0.1 cpd (cycles per degree) in 4/15; 0.33 cpd in 3/15; 0.66 cpd in 2/15; 1.0 cpd in 2/15 and 3.3 cpd in 1/15 patients. In two patients visual acuity (VA) assessed with Landolt C- rings was 20/546 and 20/1111. Of 6 possible gray levels on average 4.6 ± 0.8 (mean ± SD, n = 10) were discerned. Improvements (power ON vs. OFF) of ADL table tasks were measured in 13/15 patients. Overall, results were stable during the observation period. Serious adverse events (SAEs) were reported in 4 patients: 2 movements of the implant, readjusted in a second surgery; 4 conjunctival erosion/dehiscence, successfully treated; 1 pain event around the coil, successfully treated; 1 partial reduction of silicone oil tamponade leading to distorted vision (silicon oil successfully refilled). The majority of adverse events (AEs

  6. Interim Results of a Multicenter Trial with the New Electronic Subretinal Implant Alpha AMS in 15 Patients Blind from Inherited Retinal Degenerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Stingl

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We assessed the safety and efficacy of a technically advanced subretinal electronic implant, RETINA IMPLANT Alpha AMS, in end stage retinal degeneration in an interim analysis of two ongoing prospective clinical trials. The purpose of this article is to describe the interim functional results (efficacy.Methods: The subretinal visual prosthesis RETINA IMPLANT Alpha AMS (Retina Implant AG, Reutlingen, Germany was implanted in 15 blind patients with hereditary retinal degenerations at four study sites with a follow-up period of 12 months (www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT01024803 and NCT02720640. Functional outcome measures included (1 screen-based standardized 2- or 4-alternative forced-choice (AFC tests of light perception, light localization, grating detection (basic grating acuity (BaGA test, and Landolt C-rings; (2 gray level discrimination; (3 performance during activities of daily living (ADL-table tasks.Results: Implant-mediated light perception was observed in 13/15 patients. During the observation period implant mediated localization of visual targets was possible in 13/15 patients. Correct grating detection was achieved for spatial frequencies of 0.1 cpd (cycles per degree in 4/15; 0.33 cpd in 3/15; 0.66 cpd in 2/15; 1.0 cpd in 2/15 and 3.3 cpd in 1/15 patients. In two patients visual acuity (VA assessed with Landolt C- rings was 20/546 and 20/1111. Of 6 possible gray levels on average 4.6 ± 0.8 (mean ± SD, n = 10 were discerned. Improvements (power ON vs. OFF of ADL table tasks were measured in 13/15 patients. Overall, results were stable during the observation period. Serious adverse events (SAEs were reported in 4 patients: 2 movements of the implant, readjusted in a second surgery; 4 conjunctival erosion/dehiscence, successfully treated; 1 pain event around the coil, successfully treated; 1 partial reduction of silicone oil tamponade leading to distorted vision (silicon oil successfully refilled. The majority of adverse events

  7. The Impact of Supplemental Antioxidants on Visual Function in Nonadvanced Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Head-to-Head Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akuffo, Kwadwo Owusu; Beatty, Stephen; Peto, Tunde; Stack, Jim; Stringham, Jim; Kelly, David; Leung, Irene; Corcoran, Laura; Nolan, John M

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of supplemental macular carotenoids (including versus not including meso-zeaxanthin) in combination with coantioxidants on visual function in patients with nonadvanced age-related macular degeneration. In this study, 121 participants were randomly assigned to group 1 (Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2 formulation with a low dose [25 mg] of zinc and an addition of 10 mg meso-zeaxanthin; n = 60) or group 2 (Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2 formulation with a low dose [25 mg] of zinc; n = 61). Visual function was assessed using best-corrected visual acuity, contrast sensitivity (CS), glare disability, retinal straylight, photostress recovery time, reading performance, and the National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire-25. Macular pigment was measured using customized heterochromatic flicker photometry. There was a statistically significant improvement in the primary outcome measure (letter CS at 6 cycles per degree [6 cpd]) over time (P = 0.013), and this observed improvement was statistically comparable between interventions (P = 0.881). Statistically significant improvements in several secondary outcome visual function measures (letter CS at 1.2 and 2.4 cpd; mesopic and photopic CS at all spatial frequencies; mesopic glare disability at 1.5, 3, and 6 cpd; photopic glare disability at 1.5, 3, 6, and 12 cpd; photostress recovery time; retinal straylight; mean and maximum reading speed) were also observed over time (P 0.05, for all). Statistically significant increases in macular pigment at all eccentricities were observed over time (P 0.05). Antioxidant supplementation in patients with nonadvanced age-related macular degeneration results in significant increases in macular pigment and improvements in CS and other measures of visual function. (Clinical trial, http://www.isrctn.com/ISRCTN13894787).

  8. The design and implementation of a study to investigate the effectiveness of community vs hospital eye service follow-up for patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration with quiescent disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, J; Scott, L J; Rogers, C A; Muldrew, A; O'Reilly, D; Wordsworth, S; Mills, N; Hogg, R; Violato, M; Harding, S P; Peto, T; Townsend, D; Chakravarthy, U; Reeves, B C

    2016-01-01

    IntroductionStandard treatment for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) is intravitreal injections of anti-VEGF drugs. Following multiple injections, nAMD lesions often become quiescent but there is a high risk of reactivation, and regular review by hospital ophthalmologists is the norm. The present trial examines the feasibility of community optometrists making lesion reactivation decisions.MethodsThe Effectiveness of Community vs Hospital Eye Service (ECHoES) trial is a virtual trial; lesion reactivation decisions were made about vignettes that comprised clinical data, colour fundus photographs, and optical coherence tomograms displayed on a web-based platform. Participants were either hospital ophthalmologists or community optometrists. All participants were provided with webinar training on the disease, its management, and assessment of the retinal imaging outputs. In a balanced design, 96 participants each assessed 42 vignettes; a total of 288 vignettes were assessed seven times by each professional group.The primary outcome is a participant's judgement of lesion reactivation compared with a reference standard. Secondary outcomes are the frequency of sight threatening errors; judgements about specific lesion components; participant-rated confidence in their decisions about the primary outcome; cost effectiveness of follow-up by optometrists rather than ophthalmologists.DiscussionThis trial addresses an important question for the NHS, namely whether, with appropriate training, community optometrists can make retreatment decisions for patients with nAMD to the same standard as hospital ophthalmologists. The trial employed a novel approach as participation was entirely through a web-based application; the trial required very few resources compared with those that would have been needed for a conventional randomised controlled clinical trial.

  9. Proof of activity with AMD11070, an orally bioavailable inhibitor of CXCR4-tropic HIV type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyle, Graeme; DeJesus, Edwin; Boffito, Marta; Wong, Rebecca S; Gibney, Colleen; Badel, Karin; MacFarland, Ron; Calandra, Gary; Bridger, Gary; Becker, Stephen

    2009-03-15

    The X4 Antagonist Concept Trial investigates the safety and antiviral activity of AMD11070, a potent inhibitor of X4-tropic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in vitro in HIV-infected patients harboring X4-tropic virus. Patients enrolled in the study had an X4 virus population 2000 relative luminescence units (rlu; by the Monogram Trofile Assay) and an HIV-1 RNA level 5000 copies/mL. Patients received AMD11070 monotherapy for 10 days. Coreceptor tropism, plasma HIV-1 RNA level, and CD4 cell count were measured at study entry, on day 5, and on day 10. Daily predose and serial samples on the last day of treatment were obtained for determination of plasma AMD11070 concentration. Ten patients were given AMD11070 monotherapy (200 mg to 8 patients and 100 mg to 2 patients) twice daily for 10 days. The median baseline CD4 cell count was 160 cells/mm(3), and the median HIV-1 RNA level was 91,447 copies/mL. Four of 9 evaluable patients achieved a reduction in X4 virus population of >or= rlu. The median change in X4 virus population at the end of treatment was -0.22 log(10) rlu (range, -1.90 to 0.23 log(10) rlu). Three of 4 patients who responded to therapy showed a tropism shift from dual- or mixed-tropic viruses to exclusively R5 virus by day 10. There were no drug-related serious adverse events, adverse events of greater than grade 2, or laboratory abnormalities. These results demonstrate the activity of AMD11070, the first oral CXCR4 antagonist, against X4-tropic HIV-1. The drug was well tolerated, with no serious safety concerns. AMD11070 is on clinical hold because of histologic changes to the liver observed in long-term animal studies; additional preclinical safety assessments are pending.

  10. Optical Coherence Tomography-Based Decision Making in Exudative Age-related Macular Degeneration: Comparison of Time- versus Spectral-Domain Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukras, Catherine; Wang, Yunqing D.; Meyerle, Catherine B.; Forooghian, Farzin; Chew, Emily Y.; Wong, Wai T.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To determine if optical coherence tomography (OCT) device-type influences clinical grading of OCT imaging in the context of exudative age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods Ninety-six paired OCT scans from 49 patients with active exudative AMD were obtained on both the time-domain Stratus™ OCT system and the spectral-domain Cirrus™ OCT system at the same visit. Three independent graders judged each scan for the presence of intraretinal fluid (IRF) or subretinal fluid (SRF). The degree of grader consensus was evaluated and the ability of the systems to detect the presence of disease activity was analyzed. Results Cirrus™ OCT generated a higher degree of inter-grader consensus than Stratus OCT with higher intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) for all parameters analyzed. A pair-wise comparison of Cirrus™ OCT to Stratus™ OCT systems revealed that Cirrus™-based gradings more frequently reported the presence of SRF and IRF and detected overall neovascular activity at a higher rate (p<0.05) compared to Stratus™-based gradings Conclusions The choice of time-domain (Stratus™) versus spectra-domain (Cirrus™) OCT systems has a measurable impact on clinical decision making in exudative AMD. Spectral-domain OCT systems may be able to generate more consensus in clinical interpretation and, in particular cases, detect disease activity not detected by time-domain systems. Clinical trials employing OCT-based clinical evaluations of exudative AMD may need to account for these inter-system differences in planning and analysis. PMID:19696804

  11. Age, sex, and type of medication predict the effect of anti-VEGF treatment on central retinal thickness in wet age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bek T

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Toke Bek, Sidsel Ehlers Klug Department of Ophthalmology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark Purpose: Randomized clinical trials studying the effects of VEGF inhibition on wet age-related macular degeneration (wAMD are designed so that the effects of individually varying risk factors on the treatment response are eliminated. The influence of these risk factors can be studied in large data sets from real-life experience.Patients and methods: All 2,255 patients diagnosed with wAMD requiring anti-VEGF treatment in at least one eye over more than 9 years in a defined Danish population with 0.9 million inhabitants were studied. The predictive value of eye laterality, sex, current smoking status, type of anti-VEGF compound, membrane position, membrane type, leakage area, number of injections, number of visits, age, time to follow-up, visual acuity, and central retinal thickness (CRT at baseline on change in CRT after three monthly injections with anti-VEGF compound followed by treatment pro re nata for up to 12 months was assessed.Results: After 12 months, 67 patients had died, 903 had had stable CRT for at least 6 months, and 1,285 patients had not achieved stable CRT. The reduction in CRT was -84.8±118.3 µm, whereas the increase in visual acuity was 2.2±14.7 Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study letters. The risk factors included contributed to 64% of the variation in CRT reduction. High age and high CRT at baseline predicted high CRT reduction, whereas more injections, treatment with ranibizumab, and male sex predicted a low CRT reduction.Conclusion: Age, sex, and type of anti-VEGF medication can be used to plan treatment and inform patients about the expected response of anti-VEGF treatment in wAMD. Keywords: wet AMD, anti-VEGF treatment, risk factors, real-life experience 

  12. Plasma long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and macular pigment in subjects with family history of age-related macular degeneration: the Limpia Study.

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    Merle, Bénédicte M J; Buaud, Benjamin; Korobelnik, Jean-François; Bron, Alain; Delyfer, Marie-Noëlle; Rougier, Marie-Bénédicte; Savel, Hélène; Vaysse, Carole; Creuzot-Garcher, Catherine; Delcourt, Cécile

    2017-12-01

    In numerous epidemiological studies, omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have been associated with a decreased risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Beyond their structural, functional and neuroprotective roles, omega-3 PUFAs may favour the retinal accumulation of lutein and zeaxanthin and thus increase macular pigment optical density (MPOD). We examined the associations of MPOD with plasma omega-3 PUFAs in subjects with family history of AMD. The Limpia study is a double-blind, placebo-controlled, prospective randomized clinical trial performed in 120 subjects. Subjects with at least one parent treated for neovascular AMD, aged 40-70, with a best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) >20/25, free of late AMD and other major eye conditions and with no use of supplement containing lutein or zeaxanthin the preceding year were recruited in Bordeaux and Dijon, France. At baseline, MPOD within 1° of eccentricity was measured by modified Heidelberg retinal analyser (Heidelberg, Germany) and plasma omega-3 PUFAs by gas chromatography. Medical history and lifestyle data were collected from a standardized questionnaire. Associations of MPOD with plasma omega-3 PUFAs were assessed at the baseline examination, using mixed linear models adjusted for age, gender, centre, body mass index, smoking, plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and lutein+zeaxanthin. After multivariate adjustment, high MPOD was significantly associated with higher level of plasma docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) (β = 0.029, 95% CI: 0.003, 0.055; p = 0.03). Plasma alpha linolenic, eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids were not significantly associated with MPOD. In the Limpia study, high MPOD within 1° was significantly associated with higher plasma levels of omega-3 DPA. © 2017 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Interactive Image Analysis in Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) and Stargardt Disease (STGD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R Theodore; Lee, Noah; Chen, Jian; Busuioc, Mihai; Laine, Andrew F

    2008-10-26

    The literature of the last three decades is replete with automatic methods for retinal image analysis. Acceptance has been limited due to post-processing or tuning requirements that may be just as time consuming as the original manual methods. The point of view herein is that by taking advantage of the human visual system and expert knowledge from the outset, the promised efficiencies of digital methods can be achieved in practice as well as in theory. Thus, simple labeling of regions of interest that is accepted and easily performed in a few moments by the human can provide enormous advantage to an already well-developed algorithm. Three examples are provided: drusen segmentation, image registration, and geographic atrophy segmentation, with applications to disease understanding.

  14. Divergence in the lived experience of people with macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCloud, Christine; Khadka, Jyoti; Gilhotra, Jagjit Singh; Pesudovs, Konrad

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to understand people's experience with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in light of new treatment successes. An interpretive qualitative methodology was used to facilitate understanding of the experience of people with AMD. Rich in-depth data were collected using focus groups and individual interviews. Thematic analysis of the data occurred through the processes of line-by-line coding, aggregation, and theme development using the NVivo 10 software. A total of 4 focus groups and 16 individual interviews were conducted with 34 people (median age = 81 years; range = 56 to 102 years; 19 females) with AMD. Four major themes arose from the narratives of the participants: cautious optimism, enduring, adaptation, and profound loss. Cautious optimism resonated for participants who had received successful treatment and stabilization of AMD. Enduring emerged as participants with exudative AMD described an ongoing need for invasive and frequent treatments (anti-vascular endothelial growth factor injections) that maintained their vision. Adaptation was evident in the narratives of all participants and was directly related to the physical and psychological limitations that were a consequence of visual disability. Profound loss encompassed both physical and emotional aspects of deteriorating vision and was most evident in patients for whom treatment had failed or had not been considered appropriate for their disease. The findings of this study shed new light on the influence of underlying pathology, disease trajectory, and success of new treatments on quality of life of people living with AMD. Optimism toward maintaining vision in the presence of exudative AMD was described by participants, moderated by ongoing caution and a need for endurance of frequent and often problematic intravitreal treatments. These findings add a deeper understanding of this complex and life-changing experience.

  15. Imaging Polarimetry in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Masahiro; Yamanari, Masahiro; Iwasaki, Takuya; Elsner, Ann E.; Makita, Shuichi; Yatagai, Toyohiko; Yasuno, Yoshiaki

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the birefringence properties of eyes with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). To compare the information from two techniques—scanning laser polarimetry (GDx) and polarization-sensitive spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT)—and investigate how they complement each other. METHODS The authors prospectively examined the eyes of two healthy subjects and 13 patients with exudative AMD. Using scanning laser polarimetry, they computed phase-retardation maps, average reflectance images, and depolarized light images. To obtain polarimetry information with improved axial resolution, they developed a fiber-based, polarization-sensitive, spectral-domain OCT system and measured the phase retardation associated with birefringence in the same eyes. RESULTS Both GDx and polarization-sensitive spectral-domain optical coherence tomography detected abnormal birefringence at the locus of exudative lesions. Polarization-sensitive, spectral-domain OCT showed that in the old lesions with fibrosis, phase-retardation values were significantly larger than in the new lesions (P = 0.020). Increased scattered light and altered polarization scramble were associated with portions of the lesions. CONCLUSIONS GDx and polarization-sensitive spectral-domain OCT are complementary in probing birefringence properties in exudative AMD. Polarimetry findings in exudative AMD emphasized different features and were related to the progression of the disease, potentially providing a noninvasive tool for microstructure in exudative AMD. PMID:18515594

  16. DNA sequence variants in PPARGC1A, a gene encoding a coactivator of the ω-3 LCPUFA sensing PPAR-RXR transcription complex, are associated with NV AMD and AMD-associated loci in genes of complement and VEGF signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SanGiovanni, John Paul; Chen, Jing; Sapieha, Przemyslaw; Aderman, Christopher M; Stahl, Andreas; Clemons, Traci E; Chew, Emily Y; Smith, Lois E H

    2013-01-01

    Increased intake of ω-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs) and use of peroxisome proliferator activator receptor (PPAR)-activating drugs are associated with attenuation of pathologic retinal angiogenesis. ω-3 LCPUFAs are endogenous agonists of PPARs. We postulated that DNA sequence variation in PPAR gamma (PPARG) co-activator 1 alpha (PPARGC1A), a gene encoding a co-activator of the LCPUFA-sensing PPARG-retinoid X receptor (RXR) transcription complex, may influence neovascularization (NV) in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). We applied exact testing methods to examine distributions of DNA sequence variants in PPARGC1A for association with NV AMD and interaction of AMD-associated loci in genes of complement, lipid metabolism, and VEGF signaling systems. Our sample contained 1858 people from 3 elderly cohorts of western European ancestry. We concurrently investigated retinal gene expression profiles in 17-day-old neonatal mice on a 2% LCPUFA feeding paradigm to identify LCPUFA-regulated genes both associated with pathologic retinal angiogenesis and known to interact with PPARs or PPARGC1A. A DNA coding variant (rs3736265) and a 3'UTR-resident regulatory variant (rs3774923) in PPARGC1A were independently associated with NV AMD (exact P = 0.003, both SNPs). SNP-SNP interactions existed for NV AMD (Pcomplement factor B (CFB, rs512559). PPARGC1A influences activation of the AMD-associated complement component 3 (C3) promoter fragment and CFB influences activation and proteolysis of C3. We observed interaction (P ≤ 0.003) of rs3736265 with a variant in vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA, rs3025033), a key molecule in retinal angiogenesis. Another PPARGC1A coding variant (rs8192678) showed statistical interaction with a SNP in the VEGFA receptor fms-related tyrosine kinase 1 (FLT1, rs10507386; P ≤ 0.003). C3 expression was down-regulated 2-fold in retinas of ω-3 LCPUFA-fed mice - these animals also showed 70% reduction in retinal NV (P

  17. Repressed SIRT1/PGC-1α pathway and mitochondrial disintegration in iPSC-derived RPE disease model of age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golestaneh, Nady; Chu, Yi; Cheng, Shuk Kei; Cao, Hong; Poliakov, Eugenia; Berinstein, Daniel M

    2016-12-20

    Study of age related macular degeneration (AMD) has been hampered by lack of human models that represent the complexity of the disease. Here we have developed a human in vitro disease model of AMD to investigate the underlying AMD disease mechanisms. Generation of iPSCs from retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) of AMD donors, age-matched normal donors, skin fibroblasts of a dry AMD patient, and differentiation of iPSCs into RPE (AMD RPE-iPSC-RPE, normal RPE-iPSC-RPE and AMD Skin-iPSC-RPE, respectively). Immunostaining, cell viability assay and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production under oxidative stress conditions, electron microscopy (EM) imaging, ATP production and glycogen concentration assays, quantitative real time PCR, western blot, karyotyping. The AMD RPE-iPSC-RPE and AMD Skin-iPSC-RPE present functional impairment and exhibit distinct disease phenotypes compared to RPE-iPSC-RPE generated from normal donors (Normal RPE-iPSC-RPE). The AMD RPE-iPSC-RPE and AMD Skin-iPSC-RPE show increased susceptibility to oxidative stress and produced higher levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) under stress in accordance with recent reports. The susceptibility to oxidative stress-induced cell death in AMD RPE-iPSC-RPE and Skin-iPSC-RPE was consistent with inability of the AMD RPE-iPSC-RPE and Skin-iPSC-RPE to increase SOD2 expression under oxidative stress. Phenotypic analysis revealed disintegrated mitochondria, accumulation of autophagosomes and lipid droplets in AMD RPE-iPSC-RPE and AMD Skin-iPSC-RPE. Mitochondrial activity was significantly lower in AMD RPE-iPSC-RPE and AMD Skin-iPSC-RPE compared to normal cells and glycogen concentration was significantly increased in the diseased cells. Furthermore, Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α), a regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis and function was repressed, and lower expression levels of NAD-dependent deacetylase sirtuin1 (SIRT1) were found in AMD RPE-iPSC-RPE and AMD Skin

  18. Macular ganglion cell complex and retinal nerve fiber layer comparison in different stages of age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucchiatti, Ilaria; Parodi, Maurizio Battaglia; Pierro, Luisa; Cicinelli, Maria Vittoria; Gagliardi, Marco; Castellino, Niccolò; Bandello, Francesco

    2015-09-01

    To employ optical coherence tomography (OCT) to analyze the morphologic changes in the inner retina in different categories of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Observational cross-sectional study. Single-center study. Inclusion criteria were age over 50, diagnosis of Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) category 2 and 3, naïve neovascular AMD, and atrophic AMD. Healthy patients of similar age acted as a control group. Primary outcome measures were the changes in ganglion cell complex (GCC) and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL). Secondary outcomes included modifications of rim area and cup-to-disc ratio. One hundred and thirty eyes of 130 patients were recruited: 26 eyes for AREDS category 2, 26 for AREDS category 3, 26 for neovascular AMD, 26 with atrophic AMD, and 26 controls. Mean peripapillary RNFL thickness was significantly lower in neovascular AMD, compared to controls (P = .004); peripapillary RNFL did not significantly vary among AREDS category 2 and 3 and atrophic AMD groups, compared to controls. Mean GCC thickness was higher in the control group, becoming progressively thinner up to neovascular and atrophic AMD groups (P < .0001). Rim area was significantly thinner in the neovascular AMD group compared with controls (P = .047); cup-to-disc ratio was higher in the neovascular AMD group compared with the control group (P = .047). This study demonstrates that eyes with neovascular AMD display reduced RNFL and GCC thickness. RNFL is partially spared in atrophic advanced AMD. The identification of alteration in RNFL and GCC thickness may reveal useful for future therapeutic implications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Multifragmentation in Au + Au collisions studied with AMD-V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, Akira [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Faculty of Science

    1998-07-01

    AMD-V is an optimum model for calculation of multifragmentation in Au + Au collisions. AMD-V consider anti-symmetry of incident nucleus, target nucleus and fragments, furthermore, it treat the quantum effect to exist many channels in the intermediate and final state. 150 and 250 MeV/nucleon incident energy were used in the experiments. The data of multifragment atom in {sup 197}Au + {sup 197}Au collisions was reproduced by AMD-V calculation using Gognny force, corresponding to the imcompressibility of nuclear substance K = 228 MeV and its mean field depend on momentum. When other interaction (SKG 2 force, corresponding to K = 373 KeV) was used an mean field does not depend on momentum, the calculation results could not reproduce the experimental values, because nucleus and deuteron were estimated too large and {alpha}-particle and intermediate fragments estimated too small. (S.Y.)

  20. Further mapping of 10q26 supports strong association of HTRA1 polymorphisms with age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Daniel; Yang, Zhenglin; Constantine, Ryan; Ma, Xiang; Camp, Nicola J; Yang, Xian; Chen, Hayou; Jorgenson, Adam; Hau, Vincent; Dewan, Andrew; Zeng, Jiexi; Harmon, Jennifer; Buehler, Jeanette; Brand, John M; Hoh, Josephine; Cameron, D Joshua; Dixit, Manjusha; Tong, Zongzhong; Zhang, Kang

    2008-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a complex disorder with genetic and environmental influences. The genetic influences affecting AMD are not well understood and few genes have been consistently implicated and replicated for this disease. A polymorphism (rs11200638) in a transcription factor binding site of the HTRA1 gene has been described, in previous reports, as being most significantly associated with AMD. In this paper, we investigate haplotype association and individual polymorphic association by genotyping additional variants in the AMD risk-associated region of chromosome 10q26. We demonstrate that rs11200638 in the promoter region and rs2293870 in exon 1 of HTRA1, are among the most significantly associated variants for advanced forms of AMD.

  1. Assessment of serum lipids in patients with age related macular degeneration from Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambreen, F.; Qureshi, I. Z.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine serum lipids in patients with age related macular degeneration from Pakistani population. Methods: The study was a cross sectional, randomized and case-control. Selected subjects ages were >50 years and were normotensive, non-diabetic with no family history of any such disease and no complication of posterior ocular chamber other than age related macular degeneration (AMD). Controls were age matched healthy individuals with no symptoms of AMD. Diagnosis of AMD was done through conventional diagnostic techniques by professional ophthalmologists. Serum samples were analyzed for total cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL and HDL using commercially available kits. Data were compared with Student's t-test. Pearson correlation was calculated for relationship between different parameters. P<0.05 was considered significant. Results: Compared to controls, AMD patients had significantly greater total cholesterol concentration (p<0.041), and power HDL/LDL ratio (p<0.038), while serum triglycerides, HDL and LDL were non-significantly different from control subjects. Total cholesterol in AMD patients was significantly correlated with TG, LDL and HDL (p<0.0001). Conclusion: The study indicates that high cholesterol might be a predictor of AMD and can be a diagnostic parameter. (author)

  2. Declines in arrestin and rhodopsin in the macula with progression of age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethen, Cheryl M; Feng, Xiao; Olsen, Timothy W; Ferrington, Deborah A

    2005-03-01

    Biochemical analysis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) at distinct stages of the disease will help further understanding of the molecular events associated with disease progression. This study was conducted to determine the ability of a new grading system for eye bank eyes, the Minnesota Grading System (MGS), to discern distinct stages of AMD so that retinal region-specific changes in rod photoreceptor protein expression from donors could be determined. Donor eyes were assigned to a specific level of AMD by using the MGS. Expression of the rod photoreceptor proteins rhodopsin and arrestin was evaluated by Western immunoblot analysis in the macular and peripheral regions of the neurosensory retina from donors at different stages of AMD. A significant linear decline in both arrestin and rhodopsin content correlated with progressive MGS levels in the macula. In contrast, the peripheral region showed no significant correlation between MGS level and the content of either protein. The statistically significant relationship between decreasing macular rod photoreceptor proteins and progressive MGS levels of AMD demonstrates the utility of the clinically based MGS to correspond with specific protein changes found at known, progressive stages of degeneration. Future biochemical analysis of clinically characterized donor eyes will further understanding of the pathobiochemistry of AMD.

  3. NLRP3 Inflammasome: Activation and Regulation in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangyuan Gao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the leading cause of legal blindness in the elderly in industrialized countries. AMD is a multifactorial disease influenced by both genetic and environmental risk factors. Progression of AMD is characterized by an increase in the number and size of drusen, extracellular deposits, which accumulate between the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE and Bruch’s membrane (BM in outer retina. The major pathways associated with its pathogenesis include oxidative stress and inflammation in the early stages of AMD. Little is known about the interactions among these mechanisms that drive the transition from early to late stages of AMD, such as geographic atrophy (GA or choroidal neovascularization (CNV. As part of the innate immune system, inflammasome activation has been identified in RPE cells and proposed to be a causal factor for RPE dysfunction and degeneration. Here, we will first review the classic model of inflammasome activation, then discuss the potentials of AMD-related factors to activate the inflammasome in both nonocular immune cells and RPE cells, and finally introduce several novel mechanisms for regulating the inflammasome activity.

  4. Assessment of Choroidal Microstructure and Subfoveal Thickness Change in Eyes With Different Stages of Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Linna; Xu, Shiqiong; He, Fangling; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Yidan; Wang, Jing; Wang, Zhiliang; Fan, Xianqun

    2016-03-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of irreversible blindness. Choroidal structural changes seem to be inevitable in AMD pathogenesis. Our study revealed associated choroidal microstructural changes in AMD eyes.The aim of the study was to compare choroidal microstructural changes in eyes with AMD of different stages.The study was a retrospective, cross-sectional case series.The participants comprised of 32 age-matched normal eyes as controls, and 26 fellow uninvolved eyes of intermediate/late AMD, 29 of early AMD, 28 of intermediate AMD, and 39 of late AMD.All subjects underwent comprehensive ophthalmologic examination. The choroid images, including subfoveal choroidal thickness, percentage of Sattler layer area, and en face images of the choroid, were obtained using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography.The main outcome measures were subfoveal choroidal thickness changes, percentage of Sattler layer area changes, and en face images of the choroid in AMD eyes.One hundred fifty-four eyes of 96 individuals with mean age of 67.1±9.2 years were included. The mean subfoveal choroidal thickness was 295.4 ± 56.8 μm in age-matched normal eyes, 306.7 ± 68.4 μm in fellow uninvolved eyes with AMD, 293.8 ± 80.4 μm in early AMD, 215.6 ± 80.4 μm in intermediate AMD, and 200.4 ± 66.6 μm in late AMD (F = 14.2, all P < 0.001). Choroidal thickness was greater in early AMD eyes than in intermediate/late AMD eyes (P < 0.001). Mean percentage of Sattler layer area in each group showed a similar tendency. Microstructure of the choroid showed reduced vascular density of Sattler layer areas in late AMD eyes compared with normal eyes.Decreasing subfoveal choroidal thickness and percentage of Sattler layer area were demonstrated in the progression of AMD. The choroidal change was related to atrophy of the microstructural changes of underlying capillaries and medium-sized vessels.

  5. Age related macular degeneration and visual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoforidis, John B; Tecce, Nicola; Dell'Omo, Roberto; Mastropasqua, Rodolfo; Verolino, Marco; Costagliola, Ciro

    2011-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of central blindness or low vision among the elderly in industrialized countries. AMD is caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Among modifiable environmental risk factors, cigarette smoking has been associated with both the dry and wet forms of AMD and may increase the likelihood of worsening pre-existing AMD. Despite advances, the treatment of AMD has limitations and affected patients are often referred for low vision rehabilitation to help them cope with their remaining eyesight. The characteristic visual impairment for both forms of AMD is loss of central vision (central scotoma). This loss results in severe difficulties with reading that may be only partly compensated by magnifying glasses or screen-projection devices. The loss of central vision associated with the disease has a profound impact on patient quality of life. With progressive central visual loss, patients lose their ability to perform the more complex activities of daily living. Common vision aids include low vision filters, magnifiers, telescopes and electronic aids. Low vision rehabilitation (LVR) is a new subspecialty emerging from the traditional fields of ophthalmology, optometry, occupational therapy, and sociology, with an ever-increasing impact on the usual concepts of research, education, and services for visually impaired patients. Relatively few ophthalmologists practise LVR and fewer still routinely use prismatic image relocation (IR) in AMD patients. IR is a method of stabilizing oculomotor functions with the purpose of promoting better function of preferred retinal loci (PRLs). The aim of vision rehabilitation therapy consists in the achievement of techniques designed to improve PRL usage. The use of PRLs to compensate for diseased foveae has offered hope to these patients in regaining some function. However, in a recently published meta-analysis, prism spectacles were found to be unlikely to be of

  6. Effect of the Gas6 c.834+7G>A polymorphism and the interaction of known risk factors on AMD pathogenesis in Hungarian patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gergely Losonczy

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly in the developed world. Numerous genetic factors contribute to the development of the multifactorial disease. We performed a case-control study to assess the risk conferred by known and candidate genetic polymorphisms on the development of AMD. We searched for genetic interactions and for differences in dry and wet AMD etiology. We enrolled 213 patients with exudative, 67 patients with dry AMD and 106 age and ethnically matched controls. Altogether 12 polymorphisms in Apolipoprotein E, complement factor H, complement factor I, complement component 3, blood coagulation factor XIII, HTRA1, LOC387715, Gas6 and MerTK genes were tested. No association was found between either the exudative or the dry form and the polymorphisms in the Apolipoprotein E, complement factor I, FXIII and MerTK genes. Gas6 c.834+7G>A polymorphism was found to be significantly protective irrespective of other genotypes, reducing the odds of wet type AMD by a half (OR = 0.50, 95%CI: 0.26-0.97, p = 0.04. Multiple regression models revealed an interesting genetic interaction in the dry AMD subgroup. In the absence of C3 risk allele, mutant genotypes of both CFH and HTRA1 behaved as strongly significant risk factors (OR = 7.96, 95%CI: 2.39 = 26.50, p = 0.0007, and OR = 36.02, 95%CI: 3.30-393.02, p = 0.0033, respectively, but reduced to neutrality otherwise. The risk allele of C3 was observed to carry a significant risk in the simultaneous absence of homozygous CFH and HTRA1 polymorphisms only, in which case it was associated with a near-five-fold relative increase in the odds of dry type AMD (OR = 4.93, 95%CI: 1.98-12.25, p = 0.0006. Our results suggest a protective role of Gas6 c.834+7G>A polymorphism in exudative AMD development. In addition, novel genetic interactions were revealed between CFH, HTRA1 and C3 polymorphisms that might contribute to the

  7. Obesity, lutein metabolism, and age-related macular degeneration: a web of connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Elizabeth J

    2005-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of visual impairment in the United States. Currently there is no effective cure for this disease. Risk factors include decreased lutein and zeaxanthin status and obesity. Obesity is also an increasing public health concern. The alarming increase in the prevalence of obesity further exacerbates the public health concern of AMD. The mechanism by which obesity increases the risk of AMD may be related to the physiologic changes that occur with this condition. These include increased oxidative stress, changes in the lipoprotein profile, and increased inflammation. These changes would also result in an increased destruction and a decreased circulatory delivery of lutein and zeaxanthin to the macula of the eye. Therefore, the mechanism by which obesity is related to AMD risk may be through indirect effects on changes in lutein and zeaxanthin status and metabolism.

  8. Pluripotent stem cells: A therapeutic source for age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sowmya Parameswaran

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD leads to progressive loss of central vision in the elderly. At a cellular level, there is aging of the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells, and accumulation of lipofuscin that interferes with the proper functioning of RPE which eventually leads to apoptosis. Treatment depends on the stage of the disease. Wet AMD which has neovascularization is managed by local therapies such as laser photocoagulation and photodynamic therapy and is managed with injections of antivascular endothelial growth factor-based therapy. Unlike the wet AMD, an effective therapy does not exist for dry AMD and geographic atrophy. Cell replacement therapy has shown promise. This review discusses the opportunities in the various types of cell-based therapy, their limitations, and what is possible for India.

  9. New research progress on the epidemiology of age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Xing Wu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration(AMDis a kind of age-related blinding degenerative fundus lesions, totally about 30 million patients suffering from AMD all over the world, with about 500 000 people blind for it yearly. As the development of economy and the aging of the population intensified, incidence of AMD indicates a trend of rising year by year, being the third major cause of blindness in our country. At present, the pathogenesis of AMD is not fully clear, as reported it may be related to oxidative stress, inflammatory immune response, VEGF and genetic manipulation. Clinical treatments mainly include photodynamic therapy, drug therapy, radiation therapy, laser photocoagulaory operation, the pupil warm treatments, Chinese medicine and intravitreous injection VEGF antagonists such as Ranibizumab, Conbercept and so on. In this issue, we mainly expound on the progress in the epidemiological studies of AMD, especially elaborate the progress made on genetic manipulation in recent years.

  10. Knowledge discovery in ophthalmology: analysis of wet form of age-related macular degeneration treatment outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulińska, Magdalena; Tataj, Emanuel; Mulawka, Jan J.; Szaflik, Jerzy

    2009-06-01

    Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD), according to epidemiological data, is a main reason of social blindness among elderly people in developed countries. There are two forms of AMD: dry and wet. The first one is of good prognosis with low possibility of serious visual deterioration, while the second one usually leads to quick and severe visual impairment. The aim of our investigations is to analyse results of so called real-life treatment of wet AMD. We analysed outcomes of our patients treated with intravitreal injections of anti-VEGF drugs: Lucentis (61 patients) and Avastin (78 patients). We analysed changes in visual acuity (functional effect) and central retinal thickness (anatomic effect). Both drugs occurred to be efficient in treatment of wet form of AMD, however results were more satisfying in patients with better baseline visual acuity. In our approach we used R environment - an integrated suite of software facilities for data analysis and graphics.

  11. Automated detection of age-related macular degeneration in OCT images using multiple instance learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Weiwei; Liu, Xiaoming; Yang, Zhou

    2017-07-01

    Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) is a kind of macular disease which mostly occurs in old people,and it may cause decreased vision or even lead to permanent blindness. Drusen is an important clinical indicator for AMD which can help doctor diagnose disease and decide the strategy of treatment. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is widely used in the diagnosis of ophthalmic diseases, include AMD. In this paper, we propose a classification method based on Multiple Instance Learning (MIL) to detect AMD. Drusen can exist in a few slices of OCT images, and MIL is utilized in our method. We divided the method into two phases: training phase and testing phase. We train the initial features and clustered to create a codebook, and employ the trained classifier in the test set. Experiment results show that our method achieved high accuracy and effectiveness.

  12. Review of graft rejection in age-related macular degeneration replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi-Ying Mao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration(AMDis the leading cause of blindness among the elderly worldwide. AMD is classified as either neovascular(wetor non-neovascular(dry. The dysfunction and loss of retinal pigment epithelial(RPEcells is regarded as the main pathological changes of AMD. The recent development of regenerative medicine has witnessed RPE cell-replacement therapy as a new approach to treat AMD, resulting in obvious visual improvement in various studies. However, there are still many problems and challenges that remain unsolved, including graft rejection. This review introduces subretinal immune environment under both normal and AMD condition, putting emphasis on immune response to allogeneic RPE. Lastly, strategies to prevent graft rejection are discussed.

  13. New approaches in the management of choroidal neovascular membrane in age-related macular degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verma Lalit

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a leading cause of blindness in the elderly population. The prevalence is reported to be 1.2-1.4% in several population-based epidemiological studies. Currently 25-30 million people worldwide are blind due to AMD. With the aging world population it is bound to increase significantly, and could become a significant public health problem in next two decades, with serious socio-economic implications. Several strategies are today available to treat the wet form of AMD, which is responsible for significant visual loss. These were until recently confined to laser photocoagulation, and subretinal surgery, but today two other modalities, namely, radiation and photodynamic therapy, are available. These treatment modalities however, are aimed at preservation of vision only, and not at reversing the process of the disease. Further research on antiangiogenic drugs and gene therapy could significantly help AMD patients.

  14. Age-related macular degeneration: using morphological predictors to modify current treatment protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Mohammed; Souka, Ahmed; Adelman, Ron A

    2018-03-01

    To assess predictors of treatment response in neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in an attempt to develop a patient-centric treatment algorithm. We conducted a systematic search using PubMed, EMBASE and Web of Science for prognostic indicators/predictive factors with the key words: 'age related macular degeneration', 'neovascular AMD', 'choroidal neovascular membrane (CNV)', 'anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF)', 'aflibercept', 'ranibizumab', 'bevacizumab', 'randomized clinical trials', 'post-hoc', 'prognostic', 'predictive', 'response' 'injection frequency, 'treat and extend (TAE), 'pro re nata (PRN)', 'bi-monthly' and 'quarterly'. We only included studies that had an adequate period of follow-up (>1 year), a single predefined treatment regimen with a predetermined re-injection criteria, an adequate number of patients, specific morphological [optical coherence tomography (OCT)] criteria that predicted final visual outcomes and injection frequency and did not include switching from one drug to the other. We were able to identify seven prospective studies and 16 retrospective studies meeting our inclusion criteria. There are several morphological and demographic prognostic indicators that can predict response to therapy in wet AMD. Smaller CNV size, subretinal fluid (SRF), retinal angiomatous proliferation (RAP) and response to therapy at 12 weeks (visual, angiographic or OCT) can all predict good visual outcomes in patients receiving anti-VEGF therapy. Patients with larger CNV, older age, pigment epithelial detachment (PED), intraretinal cysts (IRC) and vitreomacular adhesion (VMA) achieved less visual gains. Patients having VMA/VMT required more intensive treatment with increased treatment frequency. Patients with both posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) and SRF require infrequent injections. Patients with PED are prone to recurrences of fluid activity with a reduction in visual acuity (VA). A regimen that involves less intensive

  15. Forecasting age-related macular degeneration through the year 2050: the potential impact of new treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rein, David B; Wittenborn, John S; Zhang, Xinzhi; Honeycutt, Amanda A; Lesesne, Sarah B; Saaddine, Jinan

    2009-04-01

    To forecast age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and its consequences in the United States through the year 2050 with different treatment scenarios. We simulated cases of early AMD, choroidal neovascularization (CNV), geographic atrophy (GA), and AMD-attributable visual impairment and blindness with 5 universal treatment scenarios: (1) no treatment; (2) focal laser and photodynamic therapy (PDT) for CNV; (3) vitamin prophylaxis at early-AMD incidence with focal laser/PDT for CNV; (4) no vitamin prophylaxis followed by focal laser treatment for extra and juxtafoveal CNV and anti-vascular endothelial growth factor treatment; and (5) vitamin prophylaxis at early-AMD incidence followed by CNV treatment, as in scenario 4. Cases of early AMD increased from 9.1 million in 2010 to 17.8 million in 2050 across all scenarios. In non-vitamin-receiving scenarios, cases of CNV and GA increased from 1.7 million in 2010 to 3.8 million in 2050 (25% lower in vitamin-receiving scenarios). Cases of visual impairment and blindness increased from 620 000 in 2010 to 1.6 million in 2050 when given no treatment and were 2.4%, 22.0%, 16.9%, and 34.5% lower in scenarios 2, 3, 4, and 5, respectively. Prevalence of AMD will increase substantially by 2050, but the use of new therapies can mitigate its effects.

  16. Vascular endothelial growth factor gene polymorphisms in age-related macular degeneration in a Turkish population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunus Bulgu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To assess the association between age-related macular degeneration (AMD and three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs related to the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF gene.METHODS: The patients who were diagnosed with AMD were included in this prospective study. Three SNPs (rs1413711, rs2146323, and rs3025033 of the VEGF gene were genotyped by real-time polymerase chain reaction in the genomic DNA isolated from peripheral blood samples of the 82 patients and 80 controls.RESULTS: The genotype frequencies of rs1413711 and rs2146323 were not significantly different between the study group and the control group (P=0.072 and P=0.058. However, there was a significant difference in the genotype frequencies of these SNPs between the wet type AMD and dry type AMD (P=0.005 and P=0.010, respectively. One of the SNPs (rs1413711 was also found to be associated with the severity of AMD (P=0.001 with significant genotype distribution between early, intermediate, and advanced stages of the disease. The ancestral alleles were protective for both SNPs while the polymorphic alleles increased the risk for dry AMD.CONCLUSION: VEGF SNPs rs1413711 and rs2146323 polymorphisms are significantly associated with AMD subtypes in our population.

  17. The association between statin use and risk of age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Le; Wang, Yafeng; Du, Junhui; Wang, Mingxu; Zhang, Rui; Fu, Yihao

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between statin use and the risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). A systematic search of the PubMed, EMBASE and ISI web of science databases was used to identify eligible published literatures without language restrictions up to April 2015. Summary relative ratios (RRs) and 95% CIs were estimated using a fixed-effect or random-effects model. A total of 14 studies met the inclusion criteria and were included in this meta-analysis. No significant association was observed between statin use and the risk of any AMD (RR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.74–1.15); and stratified analysis showed that statins had a significantly different effects on early and late stages of AMD. For early AMD, statin use significantly reduced the risk approximately 17% (RR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.66–0.99). At the late stage, we observed a significant protective association of statin use with exudative AMD (RR, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.80–0.99), in contrast with the absent association between statins and geographic atrophy (RR, 1.16; 95% CI, 0.77–1.56). These results demonstrated that statin use was protective for early and exudative AMD. Additional large prospective cohort studies and RCTs are required to determine the potential effect of statins on AMD prevention. PMID:26658620

  18. The Age-Related Eye Disease 2 Study: Micronutrients in the Treatment of Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorusupudi, Aruna; Nelson, Kelly; Bernstein, Paul S

    2017-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is one of the leading causes of vision loss in the elderly. With an increasingly aged population worldwide, the need for the prevention of AMD is rising. Multiple studies investigating AMD with the use of animal models and cell culture have identified oxidative stress-related retinal damage as an important contributing factor. In general, diet is an excellent source of the antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals necessary for healthy living; moreover, the general public is often receptive to recommendations made by physicians and health care workers regarding diet and supplements as a means of empowering themselves to avoid common and worrisome ailments such as AMD, which has made epidemiologists and clinicians enthusiastic about dietary intervention studies. A wide variety of nutrients, such as minerals, vitamins, ω-3 (n-3) fatty acids, and various carotenoids, have been associated with reducing the risk of AMD. Initial results from the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) indicated that supplementation with antioxidants (β-carotene and vitamins C and E) and zinc was associated with a reduced risk of AMD progression. The AREDS2 follow-up study, designed to improve upon the earlier formulation, tested the addition of lutein, zeaxanthin, and ω-3 fatty acids. In this review, we examine the science behind the nutritional factors included in these interventional studies and the reasons for considering their inclusion to lower the rate of AMD progression. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  19. Nutrition and age-related macular degeneration: research evidence in practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downie, Laura Elizabeth; Keller, Peter Richard

    2014-08-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of irreversible visual impairment in developed countries. In the absence of effective treatments to slow AMD progression, it is predicted that the prevalence of AMD will double over the next 20 years. One area of significant interest is the potential role that nutrition may play in preventing and/or delaying the progression of AMD. Specifically, is there any benefit in oral antioxidant and/or mineral supplementation? This review critically evaluates the currently available evidence relating to nutrition and AMD, with particular reference to the key findings of two large National Eye Institute-sponsored clinical studies, namely, the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) and AREDS2. Topical controversies relating to nutrition and AMD are considered and analyzed in the context of the published literature to guide practitioners through assessing the merit, or otherwise, of common claims. This article provides a foundation for clinicians to provide informed advice to AMD patients based on available research evidence.

  20. JNK inhibition reduces apoptosis and neovascularization in a murine model of age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Hongjun; Sun, Xufang; Guma, Monica; Luo, Jing; Ouyang, Hong; Zhang, Xiaohui; Zeng, Jing; Quach, John; Nguyen, Duy H; Shaw, Peter X; Karin, Michael; Zhang, Kang

    2013-02-05

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of registered blindness among the elderly and affects over 30 million people worldwide. It is well established that oxidative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis play critical roles in pathogenesis of AMD. In advanced wet AMD, although, most of the severe vision loss is due to bleeding and exudation of choroidal neovascularization (CNV), and it is well known that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays a pivotal role in the growth of the abnormal blood vessels. VEGF suppression therapy improves visual acuity in AMD patients. However, there are unresolved issues, including safety and cost. Here we show that mice lacking c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1) exhibit decreased inflammation, reduced CNV, lower levels of choroidal VEGF, and impaired choroidal macrophage recruitment in a murine model of wet AMD (laser-induced CNV). Interestingly, we also detected a substantial reduction in choroidal apoptosis of JNK1-deficient mice. Intravitreal injection of a pan-caspase inhibitor reduced neovascularization in the laser-induced CNV model, suggesting that apoptosis plays a role in laser-induced pathological angiogenesis. Intravitreal injection of a specific JNK inhibitor decreased choroidal VEGF expression and reduced pathological CNV. These results suggest that JNK1 plays a key role in linking oxidative stress, inflammation, macrophage recruitment apoptosis, and VEGF production in wet AMD and pharmacological JNK inhibition offers a unique and alternative avenue for prevention and treatment of AMD.

  1. The Age-Related Eye Disease 2 Study: Micronutrients in the Treatment of Macular Degeneration123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorusupudi, Aruna; Nelson, Kelly; Bernstein, Paul S

    2017-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is one of the leading causes of vision loss in the elderly. With an increasingly aged population worldwide, the need for the prevention of AMD is rising. Multiple studies investigating AMD with the use of animal models and cell culture have identified oxidative stress–related retinal damage as an important contributing factor. In general, diet is an excellent source of the antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals necessary for healthy living; moreover, the general public is often receptive to recommendations made by physicians and health care workers regarding diet and supplements as a means of empowering themselves to avoid common and worrisome ailments such as AMD, which has made epidemiologists and clinicians enthusiastic about dietary intervention studies. A wide variety of nutrients, such as minerals, vitamins, ω-3 (n–3) fatty acids, and various carotenoids, have been associated with reducing the risk of AMD. Initial results from the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) indicated that supplementation with antioxidants (β-carotene and vitamins C and E) and zinc was associated with a reduced risk of AMD progression. The AREDS2 follow-up study, designed to improve upon the earlier formulation, tested the addition of lutein, zeaxanthin, and ω-3 fatty acids. In this review, we examine the science behind the nutritional factors included in these interventional studies and the reasons for considering their inclusion to lower the rate of AMD progression. PMID:28096126

  2. DISCORDANCE BETWEEN BLUE-LIGHT AUTOFLUORESCENCE AND NEAR-INFRARED AUTOFLUORESCENCE IN AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiferman, Michael J; Fawzi, Amani A

    2016-12-01

    To identify the origin and significance of discordance between blue-light autofluorescence (BL-AF; 488 nm) and near-infrared autofluorescence (NI-AF; 787 nm) in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). A total of 86 eyes of 59 patients with a diagnosis of AMD were included in this cross-sectional study conducted between March 9, 2015 and May 1, 2015. A masked observer examined the BL-AF, NI-AF, and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography images. Areas with discordance of autofluorescence patterns between NI-AF and BL-AF images were correlated with structural findings at the corresponding location in optical coherence tomography scans. Seventy-nine eyes had discordance between BL-AF and NI-AF. The most common optical coherence tomography finding accounting for these discrepancies was pigment migration accounting for 35 lesions in 21 eyes. The most clinically relevant finding was geographic atrophy missed on BL-AF in 7 eyes. Our findings indicate that variations in the distribution of lipofuscin, melanin and melanolipofuscin account for the majority of discordance between BL-AF and NI-AF. Given our finding of missed geographic atrophy lesions on BL-AF in 24% of eyes with geographic atrophy (7/29 eyes), clinicians should consider multimodal imaging, including NI-AF and optical coherence tomography, especially in clinical trials of geographic atrophy.

  3. Removal of phosphorus using AMD-treated lignocellulosic material

    Science.gov (United States)

    James S. Han; Soo-Hong Min; Yeong-Kwan Kim

    2005-01-01

    Excess nutrients, including phosphorus, can cause eutrophication in surface water and reservoirs. We tested the phosphate removal capacity of juniper fiber through isotherm, kinetic, column, and field tests. Heavy metals from an acid mine drainage (AMD) site were precipitated on the surface ofjuniper fiber. The modified fiber was tested in laboratory- caled batch and...

  4. Mitigating health problems associated with AMD in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schachtschneider, K

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available on communities’ water supply and the water table. The CSIR has developed a novel process to reclaim high-quality precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC) from calcium-rich industrial solid waste. Calcium carbonate can be used to prevent AMD from becoming too acidic...

  5. Geophysical delineation of AMD in the Cradle of Humankind

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Schoor, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Acid mine drainage (AMD) and its effect on surface and groundwater resources in the Cradle of Humankind (COH) area near Krugersdorp is a pertinent and well-documented concern. In 2008, a water resources monitoring programme for the area...

  6. DEMONSTRATION OF AN INTEGRATED, PASSIVE BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT PROCESS FOR AMD

    Science.gov (United States)

    An innovative, cost-effective, biological treatment process has been designed by MSE Technology Applications, Inc. to treat acid mine drainage (AMD). A pilot-scale demonstration is being conducted under the Mine Waste Technology Program using water flowing from an abandoned mine ...

  7. Decision Support System for Age-Related Macular Degeneration Using Convolutional Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Langarizadeh

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is one of the major causes of visual loss among the elderly. It causes degeneration of cells in the macula. Early diagnosis can be helpful in preventing blindness. Drusen are the initial symptoms of AMD. Since drusen have a wide variety, locating them in screening images is difficult and time-consuming. An automated digital fundus photography-based screening system help overcome such drawbacks. The main objective of this study was to suggest a novel method to classify AMD and normal retinal fundus images. Materials and Methods: The suggested system was developed using convolutional neural networks. Several methods were adopted for increasing data such as horizontal reflection, random crop, as well as transfer and combination of such methods. The suggested system was evaluated using images obtained from STARE database and a local dataset. Results: The local dataset contained 3195 images (2070 images of AMD suspects and 1125 images of healthy retina and the STARE dataset comprised of 201 images (105 images of AMD suspects and 96 images of healthy retina. According to the results, the accuracies of the local and standard datasets were 0.95 and 0.81, respectively. Conclusion: Diagnosis and screening of AMD is a time-consuming task for specialists. To overcome this limitation, we attempted to design an intelligent decision support system for the diagnosis of AMD fundus using retina images. The proposed system is an important step toward providing a reliable tool for supervising patients. Early diagnosis of AMD can lead to timely access to treatment.

  8. Targeting modifiable risk factors in age-related macular degeneration in optometric practice in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin L

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Lene Martin1,2 1School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, Sweden; 2School of Health Sciences, City, University of London, London, UK Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the extent to which ophthalmologists and optometrists in Sweden recommend the use of nutritional supplements, changes in diet, or smoking cessation to patients who are at risk of or with signs of age-related macular degeneration (AMD. In addition, this study also examined how these practitioners rate the strength of evidence for nutritional supplements in AMD management and which sources of information they consult to determine supplement recommendations for the prevention or treatment of AMD. Methods: This study implemented a cross-sectional design using data from a questionnaire. All Swedish optometrists and ophthalmologists who were registered in the membership databases of their respective professional organizations were invited to participate. The questionnaire contained 18 forced choice questions and one free text question and was organized into the following four sections: use of nutritional supplements, dietary advice, smoking and eye diseases, and strength of evidence and the sources of information regarding nutritional supplement interventions. Results: The response rate was 40.3% for optometrists and 5% for ophthalmologists. Optometrists were more likely than ophthalmologists to recommend nutritional supplements in AMD and provided significantly more advice about diet than did the ophthalmologists for both patients at risk for AMD and those with established disease. The ophthalmologists were more likely than the optometrists to rely on the findings from the age-related eye disease studies of AMD regarding treatment with and selection of supplements and to recommend smoking cessation. Conclusion: Common evidence-based strategies for AMD management among eye care professionals would presumably be beneficial for AMD

  9. Risk factors for age-related macular degeneration: Pooled findings from three continents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, W.; Assink, J.; Klein, R.; Mitchell, P.; Klaver, C. C.; Klein, B. E.; Hofman, A.; Jensen, S.; Wang, J. J.; de Jong, P. T.

    2001-01-01

    To assess the prevalence and potential risk factors for late age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in three racially similar populations from North America, Europe, and AUSTRALIA: Combined analysis of population-based eye disease prevalence data. There were 14,752 participants with gradable

  10. Mediterranean Diet Score and Its Association with Age-Related Macular Degeneration : The European Eye Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogg, Ruth E; Woodside, Jayne V; McGrath, Alanna; Young, Ian S; Vioque, Jesus L; Chakravarthy, Usha; de Jong, Paulus T; Rahu, Mati; Seland, Johan; Soubrane, Gisele; Tomazzoli, Laura; Topouzis, Fotis; Fletcher, Astrid E

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To examine associations between adherence to a Mediterranean diet and prevalence of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in countries ranging from Southern to Northern Europe. DESIGN: Cross-sectional, population-based epidemiologic study. PARTICIPANTS: Of 5060 randomly sampled people aged

  11. Single-Chain Antibody Fragment VEGF Inhibitor RTH258 for Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holz, Frank G; Dugel, Pravin U.; Weissgerber, Georges

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess the safety and efficacy of different doses of RTH258 applied as single intravitreal administration compared with ranibizumab 0.5 mg in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Design Six-month, phase 1/2, prospective, multicenter, double-masked, randomized...

  12. The relationship of major American dietary patterns to age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    We hypothesized that major American dietary patterns are associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) risk. This was a cross-sectional study with 8,103 eyes from 4,088 eligible participants in the baseline Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) were classified into control (n=2,739), early ...

  13. Visual outcomes in relation to time to treatment in neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Annette; Bloch, Sara Brandi; Fuchs, Josefine

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To study the relation between the interval from diagnosis to initiation of intravitreal injection therapy and visual outcome in neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) and to report changes over time in fellow-eye status. METHODS: Retrospective chart review. The study included...

  14. A systematic review on zinc for the prevention and treatment of age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinc is a potential candidate for the prevention and treatment of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) due to its high concentration in the retina and role as a cofactor for antioxidant enzymes. The objective of this work was to conduct a systematic review of studies that investigated dietary inta...

  15. [Fundus autofluorescence in dry AMD - impact on disease progression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidinova, C N; Gouguchkova, P T; Vidinov, K N

    2013-11-01

    Fundus autofluorescence is a novel technique that gives us information about the RPE cells by evaluating the distribution of lipofuscin in the retina. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the diagnostic abilities of OCT, RTVue and fundus autofluorescence in predicting the progression of dry AMD. In our study 37 dry AMD patients were enrolled: 22 of them with druses and 15 with developed geographic atrophy. They all underwent complete ophthalmological examinations including OCT and autofluorescence. We used the RTVue OCT programmes HD line, Cross line, EMM5 and EMM5 progression in all cases. The autofluorescence was recorded with the help of the Canon CX1 fundus camera. OCT images in the AMD patients with dry AMD and large druses showed typical undulations in the RPE/choroid line and occasionally drusenoid detachment of the RPE. Autofluorescence showed different patterns. The confluent reticular autofluorescence was associated with the development of neovascular membranes. In geographic atrophy patient OCTs showed diminished retinal thickness measured with EMM5. On autofluorescence the findings at the border zone atrophic/normal retina were of particular importance. The diffuse increased autofluorescence in that area was considered to be a sign for further atrophy progression. Our results point out that OCT in combination with autofluorescence is important in following the progression of dry AMD. Pathological autofluorescence at the border of atrophic lesions is an important sign for disease activity. Although both OCT and autofluorescence visualise the changes in RPE, autofluorescence is of key importance in predicting the development of the disease. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Age-related macular degeneration: prevention and treatment. A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Mirzabekova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a multifactorial disease. Age, light exposure, smoking, melanin levels and low-antioxidant diet are contributed to AMD development and progression. Cardiovascular disorders are of considerable importance as well. In macula, photoreceptor outer segments that are rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (FA, particularly, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, are susceptible to free radicals damage. High blood flow velocity and oxygen partial pressure as well as direct sunlight exposure induce oxidative processes. The source of free radicals in photoreceptor cells and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE is an extensive mitochondrial metabolism, photoreceptor outer segments phagocytosis, lipofuscin phototoxic activity and hemoglobin or protoporphyrin precursors photosensitization. Oxidative stress is considered as an universal component of cell depth in necrosis, apoptosis and toxic damage. Antioxidant protective system consists of enzymes (superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase and non-enzymatic factors (ascorbic acid, alpha tocopherol, retinol, carotenoids. Specific antioxidant food supplement containing ascorbic acid (500 mg, vitamin E (400 IU and beta carotene (15 mg coupled with zinc (80 mg of zinc oxide and copper (2 mg of copper oxide results in 25 % decrease in late-stage AMD development rate. Amongst the agents that can protect retina from oxidative stress and AMD development, carotenoids are of special importance. Lutein and zeaxanthin containing in retina and lens screen blue light from central area of the retina. They also absorb blue light and inhibit free radicals generation thus preventing polyunsaturated FA light destruction. Association between lutein and zeaxanthin intake and late-stage AMD risk was revealed. Amongst the most important factors which deficiency favors macular degeneration are omega-3 FAs, i.e., DHA. DHA is the key component of visual pigment rhodopsin transformation. It

  17. Age-related macular degeneration: prevention and treatment. A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Mirzabekova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a multifactorial disease. Age, light exposure, smoking, melanin levels and low-antioxidant diet are contributed to AMD development and progression. Cardiovascular disorders are of considerable importance as well. In macula, photoreceptor outer segments that are rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (FA, particularly, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, are susceptible to free radicals damage. High blood flow velocity and oxygen partial pressure as well as direct sunlight exposure induce oxidative processes. The source of free radicals in photoreceptor cells and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE is an extensive mitochondrial metabolism, photoreceptor outer segments phagocytosis, lipofuscin phototoxic activity and hemoglobin or protoporphyrin precursors photosensitization. Oxidative stress is considered as an universal component of cell depth in necrosis, apoptosis and toxic damage. Antioxidant protective system consists of enzymes (superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase and non-enzymatic factors (ascorbic acid, alpha tocopherol, retinol, carotenoids. Specific antioxidant food supplement containing ascorbic acid (500 mg, vitamin E (400 IU and beta carotene (15 mg coupled with zinc (80 mg of zinc oxide and copper (2 mg of copper oxide results in 25 % decrease in late-stage AMD development rate. Amongst the agents that can protect retina from oxidative stress and AMD development, carotenoids are of special importance. Lutein and zeaxanthin containing in retina and lens screen blue light from central area of the retina. They also absorb blue light and inhibit free radicals generation thus preventing polyunsaturated FA light destruction. Association between lutein and zeaxanthin intake and late-stage AMD risk was revealed. Amongst the most important factors which deficiency favors macular degeneration are omega-3 FAs, i.e., DHA. DHA is the key component of visual pigment rhodopsin transformation. It

  18. The putative role of lutein and zeaxanthin as protective agents against age-related macular degeneration: promise of molecular genetics for guiding mechanistic and translational research in the field1234

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuringer, Martha

    2012-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the primary cause of vision loss in elderly people of western European ancestry. Genetic, dietary, and environmental factors affect tissue concentrations of macular xanthophylls (MXs) within retinal cell types manifesting AMD pathology. In this article we review the history and state of science on the putative role of the MXs (lutein, zeaxanthin, and meso-zeaxanthin) in AMD and report findings on AMD-associated genes encoding enzymes, transporters, ligands, and receptors affecting or affected by MXs. We then use this context to discuss emerging research opportunities that offer promise for meaningful investigation and inference in the field. PMID:23053548

  19. Nitrogen Metabolism and Growth Enhancement in Tomato Plants Challenged with Trichoderma harzianum Expressing the Aspergillus nidulans Acetamidase amdS Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, Sara; Rubio, M. Belén; Cardoza, Rosa E.; Gutiérrez, Santiago; Nicolás, Carlos; Bettiol, Wagner; Hermosa, Rosa; Monte, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Trichoderma is a fungal genus that includes species that are currently being used as biological control agents and/or as biofertilizers. In addition to the direct application of Trichoderma spp. as biocontrol agents in plant protection, recent studies have focused on the beneficial responses exerted on plants, stimulating the growth, activating the defenses, and/or improving nutrient uptake. The amdS gene, encoding an acetamidase of Aspergillus, has been used as a selectable marker for the transformation of filamentous fungi, including Trichoderma spp., but the physiological effects of the introduction of this gene into the genome of these microorganisms still remains unexplored. No evidence of amdS orthologous genes has been detected within the Trichoderma spp. genomes and the amdS heterologous expression in Trichoderma harzianum T34 did not affect the growth of this fungus in media lacking acetamide. However, it did confer the ability for the fungus to use this amide as a nitrogen source. Although a similar antagonistic behavior was observed for T34 and amdS transformants in dual cultures against Rhizoctonia solani, Botrytis cinerea, and Fusarium oxysporum, a significantly higher antifungal activity was detected in amdS transformants against F. oxysporum, compared to that of T34, in membrane assays on media lacking acetamide. In Trichoderma-tomato interaction assays, amdS transformants were able to promote plant growth to a greater extent than the wild-type T34, although compared with this strain the transformants showed similar capability to colonize tomato roots. Gene expression patterns from aerial parts of 3-week-old tomato plants treated with T34 and the amdS transformants have also been investigated using GeneChip Tomato Genome Arrays. The downregulation of defense genes and the upregulation of carbon and nitrogen metabolism genes observed in the microarrays were accompanied by (i) enhanced growth, (ii) increased carbon and nitrogen levels, and (iii) a

  20. Nitrogen metabolism and growth enhancement in tomato plants challenged with Trichoderma harzianum expressing the Aspergillus nidulans acetamidase amdS gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Domínguez

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Trichoderma is a fungal genus that includes species that are currently being used as biological control agents and/or as biofertilizers. In addition to the direct application of Trichoderma spp. as biocontrol agents in plant protection, recent studies have focused on the beneficial responses exerted on plants, stimulating the growth, activating the defenses, and/or improving nutrient uptake. The amdS gene, encoding an acetamidase of Aspergillus, has been used as a selectable marker for the transformation of filamentous fungi, including Trichoderma spp., but the physiological effects of the introduction of this gene into the genome of these microorganisms still remains unexplored. No evidence of amdS orthologous genes has been detected within the Trichoderma spp. genomes and the amdS heterologous expression in T. harzianum T34 did not affect the growth of this fungus in media lacking acetamide. However, it did confer the ability for the fungus to use this amide as a nitrogen source. Although a similar antagonistic behavior was observed for T34 and amdS transformants in dual cultures against Rhizoctonia solani, Botrytis cinerea and Fusarium oxysporum, a significantly higher antifungal activity was detected in amdS transformants against F. oxysporum, compared to that of T34, in membrane assays on media lacking acetamide. In Trichoderma-tomato interaction assays, amdS transformants were able to promote plant growth to a greater extent than the wild-type T34, although compared with this strain the transformants showed similar capability to colonize tomato roots. Gene expression patterns from aerial parts of 3-week-old tomato plants treated with T34 and the amdS transformants have also been investigated using GeneChip Tomato Genome Arrays. The downregulation of defense genes and the upregulation of carbon and nitrogen metabolism genes observed in the microarrays were accompanied by i enhanced growth, ii increased carbon and nitrogen levels and iii a

  1. Nitrogen Metabolism and Growth Enhancement in Tomato Plants Challenged with Trichoderma harzianum Expressing the Aspergillus nidulans Acetamidase amdS Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, Sara; Rubio, M Belén; Cardoza, Rosa E; Gutiérrez, Santiago; Nicolás, Carlos; Bettiol, Wagner; Hermosa, Rosa; Monte, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Trichoderma is a fungal genus that includes species that are currently being used as biological control agents and/or as biofertilizers. In addition to the direct application of Trichoderma spp. as biocontrol agents in plant protection, recent studies have focused on the beneficial responses exerted on plants, stimulating the growth, activating the defenses, and/or improving nutrient uptake. The amdS gene, encoding an acetamidase of Aspergillus, has been used as a selectable marker for the transformation of filamentous fungi, including Trichoderma spp., but the physiological effects of the introduction of this gene into the genome of these microorganisms still remains unexplored. No evidence of amdS orthologous genes has been detected within the Trichoderma spp. genomes and the amdS heterologous expression in Trichoderma harzianum T34 did not affect the growth of this fungus in media lacking acetamide. However, it did confer the ability for the fungus to use this amide as a nitrogen source. Although a similar antagonistic behavior was observed for T34 and amdS transformants in dual cultures against Rhizoctonia solani, Botrytis cinerea, and Fusarium oxysporum, a significantly higher antifungal activity was detected in amdS transformants against F. oxysporum, compared to that of T34, in membrane assays on media lacking acetamide. In Trichoderma-tomato interaction assays, amdS transformants were able to promote plant growth to a greater extent than the wild-type T34, although compared with this strain the transformants showed similar capability to colonize tomato roots. Gene expression patterns from aerial parts of 3-week-old tomato plants treated with T34 and the amdS transformants have also been investigated using GeneChip Tomato Genome Arrays. The downregulation of defense genes and the upregulation of carbon and nitrogen metabolism genes observed in the microarrays were accompanied by (i) enhanced growth, (ii) increased carbon and nitrogen levels, and (iii) a

  2. CX3CL1/CX3CR1 and CCL2/CCR2 Chemokine/Chemokine Receptor Complex in Patients with AMD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Mads Krüger; Singh, Amardeep; Faber, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: The chemokine receptors CX3CR1 and CCR2 have been implicated in the development of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The evidence is mainly derived from experimental cell studies and murine models of AMD. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between expression...... of CX3CR1 and CCR2 on different leukocyte subsets and AMD. Furthermore we measured the plasma levels of ligands CX3CL1 and CCL2. METHODS: Patients attending our department were asked to participate in the study. The diagnosis of AMD was based on clinical examination and multimodal imaging techniques...... positive correlation between CCR2 and CX3CR1 expression on CD8+ cells (r = 0.727, p = 0.0001). We found no difference in plasma levels of CX3CL1 and CCL2 among the groups. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show a down regulation of CX3CR1 on CD8+ cells; this correlated to a low expression of CCR2 on CD8+ cells...

  3. Multi-surface segmentation of OCT images with AMD using sparse high order potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Jorge; Pereira, Sérgio; Gonçalves, Luís; Ferreira, Manuel; Silva, Carlos A

    2017-01-01

    In age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the quantification of drusen is important because it is correlated with the evolution of the disease to an advanced stage. Therefore, we propose an algorithm based on a multi-surface framework for the segmentation of the limiting boundaries of drusen: the inner boundary of the retinal pigment epithelium + drusen complex (IRPEDC) and the Bruch's membrane (BM). Several segmentation methods have been considerably successful in segmenting retinal layers of healthy retinas in optical coherence tomography (OCT) images. These methods are successful because they incorporate prior information and regularization. Nonetheless, these factors tend to hinder the segmentation for diseased retinas. The proposed algorithm takes into account the presence of drusen and geographic atrophy (GA) related to AMD by excluding prior information and regularization just valid for healthy regions. However, even with this algorithm, prior information and regularization still cause the oversmoothing of drusen in some locations. Thus, we propose the integration of local shape prior in the form of a sparse high order potentials (SHOPs) into the algorithm to reduce the oversmoothing of drusen. The proposed algorithm was evaluated in a public database. The mean unsigned errors, relative to the average of two experts, for the inner limiting membrane (ILM), IRPEDC and BM were 2.94±2.69, 5.53±5.66 and 4.00±4.00 µ m, respectively. Drusen areas measurements were evaluated, relative to the average of two expert graders, by the mean absolute area difference and overlap ratio, which were 1579.7 ± 2106.8 µ m 2 and 0.78 ± 0.11, respectively.

  4. Ultra-widefield fundus autofluorescence in age-related macular degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhilash Guduru

    Full Text Available Establish accuracy and reproducibility of subjective grading in ultra-widefield fundus autofluorescence (FAF imaging in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD, and determine if an association exists between peripheral FAF abnormalities and AMD.This was a prospective, single-blinded case-control study. Patients were consecutively recruited for the study. Patients were excluded if there was a history of prior or active ocular pathology other than AMD or image quality was insufficient for analysis as determined by two independent graders. Control patients were those without any evidence of AMD or other ophthalmic disease apart from cataract. Using the Optos 200Tx (Optos, Marlborough, MA, USA, a ResMax central macula and an ultra-widefield peripheral retina image was taken for each eye in both normal color and short wavelength FAF. Ultra-widefield photographs were modified to mask the macula. Each ResMax and ultra-widefield image was independently graded by two blinded investigators.There were 28 AMD patients and 11 controls. There was a significant difference in the average age between AMD patients and control groups (80 versus 64, respectively P<0.001. There was moderate, statistically significant agreement between observers regarding image interpretation (78.4%, K = 0.524, P<0.001, and 69.0% (K = 0.49, P<0.001 agreement between graders for FAF abnormality patterns. Patients with AMD were at greater risk for peripheral FAF abnormalities (OR: 3.43, P = 0.019 and patients with FAF abnormalities on central macular ResMax images were at greater risk of peripheral FAF findings (OR: 5.19, P = 0.017.Subjective interpretation of FAF images has moderate reproducibility and validity in assessment of peripheral FAF abnormalities. Peripheral FAF abnormalities are seen in both AMD and control patients. Those with AMD, poor visual acuity, and macular FAF abnormalities are at greater risk.

  5. Towards the application of precision medicine in Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascella, Raffaella; Strafella, Claudia; Caputo, Valerio; Errichiello, Valeria; Zampatti, Stefania; Milano, Filippo; Potenza, Saverio; Mauriello, Silvestro; Novelli, Giuseppe; Ricci, Federico; Cusumano, Andrea; Giardina, Emiliano

    2018-03-01

    The review essentially describes genetic and non-genetic variables contributing to the onset and progression of exudative Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) in Italian population. In particular, AMD susceptibility within Italian population is contributed to by genetic variants, accounting for 23% of disease and non-genetic variants, accounting for 10% of AMD. Our data highlighted prominent differences concerning genetic and non-genetic contributors to AMD in our cohort with respect to worldwide populations. Among genetic variables, SNPs of CFH, ARMS2, IL-8, TIMP3, SLC16A8, RAD51B, VEGFA and COL8A1 were significantly associated with the risk of AMD in the Italian cohort. Surprisingly, other susceptibility variants described in European, American and Asiatic populations, did not reach the significance threshold in our cohort. As expected, advanced age, smoking and dietary habits were associated with the disease. In addition, we also describe a number of gene-gene and gene-phenotype interactions. In fact, AMD-associated genes may be involved in the alteration of Bruch's membrane and induction of angiogenesis, contributing to exacerbate the damage caused by aging and environmental factors. Our review provides an overview of genetic and non-genetic factors characterizing AMD susceptibility in Italian population, outlining the differences with respect to the worldwide populations. Altogether, these data reflect historical, geographic, demographic and lifestyle peculiarities of Italian population. The role of epigenetics, pharmacogenetics, comorbities and genetic counseling in the management of AMD patients have been described, in the perspective of the application of a "population-specific precision medicine" approach addressed to prevent AMD onset and improve patients' quality of life. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Clinical risk factors for age-related macular degeneration: a systematic review and meta-analysis

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    Evans Christopher

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the leading cause of blindness in Western countries. Numerous risk factors have been reported but the evidence and strength of association is variable. We aimed to identify those risk factors with strong levels of evidence which could be easily assessed by physicians or ophthalmologists to implement preventive interventions or address current behaviours. Methods A systematic review identified 18 prospective and cross-sectional studies and 6 case control studies involving 113,780 persons with 17,236 cases of late AMD that included an estimate of the association between late AMD and at least one of 16 pre-selected risk factors. Fixed-effects meta-analyses were conducted for each factor to combine odds ratio (OR and/or relative risk (RR outcomes across studies by study design. Overall raw point estimates of each risk factor and associated 95% confidence intervals (CI were calculated. Results Increasing age, current cigarette smoking, previous cataract surgery, and a family history of AMD showed strong and consistent associations with late AMD. Risk factors with moderate and consistent associations were higher body mass index, history of cardiovascular disease, hypertension, and higher plasma fibrinogen. Risk factors with weaker and inconsistent associations were gender, ethnicity, diabetes, iris colour, history of cerebrovascular disease, and serum total and HDL cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Conclusions Smoking, previous cataract surgery and a family history of AMD are consistent risk factors for AMD. Cardiovascular risk factors are also associated with AMD. Knowledge of these risk factors that may be easily assessed by physicians and general ophthalmologists may assist in identification and appropriate referral of persons at risk of AMD.

  7. Age-related macular degeneration: the importance of family history as a risk factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Humma; Khan, Jane C; Cipriani, Valentina; Sepp, Tiina; Matharu, Baljinder K; Bunce, Catey; Harding, Simon P; Clayton, David G; Moore, Anthony T; Yates, John R W

    2012-03-01

    Family history is considered a risk factor for age-related macular degeneration (AMD). With the advent of effective therapy for the disease, the importance of family history merits further investigation. This study quantifies the risk associated with family history, first, by a case-control study of reported family history and, second, by examining the siblings of AMD cases. The authors recruited cases with advanced AMD, spouses and siblings. All subjects were carefully phenotyped. Clinical findings in the siblings were compared with spouses. Information about family history was collected. The ORs for reported family history of AMD were calculated. Analyses were adjusted for age, smoking and genotype. 495 AMD cases, 259 spouses and 171 siblings were recruited. The OR for AMD was 27.8 (CI 3.8 to 203.0; p=0.001) with a reported family history of an affected parent and 12.0 (CI 3.7 to 38.6; p<0.0001) with a history of an affected sibling. ORs adjusted for age and smoking were higher. Examination of siblings confirmed their increased risk with 23% affected by AMD and an OR of 10.8 (4.5 to 25.8; p<0.0001). Adjusting for age increased the OR to 16.1 (6.2 to 41.8). The risk of AMD is greatly increased by having an affected first-degree relative. Those at risk need to be made aware of this and AMD patients should advise siblings and children to seek prompt ophthalmological advice if they develop visual symptoms of distortion or reduced vision.

  8. Risks of newly onset hemorrhagic stroke in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wan-Ju Annabelle; Cheng, Ching-Lan; Lee, Cheng-Han; Kao Yang, Yea-Huei; Lin, Swu-Jane; Hsieh, Cheng-Yang

    2017-10-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is an eye disease causing blindness in the elderly. It shares many common possible pathogenic mechanisms with cardiovascular diseases. Many studies have discussed the association between AMD and stroke, but the results were inconsistent. Our aim was to determine the associations between neovascular AMD and the risk of stroke in the Taiwanese population. This is a retrospective cohort study. We used claims data from National Health Insurance Research Database. Patients aged more than 45 years without stroke, myocardial infarction, or any AMD were selected from 2001 to 2008 and followed until 2010. The index date was defined as the date of nAMD diagnosis (ICD-9 code, 362.52). The comparison group was patients without an nAMD diagnosis with age- and sex-matched to nAMD subjects at a ratio of up to 10 to 1. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox regression analysis were used. The incidence of stroke events (ICD-9 codes, 430-434) and their subtypes (hemorrhagic and ischemic) were primary outcomes. Secondary outcomes included acute myocardial infarction (AMI), composite AMI/stroke, and all-cause mortality. Patients with nAMD had a higher risk of developing stroke, with an adjusted HR of 1.30 (95% CI, 1.01-1.68). A higher risk for hemorrhagic stroke (HR, 1.70, 95% CI, 1.03-2.83) was also found. No significant differences were observed in ischemic stroke, the composite of AMI/stroke, and all-cause mortality. Patients with nAMD had a significantly higher risk of developing stroke, which was driven mainly by the increased risk of developing the hemorrhagic subtype. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Association of OCT-Derived Drusen Measurements with AMD-Associated Genotypic SNPs in the Amish Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkata Ramana Murthy Chavali

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To investigate the association of optical coherence tomography (OCT-derived drusen measures in Amish age-related macular degeneration (AMD patients with known loci for macular degeneration. Methods: Members of the Old Order Amish community in Pennsylvania ages 50 and older were assessed for drusen area, volume and regions of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE atrophy using a Cirrus High-Definition OCT. Measurements were obtained in the macula region within a central circle (CC of 3 mm in diameter and a surrounding perifoveal ring (PR of 3 to 5 mm in diameter using the Cirrus OCT RPE analysis software. Other demographic information, including age, gender and smoking status, were collected. Study subjects were further genotyped to determine their risk for the AMD-associated SNPs in the SYN3, LIPC, ARMS2, C3, CFB, CETP, CFI and CFH genes using TaqMan genotyping assays. The association of genotypes with OCT measures were assessed using linear trend p-values calculated from univariate and multivariate generalized linear models. Results: 432 eyes were included in the analysis. Multivariate analysis (adjusted by age, gender and smoking status confirmed the known significant association between AMD and macular drusen with the number of CFH risk alleles for the drusen area (the area increased 0.12 mm2 for a risk allele increase, p < 0.01, drusen volume (the volume increased 0.01 mm3 for a risk allele increase, p ≤ 0.05 and the area of RPE atrophy (the area increased 0.43 mm2 for a risk allele increase, p = 0.003. SYN3 risk allele G is significantly associated with larger area PR (the area increased 0.09 mm2 for a risk allele increase, p = 0.03 and larger drusen volume in the central circle (the volume increased 0.01 mm3 for a risk allele increase, p = 0.04. Conclusion: Among the genotyped SNPs tested, the CFH risk genotype appears to play a major role in determining the drusen phenotype in the Amish AMD population.

  10. Therapeutic Approaches to Histone Reprogramming in Retinal Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, Andre K; Kleinman, Mark E

    2016-01-01

    Recent data have revealed epigenetic derangements and subsequent chromatin remodeling as a potent biologic switch for chronic inflammation and cell survival which are important therapeutic targets in the pathogenesis of several retinal degenerations. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are a major component of this system and serve as a unique control of the chromatin remodeling process. With a multitude of targeted HDAC inhibitors now available, their use in both basic science and clinical studies has widened substantially. In the field of ocular biology, there are data to suggest that HDAC inhibition may suppress neovascularization and may be a possible treatment for retinitis pigmentosa and dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, the effects of these inhibitors on cell survival and chemokine expression in the chorioretinal tissues remain very unclear. Here, we review the multifaceted biology of HDAC activity and pharmacologic inhibition while offering further insight into the importance of this epigenetic pathway in retinal degenerations. Our laboratory investigations aim to open translational avenues to advance dry AMD therapeutics while exploring the role of acetylation on inflammatory gene expression in the aging and degenerating retina.

  11. Identification of Age-Related Macular Degeneration Using OCT Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabi, Punal M., Dr; Krishna, Nanditha; Ashwini, V.; Prathibha, H. M.

    2018-02-01

    Age-related Macular Degeneration is the most leading retinal disease in the recent years. Macular degeneration occurs when the central portion of the retina, called macula deteriorates. As the deterioration occurs with the age, it is commonly referred as Age-related Macular Degeneration. This disease can be visualized by several imaging modalities such as Fundus imaging technique, Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) technique and many other. Optical Coherence Tomography is the widely used technique for screening the Age-related Macular Degeneration disease, because it has an ability to detect the very minute changes in the retina. The Healthy and AMD affected OCT images are classified by extracting the Retinal Pigmented Epithelium (RPE) layer of the images using the image processing technique. The extracted layer is sampled, the no. of white pixels in each of the sample is counted and the mean value of the no. of pixels is calculated. The average mean value is calculated for both the Healthy and the AMD affected images and a threshold value is fixed and a decision rule is framed to classify the images of interest. The proposed method showed an accuracy of 75%.

  12. Adjacent segment degeneration after lumbar spinal fusion: the impact of anterior column support: a randomized clinical trial with an eight- to thirteen-year magnetic resonance imaging follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videbaek, Tina S; Egund, Niels; Christensen, Finn B; Grethe Jurik, Anne; Bünger, Cody E

    2010-10-15

    Randomized controlled trial. To analyze long-term adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) after lumbar fusion on magnetic resonance imaging and compare randomization groups with and without anterior column support. ASD can be a long-term complication after fusion. The prevalence and the cause of ASD are not well documented, but ASD are one of the main arguments for introducing the use of motion-preserving techniques as an alternative to fusion. Anterior lumbar interbody fusion combined with posterolateral lumbar fusion (ALIF+PLF) has been proved superior to posterolateral fusion alone regarding outcome and cost-effectiveness. Between 1996 and 1999, 148 patients with severe chronic low back pain were randomly selected for ALIF+PLF or for PLF alone. Ninety-five patients participated. ASD was examined on magnetic resonance imaging with regard to disc degeneration, disc herniation, stenosis, and endplate changes. Disc heights on radiographs taken at index surgery and at long-term follow-up were compared. Outcome was assessed by validated questionnaires. The follow-up rate was 76%. ASD was similar between randomization groups. In the total cohort, endplate changes were seen in 26% of the participants and correlated significantly with the presence of disc degeneration and disc herniation. Disc degeneration and dorsal disc herniation were the parameters registered most frequently and were significantly more pronounced at the first adjacent level than at the second and the third adjacent levels. Patients without disc height reduction over time were significantly younger than patients with disc height reduction. Disc degeneration and stenosis correlated significantly with outcome at the first adjacent level. The cause of the superior outcome in the group with anterior support is still unclear. Compared with the findings reported in the literature, the prevalence of ASD is likely to be in concordance with the expected changes in a nonoperated symptomatic population and therefore

  13. Human Plasma Metabolomics Study across All Stages of Age-Related Macular Degeneration Identifies Potential Lipid Biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laíns, Inês; Kelly, Rachel S; Miller, John B; Silva, Rufino; Vavvas, Demetrios G; Kim, Ivana K; Murta, Joaquim N; Lasky-Su, Jessica; Miller, Joan W; Husain, Deeba

    2018-02-01

    To characterize the plasma metabolomic profile of patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) using mass spectrometry (MS). Cross-sectional observational study. We prospectively recruited participants with a diagnosis of AMD and a control group (>50 years of age) without any vitreoretinal disease. All participants underwent color fundus photography, used for AMD diagnosis and staging, according to the Age-Related Eye Disease Study classification scheme. Fasting blood samples were collected and plasma was analyzed by Metabolon, Inc. (Durham, NC), using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) and high-resolution MS. Metabolon's hardware and software were used to identify peaks and control quality. Principal component analysis and multivariate regression were performed to assess differences in the metabolomic profiles of AMD patients versus controls, while controlling for potential confounders. For biological interpretation, pathway enrichment analysis of significant metabolites was performed using MetaboAnalyst. The primary outcome measures were levels of plasma metabolites in participants with AMD compared with controls and among different AMD severity stages. We included 90 participants with AMD (30 with early AMD, 30 with intermediate AMD, and 30 with late AMD) and 30 controls. Using UPLC and MS, 878 biochemicals were identified. Multivariate logistic regression identified 87 metabolites with levels that differed significantly between AMD patients and controls. Most of these metabolites (82.8%; n = 72), including the most significant metabolites, belonged to the lipid pathways. Analysis of variance revealed that of the 87 metabolites, 48 (55.2%) also were significantly different across the different stages of AMD. A significant enrichment of the glycerophospholipids pathway was identified (P = 4.7 × 10 -9 ) among these metabolites. Participants with AMD have altered plasma metabolomic profiles compared with controls. Our data suggest

  14. A systematic review on zinc for the prevention and treatment of age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwanathan, Rohini; Chung, Mei; Johnson, Elizabeth J

    2013-06-12

    The objective of this systematic review was to examine the evidence on zinc intake from foods and supplements in the primary prevention and treatment of AMD. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs), prospective cohort, retrospective cohort, and case-control studies that investigated zinc intake from foods and/or supplements, and AMD in men and women with a mean age of 50 years or older were included. Medline and Cochrane Central were searched from inception to February 2012 and November 2012, respectively. Data extraction and quality appraisal were done on all eligible studies. TEN STUDIES WERE INCLUDED: four RCTs, four prospective cohort, and two retrospective cohort studies. Age-related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) showed zinc treatment to significantly reduce the risk of progression to advanced AMD. The risk of visual acuity loss was of similar magnitude, but not statistically significant. Two RCTs reported statistically significant increases in visual acuity in early AMD patients and one RCT showed no effect of zinc treatment on visual acuity in advanced AMD patients. Results from six cohort studies on associations between zinc intake and incidence of AMD were inconsistent. Current evidence on zinc intake for the prevention of AMD is inconclusive. Based on the strength of AREDS, we can conclude that zinc treatment may be effective in preventing progression to advanced AMD. Zinc supplementation alone may not be sufficient to produce clinically meaningful changes in visual acuity.

  15. Treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration with a variable ranibizumab dosing regimen and one-time reduced-fluence photodynamic therapy: the TORPEDO trial at 2 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielberg, Leigh; Leys, Anita

    2010-07-01

    The combination of verteporfin photodynamic therapy (PDT) and anti-angiogenics has been shown to be safe and efficacious in the treatment of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) secondary to age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The purpose of this study is to demonstrate long-term prevention of vision loss and improvement in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) after treatment with one-time reduced-fluence-rate PDT followed by administration of ranibizumab on a variable dosing regimen over 24 months in patients with neovascular AMD. Secondary outcome measures included the change in central macular thickness (CMT), reinjection frequency, and safety. This prospective, nonrandomized, open-label, single-center study enrolled 27 consecutive patients (27 eyes) presenting at the Leuven University Eye Hospital with previously untreated, active neovascular AMD between September 2006 and January 2007. All patients were treated with one-time, reduced-fluence-rate verteporfin PDT, followed by intravitreal ranibizumab 0.5 mg on the same day. A second and third ranibizumab injection were given at weeks 4 and 8, respectively, after which patients were followed up monthly for 24 months. Additional treatment with ranibizumab was administered to eyes with active neovascularization as indicated clinically and on imaging studies. Retreatment was based on the following criteria: (1) presence of subretinal fluid (SRF), intraretinal edema or sub-retinal pigment epithelial fluid, as seen on OCT; (2) increase of CMT by >100 mm on OCT; (3) signs of active CNV leakage on fluorescein angiography; (4) new sub- or intraretinal hemorrhage; and (5) BCVA decreased of > or =5 letters on the Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) chart. If any single criterion for reinjection was fulfilled, retreatment with ranibizumab was administered. Twenty-five patients completed the 2-year study. Occult CNV was present in 64% and retinal angiomatous proliferative (RAP) lesions were present in 24

  16. Can Vitamin A be Improved to Prevent Blindness due to Age-Related Macular Degeneration, Stargardt Disease and Other Retinal Dystrophies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Leonide; Washington, Ilyas

    2016-01-01

    We discuss how an imperfect visual cycle results in the formation of vitamin A dimers, thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of various retinal diseases, and summarize how slowing vitamin A dimerization has been a therapeutic target of interest to prevent blindness. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of vitamin A dimerization, an alternative form of vitamin A, one that forms dimers more slowly yet maneuvers effortlessly through the visual cycle, was developed. Such a vitamin A, reinforced with deuterium (C20-D3-vitamin A), can be used as a non-disruptive tool to understand the contribution of vitamin A dimers to vision loss. Eventually, C20-D3-vitamin A could become a disease-modifying therapy to slow or stop vision loss associated with dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD), Stargardt disease and retinal diseases marked by such vitamin A dimers. Human clinical trials of C20-D3-vitamin A (ALK-001) are underway.

  17. RECURRENCE OF CHOROIDAL NEOVASCULARIZATION LESION ACTIVITY AFTER AFLIBERCEPT TREATMENT FOR AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakazono, Tomotaka; Yamashiro, Kenji; Oishi, Akio; Ooto, Sotaro; Tamura, Hiroshi; Akagi-Kurashige, Yumiko; Hata, Masayuki; Takahashi, Ayako; Tsujikawa, Akitaka; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2017-11-01

    To examine the recurrence rate of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) lesion activity in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and associated factors after 1-year aflibercept treatment. Age-related macular degeneration eyes with 1-year aflibercept fixed-regimen treatment and a follow-up period of at least 18 months from the initial aflibercept injection for treatment-naive exudative AMD were retrospectively evaluated. The recurrence rate was examined. Age, gender, visual acuity, AMD subtype, greatest linear dimension, and retinal and choroidal thicknesses at the 12th month examination were compared between eyes with and without recurrence. Presence of remnant polyps and pigment epithelial detachment (PED) morphology were also compared in polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (PCV) eyes. Of the 98 eyes studied, 69 displayed a dry macula at the 12th month examination; 43.7% exhibited recurrence during the subsequent 12-month period in Kaplan-Meier analysis. Although no factors associated with recurrence were detected in AMD, remnant polyps and pigment epithelial detachment morphology at the 12th month examination were significantly associated with recurrence in polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (P = 0.018 and 0.048, respectively). Continuous, proactive treatment would be considered overtreatment for more than half of the AMD eyes that achieved a dry macula. Angiography and optical coherence tomography analyses may be useful for predicting recurrence in polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy eyes.

  18. Parainflammation, chronic inflammation and age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mei; Xu, Heping

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is an adaptive response of the immune system to noxious insults to maintain homeostasis and restore functionality. The retina is considered an immune privileged tissue due to its unique anatomical and physiological properties. During aging, the retina suffers from a low-grade chronic oxidative insult, which sustains for decades and increases in level with advancing age. As a result, the retinal innate immune system, particularly microglia and the complement system, undergo low levels of activation (para-inflammation). In many cases, this para-inflammatory response can maintain homeostasis in the healthy aging eye. However, in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD), this para-inflammatory response becomes dysregulated and contributes to macular damage. Factors contributing to the dysregulation of age-related retinal para-inflammation include genetic predisposition, environmental risk factors and old age. Dysregulated para-inflammation (chronic inflammation) in AMD damages the blood retina barrier (BRB), resulting in the breach of retinal immune privilege leading to the development of retinal lesions. This review discusses the basic principles of retinal innate immune responses to endogenous chronic insults in normal aging and in AMD, and explores the difference between beneficial para-inflammation and the detrimental chronic inflammation in the context of AMD. PMID:26292978

  19. Copy number variation in VEGF gene as a biomarker of susceptibility to age-related macular degeneration

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    Norshakimah Md Bakri

    2018-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several studies in various populations have been conducted to determine candidate genes that could contribute to age-related macular degeneration (AMD pathogenesis. Objective: The present study was undertaken to determine the association of high temperature requirement A-1 (HTRA1, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and very-low-density receptor (VLDR genes with wet AMD subjects in Malaysia. Methods: A total of 125 subjects with wet AMD and 120 subjects without AMD from the Malaysian population were selected for this study. Genomic DNA was extracted and copy number variations (CNVs were determined using quantitative real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR and comparison between the two groups was done. The demographic characteristics were also recorded. Statistical analysis was carried out using software where a level of P  0.05. Conclusion: Observations of an association between CNVs of VEGF gene and wet AMD have revealed that the CNVs of VEGF gene appears to be a possible contributor to wet AMD subjects in Malaysia. Keywords: Age-related macular degeneration, Copy number variations, VEGF, HTRA1, VLDR genes and Malaysia

  20. [Quality of life in patients with age-related macular degeneration - medical and social problem].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzyka-Woźniak, Maria; Misiuk-Hojło, Marta; Wesolowska, Alicja

    2011-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of blindness over the age of 50 in western countries. People with AMD are suffering from serious vision-related disability and their social life is compromised. The aim of our study was to assess quality of life (QoL) in patients with exudative AMD. The study group was 100 patients treated for AMD, the control group were 30 age and sex matched subjects without ophthalmic disorders. Patients were treated with anti-VEGF therapy, by means of National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire (NEI VFQ-25). As well as visual function, the NEI-VFQ investigates social functioning, mental health and dependency. There was statistically significant difference in QoL overall score between study group and control group. Patients with AMD obtained 51.1 (+/- 20.5 ) overall score, control group reached 83.7 (+/- 11.7) overall score, p = 0.001. Detailed analysis of study group revealed low acceptance of the disease and strong dependency. QoL in patients with AMD assessed with NEI VFQ-25, is significantly impaired. Low quality of life and difficulties in performing daily activities point at the need of formal psychological and social care.

  1. Genetic Variability in DNA Repair Proteins in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

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    Janusz Blasiak

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD is complex and involves interactions between environmental and genetic factors, with oxidative stress playing an important role inducing damage in biomolecules, including DNA. Therefore, genetic variability in the components of DNA repair systems may influence the ability of the cell to cope with oxidative stress and in this way contribute to the pathogenesis of AMD. However, few reports have been published on this subject so far. We demonstrated that the c.977C>G polymorphism (rs1052133 in the hOGG1 gene and the c.972G>C polymorphism (rs3219489 in the MUTYH gene, the products of which play important roles in the repair of oxidatively damaged DNA, might be associated with the risk of AMD. Oxidative stress may promote misincorporation of uracil into DNA, where it is targeted by several DNA glycosylases. We observed that the g.4235T>C (rs2337395 and c.−32A>G (rs3087404 polymorphisms in two genes encoding such glycosylases, UNG and SMUG1, respectively, could be associated with the occurrence of AMD. Polymorphisms in some other DNA repair genes, including XPD (ERCC2, XRCC1 and ERCC6 (CSB have also been reported to be associated with AMD. These data confirm the importance of the cellular reaction to DNA damage, and this may be influenced by variability in DNA repair genes, in AMD pathogenesis.

  2. Baseline Predictors of Visual Acuity Outcome in Patients with Wet Age-Related Macular Degeneration

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    Xinyuan Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is one of the leading causes of severe vision loss in people over 60 years. Wet AMD (wAMD causes more severe visual acuity (VA loss compared with the dry form due to formation of choroidal neovascularization (CNV. Antivascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF agents such as ranibizumab and aflibercept are now the standard of care treatment for wAMD. Unfortunately, up to a quarter of anti-VEGF-treated wAMD patients might not fully benefit from intravitreal injections and CNV activity may not respond to the treatment and these patients are called anti-VEGF nonresponders. This article aims to discuss the baseline factors associated with VA outcome such as age, initial VA, lesion types, disease duration, optical coherence tomography (OCT features, fundus autofluorescence findings, and the presence of particular genotype risk alleles in patients with wAMD. Recommendations are provided regarding when to consider discontinuation of therapy because of either success or futility. Understanding the predictive factors associated with VA outcome and treatment frequency response to anti-VEGF therapy may help retina specialists to manage patients’ expectations and guide treatment decisions from the beginning of treatment on the basis of “personalized medicine.”

  3. Can innate and autoimmune reactivity forecast early and advance stages of age-related macular degeneration?

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    Adamus, Grazyna

    2017-03-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of central vision loss in persons over 55years of age in developed countries. AMD is a complex disease in which genetic, environmental and inflammatory factors influence its onset and progression. Elevation in serum anti-retinal autoantibodies, plasma and local activation of complement proteins of the alternative pathway, and increase in secretion of proinflammatory cytokines have been seen over the course of disease. Genetic studies of AMD patients confirmed that genetic variants affecting the alternative complement pathway have a major influence on AMD risk. Because the heterogeneity of this disease, there is no sufficient strategy to identify the disease onset and progression sole based eye examination, thus identification of reliable serological biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis and response to treatment by sampling patient's blood is necessary. This review provides an outline of the current knowledge on possible serological (autoantibodies, complement factors, cytokines, chemokines) and related genetic biomarkers relevant to the pathology of AMD, and discusses their application for prediction of disease activity and prognosis in AMD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Prevalence of and risk factors for age-related macular degeneration in a multiethnic Asian cohort.

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    Cheung, Chui Ming Gemmy; Tai, E Shyong; Kawasaki, Ryo; Tay, Wan Ting; Lee, Jeannette L; Hamzah, Haslina; Wong, Tien Y

    2012-04-01

    To describe the prevalence of and risk factors for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in a multiethnic Asian cohort of Chinese, Malay, and Indian persons. In this population-based study, 3172 persons of Chinese, Malay, and Indian ethnicities 40 years and older were included. Participants underwent comprehensive systemic and ocular examination, retinal photography, and laboratory investigations. Early and late AMD signs were graded from retinal photographs. Age-standardized prevalence estimates were calculated using the 2010 Singapore adult population as the standard population. Association with a range of systemic risk factors was analyzed. Of 3172 participants, AMD was present in 211 subjects. Age-standardized prevalence of AMD was 7.0% in persons 40 years and older. The age-standardized prevalence was similar in all 3 Asian ethnic groups: Chinese, 7.3%; Malay, 7.7%; and Indian, 5.7% (P value = .44). The prevalence increased with age and was higher in men. Of the range of risk factors evaluated, only myopic refractive error (Chinese men. The prevalence of AMD was similar in the 3 major ethnic groups in Asia and comparable with white populations. Myopic refractive error was associated with reduced risk of AMD in Chinese men.

  5. Netrin-1 - DCC Signaling Systems and Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

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    John Paul SanGiovanni

    Full Text Available We conducted a nested candidate gene study and pathway-based enrichment analysis on data from a multi-national 77,000-person project on the molecular genetics of age-related macular degeneration (AMD to identify AMD-associated DNA-sequence variants in genes encoding constituents of a netrin-1 (NTN1-based signaling pathway that converges on DNA-binding transcription complexes through a 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate-calcineurin (cAMP-CN-dependent axis. AMD-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs existed in 9 linkage disequilibrium-independent genomic regions; these included loci overlapping NTN1 (rs9899630, P ≤ 9.48 x 10(-5, DCC (Deleted in Colorectal Cancer--the gene encoding a primary NTN1 receptor (rs8097127, P ≤ 3.03 x 10(-5, and 6 other netrin-related genes. Analysis of the NTN1-DCC pathway with exact methods demonstrated robust enrichment with AMD-associated SNPs (corrected P-value = 0.038, supporting the idea that processes driven by NTN1-DCC signaling systems operate in advanced AMD. The NTN1-DCC pathway contains targets of FDA-approved drugs and may offer promise for guiding applied clinical research on preventive and therapeutic interventions for AMD.

  6. Automated age-related macular degeneration classification in OCT using unsupervised feature learning

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    Venhuizen, Freerk G.; van Ginneken, Bram; Bloemen, Bart; van Grinsven, Mark J. J. P.; Philipsen, Rick; Hoyng, Carel; Theelen, Thomas; Sánchez, Clara I.

    2015-03-01

    Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) is a common eye disorder with high prevalence in elderly people. The disease mainly affects the central part of the retina, and could ultimately lead to permanent vision loss. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is becoming the standard imaging modality in diagnosis of AMD and the assessment of its progression. However, the evaluation of the obtained volumetric scan is time consuming, expensive and the signs of early AMD are easy to miss. In this paper we propose a classification method to automatically distinguish AMD patients from healthy subjects with high accuracy. The method is based on an unsupervised feature learning approach, and processes the complete image without the need for an accurate pre-segmentation of the retina. The method can be divided in two steps: an unsupervised clustering stage that extracts a set of small descriptive image patches from the training data, and a supervised training stage that uses these patches to create a patch occurrence histogram for every image on which a random forest classifier is trained. Experiments using 384 volume scans show that the proposed method is capable of identifying AMD patients with high accuracy, obtaining an area under the Receiver Operating Curve of 0:984. Our method allows for a quick and reliable assessment of the presence of AMD pathology in OCT volume scans without the need for accurate layer segmentation algorithms.

  7. PPAR-α Ligands as Potential Therapeutic Agents for Wet Age-Related Macular Degeneration

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    Marisol del V Cano

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR's are members of the steroid/thyroid nuclear receptor, superfamily of transcription factors. There are currently three known PPAR subtypes, α, β, and γ. The PPARs are now recognized participants in a number of biological pathways some of which are implicated in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD. These include immune modulation, lipid regulation, and oxidant/antioxidant pathways important to the onset and progression of “dry” AMD, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF mediated pathways that stimulate choroidal neovascularization (CNV, characteristic of “wet” AMD. PPAR-α is found in retina and also on vascular cells important to formation of CNV. At this time, however, relatively little is known about potential contributions of PPAR-α to the pathogenesis of dry and wet AMD. This review examines current literature for potential roles of PPAR-α in the pathogenesis and potential treatment of AMD with emphasis on prevention and treatment of wet AMD.

  8. Peripapillary Retinal Nerve Fiber Measurement with Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

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    Simon K. Law

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the relationship between the peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL measurements with Spectral-domain Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT and Age-related macular degeneration (AMD. Methods: Patients >60 years of age without glaucoma or record of intraocular pressure >21 mmHg and no systemic or intraocular diseases or treatment or surgical intervention that affected the RNFL underwent OCT measurement of the RNFL. The severity of AMD was staged with the Clinical Age-Related Maculopathy Staging System. The relationship between RNFL measurements and AMD stages of one eye per patient was analyzed. Results: Eighty-six eyes (46 patients with AMD and no glaucoma or other exclusion criteria received OCT RNFL measurements. Nine eyes (10.5% were excluded because of distorted peripapillary anatomy from exudative AMD (7 eyes or failure of the RNFL segmentation algorithm (2 eyes. Mean age ± S.D. of the 43 patients analyzed was 81.2 ± 7.3 years. The mean stage ± S.D. of AMD of the 77 eyes was 3.77 ± 1.05. Higher stages of AMD were statistically significantly associated with lower average RNFL and inferior sector RNFL (p = 0.049, 0 0015, respectively. The association of inferior sector RNFL and AMD stage remained statistically significant after adjusting for age. Conclusions: Spectral domain OCT is generally useful in measuring the peripapillary RNFL in eyes with different stages of AMD. Higher stage of AMD is associated with thinner peripapillary RNFL, which may masquerade as early glaucomatous damage.

  9. Is Age-Related Macular Degeneration Associated with Stroke Among Elderly Americans?§

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    Liao, Duanping; Mo, Jingping; Duan, Yinkang; Klein, Ronald; Scott, Ingrid U; Huang, Kui A; Zhou, Haibo

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is associated with the development of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke among elderly Americans. Design: Population-based cohort study. Participants: The five percent random sample of 2000-2003 Medicare enrollees was obtained. The cohort (n=1,519,086) consisted of enrollees who were aged 65 or older at the first two-year (January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2001). Methods: Baseline demographic variables and chronic conditions (AMD and type, history of myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, hypertension, and diabetes) were defined based on the occurrence of relevant ICD-9 codes in relevant diagnosis fields of the baseline Medicare Data. We excluded 215,900 persons who had a diagnosis of MI or stroke during baseline period to form a cohort of 1,303,186 individuals who were free of major cardio-cerebral vascular disease (CVD) at baseline. Main Outcome Measures: In two years of follow-up (January 1, 2002 to December 31, 2003), a total of 89,501 incident stroke cases were identified, including 80,018 ischemic, 7048 hemorrhagic, and 2,435 stroke cases of both types. Results: Baseline mean age was 75 years (Standard Divination=7.7), with 60% women and 88% whites. The prevalence of AMD was 10.6%, with 19.7% being neovascular AMD and 80.3% being non-neovascular AMD. Baseline age, gender, race, hypertension, and diabetes adjusted 2-year incident odds ratios and 95% confidence internal of stroke associated with AMD were 1.31 (1.26, 1.36) for neovascular AMD, 1.18 (1.15, 1.21) for non-neovascular AMD, and 1.21 (1.18, 1.23) for either neovascular or non-neovascular AMD. Conclusion: The findings are suggestive of an association between AMD, especially neovascular AMD, and incident stroke, independent of demographic factors and co-morbidity. These findings, if confirmed by other studies that control for smoking and other lifestyle covariables not measured in this study, suggest the possibility of shared common

  10. Is age-related macular degeneration associated with stroke among elderly americans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Duanping; Mo, Jingping; Duan, Yinkang; Klein, Ronald; Scott, Ingrid U; Huang, Kui A; Zhou, Haibo

    2008-03-08

    To investigate whether age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is associated with the development of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke among elderly Americans. Population-based cohort study. The five percent random sample of 2000-2003 Medicare enrollees was obtained. The cohort (n=1,519,086) consisted of enrollees who were aged 65 or older at the first two-year (January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2001). Baseline demographic variables and chronic conditions (AMD and type, history of myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, hypertension, and diabetes) were defined based on the occurrence of relevant ICD-9 codes in relevant diagnosis fields of the baseline Medicare Data. We excluded 215,900 persons who had a diagnosis of MI or stroke during baseline period to form a cohort of 1,303,186 individuals who were free of major cardio-cerebral vascular disease (CVD) at baseline. In two years of follow-up (January 1, 2002 to December 31, 2003), a total of 89,501 incident stroke cases were identified, including 80,018 ischemic, 7048 hemorrhagic, and 2,435 stroke cases of both types. Baseline mean age was 75 years (Standard Divination=7.7), with 60% women and 88% whites. The prevalence of AMD was 10.6%, with 19.7% being neovascular AMD and 80.3% being non-neovascular AMD. Baseline age, gender, race, hypertension, and diabetes adjusted 2-year incident odds ratios and 95% confidence internal of stroke associated with AMD were 1.31 (1.26, 1.36) for neovascular AMD, 1.18 (1.15, 1.21) for non-neovascular AMD, and 1.21 (1.18, 1.23) for either neovascular or non-neovascular AMD. The findings are suggestive of an association between AMD, especially neovascular AMD, and incident stroke, independent of demographic factors and co-morbidity. These findings, if confirmed by other studies that control for smoking and other lifestyle covariables not measured in this study, suggest the possibility of shared common antecedents between stroke and AMD.

  11. High-Density Lipoprotein Function in Exudative Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

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    Laura Pertl

    Full Text Available High-density lipoproteins (HDL have long been implicated in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD. However, conflicting results have been reported with regard to the associations of AMD with HDL-cholesterol levels. The present study is the first to assess HDL composition and metrics of HDL function in patients with exudative AMD and control patients.Blood samples were collected from 29 patients with exudative AMD and 26 age-matched control patients. Major HDL associated apolipoproteins were determined in apoB-depleted serum by immunoturbidimetry or ELISA, HDL-associated lipids were quantified enzymatically. To get an integrated measure of HDL quantity and quality, we assessed several metrics of HDL function, including cholesterol efflux capacity, anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory activities using apoB-depleted serum from study participants.In our study, we observed that the HDL associated acute phase protein serum amyloid A (SAA was significantly increased in AMD patients (p<0.01, whereas all other assessed apolipoproteins including ApoA-I, apoA-II, apoC-II, apoC-III and apoE as well as major HDL associated lipids were not altered. HDL efflux capacity, anti-oxidative capacity and arylesterase activity were not different in AMD patients when compared with the control group. The ability of apoB-depleted serum to inhibit monocyte NF-κB expression was significantly improved in AMD patients (mean difference (MD -5.6, p<0.01. Moreover, lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 activity, a marker of vascular inflammation, was decreased in AMD subjects (MD -24.1, p<0.01.The investigated metrics of HDL composition and HDL function were not associated with exudative AMD in this study, despite an increased content of HDL associated SAA in AMD patients. Unexpectedly, anti-inflammatory activity of apoB-depleted serum was even increased in our study. Our data suggest that the investigated parameters of serum HDL function showed no

  12. Complement Factor H Y402H and LOC387715 A69S Polymorphisms in Association with Age-Related Macular Degeneration in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazari Khanamiri, Hossein; Ghasemi Falavarjani, Khalil; Sanati, Mohammad Hossein; Aryan, Hajar; Irani, Alireza; Hashemi, Masih; Modarres, Mehdi; Parvaresh, Mohammad Mehdi; Nikeghbali, Aminollah

    2014-04-01

    To determine the frequency of complement factor H (Y402H) and age related macular degeneration susceptibility gene 2 (A69S) single nucleotide polymorphisms in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and in matched non-AMD controls in an Iranian population. Seventy patients with AMD and 86 age- and sex-matched controls were recruited and examined. Peripheral blood sample was obtained from all subjects for DNA extraction and direct sequencing of Y402H and A69S genes. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association of Y402H and A69S polymorphisms with AMD were determined. The frequencies of both homozygous and heterozygous genotypes were significantly higher in cases than controls for both Y402H and A69S polymorphisms. In comparison to the wild genotypes, OR for AMD associated with Y402H and A69S polymorphisms were 1.9 (95% CI, 1.1-3.2) and 2.2 (95%CI, 1.6-3.1), respectively. Joint risk analysis considering both genes revealed a higher risk of AMD when polymorphisms were present for both genes. Y402H and A69S polymorphisms were strongly associated with AMD in this Iranian population.

  13. Complement Factor H Y402H and LOC387715 A69S Polymorphisms in Association with Age-Related Macular Degeneration in Iran

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    Hossein Nazari Khanamiri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To determine the frequency of complement factor H (Y402H and age related macular degeneration susceptibility gene 2 (A69S single nucleotide polymorphisms in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD and in matched non-AMD controls in an Iranian population. Methods: Seventy patients with AMD and 86 age- and sex-matched controls were recruited and examined. Peripheral blood sample was obtained from all subjects for DNA extraction and direct sequencing of Y402H and A69S genes. Odds ratios (ORs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs for the association of Y402H and A69S polymorphisms with AMD were determined. Results: The frequencies of both homozygous and heterozygous genotypes were significantly higher in cases than controls for both Y402H and A69S polymorphisms. In comparison to the wild genotypes, OR for AMD associated with Y402H and A69S polymorphisms were 1.9 (95% CI, 1.1-3.2 and 2.2 (95%CI, 1.6-3.1, respectively. Joint risk analysis considering both genes revealed a higher risk of AMD when polymorphisms were present for both genes. Conclusion: Y402H and A69S polymorphisms were strongly associated with AMD in this Iranian population.

  14. Macular degeneration (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... macula in the back of the eye. The macula is important for clear central vision, allowing an individual to see fine details. There are two types of macular degeneration, dry and wet. Dry macular degeneration is more ...

  15. Predictive Factors in OCT Analysis for Visual Outcome in Exudative AMD

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    Maria-Andreea Gamulescu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Reliable predictive factors for therapy outcome may enable treating physicians to counsel their patients more efficiently concerning probability of improvement or time point of discontinuation of a certain therapy. Methods. This is a retrospective analysis of 87 patients with exudative age-related macular degeneration who received three monthly intravitreal ranibizumab injections. Visual acuity before initiation of intravitreal therapy and 4–6 weeks after last intravitreal injection was compared and related to the preoperative visualisation of continuity of the outer retinal layers as assessed by OCT: external limiting membrane (ELM, inner photoreceptor segments (IPS, junction between inner and outer segments (IS/OS, and outer photoreceptor segments (OPS. Results. Visual acuity increased in 40 of 87 (46.0% patients, it remained stable in 25 (28.7%, and 22 (25.3% patients had decreased visual acuity four to six weeks after triple intravitreal ranibizumab injections. No statistically significant predictive value could be demonstrated for grade of continuity of outer retinal layers concerning visual acuity development. Conclusions. In our series of AMD patients, grade of continuity of outer retinal layers was not a significant predictive value for visual acuity development after triple ranibizumab injections.

  16. Prevalence of age-related macular degeneration in Nakuru, Kenya: a cross-sectional population-based study.

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    Wanjiku Mathenge

    Full Text Available Diseases of the posterior segment of the eye, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD, have recently been recognised as the leading or second leading cause of blindness in several African countries. However, prevalence of AMD alone has not been assessed. We hypothesized that AMD is an important cause of visual impairment among elderly people in Nakuru, Kenya, and therefore sought to assess the prevalence and predictors of AMD in a diverse adult Kenyan population.In a population-based cross-sectional survey in the Nakuru District of Kenya, 100 clusters of 50 people 50 y of age or older were selected by probability-proportional-to-size sampling between 26 January 2007 and 11 November 2008. Households within clusters were selected through compact segment sampling. All participants underwent a standardised interview and comprehensive eye examination, including dilated slit lamp examination by an ophthalmologist and digital retinal photography. Images were graded for the presence and severity of AMD lesions following a modified version of the International Classification and Grading System for Age-Related Maculopathy. Comparison was made between slit lamp biomicroscopy (SLB and photographic grading. Of 4,381 participants, fundus photographs were gradable for 3,304 persons (75.4%, and SLB was completed for 4,312 (98%. Early and late AMD prevalence were 11.2% and 1.2%, respectively, among participants graded on images. Prevalence of AMD by SLB was 6.7% and 0.7% for early and late AMD, respectively. SLB underdiagnosed AMD relative to photographic grading by a factor of 1.7. After controlling for age, women had a higher prevalence of early AMD than men (odds ratio 1.5; 95% CI, 1.2-1.9. Overall prevalence rose significantly with each decade of age. We estimate that, in Kenya, 283,900 to 362,800 people 50 y and older have early AMD and 25,200 to 50,500 have late AMD, based on population estimates in 2007.AMD is an important cause of visual

  17. The ARMOUR Study: Anti-VEGF in Neovascular AMD--Our Understanding in a Real-World Indian Setting.

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    Jain, Nimesh; Yadav, Naresh Kumar; Jayadev, Chaitra; Srinivasan, Priya; Mohan, Ashwin; Shetty, Bhujang K

    2017-01-01

    The aim of our study was to share our experience with anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) injections in the treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) in a real-world setting. A retrospective, observational study. Patients of Indian origin with nAMD receiving anti-VEGF with a minimum follow-up of 12 months were enrolled in this study. In group 1, patients were treated on a pro re nata (PRN) basis; in group 2, patients received a loading dose (3 injecti Results: Overall, we observed that 77.31% (92/119 eyes) of patients either maintained or had improved visual acuity at 12 months' follow-up. Similar visual outcome was observed in both groups. The average number of injections given in group 1 was 4.98 and in group 2 was 3.7. CDVA at 12 months was significantly correlated with type of drug molecule, CSFT at 3 and 12 months, baseline visual acuity, and CDVA at 3 months. PRN treatment with significantly fewer injections achieved similar anatomical and functional outcomes when compared with the loading dose group. The results of this study need to be validated with a larger study group and a longer follow-up. Copyright 2017 Asia-Pacific Academy of Ophthalmology.

  18. Increased Th1/Th17 Responses Contribute to Low-Grade Inflammation in Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiajia; Wang, Wenzhan; Li, Qiuming

    2017-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the primary cause of senior blindness in developed countries. Mechanisms underlying initiation and development of AMD remained known. We examined the CD4+ T cell compartments and their functions in AMD patients. AMD patients presented significantly higher frequencies of interferon (IFN)-γ-expressing and interleukin (IL)-17-expressing CD4+ T cells than healthy controls. The levels of IFN-γ and IL-17 expression by CD4+ T cells were significantly higher in AMD patients. These IFN-γ-expressing Th1 cells and IL-17-expressing Th17 cells could be selectively enriched by surface CCR3+ and CCR4+CCR6+ expression, respectively. Th1 and Th17 cells from AMD patients promoted the differentiation of monocytes toward M1 macrophages, which were previously associated with retinal damage. Th1 and Th17 cells also increased the level of MHC class I expression in human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE)-1 cells, while Th1 cells increased the frequency of MHC class II-expressing RPE-1 cells. These proinflammatory effects were partly, but not entirely, induced by the secretion of IFN-γ and IL-17. This study demonstrated an enrichment of Th1 cells and Th17 cells in AMD patients. These Th1 and Th17 cells possessed proinflammatory roles in an IFN-γ- and IL-17-dependent fashion, and could potentially serve as therapeutic targets. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Relationship between HTRA1 polymorphism and genetic susceptibility of wet age-related macular degeneration in Han population

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    Nan Yang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the relationship between high temperature essential factor A-1(HTRA1polymorphism and genetic susceptibility of wet age-related macular degeneration(AMDin Han population. METHODS: Totally 201 patients of wet AMD in Han population were selected from May 2014 to January 2017 in our hospital as disease group, and 201 healthy persons of Han were selected as health group. Blood samples of peripheral vein were collected and genomic DNA was extracted. HTRA1 polymorphism loci were detected, and the rs11200638 and rs2248799 loci of HTRA1 gene were detected by Sequenom mass spectrometry platform. Then the relationship between HTRA1 polymorphism and genetic susceptibility of wet AMD were analyzed. RESULTS: The grade distributions of the genotype of the rs11200638 and rs2248799 loci in the two groups subjects had significant differences(PPPOR values of rs11200638 genotype AA and AG were respectively 5.36 and 3.45, which were the risk factors of wet AMD(POR values of rs2248799 genotype TT and TC were respectively 2.36 and 1.98, which were the risk factors of wet AMD(PCONCLUSION: The rs11200638 and rs2248799 polymorphisms of HTRA1 gene are associated with the incidence of wet AMD, and the genotype AA and TT are closely related to the risk of wet AMD in Han population, of which the higher frequencies can increase the risk of wet AMD.

  20. T-cell differentiation and CD56+ levels in polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy and neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subhi, Yousif; Nielsen, Marie Krogh; Molbech, Christopher Rue; Oishi, Akio; Singh, Amardeep; Nissen, Mogens Holst; Sørensen, Torben Lykke

    2017-11-20

    Polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (PCV) and neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are prevalent age-related diseases characterized by exudative changes in the macula. Although they share anatomical and clinical similarities, they are also distinctly characterized by their own features, e.g. vascular abnormalities in PCV and drusen-mediated progression in neovascular AMD. PCV remains etiologically uncharacterized, and ongoing discussion is whether PCV and neovascular AMD share the same etiology or constitute two substantially different diseases. In this study, we investigated T-cell differentiation and aging profile in human patients with PCV, patients with neovascular AMD, and age-matched healthy control individuals. Fresh venous blood was prepared for flow cytometry to investigate CD4 + and CD8 + T-cell differentiation (naïve, central memory, effector memory, effector memory CD45ra + ), loss of differentiation markers CD27 and CD28, and expression of aging marker CD56. Patients with PCV were similar to the healthy controls in all aspects. In patients with neovascular AMD we found significantly accelerated T-cell differentiation (more CD28 - CD27 - cells) and aging (more CD56 + cells) in the CD8 + T-cell compartment. These findings suggest that PCV and neovascular AMD are etiologically different in terms of T cell immunity, and that neovascular AMD is associated with T-cell immunosenescence.

  1. Increased Expression of CD200 on Circulating CD11b+ Monocytes in Patients with Neovascular Age-related Macular Degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Amardeep; Falk, Mads K; Hviid, Thomas V F

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Dysregulation of retinal microglial activity has been implicated in the pathogenesis of neovascular age-related macular degeneration. Microglia activity can be regulated through the membrane protein CD200 and its corresponding receptor, the CD200 receptor (CD200R). Because both...... with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and 44 age-matched controls without AMD. METHODS: The participants were aged 60 years or older, had no history of immune dysfunction or cancer, and were not receiving immune-modulating therapy. All participants were subjected to a structured interview......: Patients with neovascular AMD had a higher percentage of CD11b+CD200+ monocytes and CD200+ monocytes compared with controls. Multiple regression analysis revealed that the intergroup differences observed were independent of age. Moreover, an age-related increment in CD200 expression on monocytes...

  2. Age-related macular degeneration: Effects of a short-term intervention with an oleaginous kale extract--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Christin; Jentsch, Susanne; Dawczynski, Jens; Böhm, Volker

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a multifactorial degenerative disease of the retina, which accounts for slowly progressive visual impairment in the elderly. An increased dietary intake of xanthophylls is suggested to be inversely related to the risk of macular disease. The present study was designed as a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel trial examining the influence of a short-term intervention with an oleaginous extract of Brassica oleracea var. sabellica L. (kale) on plasma xanthophyll concentrations and the optical density of the macular pigment xanthophylls (MPOD). Twenty patients with non-exudative AMD were recruited for a 10-wk study period (2-wk run-in, 4-wk intervention, 4-wk washout). All participants received 50 mL of a beverage containing either an oleaginous extract of kale (kale) or refined rapeseed oil (placebo). The verum product provides 10 mg lutein and 3 mg zeaxanthin per day. The concentrations of the xanthophylls in plasma and the MPOD increased significantly in the kale group after 4 wk of intervention. The successive washout period resulted in a significant decline of the values in plasma and macula. The values at the end of the study were still significantly higher than the initial values. Nevertheless, the improvements did not persist over 4 wk of washout. The distribution of the xanthophylls in the macula seems to be more dynamic than originally assumed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Complement factor H polymorphisms in Japanese population with age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Haru; Umeda, Shinsuke; Obazawa, Minoru; Minami, Masayoshi; Noda, Toru; Mizota, Atsushi; Honda, Miki; Tanaka, Minoru; Koyama, Risa; Takagi, Ikue; Sakamoto, Yoshihiro; Saito, Yoshihiro; Miyake, Yozo; Iwata, Takeshi

    2006-03-06

    To study the frequency of five haplotypes previously reported in the complement factor H (CFH) gene for Japanese patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Genomic DNA was isolated from peripheral blood samples taken from 96 Japanese AMD patients and 89 age-matched controls. All patients were diagnosed as having exudative (wet-type) AMD. The amplified polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products of CFH exons 2, 9, and 13, and intron 6 were analyzed by temperature gradient capillary electrophoresis (TGCE) and by direct sequencing. The haplotypes were identified, and their frequencies were calculated and compared with reported results. Five haplotypes were identified in the Japanese population including four already reported in the American population. The frequencies of these haplotypes were significantly different between Japanese and American in both control and case groups. The haplotype containing Y402H, which was previously reported to be associated with AMD, was only 4% in the control and case population, with a p value of 0.802. However, two other haplotypes were found as risk factors, which gave an increased likelihood of AMD of 1.9 and 2.5 fold (95% CI 1.12-3.69 and 1.42-6.38). One protective haplotype that decreased the likelihood of AMD by 1.6 fold (95% CI 0.26-0.67) was identified. The frequencies for five haplotypes previously identified were analyzed in a Japanese population with AMD. Four previously found haplotypes were identified and one additional haplotype was found. The frequencies of each haplotype were significantly different from that in found Americans affected with AMD. Two of the haplotypes were identified as risk factors and one was considered protective.

  4. Is Coffee Consumption associated with Age-related Macular Degeneration and Diabetic Retinopathy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelam Kumari

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Coffee is among the most widely consumed beverages in the world. Several epidemiological studies have evaluated the association between coffee consumption and risk of systemic diseases; however, there is paucity of data in relation to coffee consumption and risk of eye diseases.  This study aims to examine the relationship between coffee consumption and risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD and diabetic retinopathy (DR in multiethnic population of Singapore.   Materials and MethodsWe analyzed the data from 4121 study participants from the Singapore Prospective Study Program to examine the relationship of coffee to prevalence of AMD and DR.  A standardized questionnaire that included information about the habitual amount of coffee consumed was completed by all study participants.  Presence and severity of AMD and DR was assessed on fundus photographs using the Mutiethnic Study of Atherosclerosis Grading Protocol. ResultsThe prevalence of AMD and DR in our population was 5.4% and 32.0%, respectively. A positive history of coffee consumption was present in 77.5% of AMD population and 76.1% of DR population with majority of participants consuming 1-2 cups of coffee daily.  No statistically significant association was observed between coffee consumption and odds of AMD or DR after adjusting for confounding factors [AMD: Odds Ratio (OR = 1.27, Confidence Interval (CI = 0.88-1.83, p = 0.20; DR: OR = 1.36, CI = 0.69-2.69, p = 0.37.  ConclusionThis epidemiological study of a large multiethnic population data set do not support the hypothesis that habitual intake of coffee and caffeine is associated with an altered risk of AMD and DR among Asians.

  5. Macular xanthophylls, lipoprotein-related genes, and age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Euna; Neuringer, Martha; SanGiovanni, John Paul

    2014-07-01

    Plant-based macular xanthophylls (MXs; lutein and zeaxanthin) and the lutein metabolite meso-zeaxanthin are the major constituents of macular pigment, a compound concentrated in retinal areas that are responsible for fine-feature visual sensation. There is an unmet need to examine the genetics of factors influencing regulatory mechanisms and metabolic fates of these 3 MXs because they are linked to processes implicated in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In this work we provide an overview of evidence supporting a molecular basis for AMD-MX associations as they may relate to DNA sequence variation in AMD- and lipoprotein-related genes. We recognize a number of emerging research opportunities, barriers, knowledge gaps, and tools offering promise for meaningful investigation and inference in the field. Overviews on AMD- and high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-related genes encoding receptors, transporters, and enzymes affecting or affected by MXs are followed with information on localization of products from these genes to retinal cell types manifesting AMD-related pathophysiology. Evidence on the relation of each gene or gene product with retinal MX response to nutrient intake is discussed. This information is followed by a review of results from mechanistic studies testing gene-disease relations. We then present findings on relations of AMD with DNA sequence variants in MX-associated genes. Our conclusion is that AMD-associated DNA variants that influence the actions and metabolic fates of HDL system constituents should be examined further for concomitant influence on MX absorption, retinal tissue responses to MX intake, and the capacity to modify MX-associated factors and processes implicated in AMD pathogenesis. © 2014 American Society for Nutrition.

  6. Macular xanthophylls, lipoprotein-related genes, and age-related macular degeneration1234

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Euna; Neuringer, Martha; SanGiovanni, John Paul

    2014-01-01

    Plant-based macular xanthophylls (MXs; lutein and zeaxanthin) and the lutein metabolite meso-zeaxanthin are the major constituents of macular pigment, a compound concentrated in retinal areas that are responsible for fine-feature visual sensation. There is an unmet need to examine the genetics of factors influencing regulatory mechanisms and metabolic fates of these 3 MXs because they are linked to processes implicated in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In this work we provide an overview of evidence supporting a molecular basis for AMD-MX associations as they may relate to DNA sequence variation in AMD- and lipoprotein-related genes. We recognize a number of emerging research opportunities, barriers, knowledge gaps, and tools offering promise for meaningful investigation and inference in the field. Overviews on AMD- and high-density lipoprotein (HDL)–related genes encoding receptors, transporters, and enzymes affecting or affected by MXs are followed with information on localization of products from these genes to retinal cell types manifesting AMD-related pathophysiology. Evidence on the relation of each gene or gene product with retinal MX response to nutrient intake is discussed. This information is followed by a review of results from mechanistic studies testing gene-disease relations. We then present findings on relations of AMD with DNA sequence variants in MX-associated genes. Our conclusion is that AMD-associated DNA variants that influence the actions and metabolic fates of HDL system constituents should be examined further for concomitant influence on MX absorption, retinal tissue responses to MX intake, and the capacity to modify MX-associated factors and processes implicated in AMD pathogenesis. PMID:24829491

  7. Radiation therapy: age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Carlos A Medina; Ehlers, Justis P

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of severe irreversible vision loss in patients over the age of 50 years in the developed world. Neovascular AMD (NVAMD) is responsible for 90% of the cases with severe visual loss. In the last decade, the treatment paradigm for NVAMD has been transformed by the advent of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy. Despite the excellent results of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy, frequent injections remain a necessity for most patients. The burden of these frequent visits as well as the cumulative risks of indefinite intravitreal injections demand continued pursuit of more enduring therapy that provides similar functional results. Radiotherapy has been studied for two decades as a potential therapy for NVAMD. Because of its antiangiogenic properties, radiation therapy remains a promising potential adjunctive resource for the treatment of choroidal neovascularization secondary to NVAMD. This review considers the past, present and future of radiation as a treatment or combination treatment of NVAMD. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Treatment of combined acid mine drainage (AMD)--flotation circuit effluents from copper mine via Fenton's process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahiroglu, Ayse; Tarlan-Yel, Esra; Sevimli, Mehmet Faik

    2009-07-30

    The treatability of a copper mine wastewater, including heavy metals, AMD, as well as flotation chemicals, with Fenton process was investigated. Fenton process seems advantageous for this treatment, because of Fe(2+) content and low pH of AMD. First, optimum Fe(2+) condition under constant H(2)O(2) was determined, and initial Fe(2+) content of AMD was found sufficient (120 mg/L for removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) of 6125 mg/L). In the second step, without any additional Fe(2+), optimum H(2)O(2) dosage was determined as 40 mg/L. Fe(2+)/H(2)O(2) molar ratio of 1.8 was enough to achieve the best treatment performance. In all trials, initial pH of AMD was 4.8 and pH adjustment was not performed. Utilization of existing pH and Fe(2+), low H(2)O(2) requirements, and up to 98% treatment performances in COD, turbidity, color, Cu(2+), Zn(2+) made the proposed treatment system promising. Since the reaction occurs stepwise, a two-step kinetic model was applied and calculated theoretical maximum removal rate was consistent to experimental one, which validates the applied model. For the optimum molar ratio (1.8), 140 mL/L sludge of high density (1.094 g/mL), high settling velocity (0.16 cm/s) with low specific resistance (3.15 x 10(8)m/kg) was obtained. High reaction rates and easily dewaterable sludge characteristics also made the proposed method advantageous.

  9. A large genome-wide association study of age-related macular degeneration highlights contributions of rare and common variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.G. Fritsche (Lars); W. Igl (Wilmar); J.N. Cooke Bailey (Jessica N.); F. Grassmann (Felix); S. Sengupta (Sebanti); J.L. Bragg-Gresham (Jennifer L.); Burdon, K.P. (Kathryn P.); S.J. Hebbring (Scott J.); Wen, C. (Cindy); M. Gorski (Mathias); I.K. Kim (Ivana); Cho, D. (David); Zack, D. (Donald); E.H. Souied (Eric); H.P.N. Scholl (Hendrik); E. Bala (Elisa); ELee, K. (Kristine); D. Hunter (David); Sardell, R.J. (Rebecca J.); P. Mitchell (Paul); J.E. Merriam (Joanna); F. Cipriani (Francesco); Hoffman, J.D. (Joshua D.); T. Schick (Tina); Y.T.E. Lechanteur (Yara T. E.); R.H. Guymer (Robyn); M.P. Johnson (Matthew); Y. Jiang; C.M. Stanton (Chloe); G.H.S. Buitendijk (Gabrielle); X. Zhan (Xiaowei); Kwong, A.M. (Alan M.); A. Boleda (Alexis); M. Brooks (Matthew); L. Gieser (Linn); R. Ratna Priya (Rinki); K.E. Branham (Kari); Foerster, J.R. (Johanna R.); J.R. Heckenlively (John); M.I. Othman (Mohammad); B.J. Vote (Brendan J.); Liang, H.H. (Helena Hai); E. Souzeau (Emmanuelle); McAllister, I.L. (Ian L.); T. Isaacs (Timothy); Hall, J. (Janette); Lake, S. (Stewart); D.A. Mackey (David); Constable, I.J. (Ian J.); J.E. Craig (Jamie E.); T.E. Kitchner (Terrie E.); Yang, Z. (Zhenglin); Su, Z. (Zhiguang); Luo, H. (Hongrong); Chen, D. (Daniel); Ouyang, H. (Hong); K. Flagg (Ken); Lin, D. (Danni); Mao, G. (Guanping); H.A. Ferreyra (Henry); K. Stark (Klaus); C. von Strachwitz (Claudia); Wolf, A. (Armin); C. Brandl (Caroline); Rudolph, G. (Guenther); M. Olden (Matthias); M.A. Morrison (Margaux); D.J. Morgan (Denise); M. Schu (Matthew); Ahn, J. (Jeeyun); G. Silvestri (Giuliana); E.E. Tsironi (Evangelia); Park, K.H. (Kyu Hyung); L.A. Farrer (Lindsay); A. Orlin (Anton); Brucker, A. (Alexander); X. Li (Xiaohui); C.A. Curcio (Christine A.); Mohand-Sa'd, S. (Saddek); J.-A. Sahel (José-Alain); I. Audo (Isabelle); M. Benchaboune (Mustapha); A.J. Cree (Angela); Rennie, C.A. (Christina A.); Goverdhan, S.V. (Srinivas V.); M. Grunin (Michelle); S. Hagbi-Levi (Shira); B. Campochiaro (Betsy); N. Katsanis (Nicholas); J.-B. Holz; F. Blond (Frédéric); Blanché, H. (Hél'ne); Deleuze, J.-F. (Jean-Fran'ois); R.P. Igo Jr. (Robert); B.J. Truitt (Barbara); N.S. Peachey (Neal ); S.M. Meuer (Stacy); C.E. Myers (Chelsea); Moore, E.L. (Emily L.); R. Klein (Ronald); M.A. Hauser (Michael); E.A. Postel (Eric); M.D. Courtenay (Monique D.); S.M. Schwartz (Stephen); J.L. Kovach (Jaclyn); W.K. Scott (William); Liew, G. (Gerald); Tan, A.G. (Ava G.); B. Gopinath (Bamini); J.E. Merriam (Joanna); T. Smith (Tim); J.C. Khan (Jane); M. Shahid (Mohammad); A.T. Moore (Anthony); J.A. McGrath (J Allie); R. Laux (Reneé); M.A. Brantley (Milam); A. Agarwal (Anita); L. Ersoy (Lebriz); A. Caramoy (Albert); T. Langmann (Thomas); N.T.M. Saksens (Nicole T.); Jong, E.K. (Eiko Kde); C. Hoyng (Carel); M.S. Cain (Melinda); A.J. Richardson (Andrea); T.M. Martin (Tammy M.); J. Blangero (John); D.E. Weeks (Daniel); Dhillon, B. (Bal); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); K.F. Doheny (Kimberly); Romm, J. (Jane); C.C.W. Klaver (Caroline); C. Hayward (Caroline); Gorin, M.B. (Michael B.); M.L. Klein (Michael); P.N. Baird (Paul); A.I. Hollander (Anneke); Fauser, S. (Sascha); WYates, J.R. (John R.); R. Allikmets (Rando); J.J. Wang (Jie Jin); D.A. Schaumberg (Debra); B.E.K. Klein (Barbara); S.A. Hagstrom (Stephanie); Y. Chowers (Yehuda); A.J. Lotery (Andrew); T. Léveillard (Thierry); K. Zhang (Kang); M.H. Brilliant (Murray H.); A.W. Hewit (Alex); A. Swaroop (Anand); Chew, E.Y. (Emily Y.); M.A. Pericak-Vance (Margaret); M.M. DeAngelis (Margaret); D. Stambolian (Dwight); J.L. Haines (Jonathan); S.K. Iyengar (Sudha); B.H.F. Weber (Bernhard); G.R. Abecasis (Gonçalo); I.M. Heid (Iris)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractAdvanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly, with limited therapeutic options. Here we report on a study of >12 million variants, including 163,714 directly genotyped, mostly rare, protein-altering variants. Analyzing 16,144 patients

  10. Loosely coupled level sets for retinal layers and drusen segmentation in subjects with dry age-related macular degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Novosel, J.; Wang, Ziyuan; De Jong, Henk; Vermeer, K.A.; van Vliet, L.J.; Styner, Martin A.; Angelini, Elsa D.

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is used to produce high-resolution three-dimensional images of the retina, which permit the investigation of retinal irregularities. In dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a chronic eye disease that causes central vision loss, disruptions such as drusen and

  11. Imaging Protocols in Clinical Studies in Advanced Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Recommendations from Classification of Atrophy Consensus Meetings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holz, F.G.; Sadda, S.R.; Staurenghi, G.; Lindner, M.; Bird, A.C.; Blodi, B.A.; Bottoni, F.; Chakravarthy, U.; Chew, E.Y.; Csaky, K.; Curcio, C.A.; Danis, R.; Fleckenstein, M.; Freund, K.B.; Grunwald, J.; Guymer, R.; Hoyng, C.B.; Jaffe, G.J.; Liakopoulos, S.; Mones, J.M.; Oishi, A.; Pauleikhoff, D.; Rosenfeld, P.J.; Sarraf, D.; Spaide, R.F.; Tadayoni, R.; Tufail, A.; Wolf, S.; Schmitz-Valckenberg, S.

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To summarize the results of 2 consensus meetings (Classification of Atrophy Meeting [CAM]) on conventional and advanced imaging modalities used to detect and quantify atrophy due to late-stage non-neovascular and neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and to provide

  12. Common variants near FRK/COL10A1 and VEGFA are associated with advanced age-related macular degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Yu (Yi); T. Bhangale (Tushar); J. Fagerness (Jesen); S. Ripke (Stephan); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); P.L. Tan (Perciliz); E.H. Souied (Eric); A.J. Richardson (Andrea); J.E. Merriam (Joanna); G.H.S. Buitendijk (Gabrielle); R. Reynolds (Robyn); S. Raychaudhuri (Soumya); K.A. Chin (Kimberly); L. Sobrin (Lucia); E. Evangelou (Evangelos); P.H. Lee (Phil); N. Leveziel (Nicolas); D.J. Zack (Donald); B. Campochiaro (Betsy); R.T. Smith (Theodore); G.R. Barile (Gaetano); R.H. Guymer (Robyn); R. Hogg (Ruth); U. Chakravarthy (Usha); L.D. Robman (Luba); O. Gustafsson (Omar); H. Sigurdsson (Haraldur); W. Ortmann (Ward); T.W. Behrens (Timothy); K. Stefansson (Kari); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); P. Tikka-Kleemola (Päivi); J.R. Vingerling (Hans); C.C.W. Klaver (Caroline); R. Allikmets (Rando); M.A. Brantley (Milam); P.N. Baird (Paul); N. Katsanis (Nicholas); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); J.P.A. Ioannidis (John); M.J. Daly (Mark); R.R. Graham (Robert); J.M. Seddon (Johanna)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractDespite significant progress in the identification of genetic loci for age-related macular degeneration (AMD), not all of the heritability has been explained. To identify variants which contribute to the remaining genetic susceptibility, we performed the largest meta-analysis of

  13. A large genome-wide association study of age-related macular degeneration highlights contributions of rare and common variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fritsche, L.G.; Igl, W.; Bailey, J.N.; Grassmann, F.; Sengupta, S; Bragg-Gresham, J.L.; Burdon, K.P.; Hebbring, S.J.; Wen, C.; Gorski, M.; Kim, I.K.; Cho, D.; Zack, D.; Souied, E.; Scholl, H.P.; Bala, E.; Lee, K.E.; Hunter, D.J.; Sardell, R.J.; Mitchell, P.; Merriam, J.E.; Cipriani, V.; Hoffman, J.D.; Schick, T.; Lechanteur, Y.T.; Guymer, R.H.; Johnson, M.P.; Jiang, Y.; Stanton, C.M.; Buitendijk, G.H.; Zhan, X.; Kwong, A.M.; Boleda, A.; Brooks, M.; Gieser, L.; Ratnapriya, R.; Branham, K.E.; Foerster, J.R.; Heckenlively, J.R.; Othman, M.I.; Vote, B.J.; Liang, H.H.; Souzeau, E.; McAllister, I.L.; Isaacs, T.; Hall, J.; Lake, S.; Mackey, D.A.; Constable, I.J.; Craig, J.E.; Kitchner, T.E.; Yang, Z; Su, Z.; Luo, H.; Chen, D.; Ouyang, H.; Flagg, K.; Lin, D.; Mao, G.; Ferreyra, H.; Stark, K.; Strachwitz, C.N. von; Wolf, A.; Brandl, C.; Rudolph, G.; Olden, M.; Morrison, M.A.; Morgan, D.J.; Schu, M.; Ahn, J.; Silvestri, G.; Tsironi, E.E.; Park, K.H.; Farrer, L.A.; Orlin, A.; Brucker, A.; Li, M.; Curcio, C.A.; Mohand-Said, S.; Sahel, J.A.; Audo, I.; Benchaboune, M.; Cree, A.J.; Rennie, C.A.; Goverdhan, S.V.; Grunin, M.; Hagbi-Levi, S.; Campochiaro, P.; Katsanis, N.; Holz, F.G.; Blond, F.; Blanche, H.; Deleuze, J.F.; Igo, R.P., Jr.; Truitt, B.; Peachey, N.S.; Meuer, S.M.; Myers, C.E.; Moore, E.L.; Klein, R.; Hollander, A.I. den; Saksens, N.T.M.; Hoyng, C.B.; Jong, E.K.; et al.,

    2016-01-01

    Advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly, with limited therapeutic options. Here we report on a study of >12 million variants, including 163,714 directly genotyped, mostly rare, protein-altering variants. Analyzing 16,144 patients and 17,832

  14. Neovascular age-related macular degeneration without drusen in the fellow eye : clinical spectrum and therapeutic outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chung, Wing H; van Dijk, Elon H C; Mohabati, Danial; Dijkman, Greet; Yzer, Suzanne; de Jong, Eiko K; Fauser, Sascha; Schlingemann, Reinier O; Hoyng, Carel B; Boon, Camiel J F

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the clinical characteristics and therapeutic outcome of patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) in 1 eye, without drusen in the fellow eye. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Medical records of 381 patients were analyzed to identify the cases. The main outcomes

  15. Neovascular age-related macular degeneration without drusen in the fellow eye: clinical spectrum and therapeutic outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chung, Wing H.; van Dijk, Elon H. C.; Mohabati, Danial; Dijkman, Greet; Yzer, Suzanne; de Jong, Eiko K.; Fauser, Sascha; Schlingemann, Reinier O.; Hoyng, Carel B.; Boon, Camiel J. F.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical characteristics and therapeutic outcome of patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) in 1 eye, without drusen in the fellow eye. Patients and methods: Medical records of 381 patients were analyzed to identify the cases. The main outcomes

  16. Neovascular age-related macular degeneration treated with ranibizumab or aflibercept in the same large clinical setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Annette; Sander, Birgit; Larsen, Michael

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To study visual outcome and number of annual injections in treatment-naïve patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) before and after a change in first-line therapy from ranibizumab to aflibercept in a high-volume clinical practice. METHODS: This was a retrospective...

  17. Blood expression levels of chemokine receptor CCR3 and chemokine CCL11 in age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Mads Krüger; Singh, Amardeep; Faber, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Dysregulation of the CCR3/CCL11 pathway has been implicated in the pathogenesis of choroidal neovascularisation, a common feature of late age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of CCR3 and its ligand CCL11 in peripheral blood in patients...

  18. A risk score for the prediction of advanced age-related macular degeneration: Development and validation in 2 prospective cohorts

    Science.gov (United States)

    We aimed to develop an eye specific model which used readily available information to predict risk for advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD). We used the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) as our training dataset, which consisted of the 4,507 participants (contributing 1,185 affected v...

  19. Guidelines for the management of neovascular age-related macular degeneration by the European Society of Retina Specialists (EURETINA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula; Chong, Victor; Loewenstein, Anat

    2014-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is still referred to as the leading cause of severe and irreversible visual loss world-wide. The disease has a profound effect on quality of life of affected individuals and represents a major socioeconomic challenge for societies due...

  20. Associations between genetic polymorphisms of insulin-like growth factor axis genes and risk for age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purpose: Our objective was to investigate if insulin-like growth factor (IGF) axis genes affect the risk for age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods: 864 Caucasian non-diabetic participants from the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) Genetic Repository were used in this case control st...

  1. In patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration, physical activity may influence C-reactive protein levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Subhi, Yousif; Singh, Amardeep; Falk, Mads Krüger

    2014-01-01

    Association of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) with C-reactive protein (CRP) was previously reported, indicating a relation to systemic low-grade inflammation. However, visual impairment limits physical activity, and physical activity modulates CRP levels. Here, we investigated...

  2. The Rate of Vitamin A Dimerization in Lipofuscinogenesis, Fundus Autofluorescence, Retinal Senescence and Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Ilyas; Saad, Leonide

    2016-01-01

    One of the earliest events preceding several forms of retinal degeneration is the formation and accumulation of vitamin A dimers in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and underlying Bruch's membrane (BM). Such degenerations include Stargardt disease, Best disease, forms of retinitis pigmentosa, and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Since their discovery in the 1990's, dimers of vitamin A, have been postulated as chemical triggers driving retinal senescence and degeneration. There is evidence to suggest that the rate at which vitamin A dimerizes and the eye's response to the dimerization products may dictate the retina's lifespan. Here, we present outstanding questions, finding the answers to which may help to elucidate the role of vitamin A dimerization in retinal degeneration.

  3. The generation of induced pluripotent stem cells for macular degeneration as a drug screening platform: identification of curcumin as a protective agent for retinal pigment epithelial cells against oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Ching eChang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is one retinal aging process that may lead to irreversible vision loss in the elderly. Its pathogenesis remains unclear, but oxidative stress inducing retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells damage is perhaps responsible for the aging sequence of retina and may play an important role in macular degeneration. In this study, we have reprogrammed T cells from patients with dry type AMD into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs via integration-free episomal vectors and differentiated them into RPE cells that were used as an expandable platform for investigating pathogenesis of the AMD and in-vitro drug screening. These patient-derived RPEs with the AMD-associated background (AMD-RPEs exhibited reduced antioxidant ability, compared with normal RPE cells. Among several screened candidate drugs, curcumin caused most significant reduction of ROS in AMD-RPEs. Pre-treatment of curcumin protected these AMD-RPEs from H2O2-induced cell death and also increased the cytoprotective effect against the oxidative stress of H2O2 through the reduction of ROS levels. In addition, curcumin with its versatile activities modulated the expression of many oxidative stress-regulating genes such as PDGF, VEGF, IGFBP-2, HO1, SOD2 and GPX1. Our findings indicated that the RPE cells derived from AMD patients have decreased antioxidative defense, making RPE cells more susceptible to oxidative damage and thereby leading to AMD formation. Curcumin represented an ideal drug that can effectively restore the neuronal functions in AMD patient-derived RPE cells, rendering this drug an effective option for macular degeneration therapy and an agent against aging-associated oxidative stress.

  4. Insights into the genetic architecture of early stage age-related macular degeneration: a genome-wide association study meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth G Holliday

    Full Text Available Genetic factors explain a majority of risk variance for age-related macular degeneration (AMD. While genome-wide association studies (GWAS for late AMD implicate genes in complement, inflammatory and lipid pathways, the genetic architecture of early AMD has been relatively under studied. We conducted a GWAS meta-analysis of early AMD, including 4,089 individuals with prevalent signs of early AMD (soft drusen and/or retinal pigment epithelial changes and 20,453 individuals without these signs. For various published late AMD risk loci, we also compared effect sizes between early and late AMD using an additional 484 individuals with prevalent late AMD. GWAS meta-analysis confirmed previously reported association of variants at the complement factor H (CFH (peak P = 1.5×10(-31 and age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2 (ARMS2 (P = 4.3×10(-24 loci, and suggested Apolipoprotein E (ApoE polymorphisms (rs2075650; P = 1.1×10(-6 associated with early AMD. Other possible loci that did not reach GWAS significance included variants in the zinc finger protein gene GLI3 (rs2049622; P = 8.9×10(-6 and upstream of GLI2 (rs6721654; P = 6.5×10(-6, encoding retinal Sonic hedgehog signalling regulators, and in the tyrosinase (TYR gene (rs621313; P = 3.5×10(-6, involved in melanin biosynthesis. For a range of published, late AMD risk loci, estimated effect sizes were significantly lower for early than late AMD. This study confirms the involvement of multiple established AMD risk variants in early AMD, but suggests weaker genetic effects on the risk of early AMD relative to late AMD. Several biological processes were suggested to be potentially specific for early AMD, including pathways regulating RPE cell melanin content and signalling pathways potentially involved in retinal regeneration, generating hypotheses for further investigation.

  5. Cosegregation and functional analysis of mutant ABCR (ABCA4) alleles in families that manifest both Stargardt disease and age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shroyer, N F; Lewis, R A; Yatsenko, A N; Wensel, T G; Lupski, J R

    2001-11-01

    Mutations in ABCR (ABCA4) have been reported to cause a spectrum of autosomal recessively inherited retinopathies, including Stargardt disease (STGD), cone-rod dystrophy and retinitis pigmentosa. Individuals heterozygous for ABCR mutations may be predisposed to develop the multifactorial disorder age-related macular degeneration (AMD). We hypothesized that some carriers of STGD alleles have an increased risk to develop AMD. We tested this hypothesis in a cohort of families that manifest both STGD and AMD. With a direct-sequencing mutation detection strategy, we found that AMD-affected relatives of STGD patients are more likely to be carriers of pathogenic STGD alleles than predicted based on chance alone. We further investigated the role of AMD-associated ABCR mutations by testing for expression and ATP-binding defects in an in vitro biochemical assay. We found that mutations associated with AMD have a range of assayable defects ranging from no detectable defect to apparent null alleles. Of the 21 missense ABCR mutations reported in patients with AMD, 16 (76%) show abnormalities in protein expression, ATP-binding or ATPase activity. We infer that carrier relatives of STGD patients are predisposed to develop AMD.

  6. Low-frequency coding variants in CETP and CFB are associated with susceptibility of exudative age-related macular degeneration in the Japanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momozawa, Yukihide; Akiyama, Masato; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Arakawa, Satoshi; Yasuda, Miho; Yoshida, Shigeo; Oshima, Yuji; Mori, Ryusaburo; Tanaka, Koji; Mori, Keisuke; Inoue, Satoshi; Terasaki, Hiroko; Yasuma, Tetsuhiro; Honda, Shigeru; Miki, Akiko; Inoue, Maiko; Fujisawa, Kimihiko; Takahashi, Kanji; Yasukawa, Tsutomu; Yanagi, Yasuo; Kadonosono, Kazuaki; Sonoda, Koh-Hei; Ishibashi, Tatsuro; Takahashi, Atsushi; Kubo, Michiaki

    2016-11-15

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of blindness in the elderly. Previous sequencing studies of AMD susceptibility genes have revealed the association of rare coding variants in CFH, CFI, C3 and C9 in European population; however, the impact of rare or low-frequency coding variants on AMD susceptibility in other populations is largely unknown. To identify the role of low-frequency coding variants on exudative AMD susceptibility in a Japanese population, we analysed the association of coding variants of 34 AMD candidate genes in the two-stage design by a multiplex PCR-based target sequencing method. We used a total of 2,886 (1st: 827, 2nd: 2,059) exudative AMD cases including typical AMD, polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy, and retinal angiomatous proliferation and 9,337 (1st: 3,247 2nd: 6,090) controls. Gene-based analysis found a significant association of low-frequency variants (minor allele frequency (MAF) low-frequency variant (R74H) in CFB would be individually associated with AMD susceptibility independent of the GWAS associated SNP. These findings highlight the importance of target sequencing to reveal the impact of rare or low-frequency coding variants on disease susceptibility in different ethnic populations.

  7. Complement component C5a Promotes Expression of IL-22 and IL-17 from Human T cells and its Implication in Age-related Macular Degeneration

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    Klein Michael L

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Age related macular degeneration (AMD is the leading cause of irreversible blindness in elderly populations worldwide. Inflammation, among many factors, has been suggested to play an important role in AMD pathogenesis. Recent studies have demonstrated a strong genetic association between AMD and complement factor H (CFH, the down-regulatory factor of complement activation. Elevated levels of complement activating molecules including complement component 5a (C5a have been found in the serum of AMD patients. Our aim is to study whether C5a can impact human T cells and its implication in AMD. Methods Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were isolated from the blood of exudative form of AMD patients using a Ficoll gradient centrifugation protocol. Intracellular staining and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were used to measure protein expression. Apoptotic cells were detected by staining of cells with the annexin-V and TUNEL technology and analyzed by a FACS Caliber flow cytometer. SNP genotyping was analyzed by TaqMan genotyping assay using the Real-time PCR system 7500. Results We show that C5a promotes interleukin (IL-22 and IL-17 expression by human CD4+ T cells. This effect is dependent on B7, IL-1β and IL-6 expression from monocytes. We have also found that C5a could protect human CD4+ cells from undergoing apoptosis. Importantly, consistent with a role of C5a in promoting IL-22 and IL-17 expression, significant elevation in IL-22 and IL-17 levels was found in AMD patients as compared to non-AMD controls. Conclusions Our results support the notion that C5a may be one of the factors contributing to the elevated serum IL-22 and IL-17 levels in AMD patients. The possible involvement of IL-22 and IL-17 in the inflammation that contributes to AMD may herald a new approach to treat AMD.

  8. Overview of AMD (Automotive Metal Division)/USAMP projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demeri, M. [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States)

    2001-07-01

    This power point presentation described the mission of Ford's Automotive Metal Division (AMD) and presented a list of AMD projects. Their goal is to facilitate the development of improved materials and related manufacturing technologies for the automotive use of metals through cooperative, precompetitive programs, including those supporting PNGV. Some of the projects included: (1) magnesium casting for structural applications, (2) low cost powder metallurgy technology for particle reinforced aluminium, (3) sorting mixed alloys from shredded automobiles, (4) hydroforming aluminium tubes, (5) flexible binder controls for robust sampling, (6) long life electrodes for resistance spot welding of aluminium, sheet alloys, and coated high strength sheet steels, (7) NDE tools for evaluation of laser welded metals, (8) magnesium power train die cast components, (9) improved A206 alloy for cast automotive suspension components, (10) plasma arc welding of lightweight metals such as aluminium/magnesium, and (11) warm forming of aluminium alloys. The objectives, process controls and benefits of each of these projects were illustrated. Some of the issues that still need to be resolved include: an improved alloy with greater grain size and strength, an easily washable lubricant, a process to rapidly heat the blank and feed it into the heated dies, a method to achieve better thermal distribution in dies, and post forming mechanical properties. 5 figs.

  9. A circulating microrna profile is associated with late-stage neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

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    Felix Grassmann

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the leading cause of severe vision impairment in Western populations over 55 years. A growing number of gene variants have been identified which are strongly associated with an altered risk to develop AMD. Nevertheless, gene-based biomarkers which could be dysregulated at defined stages of AMD may point toward key processes in disease mechanism and thus may support efforts to design novel treatment regimens for this blinding disorder. Circulating microRNAs (cmiRNAs which are carried by nanosized exosomes or microvesicles in blood plasma or serum, have been recognized as valuable indicators for various age-related diseases. We therefore aimed to elucidate the role of cmiRNAs in AMD by genome-wide miRNA expression profiling and replication analyses in 147 controls and 129 neovascular AMD patients. We identified three microRNAs differentially secreted in neovascular (NV AMD (hsa-mir-301-3p, pcorrected = 5.6*10-5, hsa-mir-361-5p, pcorrected = 8.0*10-4 and hsa-mir-424-5p, pcorrected = 9.6*10-3. A combined profile of the three miRNAs revealed an area under the curve (AUC value of 0.727 and was highly associated with NV AMD (p = 1.2*10-8. To evaluate subtype-specificity, an additional 59 AMD cases with pure unilateral or bilateral geographic atrophy (GA were analyzed for microRNAs hsa-mir-301-3p, hsa-mir-361-5p, and hsa-mir-424-5p. While we found no significant differences between GA AMD and controls neither individually nor for a combined microRNAs profile, hsa-mir-424-5p levels remained significantly higher in GA AMD when compared to NV (pcorrected<0.005. Pathway enrichment analysis on genes predicted to be regulated by microRNAs hsa-mir-301-3p, hsa-mir-361-5p, and hsa-mir-424-5p, suggests canonical TGFβ, mTOR and related pathways to be involved in NV AMD. In addition, knockdown of hsa-mir-361-5p resulted in increased neovascularization in an in vitro angiogenesis assay.

  10. Pharmacologic Treatment of Wet Type Age-related Macular Degeneration; Current and Evolving Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams Najafabadi, Hoda; Daftarian, Narsis; Ahmadieh, Hamid; Soheili, Zahra-Soheila

    2017-08-01

    Age-related macular degeneration as the major cause of blindness in the elderly population has remained at the epicenter of clinical research in ophthalmology. This retinal disorder is characterized by the photoreceptor and retinal pigment epithelial cells loss, occurring within the macula. The disease represents a spectrum of clinical manifestations. It is a multifactorial disease resulting from a combination of genetic predispositions and environmental risk factors. AMD is classified into two different types, dry and wet. Wet AMD is in close relation with angiogenesis and inflammatory processes.A variety of anti-angiogenesis and anti-inflammatory drugs have been proposed for the treatment of the disease. The purpose of this paper is to briefly review the pharmacological therapies of the wet form of AMD and focus on new drugs that are currently in different stages of research and development.

  11. Genetic and functional dissection of HTRA1 and LOC387715 in age-related macular degeneration.

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    Zhenglin Yang

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A common haplotype on 10q26 influences the risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD and encompasses two genes, LOC387715 and HTRA1. Recent data have suggested that loss of LOC387715, mediated by an insertion/deletion (in/del that destabilizes its message, is causally related with the disorder. Here we show that loss of LOC387715 is insufficient to explain AMD susceptibility, since a nonsense mutation (R38X in this gene that leads to loss of its message resides in a protective haplotype. At the same time, the common disease haplotype tagged by the in/del and rs11200638 has an effect on the transcriptional upregulation of the adjacent gene, HTRA1. These data implicate increased HTRA1 expression in the pathogenesis of AMD and highlight the importance of exploring multiple functional consequences of alleles in haplotypes that confer susceptibility to complex traits.

  12. Spinal mobilization vs conventional physiotherapy in the management of chronic low back pain due to spinal disk degeneration: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krekoukias, Georgios; Gelalis, Ioannis D; Xenakis, Theodoros; Gioftsos, Georgios; Dimitriadis, Zacharias; Sakellari, Vasiliki

    2017-05-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the efficacy of spinal mobilization in subjects with low back pain (LBP) and associated spinal disk degeneration. Seventy-five subjects suffering from chronic LBP (>3 months) were randomly allocated into 3 groups of 25 subjects each. Each group received five treatment sessions with the first group receiving manual therapy (MT) (spinal mobilization), the second a sham treatment, and the third conventional physiotherapy (CP) (stretching exercises, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, and massage). Subjects were assessed for their pain intensity using the numerical pain rating scale and for their self-reported disability using the Oswestry and Roland-Morris Questionnaire at baseline and after the completion of the five treatment sessions. Paired t -tests showed a significant improvement for all outcome measures in the MT and CP group ( p   0.05). MT is preferable to CP in order to reduce the pain intensity and disability in subjects with chronic LBP and associated disk degeneration. The findings of this study may lead to the establishment of spinal mobilization as one of the most preferable approaches for the management of LBP due to disk degeneration. 1b.

  13. Mediterranean Diet Score and Its Association with Age-Related Macular Degeneration: The European Eye Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, Ruth E; Woodside, Jayne V; McGrath, Alanna; Young, Ian S; Vioque, Jesus L; Chakravarthy, Usha; de Jong, Paulus T; Rahu, Mati; Seland, Johan; Soubrane, Gisele; Tomazzoli, Laura; Topouzis, Fotis; Fletcher, Astrid E

    2017-01-01

    To examine associations between adherence to a Mediterranean diet and prevalence of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in countries ranging from Southern to Northern Europe. Cross-sectional, population-based epidemiologic study. Of 5060 randomly sampled people aged 65 years or older from 7 study centers across Europe (Norway, Estonia, United Kingdom, France, Italy, Greece, and Spain), full dietary data were available in 4753. The mean age of participants was 73.2 years (standard deviation, 5.6), and 55% were women. Participants underwent an eye examination and digital retinal color photography. The images were graded at a single center. Dietary intake during the previous 12 months was assessed by using a semiquantitative food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ). A previously published Mediterranean Diet Score (MDS) was used to classify participants according to their responses on the FFQ. Multivariable logistic regression was used to investigate the association of the MDS score and AMD, taking account of potential confounders and the multicenter study design. Images were graded according to the International Classification System for age-related maculopathy and stratified using the Rotterdam staging system into 5 exclusive stages (AMD 0-4) and a separate category of large drusen (≥125 μm). Age-related macular degeneration 4 included neovascular AMD (nvAMD) and geographic atrophy (GA). Increasing MDS was associated with reduced odds of nvAMD in unadjusted and confounder-adjusted analysis. Compared with the lowest MDS adherence (≤4 score), those in the highest category MDS adherence (>6 score) showed lower odds of nvAMD (odds ratio, 0.53; 0.27-1.04; P trend = 0.01). The association with MDS did not differ by Y204H risk allele (P = 0.89). For all early AMD (grade 1-3), there was no relationship with MDS (P trend = 0.9). There was a weak trend (P = 0.1) between MDS and large drusen; those in the highest category of MDS had 20% reduced odds compared with those in

  14. Environmental cadmium and lead exposures and age-related macular degeneration in U.S. adults: The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005 to 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Erin W.; Schaumberg, Debra A.; Park, Sung Kyun

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a complex disease resulting from the interplay of genetic predisposition and environmental exposures, and has been linked to oxidative stress and inflammatory mechanisms. Lead and cadmium can accumulate in human retinal tissues and may damage the retina through oxidative stress, and may thereby play a role in the development of AMD. We examined associations between blood lead, blood cadmium, and urinary cadmium concentrations and the presence of AMD in 5390 participants aged 40 years and older with blood lead and blood cadmium measures and a subsample of 1548 with urinary cadmium measures in the 2005–2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys. AMD was identified by grading retinal photographs with a modification of the Wisconsin Age-Related Maculopathy Grading System. The weighted prevalence of AMD was 6.6% (n=426). Controlling for age, gender, race/ethnicity, education and body mass index, adults in the highest blood cadmium quartile had higher odds of AMD compared to the lowest quartile (odds ratio [OR], 1.56; 95% CI, 1.02–2.40), with a significant trend across quartiles (p-trend=0.02). After further adjustment for pack-years of cigarette smoking, estimates were somewhat attenuated (OR, 1.43; 95% CI, 0.91–2.27; p-trend=0.08). Similar associations were found with urinary cadmium. The association between urinary cadmium and AMD was stronger in non-Hispanic whites (NHW) than in non-Hispanic blacks (NHB) (OR, 3.31; 95% CI, 1.37–8.01 for levels above versus below the median among NHW; OR,1.45; 95% CI, 0.40–5.32 for levels above versus below the median among NHB; p-interaction=0.03). We found no association between blood lead levels and AMD. Higher cadmium body burden may increase risk of AMD, particularly among non-Hispanic white individuals; however, additional studies are needed before firm conclusions can be drawn. - Highlights: • We examined the association of cadmium and lead with age

  15. Environmental cadmium and lead exposures and age-related macular degeneration in U.S. adults: The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005 to 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Erin W. [Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Schaumberg, Debra A. [Division of Preventive Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School and Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States); Center for Translational Medicine, Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Park, Sung Kyun, E-mail: sungkyun@umich.edu [Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a complex disease resulting from the interplay of genetic predisposition and environmental exposures, and has been linked to oxidative stress and inflammatory mechanisms. Lead and cadmium can accumulate in human retinal tissues and may damage the retina through oxidative stress, and may thereby play a role in the development of AMD. We examined associations between blood lead, blood cadmium, and urinary cadmium concentrations and the presence of AMD in 5390 participants aged 40 years and older with blood lead and blood cadmium measures and a subsample of 1548 with urinary cadmium measures in the 2005–2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys. AMD was identified by grading retinal photographs with a modification of the Wisconsin Age-Related Maculopathy Grading System. The weighted prevalence of AMD was 6.6% (n=426). Controlling for age, gender, race/ethnicity, education and body mass index, adults in the highest blood cadmium quartile had higher odds of AMD compared to the lowest quartile (odds ratio [OR], 1.56; 95% CI, 1.02–2.40), with a significant trend across quartiles (p-trend=0.02). After further adjustment for pack-years of cigarette smoking, estimates were somewhat attenuated (OR, 1.43; 95% CI, 0.91–2.27; p-trend=0.08). Similar associations were found with urinary cadmium. The association between urinary cadmium and AMD was stronger in non-Hispanic whites (NHW) than in non-Hispanic blacks (NHB) (OR, 3.31; 95% CI, 1.37–8.01 for levels above versus below the median among NHW; OR,1.45; 95% CI, 0.40–5.32 for levels above versus below the median among NHB; p-interaction=0.03). We found no association between blood lead levels and AMD. Higher cadmium body burden may increase risk of AMD, particularly among non-Hispanic white individuals; however, additional studies are needed before firm conclusions can be drawn. - Highlights: • We examined the association of cadmium and lead with age

  16. What is new in the management of wet age-related macular degeneration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaprasad, Sobha; Hykin, Philip

    2013-01-01

    The hallmark of wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is choroidal neovascularization (CNV). The key cytokine involved in the pathogenesis of CNV is vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Since 2005, antiVEGF therapy has revolutionized the management of this condition. A systematic computerized literature search was conducted on PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/). AntiVEGF therapy has resulted in improvement in visual function and performance. Currently, practitioners are spoilt for choice of these agents. Bevacizumab is unlicensed for intraocular use but has a better market share than ranibizumab in the treatment of wet AMD as it is approximately 40 times cheaper than ranibizumab, if aliquoted into smaller doses for intraocular use. This has stirred up questions on indemnity, safety, dosing, treatment regimen and quality control, despite the fact that well-designed clinical trials have shown that both drugs are equally effective. Another dilemma for the physicians is the choice of treatment regimens with antiVEGF agents that include fixed dosing, optical coherence tomography (OCT)-guided re-treatment, treat and extend or a combination of proactive and reactive dosing. Real-life outcomes of physician-dependent OCT-guided re-treatment with these agents are inferior to outcomes reported in clinical trials. A recently food and drug administration-approved antiVEGF agent, aflibercept, is rapidly becoming a popular choice as well-designed randomized clinical trials indicate that eight weekly fixed dosing of aflibercept is non-inferior to monthly ranibizumab. Options for reducing the frequency of repeated intravitreal injections are being explored. Combination therapy with photodynamic therapy and epimacular brachytherapy seem scientifically plausible due to their synergistic effects. However, so far the results on these combinations have not shown any superior visual outcomes to antiVEGF monotherapy, and the practicalities of delivering these

  17. Serological association of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection with age-related macular degeneration: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueyu Chen

    Full Text Available We investigated the serological association of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection with age-related macular degeneration (AMD.A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed. PubMed, Embase, Web of Science and the Association of Research in Vision and Ophthalmology abstracts were searched to identify studies investigating the serological association of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection with age-related macular degeneration. The quality of original studies was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa scale. Heterogeneity was explored with meta-regression. The odds ratios (ORs and standardized mean differences (SMD of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection between AMD patients and controls were pooled.In total, 9 studies met the inclusion criteria using the Newcastle-Ottawa scale scores ranging from 4 to 9. There was heterogeneity among studies due to a difference in the study designs and measurement of exposure to Chlamydia pneumoniae infection. The overall OR of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection with AMD was 1.11 (95% confidence interval: 0.78-1.57, P = 0.56. The overall SMD of antibody titer between AMD and control was 0.43 (95% confidence interval: -0.12 to 0.99, P = 0.13.Evidence from the current published literature suggested no statistically significant association between Chlamydia pneumoniae infection and AMD.

  18. Serological association of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection with age-related macular degeneration: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xueyu; Jhanji, Vishal; Chen, Chupeng; Chen, Haoyu

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the serological association of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed. PubMed, Embase, Web of Science and the Association of Research in Vision and Ophthalmology abstracts were searched to identify studies investigating the serological association of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection with age-related macular degeneration. The quality of original studies was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa scale. Heterogeneity was explored with meta-regression. The odds ratios (ORs) and standardized mean differences (SMD) of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection between AMD patients and controls were pooled. In total, 9 studies met the inclusion criteria using the Newcastle-Ottawa scale scores ranging from 4 to 9. There was heterogeneity among studies due to a difference in the study designs and measurement of exposure to Chlamydia pneumoniae infection. The overall OR of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection with AMD was 1.11 (95% confidence interval: 0.78-1.57, P = 0.56). The overall SMD of antibody titer between AMD and control was 0.43 (95% confidence interval: -0.12 to 0.99, P = 0.13). Evidence from the current published literature suggested no statistically significant association between Chlamydia pneumoniae infection and AMD.

  19. Mitochondrial and Nuclear DNA Damage and Repair in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Blasiak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aging and oxidative stress seem to be the most important factors in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD, a condition affecting many elderly people in the developed world. However, aging is associated with the accumulation of oxidative damage in many biomolecules, including DNA. Furthermore, mitochondria may be especially important in this process because the reactive oxygen species produced in their electron transport chain can damage cellular components. Therefore, the cellular response to DNA damage, expressed mainly through DNA repair, may play an important role in AMD etiology. In several studies the increase in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA damage and mutations, and the decrease in the efficacy of DNA repair have been correlated with the occurrence and the stage of AMD. It has also been shown that mitochondrial DNA accumulates more DNA lesions than nuclear DNA in AMD. However, the DNA damage response in mitochondria is executed by nucleus-encoded proteins, and thus mutagenesis in nuclear DNA (nDNA may affect the ability to respond to mutagenesis in its mitochondrial counterpart. We reported that lymphocytes from AMD patients displayed a higher amount of total endogenous basal and oxidative DNA damage, exhibited a higher sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide and UV radiation, and repaired the lesions induced by these factors less effectively than did cells from control individuals. We postulate that poor efficacy of DNA repair (i.e., is impaired above average for a particular age when combined with the enhanced sensitivity of retinal pigment epithelium cells to environmental stress factors, contributes to the pathogenesis of AMD. Collectively, these data suggest that the cellular response to both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA damage may play an important role in AMD pathogenesis.

  20. Maculoplasty for age-related macular degeneration: reengineering Bruch's membrane and the human macula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Priore, Lucian V; Tezel, Tongalp H; Kaplan, Henry J

    2006-11-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the western world. Over the last decade, there have been significant advances in the management of exudative AMD with the introduction of anti-VEGF drugs; however, many patients with exudative AMD continue to lose vision and there are no effective treatments for advanced exudative AMD or geographic atrophy. Initial attempts at macular reconstruction using cellular transplantation have not been effective in reversing vision loss. Herein we discuss the current status of surgical attempts to reconstruct damaged subretinal anatomy in advanced AMD. We reinforce the concept of maculoplasty for advanced AMD, which is defined as reconstruction of macular anatomy in patients with advanced vision loss. Successful maculoplasty is a three-step process that includes replacing or repairing damaged cells (using transplantation, translocation or stimulation of autologous cell proliferation); immune suppression (if allografts are used to replace damaged cells); and reconstruction or replacement of Bruch's membrane (to restore the integrity of the substrate for proper cell attachment). In the current article we will review the rationale for maculoplasty in advanced AMD, and discuss the results of initial clinical attempts at macular reconstruction. We will then discuss the role of Bruch's membrane damage in limiting transplant survival and visual recovery, and discuss the effects of age-related changes within human Bruch's membrane on the initial attachment and subsequent proliferation of transplanted cells. We will discuss attempts to repair Bruch's membrane by coating with extracellular matrix ligands, anatomic reconstitution of the inner collagen layer, and the effects of Bruch's membrane reconstruction of ultrastuctural anatomy and subsequent cell behavior. Lastly, we will emphasize the importance of continued efforts required for successful maculoplasty.

  1. Intraocular Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Levels in Pachychoroid Neovasculopathy and Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Masayuki; Yamashiro, Kenji; Ooto, Sotaro; Oishi, Akio; Tamura, Hiroshi; Miyata, Manabu; Ueda-Arakawa, Naoko; Takahashi, Ayako; Tsujikawa, Akitaka; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the difference in intraocular vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) concentration between pachychoroid neovasculopathy and neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) and its associations with responses to three monthly anti-VEGF injections as an initial treatment for the two conditions. This study included nine eyes with treatment-naïve pachychoroid neovasculopathy and 21 eyes with treatment-naïve nAMD. Before the initial intravitreal anti-VEGF injection, aqueous humor samples were collected and the concentration of VEGF was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The concentration was compared between the two conditions, and its associations with responses to anti-VEGF therapy were investigated. The mean VEGF concentration in pachychoroid neovasculopathy was significantly lower than that in nAMD (63.4 ± 17.8 pg/ml and 89.8 ± 45.0 pg/ml, respectively; P = 0.035). The VEGF concentration was associated with the presence or absence of drusen (β = 0.503, P = 0.004). After anti-VEGF therapy, 6 (66.7%) of 9 eyes with pachychoroid neovasculopathy and 17 (81.0%) of 21 eyes with nAMD achieved dry macula (P = 0.640). Dry macula at 3 months and 12 months was significantly associated with a low VEGF concentration in pachychoroid neovasculopathy (P = 0.013 and P = 0.042, respectively), but not in nAMD (P = 0.108 and P = 0.219). The mean VEGF concentration in pachychoroid neovasculopathy was lower than that in nAMD, suggesting that the way in which VEGF is involved in angiogenesis may differ between pachychoroid neovasculopathy and nAMD.

  2. Plasma levels of hypoxia-regulated factors in patients with age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioanna, Zygoula; Christian, Schori; Christian, Grimm; Daniel, Barthelmes

    2018-02-01

    Various hypoxia-related proteins are differentially expressed in the retina and secreted to the vitreous and/or aqueous humor of patients affected by dry or neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD). To determine whether these conditions alter concentrations of cytokines also in the systemic circulation, we measured plasma levels of six hypoxia-related proteins. Plasma was prepared from EDTA blood that was collected from patients affected by dry AMD (n = 5), nAMD (n = 11), proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR; n = 9), and patients with an epiretinal membrane (ERM; n = 11). ERM samples served as negative controls, PDR samples as positive controls. Protein concentrations of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), erythropoietin (EPO), angiopoietin-like 4 (ANGPTL4), placental growth factor (PlGF), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The concentration of PlGF was significantly increased in plasma of patients affected by nAMD. Although no statistically significant differences were found for EPO, ANGPTL4, PlGF, TNF-α, and PEDF, the mean concentration of VEGF was lowest in the nAMD group. Plasma concentrations of the six factors did not correlate with gender or age of patients. nAMD may increase plasma concentrations of PlGF, making it a candidate as a biomarker for the neovascular form of AMD. Other factors, however, were not differentially regulated, suggesting that their systemic concentrations are not generally increased in hypoxia-related retinal diseases.

  3. Exploring the cross talk between ER stress and inflammation in age-related macular degeneration.

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    Samira Kheitan

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence demonstrates that inflammation and endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress is implicated in the development and progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD, a multifactorial neurodegenerative disease. However the cross talk between these cellular mechanisms has not been clearly and fully understood. The present study investigates a possible intersection between ER stress and inflammation in AMD. In this study, we recruited two collections of involved protein markers to retrieve their interaction information from IMEx-curated databases, which are the most well- known protein-protein interaction collections, allowing us to design an intersection network for AMD that is unprecedented. In order to find expression activated subnetworks, we utilized AMD expression profiles in our network. In addition, we studied topological characteristics of the most expressed active subnetworks to identify the hubs. With regard to topological quantifications and expressional activity, we reported a list of the most pivotal hubs which are potentially applicable as probable therapeutic targets. Furthermore, we introduced MAPK signaling pathway as a significantly involved pathway in the association between ER stress and inflammation, leading to promising new directions in discovering AMD formation mechanisms and possible treatments.

  4. Exploring the cross talk between ER stress and inflammation in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheitan, Samira; Minuchehr, Zarrin; Soheili, Zahra-Soheila

    2017-01-01

    Increasing evidence demonstrates that inflammation and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is implicated in the development and progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a multifactorial neurodegenerative disease. However the cross talk between these cellular mechanisms has not been clearly and fully understood. The present study investigates a possible intersection between ER stress and inflammation in AMD. In this study, we recruited two collections of involved protein markers to retrieve their interaction information from IMEx-curated databases, which are the most well- known protein-protein interaction collections, allowing us to design an intersection network for AMD that is unprecedented. In order to find expression activated subnetworks, we utilized AMD expression profiles in our network. In addition, we studied topological characteristics of the most expressed active subnetworks to identify the hubs. With regard to topological quantifications and expressional activity, we reported a list of the most pivotal hubs which are potentially applicable as probable therapeutic targets. Furthermore, we introduced MAPK signaling pathway as a significantly involved pathway in the association between ER stress and inflammation, leading to promising new directions in discovering AMD formation mechanisms and possible treatments.

  5. Ex Vivo Confocal Spectroscopy of Autofluorescence in Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Kaluzny

    Full Text Available We investigated the autofluorescence (AF signature of the microscopic features of retina with age-related macular degeneration (AMD using 488 nm excitation.The globes of four donors with AMD and four age-matched controls were embedded in paraffin and sectioned through the macula. Sections were excited using a 488 nm argon laser, and the AF emission was captured using a laser scanning confocal microscope (496-610 nm, 6 nm resolution. The data cubes were then analyzed to compare peak emission spectra between the AMD and the controls. Microscopic features, including individual lipofuscin and melanolipofuscin granules, Bruch's Membrane, as well macroscopic features, were considered.Overall, the AMD eyes showed a trend of blue-shifted emission peaks compared with the controls. These differences were statistically significant when considering the emission of the combined RPE/Bruch's Membrane across all the tissue cross-sections (p = 0.02.The AF signatures of ex vivo AMD RPE/BrM show blue-shifted emission spectra (488 nm excitation compared with the control tissue. The magnitude of these differences is small (~4 nm and highlights the potential challenges of detecting these subtle spectral differences in vivo.

  6. Small Drusen and Age-Related Macular Degeneration: The Beaver Dam Eye Study

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    Ronald Klein

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We tested the hypothesis that large areas of small hard drusen (diameter <63 µm and intermediate drusen (diameter 63–124 µm are associated with the incidence of age-related macular degeneration (AMD. Eyes of 3344 older adults with at least two consecutive visits spaced five years apart over a 20-year period were included. A 6-level severity scale, including no drusen, four levels of increasing area (from minimal (<2596 µm² to large (>9086 µm² of only small hard drusen, and intermediate drusen, was used. The five-year incidence of AMD was 3% in eyes at the start of the interval with no, minimal, small, and moderate areas of only small drusen and 5% and 25% for eyes with large area of only small drusen and intermediate drusen, respectively. Compared to eyes with a moderate area of small drusen, the odds ratio (OR of developing AMD in eyes with a large area of only small drusen was 1.8 (p < 0.001. Compared to eyes with large area of only small drusen, eyes with intermediate drusen had an OR of 5.5 (p < 0.001 of developing AMD. Our results are consistent with our hypothesis that large areas of only small drusen are associated with the incidence of AMD.

  7. [Potential of melatonin for prevention of age-related macular degeneration: experimental study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanova, N A; Zhdankina, A A; Fursova, A Zh; Kolosova, N G

    2013-01-01

    Decline with age of the content of melatonin is considered as one of the leading mechanisms of aging and development of associated diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD)--the disease, which becomes the most common cause of blindness and acuity of vision deterioration in elderly. The prospects of the use of melatonin in the prevention of AMD is being actively discussed, but as a rule on the basis of the results of the experiments on cells in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). We showed previously that the senescence-accelerated OXYS rat is an adequate animal model of AMD, already used for identifying the relevant therapeutic targets. Here we have investigated the effect of Melatonin (Melaksen, 0,004 mg per kg--a dose equivalent to the recommended one for people) on the development of retinopathy similar to AMD in OXYS rats. Ophthalmoscopic examinations show that Melatonin supplementation decreased the incidence and severity of retinopathy and improved some (but not all) histological abnormalities associated with retinopathy. Thus, melatonin prevented the structural and functional changes in RPE cells, reduced the severity of microcirculatory disorders. Importantly, Melatonin prevented destruction of neurosensory cells, associative and gangliolar neurons in the retina. Taken together, our data suggest the therapeutic potential of Melatonin for treatment and prevention of AMD.

  8. Benefits, Potential Harms, and Optimal Use of Nutritional Supplementation for Preventing Progression of Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Fernandez, Carlos H; Tyber, Kevin

    2017-03-01

    To briefly review age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the main findings from the Age Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) report number 8 on the use of nutritional supplements for AMD, and to focus on data suggesting that supplement use should be guided using genetic testing of AMD risk genes. A literature search (January 2001 through October 26, 2016) was conducted using MEDLINE and the following MeSH terms: Antioxidants/therapeutic use, Genotype, Macular Degeneration/drug therapy, Macular degeneration/genetics, Dietary Supplements, Proteins/genetics, and Zinc Compounds/therapeutic use. Bibliographies of publications identified were also reviewed. English-language studies assessing AREDS supplement response in patients with AMD in relation to complement factor H gene ( CFH) and age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2 gene ( ARMS2) risk alleles were evaluated. Three of the 4 studies demonstrated a treatment interaction between ARMS2 and CFH genotypes and a differential response to supplements. The fourth study documented an interaction for the CFH genotype only. Reported response interactions included attenuated response, no response, and good response, whereas a subset showed increased progression of AMD. Conversely, one study reported no interactions between CFH and ARMS2 risk alleles and response to supplements. The weight of the evidence supports using genetic testing to guide selection of ocular vitamin use. This approach will avoid using supplements that could speed the progression of AMD in vulnerable patients, avoid using supplements that will have little to no effect in others, and result in appropriately using supplements in those that are likely to derive meaningful benefits.

  9. Prevalence of subretinal drusenoid deposits in older persons with and without age-related macular degeneration, by multimodal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarubina, Anna V.; Neely, David C.; Clark, Mark E.; Huisingh, Carrie E.; Samuels, Brian C.; Zhang, Yuhua; McGwin, Gerald; Owsley, Cynthia; Curcio, Christine A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess the prevalence of subretinal drusenoid deposits (SDD) in older adults with healthy maculas and early and intermediate age-related macular degeneration (AMD) using multimodal imaging. Design Cross-sectional study. Participants A total of 651 subjects aged ≥60 years enrolled in the Alabama Study of Early Age-Related Macular Degeneration from primary care ophthalmology clinics. Methods Subjects were imaged using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) of the macula and optic nerve head (ONH), infrared reflectance, fundus autofluorescence, and color fundus photographs (CFP). Eyes were assessed for AMD presence and severity using the AREDS 9-step scale. Criteria for SDD presence were identification on ≥1 en-face modality plus SD-OCT or on ≥2 en-face modalities if absent on SD-OCT. SDD were considered present at the person-level if present in 1 or both eyes. Main outcomes measures Prevalence of SDD in participants with and without AMD. Results Overall prevalence of SDD was 32% (197/611), with 62% (122/197) affected in both eyes. Persons with SDD were older than those without SDD (70.6 vs. 68.7 years, p =0.0002). Prevalence of SDD was 23% in subjects without AMD and 52% in subjects with AMD (pmaculae and in more than half of persons with early to intermediate AMD, even by stringent criteria. The prevalence of SDD is strongly associated with AMD presence and severity and increases with age, and its retinal topography including peripapillary involvement resembles that of rod photoreceptors. Consensus on SDD detection methods is recommended to advance our knowledge of this lesion and its clinical and biologic significance. PMID:26875000

  10. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN VISUAL FUNCTION AND SUBRETINAL DRUSENOID DEPOSITS IN NORMAL AND EARLY AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION EYES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neely, David; Zarubina, Anna V; Clark, Mark E; Huisingh, Carrie E; Jackson, Gregory R; Zhang, Yuhua; McGwin, Gerald; Curcio, Christine A; Owsley, Cynthia

    2017-07-01

    To examine the association between subretinal drusenoid deposits (SDDs) identified by multimodal retinal imaging and visual function in older eyes with normal macular health or in the earliest phases of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Age-related macular degeneration status for each eye was defined according to the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) 9-step classification system (normal = Step 1, early AMD = Steps 2-4) based on color fundus photographs. Visual functions measured were best-corrected photopic visual acuity, contrast and light sensitivity, mesopic visual acuity, low-luminance deficit, and rod-mediated dark adaptation. Subretinal drusenoid deposits were identified through multimodal imaging (color fundus photographs, infrared reflectance and fundus autofluorescence images, and spectral domain optical coherence tomography). The sample included 1,202 eyes (958 eyes with normal health and 244 eyes with early AMD). In normal eyes, SDDs were not associated with any visual function evaluated. In eyes with early AMD, dark adaptation was markedly delayed in eyes with SDDs versus no SDD (a 4-minute delay on average), P = 0.0213. However, this association diminished after age adjustment, P = 0.2645. Other visual functions in early AMD eyes were not associated with SDDs. In a study specifically focused on eyes in normal macular health and in the earliest phases of AMD, early AMD eyes with SDDs have slower dark adaptation, largely attributable to the older ages of eyes with SDD; they did not exhibit deficits in other visual functions. Subretinal drusenoid deposits in older eyes in normal macular health are not associated with any visual functions evaluated.

  11. Implementation studies of ranibizumab for neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Sara Brandi

    2013-11-01

    comparing our results with other pro re nata regimens based on a monthly reassessment of disease activity that our patients could gain substantial vision if we optimized our frequency of re-examinations. The analysis demonstrated that we could discontinue treatment in patients who had a poor visual acuity during the first 3 months of treatment and that visual outcome could be improved by minimizing the delay from diagnosis of neovascular AMD to first administered ranibizumab injection. This study led to changes in departmental treatment procedures. In the second study, we found that type 2 CNV lesions had a higher hazard ratio as compared to type 1 CNV lesions in developing subfoveal fibrosis. Prominent subfoveal fibrous tissue and fibrous tissue with retinal atrophy led to poorer visual performances in eyes with neovascular AMD after 2 years of treatment as compared with eyes without subfoveal fibrous tissue. In the development of randomized clinical trials designed to address how treatment with VEGF inhibitors can be improved by limiting the growth of subfoveal fibrous tissue or neuroretinal atrophy, it is important to define subgroups of eyes at risk of these pathological changes. The second PhD study has contributed to identify this subgroup of eyes. The third study included in this PhD thesis revealed that the annual incidence rate of AMD-related legally blind persons registered in Denmark has halved during the last decade, with the bulk of the reduction observed after the introduction of ranibizumab for neovascular AMD.

  12. Smoking,serum antioxidant vitamin levels and age-related macular degeneration

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    Sezen Akkaya Çakir

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate associations between the grades of age related macular degeneration(AMDand serum levels of antioxidant vitamins(vitamin A, C and Eand smoking. METHODS: Fifty-three AMD patients and 31 individuals having ages matching with the patient group were enrolled the study. Colored fundus photographs of the macula were used to place participants(n=84into one of the five groups(Grade I-Vbased on the frequency and severity of the lesions associated with AMD. Serum antioxidant vitamin levels were measured using High Performance Liquid Chromatography(HPLC. Smoking status was classified as non-smoker, ex-smoker and current smoker. Total number of packs smoked per year, was defined.RESULTS: The distribution of vitamin A, E, and C levels were 0.874±0.326mg/L, 10.739±4.874mg/L, 1.737±0.447mg/L in control group and 0.880±0.305mg/L, 9.487±6.060mg/L, 1.870±2.191mg/L in AMD group, respectively. The difference between AMD and control group was not statistically significant for vitamin A, E and C levels(P>0.05. There were no significant differences between subgroups of AMD for vitamin A(P=0.881and vitamin E(P=0.293but there was a contradicting rise of vitamin C levels(P=0.044with increasing levels of the disease. There were no significant differences between AMD and control group regarding smoking status, but there was a significant difference for total number of packs smoked per year(P=0.02. An increase of number of total packs smoked per year was determined along with the rising grade of AMD(P=0.007. CONCLUSION: We found no relation between AMD and serum levels of vitamin A and E but vitamin C levels was increase with AMD grades unexpectedly. We found dose-response relationship between smoking and AMD.

  13. Risk factors for exudative age-related macular degeneration in a large French case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerbib, Jennyfer; Delcourt, Cécile; Puche, Nathalie; Querques, Giuseppe; Cohen, Salomon Yves; Sahel, José; Korobelnik, Jean-François; Le Goff, Mélanie; Souied, Eric H

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of the CAP (Creteil AMD PHRC-funded) Study was to analyze risk factors of exudative age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in a large French case-control population. One thousand and twenty-four patients with exudative AMD and 275 controls were recruited. Information about lifestyle, medical history, and dietary intake were collected. Associations of risk factors were estimated using logistic regression. After multivariate adjustment, CFH Y402H and ARMS2 A69S polymorphisms were associated with very high risk for exudative AMD (OR = 6.21 and OR = 11.7, respectively, p cooking oils rich in omega 3 fatty acids was significantly associated with a reduced risk of exudative AMD (OR = 0.55, 95 % CI: 0.36-0.84, p = 0.006), as well as a high consumption of fruits (OR = 0.60, 95 % CI: 0.37-0.98, p = 0.04), but not the consumption of fish, vegetables or oils rich in omega 6. High waist circumference was associated with increased risk for exudative AMD (OR = 2.53, p cooking oils harboring a beneficial omega-3 fatty acid profile.

  14. Mechanism of Inflammation in Age-Related Macular Degeneration: An Up-to-Date on Genetic Landmarks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Parmeggiani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the most common cause of irreversible visual impairment among people over 50 years of age, accounting for up to 50% of all cases of legal blindness in Western countries. Although the aging represents the main determinant of AMD, it must be considered a multifaceted disease caused by interactions among environmental risk factors and genetic backgrounds. Mounting evidence and/or arguments document the crucial role of inflammation and immune-mediated processes in the pathogenesis of AMD. Proinflammatory effects secondary to chronic inflammation (e.g., alternative complement activation and heterogeneous types of oxidative stress (e.g., impaired cholesterol homeostasis can result in degenerative damages at the level of crucial macular structures, that is photoreceptors, retinal pigment epithelium, and Bruch’s membrane. In the most recent years, the association of AMD with genes, directly or indirectly, involved in immunoinflammatory pathways is increasingly becoming an essential core for AMD knowledge. Starting from the key basic-research notions detectable at the root of AMD pathogenesis, the present up-to-date paper reviews the best-known and/or the most attractive genetic findings linked to the mechanisms of inflammation of this complex disease.

  15. A thermographic study on eyes affected by Age-related Macular Degeneration: Comparison among various forms of the pathology and analysis of risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteoli, Sara; Finocchio, Lucia; Biagini, Ilaria; Giacomelli, Giovanni; Sodi, Andrea; Corvi, Andrea; Virgili, Gianni; Rizzo, Stanislao

    2016-05-01

    The aims of this study are to investigate (1) the ocular thermographic profiles in eyes affected by Age related Macular Degeneration (AMD) and age-matched controls to detect possible hemodynamic abnormalities that could be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease, (2) whether any risk factors associated with the disease could affect the development of a form of AMD rather than another. Thirty-four eyes with Age-Related Maculopathy (ARM), 41 eyes with dry AMD, 60 eyes affected by wet AMD, and 74 eyes with fibrotic AMD were included in the study. The control group consisted of 48 healthy eyes. Exclusion criteria were represented by any other ocular diseases other than AMD, tear film abnormalities, systemic cardiovascular abnormalities, systemic diseases and a body temperature higher than 37.5 °C. A total of 210 eyes without pupil dilation were investigated by infrared thermography (FLIR A320). The Ocular Surface Temperature (OST) of five ocular areas was calculated by means of an image processing technique from the infrared images. Two-sample t-test, one-way ANOVA test and multivariate analysis were used for statistical analyses. ANOVA analyses showed no significant differences among AMD groups (P-value > 0.05), however, OST in AMD patients was significantly lower than in controls (P-value < 0.0001). Smokers showed higher possibility (P-value = 0.012) of developing wet AMD instead of dry AMD. Infrared thermography may be a helpful, non-invasive and not time-consuming method to be used in the management of patients with this common degenerative maculopathy.

  16. Synthesis of AMD3100 for antagonist of CXCR4 and labeled with 99Tcm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gui Yuan; Xu Zhihong; Zhang Xiaojun; Zhang Shuwen; Liu Jian; Tian Jiahe; Zhang Jinming

    2013-01-01

    Most of human tumors over-express CXCR4. AMD3100, a nonpeptide antagonist for CXCR4 receptor, can be used for therapy of those tumors. It was found that metal ion complex, such as Cu 2+ , with AMD3100 enhanced its binding affinity to the receptor 10-fold higher as compared to AMD3100 alone. AMD3100 was synthesis from 3-aminopropyl ethylene diamine. 99 Tc m -AMD3100 was labeled directly. Biodistribution studies were carried out in NH mice. SPECT imaging was performed in Hep-G2 tumor bearing mouse. The synthetic yield was 5.8% from 3-aminopropyl ethylene diamine to AMD3100. The labeling yield of 99 Tc m -AMD3100 was over 98%. Biodistribution studies showed high accumulation of radio- tracer in liver which had high-expression of CXCR4. SPECT imaging results showed that uptake in Hep-G2 tumor was high. The results showed that 99 Tc m -AMD3100 was an attractive candidate for further development of SPECT radiotracer potentially suitable for CXCR4. (authors)

  17. The Revival of a Failed Constructed Wetland Treating of a High Fe Load AMD

    Science.gov (United States)

    A.D. Karathanasis; C.D. Barton

    1999-01-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) from abandoned mines has significantly impaired water quality in eastern Kentucky. A small surface flow wetland constructed in 1989 to reduce AMD effects and subsequently failed after six months of operation was renovated by incorporating anoxic limestone drains (ALDs) and anaerobic subsurface drains promoting vertical flow through successive...

  18. AMD-stability in the presence of first-order mean motion resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, A. C.; Laskar, J.; Boué, G.

    2017-11-01

    The angular momentum deficit (AMD)-stability criterion allows to discriminate between a priori stable planetary systems and systems for which the stability is not granted and needs further investigations. AMD-stability is based on the conservation of the AMD in the averaged system at all orders of averaging. While the AMD criterion is rigorous, the conservation of the AMD is only granted in absence of mean-motion resonances (MMR). Here we extend the AMD-stability criterion to take into account mean-motion resonances, and more specifically the overlap of first-order MMR. If the MMR islands overlap, the system will experience generalized chaos leading to instability. The Hamiltonian of two massive planets on coplanar quasi-circular orbits can be reduced to an integrable one degree of freedom problem for period ratios close to a first-order MMR. We use the reduced Hamiltonian to derive a new overlap criterion for first-order MMR. This stability criterion unifies the previous criteria proposed in the literature and admits the criteria obtained for initially circular and eccentric orbits as limit cases. We then improve the definition of AMD-stability to take into account the short term chaos generated by MMR overlap. We analyze the outcome of this improved definition of AMD-stability on selected multi-planet systems from the Extrasolar Planets Encyclopædia.

  19. Analysis OpenMP performance of AMD and Intel architecture for breaking waves simulation using MPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamsyah, M. N. A.; Utomo, A.; Gunawan, P. H.

    2018-03-01

    Simulation of breaking waves by using Navier-Stokes equation via moving particle semi-implicit method (MPS) over close domain is given. The results show the parallel computing on multicore architecture using OpenMP platform can reduce the computational time almost half of the serial time. Here, the comparison using two computer architectures (AMD and Intel) are performed. The results using Intel architecture is shown better than AMD architecture in CPU time. However, in efficiency, the computer with AMD architecture gives slightly higher than the Intel. For the simulation by 1512 number of particles, the CPU time using Intel and AMD are 12662.47 and 28282.30 respectively. Moreover, the efficiency using similar number of particles, AMD obtains 50.09 % and Intel up to 49.42 %.

  20. [Economic Short-Term Cost Model for Stereotactic Radiotherapy of Neovascular AMD].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, A S; Reznicek, L; Minartz, C; Ziemssen, F

    2016-08-01

    Stereotactic radiation therapy (Oraya, OT) is available as a second line therapy for patients who, despite intensive anti-VEGF therapy for neovascular AMD, do not show an improvement in CNV. As OT is expensive (5,308 €), the short term economics for starting this therapy were investigated. A short-term cost model was set up in MS Excel with a two year time horizon. On the basis of the data of the randomised, controlled INTREPID pivotal trial and current treatment practice in Germany, the costs were compared of conventional anti-VEGF therapy, with or without a single OT treatment. Patients with an active lesion after initial anti-VEGF therapy and a maximum lesion diameter ≤ 4 mm were included. Modeled cost components/aspects were direct savings from injection number, control follow-up examinations and aids, as well as anti-VEGF switches. Costs for Germany were employed and a univariate sensitivity analysis was performed to address the existing uncertainty. For the patients with a maximum AMD lesion diameter ≤ 4 mm and a macula volume > 7.4 mm(3), the INTREPID trial showed a mean reduction of 3.68 intravitreal injections for 16 Gy radiation versus sham over a time period of 2 years. These 3.68 IVM result in ~ 4,500 € direct cost savings. Moreover, due to the higher response rate with 16 Gy radiation, the number of follow-up visits and aids can be reduced, which results in savings between 207 € and 1,224 € over 2 years. After radiation, fewer anti-VEGF switches for low or non-responders are expected, which is modeled to result in ~ 1.7 fewer injections over 2 years. Due to overall fewer injections, fewer endophthalmitis cases would be expected. However, endophthalmitis and microvascular abnormalities, which can be observed in a few cases, are associated with low or non-quantifiable costs in this cost-cost comparison model. In summary, cost reductions of between 6,400 and 8,500 € are predicted in the model over two years

  1. Novel grid combined with peripheral distortion correction for ultra-widefield image grading of age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oellers P

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Patrick Oellers,1,* Inês Laíns,1,2,* Steven Mach,1 Shady Garas,1 Ivana K Kim,1 Demetrios G Vavvas,1 Joan W Miller,1 Deeba Husain,1 John B Miller1 1Retina Service, Department of Ophthalmology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 2Faculty of Medicine, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: Eyes with age-related macular degeneration (AMD often harbor pathological changes in the retinal periphery and perimacular region. These extramacular changes have not been well classified, but may be phenotypically and functionally relevant. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate a novel grid to systematically study peripheral retinal abnormalities in AMD using geometric distortion-corrected ultra-widefield (UWF imaging.Methods: This is a cross-sectional observational case series. Consecutive patients with AMD without any other coexisting vitreoretinal disease and control patients over age 50 without AMD or any other vitreoretinal disease were imaged using Optos 200 Tx. Captured 200° UWF images were corrected for peripheral geometric distortion using Optos transformation software. A newly developed grid to study perimacular and peripheral abnormalities in AMD was then projected onto the images.Results: Peripheral and perimacular changes such as drusen, retinal pigment epithelium changes and atrophy were found in patients with AMD. The presented grid in conjunction with geometric distortion-corrected UWF images allowed for systematic study of these peripheral changes in AMD.Conclusion: We present a novel grid to study peripheral and posterior pole changes in AMD. The grid is unique in that it adds a perimacular zone, which may be important in characterizing certain phenotypes in AMD. Our UWF images were corrected for geometric peripheral distortion to accurately reflect the anatomical dimensions of the retina. This grid offers a reliable and reproducible foundation

  2. Anxiety and depression in patients with advanced macular degeneration: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cimarolli VR

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Verena R Cimarolli,1 Robin J Casten,2 Barry W Rovner,3–5 Vera Heyl,6 Silvia Sörensen,7,8 Amy Horowitz9 1Research Institute on Aging, Jewish Home Lifecare, New York, NY, USA; 2Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 3Department of Neurology, Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 4Department of Psychiatry, Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 5Department of Ophthalmology, Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 6Institute of Special Education, University of Education, Heidelberg, Germany; 7Warner School of Education and Human Development, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA; 8Department of Ophthalmology, Flaum Eye Institute, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY, USA; 9Graduate School of Social Service, Fordham University, New York, NY, USA Abstract: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD – despite advances in prevention and medical treatment options – remains prevalent among older adults, often resulting in functional losses that negatively affect the mental health of older adults. In particular, the prevalence of both anxiety and depression in patients with AMD is high. Along with medical treatment options, low vision rehabilitation and AMD-specific behavioral and self-management programs have been developed and have demonstrated effectiveness in improving the mental health of AMD patients. This article reviews the prevalence of anxiety and depression in patients with advanced AMD, discusses potential mechanisms accounting for the development of depression and anxiety in AMD patients, presents the state-of the-art of available interventions for addressing anxiety and depression in AMD patients, and delineates recommendations for eye care professionals regarding how to

  3. Laser treatment of drusen to prevent progression to advanced age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virgili, Gianni; Michelessi, Manuele; Parodi, Maurizio B; Bacherini, Daniela; Evans, Jennifer R

    2015-10-23

    Drusen are amorphous yellowish deposits beneath the sensory retina. People with drusen, particularly large drusen, are at higher risk of developing age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The most common complication in AMD is choroidal neovascularisation (CNV), the growth of new blood vessels in the centre of the macula. The risk of CNV is higher among people who are already affected by CNV in one eye.It has been observed clinically that laser photocoagulation of drusen leads to their disappearance and may prevent the occurrence of advanced disease (CNV or geographic atrophy) associated with visual loss. To examine the effectiveness and adverse effects of laser photocoagulation of drusen in AMD. We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (2015, Issue 7), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to August 2015), EMBASE (January 1980 to August 2015), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS) (January 1982 to August 2015), the ISRCTN registry (www.isrctn.com/editAdvancedSearch), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 3 August 2015. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of laser treatment of drusen in AMD in which laser treatment had been compared with no intervention or sham treatment. Two types of trials were included. Some trials studied one eye of each participant (unilateral studies); other studies recruited participants with bilateral drusen and randomised one eye to photocoagulation or control and the fellow eye to the other group. Two review authors independently selected studies and extracted data. We pooled data from unilateral and bilateral

  4. Metallothionein polymorphisms in a Northern Spanish population with neovascular and dry forms of age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Montserrat; Álvarez, Lydia; Fernández, Ángela; González-Iglesias, Héctor; Escribano, Julio; Fernández-Vega, Beatriz; Villota, Eva; Fernández-Vega Cueto, Luis; Fernández-Vega, Álvaro; Coca-Prados, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    To elucidate the potential role of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the metallothionein (MT) genes in Northern Spanish patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). A total of 130 unrelated Northern Spanish natives diagnosed with AMD (46 dry, 35 neovascular, and 49 mixed) and 96 healthy controls, matched by age and ethnicity, were enrolled in a case-control study. DNA was isolated from peripheral blood and genotyped for 14 SNPs located at 5 MT genes (MT1A: rs11076161, rs 11640851, rs8052394, and rs7196890; MT1B: rs8052334, rs964372, and rs7191779; MT1M: rs2270836 and rs9936741; MT2A: rs28366003, rs1610216, rs10636, and rs1580833; MT3: rs45570941) using TaqMan probes. The association study was performed using the HaploView 4.0 software. The allelic and genotypic frequencies analysis revealed that rs28366003 at MT2A gene is significantly associated with dry AMD. The frequency of genotype AG was significantly higher in dry AMD than in control cases (p = 2.65 × 10 -4 ; AG vs. AA) conferring more than ninefold increased risk to dry AMD (OR = 9.39, 95% CI: 2.11-41.72), whereas the genotype AA confers disease protection (OR = 0.82, 95% CI: 0.71-0.95). No statistically significant differences were observed between AMD subjects and controls in the rest of the 14 SNPs analyzed. The present study is the first to investigate the potential association of SNPs at MT genes with susceptibility to AMD. We found a significant association of SNP rs28366003 at MT2A gene with susceptibility to the dry form of AMD in a Northern Spanish population.

  5. Association of exudative age-related macular degeneration with matrix metalloproteinases-2 (-1306 C/T rs243865 gene polymorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasa Liutkeviciene

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a disease of the macula that significantly affects eyesight and leads to irreversible central vision loss. Recent studies have demonstrated that angiogenesis is the most important mechanism of AMD development. It is associated with extracellular remodeling involving different proteolytic systems, among them matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, which play an essential role in the etiopathogenesis of AMD. The main objective of the present study was to determine the relationship between exudative AMD and MMP-2 (-1306 C/T rs243865 polymorphism. Methods: The study enrolled 267 patients with exudative AMD and 318 controls. DNA was extracted from peripheral venous blood leukocytes by commercial kits. Genotyping of MMP-2 (-1306 C/T rs243865 was carried out using real-time polymerase chain reaction method. Results: The analysis of MMP-2 (-1306 C/T polymorphism did not reveal any differences in the distribution of CC, CT, and TT genotypes between the exudative AMD and control groups: 58.8%, 31.5% and 9.7% vs. 59.75%, 33.96% and 6.29%, respectively, P = 0.287. When the study population was subdivided into age groups, MMP-2 (-1306 C/T rs243865 CT genotype showed 5.7-fold increased the risk of exudative AMD development compared to CC and TT genotypes together in younger (<65 years males group (P = 0.05. Conclusion: MMP-2 (-1306 C/T polymorphism is associated with exudative AMD development in younger males.

  6. Analysis on concentration of VEGF in aqueous humor in patients with wAMD after Ranibizumab treating at high altitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui-Juan Guan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To study the concentration of vascular endothelial growth factor(VEGFin aqueous humor in patients with wet age-related macular degeneration(wAMDbefore and after Ranibizumab treating at high altitude and the correlation of VEGF concentration with central fovea macula thickness. METHODS: The patients with wAMD in our hospital from Jun. 2014. to Oct. 2015 were retrospectively analyzed, diagnosed after best corrected visual acuity, intraocular pressure, fundus examination, fundus color photography, fluorescence fundus angiography(FFAand optical coherence tomography(OCTinspection. Seventy- six patients with cataract without choroidal neovascularization(CNVwere selected as control group. In the 76 patients(76 eyes, 46 were male, 30 were female, aged 40-80(55±11.18. The course was 0.3-6mo. The corrected visual acuity was 0.01-0.6. The intraocular press was 15.24±3.12mmHg. The CNV in all cases was within the range of the 500μm in diameter. Under surface anesthesia, Ranibizumab(0.5mgwas injected into vitreous cavity. Before and after injection, aqueous humor was obtained and used to detect the concentration of VEGF through ELISA. Best corrected visual acuity, slit lamp microscope, intraocular pressure, OCT and FFA were observed after treatment. RESULTS:The clinical curative effect is the best at 1mo after treatment with statistical significance(PPPCONCLUSION: For wAMD patients, Ranibizumab injection is effective for it reduces the concentration of VEGF in aqueous humor and the central fovea macula thickness. The VEGF concentration in aqueous humor and foveal retinal thickness has a positive correlation.

  7. The 'Displacing Foods of Modern Commerce' Are the Primary and Proximate Cause of Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Unifying Singular Hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobbe, Chris A; Stojanoska, Marija

    2017-11-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of irreversible vision loss and blindness in developed nations. AMD is anticipated to affect 196 million people worldwide, by 2020. However, the etiology of this disease remains unknown. Aging, genetic, and environmental influences have generally been implicated as major etiologic factors. We sought to examine the hypothesis that consumption of the 'displacing foods of modern commerce,' which equate to processed, nutrient-deficient and potentially toxic foods, may be the primary and proximate cause of AMD. To evaluate this hypothesis, we ran correlative AMD prevalence data against well-known proxy markers of processed food consumption, namely, sugar and vegetable oils, in 25 nations. In twenty-one nations, published studies provided AMD prevalence data and in four Pacific Island nations, practicing ophthalmologists in the regions completed retrospective chart analyses to estimate AMD prevalence in their respective regions. To estimate AMD prevalence historically, an extensive review of published papers and ophthalmic literature was completed. This review indicates that, between the years 1851 and 1930, AMD was a medical rarity worldwide, which then rose modestly in prevalence in the 1930s in the U.S. and U.K, finally elevating to epidemic proportions by 1975 in the U.S. Numerous developed nations have followed suit in recent decades. Simultaneously, between approximately 1880 and 2009, processed, nutrient-deficient foods gradually supplanted and displaced whole, unprocessed, nutrient-dense foods in developed nations, such that by 2009, 63 percent of the American diet was made up of nutrient-deficient foods in the form of refined white flour, added sugars, vegetable oils, and artificially created trans fats. The correlative data in 25 nations shows that increasing sugar and polyunsaturated vegetable oil consumption is invariably associated with new onset or rising prevalence of AMD, generally within about

  8. Interleukin-17 retinotoxicity is prevented by gene transfer of a soluble interleukin-17 receptor acting as a cytokine blocker: implications for age-related macular degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Ardeljan

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a common yet complex retinal degeneration that causes irreversible central blindness in the elderly. Pathology is widely believed to follow loss of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE and photoreceptor degeneration. Here we report aberrant expression of interleukin-17A (IL17A and the receptor IL17RC in the macula of AMD patients. In vitro, IL17A induces RPE cell death characterized by the accumulation of cytoplasmic lipids and autophagosomes with subsequent activation of pro-apoptotic Caspase-3 and Caspase-9. This pathology is reduced by siRNA knockdown of IL17RC. IL17-dependent retinal degeneration in a mouse model of focal retinal degeneration can be prevented by gene therapy with adeno-associated virus vector encoding soluble IL17 receptor. This intervention rescues RPE and photoreceptors in a MAPK-dependent process. The IL17 pathway plays a key role in RPE and photoreceptor degeneration and could hold therapeutic potential in AMD.

  9. Patient-reported utilities in bilateral visual impairment from amblyopia and age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Graaf, Elizabeth S; Despriet, Dominiek D G; Klaver, Caroline C W; Simonsz, Huibert J

    2016-05-17

    Utility of visual impairment caused by amblyopia is important for the cost-effectiveness of screening for amblyopia (lazy eye, prevalence 3-3.5 %). We previously measured decrease of utility in 35-year-old persons with unilateral persistent amblyopia. The current observational case-control study aimed to measure loss of utility in patients with amblyopia with recent decrease of vision in their better eye. As these patients are rare, the sample was supplemented by patients with bilateral age-related macular degeneration with similar decrease of vision. From our out-patient department, two groups of patients with recent deterioration to bilateral visual acuity less than Snellen 0.5 (bilateral visual impairment, BVI) were recruited, with either persistent amblyopia and age-related macular degeneration (AMB + AMD), or with bilateral age-related macular degeneration (BAMD). To measure utility, the time trade-off method and the standard gamble method were applied through interviews. Correlations were sought between utility values and visual acuity, age and Visual Function Questionnaire-25 scores. Seventeen AMB + AMD patients (mean age 72.9 years), and 63 BAMD patients (mean age 79.6 years) were included in the study. Among AMB + AMD, 80 % were willing to trade lifetime in exchange for cure. The overall mean time trade-off utility was 0.925. Among BAMD, 75 % were willing to trade, utility was 0.917. Among AMB + AMD, 38 % accepted risk of death in exchange for cure, overall mean standard gamble utility was 0.999. Among BAMD, 49 % accepted risk of death, utility was 0.998. Utility was not related to visual acuity but it was to age (p = 0.02). Elderly patients with BVI, caused by persistent amblyopia and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) or by bilateral AMD, had an approximately 8 % loss of TTO utility. Notably, the 8 % loss in elderly with BVI differs little from the 3.7 % loss we found previously in 35-year-old persons with unilateral

  10. IFN-alpha antibodies in patients with age-related macular degeneration treated with recombinant human IFN-alpha2a

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ross, Christian; Engler, Claus Bødker; Sander, Birgit

    2002-01-01

    We tested for development of binding and neutralizing antibodies to interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) during IFN-alpha2a therapy of patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) of the eyes. Antibodies were investigated retrospectively in sera of 34 patients treated with 3 x 10(6) IU IFN-alpha2...

  11. Fixation stability and implication for multifocal electroretinography in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration after anti-VEGF treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karen Bjerg; Sjølie, Anne Katrin; Vestergaard, Anders Højslet

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify fixation stability in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) at baseline, 3 and 6 months after anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) treatment and furthermore asses the implications of an unsteady fixation for multifocal...

  12. Roles for the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in protein quality control and signaling in the retina: implications in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    The accumulation of damaged or postsynthetically modified proteins and dysregulation of inflammatory responses and angiogenesis in the retina/RPE are thought be etiologically related to formation of drusen and choroidal neovascularization (CNV), hallmarks of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). T...

  13. IFN-alpha antibodies in patients with age-related macular degeneration treated with recombinant human IFN-alpha2a

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ross, Christian; Engler, Claus Bødker; Sander, Birgit

    2002-01-01

    We tested for development of binding and neutralizing antibodies to interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) during IFN-alpha2a therapy of patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) of the eyes. Antibodies were investigated retrospectively in sera of 34 patients treated with 3 x 10(6) IU IFN-alpha2a...

  14. Targeted Vision Function Goals and Use of Vision Resources in Ophthalmology Patients with Age-Related Macular Degeneration and Comorbid Depressive Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casten, Robin; Rovner, Barry W.; Fontenot, Joseph L.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This study characterizes self-reported functional vision goals and the use of low vision resources (for example, services and devices) in ophthalmology clinic patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and comorbid depressive symptoms. Methods: From July 2009 to February 2013, we assessed 188 consecutive patients (age 65+;…

  15. Evaluation of new and established age-related macular degeneration susceptibility genes in the Women's Health Initiative Sight Exam (WHI-SE) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    To assess whether established and newly reported genetic variants, independent of known lifestyle factors, are associated with the risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) among women participating in the Women's Health Initiative Sight Exam (WHI-SE) Genetic Ancillary Study. This is a multice...

  16. Does eating particular diets alter risk of age-related macular degeneration in users of the Age-Related Eye Disease Study supplements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Recent information suggests that the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) supplement, enhanced intake of omega-3 fatty acids, and diminishing dietary glycemic index (dGI) are protective against advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods: Dietary information was collected a...

  17. A prospective, observational, open-label, multicentre study to investigate the daily treatment practice of ranibizumab in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asten, F. van; Evers-Birkenkamp, K.U.; Lith-Verhoeven, J.J. van; Jong-Hesse, Y. de; Hoppenreijs, V.P.T.; Hommersom, R.F.; Scholten, A.M.; Hoyng, C.B.; Klaver, J.H.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The HELIOS (Health Economics with Lucentis in Observational Settings) study was designed on request of the Dutch Health Authority for an observational study to assess the effectiveness and safety of ranibizumab for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (wet AMD) in daily practice.

  18. A prospective, observational, open-label, multicentre study to investigate the daily treatment practice of ranibizumab in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Asten, Freekje; Evers-Birkenkamp, Kim U.; van Lith-Verhoeven, Janneke J. C.; de Jong-Hesse, Yvonne; Hoppenreijs, Vincent P. T.; Hommersom, Richard F.; Scholten, Agnes M.; Hoyng, Carel B.; Klaver, Johannes H. J.; Klaver, J. H. J.; Hoyng, C. B.; Raijmakers, A. J.; van Lith-Verhoeven, J. J. C.; Rulo, A. H. F.; Verbraak, F. D.; Schlingemann, R. O.; Hommersom, C. F.; de Jong-Hesse, Y.; Bosch-Driessen, E. H.; Smeets, M. H.; Gonçalves, A.; Klomp, H. J.; Hoppenreijs, V. P. T.; Dito, J. J.

    2015-01-01

    The HELIOS (Health Economics with Lucentis in Observational Settings) study was designed on request of the Dutch Health Authority for an observational study to assess the effectiveness and safety of ranibizumab for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (wet AMD) in daily practice. The HELIOS

  19. Joint Analysis of Nuclear and Mitochondrial Variants in Age-Related Macular Degeneration Identifies Novel Loci TRPM1 and ABHD2/RLBP1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Persad, P.J.; Heid, I.M.; Weeks, D.E.; Baird, P.N.; Jong, E.K.; Haines, J.L.; Pericak-Vance, M.A.; Scott, W.K.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Presently, 52 independent nuclear single nucleotide polymorphisms (nSNPs) have been associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) but their effects do not explain all its variance. Genetic interactions between the nuclear and mitochondrial (mt) genome may unearth additional genetic

  20. Polarisation-sensitive OCT is useful for evaluating retinal pigment epithelial lesions in patients with neovascular AMD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütze, Christopher; Teleky, Katharina; Baumann, Bernhard; Pircher, Michael; Götzinger, Erich; Hitzenberger, Christoph K; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula

    2016-03-01

    To examine the reproducibility of lesion dimensions of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) in neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) with polarisation-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT), specifically imaging the RPE. Twenty-six patients (28 eyes) with neovascular AMD were included in this study, and examined by a PS-OCT prototype. Each patient was scanned five times at a 1-day visit. The PS-OCT B-scan located closest to the macular centre presenting with RPE atrophy was identified, and the longitudinal diameter of the lesion was quantified manually using AutoCAD 2008. This procedure was followed for the identical B-scan position in all five scans per eye and patient. Reproducibility of qualitative changes in PS-OCT was evaluated. Interobserver variability was assessed. Results were compared with intensity-based spectral-domain OCT (SD-OCT) imaging. Mean variability of all atrophy lesion dimensions was 0.10 mm (SD±=0.06 mm). Coefficient of variation (SD±/mean) was 0.06 on average (SD±=0.03). Interobserver variability assessment showed a mean difference of 0.02 mm across all patients regarding RPE lesion size evaluation (paired t test: p=0.38). Spearman correlation coefficient was r=0.98, p<0.001. Results revealed a good overall reproducibility of ∼90%. PS-OCT specifically detected the RPE in all eyes compared with conventional intensity-based SD-OCT that was not capable to clearly identify RPE atrophy in 25 eyes (89.3%, p<0.01). PS-OCT offers good reproducibility of RPE atrophy assessment in neovascular AMD, and may be suitable for precise RPE evaluation in clinical practice. PS-OCT unambiguously identifies RPE changes in choroidal neovascularisation compared with intensity-based SD-OCT that does not identify the RPE status reliably. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  1. Outer retinal tubulation as a predictor of the enlargement amount of geographic atrophy in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariri, Amirhossein; Nittala, Muneeswar G; Sadda, SriniVas R

    2015-02-01

    To determine the prognostic value of outer retinal tubulation (ORT) in the enlargement amount of geographic atrophy (GA) in eyes with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Cohort study. One hundred eight fellow untreated eyes of 143 patients with GA resulting from AMD enrolled in the MAHALO study (clinicaltrials.gov identifier, NCT01229215) who completely satisfied the study term and had gradable spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) images obtained at both baseline and month 18 visits. The MAHALO study enrolled 143 subjects into a phase 1b/2 multicenter, randomized, single-masked, sham-injection controlled clinical trial of the safety, tolerability, and evidence of activity of lampalizumab in patients with GA associated with AMD. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography images were obtained at multiple time points in both eyes, although only the baseline and month 18 data of the fellow (nonstudy) eyes were considered in this exploratory analysis. The Cirrus HD-OCT review software was used for automatic segmentation and measurement of GA areas, with manual correction of segmentation errors by certified OCT graders. Baseline OCT images also were assessed for the presence of ORT. The enlargement amount of GA in eyes with ORT was compared with that of eyes without ORT. Comparison of the enlargement amount of GA in eyes with and without ORT. Twenty-four of these 108 eyes demonstrated evidence of ORT. The amount of enlargement of GA in eyes with ORT was significantly slower than that of eyes without ORT (1.85±0.78 vs. 2.67±1.61; P = 0.001). This difference remained significant when considering subgroups with unifocal or multifocal GA lesions, because eyes with ORT in both subgroups had a slower enlargement amount of GA than eyes without ORT (2.91±1.70 vs. 2.08±0.88 [P = 0.01], in eyes with multifocal GA lesions; and 2.24±1.40 vs. 1.63±0.57 [P = 0.02], in eyes with unifocal GA lesions). In eyes with ORT, GA lesions seem to enlarge at a

  2. Removal of phosphorus from wastewater using ferroxysorb sorption media produced from amd sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibrell, P.L.; Tucker, T.W.; Kehler, T.; Fletcher, J.W.

    2008-01-01

    Treatment of acid mine drainage (AMD), whether with lime, limestone, caustic or simple aeration, nearly always results in generation of a metal hydroxide sludge. Disposal of the sludge often constitutes a significant fraction of the operating cost for the AMD treatment plant. Research at the USGS - Leetown Science Center has shown that AMD sludge, with its high content of aluminum and iron oxides, has a high affinity of phosphorus (P). Anthropogenic sources of P are associated with eutrophication and degradation of aquatic environments, resulting in anoxic dead zones in certain sensitive waterways. In this paper, we describe a method of converting the AMD sludge from a liability into an asset - Ferroxysorb P removal media - which can be used to remove excess P from wastewater. Three different Ferroxysorb media samples were produced from differing AMD sources and tested for P removal. Adsorption isotherms confirmed that the media had a high sorption capacity for P, as high as 19,000 mg/kg. The technology was demonstrated at an active fish hatchery, where the media remained in service for over three months without stripping or regeneration. Over that period of time, the calculated P removal was 50%, even at a very low influent P concentration of 60 parts per billion. In summary, use of the AMD-derived Ferroxysorb sorption media will reduce AMD treatment costs while at the same time helping to resolve the pressing environmental issue of eutrophication and degradation of sensitive waterways.

  3. Interaction of complement factor h and fibulin3 in age-related macular degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Keith Wyatt

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a major cause of vision loss. It is associated with development of characteristic plaque-like deposits (soft drusen in Bruch's membrane basal to the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE. A sequence variant (Y402H in short consensus repeat domain 7 (SCR7 of complement factor H (CFH is associated with risk for "dry" AMD. We asked whether the eye-targeting of this disease might be related to specific interactions of CFH SCR7 with proteins expressed in the aging human RPE/choroid that could contribute to protein deposition in drusen. Yeast 2-hybrid (Y2H screens of a retinal pigment epithelium/choroid library derived from aged donors using CFH SCR7 baits detected an interaction with EFEMP1/Fibulin 3 (Fib3, which is the locus for an inherited macular degeneration and also accumulates basal to macular RPE in AMD. The CFH/Fib3 interaction was validated by co-immunoprecipitation of native proteins. Quantitative Y2H and ELISA assays with different recombinant protein constructs both demonstrated higher affinity for Fib3 for the disease-related CFH 402H variant. Immuno-labeling revealed colocalization of CFH and Fib3 in globular deposits within cholesterol-rich domains in soft drusen in two AMD donors homozygous for CFH 402H (H/H. This pattern of labeling was quite distinct from those seen in examples of eyes with Y/Y and H/Y genotypes. The CFH 402H/Fib3 interaction could contribute to the development of pathological aggregates in soft drusen in some patients and as such might provide a target for therapeutic intervention in some forms of AMD.

  4. Age-related macular degeneration and modification of systemic complement factor H production through liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandhadia, Samir; Hakobyan, Svetlana; Heng, Ling Z; Gibson, Jane; Adams, David H; Alexander, Graeme J; Gibson, Jonathan M; Martin, Keith R; Menon, Geeta; Nash, Kathryn; Sivaprasad, Sobha; Ennis, Sarah; Cree, Angela J; Morgan, B Paul; Lotery, Andrew J

    2013-08-01

    To investigate whether modification of liver complement factor H (CFH) production, by alteration of liver CFH Y402H genotype through liver transplantation (LT), influences the development of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Multicenter, cross-sectional study. We recruited 223 Western European patients ≥ 55 years old who had undergone LT ≥ 5 years previously. We determined AMD status using a standard grading system. Recipient CFH Y402H genotype was obtained from DNA extracted from recipient blood samples. Donor CFH Y402H genotype was inferred from recipient plasma CFH Y402H protein allotype, measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. This approach was verified by genotyping donor tissue from a subgroup of patients. Systemic complement activity was ascertained by measuring levels of plasma complement proteins using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, including substrates (C3, C4), activation products (C3a, C4a, and terminal complement complex), and regulators (total CFH, C1 inhibitor). We evaluated AMD status and recipient and donor CFH Y402H genotype. In LT patients, AMD was associated with recipient CFH Y402H genotype (P = 0.036; odds ratio [OR], 1.6; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.0-2.4) but not with donor CFH Y402H genotype (P = 0.626), after controlling for age, sex, smoking status, and body mass index. Recipient plasma CFH Y402H protein allotype predicted donor CFH Y402H genotype with 100% accuracy (n = 49). Plasma complement protein or activation product levels were similar in LT patients with and without AMD. Compared with previously reported prevalence figures (Rotterdam Study), LT patients demonstrated a high prevalence of both AMD (64.6% vs 37.1%; OR, 3.09; Pproduction. In addition, AMD is not associated with systemic complement activity in LT patients. These findings suggest that local intraocular complement activity is of greater importance in AMD pathogenesis. The high AMD prevalence observed in LT patients may be associated with

  5. Degenerate nonlinear diffusion equations

    CERN Document Server

    Favini, Angelo

    2012-01-01

    The aim of these notes is to include in a uniform presentation style several topics related to the theory of degenerate nonlinear diffusion equations, treated in the mathematical framework of evolution equations with multivalued m-accretive operators in Hilbert spaces. The problems concern nonlinear parabolic equations involving two cases of degeneracy. More precisely, one case is due to the vanishing of the time derivative coefficient and the other is provided by the vanishing of the diffusion coefficient on subsets of positive measure of the domain. From the mathematical point of view the results presented in these notes can be considered as general results in the theory of degenerate nonlinear diffusion equations. However, this work does not seek to present an exhaustive study of degenerate diffusion equations, but rather to emphasize some rigorous and efficient techniques for approaching various problems involving degenerate nonlinear diffusion equations, such as well-posedness, periodic solutions, asympt...

  6. Development of a new methodology for mitigating acid mine drainage (AMD) at reclaimed surface mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackman, T.E.; Kim, A.G.

    1993-01-01

    A 1.2 hectare (ha) experimental site located on a 14.5 ha reclaimed surface mine in Greene County, PA was injected with a 141 cubic meters (m 3 ) of fly ash and fluidized bed combustion (FBC) ash grout that included acid mine drainage (AMD) sludge. An evaluation of this AMD abatement approach by the Bureau of Mines found that the average net acidity and concentrations of several metal ions at the discharge seep and monitoring wells decreased after grouting. Changes in metal concentrations were assumed to be related to alkaline addition and/or encapsulation. Initial results indicate that this technique is potentially an effective AMD abatement method

  7. Segmentation and quantification of retinal lesions in age-related macular degeneration using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Bernhard; Gotzinger, Erich; Pircher, Michael; Sattmann, Harald; Schuutze, Christopher; Schlanitz, Ferdinand; Ahlers, Christian; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula; Hitzenberger, Christoph K

    2010-01-01

    We present polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) for quantitative assessment of retinal pathologies in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). On the basis of the polarization scrambling characteristics of the retinal pigment epithelium, novel segmentation algorithms were developed that allow one to segment pathologic features such as drusen and atrophic zones in dry AMD as well as to determine their dimensions. Results from measurements in the eyes of AMD patients prove the ability of PS-OCT for quantitative imaging based on the retinal features polarizing properties. Repeatability measurements were performed in retinas diagnosed with drusen and geographic atrophy in order to evaluate the performance of the described methods. PS-OCT appears as a promising imaging modality for three-dimensional retinal imaging and ranging with additional contrast based on the structures' tissue-inherent polarization properties.

  8. [The effect of yellow filter intraocular lens on the macula after cataract phacoemulsification in patients with age macular degeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpak, A A; Maliugin, B É; Fadeeva, T V

    2012-01-01

    Macula changes diagnosed with optical coherence tomography (OCT) within a year after cataract phacoemulsification (PE) with intraocular lens implantation with and without yellow filter are presented. 32 patients (36 eyes) with early stages of age macular degeneration (AMD) were included into the experimental group and 35 patients (36 eyes) served as controls. IOLs with yellow filter were implanted in 21 eyes, and in 15 cases IOLs without filter were used in each group. According to OCT data thickening of fovea and increasing of macula volume developed within 6 months after cataract PE. Implantation of yellow filter IOLs reduced the intensity of these changes after surgery in patients with AMD. The progression of early AMD into advanced stages within a year after PE was not observed.

  9. Rapid glutamate receptor 2 trafficking during retinal degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Yanhua

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retinal degenerations, such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD and retinitis pigmentosa (RP, are characterized by photoreceptor loss and anomalous remodeling of the surviving retina that corrupts visual processing and poses a barrier to late-stage therapeutic interventions in particular. However, the molecular events associated with retinal remodeling remain largely unknown. Given our prior evidence of ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR reprogramming in retinal degenerations, we hypothesized that the edited glutamate receptor 2 (GluR2 subunit and its trafficking may be modulated in retinal degenerations. Results Adult albino Balb/C mice were exposed to intense light for 24 h to induce light-induced retinal degeneration (LIRD. We found that prior to the onset of photoreceptor loss, protein levels of GluR2 and related trafficking proteins, including glutamate receptor-interacting protein 1 (GRIP1 and postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95, were rapidly increased. LIRD triggered neuritogenesis in photoreceptor survival regions, where GluR2 and its trafficking proteins were expressed in the anomalous dendrites. Immunoprecipitation analysis showed interaction between KIF3A and GRIP1 as well as PSD-95, suggesting that KIF3A may mediate transport of GluR2 and its trafficking proteins to the novel dendrites. However, in areas of photoreceptor loss, GluR2 along with its trafficking proteins nearly vanished in retracted retinal neurites. Conclusions All together, LIRD rapidly triggers GluR2 plasticity, which is a potential mechanism behind functionally phenotypic revisions of retinal neurons and neuritogenesis during retinal degenerations.

  10. Evidence for an Association between Macular Degeneration and Thyroid Cancer in the Aged Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Yi; Hsu, Wu-Huei; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Lin, Jane-Ming; Chang, Yun-Lun; Hsu, Chung-Y; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2018-05-03

    Direct evidence of whether thyroid cancer patients have a higher risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) has yet to be investigated. Patients older than 50 years-old and newly diagnosed with thyroid cancer between 2000 and 2008 were identified from the national health insurance research database (NHIRD). We applied time-varying Cox proportional hazard models to assess the association between thyroid cancer and AMD. The multivariable models included conventional cardiovascular risk factors, myopia, vitreous floaters, hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, and treatment modality of thyroid cancer. The analysis process was stratified by age, gender, and comorbidity. In this study, 5253 patients were included in a thyroid cancer cohort (men 24.5%; median age 59.1 years (53.7⁻67.4 years), and 21,012 matched controls were included in a non-thyroid cancer cohort. The AMD incidence was 40.7 per 10,000 person/year in the thyroid cancer cohort. The thyroid cancer cohort had a higher risk (adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) = 1.38, 95% confidence interval, CI = 1.09⁻1.75) of AMD than the non-thyroid cohort. Thyroid cancer patients had a higher risk of AMD, especially the male patients (aHR = 1.92, 95% CI = 1.38⁻3.14) and the patients with comorbidities (aHR = 1.38, 95% CI = 1.09⁻1.74). In conclusion, thyroid cancer patients older than 50 years-old have increased risk of AMD.

  11. OPTIMAL MANAGEMENT OF PIGMENT EPITHELIAL DETACHMENTS IN EYES WITH NEOVASCULAR AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanani, Arshad M; Eichenbaum, David; Schlottmann, Patricio G; Tuomi, Lisa; Sarraf, David

    2018-04-24

    This review aimed to determine the optimal management of retinal pigment epithelial detachments (PEDs) in neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) based on review of available evidence in the literature. A comprehensive literature review evaluates previous retrospective and prospective studies that assessed the treatment of PEDs in nAMD. Studies illustrated that anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) therapy can be effective in eyes with PED secondary to nAMD. Similar visual outcomes are associated with different anti-VEGF treatments. Higher anti-VEGF doses may improve anatomical response, without correlation with vision improvement. Fibrovascular PEDs may be difficult to treat, but even these eyes can gain vision with anti-VEGF therapy. A retinal pigment epithelial tear may develop in 15% to 20% of eyes with PEDs after anti-VEGF therapy, especially in PEDs greater than 500 µm to 600 µm in height; however, vision may stabilize with continued therapy. Atrophy may complicate eyes with PED and nAMD after anti-VEGF therapy, especially in association with complete PED resolution. Available literature suggests that anti-VEGF therapy is safe and efficacious for PED and nAMD. Treatment should focus on vision gains rather than PED resolution because there is no apparent correlation between anatomical and functional improvement in most eyes with PED and nAMD.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.

  12. Recent developments in the management of dry age-related macular degeneration

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    Buschini E

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Elisa Buschini, Antonio M Fea, Carlo A Lavia, Marco Nassisi, Giulia Pignata, Marta Zola, Federico M Grignolo Ospedale Oftalmico, Ophthalmic Section, Department of Clinical Pathophysiology, University of Turin, Turin, Italy Abstract: Dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD, also called geographic atrophy, is characterized by the atrophy of outer retinal layers and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE cells. Dry AMD accounts for 80% of all intermediate and advanced forms of the disease. Although vision loss is mainly due to the neovascular form (75%, dry AMD remains a challenge for ophthalmologists because of the lack of effective therapies. Actual management consists of lifestyle modification, vitamin supplements, and supportive measures in the advanced stages. The Age-Related Eye Disease Study demonstrated a statistically significant protective effect of dietary supplementation of antioxidants (vitamin C, vitamin E, beta-carotene, zinc, and copper on dry AMD progression rate. It was also stated that the consumption of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, such as docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid, has protective effects. Other antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals (such as crocetin, curcumin, and vitamins B9, B12, and B6 are under evaluation, but the results are still uncertain. New strategies aim to 1 reduce or block drusen formation, 2 reduce or eliminate inflammation, 3 lower the accumulation of toxic by-products from the visual cycle, 4 reduce or eliminate retinal oxidative stress, 5 improve choroidal perfusion, 6 replace/repair or regenerate lost RPE cells and photoreceptors with stem cell therapy, and 7 develop a target gene therapy. Keywords: dry AMD, geographic atrophy, new AMD therapy

  13. Associations Between Vitamin D Intake and Progression to Incident Advanced Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merle, Bénédicte M J; Silver, Rachel E; Rosner, Bernard; Seddon, Johanna M

    2017-09-01

    There is growing evidence of the importance of nutrition in age-related macular degeneration (AMD), but no prospective studies have explored the impact of vitamin D. We evaluated the association between vitamin D intake and progression to advanced AMD. Among 2146 participants (3965 eyes), 541 (777 eyes) progressed from early or intermediate AMD to advanced disease (mean follow-up: 9.4 years) based on ocular imaging. Nutrients were log transformed and calorie adjusted. Survival analysis was used to assess associations between incident advanced disease and vitamin D intake. Neovascular disease (NV) and geographic atrophy (GA) were evaluated separately. Combined effects of dietary vitamin D and calcium were assessed based on high or low consumption of each nutrient. There was a lower risk of progression to advanced AMD in the highest versus lowest quintile of dietary vitamin D intake after adjustment for demographic, behavioral, ocular, and nutritional factors (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.60; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.43-0.83; P trend = 0.0007). Similar results were observed for NV (HR: 0.59; 95% CI: 0.39-0.89; P trend = 0.005) but not GA (HR: 0.83; 95% CI: 0.53-1.30; P trend = 0.35). A protective effect was observed for advanced AMD among participants with high vitamin D and low calcium compared to the group with low levels for each nutrient (HR: 0.67; 95% CI: 0.50-0.88; P = 0.005). When supplement use was considered, the effect was in the protective direction but was not significant. A diet rich in vitamin D may prevent or delay progression to advanced AMD, especially NV. Additional exploration is needed to elucidate the potential protective role of vitamin D and its contribution to reducing visual loss.

  14. Immunotherapy for choroidal neovascularization in a laser-induced mouse model simulating exudative (wet) macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bora, Puran S.; Hu, Zhiwei; Tezel, Tongalp H.; Sohn, Jeong-Hyeon; Kang, Shin Goo; Cruz, Jose M. C.; Bora, Nalini S.; Garen, Alan; Kaplan, Henry J.

    2003-03-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness after age 55 in the industrialized world. Severe loss of central vision frequently occurs with the exudative (wet) form of AMD, as a result of the formation of a pathological choroidal neovasculature (CNV) that damages the macular region of the retina. We tested the effect of an immunotherapy procedure, which had been shown to destroy the pathological neovasculature in solid tumors, on the formation of laser-induced CNV in a mouse model simulating exudative AMD in humans. The procedure involves administering an Icon molecule that binds with high affinity and specificity to tissue factor (TF), resulting in the activation of a potent cytolytic immune response against cells expressing TF. The Icon binds selectively to TF on the vascular endothelium of a CNV in the mouse and pig models and also on the CNV of patients with exudative AMD. Here we show that the Icon dramatically reduces the frequency of CNV formation in the mouse model. After laser treatment to induce CNV formation, the mice were injected either with an adenoviral vector encoding the Icon, resulting in synthesis of the Icon by vector-infected mouse cells, or with the Icon protein. The route of injection was i.v. or intraocular. The efficacy of the Icon in preventing formation of laser-induced CNV depends on binding selectively to the CNV. Because the Icon binds selectively to the CNV in exudative AMD as well as to laser-induced CNV, the Icon might also be efficacious for treating patients with exudative AMD.

  15. Natural history of drusenoid pigment epithelial detachment in age-related macular degeneration: Age-Related Eye Disease Study Report No. 28.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukras, Catherine; Agrón, Elvira; Klein, Michael L; Ferris, Frederick L; Chew, Emily Y; Gensler, Gary; Wong, Wai T

    2010-03-01

    To describe the natural history of eyes with drusenoid pigment epithelial detachments (DPEDs) associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Multicenter, clinic-based, prospective cohort study. Among 4757 participants enrolled in the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS), 255 were identified as having DPED in at least 1 eye and having 5 or more years of follow-up after the initial detection of the DPED. Baseline and annual fundus photographs were evaluated for the evolution of the fundus features and the development of advanced AMD in the forms of central geographic atrophy (CGA) or neovascular (NV) AMD. Kaplan-Meier analyses of progression to advanced AMD and of moderate vision loss (> or =15 letters compared with baseline) were performed. Rate of progression to advanced AMD and change in visual acuity from baseline (in terms of mean letters lost and proportion losing > or =15 letters). A total of 311 eyes (from 255 participants) with DPED were followed for a median follow-up time of 8 years subsequent to the initial detection of a DPED. Of the 282 eyes that did not have advanced AMD at baseline, advanced AMD developed within 5 years in 119 eyes (42%) (19% progressing to CGA and 23% progressing to NV-AMD). In the remaining eyes that did not develop advanced AMD (n=163), progressive fundus changes, typified by the development of calcified drusen and pigmentary changes, were detected. Visual decline was prominent among study eyes, with approximately 40% of all eyes decreasing in visual acuity by > or =15 letters at 5 years follow-up. Mean visual acuity decreased from 76 letters ( approximately 20/30) at baseline to 61 letters ( approximately 20/60) at 5 years. Five-year decreases in mean visual acuity averaged 26 letters for eyes progressing to advanced AMD and 8 letters for non-progressing eyes. The natural history of eyes containing DPED is characterized by a high rate of progression to both CGA and NV-AMD. Among eyes not progressing to advanced AMD

  16. Absolute and estimated values of macular pigment optical density in young and aged Asian participants with or without age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Yoko; Shigeno, Yuta; Nagai, Norihiro; Suzuki, Misa; Kurihara, Toshihide; Minami, Sakiko; Hirano, Eri; Shinoda, Hajime; Kobayashi, Saori; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2017-08-29

    Lutein and zeaxanthin are suggested micronutrient supplements to prevent the progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of blindness worldwide. To monitor the levels of lutein/zeaxanthin in the macula, macular pigment optical density (MPOD) is measured. A commercially available device (MPSII®, Elektron Technology, Switzerland), using technology based on heterochromatic flicker photometry, can measure both absolute and estimated values of MPOD. However, whether the estimated value is applicable to Asian individuals and/or AMD patients remains to be determined. The absolute and estimated values of MPOD were measured using the MPSII® device in 77 participants with a best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) > 0.099 (logMAR score). The studied eyes included 17 young (20-29 years) healthy, 26 aged (>50 years) healthy, 18 aged and AMD-fellow, and 16 aged AMD eyes. The mean BCVA among the groups were not significantly different. Both absolute and estimated values were measurable in all eyes of young healthy group. However, absolute values were measurable in only 57.7%, 66.7%, and 43.8%, of the aged healthy, AMD-fellow, and AMD groups, respectively, and 56.7% of the eyes included in the 3 aged groups. In contrast, the estimated value was measurable in 84.6%, 88.9% and 93.8% of the groups, respectively, and 88.3% of eyes in the pooled aged group. The estimated value was correlated with absolute value in individuals from all groups by Spearman's correlation coefficient analyses (young healthy: R 2  = 0.885, P = 0.0001; aged healthy: R 2  = 0.765, P = 0.001; AMD-fellow: R 2  = 0.851, P = 0.0001; and AMD: R 2  = 0.860, P = 0.013). Using the estimated value, significantly lower MPOD values were found in aged AMD-related eyes, which included both AMD-fellow and AMD eyes, compared with aged healthy eyes by Student's t-test (P = 0.02). Absolute, in contrast to estimated, value was measurable in a limited number of aged participants

  17. Comparison of Visual Function in Older Eyes in the Earliest Stages of Age-related Macular Degeneration to Those in Normal Macular Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owsley, Cynthia; Huisingh, Carrie; Clark, Mark E; Jackson, Gregory R; McGwin, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    To compare the ability of several visual functional tests in terms of the strength of their associations with the earliest phases of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), which bears on their potential to serve as functional endpoints in evaluating treatments for early AMD and prevention strategies. Eyes from adults ≥60 years old were identified as being in normal macular health or in the earliest stages of AMD (steps 2, 3 or 4) through grading of color stereo-fundus photos by an experienced grader masked to all other study variables who used the 9-step Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) classification system for AMD severity. Visual function was assessed using the following tests: best-corrected visual acuity, low luminance visual acuity, spatial contrast sensitivity, macular cone-mediated light sensitivity and rod-mediated dark adaptation. A total of 1260 eyes were tested from 640 participants; 1007 eyes were in normal macular health (defined as step 1 in AREDS system) and 253 eyes had early AMD (defined as steps 2, 3 or 4). Adjusting for age and gender, early AMD eyes had two times the odds of having delayed rod-mediated dark adaptation than eyes in normal macular health (p = 0.0019). Visual acuity, low luminance acuity, spatial contrast sensitivity and macular light sensitivity did not differ between normal eyes and early AMD eyes. Eyes in the earliest phases of AMD were two times more likely to have delayed rod-mediated dark adaptation, as assessed by the rod-intercept, as compared to older eyes in normal macular health, whereas there was no difference in early AMD versus normal eyes in tests of visual acuity, low luminance acuity, macular light sensitivity and spatial contrast sensitivity.

  18. Altered bioenergetics and enhanced resistance to oxidative stress in human retinal pigment epithelial cells from donors with age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah A. Ferrington

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the leading cause of blindness among older adults. It has been suggested that mitochondrial defects in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE underlies AMD pathology. To test this idea, we developed primary cultures of RPE to ask whether RPE from donors with AMD differ in their metabolic profile compared with healthy age-matched donors. Analysis of gene expression, protein content, and RPE function showed that these cultured cells replicated many of the cardinal features of RPE in vivo. Using the Seahorse Extracellular Flux Analyzer to measure bioenergetics, we observed RPE from donors with AMD exhibited reduced mitochondrial and glycolytic function compared with healthy donors. RPE from AMD donors were also more resistant to oxidative inactivation of these two energy-producing pathways and were less susceptible to oxidation-induced cell death compared with cells from healthy donors. Investigation of the potential mechanism responsible for differences in bioenergetics and resistance to oxidative stress showed RPE from AMD donors had increased PGC1α protein as well as differential expression of multiple genes in response to an oxidative challenge. Based on our data, we propose that cultured RPE from donors phenotyped for the presence or absence of AMD provides an excellent model system for studying “AMD in a dish”. Our results are consistent with the ideas that (i a bioenergetics crisis in the RPE contributes to AMD pathology, and (ii the diseased environment in vivo causes changes in the cellular profile that are retained in vitro.

  19. Kiibitootja AMD on võitmas turuosa suure rivaali Inteli käest / Lauri Matsulevitsh

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Matsulevitsh, Lauri

    2006-01-01

    Arvutiprotsessorite tootja Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) näitas oma lõppenud kvartalis teenitud kasumiga, et hakkab konkurent Intelile järgi jõudma. Diagramm: Aktsia hind. Kommenteerib Peeter Teder

  20. Effect of substance P on recovery from laser-induced retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hyun Sook; Kim, Suna; Nam, Seungwoo; Um, Jihyun; Kim, Yeong Hoon; Son, Youngsook

    2015-01-01

    Retinal degeneration is caused by neovascularization and persistent inflammation in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and choroid, and causes serious eye disease including age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Thus, inhibiting inflammation and neovascularization may be a primary approach to protect the retina from degeneration. The purpose of this study was to determine whether substance P (SP), which can suppress inflammation and mobilize stem cells, can protect the RPE from degeneration. The effect of SP was evaluated by analyzing systemic inflammation, cell survival, and neovascularization within the argon laser-injured retina of mice. At 1 week postinjury, the SP-treated group had lower tumor necrosis factor-alpha and higher interleukin-10 serum concentrations, and a more intact retinal structure compared to the vehicle-treated group. In mice administered SP repeatedly for 4 weeks, the retinal structure appeared normal and showed sparse neovascularization, whereas the vehicle-treated group showed severe retinal destruction and dense neovascularization. Moreover, the efficacy of SP was identical to that of mesenchymal stem cells that were transplanted into the vitreous after retinal injury. This study highlights the potential for the endogenous neuropeptide SP as a treatment for retinal damage to prevent conditions such as AMD. © 2015 by the Wound Healing Society.

  1. Disc degeneration: current surgical options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Schizas

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Chronic low back pain attributed to lumbar disc degeneration poses a serious challenge to physicians. Surgery may be indicated in selected cases following failure of appropriate conservative treatment. For decades, the only surgical option has been spinal fusion, but its results have been inconsistent. Some prospective trials show superiority over usual conservative measures while others fail to demonstrate its advantages. In an effort to improve results of fusion and to decrease the incidence of adjacent segment degeneration, total disc replacement techniques have been introduced and studied extensively. Short-term results have shown superiority over some fusion techniques. Mid-term results however tend to show that this approach yields results equivalent to those of spinal fusion. Nucleus replacement has gained some popularity initially, but evidence on its efficacy is scarce. Dynamic stabilisation, a technique involving less rigid implants than in spinal fusion and performed without the need for bone grafting, represents another surgical option. Evidence again is lacking on its superiority over other surgical strategies and conservative measures. Insertion of interspinous devices posteriorly, aiming at redistributing loads and relieving pain, has been used as an adjunct to disc removal surgery for disc herniation. To date however, there is no clear evidence on their efficacy. Minimally invasive intradiscal thermocoagulation techniques have also been tried, but evidence of their effectiveness is questioned. Surgery using novel biological solutions may be the future of discogenic pain treatment. Collaboration between clinicians and basic scientists in this multidisciplinary field will undoubtedly shape the future of treating symptomatic disc degeneration.

  2. AMDE-1 is a dual function chemical for autophagy activation and inhibition.

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    Min Li

    Full Text Available Autophagy is the process by which cytosolic components and organelles are delivered to the lysosome for degradation. Autophagy plays important roles in cellular homeostasis and disease pathogenesis. Small chemical molecules that can modulate autophagy activity may have pharmacological value for treating diseases. Using a GFP-LC3-based high content screening assay we identified a novel chemical that is able to modulate autophagy at both initiation and degradation levels. This molecule, termed as Autophagy Modulator with Dual Effect-1 (AMDE-1, triggered autophagy in an Atg5-dependent manner, recruiting Atg16 to the pre-autophagosomal site and causing LC3 lipidation. AMDE-1 induced autophagy through the activation of AMPK, which inactivated mTORC1 and activated ULK1. AMDE-1did not affect MAP kinase, JNK or oxidative stress signaling for autophagy induction. Surprisingly, treatment with AMDE-1 resulted in impairment in autophagic flux and inhibition of long-lived protein degradation. This inhibition was correlated with a reduction in lysosomal degradation capacity but not with autophagosome-lysosome fusion. Further analysis indicated that AMDE-1 caused a reduction in lysosome acidity and lysosomal proteolytic activity, suggesting that it suppressed general lysosome function. AMDE-1 thus also impaired endocytosis-mediated EGF receptor degradation. The dual effects of AMDE-1 on autophagy induction and lysosomal degradation suggested that its net effect would likely lead to autophagic stress and lysosome dysfunction, and therefore cell death. Indeed, AMDE-1 triggered necroptosis and was preferentially cytotoxic to cancer cells. In conclusion, this study identified a new class of autophagy modulators with dual effects, which can be explored for potential uses in cancer therapy.

  3. The Mitochondria-Targeted Antioxidant SkQ1 Downregulates Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor-Dependent Genes in the Retina of OXYS Rats with AMD-Like Retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Perepechaeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondria-targeted antioxidant SkQ1 is a novel drug thought to retard development of age-related diseases. It has been shown that SkQ1 reduces clinical signs of retinopathy in senescence-accelerated OXYS rats, which are a known animal model of human age-related macular degeneration (AMD. The aim of this work was to test whether SkQ1 affects transcriptional activity of AhR (aryl hydrocarbon receptor and Nrf2 (nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2, which are considered as AMD-associated genes in the retina of OXYS and Wistar rats. Our results showed that only AhR and AhR-dependent genes were sensitive to SkQ1. Dietary supplementation with SkQ1 decreased the AhR mRNA level in both OXYS and Wistar rats. At baseline, the retinal Cyp1a1 mRNA level was lower in OXYS rats. SkQ1 supplementation decreased the Cyp1a1 mRNA level in Wistar rats, but this level remained unchanged in OXYS rats. Baseline Cyp1a2 and Cyp1b1 mRNA expression was stronger in OXYS than in Wistar rats. In the OXYS strain, Cyp1a2 and Cyp1b1 mRNA levels decreased as a result of SkQ1 supplementation. These data suggest that the Cyp1a2 and Cyp1b1 enzymes are involved in the pathogenesis of AMD-like retinopathy of OXYS rats and are possible therapeutic targets of SkQ1.

  4. Decreased Thickness and Integrity of the Macular Elastic Layer of Bruch’s Membrane Correspond to the Distribution of Lesions Associated with Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, N.H. Victor; Keonin, Jason; Luthert, Phil J.; Frennesson, Christina I.; Weingeist, David M.; Wolf, Rachel L.; Mullins, Robert F.; Hageman, Gregory S.

    2005-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of blindness in the elderly. In its severest form, choroidal neovessels breach the macular Bruch’s membrane, an extracellular matrix compartment comprised of elastin and collagen laminae, and grow into the retina. We sought to determine whether structural properties of the elastic lamina (EL) correspond to the region of the macula that is predilected toward degeneration in AMD. Morphometric assessment of the macular and extramacular regions of 121 human donor eyes, with and without AMD, revealed a statistically significant difference in both the integrity (P macula than in the periphery. The integrity of the macular EL was significantly lower in donors with early-stage AMD (P = 0.028), active choroidal neovascularization (P = 0.020), and disciform scars (P = 0.003), as compared to unaffected, age-matched controls. EL thickness was significantly lower only in individuals with disciform scars (P = 0.008). The largest gaps in macular EL integrity were significantly larger in all categories of AMD (each P macula is more susceptible to degenerative events that occur in this disease. PMID:15632016

  5. Familial aggregation of age-related macular degeneration in the Utah population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ling; Harmon, Jennifer; Yang, Xian; Chen, Haoyu; Patel, Shrena; Mineau, Geraldine; Yang, Zhenglin; Constantine, Ryan; Buehler, Jeanette; Kaminoh, Yuuki; Ma, Xiang; Wong, Tien Y; Zhang, Maonian; Zhang, Kang

    2008-02-01

    We examined familial aggregation and risk of age-related macular degeneration in the Utah population using a population-based case-control study. Over one million unique patient records were searched within the University of Utah Health Sciences Center and the Utah Population Database (UPDB), identifying 4764 patients with AMD. Specialized kinship analysis software was used to test for familial aggregation of disease, estimate the magnitude of familial risks, and identify families at high risk for disease. The population-attributable risk (PAR) for AMD was calculated to be 0.34. Recurrence risks in relatives indicate increased relative risks in siblings (2.95), first cousins (1.29), second cousins (1.13), and parents (5.66) of affected cases. There were 16 extended large families with AMD identified for potential use in genetic studies. Each family had five or more living affected members. The familial aggregation of AMD shown in this study exemplifies the merit of the UPDB and supports recent research demonstrating significant genetic contribution to disease development and progression.

  6. Retinal pigment epithelium, age-related macular degeneration and neurotrophic keratouveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Enrica; Scarinci, Fabio; Ripandelli, Guido; Feher, Janos; Pacella, Elena; Magliulo, Giuseppe; Gabrieli, Corrado Balacco; Plateroti, Rocco; Plateroti, Pasquale; Mignini, Fiorenzo; Artico, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of impaired vision and blindness in the aging population. The aims of our studies were to identify qualitative and quantitative alterations in mitochondria in human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) from AMD patients and controls and to test the protective effects of pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), a known neurotrophic and antiangiogenic substance, against neurotrophic keratouveitis. Histopathological alterations were studied by means of morphometry, light and electron microscopy. Unexpectedly, morphometric data showed that the RPE alterations noted in AMD may also develop in normal aging, 10-15 years later than appearing in AMD patients. Reduced tear secretion, corneal ulceration and leukocytic infiltration were found in capsaicin (CAP)-treated rats, but this effect was significantly attenuated by PEDF. These findings suggest that PEDF accelerated the recovery of tear secretion and also prevented neurotrophic keratouveitis and vitreoretinal inflammation. PEDF may have a clinical application in inflammatory and neovascular diseases of the eye.

  7. Variability of disease activity in patients treated with ranibizumab for neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enders, P; Scholz, P; Muether, P S; Fauser, S

    2016-08-01

    PurposeTo analyze choroidal neovasularization (CNV) activity and recurrence patterns in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) treated with ranibizumab, and the correlation with individual intraocular vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) suppression time (VST).MethodsPost-hoc analysis of data from a prospective, non-randomized clinical study. Patients with nAMD treated with ranibizumab on a pro re nata regimen. Disease activity was analyzed monthly by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography and correlated with VSTs.ResultsOverall, 73 eyes of 73 patients were included in the study with a mean follow-up of 717 days (range: 412-1239 days). Overall, the mean CNV-activity-free interval was 76.5 days (range: 0-829 days). The individual range of the length of dry intervals was high. A total of 42% of patients had a range of more than 90 days. Overall, 16% of patients showed persistent activity. And 12% stayed dry after the initial ranibizumab treatment. No significant correlation was found between the CNV-recurrence pattern and VST (P=0.12).ConclusionsCNV activity in nAMD is irregular, which is reflected in the range of the duration of dry intervals and late recurrences. The biomarker VST solely seems not to be sufficient to explain recurrence pattern of CNV in all AMD patients.

  8. Multimodal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy for image guided treatment of age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Daniel X.; Ferguson, R. D.; Patel, Ankit H.; Iftimia, Nicusor V.; Mujat, Mircea; Husain, Deeba

    2009-02-01

    Subretinal neovascular membranes (SRNM) are a deleterious complication of laser eye injury and retinal diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), choroiditis, and myopic retinopathy. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) and anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) drugs are approved treatment methods. PDT acts by selective dye accumulation, activation by laser light, and disruption and clotting of the new leaky vessels. However, PDT surgery is currently not image-guided, nor does it proceed in an efficient or automated mann