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Sample records for degassed cation conductivity

  1. Research on Melt Degassing Processes of High Conductivity Hard Drawn Aluminum Wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xuexia; Feng, Yanting; Wang, Qing; Li, Wenbin; Fan, Hui; Wang, Yong; Li, Guowei; Zhang, Daoqian

    2018-03-01

    Degassing effects of ultrasonic and vacuum processes on high conductivity hard drawn aluminum melt were studied. Results showed that the degassing efficiency improved with the increase of ultrasonic power within certain range, stabilizing at 70% with 240W. For vacuum degassing process, hydrogen content of aluminum melt decreased with the loading time and was linear with logarithm of vacuum degree. Comparison of degassing effects of ultrasonic, vacuum, vacuum-ultrasonic degassing process showed that vacuum-ultrasonic process presented optimal effect.

  2. Use of a material conducting hydrogen cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, A.T.; Shilton, M.G.

    1986-01-01

    The invention concerns a separator conducting hydrogenous for electrical devices, which contains at least one compound with the formula H(UO 2 )PO 4 x nH 2 O, H(UO 2 )AsO 4 x nH 2 O or H(UO 2 )IO 4 (OH) 2 x nH 2 O, where not more than 50% by weight of the H + is replaced by one or more cations, such as Li + , Na + , K + , NH 4 + , Cu 2+ , Mg 2+ , Ca 2+ , Ba 2+ , Sr 2+ , Pb 2+ , Fe 2+ , Co 2+ , Ni 2+ , Mn 2+ or Al 3+ . The electrical device having the separator can be an electrolysis cell, for example, an electro chromium cell. (H x WO 3 ), a hydrogen isotope enrichment device, a proton-sensitive electrode (eg for a pH meter), a battery or a fuel cell. (orig./MM) [de

  3. Cationic Polymers Inhibit the Conductance of Lysenin Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Fologea

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The pore-forming toxin lysenin self-assembles large and stable conductance channels in natural and artificial lipid membranes. The lysenin channels exhibit unique regulation capabilities, which open unexplored possibilities to control the transport of ions and molecules through artificial and natural lipid membranes. Our investigations demonstrate that the positively charged polymers polyethyleneimine and chitosan inhibit the conducting properties of lysenin channels inserted into planar lipid membranes. The preservation of the inhibitory effect following addition of charged polymers on either side of the supporting membrane suggests the presence of multiple binding sites within the channel's structure and a multistep inhibition mechanism that involves binding and trapping. Complete blockage of the binding sites with divalent cations prevents further inhibition in conductance induced by the addition of cationic polymers and supports the hypothesis that the binding sites are identical for both multivalent metal cations and charged polymers. The investigation at the single-channel level has shown distinct complete blockages of each of the inserted channels. These findings reveal key structural characteristics which may provide insight into lysenin’s functionality while opening innovative approaches for the development of applications such as transient cell permeabilization and advanced drug delivery systems.

  4. Structure-conductivity studies in polymer electrolytes containing multivalent cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aziz, M.

    1996-05-01

    Understanding the structure - conductivity relationship is of paramount importance for the development of polymer electrolytes. The present studies present the techniques found useful in the elucidation of structure - conductivity relationship in PEO n :ZnBr 2 (n = 8, 1000, 2000, 3000, 4000 and 5000) and PEO n :FeBr x (n= 8, 20 and 50; x = 2 and 3). Local structural studies have been undertaken using X-ray absorption fine structures (XAFS) which includes extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES). EXAFS provides interatomic distance and coordination numbers of the nearest neighbours and results from the EXAFS studies showed that high conductivity is associated with stretched M - O interatomic distance. In the studies on ultra dilute Zn samples it was found that the cation is highly solvated by the heteroatom forming a tightly bound environment which inhibits local segmental motion thus impeding ion migration. XANES studies on the PEO and modified PEO complexes of NiBr 2 revealed the sensitivity of XANES to the structural differences. XANES on Zn and Fe samples also revealed the sensitivity to changes in interatomic distances reflected in shifts of the white line. The complementary nature of EXAFS and XANES was reflected in the studies conducted. Morphological studies were undertaken employing differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), variable temperature polarising microscopy (VTPM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). DSC evidences helped to explain the texture of the iron samples during the drying process, and showed transitions between low melting, PEO and high melting spherulites, and VTPM is able to visualise the spherulites present in the samples. AFM has successfully imaged the as cast PEO 8 :FeBr 2 sample and the surface effect causing extra resistance in the impedance spectra could be seen. Conductivity studies were carried out using a.c. impedance spectra. Fe(ll) samples exhibit the typical semicircle

  5. Effects of Cationic Pendant Groups on Ionic Conductivity for Anion Exchange Membranes: Structure Conductivity Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sojeong; Choi, Soo-Hyung; Lee, Won Bo

    Anion exchange membranes(AEMs) have been widely studied due to their various applications, especially for Fuel cells. Previous proton exchange membranes(PEMs), such as Nafions® have better conductivity than AEMs so far. However, technical limitations such as slow electrode kinetics, carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning of metal catalysts, high methanol crossover and high cost of Pt-based catalyst detered further usages. AEMs have advantages to supplement its drawbacks. AEMs are environmentally friendly and cost-efficient. Based on the well-defined block copolymer, self-assembled morphology is expected to have some relationship with its ionic conductivity. Recently AEMs based on various cations, including ammonium, phosphonium, guanidinium, imidazolium, metal cation, and benzimidazolium cations have been developed and extensively studied with the aim to prepare high- performance AEMs. But more fundamental approach, such as relationships between nanostructure and conductivity is needed. We use well-defined block copolymer Poly(styrene-block-isoprene) as a backbone which is synthesized by anionic polymerization. Then we graft various cationic functional groups and analysis the relation between morphology and conductivity. Theoretical and computational soft matter lab.

  6. Electrochemical ion exchanger in the water circuit to measure cation conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengtsson, B.; Ingemarsson, R.; Settervik, G.; Velin, A.

    2010-01-01

    In Ringhals NPP, more than four years of successful operation with a full-scale EDI for the recycling of steam generator blow down (SGBD) gave the inspiration to modify and 'scale down' this EDI process. This with purpose to explore the possibilities to replace the cation exchanger columns used for cation conductivity analysis, with some small and integrated electrochemical ion-exchange cells. Monitoring the cation conductivity requires the use of a small cation resin column upstream of the conductivity probe and is one of the most important analyses at power plants. However, when operating with high alkaline treatment in the steam circuit, it's connected to the disadvantage of getting the resins rapidly exhausted, with needs to be frequently replaced or regenerated. This is causing interruptions in the monitoring and giving rise to high workload for the maintenance. This paper reports about some optimization and tests of two different two-compartment electrochemical cells for the possible replacements of cation resin columns when analyzing cation conductivity in the secondary steam circuit at Ringhals NPPs. Field tests during start up condition and more than four months of steady operation together with real and simulated test for impurity influences, indicates that a ELectrical Ion Echange process (ELIX) could be successfully used to replace the resin columns in Ringhals during operating with high pH-AVT (All Volatile Treatment), using hydrazine and ammonia. Installation of an ELIX-system downstream a particle filter and upstream of a small cation resin column, will introduce additional safety and further reduce the maintenance with possible interruptions. Performance of the ELIX-process together with other chemical additives (Morpholine, ETA, MPA, DMA) and dispersants, may be further evaluated to qualify the ELIX-process as well as SGBD-EDI for wider use in nuclear applications. (author)

  7. Correlation between the Increasing Conductivity of Aqueous Solutions of Cation Chlorides with Time and the “Salting-Out” Properties of the Cations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada Verdel

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The time-dependent role of cations was investigated by ageing four different aqueous solutions of cation chlorides. A linear correlation was found between the cations’ Setchenov coefficient for the salting-out of benzene and the increase in the conductivity with time. The conductivity of the structure-breaking cations or the chaotropes increased more significantly with time than the conductivity of the kosmotropes. Since larger water clusters accelerate the proton or hydroxyl hopping mechanism, we propose that the structuring of the hydration shells of the chaotropes might be spontaneously enhanced over time.

  8. Ionic charge transport between blockages: Sodium cation conduction in freshly excised bulk brain tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emin, David, E-mail: emin@unm.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Akhtari, Massoud [Semple Institutes for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Ellingson, B. M. [Department of Radiology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Mathern, G. W. [Department of Neurosurgery, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    We analyze the transient-dc and frequency-dependent electrical conductivities between blocking electrodes. We extend this analysis to measurements of ions’ transport in freshly excised bulk samples of human brain tissue whose complex cellular structure produces blockages. The associated ionic charge-carrier density and diffusivity are consistent with local values for sodium cations determined non-invasively in brain tissue by MRI (NMR) and diffusion-MRI (spin-echo NMR). The characteristic separation between blockages, about 450 microns, is very much shorter than that found for sodium-doped gel proxies for brain tissue, >1 cm.

  9. Divalent Cations Regulate the Ion Conductance Properties of Diverse Classes of Aquaporins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Kourghi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Aquaporins (AQPs are known to facilitate water and solute fluxes across barrier membranes. An increasing number of AQPs are being found to serve as ion channels. Ion and water permeability of selected plant and animal AQPs (plant Arabidopsis thaliana AtPIP2;1, AtPIP2;2, AtPIP2;7, human Homo sapiens HsAQP1, rat Rattus norvegicus RnAQP4, RnAQP5, and fly Drosophila melanogaster DmBIB were expressed in Xenopus oocytes and examined in chelator-buffered salines to evaluate the effects of divalent cations (Ca2+, Mg2+, Ba2+ and Cd2+ on ionic conductances. AtPIP2;1, AtPIP2;2, HsAQP1 and DmBIB expressing oocytes had ionic conductances, and showed differential sensitivity to block by external Ca2+. The order of potency of inhibition by Ca2+ was AtPIP2;2 > AtPIP2;1 > DmBIB > HsAQP1. Blockage of the AQP cation channels by Ba2+ and Cd2+ caused voltage-sensitive outward rectification. The channels with the highest sensitivity to Ca2+ (AtPIP2;1 and AtPIP2;2 showed a distinctive relief of the Ca2+ block by co-application of excess Ba2+, suggesting that divalent ions act at the same site. Recognizing the regulatory role of divalent cations may enable the discovery of other classes of AQP ion channels, and facilitate the development of tools for modulating AQP ion channels. Modulators of AQPs have potential value for diverse applications including improving salinity tolerance in plants, controlling vector-borne diseases, and intervening in serious clinical conditions involving AQPs, such as cancer metastasis, cardiovascular or renal dysfunction.

  10. Effects of cation contaminants in conductive TiO2 ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, M. F.; Rhodes, W. W.

    1982-12-01

    Ten cation contaminants, namely Al, Ga, Co, Fe, Mg, Zn, Zr, Ca, Sr, and Ba were investigated for their effects on the electrical properties, microstructures, and discoloration of conductive TiO2 ceramics. It was found that Al, Ga, Co, Fe, and Mg cause discoloration and increase the electrical resistivity by a factor of 104 to 106 in Nb-doped TiO2 ceramics. The other dopants do not introduce such changes in TiO2. The electrical properties, microstructures, and discoloration were measured in specimens of AlxNb0.007Ti0.993-xO2 with 0≤x≤0.01. When the Al content exceeds a critical value, ranging from 0.48% at 1400 °C to 0.25% at 1200 °C, the electrical resistivities and grain size increase rapidly, and the specimen is discolored from the original black to an ivory white color. Color boundary migration induced by Al diffusion in Nb-doped TiO2 was quantitatively measured. From the kinetics of the boundary migration, the Al diffusivity (D) was calculated to be D=2.67 exp(-53.3 kcal/mole/RT) cm2/s in the temperature range of 1200 to 1400 °C. The rapid diffusion of the small cations, namely Al, Ga, Co, Fe, and Mg, results from an interstitial diffusion mechanism. However, other cations, having a radius larger than the interstitial channel (˜0.77 Å radius), cannot diffuse by this mechanism. Defect reactions are proposed to explain the increase in the electrical resistivity and microstructural changes due to Al diffusion. These defect reactions also show that the problem of acceptor contamination cannot be avoided by adding an excess quantity of donor dopant if the solubility of the donor is much less than that of the acceptor contaminant.

  11. The ionic conductivity and local environment of cations in Bi9ReO17

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, M.; Herranz, T.; Santos, B.; Marco, J.F.; Berry, F.J.; Greaves, C.

    2010-01-01

    The influence of temperature on the structure of Bi 9 ReO 17 has been investigated using differential thermal analysis, variable temperature X-ray diffraction and neutron powder diffraction. The material undergoes an order-disorder transition at ∼1000 K on heating, to form a fluorite-related phase. The local environments of the cations in fully ordered Bi 9 ReO 17 have been investigated by Bi L III - and Re L III -edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements to complement the neutron powder diffraction information. Whereas rhenium displays regular tetrahedral coordination, all bismuth sites show coordination geometries which reflect the importance of a stereochemically active lone pair of electrons. Because of the wide range of Bi-O distances, EXAFS data are similar to those observed for disordered structures, and are dominated by the shorter Bi-O bonds. Ionic conductivity measurements indicate that ordered Bi 9 ReO 17 exhibits reasonably high oxide ion conductivity, corresponding to 2.9x10 -5 Ω -1 cm -1 at 673 K, whereas the disordered form shows higher oxide ion conductivity (9.1x10 -4 Ω -1 cm -1 at 673 K). - Graphical abstract: The structure of Bi 9 ReO 17 is discussed and related to the ionic conductivity of the ordered and disordered forms.

  12. A Novel Method for the Determination of Membrane Hydration Numbers of Cations in Conducting Polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jafeen, M.J.M.; Careem, M.A.; Skaarup, Steen

    2012-01-01

    Polypyrrole polymer films doped with the large, immobile dodecy lbenzene sulfonate anions operating in alkali halide aqueous electroly tes has beenused as a novel physico-chemical environment to develop a more direct way of obtaining reliable values for the hydration numbers of cations. Simultane......Polypyrrole polymer films doped with the large, immobile dodecy lbenzene sulfonate anions operating in alkali halide aqueous electroly tes has beenused as a novel physico-chemical environment to develop a more direct way of obtaining reliable values for the hydration numbers of cations....... The number of water moleculesentering the polymer during the initial part of the first reduction was found to be constant and independent of the concentration of the electrolyte below ∼1 M. This well-defined value can be considered as the primarymembrane hydration number of the cation involved...... in the reduction process. The goal was to investigate both the effects of cation size and of cation charge. The membrane hydration number values obtained by this simple and direct method for a number of cations are: The hydration number for all of these cations seems to follow the same simple relation....

  13. Degassing a large LHe cryopump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denhoy, B.S.; Batzer, T.H.; Call, W.R.

    1977-01-01

    A method has been developed and successfully tested to degas a large LHe cryopump. Use of this method inhibits the normally excessive pressure rise during the degassing cycle when the degassing rate exceeds the external pumping capabilities of the system. A small appendage pump, installed close to the main cryopump, absorbs all the gas, as it is desorbed from the main cryopump, with no rise in the system pressure. The appendage pump can then be isolated from the main vacuum system and degassed at high pressure. We pumped 15 to 20 x 10 3 Torr . 1 of H 2 on a 1.25 m 2 panel. During the degassing cycle the system pressure never rose above 1 x 10 -4 Torr. In large vacuum systems for future fusion machines that contain cryopump panels as well as cryogenic magnets, this method is a unique and very useful tool. It will allow the degassing of cryopumps without affecting the temperature equilibrium of cryogenic magnets

  14. DFT studies of all fluorothiophenes and their cations as candidate monomers for conductive polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirani, Hossein, E-mail: shiranihossein@gmail.com [Young Researchers Club, Islamic Azad University, Toyserkan Branch, Toyserkan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jameh-Bozorghi, Saeed [Department of Chemistry, Islamic Azad University, Arak Branch, Arak (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Yousefi, Ali [Department of Computer Engineering, Islamic Azad University, Hamedan Branch, Hamedan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-01-22

    In this paper, electronic, structural, and properties of mono-, di-, tri-, and tetrafluorothiophenes and their radical cations are studied using the density functional theory and B3LYP method with 6-311++G** basis set. Also, the effects of the number and position of the substituent of fluorine atoms on the properties of the thiophene ring have been studied using optimized structures obtained for these molecules and their radical cations; vibrational frequencies, spin-density distribution, size and direction of the dipole moment vector, ionization potential, electric Polarizabilities, HOMO–LUMO gaps and NICS values of these compounds have been calculated and analyzed.

  15. Electromembrane extraction of heavy metal cations followed by capillary electrophoresis with capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubáň, Pavel; Strieglerová, Lenka; Gebauer, Petr; Boček, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 9 (2011), s. 1025-1032 ISSN 0173-0835 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/08/1536; GA ČR GAP206/10/1219; GA AV ČR IAA400310703 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : capillary electrophoresis * electromembrane extraction * heavy metal cations Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 3.303, year: 2011

  16. Spontaneous and CRH-Induced Excitability and Calcium Signaling in Mice Corticotrophs Involves Sodium, Calcium, and Cation-Conducting Channels

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zemková, Hana; Tomič, M.; Kučka, M.; Aguilera, G.; Stojilkovic, S. S.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 157, č. 4 (2016), s. 1576-1589 ISSN 0013-7227 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069; GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1604; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : action potential * background sodium conductance * bursting activity * cation -conducting channels * cytosolic calcium concentration * resting membrane potential Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 4.286, year: 2016

  17. Structural vs. intrinsic carriers: contrasting effects of cation chemistry and disorder on ionic conductivity in pyrochlores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perriot, Romain; Uberuaga, Blas P.

    2015-01-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the role of cation disorder on oxygen diffusion in Gd 2 Zr 2 O 7 (GZO) and Gd 2 Ti 2 O 7 (GTO) pyrochlores, a class of complex oxides which contain a structural vacancy relative to the basic fluorite structure. The introduction of disorder has distinct effects depending on the chemistry of the material, increasing the mobility of structural carriers by up to four orders of magnitude in GZO. In contrast, in GTO, there is no mobility at zero or low disorder on the ns timescale, but higher disorder liberates the otherwise immobile carriers, allowing diffusion with rates comparable to GZO for the fully disordered material. Here, we show that the cation disorder enhances the diffusivity by both increasing the concentration of mobile structural carriers and their individual mobility. The disorder also influences the diffusion in materials containing intrinsic carriers, such as additional vacancies VO or oxygen interstitials OI. And while in ordered GZO and GTO the contribution of the intrinsic carriers dominates the overall diffusion of oxygen, OI in GZO contributes along with structural carriers, and the total diffusion rate can be calculated by assuming simple additive contributions from the two sources. Although the disorder in the materials with intrinsic defects usually enhances the diffusivity as in the defect-free case, in low concentrations, cation antisites AB or BA, where A = Gd and B = Zr or Ti, can act as traps for fast intrinsic defects. The trapping results in a lowering of the diffusivity, and causes a non-monotonic behavior of the diffusivity with disorder. Conversely, in the case of slow intrinsic defects, the main effect of the disorder is to liberate the structural carriers, resulting in an increase of the diffusivity regardless of the defect trapping.

  18. Effect of Degassing Treatment on the Interfacial Reaction of Molten Aluminum and Solid Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triyono T.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The gas porosity is one of the most serious problems in the casting of aluminum. There are several degassing methods that have been studied. During smelting of aluminum, the intermetallic compound (IMC may be formed at the interface between molten aluminum and solid steel of crucible furnace lining. In this study, the effect of degassing treatment on the formations of IMC has been investigated. The rectangular substrate specimens were immersed in a molten aluminum bath. The holding times of the substrate immersions were in the range from 300 s to 1500 s. Two degassing treatments, argon degassing and hexachloroethane tablet degassing, were conducted to investigate their effect on the IMC formation. The IMC was examined under scanning electron microscope with EDX attachment. The thickness of the IMC layer increased with increasing immersion time for all treatments. Due to the high content of hydrogen, substrate specimens immersed in molten aluminum without degasser had IMC layer which was thicker than others. Argon degassing treatment was more effective than tablet degassing to reduce the IMC growth. Furthermore, the hard and brittle phase of IMC, FeAl3, was formed dominantly in specimens immersed for 900 s without degasser while in argon and tablet degasser specimens, it was formed partially.

  19. Electrical conductivity of pyroxene which contains trivalent cations: Laboratory measurements and the lunar temperature profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huebner, J.S.; Duba, A.; Wiggins, L.B.

    1979-01-01

    Three natural orthopyroxene single crystals, measured in the laboratory over the temperature range 850 0 --1200 0 C, are more than 1/2 order of magnitude more electrically conducting than previously measured crystals. Small concentrations (1--2%) of Al 2 O 3 and Cr 2 O 3 present in these crystals may be responsible for their relatively high conductivity. Such pyroxenes, which contain trivalent elements, are more representative of pyroxenes expected to be present in the lunar mantle than those which have been measured by other investigators. The new conductivity values for pyroxene are responsible for a relatively large bulk conductivity calculated for (polymineralic) lunar mantle assemblages. The results permit a somewhat cooler lunar temperature profile than previously proposed. Such lower profiles, several hundred degrees Celsius below the solidus, are quite consistent with low seismic attenuation and deep moonquakes observed in the lunar mantle

  20. Integrating high electrical conductivity and photocatalytic activity in cotton fabric by cationizing for enriched coating of negatively charged graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahito, Iftikhar Ali; Sun, Kyung Chul; Arbab, Alvira Ayoub; Qadir, Muhammad Bilal; Jeong, Sung Hoon

    2015-10-05

    Electroconductive textiles have attended tremendous focus recently and researchers are making efforts to increase conductivity of e-textiles, in order to increase the use of such flexible and low cost textile materials. In this study, surface conductivity and photo catalytic activity of standard cotton fabric (SCF) was enhanced by modifying its surface charge, from negative to positive, using Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) as a cationic agent, to convert it into cationised cotton fabric (CCF). Then, both types of fabrics were dip coated with a simple dip and dry technique for the adsorption of negatively charged graphene oxide (GO) sheets onto its surface. This resulted in 67.74% higher loading amount of GO on the CCF making self-assembly. Finally, this coating was chemically converted by vapor reduction using hydrazine hydrate to reduced graphene oxide (rGO) for restoration of a high electrical conductivity at the fabric surface. Our results revealed that with such high loading of GO, the surface resistance of CCF was only 40Ω/sq as compared to 510Ω/sq of the SCF and a 66% higher photo catalytic activity was also achieved through cationization for improved GO coating. Graphene coated SCF and CCF were characterized using FE-SEM, FTIR, Raman, UV-vis, WAXD, EDX and XPS spectroscopy to ascertain successful reduction of GO to rGO. The effect of BSA treatment on adsorption of cotton fabric was studied using drop shape analyzer to measure contact angle and for thermal and mechanical resistance, the fabric was tested for TGA and tensile strength, respectively. rGO coated fabric also showed slightly improved thermal stability yet a minor loss of strength was observed. The high flexibility, photocatalytic activity and excellent conductivity of this fabric suggests that it can be used as an electrode material for various applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. An evaluation of soluble cations and anions on the conductivity and rate of flocculation of kaolins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, Deborah Lee

    1998-10-01

    The focus of this project was to learn how ionic concentrations and their contributions to electric conductivity influence the flocculation behavior of kaolin/water suspensions. Sodium silicate, calcium chloride, and magnesium sulfate were used as chemical additives. The specific surface areas, particle size distributions, and methylene blue indices for two kaolins were measured. The SSA and MBI for these kaolins indicated that they possessed inherent differences in SSA and flocculation behaviors. Rheological studies were also performed. Testing included simultaneous gelation, deflocculation, and pH tests. Viscosity, pH, temperature, and chemical additive concentrations were monitored at each point. Testing was performed at 45/55 wt% solids. Effects of additions of various levels of deflocculant and flocculant to each of the kaolin/water suspensions were studied by making several suspensions from each kaolin. The concentrations of dispersant, and flocculant levels and types were varied to produce suspensions with different chemical additive "histories," but all with similar final apparent viscosities. Slurry filtrates were analyzed for conductivity, pH, temperature, and ion concentrations of (Al3+, Fe2+,3+, Ca 2+, Mg+, Na+, SO4 2--, and Cl--). Plastic properties were calculated to determine how variations in suspension histories affected conductivities, pH, and detectable ion contents of the suspensions. These analyses were performed on starting slurries which were under-, completely-, and over-deflocculated before further additions of flocculants and deflocculant were added to tune the slurries to the final, constant, target viscosity. Results showed that rates of flocculation and conductivities increased as concentrations of ions increased. By increasing conductivity correlations with increases in flocculation occurs, which yields higher rates of buildup, or RBU [1]. This is the single most important slip control property in the whitewares industry. Shear

  2. Coolant degassing device for PWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kita, Kaoru; Takezawa, Kazuaki; Minemoto, Masaki.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To efficiently decrease the rare gas concentration in primary coolants, as well as shorten the degassing time required for the periodical inspection in the waste gas processing system of a PWR type reactor. Constitution: Usual degassing method by supplying hydrogen or nitrogen to a volume control tank is replaced with a method of utilizing a degassing tower (method of flowing down processing liquid into the filled tower from above while uprising streams from the bottom of the tower thereby degassing the gases dissolved in the liquid into the steams). The degassing tower is combined with a hydrogen separator or hydrogen recombiner to constitute a waste gas processing system. (Ikeda, J.)

  3. Atomistic detailed mechanism and weak cation-conducting activity of HIV-1 Vpu revealed by free energy calculations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siladitya Padhi

    Full Text Available The viral protein U (Vpu encoded by HIV-1 has been shown to assist in the detachment of virion particles from infected cells. Vpu forms cation-specific ion channels in host cells, and has been proposed as a potential drug target. An understanding of the mechanism of ion transport through Vpu is desirable, but remains limited because of the unavailability of an experimental structure of the channel. Using a structure of the pentameric form of Vpu--modeled and validated based on available experimental data--umbrella sampling molecular dynamics simulations (cumulative simulation time of more than 0.4 µs were employed to elucidate the energetics and the molecular mechanism of ion transport in Vpu. Free energy profiles corresponding to the permeation of Na+ and K+ were found to be similar to each other indicating lack of ion selection, consistent with previous experimental studies. The Ser23 residue is shown to enhance ion transport via two mechanisms: creating a weak binding site, and increasing the effective hydrophilic length of the channel, both of which have previously been hypothesized in experiments. A two-dimensional free energy landscape has been computed to model multiple ion permeation, based on which a mechanism for ion conduction is proposed. It is shown that only one ion can pass through the channel at a time. This, along with a stretch of hydrophobic residues in the transmembrane domain of Vpu, explains the slow kinetics of ion conduction. The results are consistent with previous conductance studies that showed Vpu to be a weakly conducting ion channel.

  4. A solid phase extraction-ion chromatography with conductivity detection procedure for determining cationic surfactants in surface water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olkowska, Ewa; Polkowska, Żaneta; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2013-11-15

    A new analytical procedure for the simultaneous determination of individual cationic surfactants (alkyl benzyl dimethyl ammonium chlorides) in surface water samples has been developed. We describe this methodology for the first time: it involves the application of solid phase extraction (SPE-for sample preparation) coupled with ion chromatography-conductivity detection (IC-CD-for the final determination). Mean recoveries of analytes between 79% and 93%, and overall method quantification limits in the range from 0.0018 to 0.038 μg/mL for surface water and CRM samples were achieved. The methodology was applied to the determination of individual alkyl benzyl quaternary ammonium compounds in environmental samples (reservoir water) and enables their presence in such types of waters to be confirmed. In addition, it is a simpler, less time-consuming, labour-intensive, avoiding use of toxic chloroform and significantly less expensive methodology than previously described approaches (liquid-liquid extraction coupled with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Ion-exclusion/cation-exchange chromatography with dual detection of the conductivity and spectrophotometry for the simultaneous determination of common inorganic anionic species and cations in river and wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatani, Nobutake; Kozaki, Daisuke; Mori, Masanobu; Hasebe, Kiyoshi; Nakagoshi, Nobukazu; Tanaka, Kazuhiko

    2011-01-01

    Simultaneous determinations of common inorganic anionic species (SO(4)(2-), Cl(-), NO(3)(-), phosphate and silicate) and cations (Na(+), NH(4)(+), K(+), Mg(2+) and Ca(2+)) were conducted using an ion-chromatography system with dual detection of conductivity and spectrophotometry in tandem. The separation of ionic species on a weakly acidic cation-exchange resin was accomplished using a mixture of 100 mM ascorbic acid and 4 mM 18-crown-6 as an acidic eluent (pH 2.6), after which the ions were detected using a conductivity detector. Subsequently, phosphate and silicate were analyzed based on derivatization with molybdate and spectrophotometry at 700 nm. The detection limits at S/N = 3 ranged from 0.11 to 2.9 µM for analyte ionic species. This method was applied to practical river water and wastewater with acceptable criteria for the anion-cation balance and comparisons of the measured and calculated electrical conductivity, demonstrating the usefulness of the present method for water quality monitoring.

  6. Flow reduction due to degassing and redissolution phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doughty, C. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    At the Stripa mine in Sweden, flow and transport experiments in a water-saturated fractured granite were conducted to investigate techniques for site characterization for a geologic nuclear waste repository. In the Simulated Drift Experiment, measured water inflow to an excavated drift with pressure held at 1 bar was only 1/9th the value expected based on inflow to boreholes with pressure held at 2.7 bars. Several physical and chemical mechanisms were hypothesized to be responsible for this reduction in flow. One possibility is that significant degassing of dissolved nitrogen takes place between 2.7 and 1 bars, credating a two-phase regime with an accompanying decrease in fluid mobility, resulting in a decrease in flow to the drift. To investigate this process, theoretical studies on degassing and redissolution phenomena have been carried out, beginning with an idealized model which yields a simple analytical solution, then relaxing some of the simplifying assumptions and using TOUGH2 to study the phenomena numerically. In conjunction with these theoretical studies, laboratory experiments on flow and degassing in transparent fracture replicas are being carried out, and are being used to check the modeling approach. We need to develop a fundamental understanding of degassing and redissolution in particular and two-phase flow phenomena in general for flow in fractures and fracture networks, in order to successfully model conditions around a nuclear waste repository, where long time and large space scales may preclude conclusive field experiments.

  7. Update estimate emissions degassing inland tank vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Buck, A.; Hoen, M. ' t; Den Boer, E.

    2013-11-15

    At the exchange of cargos of petroleum or chemical products, ships can be degassed, resulting in emissions of VOCs (volatile organic compounds). CE Delft investigated the current size of degassing in the Netherlands. Results can serve as a basis for feasible and effective policies.

  8. Influence of anionic and cationic polyelectrolytes on the conductivity and morphology of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valtakari, Dimitar, E-mail: dimitar.valtakari@abo.fi [Abo Akademi University, Laboratory of Paper Coating and Converting, Center for Functional Materials at Biological Interfaces (FUNMAT), Porthansgatan 3, FI-20500 Åbo/Turku (Finland); Bollström, Roger [Omya International AG, CH 4665 Oftringen (Switzerland); Toivakka, Martti; Saarinen, Jarkko J. [Abo Akademi University, Laboratory of Paper Coating and Converting, Center for Functional Materials at Biological Interfaces (FUNMAT), Porthansgatan 3, FI-20500 Åbo/Turku (Finland)

    2015-09-01

    Conductivity of the poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) strongly depends on the film morphology, which can be altered by the presence of polyelectrolytes. Aqueous dispersion of PEDOT:PSS was studied with anionic sodium polyacrylate (PA) and cationic poly(dimethyldiallylammonium chloride) (pDADMAC) polyelectrolytes that are typically used in papermaking as retention aids and dispersing agents in the paper pigment coating formulations. Spin-coated PEDOT:PSS films on a PA coated glass formed non-uniform layers with lowered conductivity compared to the reference PEDOT:PSS films on a clean glass substrate. On contrary, spin-coated PEDOT:PSS on a pDADMAC coated glass formed uniform layers with good conductivity. These results point out the importance of surface chemistry when using renewable and recyclable paper-based substrates with the PEDOT:PSS films. - Highlights: • PEDOT:PSS polymer was studied in the presence of polyelectrolytes. • Uniform layers of PEDOT:PSS and polyelectrolytes were spin-coated on glass. • Cationic polyelectrolyte was found to be more susceptible to humidity. • Cationic polyelectrolyte improves the conductivity of PEDOT:PSS. • PEDOT:PSS forms non-uniform layers on anionic polyelectrolyte coated glass.

  9. Influence of anionic and cationic polyelectrolytes on the conductivity and morphology of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valtakari, Dimitar; Bollström, Roger; Toivakka, Martti; Saarinen, Jarkko J.

    2015-01-01

    Conductivity of the poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) strongly depends on the film morphology, which can be altered by the presence of polyelectrolytes. Aqueous dispersion of PEDOT:PSS was studied with anionic sodium polyacrylate (PA) and cationic poly(dimethyldiallylammonium chloride) (pDADMAC) polyelectrolytes that are typically used in papermaking as retention aids and dispersing agents in the paper pigment coating formulations. Spin-coated PEDOT:PSS films on a PA coated glass formed non-uniform layers with lowered conductivity compared to the reference PEDOT:PSS films on a clean glass substrate. On contrary, spin-coated PEDOT:PSS on a pDADMAC coated glass formed uniform layers with good conductivity. These results point out the importance of surface chemistry when using renewable and recyclable paper-based substrates with the PEDOT:PSS films. - Highlights: • PEDOT:PSS polymer was studied in the presence of polyelectrolytes. • Uniform layers of PEDOT:PSS and polyelectrolytes were spin-coated on glass. • Cationic polyelectrolyte was found to be more susceptible to humidity. • Cationic polyelectrolyte improves the conductivity of PEDOT:PSS. • PEDOT:PSS forms non-uniform layers on anionic polyelectrolyte coated glass

  10. Hypoxia activates a Ca2+-permeable cation conductance sensitive to carbon monoxide and to GsMTx-4 in human and mouse sickle erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandorpe, David H; Xu, Chang; Shmukler, Boris E; Otterbein, Leo E; Trudel, Marie; Sachs, Frederick; Gottlieb, Philip A; Brugnara, Carlo; Alper, Seth L

    2010-01-15

    Deoxygenation of sickle erythrocytes activates a cation permeability of unknown molecular identity (Psickle), leading to elevated intracellular [Ca(2+)] ([Ca(2+)](i)) and subsequent activation of K(Ca) 3.1. The resulting erythrocyte volume decrease elevates intracellular hemoglobin S (HbSS) concentration, accelerates deoxygenation-induced HbSS polymerization, and increases the likelihood of cell sickling. Deoxygenation-induced currents sharing some properties of Psickle have been recorded from sickle erythrocytes in whole cell configuration. We now show by cell-attached and nystatin-permeabilized patch clamp recording from sickle erythrocytes of mouse and human that deoxygenation reversibly activates a Ca(2+)- and cation-permeable conductance sensitive to inhibition by Grammastola spatulata mechanotoxin-4 (GsMTx-4; 1 microM), dipyridamole (100 microM), DIDS (100 microM), and carbon monoxide (25 ppm pretreatment). Deoxygenation also elevates sickle erythrocyte [Ca(2+)](i), in a manner similarly inhibited by GsMTx-4 and by carbon monoxide. Normal human and mouse erythrocytes do not exhibit these responses to deoxygenation. Deoxygenation-induced elevation of [Ca(2+)](i) in mouse sickle erythrocytes did not require KCa3.1 activity. The electrophysiological and fluorimetric data provide compelling evidence in sickle erythrocytes of mouse and human for a deoxygenation-induced, reversible, Ca(2+)-permeable cation conductance blocked by inhibition of HbSS polymerization and by an inhibitor of strctch-activated cation channels. This cation permeability pathway is likely an important source of intracellular Ca(2+) for pathologic activation of KCa3.1 in sickle erythrocytes. Blockade of this pathway represents a novel therapeutic approach for treatment of sickle disease.

  11. Hypoxia activates a Ca2+-permeable cation conductance sensitive to carbon monoxide and to GsMTx-4 in human and mouse sickle erythrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David H Vandorpe

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Deoxygenation of sickle erythrocytes activates a cation permeability of unknown molecular identity (Psickle, leading to elevated intracellular [Ca(2+] ([Ca(2+](i and subsequent activation of K(Ca 3.1. The resulting erythrocyte volume decrease elevates intracellular hemoglobin S (HbSS concentration, accelerates deoxygenation-induced HbSS polymerization, and increases the likelihood of cell sickling. Deoxygenation-induced currents sharing some properties of Psickle have been recorded from sickle erythrocytes in whole cell configuration.We now show by cell-attached and nystatin-permeabilized patch clamp recording from sickle erythrocytes of mouse and human that deoxygenation reversibly activates a Ca(2+- and cation-permeable conductance sensitive to inhibition by Grammastola spatulata mechanotoxin-4 (GsMTx-4; 1 microM, dipyridamole (100 microM, DIDS (100 microM, and carbon monoxide (25 ppm pretreatment. Deoxygenation also elevates sickle erythrocyte [Ca(2+](i, in a manner similarly inhibited by GsMTx-4 and by carbon monoxide. Normal human and mouse erythrocytes do not exhibit these responses to deoxygenation. Deoxygenation-induced elevation of [Ca(2+](i in mouse sickle erythrocytes did not require KCa3.1 activity.The electrophysiological and fluorimetric data provide compelling evidence in sickle erythrocytes of mouse and human for a deoxygenation-induced, reversible, Ca(2+-permeable cation conductance blocked by inhibition of HbSS polymerization and by an inhibitor of strctch-activated cation channels. This cation permeability pathway is likely an important source of intracellular Ca(2+ for pathologic activation of KCa3.1 in sickle erythrocytes. Blockade of this pathway represents a novel therapeutic approach for treatment of sickle disease.

  12. A cell shrinkage-induced non-selective cation conductance with a novel pharmacology in Ehrlich-Lettre-ascites tumour cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawonn, Peter; Hoffmann, Else K; Hougaard, Charlotte

    2003-01-01

    In whole-cell recordings on Ehrlich-Lettre-ascites tumour (ELA) cells, the shrinkage-induced activation of a cation conductance with a selectivity ratio P(Na):P(Li):P(K):P(choline):P(NMDG) of 1.00:0.97:0.88:0.03:0.01 was observed. In order of potency, this conductance was blocked by Gd(3+)=benzam......-sensitive and -insensitive channels. In addition, because of its pharmacological profile, it may possibly be related to epithelial Na+ channels (ENaCs)....

  13. Pinatubo Lake Chemistry and Degassing 1991-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwandner, F. M.; Newhall, C. G.; Christenson, B. W.; Apfelbeck, C. A.; Arpa, M. C. B.; Vaquilar, R.; Bariso, E.

    2016-12-01

    We review the history of degassing, bathymetry and water chemistry of the crater lake of Mt. Pinatubo (Philippines) using data obtained during 1991-2001, and 2010. In late 1992, the initial small lake had a significant acid-sulfate component from a volcanic degassing through a hydrothermal system and the lake, and anhydrite dissolution. Subsequently, this component was "drowned" by rainfall (2-4 m/y), meteoric groundwater draining from the crater walls into the lake, and a few neutral chloride crater wall springs. Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) measurements in August 2000 found a strong inverted thermal gradient below 20m depth, reaching over 70°C at 50-60 m depth. By January 2001 the lake had homogenized and was much cooler (27°C at all depths), and it was again well-mixed and still cool when re-surveyed in June 2001 and November 2010. By 2010, the lake was well mixed, at neutral pH, with no significant vertical or horizontal structure. Bubbling of a predominantly carbon dioxide (CO2) gas phase persists throughout the lake's history, some from 1991-92 magma and some from degassing of the long-standing (pre-1991) hydrothermal system fed from a deeper magmatic or mantle source. Crater wall fumaroles emit boiling-point hydrothermal gases dominated by water, air, and CO2.

  14. Liquid metal degassing in electromagnetic mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pakhomov, A I; EHL' -FAVAKHRI, KAMAL' -ABD-RABU MOKHAMED [LENINGRADSKIJ POLITEKHNICHESKIJ INST. (USSR)

    1977-01-01

    Experimental results for laboratory and industrial conditions are presented showing the favourable effect of electromagnetic mixing on hot metal degassing process. It has been found that the intensity and duration of the mixing process increase with the degree of iron and steel degassing. Initiation of cavitation phenomena during hot metal electromagnetic mixing is intensified because of the presence of alien inclusions in the metal reducing the tensile strength of the liquid metal. This is the most substantial factor contributing to the gas content in the process of electromagnetic mixing.

  15. Actinide cation-cation complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoyer, N.J.; Seaborg, G.T.

    1994-12-01

    The +5 oxidation state of U, Np, Pu, and Am is a linear dioxo cation (AnO 2 + ) with a formal charge of +1. These cations form complexes with a variety of other cations, including actinide cations. Other oxidation states of actinides do not form these cation-cation complexes with any cation other than AnO 2 + ; therefore, cation-cation complexes indicate something unique about AnO 2 + cations compared to actinide cations in general. The first cation-cation complex, NpO 2 + ·UO 2 2+ , was reported by Sullivan, Hindman, and Zielen in 1961. Of the four actinides that form AnO 2 + species, the cation-cation complexes of NpO 2 + have been studied most extensively while the other actinides have not. The only PuO 2 + cation-cation complexes that have been studied are with Fe 3+ and Cr 3+ and neither one has had its equilibrium constant measured. Actinides have small molar absorptivities and cation-cation complexes have small equilibrium constants; therefore, to overcome these obstacles a sensitive technique is required. Spectroscopic techniques are used most often to study cation-cation complexes. Laser-Induced Photacoustic Spectroscopy equilibrium constants for the complexes NpO 2 + ·UO 2 2+ , NpO 2 + ·Th 4+ , PuO 2 + ·UO 2 2+ , and PuO 2 + ·Th 4+ at an ionic strength of 6 M using LIPAS are 2.4 ± 0.2, 1.8 ± 0.9, 2.2 ± 1.5, and ∼0.8 M -1

  16. Diffuse CO2 degassing at Vesuvio, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frondini, Francesco; Chiodini, Giovanni; Caliro, Stefano; Cardellini, Carlo; Granieri, Domenico; Ventura, Guido

    2004-10-01

    At Vesuvio, a significant fraction of the rising hydrothermal-volcanic fluids is subjected to a condensation and separation process producing a CO2-rich gas phase, mainly expulsed through soil diffuse degassing from well defined areas called diffuse degassing structures (DDS), and a liquid phase that flows towards the outer part of the volcanic cone. A large amount of thermal energy is associated with the steam condensation process and subsequent cooling of the liquid phase. The total amount of volcanic-hydrothermal CO2 discharged through diffuse degassing has been computed through a sequential Gaussian simulation (sGs) approach based on several hundred accumulation chamber measurements and, at the time of the survey, amounted to 151 t d-1. The steam associated with the CO2 output, computed assuming that the original H2O/CO2 ratio of hydrothermal fluids is preserved in fumarolic effluents, is 553 t d-1, and the energy produced by the steam condensation and cooling of the liquid phase is 1.47×1012 J d-1 (17 MW). The location of the CO2 and temperature anomalies show that most of the gas is discharged from the inner part of the crater and suggests that crater morphology and local stratigraphy exert strong control on CO2 degassing and subsurface steam condensation. The amounts of gas and energy released by Vesuvio are comparable to those released by other volcanic degassing areas of the world and their estimates, through periodic surveys of soil CO2 flux, can constitute a useful tool to monitor volcanic activity.

  17. Laboratory studies of groundwater degassing in replicas of natural fractured rock for linear flow geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geller, J.T.

    1998-02-01

    Laboratory experiments to simulate two-phase (gas and water) flow in fractured rock evolving from groundwater degassing were conducted in transparent replicas of natural rock fractures. These experiments extend the work by Geller et al. (1995) and Jarsjo and Geller (1996) that tests the hypothesis that groundwater degassing caused observed flow reductions in the Stripa Simulated Drift Experiment (SDE). Understanding degassing effects over a range of gas contents is needed due to the uncertainty in the gas contents of the water at the SDE. The main objectives of this study were to: (1) measure the effect of groundwater degassing on liquid flow rates for lower gas contents than the values used in Geller for linear flow geometry in the same fracture replicas of Geller; (2) provide a data set to develop a predictive model of two-phase flow in fractures for conditions of groundwater degassing; and (3) improve the certainty of experimental gas contents (this effort included modifications to the experimental system used by Geller et al. and separate gas-water equilibration tests). The Stripa site is being considered for a high-level radioactive waste repository

  18. Theoretical analysis and experimental study of spray degassing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Ruizhi; Shu Da; Sun Baode; Wang Jun; Li Fei; Chen Haiyan; Lu YanLing

    2005-01-01

    A new hydrogen-removal method of aluminum melt, spray degassing, is presented. The thermodynamic and kinetic analysis of the method are discussed. A comparison between the thermodynamics and kinetics of the spray degassing method and rotary impellor degassing method is made. The thermodynamic analysis shows that the relationship between the final hydrogen content of the aluminum melt and the ratio of purge gas flow rate to melt flow rate is linear. The result of thermodynamic calculation shows that, in spray degassing, when the ratio of G/q is larger than 2.2 x 10 -6 , the final hydrogen content will be less than 0.1 ml/100 g Al. From the kinetic analysis, the degassing effect is affected by both the size of melt droplets and the time that melt droplets move from sprayer to the bottom of the treatment tank. In numerical calculation, the hydrogen in aluminum melt can be degassed to 0.05 ml/100 g Al from 0.2 ml/100 g Al in 0.02 s with the spray degassing method. Finally, the water-model experiments are presented with the spray degassing method and rotary impellor degassing method. Melt experiments are also presented. Both the water-model experiments and the melt experiments show that the degassing effect of the spray degassing method is better than that of the rotary impeller method

  19. Impact of reclaimed water irrigation on soil salinity, hydraulic conductivity, cation exchange capacity and macro-nutrients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saif A. Al-Khamisi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Field studies were conducted at Agriculture Research Center, Oman during the year 2010/2011 to monitor the impact of reclaimed water irrigation on soil physical and chemical properties after wheat, cowpea and maize cultivation (in rotation. Three different water sources (Groundwater (GW, desalinized water (DW, and Reclaimed Water (RW were used as the treatments in Randomized Completely Block Design (RCBD with 3 blocks (replicates. Samples were taken from four depths (30, 45, 60 and 90 cm after harvesting time of the three crops. Soil salinity (ECe in all soil depths decreased with time. Organic carbon did not show significant difference between harvest timings of wheat and cowpea. Organic carbon increased with time in soil irrigated with reclaimed water. The saturated hydraulic conductivity of the soil, Ksat didn’t show significant difference among the water types and their interaction with soil depths. Total nitrogen was the highest after cowpea harvest in reclaimed water irrigation. The soil phosphorus and potassium were not affected by any of the three water irrigation types. The highest concentrations of phosphorus and potassium were found to be in the upper soil layers. Overall, no adverse impacts of reclaimed water irrigation were observed after growing three crops of rotation.

  20. Volatilization: a soil degassing coefficient for iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheppard, M.I.; Thibault, D.H.; Smith, P.A.; Hawkins, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    Iodine, an element essential to some animals, is ubiquitous in the biosphere. Unlike other metallic elements, molecular I is volatile, and other inorganic species present in aerated soils, such as I - and IO 3 - , may also volatilize as hydrides, hydrogen iodide (HI), or hydrogen iodates (HIO 3 , HIO 4 ). Methyl iodide has been measured in soils, and it is likely evolved from soils and plants. The long-lived radioisotope 129 I is abundant in nuclear wastes, and its high solubility in groundwater makes it an important element in the performance assessment of underground disposal facilities. Overestimates of soil I residence half-times by traditional foodchain models may be due to underestimation of volatilization. Field and lysimeter experiments over a 3-year period, and direct trapping experiments in the laboratory are reported. The results, combined with values from the literature, indicate the soil I degassing coefficient for a wide range of soil types, vegetated and bare, wet and dry, is lognormally distributed with a geometric mean of 2.1 x 10 -2 year -1 , a range of 1.8 x 10 -4 to 3.1 year -1 and a geometric standard deviation of 3.0. The results of a biosphere model simulation including degassing reduces soil I concentrations fivefold and increases air concentrations 25-fold at steady state, compared to simulations without degassing. (author)

  1. Degassing of reduced carbon from planetary basalts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzel, Diane T; Rutherford, Malcolm J; Jacobsen, Steven D; Hauri, Erik H; Saal, Alberto E

    2013-05-14

    Degassing of planetary interiors through surface volcanism plays an important role in the evolution of planetary bodies and atmospheres. On Earth, carbon dioxide and water are the primary volatile species in magmas. However, little is known about the speciation and degassing of carbon in magmas formed on other planets (i.e., Moon, Mars, Mercury), where the mantle oxidation state [oxygen fugacity (fO2)] is different from that of the Earth. Using experiments on a lunar basalt composition, we confirm that carbon dissolves as carbonate at an fO2 higher than -0.55 relative to the iron wustite oxygen buffer (IW-0.55), whereas at a lower fO2, we discover that carbon is present mainly as iron pentacarbonyl and in smaller amounts as methane in the melt. The transition of carbon speciation in mantle-derived melts at fO2 less than IW-0.55 is associated with a decrease in carbon solubility by a factor of 2. Thus, the fO2 controls carbon speciation and solubility in mantle-derived melts even more than previous data indicate, and the degassing of reduced carbon from Fe-rich basalts on planetary bodies would produce methane-bearing, CO-rich early atmospheres with a strong greenhouse potential.

  2. A fixed cations and low Tg polymer: the poly(4-vinyl-pyridine) quaternized by poly(ethylene oxide) links. Conductivity study; Un electrolyte polymere a cations fixes et bas Tg: les poly(4-vinylpyridine) quaternisees par des chainons de poly(oxyde d`ethylene). Etude de la conductivite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gramain, Ph. [Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Montpellier, 34 (France); Frere, Y. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 67 - Strasbourg (France). Institut Charles Sadron

    1996-12-31

    The spontaneous ionic polymerization of 4-vinyl-pyridine in presence of mono-tosylated or bromated short chains of poly(ethylene oxide)-(PEO) is used to prepare amorphous comb-like poly-cations with low Tg. The polymer electrolyte properties of these new structures have been studied without any addition of salts. The ionic conductivity of these fixed cation poly-electrolytes depends on the length of the grafted PEO and varies from 10{sup -7} to 10{sup -4} S/cm between 25 and 80 deg. C. It is only weakly dependent on the nature of the cation but it is controlled by the movements of the pyridinium cation which are facilitated by the plastifying effect of the POE chains which do not directly participate to the ionic transport. (J.S.) 17 refs.

  3. A fixed cations and low Tg polymer: the poly(4-vinyl-pyridine) quaternized by poly(ethylene oxide) links. Conductivity study; Un electrolyte polymere a cations fixes et bas Tg: les poly(4-vinylpyridine) quaternisees par des chainons de poly(oxyde d`ethylene). Etude de la conductivite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gramain, Ph [Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Montpellier, 34 (France); Frere, Y [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 67 - Strasbourg (France). Institut Charles Sadron

    1997-12-31

    The spontaneous ionic polymerization of 4-vinyl-pyridine in presence of mono-tosylated or bromated short chains of poly(ethylene oxide)-(PEO) is used to prepare amorphous comb-like poly-cations with low Tg. The polymer electrolyte properties of these new structures have been studied without any addition of salts. The ionic conductivity of these fixed cation poly-electrolytes depends on the length of the grafted PEO and varies from 10{sup -7} to 10{sup -4} S/cm between 25 and 80 deg. C. It is only weakly dependent on the nature of the cation but it is controlled by the movements of the pyridinium cation which are facilitated by the plastifying effect of the POE chains which do not directly participate to the ionic transport. (J.S.) 17 refs.

  4. Surface Modification of Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes with Cationic Conjugated Polyelectrolytes: Fundamental Interactions and Intercalation into Conductive Poly(methyl-methacrylate) Composites

    KAUST Repository

    Ezzeddine, Alaa

    2015-05-22

    This research investigates the modification and dispersion and of pristine multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) through a simple solution mixing technique based on noncovalent interactions between poly(phenylene ethynylene) based conjugated polyelectrolytes functionalized with cationic imidazolium solubilizing groups (PIM-2 and PIM-4) and MWCNTs. Spectroscopic studies demonstrated the ability of PIMs to strongly interact with and efficiently disperse MWCNTs in different solvents mainly due to π-interactions between the PIMs and MWCNTs. Transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy revealed the coating of the polyelectrolytes on the walls of the nanotubes. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies confirm the homogenous dispersion of PIM modified MWCNTs in poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) matrix. The addition of 1 wt% PIM modified MWCNTs to the matrix has led to a significant decrease in DC resistivity of the composite (13 orders of magnitude). The increase in electrical conductivity and the improvement in thermal and mechanical properties of the membranes containing the PIM modified MWCNTs is ascribed to the formation of MWCNTs networks and cross-linking sites that provided channels for the electrons to move in throughout the matrix and reinforced the interface between MWCNTs and PMMA.

  5. Carbon dioxide degassing in fresh and saline water I: Degassing performance of a cascade column

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moran, Damian

    2010-01-01

    A study was undertaken to measure carbon dioxide degassing in a cascade column operating with both fresh (0‰) and saline water (35‰ NaCl) at 15 °C. The cascade column contained bio-block type packing material, was 1.7 m long in each dimension, and was tested both with and without countercurrent a...

  6. Thermodynamics of self-assembling of mixture of a cationic gemini surfactant and sodium dodecylsulfate in aqueous solution: Calorimetry, conductivity and surface pressure measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Guangyue; Wang, Yujie; Ding, Yanhong; Zhuo, Kelei; Wang, Jianji; Bastos, Margarida

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • ITC provided thermodynamic characterization of self-association of oppositely charged gemini/SDS surfactants. • Phase transitions and corresponding enthalpies were obtained by ITC. • The transitions reflect a change in morphology, supported by Cryo-TEM images. • Conductivity and ITC results show very good agreement. • An asymmetric distribution of surfactants in the aggregates is supported by results. - Abstract: The thermodynamics and phase behavior of mixtures of cationic gemini surfactant decanediyl-α,ω-bis(dodecyldimethylammonium bromide) (12-10-12) and sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) were studied in the dilute SDS-rich region. The enthalpy of interaction between both surfactant monomers before the critical micelle concentration for the mixture (cmc_m_i_x) was determined by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). After the cmc_m_i_x, ITC results exhibited a first process associated with a large endothermic enthalpy change followed by a second one with a very small exothermic enthalpy change. In the same regions, the conductivity curves show an increase in slope after the break, followed by a plateau region, respectively for the two processes. The combined results from the various methodologies used lead us to propose that the first process reflects the formation of non-spherical micelles and the second one the vesicle formation. The area per catanionic complex was obtained through surface pressure measurements, leading to an apparent packing parameter ⩾1. The observed behavior may be rationalized on the basis of the hypothesis that both surfactants distribute asymmetrically in the vesicle bilayers and unevenly in the non-spherical micelle. In order to get structural information Cryo-TEM experiments were performed, which provided images that support this interpretation. From all the information gathered a phase diagram was mapped, including three one-phase regions of spherical micelles, non-spherical micelles and vesicles.

  7. Denitrogenation model for vacuum tank degasser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobinath, R.; Vetrivel Murugan, R.

    2018-02-01

    Nitrogen in steel is both beneficial and detrimental depending on grade of steel and its application. To get desired low nitrogen during vacuum degassing process, VD parameters namely vacuum level, argon flow rate and holding time has to optimized depending upon initial nitrogen level. In this work a mathematical model to simulate nitrogen removal in tank degasser is developed and how various VD parameters affects nitrogen removal is studied. Ladle water model studies with bottom purging have shown two distinct flow regions, namely the plume region and the outside plume region. The two regions are treated as two separate reactors exchanging mass between them and complete mixing is assumed in both the reactors. In the plume region, transfer of nitrogen to single bubble is simulated. At the gas-liquid metal interface (bubble interface) thermodynamic equilibrium is assumed and the transfer of nitrogen from bulk liquid metal in the plume region to the gas-metal interface is obtained using mass transport principles. The model predicts variation of Nitrogen content in both the reactors with time. The model is validated with industrial process and the predicted results were found to have fair agreement with the measured results.

  8. 75 FR 67100 - Superalloy Degassed Chromium From Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    ... Chromium From Japan AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Institution of a five-year review concerning the antidumping duty order on superalloy degassed chromium from Japan. SUMMARY... order on superalloy degassed chromium from Japan would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence...

  9. 76 FR 8773 - Superalloy Degassed Chromium From Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-15

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 731-TA-1090 (Review)] Superalloy Degassed Chromium From Japan AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Termination of five-year... revocation of the antidumping duty order on superalloy degassed chromium from Japan would be likely to lead...

  10. Activation of a Ca2+-dependent cation conductance with properties of TRPM2 by reactive oxygen species in lens epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keckeis, Susanne; Wernecke, Laura; Salchow, Daniel J; Reichhart, Nadine; Strauß, Olaf

    2017-08-01

    Ion channels are crucial for maintenance of ion homeostasis and transparency of the lens. The lens epithelium is the metabolically and electrophysiologically active cell type providing nutrients, ions and water to the lens fiber cells. Ca 2+ -dependent non-selective ion channels seem to play an important role for ion homeostasis. The aim of the study was to identify and characterize Ca 2+ - and reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent non-selective cation channels in human lens epithelial cells. RT-PCR revealed gene expression of the Ca 2+ -activated non-selective cation channels TRPC3, TRPM2, TRPM4 and Ano6 in both primary lens epithelial cells and the cell line HLE-B3, whereas TRPM5 mRNA was only found in HLE-B3 cells. Using whole-cell patch-clamp technique, ionomycin evoked non-selective cation currents with linear current-voltage relationship in both cell types. The current was decreased by flufenamic acid (FFA), 2-APB, 9-phenanthrol and miconazole, but insensitive to DIDS, ruthenium red, and intracellularly applied spermine. H 2 O 2 evoked a comparable current, abolished by FFA. TRPM2 protein expression in HLE-B3 cells was confirmed by means of immunocytochemistry and western blot. In summary, we conclude that lens epithelial cells functionally express Ca 2+ - and H 2 O 2 -activated non-selective cation channels with properties of TRPM2. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of sodium cation-conducting Nax(MyL1-yO2 (M = Ni2+, Fe3+; L = Ti4+, Sb5+

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marques, F. M. B.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The Na+-conducting ceramics of layered Na0.8Ni0.4Ti0.6O2, Na0.8Fe0.8Ti0.2O2, Na0.8Ni0.6Sb0.4O2 (structural type O3 and Na0.68Ni0.34Ti0.66O2 (P2 type with density higher than 91% were prepared via the standard solid-state synthesis route and characterized by the impedance spectroscopy, thermal analysis, scanning electron microscopy, structure refinement using X-ray powder diffraction data, measurements of Na+ concentration cell e.m.f., and dilatometry. The conductivity of antimonate Na0.8Ni0.6Sb0.4O2, synthesized first time, was found lower than that of isostructural Na0.8Ni0.4Ti0.6O2 due to larger ion jump distance between Na+ sites. At temperatures above 420 K, transport properties of sodium cationconducting materials are essentially independent of partial water vapor pressure. In the low-temperature range, the conductivity reversibly increases with water vapor pressure varied in the range from approximately 0 (dry air up to 0.46 atm. The sensitivity to air humidity is influenced by the ceramic microstructure, being favored by increasing boundary area. The average thermal expansion coefficients of layered materials at 300-1173 K are in the range (13.7-16.0×10-6 K-1.Se han preparado cerámicas conductoras conteniendo Na+ de composición Na0.8Ni0.4Ti0.6O2, Na0.8Fe0.8Ti0.2O2, Na0.8Ni0.6Sb0.4O2 (tipo estructural O3 y Na0.68Ni0.34Ti0.66O2 (tipo P2 con densidad mayor del 91%. Las vía de preparación fu la ruta de estandard de síntesis en estado sólido. Las composiciones se caracterizaron mediante espectroscopía de impedancia, análisis térmico, microscopía electrónica de barrido, refinamiento de la estructura usando datos de difracción de rayos X en polvo, medidas de concentración de Na+, f.e.m. de la célula y dilatometría. La conductividad del antimoniate, sintetizado por primera vez, Na0.8Ni0.6Sb0.4O2, era menor que la del compuesto isoestructural Na0.8Ni0.4Ti0.6O2 debido a la mayor distancia de salto iónico entre las posiciones de Na

  12. Hypoxia activates a Ca2+-permeable cation conductance sensitive to carbon monoxide and to GsMTx-4 in human and mouse sickle erythrocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    David H Vandorpe; Chang Xu; Boris E Shmukler; Leo E Otterbein; Marie Trudel; Frederick Sachs; Philip A Gottlieb; Carlo Brugnara; Seth L Alper

    2010-01-01

    Background: Deoxygenation of sickle erythrocytes activates a cation permeability of unknown molecular identity (Psickle), leading to elevated intracellular [Ca2+] ([Ca2+]i) and subsequent activation of KCa 3.1. The resulting erythrocyte volume decrease elevates intracellular hemoglobin S (HbSS) concentration, accelerates deoxygenation-induced HbSS polymerization, and increases the likelihood of cell sickling. Deoxygenation-induced currents sharing some properties of Psickle have been recorded...

  13. A degassing instrument for analysing CO2 dissolved in natural water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, Brian; Pfrang, Christian

    2017-04-01

    Arising from our EGU 2017 presentation (http://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EGU2016/posters/20564, X2 352), interest has been expressed in its application to the analysis of the hydrocarbonate ion [HCO3-] in atmospheric water. Arising from the historic difficulty in analysing the aqueous [HCO3-] ion ('it is in all our reagents', pers. comm. UK laboratory) the classic determination has been to measure a suite of other anions and cations including [H+] via pH, and to treat the balance of negative charge as a measure of [HCO3-]. From this balance, dissolved CO2 can be inferred via the dissociation constant as published for pure water. CO2 + H2O ⇓♢[HCO3-] + [H+] K1 = 4.2 x 10-7 Our EGU 2016 presentation sought to determine how the ionic environment in 263 UK rain samples can influence the above equilibrium, which is work in progress. In the mean time we have received the following expression of interest from an atmospheric science advisory group. …….. is very interested in the role of H-carbonate in the ion balance of precipitation. They have had some discussions recently about the best approach to infer H-carbonate currently discussing the possibility of sending you samples from other locations for analysis. We have duly offered to use our degassing instrument to corroborate current analyses in a batch of 'blind' samples, and to provide a design for a basic degasser that water quality laboratories could evaluate in house. This paper therefore presents a circuit for degassing CO2 from water samples irrespective of whether in atmospheric equilibrium or supersaturated, including a prototype 4-way distribution and collection valve which it is hoped will make the analysis intuitive and therefore open to automation.

  14. The influence of episodic shallow magma degassing on heat and chemical transport in volcanic hydrothermal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kewei; Zhan, Hongbin; Burns, Erick; Ingebritsen, Steven E.; Agrinier, Pierre

    2018-01-01

    Springs at La Soufrière of Guadeloupe have been monitored for nearly four decades since the phreatic eruption and associated seismic activity in 1976. We conceptualize degassing vapor/gas mixtures as square‐wave sources of chloride and heat and apply a new semianalytic solution to demonstrate that chloride and heat pulses with the same timing and duration result in good matches between measured and simulated spring temperatures and concentrations. While the concentration of chloride pulses is variable, the local boiling temperature of 96°C was assigned to all thermal pulses. Because chloride is a conservative tracer, chloride breakthrough is only affected by one‐dimensional advection and dispersion. The thermal tracer is damped and lagged relative to chloride due to conductive heat exchange with the overlying and underlying strata. Joint analysis of temperature and chloride allows estimation of the onset and duration of degassing pulses, refining the chronology of recent magmatic intrusion.

  15. Degassing Processes at Persistently Active Explosive Volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smekens, Jean-Francois

    Among volcanic gases, sulfur dioxide (SO2) is by far the most commonly measured. More than a monitoring proxy for volcanic degassing, SO 2 has the potential to alter climate patterns. Persistently active explosive volcanoes are characterized by short explosive bursts, which often occur at periodic intervals numerous times per day, spanning years to decades. SO 2 emissions at those volcanoes are poorly constrained, in large part because the current satellite monitoring techniques are unable to detect or quantify plumes of low concentration in the troposphere. Eruption plumes also often show high concentrations of ash and/or aerosols, which further inhibit the detection methods. In this work I focus on quantifying volcanic gas emissions at persistently active explosive volcanoes and their variations over short timescales (minutes to hours), in order to document their contribution to natural SO2 flux as well as investigate the physical processes that control their behavior. In order to make these measurements, I first develop and assemble a UV ground-based instrument, and validate it against an independently measured source of SO2 at a coal-burning power plant in Arizona. I establish a measurement protocol and demonstrate that the instrument measures SO 2 fluxes with Indonesia), a volcano that has been producing cycles of repeated explosions with periods of minutes to hours for the past several decades. Semeru produces an average of 21-71 tons of SO2 per day, amounting to a yearly output of 8-26 Mt. Using the Semeru data, along with a 1-D transient numerical model of magma ascent, I test the validity of a model in which a viscous plug at the top of the conduit produces cycles of eruption and gas release. I find that it can be a valid hypothesis to explain the observed patterns of degassing at Semeru. Periodic behavior in such a system occurs for a very narrow range of conditions, for which the mass balance between magma flux and open-system gas escape repeatedly

  16. Loss of shutdown cooling during degassing in Doel 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The presentation describes loss of shutdown cooling event during degassing in Doel 1 reactor, including description of Doel 1 features,status of plant prior to incident, event sequence and incident causes

  17. Spatial variability in degassing at Erebus volcano, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilanko, Tehnuka; Oppenheimer, Clive; Kyle, Philip; Burgisser, Alain

    2015-04-01

    Erebus volcano on Ross Island, Antarctica, hosts an active phonolitic lava lake, along with a number of persistently degassing vents in its summit crater. Flank degassing also occurs through ice caves and towers. The longevity of the lake, and its stable convection, have been the subject of numerous studies, including Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy of the lava lake. Two distinct gas compositions were previously identified in the main lava lake plume (Oppenheimer et al., 2009; 2011): a persistent 'conduit' gas with a more oxidised signature, ascribed to degassing through a permeable magma conduit; and a H2O- and SO2- enriched 'lake' composition that increases and decreases cyclically due to shallow degassing of incoming magma batches. During the past decade of annual field seasons on Erebus, gas compositions have been measured through FTIR spectroscopy at multiple sites around Erebus volcano, including flank degassing through an ice cave (Warren Cave). We present measurements from four such vents, and compare their compositions to those emitted from the main lava lake. Summit degassing involves variable proportions of H2O, CO2, CO, SO2, HF, HCl, OCS. Cyclicity is evident in some summit vents, but with signatures indicative of shallower magmatic degassing than that of the lava lake. By contrast, flank degassing at Warren Cave is dominated by H2O, CO2, and CH4. The spatial variability in gas compositions within the summit crater suggests an alternative origin for 'conduit' and 'lake' degassing to previous models that assume permeability in the main conduit. Rather, the two compositions observed in main lake degassing may be a result of decoupled 'conduit' gas and pulses of magma rising through discrete fractures before combining in the lake floor or the main plume. Smaller vents around the crater thus emit isolated 'lake' or 'conduit' compositions while their combined signature is observed in the lava lake. We suggest that this separation between gas

  18. The atypical cation-conduction and gating properties of ELIC underscore the marked functional versatility of the pentameric ligand-gated ion-channel fold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Gutierrez, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    The superfamily of pentameric ligand-gated ion channels (pLGICs) is unique among ionotropic receptors in that the same overall structure has evolved to generate multiple members with different combinations of agonist specificities and permeant-ion charge selectivities. However, aside from these differences, pLGICs have been typically regarded as having several invariant functional properties. These include pore blockade by extracellular quaternary-ammonium cations in the micromolar-to-millimolar concentration range (in the case of the cation-selective members), and a gain-of-function phenotype, which manifests as a slower deactivation time course, as a result of mutations that reduce the hydrophobicity of the transmembrane pore lining. Here, we tested this notion on three distantly related cation-selective members of the pLGIC superfamily: the mouse muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR), and the bacterial GLIC and ELIC channels. Remarkably, we found that, whereas low millimolar concentrations of TMA+ and TEA+ block the nAChR and GLIC, neither of these two quaternary-ammonium cations blocks ELIC at such concentrations; instead, both carry measurable inward currents when present as the only cations on the extracellular side. Also, we found that, whereas lidocaine binding speeds up the current-decay time courses of the nAChR and GLIC in the presence of saturating concentrations of agonists, the binding of lidocaine to ELIC slows this time course down. Furthermore, whereas mutations that reduce the hydrophobicity of the side chains at position 9′ of the M2 α-helices greatly slowed the deactivation time course of the nAChR and GLIC, these mutations had little effect—or even sped up deactivation—when engineered in ELIC. Our data indicate that caution should be exercised when generalizing results obtained with ELIC to the rest of the pLGICs, but more intriguingly, they hint at the possibility that ELIC is a representative of a novel branch of the

  19. Tuning the optical bandgap in multi-cation compound transparent conducting-oxides: The examples of In2ZnO4 and In4Sn3O12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabino, Fernando P.; Oliveira, Luiz N.; Wei, Su-Huai; Da Silva, Juarez L. F.

    2018-02-01

    Transparent conducting oxides such as the bixbyite In2O3 and rutile SnO2 systems have large disparities between the optical and fundamental bandgaps, ΔEgO F , because selection rules forbid dipolar transitions from the top of the valence band to the conduction-band minimum; however, the optical gaps of multi-cation compounds with the same chemical species often coincide with their fundamental gaps. To explain this conundrum, we have employed density-functional theory to compute the optical properties of multi-cation compounds, In2ZnO4 and In4Sn3O12, in several crystal structures. We show that a recently proposed mechanism to explain the disparity between the optical and fundamental gaps of M2O3 (M = Al, Ga, and In) applies also to other binary systems and to multi-compounds. Namely, a gap disparity will arise if the following three conditions are satisfied: (i) the crystal structure has inversion symmetry; (ii) the conduction-band minimum is formed by the cation and O s-orbitals; and (iii) there is strong p-d coupling and weak p-p in the vicinity of the valence-band maximum. The third property depends critically on the cationic chemical species. In the structures with inversion symmetry, Zn (Sn) strengthens (weakens) the p-d coupling in In2ZnO4 (In4Sn3O12), enhancing (reducing) the gap disparity. Furthermore, we have also identified a In4Sn3O12 structure that is 31.80 meV per formula unit more stable than a recently proposed alternative model.

  20. Preparation and characterization of electrically conducting polypyrrole Sn(IV phosphate cation-exchanger and its application as Mn(II ion selective membrane electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Khan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Polypyrrole Sn(IV phosphate, an organic–inorganic composite cation-exchanger was synthesized via sol-gel mixing of an organic polymer, polypyrrole, into the matrices of the inorganic precipitate of Sn(IV phosphate. The physico-chemical properties of the material were determined using Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS, CHN elemental analysis (inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, ICP-MS, UV–VIS spectrophotometry, FTIR (Fourier Transform Infra-Red, SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy, TGA–DTA (Thermogravimetric Analysis–Differential Thermal Analysis, and XRD (X-ray diffraction. Ion-exchange behavior was observed to characterize the material. On the basis of distribution studies, the material was found to be highly selective for toxic heavy metal ion Mn2+. Due to its selective nature, the material was used as an electroactive component for the construction of an ion-selective membrane electrode. The proposed electrode shows fairly good discrimination of mercury ion over several other inorganic ions. The analytical utility of this electrode was established by employing it as an indicator electrode in electrometric titrations for Mn(II in water.

  1. Groundwater degassing in fractured rock: Modelling and data comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarsjoe, J.; Destouni, G. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Water Resources Engineering

    1998-11-01

    Dissolved gas may be released from deep groundwater in the vicinity of open boreholes and drifts, where the water pressures are relatively low. Degassing of groundwater may influence observations of hydraulic conditions made in drifts, interpretation of experiments performed close to drifts, and buffer mass and backfill performance, particularly during emplacement and repository closure. Under certain conditions, considerable fracture inflow and transmissivity reductions have been observed during degassing experiments in the field and in the laboratory; such reductions affect the outcome and interpretation of both hydraulic and tracer tests. We develop models for the estimation of the resulting degree of fracture gas saturation and the associated transmissivity reduction due to groundwater degassing in fractured rock. Derived expressions for bubble trapping probability show that fracture aperture variability and correlation length influence the conditions for capillary bubble trapping and gas accumulation. The laboratory observations of bubble trapping in an Aespoe fracture replica are consistent with the prediction of a relatively high probability of bubble trapping in this fracture. The prediction was based on the measured aperture distribution of the Aespoe fracture and the applied hydraulic gradient. Results also show that the conceptualisation of gas and water occupancy in a fracture greatly influences model predictions of gas saturation and relative transmissivity. Images from laboratory degassing experiments indicate that tight apertures are completely filled with water, whereas both gas and water exist in wider apertures under degassing conditions; implementation of this relation in our model resulted in the best agreement between predictions and laboratory observations. Model predictions for conditions similar to those prevailing in field for single fractures at great depths indicate that degassing effects in boreholes should generally be small, unless the

  2. A short term NaCl exposure increases the Na+ conductance of outward-rectified cation currents in the pith cells of sweet pepper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, M.; Vogelzang, S.A.

    2003-01-01

    The regulatory role of pith cells in the stem in Na recirculation in sweet pepper was investigated by evaluating the transport characteristics of the plasma membrane of this cell type and comparison with those of root cells. Ion conductivity and Na permeability of the plasma membranes of protoplasts

  3. Relationship between Diffuse CO2 Degassing and Volcanic Activity. Case Study of the Poás, Irazú, and Turrialba Volcanoes, Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthieu Epiard

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Active volcanoes exhibit diffuse gas emanations through the ground, the most abundant species of which is CO2. However, the relationship between diffuse degassing and volcanic activity is not often clear and some volcanoes may have low diffuse degassing levels despite having strong volcanic activity. The main goals of this study are to quantify diffuse CO2 degassing and determine whether patterns exist in relation to volcanic activity through the study of Turrialba, Poás, and Irazú, three active volcanoes in Costa Rica which are at different stages of activity. Structural controls of spatial distribution of diffuse degassing were also investigated. Measurement campaigns were conducted using the accumulation chamber method coupled with 10 cm depth ground temperature sampling with the aim of estimating the total diffuse CO2 degassing budget. The total amount of CO2 emitted diffusely by each volcano is ~113 ± 46 t/d over ~0.705 km2 for Turrialba, 0.9 ± 0.5 t/d for Poás over ~0.734 km2, 3.8 ± 0.9 t/d over ~0.049 km2 for Irazú's main crater, and 15 ± 12 t/d over 0.0059 km2 for Irazú's north flank. Turrialba and Poás volcano diffuse degassing budget represent about 10% of the whole gas output. Both volcanoes were in a transitional stage and the opening of new conduits may cause a loss in diffuse degassing and an increase of active degassing. Numerous diffuse degassing structures were also identified. At Turrialba, one of which was closely associated with the collapse of a crater wall in 2014 during the initiation of a new period of heightened eruptive activity. Similar structures were also observed on the outer slopes of the west crater, suggesting strong alteration and perhaps destabilization of the upper outer cone. Irazú's north flank is highly permeable and has experienced intense hydrothermal alteration.

  4. Synthetic cation-selective nanotube: permeant cations chaperoned by anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilder, Tamsyn A; Gordon, Dan; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2011-01-28

    The ability to design ion-selective, synthetic nanotubes which mimic biological ion channels may have significant implications for the future treatment of bacteria, diseases, and as ultrasensitive biosensors. We present the design of a synthetic nanotube made from carbon atoms that selectively allows monovalent cations to move across and rejects all anions. The cation-selective nanotube mimics some of the salient properties of biological ion channels. Before practical nanodevices are successfully fabricated it is vital that proof-of-concept computational studies are performed. With this in mind we use molecular and stochastic dynamics simulations to characterize the dynamics of ion permeation across a single-walled (10, 10), 36 Å long, carbon nanotube terminated with carboxylic acid with an effective radius of 5.08 Å. Although cations encounter a high energy barrier of 7 kT, its height is drastically reduced by a chloride ion in the nanotube. The presence of a chloride ion near the pore entrance thus enables a cation to enter the pore and, once in the pore, it is chaperoned by the resident counterion across the narrow pore. The moment the chaperoned cation transits the pore, the counterion moves back to the entrance to ferry another ion. The synthetic nanotube has a high sodium conductance of 124 pS and shows linear current-voltage and current-concentration profiles. The cation-anion selectivity ratio ranges from 8 to 25, depending on the ionic concentrations in the reservoirs.

  5. Hand drawing of pencil electrodes on paper platforms for contactless conductivity detection of inorganic cations in human tear samples using electrophoresis chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagas, Cyro L S; Costa Duarte, Lucas; Lobo-Júnior, Eulício O; Piccin, Evandro; Dossi, Nicolò; Coltro, Wendell K T

    2015-08-01

    This paper describes for the first time the fabrication of pencil drawn electrodes (PDE) on paper platforms for capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection (C(4) D) on electrophoresis microchips. PDE-C(4) D devices were attached on PMMA electrophoresis chips and used for detection of K(+) and Na(+) in human tear samples. PDE-C(4) D devices were produced on office paper and chromatographic paper platforms and their performance were thoroughly investigated using a model mixture containing K(+) , Na(+) , and Li(+) . In comparison with chromatographic paper, PDE-C(4) D fabricated on office paper has exhibited better performance due to its higher electrical conductivity. Furthermore, the detector response was similar to that recorded with electrodes prepared with copper adhesive tape. The fabrication of PDE-C(4) D on office paper has offered great advantages including extremely low cost (paper). The proposed electrodes demonstrated excellent analytical performance with good reproducibility. For an inter-PDE comparison (n = 7), the RSD values for migration time, peak area, and separation efficiency were lower than 2.5, 10.5, and 14%, respectively. The LOD's achieved for K(+) , Na(+) , and Li(+) were 4.9, 6.8, and 9.0 μM, respectively. The clinical feasibility of the proposed approach was successfully demonstrated with the quantitative analysis of K(+) and Na(+) in tear samples. The concentration levels found for K(+) and Na(+) were, respectively, 20.8 ± 0.1 mM and 101.2 ± 0.1 mM for sample #1, and 20.4 ± 0.1 mM and 111.4 ± 0.1 mM for sample #2. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Diffuse soil CO_2 degassing from Linosa island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Cellura

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 14 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Normal 0 14 false false false IT X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Herein, we present and discuss the result of 148 measurements of soil CO2 flux performed for the first time in Linosa island (Sicily Channel, Italy, a Plio-Pleistocene volcanic complex no longer active but still of interest owing to its location within a seismically active portion of the Sicily Channel rift system. The main purpose of this survey was to assess the occurrence of CO2 soil degassing, and compare flux estimations from this island with data of soil degassing from worldwide active volcanic as well as non-volcanic areas. To this aim soil CO2 fluxes were measured over a surface of about 4.2 km2 covering ~80% of the island. The soil CO2 degassing was observed to be mainly concentrated in the eastern part of the island likely due to volcano-tectonic lineaments, the presence of which is in good agreement with the known predominant regional faults system. Then, the collected data were interpreted using sequential Gaussian simulation that allowed estimating the total CO2 emissions of the island. Results show low levels of CO2 emissions from the soil of the island (~55 ton d-1 compared with CO2 emissions of currently active volcanic areas, such as Miyakejima (Japan and Vulcano (Italy. Results from this study suggest that soil degassing in Linosa is mainly fed by superficial organic activity with a moderate contribution of a deep CO2 likely driven by NW-SE trending active tectonic structures in the eastern part of the island.

  7. Diffuse magmatic soil degassing at Soufriere of Guadeloupe, Antilles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allard, P.; Parello, F.

    1998-01-01

    A soil gas profiling made along the southern basis of Soufriere summit lave dome, in Guadeloupe, reveals the existence of diffuse emanations of magma-derived CO 2 in coincidence with a major volcanic (Ty) fault, where CO 2 concentrations at 70 cm depth in the ground reach 35-96 % and are associated with a thermal convective cell. Outside, a few 'cold' gaseous anomalies of volcanic origin (lack of methane) provide reliable conditions for continuous radon monitoring of soil degassing. (authors)

  8. Comparison of diffuse CO2 degassing at Miravalles and Rincón de la Vieja volcanoes (Guanacaste Province, Costa Rica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liegler, A.; Bakkar Hindeleh, H.; Deering, C. D.; Fentress, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic gas emissions are a key component for monitoring volcanic activity, magmatic input of volatiles to the atmosphere and the assessment of geothermal potential in volcanic regions. Diffuse soil degassing has been shown to represent a major part of volcanic gas emissions. However, this type of gas emission has not yet been quantified in the Guanacaste province of Costa Rica; a region of the country with several large, active or dormant volcanoes. We conducted the first study of diffuse CO2 degassing at Rincón de la Vieja and Miravalles volcanoes, both located in Guanacaste. Diffuse degassing was measured using the accumulation chamber method to quantify CO2 flux in regions where hydrothermal surface features indicate anomalous activity. The total diffuse carbon dioxide flux estimated at Miravalles in two areas, together roughly 2 km2 in size, was 135 t/day and in several areas at Rincón de la Vieja a minimum of 4 t/day. Comparatively low flux values and a very local concentration (few m2) of CO2 flux were observed at the active Rincón de la Vieja volcano, compared to the dormant Miravalles volcano, where significant soil flux was found over extended areas, not only around vents. Our assessment of the origin of these differences leads to two possibilities depending on if the surface features on the two volcanoes are fed by a common hydrothermal system or two separate ones. In the former case, the different intensity of diffuse CO2 flux could indicate a different degassing behavior and stronger concentration of gas emissions at the active vent areas at Rincon de la Vieja. In the latter case, where the hydrothermal systems are not linked, the amount of CO2 degassed through the flanks of the volcanoes could indicate that different physical and chemical conditions are governing the degassing of the two systems.

  9. Exploring backbone-cation alkyl spacers for multi-cation side chain anion exchange membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Liang; Yu, Xuedi; Hickner, Michael A.

    2018-01-01

    In order to systematically study how the arrangement of cations on the side chain and length of alkyl spacers between cations impact the performance of multi-cation AEMs for alkaline fuel cells, a series of polyphenylene oxide (PPO)-based AEMs with different cationic side chains were synthesized. This work resulted in samples with two or three cations in a side chain pendant to the PPO backbone. More importantly, the length of the spacer between cations varied from 3 methylene (-CH2-) (C3) groups to 8 methylene (C8) groups. The highest conductivity, up to 99 mS/cm in liquid water at room temperature, was observed for the triple-cation side chain AEM with pentyl (C5) or hexyl (C6) spacers. The multi-cation AEMs were found to have decreased water uptake and ionic conductivity when the spacer chains between cations were lengthened from pentyl (C5) or hexyl (C6) to octyl (C8) linking groups. The triple-cation membranes with pentyl (C5) or hexyl (C6) groups between cations showed greatest stability after immersion in 1 M NaOH at 80 °C for 500 h.

  10. Uranium isotope separation using styrene cation exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahovec, J.

    1980-01-01

    The separation of 235 U and 238 U isotopes is carried out either by simple isotope exchange in the system uranium-cation exchanger (sulphonated styrene divinylbenzene resin), or by combination of isotope exchange in a uranium-cation exchanger (Dowex 50, Amberlite IR-120) system and a chemical reaction. A review is presented of elution agents used, the degree of cation exchanger cross-linking, columns length, and 235 U enrichment. The results are described of the isotope effect study in a U(IV)-U(VI)-cation exchanger system conducted by Japanese and Romanian authors (isotope exchange kinetics, frontal analysis, reverse (indirect) frontal analysis). (H.S.)

  11. Carbon monoxide degassing from seismic fault zones in the Basin and Range province, west of Beijing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yutao; Zhou, Xiaocheng; Zheng, Guodong; Li, Jing; Shi, Hongyu; Guo, Zhengfu; Du, Jianguo

    2017-11-01

    Degassing of carbon monoxide (CO), which plays a significant role in the contribution of deep carbon to the atmosphere, commonly occurs within active fault zones. CO degassing from soil to the atmosphere in the Basin and Range province, west of Beijing (BRPB), China, was investigated by in-situ field measurements in the active fault zones. The measured concentrations of CO in soil gas in the BRPB ranged from 0.29 × 10-6 to 1.1 × 10-6 with a mean value of 0.6 × 10-6, which is approximately twice as large as that in the atmosphere. Net fluxes of CO degassing ranged from -48.6 mg m-2 d-1 to 12.03 mg m-2 d-1. The diffusion of CO from soil to the atmosphere in the BRPB was estimated to be at least 7.6 × 103 ton/a, which is comparable to the corresponding result of about 1.2 × 104 ton/a for CO2. CO concentrations were spatially heterogeneous with clearly higher concentrations along the NE-SW trending in the BRPB. These elevated values of CO concentrations were also coincident with the region with low-velocity and high conductivity in deep mantle, and high Poisson's ratio in the crust, thereby suggesting that CO degassing from the soil might be linked to upwelling of the asthenospheric mantle. Other sources of CO in the soil gas are suggested to be dominated by chemical reactions between deep fluids and carbonate minerals (e.g., dolomite, limestone, and siderite) in country rocks. Biogenic processes may also contribute to the CO in soil gas. The spatial distribution patterns of CO concentrations are coincident with the stress field, suggesting that the concentrations of CO could be a potential indicator for crustal stress field and, hence is potential useful for earthquake monitoring in the BRPB.

  12. Improvement in a degassing chamber with continuous operation and arrangement for distillation sublimation, etc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lurmann, F

    1881-05-25

    The degassing chambers shown in Patent 13,021 are combined with a receiver. Through arrangement of more roomy sucking openings for the distillation products, a continual partial recovery of the coke oven gases rich in different valuable constituents is attained. Arches lie over the degassing chamber and extend to the gas-burning rooms; to prevent their burning through. They remain directly in communication with the atmosphere and are on the top of the gasification room above the final arches. The charging of the various degassing rooms can be carried out by the usual charging apparatus, which runs lengthwise on rails on the degassing chambers.

  13. Process for water-gas generation from degassed combustibles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1906-05-23

    A process for water-gas generation in a continuous operation from degassed combustibles in the lower part of a vertical exterior-heated retort, whose middle part can serve to degas the combustibles, is described. It is characterized in that the water vapor employed is obtained by vaporizing water in the upper part of the retort by means of the waste heat from the heating gases, which had effected the coking of the combustibles before the water-gas recovery or after the latter.

  14. Soil degassing at the Los Humeros geothermal field (Mexico)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiffer, Loïc; Carrasco-Núñez, Gerardo; Mazot, Agnès; Villanueva-Estrada, Ruth Esther; Inguaggiato, Claudio; Bernard Romero, Rubén; Rocha Miller, Roberto; Hernández Rojas, Javier

    2018-05-01

    The Los Humeros geothermal field is the third most important producer of geothermal electricity (70 MW) in Mexico. Geothermal fluids are hosted in fractured andesitic lavas and mostly consist of high enthalpy steam with limited water content (vapor fraction > 0.9). Despite the high reservoir temperature ( 300-400 °C), thermal manifestations at the surface are scarce and locally appear as steaming grounds, weak steam vents and advanced argillic alteration. Geothermal fluid upflow from the reservoir towards the surface is limited by welded ignimbrite deposits that act as a low-permeability barrier. In this study, we present the first measurements of CO2, CH4 and H2S degassing rates from the soil performed at Los Humeros. Flux measurements were complemented with δ13C composition of degassing CO2 and soil temperatures to discuss gas origin and thermal anomalies. We measured high soil degassing rates (up to 7530 g m-2 d-1 CO2, 33 g m-2 d-1 CH4 and 22 g m-2 d-1 H2S) in three localized areas (Humeros North - HN, Humeros South - HS and Xalapazco - XA) as well as high soil temperatures reaching the boiling temperature at the local altitude (90.6 °C). The particular location of these three areas suggests that the steam-dominated reservoir degases to the surface through permeable faults crossing the ignimbritic deposits. The remaining surveyed areas are characterized by weak CO2 fluxes (≤44 g m-2 d-1), non-detectable CH4 and H2S fluxes, and lower soil temperatures (5-21 °C). The compositions in δ13CCO2 from HN-HS-XA areas (δ13CCO2 = -7.94 to -2.73‰) reflect a magmatic source with some possible contribution from the sedimentary basement, as well as fractionation induced by boiling and CO2 dissolution in shallow water bodies. We also discuss the processes causing the spread in CO2/CH4 flux ratios. Finally, we estimate the heat output from the three high degassing areas to a value of 16.4 MWt.

  15. Influences of different degassing processes on refining effect and properties of 4004 Al alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Liping

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the plasticity of 4004 Al alloy and subsequently the productivity of 4004 Al foil, the research studied in detail the influence of the rotary impeller degassing process on the refining effect of 4004 Al alloy, in which the impacts of four major parameters: gas flow, rotational speed, refining time, and stewing time, on degassing rate of 4004 Al alloy was systematically studied by using an orthogonal experiment methodology. Results show that the rotational speed has the greatest impact on the degassing of 4004 Al alloy, followed by gas flow and refining time; stewing time has the least impact. The optimum purification parameters obtained by current orthogonal analysis were: rotor speed of 500 r·min-1, inert gas flow of 0.4 mL·h-1, refining time of 15 min, and stewing time of 6 min. Degassing rate using the optimum parameters reaches 68%. In addition, the comparison experiments among C2Cl6 refining, rotary impeller degassing, and combined treatment of C2Cl6 refining and rotary impeller degassing for 4004 Al alloy were performed. The experimental data indicated that the combined treatment of C2Cl6 refining and rotary impeller degassing has the best degassing effect. Degassing rate of C2Cl6 refining, rotary impeller degassing and combined refining treatment is 39%, 69.1% and 76.9%, respectively. The mechanical properties of the specimen refined by rotary impeller degassing were higher than those by C2Cl6 refining, but lower than those by combined refining treatment.

  16. Carbon dioxide degassing and thermal energy release at Vesuvio (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frondini, F.; Chiodini, G.; Caliro, S.; Cardellini, C.; Granieri, D.

    2003-04-01

    At Vesuvio, basing on the data of the CO2 flux surveys carried out in April and May 2000, are discharged about 130 t d-1 of CO2 through soil diffuse degassing. In the crater area the distribution of the soil temperatures show a general correspondence between the CO2 flux anomalies and the high temperatures, suggesting that the heating of the soil is mainly due to the condensation of the rising volcanic-hydrothermal fluids. Considering that the original H2O/CO2 ratio of hydrothermal fluids is recorded by fumarolic effluents, the steam associated to the CO2 output has been computed and amount to is 475 t d-1. The energy produced by the steam condensation and cooling of the liquid phase is 1.26 1012 J d-1 (14.6 MW). The amounts of gas and energy released by Vesuvio are comparable to those released by other volcanic degassing areas of the world and their estimates, through periodical CO2 flux surveys, can constitute a powerful tool to monitor the activity of the volcano.

  17. The use of tree-rings and foliage as an archive of volcanogenic cation deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watt, Sebastian F.L. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EQ (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: sebastian.watt@earth.ox.ac.uk; Pyle, David M. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EQ (United Kingdom); Mather, Tamsin A. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EQ (United Kingdom); Day, Jason A. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EQ (United Kingdom); Aiuppa, Alessandro [CFTA - Dipt. Chimica e Fisica della Terra e Applicazioni alle Georisorse, Universita degli Studi di Palermo, Via Archirafi 36, 90123 (Italy)

    2007-07-15

    Tree cores (Pinus nigra ssp. laricio) and leaves (Castanea sativa) from the flanks of Mount Etna, Sicily were analysed by ICP-MS to investigate whether volcanogenic cations within plant material provide an archive of a volcano's temporal and spatial depositional influence. There is significant compositional variability both within and between trees, but no systematic dendrochemical correlation with periods of effusive, explosive or increased degassing activity. Dendrochemistry does not provide a record of persistent but fluctuating volcanic activity. Foliar levels of bioaccumulated cations correspond to modelled plume transport patterns, and map short-term volcanic fumigation. Around the flanks of the volcano foliar variation is greater for volatile cations (Cs, Cd, Pb) than for lithophilic cations (Ba, Sr), consistent with trace-metal supply from volcanic aerosol during quiescent periods. - Dendrochemistry does not provide an archive of persistent volcanic activity.

  18. The use of tree-rings and foliage as an archive of volcanogenic cation deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watt, Sebastian F.L.; Pyle, David M.; Mather, Tamsin A.; Day, Jason A.; Aiuppa, Alessandro

    2007-01-01

    Tree cores (Pinus nigra ssp. laricio) and leaves (Castanea sativa) from the flanks of Mount Etna, Sicily were analysed by ICP-MS to investigate whether volcanogenic cations within plant material provide an archive of a volcano's temporal and spatial depositional influence. There is significant compositional variability both within and between trees, but no systematic dendrochemical correlation with periods of effusive, explosive or increased degassing activity. Dendrochemistry does not provide a record of persistent but fluctuating volcanic activity. Foliar levels of bioaccumulated cations correspond to modelled plume transport patterns, and map short-term volcanic fumigation. Around the flanks of the volcano foliar variation is greater for volatile cations (Cs, Cd, Pb) than for lithophilic cations (Ba, Sr), consistent with trace-metal supply from volcanic aerosol during quiescent periods. - Dendrochemistry does not provide an archive of persistent volcanic activity

  19. Studies of structural material degassing in cryogenic vacuum technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshmarov, Yu.A.; Kupriyanov, V.I.; Ivanov, A.E.; Chubarov, E.V.; Dryamov, V.A.

    1976-01-01

    The choice and design of cryogenic vacuum pumping equipment require a reliable knowledge of qualitative and quantitative gassing parameters characteristic of the structural materials now in use. The gassing study has been made on the plates of stainless steel, copper and aluminium at a pressure of 1.33 (10 -3 -10 -5 ) Pa (10 -5 -10 -7 mm Hg) at room temperature and degassing duration up to 50 hours. An approximate method is proposed for the determination of the diffusion coefficients initial concentration of dissolved in metals gases, and gaseous exchange coefficient for various components of the gas dissolved in steel copper and aluminium alloys. The data obtained permit the designing of pumping equipment for various vacuum systems

  20. Isomerization of propargyl cation to cyclopropenyl cation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    step) for isomeri- zation of the linear propargyl cation to ..... C3, C4 and C5. The ZPE corrections in each case are derived from the. B3LYP calculations. ..... the converse of which gives the relative capacity of the. LPD's to stabilize TS6 with respect ...

  1. Restructuring of a peat in interaction with multivalent cations: effect of cation type and aging time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunhi Mouvenchery, Yamuna; Jaeger, Alexander; Aquino, Adelia J A; Tunega, Daniel; Diehl, Dörte; Bertmer, Marko; Schaumann, Gabriele Ellen

    2013-01-01

    It is assumed to be common knowledge that multivalent cations cross-link soil organic matter (SOM) molecules via cation bridges (CaB). The concept has not been explicitly demonstrated in solid SOM by targeted experiments, yet. Therefore, the requirements for and characteristics of CaB remain unidentified. In this study, a combined experimental and molecular modeling approach was adopted to investigate the interaction of cations on a peat OM from physicochemical perspective. Before treatment with salt solutions of Al(3+), Ca(2+) or Na(+), respectively, the original exchangeable cations were removed using cation exchange resin. Cation treatment was conducted at two different values of pH prior to adjusting pH to 4.1. Cation sorption is slower (>2 h) than deprotonation of functional groups (cation addition and decreased with increasing cation valency. Sorption coefficients were similar for all cations and at both pH. This contradicts the general expectations for electrostatic interactions, suggesting that not only the interaction chemistry but also spatial distribution of functional groups in OM determines binding of cations in this peat. The reaction of contact angle, matrix rigidity due to water molecule bridges (WaMB) and molecular mobility of water (NMR analysis) suggested that cross-linking via CaB has low relevance in this peat. This unexpected finding is probably due to the low cation exchange capacity, resulting in low abundance of charged functionalities. Molecular modeling demonstrates that large average distances between functionalities (∼3 nm in this peat) cannot be bridged by CaB-WaMB associations. However, aging strongly increased matrix rigidity, suggesting successive increase of WaMB size to connect functionalities and thus increasing degree of cross-linking by CaB-WaMB associations. Results thus demonstrated that the physicochemical structure of OM is decisive for CaB and aging-induced structural reorganisation can enhance cross-link formation.

  2. Liquid-solid extraction of metallic cations by cationic amphiphiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, Wolfram; Sievers, Torsten K.; Zemb, Thomas; Diat, Olivier; Sievers, Torsten K.; Dejugnat, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    In the field of selective metal ion separation, liquid-liquid extraction is usually conducted through an emulsion mixing of hydrophobic complexants dispersed in an organic phase and acidic water containing the ionic species. Recently, it has been shown that amphiphilic complexants could influence strongly extraction efficiency by enhancing the interfacial interaction between the metal ion in the aqueous and the complexant in the organic phase. Moreover, these amphiphiles can also substitute the organic phase if an appropriate aliphatic chain is chosen. The dispersion of such amphiphilic complexants in an aqueous solution of salt mixtures is not only attractive for studying specific interactions but also to better the understanding of complex formation in aqueous solution of multivalent metal ions, such as lanthanides and actinides. This understanding is of potential interest for a broad range of industries including purification of rare earth metals and pollute treatment e.g. of fission byproducts. This principle can also be applied to liquid-solid extraction, where the final state of the separation is a solid phase containing the selectively extracted ions. Indeed, a novel solid-liquid extraction method exploits the selective precipitation of metal ions from an aqueous salt mixture using a cationic surfactant, below its Krafft point (temperature below which the long aliphatic chains of surfactant crystallize). This technique has been proven to be highly efficient for the separation of actinides and heavy metal using long chain ammonium or pyridinium amphiphiles. The most important point in this process is the recognition of cationic metal ions by cationic surfactants. By computing the free energy of the polar head group per micelle as a function of the different counter-anions, we have demonstrated for the first time that different interactions exist between the micellar surface and the ions. These interactions depend on the nature of the cation but also on

  3. Shallow magmatic degassing into the hydrothermal system of Copahue, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varekamp, J.; Ouimette, A.; Kreulen, R.; Delpino, D.; Bermudez, A.

    2001-05-01

    Copahue volcano has a crater lake and acid hot springs that discharge into the Rio Agrio river system. These fluids are very concentrated (up to 6 percent sulfate), rich in rock-forming elements (up to 2000 ppm Mg) and small spheres of native sulfur float in the crater lake. The stable isotope composition of the waters (delta 18O =-2.1 to + 3.6 per mille; delta D = -49 to -26 per mille) indicates that the hot spring waters are at their most concentrated about 70 percent volcanic brine and 30 percent glacial meltwater. The crater lake waters have similar mixing proportions but added isotope effects from intense evaporation. Further dilution of the waters in the Rio Agrio gives values closer to local meteoric waters (delta 18O = -11 per mille; delta D = -77 per mille), whereas evaporation in closed ponds led to very heavy water (up to delta 18O = +12 per mille). The delta 34S value of dissolved sulfate is +14.2 per mille, whereas the native sulfur has values of -8.2 to -10.5 per mille. The heavy sulfate probably formed when SO2 disproportionated into bisulfate and native sulfur. We measured the sulfate fluxes in the Rio Agrio, and from these flux values and the stoichiometry of the disproportionation reaction we calculated the rate of liquid sulfur storage inside the volcano (6000 m3/year). During the eruptions of 1995/2000, large amounts of that stored liquid sulfur were ejected as pyroclastic sulfur. The calculated rate of rock dissolution (from rock- forming element fluxes in the Rio Agrio) suggests that the void space generated by rock dissolution is largely filled by native sulfur. The isotopic signature of the magmatic sulfur can be reconstituted at about +7 per mille, which is a source signature with superposed effects of shallow degassing. Lead isotope and 129Iodine data from the fluids indicate that subducted components may have played a role in the Copahue magma formation. Primary glass inclusions in plagioclase and olivine have 1110-1670 ppm Cl, 90-400 ppm

  4. Effect of degassing temperature on the microstructure of a nanocrystalline Al-Mg alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Byungmin; Newbery, A. Piers; Lavernia, Enrique J.; Nutt, Steven R.

    2007-01-01

    The microstructural evolution of a nanocrystalline Al-Mg alloy was investigated to determine the effects of degassing temperature. Al 5083 powder was ball-milled in liquid nitrogen to obtain a nanocrystalline structure, then vacuum degassed to remove contaminants. The degassed powder was consolidated by cold isostatic pressing and then forged to produce bulk, low-porosity material. The material microstructure was analyzed at different stages using optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and density measurements. The impurity concentration of the final product was also measured. The forged material exhibited a bimodal grain size distribution, consisting of both ultra fine and coarse grains. The bimodal distribution was attributed to the presence of residual coarse grains in the as-milled powder. Higher degassing temperatures resulted in higher density values and lower hydrogen content in the consolidated materials, although these materials also exhibited more extensive grain growth

  5. Cation Exchange Water Softeners

    Science.gov (United States)

    WaterSense released a notice of intent to develop a specification for cation exchange water softeners. The program has made the decision not to move forward with a spec at this time, but is making this information available.

  6. Pengaruh Degasser Dan Grain Refiner Terhadap Sifat Mekanik Paduan Al-Si Produk Cor

    OpenAIRE

    Yohanes, Glenn; Djamil, Sofyan

    2008-01-01

    Paduan aluminium banyak digunakan pada industri otomotif, seperti pada pembuatan velg dan komponen-komponen mesin. Studi pengaruh degasser dan grain refiner terhadap kekuatan tarik, kekuatan luluh, elongasi dan kekerasan, pada proses peleburan dibandingkan dengan atau tanpa menggunakan degasser dan grain refiner. Benda uji didapat dengan melebur blok mesin Mitsubishi L.300, menggunakan tungku listrik dan proses cor sistem cetakan terbuka. Hasil penelitian, meliputi kekuatan tarik, luluh, elon...

  7. Pengaruh Degasser dan Grain Refiner terhadap Sifat Mekanik Paduan Al-Si Produk Cor

    OpenAIRE

    Yohanes, Glenn; Djamil, Sofyan

    2009-01-01

    Paduan aluminium banyak digunakan pada industri otomotif, seperti pada pembuatan velg dan komponen-komponen mesin. Studi pengaruh degasser dan grain refiner terhadap kekuatan tarik, kekuatan luluh, elongasi dan kekerasan, pada proses peleburan dibandingkan dengan atau tanpa menggunakan degasser dan grain refiner. Benda uji didapat dengan melebur blok mesin Mitsubishi L.300, menggunakan tungku listrik dan proses cor sistem cetakan terbuka. Hasil penelitian, meliputi kekuatan tarik, luluh, elon...

  8. Conduit degassing and thermal controls on eruption styles at Mount St. Helens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Andrew; Rempel, Alan W.; Cashman, Katharine V.

    2012-12-01

    The explosivity of silicic eruptions depends on the interplay between magma rheology, exsolution kinetics, and degassing. Magma degassing is governed by the competing effects of vertical transport within the conduit and the lateral flux of gas out of the conduit (Diller et al., 2006; Jaupart and Allegre, 1991). We combine a simplified treatment of these degassing processes with thermodynamic modeling to examine the conditions present at Mount St. Helens during the spine extruding eruption from 2004 to 2008. We find that two parameters are primarily responsible for controlling the eruptive style: the magma chamber temperature, and a dimensionless parameter that gauges the efficiency of lateral degassing. Together, these parameters determine whether and where magma can solidify at depth to form a dense solid plug that is gradually extruded as a volcanic spine. We show that the small (50 oC) decrease in magma chamber temperature between eruptive activity in the 1980s and that of 2004-2008, combined with a modest increase in degassing efficiency associated with lower volumetric flux, can explain the observed change in erupted material from viscous lava flows to solidified spines. More generally, we suggest that similar threshold behavior may explain observed abrupt transitions in effusive eruptive styles at other intermediate composition volcanoes. Finally, we extrapolate our results to suggest that the increase in degassing efficiency accompanying decreasing magma supply rates may have caused the transition from explosive to effusive activity in late 1980.

  9. Infrared remote sensing of Earth degassing - Ground study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Strobl

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Geodynamical processes e.g., volcanoes, often cause degassing at the Earth surface. The geogas emanates via mineral springs, water mofettes, or dry mofettes. It is assumed that the emerging gas influences the temperature of the spring or mofette water, respectively and the surface temperature of the soil at and around the dry gas vents. This causes a thermal anomaly in comparison to the close vicinity. Under specific conditions this effect should be extractable from remotely acquired infrared images allowing detection, mapping and monitoring of gas vents/springs within large areas and short times. This article describes preparatory investigations for which emanating Earth gas was simulated by leading compressed air into the ground and releasing it in some depth via a metal lance. The thermal effect at the surface was observed from a nearby thermovision camera in summer and winter under varying meteorological conditions. A procedure was developed to reliably identify gas release areas within the recorded thermal images of the scene. The investigations are aiming at studies to be performed later in the Western Bohemia (Czech Republic earthquake swarm region where especially CO2 of magmatic origin from European SubContinental Mantle (ESCM emanates.

  10. Continental smokers couple mantle degassing and distinctive microbiology within continents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossey, Laura J.; Karlstrom, Karl E.; Schmandt, Brandon; Crow, Ryan R.; Colman, Daniel R.; Cron, Brandi; Takacs-Vesbach, Cristina D.; Dahm, Clifford N.; Northup, Diana E.; Hilton, David R.; Ricketts, Jason W.; Lowry, Anthony R.

    2016-02-01

    The discovery of oceanic black (and white) smokers revolutionized our understanding of mid-ocean ridges and led to the recognition of new organisms and ecosystems. Continental smokers, defined here to include a broad range of carbonic springs, hot springs, and fumaroles that vent mantle-derived fluids in continental settings, exhibit many of the same processes of heat and mass transfer and ecosystem niche differentiation. Helium isotope (3He/4He) analyses indicate that widespread mantle degassing is taking place in the western U.S.A., and that variations in mantle helium values correlate best with low seismic-velocity domains in the mantle and lateral contrasts in mantle velocity rather than crustal parameters such as GPS, proximity to volcanoes, crustal velocity, or composition. Microbial community analyses indicate that these springs can host novel microorganisms. A targeted analysis of four springs in New Mexico yield the first published occurrence of chemolithoautotrophic Zetaproteobacteria in a continental setting. These observations lead to two linked hypotheses: that mantle-derived volatiles transit through conduits in extending continental lithosphere preferentially above and at the edges of mantle low velocity domains. High CO2 and other constituents ultimately derived from mantle volatiles drive water-rock interactions and heterogeneous fluid mixing that help structure diverse and distinctive microbial communities.

  11. Research regarding the vacuuming of liquid steel on steel degassing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magaon, M.; Radu, M.; Şerban, S.; Zgripcea, L.

    2018-01-01

    When the liquid steel comes in contact with the atmosphere of the elaboration aggregates, a process of gas diffusion into the metal bath takes place on the one hand, and on the other hand a process that allows them to pass from the metal bath into the atmosphere. The meaning of these processes is determined by a number of factors as follows: the quality of raw and auxiliary materials (moisture content, oils, etc.), the boiling intensity, the evacuation duration, the properties of used slags, the values of the casting ladle processing parameters (bubbling, vacuuming, etc.). The research was carried out at an electrical steelwork, equipped with an electric arc furnace type EBT (Electric Bottom Tapping) capacity 100t, LF (Ladle-Furnace) and VD (Vacuum Degassing) facilities, establishing some correlations between the vacuuming parameters from the V.D.facility and the amounts of hydrogen and nitrogen removed from the metal bath, as well as their removal efficiency, were taken into consideration. The obtained data was processed in MATLAB calculation program, the established correlations form was presented both in analytical and graphical form. The validity of these correlations was verified in practice, being particularly useful in research.

  12. Unraveling the dynamics of magmatic CO2 degassing at Mammoth Mountain, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiffer, Loïc; Wanner, Christoph; Lewicki, Jennifer L.

    2018-02-01

    The accumulation of magmatic CO2 beneath low-permeability barriers may lead to the formation of CO2-rich gas reservoirs within volcanic systems. Such accumulation is often evidenced by high surface CO2 emissions that fluctuate over time. The temporal variability in surface degassing is believed in part to reflect a complex interplay between deep magmatic degassing and the permeability of degassing pathways. A better understanding of the dynamics of CO2 degassing is required to improve monitoring and hazards mitigation in these systems. Owing to the availability of long-term records of CO2 emissions rates and seismicity, Mammoth Mountain in California constitutes an ideal site towards such predictive understanding. Mammoth Mountain is characterized by intense soil CO2 degassing (up to ∼1000 t d-1) and tree kill areas that resulted from leakage of CO2 from a CO2-rich gas reservoir located in the upper ∼4 km. The release of CO2-rich fluids from deeper basaltic intrusions towards the reservoir induces seismicity and potentially reactivates faults connecting the reservoir to the surface. While this conceptual model is well-accepted, there is still a debate whether temporally variable surface CO2 fluxes directly reflect degassing of intrusions or variations in fault permeability. Here, we report the first large-scale numerical model of fluid and heat transport for Mammoth Mountain. We discuss processes (i) leading to the initial formation of the CO2-rich gas reservoir prior to the occurrence of high surface CO2 degassing rates and (ii) controlling current CO2 degassing at the surface. Although the modeling settings are site-specific, the key mechanisms discussed in this study are likely at play at other volcanic systems hosting CO2-rich gas reservoirs. In particular, our model results illustrate the role of convection in stripping a CO2-rich gas phase from a rising hydrothermal fluid and leading to an accumulation of a large mass of CO2 (∼107-108 t) in a shallow

  13. Hydrothermal activity and subsoil complexity: implication for degassing processes at Solfatara crater, Campi Flegrei caldera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanaro, Cristian; Mayer, Klaus; Isaia, Roberto; Gresse, Marceau; Scheu, Bettina; Yilmaz, Tim I.; Vandemeulebrouck, Jean; Ricci, Tullio; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2017-12-01

    The Solfatara area and its fumaroles are the main surface expression of the vigorous hydrothermal activity within the active Campi Flegrei caldera system. At depth, a range of volcanic and structural processes dictate the actual state of the hydrothermal system below the crater. The presence of a large variety of volcanic products at shallow depth (including pyroclastic fallout ash beds, pyroclastic density current deposits, breccias, and lavas), and the existence of a maar-related fault system appears to exert major controls on the degassing and alteration behavior. Adding further to the complexity of this environment, variations in permeability and porosity, due to subsoil lithology and alteration effects, may further influence fluid flow towards the surface. Here, we report results from a field campaign conducted in July 2015 that was designed to characterize the in situ physical (temperature, humidity) and mechanical (permeability, strength, stiffness) properties of the Solfatara crater subsoil. The survey also included a mapping of the surficial hydrothermal features and their distributions. Finally, laboratory measurements (porosity, granulometry) of selected samples were performed. Our results enable the discrimination of four main subsoils around the crater: (1) the Fangaia domain located in a topographic low in the southwestern sector, (2) the silica flat domain on the western altered side, (3) the new crust domain in the central area, and (4) the crusted hummocks domain that dominates the north, east, and south parts. These domains are surrounded by encrusted areas, reworked material, and vegetated soil. The distribution of these heterogeneous subsoils suggests that their formation is mostly related to (i) the presence of the Fangaia domain within the crater and (ii) a system of ring faults bordering it. The subsoils show an alternation between very high and very low permeabilities, a fact which seems to affect both the temperature distribution and

  14. In situ baking method for degassing of a kicker magnet in accelerator beam line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamiya, Junichiro; Ogiwara, Norio; Yanagibashi, Toru; Kinsho, Michikazu; Yasuda, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the authors propose a new in situ degassing method by which only kicker magnets in the accelerator beam line are baked out without raising the temperature of the vacuum chamber to prevent unwanted thermal expansion of the chamber. By simply installing the heater and thermal radiation shield plates between the kicker magnet and the chamber wall, most of the heat flux from the heater directs toward the kicker magnet. The result of the verification test showed that each part of the kicker magnet was heated to above the target temperature with a small rise in the vacuum chamber temperature. A graphite heater was selected in this application to bake-out the kicker magnet in the beam line to ensure reliability and easy maintainability of the heater. The vacuum characteristics of graphite were suitable for heater operation in the beam line. A preliminary heat-up test conducted in the accelerator beam line also showed that each part of the kicker magnet was successfully heated and that thermal expansion of the chamber was negligibly small

  15. In situ baking method for degassing of a kicker magnet in accelerator beam line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamiya, Junichiro, E-mail: kamiya.junichiro@jaea.go.jp; Ogiwara, Norio; Yanagibashi, Toru; Kinsho, Michikazu [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, J-PARC Center, Ooaza Shirakata 2-4, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Yasuda, Yuichi [SAKAGUCHI E.H VOC CORP., Sakura Dai-san Kogyodanchi 1-8-6, Osaku, Sakura, Chiba 285-0802 (Japan)

    2016-03-15

    In this study, the authors propose a new in situ degassing method by which only kicker magnets in the accelerator beam line are baked out without raising the temperature of the vacuum chamber to prevent unwanted thermal expansion of the chamber. By simply installing the heater and thermal radiation shield plates between the kicker magnet and the chamber wall, most of the heat flux from the heater directs toward the kicker magnet. The result of the verification test showed that each part of the kicker magnet was heated to above the target temperature with a small rise in the vacuum chamber temperature. A graphite heater was selected in this application to bake-out the kicker magnet in the beam line to ensure reliability and easy maintainability of the heater. The vacuum characteristics of graphite were suitable for heater operation in the beam line. A preliminary heat-up test conducted in the accelerator beam line also showed that each part of the kicker magnet was successfully heated and that thermal expansion of the chamber was negligibly small.

  16. Effect of doping of trivalent cations Ga{sup 3+}, Sc{sup 3+}, Y{sup 3+} in Li{sub 1.3}Al{sub 0.3}Ti{sub 1.7} (PO{sub 4}){sub 3} (LATP) system on Li{sup +} ion conductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kothari, Dharmesh H.; Kanchan, D.K., E-mail: dkkanchan.ssi@gmail.com

    2016-11-15

    We report the effect of trivalent cations dopants in the Li{sub 1.3}Al{sub 0.3−x}R{sub x}Ti{sub 1.7}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3} (R=Ga{sup 3+}, Sc{sup 3+}, Y{sup 3+}) NASICON ceramic system in the concentration range x=0.01,0.03,0.05,0.07, on the Li{sup +} ion conducting properties using impedance spectroscopy. The samples were prepared by solid state reaction method and characterized by X-Ray Diffraction and density measurements. The electrical properties were studied using impedance spectroscopy in frequency range 10 Hz to 20 MHz and temperature range 303 K to 423 K. Although the porosity of the material decreased with doping, the overall Li{sup +} ion conductivity of the system did not improve with doping. Ionic radii of the dopant cations was found to be an important factor in formation of impurity phases and low Li{sup +} ion conductivity. Gallium doped samples exhibited a higher Li{sup +} ion conductivity compared to its scandium and yttrium doped counterparts.

  17. Cation radicals of xanthophylls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galinato, Mary Grace I; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz; Deal, Cailin; Birge, Robert R; Frank, Harry A

    2007-10-01

    Carotenes and xanthophylls are well known to act as electron donors in redox processes. This ability is thought to be associated with the inhibition of oxidative reactions in reaction centers and light-harvesting pigment-protein complexes of photosystem II (PSII). In this work, cation radicals of neoxanthin, violaxanthin, lutein, zeaxanthin, beta-cryptoxanthin, beta-carotene, and lycopene were generated in solution using ferric chloride as an oxidant and then studied by absorption spectroscopy. The investigation provides a view toward understanding the molecular features that determine the spectral properties of cation radicals of carotenoids. The absorption spectral data reveal a shift to longer wavelength with increasing pi-chain length. However, zeaxanthin and beta-cryptoxanthin exhibit cation radical spectra blue-shifted compared to that of beta-carotene, despite all of these molecules having 11 conjugated carbon-carbon double bonds. CIS molecular orbital theory quantum computations interpret this effect as due to the hydroxyl groups in the terminal rings selectively stabilizing the highest occupied molecular orbitals of preferentially populated s-trans-isomers. The data are expected to be useful in the analysis of spectral results from PSII pigment-protein complexes seeking to understand the role of carotene and xanthophyll cation radicals in regulating excited state energy flow, in protecting PSII reaction centers against photoinhibition, and in dissipating excess light energy absorbed by photosynthetic organisms but not used for photosynthesis.

  18. Identifi cation of Sectarianism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinovich Vladimir

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available «New religious movements and society» is traditionally one of the most sophisticated topics in the area of new religions studies. Its problem field is so huge that up to now by far not all important research themes where even touched by scientists from all over the world. The problem of the process of the identification of sectarianism by diff erent societal institutions is one of such untouched themes that is taken as the main subject of this article. This process by itself is an inseparable part of the every societal deliberate reaction to the very existence of unconventional religiosity, its unstructured and mainly structured types. The focal point of the article is step-by-step analysis of the general structure elements of the process of the identification of sectarianism without any reference to the specific time and place of its flow. Special attention is paid to the analysis of the subjects of the identification of sectarianism, to the criteria for religious groups to be qualified as new religious movements, and to the specific features of the process of documents filtration. The causes of selective perception of sectarianism are disclosed. Some main consequences and unpredictable outcomes of the process of the identification of sectarianism are described.

  19. CO2, SO2, and H2S Degassing Related to the 2009 Redoubt Eruption, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, C. A.; Kelly, P. J.; Evans, W.; Doukas, M. P.; McGimsey, R. G.; Neal, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    The 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska was particularly well monitored for volcanic gas emissions with 35 airborne measurements of CO2, SO2, and H2S that span from October 2008 to August 2010. Increases in CO2 degassing were detected up to 5 months prior to the eruption and varied between 3630 and 9020 tonnes per day (t/d) in the 6 weeks prior to the eruption. Increased pre-eruptive CO2 degassing was accompanied by comparatively low S emission, resulting in molar C/S ratios that ranged between 30-60. However, the C/S ratio dropped to 2.4 coincident with the first phreatic explosion on March 15, 2009, and remained steady during the explosive (March 22 - April 4, 2009), effusive dome-building (April 5 - July 1, 2009), and waning phases (August 2009 onward) of the eruption. Observations of ice-melt rates, melt water discharge, and water chemistry in the months leading up to the eruption suggested that surface waters represented drainage from surficial, perched reservoirs of condensed magmatic steam and glacial meltwater. While the surface waters were capable of scrubbing many thousands of t/d of SO2, sampling of these fluids revealed that only a few hundred tonnes of SO2 was reacting to a dissolved component each day. This is also much less than the ~ 2100 t/d SO2 expected from degassing of magma in the upper crust (3-6.5 km), where petrologic analysis shows the final magma equilibration occurred. Thus, the high pre-eruptive C/S ratios observed could reflect bulk degassing of upper-crustal magma followed by nearly complete loss of SO2 in a magmatic-hydrothermal system. Alternatively, high C/S ratios could be attributed to degassing of low silica andesitic magma that intruded into the mid-crust in the 5 months prior to eruption; modeling suggests that mixing of this magma with pre-existing high silica andesite magma or mush would have caused a reduction of the C/S ratio to a value consistent with that measured during the eruption. Monitoring emissions regularly

  20. Geophysical Images of the Shallow Hydrothermal Degassing at Solfatara (Phlegrean Fields, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrdina, S.; Vandemeulebrouck, J.; Cardellini, C.; Chiodini, G.; Legaz, A.; Camerlynck, C.; Lebourg, T.

    2014-12-01

    We present the results of an electric resistivity tomography (ERT) survey, combined with mappings of diffuse carbon dioxide flux, ground temperature and self-potential (SP) at Solfatara, the most active crater of Phlegrean Fields. Solfatara is characterized by an intense carbon dioxide degassing, fumarole activity, and ground deformation. This ensemble of methods is applied to image the hydrothermal system of Solfatara, to understand the geometry of the fluid circulation, and to define the extension of the hydrothermal plume at a high enough resolution for a quantitative modeling. ERT inversion results show Solfatara as a globally conductive structure, with resistivity in the range 1-200 Ohmm. Broad negative anomaly of self-potential in the inner part of Solfatara with a minimum in the area of Bocca Grande suggests a significant downward flow of condensing liquid water. Comparison between spatial variations of resistivity and gas flux indicates that resistivity changes at depth are related to gas saturation and fluid temperature. These variations delineate two plume structures: a liquid-dominated conductive plume below Fangaia mud-pool and a gas-dominated plume below Bocca Grande fumarole. The geometry of the Fangaia liquid-saturated plume is also imaged by a high resolution 3-D resistivity model. In order to estimate the permeability, we propose a 2-D axis-symmetric numerical model coupling Richards's equation for fluid flow in conditions of partial saturation with the resistivity calculation as function of saturation only. Alternatively, we apply the Dupuit equation to estimate the permeability of the shallow layer. Using these two approaches, we obtain the permeability of the shallow layer below Fangaia which ranges between (2 - 4) 10-14 m 2.

  1. Halogen degassing during ascent and eruption of water-poor basaltic magma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, M.; Gerlach, T.M.; Herd, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    A study of volcanic gas composition and matrix glass volatile concentrations has allowed a model for halogen degassing to be formulated for K??lauea Volcano, Hawai'i. Volcanic gases emitted during 2004-2005 were characterised by a molar SO2/HCl of 10-64, with a mean of 33; and a molar HF/HCl of 0-5, with a mean of 1.0 (from approximately 2500 measurements). The HF/HCl ratio was more variable than the SO2/HCl ratio, and the two correlate weakly. Variations in ratio took place over rapid timescales (seconds). Matrix glasses of Pele's tears erupted in 2006 have a mean S, Cl and F content of 67, 85 and 173??ppm respectively, but are associated with a large range in S/F. A model is developed that describes the open system degassing of halogens from parental magmas, using the glass data from this study, previously published results and parameterisation of sulphur degassing from previous work. The results illustrate that halogen degassing takes place at pressures of < 1??MPa, equivalent to < ~ 35??m in the conduit. Fluid-melt partition coefficients for Cl and F are low (< 1.5); F only degasses appreciably at < 0.1??MPa above atmospheric pressure, virtually at the top of the magma column. This model reproduces the volcanic gas data and other observations of volcanic activity well and is consistent with other studies of halogen degassing from basaltic magmas. The model suggests that variation in volcanic gas halogen ratios is caused by exsolution and gas-melt separation at low pressures in the conduit. There is no evidence that either diffusive fractionation or near-vent chemical reactions involving halogens is important in the system, although these processes cannot be ruled out. The fluxes of HCl and HF from K??lauea during 2004-5 were ~ 25 and 12??t/d respectively. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V.

  2. Restructuring of a peat in interaction with multivalent cations: effect of cation type and aging time.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamuna Kunhi Mouvenchery

    Full Text Available It is assumed to be common knowledge that multivalent cations cross-link soil organic matter (SOM molecules via cation bridges (CaB. The concept has not been explicitly demonstrated in solid SOM by targeted experiments, yet. Therefore, the requirements for and characteristics of CaB remain unidentified. In this study, a combined experimental and molecular modeling approach was adopted to investigate the interaction of cations on a peat OM from physicochemical perspective. Before treatment with salt solutions of Al(3+, Ca(2+ or Na(+, respectively, the original exchangeable cations were removed using cation exchange resin. Cation treatment was conducted at two different values of pH prior to adjusting pH to 4.1. Cation sorption is slower (>>2 h than deprotonation of functional groups (<2 h and was described by a Langmuir model. The maximum uptake increased with pH of cation addition and decreased with increasing cation valency. Sorption coefficients were similar for all cations and at both pH. This contradicts the general expectations for electrostatic interactions, suggesting that not only the interaction chemistry but also spatial distribution of functional groups in OM determines binding of cations in this peat. The reaction of contact angle, matrix rigidity due to water molecule bridges (WaMB and molecular mobility of water (NMR analysis suggested that cross-linking via CaB has low relevance in this peat. This unexpected finding is probably due to the low cation exchange capacity, resulting in low abundance of charged functionalities. Molecular modeling demonstrates that large average distances between functionalities (∼3 nm in this peat cannot be bridged by CaB-WaMB associations. However, aging strongly increased matrix rigidity, suggesting successive increase of WaMB size to connect functionalities and thus increasing degree of cross-linking by CaB-WaMB associations. Results thus demonstrated that the physicochemical structure of OM is

  3. Groundwater degassing and two-phase flow in fractured rock: Summary of results and conclusions achieved during the period 1994-2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarsjoe, J.; Destouni, G.

    2001-06-01

    drifts, by summarising and systematically interpreting all available laboratory and field investigations that have been conducted within the SKB degassing and two-phase flow programme. Data from various sites in Sweden show that the volumetric percent gas coming out of solution as the pressure of deep groundwater is lowered down to atmospheric pressure is generally less than 5%. Laboratory experiments and an analytical expression showed that conditions often are favourable for trapping and accumulation of gas bubbles in the fracture pore space (once bubbles are formed), implying that local fracture gas saturation degrees may become considerable, even though the evolved percent gas per unit volume flowing water is relatively low. For instance, a saturation degree of 40% was observed in a laboratory fracture for 7% evolved gas. However, degassing effects such as inflow reductions to boreholes and drifts will not be considerable unless the potential degassing zone (where the water pressure is lower than the gas bubble pressure) is sufficiently large in relation to the total length of the fracture. A series of borehole test conducted at Aespoe HRL between 300 and 450 meters depth indicated that degassing only causes considerable flow reductions for gas contents that are well above the normal ones in Swedish granitic bedrock. This field result was reproduced by a predictive degassing model, developed considering independent degassing observations in the laboratory. Since the model predictions were shown to be robust with regard to plausible variable ranges for rock fractures intersecting boreholes at depths between 20 and 600 metres, we conclude more generally that groundwater degassing will not cause considerable inflow reductions in fractures intersecting open boreholes under conditions normal for Swedish granitic bedrock. We also considered the relatively large drift inflow reductions observed in the Stripa simulated drift experiment. These reductions were hypothesised to

  4. Evolution of the chemistry of Fe bearing waters during CO2 degassing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geroni, J.N.; Cravotta, C.A.; Sapsford, D.J.

    2012-01-01

    The rates of Fe(II) oxidation and precipitation from groundwater are highly pH dependent. Elevated levels of dissolved CO2 can depress pH and cause difficulty in removing dissolved Fe and associated metals during treatment of ferruginous water. This paper demonstrates interdependent changes in pH, dissolved inorganic C species, and Fe(II) oxidation rates that occur as a result of the removal (degassing) of CO2 during aeration of waters discharged from abandoned coal mines. The results of field monitoring of aeration cascades at a treatment facility as well as batchwise aeration experiments conducted using net alkaline and net acidic waters in the UK are combined with geochemical modelling to demonstrate the spatial and temporal evolution of the discharge water chemistry. The aeration cascades removed approximately 67% of the dissolved CO2 initially present but varying the design did not affect the concentration of Fe(II) leaving the treatment ponds. Continued removal of the residual CO2 by mechanical aeration increased pH by as much as 2 units and resulted in large increases in the rates of Fe(II) oxidation and precipitation. Effective exsolution of CO2 led to a reduction in the required lime dose for removal of remaining Fe(II), a very important factor with regard to increasing the sustainability of treatment practices. An important ancillary finding for passive treatment is that varying the design of the cascades had little impact on the rate of CO2 removal at the flow rates measured.

  5. Monitoring diffuse volcanic degassing during volcanic unrests: the case of Campi Flegrei (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardellini, C; Chiodini, G; Frondini, F; Avino, R; Bagnato, E; Caliro, S; Lelli, M; Rosiello, A

    2017-07-28

    In volcanoes with active hydrothermal systems, diffuse CO 2 degassing may constitute the primary mode of volcanic degassing. The monitoring of CO 2 emissions can provide important clues in understanding the evolution of volcanic activity especially at calderas where the interpretation of unrest signals is often complex. Here, we report eighteen years of CO 2 fluxes from the soil at Solfatara of Pozzuoli, located in the restless Campi Flegrei caldera. The entire dataset, one of the largest of diffuse CO 2 degassing ever produced, is made available for the scientific community. We show that, from 2003 to 2016, the area releasing deep-sourced CO 2 tripled its extent. This expansion was accompanied by an increase of the background CO 2 flux, over most of the surveyed area (1.4 km 2 ), with increased contributions from non-biogenic source. Concurrently, the amount of diffusively released CO 2 increased up to values typical of persistently degassing active volcanoes (up to 3000 t d -1 ). These variations are consistent with the increase in the flux of magmatic fluids injected into the hydrothermal system, which cause pressure increase and, in turn, condensation within the vapor plume feeding the Solfatara emission.

  6. Volcanic degassing at Somma-Vesuvio (Italy) inferred by chemical and isotopic signatures of groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caliro, S. [Osservatorio Vesuviano sezione di Napoli dell' Istituto, Nazionale Geofisica Vulcanologia, Via Diocleziano 328, 80124 Naples (Italy)]. E-mail: caliro@ov.ingv.it; Chiodini, G. [Osservatorio Vesuviano sezione di Napoli dell' Istituto, Nazionale Geofisica Vulcanologia, Via Diocleziano 328, 80124 Naples (Italy); Avino, R. [Osservatorio Vesuviano sezione di Napoli dell' Istituto, Nazionale Geofisica Vulcanologia, Via Diocleziano 328, 80124 Naples (Italy); Cardellini, C. [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Universita di Perugia (Italy); Frondini, F. [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Universita di Perugia (Italy)

    2005-06-15

    A geochemical model is proposed for water evolution at Somma-Vesuvio, based on the chemical and isotopic composition of groundwaters, submarine gas emission and chemical composition of the dissolved gases. The active degassing processes, present in the highest part of the volcano edifice, strongly influence the groundwater evolution. The geological-volcanological setting of the volcano forces the waters infiltrating at Somma-Vesuvio caldera, enriched in volcanic gases, to flow towards the southern sector to an area of high pCO{sub 2} groundwaters. Reaction path modelling applied to this conceptual model, involving gas-water-rock interaction, highlights an intense degassing process in the aquifer controlling the chemical and isotopic composition of dissolved gases, total dissolved inorganic C (TDIC) and submarine gas emission. Mapping of TDIC shows a unique area of high values situated SSE of Vesuvio volcano with an average TDIC value of 0.039 mol/L, i.e., one order of magnitude higher than groundwaters from other sectors of the volcano. On the basis of TDIC values, the amount of CO{sub 2} transported by Vesuvio groundwaters was estimated at about 150 t/d. This estimate does not take into account the fraction of gas loss by degassing, however, it represents a relevant part of the CO{sub 2} emitted in this quiescent period by the Vesuvio volcanic system, being of the same order of magnitude as the CO{sub 2} diffusely degassed from the crater area.

  7. Volcanic degassing at Somma-Vesuvio (Italy) inferred by chemical and isotopic signatures of groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caliro, S.; Chiodini, G.; Avino, R.; Cardellini, C.; Frondini, F.

    2005-01-01

    A geochemical model is proposed for water evolution at Somma-Vesuvio, based on the chemical and isotopic composition of groundwaters, submarine gas emission and chemical composition of the dissolved gases. The active degassing processes, present in the highest part of the volcano edifice, strongly influence the groundwater evolution. The geological-volcanological setting of the volcano forces the waters infiltrating at Somma-Vesuvio caldera, enriched in volcanic gases, to flow towards the southern sector to an area of high pCO 2 groundwaters. Reaction path modelling applied to this conceptual model, involving gas-water-rock interaction, highlights an intense degassing process in the aquifer controlling the chemical and isotopic composition of dissolved gases, total dissolved inorganic C (TDIC) and submarine gas emission. Mapping of TDIC shows a unique area of high values situated SSE of Vesuvio volcano with an average TDIC value of 0.039 mol/L, i.e., one order of magnitude higher than groundwaters from other sectors of the volcano. On the basis of TDIC values, the amount of CO 2 transported by Vesuvio groundwaters was estimated at about 150 t/d. This estimate does not take into account the fraction of gas loss by degassing, however, it represents a relevant part of the CO 2 emitted in this quiescent period by the Vesuvio volcanic system, being of the same order of magnitude as the CO 2 diffusely degassed from the crater area

  8. Reconciling Gases With Glasses: Magma Degassing, Overturn and Mixing at Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, M.; Gerlach, T. M.

    2006-12-01

    Our understanding of the volatile budget at Kilauea Volcano is based on measurements of the abundance of volatile elements in volcanic glasses and gases. Observations of volcanic gases gave rise to a fundamental model describing volatile fractionation between the summit and rift zone during the current eruption [Gerlach and Graeber, 1985]. Other workers' analysis of glasses from the Puna Ridge, Kilauea Iki and Pu`u `O`o indicate that magma degassing, drain-back, mixing and assimilation are important processes at Kilauea Volcano. Volcanic gases have not illustrated these kinds of processes clearly in the past, owing to infrequent and poorly resolved data. New, detailed studies of volcanic gas emissions have refined our understanding of volatile degassing and magma budgets at Kilauea Volcano. Open Path Fourier Transform Infra-Red spectroscopy measurements carried out during 2004-2005 allow retrieval of the relative abundances of the major volatile species H2O, CO2 and SO2, which together make up >99 vol% of the magmatic vapor phase. The proportions of these gases vary over time and space and can be used to infer magma transport, ascent, degassing, overturn and mixing and gas segregation processes within the plumbing system of Kilauea Volcano. Gases from Pu`u `O`o in 2004-2005 display a range in composition. A trend relates molar C/S to the total H2O content of the gases over time and space; total H2O ranges from 60-98 mol %, while molar C/S ranges from 50. The range in volcanic gas composition over time and space is caused by magma degassing, overturn and mixing of partially degassed magma with fresh primary magma beneath Pu`u `O`o. Measurements of the mean rate of magma degassing (from SO2 emissions) and mean lava effusion rate (from geophysical measurements of lava tube flux) suggest that a larger volume (DRE) of magma is degassing than is being erupted, on average. This analysis suggests that magma storage in the Rift Zone might be important during eruptions as

  9. Unraveling the dynamics of magmatic CO2 degassing at Mammoth Mountain, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Loic; Wanner, Christoph; Lewicki, Jennifer L.

    2018-01-01

    The accumulation of magmatic CO2 beneath low-permeability barriers may lead to the formation of CO2-rich gas reservoirs within volcanic systems. Such accumulation is often evidenced by high surface CO2 emissions that fluctuate over time. The temporal variability in surface degassing is believed in part to reflect a complex interplay between deep magmatic degassing and the permeability of degassing pathways. A better understanding of the dynamics of CO2 degassing is required to improve monitoring and hazards mitigation in these systems. Owing to the availability of long-term records of CO2 emissions rates and seismicity, Mammoth Mountain in California constitutes an ideal site towards such predictive understanding. Mammoth Mountain is characterized by intense soil CO2 degassing (up to ∼1000 t d−1) and tree kill areas that resulted from leakage of CO2 from a CO2-rich gas reservoir located in the upper ∼4 km. The release of CO2-rich fluids from deeper basaltic intrusions towards the reservoir induces seismicity and potentially reactivates faults connecting the reservoir to the surface. While this conceptual model is well-accepted, there is still a debate whether temporally variable surface CO2 fluxes directly reflect degassing of intrusions or variations in fault permeability. Here, we report the first large-scale numerical model of fluid and heat transport for Mammoth Mountain. We discuss processes (i) leading to the initial formation of the CO2-rich gas reservoir prior to the occurrence of high surface CO2 degassing rates and (ii) controlling current CO2 degassing at the surface. Although the modeling settings are site-specific, the key mechanisms discussed in this study are likely at play at other volcanic systems hosting CO2-rich gas reservoirs. In particular, our model results illustrate the role of convection in stripping a CO2-rich gas phase from a rising hydrothermal fluid and leading to an accumulation of a large mass of CO2 (∼107–108

  10. Integrated geophysical and hydrothermal models of flank degassing and fluid flow at Masaya Volcano, Nicaragua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, Ward E.; Pearson, S.C.P.; Kiyosugi, K.; Lehto, H.L.; Saballos, J.A.; Connor, C.B.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate geologic controls on circulation in the shallow hydrothermal system of Masaya volcano, Nicaragua, and their relationship to surface diffuse degassing. On a local scale (~250 m), relatively impermeable normal faults dipping at ~60° control the flowpath of water vapor and other gases in the vadose zone. These shallow normal faults are identified by modeling of a NE-SW trending magnetic anomaly of up to 2300 nT that corresponds to a topographic offset. Elevated SP and CO2 to the NW of the faults and an absence of CO2 to the SE suggest that these faults are barriers to flow. TOUGH2 numerical models of fluid circulation show enhanced flow through the footwalls of the faults, and corresponding increased mass flow and temperature at the surface (diffuse degassing zones). On a larger scale, TOUGH2 modeling suggests that groundwater convection may be occurring in a 3-4 km radial fracture zone transecting the entire flank of the volcano. Hot water rising uniformly into the base of the model at 1 x 10-5 kg/m2s results in convection that focuses heat and fluid and can explain the three distinct diffuse degassing zones distributed along the fracture. Our data and models suggest that the unusually active surface degassing zones at Masaya volcano can result purely from uniform heat and fluid flux at depth that is complicated by groundwater convection and permeability variations in the upper few km. Therefore isolating the effects of subsurface geology is vital when trying to interpret diffuse degassing in light of volcanic activity.

  11. First measurements of the neutrals pressure and of the degassing level of the lower hybrid antenna induced by the HF power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goniche, M.; Berger-By, G.; Bibet, P.; Bonnel, P.; Bruneau, J.L.; Capitain, J.J.; Gil, C.; Hertout, P.; Rodriguez, L.; Magne, R.

    1989-12-01

    Previous experiments have shown that large amounts of gas may be desorbed from the waveguides walls of a lower hybrid antenna. To reduce the pressure rise, a getter pump has been connected to the LH vessel of Tore Supra. The effective neutrals pumping speed of the LH launcher during a plasma shot has been measured for different configurations of the getter pump (inactive, low conductance and high conductance duct). For deuterium, an effective pumping speed of 33 m 3 /s was obtained. During short conditioning pulses and 2-s plasma shots, degassing rates were measured for RF power level up to 1.2 MW. With different filling gas (He, H 2 , D 2 ), degassing rates are documented and effects of conditioning are discussed. This neutrals influx contributes to the particles balance of the plasma discharge: a significant increase of the total number of particles (10-20%) and a flattening of the density profile are inferred. Large increase of the neutrals pressure in the pumped limitor (up to 32%) was also observed. For 2-s shots, this pressure rise was held below 3 mPa at an average LH power density of 1.5 kW/cm 2 . However, this pressure rise may be, to some extent, larger in the reduced-section part of the launcher which has a low conductance. It is expected that this pressure rise should not exceed 5 mPa at full power (5 KW/cm 2 ) after conditioning [fr

  12. Effects of Degassing on the Microstructure, Chemistry, and Estimated Mechanical Properties of a Cryomilled Al-Mg Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmeister, Clara; Zhou, Le; Kellogg, Frank; Giri, Anit; Cho, Kyu; Sohn, Yongho

    2018-04-01

    Nanostructured aluminum alloys produced through cryomilling have generated interest due to their potential to create consolidated parts with high strength and low density. Degassing prior to consolidation minimizes adsorbed and absorbed volatiles, but is accompanied by microstructural changes such as grain growth, dislocation annihilation, and formation of dispersoids. These changes can influence the mechanical behavior of consolidated components. Cryomilled AA5083 was degassed at temperatures from 473 K to 773 K (200 °C to 500 °C) with a vacuum at or below 2.7 × 10-3 Pa. Grain size in the as-cryomilled powder (ranging from 21 to 34 nm) increased with higher degassing temperature and reached a maximum size of up to 70 to 80 nm. The dislocation density of 1.11 × 1015 m-2 in as-cryomilled powder decreased to 1.56 × 1014 m-2 for powder degassed at 773 K (500 °C). The Al6(MnFeCr) dispersoid formed when powders were degassed at or above 573 K (300 °C). Oxygen and nitrogen concentrations were unaffected by degassing; however, hydrogen concentration decreased with increasing degassing temperature to a minimum of 45 ± 3.16 ppm. Evolutions in composition and microstructure in cryomilled AA5083 were correlated to the strengthening mechanisms of grain size reduction (i.e., Hall-Petch), dislocation forest, and Orowan. However, strengthening by grain size reduction was the dominant strengthening mechanism.

  13. Preliminary simulation of degassing of natural gases dissolved in groundwater during shaft excavation in Horonobe underground research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Hajime; Shimo, Michito; Kunimaru, Takanori; Kurikami, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    In Neogene-Quaternary sedimentary basins, natural gases such as methane are often dissolved in groundwater significantly. In this paper, two-phase flow simulations incorporating the degassing of methane, and carbon dioxide, were performed for the shaft excavation in Horonobe underground research project. The results drawn from the simulations are summarized as follows. 1) As depth increases, degassing and gas inflow occurs significantly. 2) Degassing increases the compressibility of pore fluids, resulting in slow changes in groundwater pressures. 3) Although the occurrence of gas phase decreases water mobility, the influence of the dissolved gas on the groundwater inflow rate to the shaft was small. (author)

  14. Sorption by cation exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, M.H.; Baeyens, B.

    1994-04-01

    A procedure for introducing exchange into geochemical/surface complexation codes is described. Beginning with selectivity coefficients, K c , defined in terms of equivalent fractional ion occupancies, a general expression for the molar based exchange code input parameters, K ex , is derived. In natural systems the uptake of nuclides onto complex sorbents often occurs by more than one mechanism. The incorporation of cation exchange and surface complexation into a geochemical code therefore enables sorption by both mechanisms to be calculated simultaneously. The code and model concepts are tested against sets of experimental data from widely different sorption studies. A proposal is made to set up a data base of selectivity coefficients. Such a data base would form part of a more general one consisting of sorption mechanism specific parameters to be used in conjunction with geochemical/sorption codes to model and predict sorption. (author) 6 figs., 6 tabs., 26 refs

  15. Quantitative evaluation of the effect of H2O degassing on the oxidation state of magmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, R. A.; Waters, L.

    2014-12-01

    The extent to which degassing of the H2O component affects the oxidation state of hydrous magmas is widely debated. Several researchers have examined how degassing of mixed H-C-O-S-Cl fluids may change the Fe3+/FeT ratio of various magmas, whereas our focus is on the H2O component. There are two ways that degassing of H2O by itself may cause oxidation: (1) the reaction: H2O (melt) + 2FeO (melt) = H2 (fluid) + Fe2O3 (melt), and/or (2) if dissolved water preferentially enhances the activity of ferrous vs. ferric iron in magmatic liquids. In this study, a comparison is made between the pre-eruptive oxidation states of 14 crystal-poor, jet-black obsidian samples (obtained from two Fe-Ti oxides) and their post-eruptive values (analyzed with the Wilson 1960 titration method tested against USGS standards). The obsidians are from Medicine Lake (CA), Long Valley (CA), and the western Mexican arc; all have low FeOT (1.1-2.1 wt%), rendering their Fe2+/Fe3+ ratios highly sensitive to the possible effects of substantial H2O degassing. The Fe-Ti oxide thermometer/oxybarometer of Ghiorso and Evans, (2008) gave temperatures for the 14 samples that range for 720 to 940°C and ΔNNO values of -0.9 to +1.4. With temperature known, the plagioclase-liquid hygrometer was applied and show that ≤ 6.5 wt% H2O was dissolved in the melts prior to eruption. In addition, pre-eruptive Cl and S concentrations were constrained on the basis of apatite analyses (Webster et al., 2009) and sulfur concentrations needed for saturation with pyrrhotite (Clemente et al., 2004), respectively. Maximum pre-eruptive chlorine and sulfur contents are 6000 and 200 ppm, respectively. After eruption, the rhyolites lost nearly all of their volatiles. Our results indicate no detectable change between pre- and post-eruptive Fe2+ concentrations, with an average deviation of ± 0.1 wt % FeO. Although degassing of large concentrations of S and/or Cl may affect the oxidation state of magmas, at the pre-eruptive levels

  16. Degassing measurement for beryllium exposed to D{sub 2} atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markin, A.V.; Zakharov, A.P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. of Physical Chemistry

    1998-01-01

    A possibility of the correct determination of deuterium solubility and diffusivity in Be on the basis of degassing experiments is demonstrated. It has been found that the main fraction (above 90%) of deuterium retained under D{sub 2} exposure is removed under slight electropolishing (descaling of {approx} 2-5 {mu}m) of the samples before TDS measurement. This deuterium seems to be located in the near surface oxide layers formed during the exposure as a result of interaction of beryllium with oxygen containing molecules of residual gas. In all degassing runs the diffusion of deuterium in the bulk of beryllium samples was not a limited-stage of gas release. (author)

  17. Analysis of Ruptured Heater Tube of Degasser Condenser in Wolsong Unit 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hong Pyo; Kim, J. S.; Lim, Y. S.; Kim, S. S.; Hwang, S. S.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, S. W.; Jeong, M. K.; Hong, J. H.

    2007-08-01

    In a degasser condenser in Wolsong unit 4, the cracks were found in the heater tube no. 6 and no. 7. To avoid additional damages in the specimen during a decontamination process for the previous analysis, the cracks were analyzed without any decontamination process in this work. We performed the investigation of the ruptured surface morphology, the EDS analysis of the ruptured surface, the microstructural analysis of Alloy 800H sheath tube and literature survey to find the failure mechanism. From the results, it was expected that the sheath tube has been exposed in a steam condition as the coolant level was decreased in the degasser condenser, leading to the rupture of the sheath tube

  18. Utilizing methane from degassing as a fuel for furnaces of drying systems. [USSR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matveev, V.I.; Telegin, A.K.

    1984-10-01

    The use is evaluated of methane from coal seam degassing in the Severnaya mine as a fuel for dryers in the Severnaya coal preparation plant in the USSR. Dryers used in the plant are equipped with PMZ-4TsR furnaces. Middlings (type Zh18 coal) with 30% ash content and 0.25 MJ/kg calorific value were used as a fuel. When dryers were fired with middlings moisture content in coal concentrate declined from 10.1% to 5.1%, system output amounted to 133 t/h. After plant modernization middlings were replaced with methane from coal seam degassing (methane content in the mixture with air ranged from 40 to 60%). Replacing middlings with methane increased dryer output from 133 to 203 t/h. Moisture content in dried coal was reduced from 11.8 to 4.8%. Repair cost decreased, environmental pollution caused by combustion also declined. Payback period amounted to 6 months.

  19. Investigation of Inner Vacuum Sucking method for degassing of molten aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, Jianmin; Gu, Ping; Wang, Youbing

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen is a harmful gas element that is appreciably soluble in aluminum and its alloys. Removal of hydrogen from molten aluminum has been one of the most important tasks in aluminum melt processing. In this paper, a patented degassing process, which is based on principle of vacuum metallurgy, is proposed. A porous head that connects a vacuum system is immersed in the molten aluminum. The vacuum is created within the porous head and the dissolved hydrogen will diffuse unidirectionally towards the porous head according to Sievert's law. In this way, the hydrogen in the molten aluminum can be removed. The Fick's diffusion equation is used to explain hydrogen transfer in the molten aluminum. RPT experiments are carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of the new degassing process. The experiments indicate that the hydrogen content can be dramatically reduced by use of this process.

  20. Integrative device and process of oxidization, degassing, acidity adjustment of 1BP from APOR process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuo, Chen; Zheng, Weifang, E-mail: wfazh@ciae.ac.cn; Yan, Taihong; He, Hui; Li, Gaoliang; Chang, Shangwen; Li, Chuanbo; Yuan, Zhongwei

    2016-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Previous (left) and present (right) device of oxidation, degassing, acidity adjustment of 1BP. - Highlights: • We designed an integrative device and process. • The utilization efficiency of N{sub 2}O{sub 4} is increased significantly. • Our work results in considerable simplification of the device. • Process parameters are determined by experiments. - Abstract: Device and process of oxidization, degassing, acidity adjustment of 1BP (The Pu production feed from U/Pu separation section) from APOR process (Advanced Purex Process based on Organic Reductants) were improved through rational design and experiments. The device was simplified and the process parameters, such as feed position and flow ratio, were determined by experiments. Based on this new device and process, the reductants N,N-dimethylhydroxylamine (DMHAN) and methylhydrazine (MMH) in 1BP solution could be oxidized with much less N{sub 2}O{sub 4} consumption.

  1. Experimental investigation of nitrogen isotopic effects associated with ammonia degassing at 0-70 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yuying; Li, Yingzhou; Li, Long

    2018-04-01

    Ammonia degassing is a common process in natural alkaline waters and in the atmosphere. To quantitatively assess the nitrogen cycle in these systems, the essential parameter of nitrogen isotope fractionation factors associated with ammonia degassing is required, but still not constrained yet. In this study, we carried out laboratory experiments to examine the nitrogen isotope behavior during ammonia degassing in alkaline conditions. The experiments started with ammonium sulfate solution with excess sodium hydroxide. The reaction can be described as: NH4+ + OH- (excess) → NH3·nH2O → NH3 (g)↑. Two sets of experiments, one with ammonia degassing under static conditions and the other with ammonia degassing by bubbling of N2 gas, were carried out at 2, 21, 50, and 70 °C. The results indicate that kinetic isotopic effects are dominated during efficient degassing of ammonia in the bubbling experiments, which yielded kinetic nitrogen isotope fractionation factors αNH3(g)-NH3(aq) of 0.9898 at 2 °C, 0.9918 at 21 °C, 0.9935 at 50 °C and 0.9948 at 70 °C. These values show a good relationship with temperature as 103lnαNH3(g)-NH3(aq) = 14.6 - 6.8 × 1000/T. In contrast, isotopic effects during less efficient degassing of ammonia in the static experiments are more complicated. The results do not match either kinetic isotope fractionation or equilibrium isotope fractionation but sit between these two. The most likely cause is that back dissolution of the degassed ammonia occurred in these experiments and consequently shifted kinetic isotope fractionation toward equilibrium isotope fractionation. Our experimental results highlight complicated isotopic effects may occur in natural environments, and need to be fully considered in the interpretation of field data.

  2. Intense magmatic degassing through the lake of Copahue volcano, 2013-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburello, G.; Agusto, M.; Caselli, A.; Tassi, F.; Vaselli, O.; Calabrese, S.; Rouwet, D.; Capaccioni, B.; Di Napoli, R.; Cardellini, C.; Chiodini, G.; Bitetto, M.; Brusca, L.; Bellomo, S.; Aiuppa, A.

    2015-09-01

    Here we report on the first assessment of volatile fluxes from the hyperacid crater lake hosted within the summit crater of Copahue, a very active volcano on the Argentina-Chile border. Our observations were performed using a variety of in situ and remote sensing techniques during field campaigns in March 2013, when the crater hosted an active fumarole field, and in March 2014, when an acidic volcanic lake covered the fumarole field. In the latter campaign, we found that 566 to 1373 t d-1 of SO2 were being emitted from the lake in a plume that appeared largely invisible. This, combined with our derived bulk plume composition, was converted into flux of other volcanic species (H2O ~ 10989 t d-1, CO2 ~ 638 t d-1, HCl ~ 66 t d-1, H2 ~ 3.3 t d-1, and HBr ~ 0.05 t d-1). These levels of degassing, comparable to those seen at many open-vent degassing arc volcanoes, were surprisingly high for a volcano hosting a crater lake. Copahue's unusual degassing regime was also confirmed by the chemical composition of the plume that, although issuing from a hot (65°C) lake, preserves a close-to-magmatic signature. EQ3/6 models of gas-water-rock interaction in the lake were able to match observed compositions and demonstrated that magmatic gases emitted to the atmosphere were virtually unaffected by scrubbing of soluble (S and Cl) species. Finally, the derived large H2O flux (10,988 t d-1) suggested a mechanism in which magmatic gas stripping drove enhanced lake water evaporation, a process likely common to many degassing volcanic lakes worldwide.

  3. Infrasonic harmonic tremor and degassing bursts from Halema'uma'u Crater, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fee, David; Garcés, Milton; Patrick, Matt; Chouet, Bernard; Dawson, Phil; Swanson, Donald A.

    2010-01-01

    The formation, evolution, collapse, and subsequent resurrection of a vent within Halema'uma'u Crater, Kilauea Volcano, produced energetic and varied degassing signals recorded by a nearby infrasound array between 2008 and early 2009. After 25 years of quiescence, a vent-clearing explosive burst on 19 March 2008 produced a clear, complex acoustic signal. Near-continuous harmonic infrasonic tremor followed this burst until 4 December 2008, when a period of decreased degassing occurred. The tremor spectra suggest volume oscillation and reverberation of a shallow gas-filled cavity beneath the vent. The dominant tremor peak can be sustained through Helmholtz oscillations of the cavity, while the secondary tremor peak and overtones are interpreted assuming acoustic resonance. The dominant tremor frequency matches the oscillation frequency of the gas emanating from the vent observed by video. Tremor spectra and power are also correlated with cavity geometry and dynamics, with the cavity depth estimated at ~219 m and volume ~3 x 106 m3 in November 2008. Over 21 varied degassing bursts were observed with extended burst durations and frequency content consistent with a transient release of gas exciting the cavity into resonance. Correlation of infrasound with seismicity suggests an open system connecting the atmosphere to the seismic excitation process at depth. Numerous degassing bursts produced very long period (0.03-0.1 Hz) infrasound, the first recorded at Kilauea, indicative of long-duration atmospheric accelerations. Kilauea infrasound appears controlled by the exsolution of gas from the magma, and the interaction of this gas with the conduits and cavities confining it.

  4. Sulfur diffusion in dacitic melt at various oxidation states: Implications for volcanic degassing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lierenfeld, Matthias Bernhard; Zajacz, Zoltán; Bachmann, Olivier; Ulmer, Peter

    2018-04-01

    The diffusivity of S in a hydrous dacitic melt (4.5-6.0 wt.% H2O) has been investigated in the temperature (T) and pressure (P) range of 950 °C to 1100 °C and 200 to 250 MPa, respectively. Three series of experiments were conducted at relatively low oxygen fugacity (fO2) conditions [0.8 log units below fayalite-magnetite-quartz equilibrium (FMQ -0.8); referred to as "low fO2"] and high fO2 conditions (FMQ +2.5; referred to as "high fO2") to determine if the diffusivity of S is affected by its oxidation state and speciation. Sulfur concentration profiles were measured by electron microprobe and the diffusion coefficient (D) was calculated by fitting these profiles. Sulfur diffusion is approximately one order of magnitude faster when S is dominantly present as sulfide species (low fO2) in comparison to the sulfate dominated experiments (high fO2). The following Arrhenian equations were obtained for high and low fO2 conditions at 200 MPa: high fO2: D = 10-5.92±0.86 * exp ({-137.3±21.5 kJ/mol}/{RT}) low fO2: D = 10-5.18±1.39 * exp ({-125.7±34.4 kJ/mol}/{RT}) where D is the average diffusion coefficient in m2 s-1, R is the gas constant in 8.3144 J mol-1 K-1 and T is the temperature in K. Our results demonstrate for the first time in natural melts that S diffusion is strongly sensitive to fO2. Our S diffusivities under low fO2 conditions are only slightly slower of those found for H2O, suggesting that S can be rather efficiently purged from reduced dacitic melts during volcanic eruptions. However, for more oxidized systems (e.g. subduction zones), S diffusion will be much slower and will hinder equilibrium syn-eruptive degassing during rapid decompression. Therefore, we conclude that the "excess" measured during many explosive volcanic eruptions in arcs is dominantly derived from S-rich bubble accumulation in the eruptible portion of the magma reservoir.

  5. A model of diffuse degassing at three subduction-related volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams-Jones, Glyn; Stix, John; Heiligmann, Martin; Charland, Anne; Sherwood Lollar, Barbara; Arner, N.; Garzón, Gustavo V.; Barquero, Jorge; Fernandez, Erik

    Radon, CO2 and δ13C in soil gas were measured at three active subduction-related stratovolcanoes (Arenal and Poás, Costa Rica; Galeras, Colombia). In general, Rn, CO2 and δ13C values are higher on the lower flanks of the volcanoes, except near fumaroles in the active craters. The upper flanks of these volcanoes have low Rn concentrations and light δ13C values. These observations suggest that diffuse degassing of magmatic gas on the upper flanks of these volcanoes is negligible and that more magmatic degassing occurs on the lower flanks where major faults and greater fracturing in the older lavas can channel magmatic gases to the surface. These results are in contrast to findings for Mount Etna where a broad halo of magmatic CO2 has been postulated to exist over much of the edifice. Differences in radon levels among the three volcanoes studied here may result from differences in age, the degree of fracturing and faulting, regional structures or the level of hydrothermal activity. Volcanoes, such as those studied here, act as plugs in the continental crust, focusing magmatic degassing towards crater fumaroles, faults and the fractured lower flanks.

  6. Porous aerosol in degassing plumes of Mt. Etna and Mt. Stromboli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Shcherbakov

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aerosols of the volcanic degassing plumes from Mt. Etna and Mt. Stromboli were probed with in situ instruments on board the Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt research aircraft Falcon during the contrail, volcano, and cirrus experiment CONCERT in September 2011. Aerosol properties were analyzed using angular-scattering intensities and particle size distributions measured simultaneously with the Polar Nephelometer and the Forward Scattering Spectrometer probes (FSSP series 100 and 300, respectively. Aerosols of degassing plumes are characterized by low values of the asymmetry parameter (between 0.6 and 0.75; the effective diameter was within the range of 1.5–2.8 µm and the maximal diameter was lower than 20 µm. A principal component analysis applied to the Polar Nephelometer data indicates that scattering features of volcanic aerosols of different crater origins are clearly distinctive from angular-scattering intensities of cirrus and contrails. Retrievals of aerosol properties revealed that the particles were "optically spherical" and the estimated values of the real part of the refractive index are within the interval from 1.35 to 1.38. The interpretation of these results leads to the conclusion that the degassing plume aerosols were porous with air voids. Our estimates suggest that aerosol particles contained about 18 to 35 % of air voids in terms of the total volume.

  7. Mantle to surface degassing of alkalic magmas at Erebus volcano, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenheimer, C.; Moretti, R.; Kyle, P.R.; Eschenbacher, A.; Lowenstern, J. B.; Hervig, R.L.; Dunbar, N.W.

    2011-01-01

    Continental intraplate volcanoes, such as Erebus volcano, Antarctica, are associated with extensional tectonics, mantle upwelling and high heat flow. Typically, erupted magmas are alkaline and rich in volatiles (especially CO2), inherited from low degrees of partial melting of mantle sources. We examine the degassing of the magmatic system at Erebus volcano using melt inclusion data and high temporal resolution open-path Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic measurements of gas emissions from the active lava lake. Remarkably different gas signatures are associated with passive and explosive gas emissions, representative of volatile contents and redox conditions that reveal contrasting shallow and deep degassing sources. We show that this unexpected degassing signature provides a unique probe for magma differentiation and transfer of CO2-rich oxidised fluids from the mantle to the surface, and evaluate how these processes operate in time and space. Extensive crystallisation driven by CO2 fluxing is responsible for isobaric fractionation of parental basanite magmas close to their source depth. Magma deeper than 4kbar equilibrates under vapour-buffered conditions. At shallower depths, CO2-rich fluids accumulate and are then released either via convection-driven, open-system gas loss or as closed-system slugs that ascend and result in Strombolian eruptions in the lava lake. The open-system gases have a reduced state (below the QFM buffer) whereas the closed-system gases preserve their deep oxidised signatures (close to the NNO buffer). ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  8. The technology of extracting gaseous fuel based on comprehensive in situ gasification and coalbed degassing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. Н. Шабаров

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The study considers a comprehensive technology (designed and patented by the authors of developing coal and methane deposits which combines in situ gasification of lower coalbeds in the suite of rock bump hazardous gassy beds, extraction of coal methane and mechanized mining of coal. The first stage of the technology consists in mining gaseous fuel that enables one to extract up to 15-20 % of total energy from the suite of coalbeds. Geodynamic zoning is used to select positions for boring wells. Using the suggested technology makes it possible to solve a number of tasks simultaneously. First of all that is extracting gaseous fuel from the suite of coalbeds without running any mining works while retaining principal coalbeds in the suite and preparing them for future processing (unloading and degassing. During the first phase the methane-coal deposit works as a gas deposit only, the gas having two sources – extracted methane (which includes its locked forms, absorbed and adsorbed and the products of partial incineration of thin coalbeds, riders and seams from thee suite. The second stage consists in deep degassing and unloading of coal beds which sharply reduces the hazards of methane explosion and rock bumps, thus increasing the productivity of mechanized coal mining. During the second stage coal is mined in long poles with the account of degassing and unloading of coal beds, plus the data on gas dynamic structure of coal rock massif.

  9. Degassing of primordial hydrogen and helium as the major energy source for internal terrestrial processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arie Lev Gilat

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Examples of the mightiest energy releases by great earthquakes and volcanic eruptions and hypotheses providing explanations for them are analyzed along with the results of some recently published researches and visualizations. The emerging conclusions are that the mechanism of the strong earthquake is a chemical explosion; that volcanic eruption is a special type of earthquake wherein the hypocenter rises to the earth-surface; and that there is an association between the seismic-volcanic processes and mantle “fluids” and the lack of energy for mantle plumes. A conceptual system of hypotheses is put forward to explain the conservation of energy during Earth’s accretion, its quasi-stable release by primordial H- and He-degassing and of the crucial role of the energy of degassing-comprising-reactions in endogenic processes. Specific mechanisms and chemical processes are proposed for the gas-liquid mantle plumes melting through the solid mantle using heat-energy released in reactions of their metamorphic and chemical transformation under gradual decrease of pressure and temperature; volcanic gases are put forward as energy carriers. 3He performance as a unique measuring transformer correlative to the internal heat flow was used for calculation of energy release by degassing; it equals to 5.12 × 1020 J/yr, an amount of energy five-fold greater than the entire energy loss involved in earthquake and volcanic activity. The hypotheses proposed are objectively testable.

  10. Degassing during quiescence as a trigger of magma ascent and volcanic eruptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girona, Társilo; Costa, Fidel; Schubert, Gerald

    2015-12-15

    Understanding the mechanisms that control the start-up of volcanic unrest is crucial to improve the forecasting of eruptions at active volcanoes. Among the most active volcanoes in the world are the so-called persistently degassing ones (e.g., Etna, Italy; Merapi, Indonesia), which emit massive amounts of gas during quiescence (several kilotonnes per day) and erupt every few months or years. The hyperactivity of these volcanoes results from frequent pressurizations of the shallow magma plumbing system, which in most cases are thought to occur by the ascent of magma from deep to shallow reservoirs. However, the driving force that causes magma ascent from depth remains unknown. Here we demonstrate that magma ascent can be triggered by the passive release of gas during quiescence, which induces the opening of pathways connecting deep and shallow magma reservoirs. This top-down mechanism for volcanic eruptions contrasts with the more common bottom-up mechanisms in which magma ascent is only driven by processes occurring at depth. A cause-effect relationship between passive degassing and magma ascent can explain the fact that repose times are typically much longer than unrest times preceding eruptions, and may account for the so frequent unrest episodes of persistently degassing volcanoes.

  11. Cationic polymers and porous materials

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Yu

    2017-04-27

    According to one or more embodiments, cationic polymers may be produced which include one or more monomers containing cations. Such cationic polymers may be utilized as structure directing agents to form mesoporous zeolites. The mesoporous zeolites may include micropores as well as mesopores, and may have a surface area of greater than 350 m2/g and a pore volume of greater than 0.3 cm3/g. Also described are core/shell zeolites, where at least the shell portion includes a mesoporous zeolite material.

  12. Cationic polymers and porous materials

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Yu; Tian, Qiwei; Dong, Xinglong; Liu, Zhaohui; Basset, Jean-Marie; Saih, Youssef; Sun, Miao; Xu, Wei; Shaikh, Sohel

    2017-01-01

    According to one or more embodiments, cationic polymers may be produced which include one or more monomers containing cations. Such cationic polymers may be utilized as structure directing agents to form mesoporous zeolites. The mesoporous zeolites may include micropores as well as mesopores, and may have a surface area of greater than 350 m2/g and a pore volume of greater than 0.3 cm3/g. Also described are core/shell zeolites, where at least the shell portion includes a mesoporous zeolite material.

  13. Argon-40 as a Constraint on the Volcanic Degassing History and Thermal Evolution of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, W. S.

    2017-12-01

    Models for the thermal and magmatic evolution of Mars are strongly controlled by the volcanic degassing of water from the interior. Water affects the mantle's viscosity and hence the vigor of convective flow. It also affects the mantle's solidus temperature and hence the rate of magma generation. This set of coupled feedback loops affects both the volume of crustal production and the possible production of a magnetic field via a core dynamo (e.g., Sandu and Kiefer, GRL 2012, 2011GL050225). Volcanic degassing also affects other atmospheric components. Argon-40, which is a radioactive decay product of potassium-40, can potentially serve as an additional test of thermal evolution models. As a noble gas, 40Ar is highly incompatible in mantle and crustal rocks and thus tends to degas to the atmosphere during magmatic events. 40K has a half-life of 1.25 billion years and thus 40Ar measures volcanic degassing throughout martian history. It is relatively insensitive to atmospheric loss processes during the earliest part of solar system history, and long-term loss of 40Ar from the atmosphere can be estimated from fractionation of the 38Ar/36Ar ratio relative to solar (MAVEN results indicate that 66% of 36Ar has been lost from the martian atmosphere, Jakosky et al., Science 2017). The noble gas composition of the martian atmosphere has been measured both in situ using the SAM mass spectrometer on NASA's Curiosity rover and via measurements of trapped atmospheric gases in martian meteorites. One important application of 40Ar degassing models is as a constraint on the bulk silicate composition of Mars. The most widely accepted composition model for Mars has a potassium abundance of 305-310 ppm, slightly higher than the bulk silicate Earth. However, several other models assume a bulk silicate Mars K of up to 1040 ppm. Preliminary Ar degassing modeling favors K in the lower half of this range, consistent with results from long-term and present-day magma production models

  14. The cation-π interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Dennis A

    2013-04-16

    The chemistry community now recognizes the cation-π interaction as a major force for molecular recognition, joining the hydrophobic effect, the hydrogen bond, and the ion pair in determining macromolecular structure and drug-receptor interactions. This Account provides the author's perspective on the intellectual origins and fundamental nature of the cation-π interaction. Early studies on cyclophanes established that water-soluble, cationic molecules would forego aqueous solvation to enter a hydrophobic cavity if that cavity was lined with π systems. Important gas phase studies established the fundamental nature of the cation-π interaction. The strength of the cation-π interaction (Li(+) binds to benzene with 38 kcal/mol of binding energy; NH4(+) with 19 kcal/mol) distinguishes it from the weaker polar-π interactions observed in the benzene dimer or water-benzene complexes. In addition to the substantial intrinsic strength of the cation-π interaction in gas phase studies, the cation-π interaction remains energetically significant in aqueous media and under biological conditions. Many studies have shown that cation-π interactions can enhance binding energies by 2-5 kcal/mol, making them competitive with hydrogen bonds and ion pairs in drug-receptor and protein-protein interactions. As with other noncovalent interactions involving aromatic systems, the cation-π interaction includes a substantial electrostatic component. The six (four) C(δ-)-H(δ+) bond dipoles of a molecule like benzene (ethylene) combine to produce a region of negative electrostatic potential on the face of the π system. Simple electrostatics facilitate a natural attraction of cations to the surface. The trend for (gas phase) binding energies is Li(+) > Na(+) > K(+) > Rb(+): as the ion gets larger the charge is dispersed over a larger sphere and binding interactions weaken, a classical electrostatic effect. On other hand, polarizability does not define these interactions. Cyclohexane is

  15. Simultaneous anionic and cationic redox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sung-Kyun; Kang, Kisuk

    2017-12-01

    It is challenging to unlock anionic redox activity, accompanied by full utilization of available cationic redox process, to boost capacity of battery cathodes. Now, material design by tuning the metal-oxygen interaction is shown to be a promising solution.

  16. Cation disorder in Ga1212.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, K B; Ko, D; Vander Griend, D A; Sarjeant, G M; Milgram, J W; Garrity, E S; DeLoach, D I; Poeppelmeier, K R; Salvador, P A; Mason, T O

    2000-07-24

    Substitution of calcium for strontium in LnSr2-xCaxCu2GaO7 (Ln = La, Pr, Nd, Gd, Ho, Er, Tm, and Yb) materials at ambient pressure and 975 degrees C results in complete substitution of calcium for strontium in the lanthanum and praseodymium systems and partial substitution in the other lanthanide systems. The calcium saturation level depends on the size of the Ln cation, and in all cases, a decrease in the lattice parameters with calcium concentration was observed until a common, lower bound, average A-cation size is reached. Site occupancies from X-ray and neutron diffraction experiments for LnSr2-xCaxCu2GaO7 (x = 0 and x = 2) confirm that the A-cations distribute between the two blocking-layer sites and the active-layer site based on size. A quantitative link between cation distribution and relative site-specific cation enthalpy for calcium, strontium, and lanthanum within the gallate structure is derived. The cation distribution in other similar materials can potentially be modeled.

  17. Liquid-solid extraction of cationic metals by cationic amphiphiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, W.

    2010-01-01

    In the field of selective separation for recycling of spent nuclear fuel, liquid-liquid extraction processes are widely used (PUREX, DIAMEX..) in industrial scale. In order to guarantee a sustainable nuclear energy for the forthcoming generations, alternative reprocessing techniques are under development. One of them bases on the studies from Heckmann et al in the 80's and consists in selectively precipitating actinides from aqueous waste solutions by cationic surfactants (liquid-solid extraction). This technique has some interesting advantages over liquid-liquid extraction techniques, because several steps are omitted like stripping or solvent washing. Moreover, the amount of waste is decreased considerably, since no contaminated organic solvent is produced. In this thesis, we have carried out a physico-chemical study to understand the specific interactions between the metallic cations with the cationic surfactant. First, we have analysed the specific effect of the different counter-ions (Cl - , NO 3 - , C 2 O 4 2- ) and then the effect of alkaline cations on the structural properties of the surfactant aggregation in varying thermodynamical conditions. Finally, different multivalent cations (Cu 2+ , Zn 2+ , UO 2 2+ , Fe 3+ , Nd 3+ , Eu 3+ , Th 4+ ) were considered; we have concluded that depending on the anionic complex of these metals formed in acidic media, we can observe either an adsorption at the micellar interface or not. This adsorption has a large influence of the surfactant aggregation properties and determines the limits of the application in term of ionic strength, temperature and surfactant concentration. (author) [fr

  18. Magmas in motion: Degassing in volcanic conduits and fabrics of pyroclastic density current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgisser, Alain

    Volcanoes are caused by the transport of magma batches from the Earth's crust to the surface. These magmas in motion undergo drastic changes of rheologic properties during their journey to the surface and this work explores how these changes affect volcanic eruptions. The first part of this study is devoted to the dynamic aspects of degassing and permeability in magmas with high pressure, high temperature experiments on natural volcanic rocks. Degassing is measured by the influence of decompression rate on the growth of the bubbles present in the magma while permeability is deduced from the temporal evolution of these bubbles. The parameterization of our results in a numerical model of volcanic conduit flow show that previous models based on equilibrium degassing overestimate the acceleration and the decompression rate of the magma. Assessing permeability effects derived form our results show that the transition between explosive and effusive eruptions is a strong function of the magma initial ascent rate. The second part of this work is a unification of two end-members of pyroclastic currents (highly concentrated pyroclastic flows and dilute, turbulent pyroclastic surges) using theoretical scaling arguments based on multiphase physics. Starting from the dynamics of the particle interactions with a fundamental eddy, we consider the full spectrum of eddies generated within a turbulent current. We demonstrate that the presence of particles with various sizes induces a density stratification of the current, leading to its segregation into a basal concentrated part overlain by a dilute cloud. To verify our predictions on the interactions of such a segregated pyroclastic current with its surroundings (hills and sea), we studied the products of the 2050 BP caldera-forming eruption of Okmok Volcano (Alaska). This field study allowed us to reconstruct the eruptive sequence and to validate the main aspects of our theoretical model, such as the superposition of a dense and

  19. Surface geothermal exploration in the Canary Islands by means of soil CO_{2} degassing surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Merino, Marta; Rodríguez, Fátima; Padrón, Eleazar; Melián, Gladys; Asensio-Ramos, María; Barrancos, José; Hernández, Pedro A.; Pérez, Nemesio M.

    2017-04-01

    With the exception of the Teide fumaroles, there is not any evidence of hydrothermal fluid discharges in the surficial environment of the Canary Islands, the only Spanish territory with potential high enthalpy geothermal resources. Here we show the results of several diffuse CO2 degassing surveys carried out at five mining licenses in Tenerife and Gran Canaria with the aim of sorting the possible geothermal potential of these five mining licenses. The primary objective of the study was to reduce the uncertainty inherent to the selection of the areas with highest geothermal potential for future exploration works. The yardstick used to classify the different areas was the contribution of volcano-hydrothermal CO2 in the diffuse CO2 degassing at each study area. Several hundreds of measurements of diffuse CO2 emission, soil CO2 concentration and isotopic composition were performed at each mining license. Based in three different endmembers (biogenic, atmospheric and deep-seated CO2) with different CO2 concentrations (100, 0.04 and 100%, respectively) and isotopic compositions (-24, -8 and -3 per mil vs. VPDB respectively) a mass balance to distinguish the different contribution of each endmember in the soil CO2 at each sampling site was made. The percentage of the volcano-hydrothermal contribution in the current diffuse CO2 degassing was in the range 0-19%. The Abeque mining license, that comprises part of the north-west volcanic rift of Tenerife, seemed to show the highest geothermal potential, with an average of 19% of CO2 being released from deep sources, followed by Atidama (south east of Gran Canaria) and Garehagua (southern volcanic rift of Tenerife), with 17% and 12% respectively.

  20. Melt fracturing and healing: A mechanism for degassing and origin of silicic obsidian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, A.; Weinberg, R.F.; Wright, H.M.N.; Zlotnik, S.; Cas, Ray A.F.

    2011-01-01

    We present water content transects across a healed fault in pyroclastic obsidian from Lami pumice cone, Lipari, Italy, using synchrotron Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Results indicate that rhyolite melt degassed through the fault surface. Transects define a trough of low water content coincident with the fault trace, surrounded on either side by high-water-content plateaus. Plateaus indicate that obsidian on either side of the fault equilibrated at different pressure-temperature (P-T) conditions before being juxtaposed. The curves into the troughs indicate disequilibrium and water loss through diffusion. If we assume constant T, melt equilibrated at pressures differing by 0.74 MPa before juxtaposition, and the fault acted as a low-P permeable path for H2O that diffused from the glass within time scales of 10 and 30 min. Assuming constant P instead, melt on either side could have equilibrated at temperatures differing by as much as 100 ??C, before being brought together. Water content on the fault trace is particularly sensitive to post-healing diffusion. Its preserved value indicates either higher temperature or lower pressure than the surroundings, indicative of shear heating and dynamic decompression. Our results reveal that water contents of obsidian on either side of the faults equilibrated under different P-T conditions and were out of equilibrium with each other when they were juxtaposed due to faulting immediately before the system was quenched. Degassing due to faulting could be linked to cyclical seismic activity and general degassing during silicic volcanic activity, and could be an efficient mechanism of producing low-water-content obsidian. ?? 2011 Geological Society of America.

  1. Effect of high shear mixing parameters and degassing temperature on the morphology of epoxy-clay nanocomposites

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Qadhi, Muneer; Merah, N.; Mezghani, Khaled S.; Khan, Zafarullah; Gasem, Zuhair Mattoug Asad; Sougrat, Rachid

    2013-01-01

    Epoxy-clay nanocomposites were prepared by high shear mixing method using Nanomer I.30E nanoclay as nano-reinforcement in diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA). The effect of mixing speed and time on the nature and degree of clay dispersion were investigated by varying the mixing speed in the range of 500-8000 RPM and mixing time in the range of 15-90 minutes. The effect of degassing temperature on the morphology of the resultant nanocomposites was also studied. Scanning and transmission microscopy (SEM and TEM) along with x-ray diffraction (XRD) have been used to characterize the effect of shear mixing speed, mixing time and degassing temperature on the structure of the resultant nanocomposites. The SEM, TEM and XRD examinations demonstrated that the degree of clay dispersion was improved with increasing the high shear mixing speed and mixing time. The results showed that the optimum high shear mixing speed and mixing time were 6000 rpm and 60 min, respectively. It was observed that the structure of the nanocomposites that have been degassed at 65°C was dominated by ordered intercalated morphology while disordered intercalated with some exfoliated morphology was found for the sample degassed at 100°C for the first 2 hours of the degassing process. © (2013) Trans Tech Publications, Switzerland.

  2. The 2012 Copahue eruption: magnitude of gas fluxes and time scale of degassing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varekamp, J. C.; Camfield, L.

    2015-12-01

    Copahue volcano (Argentina, 37.5 S, 71.5 W) erupted in 2000 and 2012 with initial phreato-magmatic blasts, violent Strombolian eruptions of several hours duration, followed by open conduit activity for days to months. The 2012 basal deposits 10 km S of Copahue are mm-sized ashes with hydrothermally altered debris, followed by up to 10cm pancake pumices, while denser cinders fell near the crater in the waning stages. The strombolian plume was ~ 6 km high and satellite images show its trajectory up to 200 km S. The pumices have finely porous rims (0.3mm vesicles) that were probably quenched by hydrothermal fluids and coarse interiors (several mm vesicles) that inflated during eruption. All the products have identical chemical composition and mineralogy, and only vary in degree of vesiculation. The 2012 products are the most mafic of the whole volcanic history of Copahue, with MgO ~ 4.5 %. The quench rim pumice glass contains 1160 ppm Cl while glass inclusions have up to 1800 ppm Cl. Water concentrations are 0.5-2.0 % (by difference with EMPA) and plagioclase hygrometry. Pre-eruptive conditions were 1080 oC and 1-2.5 kb pressure. The magmato-hydrothermal system is leaking fluids into the overlying crater lake and into a river. The hot springs have pH <1 and these fluids are up to 60% magmatic in origin. Annual river flux measurements and non-steady state modeling between 1997 and 2013 constrain the mean hydrothermal Cl flux at 1170 tonnes/month. The 2012 erupted magma mass is about 1012 gr, and from the measured total Cl loss between 2000 and 2012 and mean degassed Cl in the magma the volume of degassing magma is estimated at 1014-1015 grams. Much more magma was degassing than was erupted. Analyses of 226Ra-210Pb constrained the maximum degassing time at 8-10 years prior to the 2012 eruption. Almost all rock samples have 210Pb deficits, and so most gas escaped from the magma into the hydrothermal system. Nonetheless, the top of the magma reservoir accumulated bubbles

  3. Environmental impact study on a degassing and scaling of cistern trucks for fuel transportation plant.

    OpenAIRE

    Tupia, Elmer

    2014-01-01

    The present Study of Environmental Impact (EIA) it is carried out by the Company Ecoplanet Group from the Peru CORP, to application of Servisya CORP, proprietor of a degassing plant and scaling of trucks cistern for transports of derived liquid fuels of the hydrocarbons, the environment of the location area undestood in the Country of Lima of the district of Villa El Salvador being. El presente estudio de Impacto Ambiental(EIA) es realizado por la empresa Ecoplanet group del Perú S.A. a s...

  4. Apparatus for measuring the release of fission gases and other fission products by degassing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stradal, Karl Alfred

    1970-10-15

    In gas-cooled high-temperature reactors, the fuel is, in general, inserted in the fuel elements in the form of small particles, which are, for example, coated with pyrolytic carbon. The purpose of this coating is to keep the fission products separate from the coolant gas. The further development of these coated particles makes it necessary to check the retention capacity. One possible method of doing this is the degassing test after irradiation in the reactor. An apparatus is described below, which was developed and installed in order to measure to a higher degree of sensitivity and in serial measurements the release of fission gases and sparingly volatile fission products.

  5. Inversion of membrane surface charge by trivalent cations probed with a cation-selective channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnev, Philip A; Bezrukov, Sergey M

    2012-11-13

    We demonstrate that the cation-selective channel formed by gramicidin A can be used as a reliable sensor for studying the multivalent ion accumulation at the surfaces of charged lipid membranes and the "charge inversion" phenomenon. In asymmetrically charged membranes with the individual leaflets formed from pure negative and positive lipids bathed by 0.1 M CsCl solutions the channel exhibits current rectification, which is comparable to that of a typical n/p semiconductor diode. We show that even at these highly asymmetrical conditions the channel conductance can be satisfactorily described by the electrodiffusion equation in the constant field approximation but, due to predictable limitations, only when the applied voltages do not exceed 50 mV. Analysis of the changes in the voltage-dependent channel conductance upon addition of trivalent cations allows us to gauge their interactions with the membrane surface. The inversion of the sign of the effective surface charge takes place at the concentrations, which correlate with the cation size. Specifically, these concentrations are close to 0.05 mM for lanthanum, 0.25 mM for hexaamminecobalt, and 4 mM for spermidine.

  6. Volcanic gas composition changes during the gradual decrease of the gigantic degassing activity of Miyakejima volcano, Japan, 2000-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Hiroshi; Geshi, Nobuo; Matsushima, Nobuo; Saito, Genji; Kazahaya, Ryunosuke

    2017-02-01

    The composition of volcanic gases discharged from Miyakejima volcano has been monitored during the intensive degassing activity that began after the eruption in 2000. During the 15 years from 2000 to 2015, Miyakejima volcano discharged 25.5 Mt of SO2, which required degassing of 3 km3 of basaltic magma. The SO2 emission rate peaked at 50 kt/day at the end of 2000 and quickly decreased to 5 kt/day by 2003. During the early degassing period, the volcanic gas composition was constant with the CO2/SO2 = 0.8 (mol ratio), H2O/SO2 = 35, HCl/SO2 = 0.08, and SO2/H2S = 15. The SO2 emission rate decreased gradually to 0.5 kt/day by 2012, and the gas composition also changed gradually to CO2/SO2 = 1.5, H2O/SO2 = 150, HCl/SO2 = 0.15, and SO2/H2S = 6. The compositional changes are not likely caused by changes in degassing pressure or volatile heterogeneity of a magma chamber but are likely attributed to an increase of hydrothermal scrubbing caused by large decrease of the volcanic gas emission rate, suggesting a supply of gases with constant composition during the 15 years. The intensive degassing was modeled based on degassing of a convecting magma conduit. The gradual SO2 emission rate that decrease without changes in volcanic gas composition is attributed to a reduction of diameter of the convecting magma conduit.

  7. Sorption of the organic cation metoprolol on silica gel from its aqueous solution considering the competition of inorganic cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutzner, Susann; Schaffer, Mario; Börnick, Hilmar; Licha, Tobias; Worch, Eckhard

    2014-05-01

    Systematic batch experiments with the organic monovalent cation metoprolol as sorbate and the synthetic material silica gel as sorbent were conducted with the aim of characterizing the sorption of organic cations onto charged surfaces. Sorption isotherms for metoprolol (>99% protonated in the tested pH of around 6) in competition with mono- and divalent inorganic cations (Na(+), NH4(+), Ca(2+), and Mg(2+)) were determined in order to assess their influence on cation exchange processes and to identify the role of further sorptive interactions. The obtained sorption isotherms could be described well by an exponential function (Freundlich isotherm model) with consistent exponents (about 0.8). In general, a decreasing sorption of metoprolol with increasing concentrations in inorganic cations was observed. Competing ions of the same valence showed similar effects. A significant sorption affinity of metoprolol with ion type dependent Freundlich coefficients KF,0.77 between 234.42 and 426.58 (L/kg)(0.77) could still be observed even at very high concentrations of competing inorganic cations. Additional column experiments confirm this behavior, which suggests the existence of further relevant interactions beside cation exchange. In subsequent batch experiments, the influence of mixtures with more than one competing ion and the effect of a reduced negative surface charge at a pH below the point of zero charge (pHPZC ≈ 2.5) were also investigated. Finally, the study demonstrates that cation exchange is the most relevant but not the sole mechanism for the sorption of metoprolol on silica gel. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Cyclic thermal behavior associated to the degassing process at El Hierro submarine volcano, Canary Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraile-Nuez, E.; Santana-Casiano, J. M.; González-Dávila, M.

    2016-12-01

    One year after the ceasing of magmatic activity in the shallow submarine volcano of the island of El Hierro, significant physical-chemical anomalies produced by the degassing process as: (i) thermal anomalies increase of +0.44 °C, (ii) pH decrease of -0.034 units, (iii) total dissolved inorganic carbon, CT increase by +43.5 µmol kg-1 and (iv) total alkalinity, AT by +12.81 µmol kg-1 were still present in the area. These evidences highlight the potential role of the shallow degassing processes as a natural ecosystem-scale experiments for the study of significant effects of global change stressors on marine environments. Additionally, thermal time series obtained from a temporal yo-yo CTD study, in isopycnal components, over one of the most active points of the submarine volcano have been analyzed in order to investigate the behavior of the system. Signal processing of the thermal time series highlights a strong cyclic temperature period of 125-150 min at 99.9% confidence, due to characteristic time-scales revealed in the periodogram. These long cycles might reflect dynamics occurring within the shallow magma supply system below the island of El Hierro.

  9. Calibration of a degassing-emanation line for 222Rn determination in seawater samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farias, Luciana Aparecida

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to calibrate a degassing-emanation line and to determine 222 Rn and 226 Ra activity concentrations in seawater samples. This methodology, also called Lucas method, consists in the extraction of radon (originally dissolved in seawater), collection of the gas in a liquid nitrogen cold trap and transfer from the trap to an alpha scintillation cell. Total extraction efficiencies of the 4 degassing-emanation systems were determined by measuring 226 Ra reference solutions. The efficiencies obtained for these 4 systems varied from 21 % to 62%. This work also presents preliminary results of a study carried out in a series of small embayements of Ubatuba, Sao Paulo State-Brazil: Flamengo Bay, Fortaleza Bay, Mar Virado Bay and Ubatuba Bay. Concentration of Rn in excess varied from 0,011 to 0,317 Bq/L for Flamengo Bay, from 0,009 to 0,130 Bq/L for Fortaleza Bay, from 0,018 to 0,050 Bq/L for Mar Virado Bay and from 0,004 to 0,120 Bq/L for Ubatuba Bay. The results obtained for the concentration of 222 Rn in excess in a transect at Flamengo Bay varied from 0,002 to 0,036 Bq/L. Higher concentrations of 222 Rn in excess were obtained in Flamengo Bay, Fortaleza Bay and Ubatuba bay. It was also observed that the concentration of 222 Rn in excess increases with depth, as expected. (author)

  10. Passive degassing at Nyiragongo (D.R. Congo and Etna (Italy volcanoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Calabrese

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Volcanoes are well known as an impressive large natural source of trace elements into the troposphere. Etna (Italy and Nyiragongo (D.R. Congo are two stratovolcanoes located in different geological settings, both characterized by persistent passive degassing from their summit craters. Here, we present some results on trace element composition in volcanic plume emissions, atmospheric bulk deposition (rainwater and their uptake by the surrounding vegetation, with the aim to compare and identify differences and similarities between these two volcanoes. Volcanic emissions were sampled by using active filter-packs for acid gases (sulfur and halogens and specific teflon filters for particulates (major and trace elements. The environmental impact of the volcanogenic deposition in the area surrounding of the crater rims was investigated by using different sampling techniques: bulk rain collectors’ gauges were used to collect atmospheric bulk deposition, and biomonitoring was carried out to collect gases and particulates by using endemic plant species. The estimates of the trace element fluxes confirm that Etna and Nyiragongo are large sources of metals into the atmosphere, especially considering their persistent state of passive degassing. The large amount of emitted trace elements is clearly reflected on the chemical composition of rainwater collected at the summit areas both for Etna and Nyiragongo. Moreover, the biomonitoring results highlight that bioaccumulation of trace elements is extremely high in the proximity of the crater rim and de- creases with the distance from the active craters.  

  11. Conventional resin cation exchangers versus EDI for CACE measurement in power plants. Feasibility and practical field results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sigrist, Manuel [Swan Systeme AG, Hinwil (Switzerland)

    2017-10-15

    The conductivity measurement after a cation exchanger in power plants with steam turbines was introduced soon after 1950 by Larson and Lane. Due to the simple measuring principle, the sensitivity to ionic contaminations and to its high reliability, the conductivity measurement after a cation exchanger (CACE) has become the most commonly used online analytical method in power plants with steam generators. Swan has investigated electro deionisation (EDI) as substitution of the conventional cation exchange resin and has developed a new conductivity instrument using this principle. This paper provides a description of the conventional method for cation conductivity measurements as well as of the new AMI CACE using EDI method.

  12. Conventional resin cation exchangers versus EDI for CACE measurement in power plants. Feasibility and practical field results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigrist, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    The conductivity measurement after a cation exchanger in power plants with steam turbines was introduced soon after 1950 by Larson and Lane. Due to the simple measuring principle, the sensitivity to ionic contaminations and to its high reliability, the conductivity measurement after a cation exchanger (CACE) has become the most commonly used online analytical method in power plants with steam generators. Swan has investigated electro deionisation (EDI) as substitution of the conventional cation exchange resin and has developed a new conductivity instrument using this principle. This paper provides a description of the conventional method for cation conductivity measurements as well as of the new AMI CACE using EDI method.

  13. Carbon dioxide degassing at the groundwater-stream-atmosphere interface: isotopic equilibration and hydrological mass balance in a sandy watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deirmendjian, Loris; Abril, Gwenaël

    2018-03-01

    Streams and rivers emit significant amounts of CO2 and constitute a preferential pathway of carbon transport from terrestrial ecosystems to the atmosphere. However, the estimation of CO2 degassing based on the water-air CO2 gradient, gas transfer velocity and stream surface area is subject to large uncertainties. Furthermore, the stable isotope signature of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13C-DIC) in streams is strongly impacted by gas exchange, which makes it a useful tracer of CO2 degassing under specific conditions. For this study, we characterized the annual transfers of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) along the groundwater-stream-river continuum based on DIC concentrations, stable isotope composition and measurements of stream discharges. We selected a homogeneous, forested and sandy lowland watershed as a study site, where the hydrology occurs almost exclusively through drainage of shallow groundwater (no surface runoff). We observed the first general spatial pattern of decreases in pCO2 and DIC and an increase in δ13C-DIC from groundwater to stream orders 1 and 2, which was due to the experimentally verified faster degassing of groundwater 12C-DIC compared to 13C-DIC. This downstream enrichment in 13C-DIC could be modelled by simply considering the isotopic equilibration of groundwater-derived DIC with the atmosphere during CO2 degassing. A second spatial pattern occurred between stream orders 2 and 4, consisting of an increase in the proportion of carbonate alkalinity to the DIC accompanied by the enrichment of 13C in the stream DIC, which was due to the occurrence of carbonate rock weathering downstream. We could separate the contribution of these two processes (gas exchange and carbonate weathering) in the stable isotope budget of the river network. Thereafter, we built a hydrological mass balance based on drainages and the relative contribution of groundwater in streams of increasing order. After combining with the dissolved CO2 concentrations, we

  14. New double-cation borohydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindemann, Inge; Domenech Ferrer, Roger; Schultz, Ludwig; Gutfleisch, Oliver [IFW Dresden, Institute for Metallic Materials, P.O. Box 270016, 01171 Dresden (Germany); Filinchuk, Yaroslav [Swiss-Norwegian Beam Lines at ESRF, BP-220, 38043 Grenoble (France); Hagemann, Hans; Cerny, Radovan [Department of Physical Chemistry and Crystallography, University of Geneva, 1211 Geneva (Switzerland)

    2011-07-01

    Complex hydrides are under consideration for on-board hydrogen storage due to their high hydrogen density. However, up to now conventional borohydrides are either too stable or unstable for applications as in PEM fuel cells (60-120 C). Recently, double-cation borohydride systems have attracted great interest. The desorption temperature of the borohydrides decreases with increasing electronegativity of the cation. Consequently, it is possible to tailor a feasible on-board hydrogen storage material by the combination of appropriate cations. The stability was found to be intermediate between the single-cation borohydride systems. Two combinations were sucessfully synthesised by metathesis reaction via high energy ball milling. Al-Li-borohydride shows desorption at about 70 C combined with a very high hydrogen density (17.2 wt.%) and the Na-Al-borohydride (14.2 wt.%) decomposes around 90 C. Both desorption temperatures are in the target range for applications. The decomposition pathways were observed by in-situ-Raman spectroscopy, DSC (Differential Scanning Calorimetry), TG (Thermogravimetry) and thermal desorption measurements.

  15. Cationic mobility in polystyrene sulfone exchangers - Application to the elution of a cation on an exchange column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menin, Jean-Pierre

    1969-01-01

    The aim of this work is to improve elutions and separations carried out on inorganic exchangers by selective electromigration of the ionic species to be displaced. To do this, it has been found indispensable to make a fundamental study of the mobility of cations in exchangers. As the field for this research we have chosen those organic exchangers whose structure and behaviour with respect to ion-exchange are much better known that in the case of their inorganic equivalents. We have related the idea of the equivalent conductivity to that of the cation mobility in the exchanger, and this has entailed determining the specific conductivity of the exchanger and the cation concentration in the resin. The results obtained have allowed us to draw up a hypothesis concerning the cation migration mechanism in the exchanger. The third part of our work has been the application of the preceding results to an operation on an ion-exchange column, viz. the elution by an acid solution of a single fixed ion, magnesium or strontium. This work has enabled us to show that the electromigration of a cation during its elution can markedly accelerate or retard this elution. (author) [fr

  16. Tripodal receptors for cation and anion sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuswandi, Bambang; Nuriman, [Unknown; Verboom, Willem; Reinhoudt, David

    2006-01-01

    This review discusses different types of artificial tripodal receptors for the selectiverecognition and sensing of cations and anions. Examples on the relationship between structure andselectivity towards cations and anions are described. Furthermore, their applications as potentiometricion sensing

  17. Heavy metal cations permeate the TRPV6 epithelial cation channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Gergely; Danko, Tamas; Bergeron, Marc J; Balazs, Bernadett; Suzuki, Yoshiro; Zsembery, Akos; Hediger, Matthias A

    2011-01-01

    TRPV6 belongs to the vanilloid family of the transient receptor potential channel (TRP) superfamily. This calcium-selective channel is highly expressed in the duodenum and the placenta, being responsible for calcium absorption in the body and fetus. Previous observations have suggested that TRPV6 is not only permeable to calcium but also to other divalent cations in epithelial tissues. In this study, we tested whether TRPV6 is indeed also permeable to cations such as zinc and cadmium. We found that the basal intracellular calcium concentration was higher in HEK293 cells transfected with hTRPV6 than in non-transfected cells, and that this difference almost disappeared in nominally calcium-free solution. Live cell imaging experiments with Fura-2 and NewPort Green DCF showed that overexpression of human TRPV6 increased the permeability for Ca(2+), Ba(2+), Sr(2+), Mn(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+), and interestingly also for La(3+) and Gd(3+). These results were confirmed using the patch clamp technique. (45)Ca uptake experiments showed that cadmium, lanthanum and gadolinium were also highly efficient inhibitors of TRPV6-mediated calcium influx at higher micromolar concentrations. Our results suggest that TRPV6 is not only involved in calcium transport but also in the transport of other divalent cations, including heavy metal ions, which may have toxicological implications. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. An experimental device for characterizing degassing processes and related elastic fingerprints: Analog volcano seismo-acoustic observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spina, Laura; Morgavi, Daniele; Cannata, Andrea; Campeggi, Carlo; Perugini, Diego

    2018-05-01

    A challenging objective of modern volcanology is to quantitatively characterize eruptive/degassing regimes from geophysical signals (in particular seismic and infrasonic), for both research and monitoring purposes. However, the outcomes of the attempts made so far are still considered very uncertain because volcanoes remain inaccessible when deriving quantitative information on crucial parameters such as plumbing system geometry and magma viscosity. In order to improve our knowledge of volcanic systems, a novel experimental device, which is capable of mimicking volcanic degassing processes with different regimes and gas flow rates, and allowing for the investigation of the related seismo-acoustic emissions, was designed and developed. The benefits of integrating observations on real volcanoes with seismo-acoustic signals generated in laboratory are many and include (i) the possibility to fix the controlling parameters such as the geometry of the structure where the gas flows, the gas flow rate, and the fluid viscosity; (ii) the possibility of performing acoustic measurements at different azimuthal and zenithal angles around the opening of the analog conduit, hence constraining the radiation pattern of different acoustic sources; (iii) the possibility to measure micro-seismic signals in distinct points of the analog conduit; (iv) finally, thanks to the transparent structure, it is possible to directly observe the degassing pattern through the optically clear analog magma and define the degassing regime producing the seismo-acoustic radiations. The above-described device represents a step forward in the analog volcano seismo-acoustic measurements.

  19. Apparatus and method for depressurizing, degassing, and affording decay of the radioactivity of weakly radioactive condensates in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, R.; Plotz, J.

    1976-01-01

    Described is an apparatus for depressurizing, degassing and affording decay of weakly radioactive condensates in nuclear power plants having a turbine and a main condenser turbine wherein exhaust steam of the turbine is condensed and forms a main condensate, and includes a collecting tank for the condensate situated below the condenser. A plurality of horizontal degassing channels, each having a lateral overflow, are disposed in the upper part of the condensate collecting tank and are filled with the main condensate up to the level of the overflow. At least one feedwater preheater which is heated by bleeder steam from the turbine provides a secondary condensate. Below the overflow height of the degassing channels extend horizontal feed pipes for the secondary condensate. The feed pipes are connected to the output of pressure relieving expanding devices and are provided on their underside with discharge openings for the bubbling of the secondary condensate into the main condensate to thereby degass the main condensate. The condensate collecting tank has mutually offset partitions therein providing an adequately long path for the decay of the main and secondary condensates. The condensate which is discharged from the condensate collecting tank is returned into the cycle as feedwater. Also disclosed is a method of operating the foregoing apparatus

  20. Short lived radionuclides in gases and magmas: contribution to the study of degassing and of the dynamics of magmatic reservoirs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauthier, P.J.

    1998-01-01

    Crystallization and magma degassing at Stromboli (Italy) and Merapi (Indonesia) volcanoes are studied through 230 Th- 226 Ra- 210 Pb and 210 Pb- 210 Bi- 210 Po disequilibria in lavas and gases. An attempt to date crystallization by internal isochrones in ( 226 Ra)/Ba - ( 230 Th)/Ba and ( 210 Pb)/Pb - ( 226 Ra)/Pb diagrams reveals the complex evolution of these arc magmas. Several models (instantaneous but non simultaneous crystallization of the different mineral phases; continuous crystallization) are proposed to explain the lack of simple isochrones. The influence of other magmatic processes (assimilation, magma reinjection, degassing...) is discussed. The role played by radon loss from magmas (controlled by the ex solution of major gas species) on 210 Pb- 226 Ra disequilibria in lavas is examined through a model of dynamic degassing. At Stromboli, the magma reservoir has reached a steady-state and is rapidly renewed, thus explaining (Pb/Ra) ratios close to 1. At Merapi, the evolution of the reservoir is controlled by a succession of low dynamics degassing periods ( 2 analyses in the volcanic plume. The contribution of Etna as a source of atmospheric pollution is estimated during periods of contrasted volcanic activity and is compared to the volcanic emissions worldwide. (author)

  1. The use of imagery of the earth to study the structure of degassing zones within oil and gas basins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amurskii, G I; Bondareva, M S

    1981-05-01

    Space imagery is used to identify and trace the local faults and fracture zones of several anticlinal structures in Central Asia. These zones, favorable to the vertical migration of stratified fluids, exhibit an increased permeability, and are therefore subject to degassing and the accumulation of gaseous sulfur.

  2. Complex Macromolecular Architectures by Living Cationic Polymerization

    KAUST Repository

    Alghamdi, Reem D.

    2015-05-01

    Poly (vinyl ether)-based graft polymers have been synthesized by the combination of living cationic polymerization of vinyl ethers with other living or controlled/ living polymerization techniques (anionic and ATRP). The process involves the synthesis of well-defined homopolymers (PnBVE) and co/terpolymers [PnBVE-b-PCEVE-b-PSiDEGVE (ABC type) and PSiDEGVE-b-PnBVE-b-PSiDEGVE (CAC type)] by sequential living cationic polymerization of n-butyl vinyl ether (nBVE), 2-chloroethyl vinyl ether (CEVE) and tert-butyldimethylsilyl ethylene glycol vinyl ether (SiDEGVE), using mono-functional {[n-butoxyethyl acetate (nBEA)], [1-(2-chloroethoxy) ethyl acetate (CEEA)], [1-(2-(2-(t-butyldimethylsilyloxy)ethoxy) ethoxy) ethyl acetate (SiDEGEA)]} or di-functional [1,4-cyclohexanedimethanol di(1-ethyl acetate) (cHMDEA), (VEMOA)] initiators. The living cationic polymerizations of those monomers were conducted in hexane at -20 0C using Et3Al2Cl3 (catalyst) in the presence of 1 M AcOEt base.[1] The PCEVE segments of the synthesized block terpolymers were then used to react with living macroanions (PS-DPE-Li; poly styrene diphenyl ethylene lithium) to afford graft polymers. The quantitative desilylation of PSiDEGVE segments by n-Bu4N+F- in THF at 0 °C led to graft co- and terpolymers in which the polyalcohol is the outer block. These co-/terpolymers were subsequently subjected to “grafting-from” reactions by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of styrene to afford more complex macromolecular architectures. The base assisted living cationic polymerization of vinyl ethers were also used to synthesize well-defined α-hydroxyl polyvinylether (PnBVE-OH). The resulting polymers were then modified into an ATRP macro-initiator for the synthesis of well-defined block copolymers (PnBVE-b-PS). Bifunctional PnBVE with terminal malonate groups was also synthesized and used as a precursor for more complex architectures such as H-shaped block copolymer by “grafting-from” or

  3. Degassing of CO2, SO2, and H2S associated with the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Cynthia; Kelly, Peter J.; Doukas, Michael; Lopez, Taryn; Pfeffer, Melissa; McGimsey, Robert; Neal, Christina

    2013-06-01

    The 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska was particularly well monitored for volcanic gas emissions. We report 35 airborne measurements of CO2, SO2, and H2S emission rates that span from October 2008 to August 2010. The magmatic system degassed primarily as a closed system although minor amounts of open system degassing were observed in the 6 months prior to eruption on March 15, 2009 and over 1 year following cessation of dome extrusion. Only 14% of the total CO2 was emitted prior to eruption even though high emissions rates (between 3630 and 9020 t/d) were observed in the final 6 weeks preceding the eruption. A minor amount of the total SO2 was observed prior to eruption (4%), which was consistent with the low emission rates at that time (up to 180 t/d). The amount of the gas emitted during the explosive and dome growth period (March 15-July 1, 2009) was 59 and 66% of the total CO2 and SO2, respectively. Maximum emission rates were 33,110 t/d CO2, 16,650 t/d SO2, and 1230 t/d H2S. Post-eruptive passive degassing was responsible for 27 and 30% of the total CO2 and SO2, respectively. SO2 made up on average 92% of the total sulfur degassing throughout the eruption. Magmas were vapor saturated with a C- and S-rich volatile phase, and regardless of composition, the magmas appear to be buffered by a volatile composition with a molar CO2/SO2 ratio of ~ 2.4. Primary volatile contents calculated from degassing and erupted magma volumes range from 0.9 to 2.1 wt.% CO2 and 0.27-0.56 wt.% S; whole-rock normalized values are slightly lower (0.8-1.7 wt.% CO2 and 0.22-0.47 wt.% S) and are similar to what was calculated for the 1989-90 eruption of Redoubt. Such contents argue that primary arc magmas are rich in CO2 and S. Similar trends between volumes of estimated degassed magma and observed erupted magma during the eruptive period point to primary volatile contents of 1.25 wt.% CO2 and 0.35 wt.% S. Assuming these values, up to 30% additional unerupted magma degassed in the

  4. Cationic electrodepositable coating composition comprising lignin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenn, David; Bowman, Mark P; Zawacky, Steven R; Van Buskirk, Ellor J; Kamarchik, Peter

    2013-07-30

    A cationic electrodepositable coating composition is disclosed. The present invention in directed to a cationic electrodepositable coating composition comprising a lignin-containing cationic salt resin, that comprises (A) the reaction product of: lignin, an amine, and a carbonyl compound; (B) the reaction product of lignin, epichlorohydrin, and an amine; or (C) combinations thereof.

  5. Magmas near the critical degassing pressure drive volcanic unrest towards a critical state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiodini, Giovanni; Paonita, Antonio; Aiuppa, Alessandro; Costa, Antonio; Caliro, Stefano; De Martino, Prospero; Acocella, Valerio; Vandemeulebrouck, Jean

    2016-01-01

    During the reawaking of a volcano, magmas migrating through the shallow crust have to pass through hydrothermal fluids and rocks. The resulting magma–hydrothermal interactions are still poorly understood, which impairs the ability to interpret volcano monitoring signals and perform hazard assessments. Here we use the results of physical and volatile saturation models to demonstrate that magmatic volatiles released by decompressing magmas at a critical degassing pressure (CDP) can drive volcanic unrest towards a critical state. We show that, at the CDP, the abrupt and voluminous release of H2O-rich magmatic gases can heat hydrothermal fluids and rocks, triggering an accelerating deformation that can ultimately culminate in rock failure and eruption. We propose that magma could be approaching the CDP at Campi Flegrei, a volcano in the metropolitan area of Naples, one of the most densely inhabited areas in the world, and where accelerating deformation and heating are currently being observed. PMID:27996976

  6. Internally heated mantle convection and the thermal and degassing history of the earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David R.; Pan, Vivian

    1992-01-01

    An internally heated model of parameterized whole mantle convection with viscosity dependent on temperature and volatile content is examined. The model is run for 4l6 Gyr, and temperature, heat flow, degassing and regassing rates, stress, and viscosity are calculated. A nominal case is established which shows good agreement with accepted mantle values. The effects of changing various parameters are also tested. All cases show rapid cooling early in the planet's history and strong self-regulation of viscosity due to the temperature and volatile-content dependence. The effects of weakly stress-dependent viscosity are examined within the bounds of this model and are found to be small. Mantle water is typically outgassed rapidly to reach an equilibrium concentration on a time scale of less than 200 Myr for almost all models, the main exception being for models which start out with temperatures well below the melting temperature.

  7. Asymmetric cation-binding catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveira, Maria Teresa; Lee, Jiwoong

    2017-01-01

    The employment of metal salts is quite limited in asymmetric catalysis, although it would provide an additional arsenal of safe and inexpensive reagents to create molecular functions with high optical purity. Cation chelation by polyethers increases the salts' solubility in conventional organic...... solvents, thus increasing their applicability in synthesis. The expansion of this concept to chiral polyethers led to the emergence of asymmetric cation-binding catalysis, where chiral counter anions are generated from metal salts, particularly using BINOL-based polyethers. Alkali metal salts, namely KF...... highly enantioselective silylation reactions in polyether-generated chiral environments, and leading to a record-high turnover in asymmetric organocatalysis. This can lead to further applications by the asymmetric use of other inorganic salts in various organic transformations....

  8. Volcanic sulfur degassing and the role of sulfides in controlling volcanic metal emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, M.; Liu, E.

    2017-12-01

    Volcanoes emit prodigious quantities of sulfur and metals, their behaviour inextricably linked through pre-eruptive sulfide systematics and through degassing and speciation in the volcanic plume. Fundamental differences exist in the metal output of ocean island versus arc volcanoes, with volcanoes in Hawaii and Iceland outgassing large fluxes of gaseous and particulate chalcophiles; and arc volcanoes' plumes, in contrast, enriched in Zn, Cu, Tl and Pb. Metals and metalloids partition into a magmatic vapor phase from silicate melt at crustal pressures. Their abundance in magmatic vapor is influenced strongly by sulfide saturation and by the composition of the magmatic vapor phase, particularly with respect to chloride. These factors are highly dependent on tectonic setting. Metal outgassing is controlled by magma water content and redox: deep saturation in vapor and minimal sulfide in arc basalts yields metal-rich vapor; shallow degassing and resorption of sulfides feeds the metal content of volcanic gas in ocean islands. We present a detailed study of the sulfide systematics of the products of the 2014-2015 Holuhraun basaltic fissure eruption (Bárðarbunga volcanic system, Iceland) to illustrate the interplay between late water and sulfur outgassing; sulfide saturation and breakdown; and metal partitioning into a vapor phase. Sulfide globules, representing quenched droplets of an immiscible sulfide liquid, are preserved within erupted tephra. Sulfide globules in rapidly quenched tephra are preserved within both matrix glass and as inclusions in crystals. The stereologically-corrected 3D size distribution of sulfide globules ranges from importance in supplying sulfur and metals to the atmosphere during eruption.

  9. Time-Resolved Gravimetric Method To Assess Degassing of Roasted Coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smrke, Samo; Wellinger, Marco; Suzuki, Tomonori; Balsiger, Franz; Opitz, Sebastian E W; Yeretzian, Chahan

    2018-05-30

    During the roasting of coffee, thermally driven chemical reactions lead to the formation of gases, of which a large fraction is carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). Part of these gases is released during roasting while part is retained inside the porous structure of the roasted beans and is steadily released during storage or more abruptly during grinding and extraction. The release of CO 2 during the various phases from roasting to consumption is linked to many important properties and characteristics of coffee. It is an indicator for freshness, plays an important role in shelf life and in packaging, impacts the extraction process, is involved in crema formation, and may affect the sensory profile in the cup. Indeed, and in view of the multiple roles it plays, CO 2 is a much underappreciated and little examined molecule in coffee. Here, we introduce an accurate, quantitative, and time-resolved method to measure the release kinetics of gases from whole beans and ground coffee using a gravimetric approach. Samples were placed in a container with a fitted capillary to allow gases to escape. The time-resolved release of gases was measured via the weight loss of the container filled with coffee. Long-term stability was achieved using a customized design of a semimicro balance, including periodic and automatic zero value measurements and calibration procedures. The novel gravimetric methodology was applied to a range of coffee samples: (i) whole Arabica beans and (ii) ground Arabica and Robusta, roasted to different roast degrees and at different speeds (roast air temperatures). Modeling the degassing rates allowed structural and mechanistic interpretation of the degassing process.

  10. Operative modes of the primary circuit degasser of Atucha II N.P.P

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, Ivanna; Contino, Maximiliano; Chocron, Mauricio; Duca, Jorge

    2012-09-01

    Atucha II (N.A.S.A., Buenos Aires Province, Argentina) is a Pressurized Vessel Heavy Water Reactor designed by Siemens with a capacity of 740 MWe. After a long delay in construction the plant is close to the commissioning and among the many task that are carried out, chemistry and operation of devices related to it are under consideration [1]. As it is known, Hydrogen or Deuterium dosing has the purpose of both: limitation of the water radiolysis and to provide an appropriate reductive media for the structural materials, mainly stainless steel, A800 and Zr-4. Dealing with a heavy water plant, it is critical to determine whether it is necessary to add D 2 or if it is feasible to dose H 2 , by considering heavy water degradation and heavy water upgrading system capability. Those aspects have been previously analyzed and presented [2]. It is also necessary to consider blankets and venting locations that address to losses of the expensive D 2 . In the present work several alternatives of hydrogenation are presented and evaluated, considering the Degasser (D), the Volume Control Tank (TCV) and the special features of the purification and volume control system of a pressurized vessel heavy water plant where the primary circuit and moderator are partially mixed. Also the influence of venting through the pressurizer is analyzed. Conclusions are obtained in connection to (i) the maintenance of a permanent blanket of H 2 /He, 4%, in the TCV dome at a given initial pressure, (ii) The same but constant pressure to reach 0.6 ppm of H 2 in the Primary and Moderator water circuit, (iii) transients while reducing pressure in the Degasser and considering contribution of pressurizer venting, (iv) estimated contribution of the general corrosion of the system and (iv) differences if D 2 is used. (authors)

  11. Magma fracturing and degassing associated with obsidian formation: The explosive–effusive transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Agustin; Weinberg, Roberto; Wright, Heather M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the role of melt fracturing in degassing rhyolitic volcanic systems. The Monte Pilato-Rocche Rosse eruptions in Italy evolved from explosive to effusive in style, and H2O content in quenched glasses changed over time from relatively H2O-rich (~ 0.90 wt.%) to H2O-poor dense obsidian (~ 0.10–0.20 wt.%). In addition, healed fractures have been recorded in all different eruptive materials, from the glass of early-erupted tube pumice and rinds of breadcrusted obsidian pyroclasts, to the glass of late-erupted dense obsidian pyroclasts, and throughout the final effusive Rocche Rosse lava flow. These rocks show multiple fault sets, some with crenulated fault planes indicating resumption of viscous flow after faulting, complex obsidian breccias with evidence for post-brecciation folding and stretching, and centimetre- to metre-thick tuffisite preserved in pyroclasts and lava, representing collapsed foam due to fracturing of vesicle walls. These microstructural observations indicate that multiple fracturing and healing events occurred during both explosive and effusive eruptions. H2O content in glass decreases by as much as 0.14 wt.% towards healed fractures/faults and decreases in stretched obsidian breccias towards regions of intense brecciation. A drop in pressure and/or increase in temperature along fractures caused diffusive H2O migration through melt towards fracture surfaces. Repetitive and pervasive fracturing and healing thereby create conditions for diffusive H2O loss into fractures and subsequent escape through permeable paths. This type of progressive magma degassing provides a potential mechanism to explain the formation of dense obsidian and the evolution from explosive to effusive eruption style.

  12. The November 2002 degassing event at Panarea Island (Italy: five months of geochemical monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. L. Rossi

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available On 3rd November 2002, at about 3 km off-shore of Panarea Island (Aeolian Islands, Southern Italy, a series of gas vents suddenly and violently opened from the seafloor at the depth of 10-15 m, with an unusually high gas flux and superimposing on the already existing submarine fumarolic field. Starting from the 12th November 2002 a discontinuous geochemical monitoring program was carried out. The emissions consisted in an emulsion whose liquid phase derived from condensation of an uprising vapor phase occurring close to the fluid outlets without significant contamination by seawater. The whole composition of the fluids was basically H2O- and CO2-dominated, with minor amounts of typical «hydrothermal» components (such as H2S, H2, CO and light hydrocarbons, atmospheric-related compounds, and characterized by the occurrence of a significant magmatic gas fraction (mostly represented by SO2, HCl and HF. According to the observed temporal variability of the fluid compositions, between November and December 2002 the hydrothermal feeding system was controlled by oxidizing conditions due to the input of magmatic gases. The magmatic degassing phenomena showed a transient nature, as testified by the almost complete disappearance of the magmatic markers in a couple of months and by the restoration, since January 2003, of the chemical features of the existing hydrothermal system. The most striking feature of the evolution of the «Panarea degassing event» was the relatively rapid restoration of the typical reducing conditions of a stationary hydrothermal system, in which the FeO/Fe1.5O redox pair of the rock mineral phases has turned to be the dominating redox controlling system.

  13. Electrical conductivities and chemical stabilities of mixed conducting pyrochlores for SOFC applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holtappels, P.; Poulsen, F.W.; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2000-01-01

    Pyrochlores with praseodymium as the A-site cation and zirconium, tin, cerium and manganese cations on the B-site were prepared in air and their electrical conductivities were investigated as a function of oxygen partial pressure and temperature. Pure Pr2Zr2O7+/-delta as well as samples modified...

  14. Conserved Aromatic Residue Confers Cation Selectivity in Claudin-2 and Claudin-10b*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiahua; Zhuo, Min; Pei, Lei; Yu, Alan S. L.

    2013-01-01

    In tight junctions, both claudin-2 and claudin-10b form paracellular cation-selective pores by the interaction of the first ECL 1 with permeating ions. We hypothesized that a highly conserved aromatic residue near the pore selectivity filter of claudins contributes to cation selectivity by cation-π interaction with the permeating cation. To test this, we generated MDCK I Tet-off cells stably transfected with claudin-2 Tyr67 mutants. The Y67L mutant showed reduced cation selectivity compared with wild-type claudin-2 due to a decrease in Na+ permeability, without affecting the Cl− permeability. The Y67A mutant enlarged the pore size and further decreased the charge selectivity due to an increase in Cl− permeability. The Y67F mutant restored the Na+ permeability, Cl− permeability, and pore size back to wild-type. The accessibility of Y67C to methanethiosulfonate modification indicated that its side chain faces the lumen of the pore. In claudin-10b, the F66L mutant reduced cation selectivity, and the F66A mutant lost pore conductance. We conclude that the conserved aromatic residue near the cation pore domain of claudins contributes to cation selectivity by a dual role of cation-π interaction and a luminal steric effect. Our findings provide new insight into how ion selectivity is achieved in the paracellular pore. PMID:23760508

  15. Ionic Conductivity of Polyelectrolyte Hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chen-Jung; Wu, Haiyan; Hu, Yang; Young, Megan; Wang, Huifeng; Lynch, Dylan; Xu, Fujian; Cong, Hongbo; Cheng, Gang

    2018-02-14

    Polyelectrolytes have many important functions in both living organisms and man-made applications. One key property of polyelectrolytes is the ionic conductivity due to their porous networks that allow the transport of water and small molecular solutes. Among polyelectrolytes, zwitterionic polymers have attracted huge attention for applications that involve ion transport in a polyelectrolyte matrix; however, it is still unclear how the functional groups of zwitterionic polymer side chains affect their ion transport and swelling properties. In this study, zwitterionic poly(carboxybetaine acrylamide), poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine), and poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate) hydrogels were synthesized and their ionic conductivity was studied and compared to cationic, anionic, and nonionic hydrogels. The change of the ionic conductivity of zwitterionic and nonionic hydrogels in different saline solutions was investigated in detail. Zwitterionic hydrogels showed much higher ionic conductivity than that of the widely used nonionic poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate hydrogel in all tested solutions. For both cationic and anionic hydrogels, the presence of mobile counterions led to high ionic conductivity in low salt solutions; however, the ionic conductivity of zwitterionic hydrogels surpassed that of cationic and ionic hydrogels in high salt solutions. Cationic and anionic hydrogels showed much higher water content than that of zwitterionic hydrogels in deionized water; however, the cationic hydrogels shrank significantly with increasing saline concentration. This work provides insight into the effects of polyelectrolyte side chains on ion transport. This can guide us in choosing better polyelectrolytes for a broad spectrum of applications, including bioelectronics, neural implants, battery, and so on.

  16. Electrical Conductivity in Transition Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Christopher; Vickneson, Kishanda

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this "Science Note" is to describe how to test the electron-sea model to determine whether it accurately predicts relative electrical conductivity for first-row transition metals. In the electron-sea model, a metal crystal is viewed as a three-dimensional array of metal cations immersed in a sea of delocalised valence…

  17. Thermodynamics and Cation Diffusion in the Oxygen Ion Conductor Lsgm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, M.; Schulz, O.

    Perovskite type oxides based on LaGaO3 are of large technical interest because of their high oxygen-ion conductivity. Lanthanum gallate doped with Sr on A- and Mg on B-sites, La1-xSrxGa1-yMgyO3-(x+y)/2 (LSGM), reaches higher oxygen-ion conductivities than yttria-doped zirconia (YSZ). Thus LSGM represents a promising alternative for YSZ as electrolyte in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). Cells using thin LSGM-layers as electrolyte are expected to operate at intermediate temperatures around 700°C for more than 30000 hours without severe degradation. A potential long term degradation effect of LSGM is kinetic demixing of the electrolyte, caused by different cation diffusion coefficients. In this paper we report on experimental studies concerning the phase diagram of LSGM and the diffusion of cations. Cation self-diffusion of 139La, 84Sr and 25Mg and cation impurity diffusion of 144Nd, 89Y and 56Fe in polycrystalline LSGM samples was investigated by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) for temperatures between 900°C and 1400°C. It was found that diffusion occurs by means of bulk and grain boundaries. The bulk diffusion coefficients are similar for all cations with activation energies which are strongly dependent on temperature. At high temperatures, the activation energies are about 5 eV, while at low temperatures values of about 2 eV are found. These results are explained by a frozen in defect structure at low temperatures. This means that the observed activation energy at low temperatures represents only the migration energy of the different cations while the observed activation energy at high temperatures is the sum of the defect formation energy and the migration energy. The migration energies for all cations are nearly identical, although 139La, 84Sr and 144Nd are occupying A-sites while 25Mg and 56Fe are occupying B-sites in the perovskite-structure. To explain these experimental findings we propose a defect cluster containing cation vacancies in both the A

  18. Cation-Coupled Bicarbonate Transporters

    OpenAIRE

    Aalkjaer, Christian; Boedtkjer, Ebbe; Choi, Inyeong; Lee, Soojung

    2014-01-01

    Cation-coupled HCO3− transport was initially identified in the mid-1970s when pioneering studies showed that acid extrusion from cells is stimulated by CO2/HCO3− and associated with Na+ and Cl− movement. The first Na+-coupled bicarbonate transporter (NCBT) was expression-cloned in the late 1990s. There are currently five mammalian NCBTs in the SLC4-family: the electrogenic Na,HCO3-cotransporters NBCe1 and NBCe2 (SLC4A4 and SLC4A5 gene products); the electroneutral Na,HCO3-cotransporter NBCn1 ...

  19. Cation disorder in shocked orthopyroxene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dundon, R. W.; Hafner, S. S.

    1971-01-01

    The study of cation distributions over nonequivalent lattice sites in minerals may reveal information on the history of temperature and pressure in rocks. Chemically homogeneous orthopyroxene specimens were shocked under well-controlled conditions in the laboratory in order to provide a basis for the interpretation of more complex natural materials. As a result of the investigation it is concluded that the distribution of magnesium and iron over the M1 and M2 positions in Bamle enstatite shocked at 1 megabar is highly disordered. It corresponds to an equilibrium distribution of at least 1000 C.

  20. Cation coordination in oxychloride glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J A [Energy Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Holland, D [Physics Department, Warwick University, Coventry (United Kingdom); Bland, J [Physics Department, University of Liverpool, PO Box 147, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Johnson, C E [Physics Department, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL (United States); Thomas, M F [Physics Department, University of Liverpool, PO Box 147, Liverpool (United Kingdom)

    2003-02-19

    Glasses containing mixtures of cations and anions of nominal compositions [Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3}]{sub x} - [ZnCl{sub 2}]{sub 1-x} where x = 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, and 1.00, have been studied by means of neutron diffraction and Raman and Moessbauer spectroscopy. There is preferential bonding within the system with the absence of Sb-Cl bonds. Antimony is found to be threefold coordinated to oxygen, and zinc fourfold coordinated. The main contributing species are of the form [Sb(OSb){sub 2}(OZn)] and [Zn(ClZn){sub 2}(OSb){sub 2}].

  1. Cation coordination in oxychloride glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J A; Holland, D; Bland, J; Johnson, C E; Thomas, M F

    2003-01-01

    Glasses containing mixtures of cations and anions of nominal compositions [Sb 2 O 3 ] x - [ZnCl 2 ] 1-x where x = 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, and 1.00, have been studied by means of neutron diffraction and Raman and Moessbauer spectroscopy. There is preferential bonding within the system with the absence of Sb-Cl bonds. Antimony is found to be threefold coordinated to oxygen, and zinc fourfold coordinated. The main contributing species are of the form [Sb(OSb) 2 (OZn)] and [Zn(ClZn) 2 (OSb) 2

  2. The Free Tricoordinated Silyl Cation Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čičak, H.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available As the importance and abundance of silicon in our environment is large, it has been thought that silicon might take the place of carbon in forming a host of similar compounds and silicon-based life. However, until today there is no experimental evidence for such a hypothesis and carbon is still unique among the elements in the vast number and variety of compounds it can form. Also, the corresponding derivatives of the two elements show considerable differences in their chemical properties.The essential debate concerning organosilicon chemistry relates to the existence of the free planar tricoordinated silyl cations in condensed phase (R3Si+, in analogy to carbocations (R3C+ which have been known and characterized as free species. Although silyl cations are thermodynamically more stable than their carbon analogs, they are very reactive due to their high inherent electrophilicity and the ability of hypervalent coordination. On the other hand, stabilization by inductive and hyperconjugative effects and larger steric effects of carbocations make them less sensitive to solvation or other environmental effects than silyl cations. Hence, observation of free silyl cations in the condensed phase proved extremely difficult and the actual problem is the question of the degree of the (remaining silyl cation character.The first free silyl cation, trimesitylsilyl cation, and in analogy with it tridurylsilyl cation, were synthesized by Lambert et al. Free silyl cations based on analogy to aromatic ions (homocyclopropenylium and tropylium have also been prepared. However, in these silyl cations the cationic character is reduced by internal π -conjugation. Čičak et al. prepared some silyl-cationic intermediates (Me3Si--CH≡CR+in solid state. With the help of quantum-mechanical calculations it was concluded that these adducts have much more silyl cation than carbocation character.

  3. Disclosing Multiple Magma Degassing Sources Offers Unique Insights of What's Behind the Campi Flegrei Caldera Unrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, R.; Civetta, L.; Orsi, G.; Arienzo, I.; D'Antonio, M.; Di Renzo, V.

    2013-12-01

    The definition of the structure and evolution of the magmatic system of Campi Flegrei caldera (CFc), Southern Italy, has been a fundamental tool for the assessment of the short-term volcanic hazard. The ensemble of geophysical and petrologic data show that the CFc magmatic system has been -and still is- characterized by two major reservoirs at different depths. From the deep one (around 8 km), less evolved magmas crystallize and degas, supplying fluids and magmas to the shallow (3-4 km) reservoirs. A thorough reconstruction of processes occurring in magma chamber/s prior and/or during the CFc eruptions has shown that magmas entering shallow reservoirs mixed with resident and crystallized batches. Also the 1982-85 unrest episode has been related to a magma intrusion of 2.1 x 10^7 m^3 at 3-4 km depth, on the basis of geophysical data (ground deformation, gravimetry, seismic imaging) and their interpretation. Thermodynamic evaluation of magma properties, at the time of emplacement, suggests for such an intrusion a bulk density of 2.000 kg/m^3 . Such a value testifies the high amount of exsolved volatiles within the system. The available record of geochemical and isotopic data on surface fumaroles, coupled with melt inclusion data, has already shown that dual (deep and shallow) magma degassing from such two reservoirs, as well as their interaction with the hydrothermal system, allows explaining the relevant fluctuations observed at crater fumaroles after the 1982-85 magma intrusion. An important role was played by the rapid crystallization (around 30 years) of the shallow magma, such that in the recent years gas discharges should be fuelled mostly by the deep magma. Such a process is well recorded in the fumarolic gas composition of the last ~10 years, but has to be reconciled with the unrest dynamics which took place after year 2000, characterized by a slow but continuous ground uplift. All geochemical indicators (major species and noble gases) point to three possible

  4. Development of a discharge model for the Bopp and Reuther Degasser/Condenser relief valves for heat sink assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasnaoui, C. . chiheb@hasnaoui.net; Huynh, M.

    2004-01-01

    A total loss of all sustained engineering heat sinks is considered as a severe accident with low probability of occurrence. Following a total loss of all sustained engineering heat sinks, the Degasser/Condenser relief valves (3332-RV11 and RV21) would then become the sole means available for the depressurization of the primary heat transport system. Accurate estimation of the discharge through these valves is required to assess the impact of this kind of accident on fuel cooling and the primary circuit integrity. This paper describes a model used to estimate the Degasser/Condenser relief valve discharge capacity. This model is used to predict the flow discharge under a range of conditions upstream of the relief valves; from sub-cooled to saturated liquid and up to vapor conditions. The defined model is then used to estimate the relief valve discharge rates under various hypothetical conditions of the PHTS using the Cathena code. (author)

  5. ADSORPTION METHOD FOR SEPARATING METAL CATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khym, J.X.

    1959-03-10

    The chromatographic separation of fission product cations is discussed. By use of this method a mixture of metal cations containing Zr, Cb, Ce, Y, Ba, and Sr may be separated from one another. Mentioned as preferred exchange adsorbents are resins containing free sulfonic acid groups. Various eluants, such as tartaric acid, HCl, and citric acid, used at various acidities, are employed to effect the selective elution and separation of the various fission product cations.

  6. Electronic spectra of astrophysically interesting cations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maier, John P., E-mail: j.p.maier@unibas.ch; Rice, Corey A., E-mail: j.p.maier@unibas.ch; Mazzotti, Fabio J., E-mail: j.p.maier@unibas.ch; Johnson, Anatoly, E-mail: j.p.maier@unibas.ch [Department of Chemistry, University of Basel, Klingelbergstr. 80, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland)

    2015-01-22

    The electronic spectra of polyacetylene cations were recorded at 20K in the laboratory in an ion trap instrument. These can then be compared with diffuse interstellar band (DIB) absorptions. Examination of recently published data shows that the attribution of a weak DIB at ∼506.9 nm to diacetylene cation is not justified. Study of the higher excited electronic states of polyacetylene cations shows that their widths can still be sufficiently narrow for consideration as DIB carriers.

  7. Using 81Kr-age of groundwater in the Guarani Aquifer, Brazil, to constrain estimates of continental degassing flux of 4He

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, P. K.; Matsumoto, T.; Sturchio, N. C.; Chang, H. K.; Gastmans, D.; Lu, Z.; Jiang, W.; Müller, P.; Yokochi, R.; Han, L.; Klaus, P.; Torgersen, T.

    2013-12-01

    Continental degassing flux of helium is the dominant component of dissolved helium in deep groundwater together with that produced in-situ in the aquifer. A reliable estimate of the degassing flux is critical to the use of 4He as a dating tool in groundwater studies. The degassing flux is also important for understanding fluid and heat transport in the mantle and the rust. An independent tracer of groundwater age is required in order to deconvolute the two signals of the external, degassing flux and in situ production. Estimates of degassing flux mostly have relied upon shorter-lived radionuclides such as 14C and tritium and the resulting flux estimates have a significant variability (Torgersen, 2010). In the Guarani Aquifer in Brazil, an effective crustal 4He degassing flux into the aquifer was estimated from 81Kr ages ranging from about 70 Ka to 570 Ka. We then used the model framework of Toregesen and Ivey (1985), modified to include a diffusive reduction of originally uniform crustal helium flux from basement rocks through a thick sedimentary layer beneath the aquifer, to calculate a distribution of radiogenic 4He within the aquifer. With this framework, we obtain 4He ages that are consistent with ages based on 81Kr and 14C, and with a crustal degassing flux equivalent to that estimated from U and Th contents in the crust. The model framework for the Guarani Aquifer is also applied to data from other deep aquifers in Africa and Australia and our results suggest that the continental flux of 4He may be uniform, at least in stable continental areas. Additionally, a reliable estimate of the 4He degassing flux also helps to constrain the surficial discharge of deep groundwater.

  8. Safety evaluation of cation-exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalkwarf, D.R.

    1977-08-01

    Results are presented of a study to evaluate whether sufficient information is available to establish conservative limits for the safe use of cation-exchange resins in separating radionuclides and, if not, to recommend what new data should be acquired. The study was also an attempt to identify in-line analytical techniques for the evaluation of resin degradation during radionuclide processing. The report is based upon a review of the published literature and upon discussions with many people engaged in the use of these resins. It was concluded that the chief hazard in the use of cation-exchange resins for separating radionuclides is a thermal explosion if nitric acid or other strong oxidants are present in the process solution. Thermal explosions can be avoided by limiting process parameters so that the rates of heat and gas generation in the system do not exceed the rates for their transfer to the surroundings. Such parameters include temperature, oxidant concentration, the amounts of possible catalysts, the radiation dose absorbed by the resin and the diameter of the resin column. Current information is not sufficient to define safe upper limits for these parameters. They can be evaluated, however, from equations derived from the Frank-Kamenetskii theory of thermal explosions provided the heat capacities, thermal conductivities and rates of heat evolution in the relevant resin-oxidant mixtures are known. It is recommended that such measurements be made and the appropriate limits be evaluated. A list of additional safety precautions are also presented to aid in the application of these limits and to provide additional margins of safety. In-line evaluation of resin degradation to assess its safety hazard is considered impractical. Rather, it is recommended that the resin be removed from use before it has received the limiting radiation dose, evaluated as described above

  9. Turmoil at Turrialba Volcano (Costa Rica): Degassing and eruptive processes inferred from high-frequency gas monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moor, J. Maarten; Aiuppa, A.; Avard, G.; Wehrmann, H.; Dunbar, N.; Muller, C.; Tamburello, G.; Giudice, G.; Liuzzo, M.; Moretti, R.; Conde, V.; Galle, B.

    2016-08-01

    Eruptive activity at Turrialba Volcano (Costa Rica) has escalated significantly since 2014, causing airport and school closures in the capital city of San José. Whether or not new magma is involved in the current unrest seems probable but remains a matter of debate as ash deposits are dominated by hydrothermal material. Here we use high-frequency gas monitoring to track the behavior of the volcano between 2014 and 2015 and to decipher magmatic versus hydrothermal contributions to the eruptions. Pulses of deeply derived CO2-rich gas (CO2/Stotal > 4.5) precede explosive activity, providing a clear precursor to eruptive periods that occurs up to 2 weeks before eruptions, which are accompanied by shallowly derived sulfur-rich magmatic gas emissions. Degassing modeling suggests that the deep magmatic reservoir is 8-10 km deep, whereas the shallow magmatic gas source is at 3-5 km. Two cycles of degassing and eruption are observed, each attributed to pulses of magma ascending through the deep reservoir to shallow crustal levels. The magmatic degassing signals were overprinted by a fluid contribution from the shallow hydrothermal system, modifying the gas compositions, contributing volatiles to the emissions, and reflecting complex processes of scrubbing, displacement, and volatilization. H2S/SO2 varies over 2 orders of magnitude through the monitoring period and demonstrates that the first eruptive episode involved hydrothermal gases, whereas the second did not. Massive degassing (>3000 T/d SO2 and H2S/SO2 > 1) followed, suggesting boiling off of the hydrothermal system. The gas emissions show a remarkable shift to purely magmatic composition (H2S/SO2 < 0.05) during the second eruptive period, reflecting the depletion of the hydrothermal system or the establishment of high-temperature conduits bypassing remnant hydrothermal reservoirs, and the transition from phreatic to phreatomagmatic eruptive activity.

  10. Preparation, characterization, and efficient transfection of cationic liposomes and nanomagnetic cationic liposomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samadikhah HR

    2011-10-01

    magnetic characteristic for conduction of genes or drugs to target organs. Keywords: transfection efficiency, magnetic nanoparticles, luciferase, cationic liposome

  11. Cation-π interactions in structural biology

    OpenAIRE

    Gallivan, Justin P.; Dougherty, Dennis A.

    1999-01-01

    Cation-pi interactions in protein structures are identified and evaluated by using an energy-based criterion for selecting significant sidechain pairs. Cation-pi interactions are found to be common among structures in the Protein Data Bank, and it is clearly demonstrated that, when a cationic sidechain (Lys or Arg) is near an aromatic sidechain (Phe, Tyr, or Trp), the geometry is biased toward one that would experience a favorable cation-pi interaction. The sidechain of Arg is more likely tha...

  12. Simultaneous anion and cation mobility in polypyrrole

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaarup, Steen; Bay, Lasse; Vidanapathirana, K.

    2003-01-01

    and the expulsion of anions; a broad anodic peak centered at ca. - 0.5 V representing the expulsion of cations; and a second broad peak at +0.2 to +0.5 V corresponding to anions being inserted. Although the motion of cations is the most important, as expected, there is a significant anion contribution, thereby...... complicating reproducibility when employing PPy(DBS) polymers as actuators. When the cation is doubly charged, it enters the film less readily, and anions dominate the mobility. Using a large and bulky cation switches the mechanism to apparently total anion motion. The changes in area of the three peaks...

  13. Effect of compacting pressure, powder degassing and thermobaric treatment on densification and properties of nanocrystalline titanium nitride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei V. Kapylou

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The effects of compacting pressure, powder degassing and high pressure sintering temperature and time on the densification and properties of nanocrystalline titanium nitride have been investigated. For this reason, TiN powder with a mean particle size of 55 nm was pressed in the range of compacting pressure from 0.2 to 1.0 GPa and sintered under static pressure of 3.5 GPa in the temperature range of 900–1600°C for 45–120 s. Some of green bodies were degassed in vacuum before sintering. It was shown that samples compacted in the pressure range of 0.2–0.6 GPa have the highest density after the thermobaric treatment. The maximum density (about 97.3 %TD was obtained with degassed samples. Microhardness and microstructure investigations have shown that recrystallization of the TiN nanopowder begins at the sintering temperatures of 1100–1200°C and sintering time less than one minute. The maximum microhardness obtained was 23.2±1.0 GPa and themaximum Young modulus was 370 GPa.

  14. Conditions for oceans on Earth-like planets orbiting within the habitable zone: importance of volcanic CO2 degassing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadoya, S.; Tajika, E.

    2014-01-01

    Earth-like planets in the habitable zone (HZ) have been considered to have warm climates and liquid water on their surfaces if the carbonate-silicate geochemical cycle is working as on Earth. However, it is known that even the present Earth may be globally ice-covered when the rate of CO 2 degassing via volcanism becomes low. Here we discuss the climates of Earth-like planets in which the carbonate-silicate geochemical cycle is working, with focusing particularly on insolation and the CO 2 degassing rate. The climate of Earth-like planets within the HZ can be classified into three climate modes (hot, warm, and snowball climate modes). We found that the conditions for the existence of liquid water should be largely restricted even when the planet is orbiting within the HZ and the carbonate-silicate geochemical cycle is working. We show that these conditions should depend strongly on the rate of CO 2 degassing via volcanism. It is, therefore, suggested that thermal evolution of the planetary interiors will be a controlling factor for Earth-like planets to have liquid water on their surface.

  15. Cationic nanoparticles induce nanoscale disruption in living cell plasma membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiumei; Hessler, Jessica A; Putchakayala, Krishna; Panama, Brian K; Khan, Damian P; Hong, Seungpyo; Mullen, Douglas G; Dimaggio, Stassi C; Som, Abhigyan; Tew, Gregory N; Lopatin, Anatoli N; Baker, James R; Holl, Mark M Banaszak; Orr, Bradford G

    2009-08-13

    It has long been recognized that cationic nanoparticles induce cell membrane permeability. Recently, it has been found that cationic nanoparticles induce the formation and/or growth of nanoscale holes in supported lipid bilayers. In this paper, we show that noncytotoxic concentrations of cationic nanoparticles induce 30-2000 pA currents in 293A (human embryonic kidney) and KB (human epidermoid carcinoma) cells, consistent with a nanoscale defect such as a single hole or group of holes in the cell membrane ranging from 1 to 350 nm(2) in total area. Other forms of nanoscale defects, including the nanoparticle porating agents adsorbing onto or intercalating into the lipid bilayer, are also consistent; although the size of the defect must increase to account for any reduction in ion conduction, as compared to a water channel. An individual defect forming event takes 1-100 ms, while membrane resealing may occur over tens of seconds. Patch-clamp data provide direct evidence for the formation of nanoscale defects in living cell membranes. The cationic polymer data are compared and contrasted with patch-clamp data obtained for an amphiphilic phenylene ethynylene antimicrobial oligomer (AMO-3), a small molecule that is proposed to make well-defined 3.4 nm holes in lipid bilayers. Here, we observe data that are consistent with AMO-3 making approximately 3 nm holes in living cell membranes.

  16. Prodigious degassing of a billion years of accumulated radiogenic helium at Yellowstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Evans, William C.; Bergfeld, D.; Hunt, Andrew G.

    2014-01-01

    Helium is used as a critical tracer throughout the Earth sciences, where its relatively simple isotopic systematics is used to trace degassing from the mantle, to date groundwater and to time the rise of continents1. The hydrothermal system at Yellowstone National Park is famous for its high helium-3/helium-4 isotope ratio, commonly cited as evidence for a deep mantle source for the Yellowstone hotspot2. However, much of the helium emitted from this region is actually radiogenic helium-4 produced within the crust by α-decay of uranium and thorium. Here we show, by combining gas emission rates with chemistry and isotopic analyses, that crustal helium-4 emission rates from Yellowstone exceed (by orders of magnitude) any conceivable rate of generation within the crust. It seems that helium has accumulated for (at least) many hundreds of millions of years in Archaean (more than 2.5 billion years old) cratonic rocks beneath Yellowstone, only to be liberated over the past two million years by intense crustal metamorphism induced by the Yellowstone hotspot. Our results demonstrate the extremes in variability of crustal helium efflux on geologic timescales and imply crustal-scale open-system behaviour of helium in tectonically and magmatically active regions.

  17. An aqueous physical and mathematical modelling of ultrasonic degassing of molten metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meidani, A.R.N.; Hasan, M.

    1999-01-01

    A comprehensive mathematical model, combined with an aqueous physical modelling, have been developed to simulate the ultrasonic degassing of a gassy liquid. The mathematical model forms a set of coupled, highly nonlinear and stiff differential equations. Therefore, the modified Gear method, which is a good numerical scheme for solving extremely fast moving boundary problems is applied. The threshold pressure and the effects of ultrasonic specifications on rectified diffusion of the dissolved air in water with different initial concentrations are studied. The results show that the air bubble grows when the ultrasonic pressure amplitude is more than the threshold pressure. In this case, the bubble volume reaches several times of its initial value in a fraction of second and the gas bubble may float to the surface due to the buoyancy force. A parametric study on the present model is carried out. The results of aqueous physical modelling for bubble growth are compared to the results of the mathematical model which show a reasonable agreement between the experiments and the predictions. (author)

  18. Correlation of cycles in Lava Lake motion and degassing at Erebus Volcano, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Nial; Oppenheimer, Clive; Killingsworth, Drea Rae; Frechette, Jed; Kyle, Philip

    2014-08-01

    Several studies at Erebus volcano have recorded pulsatory behavior in many of the observable properties of its active lava lake. A strong correlation between the variations in surface speed of the lake and the composition of gas emitted has previously been noted. While previous studies have shown that the SO2 flux and the surface elevation exhibit pulsatory behavior with a similar period to that of the surface speed and gas composition, suggesting they are linked, a lack of overlap between the different measurements has prevented direct comparisons from being made. Using high time-resolution measurements of surface elevation, surface speed, gas composition, and SO2 flux, we demonstrate for the first time an unambiguous link between the cyclic behavior in each of these properties. We also show that the variation in gas composition may be explained by a subtle change in oxygen fugacity. The cycles are found to be in-phase with each other, with a small but consistent lag of 1-3 min between the peaks in surface elevation and surface speed. Explosive events are found to have no observable effect on the pulsatory behavior beyond the ˜5 min period required for lake refill. The close correspondences between the varying lake surface motion, gas flux and composition, and modeled oxygen fugacity suggest strong links between magma degassing, redox change, and the fluid dynamics of the shallow magmatic system.

  19. The slender bubble model for very slow degassing in porous media and cold production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chraibi, M. [Total, Paris (France); Zaleski, S. [Society of Petroleum Engineers, London (United Kingdom)]|[Paris Univ., Paris (France); Franco, F. [Society of Petroleum Engineers, London (United Kingdom)]|[Total, Paris (France)

    2008-10-15

    Cold oil production leads to degassing of the light species and the formation of a bubbly phase. This is often referred to as the foamy oil effect and is particularly observed with heavy oils, combining high viscosity and asphaltenes. The presence and behaviour of a foamy-oil effect is critical to the cold production process. However, because a wide range of different petrophysical parameters and experimental factors interact in a complex manner, this process is not a well-understood production mechanism. This study focused on improving the understanding of the solution gas drive mechanism in primary heavy oil recovery. A Darcy-scale model was developed that took into account the basic physical phenomena of bubble nucleation, bubble growth by solute diffusion and expansion, and bubble mobilization. The relative permeability of the gas phase was replaced by an expression for the gas mobility with new physical effects related to capillarity, viscosity, gravity, and bubble geometry. The purpose was to fit the productions with a limited number of parameters, having physical meaning, independently from the depletion rate. The paper also presented several simplifications of the basic Darcy-scale equations, that enabled the production prediction in a much simpler manner than through full simulations. The full set of Darcy-scale equations were solved using a numerical solution. The formation of strong gradients of the gas phase saturation were shown to depend on gravity and viscosity. 12 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Internal cation mobilities in molten lithium. Potassium fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Haruaki; Ohashi, Ryo; Chou, Pao-Hwa; Takagi, Ryuzo

    2006-01-01

    Relative differences between internal cation mobilities in molten (Li, K) F have been measured by countercurrent electromigration (Klemm method) at 1023 K. Internal mobilities of K + are larger than those of Li + in all composition on which we have measured so far. More striking feature is that the isotherms have minimum of mobilities at ca. x K =0.5. The local structural parameters would be highly related to the ionic conduction behavior in molten fluorides. (author)

  1. Afrikaans Syllabification Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilla Fick

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to English, automatic hyphenation by computer of Afrikaans words is a problem that still needs to be addressed, since errors are still often encountered in printed text. An initial step in this task is the ability to automatically syllabify words. Since new words are created continuously by joining words, it is necessary to develop an “intelligent” technique for syllabification. As a first phase of the research, we consider only the orthographic information of words, and disregard both syntactic and morphological information. This approach allows us to use machine-learning techniques such as artificial neural networks and decision trees that are known for their pattern recognition abilities. Both these techniques are trained with isolated patterns consisting of input patterns and corresponding outputs (or targets that indicate whether the input pattern should be split at a certain position, or not. In the process of compiling a list of syllabified words from which to generate training data for the  syllabification problem, irregular patterns were identified. The same letter patterns are split differently in different words and complete words that are spelled identically are split differently due to meaning. We also identified irregularities in and between  the different dictionaries that we used. We examined the influence range of letters that are involved in irregularities. For example, for their in agter-ente and vaste-rente we have to consider three letters to the left of r to be certain where the hyphen should be inserted. The influence range of the k in verstek-waarde and kleinste-kwadrate is four to the left and three to the right. In an analysis of letter patterns in Afrikaans words we found that the letter e has the highest frequency overall (16,2% of all letters in the word list. The frequency of words starting with s is the highest, while the frequency of words ending with e is the highest. It is important to

  2. Eruption Depths, Magma Storage and Magma Degassing at Sumisu Caldera, Izu-Bonin Arc: Evidence from Glasses and Melt Inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, E. R.

    2015-12-01

    Island arc volcanoes can become submarine during cataclysmal caldera collapse. The passage of a volcanic vent from atmospheric to under water environment involves complex modifications of the eruption style and subsequent transport of the pyroclasts. Here, we use FTIR measurements of the volatile contents of glass and melt inclusions in the juvenile pumice clasts in the Sumisu basin and its surroundings (Izu-Bonin arc) to investigate changes in eruption depths, magma storage and degassing over time. This study is based on legacy cores from ODP 126, where numerous unconsolidated (250 m), massive to normally graded pumice lapilli-tuffs were recovered over four cores (788C, 790A, 790B and 791A). Glass and clast geochemistry indicate the submarine Sumisu caldera as the source of several of these pumice lapilli-tuffs. Glass chips and melt inclusions from these samples were analyzed using FTIR for H2O and CO2 contents. Glass chips record variable H2O contents; most chips contain 0.6-1.6 wt% H2O, corresponding to eruption depths of 320-2100 mbsl. Variations in glass H2O and pressure estimates suggest that edifice collapse occurred prior-to or during eruption of the oldest of these samples, and that the edifice may have subsequently grown over time. Sanidine-hosted melt inclusions from two units record variably degassed but H2O-rich melts (1.1-5.6 wt% H2O). The lowest H2O contents overlap with glass chips, consistent with degassing and crystallization of melts until eruption, and the highest H2O contents suggest that large amounts of degassing accompanied likely explosive eruptions. Most inclusions, from both units, contain 2-4 wt% H2O, which further indicates that the magmas crystallized at pressures of ~50-100 MPa, or depths ~400-2800 m below the seafloor. Further glass and melt inclusion analyses, including major element compositions, will elucidate changes in magma storage, degassing and evolution over time.

  3. Isotopic insights into the degassing and secondary hydration of volcanic glass from the 1980 eruptions of Mount St. Helens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligman, Angela N.; Bindeman, Ilya; Van Eaton, Alexa; Hoblitt, Richard

    2018-04-01

    Abstract The magmatic degassing history of newly erupted volcanic glass is recorded in its remaining volatile content. However, this history is subsequently overprinted by post-depositional (secondary) hydration, the rates and origins of which are not yet adequately constrained. Here, we present the results of a natural experiment using products of the 1980 eruptions of Mount St. Helens. We measured water concentration, δDglass, and δ18OBSG (δ18O of the bulk silicate glass) of samples collected during the dry summer months of 1980 and compared them with material resampled in 2015 from the same deposits. Samples collected from the subsurface near gas escape pipes show elevated water concentrations (near 2.0 wt%), and these are associated with lower δDglass (- 110 to - 130‰) and δ18OBSG (6.0 to 6.6‰) values than the 1980 glass (- 70 to - 100‰ and 6.8 to 6.9‰, respectively). Samples collected in 2015 from the surface to 10-cm subsurface of the 1980 summer deposits have a small increase in average water contents of 0.1-0.2 wt% but similar δ18OBSG (6.8-6.9‰) values compared to the 1980 glass values. These samples, however, show 15‰ higher δDglass values; exchange with meteoric water is expected to yield lower δDglass values. We attribute higher δDglass values in the upper portion of the 1980 deposits collected in 2015 to rehydration by higher δD waters that were degassed for several months to a year from the hot underlying deposits, which hydrated the overlying deposits with relatively high δD gases. Our data also contribute to magmatic degassing of crystal-rich volcanoes. Using the 1980 samples, our reconstructed δD-H2O trends for the dacitic Mount St. Helens deposits with rhyolitic groundmass yield a trend that overlaps with the degassing trend for crystal-poor rhyolitic eruptions studied previously elsewhere, suggesting similar behavior of volatiles upon exsolution from magma. Furthermore, our data support previous studies proposing that

  4. Degassing of CO2, SO2, and H2S associated with the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Cynthia A.; Kelly, Peter; Doukas, Michael P.; Lopez, Taryn; Pfeffer, Melissa; McGimsey, Robert G.; Neal, Christina

    2013-01-01

    The 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska was particularly well monitored for volcanic gas emissions. We report 35 airborne measurements of CO2, SO2, and H2S emission rates that span from October 2008 to August 2010. The magmatic system degassed primarily as a closed system although minor amounts of open system degassing were observed in the 6 months prior to eruption on March 15, 2009 and over 1 year following cessation of dome extrusion. Only 14% of the total CO2 was emitted prior to eruption even though high emissions rates (between 3630 and 9020 t/d) were observed in the final 6 weeks preceding the eruption. A minor amount of the total SO2 was observed prior to eruption (4%), which was consistent with the low emission rates at that time (up to 180 t/d). The amount of the gas emitted during the explosive and dome growth period (March 15–July 1, 2009) was 59 and 66% of the total CO2and SO2, respectively. Maximum emission rates were 33,110 t/d CO2, 16,650 t/d SO2, and 1230 t/d H2S. Post-eruptive passive degassing was responsible for 27 and 30% of the total CO2 and SO2, respectively. SO2 made up on average 92% of the total sulfur degassing throughout the eruption. Magmas were vapor saturated with a C- and S-rich volatile phase, and regardless of composition, the magmas appear to be buffered by a volatile composition with a molar CO2/SO2 ratio of ~ 2.4. Primary volatile contents calculated from degassing and erupted magma volumes range from 0.9 to 2.1 wt.% CO2 and 0.27–0.56 wt.% S; whole-rock normalized values are slightly lower (0.8–1.7 wt.% CO2 and 0.22–0.47 wt.% S) and are similar to what was calculated for the 1989–90 eruption of Redoubt. Such contents argue that primary arc magmas are rich in CO2 and S. Similar trends between volumes of estimated degassed magma and observed erupted magma during the eruptive period point to primary volatile contents of 1.25 wt.% CO2 and 0.35 wt.% S. Assuming these values, up to 30% additional

  5. Cationic polymers and their therapeutic potential

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samal, S.K.; Dash, M.; van Vlierberghe, S.; Kaplan, D.; Chiellini, E.; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Moroni, Lorenzo; Dubruel, P.

    2012-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed enormous research focused on cationic polymers. Cationic polymers are the subject of intense research as non-viral gene delivery systems, due to their flexible properties, facile synthesis, robustness and proven gene delivery efficiency. Here, we review the most recent

  6. Tripodal Receptors for Cation and Anion Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David N. Reinhoudt

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available This review discusses different types of artificial tripodal receptors for the selectiverecognition and sensing of cations and anions. Examples on the relationship between structure andselectivity towards cations and anions are described. Furthermore, their applications as potentiometricion sensing are emphasised, along with their potential applications in optical sensors or optodes.

  7. Asymmetric Aminalization via Cation-Binding Catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Sang Yeon; Liu, Yidong; Oh, Joong Suk

    2018-01-01

    Asymmetric cation-binding catalysis, in principle, can generate "chiral" anionic nucleophiles, where the counter cations are coordinated within chiral environments. Nitrogen-nucleophiles are intrinsically basic, therefore, its use as nucleophiles is often challenging and limiting the scope of the...

  8. Structural and energetic study of cation-π-cation interactions in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Silvana; Soteras, Ignacio; Gelpí, Josep Lluis; Dehez, François; Chipot, Christophe; Luque, F Javier; Curutchet, Carles

    2017-04-12

    Cation-π interactions of aromatic rings and positively charged groups are among the most important interactions in structural biology. The role and energetic characteristics of these interactions are well established. However, the occurrence of cation-π-cation interactions is an unexpected motif, which raises intriguing questions about its functional role in proteins. We present a statistical analysis of the occurrence, composition and geometrical preferences of cation-π-cation interactions identified in a set of non-redundant protein structures taken from the Protein Data Bank. Our results demonstrate that this structural motif is observed at a small, albeit non-negligible frequency in proteins, and suggest a preference to establish cation-π-cation motifs with Trp, followed by Tyr and Phe. Furthermore, we have found that cation-π-cation interactions tend to be highly conserved, which supports their structural or functional role. Finally, we have performed an energetic analysis of a representative subset of cation-π-cation complexes combining quantum-chemical and continuum solvation calculations. Our results point out that the protein environment can strongly screen the cation-cation repulsion, leading to an attractive interaction in 64% of the complexes analyzed. Together with the high degree of conservation observed, these results suggest a potential stabilizing role in the protein fold, as demonstrated recently for a miniature protein (Craven et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2016, 138, 1543). From a computational point of view, the significant contribution of non-additive three-body terms challenges the suitability of standard additive force fields for describing cation-π-cation motifs in molecular simulations.

  9. A Model of Continental Growth and Mantle Degassing Comparing Biotic and Abiotic Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höning, D.; Hansen-Goos, H.; Spohn, T.

    2012-12-01

    While examples for interaction of the biosphere with the atmosphere can be easily cited (e.g., production and consumption of O2), interaction between the biosphere and the solid planet and its interior is much less established. It has been argued (e.g., Rosing et al. 2006; Sleep et al, 2012) that the formation of continents could be a consequence of bioactivity harvesting solar energy through photosynthesis to help build the continents and that the mantle should carry a chemical biosignature. We present an interaction model that includes mantle convection, mantle water vapor degassing at mid-oceanic ridges and regassing through subduction zones, continental crust formation and erosion and water storage and transport in a porous oceanic crust that includes hydrous mineral phases. The mantle viscosity in this model depends on the water concentration in the mantle. We use boundary layer theory of mantle convection to parameterize the mantle convection flow rate and assume that the plate speed equals the mantle flow rate. The biosphere enters the calculation through the assumption that the continental erosion rate is enhanced by a factor of several through bioactivity and through an assumed reduction of the kinetic barrier to diagenetic and metamorphic reactions (e.g., Kim et al. 2004) in the sedimentary basins in subduction zones that would lead to increased water storage capacities. We further include a stochastic model of continent-to-continent interactions that limits the effective total length of subduction zones. We use present day parameters of the Earth and explore a phase plane spanned by the percentage of surface coverage of the Earth by continents and the total water content of the mantle. We vary the ratio of the erosion rate in a postulated abiotic Earth to the present Earth, as well as the activation barrier to diagenetic and metamorphic reactions that affect the water storage capacity of the subducting crust. We find stable and unstable fixed points in

  10. Monitoring quiescent volcanoes by diffuse He degassing: case study Teide volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Nemesio M.; Melián, Gladys; Asensio-Ramos, María; Padrón, Eleazar; Hernández, Pedro A.; Barrancos, José; Padilla, Germán; Rodríguez, Fátima; Calvo, David; Alonso, Mar

    2016-04-01

    Tenerife (2,034 km2), the largest of the Canary Islands, is the only island that has developed a central volcanic complex (Teide-Pico Viejo stratovolcanoes), characterized by the eruption of differentiated magmas. This central volcanic complex has been built in the intersection of the three major volcanic rift-zones of Tenerife, where most of the historical volcanic activity has taken place. The existence of a volcanic-hydrothermal system beneath Teide volcano is suggested by the occurrence of a weak fumarolic system, steamy ground and high rates of diffuse CO2 degassing all around the summit cone of Teide (Pérez et al., 2013). Diffuse emission studies of non-reactive and/or highly mobile gases such as helium have recently provided promising results to detect changes in the magmatic gas component at surface related to volcanic unrest episodes (Padrón et al., 2013). The geochemical properties of He minimize the interaction of this noble gas on its movement toward the earth's surface, and its isotopic composition is not affected by subsequent chemical reactions. It is highly mobile, chemically inert, physically stable, non-biogenic, sparingly soluble in water under ambient conditions, almost non-adsorbable, and highly diffusive with a diffusion coefficient ˜10 times that of CO2. As part of the geochemical monitoring program for the volcanic surveillance of Teide volcano, yearly surveys of diffuse He emission through the surface of the summit cone of Teide volcano have been performed since 2006. Soil He emission rate was measured yearly at ˜130 sampling sites selected in the surface environment of the summit cone of Teide volcano (Tenerife, Canary Islands), covering an area of ˜0.5 km2, assuming that He emission is governed by convection and diffusion. The distribution of the sampling sites was carefully chosen to homogeneously cover the target area, allowing the computation of the total He emission by sequential Gaussian simulation (sGs). Nine surveys have been

  11. Diffuse He degassing from Cumbre Vieja volcano, La Palma, Canary Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asensio-Ramos, María; De Jongh, Marli E.; Lamfers, Kristen R.; Alonso, Mar; Amonte, Cecilia; Padrón, Eleazar; Hernández, Pedro A.; Pérez, Nemesio M.

    2017-04-01

    Helium is considered as an ideal geochemical tracer due to its geochemical properties: chemical inertness, physical stability and practical insolubility in water under normal conditions. These characteristics, together with its high mobility on the crust, make the presence of helium anomalies on the surface environment of a volcanic system to be related to deep fluid migration controlled by volcano-tectonic features, also providing valuable information about the location and characteristics of the gas source and the fracturing of the crust. The recent results reported by Padrón et al. (2013) clearly show importance of helium emission studies for the prediction of major volcanic events and the importance of continuous monitoring of this gas in active volcanic regions. La Palma Island (708.32 km2) is located at the northwestern end of the Canarian Archipelago. Subaerial volcanic activity on this island started ˜2.0 My ago and has taken place exclusively at the southern part in the last 123 ka. Cumbre Vieja volcano, the most active basaltic volcano of the Canary Islands, was built in this zone, including a main north-south rift area 20 km long and up to 1,950 m in elevation, with vents located also at the northwest and northeast. Padrón et al., (2012) showed that helium is mainly emitted along both N-S and N-W rift of Cumbre Vieja, being, therefore, zones of enhanced permeability for deep gas migration and preferential routes for degassing. This work represents a continuation of the results obtained by Padrón et al. (2012) until the year 2016. Each study covered the 220 km2 of Cumbre Vieja with an average of 570 homogenously distributed sampling points. At each sampling site, soil gas samples were collected at 40 cm depth by withdrawing the gas aliquots into 60 cc hypodermic syringes. He content in the soil gases was analyzed by means of quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS). Atmospheric gas was used periodically to calibrate the instrument. To estimate the helium

  12. Distribution of sulfur aerosol precursors in the SPCZ released by continuous volcanic degassing at Ambrym, Vanuatu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefèvre, Jérôme; Menkes, Christophe; Bani, Philipson; Marchesiello, Patrick; Curci, Gabriele; Grell, Georg A.; Frouin, Robert

    2016-08-01

    The Melanesian Volcanic Arc (MVA) emits about 12 kT d- 1 of sulfur dioxide (SO2) to the atmosphere from continuous passive (non-explosive) volcanic degassing, which contributes 20% of the global SO2 emission from volcanoes. Here we assess, from up-to-date and long-term observations, the SO2 emission of the Ambrym volcano, one of the dominant volcanoes in the MVA, and we investigate its role as sulfate precursor on the regional distribution of aerosols, using both satellite observations and model results at 1° × 1° spatial resolution from WRF-Chem/GOCART. Without considering aerosol forcing on clouds, our model parameterizations for convection, vertical mixing and cloud properties provide a reliable chemical weather representation, making possible a cross-examination of model solution and observations. This preliminary work enables the identification of biases and limitations affecting both the model (missing sources) and satellite sensors and algorithms (for aerosol detection and classification) and leads to the implementation of improved transport and aerosol processes in the modeling system. On the one hand, the model confirms a 50% underestimation of SO2 emissions due to satellite swath sampling of the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), consistent with field studies. The OMI irregular sampling also produces a level of noise that impairs its monitoring capacity during short-term volcanic events. On the other hand, the model reveals a large sensitivity on aerosol composition and Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) due to choices of both the source function in WRF-Chem and size parameters for sea-salt in FlexAOD, the post-processor used to compute offline the simulated AOD. We then proceed to diagnosing the role of SO2 volcanic emission in the regional aerosol composition. The model shows that both dynamics and cloud properties associated with the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) have a large influence on the oxidation of SO2 and on the transport pathways of

  13. Human impact on the historical change of CO2 degassing flux in River Changjiang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Jing

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The impact of water quality changes in River Changjiang (formally known as the Yangtze River on dissolved CO2 and silicate concentrations and seasonal carbon flux in the past several decades (1960s–2000 was evaluated, based on monitoring data from hydrographic gauge. It was found that dissolved CO2 and silicate in Changjiang decreased dramatically during this decades, as opposed to a marked increase in nutrient (e.g. NO3- concentrations. Our analyses revealed that dissolved CO2 in Changjiang was over-saturated with the atmosphere CO2, and its concentration had showed a declining trend since the 1960s, despite that fluvial DIC flux had maintained stable. Analysis results also suggested that the decrease in dissolved CO2 concentration was attributed to changes on the riverine trophic level and river damming activities in the Changjiang drainage basin. Due to the economic innovation (e.g. agriculture and industry development across the Changjiang watershed, fertilizers application and river regulations have significantly altered the original state of the river. Its ecosystem and hydrological condition have been evolving toward the "lacustrine/reservoir" autotrophic type prevailing with plankton. Accordingly, average CO2 diffusing flux to the atmosphere from the river had been reduced by three-fourth from the 1960s to 1990s, with the flux value being down to 14.2 mol.m-2.yr-1 in the 1990s. For a rough estimate, approximately 15.3 Mt of carbon was degassed annually into the atmosphere from the entire Changjiang drainage basin in the 1990s.

  14. Statistical tools applied for the reduction of the defect rate of coffee degassing valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Olmi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Coffee is a very common beverage exported all over the world: just after roasting, coffee beans are packed in plastic or paper bags, which then experience long transfers with long storage times. Fresh roasted coffee emits large amounts of CO2 for several weeks. This gas must be gradually released, to prevent package over-inflation and to preserve aroma, moreover beans must be protected from oxygen coming from outside. Therefore, one-way degassing valves are applied to each package: their correct functionality is strictly related to the interference coupling between their bodies and covers and to the correct assembly of the other involved parts. This work takes inspiration from an industrial problem: a company that assembles valve components, supplied by different manufacturers, observed a high level of defect rate, affecting its valve production. An integrated approach, consisting in the adoption of quality charts, in an experimental campaign for the dimensional analysis of the mating parts and in the statistical processing of the data, was necessary to tackle the question. In particular, a simple statistical tool was made available to predict the defect rate and to individuate the best strategy for its reduction. The outcome was that requiring a strict protocol, regarding the combinations of parts from different manufacturers for assembly, would have been almost ineffective. Conversely, this study led to the individuation of the weak point in the manufacturing process of the mating components and to the suggestion of a slight improvement to be performed, with the final result of a significant (one order of magnitude decrease of the defect rate.

  15. Using titanite petrochronology to monitor CO2-degassing episodes from the Himalayas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapa, Giulia; Groppo, Chiara; Rolfo, Franco; Petrelli, Maurizio; Mosca, Pietro

    2017-04-01

    Metamorphic degassing from active collisional orogens supplies a significant fraction of CO2 to the atmosphere, playing a fundamental role in the long-term (> 1 Ma) global carbon cycle (Gaillardet & Galy, 2008). The petro-chronologic study of the CO2-source rocks (e.g. calc-silicate rocks) in collisional settings is therefore fundamental to understand the nature, timing, duration and magnitude of the orogenic carbon cycle. So far, the incomplete knowledge of these systems hindered a reliable quantitative modelling of metamorphic CO2 fluxes. A detailed petrological modelling of a clinopyroxene + scapolite + K-feldspar + plagioclase + biotite + zoisite ± calcite calc-silicate rock from central Nepal Himalaya allowed us to identify and fully characterize - for the first time - different metamorphic reactions that led to the simultaneous growth of titanite and production of CO2. These reactions involve biotite (rather than rutile) as the Ti-bearing reactant counterpart of titanite. The results of petrological modelling combined with Zr-in-Ttn thermometry and U-Pb geochronology suggest that in the studied sample, most titanite grains grew during two nearly continuous episodes of titanite formation: a near-peak event at 730-740°C, 10 kbar, 25.5±1.5 Ma, and a peak event at 740-765°C, 10.5 kbar, 22±3 Ma. Both episodes of titanite growth are correlated to specific CO2-producing reactions, thus allowing to constrain the timing, duration and P-T conditions of the main CO2-producing events, as well as the amounts of CO2 produced. Assuming that fluids released at a depth of ca. 30 km are able to reach the Earth's surface 10 Ma after their production, it is therefore possible to speculate on the role exerted by the Himalayan orogenesis on the climate in the past. Gaillardet J. & Galy A. (2008): Himalaya-carbon sink or source? Science, 320, 1727-1728.

  16. Exploration of overloaded cation exchange chromatography for monoclonal antibody purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui F; McCooey, Beth; Duarte, Tiago; Myers, Deanna E; Hudson, Terry; Amanullah, Ashraf; van Reis, Robert; Kelley, Brian D

    2011-09-28

    Cation exchange chromatography using conventional resins, having either diffusive or perfusive flow paths, operated in bind-elute mode has been commonly employed in monoclonal antibody (MAb) purification processes. In this study, the performance of diffusive and perfusive cation exchange resins (SP-Sepharose FF (SPSFF) and Poros 50HS) and a convective cation exchange membrane (Mustang S) and monolith (SO(3) Monolith) were compared. All matrices were utilized in an isocratic state under typical binding conditions with an antibody load of up to 1000 g/L of chromatographic matrix. The dynamic binding capacity of the cation exchange resins is typically below 100 g/L resin, so they were loaded beyond the point of anticipated MAb break through. All of the matrices performed similarly in that they effectively retained host cell protein and DNA during the loading and wash steps, while antibody flowed through each matrix after its dynamic binding capacity was reached. The matrices differed, though, in that conventional diffusive and perfusive chromatographic resins (SPSFF and Poros 50HS) demonstrated a higher binding capacity for high molecular weight species (HMW) than convective flow matrices (membrane and monolith); Poros 50HS displayed the highest HMW binding capacity. Further exploration of the conventional chromatographic resins in an isocratic overloaded mode demonstrated that the impurity binding capacity was well maintained on Poros 50HS, but not on SPSFF, when the operating flow rate was as high as 36 column volumes per hour. Host cell protein and HMW removal by Poros 50HS was affected by altering the loading conductivity. A higher percentage of host cell protein removal was achieved at a low conductivity of 3 mS/cm. HMW binding capacity was optimized at 5 mS/cm. Our data from runs on Poros 50HS resin also showed that leached protein A and cell culture additive such as gentamicin were able to be removed under the isocratic overloaded condition. Lastly, a MAb

  17. Cation transport in isomeric pentanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyoergy, Istvan; Gee, Norman; Freeman, G.R.

    1985-01-01

    The cation mobility μsub(+) is measured in n-pentane, isopentane, neo-pentane, and mixtures of n- and neo-pentane over conditions from the normal liquid, through the critical fluid, to the low density gas. Most of the liquid data correlate with the reduced temperature T/Tsub(c). The T/Tsub(c) reflects free volume and viscosity changes. Comparison is made to neutral molecule diffusion. The transition from viscosity control of mobility in the liquid to density control in the dilute gas occurs over the reduced viscosity region 3 > eta/etasub(c) > 0.6, which corresponds to the reduced density region 1.9 > eta/etasub(c) > 0.5. In the saturated gas etaμsub(+) is similar in all pentanes, but iso- approximately> n- > neo-pentane. At constant density dμsub(+)/dT >= 0 for gases. The average gas nμsub(+) is similar in all pentanes, but iso- approximately> n- > neo-pentane. At constant density dμsub(+)/dT >= 0 for gases. The average momentum transfer cross sections in the n-/neo-pentane mixtures are similar to those in neo-pentane at low T but similar to those in n-pentane at high T. The present findings are combined with previous electron mobility data in addressing the effect of hydrocarbon molecular (external) shape on the electric breakdown strength of gases

  18. Cationic Bolaamphiphiles for Gene Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Amelia Li Min; Lim, Alisa Xue Ling; Zhu, Yiting; Yang, Yi Yan; Khan, Majad

    2014-05-01

    Advances in medical research have shed light on the genetic cause of many human diseases. Gene therapy is a promising approach which can be used to deliver therapeutic genes to treat genetic diseases at its most fundamental level. In general, nonviral vectors are preferred due to reduced risk of immune response, but they are also commonly associated with low transfection efficiency and high cytotoxicity. In contrast to viral vectors, nonviral vectors do not have a natural mechanism to overcome extra- and intracellular barriers when delivering the therapeutic gene into cell. Hence, its design has been increasingly complex to meet challenges faced in targeting of, penetration of and expression in a specific host cell in achieving more satisfactory transfection efficiency. Flexibility in design of the vector is desirable, to enable a careful and controlled manipulation of its properties and functions. This can be met by the use of bolaamphiphile, a special class of lipid. Unlike conventional lipids, bolaamphiphiles can form asymmetric complexes with the therapeutic gene. The advantage of having an asymmetric complex lies in the different purposes served by the interior and exterior of the complex. More effective gene encapsulation within the interior of the complex can be achieved without triggering greater aggregation of serum proteins with the exterior, potentially overcoming one of the great hurdles faced by conventional single-head cationic lipids. In this review, we will look into the physiochemical considerations as well as the biological aspects of a bolaamphiphile-based gene delivery system.

  19. Protic Cationic Oligomeric Ionic Liquids of the Urethane Type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shevchenko, V. V.; Stryutsky, A. V.; Klymenko, N. S.

    2014-01-01

    Protic oligomeric cationic ionic liquids of the oligo(ether urethane) type are synthesized via the reaction of an isocyanate prepolymer based on oligo(oxy ethylene)glycol with M = 1000 with hexamethylene-diisocyanate followed by blocking of the terminal isocyanate groups with the use of amine...... derivatives of imidazole, pyridine, and 3-methylpyridine and neutralization of heterocycles with ethanesulfonic acid and p-toluenesulfonic acid. The structures and properties of the synthesized oligomeric ionic liquids substantially depend on the structures of the ionic groups. They are amorphous at room...... temperature, but ethanesulfonate imidazolium and pyridinium oligomeric ionic liquids form a low melting crystalline phase. The proton conductivities of the oligomeric ionic liquids are determined by the type of cation in the temperature range 80-120 degrees C under anhydrous conditions and vary within five...

  20. Stressor states and the cation crossroads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Karl T; Bhattacharya, Syamal K; Newman, Kevin P; Soberman, Judith E; Ramanathan, Kodangudi B; McGee, Jesse E; Malik, Kafait U; Hickerson, William L

    2010-12-01

    Neurohormonal activation involving the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and adrenergic nervous and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone systems is integral to stressor state-mediated homeostatic responses. The levels of effector hormones, depending upon the degree of stress, orchestrate the concordant appearance of hypokalemia, ionized hypocalcemia and hypomagnesemia, hypozincemia, and hyposelenemia. Seemingly contradictory to homeostatic responses wherein the constancy of extracellular fluid would be preserved, upregulation of cognate-binding proteins promotes coordinated translocation of cations to injured tissues, where they participate in wound healing. Associated catecholamine-mediated intracellular cation shifts regulate the equilibrium between pro-oxidants and antioxidant defenses, a critical determinant of cell survival. These acute and chronic stressor-induced iterations in extracellular and intracellular cations are collectively referred to as the cation crossroads. Intracellular cation shifts, particularly excessive accumulation of Ca2+, converge on mitochondria to induce oxidative stress and raise the opening potential of their inner membrane permeability transition pores (mPTPs). The ensuing loss of cationic homeostasis and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production, together with osmotic swelling, leads to organellar degeneration and cellular necrosis. The overall impact of iterations in extracellular and intracellular cations and their influence on cardiac redox state, cardiomyocyte survival, and myocardial structure and function are addressed herein.

  1. Radical Cations and Acid Protection during Radiolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mincher, Bruce J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Zarzana, Christopher A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mezyk, Stephen P. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-09

    Ligand molecules for used nuclear fuel separation schemes are exposed to high radiation fields and high concentrations of acid. Thus, an understanding of the complex interactions between extraction ligands, diluent, and acid is critical to understanding the performance of a separation process. The diglycolamides are ligands with important structural similarities to CMPO; however, previous work has shown that their radiolytic degradation has important mechanistic differences from CMPO. The DGAs do not enjoy radioprotection by HNO3 and the kinetics of DGA radiolytic degradation are different. CMPO degrades with pseudo-zero-order kinetics in linear fashion with absorbed dose while the DGAs degrade in pseudo-first-order, exponential fashion. This suggests that the DGAs degrade by simple reaction with some product of direct diluent radiolysis, while CMPO degradation is probably multi-step, with a slow step that is not dependent on the CMPO concentration, and mitigated by HNO3. It is thus believed that radio-protection and the zero-order radiolytic degradation kinetics are related, and that these phenomena are a function of either the formation of strong acid complexes with CMPO and/or to the presence of the CMPO phenyl ring. Experiments to test both these hypotheses have been designed and partially conducted. This report summarizes findings related to these phenomena for FY16, in satisfaction of milestone M3FT-16IN030104053. It also reports continued kinetic measurements for the reactions of the dodecane radical cation with solvent extraction ligands.

  2. Radical Cations and Acid Protection during Radiolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mincher, Bruce J.; Zarzana, Christopher A.; Mezyk, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    Ligand molecules for used nuclear fuel separation schemes are exposed to high radiation fields and high concentrations of acid. Thus, an understanding of the complex interactions between extraction ligands, diluent, and acid is critical to understanding the performance of a separation process. The diglycolamides are ligands with important structural similarities to CMPO; however, previous work has shown that their radiolytic degradation has important mechanistic differences from CMPO. The DGAs do not enjoy radioprotection by HNO3 and the kinetics of DGA radiolytic degradation are different. CMPO degrades with pseudo-zero-order kinetics in linear fashion with absorbed dose while the DGAs degrade in pseudo-first-order, exponential fashion. This suggests that the DGAs degrade by simple reaction with some product of direct diluent radiolysis, while CMPO degradation is probably multi-step, with a slow step that is not dependent on the CMPO concentration, and mitigated by HNO 3 . It is thus believed that radio-protection and the zero-order radiolytic degradation kinetics are related, and that these phenomena are a function of either the formation of strong acid complexes with CMPO and/or to the presence of the CMPO phenyl ring. Experiments to test both these hypotheses have been designed and partially conducted. This report summarizes findings related to these phenomena for FY16, in satisfaction of milestone M3FT-16IN030104053. It also reports continued kinetic measurements for the reactions of the dodecane radical cation with solvent extraction ligands.

  3. Diffuse CO_{2} degassing monitoring of the oceanic active volcanic island of El Hierro, Canary Islands, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Pedro A.; Norrie, Janice; Withoos, Yannick; García-Merino, Marta; Melián, Gladys; Padrón, Eleazar; Barrancos, José; Padilla, Germán; Rodríguez, Fátima; Pérez, Nemesio M.

    2017-04-01

    Even during repose periods, volcanoes release large amounts of gases from both visible (fumaroles, solfataras, plumes) and non-visible emanations (diffuse degassing). In the last 20 years, there has been considerable interest in the study of diffuse degassing as a powerful tool in volcano monitoring programs, particularly in those volcanic areas where there are no visible volcanic-hydrothermal gas emissions. Historically, soil gas and diffuse degassing surveys in volcanic environments have focused mainly on CO2 because it is, after water vapor, the most abundant gas dissolved in magma. As CO2 travels upward by advective-diffusive transport mechanisms and manifests itself at the surface, changes in its flux pattern over time provide important information for monitoring volcanic and seismic activity. Since 1998, diffuse CO2 emission has been monitored at El Hierro Island, the smallest and south westernmost island of the Canarian archipelago with an area of 278 km2. As no visible emanations occur at the surface environment of El Hierro, diffuse degassing studies have become the most useful geochemical tool to monitor the volcanic activity in this volcanic island. The island experienced a volcano-seismic unrest that began in July 2011, characterized by the location of a large number of relatively small earthquakes (MHierro at depths between 8 and 15 km. On October 12, 2011, a submarine eruption was confirmed during the afternoon of October 12, 2011 by visual observations off the coast of El Hierro, about 2 km south of the small village of La Restinga in the southernmost part of the island. During the pre-eruptive and eruptive periods, the time series of the diffuse CO2 emission released by the whole island experienced two significant increases. The first started almost 2 weeks before the onset of the submarine eruption, reflecting a clear geochemical anomaly in CO2 emission, most likely due to increasing release of deep seated magmatic gases to the surface. The second

  4. Cation distributions on rapidly solidified cobalt ferrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Guire, Mark R.; Kalonji, Gretchen; O'Handley, Robert C.

    1990-01-01

    The cation distributions in two rapidly solidified cobalt ferrites have been determined using Moessbauer spectroscopy at 4.2 K in an 8-T magnetic field. The samples were obtained by gas atomization of a Co0-Fe2O3-P2O5 melt. The degree of cation disorder in both cases was greater than is obtainable by cooling unmelted cobalt ferrite. The more rapidly cooled sample exhibited a smaller departure from the equilibrium cation distribution than did the more slowly cooled sample. This result is explained on the basis of two competing effects of rapid solidification: high cooling rate of the solid, and large undercooling.

  5. Radioimmunoassay of human eosinophil cationic protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venge, P.; Roxin, L.E.; Olsson, I.

    1977-01-01

    A radioimmunosorbent assay has been developed which allows the detection in serum of a cationic protein derived from eosinophil granulocytes. In 34 healthy individuals the mean level was 31 μg/l. with a range of 5 to 55 μg/l. The serum concentration of 'eosinophil' cationic protein was correlated (P<0.001) to the number of eosinophil granulocytes in peripheral blood. Quantitiation of 'eosinophil' cationic protein in serum might be useful in the study of eosinophil granulocyte turnover and function in vivo. (author)

  6. Diffuse magmatic soil degassing at Soufriere of Guadeloupe, Antilles; Degazage magmatique diffus a la Soufriere de Guadeloupe, Antilles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allard, P. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l`Environnement; Hammouya, G. [Observatoire Volcanologique de la Soufriere, IPGP, Le Houelmont, 97 - Gourbeyre, Guadeloupe (France); Parello, F. [Palermo Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Chimica e Fisica della Terra ed Applicazioni

    1998-09-01

    A soil gas profiling made along the southern basis of Soufriere summit lave dome, in Guadeloupe, reveals the existence of diffuse emanations of magma-derived CO{sub 2} in coincidence with a major volcanic (Ty) fault, where CO{sub 2} concentrations at 70 cm depth in the ground reach 35-96 % and are associated with a thermal convective cell. Outside, a few `cold` gaseous anomalies of volcanic origin (lack of methane) provide reliable conditions for continuous radon monitoring of soil degassing. (authors) 14 refs.

  7. Conducting Polymers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    would exhibit electronic conductivity, their conductivities (of compressed pellets) were indeed measured by others, and were found to be .... Polyaniline. Polyphenylene. Polypheny lene- vinylene. Table 1. G!NeRAl I ARTICl! structure. Maximum conductivity Stem Stability. Processability. ~. 1.5 x 105. Reacts with Film not n air.

  8. Cationization of heparin for film applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimkovic, I.; Mendichi, R.; Kelnar, Ivan; Filip, J.; Hricovíni, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 115, 22 January (2015), s. 551-558 ISSN 0144-8617 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : heparin * cationization * NMR Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 4.219, year: 2015

  9. Influence of volatile degassing on the eruptibility of large igneous province magmatic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, T.; Richards, M. A.

    2017-12-01

    Magmatic volatiles, in particular their buoyancy, may play a critical role in determining whether a magma reservoir can build up enough overpressure leading to drive flood basalt eruptions (Black & Manga 2017). Thus, it is important to understand the extent to which volatiles can remain trapped in a magmatic system and how they influence the eruptibility. Although the high-temperature metamorphic aureloe around a magma chamber is typically considered to have low permeability due to ductile creep, recent theoretical, experimental, and field work (e.g. Noriaki et al. 2017) have highlighted the role of dynamic permeability in magmatic systems. Consequently, the effective permeability of the crust when magma is present in the system can be orders of magnitude larger than that of exhumed rock samples. We model dynamic permeability changes as a competition between hydro-fracturing (increased porosity) and fracture closure by ductile creep and hydrothermal mineral precipitation (reduced porosity) and find yearly-to-decadal time-scales for periodic fracturing and fluid loss events and an increase in average permeability. We then use a fully coupled poro-thermo-elastic framework to model to explore the macroscopic influence of volatile loss on the stress state of the crust in this higher time-averaged permeability setting. We derive new semi-analytical solutions and combine them with a magma chamber box model (modified from Degruyter & Huber 2014) to analyze system-scale dynamics for both basaltic and silicic magmatic systems. We find that passive degassing likely has a substantial temporal influence on the stress distribution in the crust and the highly crystalline mush zone immediately surrounding a magma reservoir, and find an additional scale : pore-pressure diffusion timescale that exerts a first-order control on the magnitude and frequency of volcanic eruptions. We also explore how disconnected magma batches interact indirectly with each other and its implications for

  10. Monitoring diffuse He degassing from the summit crater of Pico do Fogo volcano, Cape Verde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Mar; Dionis, Samara; Fernandes, Paulo; Melián, Gladys; Asensio-Ramos, María; Padilla, Germán D.; Hernández, Pedro A.; Pérez, Nemesio M.; Silva, Sonia

    2017-04-01

    released the highest value (up to 8 kg d-1), followed by a decrease after the eruption. The last emission value was measured in October 2016 and represents the lowest value of the series (1 kg d-1). This data suggest that monitoring of He degassing rate in volcanic areas is an excellent warning geochemical precursory signal for volcanic unrest. This work demonstrates and reinforces the importance of performing helium emission studies as an important promising volcano monitoring technique that might help to detect early warning signals of volcanic unrest in oceanic volcanic islands.

  11. Structural controls on diffuse degassing in the Las Cañadas caldera, Tenerife, Canary Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo, I.; Soriano, C.; Martí, J.; Pérez, N.

    2003-04-01

    The Las Cañadas caldera is an elliptical depression located in the central part of the Tenerife Island. The active Teide stratovolcano stands in the centre of the depression, which is limited to the south by the caldera wall, up to 500 m high above the caldera floor. Mapping most of the caldera wall at 1:5000 has provided new insights on its stratigraphy, structure, and geological evolution. Three major ENE-WSW normal faults have been mapped on the caldera wall in the area comprised between El Llano de Ucanca and Los Azulejos, where an intense hydrothermal alteration affects the lower stratigraphic levels of the caldera wall. Hydrothermal alteration is rather distinctive in this area, showing bluish to greenish colours. Most of the phonolitic cone sheets and radial dykes of the caldera wall do not show distinctive hydrothermal features, as do show the phonolitic pyroclastic rocks and lavas of the lower parts of the caldera wall. This suggests the main episodes of dyke intrusion in the Las Cañadas caldera postdate hydrothermal alteration. ENE-WSW normal faults involve dyke swarms and rocks of the upper stratigraphic levels of the caldera wall, and show displacements of up to 100 m. Unfortunately the upper possible age of these faults is poorly constrained since no contact relationship has been observed between fault planes and the rocks of the uppermost stratigraphic levels of the caldera wall. The rocks of the caldera wall adjacent to the faults are intensely fractured at the macro and mesoscale. In addition to field mapping, a soil gas survey was carried out at the caldera depression. Soil CO2 efflux and H2 concentration were measured reaching values of 12 gm-2d-1 and 4 ppmV, respectively. Spatial distribution of these species showed that positive anomalies coincide with the surface expression of the three major faults and their adjacent intensely fractured zone. The high CO2 and H2 values and their coincidence with major normal faults suggests that degassing in

  12. Numerical analysis of pressure and porosity evolution in lava domes during periodic degassing conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyman, D.; Bursik, M. I.; Pitman, E. B.

    2017-12-01

    The collapse or explosive breakup of growing and degassing lava domes presents a significant hazard due to the generation of dense, mobile pyroclastic flows as well as the wide dispersal of dense ballistic blocks. Lava dome stability is in large part governed by the balance of transport and storage of gas within the pore space. Because pore pressurization reduces the effective stress within a dome, the transient distribution of elevated gas pressure is critically important to understanding dome break up. We combine mathematical and numerical analyses to gain a better understanding of the temporal variation in gas flow and storage within the dome system. In doing so, we develop and analyze new governing equations describing nonlinear gas pressure diffusion in a deforming dome with an evolving porosity field. By relating porosity, permeability, and pressure, we show that the flux of gas through a dome is highly sensitive to the porosity distribution and viscosity of the lava, as well as the timescale and magnitude of the gas supply. The numerical results suggest that the diffusion of pressure and porosity variations play an integral role in the cyclic growth and destruction of small domes.The nearly continuous cycles of lava dome growth, pressurization, and failure that have characterized the last two decades of eruptive history at Volcán Popocatépetl, Mexico provide excellent natural data with which to compare new models of transient dome pressurization. At Popocatépetl, periodic pressure increases brought on by changes in gas supply into the base of the dome may play a role in its cyclic growth and destruction behavior. We compare our model of cyclic pressurization with lava dome survival data from Popocatépetl. We show that transient changes in pore pressure explain how small lava domes evolve to a state of criticality before explosion or collapse. Additionally, numerical analyses presented here suggest that short-term oscillations cannot arise within the dome

  13. Helium evidences for mantle degassing in the groundwater of Madeira Island – Portugal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaral, Helena I.F.; Midões, Carla; Kipfer, Rolf

    2017-01-01

    The Madeira Island is fed by an active hotspot, but there are no evidences of current volcanism and geothermal activity or, of a heat source at depth, which probably justifies why only low temperature and low TDS groundwater is found in Madeira. Nonetheless, Madeira is a relatively young island (≤7 Ma old), and a connection to the upper mantle through geological conduits, is likely to occur. To investigate whether such a connection exists, noble gases and stable isotopes were, so far as we know, for the first time measured in groundwater samples of the main (basal) aquifer of Madeira Is. Groundwater is the main supply of drinking water in Madeira Is., and the hydrogeology of the island has been well characterized in previous studies. In this study, groundwater was generically divided into ‘cold’ waters (<20 °C, near the coast) and ‘warm’ waters (20–25 °C, central part of the island). This division was based on field temperature, water chemistry and stable isotopic composition. Four ‘hot’ waters (23–25 °C) showed partly distinct characteristics. A bubbling spring was also sampled. Very low tritium values indicate groundwater recharged recently and/or mix with free-tritium waters. Groundwater is fed by rain recharged during autumn as indicated by δ"1"8O and δ"2H signatures. During infiltration, the waters dissolved soil CO_2 that according to the back-calculated δ"1"3C-CO_2 compositions corresponds mainly to CO_2 of biogenic origin. Nonetheless, a mantle CO_2 component cannot be excluded from samples from the inner part of the island. The noblegas helium was the sole tracer indicating a deep gas contribution to the groundwater. A strong mantle signal was detected in the ‘hot’ and bubbling waters, as indicated by their He-Ra values of 8 (being Ra the atmospheric "3He/"4He ratio), typical of the MORB. Thus, even if the last volcanic eruption occurred ca. 0,006 Ma, degassing of the upper-mantle was detected in the shallow cold waters of

  14. Experimental evidence for carbonate precipitation and CO 2 degassing during sea ice formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitriou, S.; Kennedy, H.; Kattner, G.; Dieckmann, G. S.; Thomas, D. N.

    2004-04-01

    -chemical processes are considered, we expect CO 2 degassing and carbonate mineral precipitation from the brine inclusions of the ice sheet, which were saturated or highly supersaturated with respect to both the anhydrous (calcite, aragonite, vaterite) and hydrated (ikaite) carbonate minerals.

  15. Test procedure for cation exchange chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, T.D.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this test plan is to demonstrate the synthesis of inorganic antimonate ion exchangers and compare their performance against the standard organic cation exchangers. Of particular interest is the degradation rate of both inorganic and organic cation exchangers. This degradation rate will be tracked by determining the ion exchange capacity and thermal stability as a function of time, radiation dose, and chemical reaction

  16. Cycloaliphatic epoxide resins for cationic UV - cure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verschueren, K.; Balwant Kaur

    1999-01-01

    This paper introduces the cyclo - aliphatic epoxide resins used for the various applications of radiation curing and their comparison with acrylate chemistry. Radiation curable coatings and inks are pre - dominantly based on acrylate chemistry but over the last few years, cationic chemistry has emerged successfully with the unique properties inherent with cyclo - aliphatic epoxide ring structures. Wide variety of cationic resins and diluents, the formulation techniques to achieve the desired properties greatly contributes to the advancement of UV - curing technology

  17. Chemical reactivity of cation-exchanged zeolites

    OpenAIRE

    Pidko, E.A.

    2008-01-01

    Zeolites modified with metal cations have been extensively studied during the last two decades because of their wide application in different technologically important fields such as catalysis, adsorption and gas separation. Contrary to the well-understood mechanisms of chemical reactions catalyzed by Brønsted acid sites in the hydrogen forms of zeolites, the nature of chemical reactivity, and related, the structure of the metal-containing ions in cation-exchanged zeolites remains the subject...

  18. Ammonia vapor sensing properties of polyaniline-titanium(IV)phosphate cation exchange nanocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Asif Ali; Baig, Umair; Khalid, Mohd

    2011-02-28

    In this study, the electrically conducting polyaniline-titanium(IV)phosphate (PANI-TiP) cation exchange nanocomposite was synthesized by sol-gel method. The cation exchange nanocomposite based sensor for detection of ammonia vapors was developed at room temperature. It was revealed that the sensor showed good reversible response towards ammonia vapors ranging from 3 to 6%. It was found that the sensor with p-toluene sulphonic acid (p-TSA) doped exhibited higher sensing response than hydrochloric acid doped. This sensor has detection limit ≤1% ammonia. The response of resistivity changes of the cation exchange nanocomposite on exposure to different concentrations of ammonia vapors shows its utility as a sensing material. These studies suggest that the cation exchange nanocomposite could be a good material for ammonia sensor at room temperature. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Formation of radical cations of diaryloxadiazoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmstreit, W.

    1988-01-01

    The nature of the formation of the radical cation of the 2,5-bis-(p-diethylaminophenyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole (PC) in liquid n-butyl chloride and acetonitrile has been investigated by observing excited state fluorescence and transient absorption using nanosecond pulse radiolysis and laser flash photolysis. The formation of solute oxonium ions has also been observed. At concentrations -4 mol dm -3 the growth time at which the transient absorption of the radical cation reaches the maximum follows the rise time of the electron pulse ( 2 laser yields the solute radical cation in an acetonitrile solution of 2 x 10 -4 mol dm -3 PC via an electronically excited state. Here, the generation time was smaller than 5 ns. The yield of the cation is increased by addition of CCl 4 . A reaction mechanism is proposed that explains the fast cation formation in terms of an exciplex formed by interaction between an electronically excited state of diaryloxadiazole and the ground state of the solvent. This exciplex yields the solute radical cation. (author)

  20. Luminescent sulfides of monovalent and trivalent cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The invention discloses a family of luminescent materials or phosphors having a rhombohedral crystal structure and consisting essentially of a mixed host sulfide of at least one monovalent host cation and at least one trivalent host cation, and containing, for each mole of phosphor, 0.0005 to 0.05 mole of at least one activating cation. The monovalent host cations may be Na, K or Rb and Cs. The trivalent host cations may be Gd, La, Lu, Sc and Y. The activating cations may be one or more of trivalent As, Bi, Ce, Dy, Er, Pr, Sb, Sm, Tb and Tm; divalent Lu, Mn, Pb and Sn; and monovalent Ag, Cu and Tl. The novel phosphors may be used in devices to convert electron-beam, ultraviolet or x-ray energy to light in the visible spectrum. Such energy conversion can be employed for example in fluoroscopic screens, and in viewing screens of cathode-ray tubes and other electron tubes

  1. The Evidence from Inclusions in Pumices for the Direct Degassing of Volatiles from the Magma to the Hydrothermal Fluids in the Okinawa Trough

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Zenghui; ZHAI Shikui; ZHAO Guangtao

    2002-01-01

    This article presents the evidence in support of the direct magma degassing as the principal mechanism of volatilesreleasing into the hydrothermal fluids in the Okinawa Trough, as contrasted to the argument for the hydrothermal strippingof volatiles from the volcanic rocks.Laser Raman microprobe and stepped-heating techniques are employed to determine the compositions and contents of thevolatiles in pumices in the middle Okinawa Trough. The results show that the volatiles are similar to the gases in the hy-drothermal fluids and hydrothermal minerals in composition, the mean percent content of each component and variationtrend. This indicates the direct influence of magma degassing on the hydrothermal fluids. In addition, the contents ofvolatiles in pumices are rather low and do not support the hydrothermal stripping as the main mechanism to enrich the fluidswith gases. The results are consistent with the idea that the direct magma degassing is more important than hydrothermalstripping in supplying gases to the hydrothermal fluids in the Okinawa Trough.

  2. Divalent cation shrinks DNA but inhibits its compaction with trivalent cation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tongu, Chika; Kenmotsu, Takahiro; Yoshikawa, Yuko; Zinchenko, Anatoly; Chen, Ning; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2016-05-28

    Our observation reveals the effects of divalent and trivalent cations on the higher-order structure of giant DNA (T4 DNA 166 kbp) by fluorescence microscopy. It was found that divalent cations, Mg(2+) and Ca(2+), inhibit DNA compaction induced by a trivalent cation, spermidine (SPD(3+)). On the other hand, in the absence of SPD(3+), divalent cations cause the shrinkage of DNA. As the control experiment, we have confirmed the minimum effect of monovalent cation, Na(+) on the DNA higher-order structure. We interpret the competition between 2+ and 3+ cations in terms of the change in the translational entropy of the counterions. For the compaction with SPD(3+), we consider the increase in translational entropy due to the ion-exchange of the intrinsic monovalent cations condensing on a highly charged polyelectrolyte, double-stranded DNA, by the 3+ cations. In contrast, the presence of 2+ cation decreases the gain of entropy contribution by the ion-exchange between monovalent and 3+ ions.

  3. Review on cation exchange selectivity coefficients for MX-80 bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domenech, C.; Arcos, D.; Duro, L.; Sellin, P.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Bentonite is considered as engineered barrier in the near field of a nuclear waste repository due to its low permeability, what impedes groundwater flow to the nuclear waste, and its high retention capacity (sorption) of radionuclides in the eventuality of groundwater intrusion. One of the main retention processes occurring at the bentonite surface is ion exchange. This process may exert a strong control on the mobility of major pore water cations. Changes in major cation concentration, especially calcium, can affect the dissolution-precipitation of calcite, which in turn controls one of the key parameters in the system: pH. The cation exchange process is usually described according to the Gaines-Thomas convention: Ca 2+ + 2 NaX = CaX 2 + 2 Na + , K Ca = (N Ca x a 2 Na + )/(N 2 Na x a Ca 2+ ) where K Ca is the selectivity coefficient for the Ca by Na exchange, ai is the activity of cation 'i' in solution and NJ the equivalent fractional occupancy of cation 'J' in bentonite. Parameters such as solid to liquid (S:L) ratio and dry density of the solid have an important influence on the value of selectivity coefficients (K ex ). Although in most geochemical modelling works, K ex values are directly taken from experiments conducted at low S:L ratios and low dry densities, the expected conditions in a deep geological nuclear waste repository are higher S:L and higher bentonite density (1.6 g.cm -3 in the SKB design to obtain a fully water saturated density of around 2.0 g.cm -3 ). Experiments focused at obtaining selectivity coefficients under the conditions of interest face the difficulty of achieving a proper extraction and analyses of pore water without disturbing the system by the sampling method itself. In this work we have conducted a complete analyses of published data on MX-80 bentonite cationic exchange in order to assess the effect of the S:L ratio and dry density on the value of the selectivity coefficients determined so far

  4. Gas adsorption on commercial magnesium stearate: Effects of degassing conditions on nitrogen BET surface area and isotherm characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapham, Darren P; Lapham, Julie L

    2017-09-15

    Commercial grades of magnesium stearate have been analysed by nitrogen adsorption having been pre-treated at temperatures between 30°C and 110°C and in the as-received state. Characteristics of nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherms are assessed through the linearity of low relative pressure isotherm data and the BET transform plot together with the extent of isotherm hysteresis. Comparison is made between thermal gravimetric analysis and mass loss on drying. Features of gas adsorption isotherms considered atypical are identified and possible causes presented. It is shown that atypical isotherm features and issues of applying BET theory to the calculation of S BET are linked to the presence of hydrated water and that these depend on the hydration state: being more pronounced for the di-hydrate than the mono-hydrate. Dehydration reduces the extent of atypical features. S BET of a mono-hydrate sample is 5.6m 2 g -1 and 3.2m 2 g -1 at 40°C and 100°C degassing respectively but 23.9m 2 g 1 and 5.9m 2 g -1 for di-hydrate containing samples under comparable degassing. Di-hydrated samples also show S BET >15m 2 g 1 , BET C-values adsorption data. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Shallow degassing events as a trigger for very-long-period seismicity at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Matthew; Wilson, David; Fee, David; Orr, Tim R.; Swanson, Donald A.

    2011-01-01

    The first eruptive activity at Kīlauea Volcano’s summit in 25 years began in March 2008 with the opening of a 35-m-wide vent in Halema‘uma‘u crater. The new activity has produced prominent very-long-period (VLP) signals corresponding with two new behaviors: episodic tremor bursts and small explosive events, both of which represent degassing events from the top of the lava column. Previous work has shown that VLP seismicity has long been present at Kīlauea’s summit, and is sourced approximately 1 km below Halema‘uma‘u. By integrating video observations, infrasound and seismic data, we show that the onset of the large VLP signals occurs within several seconds of the onset of the degassing events. This timing indicates that the VLP is caused by forces—sourced at or very near the lava free surface due to degassing—transmitted down the magma column and coupling to the surrounding rock at 1 km depth.

  6. Soil CO2 Degassing Path along Volcano-Tectonic Structures in the Pico-Faial-São Jorge Islands (Azores Archipelago, Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fátima Viveiros

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The Azores archipelago is composed of nine volcanic islands located at the triple junction between the North American, Eurasian, and Nubian plates. Nowadays the volcanic activity in the archipelago is characterized by the presence of secondary manifestations of volcanism, such as hydrothermal fumaroles, thermal and cold CO2-rich springs as well as soil diffuse degassing areas, and low magnitude seismicity. Soil CO2 degassing (concentration and flux surveys have been performed at Pico, Faial, and São Jorge islands to identify possible diffuse degassing structures. Since the settlement of the Azores in the fifteenth Century these three islands were affected by seven onshore volcanic eruptions and at least six destructive earthquakes. These islands are crossed by numerous active tectonic structures with dominant WNW-ESE direction, and less abundant conjugate NNW-SSE trending faults. A total of 2,855 soil CO2 concentration measurements have been carried out with values varying from 0 to 20.7 vol.%. Soil CO2 flux measurements, using the accumulation chamber method, have also been performed at Pico and Faial islands in the summer of 2011 and values varied from absence of CO2 to 339 g m−2 d−1. The highest CO2 emissions were recorded at Faial Island and were associated with the Pedro Miguel graben faults, which seem to control the CO2 diffuse degassing and were interpreted as the pathways for the CO2 ascending from deep reservoirs to the surface. At São Jorge Island, four main degassing zones have been identified at the intersection of faults or associated to WNW-ESE tectonic structures. Four diffuse degassing structures were identified at Pico Island essentially where different faults intersect. Pico geomorphology is dominated by a 2,351 m high central volcano that presents several steam emissions at its summit. These emissions are located along a NW-SE fault and the highest measured soil CO2 concentration reached 7.6 vol.% with a maximum

  7. Accelerators for forming cationic technetium complexes useful as radiodiagnostic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tweedle, M.F.

    1985-01-01

    This invention relates to compositions for making cationic radiodiagnostic agents and, in particular, to accelerator compounds for labelling such cationic radiodiagnostic agents, kits for preparing such 99m Tc-labelled cationic radiodiagnostic agents with technetium, and methods for labelling such cationic radiodiagnostic agents with technetium

  8. New lithium-ion conducting perovskite oxides related to (Li, La)TiO3

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    We describe the synthesis and lithium-ion conductivity of new perovskite-related oxides ... work on lithium-ion conducting perovskite oxides containing d0 cations. Keywords. ..... On the other hand, Nb/Ta compounds show a higher conductivity.

  9. Gas phase chemistry of N-benzylbenzamides with silver(I) cations: characterization of benzylsilver cation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hezhi; Jin, Zhe; Quan, Hong; Sun, Cuirong; Pan, Yuanjiang

    2015-03-07

    The benzylsilver cation which emerges from the collisional dissociation of silver(I)-N-benzylbenzamide complexes was characterized by deuterium-labeling experiments, theoretical calculations, breakdown curves and substituent effects. The nucleophilic attack of the carbonyl oxygen on an α-hydrogen results in the generation of the benzylsilver cation, which is competitive to the AgH loss with the α-hydrogen.

  10. Heat conduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigull, U.; Sandner, H.

    1984-01-01

    Included are discussions of rates of heat transfer by conduction, the effects of varying and changing properties, thermal explosions, distributed heat sources, moving heat sources, and non-steady three-dimensional conduction processes. Throughout, the importance of thinking both numerically and symbolically is stressed, as this is essential to the development of the intuitive understanding of numerical values needed for successful designing. Extensive tables of thermophysical properties, including thermal conductivity and diffusivity, are presented. Also included are exact and approximate solutions to many of the problems that arise in practical situations

  11. Effect of Divalent Cations on RED Performance and Cation Exchange Membrane Selection to Enhance Power Densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijnaarts, Timon; Huerta, Elisa; van Baak, Willem; Nijmeijer, Kitty

    2017-11-07

    Reverse electrodialysis (RED) is a membrane-based renewable energy technology that can harvest energy from salinity gradients. The anticipated feed streams are natural river and seawater, both of which contain not only monovalent ions but also divalent ions. However, RED using feed streams containing divalent ions experiences lower power densities because of both uphill transport and increased membrane resistance. In this study, we investigate the effects of divalent cations (Mg 2+ and Ca 2+ ) on RED and demonstrate the mitigation of those effects using both novel and existing commercial cation exchange membranes (CEMs). Monovalent-selective Neosepta CMS is known to block divalent cations transport and can therefore mitigate reductions in stack voltage. The new multivalent-permeable Fuji T1 is able to transport divalent cations without a major increase in resistance. Both strategies significantly improve power densities compared to standard-grade CEMs when performing RED using streams containing divalent cations.

  12. Electrical Conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershey, David R.; Sand, Susan

    1993-01-01

    Explains how electrical conductivity (EC) can be used to measure ion concentration in solutions. Describes instrumentation for the measurement, temperature dependence and EC, and the EC of common substances. (PR)

  13. Conduct Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... objections runs away from home often truant from school Children who exhibit these behaviors should receive a comprehensive evaluation by an experience mental health professional. Many children with a conduct disorder may ...

  14. Resistivity Effects of Cation Ordering in Highly-Doped La2-xSrxCu4 Epitaxial Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burquest, Franklin; Marmol, Rodrigo; Cox, Nicholas; Nelson-Cheeseman, Brittany

    Highly-doped La2-xSrxCuO4 (LSCO) films (0.5 causes internal polar electrostatic forces, which have been shown to cause stretching of the apical oxygen bond in analogous epitaxial nickelate films. Thin film samples are grown concurrently to minimize extraneous effects on film structure and properties. Atomic force microscopy and x-ray reflectivity demonstrate that the films are single crystalline, epitaxial, and smooth. X-ray diffraction is used to measure the c-axis of the films as a function of doping and dopant cation ordering. Electrical transport data of the ordered samples is compared with transport data of conventional disordered cation samples. Preliminary data indicates significant differences in resistivity at both 300K and 10K between the cation-ordered and cation-disordered samples. This work indicates that dopant cation ordering within the layered cuprates could significantly modify the conduction mechanisms at play in these materials.

  15. High cation transport polymer electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Rathke, Jerome W [Homer Glen, IL; Klingler, Robert J [Westmont, IL

    2007-06-05

    A solid state ion conducting electrolyte and a battery incorporating same. The electrolyte includes a polymer matrix with an alkali metal salt dissolved therein, the salt having an anion with a long or branched chain having not less than 5 carbon or silicon atoms therein. The polymer is preferably a polyether and the salt anion is preferably an alkyl or silyl moiety of from 5 to about 150 carbon/silicon atoms.

  16. Fault-related CO2 degassing, geothermics, and fluid flow in southern California basins---Physiochemical evidence and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boles, James R. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Garven, Grant [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)

    2015-08-04

    Our studies have had an important impact on societal issues. Experimental and field observations show that CO2 degassing, such as might occur from stored CO2 reservoir gas, can result in significant stable isotopic disequilibrium. In the offshore South Ellwood field of the Santa Barbara channel, we show how oil production has reduced natural seep rates in the area, thereby reducing greenhouse gases. Permeability is calculated to be ~20-30 millidarcys for km-scale fault-focused fluid flow, using changes in natural gas seepage rates from well production, and poroelastic changes in formation pore-water pressure. In the Los Angeles (LA) basin, our characterization of formation water chemistry, including stable isotopic studies, allows the distinction between deep and shallow formations waters. Our multiphase computational-based modeling of petroleum migration demonstrates the important role of major faults on geological-scale fluid migration in the LA basin, and show how petroleum was dammed up against the Newport-Inglewood fault zone in a “geologically fast” interval of time (less than 0.5 million years). Furthermore, these fluid studies also will allow evaluation of potential cross-formational mixing of formation fluids. Lastly, our new study of helium isotopes in the LA basin shows a significant leakage of mantle helium along the Newport Inglewood fault zone (NIFZ), at flow rates up to 2 cm/yr. Crustal-scale fault permeability (~60 microdarcys) and advective versus conductive heat transport rates have been estimated using the observed helium isotopic data. The NIFZ is an important deep-seated fault that may crosscut a proposed basin decollement fault in this heavily populated area, and appears to allow seepage of helium from the mantle sources about 30 km beneath Los Angeles. The helium study has been widely cited in recent weeks by the news media, both in radio and on numerous web sites.

  17. Fault-Related CO2 Degassing, Geothermics, and Fluid Flow in Southern California Basins--Physiochemical Evidence and Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garven, Grant [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)

    2015-08-11

    Our studies have had an important impact on societal issues. Experimental and field observations show that CO2 degassing, such as might occur from stored CO2 reservoir gas, can result in significant stable isotopic disequilibrium. In the offshore South Ellwood field of the Santa Barbara channel, we show how oil production has reduced natural seep rates in the area, thereby reducing greenhouse gases. Permeability is calculated to be ~20-30 millidarcys for km-scale fault-focused fluid flow, using changes in natural gas seepage rates from well production, and poroelastic changes in formation pore-water pressure. In the Los Angeles (LA) basin, our characterization of formation water chemistry, including stable isotopic studies, allows the distinction between deep and shallow formations waters. Our multiphase computational-based modeling of petroleum migration demonstrates the important role of major faults on geological-scale fluid migration in the LA basin, and show how petroleum was dammed up against the Newport-Inglewood fault zone in a “geologically fast” interval of time (less than 0.5 million years). Furthermore, these fluid studies also will allow evaluation of potential cross-formational mixing of formation fluids. Lastly, our new study of helium isotopes in the LA basin shows a significant leakage of mantle helium along the Newport Inglewood fault zone (NIFZ), at flow rates up to 2 cm/yr. Crustal-scale fault permeability (~60 microdarcys) and advective versus conductive heat transport rates have been estimated using the observed helium isotopic data. The NIFZ is an important deep-seated fault that may crosscut a proposed basin decollement fault in this heavily populated area, and appears to allow seepage of helium from the mantle sources about 30 km beneath Los Angeles. The helium study has been widely cited in recent weeks by the news media, both in radio and on numerous web sites.

  18. Forging Colloidal Nanostructures via Cation Exchange Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Trizio, Luca; Manna, Liberato

    2016-09-28

    Among the various postsynthesis treatments of colloidal nanocrystals that have been developed to date, transformations by cation exchange have recently emerged as an extremely versatile tool that has given access to a wide variety of materials and nanostructures. One notable example in this direction is represented by partial cation exchange, by which preformed nanocrystals can be either transformed to alloy nanocrystals or to various types of nanoheterostructures possessing core/shell, segmented, or striped architectures. In this review, we provide an up to date overview of the complex colloidal nanostructures that could be prepared so far by cation exchange. At the same time, the review gives an account of the fundamental thermodynamic and kinetic parameters governing these types of reactions, as they are currently understood, and outlines the main open issues and possible future developments in the field.

  19. Forging Colloidal Nanostructures via Cation Exchange Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Among the various postsynthesis treatments of colloidal nanocrystals that have been developed to date, transformations by cation exchange have recently emerged as an extremely versatile tool that has given access to a wide variety of materials and nanostructures. One notable example in this direction is represented by partial cation exchange, by which preformed nanocrystals can be either transformed to alloy nanocrystals or to various types of nanoheterostructures possessing core/shell, segmented, or striped architectures. In this review, we provide an up to date overview of the complex colloidal nanostructures that could be prepared so far by cation exchange. At the same time, the review gives an account of the fundamental thermodynamic and kinetic parameters governing these types of reactions, as they are currently understood, and outlines the main open issues and possible future developments in the field. PMID:26891471

  20. Isotopic Insights Into the Degassing and Secondary Hydration Rates of Volcanic Glass From the 1980 Eruptions of Mount St. Helens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligman, A. N.; Bindeman, I. N.; Van Eaton, A. R.; Hoblitt, R. P.

    2016-12-01

    Following eruption, volcanic glass undergoes hydration in its depositional environment, which overprints the history of magmatic degassing recorded in the glass. However, the rates of secondary hydration of volcanic glass used for paleoclimate studies are poorly constrained. Here, we present our results of a natural experiment using products of the 1980 eruptions of Mount St. Helens. We measured the δD of extracted water and the δ18O of the bulk glass of samples collected during the dry summer months of 1980 and compared them with material resampled in August of 2015. Results demonstrate that only samples collected from the subsurface near gas escape pipes show elevated water concentrationss (near 2.0 wt.%) and low δD (-110 to -130 ‰) and δ18O (6.0 to 6.6 ‰) values, and that the initial process of secondary hydration is not always a simple addition of low δD waters at ambient temperature. On average, the 2015 surface samples have slightly higher water contents (0.1-0.2 wt.%) and similar δ18O (6.8 - 6.9 ‰) to those collected in 1980. Given the moderate vesicularity of the samples and the slow rate of surface temperature diffusion, we attribute these observations to hydration during cooling, with only little exchange after. We also compare our results to rapidly quenched air fall pumice from the May 18th eruption, which shows moderate δD values (-74 ‰) and water concentrations (0.3 wt.%) that are closer to those for the 1980 samples. Surprisingly, the 2015 surface samples show higher δD values (+15 ‰), which we attribute to any of four possibilities: (1) evaporation or (2) degassing of underlying deposits; (3) exchange of hydrogen with local vegetation; and/or (4) microlite crystallization that aided diffusion of water. Reconstructed δD-H2O trends for the Mount St. Helens samples collected in 1980 support previous studies proposing that exsolved volatiles were trapped within a rapidly rising magma that degassed at shallow depths. The dacitic Mount

  1. Examination of the effect of the annealing cation on higher order structures containing guanine or isoguanine repeats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Sarah E.; Wang, Junmei; Jayawickramarajah, Janarthanan; Hamilton, Andrew D.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2010-01-01

    Isoguanine (2-oxo-6-amino-guanine), a natural but non-standard base, exhibits unique self-association properties compared to its isomer, guanine, and results in formation of different higher order DNA structures. In this work, the higher order structures formed by oligonucleotides containing guanine repeats or isoguanine repeats after annealing in solutions containing various cations are evaluated by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The guanine-containing strand (G9) consistently formed quadruplexes upon annealing, whereas the isoguanine strand (Ig9) formed both pentaplexes and quadruplexes depending on the annealing cation. Quadruplex formation with G9 showed some dependence on the identity of the cation present during annealing with high relative quadruplex formation detected with six of ten cations. Analogous annealing experiments with Ig9 resulted in complex formation with all ten cations, and the majority of the resulting complexes were pentaplexes. CD results indicated most of the original complexes survived the desalting process necessary for ESI-MS analysis. In addition, several complexes, especially the pentaplexes, were found to be capable of cation exchange with ammonium ions. Ab initio calculations were conducted for isoguanine tetrads and pentads coordinated with all ten cations to predict the most energetically stable structures of the complexes in the gas phase. The observed preference of forming quadruplexes versus pentaplexes as a function of the coordinated cation can be interpreted by the calculated reaction energies of both the tetrads and pentads in combination with the distortion energies of tetrads. PMID:19746468

  2. Enhance performance of micro direct methanol fuel cell by in situ CO2 removal using novel anode flow field with superhydrophobic degassing channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Junsheng; Luo, Ying; Zheng, Sheng; Wang, Dazhi

    2017-05-01

    Capillary blocking caused by CO2 bubbles in anode flow field (AFF) is one of the bottlenecks for performance improvement of a micro direct methanol fuel cell (μDMFC). In this work, we present a novel AFF structure with nested layout of hydrophilic fuel channels and superhydrophobic degassing channels which can remove most of CO2 from AFF before it is released to the fuel channels. The new AFFs are fabricated on Ti substrates by using micro photochemical etching combined with anodization and fluorination treatments. Performance of the μDMFCs with and without superhydrophobic degassing channels in their AFF is comparatively studied. Results show that the superhydrophobic degassing channels can significantly speed up the exhaust of CO2 from the AFF. CO2 clogging is not observed in the new AFFs even when their comparison AFFs have been seriously blocked by CO2 slugs under the same operating conditions. 55% and 60% of total CO2 produced in μDMFCs with N-serpentine and N-spiral AFF can be respectively removed by the superhydrophobic degassing channels. The power densities of the μDMFCs equipped with new serpentine and spiral AFFs are respectively improved by 30% and 90% compared with those using conventional AFFs. This means that the new AFFs developed in this work can effectively prevent CO2-induced capillary blocking in the fuel channels, and finally significantly improve the performance of the μDMFCs.

  3. Molecular design of high performance fused heteroacene radical cations: A DFT study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawabata, Hiroshi; Ohmori, Shigekazu; Matsushige, Kazumi; Tachikawa, Hiroto

    2008-01-01

    Hybrid density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been carried out for neutral and radical cation of fused furan oligomer, denoted by F(n) where n means number of furan rings in the oligomer, to elucidate the electronic structures at ground and low-lying excited states. A polymer of fused furan was also investigated using one-dimensional periodic boundary condition (PBC) for comparison. It was found that the reorganization energy of radical cation of F(n) from vertical hole trapping point to its relaxed structure is significantly small. Also, the reorganization energy decreased gradually with increasing n, indicating that F(n) has an effective hole transport property. It was found that the cation radical of F(n) has a low energy band at near IR region, which is strongly correlated to hole conductivity. The relation between the electronic states and hole conductivity was discussed on the basis of theoretical calculations

  4. MaGa, a web-based collaborative database for gas emissions: a tool to improve the knowledge on Earth degassing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigeri, A.; Cardellini, C.; Chiodini, G.; Frondini, F.; Bagnato, E.; Aiuppa, A.; Fischer, T. P.; Lehnert, K. A.

    2014-12-01

    The study of the main pathways of carbon flux from the deep Earth requires the analysis of a large quantity and variety of data on volcanic and non-volcanic gas emissions. Hence, there is need for common frameworks to aggregate available data and insert new observations. Since 2010 we have been developing the Mapping Gas emissions (MaGa) web-based database to collect data on carbon degassing form volcanic and non-volcanic environments. MaGa uses an Object-relational model, translating the experience of field surveyors into the database schema. The current web interface of MaGa allows users to browse the data in tabular format or by browsing an interactive web-map. Enabled users can insert information as measurement methods, instrument details as well as the actual values collected in the field. Measurements found in the literature can be inserted as well as direct field observations made by human-operated instruments. Currently the database includes fluxes and gas compositions from active craters degassing, diffuse soil degassing and fumaroles both from dormant volcanoes and open-vent volcanoes from literature survey and data about non-volcanic emission of the Italian territory. Currently, MaGa holds more than 1000 volcanic plume degassing fluxes, data from 30 sites of diffuse soil degassing from italian volcanoes, and about 60 measurements from fumarolic and non volcanic emission sites. For each gas emission site, the MaGa holds data, pictures, descriptions on gas sampling, analysis and measurement methods, together with bibliographic references and contacts to researchers having experience on each site. From 2012, MaGa developments started to be focused towards the framework of the Deep Earth Carbon Degassing research initiative of the Deep Carbon Observatory. Whithin the DECADE initiative, there are others data systems, as EarthChem and the Smithsonian Institution's Global Volcanism Program. An interoperable interaction between the DECADE data systems is being

  5. Conduct disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buitelaar, J.K.; Smeets, K.C.; Herpers, P.; Scheepers, F.; Glennon, J.; Rommelse, N.N.J.

    2013-01-01

    Conduct disorder (CD) is a frequently occurring psychiatric disorder characterized by a persistent pattern of aggressive and non-aggressive rule breaking antisocial behaviours that lead to considerable burden for the patients themselves, their family and society. This review paper updates diagnostic

  6. The Mechanism of Ultrasonic Vibration on Grain Refining and Degassing in GTA Spot Welding of Copper Joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ezzi, Salih; Quan, Gaofeng; Elrayah, Adil

    2018-05-07

    This paper examines the effect of ultrasonic vibration (USV) on grain size and interrupted porosity in Gas Tungsten Arc (GTA) spot-welded copper. Grain size was refined by perpendicularly attaching a transducer to the welded sheet and applying USV to the weld pool for a short time (0, 2, 4, and 6 s) in addition improvements to the degassing process. Results illustrate a significant reduction of grain size (57%). Notably, USV provided interaction between reformations (fragmentation) and provided nucleation points (detaching particles from the fusion line) for grains in the nugget zone and the elimination of porosity in the nugget zone. The GTA spot welding process, in conjunction with USV, demonstrated an improvement in the corrosion potential for a copper spot-welded joint in comparison to the joint welded without assistance of USV. Finally, welding of copper by GTA spot welding in conjunction with ultrasound for 2 s presented significant mechanical properties.

  7. Noble gas solubility in silicate melts:a review of experimentation and theory, and implications regarding magma degassing processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Paonita

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Noble gas solubility in silicate melts and glasses has gained a crucial role in Earth Sciences investigations and in the studies of non-crystalline materials on a micro to a macro-scale. Due to their special geochemical features, noble gases are in fact ideal tracers of magma degassing. Their inert nature also allows them to be used to probe the structure of silicate melts. Owing to the development of modern high pressure and temperature technologies, a large number of experimental investigations have been performed on this subject in recent times. This paper reviews the related literature, and tries to define our present state of knowledge, the problems encountered in the experimental procedures and the theoretical questions which remain unresolved. Throughout the manuscript I will also try to show how the thermodynamic and structural interpretations of the growing experimental dataset are greatly improving our understanding of the dissolution mechanisms, although there are still several points under discussion. Our improved capability of predicting noble gas solubilities in conditions closer to those found in magma has allowed scientists to develop quantitative models of magma degassing, which provide constraints on a number of questions of geological impact. Despite these recent improvements, noble gas solubility in more complex systems involving the main volatiles in magmas, is poorly known and a lot of work must be done. Expertise from other fields would be extremely valuable to upcoming research, thus focus should be placed on the structural aspects and the practical and commercial interests of the study of noble gas solubility.

  8. Adsorption of cationic amylopectin on microcrystalline cellulose.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steeg, van de H.G.M.; Keizer, de A.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Bijsterbosch, B.H.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of electrolyte concentration and pH on the adsorption of cationic amylopectin on microcrystalline cellulose were investigated. The adsorbed amount in the pseudo-plateau of the isotherm showed a maximum as a function of the electrolyte concentration. We compared the data with a recent

  9. Alkynylcarbenium ions and related unsaturated cations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukyanov, Sergey M; Koblik, Alla V; Muradyan, Lyudmila A [Institute of Physical and Organic Chemistry, Rostov State University, Rostov-on-Don (Russian Federation)

    1998-10-31

    Published data on carbenium ions containing carbon-carbon triple bonds both directly conjugated with the carbenium centre and separated from it are surveyed and described systematically. Ammonium, diazonium, iminium, phosphonium and iodonium cations containing alkynyl groups, which can be regarded as heteroanalogues of alkynylcarbenium ions, are also considered. The bibliography includes 283 references.

  10. Alkynylcarbenium ions and related unsaturated cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukyanov, Sergey M; Koblik, Alla V; Muradyan, Lyudmila A

    1998-01-01

    Published data on carbenium ions containing carbon-carbon triple bonds both directly conjugated with the carbenium centre and separated from it are surveyed and described systematically. Ammonium, diazonium, iminium, phosphonium and iodonium cations containing alkynyl groups, which can be regarded as heteroanalogues of alkynylcarbenium ions, are also considered. The bibliography includes 283 references

  11. Effect of cations on the hydrated proton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottosson, Niklas; Hunger, Johannes; Bakker, Huib J

    2014-09-17

    We report on a strong nonadditive effect of protons and other cations on the structural dynamics of liquid water, which is revealed using dielectric relaxation spectroscopy in the frequency range of 1-50 GHz. For pure acid solutions, protons are known to have a strong structuring effect on water, leading to a pronounced decrease of the dielectric response. We observe that this structuring is reduced when protons are cosolvated with salts. This reduction is exclusively observed for combinations of protons with other ions; for all studied solutions of cosolvated salts, the effect on the structural dynamics of water is observed to be purely additive, even up to high concentrations. We derive an empirical model that quantitatively describes the nonadditive effect of cosolvated protons and cations. We argue that the effect can be explained from the special character of the proton in water and that Coulomb fields exerted by other cations, in particular doubly charged cations like Mg(2+)aq and Ca(2+)aq, induce a localization of the H(+)aq hydration structures.

  12. Mixed cation effect in sodium aluminosilicate glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Jonas; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Mauro, John C.

    , network structure, and the resistances associated with the deformation processes in mixed cation glasses by partially substituting magnesium for calcium and calcium for lithium in sodium aluminosilicate glasses. We use Raman and 27Al NMR spectroscopies to obtain insights into the structural...

  13. Cationic flotation of some lithium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valadao, G.E.S.; Peres, A.E.C.; Silva, H.C. da

    1984-01-01

    The cationic flotation of some lithium ores (spodumene, amblygonite, petalite, lepidolite) is studied by the measure of zeta potential and micro-flotation tests in Hallimond tube. The effect of some modifier agents (corn starch, meta sodium silicate) on the lithium flotation is studied. (M.A.C.) [pt

  14. Letter: OCCO*+, NNCO*+ and NNNN*+ radical cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flammang, R; Srinivas, R; Nguyen, M T; Gerbaux, P

    2007-01-01

    Chemical ionization of a mixture of nitrogen and carbon monoxide produces three stable isobaric species at m/z 56: OCCO, OCNN and NNNN radical cations. Separated at increased resolution, these ions are readily identified by collisional activation. Neutralization-reionization experiments performed on two different mass spectrometers have not allowed the detection of any recovery signals for the corresponding neutrals.

  15. Al cation induces aggregation of serum proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanphai, P; Kreplak, L; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2017-07-15

    Al cation is known to induce protein fibrillation and causes several neurodegenerative disorders. We report the spectroscopic, thermodynamic analysis and AFM imaging for the Al cation binding process with human serum albumin (HSA), bovine serum albumin (BSA) and milk beta-lactoglobulin (b-LG) in aqueous solution at physiological pH. Hydrophobicity played a major role in Al-protein interactions with more hydrophobic b-LG forming stronger Al-protein complexes. Thermodynamic parameters ΔS, ΔH and ΔG showed Al-protein bindings occur via hydrophobic and H-bonding contacts for b-LG, while van der Waals and H-bonding interactions prevail in HSA and BSA adducts. AFM clearly indicated that aluminum cations are able to force BSA and b-LG into larger or more robust aggregates than HSA, with HSA 4±0.2 (SE, n=801) proteins per aggregate, for BSA 17±2 (SE, n=148), and for b-LG 12±3 (SE, n=151). Thioflavin T test showed no major protein fibrillation in the presence of Al cation. Al complexation induced major alterations of protein conformations with the order of perturbations b-LG>BSA>HSA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Chemical reactivity of cation-exchanged zeolites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pidko, E.A.

    2008-01-01

    Zeolites modified with metal cations have been extensively studied during the last two decades because of their wide application in different technologically important fields such as catalysis, adsorption and gas separation. Contrary to the well-understood mechanisms of chemical reactions catalyzed

  17. Selective crystallization of cations with crown ethers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heffels, Dennis Egidius

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the selectivity and preferences of the incorporation of differently sized cations in the cavities of various crown ethers and the characterization of the resulting compounds. The coordination preferences of crown ethers with different cavities have long been known, and the impact of other effects on the structure formation have increasingly become the focus of attention. In this work a comparative overview of the coordination preferences depending on various factors was undertaken. The focus was mainly on the variation of the cavity of the crown ether in the presence of differently sized cations. In addition, the effects of the solvent and differently coordinating anions have been investigated. Within the framework of this work, basic coordination preferences could be detected with rare earth nitrates, which are affected particularly by the choice of the solvent. The formation of different types of structures could be controlled by varying the conditions such that the incorporation of the cation in the cavity of the crown ether was influenced and the formation of a particular type of structure can be influenced partly by the choice of solvent. In this case no direct preferences for the incorporation into the cavity of the crown ether in relation to the cation size were observed for rare earth cations. However, the coordination of the crown ether leads in each case - for lanthanides - to rather high coordination numbers. A total of five new rare earth complexes and two structural variants could be observed with crown ethers. In the study of the selectivity of the incorporation into the cavity, known structures were also reproduced and further structures were characterized but the crystal structures not entirely solved. With the use of monovalent cations such as potassium, lithium or silver a total of nine new compounds could be synthesized, while no clear preferences for the incorporation of certain cations were detected. The

  18. [Noncovalent cation-π interactions--their role in nature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Krzysztof; Boratyński, Janusz

    2014-11-07

    Non-covalent interactions play an extremely important role in organisms. The main non-covalent interactions in nature are: ion-ion interactions, dipole-dipole interactions, hydrogen bonds, and van der Waals interactions. A new kind of intermolecular interactions--cation-π interactions--is gaining increasing attention. These interactions occur between a cation and a π system. The main contributors to cation-π interactions are electrostatic, polarization and, to a lesser extent, dispersion interactions. At first, cation-π interactions were studied in a gas phase, with metal cation-aromatic system complexes. The characteristics of these complexes are as follows: an increase of cation atomic number leads to a decrease of interaction energy, and an increase of cation charge leads to an increase of interaction energy. Aromatic amino acids bind with metal cations mainly through interactions with their main chain. Nevertheless, cation-π interaction with a hydrophobic side chain significantly enhances binding energy. In water solutions most cations preferentially interact with water molecules rather than aromatic systems. Cation-π interactions occur in environments with lower accessibility to a polar solvent. Cation-π interactions can have a stabilizing role on the secondary, tertiary and quaternary structure of proteins. These interactions play an important role in substrate or ligand binding sites in many proteins, which should be taken into consideration when the screening of effective inhibitors for these proteins is carried out. Cation-π interactions are abundant and play an important role in many biological processes.

  19. Effect of illite clay and divalent cations on bitumen recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, X. [SNC-Lavalin Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada); Repka, C. [Baker Petrolite Corp., Fort McMurray, AB (Canada); Xu, Z.; Masliyah, J. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Materials Engineering

    2006-12-15

    Nearly 35 per cent of Canada's petroleum needs can be met from the Athabasca oil sands, particularly as conventional sources of petroleum decline. The interactions between bitumen and clay minerals play a key role in the recovery process of bitumen because they affect bitumen aeration. The 2 clays minerals found in various oil sands extraction process streams are kaolinite and illite. In this study, doping flotation tests using deionized water and electrokinetic studies were performed to examine the effect of illite clays on bitumen recovery. The effect of magnesium ions was also examined and compared with calcium ions. This paper also discussed the effects of temperature and tailings water chemistry. The negative effect of illite clay on bitumen recovery was found to be associated with its acidity. Denver flotation cell measurements indicated that the addition of calcium or magnesium ions to the flotation deionized water had only a slight effect on bitumen recovery, but the co-addition of illite clay and divalent cations resulted in a dramatic reduction in bitumen recovery. The effect was more significant at lower process temperature and low pH values. Zeta potential distributions of illite suspensions and bitumen emulsions were measured individually and as a mixture to determine the effect of divalent cations on the interaction between bitumen and illite clay. The presence of 1 mM calcium or magnesium ions in deionized water had a pronounced effect on the interactions between bitumen and illite clay. Slime coating of illite onto bitumen was not observed in zeta potential distribution measurements performed in alkaline tailings water. When tests were conducted using plant recycle water, the combination of illite clay and divalent cations did not have an adverse effect on bitumen recovery. 25 refs., 3 tabs., 15 figs.

  20. Conductivity Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) for NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander took measurements in Martian soil and in the air. The needles on the end of the instrument were inserted into the Martian soil, allowing TECP to measure the propagation of both thermal and electrical energy. TECP also measured the humidity in the surrounding air. The needles on the probe are 15 millimeters (0.6 inch) long. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  1. Structure relationship of cationic lipids on gene transfection mediated by cationic liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paecharoenchai, Orapan; Niyomtham, Nattisa; Apirakaramwong, Auayporn; Ngawhirunpat, Tanasait; Rojanarata, Theerasak; Yingyongnarongkul, Boon-ek; Opanasopit, Praneet

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the transfection efficiency of cationic liposomes formulated with phosphatidylcholine (PC) and novel synthesized diethanolamine-based cationic lipids at a molar ratio of 5:1 in comparison with Lipofectamine™ 2000. Factors affecting transfection efficiency and cell viability, including the chemical structure of the cationic lipids, such as different amine head group (diamine and polyamine; and non-spermine and spermine) and acyl chain lengths (C14, C16, and C18) and the weight ratio of liposomes to DNA were evaluated on a human cervical carcinoma cell line (HeLa cells) using the pDNA encoding green fluorescent protein (pEGFP-C2). Characterizations of these lipoplexes in terms of size and charge measurement and agarose gel electrophoresis were performed. The results from this study revealed that almost no transfection was observed in the liposome formulations composed of cationic lipids with a non-spermine head group. In addition, the transfection efficiency of these cationic liposomes was in the following order: spermine-C14 > spermine-C16 > spermine-C18. The highest transfection efficiency was observed in the formulation of spermine-C14 liposomes at a weight ratio of 25; furthermore, this formulation was safe for use in vitro. In conclusion, cationic liposomes containing spermine head groups demonstrated promising potential as gene carriers.

  2. Fluconazole affects the alkali-metal-cation homeostasis and susceptibility to cationic toxic compounds of Candida glabrata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elicharova, Hana; Sychrova, Hana

    2014-08-01

    Candida glabrata is a salt-tolerant and fluconazole (FLC)-resistant yeast species. Here, we analyse the contribution of plasma-membrane alkali-metal-cation exporters, a cation/proton antiporter and a cation ATPase to cation homeostasis and the maintenance of membrane potential (ΔΨ). Using a series of single and double mutants lacking CNH1 and/or ENA1 genes we show that the inability to export potassium and toxic alkali-metal cations leads to a slight hyperpolarization of the plasma membrane of C. glabrata cells; this hyperpolarization drives more cations into the cells and affects cation homeostasis. Surprisingly, a much higher hyperpolarization of C. glabrata plasma membrane was produced by incubating cells with subinhibitory concentrations of FLC. FLC treatment resulted in a substantially increased sensitivity of cells to various cationic drugs and toxic cations that are driven into the cell by negative-inside plasma-membrane potential. The effect of the combination of FLC plus cationic drug treatment was enhanced by the malfunction of alkali-metal-cation transporters that contribute to the regulation of membrane potential and cation homeostasis. In summary, we show that the combination of subinhibitory concentrations of FLC and cationic drugs strongly affects the growth of C. glabrata cells. © 2014 The Authors.

  3. (4 + 3) Cycloadditions of Nitrogen-Stabilized Oxyallyl Cations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohse, Andrew G.; Hsung, Richard P.

    2011-01-01

    The use of heteroatom-substituted oxyallyl cations in (4 + 3) cycloadditions has had a tremendous impact on the development of cycloaddition chemistry. Extensive efforts have been exerted toward investigating the effect of oxygen-, sulfur-, and halogen-substituents on the reactivity of oxyallyl cations. Most recently, the use of nitrogen-stabilized oxyallyl cations has gained prominence in the area of (4 + 3) cycloadditions. The following article will provide an overview of this concept utilizing nitrogen-stabilized oxyallyl cations. PMID:21384451

  4. Selective alkylation by photogenerated aryl and vinyl cation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slegt, Micha

    2006-01-01

    Seven para-substituted phenyl cations and the parent phenyl cation were prepared from iodonium salt precursors. Product studies revealed remarkable chemoselectivity and regioselectivity that could be related to the spin multiplicity of the cations. Also an universal method to fingerprint singlet and

  5. Esterification of phenyl acetic acid with p-cresol using metal cation exchanged montmorillonite nanoclay catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaskar, M; Surekha, M; Suma, N

    2018-02-01

    The liquid phase esterification of phenyl acetic acid with p -cresol over different metal cation exchanged montmorillonite nanoclays yields p -cresyl phenyl acetate. Different metal cation exchanged montmorillonite nanoclays (M n +  = Al 3+ , Zn 2+ , Mn 2+ , Fe 3+ , Cu 2+ ) were prepared and the catalytic activity was studied. The esterification reaction was conducted by varying molar ratio of the reactants, reaction time and catalyst amount on the yield of the ester. Among the different metal cation exchanged catalysts used, Al 3+ -montmorillonite nanoclay was found to be more active. The characterization of the material used was studied under different techniques, namely X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. The product obtained, p -cresyl phenyl acetate, was identified by thin-layer chromotography and confirmed by Fourier transform infrared, 1 H NMR and 13 C NMR. The regeneration activity of used catalyst was also investigated up to fourth generation.

  6. Biosorption of silver cations onto Lactococcus lactis and Lactobacillus casei isolated from dairy products.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Milanowski

    Full Text Available The current work deals with the phenomenon of silver cations uptake by two kinds of bacteria isolated from dairy products. The mechanism of sorption of silver cations by Lactococcus lactis and Lactobacillus casei bacteria was investigated. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS was used for determination of silver concentration sorbed by bacteria. Analysis of charge distribution was conducted by diffraction light scattering method. Changes in the ultrastructure of Lactococcus lactis and Lactobacillus casei cells after treatment with silver cations were investigated using transmission electron microscopy observation. Molecular spectroscopy methods, namely Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS were employed for description of the sorption mechanism. Moreover, an analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs extracted from bacterial cells was performed.

  7. Colloid Facilitated Transport of Radioactive Cations in the Vadose Zone: Field Experiments Oak Ridge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James E. Saiers

    2012-09-20

    The overarching goal of this study was to improve understanding of colloid-facilitated transport of radioactive cations through unsaturated soils and sediments. We conducted a suite of laboratory experiments and field experiments on the vadose-zone transport of colloids, organic matter, and associated contaminants of interest to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The laboratory and field experiments, together with transport modeling, were designed to accomplish the following detailed objectives: 1. Evaluation of the relative importance of inorganic colloids and organic matter to the facilitation of radioactive cation transport in the vadose zone; 2. Assessment of the role of adsorption and desorption kinetics in the facilitated transport of radioactive cations in the vadose zone; 3. Examination of the effects of rainfall and infiltration dynamics and in the facilitated transport of radioactive cations through the vadose zone; 4. Exploration of the role of soil heterogeneity and preferential flow paths (e.g., macropores) on the facilitated transport of radioactive cations in the vadose zone; 5. Development of a mathematical model of facilitated transport of contaminants in the vadose zone that accurately incorporates pore-scale and column-scale processes with the practicality of predicting transport with readily available parameters.

  8. Penetrating cation/fatty acid anion pair as a mitochondria-targeted protonophore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severin, Fedor F.; Severina, Inna I.; Antonenko, Yury N.; Rokitskaya, Tatiana I.; Cherepanov, Dmitry A.; Mokhova, Elena N.; Vyssokikh, Mikhail Yu.; Pustovidko, Antonina V.; Markova, Olga V.; Yaguzhinsky, Lev S.; Korshunova, Galina A.; Sumbatyan, Nataliya V.; Skulachev, Maxim V.; Skulachev, Vladimir P.

    2010-01-01

    A unique phenomenon of mitochondria-targeted protonophores is described. It consists in a transmembrane H+-conducting fatty acid cycling mediated by penetrating cations such as 10-(6’-plastoquinonyl)decyltriphenylphosphonium (SkQ1) or dodecyltriphenylphosphonium (C12TPP). The phenomenon has been modeled by molecular dynamics and directly proved by experiments on bilayer planar phospholipid membrane, liposomes, isolated mitochondria, and yeast cells. In bilayer planar phospholipid membrane, the concerted action of penetrating cations and fatty acids is found to result in conversion of a pH gradient (ΔpH) to a membrane potential (Δψ) of the Nernstian value (about 60 mV Δψ at ΔpH = 1). A hydrophobic cation with localized charge (cetyltrimethylammonium) failed to substitute for hydrophobic cations with delocalized charge. In isolated mitochondria, SkQ1 and C12TPP, but not cetyltrimethylammonium, potentiated fatty acid-induced (i) uncoupling of respiration and phosphorylation, and (ii) inhibition of H2O2 formation. In intact yeast cells, C12TPP stimulated respiration regardless of the extracellular pH value, whereas a nontargeted protonophorous uncoupler (trifluoromethoxycarbonylcyanide phenylhydrazone) stimulated respiration at pH 5 but not at pH 3. Hydrophobic penetrating cations might be promising to treat obesity, senescence, and some kinds of cancer that require mitochondrial hyperpolarization. PMID:20080732

  9. Radiation chemistry of aromatic dimer radical cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Kazumasa; Tagawa, Seiichi

    2009-01-01

    π-π Interactions of aromatic molecules are paid attention much in many fields, especially biology, chemistry, and applied physics, represented as protein, DNA, electron donor-accepter complexes, charge transfers, and self assembly molecules. Aromatic molecules including benzene rings are the simplest case to study the π-π interactions. To interpret the charge resonance (CR) structure in the dimer radical cations, spectroscopic and ESR methods have been carried out. The spectroscopic study on the dimer radical ion of molecules with two chromophores would be profitable to identify the electronic and configurational properties. In this article, dynamics of the dimer radical cation of benzenes, polystyrenes, and resist polymers is described on the basis of direct observation of CR band by the nanosecond pulse radiolysis and low temperature γ-radiolysis methods. (author)

  10. Electronic spectrum of 9-methylanthracenium radical cation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O’Connor, Gerard D.; Schmidt, Timothy W., E-mail: timothy.schmidt@unsw.edu.au [School of Chemistry, UNSW Sydney, New South Wales 2052 (Australia); Sanelli, Julian A.; Dryza, Vik; Bieske, Evan J. [School of Chemistry, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia)

    2016-04-21

    The predissociation spectrum of the cold, argon-tagged, 9-methylanthracenium radical cation is reported from 8000 cm{sup −1} to 44 500 cm{sup −1}. The reported spectrum contains bands corresponding to at least eight electronic transitions ranging from the near infrared to the ultraviolet. These electronic transitions are assigned through comparison with ab initio energies and intensities. The infrared D{sub 1}←D{sub 0} transitions exhibit significant vibronic activity, which is assigned through comparison with TD-B3LYP excited state frequencies and intensities, as well as modelled vibronic interactions. Dissociation of 9-methylanthracenium is also observed at high visible-photon energies, resulting in the loss of either CH{sub 2} or CH{sub 3}. The relevance of these spectra, and the spectra of other polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon radical cations, to the largely unassigned diffuse interstellar bands, is discussed.

  11. Photodissociation of spatially aligned acetaldehyde cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Suk Kyoung; Silva, Ruchira; Kim, Myung Hwa; Shen, Lei; Suits, Arthur G

    2007-07-26

    Photofragment translational energy and angular distributions are reported for the photodissociation of acetaldehyde cations in the wavelength range 354-363 nm obtained using the DC slice ion imaging technique. Vibrationally selected parent ions were produced by 2+1 resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) via the 3sCH3CO+, and CH4+. The angular distributions reveal that all product channels have a predominantly parallel recoil anisotropy although the lower beta2 parameter of CH3CO+ indicates the concomitant presence of a perpendicular component. Furthermore, the distinct angular distribution of the CH3CO+ fragments shows a large value of the higher order Legendre polynomial term, providing evidence that acetaldehyde cations are spatially aligned during the ionization process.

  12. Mechanism of adsorption of cations onto rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Akira; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Fujiwara, Kenso; Nishikawa, Sataro; Moriyama, Hirotake

    1999-01-01

    Adsorption behavior of cations onto granite was investigated. The distribution coefficient (K d ) of Sr 2+ and Ba 2+ onto granite was determined in the solution of which pH was ranged from 3.5 to 11.3 and ionic strength was set at 10 -2 and 10 -1 . The K d values were found to increase with increasing pH and with deceasing ionic strength. The obtained data were successfully analyzed by applying an electrical double layer model. The optimum parameter values of the double layer electrostatics and adsorption reactions were obtained, and the mechanism of adsorption of cations onto granite was discussed. Feldspar was found to play an important role in their adsorption. (author)

  13. Conduct disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buitelaar, Jan K; Smeets, Kirsten C; Herpers, Pierre; Scheepers, Floor; Glennon, Jeffrey; Rommelse, Nanda N J

    2013-02-01

    Conduct disorder (CD) is a frequently occurring psychiatric disorder characterized by a persistent pattern of aggressive and non-aggressive rule breaking antisocial behaviours that lead to considerable burden for the patients themselves, their family and society. This review paper updates diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to CD in the light of the forthcoming DSM-5 definition. The diagnostic criteria for CD will remain unchanged in DSM-5, but the introduction of a specifier of CD with a callous-unemotional (CU) presentation is new. Linked to this, we discuss the pros and cons of various other ways to subtype aggression/CD symptoms. Existing guidelines for CD are, with few exceptions, already of a relatively older date and emphasize that clinical assessment should be systematic and comprehensive and based on a multi-informant approach. Non-medical psychosocial interventions are recommended as the first option for the treatment of CD. There is a role for medication in the treatment of comorbid syndromes and/or in case of insufficient response to psychosocial interventions and severe and dangerous aggressive and violent behaviours.

  14. Regulation of Cation Balance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyert, Martha S.; Philpott, Caroline C.

    2013-01-01

    All living organisms require nutrient minerals for growth and have developed mechanisms to acquire, utilize, and store nutrient minerals effectively. In the aqueous cellular environment, these elements exist as charged ions that, together with protons and hydroxide ions, facilitate biochemical reactions and establish the electrochemical gradients across membranes that drive cellular processes such as transport and ATP synthesis. Metal ions serve as essential enzyme cofactors and perform both structural and signaling roles within cells. However, because these ions can also be toxic, cells have developed sophisticated homeostatic mechanisms to regulate their levels and avoid toxicity. Studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have characterized many of the gene products and processes responsible for acquiring, utilizing, storing, and regulating levels of these ions. Findings in this model organism have often allowed the corresponding machinery in humans to be identified and have provided insights into diseases that result from defects in ion homeostasis. This review summarizes our current understanding of how cation balance is achieved and modulated in baker’s yeast. Control of intracellular pH is discussed, as well as uptake, storage, and efflux mechanisms for the alkali metal cations, Na+ and K+, the divalent cations, Ca2+ and Mg2+, and the trace metal ions, Fe2+, Zn2+, Cu2+, and Mn2+. Signal transduction pathways that are regulated by pH and Ca2+ are reviewed, as well as the mechanisms that allow cells to maintain appropriate intracellular cation concentrations when challenged by extreme conditions, i.e., either limited availability or toxic levels in the environment. PMID:23463800

  15. Hydrocarbon degassing of the earth and origin of oil-gas fields (isotope-geochemical and geodynamic aspects)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valyaev, Boris; Dremin, Ivan

    2016-04-01

    More than half a century ago, Academician PN Kropotkin substantiated the relationship of the formation and distribution of oil and gas fields with the processes of emanation hydrocarbon degassing of the Earth. Over the years, the concept of PN Kropotkin received further development and recognition of studies based on new factual material. Of particular importance are the following factors: a) the results of studies on global and regional uneven processes of traditional oil and gas and the role of deep faults in controlling the spread of oil and gas fields; b) the results of the research on gigantic volumes and localization of the discharges of hydrocarbon fluids (mud volcanoes, seeps) on land and into the atmosphere and through the bottom of the World ocean; c) the results of the studies on grand volumes of the spread of unconventional hydrocarbon resources in their non-traditional fields, especially on near-surface interval of unconventional oil and gas accumulation with gas hydrates, heavy oil and bitumen, as well as extraordinary resources of oil and gas in the shale and tight rocks. Deep mantle-crust nature of oil and gas in traditional and nontraditional deposits thus received further substantiation of geological and geophysical data and research results. However, isotopic and geochemical data are still interpreted in favor of the concept of the genesis of oil and gas in the processes of thermal catalytic conversion of organic matter of sedimentary rocks, at temperatures up to 200°C. In this report an alternative interpretation of the isotope carbon-hydrogen system (δ13C-δD) for gas and of oil deposits, isotope carbon system for methane and carbon dioxide (δ13C1-δ13C0) will be presented. An alternative interpretation will also be presented for the data on carbon-helium isotope geochemical system for oil and gas fields, volcanoes and mud volcanoes. These constructions agree with the geological data on the nature of deep hydrocarbon fluids involved in the

  16. Preliminary assessment of the state of CO2 soil degassing on the flanks of Gede volcano (West Java, Indonesia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunrat, S. L.; Schwandner, F. M.

    2013-12-01

    Gede Volcano (West Java) is part of an andesitic stratovolcano complex consisting of Pangrango in the north-west and Gede in the south-east. The last recorded eruptive activity was a phreatic subvolcanian ash eruption in 1957. Current activity is characterized by episodic swarms at 2-4 km depth, and low-temperature (~160°C) crater degassing in two distinct summit crater fumarolic areas. Hot springs occur in the saddle between the Gede and Pangrango edifice, as well as on the NE flank base. The most recent eruptive events produced pyroclastic material, their flow deposits concentrate toward the NE. A collaborative effort between the Center for Volcanology and Geological Hazard Mitigation (CVGHM), Geological Agency and the Earth Observatory of Singapore (EOS) is since 2010 aimed at upgrading the geophysical and geochemical monitoring network at Gede Volcano. To support the monitoring instrumentation upgrades under way, surveys of soil CO2 degassing have been performed on the flanks of Gede, in circular and radial traverses.The goal was to establish a spatial distribution of flank CO2 fluxes, and to allow smart siting for continuous gas monitoring stations. Crater fluxes were not surveyed, as its low-temperature hydrothermal system is likely prone to large hydraulic changes in this tropical environment, resulting in variable permeability effects that might mask signals from deeper reservoir or conduit degassing. The high precipitation intensity in the mountains of tropical Java pose challenges to this method, since soil gas permeability is largely controlled by soil moisture content. Simultaneous soil moisture measurements were undertaken. The soil CO2 surveys were carried out using a LI-8100A campaign flux chamber instrument (LICOR Biosciences, Lincoln, Nebraska). This instrument has a very precise and highly stable sensor and an atmospheric pressure equilibrator, making it highly sensitive to low fluxes. It is the far superior choice for higher precision low

  17. Reducible cationic lipids for gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzer, B; Byk, G; Frederic, M; Airiau, M; Blanche, F; Pitard, B; Scherman, D

    2001-01-01

    One of the main challenges of gene therapy remains the increase of gene delivery into eukaryotic cells. We tested whether intracellular DNA release, an essential step for gene transfer, could be facilitated by using reducible cationic DNA-delivery vectors. For this purpose, plasmid DNA was complexed with cationic lipids bearing a disulphide bond. This reduction-sensitive linker is expected to be reduced and cleaved in the reducing milieu of the cytoplasm, thus potentially improving DNA release and consequently transfection. The DNA--disulphide-lipid complexation was monitored by ethidium bromide exclusion, and the size of complexes was determined by dynamic light scattering. It was found that the reduction kinetics of disulphide groups in DNA--lipid complexes depended on the position of the disulphide linker within the lipid molecule. Furthermore, the internal structure of DNA--lipid particles was examined by small-angle X-ray scattering before and after lipid reduction. DNA release from lipid complexes was observed after the reduction of disulphide bonds of several lipids. Cell-transfection experiments suggested that complexes formed with selected reducible lipids resulted in up to 1000-fold higher reporter-gene activity, when compared with their analogues without disulphide bonds. In conclusion, reduction-sensitive groups introduced into cationic lipid backbones potentially allow enhanced DNA release from DNA--lipid complexes after intracellular reduction and represent a tool for improved vectorization. PMID:11389682

  18. First volcanic CO2 budget estimate for three actively degassing volcanoes in the Central American Volcanic Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robidoux, Philippe; Aiuppa, Alessandro; Conde, Vladimir; Galle, Bo; Giudice, Gaetano; Avard, Geoffroy; Muñoz, Angélica

    2014-05-01

    CO2 is a key chemical tracer for exploring volcanic degassing mechanisms of basaltic magmatic systems (1). The rate of CO2 release from sub-aerial volcanism is monitored via studies on volcanic plumes and fumaroles, but information is still sparse and incomplete for many regions of the globe, including the majority of the volcanoes in the Central American Volcanic Arc (2). Here, we use a combination of remote sensing techniques and in-situ measurements of volcanic gas plumes to provide a first estimate of the CO2 output from three degassing volcanoes in Central America: Turrialba, in Costa Rica, and Telica and San Cristobal, in Nicaragua. During a field campaign in March-April 2013, we obtained (for the three volcanoes) a simultaneous record of SO2 fluxes (from the NOVAC network (3)) and CO2 vs. SO2 concentrations in the near-vent plumes (obtained via a temporary installed fully-automated Multi-GAS instrument (4)). The Multi-GAS time-series allowed to calculate the plume CO2/SO2 ratios for different intervals of time, showing relatively stable gas compositions. Distinct CO2 - SO2 - H2O proportions were observed at the three volcanoes, but still within the range of volcanic arc gas (5). The CO2/SO2 ratios were then multiplied by the SO2 flux in order to derive the CO2 output. At Turrialba, CO2/SO2 ratios fluctuated, between March 12 and 19, between 1.1 and 5.7, and the CO2flux was evaluated at ~1000-1350 t/d (6). At Telica, between March 23 and April 8, a somewhat higher CO2/SO2 ratio was observed (3.3 ± 1.0), although the CO2 flux was evaluated at only ~100-500 t/d (6). At San Cristobal, where observations were taken between April 11 and 15, the CO2/SO2 ratio ranged between 1.8 and 7.4, with a mean CO2 flux of 753 t/d. These measurements contribute refining the current estimates of the total CO2 output from the Central American Volcanic Arc (7). Symonds, R.B. et al., (2001). J. Volcanol. Geotherm. Res., 108, 303-341 Burton, M. R. et al. (2013). Reviews in

  19. Diffuse CO2 degassing studies to reveal hidden geothermal resources in oceanic volcanic islands: The Canarian archipelago case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, F.; Perez, N. M.; García-Merino, M.; Padron, E.; Melián, G.; Asensio-Ramos, M.; Hernandez Perez, P. A.; Padilla, G.; Barrancos, J.; Cótchico, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    The Canary Islands, owing to their recent volcanism, are the only Spanish territory with potential high enthalpy geothermal resources. The final goal of geothermal exploration in a specific area is to locate and define the size, shape, structure of hidden geothermal resources, and determine their characteristics (fluid type, temperature, chemical composition an ability to produce energy). At those areas where there is not any evidence of endogenous fluids manifestations at surface, that traditionally evidence the presence of an active geothermal system) the geochemical methods for geothermal exploration must include soil gas surveys. This is the case of five mining licenses for geothermal exploration in the Canay Islands, four in Tenerife and one in Gran Canaria Island. We report herein the results of diffuse CO2 emission studies in the five mining licenses during 2011-2014. The primary objective of the study was to sort the possible geothermal potential of these five mining licenses, thus reducing the uncertainty inherent to the selection of the areas with highest geothermal potential for future exploration works. The criterion used to sort the different areas was the contribution of volcano-hydrothermal CO2 in the degassing at each study area. Several hundreds of measurements of diffuse CO2 emission, soil CO2 concentration and isotopic composition were performed at each study area. Based in three different endmembers (biogenic, atmospheric and deep-seated CO2) with different CO2 concentrations (100, 0.04 and 100% respectively) and isotopic compositions (-20, -8 and -3 per mil vs. VPDB respectively) a mass balance to distinguish the different contribution of each endmember in the soil CO2 at each sampling site was made. The percentage of the volcano-hydrothermal contribution in the current diffuse CO2 degassing was in the range 2-19%.The Abeque mining license, that comprises part of the north-west volcanic rift of Tenerife, seemed to show the highest geothermal

  20. Effect of Cation Ordering on the Performance and Chemical Stability of Layered Double Perovskite Cathodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Bernuy-Lopez

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of A-site cation ordering on the cathode performance and chemical stability of A-site cation ordered LaBaCo2O5+δ and disordered La0.5Ba0.5CoO3−δ materials are reported. Symmetric half-cells with a proton-conducting BaZr0.9Y0.1O3−δ electrolyte were prepared by ceramic processing, and good chemical compatibility of the materials was demonstrated. Both A-site ordered LaBaCo2O5+δ and A-site disordered La0.5Ba0.5CoO3−δ yield excellent cathode performance with Area Specific Resistances as low as 7.4 and 11.5 Ω·cm2 at 400 °C and 0.16 and 0.32 Ω·cm2 at 600 °C in 3% humidified synthetic air respectively. The oxygen vacancy concentration, electrical conductivity, basicity of cations and crystal structure were evaluated to rationalize the electrochemical performance of the two materials. The combination of high-basicity elements and high electrical conductivity as well as sufficient oxygen vacancy concentration explains the excellent performance of both LaBaCo2O5+δ and La0.5Ba0.5CoO3−δ materials at high temperatures. At lower temperatures, oxygen-deficiency in both materials is greatly reduced, leading to decreased performance despite the high basicity and electrical conductivity. A-site cation ordering leads to a higher oxygen vacancy concentration, which explains the better performance of LaBaCo2O5+δ. Finally, the more pronounced oxygen deficiency of the cation ordered polymorph and the lower chemical stability at reducing conditions were confirmed by coulometric titration.

  1. Caffeine inhibits nonselective cationic currents in interstitial cells of Cajal from the murine jejunum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Nan Ge; Koh, Sang Don; Sanders, Kenton M

    2009-10-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) discharge unitary potentials in gastrointestinal muscles that constitute the basis for pacemaker activity. Caffeine has been used to block unitary potentials, but the ionic conductance responsible for unitary potentials is controversial. We investigated currents in cultured ICC from murine jejunum that may underlie unitary potentials and studied the effects of caffeine. Networks of ICC generated slow wave events under current clamp, and these events were blocked by caffeine in a concentration-dependent manner. Single ICC generated spontaneous transient inward currents (STICs) under voltage clamp at -60 mV and noisy voltage fluctuations in current clamp. STICs were unaffected when the equilibrium potential for Cl- (ECl) was set to -60 mV (excluding Cl- currents) and reversed at 0 mV, demonstrating that a nonselective cationic conductance, and not a Cl- conductance, is responsible for STICs in ICC. Caffeine inhibited STICs in a concentration-dependent manner. Reduced intracellular Ca2+ and calmidazolium (CMZ; 1 microM) activated persistent inward, nonselective cation currents in ICC. Currents activated by CMZ and by dialysis of cells with 10 mM BAPTA were also inhibited by caffeine. Excised inside-out patches contained channels that exhibited spontaneous openings, and resulting currents reversed at 0 mV. Channel openings were increased by reducing Ca2+ concentration from 10(-6) M to 10(-8) M. CMZ (1 microM) also increased openings of nonselective cation channels. Spontaneous currents and channels activated by CMZ were inhibited by caffeine (5 mM). The findings demonstrate that the Ca2+-inhibited nonselective cation channels that generate STICs in ICC are blocked directly by caffeine. STICs are responsible for unitary potentials in intact muscles, and the block of these events by caffeine is consistent with the idea that a nonselective cation conductance underlies unitary potentials in ICC.

  2. Dual cell conductivity during ionic exchange processes: the intelligent transmitter EXA DC 400

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mier, A.

    1997-01-01

    Why is differential conductivity important versus standard conductivity measurement? That entirely depends on the application. If we have a process where the conductivity changes ge.. Cation exchanger, then standard conductivity measurement is not appropriate. With dual cell conductivity we can rate the process and eliminate conductivity changes outside the process. Therefore we achieve more precise control or monitoring of that process. (Author)

  3. Anchoring cationic amphiphiles for nucleotide delivery: significance of DNA release from cationic liposomes for transfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirashima, Naohide; Minatani, Kazuhiro; Hattori, Yoshifumi; Ohwada, Tomohiko; Nakanishi, Mamoru

    2007-06-01

    We have designed and synthesized lithocholic acid-based cationic amphiphile molecules as components of cationic liposomes for gene transfection (lipofection). To study the relationship between the molecular structures of those amphiphilic molecules, particularly the extended hydrophobic appendant (anchor) at the 3-hydroxyl group, and transfection efficiency, we synthesized several lithocholic and isolithocholic acid derivatives, and examined their transfection efficiency. We also compared the physico-chemical properties of cationic liposomes prepared from these derivatives. We found that isolithocholic acid derivatives exhibit higher transfection efficiency than the corresponding lithocholic acid derivatives. This result indicates that the orientation and extension of hydrophobic regions influence the gene transfection process. Isolithocholic acid derivatives showed a high ability to encapsulate DNA in a compact liposome-DNA complex and to protect it from enzymatic degradation. Isolithocholic acid derivatives also facilitated the release of DNA from the liposome-DNA complex, which is a crucial step for DNA entry into the nucleus. Our results show that the transfection efficiency is directly influenced by the ability of the liposome complex to release DNA, rather than by the DNA-encapsulating ability. Molecular modeling revealed that isolithocholic acid derivatives take relatively extended conformations, while the lithocholic acid derivatives take folded structures. Thus, the efficiency of release of DNA from cationic liposomes in the cytoplasm, which contributes to high transfection efficiency, appears to be dependent upon the molecular shape of the cationic amphiphiles.

  4. Comparative analysis of cation/proton antiporter superfamily in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Chu-Yu; Yang, Xiaohan; Xia, Xinli; Yin, Weilun

    2013-06-01

    The cation/proton antiporter superfamily is associated with the transport of monovalent cations across membranes. This superfamily was annotated in the Arabidopsis genome and some members were functionally characterized. In the present study, a systematic analysis of the cation/proton antiporter genes in diverse plant species was reported. We identified 240 cation/proton antiporters in alga, moss, and angiosperm. A phylogenetic tree was constructed showing these 240 members are separated into three families, i.e., Na(+)/H(+) exchangers, K(+) efflux antiporters, and cation/H(+) exchangers. Our analysis revealed that tandem and/or segmental duplications contribute to the expansion of cation/H(+) exchangers in the examined angiosperm species. Sliding window analysis of the nonsynonymous/synonymous substitution ratios showed some differences in the evolutionary fate of cation/proton antiporter paralogs. Furthermore, we identified over-represented motifs among these 240 proteins and found most motifs are family specific, demonstrating diverse evolution of the cation/proton antiporters among three families. In addition, we investigated the co-expressed genes of the cation/proton antiporters in Arabidopsis thaliana. The results showed some biological processes are enriched in the co-expressed genes, suggesting the cation/proton antiporters may be involved in these biological processes. Taken together, this study furthers our knowledge on cation/proton antiporters in plants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A new degassing membrane coupled upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor to achieve in-situ biogas upgrading and recovery of dissolved CH4 from the anaerobic effluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Gang; Wang, Wen; Angelidaki, Irini

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A new UASB configuration was developed by coupling with degassing membrane. • In-situ biogas upgrading was achieved with high methane content (>90%). • Decrease of dissolved methane in the anaerobic effluent was achieved. - Abstract: A new technology for in-situ biogas upgrading and recovery of CH 4 from the effluent of biogas reactors was proposed and demonstrated in this study. A vacuum degassing membrane module was used to desorb CO 2 from the liquid phase of a biogas reactor. The degassing membrane was submerged into a degassing unit (DU). The results from batch experiments showed that mixing intensity, transmembrane pressure, pH and inorganic carbon concentration affected the CO 2 desorption rate in the DU. Then, the DU was directly connected to an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor. The results showed the CH 4 content was only 51.7% without desorption of CO 2 , while it increased when the liquid of UASB was recycled through the DU. The CH 4 content increased to 71.6%, 90%, and 94% with liquid recirculation rate through the DU of 0.21, 0.42 and 0.63 L/h, respectively. The loss of methane due to dissolution in the effluent was reduced by directly pumping the reactor effluent through the DU. In this way, the dissolved CH 4 concentration in the effluent decreased from higher than 0.94 mM to around 0.13 mM, and thus efficient recovery of CH 4 from the anaerobic effluent was achieved. In the whole operational period, the COD removal efficiency and CH 4 yield were not obviously affected by the gas desorption

  6. Fractionation of lithium isotopes in cation-exchange chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oi, Takao; Kawada, Kazuhiko; Kakihana, Hidetake; Hosoe, Morikazu

    1991-01-01

    Various methods for lithium isotope separation have been developed, and their applicability to large-scale enriched lithium isotope production has been assessed. Ion-exchange chromatography is one such method. Cation-exchange chromatography of lithium was carried out to investigate the lithium isotope effect in aqueous ion-exchange systems. The heavier isotope. 7 Li, was preferentially fractionated into the resin phase in every experiment conducted, and this result is consistent with the results of previous work. The value of the separation factor was 1.00089-1.00171 at 25C. A comparison of lithium isotope effect with those of potassium and rubidium indicated that the isotope effect originating from hydration is larger than the effect due to phase change for lithium, while the opposite is the case with potassium and rubidium

  7. Radical cations of quadricyclane and norbornadiene in polar ZSM-5 matrices: Radical cation photochemical transformations without photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnabas, M.V.; Trifunac, A.D.

    1994-01-01

    Radical cations of quadricyclane (Q) and norbornadiene (NBD) are produced by γ-radiolysis in zeolites. In polar ZSM-5, only one radical cation is initially observed below 100K. Increasing the temperature above 200K gives rise to the cyclopentadiene radical cation. Higher temperatures (>360K) give rise to the cyclopenten-4-yl radical. The observation of cyclopentadiene radical cation implies the occurrence of the reverse Diels-Alder reaction. This is a thermally forbidden, photochemically allowed, process, which is made possible by the interaction of the polar zeolite matrix sites with parent NBD and Q radical cations

  8. Ion motion and conductivity in rubidium and cesium hexafluorotitanates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moskvich, Yu.N.; Cherkasov, B.I.; Sukhovskij, A.A.; Davidovich, R.L.; AN SSSR, Vladivostok. Inst. Khimii)

    1988-01-01

    Relaxation times for 19 F nuclei and electric conductivity in Rb 2 TiF 6 and Cs 2 TiF 6 polycrystals are measured. The parameters of reoriented anion motion and diffusion cation motion are determined according to the NMR data. The effect of phase transition to the cubic phase on the parameters of these motions are studied. High conductivity reaching values σ∼10 -2 -10 -3 Ohm -1 xm -1 is detected at high temperatures. The electric conductivity observed is shown to be caused by the diffusion motion of Rb + and Cs + cations

  9. A new degassing membrane coupled upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor to achieve in-situ biogas upgrading and recovery of dissolved CH4 from the anaerobic effluent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Gang; Wang, Wen; Angelidaki, Irini

    2014-01-01

    A new technology for in-situ biogas upgrading and recovery of CH4 from the effluent of biogas reactors was proposed and demonstrated in this study. A vacuum degassing membrane module was used to desorb CO2 from the liquid phase of a biogas reactor. The degassing membrane was submerged...... into a degassing unit (DU). The results from batch experiments showed that mixing intensity, transmembrane pressure, pH and inorganic carbon concentration affected the CO2 desorption rate in the DU. Then, the DU was directly connected to an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor. The results showed the CH4...... content was only 51.7% without desorption of CO2, while it increased when the liquid of UASB was recycled through the DU. The CH4 content increased to 71.6%, 90%, and 94% with liquid recirculation rate through the DU of 0.21, 0.42 and 0.63L/h, respectively. The loss of methane due to dissolution...

  10. Mechanization of refractory relining and disintegration work for ladle and RH-degassing vessel; Toribe, RH datsu gas ro ni okeru seko oyobi kaitai sagyo no kikaika

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuwayama, M; Yoshida, M [Kawasaki Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Yamaguchi, T [Kawasaki Refractories Corp. Ltd., Hyogo (Japan)

    1996-02-01

    In iron and steel industry, automation and mechanization of furnace relining work are required as the measures of the environmental betterment therein which is extremely important for ensuring the factors in the future. In this paper, the inductions of the equipment for castable refractory relining at the bottom of the ladle, the equipment for handling slag line bricks of the ladle, the equipment for brick disintegration in the RH-degassing vessel which have been mechanized recently at the Mizushiminduction`s Kawasaki Steel Corporation as a part of the betterment of furnace relining work carried out hitherto are described. The main points of said betterment are indicated hereafter. The equipment for castable refractory relining at the bottom of the ladle is exploited and utilized. The hard works are lightened by the large scale of the bricks for the slag line of the ladle and the induction of the vacuum lifter. The equipment exclusive for disintegration in the RH-degassing vessel is exploited and utilized. Owing to the above-mentioned improvements, 27% and 60% of the operation time are reduced in the relining work for the ladle and disintegration work for the RH-degassing vessel respectively. 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Conditions for oceans on Earth-like planets orbiting within the habitable zone: importance of volcanic CO{sub 2} degassing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadoya, S. [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, The University of Tokyo, Kiban Bldg. 408, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan); Tajika, E., E-mail: kadoya@astrobio.k.u-tokyo.ac.jp, E-mail: tajika@astrobio.k.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Complexity Science and Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Kiban Bldg. 409, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan)

    2014-08-01

    Earth-like planets in the habitable zone (HZ) have been considered to have warm climates and liquid water on their surfaces if the carbonate-silicate geochemical cycle is working as on Earth. However, it is known that even the present Earth may be globally ice-covered when the rate of CO{sub 2} degassing via volcanism becomes low. Here we discuss the climates of Earth-like planets in which the carbonate-silicate geochemical cycle is working, with focusing particularly on insolation and the CO{sub 2} degassing rate. The climate of Earth-like planets within the HZ can be classified into three climate modes (hot, warm, and snowball climate modes). We found that the conditions for the existence of liquid water should be largely restricted even when the planet is orbiting within the HZ and the carbonate-silicate geochemical cycle is working. We show that these conditions should depend strongly on the rate of CO{sub 2} degassing via volcanism. It is, therefore, suggested that thermal evolution of the planetary interiors will be a controlling factor for Earth-like planets to have liquid water on their surface.

  12. Cationic niosomes an effective gene carrier composed of novel spermine-derivative cationic lipids: effect of central core structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opanasopit, Praneet; Leksantikul, Lalita; Niyomtham, Nattisa; Rojanarata, Theerasak; Ngawhirunpat, Tanasait; Yingyongnarongkul, Boon-Ek

    2017-05-01

    Cationic niosomes formulated from Span 20, cholesterol (Chol) and novel spermine-based cationic lipids of multiple central core structures (di(oxyethyl)amino, di(oxyethyl)amino carboxy, 3-amino-1,2-dioxypropyl and 2-amino-1,3-dioxypropyl) were successfully prepared for improving transfection efficiency in vitro. The niosomes composed of spermine cationic lipid with central core structure of di(oxyethyl)amino revealed the highest gene transfection efficiency. To investigate the factors affecting gene transfection and cell viability including differences in the central core structures of cationic lipids, the composition of vesicles, molar ratio of cationic lipids in formulations and the weight ratio of niosomes to DNA. Cationic niosomes composed of nonionic surfactants (Span20), cholesterol and spermine-based cationic lipids of multiple central core structures were formulated. Gene transfection and cell viability were evaluated on a human cervical carcinoma cell line (HeLa cells) using pDNA encoding green fluorescent protein (pEGFP-C2). The morphology, size and charge were also characterized. High transfection efficiency was obtained from cationic niosomes composed of Span20:Chol:cationic lipid at the molar ratio of 2.5:2.5:0.5 mM. Cationic lipids with di(oxyethyl)amino as a central core structure exhibited highest transfection efficiency. In addition, there was also no serum effect on transfection efficiency. These novel cationic niosomes may constitute a good alternative carrier for gene transfection.

  13. Evolutionary and Structural Perspectives of Plant Cyclic Nucleotide Gated Cation Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Kira Zelman

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Ligand-gated cation channels are a frequent component of signaling cascades in eukaryotes. Eukaryotes contain numerous diverse gene families encoding ion channels, some of which are shared and some of which are unique to particular kingdoms. Among the many different types are cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (CNGCs. CNGCs are cation channels with varying degrees of ion conduction selectivity. They are implicated in numerous signaling pathways and permit diffusion of divalent and monovalent cations, including Ca2+ and K+. CNGCs are present in both plant and animal cells, typically in the plasma membrane; recent studies have also documented their presence in prokaryotes. All eukaryote CNGC polypeptides have a cyclic nucleotide binding domain (CNBD and a calmodulin binding domain (CaMBD as well as a 6 transmembrane/1 pore tertiary structure. This review summarizes existing knowledge about the functional domains present in these cation-conducting channels, and considers the evidence indicating that plant and animal CNGCs evolved separately. Additionally, an amino acid motif that is only found in the phosphate binding cassette and hinge regions of plant CNGCs, and is present in all experimentally confirmed CNGCs but no other channels was identified. This CNGC-specific amino acid motif provides an additional diagnostic tool to identify plant CNGCs, and can increase confidence in the annotation of open reading frames in newly sequenced genomes as putative CNGCs. Conversely, the absence of the motif in some plant sequences currently identified as probable CNGCs may suggest that they are misannotated or protein fragments.

  14. Evolutionary and structural perspectives of plant cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channels

    KAUST Repository

    Zelman, Alice K.

    2012-05-29

    Ligand-gated cation channels are a frequent component of signaling cascades in eukaryotes. Eukaryotes contain numerous diverse gene families encoding ion channels, some of which are shared and some of which are unique to particular kingdoms. Among the many different types are cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (CNGCs). CNGCs are cation channels with varying degrees of ion conduction selectivity. They are implicated in numerous signaling pathways and permit diffusion of divalent and monovalent cations, including Ca2+ and K+. CNGCs are present in both plant and animal cells, typically in the plasma membrane; recent studies have also documented their presence in prokaryotes. All eukaryote CNGC polypeptides have a cyclic nucleotide-binding domain and a calmodulin binding domain as well as a six transmembrane/one pore tertiary structure. This review summarizes existing knowledge about the functional domains present in these cation-conducting channels, and considers the evidence indicating that plant and animal CNGCs evolved separately. Additionally, an amino acid motif that is only found in the phosphate binding cassette and hinge regions of plant CNGCs, and is present in all experimentally confirmed CNGCs but no other channels was identified. This CNGC-specific amino acid motif provides an additional diagnostic tool to identify plant CNGCs, and can increase confidence in the annotation of open reading frames in newly sequenced genomes as putative CNGCs. Conversely, the absence of the motif in some plant sequences currently identified as probable CNGCs may suggest that they are misannotated or protein fragments. 2012 Zelman, Dawe, Gehring and Berkowitz.

  15. Cation mobility in H+/Na+ ion exchange products of acid tantalum and zirconium phosphates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarnopol'skij, V.A.; Yaroslavtsev, A.B.

    2000-01-01

    Ionic conductivity of Na + /H + exchange products on acid zirconium phosphate with different substitution degree and on acid tantalum phosphate, where ion exchange occurs via formation of a continuous series of solid solutions, was studied by the method of conductometry. It was ascertained that ionic conductivity decreases monotonously with growth in substitution degree of H + for Na + in acid tantalum phosphate. Anomalous increase in ionic conductivity of ion exchange products on acid zirconium phosphate with a low substitution degree has been detected for the first time. Formation of a double electric layer with a high concentration of cationic defects on the interface surface is the reason for increase in ionic conductivity [ru

  16. Cation-Cation Complexes of Pentavalent Uranyl: From Disproportionation Intermediates to Stable Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mougel, Victor; Horeglad, Pawel; Nocton, Gregory; Pecaut, Jacques; Mazzanti, Marinella [CEA, INAC, SCIB, Laboratoire de Reconnaissance Ionique et Chimie de Coordination, CEA-Grenoble, 38054 GRENOBLE, Cedex 09 (France)

    2010-07-01

    Three new cation cation complexes of pentavalent uranyl, stable with respect to the disproportionation reaction, have been prepared from the reaction of the precursor [(UO{sub 2}py{sub 5})-(KI{sub 2}py{sub 2})]{sub n} (1) with the Schiff base ligands salen{sup 2-}, acacen{sup 2-}, and salophen{sup 2-} (H{sub 2}salen N, N'-ethylene-bis(salicylidene-imine), H{sub 2}acacen=-N, N'-ethylenebis(acetylacetone-imine), H{sub 2}salophen=N, N'-phenylene-bis(salicylidene-imine)). The preparation of stable complexes requires a careful choice of counter ions and reaction conditions. Notably the reaction of 1 with salophen{sup 2-} in pyridine leads to immediate disproportionation, but in the presence of [18]crown-6 ([18]C-6) a stable complex forms. The solid-state structure of the four tetra-nuclear complexes ([UO{sub 2}-(acacen)]{sub 4}[{mu}{sub 8}-]{sub 2}[K([18]C-6)(py)]{sub 2}) (3) and ([UO{sub 2}(acacen)](4)[{mu}{sub 8}-]).2[K([222])(py)] (4) ([UO{sub 2}(salophen)](4)[{mu}{sub 8}-K]{sub 2}[mu(5)-KI]{sub 2}[(K([18]C-6)]).2 [K([18]C-6)-(thf){sub 2}].2I (5), and ([UO{sub 2}(salen)(4)][{mu}{sub 8}-Rb]{sub 2}[Rb([18]C-6)]{sub 2}) (9) ([222] = [222]cryptand, py =pyridine), presenting a T-shaped cation cation interaction has been determined by X-ray crystallographic studies. NMR spectroscopic and UV/Vis studies show that the tetra-nuclear structure is maintained in pyridine solution for the salen and acacen complexes. Stable mononuclear complexes of pentavalent uranyl are also obtained by reduction of the hexavalent uranyl Schiff base complexes with cobaltocene in pyridine in the absence of coordinating cations. The reactivity of the complex [U{sup V}O{sub 2}(salen)(py)][Cp*{sub 2}Co] with different alkali ions demonstrates the crucial effect of coordinating cations on the stability of cation cation complexes. The nature of the cation plays a key role in the preparation of stable cation cation complexes. Stable tetra-nuclear complexes form in the presence of K

  17. Complexes of natural carbohydrates with metal cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseev, Yurii E; Garnovskii, Alexander D; Zhdanov, Yu A

    1998-01-01

    Data on the interaction of natural carbohydrates (mono-, oligo-, and poly-saccharides, amino sugars, and natural organic acids of carbohydrate origin) with metal cations are surveyed and described systematically. The structural diversity of carbohydrate metal complexes, caused by some specific features of carbohydrates as ligands, is demonstrated. The influence of complex formation on the chemical properties of carbohydrates is discussed. It is shown that the formation of metal complexes plays an important role in the configurational and conformational analysis of carbohydrates. The practical significance of the coordination interaction in the series of carbohydrate ligands is demonstrated. The bibliography includes 571 references.

  18. Homogeneous cation exchange membrane by radiation grafting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolhe, Shailesh M.; G, Agathian; Ashok Kumar

    2001-01-01

    Preparation of a strong cation exchange membrane by radiation grafting of styrene on to polyethylene (LDPE) film by mutual irradiation technique in the presence of air followed by sulfonation is described. The grafting has been carried out in the presence of air and without any additive. Low dose rate has been seen to facilitate the grafting. Further higher the grafting percentage more is the exchange capacity. The addition of a swelling agent during the sulfonation helped in achieving the high exchange capacity. The TGA-MASS analysis confirmed the grafting and the sulfonation. (author)

  19. No effect of H2O degassing on the oxidation state of hydrous rhyolite magmas: a comparison of pre- and post-eruptive Fe2+ concentrations in six obsidian samples from the Mexican and Cascade arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, L.; Lange, R. A.

    2011-12-01

    The extent to which degassing affects the oxidation state of arc magmas is widely debated. Several researchers have examined how degassing of mixed H-C-O-S-Cl fluids may change the Fe3+/FeT ratio of magmas, and it has been proposed that degassing may induce either oxidation or reduction depending on the initial oxidation state. A commonly proposed oxidation reaction is related to H2O degassing: H2O (melt) + 2FeO (melt) = H2 (fluid) + Fe2O3 (melt). Another mechanism by which H2O degassing can affect the iron redox state is if dissolved water affects the activity of ferrous and/or ferric iron in the melt. Although Moore et al. (1995) presented experiments showing no evidence of an affect of dissolved water on the activity of the ferric-ferrous ratio in silicate melts, other experimental results (e.g., Baker and Rutherford, 1996; Gaillard et al., 2001; 2003) indicate that there may be such an effect in rhyolite liquids. It has long been understood that rhyolites, owing to their low total iron concentrations, are more sensitive than other magma types to degassing-induced change in redox state. Therefore, a rigorous test of whether H2O degassing affects the redox state of arc magmas is best evaluated on rhyolites. In this study, a comparison is made between the pre-eruptive (pre-degassing) Fe2+ concentrations in six, phenocryst-poor (volatiles, as indicated by the low loss on ignition values (LOI ≤ 0.7 wt%). In order to test how much oxidation of ferrous iron occurred as a consequence of that degassing, we measured the ferrous iron concentration in the bulk samples by titration, using the Wilson (1960) method, which was successfully tested again three USGS and one Canadian Geological Survey standards. Our results indicate no detectable change within analytical error between pre- and post-eruptive FeO concentrations, with an average deviation of 0.09 wt% and a maximum deviation of 0.15 wt%. Our results show that H2O degassing has no effect on the redox state of

  20. Cationic polymers in water treatment: Part 1: Treatability of water with cationic polymers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Polasek, P.; Mutl, Silvestr

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 1 (2002), s. 69-82 ISSN 0378-4738 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK2067107 Keywords : cationic polymers * treatability * water quality Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 0.481, year: 2002

  1. Alkali Metal Cation versus Proton and Methyl Cation Affinities: Structure and Bonding Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boughlala, Zakaria; Fonseca Guerra, Célia; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias

    2016-06-01

    We have analyzed the structure and bonding of gas-phase Cl-X and [HCl-X](+) complexes for X(+)= H(+), CH3 (+), Li(+), and Na(+), using relativistic density functional theory (DFT). We wish to establish a quantitative trend in affinities of the anionic and neutral Lewis bases Cl(-) and HCl for the various cations. The Cl-X bond becomes longer and weaker along X(+) = H(+), CH3 (+), Li(+), and Na(+). Our main purpose is to understand the heterolytic bonding mechanism behind the intrinsic (i.e., in the absence of solvent) alkali metal cation affinities (AMCA) and how this compares with and differs from those of the proton affinity (PA) and methyl cation affinity (MCA). Our analyses are based on Kohn-Sham molecular orbital (KS-MO) theory in combination with a quantitative energy decomposition analysis (EDA) that pinpoints the importance of the different features in the bonding mechanism. Orbital overlap appears to play an important role in determining the trend in cation affinities.

  2. Cobalt 60 cation exchange with mexican clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nava Galve, R.G.

    1993-01-01

    Mexican clays can be used to remove radioactive elements from contaminated aqueous solutions. Cation exchange experiments were performed with 60 Co radioactive solution. In the present work the effect of contact time on the sorption of Co 2+ was studied. The contact time in hydrated montmorillonite was from 5 to 120 minutes and in dehydrated montmorillonite 5 to 1400 minutes. The Co 2+ uptake value was, in hydrated montmorillonite, between 0.3 to 0.85 m eq/g and in dehydrated montmorillonite, between 0.6 to 1.40 m eq/g. The experiments were done in a pH 5.1 to 5.7 and normal conditions. XRD patterns were used to characterize the samples. The crystallinity was determined by X-ray Diffraction and it was maintained before and after the cation exchange. DTA thermo grams showed the temperatures of the lost humidity and crystallization water. Finally, was observed that dehydrated montmorillonite adsorb more cobalt than hydrated montmorillonite. (Author)

  3. Cationic antimicrobial peptides in penaeid shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassanakajon, Anchalee; Amparyup, Piti; Somboonwiwat, Kunlaya; Supungul, Premruethai

    2011-08-01

    Penaeid shrimp aquaculture has been consistently affected worldwide by devastating diseases that cause a severe loss in production. To fight a variety of harmful microbes in the surrounding environment, particularly at high densities (of which intensive farming represents an extreme example), shrimps have evolved and use a diverse array of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) as part of an important first-line response of the host defense system. Cationic AMPs in penaeid shrimps composed of penaeidins, crustins, and anti-lipopolysaccharide factors are comprised of multiple classes or isoforms and possess antibacterial and antifungal activities against different strains of bacteria and fungi. Shrimp AMPs are primarily expressed in circulating hemocytes, which is the main site of the immune response, and hemocytes expressing AMPs probably migrate to infection sites to fight against pathogen invasion. Indeed, most AMPs are produced as early as the nauplii developmental stage to protect shrimp larvae from infections. In this review, we discuss the sequence diversity, expression, gene structure, and antimicrobial activities of cationic AMPs in penaeid shrimps. The information available on antimicrobial activities indicates that these shrimp AMPs have potential therapeutic applications in the control of disease problems in aquaculture.

  4. Cationic Antimicrobial Polymers and Their Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona-Ribeiro, Ana Maria; de Melo Carrasco, Letícia Dias

    2013-01-01

    Cationic compounds are promising candidates for development of antimicrobial agents. Positive charges attached to surfaces, particles, polymers, peptides or bilayers have been used as antimicrobial agents by themselves or in sophisticated formulations. The main positively charged moieties in these natural or synthetic structures are quaternary ammonium groups, resulting in quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs). The advantage of amphiphilic cationic polymers when compared to small amphiphilic molecules is their enhanced microbicidal activity. Besides, many of these polymeric structures also show low toxicity to human cells; a major requirement for biomedical applications. Determination of the specific elements in polymers, which affect their antimicrobial activity, has been previously difficult due to broad molecular weight distributions and random sequences characteristic of radical polymerization. With the advances in polymerization control, selection of well defined polymers and structures are allowing greater insight into their structure-antimicrobial activity relationship. On the other hand, antimicrobial polymers grafted or self-assembled to inert or non inert vehicles can yield hybrid antimicrobial nanostructures or films, which can act as antimicrobials by themselves or deliver bioactive molecules for a variety of applications, such as wound dressing, photodynamic antimicrobial therapy, food packing and preservation and antifouling applications. PMID:23665898

  5. Cationic Antimicrobial Polymers and Their Assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Carmona-Ribeiro

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Cationic compounds are promising candidates for development of antimicrobial agents. Positive charges attached to surfaces, particles, polymers, peptides or bilayers have been used as antimicrobial agents by themselves or in sophisticated formulations. The main positively charged moieties in these natural or synthetic structures are quaternary ammonium groups, resulting in quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs. The advantage of amphiphilic cationic polymers when compared to small amphiphilic molecules is their enhanced microbicidal activity. Besides, many of these polymeric structures also show low toxicity to human cells; a major requirement for biomedical applications. Determination of the specific elements in polymers, which affect their antimicrobial activity, has been previously difficult due to broad molecular weight distributions and random sequences characteristic of radical polymerization. With the advances in polymerization control, selection of well defined polymers and structures are allowing greater insight into their structure-antimicrobial activity relationship. On the other hand, antimicrobial polymers grafted or self-assembled to inert or non inert vehicles can yield hybrid antimicrobial nanostructures or films, which can act as antimicrobials by themselves or deliver bioactive molecules for a variety of applications, such as wound dressing, photodynamic antimicrobial therapy, food packing and preservation and antifouling applications.

  6. Basic exchangeable cations in Finnish mineral soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armi Kaila

    1972-09-01

    Full Text Available The content of exchangeable Ca, Mg, K and Na replaced by neutral ammonium acetate was determined in 470 samples of mineral soils from various parts of Finland, except from Lapland. The amount of all these cations tended to increase with an increase in the clay content, but variation within each textural class was large, and the ranges usually overlapped those of the other classes. The higher acidity of virgin surface soils was connected with a lower average degree of saturation by Ca as compared with the corresponding textural classes of cultivated soils. No significant difference in the respective contents of other cations was detected. The samples of various textural groups from deeper layers were usually poorer in exchangeable Ca and K than the corresponding groups of plough layer. The mean content of exchangeable Mg was equal or even higher in the samples from deeper layers than in the samples from plough layer, except in the group of sand soils. The percentage of Mg of the effective CEC increased, as an average, from 9 in the sand and fine sand soils of plough layer to 30 in the heavy clay soils; in the heavy clay soils from deeper layers its mean value was 38 ± 4 %. In the samples of plough layer, the mean ratio of Ca to Mg in sand and fine sand soils was about 9, in silt and loam soils about 6, in the coarser clay soils about 4, and in heavy clay about 2.

  7. Radiochemical study of isomerization of free butyl cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinotova, E.N.; Nefedov, V.D.; Skorokhodov, S.S.; Arkhipov, Yu.M.

    1987-01-01

    Ion-molecular reactions of free butyl cations, generated by nuclear chemical method, with carbon monoxide containing small quantities of ethanol vapors are studied. Carbon monoxide was used to fix instable butyl cations in the form of corresponding acyl ions. Ester of α-methyl-butyric acid appears to be the only product of free butyl cation interaction with carbon monoxide in the presence of ethanol vapors. That means, that up to the moment of butyl cation reaction with carbon monoxide, the primary butyl cations are almost completely isomerized into secondary in agreement with results of previous investigations. This allows one to study free butyl cation isomerization process according to ion-molecular reaction product isomeric composition

  8. Stability and recovery of DNA origami structure with cation concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi; Wang, Ping; Liu, Yang; Liu, Ting; Xu, Yan; Zhu, Shanshan; Zhu, Jun; Ye, Kai; Huang, Guang; Dannong, He

    2018-01-01

    We synthesized triangular and rectangular DNA origami nanostructures and investigated the stability and recovery of them under low cation concentration. Our results demonstrated that the origami nanostructures would melt when incubated in low cation concentration, and recover whilst kept in the concentration for less than 10 min. However, extending the incubation time would lead to irreversible melting. Our results show the possibility of application of DNA origami nanostructures for things such as a sensor for cation concentration response, etc.

  9. Effect of competing cations on strontium sorption to surficial sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunde, R.L.; Rosentreter, J.J.

    1995-01-01

    The following study was conducted to determine strontium distribution coefficients (K d 'S) of a surficial sediment at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Idaho. Batch experimental techniques were used to determine K d 's which describe the partitioning of a solute between the solution and solid phase. A surficial sediment was mixed with synthesized aqueous solutions designed to chemically simulate wastewater disposed to infiltrations ponds near the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant at the INEL with respect to major ionic character and pH. The effects of variable concentrations of competing cations (sodium, potassium, calcium and magnesium) on strontium sorption were investigated at a fixed pH of 8.00. The pH of the natural system shows no appreciable variation, whereas a marked variability in cation concentration has been noted. Strontium sorption was impacted to a greater degree by the concentration of calcium and magnesium in solution than by the presence of sodium or potassium. However, extreme sodium solution concentrations of 1.0 to 5.0 g/L dramatically reduced strontium sorption. In all cases, strontium K d 's decreased as the concentration of calcium and magnesium in solution increased. Linear isotherm model K d 's ranged from 12.0 to 84.7 mL/g. Analysis of data from these experiments indicated that moderate concentrations of calcium and magnesium (less than 40 mg/L) and high concentrations of sodium (1.0 to 5.0 g/L) in wastewater increase strontium mobility by decreasing the sorption of strontium on surficial sediments beneath infiltration ponds at the INEL

  10. Diffuse degassing He/CO2 ratio before and during the 2011-12 El Hierro submarine eruption, Canary Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padrón, Eleazar; Hernández, Pedro A.; Melián, Gladys V.; Barrancos, José; Padilla, Germán; Pérez, Nemesio M.; Dionis, Samara; Rodríguez, Fátima; Asensio-Ramos, María; Calvo, David

    2015-04-01

    El Hierro Island (278 km2) is the youngest and the SW-most of the Canary Islands. On July 16, 2011, a seismic-volcanic crisis started with the occurrence of more than 11,900 seismic events and significant deformation along the island, culminating with the eruption onset in October 12. Since at El Hierro Islands there are not any surface geothermal manifestation (fumaroles, etc), we have focused our studies on soil degassing surveys. Between July 2011 to March 2012, seventeen diffuse CO2 and He emissions soil gas surveys were undertaken at El Hierro volcanic system (600 observation sites) with the aim to investigate the relationship between their temporal variations and the volcanic activity (Padrón et al., 2013; Melián et al., 2014). Based on the diffuse He/CO2 emission ratio, a sharp increase before the eruption onset was observed, reaching the maximum value on September 26 (6.8×10-5), sixteen days before the occurrence of the eruption. This increase coincided with an increase in seismic energy release during the volcanic unrest and occurred together with an increase on the 3He/4He isotopic ratio in groundwaters from a well in El Hierro Island (Padrón et al., 2013; from 2-3 RA to 7.2 RA where RA = 3He/4He ratio in air), one month prior to the eruption onset. Early degassing of new gas-rich magma batch at depth could explain the observed increase on the He/CO2 ratio, causing a preferential partitioning of CO2 in the gas phase with respect to the He, due to the lower solubility of CO2 than that of He in basaltic magmas. During the eruptive period (October 2011-March 2012) the prevalence of a magmatic CO2-dominated component is evident, as indicated by the generally lower He/CO2 ratios and high 3He/4He values (Padrón et al., 2013). The onset of the submarine eruption might have produced a sudden release of volcanic gases, and consequently, a decrease in the volcanic gas pressure of the magma bodies moving beneath the island, reflected by a drastic decrease in

  11. Diffuse CO2 degassing monitoring for the volcanic surveillance of Tenerife North-East Rift Zone (NERZ) volcano, Canary Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, F.; Thomas, G. E.; Wong, T.; García, E.; Melián, G.; Padron, E.; Asensio-Ramos, M.; Hernández, P. A.; Perez, N. M.

    2017-12-01

    The North East Rift zone of Tenerife Island (NERZ, 210 km2) is one of the three major volcanic rift-zones of the island. The most recent eruptive activity along the NERZ took place in the 1704-1705 period with eruptions of Siete Fuentes, Fasnia and Arafo volcanoes. Since fumarolic activity is nowadays absent at the NERZ, soil CO2 degassing monitoring represent a potential geochemical tool for its volcanic surveillance. The aim of this study is to report the results of the last CO2 efflux survey performed in June 2017, with 658 sampling sites. In-situ measurements of CO2 efflux from the surface environment of the NERZ were performed by means of a portable non-dispersive infrared spectrophotometer (NDIR) following the accumulation chamber method. To quantify the total CO2 emission, soil CO2 efflux spatial distribution maps were constructed using Sequential Gaussian Simulation (SGS) as interpolation method. The diffuse CO2 emission values ranged between 0 - 41.1 g m-2 d-1. The probability plot technique applied to the data allowed to distinguish two different geochemical populations; background (B) and peak (P) represented by 81.8% and 18.2% of the total data, respectively, with geometric means of 3.9 and 15.0 g m-2 d-1, respectively. The average map constructed with 100 equiprobable simulations showed an emission rate of 1,361±35 t d-1. This value relatively higher than the background average of CO2 emission estimated on 415 t d-1 and slightly higher than the background range of 148 t d-1 (-1σ) and 1,189 t d-1 (+1σ) observed at the NERZ. This study reinforces the importance of performing soil CO2 efflux surveys as an effective surveillance volcanic tool in the NERZ.

  12. Mantle to surface degassing of carbon- and sulphur-rich alkaline magma at El Hierro, Canary Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longpré, Marc-Antoine; Stix, John; Klügel, Andreas; Shimizu, Nobumichi

    2017-02-01

    Basaltic volcanoes transfer volatiles from the mantle to the surface of the Earth. The quantification of deep volatile fluxes relies heavily on estimates of the volatile content of primitive magmas, the best archive of which is provided by melt inclusions. Available data from volcanoes producing mafic alkaline lavas in a range of tectonic settings suggest high volatile fluxes, but information remains sparse, particularly for intraplate ocean islands. Here we present measurements of volatile and trace element concentrations, as well as sulphur speciation, in olivine-hosted melt inclusions and matrix glasses from quenched basanite lava balloon samples from the 2011-2012 submarine eruption at El Hierro, Canary Islands. The results reveal remarkably high concentrations of dissolved volatiles and incompatible trace elements in this magma, with ∼80 ppm Nb and up to 3420 ppm CO2, 3.0 wt.% H2O and 5080 ppm S. Reconstructed primitive CO2 contents, considering CO2/Nb systematics and possible CO2 sequestration in shrinkage bubbles, reach weight percent levels, indicating that carbon is a major constituent of Canary Island magmas at depth and that exsolution of a CO2-rich fluid begins in the mantle at pressures in excess of 1 GPa. Correlations between sulphur concentration, sulphur speciation and water content suggest strong reduction of an initially oxidised mantle magma, likely controlled by coupled H2O and S degassing. This late-stage redox change may have triggered sulphide saturation, recorded by globular sulphide inclusions in clinopyroxene and ulvöspinel. The El Hierro basanite thus had a particularly high volatile-carrying capacity and released a minimum of 1.3-2.1 Tg CO2 and 1.8-2.9 Tg S to the environment, causing substantial stress on the local submarine ecosystem. These results highlight the important contribution of alkaline ocean island volcanoes, such as the Canary Islands, to volatile fluxes from the mantle.

  13. Studies of Fe-Co based perovskite cathodes with different A-site cations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammer Hansen, K.

    2006-01-01

    Iron-cobalt based perovskite cathodes with different A-site cations ((Ln(0.6)Sr(0.4))(0.99)Fe0.8Co0.2O3-delta, where Ln is La, Pr, Sm or Gd) have been synthesised, characterised by a powder XRD, dilatometry, 4-point DC conductivity measurements, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS......) on cone shaped electrodes. In addition to this scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to characterise the bars. XRD revealed that only the La-containing perovskite was hexagonal. The Pr and Sm perovskites were orthorhombic. The gadolinium-based perovskite was a two phase system consisting...... of an orthorhombic and a cubic perovskite phase. The thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) increased systematically with a decrease in the size of the A-site cation until the gadoliniurn-containing perovskite where the TEC decreases abruptly. The total electric conductivity was the highest for the La-based perovskite...

  14. A Cation-containing Polymer Anion Exchange Membrane based on Poly(norbornene)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Frederick; Price, Samuel; Ren, Xiaoming; Savage, Alice

    Cation-containing polymers are being studied widely for use as anion exchange membranes (AEMs) in alkaline fuel cells (AFCs) because AEMs offer a number of potential benefits including allowing a solid state device and elimination of the carbonate poisoning problem. The successful AEM will combine high performance from several orthogonal properties, having robust mechanical strength even when wet, high hydroxide conductivity, and the high chemical stability required for long device lifetimes. In this study, we have synthesized a model cationic polymer that combines three of the key advantages of Nafion. The polymer backbone based on semicrystalline atactic poly(norbornene) offers good mechanical properties. A flexible, ether-based tether between the backbone and fixed cation charged species (quaternary ammonium) should provide the low-Tg, hydrophilic environment required to facilitate OH- transport. Finally, methyl groups have been added at the beta position relative to the quaternary ammonium cation to prevent Hoffman elimination, one mechanism by which AEMs are neutralized in a high pH environment. In this poster, we will present our findings on mechanical properties, morphology, charge transport, and chemical stability of this material.

  15. Cation depletion by the sodium pump in red cells with pathologic cation leaks. Sickle cells and xerocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Joiner, C H; Platt, O S; Lux, S E

    1986-01-01

    The mechanism by which sickle cells and xerocytic red cells become depleted of cations in vivo has not been identified previously. Both types of cells exhibit elevated permeabilities to sodium and potassium, in the case of sickle cells, when deoxygenated. The ouabain-insensitive fluxes of sodium and potassium were equivalent, however, in both cell types under these conditions. When incubated 18 hours in vitro, sickle cells lost cations but only when deoxygenated. This cation depletion was blo...

  16. Effect of dietary cation-anion balance on milk production and blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of three diets with different cation-anion differences ((DCAD: mEq[(Na + K) − (Cl + S)]/100 g of dry matter)) in far-off and close-up period, on milk production and blood mineral of Holstein cows. Eighteen pregnant cows (220 - 225 d) were fed a base diet with three DCAD (+13 ...

  17. Cation immobilization in pyrolyzed simulated spent ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luca, Vittorio; Bianchi, Hugo L.; Manzini, Alberto C.

    2012-01-01

    Significant quantities of spent ion exchange resins that are contaminated by an assortment of radioactive elements are produced by the nuclear industry each year. The baseline technology for the conditioning of these spent resins is encapsulation in ordinary Portland cement which has various shortcomings none the least of which is the relatively low loading of resin in the cement and the poor immobilization of highly mobile elements such as cesium. The present study was conducted with cationic resin samples (Lewatit S100) loaded with Cs + , Sr 2+ , Co 2+ , Ni 2+ in roughly equimolar proportions at levels at or below 30% of the total cation exchange capacity. Low temperature thermal treatment of the resins was conducted in inert (Ar), or reducing (CH 4 ) gas atmospheres, or supercritical ethanol to convert the hydrated polymeric resin beads into carbonaceous materials that contained no water. This pyrolytic treatment resulted in at least a 50% volume reduction to give mechanically robust spherical materials. Scanning electron microscope investigations of cross-sections of the beads combined with energy dispersive analysis showed that initially all elements were uniformly distributed through the resin matrix but that at higher temperatures the distribution of Cs became inhomogeneous. Although Cs was found in the entire cross-section, a significant proportion of the Cs occurred within internal rings while a proportion migrated toward the outer surfaces to form a crustal deposit. Leaching experiments conducted in water at 25 °C showed that the divalent contaminant elements were very difficult to leach from the beads heated in inert atmospheres in the range 200–600 °C. Cumulative fractional loses of the order of 0.001 were observed for these divalent elements for temperatures below 500 °C. Regardless of the processing temperature, the cumulative fractional loss of Cs in water at 25 °C reached a plateau or steady-state within the first 24 h increasing only

  18. Alkalisation agent measurement with differential conductivity method in secondary water system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuhrmann, Peter; Lendi, Marco

    2012-09-01

    Besides ammonia hydroxide, also morpholine and ethanol-amine (ETA) are mainly used as a pH regulating agent on the secondary water side [1]. The concentration of the alkalisation agent can only be calculated if the chemical composition in the sample is known [2]. Therefore, for a reliable alkalisation agent measurement, there are three major steps to take: A reliable specific and (degassed) acid conductivity measurement, pH calculation and the selection of the chemical model for concentration calculation of the alkalisation agent (authors)

  19. Predicting Organic Cation Sorption Coefficients: Accounting for Competition from Sorbed Inorganic Cations Using a Simple Probe Molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolin, William C; Goyetche, Reaha; Carter, Katherine; Medina, John; Vasudevan, Dharni; MacKay, Allison A

    2017-06-06

    With the increasing number of emerging contaminants that are cationic at environmentally relevant pH values, there is a need for robust predictive models of organic cation sorption coefficients (K d ). Current predictive models fail to account for the differences in the identity, abundance, and affinity of surface-associated inorganic exchange ions naturally present at negatively charged receptor sites on environmental solids. To better understand how organic cation sorption is influenced by surface-associated inorganic exchange ions, sorption coefficients of 10 organic cations (including eight pharmaceuticals and two simple probe organic amines) were determined for six homoionic forms of the aluminosilicate mineral, montmorillonite. Organic cation sorption coefficients exhibited consistent trends for all compounds across the various homoionic clays with sorption coefficients (K d ) decreasing as follows: K d Na + > K d NH 4 + ≥ K d K + > K d Ca 2+ ≥ K d Mg 2+ > K d Al 3+ . This trend for competition between organic cations and exchangeable inorganic cations is consistent with the inorganic cation selectivity sequence, determined for exchange between inorganic ions. Such consistent trends in competition between organic and inorganic cations suggested that a simple probe cation, such as phenyltrimethylammonium or benzylamine, could capture soil-to-soil variations in native inorganic cation identity and abundance for the prediction of organic cation sorption to soils and soil minerals. Indeed, sorption of two pharmaceutical compounds to 30 soils was better described by phenyltrimethylammonium sorption than by measures of benzylamine sorption, effective cation exchange capacity alone, or a model from the literature (Droge, S., and Goss, K. Environ. Sci. Technol. 2013, 47, 14224). A hybrid approach integrating structural scaling factors derived from this literature model of organic cation sorption, along with phenyltrimethylammonium K d values, allowed for

  20. Computational study of cation substitutions in apatites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamm, Toomas; Peld, Merike

    2006-01-01

    Density-functional theory plane-wave modeling of fluor- and hydroxyapatites has been performed, where one or two calcium ions per unit cell were replaced with cadmium or zinc cations. It was found that cadmium ions favor Ca(1) positions in fluorapatites and Ca(2) positions in hydroxyapatites, in agreement with experiment. A similar pattern is predicted for zinc substitutions. In the doubly substituted cases, where only hydroxyapatites were modeled, a preference for the substituting ions to be located in Ca(2) position was also observed. Displacement of the hydroxide ions from their symmetrical positions on the hexagonal axis can be used to explain the preferred configurations of substituting ions around the axis. -- Deformation of the hydroxide ion chain due to substitutions around the ion channel in substituted hydroxyapatites

  1. Retention of Cationic Starch onto Cellulose Fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missaoui, Mohamed; Mauret, Evelyne; Belgacem, Mohamed Naceur

    2008-08-01

    Three methods of cationic starch titration were used to quantify its retention on cellulose fibres, namely: (i) the complexation of CS with iodine and measurement of the absorbency of the ensuing blue solution by UV-vis spectroscopy; (ii) hydrolysis of the starch macromolecules followed by the conversion of the resulting sugars to furan-based molecules and quantifying the ensuing mixture by measuring their absorbance at a Ι of 490 nm, using the same technique as previous one and; finally (iii) hydrolysis of starch macromolecules by trifluoro-acetic acid and quantification of the sugars in the resulting hydrolysates by high performance liquid chromatography. The three methods were found to give similar results within the range of CS addition from 0 to 50 mg per g of cellulose fibres.

  2. Repurposing Cationic Amphiphilic Antihistamines for Cancer Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Anne-Marie; Dehlendorff, Christian; Vind, Anna C.

    2016-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is one of the deadliest cancers worldwide. In search for new NSCLC treatment options, we screened a cationic amphiphilic drug (CAD) library for cytotoxicity against NSCLC cells and identified several CAD antihistamines as inducers of lysosomal cell death. We...... then performed a cohort study on the effect of CAD antihistamine use on mortality of patients diagnosed with non-localized cancer in Denmark between 1995 and 2011. The use of the most commonly prescribed CAD antihistamine, loratadine, was associated with significantly reduced all-cause mortality among patients...... with non-localized NSCLC or any non-localized cancer when compared with use of non-CAD antihistamines and adjusted for potential confounders. Of the less frequently described CAD antihistamines, astemizole showed a similar significant association with reduced mortality as loratadine among patients with any...

  3. A Cationic Smart Copolymer for DNA Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia Ribeiro

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A new block copolymer with a temperature-responsive block and a cationic block was prepared by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT polymerization, with good control of its size and composition. The first block is composed by di(ethylene glycol methyl ether methacrylate (DEGMA and oligo(ethylene glycol methyl ether methacrylate (OEGMA, with the ratio DEGMA/OEGMA being used to choose the volume phase transition temperature of the polymer in water, tunable from ca. 25 to above 90 °C. The second block, of trimethyl-2-methacroyloxyethylammonium chloride (TMEC, is positively charged at physiological pH values and is used for DNA binding. The coacervate complexes between the block copolymer and a model single strand DNA are characterized by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy. The new materials offer good prospects for biomedical application, for example in controlled gene delivery.

  4. Hydration Structure of the Quaternary Ammonium Cations

    KAUST Repository

    Babiaczyk, Wojtek Iwo

    2010-11-25

    Two indicators of the hydropathicity of small solutes are introduced and tested by molecular dynamics simulations. These indicators are defined as probabilities of the orientation of water molecules\\' dipoles and hydrogen bond vectors, conditional on a generalized distance from the solute suitable for arbitrarily shaped molecules. Using conditional probabilities, it is possible to distinguish features of the distributions in close proximity of the solute. These regions contain the most significant information on the hydration structure but cannot be adequately represented by using, as is usually done, joint distance-angle probability densities. Our calculations show that using our indicators a relative hydropathicity scale for the interesting test set of the quaternary ammonium cations can be roughly determined. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  5. Calixarenes synthesized for seducing and trapping cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dozol, J.F.

    1997-01-01

    Calixarenes are known to be selective extractants for cesium radioactive cations. This liquid-liquid extraction is still to be studied and would allow to reduce the volume of years living radioactive wastes before they were stored and perhaps to remove then the cesium by transmutation. Calixarenes are macrocycles with phenolic units bridged by methylene groups. They have the important property to have a flexible structure. On this basic structure, all kinds of chemical functions can be branched. They thus confer particular properties to the molecule. A computerized virtual construction phase of molecules is actually studied in order to optimize the extraction. It is currently known that with small modifications it will be possible to selectively extract heavy metals (Hg, Cd..) coming from industrial pollution. (O.M.)

  6. Effect of nature of base cation on surface conductivity of H forms of stratified silicates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasil'ev, N.G.; Ovcharenko, F.D.; Savkin, A.G.

    1976-01-01

    Interpretation has been proposed for curves of conductometric titration of diluted suspensions of natural silicates in hydrogen forms with solutions of alkalies and organic bases. The curves of conductometric are presented for suspensions of H-form of montmorillonite with solutions of alkali metal hydroxides and with Ba(OH) 2 . A linear decrease in electroconductiv;ty of the system is observed when H-mineral is neutralized with LIOH and NaOH solution. If hydroxides of other metals are added to such a system, the titration curves have an anomalous character. It is especially pronounced when H-mineral is titrated with RbOH and CsOH solutions. When these solutions are added to the suspension of h H-mineral, an additional amount of highly mobile H+-ions is formed which increases electroconductivity of the system. When all the exchange protons in a flat double layer are replaced by Rb 1 or Cs 1 ions, electroconductivity decreases which is related to neutralization of protons in the diffusion part of the layer

  7. Anaerobic toxicity of cationic silver nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gitipour, Alireza; Thiel, Stephen W.; Scheckel, Kirk G.; Tolaymat, Thabet

    2016-01-01

    The microbial toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) stabilized with different capping agents was compared to that of Ag"+ under anaerobic conditions. Three AgNPs were investigated: (1) negatively charged citrate-coated AgNPs (citrate-AgNPs), (2) minimally charged polyvinylpyrrolidone coated AgNPs (PVP-AgNPs) and (3) positively charged branched polyethyleneimine coated AgNPs (BPEI-AgNPs). The AgNPs investigated in this experiment were similar in size (10–15 nm), spherical in shape, but varied in surface charge which ranged from highly negative to highly positive. While, at AgNPs concentrations lower than 5 mg L"−"1, the anaerobic decomposition process was not influenced by the presence of the nanoparticles, there was an observed impact on the diversity of the microbial community. At elevated concentrations (100 mg L"−"1 as silver), only the cationic BPEI-AgNPs demonstrated toxicity similar in magnitude to that of Ag"+. Both citrate and PVP-AgNPs did not exhibit toxicity at the 100 mg L"−"1 as measured by biogas evolution. These findings further indicate the varying modes of action for nanoparticle toxicity and represent one of the few studies that evaluate end-of-life management concerns with regards to the increasing use of nanomaterials in our everyday life. These findings also highlight some of the concerns with a one size fits all approach to the evaluation of environmental health and safety concerns associated with the use of nanoparticles. - Highlights: • At concentrations -1 the anaerobic decomposition process was not impacted. • An impact on the microbial community at concentrations -1 were observed. • At high concentrations (100 mg L"−"1), the cationic BPEI-AgNPs demonstrated toxicity. • Toxicity was demonstrated without the presence of oxidative dissolution of silver. • A one size fits all approach for the evaluation of NPs may not be accurate.

  8. Organic cation rhodamines for screening organic cation transporters in early stages of drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugwu, Malachy C; Oli, Angus; Esimone, Charles O; Agu, Remigius U

    The aim of this study was to investigate the suitability of rhodamine-123, rhodamine-6G and rhodamine B as non-radioactive probes for characterizing organic cation transporters in respiratory cells. Fluorescent characteristics of the compounds were validated under standard in vitro drug transport conditions (buffers, pH, and light). Uptake/transport kinetics and intracellular accumulation of the compounds were investigated. Uptake/transport mechanisms were investigated by comparing the effect of pH, temperature, concentration, polarity, OCTs/OCTNs inhibitors/substrates, and metabolic inhibitors on the cationic dyes uptake in Calu-3 cells. Fluorescence stability and intensity of the compounds were altered by buffer composition, light, and pH. Uptake of the dyes was concentration-, temperature- and pH-dependent. OCTs/OCTNs inhibitors significantly reduced intracellular accumulation of the compounds. Whereas rhodamine-B uptake was sodium-dependent, pH had no effect on rhodamine-123 and rhodamine-6G uptake. Transport of the dyes across the cells was polarized: (AP→BL>BL→AP transport) and saturable: {V max =14.08±2.074, K m =1821±380.4 (rhodamine-B); V max =6.555±0.4106, K m =1353±130.4 (rhodamine-123) and V max =0.3056±0.01402, K m =702.9±60.97 (rhodamine-6G)}. The dyes were co-localized with MitoTracker®, the mitochondrial marker. Cationic rhodamines, especially rhodamine-B and rhodamine- 6G can be used as organic cation transporter substrates in respiratory cells. During such studies, buffer selection, pH and light exposure should be taken into consideration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of metallic cations in the beryl flotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima Leonel, C.M. de; Peres, A.E.C.

    1984-01-01

    The beryl zeta potential in microelectrophoretic cell is studied in the presence of neutral electrolyte, cations of calcium, magnesium and iron. The petroleum sulfonate is used how collector in Hallimond tube. Hydroxy complex of metallic cations seems activate the ore and precipitates of colloidal metallic hidroxies seems lower him when added to the mixture. (M.A.C.) [pt

  10. Stable polyfluorinated cycloalkenyl cations and their NMR spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snegirev, V.F.; Galakhov, M.V.; Makarov, K.N.; Bakhmutov, V.I.

    1986-01-01

    New stable 1-methoxyperfluoro-2-ethylcyclobutenyl, 1-methoxyperfluoro-2-methylcyclo-pentenyl, and 1-methoxyperfluoro-2-ethylcyclohexenyl cations were obtained by the action of antimony pentafluoride on the corresponding olefins. The distribution of the charges in the investigated polyfluorinated cycloalkenyl cations was investigated by 13 C NMR method

  11. Synthesis of Cationic Core-Shell Latex Particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dziomkina, N.; Hempenius, Mark A.; Vancso, Gyula J.

    2006-01-01

    Surfactant-free seeded (core-shell) polymerization of cationic polymer colloids is presented. Polystyrene core particles with sizes between 200 nm and 500 nm were synthesized. The number average diameter of the colloidal core particles increased with increasing monomer concentration. Cationic shells

  12. Cationic antimicrobial peptides inactivate Shiga toxin-encoding bacteriophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Cogliano, Manuel E.; Hollmann, Axel; Martinez, Melina; Semorile, Liliana; Ghiringhelli, Pablo D.; Maffía, Paulo C.; Bentancor, Leticia V.

    2017-12-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx) is the principal virulence factor during Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infections. We have previously reported the inactivation of bacteriophage encoding Stx after treatment with chitosan, a linear polysaccharide polymer with cationic properties. Cationic antimicrobial peptides (cAMPs) are short linear aminoacidic sequences, with a positive net charge, which display bactericidal or bacteriostatic activity against a wide range of bacterial species. They are promising novel antibiotics since they have shown bactericidal effects against multiresistant bacteria. To evaluate whether cationic properties are responsible for bacteriophage inactivation, we tested seven cationic peptides with proven antimicrobial activity as anti-bacteriophage agents, and one random sequence cationic peptide with no antimicrobial activity as a control. We observed bacteriophage inactivation after incubation with five cAMPs, but no inactivating activity was observed with the random sequence cationic peptide or with the non alpha helical cAMP Omiganan. Finally, to confirm peptide-bacteriophage interaction, zeta potential was analyzed by following changes on bacteriophage surface charges after peptide incubation. According to our results we could propose that: 1) direct interaction of peptides with phage is a necessary step for bacteriophage inactivation, 2) cationic properties are necessary but not sufficient for bacteriophage inactivation, and 3) inactivation by cationic peptides could be sequence (or structure) specific. Overall our data suggest that these peptides could be considered a new family of molecules potentially useful to decrease bacteriophage replication and Stx expression.

  13. CATION EXCHANGE METHOD FOR THE RECOVERY OF PROTACTINIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studier, M.H.; Sullivan, J.C.

    1959-07-14

    A cation exchange prccess is described for separating protactinium values from thorium values whereby they are initially adsorbed together from an aqueous 0.1 to 2 N hydrochloric acid on a cation exchange resin in a column. Then selectively eluting the thorium by an ammonium sulfate solution and subsequently eluting the protactinium by an oxalate solution.

  14. pi-Dimers of end-capped oligopyrrole cation radicals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haare, van J.A.E.H.; Groenendaal, L.; Havinga, E.E.; Janssen, R.A.J.; Meijer, E.W.

    1996-01-01

    In two consecutive one-electron oxidations, oligopyrroles substituted with phenyl capping groups (PhPynPh, n = 2–4) can be oxidized reversibly to give stable cation radicals and dications. Spectroelectrochemical studies give direct evidence that diamagnetic p-dimers of cation radicals are formed in

  15. Cation exchange of 53 elements in nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, S.F.; Alarid, J.E.; Hamond, C.F.; McLeod, M.J.; Roensch, F.R.; Rein, J.E.

    1978-02-01

    Cation-exchange distribution data are presented for 53 elements from 3 to 12M HNO 3 for three strong-acid resins, having cross-linkages of 8%, 4%, and macroporous. Data obtained by 16- to 18-h dynamic batch contacts are compared to cation-exchange distribution data from strong HCl and HClO 4

  16. Base Cation Leaching From the Canopy of a Rubber ( Hevea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Base cations are essential to the sustainability of forest ecosystems. They are important for neutralizing the acidifying effects of atmospheric deposition. There is the need for in-depth understanding of base cation depletion and leaching from forest canopy. This is important particularly due to the increasing acidification and ...

  17. Cationic Antimicrobial Peptides Inactivate Shiga Toxin-Encoding Bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel E. Del Cogliano

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin (Stx is the principal virulence factor during Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC infections. We have previously reported the inactivation of bacteriophage encoding Stx after treatment with chitosan, a linear polysaccharide polymer with cationic properties. Cationic antimicrobial peptides (cAMPs are short linear aminoacidic sequences, with a positive net charge, which display bactericidal or bacteriostatic activity against a wide range of bacterial species. They are promising novel antibiotics since they have shown bactericidal effects against multiresistant bacteria. To evaluate whether cationic properties are responsible for bacteriophage inactivation, we tested seven cationic peptides with proven antimicrobial activity as anti-bacteriophage agents, and one random sequence cationic peptide with no antimicrobial activity as a control. We observed bacteriophage inactivation after incubation with five cAMPs, but no inactivating activity was observed with the random sequence cationic peptide or with the non-alpha helical cAMP Omiganan. Finally, to confirm peptide-bacteriophage interaction, zeta potential was analyzed by following changes on bacteriophage surface charges after peptide incubation. According to our results we could propose that: (1 direct interaction of peptides with phage is a necessary step for bacteriophage inactivation, (2 cationic properties are necessary but not sufficient for bacteriophage inactivation, and (3 inactivation by cationic peptides could be sequence (or structure specific. Overall our data suggest that these peptides could be considered a new family of molecules potentially useful to decrease bacteriophage replication and Stx expression.

  18. Cation substitution induced blue-shift of optical band gap

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cation substitution induced blue-shift of optical band gap in nanocrystalline Zn ( 1 − x ) Ca x O thin films deposited by sol–gel dip coating technique ... thin films giving 13.03% enhancement in theenergy gap value due to the electronic perturbation caused by cation substitution as well as deterioration in crystallinity.

  19. In vivo toxicity of cationic micelles and liposomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Kristina Bram; Northeved, Helle; Ek, Pramod Kumar

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated toxicity of nanocarriers comprised of cationic polymer and lipid components often used in gene and drug delivery, formulated as cationic micelles and liposomes. Rats were injected intravenously with 10, 25 or 100 mg/kg and sacrificed after 24 or 48 h, or 24 h after the las...

  20. 210Pb, 230Th, and 10Be in Central Indian Basin seamount sediments: Signatures of degassing and hydrothermal alteration of recent origin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nath, B.N.; Borole, D.V.; Aldahan, A.; Patil, S; Mascarenhas-Pereira, M.B.L.; Possnert, G.; Ericsson, T.; Ramaswamy, V.; Gupta, S

    , 230 Th, and 10 Be in Central Indian Basin seamount sediments: Signatures of degassing and hydrothermal alteration of recent origin B. N. Nath, 1 D. V. Borole, 1 A. Aldahan, 2 S. K. Patil, 3 M. B. L. Mascarenhas-Pereira, 1 G. Possnert, 4 T. Ericsson, 2... V. Ramaswamy, 1 and S. M. Gupta 1 Received 4 March 2008; revised 17 March 2008; accepted 8 April 2008; published 14 May 2008. [1] Isotopic ( 210 Pb, 238 U- 230 Th, 10 Be), major and trace elements, and micromorphological and microchemical data, were...

  1. What goes up might come down: Backflow in the conduits of persistently degassing volcanoes and ramifications for melt-inclusion analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suckale, J.; Qin, Z.; Picchi, D.; Keller, T.

    2017-12-01

    Many active volcanoes erupt significantly less magma than they degas, implying that large quantities of magma must descend back into the plumbing system after degassing. The resulting bidirectional flow field in the volcanic conduit is fundamentally unstable. These instabilities are important to understand, because they likely control the episodicity of eruptive behavior observed at persistently degassing volcanoes. Laboratory experiments have provided invaluable insights into the flow regimes that may arise in volcanic conduits, but are not straightforward to scale up to volcanic systems. The goal of this study is to use direct numerical simulations to virtually reproduce the analogue experiments by Stevenson and Blake, 1998, compare them to simple analytical models and gain insights into the different flow regimes and interface instabilities observed in actual volcanic conduits. Direct numerical simulations provide a compelling complement to analogue experiments, because they are not constrained by the scales or flow properties achievable in a laboratory setting. By linking virtual and analogue experiments, we show that the interface between ascending and descending fluid is not usually stationary in volcanic conduits (see fig). The intuition that buoyant, volatile-rich magma moves up while heavy, degassed magma moves down is hence not generally true in bidirectional conduit flow. Instead, our results show that a potentially significant portion of the volatile-rich magma flows downwards despite its positive buoyancy - a process commonly referred to as backflow. The existence of backflow in volcanic conduits has potentially important ramifications for understanding melt-inclusion trends, because it affects exsolved and dissolved volatile components differently. Our preliminary results suggest that carbon dioxide bubbles exsolved at depth tend to decouple from the backflow and escape into the upward moving portion of the fluid, while dissolved water is recycled

  2. Cation binding at the node of Ranvier: I. Localization of binding sites during development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagoren, J C; Raine, C S; Suzuki, K

    1982-06-17

    Cations are known to bind to the node of Ranvier and the paranodal regions of myelinated fibers. The integrity of these specialized structures is essential for normal conduction. Sites of cation binding can be microscopically identified by the electrondense histochemical reaction product formed by the precipitate of copper sulfate/potassium ferrocyanide. This technique was used to study the distribution of cation binding during normal development of myelinating fibers. Sciatic nerves of C57B1 mice, at 1, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 13, 16, 18, 24 and 30 days of age, were prepared for electron microscopy following fixation in phosphate-buffered 2.5% glutaraldehyde and 1% osmic acid, microdissection and incubation in phosphate-buffered 0.1 M cupric sulfate followed by 0.1 M potassium ferrocyanide. Localization of reaction product was studied by light and electron microscopy. By light microscopy, no reaction product was observed prior to 9 days of age. At 13 days, a few nodes and paranodes exhibited reaction product. This increased in frequency and intensity up to 30 days when almost all nodes or paranodes exhibited reaction product. Ultrastructurally, diffuse reaction product was first observed at 3 days of age in the axoplasm of the node, in the paranodal extracellular space of the terminal loops, in the Schwann cell proper and in the terminal loops of Schwann cell cytoplasm. When myelinated axons fulfilled the criteria for mature nodes, reaction product was no longer observed in the Schwann cell cytoplasm, while the intensity of reaction product in the nodal axoplasm and paranodal extracellular space of the terminal loops increased. Reaction product in the latter site appeared to be interrupted by the transverse bands. These results suggest that cation binding accompanies nodal maturity and that the Schwann cell may play a role in production or storage of the cation binding substance during myelinogenesis and development.

  3. Cation interdiffusion in polycrystalline calcium and strontium titanate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, E.P.; Jain, H.; Smyth, D.M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses a method that has been developed to study bulk lattice interdiffusion between calcium and strontium titanate by fabrication of a diffusion couple using cosintering. The measured interdiffusion coefficients, D(C), indicate that strontium impurity diffusion in calcium titanate occurs at a faster rate than calcium impurity diffusion in strontium titanate. These interdiffusion coefficients are composition independent when the concentration of the calcium cation exceeds that of the strontium cation; otherwise D(C) is strongly composition dependent. Investigations into the effect of cation nonstoichiometry give results that are consistent with a defect incorporation reaction in which excess TiO 2 , within the solid solubility limit, produces A-site cation vacancies as compensating defects. The interdiffusion coefficients increase with increasing concentrations of TiO 2 , so it is concluded that interdiffusion of these alkaline-earth cations in their titanates occurs via a vacancy mechanism

  4. Thermochemical stability of Soviet macroporous sulfonated cation-exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rukhlyada, N.N.; Plotnikova, V.P.; Roginskaya, B.S.; Znamenskii, Yu.P.; Zavodovskaya, A.S.; Dobrova, E.I.

    1988-10-20

    The purpose of this work was to study the influence of macroporosity on the thermochemical stability of sulfonated cation-exchangers. The investigations were carried out on commercial macroporous sulfonated cation-exchangers based on styrene-divinylbenzene copolymers. Study of the thermochemical stability of macroporous sulfonated cation-exchangers in dilute hydrogen peroxide solutions showed that the type of macroporosity has virtually no influence on their stability. The determining factor in thermal stability of macroporous cation-exchangers, as of the gel type, is the degree of cross-linking of the polymer matrix. The capacity loss of macroporous cation-exchangers during oxidative thermolysis is caused by destruction of the macromolecular skeleton and elution of fragments of polar chains containing sulfo groups into the solution.

  5. Pore size matters for potassium channel conductance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldenhauer, Hans; Pincuntureo, Matías

    2016-01-01

    Ion channels are membrane proteins that mediate efficient ion transport across the hydrophobic core of cell membranes, an unlikely process in their absence. K+ channels discriminate K+ over cations with similar radii with extraordinary selectivity and display a wide diversity of ion transport rates, covering differences of two orders of magnitude in unitary conductance. The pore domains of large- and small-conductance K+ channels share a general architectural design comprising a conserved narrow selectivity filter, which forms intimate interactions with permeant ions, flanked by two wider vestibules toward the internal and external openings. In large-conductance K+ channels, the inner vestibule is wide, whereas in small-conductance channels it is narrow. Here we raise the idea that the physical dimensions of the hydrophobic internal vestibule limit ion transport in K+ channels, accounting for their diversity in unitary conductance. PMID:27619418

  6. Transcriptome analysis of beer-spoiling Lactobacillus brevis BSO 464 during growth in degassed and gassed beer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergsveinson, Jordyn; Friesen, Vanessa; Ziola, Barry

    2016-10-17

    Lactobacillus brevis BSO 464 (Lb464) is a beer-spoilage-related (BSR) isolate of interest given its unique physiological attributes; specifically, it is highly hop-tolerant and exhibits very rapid growth in pressurized/gassed beer. RNA sequencing was performed on Lb464 grown in pressurized and non-pressurized beer to determine important genetic mechanisms for growth in these environments. The data generated were compared against data in a previous transcriptional study of another lactic acid bacterium (LAB) during growth in beer, namely, Pediococcus claussenii ATCC BAA-344(T) (Pc344). Results revealed that the most important genetic elements for Lb464 growth in beer are related to biogenic amine metabolism, membrane transport and fortification, nutrient scavenging, and efficient transcriptional regulation. Comparison with the previous transcriptional study of Pc344 indicated that the total coding capacity (plasmid profile and genome size) of a LAB isolate allows for beer-spoilage virulence and adaptation to different beer environments, i.e., the ability to grow in degassed beer (during production) or gassed beer (packaged product). Further, differences in gene expression of Lb464 and Pc344 during mid-exponential growth in beer may dictate how rapidly each isolate exhausts particular carbon sources during. The presence of headspace pressure/dissolved CO2 was found to drive Lb464 transcription during mid-exponential growth in beer towards increasing cell wall and membrane modification, transport, osmoregulation, and DNA metabolism and transposition events. This transcriptional activity resembles transcriptional patterns or signatures observed in a viable, but non-culturable state established by non-related organisms, suggesting that Lb464 overall uses complex cellular regulation to maintain cell division and growth in the stressful beer environment. Additionally, increased expression of several hypothetical proteins, the hop-tolerance gene horC, and DNA repair and

  7. Monitoring diffuse degassing in monogentic volcanic field during magmatic reactivation: the case of El Hierro (Canary Islands, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Ocaña, C.; Feldman, R. C.; Pointer, Z. R.; Rodríguez, F.; Asensio-Ramos, M.; Melián, G.; Padrón, E.; Hernández, P. A.; Pérez, N. M.

    2017-12-01

    El Hierro (278 km2), the younger, smallest and westernmost island of the Canarian archipelago, is a 5-km-high edifice constructed by rapid constructive and destructive processes in 1.12 Ma, with a truncated trihedron shape and three convergent ridges of volcanic cones. It experienced a submarine eruption from 12 October, 2011 and 5 March 2012, off its southern coast that was the first one to be monitored from the beginning in the Canary Islands. As no visible emanations occur at the surface environment of El Hierro, diffuse degassing studies have become a useful geochemical tool to monitor the volcanic activity in this volcanic island. Diffuse CO2 emission has been monitored at El Hierro Island since 1998 in a yearly basis, with much higher frequency in the period 2011-2012. At each survey, about 600 sampling sites were selected to obtain a homogeneous distribution. Measurements of soil CO2 efflux were performed in situ following the accumulation chamber method. During pre-eruptive and eruptive periods, the diffuse CO2 emission released by the whole island experienced significant increases before the onset of the submarine eruption and the most energetic seismic events of the volcanic-seismic unrest (Melián et al., 2014. J. Geophys. Res. Solid Earth, 119, 6976-6991). The soil CO2 efflux values of the 2017 survey ranged from non-detectable to 53.1 g m-2 d-1. Statistical-graphical analysis of the data show two different geochemical populations; background (B) and peak (P) represented by 77.6% and 22.4% of the total data, respectively, with geometric means of 1.8 and 9.2 g m-2 d-1, respectively. Most of the area showed B values while the P values were mainly observed at the interception center of the three convergent ridges and the north of the island. To estimate the diffuse CO2 emission for the 2017 survey, we ran about 100 sGs simulations. The estimated 2017 diffuse CO2 output released to atmosphere by El Hierro was at 1,150 ± 42 t d-1, value higher than the

  8. Diffuse Carbon Dioxide Degassing Monitoring at Santa Ana-Izalco-Coatepeque Volcanic System, El Salvador, Central America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmos, R.; Barahona, F.; Cartagena, R.; Soriano, T.; Salazar, J.; Hernandez, P.; Perez, N.; Notsu, K.; Lopez, D.

    2001-12-01

    Santa Ana volcanic complex (0.22 Ma), located 40 Km west of San Salvador, comprises Santa Ana, Izalco, and Cerro Verde stratovolcanoes, the Coatepeque collapse caldera, as well as several cinder cones and explosion craters. Most recent activity has occurred at Izalco (1966) and Santa Ana which shows a permanent acidic crater lake with an intense fumarolic activity. In addition, Santa Ana exhibits a SO2-rich rising plume though no local seismicity has been reported. Weak fumarolic activity is also present at two locations within the Santa Ana volcanic complex: the summit crater of Izalco and Cerro Pacho at Coatepeque caldera. Other important structural features of this volcanic complex are two fault/fissure systems running NNW-SSE that can be identified by the alignment of the stratovolcanoes and numerous cinder cones and explosion craters. In January 2001, a 7.6 magnitude earthquake occurred about 150 Km SE of Santa Ana volcano. A soil gas and CO2 efflux survey was performed to evaluate the impact of this seismic event upon the diffuse degassing rates in Santa Ana volcanic complex in March 2001. A total of 450 soil gas and diffuse CO2 efflux measurements were carried out covering an area of 209.5 Km2. CO2 efflux ranged from non-detectable values to 293 gm-2d-1, with a median of 8.9 gm-2d-1 and an upper quartile of 5.2 gm-2d-1. The CO2 efflux spatial distribution reveals the existence of areas with CO2 efflux higher than 60 gm-2d-1 associated to the fault/fissure systems of NNW-SSE orientation. One of these areas, Cerro Pacho, was selected for the continuous monitoring of diffuse CO2 efflux in late May 2001. Secular variations of diffuse CO2 efflux ranged from 27.4 to 329 gm-2d-1 with a median of 130 gm-2d-1 and a quartile range of 59.3 gm-2d-1. An increasing trend of 43 gm-2d-1 was observed between May and August 2001 overlapped to high-frequency minor fluctuations related to meteorological variables' changes. However, a larger observation time-span is needed to

  9. Increasing Base Cations in Streams: Another Legacy of Deicing Salts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helton, A. M.; Barclay, J. R.; Bellucci, C.; Rittenhouse, C.

    2017-12-01

    Elevated use of deicing salts directly increases sodium chloride inputs to watersheds. Sodium can accumulate in soils over time and has the potential to leach other cations (e.g., calcium, magnesium, and potassium) from the soil through cation exchange. We hypothesize that increased use of deicing salts results in a legacy of soils depleted in non-sodium base cations with loss of cations to receiving waters. The goal of this project is to quantify temporal trends in base cations and chloride in streams and rivers across the United States. We used Weighted Regressions on Time, Discharge, and Season (WRTDS) to analyze trends in base cations. Our preliminary analysis of 10 rivers in Connecticut with chemical periods of record ranging from 24 - 64 years (median = 55 years), shows that the flux of base cations is increasing in all sites (25 - 366 103 meq ha-1 yr-1 yr-1), driven largely by increases in sodium (23 - 222 103 meq ha-1 yr-1 yr-1), the dominant cation in 7 of the sites. Chloride is also increasing at all sites (26 - 261 103 meq ha-1 yr-1 yr-1), which, in combination with salt use trends, suggests a road salt source for the increased sodium. Non-sodium cations are also increasing in 9 of the sites (8 - 54 103 meq ha-1 yr-1 yr-1), though they are not directly added with most deicing salts. We will compare these trends to other long-term sites across the United States, and quantify relationships between cation trends and land cover, road density, and snowfall.

  10. Thermodynamics and defect chemistry of substitutional and interstitial cation doping in layered α-V2O5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McColl, Kit; Johnson, Ian; Corà, Furio

    2018-05-25

    A systematic study of the location and energetics of cation dopants in α-V2O5 has been conducted using pair-potential methods, supplemented by first-principles calculations. The consequences of doping on intrinsic defect equilibria have been discussed and the effects of selected dopants on Li+ and Mg2+ diffusion energy barriers have been investigated.

  11. Cation and anion dependence of stable geometries and stabilization energies of alkali metal cation complexes with FSA(-), FTA(-), and TFSA(-) anions: relationship with physicochemical properties of molten salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuzuki, Seiji; Kubota, Keigo; Matsumoto, Hajime

    2013-12-19

    Stable geometries and stabilization energies (Eform) of the alkali metal complexes with bis(fluorosulfonyl)amide, (fluorosulfonyl)(trifluoromethylslufonyl)amide and bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide (FSA(-), FTA(-) and TFSA(-)) were studied by ab initio molecular orbital calculations. The FSA(-) complexes prefer the bidentate structures in which two oxygen atoms of two SO2 groups have contact with the metal cation. The FTA(-) and TFSA(-) complexes with Li(+) and Na(+) prefer the bidentate structures, while the FTA(-) and TFSA(-) complexes with Cs(+) prefer tridentate structures in which the metal cation has contact with two oxygen atoms of an SO2 group and one oxygen atom of another SO2 group. The two structures are nearly isoenergetic in the FTA(-) and TFSA(-) complexes with K(+) and Rb(+). The magnitude of Eform depends on the alkali metal cation significantly. The Eform calculated for the most stable TFSA(-) complexes with Li(+), Na(+), K(+), Rb(+) and Cs(+) cations at the MP2/6-311G** level are -137.2, -110.5, -101.1, -89.6, and -84.1 kcal/mol, respectively. The viscosity and ionic conductivity of the alkali TFSA molten salts have strong correlation with the magnitude of the attraction. The viscosity increases and the ionic conductivity decreases with the increase of the attraction. The melting points of the alkali TFSA and alkali BETA molten salts also have correlation with the magnitude of the Eform, which strongly suggests that the magnitude of the attraction play important roles in determining the melting points of these molten salts. The anion dependence of the Eform calculated for the complexes is small (less than 2.9 kcal/mol). This shows that the magnitude of the attraction is not the cause of the low melting points of alkali FTA molten salts compared with those of corresponding alkali TFSA molten salts. The electrostatic interactions are the major source of the attraction in the complexes. The electrostatic energies for the most stable TFSA

  12. Cation depletion by the sodium pump in red cells with pathologic cation leaks. Sickle cells and xerocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joiner, C H; Platt, O S; Lux, S E

    1986-12-01

    The mechanism by which sickle cells and xerocytic red cells become depleted of cations in vivo has not been identified previously. Both types of cells exhibit elevated permeabilities to sodium and potassium, in the case of sickle cells, when deoxygenated. The ouabain-insensitive fluxes of sodium and potassium were equivalent, however, in both cell types under these conditions. When incubated 18 hours in vitro, sickle cells lost cations but only when deoxygenated. This cation depletion was blocked by ouabain, removal of external potassium, or pretreatment with 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonate, which blocks the increase in cation permeability induced by deoxygenation. The loss of cation exhibited by oxygenated xerocytes similarly incubated was also blocked by ouabain. These data support the hypothesis that the elevated "passive" cation fluxes of xerocytes and deoxygenated sickle cells are not directly responsible for cation depletion of these cells; rather, these pathologic leaks interact with the sodium pump to produce a net loss of cellular cation.

  13. Comparison of "type I" and "type II" organic cation transport by organic cation transporters and organic anion-transporting polypeptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Montfoort, JE; Muller, M; Groothuis, GMM; Meijer, DKF; Koepsell, H; Meier, PJ

    Previous inhibition studies with taurocholate and cardiac glycosides suggested the presence of separate uptake systems for small "type I" (system1) and for bulky "type II" (system2) organic cations in rat hepatocytes. To identify the transport systems involved in type I and type II organic cation

  14. IRMPD Action Spectroscopy of Alkali Metal Cation-Cytosine Complexes: Effects of Alkali Metal Cation Size on Gas Phase Conformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, B.; Wu, R.R.; Polfer, N.C.; Berden, G.; Oomens, J.; Rodgers, M.T.

    2013-01-01

    The gas-phase structures of alkali metal cation-cytosine complexes generated by electrospray ionization are probed via infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectroscopy and theoretical calculations. IRMPD action spectra of five alkali metal cation-cytosine complexes exhibit both

  15. Spatial and temporal variations of diffuse CO_{2} degassing at the N-S volcanic rift-zone of Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain) during 2002-2015 period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Mar; Ingman, Dylan; Alexander, Scott; Barrancos, José; Rodríguez, Fátima; Melián, Gladys; Pérez, Nemesio M.

    2016-04-01

    Tenerife is the largest of the Canary Islands and, together with Gran Canaria Island, is the only one with a central volcanic complex that started to grow at about 3.5 Ma. Nowadays the central complex is formed by Las Cañadas caldera, a volcanic depression measuring 16×9 km that resulted from multiple vertical collapses and was partially filled by post-caldera volcanic products. Up to 297 mafic monogenetic cones have been recognized on Tenerife, and they represent the most common eruptive activity occurring on the island during the last 1 Ma (Dóniz et al., 2008). Most of the monogenetic cones are aligned following a triple junction-shaped rift system, as result of inflation produced by the concentration of emission vents and dykes in bands at 120o to one another as a result of minimum stress fracturing of the crust by a mantle upwelling. The main structural characteristic of the southern volcanic rift (N-S) of the island is an apparent absence of a distinct ridge, and a fan shaped distribution of monogenetic cones. Four main volcanic successions in the southern volcanic rift zone of Tenerife, temporally separated by longer periods (˜70 - 250 ka) without volcanic activity, have been identified (Kröchert and Buchner, 2008). Since there are currently no visible gas emissions at the N-S rift, diffuse degassing surveys have become an important geochemical tool for the surveillance of this volcanic system. We report here the last results of diffuse CO2 efflux survey at the N-S rift of Tenerife, performed using the accumulation chamber method in the summer period of 2015. The objectives of the surveys were: (i) to constrain the total CO2 output from the studied area and (ii) to evaluate occasional CO2 efflux surveys as a volcanic surveillance tool for the N-S rift of Tenerife. Soil CO2 efflux values ranged from non-detectable up to 31.7 g m-2 d-1. A spatial distribution map, constructed following the sequential Gaussian simulation (sGs) procedure, did not show an

  16. Anaerobic toxicity of cationic silver nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gitipour, Alireza; Thiel, Stephen W. [Biomedical, Chemical, and Environmental Engineering, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Scheckel, Kirk G. [USEPA, Office of Research and Development, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Tolaymat, Thabet, E-mail: tolaymat.thabet@epa.gov [USEPA, Office of Research and Development, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2016-07-01

    The microbial toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) stabilized with different capping agents was compared to that of Ag{sup +} under anaerobic conditions. Three AgNPs were investigated: (1) negatively charged citrate-coated AgNPs (citrate-AgNPs), (2) minimally charged polyvinylpyrrolidone coated AgNPs (PVP-AgNPs) and (3) positively charged branched polyethyleneimine coated AgNPs (BPEI-AgNPs). The AgNPs investigated in this experiment were similar in size (10–15 nm), spherical in shape, but varied in surface charge which ranged from highly negative to highly positive. While, at AgNPs concentrations lower than 5 mg L{sup −1}, the anaerobic decomposition process was not influenced by the presence of the nanoparticles, there was an observed impact on the diversity of the microbial community. At elevated concentrations (100 mg L{sup −1} as silver), only the cationic BPEI-AgNPs demonstrated toxicity similar in magnitude to that of Ag{sup +}. Both citrate and PVP-AgNPs did not exhibit toxicity at the 100 mg L{sup −1} as measured by biogas evolution. These findings further indicate the varying modes of action for nanoparticle toxicity and represent one of the few studies that evaluate end-of-life management concerns with regards to the increasing use of nanomaterials in our everyday life. These findings also highlight some of the concerns with a one size fits all approach to the evaluation of environmental health and safety concerns associated with the use of nanoparticles. - Highlights: • At concentrations -1 the anaerobic decomposition process was not impacted. • An impact on the microbial community at concentrations -1 were observed. • At high concentrations (100 mg L{sup −1}), the cationic BPEI-AgNPs demonstrated toxicity. • Toxicity was demonstrated without the presence of oxidative dissolution of silver. • A one size fits all approach for the evaluation of NPs may not be accurate.

  17. Vibrational Spectroscopy of Cation and Anion Channelrhodopsins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Adrian S.

    Optogenetics is a technique to control and monitor cell activity with light by expression of specific microbial rhodopsins. Cation channelrhodopsins (CCRs) and anion channelrhodopsins (ACRs) have been demonstrated to activate and silence cell activity, respectively. In this dissertation, the molecular mechanisms of two channelrhodopsins are studied: a CCR from Chlamydomonas augustae (CaChR1) and an ACR from Guillardia theta (GtACR1). The recently discovered GtACR1is especially interesting, as it achieves neural silencing with 1/1000th of the light intensity compared to previous microbial rhodopsin silencing ion pumps. Static and time-resolved resonance Raman, FTIR difference, and UV-visible spectroscopies were utilized in addition to various biochemical and genetic techniques to explore the molecular mechanisms of these channelrhodopsins. In CaChR1, Glu169 and Asp299 residues are located nearby the Schiff base (SB) similar to the homologous residues Asp85 and Asp212, which exist in an ionized state in unphotolyzed bacteriorhodopsin (BR) and play a key role in proton pumping. We observe significant changes in the protonation states of the SB, Glu169, and Asp299 of CaChR1 leading up to the open-channel P2 state, where all three groups exist in a charge neutral state. This unusual charge neutrality along with the position of these groups in the CaChR1 ion channel suggests that charge neutrality plays an important role in cation gating and selectivity in these low efficiency CCRs. Significant differences exist in the photocycle and protonation/hydrogen bonding states of key residues inGtACR1compared to BR and CaChR1. Resonance Raman studies reveal that in the unphotolyzed state of GtACR1, residues Glu68, Ser97 (BR Asp85 homolog), and Asp234 (BR Asp212 homolog) located near the SB exist in charge neutral states. Furthermore, upon K formation, these residues do not change their protonation states. At room temperature, a slow decay of the red-shifted K intermediate is

  18. Cation-π interaction of the univalent sodium cation with [2.2.2]paracyclophane: Experimental and theoretical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makrlík, Emanuel; Sýkora, David; Böhm, Stanislav; Vaňura, Petr

    2018-02-01

    By employing electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), it was proven experimentally that the univalent sodium cation (Na+) forms with [2.2.2]paracyclophane (C24H24) the cationic complex [Na(C24H24)]+. Further, applying quantum chemical DFT calculations, the most probable structure of the [Na(C24H24)]+ complex was derived. In the resulting complex with a symmetry very close to C3, the "central" cation Na+, fully located in the cavity of the parent [2.2.2]paracyclophane ligand, is bound to all three benzene rings of [2.2.2]paracyclophane via cation-π interaction. Finally, the interaction energy, E(int), of the considered cation-π complex [Na(C24H24)]+ was found to be -267.3 kJ/mol, confirming the formation of this fascinating complex species as well.

  19. Impact of monovalent cations on soil structure. Part I. Results of an Iranian soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahani, Elham; Emami, Hojat; Keller, Thomas; Fotovat, Amir; Khorassani, Reza

    2018-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of monovalent cations on clay dispersion, aggregate stability, soil pore size distribution, and saturated hydraulic conductivity on agricultural soil in Iran. The soil was incubated with treatment solutions containing different concentrations (0-54.4 mmol l-1) of potassium and sodium cations. The treatment solutions included two levels of electrical conductivity (EC=3 or 6 dS m-1) and six K:Na ratios per electrical conductivity level. At both electrical conductivity levels, spontaneously dispersible clay increased with increasing K concentration, and with increasing K:Na ratio. A negative linear relationship between percentage of water-stable aggregates and spontaneously dispersible clay was observed. Clay dispersion generally reduced the mean pore size, presumably due to clogging of pores, resulting in increased water retention. At both electrical conductivity levels, hydraulic conductivity increased with increasing exchangeable potassium percentage at low exchangeable potassium percentage values, but decreased with further increases in exchangeable potassium percentage at higher exchangeable potassium percentage. This is in agreement with earlier studies, but seems in conflict with our data showing increasing spontaneously dispersible clay with increasing exchangeable potassium percentage. Our findings show that clay dispersion increased with increasing K concentration and increasing K:Na ratio, demonstrating that K can have negative impacts on soil structure.

  20. Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulation of Cation Diffusion in Low-K Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Low thermal conductivity (low-K) ceramic materials are of interest to the aerospace community for use as the thermal barrier component of coating systems for turbine engine components. In particular, zirconia-based materials exhibit both low thermal conductivity and structural stability at high temperature, making them suitable for such applications. Because creep is one of the potential failure modes, and because diffusion is a mechanism by which creep takes place, we have performed computer simulations of cation diffusion in a variety of zirconia-based low-K materials. The kinetic Monte Carlo simulation method is an alternative to the more widely known molecular dynamics (MD) method. It is designed to study "infrequent-event" processes, such as diffusion, for which MD simulation can be highly inefficient. We describe the results of kinetic Monte Carlo computer simulations of cation diffusion in several zirconia-based materials, specifically, zirconia doped with Y, Gd, Nb and Yb. Diffusion paths are identified, and migration energy barriers are obtained from density functional calculations and from the literature. We present results on the temperature dependence of the diffusivity, and on the effects of the presence of oxygen vacancies in cation diffusion barrier complexes as well.

  1. Removal of radiocesium using cation exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita-Murase, Yuko; Mizumura, Ryosuke; Tachibana, Yoshitaka; Kanazawa, Hideko

    2013-01-01

    Cation exchange resins (calcium polystyrene sulfonate, Ca-resin and sodium polystyrene sulfonate, Na-resin) have been used as agents to improve hyperkerlemia. For removing 137 Cs from the human body, the adsorption ability of the resin for 137 Cs was examined and evaluated. Resin (0.03 g) and 137 Cs (ca.1 kBq) were introduced into 3 mL of water, the Japanese Pharmacopoeia 1st fluid for a dissolution test (pH 1.2) and 2nd fluid (pH 6.8), respectively, and shaken. After 1-3 hours, the 137 Cs adsorption (%) of Na-resin was 99% in water, 60% in a pH 1.2 fluid and, 66% in a pH 6.8 fluid. By adding potassium, the 137 Cs adsorption (%) of Ca-resin was reduced. However, the 137 Cs adsorption (%) of Na-resin was almost unchanged. These results show that both resins have adsorption ability for 137 Cs in the stomach and the intestines. Therefore, the proposed method will be an effective means in the case of a radiological emergency due to 137 Cs. (author)

  2. Cyanide ion complexation by a cationic borane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Ching-Wen; Gabbaï, François P

    2008-02-14

    While we have previously reported that [1-(Mes2B)-8-(Me3NCH2)-C10H6]+ ([2]+) complexes fluoride ions to form [1-(Mes2FB)-8-(Me3NCH2)-C10H6] (2-F), we now show that this cationic borane also complexes cyanide to form [1-(Mes2(NC)B)-8-(Me3NCH2)-C10H6] (2-CN). This reaction also occurs under biphasic conditions (H2O-CHCl3) and may serve to transport cyanide in organic phases. The zwitterionic cyanoborate 2-CN has been fully characterized and its crystal structure determined. UV-vis titration experiments carried out in THF indicate that [2]+ has a higher affinity for fluoride (K > 10(8) M(-1)) than cyanide (K = 8.0 (+/-0.5) x 10(5) M(-1)). Steric effects which impede cyanide binding to the sterically congested boron center of [2]+ are most likely at the origin of this selectivity. Finally, electrochemical studies indicate that [2]+ is significantly more electrophilic than its neutral precursor 1-(Mes2B)-8-(Me2NCH2)-(C10H6) (1). These studies also show that reduction of [2]+ is irreversible, possibly because of elimination of the NMe3 moiety under reductive conditions. In fact, [2]OTf reacts with NaBH4 to afford 1-(Mes2B)-8-(CH3)-(C10H6) (4) which has also been fully characterized.

  3. Interaction of cationic drugs with liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Brett A; Chauhan, Anuj

    2009-10-20

    Interactions between cationic drugs and anionic liposomes were studied by measuring binding of drugs and the effect of binding on liposome permeability. The measurements were analyzed in the context of a continuum model based on electrostatic interactions and a Langmuir isotherm. Experiments and modeling indicate that, although electrostatic interactions are important, the fraction of drug sequestered in the double-layer is negligible. The majority of drug enters the bilayer with the charged regions interacting with the charged lipid head groups and the lipophilic regions associated with the bilayer. The partitioning of the drug can be described by a Langmuir isotherm with the electrostatic interactions increasing the sublayer concentration of the drug. The binding isotherms are similar for all tricyclic antidepressants (TCA). Bupivacaine (BUP) binds significantly less compared to TCA because its structure is such that the charged region has minimal interactions with the lipid heads once the BUP molecule partitions inside the bilayer. Conversely, the TCAs are linear with distinct hydrophilic and lipophilic regions, allowing the lipophilic regions to lie inside the bilayer and the hydrophilic regions to protrude out. This conformation maximizes the permeability of the bilayer, leading to an increased release of a hydrophilic fluorescent dye from liposomes.

  4. Degassing behavior of Mt. Etna volcano (Italy) before and during the 2008-2009 eruption, inferred from crater plume and soil gas measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Giuseppe; La Spina, Alessandro; Giammanco, Salvatore; Burton, Michael; Caltabiano, Tommaso; Murè, Filippo; Randazzo, Daniele; Lopez, Manuela; Bruno, Nicola; Longo, Vincenza

    2010-05-01

    The evolution of magmatic degassing that preceded and accompanied the 2008-2009 Mt. Etna eruption was monitored by using a combination of: i) near-daily SO2 flux measurements; ii) calculated HCl and HF fluxes, obtained combining the daily SO2 flux values with discrete FTIR measurements of SO2/HCl and SO2/HF molar ratios; iii) periodic soil CO2 flux measurements. Thanks to the differential release of magmatic gas species from an ascending magma body we were able to track the magma transfer process in the volcano plumbing system from depth (gas-rich magma ascending and degassing via the central conduit system prior to eruption at the peripheral SEC. Conversely, the 15 month long 2008-09 eruption event was characterized by quasi steady state magma supply. The calculated volume of magma required to produce the observed SO2 flux during the 2008-2009 eruption closely matches the volume of erupted magma. This "eruptive" steady-state would indicate an almost perfect process of magma migration and eruption at the surface, without substantial storage within the volcano plumbing system.

  5. Effects of Cations on Corrosion of Inconel 625 in Molten Chloride Salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ming; Ma, Hongfang; Wang, Mingjing; Wang, Zhihua; Sharif, Adel

    2016-04-01

    Hot corrosion of Inconel 625 in sodium chloride, potassium chloride, magnesium chloride, calcium chloride and their mixtures with different compositions is conducted at 900°C to investigate the effects of cations in chloride salts on corrosion behavior of the alloy. XRD, SEM/EDS were used to analyze the compositions, phases, and morphologies of the corrosion products. The results showed that Inconel 625 suffers more severe corrosion in alkaline earth metal chloride molten salts than alkaline metal chloride molten salts. For corrosion in mixture salts, the corrosion rate increased with increasing alkaline earth metal chloride salt content in the mixture. Cations in the chloride molten salts mainly affect the thermal and chemical properties of the salts such as vapor pressure and hydroscopicities, which can affect the basicity of the molten salt. Corrosion of Inconel 625 in alkaline earth metal chloride salts is accelerated with increasing basicity.

  6. Electrochemical insertion in solid media of alkali cations in carbonated host structures (polyacetylene, fullerene and graphite)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemont, Sylvain

    1994-01-01

    This research thesis reports the investigation of electrochemical insertion of alkali cations in different host carbon containing structures (polyacetylene, fullerene, graphite). After a recall of the main characteristics of the three considered compounds, the author reports a bibliographical survey, describes the different compounds which can be used as solid electrolytes and explains the choice of the studied compounds with respect to their phase diagrams, ionic conductivity, electrochemical stability range. He describes the experimental methods, discusses the results obtained by intercalation of alkali cations (Li + , Na + , K + ) in polyacetylene. He discusses the electrochemical and structural results obtained on intercalation compounds of lithium and sodium ions in fullerene. The structures of several phases have been obtained by electron diffraction. Preliminary studies of electron energy loss spectrometry (EELS) are reported. The last part compares the results obtained on two types of graphite: pellets and spherules [fr

  7. Improvement in ionic conductivities of poly-(2-vinylpyridine) by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    cal properties, easy fabrication into thin films of desired sizes and their ability to ... liquid state can be used for electroplating and water purifi- cation. The merits of ... that its ionic conductivity increases very appreciably and. P-2VP-HI proved to ...

  8. Codes of conduct in public schools: a legal perspective

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erna Kinsey

    cation change in South Africa, particularly the transformation of public schools ... been granted legal personality to act as "juristic persons" (i.e. legal persons ..... cess, a decision is made to amend, or repeal, the code of conduct, de- pending on ...

  9. Cation exchange properties of zeolites in hyper alkaline aqueous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Tendeloo, Leen; de Blochouse, Benny; Dom, Dirk; Vancluysen, Jacqueline; Snellings, Ruben; Martens, Johan A; Kirschhock, Christine E A; Maes, André; Breynaert, Eric

    2015-02-03

    Construction of multibarrier concrete based waste disposal sites and management of alkaline mine drainage water requires cation exchangers combining excellent sorption properties with a high stability and predictable performance in hyper alkaline media. Though highly selective organic cation exchange resins have been developed for most pollutants, they can serve as a growth medium for bacterial proliferation, impairing their long-term stability and introducing unpredictable parameters into the evolution of the system. Zeolites represent a family of inorganic cation exchangers, which naturally occur in hyper alkaline conditions and cannot serve as an electron donor or carbon source for microbial proliferation. Despite their successful application as industrial cation exchangers under near neutral conditions, their performance in hyper alkaline, saline water remains highly undocumented. Using Cs(+) as a benchmark element, this study aims to assess the long-term cation exchange performance of zeolites in concrete derived aqueous solutions. Comparison of their exchange properties in alkaline media with data obtained in near neutral solutions demonstrated that the cation exchange selectivity remains unaffected by the increased hydroxyl concentration; the cation exchange capacity did however show an unexpected increase in hyper alkaline media.

  10. Effect of alkali metal cations on anodic dissolution of gold in cyanide solutions. Potentiodynamic measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bek, R.Yu.; Rogozhnikov, N.A.; Kosolapov, G.V.

    1998-01-01

    It is shown that gold dissolution rate in cyanic solutions in Li + , Na + , K + , Cs + cation series increases basically and decreases under cation concentration increasing. Cation effect on current value is caused by cations drawing in dense layer. A model of dense part of double layer with two Helmholtz planes (anion and cation) is suggested. Effect of nature and concentration of alkali metal cations on gold dissolution rate is explained on the base of the model [ru

  11. Relation between heat of vaporization, ion transport, molar volume, and cation-anion binding energy for ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borodin, Oleg

    2009-09-10

    A number of correlations between heat of vaporization (H(vap)), cation-anion binding energy (E(+/-)), molar volume (V(m)), self-diffusion coefficient (D), and ionic conductivity for 29 ionic liquids have been investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations that employed accurate and validated many-body polarizable force fields. A significant correlation between D and H(vap) has been found, while the best correlation was found for -log(DV(m)) vs H(vap) + 0.28E(+/-). A combination of enthalpy of vaporization and a fraction of the cation-anion binding energy was suggested as a measure of the effective cohesive energy for ionic liquids. A deviation of some ILs from the reported master curve is explained based upon ion packing and proposed diffusion pathways. No general correlations were found between the ion diffusion coefficient and molecular volume or the diffusion coefficient and cation/anion binding energy.

  12. Evaluation of phenomena affecting diffusion of cations in compacted bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muurinen, A.; Lehikoinen, J.

    1995-04-01

    In a number of diffusion studies, contradictions between the apparent diffusivities of cations and their distribution coefficients in bentonite have been found. Two principal reasons have been offered as explanations for this discrepancy; diffusion of the sorbed cations, often called surface diffusion, and the decrease of sorption in compacted clay compared to a sorption value obtained from a batch experiment. In the study the information available from the literature on sorption-diffusion mechanisms of cations in bentonite has been compiled and re-interpreted in order to improve the understanding of the diffusion process. (103 refs., 23 figs., 8 tabs.)

  13. Microscopic theory of cation exchange in CdSe nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Florian D; Spiegel, Leo L; Norris, David J; Erwin, Steven C

    2014-10-10

    Although poorly understood, cation-exchange reactions are increasingly used to dope or transform colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots). We use density-functional theory and kinetic Monte Carlo simulations to develop a microscopic theory that explains structural, optical, and electronic changes observed experimentally in Ag-cation-exchanged CdSe nanocrystals. We find that Coulomb interactions, both between ionized impurities and with the polarized nanocrystal surface, play a key role in cation exchange. Our theory also resolves several experimental puzzles related to photoluminescence and electrical behavior in CdSe nanocrystals doped with Ag.

  14. Cation Exchange Capacity of Biochar: An urgent method modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munera, Jose; Martinsen, Vegard; Mulder, Jan; Tau Strand, Line; Cornelissen, Gerard

    2017-04-01

    A better understanding of the cation exchange capacity (CEC) values of biochar and its acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) is crucial when tailoring a single biochar for a particular soil and crop. Literature values for the CEC of biochar are surprisingly variable, commonly ranging from 5 to 50 cmol+/Kg even as high as 69 to 204 cmol+/Kg and often poorly reproducible, suggesting methodological problems. Ashes and very fine pores in biochar may complicate the analysis and thus compromise the results. Here, we modify and critically assess different steps in a common method for CEC determination in biochar and investigate how the measured CEC may be affected by slow cation diffusion from micro-pores. We modified the existing ammonium acetate (NH4-OAc) method (buffered at pH 7), based on displaced ammonium (NH4+) in potassium chloride (KCl) extracts after removing excess NH4-OAc with alcohol in batch mode. We used pigeon pea biochar (produced at 350 ˚C; particle size 0.5mm to 2mm) to develop the method and we tested its reproducibility in biochars with different ANC. The biochar sample (1.00g) was pH-adjusted to 7 after 2 days of equilibration, using hydrochloric acid (HCl), and washed with water until the conductivity of the water was modified method were highly reproducible and that 1 day shaking with NH4OAc and KCl is enough to saturate the exchange sites with NH4+ and subsequently with K+. The biochar to NH4OAc solution ratio did not affect the measured CEC. Three washings with at least 15 ml alcohol are required to remove excess NH4-OAc. We found the CEC of biochar with the displacement method from pigeon pea, corncob, rice husk and cacao shell to be 26.4(±0.3), 19.2(±0.5), 20.5(±0.4), 46.5±(0.2) cmol+/Kg, respectively. The selected batch experiment allows a large sample throughput, less laboratory equipment is needed and shaking ensures better contact between the extracting solution and the exchange sites.

  15. Quantitative imaging of cation adsorption site densities in undisturbed soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keck, Hannes; Strobel, Bjarne W.; Gustafsson, Jon-Petter; Koestel, John

    2017-04-01

    The vast majority of present soil system models assume a homogeneous distribution and accessibility of cation adsorption sites (CAS) within soil structural units like e.g. soil horizons. This is however in conflict with several recent studies finding that CAS in soils are not uniformly but patchily distributed at and below the cm-scale. It is likely that the small-scale distribution of CAS has significant impact on the performance of these models. However, systematic approaches to map CAS densities in undisturbed soil with 3-D resolution that could lead to respective model improvements are still lacking. We therefore investigated the 3-D distribution of the CAS in undisturbed soils using X-ray scanning and barium ions as a contrast agent. We appraised the validity of the approach by comparing X-ray image-derived cation exchange coefficients (CEC) with ones obtained using the ammonium acetate method. In the process, we evaluated whether there were larger CAS concentrations at aggregate and biopore boundaries as it is often hypothesized. We sampled eight small soil cores (approx. 10 ccm) from different locations with contrasting soil texture and organic matter contents. The samples were first saturated with a potassium chloride solution (0.1 mol per liter), whereupon a 3-D X-ray image was taken. Then, the potassium chloride solution was flushed out with a barium chloride solution (0.3 mol per liter) with barium replacing the potassium from the CAS due to its larger exchange affinity. After X-ray images as well as electrical conductivity in the effluent indicated that the entire sample had been saturated with the barium chloride, the sample was again rinsed using the potassium chloride solution. When the rinsing was complete a final 3-D X-ray image was acquired. The difference images between final and initial 3-D X-ray images were interpreted as depicting the adsorbed barium as the density of barium exceeds the one of potassium by more than 2 times. The X-ray image

  16. Alkali Metal Cation versus Proton and Methyl Cation Affinities: Structure and Bonding Mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Boughlala, Z.; Guerra, C.F.; Bickelhaupt, F.M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We have analyzed the structure and bonding of gas?phase Cl?X and [HCl?X]+ complexes for X+=?H+, CH3 +, Li+, and Na+, using relativistic density functional theory (DFT). We wish to establish a quantitative trend in affinities of the anionic and neutral Lewis bases Cl? and HCl for the various cations. The Cl?X bond becomes longer and weaker along X+?=?H+, CH3 +, Li+, and Na+. Our main purpose is to understand the heterolytic bonding mechanism behind the intrinsic (i.e., in the absence ...

  17. Converting Hg-1212 to Tl-2212 via Tl-Hg cation exchange in combination with Tl cation intercalation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Hua; Wu, Judy Z

    2007-01-01

    In a cation exchange process developed recently for epitaxy of HgBa 2 CaCu 2 O 6 (Hg-1212) thin films, TlBa 2 CaCu 2 O 7 (Tl-1212) or Tl 2 Ba 2 CaCu 2 O 9 (Tl-2212) precursor films were employed as the precursor matrices and Hg-1212 was obtained by replacing Tl cations on the precursor lattice with Hg cations. The reversibility of the cation exchange dictates directly the underlying mechanism. Following our recent success in demonstrating a complete reversibility within '1212' structure, we show the conversion from Hg-1212 to Tl-2212 can be achieved via two steps: conversion from Hg-1212 to Tl-1212 followed by Tl intercalation to form double Tl-O plans in each unit cell. The demonstrated reversibility of the cation exchange process has confirmed the process is a thermal perturbation of weakly bonded cations on the lattice and the direction of the process is determined by the population ratio between the replacing cations and that to be replaced

  18. Endomembrane Cation Transporters and Membrane Trafficking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sze, Heven [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Cell Biology & Molecular Genetics

    2017-04-01

    Multicellular, as well as unicellular, organisms have evolved mechanisms to regulate ion and pH homeostasis in response to developmental cues and to a changing environment. The working hypothesis is that the balance of fluxes mediated by diverse transporters at the plasma membrane and in subcellular organelles determines ionic cellular distribution, which is critical for maintenance of membrane potential, pH control, osmolality, transport of nutrients, and protein activity. An emerging theme in plant cell biology is that cells respond and adapt to diverse cues through changes of the dynamic endomembrane system. Yet we know very little about the transporters that might influence the operation of the secretory system in plants. Here we focus on transporters that influence alkali cation and pH homeostasis, mainly in the endomembrane/ secretory system. The endomembrane system of eukaryote cells serves several major functions: i) sort cargo (e.g. enzymes, transporters or receptors) to specific destinations, ii) modulate the protein and lipid composition of membrane domains through remodeling, and iii) determine and alter the properties of the cell wall through synthesis and remodeling. We had uncovered a novel family of predicted cation/H+ exchangers (CHX) and K+ efflux antiporters (KEA) that are prevalent in higher plants, but rare in metazoans. We combined phylogenetic and transcriptomic analyses with molecular genetic, cell biological and biochemical studies, and have published the first reports on functions of plant CHXs and KEAs. CHX studied to date act at the endomembrane system where their actions are distinct from the better-studied NHX (Na/K-H+ exchangers). Arabidopsis thaliana CHX20 in guard cells modulate stomatal opening, and thus is significant for vegetative survival. Other CHXs ensure reproductive success on dry land, as they participate in organizing pollen walls, targeting of pollen tubes to the ovule or promoting

  19. Conducting single-molecule magnet materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosquer, Goulven; Shen, Yongbing; Almeida, Manuel; Yamashita, Masahiro

    2018-05-11

    Multifunctional molecular materials exhibiting electrical conductivity and single-molecule magnet (SMM) behaviour are particularly attractive for electronic devices and related applications owing to the interaction between electronic conduction and magnetization of unimolecular units. The preparation of such materials remains a challenge that has been pursued by a bi-component approach of combination of SMM cationic (or anionic) units with conducting networks made of partially oxidized (or reduced) donor (or acceptor) molecules. The present status of the research concerning the preparation of molecular materials exhibiting SMM behaviour and electrical conductivity is reviewed, describing the few molecular compounds where both SMM properties and electrical conductivity have been observed. The evolution of this research field through the years is discussed. The first reported compounds are semiconductors in spite being able to present relatively high electrical conductivity, and the SMM behaviour is observed at low temperatures where the electrical conductivity of the materials is similar to that of an insulator. During the recent years, a breakthrough has been achieved with the coexistence of high electrical conductivity and SMM behaviour in a molecular compound at the same temperature range, but so far without evidence of a synergy between these properties. The combination of high electrical conductivity with SMM behaviour requires not only SMM units but also the regular and as far as possible uniform packing of partially oxidized molecules, which are able to provide a conducting network.

  20. Cation binding to 15-TBA quadruplex DNA is a multiple-pathway cation-dependent process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshetnikov, Roman V; Sponer, Jiri; Rassokhina, Olga I; Kopylov, Alexei M; Tsvetkov, Philipp O; Makarov, Alexander A; Golovin, Andrey V

    2011-12-01

    A combination of explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulation (30 simulations reaching 4 µs in total), hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics approach and isothermal titration calorimetry was used to investigate the atomistic picture of ion binding to 15-mer thrombin-binding quadruplex DNA (G-DNA) aptamer. Binding of ions to G-DNA is complex multiple pathway process, which is strongly affected by the type of the cation. The individual ion-binding events are substantially modulated by the connecting loops of the aptamer, which play several roles. They stabilize the molecule during time periods when the bound ions are not present, they modulate the route of the ion into the stem and they also stabilize the internal ions by closing the gates through which the ions enter the quadruplex. Using our extensive simulations, we for the first time observed full spontaneous exchange of internal cation between quadruplex molecule and bulk solvent at atomistic resolution. The simulation suggests that expulsion of the internally bound ion is correlated with initial binding of the incoming ion. The incoming ion then readily replaces the bound ion while minimizing any destabilization of the solute molecule during the exchange. © The Author(s) 2011. Published by Oxford University Press.

  1. Cation binding to 15-TBA quadruplex DNA is a multiple-pathway cation-dependent process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshetnikov, Roman V.; Sponer, Jiri; Rassokhina, Olga I.; Kopylov, Alexei M.; Tsvetkov, Philipp O.; Makarov, Alexander A.; Golovin, Andrey V.

    2011-01-01

    A combination of explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulation (30 simulations reaching 4 µs in total), hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics approach and isothermal titration calorimetry was used to investigate the atomistic picture of ion binding to 15-mer thrombin-binding quadruplex DNA (G-DNA) aptamer. Binding of ions to G-DNA is complex multiple pathway process, which is strongly affected by the type of the cation. The individual ion-binding events are substantially modulated by the connecting loops of the aptamer, which play several roles. They stabilize the molecule during time periods when the bound ions are not present, they modulate the route of the ion into the stem and they also stabilize the internal ions by closing the gates through which the ions enter the quadruplex. Using our extensive simulations, we for the first time observed full spontaneous exchange of internal cation between quadruplex molecule and bulk solvent at atomistic resolution. The simulation suggests that expulsion of the internally bound ion is correlated with initial binding of the incoming ion. The incoming ion then readily replaces the bound ion while minimizing any destabilization of the solute molecule during the exchange. PMID:21893589

  2. Use of marker ion and cationic surfactant plastic membrane electrode for potentiometric titration of cationic polyelectrolytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masadome, Takashi; Imato, Toshihiko

    2003-07-04

    A plasticized poly (vinyl chloride) (PVC) membrane electrode sensitive to stearyltrimethylammonium (STA) ion is applied to the determination of cationic polyelectrolytes such as poly (diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (Cat-floc) by potentiometric titration, using a potassium poly (vinyl sulfate) (PVSK) solution as a titrant. The end-point of the titration is detected as the potential change of the plasticized PVC membrane electrode caused by decrease in the concentration of STA ion added to the sample solution as a marker ion due to the ion association reaction between the STA ion and PVSK. The effects of the concentration of STA ion, coexisting electrolytes in the sample solution and pH of the sample on the degree of the potential change at the end-point were examined. A linear relationship between the concentration of cationic polyelectrolyte and the end-point volume of the titrant exists in the concentration range from 2x10(-5) to 4x10(-4) N for Cat-floc, glycol chitosan, and methylglycol chitosan.

  3. Opposing effects of cationic antimicrobial peptides and divalent cations on bacterial lipopolysaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Matthew; Rajagopal, Aruna; Liu, Wing-Ki; Ha, Bae-Yeun

    2017-10-01

    The permeability of the bacterial outer membrane, enclosing Gram-negative bacteria, depends on the interactions of the outer, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) layer, with surrounding ions and molecules. We present a coarse-grained model for describing how cationic amphiphilic molecules (e.g., antimicrobial peptides) interact with and perturb the LPS layer in a biologically relevant medium, containing monovalent and divalent salt ions (e.g., Mg2+). In our approach, peptide binding is driven by electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions and is assumed to expand the LPS layer, eventually priming it for disruption. Our results suggest that in parameter ranges of biological relevance (e.g., at micromolar concentrations) the antimicrobial peptide magainin 2 effectively disrupts the LPS layer, even though it has to compete with Mg2+ for the layer. They also show how the integrity of LPS is restored with an increasing concentration of Mg2+. Using the approach, we make a number of predictions relevant for optimizing peptide parameters against Gram-negative bacteria and for understanding bacterial strategies to develop resistance against cationic peptides.

  4. Chemical bonding and structural ordering of cations in silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calas, G.; Cormier, L.; Galoisy, L.; Ramos, A.; Rossano, St.

    1997-01-01

    The specific surrounding of cations in multicomponent silicate glasses is briefly presented. Information about interatomic distances and site geometry may be gained by using spectroscopic methods among which x-ray absorption spectroscopy may be used for the largest number of glass components. Scattering of x-rays and neutrons may also be used to determine the importance of medium range order around specific cations. All the existing data show that cations occur in sites with a well-defined geometry, which are in most cases connected to the silicate polymeric network. Medium range order has been detected around cations such as Ti, Ca and Ni, indicating that these elements have an heterogeneous distribution within the glassy matrix. (authors)

  5. Dynamics of photoexcited Ba+ cations in 4He nanodroplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2UB, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 645, 08028 Barcelona (Spain))" data-affiliation=" (Departament ECM, Facultat de Física, and IN2UB, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 645, 08028 Barcelona (Spain))" >Leal, Antonio; 2UB, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 645, 08028 Barcelona (Spain))" data-affiliation=" (Departament ECM, Facultat de Física, and IN2UB, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 645, 08028 Barcelona (Spain))" >Pi, Martí; Zhang, Xiaohang; Drabbels, Marcel; 2UB, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 645, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Laboratoire des Collisions, Agrégats, Réactivité, IRSAMC, UMR 5589, CNRS et Université Paul Sabatier-Toulouse 3, 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse Cedex 09 (France))" data-affiliation=" (Departament ECM, Facultat de Física, and IN2UB, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 645, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Laboratoire des Collisions, Agrégats, Réactivité, IRSAMC, UMR 5589, CNRS et Université Paul Sabatier-Toulouse 3, 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse Cedex 09 (France))" >Barranco, Manuel; Cargnoni, Fausto; Hernando, Alberto; Mateo, David; Mella, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    We present a joint experimental and theoretical study on the desolvation of Ba + cations in 4 He nanodroplets excited via the 6p ← 6s transition. The experiments reveal an efficient desolvation process yielding mainly bare Ba + cations and Ba + He n exciplexes with n = 1 and 2. The speed distributions of the ions are well described by Maxwell-Boltzmann distributions with temperatures ranging from 60 to 178 K depending on the excitation frequency and Ba + He n exciplex size. These results have been analyzed by calculations based on a time-dependent density functional description for the helium droplet combined with classical dynamics for the Ba + . In agreement with experiment, the calculations reveal the dynamical formation of exciplexes following excitation of the Ba + cation. In contrast to experimental observation, the calculations do not reveal desolvation of excited Ba + cations or exciplexes, even when relaxation pathways to lower lying states are included.

  6. Aggregation of trypsin and trypsin inhibitor by Al cation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanphai, P; Kreplak, L; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2017-04-01

    Al cation may trigger protein structural changes such as aggregation and fibrillation, causing neurodegenerative diseases. We report the effect of Al cation on the solution structures of trypsin (try) and trypsin inhibitor (tryi), using thermodynamic analysis, UV-Visible, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic methods and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Thermodynamic parameters showed Al-protein bindings occur via H-bonding and van der Waals contacts for trypsin and trypsin inhibitor. AFM showed that Al cations are able to force trypsin into larger or more robust aggregates than trypsin inhibitor, with trypsin 5±1 SE (n=52) proteins per aggregate and for trypsin inhibitor 8.3±0.7 SE (n=118). Thioflavin T test showed no major protein fibrillation in the presence of Al cation. Al complexation induced more alterations of trypsin inhibitor conformation than trypsin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Significant role of cationic polymers in drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farshbaf, Masoud; Davaran, Soodabeh; Zarebkohan, Amir; Annabi, Nasim; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl; Salehi, Roya

    2017-11-06

    Cationic polymers are characterized as the macromolecules that possess positive charges, which can be either inherently in the polymer side chains and/or its backbone. Based on their origins, cationic polymers are divided in two category including natural and synthetic, in which the possessed positive charges are as result of primary, secondary or tertiary amine functional groups that could be protonated in particular situations. Cationic polymers have been employed commonly as drug delivery agents due to their superior encapsulation efficacy, enhanced bioavailability, low toxicity and improved release profile. In this paper, we focus on the most prominent examples of cationic polymers which have been revealed to be applicable in drug delivery systems and we also discuss their general synthesis and surface modification methods as well as their controlled release profile in drug delivery.

  8. Changing certain dietary cationic and anionic minerals: Impact on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Changing certain dietary cationic and anionic minerals: Impact on blood chemistry, milk ... Increased blood pH and serum HCO3 were noticed in buffaloes fed with LC ... Serum calcium and chloride increased with decreased DCAD level while ...

  9. Mercury release from deforested soils triggered by base cation enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farella, N.; Lucotte, M.; Davidson, R.; Daigle, S.

    2006-01-01

    The Brazilian Amazon has experienced considerable colonization in the last few decades. Family agriculture based on slash-and-burn enables millions of people to live in that region. However, the poor nutrient content of most Amazonian soils requires cation-rich ashes from the burning of the vegetation biomass for cultivation to be successful, which leads to forest ecosystem degradation, soil erosion and mercury contamination. While recent studies have suggested that mercury present in soils was transferred towards rivers upon deforestation, little is known about the dynamics between agricultural land-use and mercury leaching. In this context, the present study proposes an explanation that illustrates how agricultural land-use triggers mercury loss from soils. This explanation lies in the competition between base cations and mercury in soils which are characterized by a low adsorption capacity. Since these soils are naturally very poor in base cations, the burning of the forest biomass suddenly brings high quantities of base cations to soils, destabilizing the previous equilibrium amongst cations. Base cation enrichment triggers mobility in soil cations, rapidly dislocating mercury atoms. This conclusion comes from principal component analyses illustrating that agricultural land-use was associated with base cation enrichment and mercury depletion. The overall conclusions highlight a pernicious cycle: while soil nutrient enrichment actually occurs through biomass burning, although on a temporary basis, there is a loss in Hg content, which is leached to rivers, entering the aquatic chain, and posing a potential health threat to local populations. Data presented here reflects three decades of deforestation activities, but little is known about the long-term impact of such a disequilibrium. These findings may have repercussions on our understanding of the complex dynamics of deforestation and agriculture worldwide

  10. Isomerizations of the Nitromethane Radical Cation in the Gas Phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egsgaard, Helge; Carlsen, Lars; Elbel, Susanne

    1986-01-01

    The concurrent isomerizations of the nitromethane radical cation to its aci-nitromethane and methylnitrite isomers, respectively, has been established based on metastable ion studies and collision activation mass spectrometry. The energy diagram for the ionized nitromethane/aci-nitromethane tauto......The concurrent isomerizations of the nitromethane radical cation to its aci-nitromethane and methylnitrite isomers, respectively, has been established based on metastable ion studies and collision activation mass spectrometry. The energy diagram for the ionized nitromethane...

  11. The electrical conductivity of sodium polysulfide melts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Meihui [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1992-06-01

    The sodium polysulfide melt has been described by a macroscopic model. This model considers the melt to be composed of sodium cations, monosulfide anions, and neutral sulfur solvent. The transport equations of concentrated-solution theory are used to derived the governing equations for this binaryelectrolyte melt model. These equations relate measurable transport properties to fundamental transport parameters. The focus of this research is to measure the electrical conductivity of sodium polysulfide melts and calculate one of fundamental transport parameters from the experimental data. The conductance cells used in the conductivity measurements are axisymmetric cylindrical cells with a microelectrode. The electrode effects, including double-layer capacity, charge transfer resistance, and concentration overpotential, were minimized by the use of the alternating current at an adequately high frequency. The high cell constants of the conductance cells not only enhanced the experimental accuracy but also made the electrode effects negligible. The electrical conductivities of sodium polysulfide Na2S4 and Na2S5 were measured as a function of temperature (range: 300 to 360°C). Variations between experiments were only up to 2%. The values of the Arrhenius activation energy derived from the experimental data are about 33 kJ/mol. The fundamental transport parameter which quantifies the interaction within sodium cations and monosulfide anions are of interest and expected to be positive. Values of it were calculated from the experimental conductivity data and most of them are positive. Some negative values were obtained probably due to the experimental errors of transference number, diffusion coefficient, density or conductivity data.

  12. The electrical conductivity of sodium polysulfide melts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meihui Wang.

    1992-06-01

    The sodium polysulfide melt has been described by a macroscopic model. This model considers the melt to be composed of sodium cations, monosulfide anions, and neutral sulfur solvent. The transport equations of concentrated-solution theory are used to derived the governing equations for this binaryelectrolyte melt model. These equations relate measurable transport properties to fundamental transport parameters. The focus of this research is to measure the electrical conductivity of sodium polysulfide melts and calculate one of fundamental transport parameters from the experimental data. The conductance cells used in the conductivity measurements are axisymmetric cylindrical cells with a microelectrode. The electrode effects, including double-layer capacity, charge transfer resistance, and concentration overpotential, were minimized by the use of the alternating current at an adequately high frequency. The high cell constants of the conductance cells not only enhanced the experimental accuracy but also made the electrode effects negligible. The electrical conductivities of sodium polysulfide Na{sub 2}S{sub 4} and Na{sub 2}S{sub 5} were measured as a function of temperature (range: 300 to 360{degree}C). Variations between experiments were only up to 2%. The values of the Arrhenius activation energy derived from the experimental data are about 33 kJ/mol. The fundamental transport parameter which quantifies the interaction within sodium cations and monosulfide anions are of interest and expected to be positive. Values of it were calculated from the experimental conductivity data and most of them are positive. Some negative values were obtained probably due to the experimental errors of transference number, diffusion coefficient, density or conductivity data.

  13. Tunable states of interlayer cations in two-dimensional materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, K.; Numata, K.; Dai, W.; Hunger, M.

    2014-01-01

    The local state of cations inside the Ångstrom-scale interlayer spaces is one of the controlling factors for designing sophisticated two-dimensional (2D) materials consisting of 2D nanosheets. In the present work, the molecular mechanism on how the interlayer cation states are induced by the local structures of the 2D nanosheets is highlighted. For this purpose, the local states of Na cations in inorganic 2D materials, in which the compositional fluctuations of a few percent are introduced in the tetrahedral and octahedral units of the 2D nanosheets, were systematically studied by means of 23 Na magic-angle-spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and 23 Na multiple-quantum MAS (MQMAS) NMR spectroscopy. In contrast with an uniform distribution of Na cations expected so far, various well-defined cation states sensitive to the local structures of the 2D nanosheets were identified. The tunability of the interlayer cation states along with the local structure of the 2D nanosheets, as the smallest structural unit of the 2D material, is discussed

  14. Tunable states of interlayer cations in two-dimensional materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, K.; Numata, K. [Department of Environmental Sciences, Tokyo Gakugei University, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8501 (Japan); Dai, W. [Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Materials Chemistry (Ministry of Education), College of Chemistry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Hunger, M. [Institute of Chemical Technology, University of Stuttgart, 70550 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2014-03-31

    The local state of cations inside the Ångstrom-scale interlayer spaces is one of the controlling factors for designing sophisticated two-dimensional (2D) materials consisting of 2D nanosheets. In the present work, the molecular mechanism on how the interlayer cation states are induced by the local structures of the 2D nanosheets is highlighted. For this purpose, the local states of Na cations in inorganic 2D materials, in which the compositional fluctuations of a few percent are introduced in the tetrahedral and octahedral units of the 2D nanosheets, were systematically studied by means of {sup 23}Na magic-angle-spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and {sup 23}Na multiple-quantum MAS (MQMAS) NMR spectroscopy. In contrast with an uniform distribution of Na cations expected so far, various well-defined cation states sensitive to the local structures of the 2D nanosheets were identified. The tunability of the interlayer cation states along with the local structure of the 2D nanosheets, as the smallest structural unit of the 2D material, is discussed.

  15. Separation of cations of heavy metalsfrom concentrated galvanic drains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. P. Bondareva

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available When applying galvanic coatings, soluble salts of heavy metals such as iron, copper, nickel, zinc, cadmium, chromium and other metals are used, toxic cations enter the water, with subsequent migration to the biosphere. To date, many methods have been developed for cleaning galvanic sewage, which cannot be considered sufficiently effective. The joint sorption of divalent cations of copper, nickel and cadmium from concentrated aqueous solutions was investigated. Calculation and experimental methods were used to determine the separation conditions of the bivalent ion systems that differed and close in sorption properties on the aminophosphonic polyampholyte Purolite S950 in a natrium form. It is shown that the cadmium (II cations can be isolated from solutions containing copper (II or nickel (II cations even at the height of the sorption layer of 0.13 m due to the difference in the defining characteristics of the cations. This layer height can be used not only in a chromatographic column, but also in a concentrating cartridge. Separation of the copper (II and nickel (II close to the sorption properties requires an absorbing layer of 0.76 m, which can only be used in a chromatographic column, but not for a concentrating cartridge. In this paper, the degrees of ion separation in various sorption conditions are calculated. The applicability of the conductometric method for controlling the ion exchange process is shown not only when the free cations are isolated from aqueous solutions but also bound to complexes.

  16. A multidisciplinary and multi-sensor assessment of continuous degassing at Turrialba volcano, Costa Rica; insights and their application to hazard management

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Manen, S. M.; Tortini, R.; Burson, B.; Carn, S. A.

    2013-12-01

    Turrialba is an active stratovolcano located in the Central Cordillera of Costa Rica with an elevation of 3,340 m. Located just 35 km northeast of Costa Rica's capital city San Jose it looms over Costa Rica's Central Valley, the social and economic hub of the country. After more than 100 years of quiescence Turrialba resumed activity in 1996, marked by progressive increases in degassing and seismic activity with gas emissions becoming continuous in 2007. Intermittent phreatic explosions accompanied by ash emissions that have reached the capital have been occurring since 2010. The activity has resulted in the evacuation of two villages, closure of the National Park that comprises the summit region of the volcano and devastation of the local ecosystem. In this work we present a multi-disciplinary and multi-sensor assessment of the persistent degassing and its impacts on the local ecosystem. Combining a variety of high temporal and high spatial resolution satellite-based time series with ground-based measurements of ambient gas concentrations, element deposition and surveys of species richness, enables a comprehensive assessment of SO2 emissions and changes in vegetation. Satellite-based time-series were obtained from Landsat TM and ETM+, Terra ASTER and MODIS, Aqua MODIS, EO-1 and Aura OMI, with some of the data dating back to 2000. Preliminary results show exposure to the volcanic plume results in high soil acidity and significant uptake of certain heavy metals (e.g. Cd, Co, Cu, Hg and Pb) by vegetation, in contrast other elements such as Ba, Ca and Sr are leached from the soil as a result of the acid deposition. These factors are likely to be responsible for decreased species richness and physiological damage observed downwind of Turrialba. Ambient SO2 concentrations that exceed WHO guideline values have been recorded, which has potentially important consequences for human health in the area. Analyzing and relating the remote observations to conditions and impacts

  17. Polyamines control of cation transport across plant membranes: implications for ion homeostasis and abiotic stress signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pottosin, Igor; Shabala, Sergey

    2014-01-01

    Polyamines are unique polycationic metabolites, controlling a variety of vital functions in plants, including growth and stress responses. Over the last two decades a bulk of data was accumulated providing explicit evidence that polyamines play an essential role in regulating plant membrane transport. The most straightforward example is a blockage of the two major vacuolar cation channels, namely slow (SV) and fast (FV) activating ones, by the micromolar concentrations of polyamines. This effect is direct and fully reversible, with a potency descending in a sequence Spm(4+) > Spd(3+) > Put(2+). On the contrary, effects of polyamines on the plasma membrane (PM) cation and K(+)-selective channels are hardly dependent on polyamine species, display a relatively low affinity, and are likely to be indirect. Polyamines also affect vacuolar and PM H(+) pumps and Ca(2+) pump of the PM. On the other hand, catabolization of polyamines generates H2O2 and other reactive oxygen species (ROS), including hydroxyl radicals. Export of polyamines to the apoplast and their oxidation there by available amine oxidases results in the induction of a novel ion conductance and confers Ca(2+) influx across the PM. This mechanism, initially established for plant responses to pathogen attack (including a hypersensitive response), has been recently shown to mediate plant responses to a variety of abiotic stresses. In this review we summarize the effects of polyamines and their catabolites on cation transport in plants and discuss the implications of these effects for ion homeostasis, signaling, and plant adaptive responses to environment.

  18. Radiation induced graft copolymerization for preparation of cation exchange membranes: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed Mahmoud Nasef; Hamdani Saidi; Hussin Mohd Nor

    1999-01-01

    Cation exchange membranes are regarded as the ideal solid polymer electrolyte materials for the development of various electrochemical energy conversion applications where significant improvements in the current density are required. Such membranes require special polymers and preparation techniques to maintain high chemical , mechanical and thermal stability in addition to high ionic conductivity and low resistance. A lot of different techniques have been proposed in the past to prepare such membranes. Radiation-induced graft copolymerization provides an attractive ft method for modification of chemical and physical properties of polymeric materials and is of particular interest in achieving specially desired cation exchange membranes as well as excellent membrane properties. This is due to the ability to control the membrane compositions as well as properties by proper selection of grafting conditions. Therefore numerous parameters have to be investigated to properly select the right polymeric materials, radiation grafting technique and the grafting conditions to be employed. In this paper a state-of-the-art of radiation-induced graft copolymerization for preparation of cation exchange membranes and their applications are briefly reviewed. (Author)

  19. Salinity and cationic nature of irrigation water on castor bean cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geovani S. de Lima

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study aimed to evaluate the water relations, cell damage percentage and growth of the castor bean cv. ‘BRS Energia’ as a function of salinity and cationic nature of the water used in irrigation. The experiment was conducted in drainage lysimeters under greenhouse conditions in eutrophic Grey Argisol of sandy loam texture. Six combinations of water salinity and cations were studied (S1 - Control; S2 - Na+, S3 - Ca2+, S4 - Na+ + Ca2+; S5 - K+ and S6 - Na+ + Ca2+ + Mg2+, in a randomized block design with four replicates. In the control (S1, plants were irrigated with 0.6 dS m-1 water, whereas the other treatments received 4.5 dS m-1 water, obtained by adding different salts, all in the chloride form. Higher relative water content in the leaf blade of plants irrigated with K+-salinized water associated with leaf succulence are indicative of tolerance of the castor bean cv. ‘BRS Energia’ to salinity. Saline stress negatively affected castor bean growth, regardless of cationic nature of water. Among the ions studied, ‘BRS Energia’ castor bean was more sensitive to the presence of sodium in the irrigation water, in terms of both water relations and leaf succulence.

  20. How the cation-cation π-π stacking occurs: A theoretical investigation into ionic clusters of imidazolium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wei; Tian, Yong; Xuan, Xiaopeng

    2015-07-01

    The cation-cation π-π stacking is uncommon but it is essential for the understanding of some supramolecular structures. We explore theoretically the nature of non-covalent interaction occurring in the stacked structure within modeled clusters of 1,3-dimethylimidazolium and halide. The evidences of the energy decomposition analysis (EDA) and reduced density gradient (RDG) approach are different from those of common π-π interaction. Isosurfaces with RDG also illustrate the strength of the titled π-π interaction and their region. Additionally, we find that the occurrence of this interaction is attributed to a few C-H···X interactions, as depicted using atom in molecule (AIM) method. This work presents a clear picture of the typical cation-cation π-π interaction and can serve to advance the understanding of this uncommon interaction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Novel Reactivity Of The Cationic Complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.; Dash, A.K.; Eisen, AM.; Berthet, J.C.; Ephritikhine, M.

    2002-01-01

    The catalytic chemistry of electrophilic d 0 /f organometallic complexes is nowadays under intense investigation, reaching a high level of sophistication. General aspects concerning these complexes are concentrated for most studies to the functionalization of unsaturated organic molecules. To cite an instance, the actinide-promoted oligomerization of terminal alkynes is of essential present concern since it may introduce to a diversity of organic enynes and oligoacetylene products that are valuable synthons for the synthesis of natural products. Enynes are the simplest oligomerization products of alkynes. We have demonstrated that organoactinides complexes of the type [Cp* 2 AnMe 2 AnMe 2 ] (Cp* = C 5 Me 5 ; An = U, Th) are active catalysts for the linear oligomerization of terminal alkynes and the extent of oligomerization was found to be strongly dependent on the electronic and steric properties of the alkyne substituents. Bulky alkynes were reacted with high regioselectivity toward dimer and/or trimers whereas for non-bulky alkynes, these compounds were transformed into oligomers with a total deficiency of regioselectivity. The addition of primary amines to the catalytic cycle, for An = Th, granted the chemoselective formation of dimers, chemoselectively, whereas for An = U, this control was not succeeded. In distinction to the neutral organoactinide complexes, homogeneous cationic d 0 /f n actinide complexes have been used as in the homogeneous polymerization of olefins as extremely active catalysts. Hence, the catalytic alkyne oligomerization is a opportune route to explore insertions and σ-bond metathesis reactivity of complexes. We have recently shown that the reaction of terminal alkynes (RC≡CH), promoted by [(Et 2 N) 3 U][BPh 4 ], in toluene, produces efficiently mostly the gem dimers (for R = Me, i Pr and n Bu) as the major products, whereas for bulky alkynes (R = t MS or t Bu) small amounts of the cis dimer was concomitantly obtained. A plausible

  2. Does the cation really matter? The effect of modifying an ionic liquid cation on an SN2 process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Eden E L; Yau, Hon Man; Hawker, Rebecca R; Croft, Anna K; Harper, Jason B

    2013-09-28

    The rate of reaction of a Menschutkin process in a range of ionic liquids with different cations was investigated, with temperature-dependent kinetic data giving access to activation parameters for the process in each solvent. These data, along with molecular dynamics simulations, demonstrate the importance of accessibility of the charged centre on the cation and that the key interactions are of a generalised electrostatic nature.

  3. High-capacity cation-exchange column for enhanced resolution of adjacent peaks of cations in ion chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, M A

    2001-06-22

    One of the advantages of ion chromatography [Anal Chem. 47 (1975) 1801] as compared to other analytical techniques is that several ions may be analyzed simultaneously. One of the most important contributions of cation-exchange chromatography is its sensitivity to ammonium ion, which is difficult to analyze by other techniques [J. Weiss, in: E.L. Johnson (Ed.), Handbook of Ion Chromatography, Dionex, Sunnyvale, CA, USA]. The determination of low concentrations of ammonium ion in the presence of high concentrations of sodium poses a challenge in cation-exchange chromatography [J. Weiss, Ion Chromatography, VCH, 2nd Edition, Weinheim, 1995], as both cations have similar selectivities for the common stationary phases containing either sulfonate or carboxylate functional groups. The task was to develop a new cation-exchange stationary phase (for diverse concentration ratios of adjacent peaks) to overcome limitations experienced in previous trails. Various cation-exchange capacities and column body formats were investigated to optimize this application and others. The advantages and disadvantages of two carboxylic acid columns of different cation-exchange capacities and different column formats will be discussed.

  4. Degassing vs. eruptive styles at Mt. Etna volcano (Sicily, Italy): Volatile stocking, gas fluxing, and the shift from low-energy to highly-explosive basaltic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Roberto; Métrich, Nicole; Di Renzo, Valeria; Aiuppa, Alessandro; Allard, Patrick; Arienzo, Ilenia

    2017-04-01

    Basaltic magmas can transport and release large amounts of volatiles into the atmosphere, especially in subduction zones, where slab-derived fluids enrich the mantle wedge. Depending on magma volatile content, basaltic volcanoes thus display a wide spectrum of eruptive styles, from common Strombolian-type activity to Plinian events. Mt. Etna in Sicily, is a typical basaltic volcano where the volatile control on such a variable activity can be investigated. Based on a melt inclusion study in products from Strombolian or lava-fountain activity to Plinian eruptions, here we show that for the same initial volatile content, different eruptive styles reflect variable degassing paths throughout the composite Etnean plumbing system. The combined influence of i) crystallization, ii) deep degassing and iii) CO2 gas fluxing can explain the evolution of H2O, CO2, S and Cl in products from such a spectrum of activity. Deep crystallization produces the CO2-rich gas fluxing the upward magma portions, which will become buoyant and easily mobilized in small gas-rich batches stored within the plumbing system. When reaching gas dominated conditions (i.e., a gas/melt mass ratio of 0.3 and CO2,gas/H2Ogas molar ratio 5 ), these will erupt effusively or mildly explosively, whilst in case of the 122 BC Plinian eruption, open-system degassing conditions took place within the plumbing system, such that continuous CO2-fluxing determined gas accumulation on top of the magmatic system. The emission of such a cap in the early eruptive phase triggered the arrival of deep H2O-rich whose fast decompression and bubble nucleation lead to the highly explosive character, enhanced by abundant microlite crystallization and consequent increase of magma effective viscosity. This could explain why open system basaltic systems like Etna may experience highly explosive or even Plinian episodes during eruptions that start with effusive to mildly explosive phases. The proposed mechanism also determines a

  5. Environmental impact of CO2, Rn, Hg degassing from the rupture zones produced by Wenchuan M s 8.0 earthquake in western Sichuan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaocheng; Chen, Zhi; Cui, Yueju

    2016-10-01

    The concentrations and flux of CO2, (222)Radon (Rn), and gaseous elemental mercury (Hg) in soil gas were investigated based on the field measurements in June 2010 at ten sites along the seismic rupture zones produced by the May 12, 2008, Wenchuan M s 8.0 earthquake in order to assess the environmental impact of degassing of CO2, Rn and Hg. Soil gas concentrations of 344 sampling points were obtained. Seventy measurements of CO2, Rn and Hg flux by the static accumulation chamber method were performed. The results of risk assessment of CO2, Rn and Hg concentration in soil gas showed that (1) the concentration of CO2 in the epicenter of Wenchuan M s 8.0 earthquake and north end of seismic ruptures had low risk of asphyxia; (2) the concentrations of Rn in the north segment of seismic ruptures had high levels of radon, Maximum was up to level 4, according to Chinese code (GB 50325-2001); (3) the average geoaccumulation index I geo of soil Hg denoted the lack of soil contamination, and maximum values classified the soil gas as moderately to strongly polluted in the epicenter. The investigation of soil gas CO2, Rn and Hg degassing rate indicated that (1) the CO2 in soil gas was characterized by a mean [Formula: see text] of -20.4 ‰ and by a mean CO2 flux of 88.1 g m(-2) day(-1), which were in the range of the typical values for biologic CO2 degassing. The maximum of soil CO2 flux reached values of 399 g m(-2) day(-1) in the epicenter; (2) the soil Rn had higher exhalation in the north segment of seismic ruptures, the maximum reached value of 1976 m Bq m(-2) s(-1); (3) the soil Hg flux was lower, ranging from -2.5 to 18.7 n g m(-2) h(-1) and increased from south to north. The mean flux over the all profiles was 4.2 n g m(-2) h(-1). The total output of CO2 and Hg degassing estimated along seismic ruptures for a survey area of 18.17 km(2) were approximately 0.57 Mt year(-1) and 688.19 g year(-1). It is recommended that land-use planners should

  6. New evidence of CO2 soil degassing anomalies on Piton de la Fournaise volcano and the link with volcano tectonic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liuzzo, M.; Di Muro, A.; Giudice, G.; Michon, L.; Ferrazzini, V.; Gurrieri, S.

    2015-12-01

    Piton de la Fournaise (PdF) is recognized as one of the world's most active volcanoes in terms of eruptive frequency and the substantial quantity of lava produced. Yet with the sole exception of rather modest intracrateric fumarole activity, this seems to be in contrast with an apparent absence of any type of natural fluid emission during periods of quiescence. Measurement campaigns were undertaken during a long-lasting quiescent period (2012-2014) and just after a short-lived summit eruption (June 2014) in order to identify potential degassing areas in relation to the main structural features of the volcano (e.g., rift zones) with the aim of developing a broader understanding of the geometry of the plumbing and degassing system. In order to assess the possible existence of anomalous soil CO2 flux, 513 measurements were taken along transects roughly orthogonal to the known tectonic lineaments crossing PdF edifice. In addition, 53 samples of gas for C isotope analysis were taken at measurement points that showed a relatively high CO2 concentration in the soil. CO2 flux values range from 10 to 1300 g m-2 d-1 while δ13C are between -26.6 and -8‰. The results of our investigation clearly indicate that there is a strong spatial correlation between the anomalous high values of diffusive soil emissions and the main rift zones cutting the PdF massif and, moreover, that generally high soil CO2 fluxes show a δ13C signature clearly related to a magmatic origin.

  7. Graben structure in the Las Cañadas edifice (Tenerife, Canary Islands): implications for active degassing and insights on the caldera formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo, Inés; Soriano, Carles; Martí, Joan; Pérez, Nemesio

    2005-06-01

    A graben structure has been identified at the western area of the Las Cañadas caldera wall, here referred as the Los Azulejos Graben. This graben is 1 km wide and is bounded by two major normal faults trending NE-SW, the Los Azulejos Fault and the Ucanca Fault. The graben was active for at least 0.5 Ma, from the end of the Ucanca Fm to the end of the Guajara Fm, and before the collapse of the Las Cañadas edifice that formed the western caldera. A right-lateral transtension regime operated in the graben as suggested by small fault orientations and kinematics. The prolongation of the NE rift zone of Tenerife to the Cañadas edifice is the most likely volcano-tectonic scenario for the graben. In this context, inflation of phonolitic shallow magma chambers may have produced reverse faults and reactivation of normal faults. An intense and widespread hydrothermal alteration, here called Azulejos-type, occurred mainly before the graben formation, while a fault-related hydrothermal alteration occurred during and after the graben. Diffuse carbon dioxide and hydrogen degassing in and around the Las Cañadas caldera show relatively enriched values along a NE-SW trend suggesting that faults in the Los Azulejos Graben act as a pathway for deep-seated gases to the surface. Diffuse degassing and hydrothermalism indicate that the graben area has been a zone of intense fluid circulation during the evolution of the Las Cañadas edifice.

  8. Level of carbon dioxide diffuse degassing from the ground of Vesuvio: comparison between extensive surveys and inferences on the gas source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Granieri

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available An extensive campaign of diffuse CO2 soil flux was carried out at the cone of Vesuvio in October 2006 with two main objectives: 1 to provide an estimation of CO2 diffusely discharged through the soils in the summit area and 2 to evidence those sectors of the volcano where structural and morphological conditions could favour the gas output. The survey consisted of 502 measurements of soil CO2 flux homogenously distributed over an area of about 1.8 km2. Results of this survey were compared with those obtained during a similar campaign carried out by Frondini et al. in 2000, from which we have taken and reinterpreted a subset of data belonging to the common investigated area. Graphical statistical analysis showed three overlapping populations in both surveys, evidencing the contribution of three different sources feeding the soil CO2 degassing process. The overall CO2 emission pattern of 2006 is coherent with that observed in 2000 and suggests that a value between 120 and 140 t/day of CO2 is representative of the total CO2 discharged by diffuse degassing from the summit area of Vesuvio. The preferential exhaling area lies in the inner crater, whose contribution resulted in 45.3% of the total CO2 emission in 2006 (with 62.8 t/day and in 57.4% (with 70.3 t/day in 2000, although its extension is only 13% of the investigated area. This highly emissive area correlated closely with the structural discontinuities of Vesuvio cone, mainly suggesting that the NW-SE trending tectonic line is actually an active fault leaking deep gas to the bottom of the crater. The drainage action of the fault could be enhanced by the “aspiration” effect of the volcanic conduit.

  9. (Cationic + nonionic) mixed surfactant aggregates for solubilisation of curcumin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Arun; Kaur, Gurpreet; Kansal, S.K.; Chaudhary, G.R.; Mehta, S.K.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Critical micelle concentration of mixed surfactant has been measured. • Aqueous solubility and alkaline stability of curcumin has been significantly improved. • Location of curcumin within micelles has been evaluated. • Scavenging activity of curcumin has been improved. • Non-intercalative binding with ct-DNA has been observed. - Abstract: Curcumin is a potential drug for variety of diseases. Major limitations of curcumin are low water solubility, rapid hydrolytic degradation in alkaline medium and poor bioavailability. To overcome these limitations, highly potential mixed micellar system has been prepared. In order to reduce inter ionic repulsion and precipitation of surfactants, (cationic + non-ionic) mixed system have been chosen that directly influence its applicability. Hydrophobic chain of non-ionic surfactant significantly influences the cmc of mixed surfactant system as indicated by fluorescence and conductivity data. UV–visible spectroscopy analyses show that solubility, stability and antioxidant property of the curcumin is remarkably improved depending on cmc and aggregation number (N_a_g_g) of mixed surfactants, where N_a_g_g plays crucial role. Generally, curcumin undergoes complete degradation in slight basic medium, but stability has been maintained up to 8 h at pH-13 using formulated mixed micelles (only (20 to 25)% degraded). Location of curcumin which is monitored using emission spectroscopy, fluorescence quenching and "1H NMR spectroscopy techniques play the most important role. Observed results show that the major population of curcumin is located at the polar region and some are in hydrophobic region of the mixed micelles. To ensure the effect of mixed surfactants and curcumin loaded mixed surfactants on DNA, the interaction parameter indicates non-interclative interactions.

  10. ETUDE DE LA DISTRIBUTION DES CATIONS ECHANGEABLES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SEI Joseph

    Belgium. In this work we are interested in studying the causes of deterioration of reinforced concrete pipeline in the region of east Morocco. This pipe is used for transporting drinking water. The alteration of the pipe was found damaged by corrosion way on a section well-defined. For this we conducted a sampling of section.

  11. Cation Substitution in Earth‐Abundant Kesterite Photovoltaic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianjun; Wang, Dongxiao; Li, Xiuling; Zeng, Yu

    2018-01-01

    Abstract As a promising candidate for low‐cost and environmentally friendly thin‐film photovoltaics, the emerging kesterite‐based Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 (CZTSSe) solar cells have experienced rapid advances over the past decade. However, the record efficiency of CZTSSe solar cells (12.6%) is still significantly lower than those of its predecessors Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) and CdTe thin‐film solar cells. This record has remained for several years. The main obstacle for this stagnation is unanimously attributed to the large open‐circuit voltage (V OC) deficit. In addition to cation disordering and the associated band tailing, unpassivated interface defects and undesirable energy band alignment are two other culprits that account for the large V OC deficit in kesterite solar cells. To capture the great potential of kesterite solar cells as prospective earth‐abundant photovoltaic technology, current research focuses on cation substitution for CZTSSe‐based materials. The aim here is to examine recent efforts to overcome the V OC limit of kesterite solar cells by cation substitution and to further illuminate several emerging prospective strategies, including: i) suppressing the cation disordering by distant isoelectronic cation substitution, ii) optimizing the junction band alignment and constructing a graded bandgap in absorber, and iii) engineering the interface defects and enhancing the junction band bending. PMID:29721421

  12. Cation Substitution in Earth-Abundant Kesterite Photovoltaic Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianjun; Wang, Dongxiao; Li, Xiuling; Zeng, Yu; Zhang, Yi

    2018-04-01

    As a promising candidate for low-cost and environmentally friendly thin-film photovoltaics, the emerging kesterite-based Cu 2 ZnSn(S,Se) 4 (CZTSSe) solar cells have experienced rapid advances over the past decade. However, the record efficiency of CZTSSe solar cells (12.6%) is still significantly lower than those of its predecessors Cu(In,Ga)Se 2 (CIGS) and CdTe thin-film solar cells. This record has remained for several years. The main obstacle for this stagnation is unanimously attributed to the large open-circuit voltage ( V OC ) deficit. In addition to cation disordering and the associated band tailing, unpassivated interface defects and undesirable energy band alignment are two other culprits that account for the large V OC deficit in kesterite solar cells. To capture the great potential of kesterite solar cells as prospective earth-abundant photovoltaic technology, current research focuses on cation substitution for CZTSSe-based materials. The aim here is to examine recent efforts to overcome the V OC limit of kesterite solar cells by cation substitution and to further illuminate several emerging prospective strategies, including: i) suppressing the cation disordering by distant isoelectronic cation substitution, ii) optimizing the junction band alignment and constructing a graded bandgap in absorber, and iii) engineering the interface defects and enhancing the junction band bending.

  13. THERMODYNAMICS OF ETHANOLAMMONIUM CATIONES DISSOCIATION IN AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. E. Khoma

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The literature data on the thermodynamics of ethanolamines onium cations dissociation have been systematized and generalized. The correlation between these cations dissociation thermodynamic functions (DH and DS and physicochemical properties (Tmp., Tbp, Pp, lgPow et al. has been revealed. There was a correlation between lipophilicity determined experimentally and calculated by QSAR. For monoethanolammonium, diethanolammonium, and their N-methyl and N-ethyl derivatives it was found dissociation thermodynamic functions to depend on bases lgPow. Acid-base dissociation of TRIS and triethanolamine onium cations does not correspond to said relationship because TRIS (primary amine, TEA (tertiary amine act differently on aqueous solutions of SO2. TEA, unlike MEA, DEA and MMEA, has a salting out effect towards sulfur dioxide because of competing hydration that promotes sulfite «onium» salts hydrolysis. TRIS promotes S(IV → S(VI sulphooxidation, in contrast to another ethanolamines. Enthalpy–enthropy compensation with isothermodynamic temperature 303 K has been recorded. The revealed correlations may be useful in developing of procedures for air sanitary cleaning from acidic gases; chemisorbents immobilized for gas and ion exchange chromatography; potentiometric methods for fluorocomplex acids determinations. The use of monoethanolamine is most promising to obtain chemisorbents because the thermodynamic functions of its onium cation acid-base dissociation are least dependent on temperature compared to other etanolammonium cations.

  14. Electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry of ammonium cationized polyethers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasioudis, Andreas; Heeren, Ron M A; van Doormalen, Irene; de Wijs-Rot, Nicolette; van den Brink, Oscar F

    2011-05-01

    Quaternary ammonium salts (Quats) and amines are known to facilitate the MS analysis of high molar mass polyethers by forming low charge state adduct ions. The formation, stability, and behavior upon collision-induced dissociation (CID) of adduct ions of polyethers with a variety of Quats and amines were studied by electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight, quadrupole ion trap, and linear ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The linear ion trap instrument was part of an Orbitrap hybrid mass spectrometer that allowed accurate mass MS/MS measurements. The Quats and amines studied were of different degree of substitution, structure, and size. The stability of the adduct ions was related to the structure of the cation, especially the amine's degree of substitution. CID of singly/doubly charged primary and tertiary ammonium cationized polymers resulted in the neutral loss of the amine followed by fragmentation of the protonated product ions. The latter reveals information about the monomer unit, polymer sequence, and endgroup structure. In addition, the detection of product ions retaining the ammonium ion was observed. The predominant process in the CID of singly charged quaternary ammonium cationized polymers was cation detachment, whereas their doubly charged adduct ions provided the same information as the primary and tertiary ammonium cationized adduct ions. This study shows the potential of specific amines as tools for the structural elucidation of high molar mass polyethers. © American Society for Mass Spectrometry, 2011

  15. Cation-enhanced capillary electrophoresis separation of atropoisomer anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Yun-Cheol; Berthod, Alain; Armstrong, Daniel W

    2015-12-01

    CE was used to study the separation of the atropoisomers of four phosphoric acids and two sulfonic acids and the enantiomers of two phosphoric acids. All solutes are in their anionic forms in aqueous electrolytes. The chiral additives were two hydroxypropyl cyclodextrins (CDs) and cyclofructan 6 (CF6). The CDs were able to separate four solutes and the CF6 additive could separate only one: 1,1'-binaphthyl-2,2'-diyl hydrogenphosphate (BHP). Since CF6 is able to bind with cations, nitrate of alkaline metals, Ba(2+) , and Pb(2+) were added, greatly improving the BHP separation at the expense of longer migration times. There seems to be a link between CF6-cation-binding constants and BHP resolution factors. Cation additions were also performed with CD selectors that are less prone to form complexes with cations. Significant improvements of enantiomer or atropoisomer separations were observed also associated with longer migration times. It is speculated that the anionic solutes associate with the added cations forming larger entities better differentiated by CDs. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Cation Binding to Xanthorhodopsin: Electron Paramagnetic Resonance and Magnetic Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolensky Koganov, Elena; Leitus, Gregory; Rozin, Rinat; Weiner, Lev; Friedman, Noga; Sheves, Mordechai

    2017-05-04

    Xanthorhodopsin (xR) is a member of the retinal protein family and acts as a proton pump in the cell membranes of the extremely halophilic eubacterium Salinibacter ruber. In addition to the retinal chromophore, xR contains a carotenoid, which acts as a light-harvesting antenna as it transfers 40% of the quanta it absorbs to the retinal. Our previous studies have shown that the CD and absorption spectra of xR are dramatically affected due to the protonation of two different residues. It is still unclear whether xR can bind cations. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy used in the present study revealed that xR can bind divalent cations, such as Mn 2+ and Ca 2+ , to deionized xR (DI-xR). We also demonstrate that xR can bind 1 equiv of Mn 2+ to a high-affinity binding site followed by binding of ∼40 equiv in cooperative manner and ∼100 equiv of Mn 2+ that are weakly bound. SQUID magnetic studies suggest that the high cooperative binding of Mn 2+ cations to xR is due to the formation of Mn 2+ clusters. Our data demonstrate that Ca 2+ cations bind to DI-xR with a lower affinity than Mn 2+ , supporting the assumption that binding of Mn 2+ occurs through cluster formation, because Ca 2+ cations cannot form clusters in contrast to Mn 2+ .

  17. Cationic polymerization of styrene by means of pulse radiolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egusa, S.; Arai, S.; Kira, A.; Imamura, M.; Tabata, Y.

    1977-01-01

    The radiation-induced cationic polymerization of styrene has been studied by microsecond pulse radiolysis. It was possible to observe absorption bands of a monomer cation radical (St. + ) at 630 nm and at 350 nm in a mixture of isopentane and n-butyl chloride at - 165 0 C. Three absorption bands, around 1600 nm, at 600 nm and at 450 nm, grew in parallel with the decay of St. + after pulse. The 1600-nm and 600-nm bands were assigned to an associated dimer cation radical (St 2 . + ), and the 450-nm band to a bonded dimer cation radical (St-St. + ) by comparison of absorption spectra of α-methylstyrene, 1,2-dihydronaphthalene and trans-β-methylstyrene. The kinetic behaviour of these species suggests that St-St. + and a part of St 2 . + are formed by the reaction of St. + with a styrene monomer, and the rest of St 2 . + may be formed by positive charge transfer from a solvent cation radical to an auto-associated neutral dimer of styrene. A long-lived absorption band at 340 nm grew with the decay of St-St. + . This band is considered due to a growing polymer carbonium ion. (author)

  18. Cationic uremic toxins affect human renal proximal tubule cell functioning through interaction with the organic cation transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schophuizen, Carolien M S; Wilmer, Martijn J; Jansen, Jitske; Gustavsson, Lena; Hilgendorf, Constanze; Hoenderop, Joost G J; van den Heuvel, Lambert P; Masereeuw, Rosalinde

    2013-12-01

    Several organic cations, such as guanidino compounds and polyamines, have been found to accumulate in plasma of patients with kidney failure due to inadequate renal clearance. Here, we studied the interaction of cationic uremic toxins with renal organic cation transport in a conditionally immortalized human proximal tubule epithelial cell line (ciPTEC). Transporter activity was measured and validated in cell suspensions by studying uptake of the fluorescent substrate 4-(4-(dimethylamino)styryl)-N-methylpyridinium-iodide (ASP(+)). Subsequently, the inhibitory potencies of the cationic uremic toxins, cadaverine, putrescine, spermine and spermidine (polyamines), acrolein (polyamine breakdown product), guanidine, and methylguanidine (guanidino compounds) were determined. Concentration-dependent inhibition of ASP(+) uptake by TPA, cimetidine, quinidine, and metformin confirmed functional endogenous organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2) expression in ciPTEC. All uremic toxins tested inhibited ASP(+) uptake, of which acrolein required the lowest concentration to provoke a half-maximal inhibition (IC50 = 44 ± 2 μM). A Dixon plot was constructed for acrolein using three independent inhibition curves with 10, 20, or 30 μM ASP(+), which demonstrated competitive or mixed type of interaction (K i = 93 ± 16 μM). Exposing the cells to a mixture of cationic uremic toxins resulted in a more potent and biphasic inhibitory response curve, indicating complex interactions between the toxins and ASP(+) uptake. In conclusion, ciPTEC proves a suitable model to study cationic xenobiotic interactions. Inhibition of cellular uptake transport was demonstrated for several uremic toxins, which might indicate a possible role in kidney disease progression during uremia.

  19. Hydration of cations: a key to understanding of specific cation effects on aggregation behaviors of PEO-PPO-PEO triblock copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutter, Jacob C; Wu, Tsung-yu; Zhang, Yanjie

    2013-09-05

    This work reports results from the interactions of a series of monovalent and divalent cations with a triblock copolymer, poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(propylene oxide)-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO-PPO-PEO). Phase transition temperatures of the polymer in the presence of chloride salts with six monovalent and eight divalent cations were measured using an automated melting point apparatus. The polymer undergoes a two-step phase transition, consisting of micellization of the polymer followed by aggregation of the micelles, in the presence of all the salts studied herein. The results suggest that hydration of cations plays a key role in determining the interactions between the cations and the polymer. The modulation of the phase transition temperature of the polymer by cations can be explained as a balance between three interactions: direct binding of cations to the oxygen in the polymer chains, cations sharing one water molecule with the polymer in their hydration layer, and cations interacting with the polymer via two water molecules. Monovalent cations Na(+), K(+), Rb(+), and Cs(+) do not bind to the polymer, while Li(+) and NH4(+) and all the divalent cations investigated including Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Sr(2+), Ba(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), and Cd(2+) bind to the polymer. The effects of the cations correlate well with their hydration thermodynamic properties. Mechanisms for cation-polymer interactions are discussed.

  20. Ionomers for Ion-Conducting Energy Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colby, Ralph

    For ionic actuators and battery separators, it is vital to utilize single-ion conducting ionomers that avoid the detrimental polarization of other ions. Single-ion conducting ionomers are synthesized based on DFT calculations, with low glass transition temperatures (facile dynamics) to prepare ion-conducting membranes for battery separators that conduct Li+ or Na+. Characterization by X-ray scattering, dielectric spectroscopy, FTIR, NMR and linear viscoelasticity collectively develop a coherent picture of ionic aggregation and both counterion and polymer dynamics. 7Li NMR diffusion measurements find that diffusion is faster than expected by conductivity using the Nernst-Einstein equation, which means that the majority of Li diffusion occurs by ion pairs moving with the polymer segmental motion. Segmental motion only contributes to ionic conduction in the rare event that one of these ion pairs has an extra Li (a positive triple ion). This leads us to a new metric for ion-conducting soft materials, the product of the cation number density p0 and their diffusion coefficient D; p0D is the diffusive flux of lithium ions. This new metric has a maximum at intermediate ion content that corresponds to the overlap of ion pair polarizability volumes. At higher ion contents, the ion pairs interact strongly and form larger aggregation states that retard segmental motion of both mobile ion pairs and triple ions.

  1. Multidimensional Heat Conduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rode, Carsten

    1998-01-01

    Analytical theory of multidimensional heat conduction. General heat conduction equation in three dimensions. Steay state, analytical solutions. The Laplace equation. Method of separation of variables. Principle of superposition. Shape factors. Transient, multidimensional heat conduction....

  2. Enhanced Mixed Electronic-Ionic Conductors through Cation Ordering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, Allan J. [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States); Morgan, Dane [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Grey, Clare [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States)

    2014-08-31

    The performance of many energy conversion and storage devices depend on the properties of mixed ionic-electronic conducting (miec) materials. Mixed or ambipolar conductors simultaneously transport ions and electrons and provide the critical interface between chemical and electrical energy in devices such as fuel cells, ion transport membranes, and batteries. Enhancements in storage capacity, reversibility, power density and device lifetime all require new materials and a better understanding of the fundamentals of ambipolar conductivity and surface reactivity.The high temperature properties of the ordered perovksites AA’B2O5+x, where A = rare earth ion, Y and B = Ba, Sr were studied. The work was motivated by the high oxygen transport and surface exchange rates observed for members of this class of mixed ionic and electronic conductors. A combined experimental and computational approach, including structural, electrochemical, and transport characterization and modeling was used. The approach attacks the problem simultaneously at global (e.g., neutron diffraction and impedance spectroscopy), local (e.g., pair distribution function, nuclear magnetic resonance) and molecular (ab initio thermokinetic modeling) length scales. The objectives of the work were to understand how the cation and associated anion order lead to exceptional ionic and electronic transport properties and surface reactivity in AA’B2O5+x perovskites. A variety of compounds were studied by X-ray and neutron diffraction, measurements of thermodynamics and transport and theoretically. These included PrBaCo2O5+x and NdBaCo2O5+x, PrBaCo2-xFexO6- δ (x = 0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2) and LnBaCoFeO6- δ (Ln = La, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu and Gd), Sr3YCo4O10.5, YBaMn2O5+x. A0.5A’0.5BO3 (where A=Y, Sc, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Pm, Sm; A’= Sr

  3. Comparison contemporary methods of regeneration sodium-cationic filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burakov, I. A.; Burakov, A. Y.; Nikitina, I. S.; Verkhovsky, A. E.; Ilyushin, A. S.; Aladushkin, S. V.

    2017-11-01

    Regeneration plays a crucial role in the field of efficient application sodium-cationic filters for softening the water. Traditionally used as regenerant saline NaCl. However, due to the modern development of the energy industry and its close relationship with other industrial and academic sectors the opportunity to use in the regeneration of other solutions. The report estimated data and application possibilities as regenerant solution sodium-cationic filters brine wells a high mineral content, as both primary application and after balneotherapeutic use reverse osmosis and concentrates especially recycled regenerant water repeated. Comparison of the effectiveness of these solutions with the traditional use of NaCl. Developed and tested system for the processing of highly mineralized brines wells after balneological use. Recommendations for use as regeneration solutions for the sodium-cationic unit considered solutions and defined rules of brine for regeneration costs.

  4. Gamma-irradiated cationic starches: Paper surface-sizing agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofreiter, B.T.; Heath, H.D.; Schulte, M.I.; Phillips, B.S.

    1981-01-01

    Cationic starches, precisely depolymerized by gamma-irradiation ( 60 Co), were dispersed in mild alkali and evaluated as surface sizes for bond paper on a pilot paper machine. The irradiated products had excellent dispersion properties, were well retained on fibers when sized wastepaper (broke) was repulped and had an ability to enhance paper properties that was comparable to that of starch-based materials used commercially. A yellow corn flour, cationized by an essentially dry reaction process recently developed at this Center, was also radiolyzed and evaluated as a size. This latter product was unique in that all drying steps were eliminated in the preparation of a cationic ceral product of reduced viscosity. (orig.) [de

  5. Nanoscale encapsulation: the structure of cations in hydrophobic microporous aluminosilicates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasserman, S.R.; Yuchs, S.E.; Giaquinta, D.; Soderholm, L.; Song, Kang.

    1996-01-01

    Hydrophobic microporous aluminosilicates, created by organic surface modification of inherently hydrophilic materials such as zeolites and clays, are currently being investigated as storage media for hazardous cations. Use of organic monolayers to modify the surface of an aluminosilicate after introducing an ion into the zeolite/clay reduces the interaction of water with the material. Resulting systems are about 20 times more resistant to leaching of stored ion. XAS spectra from the encapsulated ion demonstrate that byproducts from the organic modifier can complex with the stored cation. This complexation can result in a decreased affinity of the cation for the aluminosilicate matrix. Changing the organic modifier eliminates this problem. XAS spectra also indicate that the reactivity and speciation of the encapsulated ion may change upon application of the hydrophobic layer

  6. Radical Addition to Iminium Ions and Cationic Heterocycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Tauber

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbon-centered radicals represent highly useful reactive intermediates in organic synthesis. Their nucleophilic character is reflected by fast additions to electron deficient C=X double bonds as present in iminium ions or cationic heterocycles. This review covers diverse reactions of preformed or in situ-generated cationic substrates with various types of C-radicals, including alkyl, alkoxyalkyl, trifluoromethyl, aryl, acyl, carbamoyl, and alkoxycarbonyl species. Despite its high reactivity, the strong interaction of the radical’s SOMO with the LUMO of the cation frequently results in a high regioselectivity. Intra- and intermolecular processes such as the Minisci reaction, the Porta reaction, and the Knabe rearrangement will be discussed along with transition metal and photoredox catalysis or electrochemical methods to generate the odd-electron species.

  7. A covalent attraction between two molecular cation TTF·~+

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG FangFang; WANG Yi; WANG BingQiang; WANG YinFeng; MA Fang; Li ZhiRu

    2009-01-01

    The optimized structure of the tetrathiafulvalence radical-cation dimer (TTF·~+-TTF·~+) with all-real frequencies is obtained at MP2/6-311G level,which exhibits the attraction between two molecular cation TTF·~+.The new attraction interaction is a 20-center-2-electron intermolecular covalent π/π bonding with a telescope shape.The covalent π/π bonding has the bonding energy of about-21 kcal·mol~(-1) and is concealed by the Coulombic repulsion between two TTF·~+ cations.This intermolecular covalent attraction also influences the structure of the TTF·~+ subunit,I.e.,its molecular plane is bent by an angle θ=5.6°.This work provides new knowledge on intermolecular interaction.

  8. A covalent attraction between two molecular cation TTF·~+

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The optimized structure of the tetrathiafulvalence radical-cation dimer(TTF·+-TTF·+) with all-real frequencies is obtained at MP2/6-311G level,which exhibits the attraction between two molecular cation TTF·+.The new attraction interaction is a 20-center-2-electron intermolecular covalent π /π bonding with a telescope shape.The covalent π /π bonding has the bonding energy of about -21 kcal·mol-1 and is concealed by the Coulombic repulsion between two TTF·+ cations.This intermolecular covalent attraction also influences the structure of the TTF·+ subunit,i.e.,its molecular plane is bent by an angle θ=5.6°.This work provides new knowledge on intermolecular interaction.

  9. Intracrystalline cation order in a lunar crustal troctolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    Lunar sample 76535 appears to be one of the most slowly cooled bits of silicate material yet studied. It provides, therefore, a unique opportunity for the study of ordering processes in the minerals present. A better understanding of these processes may permit better characterization of the thermal history of this and similar rocks. The cation ordering in the olivine is consistent with terrestrial olivines favoring the interpretation that ordering in olivines increases with increasing temperature. In low bronzite, the deviations from the common orthopyroxene space group appear to be caused by cation order on the basis of four M sites instead of two. The degree of cation order in each of these minerals is consistent with the rock having been excavated from its depth of formation by tectonic or impact processes without being reheated above 300 C.

  10. Structure and Intramolecular Proton Transfer of Alanine Radical Cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Gab Yong

    2012-01-01

    The structures of the four lowest alanine conformers, along with their radical cations and the effect of ionization on the intramolecular proton transfer process, are studied using the density functional theory and MP2 method. The energy order of the radical cations of alanine differs from that of the corresponding neutral conformers due to changes in the basicity of the NH 2 group upon ionization. Ionization favors the intramolecular proton transfer process, leading to a proton-transferred radical-cation structure, [NH 3 + -CHCH 3 -COO·], which contrasts with the fact that a proton-transferred zwitterionic conformer is not stable for a neutral alanine in the gas phase. The energy barrier during the proton transfer process is calculated to be about 6 kcal/mol

  11. Effect of cation exchange of major cation chemistry in the large scale redox experiment at Aespoe. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viani, B.E.; Bruton, C.J.

    1996-06-01

    Geochemical modeling was used to test the hypothesis that cation exchange with fracture-lining clays during fluid mixing in the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory can significantly affect major element chemistry. Conservative mixing models do not adequately account for changes in Na, Ca and Mg concentrations during mixing. Mixing between relatively dilute shallow waters and more concentrated waters at depth along fracture zones was modeled using the EQ3/6 geochemical modeling package. A cation exchange model was added to the code to describe simultaneously aqueous speciation, mineral precipitation/dissolution, and equilibration between a fluid and a cation exchanger. Fluid chemistries predicted to result from mixing were compared with those monitored from boreholes intersecting the fracture zone. Modeling results suggest that less than 0.1 equivalent of a smectite exchanger per liter of groundwater is necessary to account for discrepancies between predictions from a conservative mixing model and measured Na and Ca concentrations. This quantity of exchanger equates to an effective fracture coating thickness of 20 microm or less given a fracture aperture width of 1,000 microm or less. Trends in cation ratios in the fluid cannot be used to predict trends in cation ratios on the exchanger because of the influence of ionic strength on heterovalent exchange equilibrium. It is expected that Na for Ca exchange will dominate when shallow waters such as HBHO2 are mixed with deeper waters. In contrast, Na for Mg exchange will dominate mixing between deeper waters

  12. Selected anionic and cationic surface active agents: case study on the Kłodnica sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olkowska Ewa

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Surface active agents (surfactants are a group of chemical compounds, which are used as ingredients of detergents, cleaning products, cosmetics and functional products. After use, wastes containing surfactants or their degradation products are discharged to wastewater treatment plants or directly into surface waters. Due to their specific properties of SAAs, compounds are able to migrate between different environmental compartments such as soil, sediment, water or even living organisms and accumulate there. Surfactants can have a harmful effect on living organisms. They can connect with bioactive molecules and modify their function. Additionally, they have the ability to migrate into cells and cause their damage or death. For these reasons investigation of individual surfactants should be conducted. The presented research has been undertaken to obtain information about SAA contamination of sediment from the River Kłodnica catchment caused by selected anionic (linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LAS C10-C13 and cationic (alkylbenzyldimethylammonium (BDMA-C12-16, alkyl trimethyl ammonium (DTMA, hexadecyl piridinium chloride (HP chlorides surfactants. This river flows through an area of the Upper Silesia Industrial Region where various companies and other institutions (e.g. coal mining, power plants, metallurgy, hospitals are located. To determine their concentration the following analytical tools have been applied: accelerated solvent extraction– solid phase extraction – high performance liquid chromatography – UV-Vis (anionic SAAs and conductivity (cationic SAAs detectors. In all sediments anionic SAAs have been detected. The concentrations of HTMA and BDMA-C16 in tested samples were higher than other cationic analytes. Generally, levels of surfactants with longer alkyl chains were higher and this observation can confirm their higher susceptibility to sorption on solid surfaces.

  13. Biochar immobilizes soil-borne arsenic but not cationic metals in the presence of low-molecular-weight organic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alozie, Nneka; Heaney, Natalie; Lin, Chuxia

    2018-07-15

    A batch experiment was conducted to examine the effects of biochar on the behaviour of soil-borne arsenic and metals that were mobilized by three low-molecular-weight organic acids. In the presence of citric acid, oxalic acid and malic acid at a molar concentration of 0.01M, the surface of biochar was protonated, which disfavours adsorption of the cationic metals released from the soil by organic acid-driven mobilization. In contrast, the oxyanionic As species were re-immobilized by the protonated biochar effectively. Biochar could also immobilize oxyanionic Cr species but not cationic Cr species. The addition of biochar increased the level of metals in the solution due to the release of the biochar-borne metals under attack by LMWOAs via cation exchange. Biochar could also have the potential to enhance reductive dissolution of iron and manganese oxides in the soil, leading to enhanced release of trace elements bound to these oxides. The findings obtained from this study have implications for evaluating the role of biochar in immobilizing trace elements in rhizosphere. Adsorption of cationic heavy metals on biochar in the presence of LMWOAs is unlikely to be a mechanism responsible for the impeded uptake of heavy metals by plants growing in heavy metal-contaminated soils. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Inward Cationic Diffusion and Percolation Transition in Glass-Ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smedsklaer, Morten Mattrup; Yue, Yuanzheng; Mørup, Steen

    2010-01-01

    We show the quantitative correlation between the degree of crystallization and the cationic diffusion extent in iron-containing diopside glass–ceramics at the glass transition temperature. We find a critical degree of crystallization, above which the diffusion extent sharply drops with the degree...... of crystallization. Below the critical value, the diffusion extent decreases only slightly with the degree of crystallization. No cationic diffusion is observed in the fully crystalline materials. The critical value might be associated with a percolation transition from an interconnected to a disconnected glass...

  15. Radiation-induced cationic curing of vinyl ethers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapin, S.C.

    1992-01-01

    Recently there has been an increasing interest in nonacrylate radiation-curable coatings. Vinyl ethers are particularly reactive under cationic polymerization reaction conditions. The high efficiency of the photoacid initiators combined with the high reactivity of vinyl ether monomers makes this a potentially very useful system. This chapter discusses the preparation of vinyl ethers, introduces vinyl ether-functional monomers and oligomers, describes radiation-induced cationic polymerization of vinyl ethers, and discusses various coating systems. Throughout the chapter, an emphasis is placed on radiation-curable coating applications. 64 refs., 5 figs., 11 tabs

  16. Conductometric determination of solvation numbers of alkali metal cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fialkov, Yu.Ya.; Gorbachev, V.Yu.; Chumak, V.L.

    1997-01-01

    Theories describing the interrelation of ion mobility with their effective radii in solutions are considered. Possibility of using these theories for determination the solvation numbers n s of some ions is estimated. According to conductometric data values of n s are calculated for alkali metal ions in propylene carbonate. The data obtained are compared with solvation numbers determined with the use of entropies of ions solvation. Change of n s values within temperature range 273.15-323.15 K is considered. Using literature data the effect of crystallographic radii of cations and medium permittivity on the the values of solvation numbers of cations are analyzed. (author)

  17. Membrane potential and cation channels in rat juxtaglomerular cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, U G; Jørgensen, F; Andreasen, D

    2004-01-01

    The relationship between membrane potential and cation channels in juxtaglomerular (JG) cells is not well understood. Here we review electrophysiological and molecular studies of JG cells demonstrating the presence of large voltage-sensitive, calcium-activated potassium channels (BK(Ca)) of the Z......The relationship between membrane potential and cation channels in juxtaglomerular (JG) cells is not well understood. Here we review electrophysiological and molecular studies of JG cells demonstrating the presence of large voltage-sensitive, calcium-activated potassium channels (BK...

  18. Mass spectral analysis of cationic and neutral technetium complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unger, S.E.; McCormick, T.J.; Nunn, A.N.; Treher, E.N.

    1986-01-01

    Cationic and neutral technetium compounds have been characterized by mass spectrometry using a variety of ionization methods. These compounds include octahedral cationic complexes containing phosphorous and arsenic ligands such as DIPHOS and DIARS and neutral complexes containing PnAO and dimethylglyoxime, DMG, or cyclohexanedione dioxime, CDO, ligands. Boronate esters incorporating methyl and butyl derivatives of the DMG and CDO dioximes represent a new class of seven-coordinate Tc radiopharmaceuticals whose characterization by mass spectrometry has not previously been described. These complexes show promise as myocardial imaging agents. (author)

  19. Basally activated nonselective cation currents regulate the resting membrane potential in human and monkey colonic smooth muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Laura; Rhee, Poong-Lyul; Lowe, Vanessa; Zheng, Haifeng; Peri, Lauren; Ro, Seungil; Sanders, Kenton M.

    2011-01-01

    Resting membrane potential (RMP) plays an important role in determining the basal excitability of gastrointestinal smooth muscle. The RMP in colonic muscles is significantly less negative than the equilibrium potential of K+, suggesting that it is regulated not only by K+ conductances but by inward conductances such as Na+ and/or Ca2+. We investigated the contribution of nonselective cation channels (NSCC) to the RMP in human and monkey colonic smooth muscle cells (SMC) using voltage- and current-clamp techniques. Qualitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction was performed to examine potential molecular candidates for these channels among the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel superfamily. Spontaneous transient inward currents and holding currents were recorded in human and monkey SMC. Replacement of extracellular Na+ with equimolar tetraethylammonium or Ca2+ with Mn2+ inhibited basally activated nonselective cation currents. Trivalent cations inhibited these channels. Under current clamp, replacement of extracellular Na+ with N-methyl-d-glucamine or addition of trivalent cations caused hyperpolarization. Three unitary conductances of NSCC were observed in human and monkey colonic SMC. Molecular candidates for basally active NSCC were TRPC1, C3, C4, C7, M2, M4, M6, M7, V1, and V2 in human and monkey SMC. Comparison of the biophysical properties of these TRP channels with basally active NSCC (bINSCC) suggests that TRPM4 and specific TRPC heteromultimer combinations may underlie the three single-channel conductances of bINSCC. In conclusion, these findings suggest that basally activated NSCC contribute to the RMP in human and monkey colonic SMC and therefore may play an important role in determining basal excitability of colonic smooth muscle. PMID:21566016

  20. Conducting compositions of matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Tito (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The invention provides conductive compositions of matter, as well as methods for the preparation of the conductive compositions of matter, solutions comprising the conductive compositions of matter, and methods of preparing fibers or fabrics having improved anti-static properties employing the conductive compositions of matter.

  1. A theoretical study of complexes formed between cations and curved aromatic systems: electrostatics does not always control cation-π interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrazana-García, Jorge A; Cabaleiro-Lago, Enrique M; Rodríguez-Otero, Jesús

    2017-04-19

    The present work studies the interaction of two extended curved π-systems (corannulene and sumanene) with various cations (sodium, potassium, ammonium, tetramethylammonium, guanidinium and imidazolium). Polyatomic cations are models of groups found in important biomolecules in which cation-π interaction plays a fundamental role. The results indicate an important size effect: with extended π systems and cations of the size of potassium and larger, dispersion is much more important than has been generally recognized for cation-π interactions. In most of the systems studied here, the stability of the cation-π complexes is the result of a balanced combination of electrostatic, induction and dispersion contributions. None of the systems studied here owes its stability to the electrostatic interaction more than 42%. Induction dominates stabilization in complexes with sodium, and in some of the potassium and ammonium complexes. In complexes with large cations and with flat cations dispersion is the major stabilizing contribution and can provide more than 50% of the stabilization energy. This implies that theoretical studies of the cation-π interaction involving large or even medium-size fragments require a level of calculation capable of properly modelling dispersion. The separation between the cation and the π system is another important factor to take into account, especially when the fragments of the cation-π complex are bound (for example, to a protein backbone) and cannot interact at the most favourable distance.

  2. Spatial and temporal variations of diffuse CO_{2} degassing at the Tenerife North-South Rift Zone (NSRZ) volcano (Canary Islands) during the period 2002-2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Fátima; McCollum, John J. K.; Orland, Elijah D. M.; Barrancos, José; Padilla, Germán D.; Calvo, David; Amonte, Cecilia; Pérez, Nemesio M.

    2017-04-01

    Subaerial volcanic activity on Tenerife (2034 km2), the largest island of the Canary archipelago, started 14 My ago and 4 volcanic eruptions have occurred in historical times during the last 300 years. The main volcano-structural and geomorphological features of Tenerife are (i) the central volcanic complex, nowadays formed by Las Cañadas caldera, a volcanic depression measuring 16×9 km that resulted from multiple vertical collapses and partially filled by post-caldera volcanic products and (ii) the triple junction-shaped rift system, formed by numerous aligned monogenetic cones. Up to 297 mafic monogenetic cones have been recognized on Tenerife, and they represent the most common eruptive activity occurring on the island during the last 1 My (Dóniz et al., 2008). The North-South Rift Zone (NSRZ) of Tenerife comprises at least 139 cones. The main structural characteristic of the NSRZ of the island is an apparent absence of a distinct ridge, and a fan shaped distribution of monogenetic cones. Since there are currently no visible gas emissions at the NSRZ, diffuse degassing surveys have become an important geochemical tool for the surveillance of this volcanic system. Five diffuse CO2 degassing surveys have been carried out at NSRZ of Tenerife since 2002, the last one in the summer period of 2016, to evaluate the spatio-temporal variations of CO2 degassing as a volcanic surveillance tool for the NSRZ of Tenerife. At each survey, around 600 sampling sites were selected to cover homogenously the study area (325 km2) using the accumulation chamber method. The diffuse CO2 output ranged from 78 to 707 t/d in the study period, with the highest emission rate measured in 2015. The backgroung emission rate was estimated in 300 t/d. The last results the soil CO2 efflux values ranged from non-detectable up to 24.7 g m-2 d-1. The spatial distribution map, constructed following the sequential Gaussian simulation (sGs) procedure, showed the highest CO2 values as multiple

  3. Electrodeposition properties of modified cational epoxy resin-type photoresist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yong He; Yunlong Zhang; Feipeng Wu; Miaozhen Li; Erjian Wang

    1999-01-01

    Multi-component cationic epoxy and acrylic resin system for ED photoresist was used in this work, since they can provide better storage stability for ED emulsion and better physical and chemical properties of deposited film than one-component system. The cationic main resin (AE) was prepared from amine modified epoxy resins and then treated with acetic acid. The amination degree was controlled as required. The synthetic procedure of cationic main resins is described in scheme I. The ED photoresist (AME) is composed of cationic main resin (AE) and nonionic multifunctional acrylic crosslinkers (PETA), in combination with suitable photo-initiator. They can easily be dispersed in deionized water to form a stable ED emulsion. The exposed part of deposited film upon UV irradiation occurs crosslinking to produce an insoluble semi-penetrating network and the unexposed part remains good solubility in the acidic water solution. It is readily utilized for fabrication of fine micropattern. The electrodeposition are carried out on Cu plate at room temperature. To evaluate the electrodeposition properties of ED photoresist (AME), the different influences are examined

  4. Fusion Pore Diameter Regulation by Cations Modulating Local Membrane Anisotropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doron Kabaso

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The fusion pore is an aqueous channel that is formed upon the fusion of the vesicle membrane with the plasma membrane. Once the pore is open, it may close again (transient fusion or widen completely (full fusion to permit vesicle cargo discharge. While repetitive transient fusion pore openings of the vesicle with the plasma membrane have been observed in the absence of stimulation, their frequency can be further increased using a cAMP-increasing agent that drives the opening of nonspecific cation channels. Our model hypothesis is that the openings and closings of the fusion pore are driven by changes in the local concentration of cations in the connected vesicle. The proposed mechanism of fusion pore dynamics is considered as follows: when the fusion pore is closed or is extremely narrow, the accumulation of cations in the vesicle (increased cation concentration likely leads to lipid demixing at the fusion pore. This process may affect local membrane anisotropy, which reduces the spontaneous curvature and thus leads to the opening of the fusion pore. Based on the theory of membrane elasticity, we used a continuum model to explain the rhythmic opening and closing of the fusion pore.

  5. Cation exchange interaction between antibiotic ciprofloxacin and montmorillonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chih-Jen [Department of Earth Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Department of Geosciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Li, Zhaohui, E-mail: li@uwp.edu [Department of Earth Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Department of Geosciences, University of Wisconsin - Parkside, Kenosha, WI 53144 (United States); Jiang, Wei-Teh, E-mail: atwtj@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Earth Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Jean, Jiin-Shuh; Liu, Chia-Chuan [Department of Earth Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China)

    2010-11-15

    Exploring the interactions between antibiotics and soils/minerals is of great importance in resolving their fate, transport, and elimination in the environment due to their frequent detection in wastewater, river water, sewage sludge and soils. This study focused on determining the adsorption properties and mechanisms of interaction between antibiotic ciprofloxacin and montmorillonite (SAz-1), a swelling dioctahedral mineral with Ca{sup 2+} as the main interlayer cation. In acidic and neutral aqueous solutions, a stoichiometric exchange between ciprofloxacin and interlayer cations yielded an adsorption capacity as high as 330 mg/g, corresponding to 1.0 mmol/g. When solution pH was above its pK{sub a2} (8.7), adsorption of ciprofloxacin was greatly reduced due to the net repulsion between the negatively charged clay surfaces and the ciprofloxacin anion. The uptake of ciprofloxacin expanded the basal spacing (d{sub 001}) of montmorillonite from 15.04 to 17.23 A near its adsorption capacity, confirming cation exchange within the interlayers in addition to surface adsorption. Fourier transform infrared results further suggested that the protonated amine group of ciprofloxacin in its cationic form was electrostatically attracted to negatively charged sites of clay surfaces, and that the carboxylic acid group was hydrogen bonded to the basal oxygen atoms of the silicate layers. The results indicate that montmorillonite is an effective sorbent to remove ciprofloxacin from water.

  6. Cation exchange interaction between antibiotic ciprofloxacin and montmorillonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Chih-Jen; Li, Zhaohui; Jiang, Wei-Teh; Jean, Jiin-Shuh; Liu, Chia-Chuan

    2010-01-01

    Exploring the interactions between antibiotics and soils/minerals is of great importance in resolving their fate, transport, and elimination in the environment due to their frequent detection in wastewater, river water, sewage sludge and soils. This study focused on determining the adsorption properties and mechanisms of interaction between antibiotic ciprofloxacin and montmorillonite (SAz-1), a swelling dioctahedral mineral with Ca 2+ as the main interlayer cation. In acidic and neutral aqueous solutions, a stoichiometric exchange between ciprofloxacin and interlayer cations yielded an adsorption capacity as high as 330 mg/g, corresponding to 1.0 mmol/g. When solution pH was above its pK a2 (8.7), adsorption of ciprofloxacin was greatly reduced due to the net repulsion between the negatively charged clay surfaces and the ciprofloxacin anion. The uptake of ciprofloxacin expanded the basal spacing (d 001 ) of montmorillonite from 15.04 to 17.23 A near its adsorption capacity, confirming cation exchange within the interlayers in addition to surface adsorption. Fourier transform infrared results further suggested that the protonated amine group of ciprofloxacin in its cationic form was electrostatically attracted to negatively charged sites of clay surfaces, and that the carboxylic acid group was hydrogen bonded to the basal oxygen atoms of the silicate layers. The results indicate that montmorillonite is an effective sorbent to remove ciprofloxacin from water.

  7. Stepwise radical cation Diels-Alder reaction via multiple pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Ryo; Okada, Yohei; Chiba, Kazuhiro

    2018-01-01

    Herein we disclose the radical cation Diels-Alder reaction of aryl vinyl ethers by electrocatalysis, which is triggered by an oxidative SET process. The reaction clearly proceeds in a stepwise fashion, which is a rare mechanism in this class. We also found that two distinctive pathways, including "direct" and "indirect", are possible to construct the Diels-Alder adduct.

  8. Fabrication of Cationic Exchange Polystyrene Nanofibers for Drug ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To prepare polystyrene nanofiber ion exchangers (PSNIE) with surface cation exchange functionality using a new method based on electrospinning and also to optimize crosslinking and sulfonation reactions to obtain PSNIE with maximum ion exchange capacity (IEC). Method: The nanofibers were prepared from ...

  9. Catalytic Ketone Hydrodeoxygenation Mediated by Highly Electrophilic Phosphonium Cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Meera; Holthausen, Michael H; Mallov, Ian; Pérez, Manuel; Qu, Zheng-Wang; Grimme, Stefan; Stephan, Douglas W

    2015-07-06

    Ketones are efficiently deoxygenated in the presence of silane using highly electrophilic phosphonium cation (EPC) salts as catalysts, thus affording the corresponding alkane and siloxane. The influence of distinct substitution patterns on the catalytic effectiveness of several EPCs was evaluated. The deoxygenation mechanism was probed by DFT methods. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Stretch-activated cation channel from larval bullfrog skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillyard, Stanley D; Willumsen, Niels J; Marrero, Mario B

    2010-01-01

    Cell-attached patches from isolated epithelial cells from larval bullfrog skin revealed a cation channel that was activated by applying suction (-1 kPa to -4.5 kPa) to the pipette. Activation was characterized by an initial large current spike that rapidly attenuated to a stable value and showed ...

  11. Peak metamorphic temperatures from cation diffusion zoning in garnet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smit, Matthijs Arjen; Scherer, Erik; Mezger, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    ) to develop a tool that uses the diffusion zoning of these cations in garnet to constrain peak temperature conditions for garnet-bearing rocks. The thermometric approach was externally tested by applying it to garnet crystals from various metamorphic terranes worldwide and comparing the results to published...

  12. Small angle neutron scattering studies on the interaction of cationic

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The structure of the protein–surfactant complex of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and cationic surfactants has been studied by small angle neutron scattering. At low concentrations, the CTAB monomers are observed to bind to the protein leading to an increase in its size. On the other hand at high concentrations, surfactant ...

  13. Cation Hydration Constants by Proton NMR: A Physical Chemistry Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert L.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Studies the polarization effect on water by cations and anions. Describes an experiment to illustrate the polarization effect of sodium, lithium, calcium, and strontium ions on the water molecule in the hydration spheres of the ions. Analysis is performed by proton NMR. (MVL)

  14. Selective oxidation of propane over cation exchanged zeolites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, J.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis focuses on investigation of the fundamental knowledge on a new method for selective oxidation of propane with O2 at low temperature (< 100°C). The relation between propane catalytic selective oxidation and physicochemical properties of cation exchanged Y zeolite has been studied. An

  15. The exchangeable cations in soils flooded with sea water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molen, van der W.H.

    1958-01-01

    The changes in the exchangeable cations of soils flooded with sea-water were extensively studied in the Netherlands after the inundations of 1940, 1945 and 1953. A synopsis of the results was given, both from a theoretical and a practical viewpoint.

    Current formulae for ion-exchange tested in the

  16. Satellite and ground-based analysis of the effects on vegetation of continuous SO2 degassing at Turrialba volcano (Costa Rica) and its application to hazard management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortini, R.; van Manen, S. M.; Burson, B.; Carn, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    Turrialba is an active stratovolcano located 35 km northeast of San Jose, Costa Rica's capital city and socioeconomic hub. After over 100 years of quiescence Turrialba resumed activity in 1996 progressively increasing its degassing and seismic activity, showing continuous gas emissions since 2007. Intermittent phreatic explosions with ash emissions that have reached the capital have occurred since 2010. This activity has resulted in the temporary evacuation of two villages, closure of the National Park that comprises the summit region of the volcano and devastation of the local ecosystem. We combined a variety of satellite-based time series with ground-based measurements of ambient gas concentrations, element deposition and surveys of species richness to enable a comprehensive assessment of SO2 emissions and changes in vegetation. Satellite-based time-series were obtained from Landsat ETM+, Terra ASTER, Terra/Aqua MODIS and Aura OMI, with some of the data dating back to 2000. From 2007-2010 we observed emissions of SO2 and loss of vegetation healthiness (i.e. decrease of EVI2) downwind of the vents. From 2010 onwards these stabilized, but we observe an apparent decrease in agriculture. Other multi-temporal products, such as the ALOS PALSAR FNF data, confirm our observations. The exposure to the volcanic plume resulted in high soil acidity and significant uptake of certain heavy metals by vegetation; in contrast other elements are leached from the soil as a result of the acid deposition. These factors are likely to be responsible for decreased species richness and physiological damage observed at Turrialba. Our study shows ecological impacts, in terms of soil characteristics, vegetation composition and diversity and physiological damage of vegetation, which all correlate to fumigation by Turrialba's plume. Analyzing and relating the remote observations to conditions and impacts on the ground provides a better understanding of volcanic degassing, its impacts on

  17. Eruption and Degassing Processes in a Supervolcanic System: The Volatile Record Preserved in Melt Inclusions from the 3.49Ma Tara Ignimbrite in the Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grocke, S.; de Silva, S. L.; Schmitt, A. K.; Wallace, P. J.

    2010-12-01

    Analysis of H2O and CO2 in quartz and sanidine-hosted melt inclusions from one of the youngest supervolcanic eruptions in the Altiplano Puna Volcanic Complex (APVC) in the Central Andes provides information on crystallization depths and eruption and degassing processes. At least 740 km3 of high-K, metaluminous, rhyodacite to rhyolite magma erupted from the Guacha Caldera in southwest Bolivia, producing three phases of the 3.49 Ma Tara Ignimbrite: a Plinian fall-deposit, an extensive ignimbrite, and several post-caldera domes. Infrared spectroscopic analyses of quartz-hosted melt inclusions from Tara Plinian pumice have H2O contents of ~4.5 wt % and variable CO2 contents (110-300 ppm), corresponding to vapor saturation pressures up to 180 MPa. In contrast, sanidine-hosted melt inclusions from the Plinian-fall deposit contain bubbles, lower water contents (1.4-2.2 wt %) and lower CO2 (87-143 ppm). These vesiculated melt inclusions and low volatile contents suggest that the sanidine crystals leaked on their ascent to the surface and therefore do not record accurate pre-eruptive melt volatile contents. In contrast, quartz-hosted melt inclusions from post-caldera dome samples contain lower H2O contents of 2.5-3.5 wt % (average 2.9 wt %) and no detectable CO2, corresponding to vapor saturation pressures of 50-90 MPa. These data indicate that the preeruptive plinian stage Tara magma was vapor saturated at the time of melt inclusion entrapment and stored between 5-6 km, while those from the post-caldera domes were trapped at 2-3 km. Differences in CO2 between Plinian and dome melt inclusions require that the post-caldera dome quartzes represent a different generation of crystals that grew as the magma slowly rose and progressively degassed at 2-3 km. During this shallow crystallization, the magma evolved further and eventually fed the post-caldera domes, one of which is a high-Si rhyolite. Consistent with this interpretation, melt inclusions from post-caldera dome samples

  18. Monitoring diffuse degassing in monogentic volcanic field during a quiescent period: the case of Cumbre Vieja (La Palma,Canary Islands, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, F.; Cole, M.; Vaccaro, W.; Alonso Cótchico, M.; Melián, G.; Asensio-Ramos, M.; Padron, E.; Hernandez Perez, P. A.; Perez, N. M.

    2017-12-01

    Volcanic activity at La Palma (Canary Islands) in the last 123 ka has taken place exclusively at the southern part of the island, where Cumbre Vieja volcano, which is characterized by a main north-south rift zone 20 km long and up to 1950 m in elevation and covering an area of 220 km2 with vents located also at the northwest and northeast. Cumbre Vieja is the most active basaltic volcano in the Canaries with 7 historical eruptions being San Juan (1949) and Teneguía (1971) the most recent ones. Since no visible degassing (fumaroles, etc.) at Cumbre Vieja occurs, our geochemical program for the volcanic surveillance of Cumbre Vieja is mainly focused on diffuse degassing monitoring. Diffuse CO2 emission surveys are yearly performed in summer to minimize the influence of meteorological variations. About 570 sampling sites were selected for each survey to obtain a homogeneous distribution after taking into consideration the local geology, structure, and accessibility. Measurements of soil CO2 efflux were performed in situ by means of a portable non-dispersive infrared sensor following the accumulation chamber method. The soil CO2 efflux values of the 2017 survey ranged from non-detectable to 47.7 g m-2 d-1. Statistical-graphical analysis of the data show two different geocheleemical populations; background (B) and peak (P) represented by 98.2% and 1.8% of the total data, respectively. The geometric means of the B and P populations are 2.9 and 36.5 g m-2 d-1, respectively. Most of the area showed B values while the P values were mainly observed both flanks of the main N-S volcanic rift. To estimate the diffuse CO2 emission in metric tons per day released from Cumbre Vieja (220 km2) for the 2017 survey, we ran about 100 sGs simulations. The estimated 2017 diffuse CO2 output released to atmosphere by Cumbre Vieja was at 801 ± 27 t d-1, value relatively higher than the background average of CO2 emission estimated on 374 t d-1 and within the background range of 132 t d-1

  19. Monitoring diffuse degassing in monogenetic volcanic field during seismic-volcanic unrest: the case of Tenerife North-West Rift Zone (NWRZ), Canary Islands, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, E.; Botelho, A. H.; Regnier, G. S. G.; Rodríguez, F.; Alonso Cótchico, M.; Melián, G.; Asensio-Ramos, M.; Padrón, E.; Hernández, P. A.; Pérez, N. M.

    2017-12-01

    Tenerife North-West Rift-Zone (NWRZ) is the most active volcano of the oceanic active volcanic island of Tenerife and the scenario of three historical eruptions (Boca Cangrejo S. XVI, Arenas Negras 1706 and Chinyero 1909). Since no visible degassing (fumaroles, etc.) at Tenerife NWRZ occurs, a geochemical monitoring program at Tenerife NWRZ was established mainly consisting on performing soil CO2 efflux surveys (50 surveys since 2000) to evaluate the temporal and spatial variations of soil CO2 efflux measurements and the diffuse CO2 emission rate. To do so, about 340 sampling sites were selected for each survey to obtain a homogeneous distribution after taking into consideration the local geology, structure, and accessibility. Measurements of soil CO2 efflux were performed in situ by means of a portable non-dispersive infrared sensor following the accumulation chamber method. The soil CO2 efflux values of the 2017 survey ranged from non-detectable to 46.6 g m-2 d-1. Statistical-graphical analysis of the 2017 data show two different geochemical populations; background (B) and peak (P) represented by 93.3% and 1.9% of the total data, respectively. The geometric means of the B and P populations are 2.4 and 19.1 g m-2 d-1, respectively. Most of the area showed B values while the P values were mainly observed at the N-W side of the volcanic rift. To estimate the diffuse CO2 emission in metric tons per day released from Tenerife NWRZ (75 km2) for the 2017 survey, we ran about 100 sGs simulations. The estimated 2017 diffuse CO2 output released to atmosphere by the Tenerife NWRZ volcano was 297 ± 13 t d-1. This 2017 diffuse CO2 emission rate value is relatively higher than the estimated background value (144 t d-1) and falls within the estimated background range (72 - 321 t d-1) observed for Tenerife NWRZ volcano during the 2000-2017 period. The observed temporal variation in the diffuse CO2 degassing output during this period does not seem to be driven by external

  20. Mutations of the cystic fibrosis gene, but not cationic trypsinogen gene, are associated with recurrent or chronic idiopathic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ockenga, J; Stuhrmann, M; Ballmann, M; Teich, N; Keim, V; Dörk, T; Manns, M P

    2000-08-01

    We investigated whether mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene and cationic trypsinogen gene are associated with recurrent acute, or chronic idiopathic pancreatitis. Twenty patients with idiopathic pancreatitis (11 women, nine men; mean age, 30 yr) were studied for the presence of a CFTR mutation by screening the genomic DNA for more than 30 mutations and variants in the CFTR gene. Selected mutations of the cationic trypsinogen gene were screened by Afl III restriction digestion or by a mutation-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In each patient exons 1, 2, and 3 of the cationic trypsinogen gene were sequenced. Patients with a CFTR mutation underwent evaluation of further functional electrophysiological test (intestinal current measurement). No mutation of the cationic trypsinogen gene was detected. A CFTR mutation was detected in 6/20 (30.0%) patients. Three patients (15.0%) had a cystic fibrosis (CF) mutation on one chromosome (deltaF508, I336K, Y1092X), which is known to cause phenotypical severe cystic fibrosis. One patient was heterozygous for the 5T allele. In addition, two possibly predisposing CFTR variants (R75Q, 1716G-->A) were detected on four patients, one of these being a compound heterozygous for the missense mutation I336K and R75Q. No other family member (maternal I336K; paternal R75Q; sister I1336K) developed pancreatitis. An intestinal current measurement in rectum samples of patients with a CFTR mutation revealed no CF-typical constellations. CFTR mutations are associated with recurrent acute, or chronic idiopathic pancreatitis, whereas mutations of the cationic trypsinogen mutation do not appear to be a frequent pathogenetic factor.

  1. On possibility of using E, H - crossed fields and gas-dynamic flowing of argon in the processes of degassing by the method of ion-stimulated desorption of residual gas in the KUTI-20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharapov, V.E.

    1985-01-01

    In the project considered if the possibility to use the degassing of an adhezatior chamber inner walls, using the method of ion-stimulated desorption (ISD) of residual gas in the glow discharge is considered. It is suggested that the experiment should be realized using the model or the KUTI (PKUTI) prototype to decrease operation pressure to p -7 Pa (2x10 -9 Tor) at the expense of introduction of the technology described and certain modifications in the processes of leak-in and pumping. The use of crossed E,H-fields and gasodynamic regime of argon flow in the process of preliminary degassing of the adhezator chamber by the glow discharge is the main idea of the project

  2. Measurement of antioxidant activity with trifluoperazine dihydrochloride radical cation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.N. Asghar

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A novel, rapid and cost-effective trifluoperazine dihydrochloride (TFPH decolorization assay is described for the screening of antioxidant activity. A chromogenic reaction between TFPH and potassium persulfate at low pH produces an orange-red radical cation with maximum absorption at 502 nm in its first-order derivative spectrum. TFPH was dissolved in distilled water to give a 100 mM solution. The TFPH radical cation solution was made by reacting 0.5 mL of the solution with K2S2O8 (final concentration: 0.1 mM and diluting to 100 mL with 4 M H2SO4 solution. A linear inhibition of color production was observed with linearly increasing amounts of antioxidants, with correlation coefficients (R² ranging from 0.999 to 0.983. The antioxidant capacity of standard solutions of an antioxidant was evaluated by comparing with the inhibition curve using Trolox as the standard. Comparison of antioxidant capacity determined with this newly developed TFPH assay and with the well-known 2,2'-azinobis-[3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid] (ABTS-persulfate decolorization assay indicated the efficacy and sensitivity of the procedure. The proposed assay is less expensive (costs about US$4 per 100 assays and requires only 20 min for preparation of radical cation solution in comparison with ABTS assay, in which almost 12-16 h are required for preparation of a stable ABTS radical cation solution. The present assay has the advantage over ABTS assay that it can be used to measure the antioxidant activity of the samples, which are naturally found at a pH as low as 1, because the radical cation itself has been stabilized at low pH.

  3. Cation effect on small phosphonium based ionic liquid electrolytes with high concentrations of lithium salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fangfang; Kerr, Robert; Forsyth, Maria

    2018-05-01

    Ionic liquid electrolytes with high alkali salt concentrations have displayed some excellent electrochemical properties, thus opening up the field for further improvements to liquid electrolytes for lithium or sodium batteries. Fundamental computational investigations into these high concentration systems are required in order to gain a better understanding of these systems, yet they remain lacking. Small phosphonium-based ionic liquids with high concentrations of alkali metal ions have recently shown many promising results in experimental studies, thereby prompting us to conduct further theoretical exploration of these materials. Here, we conducted a molecular dynamics simulation on four small phosphonium-based ionic liquids with 50 mol. % LiFSI salt, focusing on the effect of cation structure on local structuring and ion diffusional and rotational dynamics—which are closely related to the electrochemical properties of these materials.

  4. Cell shape changes induced by cationic anesthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    The effects of local anesthetics on cultivated macrophages were studied in living preparations and recorded in still pictures and time-lapse cine-micrographs. Exposure to 12mM lidocaine or 1.5 mM tetracaine resulted in rounding in 10-15 min. Rounding was characterized by cell contraction, marked increase in retraction fibrils, withdrawal of cell processes, and, in late stages, pulsation-like activity and zeiosis. Cells showed appreciable membrane activity as they rounded. Respreading was complete within 15 min of perfusion in drug-free medium and entailed a marked increase in surface motility over control periods. As many as eight successive cycles of rounding and spreading were obtained with lidocaine without evidence of cell damage. The effects of anesthetics were similar to those observed with EDTA, but ethylene- glycol-bis(beta-aminoethylether)-N, N'-tetraacetic acid-Mg was ineffective. Rounding was also induced by benzocaine, an anesthetic nearly uncharged at pH 7.0. Quaternary (nondischargeable) compounds were of low activity, presumably because they are slow permeants. Lidocaine induced rounding at 10 degrees C and above but was less effective at 5 degrees C and ineffective at 0 degrees C. Rounding by the anesthetic was also obtained in media depleted or Na or enriched with 10 mM Ca or Mg. The latter finding, together with the failure of tetrodotoxin to induce rounding, suggests that the anesthetic effect is unrelated to inhibition of sodium conductance. It is possible that the drugs influence divalent ion fluxes or some component of the contractile cells' machinery, but a metabolic target of action cannot yet be excluded. PMID:814194

  5. Nerve conduction velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003927.htm Nerve conduction velocity To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Nerve conduction velocity (NCV) is a test to see ...

  6. Conducting Polymeric Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvilsted, Søren

    2016-01-01

    The overall objective of this collection is to provide the most recent developments within the various areas of conducting polymeric materials. The conductivity of polymeric materials is caused by electrically charged particles, ions, protons and electrons. Materials in which electrons...

  7. Silver Cation Coordination Study to AsW9 Ligand – A Trilacunar Arsenotungstate Compound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berta Lavinia

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The main objective of this research is to find the coordination ratio between AsW9 and Ag+, as a preliminary study for synthesizing a new silver-arsenotungstate complex. Material and method: The ligand:cation molar ratio in complexes was determined by conductometric and potentiometric titrations of AsW9 with silver salts: CH3COOAg, AgNO3. Results: The ratio was obtained from the inflexion points of the curves when molar ratio was plotted versus conductivity, or from the equivalence point when silver added volume was plotted versus pH value. Each graphic shows one point of inflexion corresponding to 1:1.54 ratio of AsW9:Ag+. In the same manner, the equivalent volumes determined by graphical method gave the ratio 1:1.53. The spectral results confirmed that a AsW9:Ag+ complex was formed since the ligand absorption maxima values have been changed from 190 nm to 197 nm in the case of using AgNO3 and 196 nm for CH3COOAg corresponding to the W=Od bond, and from 246.5 nm to 274 nm (AgNO3 and 270 nm (CH3COO-Ag+ for the W-Ob,c-W bond. Conclusions: Silver cation exhibit a preference for AsW9 in a ratio of 3 to 2. This ratio can be associated to a sandwich type arrangement, with two trilacunary Keggin building blocks incorporating 3 metal cations in a tetrahedral geometry.

  8. Biocompatible water softening system using cationic protein from moringa oleifera extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisha, R. R.; Jegathambal, P.; Parameswari, K.; Kirupa, K.

    2017-10-01

    In developing countries like India, the deciding factors for the selection of the specific water purification system are the flow rate, cost of implementation and maintenance, availability of materials for fabrication or assembling, technical manpower, energy requirement and reliability. But most of them are energy and cost intensive which necessitate the development of cost-effective water purification system. In this study, the feasibility of development of an efficient and cost-effective water purifier using Moringa oleifera cationic protein coated sand column to treat drinking water is presented. Moringa oleifera seeds contain cationic antimicrobial protein which acts as biocoagulant in the removal of turbidity and also aids in water softening. The main disadvantage of using Moringa seeds in water purification is that the dissolved organic matter (DOM) which is left over in the water contributes to growth of any pathogens that come into contact with the stored water. To overcome this limitation, the Moringa oleifera cationic protein coated sand (MOCP c-sand) is prepared in which the flocculant and antimicrobial properties of the MOCP are maintained and the DOM to be rinsed away. The efficiency of MOCP c-sand in removing suspended particles and reducing total hardness (TH), chloride, total dissolved solids (TDS), electrical conductivity (EC) was also studied. Also, it is shown that the functionalized sand showed the same treatment efficiency even after being stored dry and in dehydrated condition for 3 months. This confirms MOCP c-sand's potential as a locally sustainable water treatment option for developing countries since other chemicals used in water purification are expensive.

  9. Automated dual capillary electrophoresis system with hydrodynamic injection for the concurrent determination of cations and anions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham, Thi Thanh Thuy; Mai, Thanh Duc [University of Basel, Department of Chemistry, Spitalstrasse 51, Basel 4056 (Switzerland); Centre for Environmental Technology and Sustainable Development (CETASD), Hanoi University of Science, Nguyen Trai Street 334, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Nguyen, Thanh Dam [Centre for Environmental Technology and Sustainable Development (CETASD), Hanoi University of Science, Nguyen Trai Street 334, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Sáiz, Jorge [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Physical Chemistry and Chemical Engineering – University of Alcalá, Ctra. Madrid-Barcelona km 33.6, Alcalá de Henares, Madrid 28871 (Spain); Pham, Hung Viet, E-mail: phamhungviet@hus.edu.vn [Centre for Environmental Technology and Sustainable Development (CETASD), Hanoi University of Science, Nguyen Trai Street 334, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Hauser, Peter C., E-mail: Peter.Hauser@unibas.ch [University of Basel, Department of Chemistry, Spitalstrasse 51, Basel 4056 (Switzerland)

    2014-09-02

    Highlights: • Concurrent determination of cations and anions was carried out by electrophoretic separation. • Optimized conditions for each class of analystes was possible by using separate capillaries. • Simultaneous hydrodynamic injection was carried out. • Pneumatic actuation was used for flushing and sample handling. • The denitrification of drinking water was successfully demonstrated. - Abstract: The capillary electrophoresis instrument developed for the concurrent determination of cations and anions features two separate capillaries and individual detectors to allow independent optimization for each group of ions. The capillaries are joined in a common injector block. The sample is drawn into the injector with a small membrane pump and automated simultaneous injection into both capillaries is achieved by pressurization of the fluid with compressed air. Flushing of the injector and of the capillaries with the background electrolyte is also carried out automatically by the same means. The buffer consisted of 12 mM histidine and 2 mM 18-crown-6 adjusted to pH 4 with acetic acid and was suitable for the contactless conductivity detection employed. The system was optimized for the determination of cationic NH{sub 4}{sup +} and anionic NO{sub 3}{sup −} and NO{sub 2}{sup −}, and linear calibration curves from about 20 μM up to about 1.5 mM were obtained for these ions. In a test run over 8 h, the reproducibility for the peak areas was within ±7%. For demonstration, the instrument was successfully applied to the concurrent monitoring of the concentrations of the three ions during the biological removal of ammonium from contaminated groundwater in a sequencing batch reactor, where NO{sub 3}{sup −} and NO{sub 2}{sup −} are formed as intermediate products.

  10. Voltammetry of Lead Cations on a New Type of Silver Composite Electrode in the Presence of Other Cations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Navrátil, Tomáš; Šebková, Světlana; Kopanica, M.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 379, - (2004), s. 294-301 ISSN 1618-2642 Grant - others:GIT(AR) 101/02/U111/CZ Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : voltammetry * silver composite electrode * lead cations Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 2.098, year: 2004

  11. Cation-pi interaction of the univalent silver cation with meso-octamethylcalix[4]pyrrole: Experimental and theoretical study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Polášek, Miroslav; Kvíčala, J.; Makrlík, E.; Křížová, Věra; Vaňura, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 1130, FEB 2017 (2017), s. 408-413 ISSN 0022-2860 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) 20/2015; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010005 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : silver cation * meso-octamethylcalix[4]pyrrole * complexation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 1.753, year: 2016

  12. IR spectroscopy of cationized aliphatic amino acids: Stability of charge-solvated structure increases with metal cation size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drayss, M. K.; Armentrout, P. B.; Oomens, J.; Schaefer, M.

    2010-01-01

    Gas-phase structures of alkali metal cationized (Li+, Na+,K+, Rb+, and Cs+) proline (Pro) and N-methyl alanine have been investigated using infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy utilizing light generated by a free electron laser and computational modeling. Measured IRMPD spectra

  13. IR spectroscopy of cationized aliphatic amino acids: Stability of charge-solvated structure increases with metal cation size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drayß, M.K.; Armentrout, P.B.; Oomens, J.; Schäfer, M.

    2010-01-01

    Gas-phase structures of alkali metal cationized (Li+, Na+, K+, Rb+, and Cs+) proline (Pro) and N-methyl alanine have been investigated using infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy utilizing light generated by a free electron laser and computational modeling. Measured IRMPD

  14. Effect of cation competition on cadmium uptake from solution by the earthworm Eisenia fetida.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, L.-Z.; Zhou, D.-M.; Wang, P.; Jin, S.-Y.; Peijnenburg, W.J.G.M.; Reinecke, A.J.; van Gestel, C.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Metal speciation alone is insufficient to predict metal accumulation in aquatic and terrestrial organisms, because competition between cations can play an important role. In the present study, the effects of competing cations (Ca

  15. Electrically conductive composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clough, Roger L.; Sylwester, Alan P.

    1989-01-01

    An electrically conductive composite material is disclosed which comprises a conductive open-celled, low density, microcellular carbon foam filled with a non-conductive polymer or resin. The composite material is prepared in a two-step process consisting of first preparing the microcellular carbon foam from a carbonizable polymer or copolymer using a phase separation process, then filling the carbon foam with the desired non-conductive polymer or resin. The electrically conductive composites of the present invention has a uniform and consistant pattern of filler distribution, and as a result is superior over prior art materials when used in battery components, electrodes, and the like.

  16. Soil temperature and CO2 degassing, SO2 fluxes and field observations before and after the February 29, 2016 new vent inside Nyiragongo crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balagizi, Charles M.; Yalire, Mathieu M.; Ciraba, Honoré M.; Kajeje, Vicky B.; Minani, Abel S.; Kinja, Annie B.; Kasereka, Marcellin M.

    2016-09-01

    Nyiragongo volcano threatens ˜1.5 million inhabitants of Goma (DR Congo) and Gisenyi (Rwanda) cities and people living in the surrounding villages. In 2002, the volcano produced lava flows which invaded Goma and destroyed the economic district of the city, forced a mass exodus of the population and caused the loss of several lives. Nyiragongo volcanic activity is therefore closely followed by the inhabitants, and any news related to increased activity agitates people in the area, especially those in Goma. Here, we report a short time series of soil temperature and carbon dioxide degassing for four locations, and plume sulphur dioxide fluxes preceding and following the opening of a new vent inside the main Nyiragongo crater on February 29, 2016. The observed sudden and unexpected changes in Nyiragongo activity raised the fear of a new volcanic eruption and led to panic in Goma and the surroundings, inducing some people to leaving the city. We use the dataset and field observations before and after the opening of the new vent, in conjunction with published information about Nyiragongo's eruptive mechanism and of the volcano's plumbing system geometry (mainly the crater), to show that the new vent was fed by magma intruded from the lava lake or the upper conduit.

  17. Monitoring of fumarole discharge and CO2 soil degassing in the Azores: contribution to volcanic surveillance and public health risk assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Faria

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Fluid geochemistry monitoring in the Azores involves the regular sampling and analysis of gas discharges from fumaroles and measurements of CO2 diffuse soil gas emissions. Main degassing areas under monitoring are associated with hydrothermal systems of active central volcanoes in S. Miguel, Terceira and Graciosa islands. Fumarole discharge analysis since 1991 show that apart from steam these gas emissions are CO2 dominated with H2S, H2, CH4 and N2 in minor amounts. Mapping of CO2 diffuse soil emissions in S. Miguel Island lead to the conclusion that some inhabited areas are located within hazard-zones. At Furnas village, inside Furnas volcano caldera, about 62% of the 896 houses are within the CO2 anomaly, 5% being in areas of moderate to high risk. At Ribeira Seca, on the north flank of Fogo volcano, few family houses were evacuated when CO2 concentrations in the air reached 8 mol%. To assess and analyse the CO2 soil flux emissions, continuous monitoring stations were installed in S. Miguel (2, Terceira and Graciosa islands. The statistical analysis of the data showed that some meteorological parameters influence the CO2 flux. The average of CO2 flux in S. Miguel stations ranges from 250 g/m2/d at Furnas volcano to 530 g/m2/d at Fogo volcano. At Terceira Island it is about 330 g/m2/d and at Graciosa 4400 g/m2/d.

  18. Mathematical Modeling of Fluid Flow in a Water Physical Model of an Aluminum Degassing Ladle Equipped with an Impeller-Injector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Eudoxio Ramos; Zenit, Roberto; Rivera, Carlos González; Trápaga, Gerardo; Ramírez-Argáez, Marco A.

    2013-04-01

    In this work, a 3D numerical simulation using a Euler-Euler-based model implemented into a commercial CFD code was used to simulate fluid flow and turbulence structure in a water physical model of an aluminum ladle equipped with an impeller for degassing treatment. The effect of critical process parameters such as rotor speed, gas flow rate, and the point of gas injection (conventional injection through the shaft vs a novel injection through the bottom of the ladle) on the fluid flow and vortex formation was analyzed with this model. The commercial CFD code PHOENICS 3.4 was used to solve all conservation equations governing the process for this two-phase fluid flow system. The mathematical model was reasonably well validated against experimentally measured liquid velocity and vortex sizes in a water physical model built specifically for this investigation. From the results, it was concluded that the angular speed of the impeller is the most important parameter in promoting better stirred baths and creating smaller and better distributed bubbles in the liquid. The pumping effect of the impeller is increased as the impeller rotation speed increases. Gas flow rate is detrimental to bath stirring and diminishes the pumping effect of the impeller. Finally, although the injection point was the least significant variable, it was found that the "novel" injection improves stirring in the ladle.

  19. Ion Dynamics in a Mixed-Cation Alkoxy-Ammonium Ionic Liquid Electrolyte for Sodium Device Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Cameron R; Kar, Mega; MacFarlane, Douglas R; Armand, Michel; Forsyth, Maria; O'Dell, Luke A

    2016-10-18

    The ion dynamics in a novel sodium-containing room-temperature ionic liquid (IL) consisting of an ether-functionalised quaternary ammonium cation and bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide [NTf 2 ] anion with various concentrations of Na[NTf 2 ] have been characterised using differential scanning calorimetry, impedance spectroscopy, diffusometry and NMR relaxation measurements. The IL studied has been specifically designed to dissolve a relatively large concentration of Na[NTf 2 ] salt (over 2 mol kg -1 ) as this has been shown to improve ion transport and conductivity. Consistent with other studies, the measured ionic conductivity and diffusion coefficients show that the overall ionic mobility decreases with decreasing temperature and increasing salt content. NMR relaxation measurements provide evidence for correlated dynamics between the ether-functionalised ammonium and Na cations, possibly with the latter species acting as cross-links between multiple ammonium cations. Finally, preliminary cyclic voltammetry experiments show that this IL can undergo stable electrochemical cycling and could therefore be potentially useful as an electrolyte in a Na-based device. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Structure and size of ions electrochemically doped in conducting polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneto, Keiichi; Hata, Fumito; Uto, Sadahito

    2018-05-01

    Among electroactive polymers (EAPs) for softactuators, conducting polymers have been intensively studied because of the large strain and stress caused by a low voltage operation. A larger deformation is desirable to extend their cycle life by reducing the operation voltage, and this is advantageous for their potential use in wider applications. The deformation is generated by the insertion of ions by electrochemical oxidation; hence, the magnitude of the strain depends on the bulkiness of the ions in the electrolytes. It is important, therefore, to clarify the structure and size of the ions during the electrochemical cycle, in order to achieve better performance of actuation. Anion and cation sizes (radii) in polypyrrole (PPy) film have been estimated using the precise measurement of strain against the amount of charge injected during the electrochemical cycles, assuming isotropic deformation of the film. The anion size was estimated using an anion-drive film, which was electrodeposited in TBABF4/methyl benzoate. The film was electrochemically cycled in sodium electrolytes, and the strain was measured simultaneously using a laser displacement meter. The cation size was obtained using a cation-drive film, being electropolymerized in aqueous dodecylbenzene sulfonic (DBS) acid. The cation-drive film was cycled in chloride electrolytes and measured the strain. The Cl-, Br-, NO3- , BF4- , and ClO4- radii were found to be approximately 235, 245, 250, 270 and 290 pm, respectively. The radii of K+, Na+ and Li+ were approximately 230, 237 and 274 pm, respectively. The results were discussed and took the crystalline ion radius and hydrated ion radius (Stokes radius) into consideration. It was found that the structure and size of the anions were slightly larger than the crystalline ion radius. Contrary to the anions, the cation radii were close to the hydrated ion radius, being larger than the crystalline ion radius.