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Sample records for deformation ecosystem structure

  1. Extremely deformable structures

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    Recently, a new research stimulus has derived from the observation that soft structures, such as biological systems, but also rubber and gel, may work in a post critical regime, where elastic elements are subject to extreme deformations, though still exhibiting excellent mechanical performances. This is the realm of ‘extreme mechanics’, to which this book is addressed. The possibility of exploiting highly deformable structures opens new and unexpected technological possibilities. In particular, the challenge is the design of deformable and bi-stable mechanisms which can reach superior mechanical performances and can have a strong impact on several high-tech applications, including stretchable electronics, nanotube serpentines, deployable structures for aerospace engineering, cable deployment in the ocean, but also sensors and flexible actuators and vibration absorbers. Readers are introduced to a variety of interrelated topics involving the mechanics of extremely deformable structures, with emphasis on ...

  2. Formation and subdivision of deformation structures during plastic deformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, B.; Poulsen, H.F.; Lienert, U.;

    2006-01-01

    During plastic deformation of metals and alloys, dislocations arrange in ordered patterns. How and when these self-organization processes take place have remained elusive, because in situ observations have not been feasible. We present an x-ray diffraction method that provided data on the dynamics...... of individual, deeply embedded dislocation structures. During tensile deformation of pure copper, dislocation-free regions were identified. They showed an unexpected intermittent dynamics, for example, appearing and disappearing with proceeding deformation and even displaying transient splitting behavior....... Insight into these processes is relevant for an understanding of the strength and work-hardening of deformed materials....

  3. Deformed metals - structure, recrystallisation and strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niels; Juul Jensen, Dorte

    2011-01-01

    It is shown how new discoveries and advanced experimental techniques in the last 25 years have led to paradigm shifts in the analysis of deformation and annealing structures of metals and in the way the strength of deformed samples is related to structural parameters. This is described in three...... sections: structural evolution by grain subdivision, recovery and recrystallisation and strength-structure relationships....

  4. Structural refinement and coarsening in deformed metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, N.; Huang, X.; Xing, Q.

    2005-01-01

    The microstructural refinement by plastic deformation is analysed in terms of key parameters, the spacing between and the misorientation angle across the boundaries subdividing the structure. Coarsening of such structures by annealing is also characterised. For both deformed and annealed structur...

  5. Stochastic deformation of a thermodynamic symplectic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazinski, P. O.

    2009-01-01

    A stochastic deformation of a thermodynamic symplectic structure is studied. The stochastic deformation is analogous to the deformation of an algebra of observables such as deformation quantization, but for an imaginary deformation parameter (the Planck constant). Gauge symmetries of thermodynamics and corresponding stochastic mechanics, which describes fluctuations of a thermodynamic system, are revealed and gauge fields are introduced. A physical interpretation to the gauge transformations and gauge fields is given. An application of the formalism to a description of systems with distributed parameters in a local thermodynamic equilibrium is considered.

  6. Design of Hierarchical Structures for Synchronized Deformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifi, Hamed; Javan, Anooshe Rezaee; Ghaedizadeh, Arash; Shen, Jianhu; Xu, Shanqing; Xie, Yi Min

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we propose a general method for creating a new type of hierarchical structures at any level in both 2D and 3D. A simple rule based on a rotate-and-mirror procedure is introduced to achieve multi-level hierarchies. These new hierarchical structures have remarkably few degrees of freedom compared to existing designs by other methods. More importantly, these structures exhibit synchronized motions during opening or closure, resulting in uniform and easily-controllable deformations. Furthermore, a simple analytical formula is found which can be used to avoid collision of units of the structure during the closing process. The novel design concept is verified by mathematical analyses, computational simulations and physical experiments.

  7. Ocean acidification causes structural deformities in juvenile coral skeletons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Taryn; Falter, James L; McCulloch, Malcolm T; Clode, Peta L

    2016-02-01

    Rising atmospheric CO2 is causing the oceans to both warm and acidify, which could reduce the calcification rates of corals globally. Successful coral recruitment and high rates of juvenile calcification are critical to the replenishment and ultimate viability of coral reef ecosystems. Although elevated Pco2 (partial pressure of CO2) has been shown to reduce the skeletal weight of coral recruits, the structural changes caused by acidification during initial skeletal deposition are unknown. We show, using high-resolution three-dimensional x-ray microscopy, that ocean acidification (Pco2 ~900 μatm, pH ~7.7) not only causes reduced overall mineral deposition but also a deformed and porous skeletal structure in newly settled coral recruits. In contrast, elevated temperature (+3°C) had little effect on skeletal formation except to partially mitigate the effects of elevated Pco2. The striking structural deformities we observed show that new recruits are at significant risk, being unable to effectively build their skeletons in the Pco2 conditions predicted to occur for open ocean surface waters under a "business-as-usual" emissions scenario [RCP (representative concentration pathway) 8.5] by the year 2100.

  8. In-situ studies of bulk deformation structures: Static properties under load and dynamics during deformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Bo

    2006-01-01

    The main goal of the study presented in this thesis was to perform in-situ investigations on deformation structures in plastically deformed polycrystalline copper at low degrees of tensile deformation (metals. Anovel synchrotron...... grains in polycrystalline samples during tensile deformation. We have shown that the resulting 3D reciprocal space maps from tensile deformed copper comprise a pronounced structure, consisting of bright sharp peaks superimposed on a cloud of enhanced intensity. Based on the integrated intensity......, the width of the peaks, and spatial scanning experiments it is concluded that the individual peaks arise from individual dislocation-free regions (the subgrains) in the dislocation structure. The cloud is attributed to the dislocation rich walls. Samples deformed to 2% tensile strain were investigated under...

  9. Classical covariant Poisson structures and Deformation Quantization

    CERN Document Server

    Berra-Montiel, Jasel; Palacios-García, César D

    2014-01-01

    Starting with the well-defined product of quantum fields at two spacetime points, we explore an associated Poisson structure for classical field theories within the deformation quantization formalism. We realize that the induced star-product is naturally related to the standard Moyal product through the causal Green functions connecting points in the space of classical solutions to the equations of motion. Our results resemble the Peierls-DeWitt bracket analyzed in the multisymplectic context. Once our star-product is defined we are able to apply the Wigner-Weyl map in order to introduce a generalized version of Wick's theorem. Finally, we include a couple of examples to explicitly test our method: the real scalar field and the bosonic string. For both models we have encountered generalizations of the creation/annihilation relations, and also a generalization of the Virasoro algebra in the bosonic string case.

  10. Deformation compatibility control for engineering structures methods and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Hanhua; Chen, Mengchong; Deng, Jianliang

    2017-01-01

    This book presents essential methods of deformation compatibility control, and explicitly addresses the implied conditions on the methods’ deformation compatibility. Consequently, these conditions can be considered in engineering structure design, while the conditions on stable equilibrium can be taken into account in the design method. Thus, the designed deformation and the actual deformation of the respective structure are approximately identical, guaranteeing both the flexibility of the construction material in force transmission and the equilibrium of force in the structure. Though equilibrium theory in engineering structures has been extensively studied, there has been comparatively little research on compatibility. In the limited researches available, the topics are primarily the theories and assumptions on the deformation compatibility, while few systematic works focus on the mechanical theoretical principles and methods of deformation compatibility control. As such, the flexibility of the constructi...

  11. Structural Transformations in Metallic Materials During Plastic Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zasimchuk, E.; Turchak, T.; Baskova, A.; Chausov, N.; Hutsaylyuk, V.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, the structure formation during the plastic deformation of polycrystalline nickel and aluminum based alloy 2024-T3 is investigated. The possibility of the relaxation and synergetic structure formation is examined. It is shown the deformation softening to be due to the crystallization of the amorphous structure of hydrodynamics flow channels (synergetic structure) HC as micrograins and their subsequent growth. The possible mechanism of micrograins' growth is proposed. The deformation processes change the phase composition of the multiphase alloy 2024-T3. It is shown by the quantitative analysis of the structures which were deformed in different regimes of the alloy samples. A method for increasing of the fatigue life through a dynamic pre-deformation is suggested.

  12. Structural Transformations in Metallic Materials During Plastic Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zasimchuk, E.; Turchak, T.; Baskova, A.; Chausov, N.; Hutsaylyuk, V.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, the structure formation during the plastic deformation of polycrystalline nickel and aluminum based alloy 2024-T3 is investigated. The possibility of the relaxation and synergetic structure formation is examined. It is shown the deformation softening to be due to the crystallization of the amorphous structure of hydrodynamics flow channels (synergetic structure) HC as micrograins and their subsequent growth. The possible mechanism of micrograins' growth is proposed. The deformation processes change the phase composition of the multiphase alloy 2024-T3. It is shown by the quantitative analysis of the structures which were deformed in different regimes of the alloy samples. A method for increasing of the fatigue life through a dynamic pre-deformation is suggested.

  13. Deformation of wrinkled membrane inflatable structures under concentrated loads

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Chang-guo; DU Xing-wen; WAN Zhi-min; HE Xiao-dong

    2008-01-01

    The axisymmetric deformation of a paraboloidal membrane inflatable structure subjected to a concentrated load at its apex and a uniform intemal pressure was analyzed.The wrinkle angle was obtained according to the membrane theory when wrinkles appeared and determined the wrinkle region.The wrinkled deformation was obtained based on the relaxed energy function.The effects of inflation pressure and concentrated loads on the wrinkle ansle were analyzed and the deformation Was obtained at the apex of structure.According to the numerical analysis,the shape of deformed meridians with wrinkles Was obtained.

  14. Structural features of plastic deformation in bulk metallic glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scudino, S., E-mail: s.scudino@ifw-dresden.de; Shakur Shahabi, H.; Stoica, M.; Kühn, U. [IFW Dresden, Institut für Komplexe Materialien, D-01069 Dresden (Germany); Kaban, I.; Escher, B.; Eckert, J. [IFW Dresden, Institut für Komplexe Materialien, D-01069 Dresden (Germany); TU Dresden, Institut für Werkstoffwissenschaft, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Vaughan, G. B. M. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facilities ESRF, BP220, 38043 Grenoble (France)

    2015-01-19

    Spatially resolved strain maps of a plastically deformed bulk metallic glass (BMG) have been created by using high-energy X-ray diffraction. The results reveal that plastic deformation creates a spatially heterogeneous atomic arrangement, consisting of strong compressive and tensile strain fields. In addition, significant shear strain is introduced in the samples. The analysis of the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the strain tensor indicates that considerable structural anisotropy occurs in both the magnitude and direction of the strain. These features are in contrast to the behavior observed in elastically deformed BMGs and represent a distinctive structural sign of plastic deformation in metallic glasses.

  15. The Lagrangian Deformation Structure of Three-Dimensional Steady Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Lester, Daniel R; Borgne, Tanguy Le; de Barros, Felipe P J

    2016-01-01

    Fluid deformation and strain history are central to wide range of fluid mechanical phenomena ranging from fluid mixing and particle transport to stress development in complex fluids and the formation of Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs). To understand and model these processes it is necessary to quantify Lagrangian deformation in terms of Eulerian flow properties, currently an open problem. To elucidate this link we develop a Protean (streamline) coordinate transform for steady three-dimensional (3D) flows which renders both the velocity gradient and deformation gradient upper triangular. This frame not only simplifies computation of fluid deformation metrics such as fi?nite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLEs) and elucidates the deformation structure of the flow, but moreover explicitly recovers kinematic and topological constraints upon deformation such as those related to helicity density and the Poincar\\'{e}-Bendixson theorem. We apply this transform to several classes of steady 3D flow, including helical ...

  16. Relationship between nano-scale deformation of coal structure and metamorphic-deformed environments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JU Yiwen; JIANG Bo; HOU Quanlin; WANG Guiliang

    2005-01-01

    There is a more consanguineous relation between nano-scale deformation of coal structure and metamorphic-deformed environment. In different metamorphic-deformed environments, deformation in the coal structure can occur not only at micro-scale, but also at nano-scale, and even leads to the change of molecular structure and nano-scale pore (<100 nm) structure. The latter is the main space absorbing coalbed methane. Through X-ray diffraction (XRD) and liquid-nitrogen absorption methods, the characteristics of macromolecular and nano-scale pore structures of coals in different metamorphic-deformed environments and deformational series of coals have been studied. By combining with high-resolution transmission electron microcopy (HRTEM), the macromolecular and nano-scale pore structures are also directly observed. These results demonstrate that the stacking Lc of the macromolecular BSU in tectonic coals increases quickly from the metamorphic-deformed environment of low rank coals to that of high rank coals. For different deformed tectonic coals, in the same metamorphic-deformed environment, the difference of Lc is obvious. These changes reflect chiefly the difference of different temperature and stress effect of nano-scale deformation in tectonic coals. The factor of temperature plays a greater role in the increase of macromolecular structure parameters Lc, the influence of stress factor is also important. With the stress strengthening, Lc shows an increasing trend, and La /Lc shows a decreasing trend. Therefore, Lc and La /Lc can be used as the indicator of nano-scale deformation degree of tectonic coals. With increasing temperature and pressure, especially oriented stress, the orientation of molecular structure becomes stronger, and ordering degree of C-nets and the arrangement of BSU are obviously enhanced. For the deformation of nano-scale pore structure, in the same metamorphic-deformed environment, along with the strengthening of stress, the ratio of mesopores to

  17. Structural refinement and deformation mechanisms in nanostructured metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, K.; Hansen, Niels

    2009-01-01

    Deformation mechanisms in metals deformed to ultrahigh strains are analyzed based on a general pattern of grain subdivision down to structural scales 10 nm. The materials analyzed are medium- to high-stacking fault energy face-centered cubic and body-centered cubic metals with different loading...... conditions. The analysis points to dislocation glide as the dominant deformation mechanism at different length scales supplemented by a limited amount of twinning at the finest scales. With decreasing deformation temperature and increasing strain rate, the contribution of twinning increases...

  18. Emergent global patterns of ecosystem structure and function from a mechanistic general ecosystem model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harfoot, Michael B J; Newbold, Tim; Tittensor, Derek P; Emmott, Stephen; Hutton, Jon; Lyutsarev, Vassily; Smith, Matthew J; Scharlemann, Jörn P W; Purves, Drew W

    2014-04-01

    Anthropogenic activities are causing widespread degradation of ecosystems worldwide, threatening the ecosystem services upon which all human life depends. Improved understanding of this degradation is urgently needed to improve avoidance and mitigation measures. One tool to assist these efforts is predictive models of ecosystem structure and function that are mechanistic: based on fundamental ecological principles. Here we present the first mechanistic General Ecosystem Model (GEM) of ecosystem structure and function that is both global and applies in all terrestrial and marine environments. Functional forms and parameter values were derived from the theoretical and empirical literature where possible. Simulations of the fate of all organisms with body masses between 10 µg and 150,000 kg (a range of 14 orders of magnitude) across the globe led to emergent properties at individual (e.g., growth rate), community (e.g., biomass turnover rates), ecosystem (e.g., trophic pyramids), and macroecological scales (e.g., global patterns of trophic structure) that are in general agreement with current data and theory. These properties emerged from our encoding of the biology of, and interactions among, individual organisms without any direct constraints on the properties themselves. Our results indicate that ecologists have gathered sufficient information to begin to build realistic, global, and mechanistic models of ecosystems, capable of predicting a diverse range of ecosystem properties and their response to human pressures.

  19. Emergent global patterns of ecosystem structure and function from a mechanistic general ecosystem model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B J Harfoot

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic activities are causing widespread degradation of ecosystems worldwide, threatening the ecosystem services upon which all human life depends. Improved understanding of this degradation is urgently needed to improve avoidance and mitigation measures. One tool to assist these efforts is predictive models of ecosystem structure and function that are mechanistic: based on fundamental ecological principles. Here we present the first mechanistic General Ecosystem Model (GEM of ecosystem structure and function that is both global and applies in all terrestrial and marine environments. Functional forms and parameter values were derived from the theoretical and empirical literature where possible. Simulations of the fate of all organisms with body masses between 10 µg and 150,000 kg (a range of 14 orders of magnitude across the globe led to emergent properties at individual (e.g., growth rate, community (e.g., biomass turnover rates, ecosystem (e.g., trophic pyramids, and macroecological scales (e.g., global patterns of trophic structure that are in general agreement with current data and theory. These properties emerged from our encoding of the biology of, and interactions among, individual organisms without any direct constraints on the properties themselves. Our results indicate that ecologists have gathered sufficient information to begin to build realistic, global, and mechanistic models of ecosystems, capable of predicting a diverse range of ecosystem properties and their response to human pressures.

  20. Formation of disorientations in dislocation structures during plastic deformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pantleon, W.

    2002-01-01

    Disorientations developing during plastic deformation in dislocation structures are investigated. Based on expected mechanisms for the formation of different types of dislocation boundaries (statistical trapping of dislocations or differently activated slip systems) the formation of the disorient...

  1. Effect of deformation on the structural state of piracetam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanunnikova, O. M.; Mikhailova, S. S.; Karban', O. V.; Mukhgalin, V. V.; Aksenova, V. V.; Sen'kovskii, B. V.; Pechina, E. A.; Lad'yanov, V. I.

    2016-04-01

    The effect of various deformation actions on the structure-phase transformations in piracetam of modifications I and II with a sodium acetate addition is studied. Mechanical activation and pressing are shown to cause the polymorphic transformation of modification I into modification II, and modification III forms predominantly during severe plastic deformation by torsion. The structural difference between the piracetam molecules of modifications I and II is found to be retained in aqueous solutions.

  2. Relativistic models of magnetars: structure and deformations

    CERN Document Server

    Colaiuda, A; Gualtieri, L; Pons, J A

    2007-01-01

    We find numerical solutions of the coupled system of Einstein-Maxwell's equations with a linear approach, in which the magnetic field acts as a perturbation of a spherical neutron star. In our study, magnetic fields having both poloidal and toroidal components are considered, and higher order multipoles are also included. We evaluate the deformations induced by different field configurations, paying special attention to those for which the star has a prolate shape. We also explore the dependence of the stellar deformation on the particular choice of the equation of state and on the mass of the star. Our results show that, for neutron stars with mass M = 1.4 Msun and surface magnetic fields of the order of 10^15 G, a quadrupole ellipticity of the order of 10^(-6) - 10^(-5) should be expected. Low mass neutron stars are in principle subject to larger deformations (quadrupole ellipticities up to 10^(-3) in the most extreme case). The effect of quadrupolar magnetic fields is comparable to that of dipolar componen...

  3. Riparian ecosystems and buffers - multiscale structure, function, and management: introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathleen A. Dwire; Richard R. Lowrance

    2006-01-01

    Given the importance of issues related to improved understanding and management of riparian ecosystems and buffers, the American Water Resources Association (AWRA) sponsored a Summer Specialty Conference in June 2004 at Olympic Valley, California, entitled 'Riparian Ecosystems and Buffers: Multiscale Structure, Function, and Management.' The primary objective...

  4. Step Structure in Cold-Rolled Deformed Nanocrystalline Nickel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xi-Yan; WU Xiao-Lei; XIA Bao-Yu; ZHOU Ming-Zhe; ZHOU Shi-Jie; JIA Chong

    2005-01-01

    @@ The microstructure characteristic of the cold-rolled deformed nanocrystalline nickel metal is studied by transmission electron microscopy. The results show that there are step structures nearby the grain boundary (GB),and the contrast of stress field in front of the step corresponds to the step in the shape. It is indicated that the interaction between twins and dislocations is not a necessary condition to realizing the deformation. In the later stage of the deformation when the grain size becomes about 100nm, the deformation can depend upon the moving of the boundary of the stack faults (SFs) which result from the partial dislocations emitted from GBs.However, when the size of SFs grows up, the local internal stress which is in front of the step gradually becomes higher. When this stress reaches a critical value which stops the gliding of the partial dislocations, the SFs will stop to grow up and leave a step structure behind.

  5. Deformation-induced dehydration structures in the Nankai accretionary prism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Famin, V.; Byrne, T.; Lewis, J. C.; Kanagawa, K.; Behrmann, J.; Iodp 314/315/316 Scientists, E.

    2008-12-01

    This study investigates the chemical changes caused by deformation in the hanging wall of a major, probably seismogenic thrust fault in the Kumano forearc basin, Nankai Trough. In cores from IODP Expedition 315 (site C0001), the clay sediments display numerous deformation structures including tilted beddings, decimeter scale faults and shear zones with normal or thrust offsets, and clusters of parallel curviplanar veins interpreted as earthquake-induced dewatering structures. Curviplanar veins are often observed to merge into small oblique shear zones with millimeter offsets, or to branch on larger shear zones with a ~30° angle. This suggests that some shear zones may form by the coalescence of veins. Curviplanar veins and shear zones appear darker than the surrounding clay at the macroscopic observation scale, and brighter and therefore denser under CT-scan imaging. At the micro-scale, clay has a preferred crystallographic orientation in the deformation structures and no preferred orientation outside. Electron probe micro-analysis reveals that the dark material has a higher sum of major elements (65-80 wt%), i.e. a lower volatile content (assumed to be mostly water) than the host sediment (50-60 wt%). All the major elements are equally enriched in proportion to the volatile depletion. Mass balance calculation indicates that a 20-30 wt% water loss is required to account for chemical change in the deformation microstructures. The water loss may be due to clay dehydration or to pore collapse. Shear zones are equally dehydrated as the curviplanar veins from the mass balance standpoint. In 1 m3 of sediment, a deformed volume of 1 % should produce about 6.2 L of water. Given the low permeability of the sediment, dehydration may increase the pore pressure and enhance further deformation. Deformation localization would be self-sustained by fluid overpressure, suggesting that dewatering veins may evolve into larger deformation structures after an earthquake.

  6. Structure, Deformations and Gravitational Wave Emission of Magnetars

    CERN Document Server

    Gualtieri, L; Ferrari, V

    2010-01-01

    Neutron stars can have, in some phases of their life, extremely strong magnetic fields, up to 10^15-10^16 G. These objects, named magnetars, could be powerful sources of gravitational waves, since their magnetic field could determine large deformations. We discuss the structure of the magnetic field of magnetars, and the deformation induced by this field. Finally, we discuss the perspective of detection of the gravitational waves emitted by these stars.

  7. Structure, deformations and gravitational wave emission of magnetars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gualtieri, L; Ciolfi, R; Ferrari, V, E-mail: leonardo.gualtieri@roma1.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, ' Sapienza' Universita di Roma and Sezione INFN Roma1, piazzale Aldo Moro 2, I-00185 Roma (Italy)

    2011-06-07

    Neutron stars can have, in some phases of their life, extremely strong magnetic fields, up to 10{sup 15-16} G. These objects, named magnetars, could be powerful sources of gravitational waves, since their magnetic field could determine large deformations. We discuss the structure of the magnetic field of magnetars, and the deformation induced by this field. Finally, we discuss the prospects of detection of the gravitational waves emitted by these stars.

  8. A structured ecosystem-scale approach to marine water quality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A structured ecosystem-scale approach to marine water quality management ... environmentally responsible and sustainable development practices, either ... which to design and implement environmental management programmes. ... It also aims to support and stimulate local stakeholder empowerment and involvement.

  9. Structured ecosystem-scale approach to marine water quality management

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Taljaard, Susan

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available and implement environmental management programmes. A structured ecosystem-scale approach for the design and implementation of marine water quality management programmes developed by the CSIR (South Africa) in response to recent advances in policies...

  10. QuikForm: Intelligent deformation processing of structural alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourcier, R.J.; Wellman, G.W.

    1994-09-01

    There currently exists a critical need for tools to enhance the industrial competitiveness and agility of US industries involved in deformation processing of structural alloys. In response to this need, Sandia National Laboratories has embarked upon the QuikForm Initiative. The goal of this program is the development of computer-based tools to facilitate the design of deformation processing operations. The authors are currently focusing their efforts on the definition/development of a comprehensive system for the design of sheet metal stamping operations. The overall structure of the proposed QuikForm system is presented, and the focus of their thrust in each technical area is discussed.

  11. Co2 injection into oil reservoir associated with structural deformation

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    In this work, the problem of structural deformation with two-phase flow of carbon sequestration is presented. A model to simulate miscible CO2 injection with structural deformation in the aqueous phase is established. In the first part of this paper, we developed analytical solution for the problem under consideration with certain types of boundary conditions, namely, Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. The second part concerns to numerical simulation using IMPDES scheme. A simulator based on cell-centered finite difference method is used to solve this equations system. Distributions of CO2 saturation, and horizontal and vertical displacements have been introduced.

  12. Chemical etching of deformation sub-structures in quartz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, M. W.; Christie, J. M.

    1983-02-01

    Chemical etching of dislocations has been studied in natural and synthetic quartz single crystals, in deformed synthetic quartz and in naturally and experimentally deformed quartzites. The ability of different etchants to produce polished or preferentially etched surfaces on quartz is described. Dislocation etching was achieved on all crystal planes examined by using a saturated solution of ammonium bifluoride as the etchant. Appropriate etching times were determined for etching quartzites for grain size, subgrain boundaries, deformation lamellae, dislocations and twins. Growth and polished surfaces of synthetic single crystal quartz were similarly etched and dislocation etch pits, characteristic of various orientations were found. The use of ammonium bifluoride proved to be expecially advantageous for the basal plane, producing a polished surface with etch pits, suitable for dislocation etch pit counting. “Double” etch pits have been found on Dauphiné twin boundaries on the basal plane and the first order prism, using this etchant. Slip lines and deformation bands were suitably etched on deformed synthetic crystal surfaces for identification of the slip planes. Other acidic etchants have been explored and their application to the study of deformation structures in quartz crystals is discussed.

  13. Structure modulated electrostatic deformable mirror for focus and geometry control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Saekwang; Park, Suntak; Yun, Sungryul; Park, Bongje; Park, Seung Koo; Kyung, Ki-Uk

    2016-01-11

    We suggest a way to electrostatically control deformed geometry of an electrostatic deformable mirror (EDM) based on geometric modulation of a basement. The EDM is composed of a metal coated elastomeric membrane (active mirror) and a polymeric basement with electrode (ground). When an electrical voltage is applied across the components, the active mirror deforms toward the stationary basement responding to electrostatic attraction force in an air gap. Since the differentiated gap distance can induce change in electrostatic force distribution between the active mirror and the basement, the EDMs are capable of controlling deformed geometry of the active mirror with different basement structures (concave, flat, and protrusive). The modulation of the deformed geometry leads to significant change in the range of the focal length of the EDMs. Even under dynamic operations, the EDM shows fairly consistent and large deformation enough to change focal length in a wide frequency range (1~175 Hz). The geometric modulation of the active mirror with dynamic focus tunability can allow the EDM to be an active mirror lens for optical zoom devices as well as an optical component controlling field of view.

  14. Investigations on structural thinning in deformation machining stretching mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Arshpreet; Nirala, Harish Kumar; Agrawal, Anupam

    2016-10-01

    Deformation machining is a combination of thin structure machining and single point incremental forming/bending. This process enables the creation of monolithic, complex structures and geometries, which are difficult or sometimes impossible to manufacture employing conventional manufacturing techniques. Section thinning of the formed structure is a measure of process formability and influences the strength and stiffness of the formed component. In this study, experimental and finite element investigations on structural thinning in Deformation machining stretching mode have been performed. Structural thinning was found out to be highly non uniform along the forming depth at varying forming angles. A compensation strategy in thin structure machining has been proposed for uniform section thickness in incremental forming.

  15. Deformation tests and failure process analysis of an anchorage structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Tongbin; Yin Yanchun; Tan Yunliang; Song Yimin

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the failure process of an anchorage structure and the evolution law of the body’s defor-mation field, anchor push-out tests were carried out based on digital speckle correlation methods (DSCM). The stress distribution of the anchorage interface was investigated using the particle flow numerical simulation method. The results indicate that there are three stages in the deformation and fail-ure process of an anchorage structure:elastic bonding stage, a de-bonding stage and a failure stage. The stress distribution in the interface controls the stability of the structure. In the elastic bonding stage, the shear stress peak point of the interface is close to the loading end, and the displacement field gradually develops into a ‘V’ shape. In the de-bonding stage, there is a shear stress plateau in the center of the anchorage section, and shear strain localization begins to form in the deformation field. In the failure stage, the bonding of the interface fails rapidly and the shear stress peak point moves to the anchorage free end. The anchorage structure moves integrally along the macro-crack. The de-bonding stage is a research focus in the deformation and failure process of an anchorage structure, and plays an important guiding role in roadway support design and prediction of the stability of the surrounding rock.

  16. Layered Structures in Deformed Metals and Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niels; Zhang, Xiaodan; Huang, Xiaoxu

    2014-01-01

    by the way of examples of different processing routes: friction, wire drawing, shot peening, high pressure torsion and rolling. The interlamellar spacing reaches from 5-10 nanometers to about one micrometer and the analysis will cover structural evolution, strengthening parameters and strength...

  17. Analysing intracellular deformation of polymer capsules using structured illumination microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Cui, Jiwei; Sun, Huanli; Müllner, Markus; Yan, Yan; Noi, Ka Fung; Ping, Yuan; Caruso, Frank

    2016-06-01

    Understanding the behaviour of therapeutic carriers is important in elucidating their mechanism of action and how they are processed inside cells. Herein we examine the intracellular deformation of layer-by-layer assembled polymer capsules using super-resolution structured illumination microscopy (SIM). Spherical- and cylindrical-shaped capsules were studied in three different cell lines, namely HeLa (human epithelial cell line), RAW264.7 (mouse macrophage cell line) and differentiated THP-1 (human monocyte-derived macrophage cell line). We observed that the deformation of capsules was dependent on cell line, but independent of capsule shape. This suggests that the mechanical forces, which induce capsule deformation during cell uptake, vary between cell lines, indicating that the capsules are exposed to higher mechanical forces in HeLa cells, followed by RAW264.7 and then differentiated THP-1 cells. Our study demonstrates the use of super-resolution SIM in analysing intracellular capsule deformation, offering important insights into the cellular processing of drug carriers in cells and providing fundamental knowledge of intracellular mechanobiology. Furthermore, this study may aid in the design of novel drug carriers that are sensitive to deformation for enhanced drug release properties.Understanding the behaviour of therapeutic carriers is important in elucidating their mechanism of action and how they are processed inside cells. Herein we examine the intracellular deformation of layer-by-layer assembled polymer capsules using super-resolution structured illumination microscopy (SIM). Spherical- and cylindrical-shaped capsules were studied in three different cell lines, namely HeLa (human epithelial cell line), RAW264.7 (mouse macrophage cell line) and differentiated THP-1 (human monocyte-derived macrophage cell line). We observed that the deformation of capsules was dependent on cell line, but independent of capsule shape. This suggests that the mechanical forces

  18. Linking community size structure and ecosystem functioning using metabolic theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yvon-Durocher, Gabriel; Allen, Andrew P

    2012-11-05

    Understanding how biogeochemical cycles relate to the structure of ecological communities is a central research question in ecology. Here we approach this problem by focusing on body size, which is an easily measured species trait that has a pervasive influence on multiple aspects of community structure and ecosystem functioning. We test the predictions of a model derived from metabolic theory using data on ecosystem metabolism and community size structure. These data were collected as part of an aquatic mesocosm experiment that was designed to simulate future environmental warming. Our analyses demonstrate significant linkages between community size structure and ecosystem functioning, and the effects of warming on these links. Specifically, we show that carbon fluxes were significantly influenced by seasonal variation in temperature, and yielded activation energies remarkably similar to those predicted based on the temperature dependencies of individual-level photosynthesis and respiration. We also show that community size structure significantly influenced fluxes of ecosystem respiration and gross primary production, particularly at the annual time-scale. Assessing size structure and the factors that control it, both empirically and theoretically, therefore promises to aid in understanding links between individual organisms and biogeochemical cycles, and in predicting the responses of key ecosystem functions to future environmental change.

  19. Characteristics of aluminum alloy microplastic deformation in different structural states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seregin, G.V.; Efimenko, L.L.; Leonov, M.V. [Novosibirsk Pedagogical Inst. (Russian Federation)

    1995-07-01

    The solution to the problem of improving the mechanical properties (including cyclic strength) of structural materials is largely dependent on our knowledge of the laws governing the development of microplastic deformations in them. The effect of heat and mechanical treatment on the elastoplastic properties and fatigue resistance of the commercial aluminum alloys AK4-1 and D16 is analyzed.

  20. Structural and functional loss in restored wetland ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Mateos, David; Power, Mary E; Comín, Francisco A; Yockteng, Roxana

    2012-01-01

    Wetlands are among the most productive and economically valuable ecosystems in the world. However, because of human activities, over half of the wetland ecosystems existing in North America, Europe, Australia, and China in the early 20th century have been lost. Ecological restoration to recover critical ecosystem services has been widely attempted, but the degree of actual recovery of ecosystem functioning and structure from these efforts remains uncertain. Our results from a meta-analysis of 621 wetland sites from throughout the world show that even a century after restoration efforts, biological structure (driven mostly by plant assemblages), and biogeochemical functioning (driven primarily by the storage of carbon in wetland soils), remained on average 26% and 23% lower, respectively, than in reference sites. Either recovery has been very slow, or postdisturbance systems have moved towards alternative states that differ from reference conditions. We also found significant effects of environmental settings on the rate and degree of recovery. Large wetland areas (>100 ha) and wetlands restored in warm (temperate and tropical) climates recovered more rapidly than smaller wetlands and wetlands restored in cold climates. Also, wetlands experiencing more (riverine and tidal) hydrologic exchange recovered more rapidly than depressional wetlands. Restoration performance is limited: current restoration practice fails to recover original levels of wetland ecosystem functions, even after many decades. If restoration as currently practiced is used to justify further degradation, global loss of wetland ecosystem function and structure will spread.

  1. Flat structures on the deformations of Gepner chiral rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belavin, Alexander [L.D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics,Akademika Semenova av., 1-A, Chernogolovka, 142432 Moscow region (Russian Federation); Department of Quantum Physics, Institute for Information Transmission Problems,Bolshoy Karetny per. 19, 127994 Moscow (Russian Federation); Belavin, Vladimir [I.E. Tamm Department of Theoretical Physics, P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute,Leninsky av., 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Department of Quantum Physics, Institute for Information Transmission Problems,Bolshoy Karetny per. 19, 127994 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-10-24

    We propose a simple method for the computation of the flat coordinates and Saito primitive forms on Frobenius manifolds of the deformations of Jacobi rings associated with isolated singularities. The method is based on using a conjecture about integral representations for the flat coordinates and on the Saito cohomology theory. This reduces the computation to a simple linear problem. We consider the case of the deformed Gepner chiral rings. The knowledge of the flat structures of Frobenius manifolds can be used for exact solution of the models of the topological conformal field theories corresponding to these chiral rings.

  2. EARTHQUAKE-INDUCED DEFORMATION STRUCTURES AND RELATED TO EARTHQUAKE MAGNITUDES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savaş TOPAL

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Earthquake-induced deformation structures which are called seismites may helpful to clasify the paleoseismic history of a location and to estimate the magnitudes of the potention earthquakes in the future. In this paper, seismites were investigated according to the types formed in deep and shallow lake sediments. Seismites are observed forms of sand dikes, introduced and fractured gravels and pillow structures in shallow lakes and pseudonodules, mushroom-like silts protruding laminites, mixed layers, disturbed varved lamination and loop bedding in deep lake sediments. Earthquake-induced deformation structures, by benefiting from previous studies, were ordered according to their formations and earthquake magnitudes. In this order, the lowest eartquake's record is loop bedding and the highest one is introduced and fractured gravels in lacustrine deposits.

  3. Microbes as Engines of Ecosystem Function: When Does Community Structure Enhance Predictions of Ecosystem Processes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Emily B; Knelman, Joseph E; Schindlbacher, Andreas; Siciliano, Steven; Breulmann, Marc; Yannarell, Anthony; Beman, J M; Abell, Guy; Philippot, Laurent; Prosser, James; Foulquier, Arnaud; Yuste, Jorge C; Glanville, Helen C; Jones, Davey L; Angel, Roey; Salminen, Janne; Newton, Ryan J; Bürgmann, Helmut; Ingram, Lachlan J; Hamer, Ute; Siljanen, Henri M P; Peltoniemi, Krista; Potthast, Karin; Bañeras, Lluís; Hartmann, Martin; Banerjee, Samiran; Yu, Ri-Qing; Nogaro, Geraldine; Richter, Andreas; Koranda, Marianne; Castle, Sarah C; Goberna, Marta; Song, Bongkeun; Chatterjee, Amitava; Nunes, Olga C; Lopes, Ana R; Cao, Yiping; Kaisermann, Aurore; Hallin, Sara; Strickland, Michael S; Garcia-Pausas, Jordi; Barba, Josep; Kang, Hojeong; Isobe, Kazuo; Papaspyrou, Sokratis; Pastorelli, Roberta; Lagomarsino, Alessandra; Lindström, Eva S; Basiliko, Nathan; Nemergut, Diana R

    2016-01-01

    Microorganisms are vital in mediating the earth's biogeochemical cycles; yet, despite our rapidly increasing ability to explore complex environmental microbial communities, the relationship between microbial community structure and ecosystem processes remains poorly understood. Here, we address a fundamental and unanswered question in microbial ecology: 'When do we need to understand microbial community structure to accurately predict function?' We present a statistical analysis investigating the value of environmental data and microbial community structure independently and in combination for explaining rates of carbon and nitrogen cycling processes within 82 global datasets. Environmental variables were the strongest predictors of process rates but left 44% of variation unexplained on average, suggesting the potential for microbial data to increase model accuracy. Although only 29% of our datasets were significantly improved by adding information on microbial community structure, we observed improvement in models of processes mediated by narrow phylogenetic guilds via functional gene data, and conversely, improvement in models of facultative microbial processes via community diversity metrics. Our results also suggest that microbial diversity can strengthen predictions of respiration rates beyond microbial biomass parameters, as 53% of models were improved by incorporating both sets of predictors compared to 35% by microbial biomass alone. Our analysis represents the first comprehensive analysis of research examining links between microbial community structure and ecosystem function. Taken together, our results indicate that a greater understanding of microbial communities informed by ecological principles may enhance our ability to predict ecosystem process rates relative to assessments based on environmental variables and microbial physiology.

  4. Extinction order and altered community structure rapidly disrupt ecosystem functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Trond H; Williams, Neal M; Kremen, Claire

    2005-05-01

    By causing extinctions and altering community structure, anthropogenic disturbances can disrupt processes that maintain ecosystem integrity. However, the relationship between community structure and ecosystem functioning in natural systems is poorly understood. Here we show that habitat loss appeared to disrupt ecosystem functioning by affecting extinction order, species richness and abundance. We studied pollination by bees in a mosaic of agricultural and natural habitats in California and dung burial by dung beetles on recently created islands in Venezuela. We found that large-bodied bee and beetle species tended to be both most extinction-prone and most functionally efficient, contributing to rapid functional loss. Simulations confirmed that extinction order led to greater disruption of function than predicted by random species loss. Total abundance declined with richness and also appeared to contribute to loss of function. We demonstrate conceptually and empirically how the non-random response of communities to disturbance can have unexpectedly large functional consequences.

  5. Deformation mechanisms in negative Poisson's ratio materials - Structural aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakes, R.

    1991-01-01

    Poisson's ratio in materials is governed by the following aspects of the microstructure: the presence of rotational degrees of freedom, non-affine deformation kinematics, or anisotropic structure. Several structural models are examined. The non-affine kinematics are seen to be essential for the production of negative Poisson's ratios for isotropic materials containing central force linkages of positive stiffness. Non-central forces combined with pre-load can also give rise to a negative Poisson's ratio in isotropic materials. A chiral microstructure with non-central force interaction or non-affine deformation can also exhibit a negative Poisson's ratio. Toughness and damage resistance in these materials may be affected by the Poisson's ratio itself, as well as by generalized continuum aspects associated with the microstructure.

  6. Modelling community structure in freshwater ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lek, S.; Scardi, M.; Verdonschot, P.F.M.; Descy, J.P.; Park, Y.S.

    2005-01-01

    The book presents approaches and methodologies for predicting the structure and diversity of key aquatic communities (namely diatoms, benthic macroinvertebrates and fish), under natural conditions and under man-made disturbance. Such an approach will make it possible to: 1) set up procedures for

  7. Habitat structure mediates biodiversity effects on ecosystem properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godbold, J A; Bulling, M T; Solan, M

    2011-08-22

    Much of what we know about the role of biodiversity in mediating ecosystem processes and function stems from manipulative experiments, which have largely been performed in isolated, homogeneous environments that do not incorporate habitat structure or allow natural community dynamics to develop. Here, we use a range of habitat configurations in a model marine benthic system to investigate the effects of species composition, resource heterogeneity and patch connectivity on ecosystem properties at both the patch (bioturbation intensity) and multi-patch (nutrient concentration) scale. We show that allowing fauna to move and preferentially select patches alters local species composition and density distributions, which has negative effects on ecosystem processes (bioturbation intensity) at the patch scale, but overall positive effects on ecosystem functioning (nutrient concentration) at the multi-patch scale. Our findings provide important evidence that community dynamics alter in response to localized resource heterogeneity and that these small-scale variations in habitat structure influence species contributions to ecosystem properties at larger scales. We conclude that habitat complexity forms an important buffer against disturbance and that contemporary estimates of the level of biodiversity required for maintaining future multi-functional systems may need to be revised.

  8. Finite Element Analysis of Deformed Legs of Offshore Platform Structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柳春图; 秦太验; 段梦兰

    2002-01-01

    The element stiffness matrix of the equivalent beam or pipe element of the deformed leg of the platform is derived bythe finite element method. The stresses and displacements of some damaged components are calculated, and the numeri-cal solutions agree well with those obtained by the fine mesh finite element method. Finally, as an application of thismethod, the stresses of some platform structures are calculated and analyzed.

  9. ROLE OF UNDERGROUND STRUCTURE DEFORMATION VELOCITY IN THE ANALYSIS OF BLAST-RESISTANT STRUCTURES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵晓兵; 方秦

    2002-01-01

    The structural deformation velocity plays a significant role in the dynamic calculation of underground blast-resistant structures. The motion differentiating equation of a structure system taking into account the role of deformation velocity of the structure will truthfully describe the actual situation of structural vibration. With the one-dimensional plane wave theory, the expression of load on the structural periphery is developed, and the generalized variation principle for the dynamic analysis of underground arched-bar structures is given. At the same time, the results of the numerical calculation are compared.

  10. Microbes as engines of ecosystem function: when does community structure enhance predictions of ecosystem processes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily B. Graham

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms are vital in mediating the earth’s biogeochemical cycles; yet, despite our rapidly increasing ability to explore complex environmental microbial communities, the relationship between microbial community structure and ecosystem processes remains poorly understood. Here, we address a fundamental and unanswered question in microbial ecology: ‘When do we need to understand microbial community structure to accurately predict function?’ We present a statistical analysis investigating the value of environmental data and microbial community structure independently and in combination for explaining rates of carbon and nitrogen cycling processes within 82 global datasets. Environmental variables were the strongest predictors of process rates but left 44% of variation unexplained on average, suggesting the potential for microbial data to increase model accuracy. Although only 29% of our datasets were significantly improved by adding information on microbial community structure, we observed improvement in models of processes mediated by narrow phylogenetic guilds via functional gene data, and conversely, improvement in models of facultative microbial processes via community diversity metrics. Our results also suggest that microbial diversity can strengthen predictions of respiration rates beyond microbial biomass parameters, as 53% of models were improved by incorporating both sets of predictors compared to 35% by microbial biomass alone. Our analysis represents the first comprehensive analysis of research examining links between microbial community structure and ecosystem function. Taken together, our results indicate that a greater understanding of microbial communities informed by ecological principles may enhance our ability to predict ecosystem process rates relative to assessments based on environmental variables and microbial physiology.

  11. Fast Detection of Material Deformation through Structural Dissimilarity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ushizima, Daniela; Perciano, Talita; Parkinson, Dilworth

    2015-10-29

    Designing materials that are resistant to extreme temperatures and brittleness relies on assessing structural dynamics of samples. Algorithms are critically important to characterize material deformation under stress conditions. Here, we report on our design of coarse-grain parallel algorithms for image quality assessment based on structural information and on crack detection of gigabyte-scale experimental datasets. We show how key steps can be decomposed into distinct processing flows, one based on structural similarity (SSIM) quality measure, and another on spectral content. These algorithms act upon image blocks that fit into memory, and can execute independently. We discuss the scientific relevance of the problem, key developments, and decomposition of complementary tasks into separate executions. We show how to apply SSIM to detect material degradation, and illustrate how this metric can be allied to spectral analysis for structure probing, while using tiled multi-resolution pyramids stored in HDF5 chunked multi-dimensional arrays. Results show that the proposed experimental data representation supports an average compression rate of 10X, and data compression scales linearly with the data size. We also illustrate how to correlate SSIM to crack formation, and how to use our numerical schemes to enable fast detection of deformation from 3D datasets evolving in time.

  12. Structure and properties of copper after large strain deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodak, Kinga; Molak, Rafal M.; Pakiela, Zbigniew

    2010-05-15

    Structure and properties of Cu in dependence on strain (from {epsilon}{proportional_to} 0.9 to {epsilon}{proportional_to} 15) during multi-axial compression processing at room temperature was investigated. The evolution of dislocation structure, misorientation distribution and crystallite size were observed by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipment with electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) facility. The mechanical properties of yield strength (YS), ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and uniform elongation was performed on MTS QTest/10 machine equipped with digital image correlation method (DIC). The structure-flow stress relationship of multi-axial compression processing material at strains {epsilon}{proportional_to} 3.5 and {epsilon}{proportional_to} 5.5 is discussed. It is found that processing does not produce any drastic changes in deformation structure and the microstructural refinement is slow. These results indicate that dynamic recrystallization plays an important role during multi-axial compression process in this range of deformation (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  13. Forecasting Urban Forest Ecosystem Structure, Function, and Vulnerability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenberg, James W. N.; Millward, Andrew A.; Nowak, David J.; Robinson, Pamela J.; Ellis, Alexis

    2017-03-01

    The benefits derived from urban forest ecosystems are garnering increasing attention in ecological research and municipal planning. However, because of their location in heterogeneous and highly-altered urban landscapes, urban forests are vulnerable and commonly suffer disproportionate and varying levels of stress and disturbance. The objective of this study is to assess and analyze the spatial and temporal changes, and potential vulnerability, of the urban forest resource in Toronto, Canada. This research was conducted using a spatially-explicit, indicator-based assessment of vulnerability and i-Tree Forecast modeling of temporal changes in forest structure and function. Nine scenarios were simulated for 45 years and model output was analyzed at the ecosystem and municipal scale. Substantial mismatches in ecological processes between spatial scales were found, which can translate into unanticipated loss of function and social inequities if not accounted for in planning and management. At the municipal scale, the effects of Asian longhorned beetle and ice storm disturbance were far less influential on structure and function than changes in management actions. The strategic goals of removing invasive species and increasing tree planting resulted in a decline in carbon storage and leaf biomass. Introducing vulnerability parameters in the modeling increased the spatial heterogeneity in structure and function while expanding the disparities of resident access to ecosystem services. There was often a variable and uncertain relationship between vulnerability and ecosystem structure and function. Vulnerability assessment and analysis can provide strategic planning initiatives with valuable insight into the processes of structural and functional change resulting from management intervention.

  14. Forecasting Urban Forest Ecosystem Structure, Function, and Vulnerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenberg, James W N; Millward, Andrew A; Nowak, David J; Robinson, Pamela J; Ellis, Alexis

    2017-03-01

    The benefits derived from urban forest ecosystems are garnering increasing attention in ecological research and municipal planning. However, because of their location in heterogeneous and highly-altered urban landscapes, urban forests are vulnerable and commonly suffer disproportionate and varying levels of stress and disturbance. The objective of this study is to assess and analyze the spatial and temporal changes, and potential vulnerability, of the urban forest resource in Toronto, Canada. This research was conducted using a spatially-explicit, indicator-based assessment of vulnerability and i-Tree Forecast modeling of temporal changes in forest structure and function. Nine scenarios were simulated for 45 years and model output was analyzed at the ecosystem and municipal scale. Substantial mismatches in ecological processes between spatial scales were found, which can translate into unanticipated loss of function and social inequities if not accounted for in planning and management. At the municipal scale, the effects of Asian longhorned beetle and ice storm disturbance were far less influential on structure and function than changes in management actions. The strategic goals of removing invasive species and increasing tree planting resulted in a decline in carbon storage and leaf biomass. Introducing vulnerability parameters in the modeling increased the spatial heterogeneity in structure and function while expanding the disparities of resident access to ecosystem services. There was often a variable and uncertain relationship between vulnerability and ecosystem structure and function. Vulnerability assessment and analysis can provide strategic planning initiatives with valuable insight into the processes of structural and functional change resulting from management intervention.

  15. Shear deformation plate continua of large double layered space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hefzy, Mohamed Samir; Nayfeh, Adnan H.

    1986-01-01

    A simple method is presented to model large rigid-jointed lattice structures as continuous elastic media with couple stresses using energy equivalence. In the analysis, the transition from the discrete system to the continuous media is achieved by expanding the displacements and the rotations of the nodal points in a Taylor series about a suitable chosen origin. The strain energy of the continuous media with couple stresses is then specialized to obtain shear deformation plate continua. Equivalent continua for single layered grids, double layered grids, and three-dimensional lattices are then obtained.

  16. Modeling adsorption properties of structurally deformed metal-organic frameworks using structure-property map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, WooSeok; Lim, Dae-Woon; Kim, Sungjune; Harale, Aadesh; Yoon, Minyoung; Suh, Myunghyun Paik; Kim, Jihan

    2017-07-25

    Structural deformation and collapse in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) can lead to loss of long-range order, making it a challenge to model these amorphous materials using conventional computational methods. In this work, we show that a structure-property map consisting of simulated data for crystalline MOFs can be used to indirectly obtain adsorption properties of structurally deformed MOFs. The structure-property map (with dimensions such as Henry coefficient, heat of adsorption, and pore volume) was constructed using a large data set of over 12000 crystalline MOFs from molecular simulations. By mapping the experimental data points of deformed SNU-200, MOF-5, and Ni-MOF-74 onto this structure-property map, we show that the experimentally deformed MOFs share similar adsorption properties with their nearest neighbor crystalline structures. Once the nearest neighbor crystalline MOFs for a deformed MOF are selected from a structure-property map at a specific condition, then the adsorption properties of these MOFs can be successfully transformed onto the degraded MOFs, leading to a new way to obtain properties of materials whose structural information is lost.

  17. The Detection of Structural Deformation Errors in Attitude Determination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. J. Moore; C. Rizos; J. Wang

    2003-01-01

    In the determination of the attitude parameters from a multi-antenna GPS array, one of the major assumptions is that the body frame is rigid at all times. If this assumption is not true then the derived attitude parameters will be in error. It is well known that in airborne platforms the wings often experience some displacement during flight, especially during periods of initializing maneouvres, such as taking off, landing,and banking. Often it is at these points in time that it is most critical to have the most precise attitude parameters.There are a number of techniques available for the detection of modeling errors.The CUSUM algorithm has successfully been implemented in the past to detect small persistent changes. In this paper the authors investigate different methods of generating the residuals, to be tested by the CUSUM algorithm, in an effort to determine which technique is best suited for the detection of structural deformation of an airborne platform. The methods investigated include monitoring the mean of the residuals generated from the difference between the known body frame coordinates, and those calculated from the derived attitude parameters. The generated residuals are then passed to a CUSUM algorithm to detect any small persistent changes. An alternative method involves transforming the generated residuals into the frequency domain through the use of the Fast Fourier Transform. The CUSUM algorithm is then used to detect any frequency changes. The final technique investigated involves transforming the generated residuals using the Haar wavelet. The wavelet coefficients are then monitored by the CUSUM algorithm in order to detect any significant change to the rigidity of the body frame.Detecting structural deformation, and quantifying the degree of deformation, during flight will ensure that these effects can be removed from the system, thus ensuring the most precise and reliable attitude parameter solutions. This paper, through a series

  18. Deformable registration of multi-modal data including rigid structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huesman, Ronald H.; Klein, Gregory J.; Kimdon, Joey A.; Kuo, Chaincy; Majumdar, Sharmila

    2003-05-02

    Multi-modality imaging studies are becoming more widely utilized in the analysis of medical data. Anatomical data from CT and MRI are useful for analyzing or further processing functional data from techniques such as PET and SPECT. When data are not acquired simultaneously, even when these data are acquired on a dual-imaging device using the same bed, motion can occur that requires registration between the reconstructed image volumes. As the human torso can allow non-rigid motion, this type of motion should be estimated and corrected. We report a deformation registration technique that utilizes rigid registration for bony structures, while allowing elastic transformation of soft tissue to more accurately register the entire image volume. The technique is applied to the registration of CT and MR images of the lumbar spine. First a global rigid registration is performed to approximately align features. Bony structures are then segmented from the CT data using semi-automated process, and bounding boxes for each vertebra are established. Each CT subvolume is then individually registered to the MRI data using a piece-wise rigid registration algorithm and a mutual information image similarity measure. The resulting set of rigid transformations allows for accurate registration of the parts of the CT and MRI data representing the vertebrae, but not the adjacent soft tissue. To align the soft tissue, a smoothly-varying deformation is computed using a thin platespline(TPS) algorithm. The TPS technique requires a sparse set of landmarks that are to be brought into correspondence. These landmarks are automatically obtained from the segmented data using simple edge-detection techniques and random sampling from the edge candidates. A smoothness parameter is also included in the TPS formulation for characterization of the stiffness of the soft tissue. Estimation of an appropriate stiffness factor is obtained iteratively by using the mutual information cost function on the result

  19. Parrots as key multilinkers in ecosystem structure and functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Guillermo; Hiraldo, Fernando; Rojas, Abraham; Dénes, Francisco V; Tella, José L

    2015-09-01

    Mutually enhancing organisms can become reciprocal determinants of their distribution, abundance, and demography and thus influence ecosystem structure and dynamics. In addition to the prevailing view of parrots (Psittaciformes) as plant antagonists, we assessed whether they can act as plant mutualists in the dry tropical forest of the Bolivian inter-Andean valleys, an ecosystem particularly poor in vertebrate frugivores other than parrots (nine species). We hypothesised that if interactions between parrots and their food plants evolved as primarily or facultatively mutualistic, selection should have acted to maximize the strength of their interactions by increasing the amount and variety of resources and services involved in particular pairwise and community-wide interaction contexts. Food plants showed different growth habits across a wide phylogenetic spectrum, implying that parrots behave as super-generalists exploiting resources differing in phenology, type, biomass, and rewards from a high diversity of plants (113 species from 38 families). Through their feeding activities, parrots provided multiple services acting as genetic linkers, seed facilitators for secondary dispersers, and plant protectors, and therefore can be considered key mutualists with a pervasive impact on plant assemblages. The number of complementary and redundant mutualistic functions provided by parrots to each plant species was positively related to the number of different kinds of food extracted from them. These mutually enhancing interactions were reflected in species-level properties (e.g., biomass or dominance) of both partners, as a likely consequence of the temporal convergence of eco-(co)evolutionary dynamics shaping the ongoing structure and organization of the ecosystem. A full assessment of the, thus far largely overlooked, parrot-plant mutualisms and other ecological linkages could change the current perception of the role of parrots in the structure, organization, and

  20. Segmentation of Pathological Structures by Landmark-Assisted Deformable Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibragimov, Bulat; Korez, Robert; Likar, Bostjan; Pernus, Franjo; Xing, Lei; Vrtovec, Tomaz

    2017-02-13

    Computerized segmentation of pathological structures in medical images is challenging, as, in addition to unclear image boundaries, image artifacts and traces of surgical activities, the shape of pathological structures may be very different from the shape of normal structures. Even if a sufficient number of pathological training samples are collected, statistical shape modeling cannot always capture shape features of pathological samples as they may be suppressed by shape features of a considerably larger number of healthy samples. At the same time, landmarking can be efficient in analyzing pathological structures but often lacks robustness. In this paper, we combine the advantages of landmark detection and deformable models into a novel supervised multi-energy segmentation framework that can efficiently segment structures with pathological shape. The framework adopts the theory of Laplacian shape editing that was introduced in the field of computer graphics, so that the limitations of statistical shape modeling are avoided. The performance of the proposed framework was validated by segmenting fractured lumbar vertebrae from three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) images, atrophic corpora callosa from two-dimensional (2D) magnetic resonance (MR) crosssections and cancerous prostates from 3D MR images, resulting respectively in a Dice coefficient of 84.7 ± 5.0%, 85.3 ± 4.8% and 78.3 ± 5.1%, and boundary distance of 1.14 ± 0.49 mm, 1.42 ± 0.45mm and 2.27 ± 0.52 mm. The obtained results were shown to be superior in comparison to existing deformable modelbased segmentation algorithms.

  1. Rapid Measurement of Tectonic Deformation Using Structure-from-Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, A.; DeLong, S.; Lienkaemper, J. J.; Hecker, S.; Prentice, C. S.; Schwartz, D. P.; Sickler, R. R.

    2016-12-01

    Rapid collection and distribution of accurate surface slip data after earthquakes can support emergency response, help coordinate scientific response, and constrain coseismic slip that can be rapidly overprinted by postseismic slip, or eliminated as evidence of surface deformation is repaired or obscured. Analysis of earthquake deformation can be achieved quickly, repeatedly and inexpensively with the use of Structure-from-Motion (SfM) photogrammetry. Traditional methods of measuring surface slip (e.g. manual measurement with tape measures) have proven inconsistent and irreproducible, and sophisticated methods such as laser scanning require specialized equipment and longer field time. Here we present a simple, cost-effective workflow for rapid, three-dimensional imaging and measurement of features affected by earthquake rupture. As part of a response drill performed by the USGS and collaborators on May 11, 2016, geologists documented offset cultural features along the creeping Hayward Fault in northern California, in simulation of a surface-rupturing earthquake. We present several photo collections from smart phones, tablets, and DSLR cameras from a number of locations along the fault collected by users with a range of experience. Using professionally calibrated photogrammetric scale bars we automatically and accurately scale our 3D models to 1 mm accuracy for precise measurement in three dimensions. We then generate scaled 3D point clouds and extract offsets from manual measurement and multiple linear regression for comparison with collected terrestrial scanner data. These results further establish dense photo collection and SfM processing as an important, low-cost, rapid means of quantifying surface deformation in the critical hours after a surface-rupturing earthquake and emphasize that researchers with minimal training can rapidly collect three-dimensional data that can be used to analyze and archive the surface effects of damaging earthquakes.

  2. On Hopf algebroid structure of kappa-deformed Heisenberg algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Lukierski, Jerzy; Woronowicz, Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    The $(4+4)$-dimensional $\\kappa$-deformed quantum phase space as well as its $(10+10)$-dimensional covariant extension by the Lorentz sector can be described as Heisenberg doubles: the $(10+10)$-dimensional quantum phase space is the double of $D=4$ $\\kappa$-deformed Poincar\\'e Hopf algebra $\\mathbb{H}$ and the standard $(4+4)$-dimensional space is its subalgebra generated by $\\kappa$-Minkowski coordinates $\\hat{x}_\\mu$ and corresponding commuting momenta $\\hat{p}_\\mu$. Every Heisenberg double appears as the total algebra of a Hopf algebroid over a base algebra which is in our case the coordinate sector. We exhibit the details of this structure, namely the corresponding right bialgebroid and the antipode map. We rely on algebraic methods of calculation in Majid-Ruegg bicrossproduct basis. The target map is derived from a formula by J-H. Lu. The coproduct takes values in the bimodule tensor product over a base, what is expressed as the presence of coproduct gauge freedom.

  3. Tooth and bone deformation: structure and material properties by ESPI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaslansky, Paul; Shahar, Ron; Barak, Meir M.; Friesem, Asher A.; Weiner, Steve

    2006-08-01

    In order to understand complex-hierarchical biomaterials such as bones and teeth, it is necessary to relate their structure and mechanical-properties. We have adapted electronic speckle pattern-correlation interferometry (ESPI) to make measurements of deformation of small water-immersed specimens of teeth and bones. By combining full-field ESPI with precision mechanical loading we mapped sub-micron displacements and determined material-properties of the samples. By gradually and elastically compressing the samples, we compensate for poor S/N-ratios and displacement differences of about 100nm were reliably determined along samples just 2~3mm long. We produced stress-strain curves well within the elastic performance range of these materials under biologically relevant conditions. For human tooth-dentin, Young's modulus in inter-dental areas of the root is 40% higher than on the outer sides. For cubic equine bone samples the compression modulus of axial orientations is about double the modulus of radial and tangential orientations (20 GPa versus 10 GPa respectively). Furthermore, we measured and reproduced a surprisingly low Poisson's ratio, which averaged about 0.1. Thus the non-contact and non-destructive measurements by ESPI produce high sensitivity analyses of mechanical properties of mineralized tissues. This paves the way for mapping deformation-differences of various regions of bones, teeth and other biomaterials.

  4. STRUCTURAL AND MECHANICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF DEFORMED POLYMER USING CONFOCAL RAMAN MICROSCOPY AND DSC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Neitzel

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Polymers have various interesting properties, which depend largely on their inner structure. One way to influence the macroscopic behaviour is the deformation of the polymer chains, which effects the change in microstructure. For analyzing the microstructure of non-deformed and deformed polymer materials, Raman spectroscopy as well as differential scanning calorimetry (DSC were used. In the present study we compare the results for crystallinity measurements of deformed polymers using both methods in order to characterize the differences in micro-structure due to deformation. The study is ongoing, and we present the results of the first tests.

  5. Shape-dependent global deformation modes of large protein structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miloshevsky, Gennady V.; Hassanein, Ahmed; Jordan, Peter C.

    2010-05-01

    Conformational changes are central to the functioning of pore-forming proteins that open and close their molecular gates in response to external stimuli such as pH, ionic strength, membrane voltage or ligand binding. Normal mode analysis (NMA) is used to identify and characterize the slowest motions in the gA, KcsA, ClC-ec1, LacY and LeuT Aa proteins at the onset of gating. Global deformation modes of the essentially cylindrical gA, KcsA, LacY and LeuT Aa biomolecules are reminiscent of global twisting, transverse and longitudinal motions in a homogeneous elastic rod. The ClC-ec1 protein executes a splaying motion in the plane perpendicular to the lipid bilayer. These global collective deformations are determined by protein shape. New methods, all-atom Monte Carlo Normal Mode Following and its simplification using a rotation-translation of protein blocks (RTB), are described and applied to gain insight into the nature of gating transitions in gA and KcsA. These studies demonstrate the severe limitations of standard NMA in characterizing the structural rearrangements associated with gating transitions. Comparison of all-atom and RTB transition pathways in gA clearly illustrates the impact of the rigid protein block approximation and the need to include all degrees of freedom and their relaxation in computational studies of protein gating. The effects of atomic level structure, pH, hydrogen bonding and charged residues on the large-scale conformational changes associated with gating transitions are discussed.

  6. Deformation Quantization of Poisson Structures Associated to Lie Algebroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolai Neumaier

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper we explicitly construct deformation quantizations of certain Poisson structures on E*, where E → M is a Lie algebroid. Although the considered Poisson structures in general are far from being regular or even symplectic, our construction gets along without Kontsevich's formality theorem but is based on a generalized Fedosov construction. As the whole construction merely uses geometric structures of E we also succeed in determining the dependence of the resulting star products on these data in finding appropriate equivalence transformations between them. Finally, the concreteness of the construction allows to obtain explicit formulas even for a wide class of derivations and self-equivalences of the products. Moreover, we can show that some of our products are in direct relation to the universal enveloping algebra associated to the Lie algebroid. Finally, we show that for a certain class of star products on E* the integration with respect to a density with vanishing modular vector field defines a trace functional.

  7. Dislocation Structures in Creep-deformed Polycrystalline MgO

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bilde-Sørensen, Jørgen

    1972-01-01

    energy of 76 ± 12 kcal/mol. The creep rate is independent of grain size. The dislocation structure was investigated by transmission electron microscopy. The total dislocation density follows the relation, σ=bG√ρ, commonly found for metals. The dislocations form a 3-dimensional network in which many......Secondary creep of polycrystalline MgO with grain sizes of 100 and 190 μm was investigated at 1300° to 1460°C under compressive loads of 2.5 to 5.5 kgf/mm2. The dependence of creep rate on load follows a power law with an exponent of 3.2±0.3. The process is thermally activated, with an activation...... dislocation segments lie in their slip or climb planes. On the basis of this structure, a model is proposed in which glide is the principal cause of deformation but the rate-limiting process, i.e. annealing of the network, is diffusion-controlled. Theoretical estimates and experimental results agree within 1...

  8. Elastic deformations disrupt structural superlubricity in large contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Tristan A.; Pastewka, Lars; Robbins, Mark O.

    Force microscopy experiments observe ultra-low friction between solids with incommensurate lattice structures. This phenomenon is referred to as superlubricity and is due to a cancellation of lateral forces because surfaces sample all relative local configurations with equal probability. We use simulations to show that elasticity disrupts superlubricity in sufficiently large circular contacts. The simulations include atomic-scale geometry and reach micron-scales. For rigid solids, cancellation is complete except at the contact boundary. The static friction force per contact area, τ, falls as a power of contact radius, τ ~a - 3 / 2 . Elastic deformations limit this cancellation when the contact radius a is larger than a characteristic length scale set by the core width of interfacial dislocations, bcore. For a >bcore sliding of moderately incommensurate contacts is dominated by dislocation motion and, at large a, τ approaches a constant value near the Peierls stress needed to move edge dislocations. Surprisingly, the stress in commensurate contacts drops to nearly the same value at large a. We conclude that true structural lubricity does not occur in large contacts, although the constant shear stress drops rapidly with bcore. NSF IGERT, DAAD.

  9. On the modelling of the dynamics of elastically deformable floating structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seng, Sopheak; Malenica, Sime; Jensen, Jørgen Juncher;

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we are reexamining the dynamic equations of an elastically deformable floating structure to identify and evaluate the contribution from the inertia cross coupling terms which commonly have been neglected due to the assumption of small structural deformation. Numerical experiments...

  10. Structural Changes in Deformed Soft Magnetic Ni-Based Metallic Glass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jurikova, A.; Csach, K.; Miskuf, J.; Ocelik, V.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of intensive plastic deformation of the soft magnetic metallic glass Ni Si 13 on the structural relaxation were examined. The enthalpy changes studied by differential scanning calorimetry revealed that the intensive plastic deformation was associated with the partial structural relaxatio

  11. A simulation model for analysing brain structure deformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bona, Sergio Di [Institute for Information Science and Technologies, Italian National Research Council (ISTI-8211-CNR), Via G Moruzzi, 1-56124 Pisa (Italy); Lutzemberger, Ludovico [Department of Neuroscience, Institute of Neurosurgery, University of Pisa, Via Roma, 67-56100 Pisa (Italy); Salvetti, Ovidio [Institute for Information Science and Technologies, Italian National Research Council (ISTI-8211-CNR), Via G Moruzzi, 1-56124 Pisa (Italy)

    2003-12-21

    Recent developments of medical software applications from the simulation to the planning of surgical operations have revealed the need for modelling human tissues and organs, not only from a geometric point of view but also from a physical one, i.e. soft tissues, rigid body, viscoelasticity, etc. This has given rise to the term 'deformable objects', which refers to objects with a morphology, a physical and a mechanical behaviour of their own and that reflects their natural properties. In this paper, we propose a model, based upon physical laws, suitable for the realistic manipulation of geometric reconstructions of volumetric data taken from MR and CT scans. In particular, a physically based model of the brain is presented that is able to simulate the evolution of different nature pathological intra-cranial phenomena such as haemorrhages, neoplasm, haematoma, etc and to describe the consequences that are caused by their volume expansions and the influences they have on the anatomical and neuro-functional structures of the brain.

  12. Assessing mismatches between ecosystem structure and function in Jiaozhou Bay by coordination degree algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoyan; Gao, Huiwang; Chen, Zhenhua; Yao, Xiaohong; Sun, Peng

    2017-04-01

    A healthy ecosystem depends on the coordination of ecosystem structure and function. The coordination among ecosystem components, however, is seldom taken into account in current ecosystem health assessments (EHA). Neglect of such coordination may lead to large degrees of uncertainty in EHA and fail to support ecosystem management. We propose an approach to quantify the level of dynamic mismatching between ecosystem structure and function and the impact on ecosystem health by incorporating the ecosystem coordination index into EHA. The coordination degree is calculated using variation coefficient of six proxies for ecosystem structure and functions. The ecosystem at Jiaozhou Bay, as a microcosm of China's coast, has been documented to fluctuate from healthy to unhealthy status over the past three decades. The results indicate that there is a 3%-17% lower health level than that calculated by common methods used in the literature, indicating that the health of Jiaozhou Bay has become worse than expected. Habitat change contributes 20%-52% to ecosystem mismatches and is the most uncoordinated factor. Mismatch-related declines account for approximately one-fourth of the total ecological declines. Restoration scenarios that aim to resolve ecosystem mismatches could increase efficiency by about 50% compared to restoration scenarios that do not consider mismatches. This study investigates ecological declines in a coastal bay due to 30 years of rapid economic development. In doing so, this study provides novel insights and enhances our understanding of the reasons for failure in ecological restoration.

  13. Complex structure-induced deformations of sigma-models

    CERN Document Server

    Bykov, Dmitri

    2016-01-01

    We describe a deformation of the principal chiral model (with an even-dimensional target space G) by a B-field proportional to the K\\"ahler form on the target space. The equations of motion of the deformed model admit a zero-curvature representation. As a simplest example, we consider the case of G=S^1 x S^3. We also apply a variant of the construction to a deformation of the AdS_3 x S^3 x S^1 (super-)sigma-model.

  14. Climate change, parasitism and the structure of intertidal ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulin, R; Mouritsen, K N

    2006-06-01

    Evidence is accumulating rapidly showing that temperature and other climatic variables are driving many ecological processes. At the same time, recent research has highlighted the role of parasitism in the dynamics of animal populations and the structure of animal communities. Here, the likely interactions between climate change and parasitism are discussed in the context of intertidal ecosystems. Firstly, using the soft-sediment intertidal communities of Otago Harbour, New Zealand, as a case study, parasites are shown to be ubiquitous components of intertidal communities, found in practically all major animal species in the system. With the help of specific examples from Otago Harbour, it is demonstrated that parasites can regulate host population density, influence the diversity of the entire benthic community, and affect the structure of the intertidal food web. Secondly, we document the extreme sensitivity of cercarial production in parasitic trematodes to increases in temperature, and discuss how global warming could lead to enhanced trematode infections. Thirdly, the results of a simulation model are used to argue that parasite-mediated local extinctions of intertidal animals are a likely outcome of global warming. Specifically, the model predicts that following a temperature increase of less than 4 degrees C, populations of the amphipod Corophium volutator, a hugely abundant tube-building amphipod on the mudflats of the Danish Wadden Sea, are likely to crash repeatedly due to mortality induced by microphallid trematodes. The available evidence indicates that climate-mediated changes in local parasite abundance will have significant repercussions for intertidal ecosystems. On the bright side, the marked effects of even slight increases in temperature on cercarial production in trematodes could form the basis for monitoring programmes, with these sensitive parasites providing early warning signals of the environmental impacts of global warming.

  15. Crustal Structure of Salton Trough using Deformable Layer Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, F.

    2012-12-01

    Salton Trough is an important geologic structure to understand the active rift between Imperial Fault and San Andreas Fault. To determine the underground geometry of Salton Trough and its nearby faults, we analyzed seismic phase data recorded by Southern California Earthquake Data Center (SCEDC). Both 2-D and 3-D models have been made to refine the velocity model so as to determine the basin and moho geometry beneath Salton Trough region. Here three inline and five cross-line velocity profiles were built by using 2D Deformable Layer Tomography (DLT) method. From these 2D profiles, we can see that the velocity gradient is very small in the low velocity zone. The low velocity anomaly can be detected beneath the axis of the Salton Trough around the depth of 19-21 km, and the relatively high velocity can be seen beneath the San Andreas faults. Within 100*150*40 km3 model volume, 90,180 P-wave and S-wave first arrival picks from 27,663 local events (from 2001 to 2012), which were obtained from 44 stations, were used to build 3D seismic velocity model of the crust. During the iterations of velocity updating, full 3-D ray tracing is implemented. From these 3-D velocity models with different sizes of grids, low velocity anomalies are present under the southwest of Salton Sea, while high velocity zone is present across Southern San Andreas Fault throughout all the depths. Profiles from 2-D velocity models compared to 3-D velocity models show similar geometry. 3-D crustal structure, which is determined from 3-D DLT, helps to better understand the divergent boundary between the North American and the Pacific tectonic plates

  16. Deformed configurations, band structures and spectroscopic properties of = 50 Ge and Se nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S K Ghorui; C R Praharaj

    2014-04-01

    The deformed configurations and rotational band structures in =50 Ge and Se nuclei are studied by deformed Hartree–Fock with quadrupole constraint and angular momentum projection. Apart from the `almost’ spherical HF solution, a well-deformed configuration occurs at low excitation. A deformed well-mixed = 1/2+ neutron orbit comes down in energy (from the shell above = 50) to break the = 50 spherical shell closure. A = 7− isomer is predicted in 84Se at fairly low excitation energy. At higher excitation energies (8 MeV), a deformed band with = 7/2+–1/2− (based on $h_{11/2}$) neutron 1p–1h excitation, for 82Ge and 84Se, is shown in our calculation. Our study gives insight into possible deformed structures at spherical shell closure.

  17. High-Resolution Reciprocal Space Mapping for Characterizing Deformation Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pantleon, Wolfgang; Wejdemann, Christian; Jakobsen, Bo

    2014-01-01

    each subgrain, but larger variations between different subgrains. On average, subgrains experience backward strains, whereas dislocation walls are strained in a forward direction. Based on these observations the necessary revision of the classical composite model is outlined. Additionally, subgrain...... relaxation occurs, but no changes in number, size and orientation of the subgrains are observed. The radial profile asymmetry becomes reversed, when pre-deformed specimens are deformed in tension along a perpendicular axis....

  18. Polycrystal deformation and single crystal deformation: Dislocation structure and flow stress in copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, X.; Borrego, A.; Pantleon, W.

    2001-01-01

    of microstructures have been identified. A correlation is found between microstructure and grain orientation, which agrees well with earlier observations in tensile deformed aluminum polycrystals and copper single crystals. The stress–strain curve of the copper polycrystal is calculated with good accuracy from...... single crystal data, which are weighted according to the volume fractions of the three different types based on a quantitative texture measurement of the polycrystal....

  19. Evaluation of soft sediment deformation structures along the Fethiye–Burdur Fault Zone, SW Turkey

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mehmet Ozcelik

    2016-03-01

    Burdur city is located on lacustrine sedimentary deposits at the northeastern end of the Fethiye–Burdur Fault Zone (FBFZ) in SW Turkey. Fault steps were formed in response to vertical displacement along normal fault zones in these deposits. Soft sediment deformation structures were identified at five sitesin lacustrine sediments located on both sides of the FBFZ. The deformed sediments are composed of unconsolidated alternations of sands, silts and clay layers and show different morphological types. The soft sediment deformation structures include load structures, flame structures, slumps, dykes, neptuniandykes, drops and pseudonodules, intercalated layers, ball and pillow structures, minor faults and water escape structures of varying geometry and dimension. These structures are a direct response to fluid escape during liquefaction and fluidization mechanism. The driving forces inferred include gravitationalinstabilities and hydraulic processes. Geological, tectonic, mineralogical investigations and age analysis were carried out to identify the cause for these soft sediment deformations. OSL dating indicated an age ranging from 15161±744 to 17434±896 years for the soft sediment deformation structures. Geological investigations of the soft sediment deformation structures and tectonic history of the basin indicate that the main factor for deformation is past seismic activity.

  20. Controlled deformation of vesicles by flexible structured media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Zhou, Ye; Martínez-González, José A.; Hernández-Ortiz, Juan P.; Abbott, Nicholas L.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2016-01-01

    Liquid crystalline (LC) materials, such as actin or tubulin networks, are known to be capable of deforming the shape of cells. Here, elements of that behavior are reproduced in a synthetic system, namely, a giant vesicle suspended in a LC, which we view as a first step toward the preparation of active, anisotropic hybrid systems that mimic some of the functionality encountered in biological systems. To that end, we rely on a coupled particle-continuum representation of deformable networks in a nematic LC represented at the level of a Landau–de Gennes free energy functional. Our results indicate that, depending on its elastic properties, the LC is indeed able to deform the vesicle until it reaches an equilibrium, anisotropic shape. The magnitude of the deformation is determined by a balance of elastic and surface forces. For perpendicular anchoring at the vesicle, a Saturn ring defect forms along the equatorial plane, and the vesicle adopts a pancake-like, oblate shape. For degenerate planar anchoring at the vesicle, two boojum defects are formed at the poles of the vesicle, which adopts an elongated, spheroidal shape. During the deformation, the volume of the topological defects in the LC shrinks considerably as the curvature of the vesicle increases. These predictions are confirmed by our experimental observations of spindle-like shapes in experiments with giant unilamellar vesicles with planar anchoring. We find that the tension of the vesicle suppresses vesicle deformation, whereas anchoring strength and large elastic constants promote shape anisotropy. PMID:27532056

  1. Observing phytoplankton physiology and ocean ecosystem structure from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Patrick

    phytoplankton biomass reflects differences in ecosystem structure and I use an objective clustering algorithm to delineate two large-scale ecological regimes. The spatial extent of the two regimes suggests that the seasonal cycle of light is the main determinant of ecosystem structure. In a second step, I use the same clustering technique to subdivide the regimes into two biomes each, which capture within-regime differences in nutrient availability.

  2. Habitat structure, trophic structure and ecosystem function: interactive effects in a bromeliad-insect community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Diane S

    2006-09-01

    Although previous studies have shown that ecosystem functions are affected by either trophic structure or habitat structure, there has been little consideration of their combined effects. Such interactions may be particularly important in systems where habitat and trophic structure covary. I use the aquatic insects in bromeliads to examine the combined effects of trophic structure and habitat structure on a key ecosystem function: detrital processing. In Costa Rican bromeliads, trophic structure naturally covaries with both habitat complexity and habitat size, precluding any observational analysis of interactions between factors. I therefore designed mesocosms that allowed each factor to be manipulated separately. Increases in mesocosm complexity reduced predator (damselfly larva) efficiency, resulting in high detritivore abundances, indirectly increasing detrital processing rates. However, increased complexity also directly reduced the per capita foraging efficiency of the detritivores. Over short time periods, these trends effectively cancelled each other out in terms of detrital processing. Over longer time periods, more complex patterns emerged. Increases in mesocosm size also reduced both predator efficiency and detritivore efficiency, leading to no net effect on detrital processing. In many systems, ecosystem functions may be impacted by strong interactions between trophic structure and habitat structure, cautioning against examining either effect in isolation.

  3. Modelling benthic biophysical drivers of ecosystem structure and biogeochemical response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Nicholas; Bruggeman, Jorn; Lessin, Gennadi; Allen, Icarus

    2016-04-01

    The fate of carbon deposited at the sea floor is ultimately decided by biophysical drivers that control the efficiency of remineralisation and timescale of carbon burial in sediments. Specifically, these drivers include bioturbation through ingestion and movement, burrow-flushing and sediment reworking, which enhance vertical particulate transport and solute diffusion. Unfortunately, these processes are rarely satisfactorily resolved in models. To address this, a benthic model that explicitly describes the vertical position of biology (e.g., habitats) and biogeochemical processes is presented that includes biological functionality and biogeochemical response capturing changes in ecosystem structure, benthic-pelagic fluxes and biodiversity on inter-annual timescales. This is demonstrated by the model's ability to reproduce temporal variability in benthic infauna, vertical pore water nutrients and pelagic-benthic solute fluxes compared to in-situ data. A key advance is the replacement of bulk parameterisation of bioturbation by explicit description of the bio-physical processes responsible. This permits direct comparison with observations and determination of key parameters in experiments. Crucially, the model resolves the two-way interaction between sediment biogeochemistry and ecology, allowing exploration of the benthic response to changing environmental conditions, the importance of infaunal functional traits in shaping benthic ecological structure and the feedback the resulting bio-physical processes exert on pore water nutrient profiles. The model is actively being used to understand shelf sea carbon cycling, the response of the benthos to climatic change, food provision and other societal benefits.

  4. On the existence of deformed Lie-Poisson structures for quantized groups

    CERN Document Server

    Lyakhovsky, V D

    1996-01-01

    The geometrical description of deformation quantization based on quantum duality principle makes it possible to introduce deformed Lie-Poisson structure. It serves as a natural analogue of classical Lie bialgebra for the case when the initial object is a quantized group. The explicit realization of the deformed Lie-Poisson structure is a difficult problem. We study the special class of such constructions characterized by quite a simple form of tanjent vector fields. It is proved that in such a case it is sufficient to find four Lie compositions that form two deformations of the first order and four Lie bialgebras. This garantees the existence of two families of deformed Lie-Poisson structures due to the intrinsic symmetry of the initial compositions. The explicit example is presented.

  5. Slip as the basic mechanism for formation of deformation relief structural elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lychagin, D. V.; Alfyorova, E. A.

    2017-07-01

    The experimental results of investigation of the nickel single crystal surface morphology after compression deformation are presented. The quasi-periodic character of the deformation profile, common for shear deformation of different types of relief structural elements, is found. It is demonstrated that the morphological manifestation of these structural elements is determined by local shear systems along octahedral planes. The regularities of the deformation structure in these regions defining the material extrusion and intrusion regions and the specific features of disorientation accumulation are established. If reorientation of local regions takes part in the relief element formation, along with octahedral slip, much stronger growth of the surface area is observed. The possibility of application of two-dimensional and three-dimensional surface roughness parameters for description of deformation relief is considered.

  6. Microconchids from microbialite ecosystem immediately after end-Permian mass extinction: ecologic selectivity and implications for microbialite ecosystem structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H.; Chen, Z.; Wang, Y. B.; Ou, W.; Liao, W.; Mei, X.

    2013-12-01

    The Permian-Triassic (P-Tr) carbonate successions are often characterized by the presence of microbialite buildups worldwide. The widespread microbialites are believed as indication of microbial proliferation immediately after the P-Tr mass extinction. The death of animals representing the primary consumer trophic structure of marine ecosystem in the P-Tr crisis allows the bloom of microbes as an important primary producer in marine trophic food web structure. Thus, the PTB microbialite builders have been regarded as disaster taxa of the P-Tr ecologic crisis. Microbialite ecosystems were suitable for most organisms to inhabit. However, increasing evidence show that microbialite dwellers are also considerably abundant and diverse, including mainly foraminifers Earlandia sp. and Rectocornuspira sp., lingulid brachiopods, ostrocods, gastropods, and microconchids. In particular, ostracods are extremely abundant in this special ecosystem. Microconchid-like calcareous tubes are also considerably abundant. Here, we have sampled systematically a PTB microbialite deposit from the Dajiang section, southern Guizhou Province, southwest China and have extracted abundant isolated specimens of calcareous worm tubes. Quantitative analysis enables to investigate stratigraphic and facies preferences of microconchids in the PTB microbialites. Our preliminary result indicates that three microconchid species Microconchus sp., Helicoconchus elongates and Microconchus aberrans inhabited in microbialite ecosystem. Most microconchilds occurred in the upper part of the microbialite buildup and the grainstone-packstone microfacies. Very few microconchilds were found in the rocks bearing well-developed microbialite structures. Their stratigraphic and environmental preferences indicate proliferation of those metazoan organisms is coupled with ebb of the microbialite development. They also proliferated in some local niches in which microbial activities were not very active even if those

  7. Urban forest structure, ecosystem services and change in Syracuse, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    David J. Nowak; Robert E. Hoehn; Allison R. Bodine; Eric J. Greenfield; Jarlath. O' Neil-Dunne

    2013-01-01

    The tree population within the City of Syracuse was assessed using a random sampling of plots in 1999, 2001 and 2009 to determine how the population and the ecosystem services these trees provide have changed over time. Ecosystem services and values for carbon sequestration, air pollution removal and changes in building energy use were derived using the i-Tree Eco...

  8. A Federated Reference Structure for Open Informational Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinen, Richard; Kerres, Michael; Scharnberg, Gianna; Blees, Ingo; Rittberger, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The paper describes the concept of a federated ecosystem for Open Educational Resources (OER) in the German education system. Here, a variety of OER repositories (ROER) (Muuß-Merholz & Schaumburg, 2014) and reference platforms have been established in the recent past. In order to develop this ecosystem, not only are metadata standards…

  9. Vortex methods for fluid-structure interaction problems with deforming geometries and their application to swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzola, Mattia; Chatelain, Philippe; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2010-11-01

    We present a vortex particle-mesh method for fluid-structure interaction problems. The proposed methodology combines implicit interface capturing, Brinkmann penalization techniques, and the self-consistent computation of momentum transfer between the fluid and the structure. In addition, our scheme is able to handle immersed bodies characterized by non-solenoidal deformations, allowing the study of arbitrary deforming geometries. This attractively simple algorithm is shown to accurately reproduce reference simulations for rigid and deforming structures. Its suitability for biological locomotion problems is then demonstrated with the simulation of self-propelled anguilliform swimmers.

  10. Deformation analysis of ferrite/pearlite banded structure under uniaxial tension using digital image correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaochuan; Wang, Yong; Yang, Jia; Qiao, Zhixia; Ren, Chunhua; Chen, Cheng

    2016-10-01

    The ferrite/pearlite banded structure causes the anisotropic behavior of steel. In this paper, digital image correlation (DIC) was used to analyze the micro deformation of this microstructure under uniaxial tension. The reliability of DIC for this application was verified by a zero-deformation experiment. The results show that the performance of DIC can satisfy the requirements of the tensile deformation measurement. Then, two uniaxial tensile tests in different directions (longitudinal direction and transverse direction) were carried out and DIC was used to measure the micro deformation of the ferrite/pearlite banded structure. The measured results show that the ferrite bands undergo the main deformation in the transverse tension, which results in the relatively weaker tensile properties in the transverse direction than in the longitudinal direction. This work is useful to guide the modification of the bands morphology and extend the application scope of DIC.

  11. Landscape structure affects the provision of multiple ecosystem services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamy, T.; Liss, K. N.; Gonzalez, A.; Bennett, E. M.

    2016-12-01

    Understanding how landscape structure, the composition and configuration of land use/land cover (LULC) types, affects the relative supply of ecosystem services (ES), is critical to improving landscape management. While there is a long history of studies on landscape composition, the importance of landscape configuration has only recently become apparent. To understand the role of landscape structure in the provision of multiple ES, we must understand how ES respond to different measures of both composition and configuration of LULC. We used a multivariate framework to quantify the role of landscape configuration and composition in the provision of ten ES in 130 municipalities in an agricultural region in Southern Québec. We identified the relative influence of composition and configuration in the provision of these ES using multiple regression, and on bundles of ES using canonical redundancy analysis. We found that both configuration and composition play a role in explaining variation in the supply of ES, but the relative contribution of composition and configuration varies significantly among ES. We also identified three distinct ES bundles (sets of ES that regularly appear together on the landscape) and found that each bundle was associated with a unique area in the landscape, that mapped to a gradient in the composition and configuration of forest and agricultural LULC. These results show that the distribution of ES on the landscape depends upon both the overall composition of LULC types and their configuration on the landscape. As ES become more widely used to steer land use decision-making, quantifying the roles of configuration and composition in the provision of ES bundles can improve landscape management by helping us understand when and where the spatial pattern of land cover is important for multiple services.

  12. Application of color structured light pattern to measurement of large out-of-plane deformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xing Lü; Jun-Hong Zhou; Dong-Dong Liu; Jue Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Measurement of out-of-plane deformation is significant to understanding of the deflection mechanisms of the plate and tube structures.In this study,a new surface contouring technique with color structured light is applied to measure the out-of-plane deformation of structures with one-shot projection.Through color fringe recognizing,decoding and triangulation processing for the captured images corresponding to each deformation state,the feasibility of the method is testified by the measurement of elastic deflections of a flexible square plate,showing good agreement with those from the calibrated displacement driver.The plastic deformation of two alloy aluminum rectangular tubes is measured to show the technique application to surface topographic evaluation of the buckling structures with large displacements.

  13. Structure and functioning of dryland ecosystems in a changing world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestre, Fernando T.; Eldridge, David J.; Soliveres, Santiago; Kéfi, Sonia; Delgado-Baquerizo, Manuel; Bowker, Matthew A.; García-Palacios, Pablo; Gaitán, Juan; Gallardo, Antonio; Lázaro, Roberto; Berdugo, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    Understanding how drylands respond to ongoing environmental change is extremely important for global sustainability. Here we review how biotic attributes, climate, grazing pressure, land cover change and nitrogen deposition affect the functioning of drylands at multiple spatial scales. Our synthesis highlights the importance of biotic attributes (e.g. species richness) in maintaining fundamental ecosystem processes such as primary productivity, illustrate how N deposition and grazing pressure are impacting ecosystem functioning in drylands worldwide, and highlight the importance of the traits of woody species as drivers of their expansion in former grasslands. We also emphasize the role of attributes such as species richness and abundance in controlling the responses of ecosystem functioning to climate change. This knowledge is essential to guide conservation and restoration efforts in drylands, as biotic attributes can be actively managed at the local scale to increase ecosystem resilience to global change. PMID:28239303

  14. Structural ensembles of the north belt of Venus deformations and possible mechanisms of their formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markov, M. S.

    1986-01-01

    The author discusses structural formations in the northern deformation belt of Venus, studied according to the data of the radar pictures obtained with the Venera 15 and 16 probes. He shows that it consists of regions of compression with submeridional orientation, regions of displacement, extending in the sublatitudinal direction and individual slightly deformed blocks. He puts forward the hypothesis that the formation of these structures is related with horizontal movements in the mantle in the sublatitudinal direction.

  15. Ecosystem structure and trophic analysis of Angolan fishery landings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronaldo Angelini

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Information on the mean trophic level of fishery landings in Angola and the output from a preliminary Ecopath with Ecosim (EwE model were used to examine the dynamics of the Angolan marine ecosystem. Results were compared with the nearby Namibian and South African ecosystems, which share some of the exploited fish populations. The results show that: (i The mean trophic level of Angola’s fish landings has not decreased over the years; (ii There are significant correlations between the landings of Angola, Namibia and South Africa; (iii The ecosystem attributes calculated by the EwE models for the three ecosystems were similar, and the main differences were related to the magnitude of flows and biomass; (iv The similarity among ecosystem trends for Namibia, South Africa and Angola re-emphasizes the need to continue collaborative regional studies on the fish stocks and their ecosystems. To improve the Angolan model it is necessary to gain a better understanding of plankton dynamics because plankton are essential for Sardinella spp. An expanded analysis of the gut contents of the fish species occupying Angola’s coastline is also necessary.

  16. Cracking in reinforced concrete structures due to imposed deformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, A.

    1997-04-01

    This thesis is concerned with modeling of the cracking process in reinforced concrete due to imposed deformations. Cracking is investigated both at early ages, during hydration, and at mature age when the final properties of the concrete are reached. One of the most important material characteristics of the concrete at early ages, the Young`s modulus is determined by means of a dynamic method called the resonance frequency method. 40 refs

  17. Influence of strain on the copper structure under controlled deformation path conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Niewielski

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: One of the methods of plastic deformation under complex deformation path conditions is compression with oscillatory torsion. The observable effects in the form of changing force parameters and structure changes confirm the possibility of deformation to a value many times higher than in the case of methods traditionally applied for forming. This article presents the results of the influence of compression with oscillatory torsion on structural phenomena occurring in copper deformed in such a way.Design/methodology/approach: The examinations were conducted at a compression/oscillatory torsion test stand. The structural examinations were conducted with the use of light and electron microscopy.Findings: In experimental investigations, a reduction of unit pressures was observed when compared to conventional compression. The structural examinations indicated substantial differences in the mechanisms of plastic deformation conducted in both conventional and combined way.Research limitations/implications: There are premises which show that a metallic material of a nanometric structure can be obtained in this way (top-down method, by the accumulation of great plastic deformation. Metallic materials characterized by grain size below 100nm are distinguished by unconventional properties. Further examinations should focus on conducting experiments in a way that would enable grain size reduction to a nanometric size. This will enable the cumulation of greater deformation in the material.Originality/value: The method of compression with oscillatory torsion is an original method developed at the Silesian University of Technology, owing to which it is possible to obtain high deformation values (SPD without risking the loss of cohesion of the material. Thorough understanding of the changes taking place in the structure of metals subjected to compression with oscillatory torsion will allow the optimal choice of process parameters in order to achieve a

  18. Recrystallization and formation of austenite in deformed lath martensitic structure of low carbon steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokizane, M.; Matsumura, N.; Tsuzaki, K.; Maki, T.; Tamura, I.

    1982-08-01

    The effect of prior deformation on the processes of tempering and austenitizing of lath martensite was studied by using low carbon steels. The recrystallization of as-quenched lath martensite was not observed on tempering while the deformed lath martensite easily recrystallized. The behavior of austenite formation in deformed specimens was different from that in as-quenched specimens because of the recrystallization of deformed lath martensite. The austenitizing behavior (and thus the austenite grain size) in deformed specimens was controlled by the competition of austenite formation with the recrystallization of lath martensite. In the case of as-quenched (non-deformed) lath martensite, the austenite particles were formed preferentially at prior austenite grain boundaries and then formed within the austenite grains mainly along the packet, block, and lath boundaries. On the other hand, in the case of lightly deformed (30 to 50 pct) lath martensite, the recrystallization of the matrix rapidly progressed prior to the formation of austenite, and the austenite particles were formed mainly at the boundaries of fairly fine recrystallized ferrite grains. When the lath martensite was heavily deformed (75 to 84 pct), the austenite formation proceeded almost simultaneously with the recrystallization of lath martensite. In such a situation, very fine austenite grain structure was obtained most effectively.

  19. Marine terraces; datum planes for study of structural deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, N.K.

    1975-01-01

    Along the earthquake-prone coastal area of north-central California, geologists are searching for criteria to establish the nature, extent, and rate of crustal movement or deformation that may be related to activity along known or postulated faults. This search has led to a study of marine terraces along the coast between San Francisco and Santa Cruz in the area that is transected by the Seal Cove-San Gregorio-Palo Colorado fault, a branch of the San Andreas fault system. 

  20. Shear Creep Simulation of Structural Plane of Rock Mass Based on Discontinuous Deformation Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoxin Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulations of the creep characteristics of the structural plane of rock mass are very useful. However, most existing simulation methods are based on continuum mechanics and hence are unsuitable in the case of large displacements and deformations. The discontinuous deformation analysis method proposed by Genhua is a discrete one and has a significant advantage when simulating the contacting problem of blocks. In this study, we combined the viscoelastic rheological model of Burgers with the discontinuous deformation analysis (DDA method. We also derived the recurrence formula for the creep deformation increment with the time step during numerical simulations. Based on the minimum potential energy principle, the general equilibrium equation was derived, and the shear creep deformation in the structural plane was considered. A numerical program was also developed and its effectiveness was confirmed based on the curves obtained by the creep test of the structural plane of a rock mass under different stress levels. Finally, the program was used to analyze the mechanism responsible for the creep features of the structural plane in the case of the toppling deformation of the rock slope. The results showed that the extended DDA method is an effective one.

  1. Effect of high temperature deformation on the structure of Ni based superalloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nowotnik

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: A study on the hot deformation behaviour and dynamic structural processes (dynamic precipitation operating during deformation at elevated temperatures of nickel based superalloy was presented.Design/methodology/approach: Compression tests were carried out on precipitations hardenable nickel based superalloy of Inconel 718 at constant true strain rates of 10-4, 4x10-4s-1 within a temperature range of 720-1150°C. True stress-true strain curves and microstructure analysis of hot deformed alloy were described. Microstructure examination has been carried out on the compressed samples of Inconel 718 alloy using an optical microscope - Nikon 300 and in the scanning electron microscope HITACHI S-3400 (SEM in a conventional back-scattered electron mode on polished sections etched with Marble’s solution.Findings: Structural observations of deformed at high temperatures, previously solution treated Inconel alloy revealed non uniform deformation effects. Distribution of molybdenum-rich carbides was found to be affected by localized flow within the investigated strain range at relatively low deformation temperatures 720 - 850°C. Microstructural examination of the alloy also shown that shear banding, cavities growth and intergranular cracks penetrating through the whole grains were responsible for decrease in the flow stress at temperature of 720, 800 and 850°C and a specimen fracture at larger strains. On the basis of received flow stress values activation energy of a high-temperature deformation process was estimated. Mathematical dependences (σpl -T and σpl - and compression data were used to determine material’s constants. These constants allowed to derive a formula that describes the relationship between strain rate ( ε, deformation temperature (T and flow stress σpl.Research limitations/implications: Even though, the light optical microstructure observation of deformed samples revealed some effects of heterogeneous distribution of

  2. Plastic deformation modelling of tempered martensite steel block structure by a nonlocal crystal plasticity model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Boeff

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The plastic deformations of tempered martensite steel representative volume elements with different martensite block structures have been investigated by using a nonlocal crystal plasticity model which considers isotropic and kinematic hardening produced by plastic strain gradients. It was found that pronounced strain gradients occur in the grain boundary region even under homogeneous loading. The isotropic hardening of strain gradients strongly influences the global stress–strain diagram while the kinematic hardening of strain gradients influences the local deformation behaviour. It is found that the additional strain gradient hardening is not only dependent on the block width but also on the misorientations or the deformation incompatibilities in adjacent blocks.

  3. Evaluation of structural deformations of a mechanical connecting unit oxidizer supplies by thermo-mechanical simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Woo [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Institute of Machine Convergence Technology, Hankyong National University, Anseong (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    A Mechanical connecting unit (MCU) used in ground facilities for a Liquid propellant rocket (LPR) acts as a bridge between the onboard system and the ground oxidizer filling system. It should be resistant to structural deformations in order to guarantee successful supply of a cryogenic oxidizer and high pressure gases without reduction of sealing capability. The MCU consists of many components and linkages and operates under harsh conditions induced by a cryogenic oxidizer, high pressure gases and other mechanical forces. Thus, the evaluation of structural deformation of the MCU considering complex conditions is expensive and time consuming. The present study efficiently evaluates the structural deformations of the key components of the MCU by Thermo-mechanical simulation (TMS) based on the superposition principle. Deformations due to the mechanical loadings including weights, pressures, and spring forces are firstly evaluated by using a non-linear flexible body simulation module (FFlex) of Multi-body dynamics (MBD) software, RecurDyn. Then, thermal deformations for the deformed geometries obtained by RecurDyn were subsequently calculated. It was conducted by using a Finite element (FE) analysis software, ANSYS. The total deformations for the onboard plate and multi-channel plate in the connecting section due to the mechanical and thermal loadings were successfully evaluated. Moreover, the outer gaps at six points between two plates were calculated and verified by comparison to the measured data. Their values and tendencies showed a good agreement. The author concluded that the TMS using MBD software considering flexible bodies and an FE simulator can efficiently evaluate structural deformations of the MCU operating under the complex load and boundary conditions.

  4. Evolution of dislocation structure and modelling of deformation resistance in CaF2 single crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Sadrabadi, Peiman

    2007-01-01

    he evolution of dislocation structure during plastic deformation in pure 111}-oriented CaF2 single crystals was investigated at constant strain rate (10−5 s−1) and constant stress (1 < / MPa < 22) in the temperature range of 0.5 < T/Tm < 0.8. The steady state and transient deformation behavior of the material is described by the composite model on the basis of microstructural data. In the following sections the important conclusions are briefly summarized. Microstructure evolution...

  5. Influence of deformation on structural-phase state of weld material in St3 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, Alexander, E-mail: galvas.kem@gmail.ru; Ababkov, Nicolay, E-mail: n.ababkov@rambler.ru; Ozhiganov, Yevgeniy, E-mail: zhigan84@mail.ru [Kuzbass State Technical University, 25-54, Krasnaya Str., 650000, Kemerovo (Russian Federation); LLC “Kuzbass Center of Welding and Control”, 33/2, Lenin Str., 650055, Kemerovo (Russian Federation); Kozlov, Eduard, E-mail: kozlov@tsuab.ru [Kuzbass State Technical University, 25-54, Krasnaya Str., 650000, Kemerovo (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2, Solyanaya Sq., 634003, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Popova, Natalya, E-mail: natalya-popova-44@mail.ru [Kuzbass State Technical University, 25-54, Krasnaya Str., 650000, Kemerovo (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2, Solyanaya Sq., 634003, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science, SB RAS, 2/4, Akademicheskii Ave., 634021, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Nikonenko, Elena, E-mail: vilatomsk@mail.ru [Kuzbass State Technical University, 25-54, Krasnaya Str., 650000, Kemerovo (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2, Solyanaya Sq., 634003, Tomsk (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30, Lenin Str., 634050, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Zboykova, Nadezhda, E-mail: tezaurusn@gmail.com; Koneva, Nina, E-mail: koneva@tsuab.ru [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2, Solyanaya Sq., 634003, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    The structural-phase condition of the weld material subjected to the plastic deformation was investigated using the translucent diffraction electron microscopy method. The investigations were carried out near the joint of the weld and the base metal. The seam was done by the method of manual arc welding without artificial defects. The St3 steel was taken as the welded material. Influence of the plastic deformation on morphology, phase composition, defect structure and its parameters of weld metal was revealed. All investigations were done at the distance of 0.5 mm from the joint of the weld and the base metal at the deformation degrees from 0 to 5% and after destruction of a sample. It was established that deformation of the sample did not lead to qualitative changes in the structure (the structure is still presented by ferrite-pearlite mixture) but changed the quantitative parameters of the structure, namely, with the increase of plastic deformation a part of the pearlite component becomes more and more imperfect. In the beginning it turns into the destroyed pearlite then into ferrite, the volume fraction of pearlite is decreased. The polarization of dislocation structure takes place but it doesn’t lead to the internal stresses that can destroy the sample.

  6. Online Deformable Object Tracking Based on Structure-Aware Hyper-Graph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Dawei; Qi, Honggang; Li, Wenbo; Wen, Longyin; Huang, Qingming; Lyu, Siwei

    2016-08-01

    Recent advances in online visual tracking focus on designing part-based model to handle the deformation and occlusion challenges. However, previous methods usually consider only the pairwise structural dependences of target parts in two consecutive frames rather than the higher order constraints in multiple frames, making them less effective in handling large deformation and occlusion challenges. This paper describes a new and efficient method for online deformable object tracking. Different from most existing methods, this paper exploits higher order structural dependences of different parts of the tracking target in multiple consecutive frames. We construct a structure-aware hyper-graph to capture such higher order dependences, and solve the tracking problem by searching dense subgraphs on it. Furthermore, we also describe a new evaluating data set for online deformable object tracking (the Deform-SOT data set), which includes 50 challenging sequences with full annotations that represent realistic tracking challenges, such as large deformations and severe occlusions. The experimental result of the proposed method shows considerable improvement in performance over the state-of-the-art tracking methods.

  7. The mechanical properties of austenite stainless steel 304 after structural deformation through cold work

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mubarok, Naila; Manaf, Azwar, E-mail: azwar@ui.ac.id [PPS Materials Science, FMIPA-Universitas Indonesia, Depok 16424 (Indonesia); Notonegoro, Hamdan Akbar [Mechanical Engineering Dept., FT-Universitas Sultan Ageng Tirtayasa,Cilegon 42435 (Indonesia); Thosin, Kemas Ahmad Zaini [Pusat Penelitian Fisika,LIPI, Serpong (Indonesia)

    2016-06-17

    The 304 stainless steel (SS) type is widely used in oil and gas operations due to its excellent corrosion resistance. However, the presence of the fine sand particles and H{sub 2}S gas contained in crude oil could lead the erosion and abrasion in steel. In this study, cold rolled treatments were conducted to the 304 SS in order to increase the wear resistance of the steel. The cold work has resulted in thickness reduction to 20%, 40% and 60% of the original. Various microstructural characterizations were used to analyze the effect of deformation. The hardness characterization showed that the initial hardness value increased from 145 HVC to 395 HVC as the level of deformation increase. Further, the wear resistance increased with the deformation rate from 0% to 40% and subsequently decreased from 40% to 60% deformation rate. Microstructural characterization shows that the boundary change to coincide by 56 µm, 49 µm, 45 µm, and 43 µm width and the grain go to flatten and being folded like needles. The effect of deformation on the grain morphology and structure was also studied by optical metallography and X-Ray Diffraction. It is shown that the deformation by means of a cold rolled process has transformed the austenite structure into martensitic structure.

  8. Comparative ecosystem trophic structure of three U.S. mid-Atlantic estuaries

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mark E. Monaco; Robert E. Ulanowicz

    1997-01-01

    Quantitative networks of trophic exchanges offer the potential to compare food webs from neighboring ecosystems in order to ascertain whether large differences and similarities exist in trophic structure and function...

  9. Flow-Induced Deformation of a Flexible Thin Structure as Manifestation of Heat Transfer Enhancement

    CERN Document Server

    Soti, Atul Kumar; Sheridan, John

    2015-01-01

    Flow-induced deformation of thin structures coupled with convective heat transfer has potential applications in energy harvesting and is important for understanding functioning of several biological systems. We numerically demonstrate large-scale flow-induced deformation as an effective passive heat transfer enhancement technique. An in-house, strongly-coupled fluid-structure interaction (FSI) solver is employed in which flow and structure solvers are based on sharp-interface immersed boundary and finite element method, respectively. In the present work, we validate convective heat transfer module of the in-house FSI solver against several benchmark examples of conduction and convective heat transfer including moving structure boundaries. The thermal augmentation is investigated as well as quantified for the flow-induced deformation of an elastic thin plate attached to lee side of a rigid cylinder in a heated channel laminar flow. We show that the wake vortices past the plate sweep higher sources of vorticity...

  10. Application of eco-exergy for assessment of ecosystem health and development of structurally dynamic models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, J.; Gürkan, Zeren; Jørgensen, S.E.

    2010-01-01

    Eco-exergy has been widely used in the assessment of ecosystem health, parameter estimations, calibrations, validations and prognoses. It offers insights into the understanding of ecosystem dynamics and disturbance-cl riven changes. Particularly, structurally dynamic models (SDMs), which are deve...... of structurally dynamic models (SDMs). The limitations and possible future applications of the approach are also addressed. (C) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  11. Deformable meshes for medical image segmentation accurate automatic segmentation of anatomical structures

    CERN Document Server

    Kainmueller, Dagmar

    2014-01-01

    ? Segmentation of anatomical structures in medical image data is an essential task in clinical practice. Dagmar Kainmueller introduces methods for accurate fully automatic segmentation of anatomical structures in 3D medical image data. The author's core methodological contribution is a novel deformation model that overcomes limitations of state-of-the-art Deformable Surface approaches, hence allowing for accurate segmentation of tip- and ridge-shaped features of anatomical structures. As for practical contributions, she proposes application-specific segmentation pipelines for a range of anatom

  12. Influence of Plastic Deformation Process on the Structure and Properties of Alloy WE43

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bednarczyk I.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the results of structure and properties tests of flat bars made of alloy WE43 obtained in the process of extrusion with the use of KOBO method. An analysis of structure changes was conducted both in initial state and after plastic deformation.

  13. Confocal scanning laser microscopic study of the RDX defect structure in deformed polymer-bonded explosives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, A.E.D.M. van der; Bouma, R.H.B.

    2016-01-01

    The influence of an explosion-driven deformation on the defect structure in RDX crystals embedded in a polymer-bonded explosive was investigated by means of confocal scanning laser microscopy. The images were compared to the defect structure in the as-received RDX grades, embedded

  14. Noncommutative spectral geometry and the deformed Hopf algebra structure of quantum field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakellariadou, Mairi; Stabile, Antonio; Vitiello, Giuseppe

    2013-06-01

    We report the results obtained in the study of Alain Connes noncommutative spectral geometry construction focusing on its essential ingredient of the algebra doubling. We show that such a two-sheeted structure is related with the gauge structure of the theory, its dissipative character and carries in itself the seeds of quantization. From the algebraic point of view, the algebra doubling process has the same structure of the deformed Hops algebra structure which characterizes quantum field theory.

  15. Noncommutative spectral geometry and the deformed Hopf algebra structure of quantum field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Sakellariadou, Mairi; Vitiello, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    We report the results obtained in the study of Alain Connes noncommutative spectral geometry construction focusing on its essential ingredient of the algebra doubling. We show that such a two-sheeted structure is related with the gauge structure of the theory, its dissipative character and carries in itself the seeds of quantization. From the algebraic point of view, the algebra doubling process has the same structure of the deformed Hops algebra structure which characterizes quantum field theory.

  16. Deciphering the shape and deformation of secondary structures through local conformation analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camproux Anne-Claude

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein deformation has been extensively analysed through global methods based on RMSD, torsion angles and Principal Components Analysis calculations. Here we use a local approach, able to distinguish among the different backbone conformations within loops, α-helices and β-strands, to address the question of secondary structures' shape variation within proteins and deformation at interface upon complexation. Results Using a structural alphabet, we translated the 3 D structures of large sets of protein-protein complexes into sequences of structural letters. The shape of the secondary structures can be assessed by the structural letters that modeled them in the structural sequences. The distribution analysis of the structural letters in the three protein compartments (surface, core and interface reveals that secondary structures tend to adopt preferential conformations that differ among the compartments. The local description of secondary structures highlights that curved conformations are preferred on the surface while straight ones are preferred in the core. Interfaces display a mixture of local conformations either preferred in core or surface. The analysis of the structural letters transition occurring between protein-bound and unbound conformations shows that the deformation of secondary structure is tightly linked to the compartment preference of the local conformations. Conclusion The conformation of secondary structures can be further analysed and detailed thanks to a structural alphabet which allows a better description of protein surface, core and interface in terms of secondary structures' shape and deformation. Induced-fit modification tendencies described here should be valuable information to identify and characterize regions under strong structural constraints for functional reasons.

  17. Correlation between locally deformed structure and oxide film properties in austenitic stainless steel irradiated with neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimi, Yasuhiro; Kitsunai, Yuji; Kasahara, Shigeki; Chatani, Kazuhiro; Koshiishi, Masato; Nishiyama, Yutaka

    2016-07-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) in high-temperature water for neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steels (SSs), the locally deformed structures, the oxide films formed on the deformed areas, and their correlation were investigated. Tensile specimens made of irradiated 316L SSs were strained 0.1%-2% at room temperature or at 563 K, and the surface structures and crystal misorientation among grains were evaluated. The strained specimens were immersed in high-temperature water, and the microstructures of the oxide films on the locally deformed areas were observed. The appearance of visible step structures on the specimens' surface depended on the neutron dose and the applied strain. The surface oxides were observed to be prone to increase in thickness around grain boundaries (GBs) with increasing neutron dose and increasing local strain at the GBs. No penetrative oxidation was observed along GBs or along surface steps.

  18. Food web structure and vulnerability of a deep-sea ecosystem in the NW Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tecchio, Samuele; Coll, Marta; Christensen, Villy; Company, Joan B.; Ramírez-Llodra, Eva; Sardà, Francisco

    2013-05-01

    There is increasing fishing pressure on the continental margins of the oceans, and this raises concerns about the vulnerability of the ecosystems thriving there. The current knowledge of the biology of deep-water fish species identifies potential reduced resilience to anthropogenic disturbance. However, there are extreme difficulties in sampling the deep sea, resulting in poorly resolved and indirectly obtained food-web relationships. Here, we modelled the flows and biomasses of a Mediterranean deep-sea ecosystem, the Catalan Sea continental slope at depths of 1000-1400 m. This is the first model of a deep-water ecosystem in the Mediterranean Sea. The objectives were to (a) quantitatively describe the food web structure of the ecosystem, (b) examine the role of key species in the ecosystem, and (c) explore the vulnerability of this deep-sea ecosystem to potential future fishing exploitation. We used the Ecopath with Ecosim (EwE) modelling approach and software to model the ecosystem. The trophic model included 18 consumers, a marine snow group, and a sediment detritus group. Trophic network analysis identified low levels of consumer biomass cycling and low system omnivory index when compared with expected values of marine ecosystems, and higher cycling and omnivory when compared with available EwE models of shallower areas of the Mediterranean Sea. The majority of flows in the ecosystem were concentrated at the trophic level of first-order consumers (TL 2). Benthic invertebrates and demersal sharks were identified to have key ecological roles in the ecosystem. We used the dynamic temporal model Ecosim to simulate expansion of the red-shrimp benthic trawl fishery that currently operates at shallower depths, down to 800 m depth. The simulations showed reductions in fish biomass and that the state of the deep continental slope ecosystem in the western Mediterranean seems to be the result of a long-term succession process, which has reached ecological stability, and is

  19. Effects of structural deformation on formation of coalbed methane reservoirs in Huaibei coalfield, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Bo; Qu, Zhenghui; Li, Ming [School of Resources and Earth Science, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Key Laboratory of CBM Resource and Reservoir-generating Process, China Ministry of Education, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Wang, Geoff G.X. [School of Chemical Engineering, The University of Queensland, QLD 4072 (Australia)

    2010-06-01

    Tectonically deformed coal is defined as coal formed by superimposed reformations from tectonic stress. The Huaibei coalfield is typically composed of various tectonically deformed coals containing rich coalbed methane resources. However, the occurrence of coal seam in this area is complicated largely by the structural deformation, which has not yet been evaluated systematically for exploration and exploitation of coalbed methane. In this study, tectonism in Huaibei coalfield is discussed by combining systematic analyses on the occurrence of coal seams and the formation of coalbed methane reservoirs. The study shows that, with structural deformation in the study area, the coal seams in Huaibei coalfield are distributed in north-south tectonic blocks and east-west tectonic zones. North tectonic block of Huaibei coalfield is not favourable for exploitation of coalbed methane because of low gas content or disadvantageous structural conditions. Within the south tectonic block, the east Suzhou syncline contains high gas content but coal permeability is very low. This area is generally not suitable for exploitation of coalbed methane and is a dangerous mining area due to gas outburst because of the widely developed mylonitic coals. South Suzhou and Nanping synclines in the middle part of the south tectonic block are exposed to relatively weak structural deformations. These synclines contain coals with high gas content and moderate permeability, which are beneficial for exploration and exploitation of coalbed methane. Linhuan mining area in the south tectonic block is generally not suitable for exploitation of coalbed methane, mainly because of well developed normal faults and interlayer slip structure, and presence of mylonitic coal, resulting in low gas content and poor structural conditions for mining coalbed methane. In contrast, Guoyang mining area in the west part of the south tectonic block, where tectonically deformed coal was generally underdeveloped, is a

  20. From bacteria to elephants: Effects of land-use legacies on biodiversity and ecosystem structure in the Serengeti-Mara ecosystem: Chapter 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verchot, Louis V.; Ward, Naomi L.; Belnap, Jayne; Bossio, Deborah; Coughenour, Michael; Gibson, John; Hanotte, Olivier; Muchiru, Andrew N.; Phillips, Susan L.; Steven, Blaire; Wall, Diana H.; Reid, Robin S.

    2015-01-01

    Generally, ecological research has considered the aboveground and belowground components of ecosystems separately. Consequently, frameworks for integrating the two components are not well developed. Integrating the microbial components into ecosystem ecology requires different approaches from those offered by plant ecology, partly because of the scales at which microbial processes operate and partly because of measurement constraints. Studies have begun to relate microbial community structure to ecosystem function. results suggest that excluding people and livestock from the MMNR, or preventing heavier livestock from grazing around settlements, may not change the general structure of the ecosystem (soils, plant structure), but can change the numbers and diversity of wildlife, nematodes and microbes in this ecosystem in subtle ways.

  1. Numerical modeling of nonlinear deformation and buckling of composite plate-shell structures under pulsed loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrosimov, N. A.

    1999-11-01

    Nonlinear three-dimensional problems of dynamic deformation, buckling, and posteritical behavior of composite shell structures under pulsed loads are analyzed. The structure is assumed to be made of rigidly joined plates and shells of revolution along the lines coinciding with the coordinate directions of the joined elements. Individual structural elements can be made of both composite and conventional isotropic materials. The kinematic model of deformation of the structural elements is based on Timoshenko-type hypotheses. This approach is oriented to the calculation of nonstationary deformation processes in composite structures under small deformations but large displacements and rotation angles, and is implemented in the context of a simplified version of the geometrically nonlinear theory of shells. The physical relations in the composite structural elements are based on the theory of effective moduli for individual layers or for the package as a whole, whereas in the metallic elements this is done in the framework of the theory of plastic flow. The equations of motion of a composite shell structure are derived based on the principle of virtual displacements with some additional conditions allowing for the joint operation of structural elements. To solve the initial boundary-value problem formulated, an efficient numerical method is developed based on the finite-difference discretization of variational equations of motion in space variables and an explicit second-order time-integration scheme. The permissible time-integration step is determined using Neumann's spectral criterion. The above method is especially efficient in calculating thin-walled shells, as well as in the case of local loads acting on the structural element, when the discretization grid has to be condensed in the zones of rapidly changing solutions in space variables. The results of analyzing the nonstationary deformation processes and critical loads are presented for composite and isotropic

  2. Large-Deformation Displacement Transfer Functions for Shape Predictions of Highly Flexible Slender Aerospace Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, William L.; Fleischer, Van Tran

    2013-01-01

    Large deformation displacement transfer functions were formulated for deformed shape predictions of highly flexible slender structures like aircraft wings. In the formulation, the embedded beam (depth wise cross section of structure along the surface strain sensing line) was first evenly discretized into multiple small domains, with surface strain sensing stations located at the domain junctures. Thus, the surface strain (bending strains) variation within each domain could be expressed with linear of nonlinear function. Such piecewise approach enabled piecewise integrations of the embedded beam curvature equations [classical (Eulerian), physical (Lagrangian), and shifted curvature equations] to yield closed form slope and deflection equations in recursive forms.

  3. Mechanical and structural aspects of high temperature deformation in Ni alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nowotnik

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Experimental results on hot deformation and dynamic structural processes of nickel based alloy were reviewed. The attention was given to the analysis of dynamic structural processes which operate during hot deformation of the material.Design/methodology/approach: Hot compression tests were performed on solution treated precipitations hardenable nickel based superalloy of Inconel 718 within a temperature range of 720-1150°C at constant true strain rates of 10-4, 4x10-4s-1. The flow stress curves and microstructure of deformed nickel based superalloy were presented.Findings: During hot compression of solution treated material, highly localized flow was observed at relatively low deformation temperatures 720 - 850°C. The particle distribution and their morphology were not found to be affected by localized flow within the investigated strain range. At low strain rate the shear banding and intergranular cracks and cavities growth were found to be responsible for the observed flow stress decrease at 720, 800 and 850°C and might result in a sample fracture at larger strains.Research limitations/implications: In spite of intense strain hardening due to deformation and phase transformation overlapping, light optical microstructure observation of deformed samples did not reveal significant effects of heterogeneous distribution of the phase components. Therefore, in order to complete and confirm obtained results it is recommended to perform further analysis of the alloy by using transmission electron microscopy technique (TEM.Practical implications: An interaction between dynamic precipitation and flow localization may become an important feature of high temperature performance and may also allow producing specific structures of materials.Originality/value: The contribution of flow localization to the strain hardening or flow softening and the flow stress-strain behavior during hot deformation of precipitation hardenable alloys is still a

  4. Structural deformation pattern within the NW Qaidam Basin in the Cenozoic era and its tectonic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Liguang; Xiao, Ancheng; Zhang, Hongwei; Wu, Zhankui; Wang, Liqun; Shen, Ya; Wu, Lei

    2016-09-01

    The Qaidam Basin is located in the northeastern Tibetan Plateau and provides an excellent field laboratory in understanding the history and mechanism of the plateau growth. It deformed widely over the northwest during the Cenozoic but with little thrust loading along the margins, where no foreland depression is observed. Based on satellite images, seismic and borehole data, we investigated the structural deformation pattern (including the structural style and timing of deformation) and its formation mechanism within the northwestern Qaidam Basin during the Cenozoic era. Mapping of surface geology shows that the modern Qaidam Basin is characterized by five SE-trending anticlinal belts. Each belt consists of several right-step en echelon anticlines with plenty of normal and strike-slip faults crossing the crests. Those anticlines are generally dominated by double fault systems at different depths: an upper thrust fault system, controlling the anticlines identified on the surface and a lower dextral transpressional fault system characterized by typical flower structures. They are separated by weak layers in the upper Xiaganchaigou or the Shangganchaigou formations. The upper system yields shortening strain 2-5 times larger than that of the lower system and the additional strain is interpreted to be accommodated by hinge-parallel elongation in the upper system. Growth strata indicate that deformation within the Qaidam Basin initiated in the middle Miocene ( 15 Ma) and accelerated in the late Miocene ( 8 Ma). A simple Riedel-P-Shear model is used to explain the deformation mechanism within the northwestern Qaidam Basin.

  5. Modeling energy storage and structural evolution during finite viscoplastic deformation of glassy polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Rui; Ghazaryan, Gagik; Tervoort, Theo A.; Nguyen, Thao D.

    2017-06-01

    The enthalpic response of amorphous polymers depends strongly on their thermal and deformation history. Annealing just below the glass transition temperature (Tg) causes a large endothermic overshoot of the isobaric heat capacity at Tg as measured by differential scanning calorimetry, while plastic deformation (cold work) can erase this overshoot and create an exothermic undershoot. This indicates that a strong coupling exists between the polymer structure, thermal response, and mechanical deformation. In this work, we apply a recently developed thermomechanical model for glassy polymers that couples structural evolution and viscoplastic deformation to investigate the effect of annealing and plastic deformation on the accumulation of stored energy during cold work and calorimetry measurements of heat flow. The thermomechanical model introduces the effective temperature as an additional state variable in a nonequilibrium thermodynamics setting to describe the structural evolution of the material. The results show that the model accurately describes the stress and enthalpy response of quenched and annealed polymers with different plastic predeformations. The model also shows that at 30% strain in uniaxial compression, 45% of the applied work is converted into stored energy, which is consistent with experimental data from literature.

  6. Measurement of deforming mode of lattice truss structures under impact loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao H.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Lattice truss structures, which are used as a core material in sandwich panels, were widely investigated experimentally and theoretically. However, explanation of the deforming mechanism using reliable experimental results is almost rarely reported, particularly for the dynamic deforming mechanism. The present work aimed at the measurement of the deforming mode of lattice truss structures. Indeed, quasi-static and Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB tests have been performed on the tetrahedral truss cores structures made of Aluminum 3003-O. Global values such as crushing forces and displacements between the loading platens are obtained. However, in order to understand the deforming mechanism and to explain the observed impact strength enhancement observed in the experiments, images of the truss core element during the tests are recorded. A method based on the edge detection algorithm is developed and applied to these images. The deforming profiles of one beam are extracted and it allows for calculating the length of beam. It is found that these lengths diminish to a critical value (due to compression and remain constant afterwards (because of significant bending. The comparison between quasi-static and impact tests shows that the beam were much more compressed under impact loading, which could be understood as the lateral inertia effect in dynamic bucking. Therefore, the impact strength enhancement of tetrahedral truss core sandwich panel can be explained by the delayed buckling of beam under impact (more compression reached, together with the strain hardening of base material.

  7. Deformation behavior of metallic glasses with shear band like atomic structure: a molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, C; Zhang, H; Cao, Q P; Wang, X D; Zhang, D X; Ramamurty, U; Jiang, J Z

    2016-08-02

    Molecular dynamics simulations were employed to investigate the plastic deformation within the shear bands in three different metallic glasses (MGs). To mimic shear bands, MG specimens were first deformed until flow localization occurs, and then the volume of the material within the localized regions was extracted and replicated. Homogeneous deformation that is independent of the size of the specimen was observed in specimens with shear band like structure, even at a temperature that is far below the glass transition temperature. Structural relaxation and rapid cooling were employed to examine the effect of free volume content on the deformation behavior. This was followed by detailed atomic structure analyses, employing the concepts of Voronoi polyhedra and "liquid-like" regions that contain high fraction of sub-atomic size open volumes. Results suggest that the total fraction of atoms in liquid-like regions is a key parameter that controls the plastic deformation in MGs. These are discussed in the context of reported experimental results and possible strategies for synthesizing monolithic amorphous materials that can accommodate large tensile plasticity are suggested.

  8. Deformation-induced structural transition in body-centred cubic molybdenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S J; Wang, H; Du, K; Zhang, W; Sui, M L; Mao, S X

    2014-03-07

    Molybdenum is a refractory metal that is stable in a body-centred cubic structure at all temperatures before melting. Plastic deformation via structural transitions has never been reported for pure molybdenum, while transformation coupled with plasticity is well known for many alloys and ceramics. Here we demonstrate a structural transformation accompanied by shear deformation from an original -oriented body-centred cubic structure to a -oriented face-centred cubic lattice, captured at crack tips during the straining of molybdenum inside a transmission electron microscope at room temperature. The face-centred cubic domains then revert into -oriented body-centred cubic domains, equivalent to a lattice rotation of 54.7°, and ~15.4% tensile strain is reached. The face-centred cubic structure appears to be a well-defined metastable state, as evidenced by scanning transmission electron microscopy and nanodiffraction, the Nishiyama-Wassermann and Kurdjumov-Sachs relationships between the face-centred cubic and body-centred cubic structures and molecular dynamics simulations. Our findings reveal a deformation mechanism for elemental metals under high-stress deformation conditions.

  9. Deformation-induced structural transition in body-centred cubic molybdenum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S. J.; Wang, H.; Du, K.; Zhang, W.; Sui, M. L.; Mao, S. X.

    2014-03-01

    Molybdenum is a refractory metal that is stable in a body-centred cubic structure at all temperatures before melting. Plastic deformation via structural transitions has never been reported for pure molybdenum, while transformation coupled with plasticity is well known for many alloys and ceramics. Here we demonstrate a structural transformation accompanied by shear deformation from an original -oriented body-centred cubic structure to a -oriented face-centred cubic lattice, captured at crack tips during the straining of molybdenum inside a transmission electron microscope at room temperature. The face-centred cubic domains then revert into -oriented body-centred cubic domains, equivalent to a lattice rotation of 54.7°, and ~15.4% tensile strain is reached. The face-centred cubic structure appears to be a well-defined metastable state, as evidenced by scanning transmission electron microscopy and nanodiffraction, the Nishiyama-Wassermann and Kurdjumov-Sachs relationships between the face-centred cubic and body-centred cubic structures and molecular dynamics simulations. Our findings reveal a deformation mechanism for elemental metals under high-stress deformation conditions.

  10. The stochastic structure of critical transitions in water-stressed ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cueto-Felgueroso, L.; Dentz, M.; Juanes, R.

    2013-12-01

    Changes in the stochastic structure of natural forcing mechanisms, such as precipitation or temperature, are likely to transform the form and function of ecological systems. Climate models and global datasets show that an increase in global temperature may result in an amplification of the hydrological cycle, not necessarily accompanied by significant changes in mean annual precipitation. In arid and semiarid environments, feedbacks between climate, soil moisture and vegetation are linked to the existence of alternative stable ecosystem states. It has been hypothesized that bistability is associated with tipping points, whereby slow changes in rainfall forcing, and random or anthropogenic disturbances, may trigger catastrophic shifts towards degraded states of the ecosystem. Identifying tipping points and characterizing ecosystem resilience are essential in the assessment of ecological services in a changing environment. We develop a stochastic framework to understand the joint probability density function (pdf) of soil moisture and vegetation biomass under stochastic rainfall. We emphasize the impact of amplified hydrological cycles on ecosystems where alternative states are possible. The joint pdf characterizes the states in which the ecosystem is most likely to be found. We show that the structure of precipitation, not just the mean annual precipitation, controls the most likely state of the ecosystem. We synthesize our analysis by proposing a definition of ecosystem resilience that is based on the modality and time dynamics of the soil moisture-biomass joint pdf.

  11. Atomic force microscopic study of the structure of high-density polyethylene deformed in liquid medium by crazing mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagrov, D V; Yarysheva, A Y; Rukhlya, E G; Yarysheva, L M; Volynskii, A L; Bakeev, N F

    2014-02-01

    A procedure has been developed for the direct atomic force microscopic (AFM) examination of the native structure of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) deformed in an adsorption-active liquid medium (AALM) by the crazing mechanism. The AFM investigation has been carried out in the presence of a liquid medium under conditions preventing deformed films from shrinkage. Deformation of HDPE in AALM has been shown to proceed through the delocalized crazing mechanism and result in the development of a fibrillar-porous structure. The structural parameters of the crazed polymer have been determined. The obtained AFM images demonstrate a nanosized nonuniformity of the deformation and enable one to observe the structural rearrangements that take place in the deformed polymer after removal of the liquid medium and stress relaxation. A structural similarity has been revealed between HDPE deformed in the AALM and hard elastic polymers.

  12. Altering strength and plastic deformation behavior via alloying and laminated structure in nanocrystalline metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, C. [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Material, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Wang, F., E-mail: wangfei@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Strength and Vibration of Mechanical Structures, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Huang, P., E-mail: huangping@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Material, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Lu, T.J. [State Key Laboratory for Strength and Vibration of Mechanical Structures, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); MOE Key Laboratory for Multifunctional Materials and Structures, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Xu, K.W. [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Material, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2015-07-29

    Nanoindentation and electron microscope techniques have been performed on sputtering deposited monolayered nanocrystalline CuNb and multilayered CuNb/Cu thin films. Microstructural features, hardness and surface morphologies of residual indentation have been evaluated to identify the effects of alloying and laminated structure on strength and plastic deformation behavior of nanocrystalline metals. By altering the content of Nb in CuNb alloy and adding crystalline Cu layers into CuNb alloy, the volume fraction of amorphous phase in CuNb alloy and interface structures changed dramatically, resulting in various trends that are related to hardness, indentation induced pileup and shear banding deformation. Based on the experimental results, the dominant deformation mechanisms of the CuNb and CuNb/Cu thin films with various Nb contents were proposed and extended to be discussed.

  13. High Tc as a consequence of structure deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djajic, R.P. (Faculty of Technical Sciences, Univ. of Novi Sad (Yugoslavia)); Tosic, B.S.; Setrajcic, J.P. (Inst. of Physics, Univ. of Novi Sad (Yugoslavia)); Mirjanic, D.L. (Faculty of Tech., Univ. of Banja Luka (Yugoslavia))

    1991-12-01

    Based on the experimental fact that doped perovskite structures behave as a system of energetically independent thin layers we developed a theoretical model for a single layer behaviour. It was shown that electron and phonon spectra are functions of azimuthal angle which in turn gives the specific relations for Tc which on the other hand differs significantly from the corresponding value in the BCS theory. The crucial fact, which allows the solution of this equation with high Tc, is the electron-electron interaction constant which in a thin doped layer is for an order or two orders of magnitude greater than the same interaction constant in the ideal infinite structure. (orig.).

  14. A POF-based distributed strain sensor for detecting deformation of wooden structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumoto, Takuji; Nakamura, Kentaro; Ueha, Sadayuki

    2008-04-01

    This report presents a feasibility test of the distributed strain sensor based on plastic optical fiber (POF) for detecting deformation of wooden structures. First, a simple method to fix POF cable onto wooden structures is developed, where the dimensions of the fixing plate are determined so as to minimize the OTDR responses due to the fixing tool as well as the slip between the POF cable and the structure. Second, the authors focus on a new function "memory effect" of the POF-based strain sensor. The strain once applied to the POF cable is memorized through the plastic deformation of the core material, and can be read out using OTDR even after the event. The characteristics of the memory effect and its life are discussed experimentally for tensile strain. Third, in this report, we showed that a 5-point measurement with the spatial resolution of around 5 m was possible for the axial elongation imposed on the POF. Then, we apply the present method for detection of deformations of wooden frame structures. We try to detect the direction and magnitude of deformations at four corners of a rectangular wooden frame using a POF cable and OTDR. The availability of the memory effect in multipoint measurements on wooden structures is also discussed.

  15. The effect of structural coefficient on stiffness and deformation of hydrostatic guideway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Zhifeng; Qiao, Zheng; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Bo; Wu, Yangong

    2016-10-01

    Hydrostatic guideway has been widely used for ultra-precision machine tools due to its high stiffness and motion accuracy. In order to optimize the stiffness and motion accuracy of hydrostatic guideway, the effect of different diameters orifice restrictors on the stiffness and deformation of hydrostatic guideway is investigated in detail in this paper. The theoretically optimal structural coefficient is verified through the experiments. Hydrostatic guideway can obtain the maximum stiffness when the value of optimal structural coefficient is 0.707. And changing the diameter of orifice restrictors is an effective method to adjusting the structural coefficient. Due to the error caused by manufacture and assembly of hydrostatic guideway, the optimal structural coefficient is hard to be obtained accurately. Based on this condition, a larger structural coefficient is adopted to reduce the oil pressure in the pocket of hydrostatic guideway effectively, so that the deformation of guideway can be reduced. And finally, the stiffness loss caused by the deformation decreased. In addition, the experimental results show that the maximum deformation of hydrostatic guideway can be reduced from 2.06μm to 1.82μm and the stiffness arise from 1453N/μm to 1855N/μm when orifice restrictors with 0.15mm diameter are used rather than 0.2mm diameter.

  16. Trophic interactions, ecosystem structure and function in the southern Yellow Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Qun; JIN Xianshi; ZHANG Bo

    2013-01-01

    The southern Yellow Sea is an important fishing ground,providing abundant fishery resources.However,overfishing and climate change have caused a decline in the resource and damaged the ecosystem.We developed an ecosystem model to analyze the trophic interactions and ecosystem structure and function to guide sustainable development of the ecosystem.Atrophic mass-balance model of the southern Yellow Sea during 2000-2001 was constructed using Ecopath with Ecosim software.We defined 22 important functional groups and studied their diet composition.The trophic levels of fish,shrimp,crabs,and cephalopods were between 2.78 and 4.39,and the mean trophic level of the fisheries was 3.24.The trophic flows within the food web occurred primarily in the lower trophic levels.The mean trophic transfer efficiency was 8.1%,of which 7.1% was from primary producers and 9.3% was from detritus within the ecosystem.The transfer efficiency between trophic levels Ⅱ to Ⅲ to Ⅳ to Ⅴ to >Ⅴ was 5.0%,5.7%,18.5%,and 19.7%-20.4%,respectively.Of the total flow,phytoplankton contributed 61% and detritus contributed 39%.Fishing is defined as a top predator within the ecosystem,and has a negative impact on most commercial species.Moreover,the ecosystem had a high gross efficiency of the fishery and a high value of primary production required to sustain the fishery.Together,our data suggest there is high fishing pressure in the southern Yellow Sea.Based on analysis of Odum's ecological parameters,this ecosystem was at an immature stage.Our results provide some insights into the structure and development of this ecosystem.

  17. Progressive deformation of feldspar recording low-barometry impact processes, Tenoumer impact structure, Mauritania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaret, Steven J.; Kah, Linda C.; Harris, R. Scott

    2014-06-01

    The Tenoumer impact structure is a small, well-preserved crater within Archean to Paleoproterozoic amphibolite, gneiss, and granite of the Reguibat Shield, north-central Mauritania. The structure is surrounded by a thin ejecta blanket of crystalline blocks (granitic gneiss, granite, and amphibolite) and impact-melt rocks. Evidence of shock metamorphism of quartz, most notably planar deformation features (PDFs), occurs exclusively in granitic clasts entrained within small bodies of polymict, glass-rich breccia. Impact-related deformation features in oligoclase and microcline grains, on the other hand, occur both within clasts in melt-breccia deposits, where they co-occur with quartz PDFs, and also within melt-free crystalline ejecta, in the absence of co-occurring quartz PDFs. Feldspar deformation features include multiple orientations of PDFs, enhanced optical relief of grain components, selective disordering of alternate twins, inclined lamellae within alternate twins, and combinations of these individual textures. The distribution of shock features in quartz and feldspar suggests that deformation textures within feldspar can record a wide range of average pressures, starting below that required for shock deformation of quartz. We suggest that experimental analysis of feldspar behavior, combined with detailed mapping of shock metamorphism of feldspar in natural systems, may provide critical data to constrain energy dissipation within impact regimes that experienced low average shock pressures.

  18. Mechanical deformation of atomic-scale metallic contacts: Structure and mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mads Reinholdt; Brandbyge, Mads; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel

    1998-01-01

    We have simulated the mechanical deformation of atomic-scale metallic contacts under tensile strain using molecular dynamics and effective medium theory potentials. The evolution of the structure of the contacts and the underlying deformation mechanisms are described along with the calculated ele...... that the results measured in a nanocontact experiment depend significantly on the elastic stiffness of the experimental apparatus. For a soft setup, some of the atomic rearrangements might not be detected, whereas others are amplified.......We have simulated the mechanical deformation of atomic-scale metallic contacts under tensile strain using molecular dynamics and effective medium theory potentials. The evolution of the structure of the contacts and the underlying deformation mechanisms are described along with the calculated...... electronic conductance. Various defects such as intersecting stacking faults, local disorder, and vacancies are created during the deformation. Disordered regions act as weak spots that reduce the strength of the contacts. The disorder tends to anneal out again during the subsequent atomic rearrangements...

  19. [Colonization and community structural features of AM fungi in urban ecosystem: a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Li-jun; Diao, Zhi-kai; Liu, Run-jin

    2011-07-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, an important component of soil microbes, are of significance in maintaining the sustainable development of urban ecosystem. This paper summarized the characteristics of the colonization and community structure of AM fungi in urban ecosystems, and discussed the effects of urban ecological factors, e.g., human activities, vegetation re-establishment and maintenance, and urban soil status, on the colonization and community structure. It was considered that the researches on the community structure and function of AM fungi in urban ecosystems, such as the effects and mechanisms of the key urban ecological factors (e.g., water resource shortage and heat island effect) on the alternation of AM fungal community structure should be strengthened in the future.

  20. Structural evolution of fault zones in sandstone by multiple deformation mechanisms: Moab fault, southeast Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davatzes, N.C.; Eichhubl, P.; Aydin, A.

    2005-01-01

    Faults in sandstone are frequently composed of two classes of structures: (1) deformation bands and (2) joints and sheared joints. Whereas the former structures are associated with cataclastic deformation, the latter ones represent brittle fracturing, fragmentation, and brecciation. We investigated the distribution of these structures, their formation, and the underlying mechanical controls for their occurrence along the Moab normal fault in southeastern Utah through the use of structural mapping and numerical elastic boundary element modeling. We found that deformation bands occur everywhere along the fault, but with increased density in contractional relays. Joints and sheared joints only occur at intersections and extensional relays. In all locations , joints consistently overprint deformation bands. Localization of joints and sheared joints in extensional relays suggests that their distribution is controlled by local variations in stress state that are due to mechanical interaction between the fault segments. This interpretation is consistent with elastic boundary element models that predict a local reduction in mean stress and least compressive principal stress at intersections and extensional relays. The transition from deformation band to joint formation along these sections of the fault system likely resulted from the combined effects of changes in remote tectonic loading, burial depth, fluid pressure, and rock properties. In the case of the Moab fault, we conclude that the structural heterogeneity in the fault zone is systematically related to the geometric evolution of the fault, the local state of stress associated with fault slip , and the remote loading history. Because the type and distribution of structures affect fault permeability and strength, our results predict systematic variations in these parameters with fault evolution. ?? 2004 Geological Society of America.

  1. DIRECT SPECTRUM ANALYSIS OF ANELASTIC DEFORMATION RESPONSE DURING STRUCTURAL RELAXATION OF AMORPHOUS METALS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    CSACH, K; Ocelik, Vaclav; MISKUF, J; BENGUS, VZ; DUHAJ, P

    1994-01-01

    Direct relaxation time spectrum analysis method has been successfully used to observe and. to study changes in the kinetics of isothermal anelastic deformation response of soft magnetic metallic glass Fe40Ni40B20 during structural relaxation. Computed relaxation time spectra contain three or four qu

  2. Modelling and Simulation of Structural Deformation of Isothermal Subsurface Flow and Carbon Dioxide Injection

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2011-05-15

    Injection of CO2 in hydrocarbon reservoir has double benefit. On the one hand, it is a profitable method due to issues related to global warming, and on the other hand it is an effective mechanism to enhance hydrocarbon recovery. Such injection associates complex processes involving, e.g., solute transport of dissolved materials, in addition to local changes in density of the phases. Also, increasing carbon dioxide injection may cause a structural deformation of the medium, so it is important to include such effect into the model. The structural deformation modelling in carbon sequestration is important to evaluate the medium stability to avoid CO2 leakage to the atmosphere. On the other hand, geologic formation of the medium is usually heterogeneous and consists of several layers of different permeability. In this work we conduct numerical simulation of two-phase flow in a heterogeneous porous medium domain with dissolved solute transport as well as structural deformation effects. The solute transport of the dissolved component is described by concentration equation. The structural deformation for geomechanics is derived from a general local differential balance equation with neglecting the local mass balance of solid phase and the inertial force term. The flux continuity condition is used at interfaces between different permeability layers of the heterogeneous medium. We analyze the vertical migration of a CO2 plume injected into a 2D layered reservoir. Analysis of distribution of flow field components such as saturation, pressures, velocities, and CO2 concentration are presented.

  3. Deformation quantization of a Kaehler-Poisson structure vanishing on a Levi nondegenerate hypersurface

    OpenAIRE

    Karabegov, Alexander V.

    2006-01-01

    We give an elementary proof of the result by Leichtnam, Tang, and Weinstein that there exists a deformation quantization with separation of variables on a complex manifold endowed with a Kaehler-Poisson structure vanishing on a Levi nondegenerate hypersurface and nondegenerate on its complement.

  4. Shear-deforming textile reinforced concrete for the construction of double-curved structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woodington, W.; Bergsma, O.K.; Schipper, H.R.

    2015-01-01

    A composite textile reinforced concrete (TRC) material is developed to overcome the difficulties of constructing double-curved freeform structures. This is possible by shear-deformation of the woven reinforcement. It affects the direction of reinforcement and thickness, resulting in variable orthotr

  5. Tailoring dislocation structures and mechanical properties of nanostructured metals produced by plastic deformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Xiaoxu

    2009-01-01

    The presence of a dislocation structure associated with low-angle dislocation boundaries and interior dislocations is a common and characteristic feature in nanostructured metals produced by plastic deformation, and plays an important role in determining both the strength and ductility of the nan...

  6. Curved Displacement Transfer Functions for Geometric Nonlinear Large Deformation Structure Shape Predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, William L.; Fleischer, Van Tran; Lung, Shun-Fat

    2017-01-01

    For shape predictions of structures under large geometrically nonlinear deformations, Curved Displacement Transfer Functions were formulated based on a curved displacement, traced by a material point from the undeformed position to deformed position. The embedded beam (depth-wise cross section of a structure along a surface strain-sensing line) was discretized into multiple small domains, with domain junctures matching the strain-sensing stations. Thus, the surface strain distribution could be described with a piecewise linear or a piecewise nonlinear function. The discretization approach enabled piecewise integrations of the embedded-beam curvature equations to yield the Curved Displacement Transfer Functions, expressed in terms of embedded beam geometrical parameters and surface strains. By entering the surface strain data into the Displacement Transfer Functions, deflections along each embedded beam can be calculated at multiple points for mapping the overall structural deformed shapes. Finite-element linear and nonlinear analyses of a tapered cantilever tubular beam were performed to generate linear and nonlinear surface strains and the associated deflections to be used for validation. The shape prediction accuracies were then determined by comparing the theoretical deflections with the finiteelement- generated deflections. The results show that the newly developed Curved Displacement Transfer Functions are very accurate for shape predictions of structures under large geometrically nonlinear deformations.

  7. Orientation relationships between recrystallization nuclei at triple junctions and deformed structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabin, T.J.; Winther, G.; Juul Jensen, D

    2003-08-15

    Pure aluminium has been cold rolled and partially annealed to yield recrystallization nuclei. The orientations present around a number of triple junctions were characterised using the Electron Back Scattered Diffraction (EBSD) technique before and after the annealing, so that a direct comparison could be made between the orientations in the local deformed structure and the nuclei. It was found that triple junctions were particularly good nucleation sites within the microstructure. Approximately half of the nuclei found had orientations that fell within the scatter from one of the original grains and the remainder were rotated about a pole close to <111> relative to a deformed grain.

  8. Linking morphology to ecosystem structure using satellite for monitoring Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipponi, F.; Valentini, E.; Taramelli, A.; Giulio, S.; Persichillo, M.; D'Alpaos, A.

    2013-12-01

    Modern views on the behavior of complex systems, like the low lying coastal areas, allow the interpretation of phenomenological coastal landscape as a steady state that corresponds to a dynamic equilibrium, and to a self-organized exogenic order of the edge of the chaos. Space-borne data, coupled with field spectral measurements and observations, are quantitative tools for the research on feedbacks between the biological influences and physical forming processes steering landscape changes, allowing the identification of critical thresholds beyond which the ecosystem reach a new steady state. This research deals with a multi-temporal change analysis of halophytic vegetation and morphology of two analogous accumulation sites along the northern Adriatic adjoining coast: the 'Bacan island' (Venice Lagoon) and the Spit of Goro Lagoon (Po Delta). These two sites represent delicate ecosystems and are susceptible to different drivers being located close to the lagoon's inlet. The two tests sites support a great biodiversity and supply important resources, so the conservation of their habitats is necessary to maintain the ecosystem services provision. Evidence from previous studies highlights the role of climate, mostly winds and hydrology acting on sediment transport, but only few accounts for the role of vegetation in landform shaping and sediment stabilizing. In this study spatial trends of both vegetation cover/typology and sediment/soil distribution are implemented to obtain detailed classification from EO. By means of sub-pixel processing techniques (Spectral Mixing Analysis), classifications are analyzed in terms of spatial (Power law) and temporal (Empirical Orthogonal Functions) patterns, in order to find the fingerprint of spatial patterns of vegetation, sediments and very shallow waters and their variation over time. The application of a double step analysis from coarse to finer spatial resolution lead first to a biophysical cover map in term of vegetation

  9. Innovation management as the management of a heterogeneous and structured ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Fernando Arango Londoño

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with innovation management as an evolutionary process that take place in a heterogeneous and structured ecosystem. This allows understand Innovation Management as the management of the interactions in a particular ecosystem that is wanted to change. First, theoretical fundamentals for an evolutionary model are presented. Then, an example is given to illustrate the variation of an ecosystem as a function of learning, performance, interests, beliefs and values of the agents. The example also shows agents restrictive action frame when it is wanted to innovate on an "earthquake resistant buildings device" and, also, it identifies the mayor interactions to be managed when a new earthquake resistant device is introduced into that ecosystem.

  10. Nanoscale mechanism and intrinsic structure related deformation of Ti-alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckert, J. [IFW Dresden, Institut fuer Komplexe Materialien, Postfach 27 01 16, D-01171 Dresden (Germany)], E-mail: j.eckert@ifw-dresden.de; Das, J. [IFW Dresden, Institut fuer Komplexe Materialien, Postfach 27 01 16, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Xu, W. [University of Melbourne, Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Vic 3010 (Australia); Theissmann, R. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut fuer Nanotechnologie, Postfach 3640, Karlsruhe D-76133 (Germany)

    2008-10-15

    A series of Ti-Nb-Ta-(In/Cr) and Ti-Fe-(Sn) alloys containing a bcc {beta}-Ti phase with a grain size ranging from the nanometer/ultrafine regime to the micrometer scale has been prepared by slow cooling from the melt. The plastic deformation behavior has been investigated under compression and the deformation-induced microstructure evolution was checked by X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The data reveal that the underlying mechanisms related to plasticity or brittleness of the {beta}-phase depends significantly on the supersaturation, the local lattice strain, the ease of dislocation slip, as well as twinning and diffusionless transformation triggering grain refinement. The intrinsic structure, the short-range order and the stability of the {beta}-Ti phase have a strong influence on the mode of plastic deformation of the investigated Ti-alloys.

  11. Lifetime Reliability Estimate and Extreme Permanent Deformations of Randomly Excited Elasto-Plastic Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren R.K.; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    1983-01-01

    A method is presented for life-time reliability' estimates of randomly excited yielding systems, assuming the structure to be safe, when the plastic deformations are confined below certain limits. The accumulated plastic deformations during any single significant loading history are considered...... to be the outcome of identically distributed, independent stochastic variables,for which a model is suggested. Further assuming the interarrival times of the elementary loading histories to be specified by a Poisson process, and the duration of these to be small compared to the designed life-time, the accumulated...... plastic deformation during several loadings can be modelled as a filtered Poisson process. Using the Markov property of this quantity the considered first-passage problem as well as the related extreme distribution problems are then solved numerically, and the results are compared to simulation studies....

  12. Local equivalent welding element to predict the welding deformations of plate-type structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Considering the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) of welding joint, the residual strain be-haviors of material under constraint and temperature circulation, as well as the activating mechanism of welding process, this paper addresses a new type welding element for numerical simulation of welding deformation, which is called the LEWE (the local equivalent welding element). This element can describe the basic char-acteristics of welded seam: the local position points of inherent strain, the equiva-lent size, the bending radius (or bending angle) from inherent strain, etc. It could be used to predict the welding deformation of plate-type structure. The comparisons between the computed deflection of welded plate and its experiment measurement are present. The results showed that the LEWE possesses a potential to simulate the deformation of welding process high-efficiently and precisely.

  13. Fluid-structure interaction analysis of bioprosthetic heart valves: Significance of arterial wall deformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ming-Chen; Kamensky, David; Bazilevs, Yuri; Sacks, Michael S; Hughes, Thomas J R

    2014-10-01

    We propose a framework that combines variational immersed-boundary and arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) methods for fluid-structure interaction (FSI) simulation of a bioprosthetic heart valve implanted in an artery that is allowed to deform in the model. We find that the variational immersed-boundary method for FSI remains robust and effective for heart valve analysis when the background fluid mesh undergoes deformations corresponding to the expansion and contraction of the elastic artery. Furthermore, the computations presented in this work show that the arterial wall deformation contributes significantly to the realism of the simulation results, leading to flow rates and valve motions that more closely resemble those observed in practice.

  14. Inherited structures impact on co-seismic surface deformation pattern during the 2013 Balochistan, Pakistan, earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallage, Amaury; Klinger, Yann; Grandin, Raphael; Delorme, Arthur; Pierrot-Deseilligny, Marc

    2016-04-01

    The understanding of earthquake processes and the interaction of earthquake rupture with Earth's free surface relies on the resolution of the observations. Recent and detailed post-earthquake measurements bring new insights on shallow mechanical behavior of rupture processes as it becomes possible to measure and locate surficial deformation distribution. The 2013 Mw 7.7 Balochistan earthquake, Pakistan, offers a nice opportunity to comprehend where and why surficial deformation might differs from at-depth localized slip. This earthquake ruptured the Hoshab fault over 200 km; the motion was mainly left lateral with a small and discontinuous vertical component in the southern part of the rupture. Using images with the finest resolution currently available, we measured the surface displacement amplitude and its orientation at the ground surface (including the numerous tensile cracks). We combined these measurements with the 1:500 scale ground rupture map to focus on the behavior of the frontal rupture in the area where deformation distributes. Comparison with orientations of inherited tectonic structures, visible in older rocks formation surrounding the actual 2013 rupture, shows the control exercised by such structures on co-seismic rupture distribution. Such observation raises the question on how pre-existing tectonic structures in a medium, mapped in several seismically active places around the globe; can control the co-seismic distribution of the deformation during earthquakes.

  15. Further Development of Ko Displacement Theory for Deformed Shape Predictions of Nonuniform Aerospace Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, William L.; Fleischer, Van Tran

    2009-01-01

    The Ko displacement theory previously formulated for deformed shape predictions of nonuniform beam structures is further developed mathematically. The further-developed displacement equations are expressed explicitly in terms of geometrical parameters of the beam and bending strains at equally spaced strain-sensing stations along the multiplexed fiber-optic sensor line installed on the bottom surface of the beam. The bending strain data can then be input into the displacement equations for calculations of local slopes, deflections, and cross-sectional twist angles for generating the overall deformed shapes of the nonuniform beam. The further-developed displacement theory can also be applied to the deformed shape predictions of nonuniform two-point supported beams, nonuniform panels, nonuniform aircraft wings and fuselages, and so forth. The high degree of accuracy of the further-developed displacement theory for nonuniform beams is validated by finite-element analysis of various nonuniform beam structures. Such structures include tapered tubular beams, depth-tapered unswept and swept wing boxes, width-tapered wing boxes, and double-tapered wing boxes, all under combined bending and torsional loads. The Ko displacement theory, combined with the fiber-optic strain-sensing system, provide a powerful tool for in-flight deformed shape monitoring of unmanned aerospace vehicles by ground-based pilots to maintain safe flights.

  16. Structural Deformation of CO2+2 in Intense Femtosecond Laser Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Sheng; XIA Yuan-Qin; WANG Yu-Quan; LU Zhen-Zhong; CHEN De-Ying

    2009-01-01

    The angular distributions of CO+ from the dissociation of CO2+2 and CO+2 in intense femtosecond laser fields (45 fs,about 5×1015 W/cm2) are studied at a laser wavelength of 800 nm based on the time-of-flight mass spectra of CO+ fragment ions.The experimental results show that structural deformation occurs in the charge state of CO2+2 and the CO+2 maintains linear geometrical structure.

  17. Atomistic tensile deformation mechanisms of Fe with gradient nano-grained structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenbin Li

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale molecular dynamics (MD simulations have been performed to investigate the tensile properties and the related atomistic deformation mechanisms of the gradient nano-grained (GNG structure of bcc Fe (gradient grains with d from 25 nm to 105 nm, and comparisons were made with the uniform nano-grained (NG structure of bcc Fe (grains with d = 25 nm. The grain size gradient in the nano-scale converts the applied uniaxial stress to multi-axial stresses and promotes the dislocation behaviors in the GNG structure, which results in extra hardening and flow strength. Thus, the GNG structure shows slightly higher flow stress at the early plastic deformation stage when compared to the uniform NG structure (even with smaller grain size. In the GNG structure, the dominant deformation mechanisms are closely related to the grain sizes. For grains with d = 25 nm, the deformation mechanisms are dominated by GB migration, grain rotation and grain coalescence although a few dislocations are observed. For grains with d = 54 nm, dislocation nucleation, propagation and formation of dislocation wall near GBs are observed. Moreover, formation of dislocation wall and dislocation pile-up near GBs are observed for grains with d = 105 nm, which is the first observation by MD simulations to our best knowledge. The strain compatibility among different layers with various grain sizes in the GNG structure should promote the dislocation behaviors and the flow stress of the whole structure, and the present results should provide insights to design the microstructures for developing strong-and-ductile metals.

  18. Deformation analysis and prediction of bank protection structure with river level fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Rui; Xing, Yixuan

    2017-04-01

    Bank structure is an important barrier to maintain the safety of the embankment. The deformation of bank protection structure is not only affected by soil pressure caused by the excavation of the riverway, but also by the water pressure caused river water level fluctuations. Thus, it is necessary to establish a coupled soil-water model to analyze the deformation of bank structure. Based on Druck-Prager failure criteria and groundwater seepage theory, a numerical model of bank protection structure with consideration of the pore water pressure of soil mass is established. According to the measured river level data with seasonal fluctuating, numerical analysis of the deformation of bank protection structure is implemented. The simulation results show that the river water level fluctuation has clear influence on the maximum lateral displacement of the pile. Meanwhile, the distribution of plastic zone is related to the depth of groundwater level. Finally, according to the river water level data of the recent ten years, we analyze the deformation of the bank structure under extreme river level. The result shows that, compared with the scenario of extreme high river level, the horizontal displacement of bank protection structure is larger (up to 65mm) under extreme low river level, which is a potential risk to the embankment. Reference Schweiger H F. On the use of drucker-prager failure criteria for earth pressure problems[J]. Computers and Geotechnics, 1994, 16(3): 223-246. DING Yong-chun,CHENG Ze-kun. Numerical study on performance of waterfront excavation[J]. Chinese Journal of Geotechnical Engineering,2013,35(2):515-521. Wu L M, Wang Z Q. Three gorges reservoir water level fluctuation influents on the stability of the slope[J]. Advanced Materials Research. Trans Tech Publications, 2013, 739: 283-286.

  19. Bio-inspired Autonomic Structures: a middleware for Telecommunications Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzalini, Antonio; Minerva, Roberto; Moiso, Corrado

    Today, people are making use of several devices for communications, for accessing multi-media content services, for data/information retrieving, for processing, computing, etc.: examples are laptops, PDAs, mobile phones, digital cameras, mp3 players, smart cards and smart appliances. One of the most attracting service scenarios for future Telecommunications and Internet is the one where people will be able to browse any object in the environment they live: communications, sensing and processing of data and services will be highly pervasive. In this vision, people, machines, artifacts and the surrounding space will create a kind of computational environment and, at the same time, the interfaces to the network resources. A challenging technological issue will be interconnection and management of heterogeneous systems and a huge amount of small devices tied together in networks of networks. Moreover, future network and service infrastructures should be able to provide Users and Application Developers (at different levels, e.g., residential Users but also SMEs, LEs, ASPs/Web2.0 Service roviders, ISPs, Content Providers, etc.) with the most appropriate "environment" according to their context and specific needs. Operators must be ready to manage such level of complication enabling their latforms with technological advanced allowing network and services self-supervision and self-adaptation capabilities. Autonomic software solutions, enhanced with innovative bio-inspired mechanisms and algorithms, are promising areas of long term research to face such challenges. This chapter proposes a bio-inspired autonomic middleware capable of leveraging the assets of the underlying network infrastructure whilst, at the same time, supporting the development of future Telecommunications and Internet Ecosystems.

  20. The structure of Mediterranean rocky reef ecosystems across environmental and human gradients, and conservation implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enric Sala

    Full Text Available Historical exploitation of the Mediterranean Sea and the absence of rigorous baselines makes it difficult to evaluate the current health of the marine ecosystems and the efficacy of conservation actions at the ecosystem level. Here we establish the first current baseline and gradient of ecosystem structure of nearshore rocky reefs at the Mediterranean scale. We conducted underwater surveys in 14 marine protected areas and 18 open access sites across the Mediterranean, and across a 31-fold range of fish biomass (from 3.8 to 118 g m(-2. Our data showed remarkable variation in the structure of rocky reef ecosystems. Multivariate analysis showed three alternative community states: (1 large fish biomass and reefs dominated by non-canopy algae, (2 lower fish biomass but abundant native algal canopies and suspension feeders, and (3 low fish biomass and extensive barrens, with areas covered by turf algae. Our results suggest that the healthiest shallow rocky reef ecosystems in the Mediterranean have both large fish and algal biomass. Protection level and primary production were the only variables significantly correlated to community biomass structure. Fish biomass was significantly larger in well-enforced no-take marine reserves, but there were no significant differences between multi-use marine protected areas (which allow some fishing and open access areas at the regional scale. The gradients reported here represent a trajectory of degradation that can be used to assess the health of any similar habitat in the Mediterranean, and to evaluate the efficacy of marine protected areas.

  1. The structure of Mediterranean rocky reef ecosystems across environmental and human gradients, and conservation implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, Enric; Ballesteros, Enric; Dendrinos, Panagiotis; Di Franco, Antonio; Ferretti, Francesco; Foley, David; Fraschetti, Simonetta; Friedlander, Alan M.; Garrabou, Joaquim; Guclusoy, Harun; Guidetti, Paolo; Halpern, Benjamin S.; Hereu, Bernat; Karamanlidis, Alexandros A.; Kizilkaya, Zafer; Macpherson, Enrique; Mangialajo, Luisa; Mariani, Simone; Micheli, Fiorenza; Pais, Antonio; Riser, Kristin; Rosenberg, Andrew A.; Sales, Marta; Selkoe, Kimberly A.; Starr, Rick; Tomas, Fiona; Zabala, Mikel

    2012-01-01

    Historical exploitation of the Mediterranean Sea and the absence of rigorous baselines makes it difficult to evaluate the current health of the marine ecosystems and the efficacy of conservation actions at the ecosystem level. Here we establish the first current baseline and gradient of ecosystem structure of nearshore rocky reefs at the Mediterranean scale. We conducted underwater surveys in 14 marine protected areas and 18 open access sites across the Mediterranean, and across a 31-fold range of fish biomass (from 3.8 to 118 g m-2). Our data showed remarkable variation in the structure of rocky reef ecosystems. Multivariate analysis showed three alternative community states: (1) large fish biomass and reefs dominated by non-canopy algae, (2) lower fish biomass but abundant native algal canopies and suspension feeders, and (3) low fish biomass and extensive barrens, with areas covered by turf algae. Our results suggest that the healthiest shallow rocky reef ecosystems in the Mediterranean have both large fish and algal biomass. Protection level and primary production were the only variables significantly correlated to community biomass structure. Fish biomass was significantly larger in well-enforced no-take marine reserves, but there were no significant differences between multi-use marine protected areas (which allow some fishing) and open access areas at the regional scale. The gradients reported here represent a trajectory of degradation that can be used to assess the health of any similar habitat in the Mediterranean, and to evaluate the efficacy of marine protected areas.

  2. Fluid-Structure Interaction Study on a Pre-Buckled Deformable Flat Ribbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fovargue, Lauren; Shams, Ehsan; Watterson, Amy; Corson, Dave; Filardo, Benjamin; Zimmerman, Daniel; Shan, Bob; Oberai, Assad

    2015-11-01

    A Fluid-Structure Interaction study is conducted for the flow over a deformable flat ribbon. This mechanism, which is called ribbon frond, maybe used as a device for pumping water and/or harvesting energy in rivers. We use a lower dimensional mathematical model, which represents the ribbon as a pre-buckled structure. The surface forces from the fluid flow, dictate the deformation of the ribbon, and the ribbon in turn imposes boundary conditions for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The mesh motion is handled using an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) scheme and the fluid-structure coupling is handled by iterating over the staggered governing equations for the structure, the fluid and the mesh. Simulations are conducted at three different free stream velocities. The results, including the frequency of oscillations, show agreement with experimental data. The vortical structures near the surface of the ribbon and its deformation are highly correlated. It is observed that the ribbon motion exhibits deviation from a harmonic motion, especially at lower free stream velocities. The behavior of the ribbon is compared to swimming animals, such as eels, in order to better understand its performance. The authors acknowledge support from ONR SBIR Phase II, contract No. N0001412C0604 and USDA, NIFA SBIR Phase I, contract No. 2013-33610-20836 and NYSERDA PON 2569, contract No. 30364.

  3. Motion and deformation estimation from medical imagery by modeling sub-structure interaction and constraints

    KAUST Repository

    Sundaramoorthi, Ganesh

    2012-09-13

    This paper presents a novel medical image registration algorithm that explicitly models the physical constraints imposed by objects or sub-structures of objects that have differing material composition and border each other, which is the case in most medical registration applications. Typical medical image registration algorithms ignore these constraints and therefore are not physically viable, and to incorporate these constraints would require prior segmentation of the image into regions of differing material composition, which is a difficult problem in itself. We present a mathematical model and algorithm for incorporating these physical constraints into registration / motion and deformation estimation that does not require a segmentation of different material regions. Our algorithm is a joint estimation of different material regions and the motion/deformation within these regions. Therefore, the segmentation of different material regions is automatically provided in addition to the image registration satisfying the physical constraints. The algorithm identifies differing material regions (sub-structures or objects) as regions where the deformation has different characteristics. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our method on the analysis of cardiac MRI which includes the detection of the left ventricle boundary and its deformation. The experimental results indicate the potential of the algorithm as an assistant tool for the quantitative analysis of cardiac functions in the diagnosis of heart disease.

  4. A nonlinear deformed su(2) algebra with a two-colour quasitriangular Hopf structure

    CERN Document Server

    Bonatsos, Dennis; Kolokotronis, P; Ludu, A; Quesne, C

    1996-01-01

    Nonlinear deformations of the enveloping algebra of su(2), involving two arbitrary functions of J_0 and generalizing the Witten algebra, were introduced some time ago by Delbecq and Quesne. In the present paper, the problem of endowing some of them with a Hopf algebraic structure is addressed by studying in detail a specific example, referred to as ${\\cal A}^+_q(1)$. This algebra is shown to possess two series of (N+1)-dimensional unitary irreducible representations, where N=0, 1, 2, .... To allow the coupling of any two such representations, a generalization of the standard Hopf axioms is proposed by proceeding in two steps. In the first one, a variant and extension of the deforming functional technique is introduced: variant because a map between two deformed algebras, su_q(2) and ${\\cal A}^+_q(1)$, is considered instead of a map between a Lie algebra and a deformed one, and extension because use is made of a two-valued functional, whose inverse is singular. As a result, the Hopf structure of su_q(2) is car...

  5. Formation of diapiric structure in the deformation zone, central Indian Ocean: A model from gravity and seismic reflection data

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Krishna, K.S.; Rao, D.G.; Neprochnov, Y.P.

    Analyses of bathymetry, gravity and seismic reflection data of the diffusive plate boundary in the central Indian Ocean reveal a new kind of deformed structure besides the well-reported structures of long-wavelength anticlinal basement rises...

  6. Predicting welding distortion in a panel structure with longitudinal stiffeners using inherent deformations obtained by inverse analysis method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Wei; Murakawa, Hidekazu

    2014-01-01

    Welding-induced deformation not only negatively affects dimension accuracy but also degrades the performance of product. If welding deformation can be accurately predicted beforehand, the predictions will be helpful for finding effective methods to improve manufacturing accuracy. Till now, there are two kinds of finite element method (FEM) which can be used to simulate welding deformation. One is the thermal elastic plastic FEM and the other is elastic FEM based on inherent strain theory. The former only can be used to calculate welding deformation for small or medium scale welded structures due to the limitation of computing speed. On the other hand, the latter is an effective method to estimate the total welding distortion for large and complex welded structures even though it neglects the detailed welding process. When the elastic FEM is used to calculate the welding-induced deformation for a large structure, the inherent deformations in each typical joint should be obtained beforehand. In this paper, a new method based on inverse analysis was proposed to obtain the inherent deformations for weld joints. Through introducing the inherent deformations obtained by the proposed method into the elastic FEM based on inherent strain theory, we predicted the welding deformation of a panel structure with two longitudinal stiffeners. In addition, experiments were carried out to verify the simulation results.

  7. Predicting Welding Distortion in a Panel Structure with Longitudinal Stiffeners Using Inherent Deformations Obtained by Inverse Analysis Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Liang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Welding-induced deformation not only negatively affects dimension accuracy but also degrades the performance of product. If welding deformation can be accurately predicted beforehand, the predictions will be helpful for finding effective methods to improve manufacturing accuracy. Till now, there are two kinds of finite element method (FEM which can be used to simulate welding deformation. One is the thermal elastic plastic FEM and the other is elastic FEM based on inherent strain theory. The former only can be used to calculate welding deformation for small or medium scale welded structures due to the limitation of computing speed. On the other hand, the latter is an effective method to estimate the total welding distortion for large and complex welded structures even though it neglects the detailed welding process. When the elastic FEM is used to calculate the welding-induced deformation for a large structure, the inherent deformations in each typical joint should be obtained beforehand. In this paper, a new method based on inverse analysis was proposed to obtain the inherent deformations for weld joints. Through introducing the inherent deformations obtained by the proposed method into the elastic FEM based on inherent strain theory, we predicted the welding deformation of a panel structure with two longitudinal stiffeners. In addition, experiments were carried out to verify the simulation results.

  8. Main Structural Styles and Deformation Mechanisms in the Northern Sichuan Basin, Southern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Liangjie; GUO Tonglou; JIN Wenzheng; YU Yixin; LI Rufeng

    2008-01-01

    The Triassic Jialingjiang Formation and Leikoupo Formation are characterized by thick salt layers. Three tectono-stratigraphic sequences can be identified according to detachment layers of Lower-Middle Triassic salt beds in the northern Sichuan Basin, i.e. the sub-salt sequence composed of Sinian to the Lower Triassic Feixianguan Formation, the salt sequence of the Lower Triassic Jialingjiang Formation and Mid-Triassic Leikoupou Formation, and the supra-salt sequence composed of continental clastics of the Upper-Triassic Xujiahe Formation, Jurassic and Cretaceous. A series of specific structural styles, such as intensively deformed belt of basement-involved imbricated thrust belt, basement-involved and salt-detached superimposed deformed belt, buried salt-related detached belt, duplex, piling triangle zone and pop-up, developed in the northern Sichuan Basin. The relatively thin salt beds, associated with the structural deformation of the northern Sichuan Basin, might act as a large decollement layer. The deformation mechanisms in the northern Sichuan Basin included regional compression and shortening, plastic flow and detachment, tectonic upwelling and erosion, gravitational sliding and spreading. The source rocks in the northern Sichuan Basin are strata underlying the salt layer, such as the Cambrian, Silurian and Permian. The structural deformation related to the Triassic salt controlled the styles of traps for hydrocarbon. The formation and development of hydrocarbon traps in the northern Sichuan Basin might have a bearing upon the Lower-Middle Triassic salt sequences which were favorable to the hydrocarbon accumulation and preservation. The salt layers in the Lower-Middle Triassic formed the main cap rocks and are favorable for the accumulation and preservation of hydrocarbon.

  9. Marine chemical ecology: chemical signals and cues structure marine populations, communities, and ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Mark E

    2009-01-01

    Chemical cues constitute much of the language of life in the sea. Our understanding of biotic interactions and their effects on marine ecosystems will advance more rapidly if this language is studied and understood. Here, I review how chemical cues regulate critical aspects of the behavior of marine organisms from bacteria to phytoplankton to benthic invertebrates and water column fishes. These chemically mediated interactions strongly affect population structure, community organization, and ecosystem function. Chemical cues determine foraging strategies, feeding choices, commensal associations, selection of mates and habitats, competitive interactions, and transfer of energy and nutrients within and among ecosystems. In numerous cases, the indirect effects of chemical signals on behavior have as much or more effect on community structure and function as the direct effects of consumers and pathogens. Chemical cues are critical for understanding marine systems, but their omnipresence and impact are inadequately recognized.

  10. Semantic modeling of the structural and process entities during plastic deformation of crystals and rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaie, Hassan; Davarpanah, Armita

    2016-04-01

    We are semantically modeling the structural and dynamic process components of the plastic deformation of minerals and rocks in the Plastic Deformation Ontology (PDO). Applying the Ontology of Physics in Biology, the PDO classifies the spatial entities that participate in the diverse processes of plastic deformation into the Physical_Plastic_Deformation_Entity and Nonphysical_Plastic_Deformation_Entity classes. The Material_Physical_Plastic_Deformation_Entity class includes things such as microstructures, lattice defects, atoms, liquid, and grain boundaries, and the Immaterial_Physical_Plastic_Deformation_Entity class includes vacancies in crystals and voids along mineral grain boundaries. The objects under the many subclasses of these classes (e.g., crystal, lattice defect, layering) have spatial parts that are related to each other through taxonomic (e.g., Line_Defect isA Lattice_Defect), structural (mereological, e.g., Twin_Plane partOf Twin), spatial-topological (e.g., Vacancy adjacentTo Atom, Fluid locatedAlong Grain_Boundary), and domain specific (e.g., displaces, Fluid crystallizes Dissolved_Ion, Void existsAlong Grain_Boundary) relationships. The dynamic aspect of the plastic deformation is modeled under the dynamical Process_Entity class that subsumes classes such as Recrystallization and Pressure_Solution that define the flow of energy amongst the physical entities. The values of the dynamical state properties of the physical entities (e.g., Chemical_Potential, Temperature, Particle_Velocity) change while they take part in the deformational processes such as Diffusion and Dislocation_Glide. The process entities have temporal parts (phases) that are related to each other through temporal relations such as precedes, isSubprocessOf, and overlaps. The properties of the physical entities, defined under the Physical_Property class, change as they participate in the plastic deformational processes. The properties are categorized into dynamical, constitutive

  11. Correlation between locally deformed structure and oxide film properties in austenitic stainless steel irradiated with neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chimi, Yasuhiro, E-mail: chimi.yasuhiro@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 2-4 Shirakata, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Kitsunai, Yuji [Nippon Nuclear Fuel Development, 2163 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Higashi-ibaraki-gun, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Kasahara, Shigeki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 2-4 Shirakata, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Chatani, Kazuhiro; Koshiishi, Masato [Nippon Nuclear Fuel Development, 2163 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Higashi-ibaraki-gun, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Nishiyama, Yutaka [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 2-4 Shirakata, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2016-07-15

    To elucidate the mechanism of irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) in high-temperature water for neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steels (SSs), the locally deformed structures, the oxide films formed on the deformed areas, and their correlation were investigated. Tensile specimens made of irradiated 316L SSs were strained 0.1%–2% at room temperature or at 563 K, and the surface structures and crystal misorientation among grains were evaluated. The strained specimens were immersed in high-temperature water, and the microstructures of the oxide films on the locally deformed areas were observed. The appearance of visible step structures on the specimens' surface depended on the neutron dose and the applied strain. The surface oxides were observed to be prone to increase in thickness around grain boundaries (GBs) with increasing neutron dose and increasing local strain at the GBs. No penetrative oxidation was observed along GBs or along surface steps. - Highlights: • Visible step structures depend on the neutron dose and the applied strain. • Local strain at grain boundaries was accumulated with the neutron dose. • Oxide thickness increases with neutron dose and local strain at grain boundaries. • No penetrative oxidation was observed along grain boundaries or surface steps.

  12. Flooding and arsenic contamination: Influences on ecosystem structure and function in an Appalachian headwater stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noah R. Lottig; H. Maurice Valett; Madeline E. Schreiber; Jackson R. Webster

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the influence of flooding and chronic arsenic contamination on ecosystem structure and function in a headwater stream adjacent to an abandoned arsenic (As) mine using an upstream (reference) and downstream (mine-influenced) comparative reach approach. In this study, floods were addressed as a pulse disturbance, and the abandoned As mine was...

  13. Shear Stress in MR Fluid with Small Shear Deformation in Bctlattic Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Lisheng; RUAN Zhongwei; ZHAI Pengcheng; ZHANG Qingjie

    2008-01-01

    A theoretical model based on BCT lattice structure was developed.Resultant force in the BCT lattice structure was deduced,following the interaction force of two kinds of magnetic particles.According to empirical FroHlich-Kennelly law,the relationship between the magnetic induction and the magnetic field was discussed,and a predictive formula of shear stresses of the BCT lattice structure model was established for the case of small shear deformation.Compared with the experimental data for different particle volume fractions,the theoretical results of the shear stress indicate the effects of the saturation magnetization and the external magnetic field on the shear stress.

  14. Systematics of fine structure in the α decay of deformed odd-mass nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhongzhou; Ni, Dongdong

    2014-12-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the a-decay fine structure in 32 deformed odd-mass nuclei from Z = 93 to Z = 102. The α-decay half-lives are systematically calculated within the multichannel cluster model (MCCM), which turns out to well reproduce the experimental data and show the neutron deformed shell structure. The branching ratios for various daughter states are investigated in the MCCM and in the WKB barrier penetration approach, respectively. It is found that the MCCM results agree well with the experimental data, while the WKB results have relatively large deviations from the experimental data for the α transitions to the high-lying members of the rotational band.

  15. Deformation structures in the frontal prism near the Japan Trench: Insights from sandbox models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Puspendu; Bose, Santanu

    2016-04-01

    Subduction of bathymetric features in the oceanic plate, e.g., seamounts, aseismic ridges, volcanic plateaus has a strong influence on the development of morphological features and deformation structures in the overriding plate. For example, the subduction of seamounts correlates to a steeper surface slope in the inner wedge than that in the outer wedge. Conversely, the subduction of aseismic ridges causes the development of a steep outer wedge slope and with almost flat inner wedge. Despite the dominance of horst-and-graben structure at many trenches, its influence on frontal wedge growth remains relatively unexplored. We have used sandbox experiments to explore the mechanics of the frontal prism structures near the Japan Trench documented by seismic reflection data and new borehole from IODP Expedition 343 (JFAST). This study investigated the effects of down-dip (normal to trench axis) variations in frictional resistance along a decollement on the structural development of the frontal wedges near subduction zones. Interpretation of seismic reflection images indicates that the wedge has been affected by trench-parallel horst-and-graben structures in the subducting plate. We performed sandbox experiments with down-dip patches of relatively high and low friction on the basal decollement to simulate the effect of variable coupling over subducting oceanic plate topography. Our experiments suggest that high frictional resistance on the basal fault can produce the internal deformation and fault-and-fold structures observed in the frontal wedge by the JFAST expedition. Subduction of patches of varying friction cause a temporal change in the style of internal deformation within the wedge and gave rise to two distinctive structural domains, separated by a break in the surface slope of the wedge: (i) complexly deformed inner wedge with steep surface slope, and (ii) shallow taper outer wedge with a sequence of imbricate thrusts. Our experiments further demonstrate that the

  16. Trophic structure and community stability in an overfished ecosystem

    KAUST Repository

    Utne-Palm, Anne Christine

    2010-07-15

    Since the collapse of the pelagic fisheries off southwest Africa in the late 1960s, jellyfish biomass has increased and the structure of the Benguelan fish community has shifted, making the bearded goby (Sufflogobius bibarbatus) the new predominant prey species. Despite increased prédation pressure and a harsh environment, the gobies are thriving. Here we show that physiological adaptations and antipredator and foraging behaviors underpin the success of these fish. In particular, body-tissue isotope signatures reveal that gobies consume jellyfish and sulphidic diatomaceous mud, transferring "dead-end" resources back into the food chain.

  17. Local deformation method for measuring element tension in space deployable structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belov Sergey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the local deformation method to determine the tension of cord and thin membrane elements in space deployable structure as antenna reflector. Possible measuring instrument model, analytical and numerical solutions and experimental results are presented. The boundary effects on measurement results of metallic mesh reflector surface tension are estimated. The study case depicting non-uniform reflector surface tension is considered.

  18. Topography-induced changes in ecosystem structure and its implications for response of terrestrial ecosystem to future climate variability and change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J.; Guan, H.

    2006-12-01

    It is well known that climate is a primary control of the structure of terrestrial ecosystems. Ecosystems adapt to climate by adjusting either the type of vegetation or the canopy density. Within an established ecosystem is difficult to estimate the role of climate because there is little climate contrast, but this is remedied by observing the larger climate gradient across climate-controlled ecotones. In particular the complex topography of mountainous terrain provides a unique opportunity to constrain the climatic boundary condition of neighboring ecosystems and revealing the vegetation-climate relationship. We use a newly developed topography- and vegetation-based surface energy partitioning model (TVET) to quantify the boundary conditions for a juniper-creosote bush ecotone in central New Mexico, and demonstrate how extreme climate variability (e.g., sustainined drought) can lead to an ecotone shift. We also investigate the relationship between vegetation density and climate using remote sensing imagery for a nearby pinyon-juniper ecosystem in central New Mexico, and demonstrate how an ecosystem adapts to a small climate gradient by adjusting its density. Such studies help build a predictive understanding about the future evolution of terrestrial ecosystems due to climate variability and change.

  19. Effect of bimaxillary rotational setback surgery on upper airway structure in skeletal class III deformities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Yuh-Jia; Chen, Yi-Chieh; Chen, Yin-An; Liao, Yu-Fang; Chen, Yu-Ray

    2015-02-01

    Upper airway narrowing has been a concern of mandibular setback. The aims of this study were (1) to evaluate the effect of bimaxillary rotational setback surgery on upper airway structure in patients with skeletal class III deformities, and (2) to compare the preoperative and postoperative upper airways of class III patients with age- and sex-matched class I control subjects. The upper airways of 36 adults who consecutively underwent bimaxillary rotational setback surgery for skeletal class III deformities were assessed by means of cone-beam computed tomography before and at least 6 months after surgery. Results were compared with those of age- and sex-matched control subjects with skeletal class I structure. Before surgery, the class III patients had significantly larger velopharyngeal, oropharyngeal, and hypopharyngeal volumes than did the control subjects (all p 0.01) compared to control subjects. The postoperative velopharyngeal and oropharyngeal airway volumes were associated with the baseline airway volume (p bimaxillary rotational setback surgery for skeletal class III deformities, but is not smaller than in normal controls, and the postoperative upper airway volume is related to airway volume at baseline and changes in the surrounding structures. Therapeutic, III.

  20. Direct investigations of deformation and yield induced structure transitions in polyamide 6 below glass transition temperature with WAXS and SAXS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Huilong; Wang, Jiayi; Zhou, Chengbo;

    2015-01-01

    Deformation and yield induced structure transitions of polyamide 6 (PA6) were detected with the combination of the wide- and small-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS and SAXS) at 30 degrees C below glass transition temperature (T-g) of PA6. During deformation, gamma-alpha phase transition was found at ...

  1. CFD simulations of flow erosion and flow-induced deformation of needle valve: Effects of operation, structure and fluid parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Hongjun, E-mail: ticky863@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Oil and Gas Reservoir Geology and Exploitation, Southwest Petroleum University, Chengdu 610500, Sichuan (China); State Key Laboratory of Hydraulics and Mountain River Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065, Sichuan (China); Pan, Qian; Zhang, Wenli; Feng, Guang; Li, Xue [State Key Laboratory of Oil and Gas Reservoir Geology and Exploitation, Southwest Petroleum University, Chengdu 610500, Sichuan (China)

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • A combined FSI–CFD and DPM computational method is used to investigate flow erosion and deformation of needle valve. • The numerical model is validated with the comparison of measured and predicted erosion rate. • Effects of operation, structure and fluid parameters on flow erosion and flow-induced deformation are discussed. • Particle diameter has the most significant effect on flow erosion. • Inlet rate has the most obvious effect on flow-induced deformation. - Abstract: A three-dimensional fluid–structure interaction (FSI) computational model coupling with a combined continuum and discrete model has been used to predict the flow erosion rate and flow-induced deformation of needle valve. Comparisons with measured data demonstrate good agreement with the predictions of erosion rate. The flow field distribution of gas-particle flow and the erosion rate and deformation of valve core are captured under different operating and structural conditions with different fluid parameters. The effects of inlet velocity, valve opening and inlet valve channel size, particle concentration, particle diameter and particle phase components are discussed in detail. The results indicate that valve tip has the most severe erosion and deformation, and flow field, erosion rate and deformation of valve are all sensitive to inlet condition changes, structural changes and fluid properties changes. The effect of particle diameter on erosion is the most significant, while the influence of inlet rate on deformation is the greatest one.

  2. The Hopf algebra structure of the h-deformed Z3-graded quantum supergroup GLh,j(1|1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasar, Ergün

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we define a new proper singular g matrix to construct a Z3-graded calculus on the h-deformed quantum superplane. Using the obtained calculus, we construct a new h-deformed Z3-graded quantum supergroup and give some features of it. Finally, we build up the Hopf algebra structure of this supergroup.

  3. Analysis of Structure and Deformation Mechanisms of Mineral Wool Slabs under Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laimutis STEPONAITIS

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The products of mineral wool are widely used for thermal insulation of buildings, both at construction of new buildings and at renovation of old ones. The mechanical resistance and stability of them, as well as their energy saving and heat saving requirements are in most cases related to the essential specifications of the building. The mechanical characteristics of these products are subject to structure of material, density, content of binder in the product and to technology of production. Subject to the latter, mineral wool products with different fibrous structure are received, therefore, for the structure of each type, the individual structural models are developed attempting to describe the properties of fibrous systems. The deformability of mineral wool products is conditioned by mobility of fibrous structure, which shows up best under compression by short term loads. This study established the impact of various thicknesses and deformations on changes in structure of rock wool products. It also established that the thickness of mineral wool products conditions and influences considerable changes in their structure.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.18.2.1926

  4. Analysis of Structure and Deformation Mechanisms of Mineral Wool Slabs under Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laimutis STEPONAITIS

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The products of mineral wool are widely used for thermal insulation of buildings, both at construction of new buildings and at renovation of old ones. The mechanical resistance and stability of them, as well as their energy saving and heat saving requirements are in most cases related to the essential specifications of the building. The mechanical characteristics of these products are subject to structure of material, density, content of binder in the product and to technology of production. Subject to the latter, mineral wool products with different fibrous structure are received, therefore, for the structure of each type, the individual structural models are developed attempting to describe the properties of fibrous systems. The deformability of mineral wool products is conditioned by mobility of fibrous structure, which shows up best under compression by short term loads. This study established the impact of various thicknesses and deformations on changes in structure of rock wool products. It also established that the thickness of mineral wool products conditions and influences considerable changes in their structure.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.18.2.1926

  5. Displacement Theories for In-Flight Deformed Shape Predictions of Aerospace Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, William L.; Richards, W. L.; Tran, Van t.

    2007-01-01

    Displacement theories are developed for a variety of structures with the goal of providing real-time shape predictions for aerospace vehicles during flight. These theories are initially developed for a cantilever beam to predict the deformed shapes of the Helios flying wing. The main structural configuration of the Helios wing is a cantilever wing tubular spar subjected to bending, torsion, and combined bending and torsion loading. The displacement equations that are formulated are expressed in terms of strains measured at multiple sensing stations equally spaced on the surface of the wing spar. Displacement theories for other structures, such as tapered cantilever beams, two-point supported beams, wing boxes, and plates also are developed. The accuracy of the displacement theories is successfully validated by finite-element analysis and classical beam theory using input-strains generated by finite-element analysis. The displacement equations and associated strain-sensing system (such as fiber optic sensors) create a powerful means for in-flight deformation monitoring of aerospace structures. This method serves multiple purposes for structural shape sensing, loads monitoring, and structural health monitoring. Ultimately, the calculated displacement data can be visually displayed to the ground-based pilot or used as input to the control system to actively control the shape of structures during flight.

  6. The effect of the internal structure of Mars on its seasonal loading deformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Métivier, Laurent; Karatekin, Özgur; Dehant, Véronique

    2008-04-01

    Mars is continuously subjected to surface loading induced by seasonal mass changes in the atmosphere and ice caps due to the CO 2 sublimation and condensation process. It results in surface deformations and in time variations of gravity. Large wavelength annual and semi-annual variations of gravity (particularly zonal coefficients ΔJ) have been determined using present day geodetic satellite measurements. However loading deformations have been poorly studied for a planet like Mars. In this paper, we compute these deformations and their effect on spacecraft orbiting around Mars. Loading deformations of terrestrial planet are typically investigated assuming a spherical planet, radially symmetric. The mean radial structure of Mars is not well known. In particular the radius of the liquid or solid core remains not precisely determined. One may then wonder what is the effect of these uncertainties on loading deformations. Moreover, Mars presents a strong topography and probably large lateral variations of crustal thickness (relative to the Earth). The paper answer the questions of what is the effect of such lateral heterogeneities on surface deformations, and is the classical way to calculate loading deformation well adapted for a planet like Mars. In order to answer these questions we have investigated theoretically loading deformations of Mars-like planets. We first investigated classical load Love numbers. We show that for degrees inferior to 10, the load Love numbers mainly depend on the radius of the core and on its state, and that for degree greater than 10, they depend on the mean radius of mantle-crust interface. Using a General Circulation Model (GCM) of atmosphere and ice caps dynamics we show that loading vertical displacements have a 4-5 cm magnitude and present a North-South pattern with periodic transitions. Finally we investigated the effect of lateral variations of the crustal thickness on these loading deformations. We show that thickness

  7. Local adaptation in Trinidadian guppies alters stream ecosystem structure at landscape scales despite high environmental variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Troy N.; Bassar, Ronald D.; Binderup, Andrew J.; Flecker, Alex S.; Freeman, Mary C.; Gilliam, James F.; Marshall, Michael C.; Thomas, Steve A.; Travis, Joseph; Reznick, David N.; Pringle, Catherine M.

    2017-01-01

    While previous studies have shown that evolutionary divergence alters ecological processes in small-scale experiments, a major challenge is to assess whether such evolutionary effects are important in natural ecosystems at larger spatial scales. At the landscape scale, across eight streams in the Caroni drainage, we found that the presence of locally adapted populations of guppies (Poecilia reticulata) is associated with reduced algal biomass and increased invertebrate biomass, while the opposite trends were true in streams with experimentally introduced populations of non-locally adapted guppies. Exclusion experiments conducted in two separate reaches of a single stream showed that guppies with locally adapted phenotypes significantly reduced algae with no effect on invertebrates, while non-adapted guppies had no effect on algae but significantly reduced invertebrates. These divergent effects of phenotype on stream ecosystems are comparable in strength to the effects of abiotic factors (e.g., light) known to be important drivers of ecosystem condition. They also corroborate the results of previous experiments conducted in artificial streams. Our results demonstrate that local adaptation can produce phenotypes with significantly different effects in natural ecosystems at a landscape scale, within a tropical watershed, despite high variability in abiotic factors: five of the seven physical and chemical parameters measured across the eight study streams varied by more than one order of magnitude. Our findings suggest that ecosystem structure is, in part, an evolutionary product and not simply an ecological pattern.

  8. Analysis of High Temperature Deformed Structure and Dynamic Precipitation in W9Mo3Cr4V Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    With TEM、SEM, various high-temperature deformed structures inW9Mo3Cr4V steel were investigated. The sub-structures,recrystallized nuclei, as well as the dynamic precipitation were also studied and analyzed. The relationship between recrystallized structures and dynamic precipitation was discussed. The results showed that the deformed structures in W9Mo3Cr4V steel are more complicated than those in low alloy steels. Because W9Mo3Cr4V steel is a high-speed steel, there are a large number of residual carbides on the matrix. Also, much dynamic precipitating carbides will precipitate during deformation at high temperature.

  9. Ecosystem structure and resilience—A comparison between the Norwegian and the Barents Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaragina, Natalia A.; Dolgov, Andrey V.

    2009-10-01

    Abundance and biomass of the most important fish species inhabited the Barents and Norwegian Sea ecosystems have shown considerable fluctuations over the last decades. These fluctuations connected with fishing pressure resulted in the trophic structure alterations of the ecosystems. Resilience and other theoretical concepts (top-down, wasp-waste and bottom-up control, trophic cascades) were viewed to examine different response of the Norwegian and Barents Sea ecosystems on disturbing forces. Differences in the trophic structure and functioning of Barents and Norwegian Sea ecosystems as well as factors that might influence the resilience of the marine ecosystems, including climatic fluctuation, variations in prey and predator species abundance, alterations in their regular migrations, and fishing exploitation were also considered. The trophic chain lengths in the deep Norwegian Sea are shorter, and energy transfer occurs mainly through the pelagic fish/invertebrates communities. The shallow Barents Sea is characterized by longer trophic chains, providing more energy flow into their benthic assemblages. The trophic mechanisms observed in the Norwegian Sea food webs dominated by the top-down control, i.e. the past removal of Norwegian Spring spawning followed by zooplankton development and intrusion of blue whiting and mackerel into the area. The wasp-waist response is shown to be the most pronounced effect in the Barents Sea, related to the position of capelin in the ecosystem; large fluctuations in the capelin abundance have been strengthened by intensive fishery. Closer links between ecological and fisheries sciences are needed to elaborate and test various food webs and multispecies models available.

  10. Damage detection of concrete masonry structures by enhancing deformation measurement using DIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolhassani, Mohammad; Rajaram, Satish; Hamid, Ahmad A.; Kontsos, Antonios; Bartoli, Ivan

    2016-04-01

    This study focuses on deformability and damage detection of a concrete masonry wall. It employed point-to-point traditional strain gages and full-field measurement technique using digital image correlation (DIC) to investigate the damage and deformability of a partially grouted (PG) reinforced masonry wall. A set of ungrouted and grouted assemblages and full-scale concrete masonry shear wall were constructed and tested under displacement control loading. The wall was constructed according with masonry standards joint committee (MSJC 2013) and tested under constant vertical compression load and horizontal lateral load using quasi-static displacement procedure. The DIC method was used to determine non-uniform strain contours on the assemblages. This method was verified by comparing strains along the selected directions with traditional TML gage results. After a successful comparison, the method was used to investigate the state of damage and deformability of the wall specimen. Panel deformation, crack pattern, displacement at the top, and the base strain of the wall were captured using full-field measurement and results were in a good agreement with traditional strain gages. It is concluded that full-filed measurements using DIC is promising especially when the test specimens experience inelastic deformation and high degree of damage. The ability to characterize and anticipate failure mechanisms of concrete masonry systems by depicting strain distribution, categorizing structural cracks and investigating their effects on the behavior of the wall were also shown using DIC. In addition to monitoring strains across the gage length, the DIC method provided full-field strain behavior of the test specimens and revealed strain hotspots at locations that corresponded to failure.

  11. Deformation analysis through the SBAS-DInSAR technique and geotechnical methods for structural damage assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonano, M.; Arangio, S.; Calò, F.; Di Mauro, M.; Manunta, M.; Marsella, M.; Sansosti, E.; Sonnessa, A.; Tagliafierro, V.; Lanari, R.

    2012-04-01

    Monitoring of displacements affecting single buildings or human-made infrastructures is of key importance for their diagnostic and damage assessment. The evaluation of the structural damage in urban areas is a critical problem related to the complexity of soil-structure interaction. Indeed, the structural damage is influenced by several factors, such as the uniformity of the settlements, the variability on the soil property, the type of foundations, the rigidity and type of the considered structure, as well as the rate at which the settlements occur. Concerning this latter issue, settlements occurring very slowly over periods of decades or more may be tolerable by masonry or reinforced concrete structures; on the other hand, the same settlements related to a few months or a few years would result in severe structural damage. In this context, remote sensing techniques allow non-invasive and non-destructive deformation analyses over large areas by properly exploiting a large number of space-borne radar data. Within this framework, Differential SAR Interferometry (DInSAR) has emerged as a valuable microwave methodology to detect and monitor ground displacements, with centimeter to millimeter accuracy, by exploiting the phase difference (interferogram) between two SAR images relevant to the same area. Recent developments of advanced DInSAR techniques are aimed at investigating not only single event deformation phenomena, but also the temporal evolution of the detected displacements through the generation of deformation time-series. These approaches benefit of the availability of huge archives of SAR data, including the ones acquired over the last 20 years by the Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) sensors on-board the ERS-1/2 and ENVISAT satellites of the European Space Agency (ESA). Among these advanced DInSAR approaches, we focus on the Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) algorithm (Berardino et al., 2002) that implements an easy combination of DInSAR data pairs characterized by

  12. Prospects of photon counting lidar for savanna ecosystem structural studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwenzi, D.; Lefsky, M. A.

    2014-11-01

    Discrete return and waveform lidar have demonstrated a capability to measure vegetation height and the associated structural attributes such as aboveground biomass and carbon storage. Since discrete return lidar (DRL) is mainly suitable for small scale studies and the only existing spaceborne lidar sensor (ICESat-GLAS) has been decommissioned, the current question is what the future holds in terms of large scale lidar remote sensing studies. The earliest planned future spaceborne lidar mission is ICESat-2, which will use a photon counting technique. To pre-validate the capability of this mission for studying three dimensional vegetation structure in savannas, we assessed the potential of the measurement approach to estimate canopy height in a typical savanna landscape. We used data from the Multiple Altimeter Beam Experimental Lidar (MABEL), an airborne photon counting lidar sensor developed by NASA Goddard. MABEL fires laser pulses in the green (532 nm) and near infrared (1064 nm) bands at a nominal repetition rate of 10 kHz and records the travel time of individual photons that are reflected back to the sensor. The photons' time of arrival and the instrument's GPS positions and Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) orientation are used to calculate the distance the light travelled and hence the elevation of the surface below. A few transects flown over the Tejon ranch conservancy in Kern County, California, USA were used for this work. For each transect we extracted the data from one near infrared channel that had the highest number of photons. We segmented each transect into 50 m, 25 m and 10 m long blocks and aggregated the photons in each block into a histogram based on their elevation values. We then used an expansion window algorithm to identify cut off points where the cumulative density of photons from the highest elevation resembles the canopy top and likewise where such cumulative density from the lowest elevation resembles mean ground elevation. These cut off

  13. Multi-trace deformations in AdS/CFT. Exploring the vacuum structure of the deformed CFT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadimitriou, I. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)]|[Center for Mathematical Physics, Hamburg (Germany)

    2007-03-15

    We present a general and systematic treatment of multi-trace deformations in the AdS/CFT correspondence in the large N limit, pointing out and clarifying subtleties relating to the formulation of the boundary value problem on a conformal boundary. We then apply this method to study multi-trace deformations in the presence of a scalar VEV, which requires the coupling to gravity to be taken into account. We show that supergravity solutions subject to 'mixed' boundary conditions are in one-to-one correspondence with critical points of the holographic effective action of the dual theory in the presence of a multi-trace deformation, and we find a number of new exact analytic solutions involving a minimally or conformally coupled scalar field satisfying 'mixed' boundary conditions. These include the generalization to any dimension of the instanton solution recently found in hep-th/0611315. Finally, we provide a systematic method for computing the holographic effective action in the presence of a multi-trace deformation in a derivative expansion away from the conformal vacuum using Hamilton-Jacobi theory. Requiring that this effective action exists and is bounded from below reproduces recent results on the stability of the AdS vacuum in the presence of 'mixed' boundary conditions. (orig.)

  14. Quantifying the pedo-ecohydrological structure and function of degraded, grassland ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazier, Richard E.

    2015-04-01

    Grassland ecosystems cover significant areas of the terrestrial land mass, across a range of geoclimates, from arctic tundra, through temperate and semi-arid landscapes. In very few locations, such grasslands may be termed 'pristine' in that they remain undamaged by human activities and resilient to changing climates. In far more cases, grasslands are being degraded, often irreversibly so, with significant implications for a number of ecosystem services related to water resources, soil quality, nutrient cycles, and therefore both global food and water security. This paper draws upon empirical research that has been undertaken over the last decade to characterise a range of different grasslands in terms of soil properties, vegetation structure and geomorphology and to understand how these structures or patterns might interact or control how the grassland ecosystems function. Particular emphasis is placed upon quantifying fluxes of water, within and from grasslands, but also fluxes of sediment, via the processes of soil erosion and finally fluxes of the macronutrients Nitrogen, Phosphorus and Carbon from the landscape to surface waters. Data are presented from semi-arid grasslands, which are subject to severe encroachment by woody species, temperate upland grasslands that have been 'improved' via drainage to support grazing, temperate lowland grasslands, that are unimproved (Culm or Rhôs pastures) and finally intensively managed grasslands in temperate regions, that have been significantly modified via land management practices to improve productivity. It is hypothesised that, once degraded, the structure and function of these very diverse grassland ecosystems follows the same negative trajectory, resulting in depleted soil depths, nutrient storage capacities and therefore reduced plant growth and long-term carbon sequestration. Results demonstrate that similar, but highly complex and non-linear responses to perturbation of the ecosystem are observed, regardless of

  15. A structurally based viscoelastic model for passive myocardium in finite deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jing Jin

    2016-09-01

    This paper discusses the finite-deformation viscoelastic modeling for passive myocardium tissue. The formulations established can also be applied to model other fiber-reinforced soft tissue. Based on the morphological structure of the myocardium, a specific free-energy function is constructed to reflect its orthotropicity. After deriving the stress-strain relationships in the simple shear deformation, a genetic algorithm is used to optimally estimate the material parameters of the myocardial constitutive equation. The results show that the proposed myocardial model can well fit the shear experimental data. To validate the viscoelastic model, it is used to predict the creep and the dynamic responses of a cylindrical model of the left ventricle. Upon comparing the results calculated by the proven myocardial elastic model with those by the viscoelastic model, the merits of the latter are discussed.

  16. Fine structure of a bulk MgB2 superconductor after deformation and heat treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, E. I.; Krinitsina, T. P.; Blinova, Yu. V.; Degtyarev, M. V.; Sudareva, S. V.

    2017-04-01

    The structure of the MgB2 superconductor subjected to high-temperature restoration annealing after cold deformation under high pressure in a Toroid chamber or Bridgman anvils has been investigated by transmission electron microscopy. It has been shown that after postdeformation annealing at 950°C the average size of crystallites in the matrix phase increases 5-10 times compared to the deformed state, reaching 50-150 nm, as well as the critical current density increases by a factor of three (up to 6.7 × 104 A/cm2, 30 K) compared to the initial state. It has been found that the MgO phase and the higher magnesium borides are present in the form of dispersed precipitates 10-70 nm in size.

  17. Influence of glacier runoff on ecosystem structure in Gulf of Alaska fjords

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimitsu, Mayumi; Piatt, John F.; Mueter, Franz J.

    2016-01-01

    To better understand the influence of glacier runoff on fjord ecosystems, we sampled oceanographic conditions, nutrients, zooplankton, forage fish and seabirds within 4 fjords in coastal areas of the Gulf Alaska. We used generalized additive models and geostatistics to identify the range of glacier runoff influence into coastal waters within fjords of varying estuarine influence and topographic complexity. We also modeled the response of depth-integrated chlorophyll a concentration, copepod biomass, fish and seabird abundance to physical, nutrient and biotic predictor variables. The effects of glacial runoff were traced at least 10 km into coastal fjords by cold, turbid, stratified and generally nutrient-rich near-surface conditions. Glacially modified physical gradients, nutrient availability and among-fjord differences explained 67% of the variation in phytoplankton abundance, which is a driver of ecosystem structure at higher trophic levels. Copepod, euphausiid, fish and seabird distribution and abundance were related to environmental gradients that could be traced to glacial freshwater input, particularly turbidity and temperature. Seabird density was predicted by prey availability and silicate concentrations, which may be a proxy for upwelling areas where this nutrient is in excess. Similarities in ecosystem structure among fjords were attributable to an influx of cold, fresh and sediment-laden water, whereas differences were likely related to fjord topography and local differences in estuarine vs. ocean influence. We anticipate that continued changes in the timing and volume of glacial runoff will ultimately alter coastal ecosystems in the future.

  18. The crustal density structures and deformation scratches in the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yanyun; Yang, Wencai; Hou, Zunze; Yu, Changqing

    2016-12-01

    After introducing the principals of the multi-scale scratch analysis method of regional gravity data, this paper presents the results of its application to the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, producing three sets of density disturbance, ridge coefficient, and edge coefficient images. The density disturbance images can be used to delineate the hardness and rheological properties of continental tectonic units. The ridge coefficient images can be used to delineate deformation belts, and the edge coefficient images can be used to determine positioning boundaries of the structural division of the units. These images provide crustal geological and tectonic information from different aspects with depth information, which are able to give quantitative constrains to any possible tectonic models. To the upper crust, these results are basically coincident with surface geological and tectonic mapping. They can also provide more structural information of the middle and lower crust, which conventionally is hard to be accurately inferred. For instance, the density disturbance images show the source-zones and squeezed flows of channel flows in the lower crust, as well as the position of the subduction front of the Indian plate beneath the Himalayan mountain range. The ridge coefficient images provide the positions of suture zones, deformation and subduction volcanic belts, ancient collision belts and strike-slip zones. By combining with these edge coefficient images, one can draw out tectonic maps with different structural units in the middle and lower crust. For example, very high density terranes such as the Kashmir and Chayuhe, are divided from the Himalayan terrane, giving physical reasons for the formation of the western and eastern structural knots in the India-Eurasia collisional belt. The multi-scale scratch analysis not only provides the plane geometry of structures and deformation belts, but also their depth extension and stereoscopic patterns. For instance, a decrease of the low

  19. Car Side Structure Crashworthiness in Pole and Moving Deformable Barrier Side Impacts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Dazhi; DONG Guang; ZHANG Jinhuan; HUANG Shilin

    2006-01-01

    To clearly understand passenger car structure's crashworthiness in typical side impacts of pole and moving deformable barrier (MDB) impact modes, which could assist the establishment of Chinese vehicle side impact safety regulations, a full midsized car finite element model, calibrated by pole side impact test, was built and the pole side impact according to European New Car Assessment Program (EuroNCAP) and the MDB side impact according to ECE R95 regulations were simulated with LS-DYNA. The accelerations and the structure deformations from simulations were compared. It can be concluded that the pole side impact focuses primarily on side structure crashworthiness as a result of large intrusions, while the MDB side impact focuses primarily on full side structure crashworthiness. Accordingly, occupant protection strategies focus on different aspects to improve side impact safety. In the pole side impact the objective is to maintain the passenger compartment and protect the passenger's head from impacting the pole, while in the MDB side impact the objective is to protect the full human body. In the design of the car side structures, at least these two tests should be considered for assessing their side impact crashworthiness. Conducting these two side impact tests as certified tests provides insights into car safety during side impacts.

  20. SYSTEM ANALYSIS OF THE STRUCTURE OF CULTURAL ECOSYSTEM SERVICES ENERATION AND INTAKE USING ONE HUNDRED WAKA POEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Takanori; Ikeno, Yuko

    It is needed to evaluate ecosystem services in order to make appropriate decision for ecosystem management. In this background the purpose of this study is to analyze structural processes of human enjoying culture-related ecosystem services. As a database including processes of enjoying cultural ecosystem services, "one hundred waka poems" was selected and coded from the context of symbiotic systems conce pts. To the dataset SOM (self organizational map) and agglomerative hierarchical clustering method, which were kinds of data mining method, were conducted. As the result, seven structures as design knowledge of cultural ecosystem services generation and in take, and for detail, (1) cultural ecosystem services are based on the visual contact to environmental objects, (2) there is a possibility of interaction between ecosystems, climate conditions, weather phenomena and activity modes of human system under the process of generating and taking cultural ecosystem services, and (3) it is possible that not only the presence of ecosystem but also products made of natural resources generate cultural ecosystem services.

  1. PSP SAR interferometry monitoring of ground and structure deformations in the archeological site of Pompeii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, Mario; Francioni, Elena; Paglia, Luca; Minati, Federico; Margottini, Claudio; Spizzichino, Daniele; Trigila, Alessandro; Iadanza, Carla; De Nigris, Bruno

    2016-04-01

    The "Major Project Pompeii" (MPP) is a great collective commitment of different institututions and people to set about solving the serious problem of conservation of the largest archeological sites in the world. The ancient city of Pompeii with its 66 hectares, 44 of which are excaveted, is divided into 9 regiones (district), subdivided in 118 insulae (blocks) and almost 1500 domus (houses), and is Unesco site since 1996. The Italian Ministry for Heritage and Cultural Activities and Tourism (MiBACT) and Finmeccanica Group have sealed an agreement whereby the Finmeccanica Group will donate innovative technologies and services for monitoring and protecting the archaeological site of Pompeii. Moreover, the Italian Institute for Environment Protection and Research (ISPRA) - Geological Survey of Italy, was also involved to support the ground based analysis and interpretation of the measurements provided by the industrial team, in order to promote an interdisciplinary approach. In this work, we will focus on ground deformation measurements obtained by satellite SAR interferometry and on their interpretation. The satellite monitoring service is based on the processing of COSMO-SkyMed Himage data by the e-Geos proprietary Persistent Scatterer Pair (PSP) SAR interferometry technology. The PSP technique is a proven SAR interferometry method characterized by the fact of exploiting in the processing only the relative properties between close points (pairs) in order to overcome atmospheric artifacts (which are one of the main problems of SAR interferometry). Validations analyses showed that this technique applied to COSMO-SkyMed Himage data is able to retrieve very dense (except of course on vegetated or cultivated areas) millimetric deformation measurements with sub-metric localization. By means of the COSMO-SkyMed PSP SAR interferometry processing, a historical analysis of the ground and structure deformations occurred over the entire archaeological site of Pompeii in the

  2. Special Features of Structure Formation in an Explosion-Welded Magnesium-Aluminum Composite Under Deformation and Subsequent Heat Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurevich, L. M.; Arisova, V. N.; Trykov, Yu. P.; Ponomareva, I. A.; Trudov, A. F.

    2016-07-01

    The effect of bending deformation and subsequent heat treatment on the variation of microhardness and structure of explosion-welded magnesium-aluminum layered composite material MA2-1 - AD1 is studied.

  3. Earthquake-related soft-sediment deformation structures in Palaeogene on the continental shelf of the East China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Earthquake,as disastrous events in geological history,can be recorded as soft-sediment deformation.In the Palaeogene of the East China Sea shelf,the soft-sediment deformation related to earthquake event is recognized as seismic micro-fractures,micro-corrugated laminations,liquefied veins,'vibrated liquefied layers',deformed cross laminations and convolute laminations,load structures,flame structures,brecciation,slump structures and seismodisconformity.There exists a lateral continuum,the wide spatial distribution and the local vertical continuous sequences of seismites including slump,liquefaction and brecciation.In the Palaeogene of East China Sea shelf,where typical soft-sediment deformation structures were developed,clastic deposits of tidal-flat,delta and river facies are the main background deposits of Middle-Upper Eocene Pinghu Formation and Oligocene Huagang Formation.This succession also records diagnostic marks of event deposits and basinal tectonic activities in the form of seismites.

  4. Superlocalization and Formation of Grain Structure in Ni3ge Single Crystals with Different Orientations of Deformation Axes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solov'eva, Yu. V.; Lipatnikova, Ya. D.; Starenchenko, S. V.; Solov'ev, A. N.; Starenchenko, V. A.

    2017-09-01

    The paper describes the influence of orientation of Ni3Ge single crystal deformation axes on the high-temperature superlocalization of plastic deformation. Mechanical properties of single crystals with different orientations are studied in this paper as well as the slip traces and the evolution of the dislocation structure. Based on these investigations, the observing conditions are described for the superlocalization bands and the formation of the grain structure in local areas of the original single crystal.

  5. Influence of Grain Structure and Doping on the Deformation and Fracture of Polycrystalline Silicon for MEMS/NEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Champaign Influence of Grain Structure and Doping on the Deformation and Fracture of Polycrystalline Silicon for MEMS/ NEMS AFOSR Grant # FA9550-09-1...Structure and Doping on the Deformation and Fracture of Polycrystalline Silicon for MEMS/ NEMS 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...Behavior of PZT Films for MEMS  PZT thin films are used in MEMS devices, such as micro- sensors , actuators, and RF-MEMS  Always fabricated in

  6. Dynamic analysis of a rotating rigid-flexible coupled smart structure with large deformations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Based on Hamilton's principle, a new kind of fully coupled nonlinear dynamic model for a rotating rigid-flexible smart structure with a tip mass is proposed. The geometrically nonlinear effects of the axial, transverse displacement and rotation angle are considered by means of the first-order approximation coupling (FOAC) model theory, in which large deformations and the centrifugal stiffening effects are considered. Three kinds of systems are established respectively, which are a structure without piezoelectric layer, with piezoelectric layer in open circuit and closed circuit. Several simulations based on simplified models are presented to show the differences in characteristics between structures with and without the tip mass, between smart beams in closed and open circuit, and between the centrifugal effects in high speed rotating state or not. The last simulation calculates the dynamic response of the structure subjected to external electrical loading.

  7. Loss of rare fish species from tropical floodplain food webs affects community structure and ecosystem multifunctionality in a mesocosm experiment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard M Pendleton

    Full Text Available Experiments with realistic scenarios of species loss from multitrophic ecosystems may improve insight into how biodiversity affects ecosystem functioning. Using 1000 L mesocoms, we examined effects of nonrandom species loss on community structure and ecosystem functioning of experimental food webs based on multitrophic tropical floodplain lagoon ecosystems. Realistic biodiversity scenarios were developed based on long-term field surveys, and experimental assemblages replicated sequential loss of rare species which occurred across all trophic levels of these complex food webs. Response variables represented multiple components of ecosystem functioning, including nutrient cycling, primary and secondary production, organic matter accumulation and whole ecosystem metabolism. Species richness significantly affected ecosystem function, even after statistically controlling for potentially confounding factors such as total biomass and direct trophic interactions. Overall, loss of rare species was generally associated with lower nutrient concentrations, phytoplankton and zooplankton densities, and whole ecosystem metabolism when compared with more diverse assemblages. This pattern was also observed for overall ecosystem multifunctionality, a combined metric representing the ability of an ecosystem to simultaneously maintain multiple functions. One key exception was attributed to time-dependent effects of intraguild predation, which initially increased values for most ecosystem response variables, but resulted in decreases over time likely due to reduced nutrient remineralization by surviving predators. At the same time, loss of species did not result in strong trophic cascades, possibly a result of compensation and complexity of these multitrophic ecosystems along with a dominance of bottom-up effects. Our results indicate that although rare species may comprise minor components of communities, their loss can have profound ecosystem consequences across

  8. Loss of rare fish species from tropical floodplain food webs affects community structure and ecosystem multifunctionality in a mesocosm experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendleton, Richard M; Hoeinghaus, David J; Gomes, Luiz C; Agostinho, Angelo A

    2014-01-01

    Experiments with realistic scenarios of species loss from multitrophic ecosystems may improve insight into how biodiversity affects ecosystem functioning. Using 1000 L mesocoms, we examined effects of nonrandom species loss on community structure and ecosystem functioning of experimental food webs based on multitrophic tropical floodplain lagoon ecosystems. Realistic biodiversity scenarios were developed based on long-term field surveys, and experimental assemblages replicated sequential loss of rare species which occurred across all trophic levels of these complex food webs. Response variables represented multiple components of ecosystem functioning, including nutrient cycling, primary and secondary production, organic matter accumulation and whole ecosystem metabolism. Species richness significantly affected ecosystem function, even after statistically controlling for potentially confounding factors such as total biomass and direct trophic interactions. Overall, loss of rare species was generally associated with lower nutrient concentrations, phytoplankton and zooplankton densities, and whole ecosystem metabolism when compared with more diverse assemblages. This pattern was also observed for overall ecosystem multifunctionality, a combined metric representing the ability of an ecosystem to simultaneously maintain multiple functions. One key exception was attributed to time-dependent effects of intraguild predation, which initially increased values for most ecosystem response variables, but resulted in decreases over time likely due to reduced nutrient remineralization by surviving predators. At the same time, loss of species did not result in strong trophic cascades, possibly a result of compensation and complexity of these multitrophic ecosystems along with a dominance of bottom-up effects. Our results indicate that although rare species may comprise minor components of communities, their loss can have profound ecosystem consequences across multiple trophic

  9. Oxygen: a fundamental property regulating pelagic ecosystem structure in the coastal southeastern tropical Pacific.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Bertrand

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the southeastern tropical Pacific anchovy (Engraulis ringens and sardine (Sardinops sagax abundance have recently fluctuated on multidecadal scales and food and temperature have been proposed as the key parameters explaining these changes. However, ecological and paleoecological studies, and the fact that anchovies and sardines are favored differently in other regions, raise questions about the role of temperature. Here we investigate the role of oxygen in structuring fish populations in the Peruvian upwelling ecosystem that has evolved over anoxic conditions and is one of the world's most productive ecosystems in terms of forage fish. This study is particularly relevant given that the distribution of oxygen in the ocean is changing with uncertain consequences. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A comprehensive data set is used to show how oxygen concentration and oxycline depth affect the abundance and distribution of pelagic fish. We show that the effects of oxygen on anchovy and sardine are opposite. Anchovy flourishes under relatively low oxygen conditions while sardine avoid periods/areas with low oxygen concentration and restricted habitat. Oxygen consumption, trophic structure and habitat compression play a fundamental role in fish dynamics in this important ecosystem. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: For the ocean off Peru we suggest that a key process, the need to breathe, has been neglected previously. Inclusion of this missing piece allows the development of a comprehensive conceptual model of pelagic fish populations and change in an ocean ecosystem impacted by low oxygen. Should current trends in oxygen in the ocean continue similar effects may be evident in other coastal upwelling ecosystems.

  10. CHANGE IN DEFORMATION PROPERTIES MODELING OF CONCRETE IN PROTECTIVE STRUCTURES OF NUCLEAR REACTOR BY IONIZING RADIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. K. Agakhanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The necessity of studying the effect impact of elementary particles impact on the strength and deformation materials properties used in protective constructions nuclear reactors and reactor technology has been stipulated. A nuclear reactor pressure vessel from prestressed concrete, combining the functions of biological protection is to be considered. The neutron flux problem distribution in the pressure vessel of a nuclear reactor has been solved. The solution is made in axisymmetric with the finite element method using a flat triangular finite element. Computing has been conducted in Matlab package. The comparison with the results has been obtained using the finite difference method, as well as the graphs of changes under the influence of radiation exposure and the elastic modulus of concrete radiation deformations have been constructed. The proposed method allows to simulate changes in the deformation properties of concrete under the influence of neutron irradiation. Results of the study can be used in the calculation of stress-strain state of structures, taking into account indirect heterogeneity caused by the physical fields influence.

  11. Lipid memberane:inelastic deformation of surface structure by an atomic force microscope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The stability of the 1,2-Dioleoyl-sn-Glycero-3-[phospho-rac-1-Glycerol-Na] liposome in the liquid crystalline state have been investigated using an atomic force microscope(AFM),We have observed the inelastic deformation of the sample surface,The AFM tip causes persistent deformation of the surface of the lipid membrane,in which some of the lipid molecules are eventually pushed or dragged by the AFM tip.The experiment shows how the surface structure of the lipid membrane can be created by the interaction between the AFM tip and lipid membrane.When the operating force exceeds 10-8N,it leads to large deformations of the surface.A squareregion of about 1×1um2 is created by the scanning probe on the surface,When the operating force is between 10-11N and 10-8N,it can image the topography of the surface of the lipid membrane.The stability of the sample is related to the concentration of the medium in which the sample is prepared.

  12. Lipid membrane: inelastic deformation of surface structure by an atomic force microscope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张静; 孙润广

    2002-01-01

    The stability of the 1,2-Dioleoyl-sn-Glycero-3-[phospho-rac-1-Glycerol-Na] liposome in the liquid crystalline statehave been investigated using an atomic force microscope (AFM). We have observed the inelastic deformation of thesample surface. The AFM tip causes persistent deformation of the surface of the lipid membrane, in which some of thelipid molecules are eventually pushed or dragged by the AFM tip. The experiment shows how the surface structure ofthe lipid membrane can be created by the interaction between the AFM tip and lipid membrane. When the operatingforce exceeds 10-8 N, it leads to large deformations of the surface. A square region of about 1×1μm2 is created by thescanning probe on the surface. When the operating force is between 10-11N and 10-8N, it can image the topographyof the surface of the lipid membrane. The stability of the sample is related to the concentration of the medium in whichthe sample is prepared.

  13. Measurement of terrace deformation and crustal shortening of some renascent fold zones within Kalpin nappe structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG XiaoPing; RAN YongKang; CHENG JianWu; CHEN LiChun; XU XiWei

    2007-01-01

    The Kalpin nappe structure is a strongest thrust and fold deformation belt in front of the Tianshan Mountains since the Cenozoic time. The tectonic deformation occurred in 5-6 striking Mesozoic-Cenozoic fold zones, and some renascent folds formed on the recent alluvial-proluvial fans in front of the folded mountains. We used the total station to measure gully terraces along the longitudinal topographic profile in the renascent fold zones and collected samples from terrace deposits for age determination. Using the obtained formation time and shortening amount of the deformed terraces, we calculated the shortening rate of 4 renascent folds to be 0.1±0.03 mm/a, 0.12±0.04 mm/a, 0.59±0.18 mm/a, and 0.26±0.08 mm/a, respectively. The formation time of the renascent folds is some later than the major tectonic uplift event of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau 0.14 Ma ago. It may be the long-distance effect of this tectonic event on the Tianshan piedmont fold belt.

  14. Highly Deformable Energy-Dissipating Reinforced Concrete Elements in Seismic Design of Reinforced Concrete Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Momoh Emmanuel Owoichoechi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Incorporating scrap tyre rubber particles as partial replacement for aggregates has been found to produce concrete with improved ductility, deformability and damping which are desired characteristics of a viable material for enhancing structural response to earthquake vibrations. An analytical study using Drain-2dX was carried out to investigate the response of 4-storey, 3-bay reinforced concrete frames on innovative rubberised concrete deformable foundation models to simulated earthquake scaled to 5 different peak ground accelerations. Stress-strain properties of 3-layers aramid fibre-reinforced polymer (FRP-confinement for concrete incorporating waste rubber from scrap vehicle tyres were used to model the elements of this foundation models. With a partial decoupling of the superstructure from the direct earthquake force, the models showed up to 70% reduction in base shear, an improved overall q-factor of 7.1, and an estimated frame acceleration of 0.11g for an earthquake peak ground acceleration of 0.44g. This implies that a non-seismically designed reinforced concrete frame on the proposed rubberised concrete deformable foundation system would provide a simple, affordable and equally efficient alternative to the conventional and usually expensive earthquake resistant concrete frames. A supplementary Arrest System (SAS was proposed to anchor the frame from the resulting soft storey at the rubberised concrete foundation. A further research is recommended for the design of concrete hinges with rubberised concrete as used in the model with the most impressive response.

  15. Ecosystem Structure Changes in the Turkish Seas as a Response to Overfishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazihan Akoglu, Ayse; Salihoglu, Baris; Akoglu, Ekin; Kideys, Ahmet E.

    2013-04-01

    Human population in Turkey has grown more than five-fold since its establishment in 1923 and more than 73 million people are currently living in the country. Turkey is surrounded by partially connected seas (the Black Sea, the Sea of Marmara, the Aegean Sea and the Mediterranean Sea) each of which has significantly different productivity levels and ecosystem characteristics. Increasing human population with its growing socio-economic needs has generated an intensive fishing pressure on the fish stocks in its exclusive economic zone. Fishing grounds in the surrounding seas were exploited with different fishing intensities depending upon their productivity level and catch rates. Hence, the responses of these different ecosystems to overfishing have been realized differently. In this study, changes of the ecosystem structures in the Turkish Seas were comparatively investigated by ecosystem indices such as Marine Trophic Index (MTI), Fishing in Balance (FiB) and Primary Production Required (PPR) to assess the degree of sustainability of the fish stocks for future generations.

  16. Deformation and structure evolution of glassy poly(lactic acid) below the glass transition temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Chengbo; Li, Hongfei; Zhang, Yao;

    2015-01-01

    Poly(lactic acid) (PLA) is a bio-based and compostable thermoplastic polyester that has rapidly evolved into a competitive commodity material over the last decade. One key bottleneck in expanding the field of application of PLA is the control of its structure and properties. Therefore, in situ...... by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The obtained results showed that the deformation and yield stress of glassy PLA are strongly dependent on the stretching temperatures together with the transition from mesophase to mesocrystal and the formation of cavities. With the increase in drawing temperature...

  17. Photonic band structures of two-dimensional photonic crystals with deformed lattices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cai Xiang-Hua; Zheng Wan-Hua; Ma Xiao-Tao; Ren Gang; Xia Jian-Bai

    2005-01-01

    Using the plane-wave expansion method, we have calculated and analysed the changes of photonic band structures arising from two kinds of deformed lattices, including the stretching and shrinking of lattices. The square lattice with square air holes and the triangular lattice with circular air holes are both studied. Calculated results show that the change of lattice size in some special ranges can enlarge the band gap, which depends strongly on the filling factor of air holes in photonic crystals; and besides, the asymmetric band edges will appear with the broken symmetry of lattices.

  18. 3D visualization of deformation structures and potential fluid pathways at the Grimsel Test Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneeberger, Raphael; Kober, Florian; Berger, Alfons; Spillmann, Thomas; Herwegh, Marco

    2015-04-01

    Knowledge on the ability of fluids to infiltrate subsurface rocks is of major importance for underground constructions, geothermal or radioactive waste disposal projects. In this study, we focus on the characterization of water infiltration pathways, their 3D geometries and origins. Based on surface and subsurface mapping in combination with drill core data, we developed by the use of MoveTM (Midland Valley Exploration Ltd.) a 3D structural model of the Grimsel Test Site (GTS). GTS is an underground laboratory operated by NAGRA, the Swiss organisation responsible for the management of nuclear waste. It is located within a suite of post-Variscan magmatic bodies comprising former granitic and granodioritic melts, which are dissected by mafic and aplitic dikes. During Alpine orogeny, the suite was tectonically overprinted within two stages of ductile deformation (Wehrens et al., in prep.) followed by brittle overprint of some of the shear zones during the retrograde exhumation history. It is this brittle deformation, which controls today's water infiltration network. However, the associated fractures, cataclasites and fault gouges are controlled themselves by aforementioned pre-existing mechanical discontinuities, whose origin ranges back as far as to the magmatic stage. For example, two sets of vertically oriented mafic dikes (E-W and NW-SE striking) and compositional heterogeneities induced by magmatic segregation processes in the plutonic host rocks served as nucleation sites for Alpine strain localization. Subsequently, NE-SW, E-W and NW-SE striking ductile shear zones were formed, in combination with high temperature fracturing while dissecting the host rocks in a complex 3D pattern (Wehrens et al, in prep.). Whether the ductile shear zones have been subjected to brittle reactivation and can serve as infiltration pathways or not, depends strongly on their orientations with respect to the principal stress field. Especially where deformation structures intersect

  19. Influence of adhesive shear deformation on laminate structural behavior with application to parabolic trough solar collectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauss, D. B.; Reuter, R. C., Jr.

    1983-02-01

    A simplified theory for the bending behavior of a thin flat bilamina panel was developed which includes the effects of shear deformation in the central adhesive layer. Static equilibrium equations for elastic thermomechanical cylindrical bending of a thin plate are used. A solution form is proposed which greatly facilitates application of this theory to structural panels with numerous discrete property changes in the variable direction. The influence of adhesive shear stiffness parameters upon overall laminate behavior is characterized through numerical examples typifying various thermal and mechanical loading conditions.

  20. Clues for a Tortonian reconstruction of the Gibraltar Arc: Structural pattern, deformation diachronism and block rotations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo-Blanc, Ana; Comas, Menchu; Balanyá, Juan Carlos

    2016-06-01

    We proposed a reconstruction of one of the tightest orogenic arcs on Earth: the Gibraltar Arc System. This reconstruction, which includes onshore and offshore data, is completed for approximately 9 Ma. The clues that lead us to draw it are based on a review in terms of structures and age of the superposed deformational events that took place during Miocene, with special attention to the external zones. This review and new structural data presented in this paper permit us to constrain the timing of vertical axis-rotations evidenced by previously published paleomagnetic data, and to identify homogeneous domains in terms of relationships between timing of deformation events, (re)magnetization and rotations. In particular, remagnetization in the Betics took place after the main shortening which produced the external fold-and-thrust belts (pre-upper Miocene), but was mostly previous to a contractive reorganization that affected the whole area; it should have occurred during lower Tortonian (between 9.9 and 11 Ma). From Tortonian to Present, block-rotations as high as 53° took place. Together with plate convergence, they accommodated a tightening and lengthening of the Gibraltar Arc System and drastically altered its geometry. As the orientation and position of any pre-9 Ma kinematic indicator or structural element is also modified, our reconstruction should be used as starting point for any pre-Tortonian model of the westernmost orogenic segment of the Alpine-Mediterranean system.

  1. In situ characterization of the deformation and failure behavior of non-stochastic porous structures processed by selective laser melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorny, B.; Niendorf, T.; Lackmann, J. [Lehrstuhl fuer Werkstoffkunde (Materials Science), University of Paderborn, Pohlweg 47-49, 33098 Paderborn (Germany); Thoene, M.; Troester, T. [Lehrstuhl fuer Leichtbau im Automobil (Automotive Lightweight Construction), University of Paderborn, Pohlweg 47-49, 33098 Paderborn (Germany); Direct Manufacturing Research Center (DMRC), Mersinweg 3, 33098 Paderborn (Germany); Maier, H.J., E-mail: hmaier@mail.upb.de [Lehrstuhl fuer Werkstoffkunde (Materials Science), University of Paderborn, Pohlweg 47-49, 33098 Paderborn (Germany)

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: {yields} The present study focused on deformation behavior and failure mechanisms in lattice structure produced by selective laser melting (SLM). {yields} It is demonstrated that heat treatments can be used to increase the energy absorption of an SLM-processed structure. {yields} An in situ testing procedure was introduced, where local strains were calculated by digital image correlation {yields} Shear failure could be predicted by localization using Tresca strains. {yields} The approach employed provides a means to understand the microstructure-mechanical property-local deformation relationship. - Abstract: Cellular materials are promising candidates for load adapted light-weight structures. Direct manufacturing (DM) tools are effective methods to produce non-stochastic structures. Many DM studies currently focus on optimization of the geometric nature of the structures obtained. The literature available so far reports on the mechanical properties but local deformation mechanisms are not taken into account. In order to fill this gap, the current study addresses the deformation behavior of a lattice structure produced by selective laser melting (SLM) on the local scale by means of a comprehensive experimental in situ approach, including electron backscatter diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and digital image correlation. SLM-processed as well as heat treated lattice structures made from TiAl6V4 alloy were employed for mechanical testing. It is demonstrated that the current approach provides means to understand the microstructure-mechanical property-local deformation relationship to allow for optimization of load adapted lattice structures.

  2. Macroalgal blooms alter community structure and primary productivity in marine ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Devin A; Arvanitidis, Christos; Blight, Andrew J; Chatzinikolaou, Eva; Guy-Haim, Tamar; Kotta, Jonne; Orav-Kotta, Helen; Queirós, Ana M; Rilov, Gil; Somerfield, Paul J; Crowe, Tasman P

    2014-09-01

    Eutrophication, coupled with loss of herbivory due to habitat degradation and overharvesting, has increased the frequency and severity of macroalgal blooms worldwide. Macroalgal blooms interfere with human activities in coastal areas, and sometimes necessitate costly algal removal programmes. They also have many detrimental effects on marine and estuarine ecosystems, including induction of hypoxia, release of toxic hydrogen sulphide into the sediments and atmosphere, and the loss of ecologically and economically important species. However, macroalgal blooms can also increase habitat complexity, provide organisms with food and shelter, and reduce other problems associated with eutrophication. These contrasting effects make their overall ecological impacts unclear. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to estimate the overall effects of macroalgal blooms on several key measures of ecosystem structure and functioning in marine ecosystems. We also evaluated some of the ecological and methodological factors that might explain the highly variable effects observed in different studies. Averaged across all studies, macroalgal blooms had negative effects on the abundance and species richness of marine organisms, but blooms by different algal taxa had different consequences, ranging from strong negative to strong positive effects. Blooms' effects on species richness also depended on the habitat where they occurred, with the strongest negative effects seen in sandy or muddy subtidal habitats and in the rocky intertidal. Invertebrate communities also appeared to be particularly sensitive to blooms, suffering reductions in their abundance, species richness, and diversity. The total net primary productivity, gross primary productivity, and respiration of benthic ecosystems were higher during macroalgal blooms, but blooms had negative effects on the productivity and respiration of other organisms. These results suggest that, in addition to their direct social and

  3. PSP SAR interferometry monitoring of ground and structure deformations applied to archaeological sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, Mario; Francioni, Elena; Trillo, Francesco; Minati, Federico; Margottini, Claudio; Spizzichino, Daniele; Trigila, Alessandro; Iadanza, Carla

    2017-04-01

    Archaeological sites and cultural heritage are considered as critical assets for the society, representing not only the history of region or a culture, but also contributing to create a common identity of people living in a certain region. In this view, it is becoming more and more urgent to preserve them from climate changes effect and in general from their degradation. These structures are usually just as precious as fragile: remote sensing technology can be useful to monitor these treasures. In this work, we will focus on ground deformation measurements obtained by satellite SAR interferometry and on the methodology adopted and implemented in order to use the results operatively for conservation policies in a Italian archaeological site. The analysis is based on the processing of COSMO-SkyMed Himage data by the e-GEOS proprietary Persistent Scatterer Pair (PSP) SAR interferometry technology. The PSP technique is a proven SAR interferometry technology characterized by the fact of exploiting in the processing only the relative properties between close points (pairs) in order to overcome atmospheric artefacts (which are one of the main problems of SAR interferometry). Validations analyses [Costantini et al. 2015] settled that this technique applied to COSMO-SkyMed Himage data is able to retrieve very dense (except of course on vegetated or cultivated areas) millimetric deformation measurements with sub-metric localization. Considering the limitations of all the interferometric techniques, in particular the fact that the measurement are along the line of sight (LOS) and the geometric distortions, in order to obtain the maximum information from interferometric analysis, both ascending and descending geometry have been used. The ascending analysis allows selecting measurements points over the top and, approximately, South-West part of the structures, while the descending one over the top and the South-East part of the structures. The interferometric techniques needs

  4. Geomorphic and paleoseismic evidence for late Quaternary deformation in the southwest Kashmir Valley, India: Out-of-sequence thrusting, or deformation above a structural ramp?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, C.; Ahmad, S.; Meigs, A.

    2011-12-01

    In the northwest Himalaya, partitioning of Indian-Eurasian convergence across multiple active structures, including a fold at the deformation front, and the Riasi thrust 60 km to the north, suggests that strain is partially accommodated by out-of-sequence thrusting. Deformation of the Plio-Pleistocene Karawa deposits (KD) and latest Pleistocene fluvial terraces on the southwest side of the Kashmir Valley (KV) indicate that deformation also occurs 100 km north of the deformation front. A historical record of 13 earthquakes in the valley over the last millennium, including damaging earthquakes in 1555 and 1885, further suggests that the KV is a locus of active deformation. We use geomorphic mapping, terrace profiling, paleoseismic trenching, and radiometric dating to constrain the extent, timing, rate and style of deformation in the KV. Tectonic geomorphic mapping on high-resolution satellite imagery reveals a series of discontinuous scarps, which we call the Balapora fault (BF), cutting the KD and younger terraces over 45-60 km south of the Jehlum River. Near the north end of the BF, only the highest three of six strath terraces that cross the fault along the Shaliganaga River are deformed, and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) ages on the highest undeformed terrace show that the fault has not moved there in 50 +/-3 ka. To the south, a flight of five strath terraces along the Sasara River have been uplifted by the BF. Correlating soil and loess stratigraphy from the youngest deformed terrace dated terraces in nearby drainages suggests that deformation has occurred since ~50 ka. Further south, along the Rembiara River (RR), the BF deforms two regionally extensive terraces. Using an OSL age of 51 +/-11 ka collected from fluvial deposits a few meters above the lower strath, and a measured strath elevation above the river of 19 +/- 1 m at the fault, we calculate an average incision rate of 0.3-0.5 mm/yr. An exposure on the left bank of the RR reveals that the BF

  5. Faunal impact on vegetation structure and ecosystem function in mangrove forests: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannicci, Stefano; Burrows, Damien; Fratini, Sara; Smith, Thomas J.; Offenberg, Joachim; Dahdouh-Guebas, Farid

    2008-01-01

    The last 20 years witnessed a real paradigm shift concerning the impact of biotic factors on ecosystem functions as well as on vegetation structure of mangrove forests. Before this small scientific revolution took place, structural aspects of mangrove forests were viewed to be the result of abiotic processes acting from the bottom-up, while, at ecosystem level, the outwelling hypothesis stated that mangroves primary production was removed via tidal action and carried to adjacent nearshore ecosystems where it fuelled detrital based food-webs. The sesarmid crabs were the first macrofaunal taxon to be considered a main actor in mangrove structuring processes, thanks to a number of studies carried out in the Indo-Pacific forests in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Following these classical papers, a number of studies on Sesarmidae feeding and burrowing ecology were carried out, which leave no doubts about the great importance of these herbivorous crabs in structuring and functioning Old world ecosystems. Although Sesarmidae are still considered very important in shaping mangrove structure and functioning, recent literature emphasizes the significance of other invertebrates. The Ocypodidae have now been shown to have the same role as Sesarmidae in terms of retention of forest products and organic matter processing in New world mangroves. In both New and Old world mangroves, crabs process large amounts of algal primary production, contribute consistently to retention of mangrove production and as ecosystem engineers, change particle size distribution and enhance soil aeration. Our understanding of the strong impact of gastropods, by means of high intake rates of mangrove products and differential consumption of propagules, has changed only recently. The role of insects must also be stressed. It is now clear that older techniques used to assess herbivory rates by insects strongly underestimate their impact, both in case of leaf eating and wood boring species and that

  6. Simulation of CO2 Injection in Porous Media with Structural Deformation Effect

    KAUST Repository

    Negara, Ardiansyah

    2011-06-18

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration is one of the most attractive methods to reduce the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere by injecting it into the geological formations. Furthermore, it is also an effective mechanism for enhanced oil recovery. Simulation of CO2 injection based on a suitable modeling is very important for explaining the fluid flow behavior of CO2 in a reservoir. Increasing of CO2 injection may cause a structural deformation of the medium. The structural deformation modeling in carbon sequestration is useful to evaluate the medium stability to avoid CO2 leakage to the atmosphere. Therefore, it is important to include such effect into the model. The purpose of this study is to simulate the CO2 injection in a reservoir. The numerical simulations of two-phase flow in homogeneous and heterogeneous porous media are presented. Also, the effects of gravity and capillary pressure are considered. IMplicit Pressure Explicit Saturation (IMPES) and IMplicit Pressure-Displacements and an Explicit Saturation (IMPDES) schemes are used to solve the problems under consideration. Various numerical examples were simulated and divided into two parts of the study. The numerical results demonstrate the effects of buoyancy and capillary pressure as well as the permeability value and its distribution in the domain. Some conclusions that could be derived from the numerical results are the buoyancy of CO2 is driven by the density difference, the CO2 saturation profile (rate and distribution) are affected by the permeability distribution and its value, and the displacements of the porous medium go to constant values at least six to eight months (on average) after injection. Furthermore, the simulation of CO2 injection provides intuitive knowledge and a better understanding of the fluid flow behavior of CO2 in the subsurface with the deformation effect of the porous medium.

  7. Crustal Structure and Deformation of the Yakutat Microplate: New Insights From STEEP Marine Seismic Reflection Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, L. A.; Gulick, S. P.; Christeson, G.; van Avendonk, H.; Reece, R.; Elmore, R.; Pavlis, T.

    2008-12-01

    In fall 2008, we will conduct an active source marine seismic experiment of the offshore Yakutat microplate in the northern Gulf of Alaska. The survey will be conducted aboard the academic research vessel, R/V Marcus Langseth, collecting deep-penetrating multi-channel seismic reflection survey using an 8-km, 640 channel hydrophone streamer and a 6600 cu. in., 36 airgun array. The survey is the concluding data acquisition phase for the ST. Elias Erosion and tectonics Project (STEEP), a multi-institution NSF-Continental Dynamics project investigating the interplay of climate and tectonics in the Chugach-St. Elias Mountains in southern Alaska. The experiment will also provide important site survey information for possible future Integrated Ocean Drilling Program investigations. Two profiles coincident with wide-angle refraction data (see Christeson, et al., this session) will image structural changes across the Dangerous River Zone from east to west and the Transition Fault from south to north. We will also image the western portion of the Transition Fault to determine the nature of faulting along this boundary including whether or not the Pacific Plate is underthrusting beneath the Yakutat microplate as part of this collision. Our westernmost profile will image the Kayak Island Zone, typically described as the northern extension of the Aleutian megathrust but which may be a forming suture acting as a deformation backstop for the converging Yakutat and North American plates. Profiles across the Pamplona Zone, the current Yakutat-North America deformation front, will further constrain relative timing of structural development and the depth of deformation on the broad folds and thrust faults that comprise the area. This new dataset will allow further insight into regional tectonics of the St. Elias region as well as provide more detail regarding the development of the south Alaskan margin during major Plio-Pleistocene glacial- interglacial periods.

  8. Geometries of deformed granitoid inclusions in the Sudbury Igneous Complex of the Sudbury Impact Structure, Canada: Evidence for deformation during solidification of the impact melt sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenauer, Iris; Riller, Ulrich

    2010-05-01

    The Main Mass of the 1.85 Ga Sudbury Igneous Complex (SIC) occupies the central portion of the Sudbury Impact Structure and represents an impact melt sheet that resulted from hypervelocity impact into Archaean and Proterozoic target rocks. During cooling, the ca. 3 km thick melt sheet differentiated into layers of norite, quartz gabbro and granophyre and now hosts one of the world's largest Cu-Ni-PGE deposits. Meteorite impact occurred apparently during an ongoing orogeny, i.e., the ca. 1.89 to 1.80 Ga Penokean orogeny. However, structural evidence for this is still sparse Dike-like, granitoid inclusions are exposed in the norite layer of the southern SIC. Here, sub-planar inclusions are folded and characterized by axial-planar cleavage. More specifically, fold mullions of the granitoid inclusions formed by layer-parallel NNW-SSE shortening. Cuspate-lobate geometries of the inclusion interfaces indicate that the granitoid inclusions were mechanically more competent than the norite host rock during ductile deformation of both lithologies. The contrast in mechanical strength between granitoid inclusions and norite host rock indicates ductile deformation at high temperature and low strain rates in the unconsolidated melt sheet. Shortening directions inferred from the geometry of the inclusions agree with those obtained from inversion of brittle-ductile faults from the same area, geometry of deformation in the metasedimentary strata of the Proterozoic target rocks and l-s mylonitic fabrics developed in the granophyre layer of the SIC and the overlying impact melt breccias. Collectively, these structural characteristics indicate that orogenic deformation in the Sudbury area occurred during cooling and solidification of the impact melt sheet.

  9. Effect of Severe Plastic Deformation on Structure and Properties of Al-Sc-Ta and Al-Sc-Ti Alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezina, Alla; Monastyrska, Tetiana; Davydenko, Olexandr; Molebny, Oleh; Polishchuk, Sergey

    2017-12-01

    The comparative analysis of the effect of monotonous and non-monotonous severe plastic deformations (SPD) on the structure and properties of aluminum alloys has been carried out. Conventional hydrostatic extrusion (HE) with a constant deformation direction and equal-channel angular hydroextrusion (ECAH) with an abrupt change in the deformation direction were chosen for the cases of monotonous and non-monotonous SPD, respectively. Model cast hypoeutectic Al-0.3%Sc alloys and hypereutectic Al-0.6%Sc alloys with Ta and Ti additives were chosen for studying. It was demonstrated that SPD of the alloys resulted in the segregation of the material into active and inactive zones which formed a banded structure. The active zones were shown to be bands of localized plastic deformation. The distance between zones was found to be independent of the accumulated strain degree and was in the range of 0.6-1 μm. Dynamic recrystallization in the active zones was observed using TEM. The dynamic recrystallization was accompanied by the formation of disclinations, deformation bands, low-angle, and high-angle boundaries, i.e., rotational deformation modes developed. The dynamic recrystallization was more intense during the non-monotonous deformation as compared with the monotonous one, which was confirmed by the reduction of texture degree in the materials after ECAH.

  10. Trophic web structure and ecosystem attributes of a temperate estuarine system (Ria de Aveiro, Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva García-Seoane

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Estuaries are among the most productive ecosystems and simultaneously among the most threatened by conflicting human activities, which damage their ecological functions. Describing and attempting to understand the structure and functioning of estuaries is an essential step for maintaining and restoring the quality of estuarine ecosystems. The objective of this study was to obtain insights into the ecosystem structure and functioning of Ria de Aveiro. The study area is a coastal lagoon located on the Northwest Atlantic coast of Portugal, which is connected to the sea through an artificial channel. The ECOPATH software was used to create a static balanced trophic food web model of the tidal part of Ria de Aveiro. The model considers 26 functional groups, including birds, fish, invertebrates, seagrasses, zooplankton, phytoplankton and detritus. Few adjustments were necessary for the input parameters because most of the data were based on direct observations or compiled from literature based on the study site. The trophic interactions within the food web of Riade Aveiro and the transference of energy between functional groups were quantitatively represented. Finally, the keystone index was defined for each functional group.

  11. Fishery-induced changes in the subtropical Pacific pelagic ecosystem size structure: observations and theory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey J Polovina

    Full Text Available We analyzed a 16-year (1996-2011 time series of catch and effort data for 23 species with mean weights ranging from 0.8 kg to 224 kg, recorded by observers in the Hawaii-based deep-set longline fishery. Over this time period, domestic fishing effort, as numbers of hooks set in the core Hawaii-based fishing ground, has increased fourfold. The standardized aggregated annual catch rate for 9 small (15 kg it decreased about 50% over the 16-year period. A size-based ecosystem model for the subtropical Pacific captures this pattern well as a response to increased fishing effort. Further, the model projects a decline in the abundance of fishes larger than 15 kg results in an increase in abundance of animals from 0.1 to 15 kg but with minimal subsequent cascade to sizes smaller than 0.1 kg. These results suggest that size-based predation plays a key role in structuring the subtropical ecosystem. These changes in ecosystem size structure show up in the fishery in various ways. The non-commercial species lancetfish (mean weight 7 kg has now surpassed the target species, bigeye tuna, as the species with the highest annual catch rate. Based on the increase in snake mackerel (mean weight 0.8 kg and lancetfish catches, the discards in the fishery are estimated to have increased from 30 to 40% of the total catch.

  12. Anthropogenic impacts on tropical forest biodiversity: a network structure and ecosystem functioning perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Rebecca J

    2010-11-27

    Huge areas of diverse tropical forest are lost or degraded every year with dramatic consequences for biodiversity. Deforestation and fragmentation, over-exploitation, invasive species and climate change are the main drivers of tropical forest biodiversity loss. Most studies investigating these threats have focused on changes in species richness or species diversity. However, if we are to understand the absolute and long-term effects of anthropogenic impacts on tropical forests, we should also consider the interactions between species, how those species are organized in networks, and the function that those species perform. I discuss our current knowledge of network structure and ecosystem functioning, highlighting empirical examples of their response to anthropogenic impacts. I consider the future prospects for tropical forest biodiversity, focusing on biodiversity and ecosystem functioning in secondary forest. Finally, I propose directions for future research to help us better understand the effects of anthropogenic impacts on tropical forest biodiversity.

  13. Effect of Temperature, Fractional Deformation, and Cooling Rate on the Structure and Properties of Steel 09GNB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodzhaspirov, G. E.; Sulyagin, R. V.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of temperature, divisibility of deformation, and cooling rate in high-temperature thermomechanical treatment (HTTMT) on the structure and mechanical properties of low-alloy steel 09GNB is studied. The steel is used as a high-strength material for the production of offshore structures, strips, and other welded articles. The study is performed using the method of experimental design where the parameters are fractional deformation (number of passes in rolling), final temperature of the deformation, and rate of post-deformation cooling. The results of the experiments are used to construct regression equations describing the qualitative and quantitative effect of the parameters of HTTMT on the mechanical properties of the steel. Microstructure and fracture surfaces of the steel are analyzed.

  14. Tracking molecular structure deformation of nitrobenzene and its torsion-vibration coupling by intense pumping CARS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chang; Wu, Hong-Lin; Song, Yun-Fei; He, Xing; Yang, Yan-Qiang; Tan, Duo-Wang

    2016-11-01

    The structural deformation induced by intense laser field of liquid nitrobenzene (NB) molecule, a typical molecule with restricting internal rotation, is tracked by time- and frequency-resolved coherent anti-Stokes. Raman spectroscopy (CARS) technique with an intense pump laser. The CARS spectra of liquid NB show that the NO2 torsional mode couples with the NO2 symmetric stretching mode, and the NB molecule undergoes ultrafast structural deformation with a relaxation time of 265 fs. The frequency of NO2 torsional mode in liquid NB (42 cm-1) at room temperature is found from the sum and difference combination bands involving the NO2 symmetric stretching mode and torsional mode in time- and frequency-resolved CARS spectra. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 21173063 and 21203047), the Foundation of Heilongjiang Bayi Agricultural University, China (Grant No. XZR2014-16), NSAF (Grant No. U1330106), and the Special Research Project of National Key Laboratory of Shock Wave and Detonation Physics, Institute of Fluid Physics, China Academy of Engineering Physics (Grant No. 2012-S-07).

  15. Differential-algebraic approach to large deformation analysis of frame structures subjected to dynamic loads

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Yu-jia; ZHU Yuan-yuan; CHENG Chang-jun

    2008-01-01

    A nonlinear mathematical model for the analysis of large deformation of frame structures with discontinuity conditions and initial displacements,subject to dynamic loads is formulated with arc-coordinates.The differential quadrature element method (DQEM)is then applied to discretize the nonlinear mathematical model in the spatial domain.An effective method is presented to deal with discontinuity conditions of multivariables in the application of DQEM.A set of DQEM discretization equations are obtained,which are a set of nonlinear differential-algebraic equations with singularity in the time domain.This paper also presents a method to solve nonlinear differential-algebra equations.As application,static and dynamical analyses of large deformation of frames and combined frame structures,subjected to concentrated and distributed forces,are presented.The obtained results are compared with those in the literatares.Numerical results show that the proposed method is general,and effective in dealing with discontinuity conditions of multi-variables and solving difierential-algebraic equations.It requires only a small number of nodes and has low computation complexity with high precision and a good convergence property.

  16. Structure, functioning, and cumulative stressors of Mediterranean deep-sea ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tecchio, Samuele; Coll, Marta; Sardà, Francisco

    2015-06-01

    Environmental stressors, such as climate fluctuations, and anthropogenic stressors, such as fishing, are of major concern for the management of deep-sea ecosystems. Deep-water habitats are limited by primary productivity and are mainly dependent on the vertical input of organic matter from the surface. Global change over the latest decades is imparting variations in primary productivity levels across oceans, and thus it has an impact on the amount of organic matter landing on the deep seafloor. In addition, anthropogenic impacts are now reaching the deep ocean. The Mediterranean Sea, the largest enclosed basin on the planet, is not an exception. However, ecosystem-level studies of response to varying food input and anthropogenic stressors on deep-sea ecosystems are still scant. We present here a comparative ecological network analysis of three food webs of the deep Mediterranean Sea, with contrasting trophic structure. After modelling the flows of these food webs with the Ecopath with Ecosim approach, we compared indicators of network structure and functioning. We then developed temporal dynamic simulations varying the organic matter input to evaluate its potential effect. Results show that, following the west-to-east gradient in the Mediterranean Sea of marine snow input, organic matter recycling increases, net production decreases to negative values and trophic organisation is overall reduced. The levels of food-web activity followed the gradient of organic matter availability at the seafloor, confirming that deep-water ecosystems directly depend on marine snow and are therefore influenced by variations of energy input, such as climate-driven changes. In addition, simulations of varying marine snow arrival at the seafloor, combined with the hypothesis of a possible fishery expansion on the lower continental slope in the western basin, evidence that the trawling fishery may pose an impact which could be an order of magnitude stronger than a climate

  17. Community Structure of Macrozoobenthos in Mangrove Ecosystem, Kutai National Park, East Kalimantan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anugrah A Budiarsa

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Mangrove forest in Kutai National Park (KNP is considered as nature-protected ecosystem. This forest ecosystem has high productivity ecosystem roles as feeding source, spawning and conservation area for water organism living in this surrounding area such as fishes, crustacean, mollusk and others. At the mangrove floor, mangrove is a benthic ecosystem that utilizes organic material either produced from mangrove itself or land sedimentation. This research was conducted using quadrant transect method with 10 observation stations. Collected data were identified, summed and analyzed. Community structure was analyzed by determining the diversity index, homogenous index and dominant index. The research showed that Makrozoobenthos found at the research location was 17 species which divided into 12 families and 3 classes. The smallest number was found in Lombok Bay (station number 8 with 6 species. The largest number was found in Perancis Cape (station number 9 with 15 species. The diversity index of community structure ranged from 1,7 to 2,4. This indicated that the community diversity was at moderate level (1,5

  18. Calcium Isotopic Evidence for Vulnerable Marine Ecosystem Structure Prior to the K/Pg Extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jeremy E; Vincent, Peggy; Tacail, Théo; Khaldoune, Fatima; Jourani, Essaid; Bardet, Nathalie; Balter, Vincent

    2017-06-05

    The collapse of marine ecosystems during the end-Cretaceous mass extinction involved the base of the food chain [1] up to ubiquitous vertebrate apex predators [2-5]. Large marine reptiles became suddenly extinct at the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K/Pg) boundary, whereas other contemporaneous groups such as bothremydid turtles or dyrosaurid crocodylomorphs, although affected at the familial, genus, or species level, survived into post-crisis environments of the Paleocene [5-9] and could have found refuge in freshwater habitats [10-12]. A recent hypothesis proposes that the extinction of plesiosaurians and mosasaurids could have been caused by an important drop in sea level [13]. Mosasaurids are unusually diverse and locally abundant in the Maastrichtian phosphatic deposits of Morocco, and with large sharks and one species of elasmosaurid plesiosaurian recognized so far, contribute to an overabundance of apex predators [3, 7, 14, 15]. For this reason, high local diversity of marine reptiles exhibiting different body masses and a wealth of tooth morphologies hints at complex trophic interactions within this latest Cretaceous marine ecosystem. Using calcium isotopes, we investigated the trophic structure of this extinct assemblage. Our results are consistent with a calcium isotope pattern observed in modern marine ecosystems and show that plesiosaurians and mosasaurids indiscriminately fall in the tertiary piscivore group. This suggests that marine reptile apex predators relied onto a single dietary calcium source, compatible with the vulnerable wasp-waist food webs of the modern world [16]. This inferred peculiar ecosystem structure may help explain plesiosaurian and mosasaurid extinction following the end-Cretaceous biological crisis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Off-Yrast low-spin structure of deformed nuclei at mass number A∼150

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krugmann, Andreas

    2014-07-14

    -spinflip parts of the cross section has been done. Here, for the first time, the Pygmy Dipole Resonance (PDR) has been identified in the heavy deformed nucleus {sup 154}Sm that appears as a double-hump structure in the E1 response. A possible interpretation of this double-hump structure in terms of a deformation splitting analogously to the Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR) has been given. In case of the spinflip cross section, a broad distribution in the excitation energy range between 6 and 12 MeV has been observed. The distribution and the extracted sum strength are in good accordance with previous experiments.

  20. The significance of the ProtDeform score for structure prediction and alignment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairo Rocha

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: When a researcher uses a program to align two proteins and gets a score, one of her main concerns is how often the program gives a similar score to pairs that are or are not in the same fold. This issue was analysed in detail recently for the program TM-align with its associated TM-score. It was shown that because the TM-score is length independent, it allows a P-value and a hit probability to be defined depending only on the score. Also, it was found that the TM-scores of gapless alignments closely follow an Extreme Value Distribution (EVD. The program ProtDeform for structural protein alignment was developed recently and is characterised by the ability to propose different transformations of different protein regions. Our goal is to analyse its associated score to allow a researcher to have objective reasons to prefer one aligner over another, and carry out a better interpretation of the output. RESULTS: The study on the ProtDeform score reveals that it is length independent in a wider score range than TM-scores and that PD-scores of gapless (random alignments also approximately follow an EVD. On the CASP8 predictions, PD-scores and TM-scores, with respect to native structures, are highly correlated (0.95, and show that around a fifth of the predictions have a quality as low as 99.5% of the random scores. Using the Gold Standard benchmark, ProtDeform has lower probabilities of error than TM-align both at a similar speed. The analysis is extended to homology discrimination showing that, again, ProtDeform offers higher hit probabilities than TM-align. Finally, we suggest using three different P-values according to the three different contexts: Gapless alignments, optimised alignments for fold discrimination and that for superfamily discrimination. In conclusion, PD-scores are at the very least as valuable for prediction scoring as TM-scores, and on the protein classification problem, even more reliable.

  1. Validation of an immersed thick boundary method for simulating fluid-structure interactions of deformable membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigüenza, J.; Mendez, S.; Ambard, D.; Dubois, F.; Jourdan, F.; Mozul, R.; Nicoud, F.

    2016-10-01

    This paper constitutes an extension of the work of Mendez et al. (2014) [36], for three-dimensional simulations of deformable membranes under flow. An immersed thick boundary method is used, combining the immersed boundary method with a three-dimensional modeling of the structural part. The immersed boundary method is adapted to unstructured grids for the fluid resolution, using the reproducing kernel particle method. An unstructured finite-volume flow solver for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations is coupled with a finite-element solver for the structure. The validation process relying on a number of test cases proves the efficiency of the method, and its robustness is illustrated when computing the dynamics of a tri-leaflet aortic valve. The proposed immersed thick boundary method is able to tackle applications involving both thin and thick membranes/closed and open membranes, in significantly high Reynolds number flows and highly complex geometries.

  2. Experiments on deformation behaviour of functionally graded NiTi structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bashir S. Shariat

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Functionally graded NiTi structures benefit from the combination of the smart properties of NiTi and those of functionally graded structures. This article provides experimental data for thermomechanical deformation behaviour of microstructurally graded, compositionally graded and geometrically graded NiTi alloy components, related to the research article entitled “Functionally graded shape memory alloys: design, fabrication and experimental evaluation” (Shariat et al., 2017 [1]. Stress–strain variation of microstructurally graded NiTi wires is presented at different heat treatment conditions and testing temperatures. The complex 4-way shape memory behaviour of a compositionally graded NiTi strip during one complete thermal cycle is demonstrated. The effects of geometrical design on pseudoelastic behaviour of geometrically graded NiTi plates over tensile loading cycles are presented on the stress–strain diagrams.

  3. ΔI = 4 structure in superdeformed rotational band - deformation with C4v symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamoto, Ikuko; Mottelson, Ben

    1995-01-01

    The recent observation of "ΔI = 4 structure" (or, alternatively, we call it "ΔI = 2 staggering") in the rotational spectra of superdeformed nuclei suggests the occurrence of Y44 deformations in the nuclear shape with associated C4v point-symmetry for the rotational Hamiltonian. Requiring the axially symmetric terms to favour rotation about an axis that is perpendicular to the long axis of nuclear shape, we have studied the general class of Hamiltonians with such symmetry. The ΔI = 4 structure can indeed result from the tunnelling between the four equivalent minima that occur in the plane perpendicular to the superdeformation symmetry axis, but the occurrence of this effect is a subtle matter depending sensitively on the axially symmetric terms in the Hamiltonian. We also discuss the dependence of the phase and the amplitude of the ΔI = 2 staggering on parameters.

  4. Burning fire-prone Mediterranean shrublands: immediate changes in soil microbial community structure and ecosystem functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goberna, M; García, C; Insam, H; Hernández, M T; Verdú, M

    2012-07-01

    Wildfires subject soil microbes to extreme temperatures and modify their physical and chemical habitat. This might immediately alter their community structure and ecosystem functions. We burned a fire-prone shrubland under controlled conditions to investigate (1) the fire-induced changes in the community structure of soil archaea, bacteria and fungi by analysing 16S or 18S rRNA gene amplicons separated through denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis; (2) the physical and chemical variables determining the immediate shifts in the microbial community structure; and (3) the microbial drivers of the change in ecosystem functions related to biogeochemical cycling. Prokaryotes and eukaryotes were structured by the local environment in pre-fire soils. Fire caused a significant shift in the microbial community structure, biomass C, respiration and soil hydrolases. One-day changes in bacterial and fungal community structure correlated to the rise in total organic C and NO(3)(-)-N caused by the combustion of plant residues. In the following week, bacterial communities shifted further forced by desiccation and increasing concentrations of macronutrients. Shifts in archaeal community structure were unrelated to any of the 18 environmental variables measured. Fire-induced changes in the community structure of bacteria, rather than archaea or fungi, were correlated to the enhanced microbial biomass, CO(2) production and hydrolysis of C and P organics. This is the first report on the combined effects of fire on the three biological domains in soils. We concluded that immediately after fire the biogeochemical cycling in Mediterranean shrublands becomes less conservative through the increased microbial biomass, activity and changes in the bacterial community structure.

  5. Peculiarities of Specimen Preparation for the Investigation of Woven Structure Deformations using Image Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovita DARGIENĖ

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a method based on non – contact image analysis, which allows to simplify experimental process and increase measurement accuracy, identifying local deformations of woven material. Striving to gain accuracy of image analysis results, specimen preparation and deformation process fixation stages are of great importance. For the studies differently marked specimen groups were prepared. Their behaviour in process of tension was analysed using a special calibrated image acquisition system. Using digital images of deformed specimen the displacement of the marked surface elements - points and their shape changes were measured and material deformations in separate specimen parts (A and B were described. According the obtained results zones of uniform deformations were established and it confirmed that stretched specimen was deformed unevenly. Mild deformations obtained in part A and the highest values of deformation recorded in the centre of part B: local deformations in the transverse to tension direction were set up to -42.9 % and 27.6 % of local elongation along tension direction. Results of local deformation variation explain buckling phenomenon of bias stretched fabric. Particular local deformation values allow us to describe behaviour of deformed material, bring opportunities to perform experimental and modelling comparison of the results. The suggested methodology could be applied for the investigation of differently deformed material behaviour.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.19.1.3830

  6. Internal deformation in layered Zechstein-III K-Mg salts. Structures formed by complex deformation and high contrasts in viscosity observed in drill cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raith, Alexander; Urai, Janos L.

    2016-04-01

    During the evaporation of a massive salt body, alternations of interrupted and full evaporation sequences can form a complex layering of different lithologies. Viscosity contrasts of up to five orders of magnitude between these different lithologies are possible in this environment. During the late stage of an evaporation cycle potassium and magnesium (K-Mg) salts are precipitated. These K-Mg salts are of economic interest but also a known drilling hazard due to their very low viscosity. How up to 200m thick layers of these evaporites affect salt deformation at different scales is not well known. A better understanding of salt tectonics with extreme mechanical stratification is needed for better exploration and production of potassium-magnesium salts and to predict the internal structure of potential nuclear waste repositories in salt. To gain a better understanding of the internal deformation of these layers we analyzed K-Mg salt rich drill cores out of the Zechstein III-1b subunit from the Veendam Pillow 10 km southeast of Groningen, near the city Veendam in the NE Netherlands. The study area has a complex geological history with multiple tectonic phases of extension and compression forming internal deformation in the pillow but also conserving most of the original layering. Beside halite the most common minerals in the ZIII-1b are carnallite, kieserite, anhydrite and bischofite alternating in thin layers of simple composition. Seismic interpretation revealed that the internal structure of the Veendam Pillow shows areas, in which the K-Mg salt rich ZIII 1b layer is much thicker than elsewhere, as a result of salt deformation. The internal structure of the ZIII-1b on the other hand, remains unknown. The core analysis shows a strong strain concentration in the weaker Bischofite (MgCl2*6H20) and Carnallite (KMgCl3*6H20) rich layers producing tectonic breccias and highly strained layers completely overprinting the original layering. Layers formed by alternating beds

  7. Deformation of Aztec Sandstone at Valley of Fire of Nevada: failure modes, sequence of deformation, structural products and their interplay with paleo fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Valley of Fire State Park, 60 km NE of Las Vegas, is a beacon of knowledge for deformation of Aztec Sandstone, a cross-bedded quartz arenite deposited in the Aztec-Navajo-Nugget erg in early Jurassic. It displays great diversity of physical properties, different localization types and micromechanics. The two deformation episodes, the Sevier folding & thrusting and the Basin & Range extension affected the area. The appearance of compaction bands marks the earliest deformation structure and their distribution, orientation, and dimension are controlled by the depositional architecture and loading. The earliest shear structures in the area are the Muddy Mountain, Summit, and Willow Tank thrusts and numerous small-scale bed-parallel faults. They altogether produced several kilometers of E-SE transport and shortening in the late Cretaceous and display numerous shear bands in its damage zone within the Aztec Sandstone. Shear bands also occur along dune boundaries and cross-bed interfaces. These observations indicate that the early deformation of the sandstone was accommodated by strain localization with various kinematics. The younger generation of faults in the area is of mid-Miocene age, and crops out pervasively. It includes a series of small offset normal faults (less than a few ten meters) which can be identified at steep cliff faces. These faults are highly segmented and are surrounded by a dense population of splay fractures. A large number of these splays were later sheared sequentially resulting in a well-defined network of left- and right-lateral strike-slip faults with slip magnitudes up to a few kilometers in the Park. The formation mechanisms of both the normal and strike-slip faults can be characterized as the sliding along planes of initial weaknesses and the accompanying cataclastic deformation. Some of the initial weak planes are associated with the depositional elements such as interdune boundaries and cross-bed interfaces while others are joint

  8. Existing Resources, Standards, and Procedures for Precise Monitoring and Analysis of Structural Deformations. Volume 2. Appendices

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-09-01

    APPENDIX 5. Geometrical Analysis of Deformation Surveys APPENDIX 6. Integrated Analysis of Deformation Surveys at Mactaquac APPENDIX 7. Combination of...1989a). "Integrated analysis of deformation surveys at Mactaquac ." International Water Power and Dam Construction, August, pp. 17-22. Czaja, J. (1971...New Brunswick P.O.Box 4400 Fredericton, N.B., E3B 5A3, Canada APPENDIX 6. INTEGRATED ANALYSIS OF DEFORMATION SURVEYS AT MACTAQUAC A-. k . - .. USA and

  9. Finite Macro-Element Mesh Deformation in a Structured Multi-Block Navier-Stokes Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Robert E.

    2005-01-01

    A mesh deformation scheme is developed for a structured multi-block Navier-Stokes code consisting of two steps. The first step is a finite element solution of either user defined or automatically generated macro-elements. Macro-elements are hexagonal finite elements created from a subset of points from the full mesh. When assembled, the finite element system spans the complete flow domain. Macro-element moduli vary according to the distance to the nearest surface, resulting in extremely stiff elements near a moving surface and very pliable elements away from boundaries. Solution of the finite element system for the imposed boundary deflections generally produces smoothly varying nodal deflections. The manner in which distance to the nearest surface has been found to critically influence the quality of the element deformation. The second step is a transfinite interpolation which distributes the macro-element nodal deflections to the remaining fluid mesh points. The scheme is demonstrated for several two-dimensional applications.

  10. Thermally assisted deformation of structural superplastics and nanostructured materials: A personal perspective

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K A Padmanabhan

    2003-02-01

    Optimal structural superplasticity and the deformation of nanostructured materials in the thermally activated region are regarded as being caused by the same physical process. In this analysis, grain/interphase boundary sliding controls the rate of deformation at the level of atomistics. Boundary sliding develops to a mesoscopic level by plane interface formation involving two or more boundaries and at this stage the rate controlling step is boundary migration. In other words, grain/interphase boundary sliding is viewed as a two-scale process. The non-zero, unbalanced shear stresses present at the grain/interphase boundaries ensure that near-random grain rotation is also a non-rate controlling concomitant of this mechanism. Expressions have been derived for the free energy of activation for the atomic scale rate controlling process, the threshold stress that should be crossed for the commencement of mesoscopic boundary sliding, the inverse Hall-Petch effect and the steady state rate equation connecting the strain rate to the independent variables of stress, temperature and grain size. Beyond the point of inflection in the log stress-log strain rate plot, climb controlled multiple dislocation motion within the grains becomes increasingly important and at sufficiently high stresses becomes rate controlling. The predictions have been validated experimentally.

  11. Highly Stretchable Superhydrophobic Composite Coating Based on Self-Adaptive Deformation of Hierarchical Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xin; Tang, Changyu; He, Zhoukun; Shao, Hong; Xu, Keqin; Mei, Jun; Lau, Woon-Ming

    2017-05-01

    With the rapid development of stretchable electronics, functional textiles, and flexible sensors, water-proof protection materials are required to be built on various highly flexible substrates. However, maintaining the antiwetting of superhydrophobic surface under stretching is still a big challenge since the hierarchical structures at hybridized micro-nanoscales are easily damaged following large deformation of the substrates. This study reports a highly stretchable and mechanically stable superhydrophobic surface prepared by a facile spray coating of carbon black/polybutadiene elastomeric composite on a rubber substrate followed by thermal curing. The resulting composite coating can maintain its superhydrophobic property (water contact angle ≈170° and sliding angle superhydrophobic property. Furthermore, the experimental observation and modeling analysis reveal that the stable superhydrophobic properties of the composite coating are attributed to the unique self-adaptive deformation ability of 3D hierarchical roughness of the composite coating, which delays the Cassie-Wenzel transition of surface wetting. In addition, it is first observed that the damaged coating can automatically recover its superhydrophobicity via a simple stretching treatment without incorporating additional hydrophobic materials. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Simulation Study of Stress and Deformation Behaviour of Debonded Laminated Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirwani, C. K.; Mittal, H.; Panda, S. K.; Mahapatra, S. S.; Mandal, S. K.; De, A. K.

    2017-02-01

    The bending strength and deformation characteristics of the debonded laminated plate under the uniformly distributed loading (UDL) have been investigated in this research article. For the simulation study, an internally damaged laminated plate structure model has been developed in ANSYS based on the first-order shear deformable kinematic theory via ANSYS parametric design language (APDL) code. The internal debonding within the laminated structure is incorporated using two sub-laminate approach. Further, the convergence (different mesh densities), as well as the validity (comparing the responses with published results) of the present simulation model, have been performed by solving the deflection responses under the influence of transversely loaded layered structure. Also, to show the coherence of the simulation analysis the results are compared with the experimental bending results of the homemade Glass/Epoxy composite with artificial delamination. For the experimental analysis, Glass/Epoxy laminated composite seeded with delamination at the central mid-plane of the laminate is fabricated using an open mould hand lay-up composites fabrication technique. For the computational purpose, the necessary material properties of fabricated composite plate evaluated experimentally via uniaxial tensile test (Universal Testing Machine INSTRON-1195). Further, the bending (three-point bend test) test is conducted with the help of Universal Testing Machine INSTRON-5967. Finally, the effect different geometrical and material parameters (thickness ratio, modular ratio, constraint conditions) and magnitude of the loading on the static deflection and stress behaviour of the delaminated composite plate are investigated thoroughly by solving different kinds of numerical illustrations and discussed in detail.

  13. Resurgence structure to all orders of multi-bions in deformed SUSY quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimori, Toshiaki; Kamata, Syo; Misumi, Tatsuhiro; Nitta, Muneto; Sakai, Norisuke

    2017-08-01

    We investigate the resurgence structure in quantum mechanical models originating in 2d nonlinear sigma models with emphasis on nearly supersymmetric and quasi-exactly solvable parameter regimes. By expanding the ground state energy in powers of a supersymmetry-breaking deformation parameter δ ɛ, we derive exact results for the expansion coefficients. In the class of models described by real multiplets, the O(δɛ) ground state energy has a non-Borel summable asymptotic series, which gives rise to imaginary ambiguities leading to rich resurgence structure. We discuss sine-Gordon quantum mechanics (QM) as an example and show that the semiclassical contributions from complex multi-bion solutions correctly reproduce the corresponding part in the exact result including the imaginary ambiguities. As a typical model described by chiral multiplets, we discuss CP^{N-1} QM and show that the exact O(δɛ) ground state energy can be completely reconstructed from the semiclassical multi-bion contributions. Although the O(δɛ) ground state energy has trivial resurgence structure, a simple but rich resurgence structure appears at O(δɛ2). We show the complete cancelation between the O(δɛ2) imaginary ambiguities arising from the non-Borel summable perturbation series and those in the semiclassical contributions of N-1 complex bion solutions. We also discuss the resurgence structure of a squashed {C}P^1 QM.

  14. Changes in food web structure and ecosystem functioning of a large, shallow Chinese lake during the 1950s, 1980s and 2000s

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kong, Xiangzhen; He, Wei; Liu, Wenxiu; Yang, Bin; Xu, Fuliu; Jørgensen, Sven Erik; Mooij, W.M.

    2016-01-01

    Food web structure dynamics and ecosystem functioning are strongly linked, and both are indispensable in evaluating ecosystem development in lakes under multiple anthropogenic stressors. However, model-based approaches concerning the changes in food web structure and ecosystem functioning in a ce

  15. Chitinolytic and pectinolytic community in the vertical structure of chernozem's zone ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukacheva, E.; Manucharova, N.

    2012-04-01

    Chitin is a long-chain polymer of a N-acetylglucosamine and is found in many places throughout the natural world. Pectin is a structural heteropolysaccharide contained in the primary cell walls of terrestrial plants. Roots of the plants and root crops contain pectin. Chitin and pectin are widely distributed throughout the natural world. For this reason it is important to investigate the structural and functional properties of complex organisms, offering degradation of these biopolymers in the terrestrial and soil ecosystems. It is known that ecosystems have their own structure. It is possible to allocate some vertical tiers: phylloplane, litter (soil covering), soil. We investigated chitinolytic and pektinolytic microbial communities dedicated to different layers of the ecosystem of the chernozem zone. Quantity of eukaryote and procaryote organisms increased in the test samples with chitin and pectin. Increasing of eukaryote in samples with pectin was more then in samples with chitin. Also should be noted the significant increasing of actinomycet`s quantity in the samples with chitin in comparison with samples with pectin. The variety and abundance of bacteria in the litter samples increased an order of magnitude as compared to other options investigated. Further prokaryote community was investigated by method FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization). FISH is a cytogenetic technique developed that is used to detect and localize the presence or absence of specific DNA sequences on chromosomes. Quantity of Actinomycets and Firmicutes was the largest among identified cells with metabolic activity in soil samples. Should be noted significant increasing of the quantity of Acidobateria and Bacteroidetes in pectinolytic community and Alphaproteobacteria in chitinolytic community. In considering of the phylogenetic structure investigated communities in samples of the litter should be noted increase in the segment of Proteobacteria. Increasing of this group of

  16. Climate-induced changes in lake ecosystem structure inferred from coupled neo- and paleoecological approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saros, Jasmine E; Stone, Jeffery R; Pederson, Gregory T; Slemmons, Krista E H; Spanbauer, Trisha; Schliep, Anna; Cahl, Douglas; Williamson, Craig E; Engstrom, Daniel R

    2012-10-01

    Over the 20th century, surface water temperatures have increased in many lake ecosystems around the world, but long-term trends in the vertical thermal structure of lakes remain unclear, despite the strong control that thermal stratification exerts on the biological response of lakes to climate change. Here we used both neo- and paleoecological approaches to develop a fossil-based inference model for lake mixing depths and thereby refine understanding of lake thermal structure change. We focused on three common planktonic diatom taxa, the distributions of which previous research suggests might be affected by mixing depth. Comparative lake surveys and growth rate experiments revealed that these species respond to lake thermal structure when nitrogen is sufficient, with species optima ranging from shallower to deeper mixing depths. The diatom-based mixing depth model was applied to sedimentary diatom profiles extending back to 1750 AD in two lakes with moderate nitrate concentrations but differing climate settings. Thermal reconstructions were consistent with expected changes, with shallower mixing depths inferred for an alpine lake where treeline has advanced, and deeper mixing depths inferred for a boreal lake where wind strength has increased. The inference model developed here provides a new tool to expand and refine understanding of climate-induced changes in lake ecosystems.

  17. Analysis of mitochondrial 3D-deformation in cardiomyocytes during active contraction reveals passive structural anisotropy of orthogonal short axes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yael Yaniv

    Full Text Available The cardiomyocyte cytoskeleton, composed of rigid and elastic elements, maintains the isolated cell in an elongated cylindrical shape with an elliptical cross-section, even during contraction-relaxation cycles. Cardiomyocyte mitochondria are micron-sized, fluid-filled passive spheres distributed throughout the cell in a crystal-like lattice, arranged in pairs sandwiched between the sarcomere contractile machinery, both longitudinally and radially. Their shape represents the extant 3-dimensional (3D force-balance. We developed a novel method to examine mitochondrial 3D-deformation in response to contraction and relaxation to understand how dynamic forces are balanced inside cardiomyocytes. The variation in transmitted light intensity induced by the periodic lattice of myofilaments alternating with mitochondrial rows can be analyzed by Fourier transformation along a given cardiomyocyte axis to measure mitochondrial deformation along that axis. This technique enables precise detection of changes in dimension of ∼1% in ∼1 µm (long-axis structures with 8 ms time-resolution. During active contraction (1 Hz stimulation, mitochondria deform along the length- and width-axes of the cell with similar deformation kinetics in both sarcomere and mitochondrial structures. However, significant deformation anisotropy (without hysteresis was observed between the orthogonal short-axes (i.e., width and depth of mitochondria during electrical stimulation. The same degree of deformation anisotropy was also found between the myocyte orthogonal short-axes during electrical stimulation. Therefore, the deformation of the mitochondria reflects the overall deformation of the cell, and the apparent stiffness and stress/strain characteristics of the cytoskeleton differ appreciably between the two cardiomyocyte orthogonal short-axes. This method may be applied to obtaining a better understanding of the dynamic force-balance inside cardiomyocytes and of changes in the

  18. Soft-sediment deformation structures in cores from lacustrine slurry deposits of the Late Triassic Yanchang Fm. (central China)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Renchao; Loon, A. J. (Tom) van; Yin, Wei; Fan, Aiping; Han, Zuozhen

    2016-09-01

    The fine-grained autochthonous sedimentation in the deep part of a Late Triassic lake was frequently interrupted by gravity-induced mass flows. Some of these mass flows were so rich in water that they must have represented slurries. This can be deduced from the soft-sediment deformation structures that abound in cores from these lacustrine deposits which constitute the Yanchang Fm., which is present in the Ordos Basin (central China). The flows and the resulting SSDS were probably triggered by earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, shear stress of gravity flows, and/or the sudden release of overburden-induced excess pore-fluid pressure. The tectonically active setting, the depositional slope and the high sedimentation rate facilitated the development of soft-sediment deformations, which consist mainly of load casts and associated structures such as pseudonodules and flame structures. Sediments with such deformations were occasionally eroded by slurries and became embedded in their deposits.

  19. The Lattice Structure of Connection Preserving Deformations for q-Painlevé Equations I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M. Ormerod

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available We wish to explore a link between the Lax integrability of the q-Painlevé equations and the symmetries of the q-Painlevé equations. We shall demonstrate that the connection preserving deformations that give rise to the q-Painlevé equations may be thought of as elements of the groups of Schlesinger transformations of their associated linear problems. These groups admit a very natural lattice structure. Each Schlesinger transformation induces a Bäcklund transformation of the q-Painlevé equation. Each translational Bäcklund transformation may be lifted to the level of the associated linear problem, effectively showing that each translational Bäcklund transformation admits a Lax pair. We will demonstrate this framework for the q-Painlevé equations up to and including q-P_{VI}.

  20. Half-lives and fine structure for the α decay of deformed even-even nuclei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The α-decay properties of well-deformed even-even nuclei are systematically calculated within the multichannel cluster model (MCCM). Instead of working in the WKB framework, the quasibound solution to the coupled Schro¨dinger equation is presented with outgoing wave boundary conditions, and the coupling potential is taken into full account in terms of the general quantum theories. The calculated α-decay half-lives are found to agree well with the experimental data with a mean factor of less than 2. The fine structure observed in α decay is also well reproduced by the four-channel microscopic calculation. Very strikingly, the MCCM can give relatively precise descriptions of the branching ratio to excited 4+ states, which is often overestimated in the usual WKB calculations. We expect it to be a significant development of theoretical models toward quantitative descriptions of α transitions to high-spin daughter states.

  1. Half-lives and fine structure for the α decay of deformed even-even nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, DongDong; Ren, ZhongZhou

    2011-08-01

    The α-decay properties of well-deformed even-even nuclei are systematically calculated within the multichannel cluster model (MCCM). Instead of working in the WKB framework, the quasibound solution to the coupled Schrödinger equation is presented with outgoing wave boundary conditions, and the coupling potential is taken into full account in terms of the general quantum theories. The calculated α-decay half-lives are found to agree well with the experimental data with a mean factor of less than 2. The fine structure observed in α decay is also well reproduced by the four-channel microscopic calculation. Very strikingly, the MCCM can give relatively precise descriptions of the branching ratio to excited 4+ states, which is often overestimated in the usual WKB calculations. We expect it to be a significant development of theoretical models toward quantitative descriptions of α transitions to high-spin daughter states.

  2. Generalized contour deformation method in momentum space two-body spectral structures and scattering amplitudes

    CERN Document Server

    Hagen, G; Vaagen, J S

    2003-01-01

    A generalized contour deformation method (GCDM) which combines complex rotation and translation in momentum space, is discussed. GCDM gives accurate results for bound, virtual (antibound), resonant and scattering states starting with a realistic nucleon-nucleon interaction. It provides a basis for full off-shell $t$-matrix calculations both for real and complex input energies. Results for both spectral structures and scattering amplitudes compare perfectly well with exact values for the separable Yamaguchi potential. Accurate calculation of virtual states in the Malfliet-Tjon and the realistic CD-Bonn nucleon-nucleon interactions are presented. GCDM is also a promising method for the computation of in-medium properties such as the resummation of particle-particle and particle-hole diagrams in infinite nuclear matter. Implications for in-medium scattering are discussed.

  3. Microscopic structure of deformed and superdeformed collective bands in rotating nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvasil, J.; Iudice, N. Lo; Andreozzi, F.; Knapp, F.; Porrino, A.

    2007-03-01

    We investigate in self-consistent cranked Nilsson plus quasiparticle random-phase approximation the structure of Hg190,192,194 in their evolution from normal to superdeformation and from low to high rotational frequencies. The analysis of the energy levels suggests a splitting of few normally deformed bands into two or more branches. The investigation of the dynamical moments of inertia supports the octupole character of the low-lying negative parity superdeformed bands, in agreement with previous theoretical predictions and experimental findings. As a more direct confirm of their octupole nature, we obtain strong E1 transitions linking those bands to the yrast superdeformed band, in agreement with experiments. A similar result is shown to hold also for Dy152. Like in Dy152, the collectivity of the low-lying scissors mode gets enhanced with the onset of superdeformation.

  4. Improved Displacement Transfer Functions for Structure Deformed Shape Predictions Using Discretely Distributed Surface Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, William L.; Fleischer, Van Tran

    2012-01-01

    In the formulations of earlier Displacement Transfer Functions for structure shape predictions, the surface strain distributions, along a strain-sensing line, were represented with piecewise linear functions. To improve the shape-prediction accuracies, Improved Displacement Transfer Functions were formulated using piecewise nonlinear strain representations. Through discretization of an embedded beam (depth-wise cross section of a structure along a strain-sensing line) into multiple small domains, piecewise nonlinear functions were used to describe the surface strain distributions along the discretized embedded beam. Such piecewise approach enabled the piecewise integrations of the embedded beam curvature equations to yield slope and deflection equations in recursive forms. The resulting Improved Displacement Transfer Functions, written in summation forms, were expressed in terms of beam geometrical parameters and surface strains along the strain-sensing line. By feeding the surface strains into the Improved Displacement Transfer Functions, structural deflections could be calculated at multiple points for mapping out the overall structural deformed shapes for visual display. The shape-prediction accuracies of the Improved Displacement Transfer Functions were then examined in view of finite-element-calculated deflections using different tapered cantilever tubular beams. It was found that by using the piecewise nonlinear strain representations, the shape-prediction accuracies could be greatly improved, especially for highly-tapered cantilever tubular beams.

  5. Food-web structure and ecosystem services: insights from the Serengeti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Andy

    2009-01-01

    The central organizing theme of this paper is to discuss the dynamics of the Serengeti grassland ecosystem from the perspective of recent developments in food-web theory. The seasonal rainfall patterns that characterize the East African climate create an annually oscillating, large-scale, spatial mosaic of feeding opportunities for the larger ungulates in the Serengeti; this in turn creates a significant annual variation in the food available for their predators. At a smaller spatial scale, periodic fires during the dry season create patches of highly nutritious grazing that are eaten in preference to the surrounding older patches of less palatable vegetation. The species interactions between herbivores and plants, and carnivores and herbivores, are hierarchically nested in the Serengeti food web, with the largest bodied consumers on each trophic level having the broadest diets that include species from a large variety of different habitats in the ecosystem. The different major habitats of the Serengeti are also used in a nested fashion; the highly nutritious forage of the short grass plains is available only to the larger migratory species for a few months each year. The longer grass areas, the woodlands and kopjes (large partially wooded rocky islands in the surrounding mosaic of grassland) contain species that are resident throughout the year; these species often have smaller body size and more specialized diets than the migratory species. Only the larger herbivores and carnivores obtain their nutrition from all the different major habitat types in the ecosystem. The net effect of this is to create a nested hierarchy of subchains of energy flow within the larger Serengeti food web; these flows are seasonally forced by rainfall and operate at different rates in different major branches of the web. The nested structure that couples sequential trophic levels together interacts with annual seasonal variation in the fast and slow chains of nutrient flow in a way that

  6. Food-web structure and ecosystem services: insights from the Serengeti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Andy

    2009-06-27

    The central organizing theme of this paper is to discuss the dynamics of the Serengeti grassland ecosystem from the perspective of recent developments in food-web theory. The seasonal rainfall patterns that characterize the East African climate create an annually oscillating, large-scale, spatial mosaic of feeding opportunities for the larger ungulates in the Serengeti; this in turn creates a significant annual variation in the food available for their predators. At a smaller spatial scale, periodic fires during the dry season create patches of highly nutritious grazing that are eaten in preference to the surrounding older patches of less palatable vegetation. The species interactions between herbivores and plants, and carnivores and herbivores, are hierarchically nested in the Serengeti food web, with the largest bodied consumers on each trophic level having the broadest diets that include species from a large variety of different habitats in the ecosystem. The different major habitats of the Serengeti are also used in a nested fashion; the highly nutritious forage of the short grass plains is available only to the larger migratory species for a few months each year. The longer grass areas, the woodlands and kopjes (large partially wooded rocky islands in the surrounding mosaic of grassland) contain species that are resident throughout the year; these species often have smaller body size and more specialized diets than the migratory species. Only the larger herbivores and carnivores obtain their nutrition from all the different major habitat types in the ecosystem. The net effect of this is to create a nested hierarchy of subchains of energy flow within the larger Serengeti food web; these flows are seasonally forced by rainfall and operate at different rates in different major branches of the web. The nested structure that couples sequential trophic levels together interacts with annual seasonal variation in the fast and slow chains of nutrient flow in a way that

  7. Soft-sediment deformations (convolute lamination and load structures) in turbidites as indicators of flow reflections against bounding slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinterri, Roberto; Muzzi Magalhaes, Pierre; Tagliaferri, Alessio; Cunha, Rogerio S.; Laporta, Michele

    2015-04-01

    Soft-sediment deformations, such as convolute laminations, load structures and water escapes are very rapid deformations that occur in unconsolidated sediments near the depositional surface during or shortly after deposition and before significant diagenesis. These types of deformations develop when primary stratifications are deformed by a system of driving forces, while the sediment is temporarily in a weakened state due to the action of a deformation mechanism know as liquidization. This deformation occurs if the applied stress exceeds the sediment strength, either through an increase in the applied stress or through a temporary reduction in sediment strength. Liquidization mechanisms can be triggered by several agents, such as seismic shaking, rapid sedimentation with high-fallout rates or cyclic-pressure variations associated with storm waves or breaking waves. Consequently, soft-sediment deformations can be produced by different processes and form ubiquitous sedimentary structures characterizing many sedimentary environments. However, even though these types of structures are relatively well-known in terms of geometry and sedimentary characteristics, many doubts arise when the understanding of deformation and trigger mechanisms is attempted. As stressed also by the recent literature, the main problem lies in the fact that the existing approaches for the identification of triggering agents rely on criteria that are not diagnostic or not applicable to outcrop-based studies, because they are not always based on detailed facies analysis related to a paleoenvironmental-context approach. For this reason, this work discusses the significance of particular types of soft-sediment deformations that are very common in turbidite deposits, namely convolute laminations and load structures, especially on the basis of a deep knowledge of the stratigraphic framework and geological setting in which these structures are inserted. More precisely, detailed facies analyses of the

  8. A workflow for sub-/seismic structure and deformation quantification of 3-D reflection seismic data sets across different scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krawczyk, C.M.; Lohr, T.; Oncken, O. [GFZ Potsdam (Germany); Tanner, D.C. [Goettingen Univ. (Germany). GZG; Endres, H. [RWTH Aachen (Germany)]|[TEEC, Isernhagen (Germany); Trappe, H.; Kukla, P. [TEEC, Isernhagen (Germany)

    2007-09-13

    The evolution of a sedimentary basin is mostly affected by deformation. Large-scale, subsurface deformation is typically identified by seismic data, sub-seismic small-scale fractures by well data. Between these two methods, we lack a deeper understanding of how deformation scales. We analysed a 3-D reflection seismic data set in the North German Basin, in order to determine the magnitude and distribution of deformation and its accumulation in space and time. A five-step approach is introduced for quantitative deformation and fracture prediction. An increased resolution of subtle tectonic lineaments is achieved by coherency processing, allowing to unravel the kinematics in the North German Basin from structural interpretation. Extensional events during basin initiation and later inversion are evident. 3-D retrodeformation shows major-strain magnitudes between 0-20% up to 1.3 km away from a fault trace, and variable deviations of associated extensional fractures. Good correlation of FMI data, strain distribution from retro-deformation and from geostatistic tools (see also Trappe et al., this volume) allows the validation of the results and makes the prediction of small-scale faults/fractures possible. The temporal component will be gained in the future by analogue models. The suggested workflow is applicable to reflection seismic surveys and yields in great detail both the tectonic history of a region as well as predictions for hydrocarbon plays or deep groundwater or geothermal reservoirs. (orig.)

  9. Microearthquake activity, lithospheric structure, and deformation modes at an amagmatic ultraslow spreading Southwest Indian Ridge segment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Florian; Schlindwein, Vera

    2016-07-01

    While nascent oceanic lithosphere at slow to fast spreading mid-ocean ridges (MOR) is relatively well studied, much less is known about the lithospheric structure and properties at ultraslow MORs. Here we present microearthquake data from a 1 year ocean bottom seismometer deployment at the amagmatic, oblique supersegment of the ultraslow spreading Southwest Indian Ridge. A refraction seismic experiment was performed to constrain upper lithosphere P-velocities and results were used to construct a 1D velocity model for earthquake location. Earthquake foci were located individually and subsequently relocated relative to each other to sharpen the image of seismically active structures. Frequent earthquake activity extends to 31 km beneath the seafloor, indicating an exceptionally thick brittle lithosphere and an undulating brittle-ductile transition that implies significant variations in the along-axis thermal structure of the lithosphere. We observe a strong relation between petrology, microseismicity distribution, and topography along the ridge axis: Peridotite-dominated areas associate with deepest hypocenters, vast volumes of lithosphere that deforms aseismically as a consequence of alteration, and the deepest axial rift valley. Areas of basalt exposure correspond to shallower hypocenters, shallower and more rugged axial seafloor. Focal mechanisms deviate from pure extension and are spatially variable. Earthquakes form an undulating band of background seismicity and do not delineate discrete detachment faults as common on slow spreading ridges. Instead, the seismicity band sharply terminates to the south, immediately beneath the rift boundary. Considering the deep alteration, large steep boundary faults might be present but are entirely aseismic.

  10. Modified Displacement Transfer Functions for Deformed Shape Predictions of Slender Curved Structures with Varying Curvatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, William L.; Fleischer, Van Tran

    2014-01-01

    To eliminate the need to use finite-element modeling for structure shape predictions, a new method was invented. This method is to use the Displacement Transfer Functions to transform the measured surface strains into deflections for mapping out overall structural deformed shapes. The Displacement Transfer Functions are expressed in terms of rectilinearly distributed surface strains, and contain no material properties. This report is to apply the patented method to the shape predictions of non-symmetrically loaded slender curved structures with different curvatures up to a full circle. Because the measured surface strains are not available, finite-element analysis had to be used to analytically generate the surface strains. Previously formulated straight-beam Displacement Transfer Functions were modified by introducing the curvature-effect correction terms. Through single-point or dual-point collocations with finite-elementgenerated deflection curves, functional forms of the curvature-effect correction terms were empirically established. The resulting modified Displacement Transfer Functions can then provide quite accurate shape predictions. Also, the uniform straight-beam Displacement Transfer Function was applied to the shape predictions of a section-cut of a generic capsule (GC) outer curved sandwich wall. The resulting GC shape predictions are quite accurate in partial regions where the radius of curvature does not change sharply.

  11. An overview of APECOSM, a spatialized mass balanced “Apex Predators ECOSystem Model” to study physiologically structured tuna population dynamics in their ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maury, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of the ecosystem model APECOSM (Apex Predators ECOSystem Model) which is developed in the framework of the GLOBEC-CLIOTOP Programme. APECOSM represents the flow of energy through the ecosystem with a size-resolved structure in both space and time. The uptake and use of energy for growth, maintenance and reproduction by the organisms are modelled according to the DEB (dynamic energy budget) theory ( Kooijmann, 2000) and the size-structured nature of predation is explicit. The pelagic community is divided into epipelagic and mesopelagic groups, the latter being subdivided into vertically migrant and non-migrant species. The model is mass-conservative. Energy is provided as the basis of the model through primary production and transferred through 3D spatially explicit size-spectra. Focus species (tunas at present, but any predator species can be considered) are “extracted” from the global size-spectra without losing mass balance and represented with more physiological and behavioural details. The forcing effects of temperature, currents, light, oxygen, primary production and fishing are explicitly taken into account.

  12. Progressive Indosinian N-S deformation of the Jiaochang structure in the Songpan-Ganzi fold-belt, Western China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Bin; Liu, Shugen; Liu, Sun; Jansa, Luba; Li, Zhiwu; Zhong, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Integrated field data, microstructural and three-dimensional strain analyses are used to document coaxial N-S shortening and southward increase in deformation intensity and metamorphism at the Jiaochang structure. Two episodes of deformation (D1,D2) with localized post-D2 deformation have been identified in the area. The first deformation (D1) episode is defined by a main axial-plane of parallel folds observable on a micro- to kilometer-scale, while the second episode of deformation (D2) is defined by micro-scale metamorphic folds, associated with E-W oriented stretching lineation. These processes are the result of Indosinian tectonism (Late Triassic to Early Jurassic) characterized by nearly coaxial N-S compression and deformation. This is indicated by E-W trending, sub-parallel to parallel foliation (S1, e.g. axial-plane of folds, and S2, i.e. axial-plane of metamorphic folds, crenulation cleavage) and lineation (L1, e.g. axis of folds, and L2, i.e. stretching lineation, axis of metamorphic folds and B-axis of echelon lens). Most of the porphyroblasts and minerals (e.g. pyrite, biotite) show two growth phases with localized growth in the third phase (muscovite). The progressive D1-D2 structure is widespread in the south of the Jiaochang area, but only D1 structure crops out at the north. The strain intensity (γ), compression ratios (c%) and octahedral strain intensity (εs) are similar across the Jiaochang structure (i.e., γ ≈ 1.8, c ≈ 27%, εs = 0.9), showing a broad range of Flinn values (K = 0.77 to 7.57). The long-axis orientations are roughly symmetric between two limbs of the structure. Therefore, we suggest that the architecture of the Jiaochang structure has been controlled by coaxial N-S shortening and deformation (D1-D2) during the Indosinian tectonic epoch, with insignificant post-D2 deformation.

  13. Progressive Indosinian N-S deformation of the Jiaochang structure in the Songpan-Ganzi fold-belt, Western China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Deng

    Full Text Available Integrated field data, microstructural and three-dimensional strain analyses are used to document coaxial N-S shortening and southward increase in deformation intensity and metamorphism at the Jiaochang structure. Two episodes of deformation (D1,D2 with localized post-D2 deformation have been identified in the area. The first deformation (D1 episode is defined by a main axial-plane of parallel folds observable on a micro- to kilometer-scale, while the second episode of deformation (D2 is defined by micro-scale metamorphic folds, associated with E-W oriented stretching lineation. These processes are the result of Indosinian tectonism (Late Triassic to Early Jurassic characterized by nearly coaxial N-S compression and deformation. This is indicated by E-W trending, sub-parallel to parallel foliation (S1, e.g. axial-plane of folds, and S2, i.e. axial-plane of metamorphic folds, crenulation cleavage and lineation (L1, e.g. axis of folds, and L2, i.e. stretching lineation, axis of metamorphic folds and B-axis of echelon lens. Most of the porphyroblasts and minerals (e.g. pyrite, biotite show two growth phases with localized growth in the third phase (muscovite. The progressive D1-D2 structure is widespread in the south of the Jiaochang area, but only D1 structure crops out at the north. The strain intensity (γ, compression ratios (c% and octahedral strain intensity (εs are similar across the Jiaochang structure (i.e., γ ≈ 1.8, c ≈ 27%, εs = 0.9, showing a broad range of Flinn values (K = 0.77 to 7.57. The long-axis orientations are roughly symmetric between two limbs of the structure. Therefore, we suggest that the architecture of the Jiaochang structure has been controlled by coaxial N-S shortening and deformation (D1-D2 during the Indosinian tectonic epoch, with insignificant post-D2 deformation.

  14. Effect of combined deformation on the structure and properties of copper and titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolyarov, V. V.; Pashinskaya, E. G.; Beigel'Zimer, Ya. E.

    2010-10-01

    The effect of a combination scheme of severe plastic deformation and subsequent cold rolling or electroplastic rolling on the deformability, microstructural evolution, and mechanical properties of copper, titanium of various purities, and a titanium alloy of an equiatomic composition is studied. The combined deformation method is shown to create a number of new nanostructured and ultrafine-grained states with a high strength and ductility.

  15. Effects on the structure of Arctic ecosystems in the short- and long-term perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaghan, Terry V; Björn, Lars Olof; Chernov, Yuri; Chapin, Terry; Christensen, Torben R; Huntley, Brian; Ims, Rolf A; Johansson, Margareta; Jolly, Dyanna; Jonasson, Sven; Matveyeva, Nadya; Panikov, Nicolai; Oechel, Walter; Shaver, Gus; Henttonen, Heikki

    2004-11-01

    Species individualistic responses to warming and increased UV-B radiation are moderated by the responses of neighbors within communities, and trophic interactions within ecosystems. All of these responses lead to changes in ecosystem structure. Experimental manipulation of environmental factors expected to change at high latitudes showed that summer warming of tundra vegetation has generally led to smaller changes than fertilizer addition. Some of the factors manipulated have strong effects on the structure of Arctic ecosystems but the effects vary regionally, with the greatest response of plant and invertebrate communities being observed at the coldest locations. Arctic invertebrate communities are very likely to respond rapidly to warming whereas microbial biomass and nutrient stocks are more stable. Experimentally enhanced UV-B radiation altered the community composition of gram-negative bacteria and fungi, but not that of plants. Increased plant productivity due to warmer summers may dominate food-web dynamics. Trophic interactions of tundra and sub-Arctic forest plant-based food webs are centered on a few dominant animal species which often have cyclic population fluctuations that lead to extremely high peak abundances in some years. Population cycles of small rodents and insect defoliators such as the autumn moth affect the structure and diversity of tundra and forest-tundra vegetation and the viability of a number of specialist predators and parasites. Ice crusting in warmer winters is likely to reduce the accessibility of plant food to lemmings, while deep snow may protect them from snow-surface predators. In Fennoscandia, there is evidence already for a pronounced shift in small rodent community structure and dynamics that have resulted in a decline of predators that specialize in feeding on small rodents. Climate is also likely to alter the role of insect pests in the birch forest system: warmer winters may increase survival of eggs and expand the range

  16. Effects of Structural Deformation and Tube Chirality on Electronic Conductance of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svizhenko, Alexei; Maiti, Amitesh; Anantram, M. P.; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A combination of large scale classical force-field (UFF), density functional theory (DFT), and tight-binding Green's function transport calculations is used to study the electronic properties of carbon nanotubes under the twist, bending, and atomic force microscope (AFM)-tip deformation. We found that in agreement with experiment a significant change in electronic conductance can be induced by AFM-tip deformation of metallic zigzag tubes and by twist deformation of armchair tubes. The effect is explained in terms of bandstructure change under deformation.

  17. Emergence of Coherent Localized Structures in Shear Deformations of Temperature Dependent Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsaounis, Theodoros; Olivier, Julien; Tzavaras, Athanasios E.

    2016-12-01

    Shear localization occurs in various instances of material instability in solid mechanics and is typically associated with Hadamard-instability for an underlying model. While Hadamard instability indicates the catastrophic growth of oscillations around a mean state, it does not by itself explain the formation of coherent structures typically observed in localization. The latter is a nonlinear effect and its analysis is the main objective of this article. We consider a model that captures the main mechanisms observed in high strain-rate deformation of metals, and describes shear motions of temperature dependent non-Newtonian fluids. For a special dependence of the viscosity on the temperature, we carry out a linearized stability analysis around a base state of uniform shearing solutions, and quantitatively assess the effects of the various mechanisms affecting the problem: thermal softening, momentum diffusion and thermal diffusion. Then, we turn to the nonlinear model, and construct localized states—in the form of similarity solutions—that emerge as coherent structures in the localization process. This justifies a scenario for localization that is proposed on the basis of asymptotic analysis in uc(Katsaounis) and uc(Tzavaras) (SIAM J Appl Math 69:1618-1643, 2009).

  18. Emergence of coherent localized structures in shear deformations of temperature dependent fluids

    KAUST Repository

    Katsaounis, Theodoros

    2016-11-25

    Shear localization occurs in various instances of material instability in solid mechanics and is typically associated with Hadamard-instability for an underlying model. While Hadamard instability indicates the catastrophic growth of oscillations around a mean state, it does not by itself explain the formation of coherent structures typically observed in localization. The latter is a nonlinear effect and its analysis is the main objective of this article. We consider a model that captures the main mechanisms observed in high strain-rate deformation of metals, and describes shear motions of temperature dependent non-Newtonian fluids. For a special dependence of the viscosity on the temperature, we carry out a linearized stability analysis around a base state of uniform shearing solutions, and quantitatively assess the effects of the various mechanisms affecting the problem: thermal softening, momentum diffusion and thermal diffusion. Then, we turn to the nonlinear model, and construct localized states - in the form of similarity solutions - that emerge as coherent structures in the localization process. This justifies a scenario for localization that is proposed on the basis of asymptotic analysis in \\\\cite{KT}.

  19. The Difference of Structural State and Deformation Behavior between Teenage and Mature Human Dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panfilov, Peter; Zaytsev, Dmitry; Antonova, Olga V; Alpatova, Victoria; Kiselnikova, Larissa P

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The cause of considerable elasticity and plasticity of human dentin is discussed in the relationship with its microstructure. Methods. Structural state of teenage and mature human dentin is examined by using XRD and TEM techniques, and their deformation behavior under compression is studied as well. Result. XRD study has shown that crystallographic type of calcium hydroxyapatite in human dentin (calcium hydrogen phosphate hydroxide Ca9HPO4(PO4)5OH; Space Group P63/m (176); a = 9,441 A; c = 6,881 A; c/a = 0,729; Crystallite (Scherrer) 200 A) is the same for these age groups. In both cases, dentin matrix is X-ray amorphous. According to TEM examination, there are amorphous and ultrafine grain phases in teenage and mature dentin. Mature dentin is stronger on about 20% than teenage dentin, while teenage dentin is more elastic on about 20% but is less plastic on about 15% than mature dentin. Conclusion. The amorphous phase is dominant in teenage dentin, whereas the ultrafine grain phase becomes dominant in mature dentin. Mechanical properties of human dentin under compression depend on its structural state, too.

  20. The Difference of Structural State and Deformation Behavior between Teenage and Mature Human Dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Panfilov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The cause of considerable elasticity and plasticity of human dentin is discussed in the relationship with its microstructure. Methods. Structural state of teenage and mature human dentin is examined by using XRD and TEM techniques, and their deformation behavior under compression is studied as well. Result. XRD study has shown that crystallographic type of calcium hydroxyapatite in human dentin (calcium hydrogen phosphate hydroxide Ca9HPO4(PO45OH; Space Group P63/m (176; a = 9,441 A; c = 6,881 A; c/a = 0,729; Crystallite (Scherrer 200 A is the same for these age groups. In both cases, dentin matrix is X-ray amorphous. According to TEM examination, there are amorphous and ultrafine grain phases in teenage and mature dentin. Mature dentin is stronger on about 20% than teenage dentin, while teenage dentin is more elastic on about 20% but is less plastic on about 15% than mature dentin. Conclusion. The amorphous phase is dominant in teenage dentin, whereas the ultrafine grain phase becomes dominant in mature dentin. Mechanical properties of human dentin under compression depend on its structural state, too.

  1. Grain refinement by cold deformation and recrystallization of bainite and acicular ferrite structures of C-Mn steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossein Nedjad, S., E-mail: hossein@sut.ac.ir [Faculty of Materials Engineering, Sahand University of Technology, P.O. Box 51335-1996, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zahedi Moghaddam, Y.; Mamdouh Vazirabadi, A. [Faculty of Materials Engineering, Sahand University of Technology, P.O. Box 51335-1996, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shirazi, H.; Nili Ahmadabadi, M. [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 14395-731, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-01-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Bainite showed weak property improvement after rolling and annealing. {yields} Additions of titanium and titanium oxide stimulated acicular ferrite. {yields} Acicular ferrite obtained by nanoparticles exhibited very high strength. {yields} Rolling and annealing of acicular ferrite gave substantial property improvement. - Abstract: The propensity of bainite and acicular ferrite structures of experimental C-Mn steels for enhanced grain refinement by combining phase transformation and plastic deformation has been investigated. Formation of acicular ferrite structures were stimulated with a small amount of titanium and titanium oxide nanoparticles added into the molten steels of high Mn concentrations. Isothermal transformations into the bainite and acicular ferrite structures were performed for 1.8 ks at 823 K after preliminary austenitization for 1.8 ks at 1523 K. Cold rolling for 50% thickness reduction was conducted on the isothermally transformed structures. Subsequent annealing of the deformed structures was conducted for 3.6 ks at 773, 873 and 973 K. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and tensile test were used for characterization of the studied steels. Cold rolling and annealing of the transformed structures at 873 K resulted in strengthening at the expense of ductility where an initial stage of recrystallization is realized. Acicular ferrite obtained by the addition of titanium into the molten steel exhibited the remarkable improvement of tensile properties. Discontinuous recrystallization of the deformed structures at 973 K leads to the formation of fine grains wherein acicular structures represented more enhanced grain refinement than bainite.

  2. Climate regulates alpine lake ice cover phenology and aquatic ecosystem structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Daniel L.; Caine, Nel; McKnight, Diane M.; Williams, Mark W.; Hell, Katherina; Miller, Matthew P.; Hart, Sarah J.; Johnson, Pieter T.J.

    2016-01-01

    High-elevation aquatic ecosystems are highly vulnerable to climate change, yet relatively few records are available to characterize shifts in ecosystem structure or their underlying mechanisms. Using a long-term dataset on seven alpine lakes (3126 to 3620 m) in Colorado, USA, we show that ice-off dates have shifted seven days earlier over the past 33 years and that spring weather conditions – especially snowfall – drive yearly variation in ice-off timing. In the most well-studied lake, earlier ice-off associated with increases in water residence times, thermal stratification, ion concentrations, dissolved nitrogen, pH, and chlorophyll-a. Mechanistically, low spring snowfall and warm temperatures reduce summer stream flow (increasing lake residence times) but enhance melting of glacial and permafrost ice (increasing lake solute inputs). The observed links among hydrological, chemical, and biological responses to climate factors highlight the potential for major shifts in the functioning of alpine lakes due to forecasted climate change.

  3. Do ecohydrology and community dynamics feed back to banded-ecosystem structure and productivity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callegaro, Chiara; Ursino, Nadia

    2016-04-01

    Mixed communities including grass, shrubs and trees are often reported to populate self-organized vegetation patterns. Patterns of survey data suggest that species diversity and complementarity strengthen the dynamics of banded environments. Resource scarcity and local facilitation trigger self organization, whereas coexistence of multiple species in vegetated self-organizing patches, implying competition for water and nutrients and favorable reproduction sites, is made possible by differing adaptation strategies. Mixed community spatial self-organization has so far received relatively little attention, compared with local net facilitation of isolated species. We assumed that soil moisture availability is a proxy for the environmental niche of plant species according to Ursino and Callegaro (2016). Our modelling effort was focused on niche differentiation of coexisting species within a tiger bush type ecosystem. By minimal numerical modelling and stability analysis we try to answer a few open scientific questions: Is there an adaptation strategy that increases biodiversity and ecosystem functioning? Does specific adaptation to environmental niches influence the structure of self-organizing vegetation pattern? What specific niche distribution along the environmental gradient gives the highest global productivity?

  4. The Community Structure of Phytoplankton in Seagrass Ecosystem and its Relationship with Environmental Characterstics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gede Iwan Setiabudi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aimed of this study was to determine  the plankton communities and its relationship with the chemical and physical condition in seagrass ecosystem at Pegametan Bay. The composition and abundance of plankton were observed in the sea water underneath the surface and were identified based on the guideline of Illustration of the Marine Plankton of Japan. The water quality was measured in situ using WQC HI 9829. The water sample was measured using closed reflux spectrometry for COD, TOC analyzer for DOC and APHA 2102 (4500 method for Nt and Pt. There are 27 species of plankton identified, which can be classified into three groups. Diatom group consists of 18 species with a 74.56% abundance. The non-litoral group consists of 6 species with a 23.35% abundance. Moreover, dinoflagellate group consist of 3 species with a 2.09% abundance. An abundance of plankton greater than 104 cell.L-1 was found in diatome group (Nitzschia sp., Thalassiosira sp., Chaetoceros sp., Flagillaria sp., Thalassiothrix sp., and Melosira sp. and non-litoral group (Oscillatoria sp. and Spirogyra sp.. The abundance of those species indicated the algae bloom phenomenon. Dinophysis sp. was also identified, which was harmful algal blooms.How to CiteSetiabudi, G. I., Bengen, D. G., Effendi, H., & Radjasa, O. K. (2016. The Community Structure of Phytoplankton in Seagrass Ecosystem and its Relationship with Environmental Characterstics. Biosaintifika: Journal of Biology & Biology Education, 8(3, 257-269.

  5. The Community Structure of Phytoplankton in Seagrass Ecosystem and its Relationship with Environmental Characterstics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gede Iwan Setiabudi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aimed of this study was to determine  the plankton communities and its relationship with the chemical and physical condition in seagrass ecosystem at Pegametan Bay. The composition and abundance of plankton were observed in the sea water underneath the surface and were identified based on the guideline of Illustration of the Marine Plankton of Japan. The water quality was measured in situ using WQC HI 9829. The water sample was measured using closed reflux spectrometry for COD, TOC analyzer for DOC and APHA 2102 (4500 method for Nt and Pt. There are 27 species of plankton identified, which can be classified into three groups. Diatom group consists of 18 species with a 74.56% abundance. The non-litoral group consists of 6 species with a 23.35% abundance. Moreover, dinoflagellate group consist of 3 species with a 2.09% abundance. An abundance of plankton greater than 104 cell.L-1 was found in diatome group (Nitzschia sp., Thalassiosira sp., Chaetoceros sp., Flagillaria sp., Thalassiothrix sp., and Melosira sp. and non-litoral group (Oscillatoria sp. and Spirogyra sp.. The abundance of those species indicated the algae bloom phenomenon. Dinophysis sp. was also identified, which was harmful algal blooms.How to CiteSetiabudi, G. I., Bengen, D. G., Effendi, H., & Radjasa, O. K. (2016. The Community Structure of Phytoplankton in Seagrass Ecosystem and its Relationship with Environmental Characterstics. Biosaintifika: Journal of Biology & Biology Education, 8(3, 257-269.

  6. Climate regulates alpine lake ice cover phenology and aquatic ecosystem structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Daniel L.; Caine, Nel; McKnight, Diane M.; Williams, Mark W.; Hell, Katherina; Miller, Matthew P.; Hart, Sarah J.; Johnson, Pieter T. J.

    2016-05-01

    High-elevation aquatic ecosystems are highly vulnerable to climate change, yet relatively few records are available to characterize shifts in ecosystem structure or their underlying mechanisms. Using a long-term data set on seven alpine lakes (3126 to 3620 m) in Colorado, USA, we show that ice-off dates have shifted 7 days earlier over the past 33 years and that spring weather conditions—especially snowfall—drive yearly variation in ice-off timing. In the most well studied lake, earlier ice-off associated with increases in water residence times, thermal stratification, ion concentrations, dissolved nitrogen, pH, and chlorophyll a. Mechanistically, low spring snowfall and warm temperatures reduce summer stream flow (increasing lake residence times) but enhance melting of glacial and permafrost ice (increasing lake solute inputs). The observed links among hydrological, chemical, and biological responses to climate factors highlight the potential for major shifts in the functioning of alpine lakes due to forecasted climate change.

  7. Emerging methods for the study of coastal ecosystem landscape structure and change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, John C.; Danielson, Jeffrey J.; Purkis, Sam

    2013-01-01

    Coastal landscapes are heterogeneous, dynamic, and evolve over a range of time scales due to intertwined climatic, geologic, hydrologic, biologic, and meteorological processes, and are also heavily impacted by human development, commercial activities, and resource extraction. A diversity of complex coastal systems around the globe, spanning glaciated shorelines to tropical atolls, wetlands, and barrier islands are responding to multiple human and natural drivers. Interdisciplinary research based on remote-sensing observations linked to process studies and models is required to understand coastal ecosystem landscape structure and change. Moreover, new techniques for coastal mapping and monitoring are increasingly serving the needs of policy-makers and resource managers across local, regional, and national scales. Emerging remote-sensing methods associated with a diversity of instruments and platforms are a key enabling element of integrated coastal ecosystem studies. These investigations require both targeted and synoptic mapping, and involve the monitoring of formative processes such as hydrodynamics, sediment transport, erosion, accretion, flooding, habitat modification, land-cover change, and biogeochemical fluxes.

  8. Impacts of drought and crayfish invasion on stream ecosystem structure and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magoulick, Daniel D.

    2014-01-01

    Drought and seasonal drying can be important disturbance events in many small streams, leading to intermittent or isolated habitats. Many small streams contain crayfish populations that are often keystone or dominant species in these systems. I conducted an experiment in stream mesocosms to examine the effects of drought and potential ecological redundancy of a native and invasive crayfish species. I examined the effects of drought (drought or control) and crayfish presence (none, native crayfish Orconectes eupunctus or invasive crayfish Orconectes neglectus) on stream mesocosm structure and function (leaf breakdown, community metabolism, periphyton, sediment and chironomid densities) in a fully factorial design. Each mesocosm contained a deep and shallow section, and drought treatments had surface water present (5-cm depth) in deep sections where tiles and leaf packs were placed. Drought and crayfish presence did not interact for any response variable. Drought significantly reduced leaf breakdown, and crayfish presence significantly increased leaf breakdown. However, the native and invasive crayfish species did not differ significantly in their effects on leaf breakdown. Drought significantly reduced primary production and community respiration overall, whereas crayfish presence did not significantly affect primary production and community respiration. Neither drought nor crayfish presence significantly affected periphyton overall. However, drought significantly reduced autotrophic index (AI), and crayfish presence increased AI. Inorganic sediment and chironomid density were not affected by drought, but both were significantly reduced by crayfish presence. O. eupunctus reduced AI and sediment more than O. neglectus did. Neither drought nor crayfish species significantly affected crayfish growth or survival. Drought can have strong effects on ecosystem function, but weaker effects on benthic structure. Crayfish can have strong effects on ecosystem

  9. Using Lidar and Radar measurements to constrain predictions of forest ecosystem structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonarakis, Alexander S; Saatchi, Sassan S; Chazdon, Robin L; Moorcroft, Paul R

    2011-06-01

    Insights into vegetation and aboveground biomass dynamics within terrestrial ecosystems have come almost exclusively from ground-based forest inventories that are limited in their spatial extent. Lidar and synthetic-aperture Radar are promising remote-sensing-based techniques for obtaining comprehensive measurements of forest structure at regional to global scales. In this study we investigate how Lidar-derived forest heights and Radar-derived aboveground biomass can be used to constrain the dynamics of the ED2 terrestrial biosphere model. Four-year simulations initialized with Lidar and Radar structure variables were compared against simulations initialized from forest-inventory data and output from a long-term potential-vegtation simulation. Both height and biomass initializations from Lidar and Radar measurements significantly improved the representation of forest structure within the model, eliminating the bias of too many large trees that arose in the potential-vegtation-initialized simulation. The Lidar and Radar initializations decreased the proportion of larger trees estimated by the potential vegetation by approximately 20-30%, matching the forest inventory. This resulted in improved predictions of ecosystem-scale carbon fluxes and structural dynamics compared to predictions from the potential-vegtation simulation. The Radar initialization produced biomass values that were 75% closer to the forest inventory, with Lidar initializations producing canopy height values closest to the forest inventory. Net primary production values for the Radar and Lidar initializations were around 6-8% closer to the forest inventory. Correcting the Lidar and Radar initializations for forest composition resulted in improved biomass and basal-area dynamics as well as leaf-area index. Correcting the Lidar and Radar initializations for forest composition and fine-scale structure by combining the remote-sensing measurements with ground-based inventory data further improved

  10. Deformations of crystal frameworks

    CERN Document Server

    Borcea, Ciprian S

    2011-01-01

    We apply our deformation theory of periodic bar-and-joint frameworks to tetrahedral crystal structures. The deformation space is investigated in detail for frameworks modelled on quartz, cristobalite and tridymite.

  11. Deformation behavior of carbon-fiber reinforced shape-memory-polymer composites used for deployable structures (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Xin; Liu, Liwu; Li, Fengfeng; Pan, Chengtong; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2017-04-01

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs) are a new type of smart material, they perform large reversible deformation with a certain external stimulus (e.g., heat and electricity). The properties (e.g., stiffness, strength and other mechanically static or quasi-static load-bearing capacity) are primarily considered for conventional resin-based composite materials which are mainly used for structural materials. By contrast, the mechanical actuating performance with finite deformation is considered for the shape memory polymers and their composites which can be used for both structural materials and functional materials. For shape memory polymers and their composites, the performance of active deformation is expected to further promote the development in smart active deformation structures, such as deployable space structures and morphing wing aircraft. The shape memory polymer composites (SMPCs) are also one type of High Strain Composite (HSC). The space deployable structures based on carbon fiber reinforced shape memory polymer composites (SMPCs) show great prospects. Considering the problems that SMPCs are difficult to meet the practical applications in space deployable structures in the recent ten years, this paper aims to research the mechanics of deformation, actuation and failure of SMPCs. In the overall view of the shape memory polymer material's nonlinearity (nonlinearity and stress softening in the process of pre-deformation and recovery, relaxation in storage process, irreversible deformation), by the multiple verifications among theory, finite element and experiments, one obtains the deformation and actuation mechanism for the process of "pre-deformation, energy storage and actuation" and its non-fracture constraint domain. Then, the parameters of SMPCs will be optimized. Theoretical analysis is realized by the strain energy function, additionally considering the interaction strain energy between the fiber and the matrix. For the common resin-based or soft

  12. Finite deformation analysis of continuum structures with time dependent anisotropic elastic plastic material behavior (LWBR/AWBA Development Program)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutula, D.N.

    1980-03-01

    A finite element procedure is presented for finite deformation analysis of continuum structures with time-dependent anisotropic elastic-plastic material behavior. An updated Lagrangian formulation is used to describe the kinematics of deformation. Anisotropic constitutive relations are referred, at each material point, to a set of three mutually orthogonal axes which rotate as a unit with an angular velocity equal to the spin at the point. The time-history of the solution is generated by using a linear incremental procedure with residual force correction, along with an automatic time step control algorithm which chooses time step sizes to control the accuracy and numerical stability of the solution.

  13. Structural and Functional Diversity of Weed Species in Organic and Conventional Rice Agro-Ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Y. Mousawi Toghani

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Diversity reflects the complexity of a system and can maintain its sustainability. Higherdiversity, results in higher inherent complexity of agro-ecosystems and strengthen their processes. It is necessary to realize the spatial distribution and temporal properties of the biodiversity components in agro-ecosystems, for the conservation and optimal utilization. Since weeds as a complementary component of agro-ecosystems and are inseparable, so the study of species, their functional and structural diversity of them can play an important role in weed management and balance in ecological systems. Materials and Methods This study was performed to determine the effects of different management systems on structural, and functional diversity of paddy weeds in Mazandaran province. Three rice fields, ranged from 0.3 to 0.5 ha, were chosen for each management system. Samples were collected from three fields running under each selected management system (organic and conventional. Data (number of weed species and their density were randomly gathered from 9 quadrates (1m×1m per each field in four stages (tillering, stem elongation, grain filling and after harvest. The diversity, evenness, frequency and similarity indices for weeds were determined at genera and species level. Data analysis carried out through T-test and grouping performed via cluster analysis as hierarchy. Results and Discussion All monitored weeds can be classified into four plant family including cereals (Poaceae, sedges (Cyperaceae, plantain (Plantaginaceae and chicory (Asteraceae.Under conventional systems the values of weed diversity indices were higher during tillering and stem elongation compared with organic ones, and were lower during grain filling and after harvest stages. However indices of weed evenness showed contrary tendency. Both Sympson and Shanon-Wiener diversity indices, consist of two clusters in 76% similarity. Evenness indices of Kamargo and Smith

  14. Effects of Fault Segmentation, Mechanical Interaction, and Structural Complexity on Earthquake-Generated Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, David Elias

    Earth's topographic surface forms an interface across which the geodynamic and geomorphic engines interact. This interaction is best observed along crustal margins where topography is created by active faulting and sculpted by geomorphic processes. Crustal deformation manifests as earthquakes at centennial to millennial timescales. Given that nearly half of Earth's human population lives along active fault zones, a quantitative understanding of the mechanics of earthquakes and faulting is necessary to build accurate earthquake forecasts. My research relies on the quantitative documentation of the geomorphic expression of large earthquakes and the physical processes that control their spatiotemporal distributions. The first part of my research uses high-resolution topographic lidar data to quantitatively document the geomorphic expression of historic and prehistoric large earthquakes. Lidar data allow for enhanced visualization and reconstruction of structures and stratigraphy exposed by paleoseismic trenches. Lidar surveys of fault scarps formed by the 1992 Landers earthquake document the centimeter-scale erosional landforms developed by repeated winter storm-driven erosion. The second part of my research employs a quasi-static numerical earthquake simulator to explore the effects of fault roughness, friction, and structural complexities on earthquake-generated deformation. My experiments show that fault roughness plays a critical role in determining fault-to-fault rupture jumping probabilities. These results corroborate the accepted 3-5 km rupture jumping distance for smooth faults. However, my simulations show that the rupture jumping threshold distance is highly variable for rough faults due to heterogeneous elastic strain energies. Furthermore, fault roughness controls spatiotemporal variations in slip rates such that rough faults exhibit lower slip rates relative to their smooth counterparts. The central implication of these results lies in guiding the

  15. Structural evolution of the Rieserferner Pluton: insight into the localization of deformation and regional tectonics implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccato, Alberto; Pennacchioni, Giorgio

    2016-04-01

    The Rieserferner pluton (RFP, Eastern Alps, 32.2±0.4 Ma, Romer et al. 2003) represents a relatively deep intrusion (12-15 km; Cesare, 1994) among Periadriatic plutons. The central portion of the RFP consists of dominant tonalites and granodiorites that show a sequence of solid-state deformation structures developed during pluton cooling and exhumation. This sequence includes: (1) quartz veins, filling two set of steeply-dipping joints trending respectively E-W and NW-SE, commonly showing a millimetric grain size and associated with strike-slip displacement. (2) Quartz- and locally epidote-filled shallowly E-dipping joint set, commonly exploited as discrete derived from both the quartz veins and the host tonalite. These mylonites show a composite sense of shear with a first stage of left-lateral strike-slip followed by a top-to-E dip-slip (normal) movement. The synmylonitic assemblage includes biotite + plagioclase + white mica + epidote ± sphene ± garnet. (3) Set of N-S-trending steeply-dipping joints. These joints are concentrated in zones 1-2 m wide, separated by otherwise un-jointed domains a few tens to hundred meters wide, and are commonly exploited as brittle-ductile faults with dominant dip-slip (normal) kinematics. The mineral assemblage of fault rocks includes white mica + calcite ± chlorite ± quartz. The joints/faults are locally involved in folding. (4) Mafic dikes, dated at 26.3±3 Ma (Steenken et al., 2000), locally injecting the N-S trending set of joints. (5) Cataclasite- and pseudotachylyte-bearing faults also forming a set of steeply-dipping N-S-trending structures. These faults are commonly associated with epidote veins surrounded by bleaching haloes. (6) Zeolite-bearing faults marked by whitish cataclasites, fault gouges and mirror-like surfaces. These faults have a complex oblique- to strike-slip kinematics with an overall N-S trending lineation. As observed in other plutons (e.g. Adamello; Pennacchioni et al., 2006), the network of

  16. Internal state variable models for micro-structure in high temperature deformation of titanium alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Jiao; LI MiaoQuan; LI XiaoLi

    2008-01-01

    There exists an interaction between microstructural evolution and deformation behavior in high temperature deformation of titanium alloys. And the microstruc-ture of titanium alloys is very sensitive to the process parameters of plastic de-formation process. In this paper, on the basis of plastic deformation mechanism of metals and alloys, a microstructural model including dislocation density rate equa-tion and grain growth rate equation is established with the dislocation density rate being an internal state variable. Applying the model to the high temperature de-formation process of Ti60 titanium alloy, the average relative errors of grain sizes between the experiments and the predictions are 9.47% for sampled data, and 13.01% for non-sampled data.

  17. Innovative design of composite structures: Axisymmetric deformations of unsymmetrically laminated cylinders loaded in axial compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyer, M. W.; Paraska, P. J.

    1990-01-01

    The study focuses on the axisymmetric deformation response of unsymmetrically laminate cylinders loaded in axial compression by known loads. A geometrically nonlinear analysis is used. Though buckling is not studied, the deformations can be considered to be the prebuckling response. Attention is directed at three 16 layer laminates: a (90 sub 8/0 sub 8) sub T; a (0 sub 8/90 sub 8) sub T and a (0/90) sub 4s. The symmetric laminate is used as a basis for comparison, while the two unsymmetric laminates were chosen because they have equal but opposite bending-stretching effects. Particular attention is given to the influence of the thermally-induced preloading deformations that accompany the cool-down of any unsymmetric laminate from the consolidation temperature. Simple support and clamped boundary conditions are considered. It is concluded that: (1) The radial deformations of an unsymmetric laminate are significantly larger than the radial deformations of a symmetric laminate, although for both symmetric and unsymmetric laminates the large deformations are confined to a boundary layer near the ends of the cylinder; (2) For this nonlinear problem the length of the boundary layer is a function of the applied load; (3) The sign of the radial deformations near the supported end of the cylinder depends strongly on the sense (sign) of the laminate asymmetry; (4) For unsymmetric laminates, ignoring the thermally-induced preloading deformations that accompany cool-down results in load-induced deformations that are under predicted; and (5) The support conditions strongly influence the response but the influence of the sense of asymmetry and the influence of the thermally-induced preloading deformations are independent of the support conditions.

  18. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Structural Characterization of Elastic and Inelastic Deformation in ZrCu Metallic Glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shidong Feng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The nanoscopic deformation behaviors in a ZrCu metallic glass model during loading-unloading process under uniaxial compression have been analyzed on the basis of the molecular dynamics (MD. The reversible degree of shear origin zones (SOZs is used as the structural indicator to distinguish the elastic deformation and inelastic deformation of ZrCu metallic glass at the atomic level. We find that the formation of SOZs is reversible at the elastic stage but irreversible at the inelastic stage during the loading and unloading processes. At the inelastic stage, the full-icosahedra fraction in SOZs is quickly reduced with increased strain and the decreasing process is also irreversible during the unloading processes.

  19. Structure and magnetic properties of bulk nanocrystalline Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets prepared by hot pressing and hot deformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Jie; YUE Ming; ZUO Jianhua; ZHANG Zirui; LIU Weiqiang; ZHANG Dongtao; ZHANG Jiuxing

    2013-01-01

    Structure and magnetic properties were studied for bulk nanocrystalline Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets that were prepared at 650 ℃ for 3 min under 300 MPa using the SPS-3.20-MK-V sintering machine and the hot pressed magnets were then submitted to hot deformation with height reduction of 50%,60%,70%,80%,and 85%.Effects of height reduction (HR) and deformation temperature on the structure and magnetic properties of the magnets were investigated.The crystal structure was evaluated by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the microstructure was observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM).The magnetic properties of the magnets were investigated by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM).As the height reduction increased,the remanence (Br) of the magnets increased first,peaks at 1.3 T with HR=60%,then decreased again,and the coercivity (Hci) of the magnets decreased monotonically.On the other hand,as the deformation temperature increased,the Br of the magnets increased first,peaks at 1.36 T with HR=60%,then decreased again,and the Hci of the magnets decreased monotonically.Under optimal conditions,the hot deformed magnet possessed excellent magnetic properties as Br=l.36 T,Hci=1143 kA/m,and (BH)max=370 kJ/m3,suggesting the good potential of the magnets in practical applications.

  20. Automatic monitoring of ecosystem structure and functions using integrated low-cost near surface sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J.; Ryu, Y.; Jiang, C.; Hwang, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Near surface sensors are able to acquire more reliable and detailed information with higher temporal resolution than satellite observations. Conventional near surface sensors usually work individually, and thus they require considerable manpower from data collection through information extraction and sharing. Recent advances of Internet of Things (IoT) provides unprecedented opportunities to integrate various low-cost sensors as an intelligent near surface observation system for monitoring ecosystem structure and functions. In this study, we developed a Smart Surface Sensing System (4S), which can automatically collect, transfer, process and analyze data, and then publish time series results on public-available website. The system is composed of micro-computer Raspberry pi, micro-controller Arduino, multi-spectral spectrometers made from Light Emitting Diode (LED), visible and near infrared cameras, and Internet module. All components are connected with each other and Raspberry pi intelligently controls the automatic data production chain. We did intensive tests and calibrations in-lab. Then, we conducted in-situ observations at a rice paddy field and a deciduous broadleaf forest. During the whole growth season, 4S obtained landscape images, spectral reflectance in red, green, blue, and near infrared, normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), fraction of photosynthetically active radiation (fPAR), and leaf area index (LAI) continuously. Also We compared 4S data with other independent measurements. NDVI obtained from 4S agreed well with Jaz hyperspectrometer at both diurnal and seasonal scales (R2 = 0.92, RMSE = 0.059), and 4S derived fPAR and LAI were comparable to LAI-2200 and destructive measurements in both magnitude and seasonal trajectory. We believe that the integrated low-cost near surface sensor could help research community monitoring ecosystem structure and functions closer and easier through a network system.

  1. Alternate spatial sampling approaches for ecosystem structure inventory using spaceborne lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefsky, M. A.; Ramond, T.; Weimer, C. S.

    2009-12-01

    Current and proposed spaceborne lidar sensors sample the land surface using observations along transects in which consecutive observations in the along-track dimension are either contiguous (e.g. VCL, DESDynI, Livex) or spaced (ICESat, ICESat-2). In contrast, vegetation inventories distribute field observations either in regular grids or within patches that are delineated to represent uniform conditions. In the context of supporting large scale inventories of ecosystem structure, a transect sampling pattern is inefficient because multiple observations are made of a spatially autocorrelated phenomenon while large areas of the landscape are left unsampled. This results in higher uncertainty in estimates of average ecosystem structure across landscapes than would be obtained using sampling in regular grids. As the pulses generated by a spaceborne laser are a valuable resource to be conserved, any strategy that decreases the number of observations required to develop large scale inventories with a given level of confidence should be pursued. Data fusion between lidar data and a spatially complete data source (e.g. polarmetric or interferrometric SAR) will also benefit from a spatially distributed sample of lidar as the average distance between any point and a lidar observation is greatly reduced. This study demonstrates that more flexible spatial arrangements of observations can result in estimates of average landscape height that have as little as one-third of the uncertainty of estimates made with an equal number of observations along transects. The method of sampling described here can be implemented by a technology, Electronically Steerable Flash Lidar, that can distribute observations in the patterns described here and simultaneously support transect sampling.

  2. Structures of Syn-deformational Granites in the Longquanguan Shear Zone and Their Monazite Electronic Microprobe Dating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jinjiang; ZHAO Lan; LIU Shuwen

    2006-01-01

    The Longquanguan shear zone is an important structural belt in the North China Craton,separating the underlying Fuping complex from the overlying Wutai complex. This shear zone has experienced three episodes of deformation: the first and main episode is a ductile top-to-ESE shear along the gently northwest-west dipping foliations, while the other two episodes are later collapse sliding. Prolonged granites parallel to the shear foliations make one of the main compositions of the Longquanguan shear zone. These granites experienced deformation to form mylonitic rocks when they emplaced during the first episode of deformation. Structural characters of the granites and their contacts to the country rocks indicate that these granites possibly resulted from in-situ partial remelting by shearing, i.e., they are syn-deformational granites. Monazites in these mylonitic granites are magmatic minerals and their crystallization ages may represent ages of the magmatic events, and also the ages for the main deformation of the Longquanguan shear zone. Monazite electronic microprobe dating were carried on two samples of granite, which gives multiple peak ages, among which 1,846 Ma and 1,877 Ma are the main peak ages for the two samples. These ages represent the main deformation of the Longquanguan shear zone, which is consistent with the main regional geological event at about 1,850 Ma caused by the collision between the Eastern and Western Blocks in North China. The good match between the monazite ages and the corresponding regional tectono-thermal events shows the feasibility and reliability of monazite electronic microprobe dating.

  3. Deformation microstructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, N.; Huang, X.; Hughes, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    Microstructural characterization and modeling has shown that a variety of metals deformed by different thermomechanical processes follows a general path of grain subdivision, by dislocation boundaries and high angle boundaries. This subdivision has been observed to very small structural scales...... of the order of 10 nm, produced by deformation under large sliding loads. Limits to the evolution of microstructural parameters during monotonic loading have been investigated based on a characterization by transmission electron microscopy. Such limits have been observed at an equivalent strain of about 10...

  4. Structural deformities of deciduous teeth in patients with hypophosphatemic vitamin D-resistant rickets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, K.; Ooshima, T.; Lily, T.S.; Yasufuku, Y.; Sobue, S.

    1988-02-01

    Structural deformities of deciduous teeth from patients with hypophosphatemic vitamin D-resistant rickets (HVDRR) (1 male and 2 female patients) were examined by means of transmitted light microscopy, contact microradiography, and x-ray microanalysis. Freshly extracted teeth were fixed in formalin and subsequently hemisected longitudinally through the midline. One half was prepared for ground sections and the other half for decalcified sections. Neither gross nor microscopic abnormalities were present in enamel of patients with HVDRR. The concentration of calcium and phosphorus and the calcium/phosphorus ratio of the enamel of patients with HVDRR were nearly equal to those of normal teeth, although the degree of radiopacity was less in HVDRR. On the other hand, numerous microscopic abnormalities in the dentin of patients with HVDRR were found, such as interglobular dentin, wide predentin zones, and tubular defects. The concentration of phosphorus in the dentin of a patient with familial HVDRR was extremely low. Furthermore, formation of reparative dentin was observed at the pulp horn of teeth in patients with HVDRR that had been subjected to definite attrition at the corresponding dentin site.

  5. Effects of common seagrass restoration methods on ecosystem structure in subtropical seagrass meadows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourque, Amanda S; Fourqurean, James W

    2014-06-01

    Seagrass meadows near population centers are subject to frequent disturbance from vessel groundings. Common seagrass restoration methods include filling excavations and applying fertilizer to encourage seagrass recruitment. We sampled macrophytes, soil structure, and macroinvertebrate infauna at unrestored and recently restored vessel grounding disturbances to evaluate the effects of these restoration methods on seagrass ecosystem structure. After a year of observations comparing filled sites to both undisturbed reference and unrestored disturbed sites, filled sites had low organic matter content, nutrient pools, and primary producer abundance. Adding a nutrient source increased porewater nutrient pools at disturbed sites and in undisturbed meadows, but not at filled sites. Environmental predictors of infaunal community structure across treatments included soil texture and nutrient pools. At the one year time scale, the restoration methods studied did not result in convergence between restored and unrestored sites. Particularly in filled sites, soil conditions may combine to constrain rapid development of the seagrass community and associated infauna. Our study is important for understanding early recovery trajectories following restoration using these methods.

  6. Effect of bimodal harmonic structure design on the deformation behaviour and mechanical properties of Co-Cr-Mo alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajpai, Sanjay Kumar; Sawangrat, Choncharoen; Yamaguchi, Osamu; Ciuca, Octav Paul; Ameyama, Kei

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, Co-Cr-Mo alloy compacts with a unique bimodal microstructural design, harmonic structure design, were successfully prepared via a powder metallurgy route consisting of controlled mechanical milling of pre-alloyed powders followed by spark plasma sintering. The harmonic structured Co-Cr-Mo alloy with bimodal grain size distribution exhibited relatively higher strength together with higher ductility as compared to the coarse-grained specimens. The harmonic Co-Cr-Mo alloy exhibited a very complex deformation behavior wherein it was found that the higher strength and the high retained ductility are derived from fine-grained shell and coarse-grained core regions, respectively. Finally, it was observed that the peculiar spatial/topological arrangement of stronger fine-grained and ductile coarse-grained regions in the harmonic structure promotes uniformity of strain distribution, leading to improved mechanical properties by suppressing the localized plastic deformation during straining.

  7. PREDICTION OF THE VALUE OF IRREVERSIBLE DEFORMATION OF ROAD STRUCTURE FROM THE IMPACT OF TRAFFIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. V. Matvienko

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement. The study of irreversible strains in areas of non-rigid pavement with asphalt coating under the influence of traffic flow requires development of methodologies for assessment of the operational status of asphalt concrete pavement subjected to the formation of ruts. To pre-dict the magnitude of irreversible deformation of the pavement, that is rut, mathematical model, methodology and instruments to measure the parameters of road construction should be developed.Results and conclusions. Measurements of the deflection of road construction and rut parameters, including wear and plastic deformation, proved the adequacy of the proposed mathematical model. Obtained analytical dependences allow prediction of pavement wear, plastic deformation and subgrade deterioration. In contrast to the known ones, they take into account the impact of traffic on the formation of a rut. Proposed methods allow estimation of irreversible pavement deformations based on the values obtained with the help of instruments.

  8. Delineating shallow Neogene deformation structures in northeastern Pará State using Ground Penetrating Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilce F. Rossetti

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The geological characterization of shallow subsurface Neogene deposits in northeastern Pará State using Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR revealed normal and reverse faults, as well as folds, not yet well documented by field studies. The faults are identified mostly by steeply-dipping reflections that sharply cut the nearby reflections causing bed offsets, drags and rollovers. The folds are recognized by reflections that are highly undulating, configuring broad concave and convex-up features that are up to 50 m wide and 80 to 90 ns deep. These deformation structures are mostly developed within deposits of Miocene age, though some of the faults might continue into younger deposits as well. Although the studied GPR sections show several diffractions caused by trees, differential degrees of moisture, and underground artifacts, the structures recorded here can not be explained by any of these ''noises''. The detailed analysis of the GPR sections reveals that they are attributed to bed distortion caused by brittle deformation and folding. The record of faults and folds are not widespread in the Neogene deposits of the Bragantina area. These GPR data are in agreement with structural models, which have proposed a complex evolution including strike-slip motion for this area from the Miocene to present.A caracterização geológica de depósitos neógenos ocorrentes em sub-superfície rasa no nordeste do Estado do Pará, usando Radar de Penetração no Solo (GPR, revelou a presença de falhas normais e reversas, bem como dobras, ainda não documentadas em estudos de campo prévios. As falhas são identificadas por reflexões inclinadas que cortam bruscamente reflexões vizinhas, causando freqüentes deslocamentos de camadas. As dobras são reconhecidas por reflexões fortemente ondulantes, configurando feições côncavas e convexas que medem até 50 m de amplitude e 80 a 90 m de profundidade. Estas estruturas deformacionais desenvolvem-se, principalmente

  9. Structural properties, deformation behavior and thermal stability of martensitic Ti-Nb alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boenisch, Matthias

    2016-06-10

    Ti-Nb alloys are characterized by a diverse metallurgy which allows obtaining a wide palette of microstructural configurations and physical properties via careful selection of chemical composition, heat treatment and mechanical processing routes. The present work aims to expand the current state of knowledge about martensite forming Ti-Nb alloys by studying 15 binary Ti-c{sub Nb}Nb (9 wt.% ≤ c{sub Nb} ≤ 44.5 wt.%) alloy formulations in terms of their structural and mechanical properties, as well as their thermal stability. The crystal structures of the martensitic phases, α{sup '} and α'', and the influence of the Nb content on the lattice (Bain) strain and on the volume change related to the β → α{sup '}/α'' martensitic transformations are analyzed on the basis of Rietveld-refinements. The magnitude of the shuffle component of the β → α{sup '}/α'' martensitic transformations is quantified in relation to the chemical composition. The largest transformation lattice strains are operative in Nb-lean alloys. Depending on the composition, both a volume dilatation and contraction are encountered and the volume change may influence whether hexagonal martensite α{sup '} or orthorhombic martensite α'' forms from β upon quenching. The mechanical properties and the deformation behavior of martensitic Ti-Nb alloys are studied by complementary methods including monotonic and cyclic uniaxial compression, nanoindentation, microhardness and impulse excitation technique. The results show that the Nb content strongly influences the mechanical properties of martensitic Ti-Nb alloys. The elastic moduli, hardness and strength are minimal in the vicinity of the limiting compositions bounding the interval in which orthorhombic martensite α'' forms by quenching. Uniaxial cyclic compressive testing demonstrates that the elastic properties of strained samples are different than those of unstrained ones

  10. Applications of Displacement Transfer Functions to Deformed Shape Predictions of the GIII Swept-Wing Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung, Shun-Fat; Ko, William L.

    2016-01-01

    The displacement transfer functions (DTFs) were applied to the GIII swept wing for the deformed shape prediction. The calculated deformed shapes are very close to the correlated finite element results as well as the measured data. The convergence study showed that using 17 strain stations, the wing-tip displacement prediction error was 1.6 percent, and that there is no need to use a large number of strain stations for G-III wing shape predictions.

  11. Changes in food web structure and ecosystem functioning of a large, shallow Chinese lake during the 1950s, 1980s and 2000s

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kong, Xiangzhen; He, Wei; Liu, Wenxiu

    2016-01-01

    validated by the stable isotope-determined trophic level (TL) for each functional group, which indicated an acceptable model performance. Over time, we observed a collapse of the food web toward a simplified structure and decreasing biodiversity and trophic interactions. The lake ecosystem was approaching......Food web structure dynamics and ecosystem functioning are strongly linked, and both are indispensable in evaluating ecosystem development in lakes under multiple anthropogenic stressors. However, model-based approaches concerning the changes in food web structure and ecosystem functioning...

  12. Deformation twinning induced decomposition of lamellar LPSO structure and its re-precipitation in an Mg-Zn-Y alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, X. H.; Zheng, S. J.; Chen, D.; Jin, Q. Q.; Peng, Z. Z.; Ma, X. L.

    2016-07-01

    The high hardness or yield strength of an alloy is known to benefit from the presence of small-scale precipitation, whose hardening effect is extensively applied in various engineering materials. Stability of the precipitates is of critical importance in maintaining the high performance of a material under mechanical loading. The long period stacking ordered (LPSO) structures play an important role in tuning the mechanical properties of an Mg-alloy. Here, we report deformation twinning induces decomposition of lamellar LPSO structures and their re-precipitation in an Mg-Zn-Y alloy. Using atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), we directly illustrate that the misfit dislocations at the interface between the lamellar LPSO structure and the deformation twin is corresponding to the decomposition and re-precipitation of LPSO structure, owing to dislocation effects on redistribution of Zn/Y atoms. This finding demonstrates that deformation twinning could destabilize complex precipitates. An occurrence of decomposition and re-precipitation, leading to a variant spatial distribution of the precipitates under plastic loading, may significantly affect the precipitation strengthening.

  13. Effect of multiaxial deformation Max-strain on the structure and properties of Ti-Ni alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khmelevskaya, I. Yu; Kawalla, R.; Prokoshkin, S. D.; Komarov, V. S.

    2014-08-01

    The severe plastic deformation (SPD) forming ultrafine-grained (nanocrystalline or nanosubgrained) structure is one of the most effective ways to improve the functional properties of Ti-Ni-based shape memory alloys [1, 2]. In the present work, the SPD of near-equiatomic Ti-Ni alloy was carried out using the multi-axial deformation module Max-strain, which is a part of the physical simulation system "Gleeble 3500". The deformation was performed at a constant temperature of 400°C with speed of 0.5 mm/s in six passes without interpass pauses. The accumulated true strain was about 3. As a result, a mixed ultrafine-grained/subgrained structure with grain/subgrain sizes from 50 to 300 nm and a high density of free dislocations formed. The resulting structure is close to a nanoscale region and provides a significant advantage in the basic functional property - completely recoverable strain - as compared with a conventional recrystallized structure: 7% versus 2%.

  14. Evolution of nutrient structure and phytoplankton composition in the Jiaozhou Bay ecosystem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Shu-jiang; JIAO Nian-zhi; WU Chang-wen; LIANG Bing; ZHANG Shu-yi

    2005-01-01

    The inventories of nutrients in the surface water and large phytoplankton( > 69 μm) were analyzed from the data set of JERS ecological database about a typical coastal waters, the Jiaozhou Bay, China, from 1960s for N, P and from 1980s for Si. By examining long-term changes of nutrient concentration, calculating stoichiometric balance, and comparing diatom composition, Si limitation of diatom production was found to be more possible. The possibility of Si limitation was from 37% in 1980s to 50% in 1990s. Jiaozhou Bay ecosystem is becoming serious eutrophication, with notable increase of NO2-N, NO3-N and NH4-N from 0.1417 μmol/L, 0.5414 μmol/L,1.7222 μmol/L in 1960s to 0.9551 μmol/L, 3.001 μmol/L, 8.0359 μmol/L in late 1990s respectively and prominent decrease of Si from 4.2614μmol/L in 1980s to 1.5861 μmol/L in late 1990s; the nutrient structure is controlled by nitrogen; the main limiting nutrient is probably silicon;because of the Si limitation the phytoplankton community structure has changed drastically.

  15. Steel Processing Properties and Their Effect on Impact Deformation of Lightweight Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simunovic, S

    2003-09-23

    The objective of the research was to perform a comprehensive computational analysis of the effects of material and process modeling approaches on performance of UltraLight Steel Auto Body (ULSAB) vehicle models. The research addressed numerous material related effects, impact conditions as well as analyzed the performance of the ULSAB vehicles in crashes against designs representing the current US vehicle fleet. This report is organized into three main sections. The first section describes the results of the computational analysis of ULSAB crash simulations that were performed using advanced material modeling techniques. The effects of strain-rate sensitivity on a high strength steel (HSS) intensive vehicle were analyzed. Frontal and frontal offset crash scenarios were used in a finite element parametric study of the ULSAB body structure. Comparisons are made between the crash results using the piece-wise-linear isotropic plasticity strain-rate dependent material model, and the isotropic plasticity material model based on quasi-static properties. The simulation results show the importance of advanced material modeling techniques for vehicle crash simulations due to strain-rate sensitivity and rapid hardening characteristics of advanced high strength steels. Material substitution was investigated for the main frontal crush structure using the material of similar yield stress a significantly different strain-rate and hardening characteristics. The objective of the research presented in Section 2 was to assess the influence of stamping process on crash response of ULSAB vehicle. Considered forming effects included thickness variations and plastic strain hardening imparted in the part forming process. The as-formed thickness and plastic strain for front crash parts were used as input data for vehicle crash analysis. Differences in structural performance between crash models with and without forming data were analyzed in order to determine the effects and feasibility of

  16. Reverse engineering model structures for soil and ecosystem respiration: the potential of gene expression programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilie, Iulia; Dittrich, Peter; Carvalhais, Nuno; Jung, Martin; Heinemeyer, Andreas; Migliavacca, Mirco; Morison, James I. L.; Sippel, Sebastian; Subke, Jens-Arne; Wilkinson, Matthew; Mahecha, Miguel D.

    2017-09-01

    Accurate model representation of land-atmosphere carbon fluxes is essential for climate projections. However, the exact responses of carbon cycle processes to climatic drivers often remain uncertain. Presently, knowledge derived from experiments, complemented by a steadily evolving body of mechanistic theory, provides the main basis for developing such models. The strongly increasing availability of measurements may facilitate new ways of identifying suitable model structures using machine learning. Here, we explore the potential of gene expression programming (GEP) to derive relevant model formulations based solely on the signals present in data by automatically applying various mathematical transformations to potential predictors and repeatedly evolving the resulting model structures. In contrast to most other machine learning regression techniques, the GEP approach generates readable models that allow for prediction and possibly for interpretation. Our study is based on two cases: artificially generated data and real observations. Simulations based on artificial data show that GEP is successful in identifying prescribed functions, with the prediction capacity of the models comparable to four state-of-the-art machine learning methods (random forests, support vector machines, artificial neural networks, and kernel ridge regressions). Based on real observations we explore the responses of the different components of terrestrial respiration at an oak forest in south-eastern England. We find that the GEP-retrieved models are often better in prediction than some established respiration models. Based on their structures, we find previously unconsidered exponential dependencies of respiration on seasonal ecosystem carbon assimilation and water dynamics. We noticed that the GEP models are only partly portable across respiration components, the identification of a general terrestrial respiration model possibly prevented by equifinality issues. Overall, GEP is a promising

  17. Effects of FeSb6 octahedral deformations on the electronic structure of LaFe4Sb12

    KAUST Repository

    Pulikkotil, Jiji Thomas Joseph

    2011-09-01

    First-principles density functional based electronic structure calculations are performed in order to clarify the influence of FeSb6 octahedral deformations on the structural and electronic structure properties of LaFe 4Sb12. Our results show that octahedral tiltings correlate with the band dispersions and, consequently, the band masses. While total energy variation points at an enhanced role of lattice anharmonicity, flat bands emerge from a redistribution of the electronic states. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Evolution of deformation structures under varying loading conditions followed in situ by high angular resolution 3DXRD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pantleon, Wolfgang; Wejdemann, Christian; Jakobsen, B.;

    2009-01-01

    intermittently. When the traction is terminated, stress relaxation occurs and number, size and orientation of subgrains are found to be constant. The subgrain structure freezes and only a minor clean-up of the dislocation structure is observed. When changing the tensile direction after pre-deformation in tension......, a systematic correlation between the degree of strain path change and the changes in the dislocation structure quantified by the volume fraction of the subgrains is established. For obtaining the subgrain volume fraction, a new fitting method has been developed for partitioning the contributions of subgrains...

  19. Effect of Biaxial Isothermal Quasi-Continuous Deformation on Structure and Shape Memory Properties of Ti-Ni Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khmelevskaya, I.; Komarov, V.; Kawalla, R.; Prokoshkin, S.; Korpala, G.

    2017-08-01

    Severe plastic deformation (SPD) of Ti-50.0 at.% Ni alloy was carried out using the multi-axial deformation MaxStrain module of Gleeble system at 400, 370, 350 and 330 °C with accumulated true strains from e = 3.5 to 9.5. Kinetics of martensitic transformations was studied by DSC method, the structure features by x-ray diffraction and TEM. The recoverable strain was studied using a bending mode for strain inducing. A mixed nanocrystalline and nanosubgrained structure with average grain/subgrain size below 100 nm has been formed in a bulk sample as a result of SPD at as low as 330 °C. The resulting nanostructure provides an obvious advantage in the completely recoverable strain (9.3%) as compared to SPD at 350-400 °C (7-8%), and to reference treatment (2.5%). That correlates with Vickers hardness changes versus SPD strain.

  20. Coupled cryoconite ecosystem structure-function relationships are revealed by comparing bacterial communities in alpine and Arctic glaciers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Arwyn; Mur, Luis A. J.; Girdwood, Susan E.

    2014-01-01

    Cryoconite holes are known as foci of microbial diversity and activity on polar glacier surfaces, but are virtually unexplored microbial habitats in alpine regions. In addition, whether cryoconite community structure reflects ecosystem functionality is poorly understood. Terminal restriction...... fragment length polymorphism and Fourier transform infrared metabolite fingerprinting of cryoconite from glaciers in Austria, Greenland and Svalbard demonstrated cryoconite bacterial communities are closely correlated with cognate metabolite fingerprints. The influence of bacterial-associated fatty acids...... and Arctic cryoconite habitats, reflecting the impact of local and regional conditions on the challenges of thriving in glacial ecosystems....

  1. Process Modelling of Curing Process-Induced Internal Stress and Deformation of Composite Laminate Structure with Elastic and Viscoelastic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongna; Li, Xudong; Dai, Jianfeng

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, two kinds of transient models, the viscoelastic model and the linear elastic model, are established to analyze the curing deformation of the thermosetting resin composites, and are calculated by COMSOL Multiphysics software. The two models consider the complicated coupling between physical and chemical changes during curing process of the composites and the time-variant characteristic of material performance parameters. Subsequently, the two proposed models are implemented respectively in a three-dimensional composite laminate structure, and a simple and convenient method of local coordinate system is used to calculate the development of residual stresses, curing shrinkage and curing deformation for the composite laminate. Researches show that the temperature, degree of curing (DOC) and residual stresses during curing process are consistent with the study in literature, so the curing shrinkage and curing deformation obtained on these basis have a certain referential value. Compared the differences between the two numerical results, it indicates that the residual stress and deformation calculated by the viscoelastic model are more close to the reference value than the linear elastic model.

  2. Structural modifications induced by compressive plastic deformation in single-step and sequentially irradiated UHMWPE for hip joint components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puppulin, Leonardo; Sugano, Nobuhiko; Zhu, Wenliang; Pezzotti, Giuseppe

    2014-03-01

    Structural modifications were studied at the molecular scale in two highly crosslinked UHMWPE materials for hip-joint acetabular components, as induced upon application of (uniaxial) compressive strain to the as-manufactured microstructures. The two materials, quite different in their starting resins and belonging to different manufacturing generations, were a single-step irradiated and a sequentially irradiated polyethylene. The latter material represents the most recently launched gamma-ray-irradiated polyethylene material in the global hip implant market. Confocal/polarized Raman spectroscopy was systematically applied to characterize the initial microstructures and the microstructural response of the materials to plastic deformation. Crystallinity fractions and preferential orientation of molecular chains have been followed up during in vitro deformation tests on unused cups and correlated to plastic strain magnitude and to the recovery capacity of the material. Moreover, analyses of the in vivo deformation behavior of two short-term retrieved hip cups are also presented. Trends of preferential orientation of molecular chains as a function of residual strain were similar for both materials, but distinctly different in their extents. The sequentially irradiated material was more resistant to plastic deformation and, for the same magnitude of residual plastic strain, possessed a higher capacity of recovery as compared to the single-step irradiated one.

  3. Soft-sediment deformation structures in cores from lacustrine slurry deposits of the Late Triassic Yanchang Fm. (central China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Renchao

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The fine-grained autochthonous sedimentation in the deep part of a Late Triassic lake was frequently interrupted by gravity-induced mass flows. Some of these mass flows were so rich in water that they must have represented slurries. This can be deduced from the soft-sediment deformation structures that abound in cores from these lacustrine deposits which constitute the Yanchang Fm., which is present in the Ordos Basin (central China.

  4. Effect of rolling-assisted deformation on the formation of an ultrafine-grained structure in a two-phase titanium alloy subjected to severe plastic deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demakov, S. L.; Elkina, O. A.; Illarionov, A. G.; Karabanalov, M. S.; Popov, A. A.; Semenova, I. P.; Saitova, L. R.; Shchetnikov, N. V.

    2008-06-01

    The effect of rolling in the temperature range 450 650°C on the fragmentation of the primary phase in a hot-rolled VT6 alloy rod preliminarily subjected to severe plastic deformation by equal-channel angular pressing at 700°C (scheme B c, the angle between the channels is 135°, 12 passes) is studied. Rolling at 450°C without preliminary ECAP is shown not to cause α-phase fragmentation and to favor intense cold working of the alloy due to multiple slip. ECAP provides partial fragmentation of the initial structure of the α phase and changes the morphology of the retained β phase: it transforms from a continuous matrix phase into separated precipitates located between α particles. This transformation activates the fragmentation of the α phase during rolling at 550°C owing to the development of twinning and polygonization processes apart from multiple slip. Both a decrease (to 450°C) and an increase (to 625 650°C) in the rolling temperature as compared to 550°C lead to the formation of a less homogeneous and fragmented structure because of weakly developed recovery and intense cold working in the former case and because of the beginning of recrystallization and the suppression of twinning in the latter case. A relation between the structure that forms upon SPD followed by rolling and the set of its properties is found. A general scheme is proposed for the structural transformations that occur during ECAP followed by rolling at various temperatures.

  5. Dual influence of the rejuvenation of Southern Tianshan and Western Kunlun orogen on the Cenozoic structure deformation of Tarim Basin, northwestern China: A superposition deformation model from Bachu Uplift

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Based on new high-resolution seismic profiles and existing structural and sedimentary results, a superposition deformation model for Cenozoic Bachu Uplift of northwestern Tarim Basin, northwestern China is proposed. The model presents the idea that the Bachu Uplift suffered structure superposition deformation under the dual influences of the Cenozoic uplifting of Southern Tianshan and Western Kunlun orogen, northwestern China. In the end of the Eocene (early Himalayan movement),Bachu Uplift started to be formed with the uplifting of Western Kunlun, and extended NNW into the interior of Kalpin Uplift. In the end of the Miocene (middle Himalayan movement), Bachu Uplift suffered not only the NNW structure deformation caused by the Western Kunlun uplifting, but also the NE structure deformation caused by the Southern Tianshan uplifting, and the thrust front fault of Kalpin thrust system related to the Southern Tianshan orogen intrudes southeastward into the hinterland of Bachu Uplift and extends NNE from well Pil to Xiaohaizi reservoir and Gudongshan mountain, which resulted in the strata folded and denuded strongly. In the end of the Pliocene (late Himalayan movement), the impact of Southern Tianshan orogen decreased because of the stress released with the breakthrough upward of Kalpin fault extending NE, and Bachu Uplift suffered mainly the structure deformation extending NW-NNW caused by the uplifting of Western Kunlun orogen.

  6. Thermomechanical Modeling of Laser-Induced Structural Relaxation and Deformation of Glass: Volume Changes in Fused Silica at High Temperatures [Thermo-mechanical modeling of laser-induced structural relaxation and deformation of SiO2 glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vignes, Ryan M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). National Ignition Facility and Photon Sciences; Soules, Thomas F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). National Ignition Facility and Photon Sciences; Stolken, James S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). National Ignition Facility and Photon Sciences; Settgast, Randolph R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). National Ignition Facility and Photon Sciences; Elhadj, Selim [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). National Ignition Facility and Photon Sciences; Matthews, Manyalibo J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). National Ignition Facility and Photon Sciences; Mauro, J.

    2012-12-17

    In a fully coupled thermomechanical model of the nanoscale deformation in amorphous SiO2 due to laser heating is presented. Direct measurement of the transient, nonuniform temperature profiles was used to first validate a nonlinear thermal transport model. Densification due to structural relaxation above the glass transition point was modeled using the Tool-Narayanaswamy (TN) formulation for the evolution of structural relaxation times and fictive temperature. TN relaxation parameters were derived from spatially resolved confocal Raman scattering measurements of Si–O–Si stretching mode frequencies. These thermal and microstructural data were used to simulate fictive temperatures which are shown to scale nearly linearly with density, consistent with previous measurements from Shelby et al. Volumetric relaxation coupled with thermal expansion occurring in the liquid-like and solid-like glassy states lead to residual stresses and permanent deformation which could be quantified. But, experimental surface deformation profiles between 1700 and 2000 K could only be reconciled with our simulation by assuming a roughly 2 × larger liquid thermal expansion for a-SiO2 with a temperature of maximum density ~150 K higher than previously estimated by Bruckner et al. Calculated stress fields agreed well with recent laser-induced critical fracture measurements, demonstrating accurate material response prediction under processing conditions of practical interest.

  7. Internal state variable models for micro- structure in high temperature deformation of titanium alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    There exists an interaction between microstructural evolution and deformation behavior in high temperature deformation of titanium alloys. And the microstruc- ture of titanium alloys is very sensitive to the process parameters of plastic de- formation process. In this paper, on the basis of plastic deformation mechanism of metals and alloys, a microstructural model including dislocation density rate equa- tion and grain growth rate equation is established with the dislocation density rate being an internal state variable. Applying the model to the high temperature de- formation process of Ti60 titanium alloy, the average relative errors of grain sizes between the experiments and the predictions are 9.47% for sampled data, and 13.01% for non-sampled data.

  8. Various aspects of the Deformation Dependent Mass model of nuclear structure

    CERN Document Server

    Petrellis, D; Minkov, N

    2015-01-01

    Recently, a variant of the Bohr Hamiltonian was proposed where the mass term is allowed to depend on the beta variable of nuclear deformation. Analytic solutions of this modified Hamiltonian have been obtained using the Davidson and the Kratzer potentials, by employing techniques from supersymmetric quantum mechanics. Apart from the new set of analytic solutions, the newly introduced Deformation-Dependent Mass (DDM) model offered a remedy to the problematic behaviour of the moment of inertia in the Bohr Hamiltonian, where it appears to increase proportionally to the square of beta. In the DDM model the moments of inertia increase at a much lower rate, in agreement with experimental data. The current work presents an application of the DDM-model suitable for the description of nuclei at the point of shape/phase transitions between vibrational and gamma-unstable or prolate deformed nuclei and is based on a method that was successfully applied before in the context of critical point symmetries.

  9. Elastic-plastic deformation of fiber composites with a tetragonal structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makarova, E.IU.; Svistkova, L.A. (Permskii Politekhnicheskii Institut, Perm (USSR))

    1991-02-01

    Results of numerical solutions are presented for elastic-plastic problems concerning arbitrary loading of unidirectional composites in the transverse plane. The nucleation and evolution of microplastic zones in the matrix and the effect of this process on the macroscopic characteristics of the composite are discussed. Attention is also given to the effect of the fiber shape on the elastic-plastic deformation of the matrix and to deformation paths realized in simple microdeformation processes. The discussion is illustrated by results obtained for a composite consisting of a VT1-0 titanium alloy matrix reinforced by Ti-Mo fibers.

  10. Piezoelectric and deformation potential effects of strain-dependent luminescence in semiconductor quantum well structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Aihua; Peng, Mingzeng; Willatzen, Morten;

    2017-01-01

    , in the framework of the 6 × 6 k·p Hamiltonian for the valence states, to directly assess the interplay between the spin-orbit coupling and the strain-induced deformation potential for the interband momentum-matrix element. We numerically addressed problems of both the infinite and IQWs with piezoelectric fields...... to elucidate the effects of the piezoelectric potential and the deformation potential on the strain-dependent luminescence. The experimentally measured photoluminescence variatio½n as a function of pressure can be qualitatively explained by the theoretical results....

  11. Structure and deformations of strongly magnetized neutron stars with twisted torus configurations

    CERN Document Server

    Ciolfi, R; Gualtieri, L

    2010-01-01

    We construct general relativistic models of stationary, strongly magnetized neutron stars. The magnetic field configuration, obtained by solving the relativistic Grad-Shafranov equation, is a generalization of the twisted torus model recently proposed in the literature; the stellar deformations induced by the magnetic field are computed by solving the perturbed Einstein's equations; stellar matter is modeled using realistic equations of state. We find that in these configurations the poloidal field dominates over the toroidal field and that, if the magnetic field is sufficiently strong during the first phases of the stellar life, it can produce large deformations.

  12. Soil bacterial community structure responses to precipitation reduction and forest management in forest ecosystems across Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felsmann, Katja; Baudis, Mathias; Gimbel, Katharina; Kayler, Zachary E; Ellerbrock, Ruth; Bruelheide, Helge; Bruehlheide, Helge; Bruckhoff, Johannes; Welk, Erik; Puhlmann, Heike; Weiler, Markus; Gessler, Arthur; Ulrich, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Soil microbial communities play an important role in forest ecosystem functioning, but how climate change will affect the community composition and consequently bacterial functions is poorly understood. We assessed the effects of reduced precipitation with the aim of simulating realistic future drought conditions for one growing season on the bacterial community and its relation to soil properties and forest management. We manipulated precipitation in beech and conifer forest plots managed at different levels of intensity in three different regions across Germany. The precipitation reduction decreased soil water content across the growing season by between 2 to 8% depending on plot and region. T-RFLP analysis and pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene were used to study the total soil bacterial community and its active members after six months of precipitation reduction. The effect of reduced precipitation on the total bacterial community structure was negligible while significant effects could be observed for the active bacteria. However, the effect was secondary to the stronger influence of specific soil characteristics across the three regions and management selection of overstorey tree species and their respective understorey vegetation. The impact of reduced precipitation differed between the studied plots; however, we could not determine the particular parameters being able to modify the response of the active bacterial community among plots. We conclude that the moderate drought induced by the precipitation manipulation treatment started to affect the active but not the total bacterial community, which points to an adequate resistance of the soil microbial system over one growing season.

  13. Multiple plant-wax compounds record differential sources and ecosystem structure in large river catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemingway, Jordon D.; Schefuß, Enno; Dinga, Bienvenu Jean; Pryer, Helena; Galy, Valier V.

    2016-07-01

    n-alkanes better represent a catchment-integrated signal with minimal response to discharge seasonality. Comparison to published data on other large watersheds indicates that this phenomenon is not limited to the Congo River, and that analysis of multiple plant-wax lipid classes and chain lengths can be used to better resolve local vs. distal ecosystem structure in river catchments.

  14. Structural coarsening during annealing of an aluminum plate heavily deformed using ECAE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishin, Oleg V.; Zhang, Yubin; Godfrey, A.

    2015-01-01

    The microstructure and softening behaviour have been investigated in an aluminum plate heavily deformed by equal channel angular extrusion and subsequently annealed at 170 °C. It is found that at this temperature the microstructure evolves by coarsening with no apparent signs of recrystallization...

  15. Effects of Fault Segmentation, Mechanical Interaction, and Structural Complexity on Earthquake-Generated Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, David Elias

    2014-01-01

    Earth's topographic surface forms an interface across which the geodynamic and geomorphic engines interact. This interaction is best observed along crustal margins where topography is created by active faulting and sculpted by geomorphic processes. Crustal deformation manifests as earthquakes at centennial to millennial timescales. Given that…

  16. Direct determination of elastic strains and dislocation densities in individual subgrains in deformation structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Bo; Poulsen, Henning Friis; Lienert, U.

    2007-01-01

    A novel synchrotron-based technique "high angular resolution 3DXRD" is presented in detail, and applied to the characterization of oxygen-free, high-conductivity copper at a tensile deformation of 2%. The position and shape in reciprocal space of 14 peaks originating from deeply embedded individual...

  17. Effects of Fault Segmentation, Mechanical Interaction, and Structural Complexity on Earthquake-Generated Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, David Elias

    2014-01-01

    Earth's topographic surface forms an interface across which the geodynamic and geomorphic engines interact. This interaction is best observed along crustal margins where topography is created by active faulting and sculpted by geomorphic processes. Crustal deformation manifests as earthquakes at centennial to millennial timescales. Given that…

  18. Evolution of orientations and deformation structures within individual grains in cold rolled columnar grained nickel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, G.L.; Godfrey, A.; Winther, Grethe;

    2011-01-01

    Columnar grained Ni is used as a model material allowing simultaneous non-surface investigations of the evolution of crystallographic orientations and deformation microstructures within individual grains as a function of rolling strain up to ε=0.7. Electron channelling contrast and electron...

  19. Kinetics deformation of current-voltage characteristics of the varistor oxide structures due to overcharging of the localized states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonkoshkur A. S.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Prolonged exposure of zinc oxide varistors to the electrical load leads to current-voltage characteristics (CVC deformation, which is associated with a change in the height and width of the intergranular barriers, which are main structural element of the varistors. Polarization phenomena in zinc oxide ceramics are studied in a number of works, but those are mainly limited to the study of the physics of the CVC deformation process and to determining the parameters of localized electronic states involved in this process. This paper presents the results on the simulation of the deformation of pulse CVC of a separate intergranular potential barrier at transient polarization/depolarization, associated with recharging of surface electronic states (SES, which cause this barrier. It is found that at high density of SES their degree of electron filling is small and the effect of DC voltage leads to a shift of pulse current-voltage characteristics into the region of small currents. Conversely, the low density SES are almost completely filled with electrons, and after crystallite polarization CVC is shifted to high currents. Experimental studies have confirmed the possibility of applying the discovered laws to ceramic varistor structures. The proposed model allows interpreting the «anomalous» effects (such as increase in the classification voltage and reduction of active losses power observed during the varistors accelerated aging test.

  20. Pyrite deformation and connections to gold mobility: insight from micro-structural analysis and trace element mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubosq, Renelle; Rogowitz, Anna; Lawley, Christopher; Schneider, David; Jackson, Simon

    2017-04-01

    Pyrite is an important and ubiquitous gold-bearing phase in many orogenic gold deposits making the study of its deformation behaviour under metamorphic conditions crucial to the understanding of gold (re)mobilization. However, pyrite deformation mechanisms and their influence on the retention or release of trace elements during deformation and metamorphism remain poorly understood. We propose a syn- to post-peak metamorphic and deformation driven gold upgrading model where gold is remobilized through deformation-induced diffusion pathways in the form of substructures in pyrite. The middle amphibolite facies assemblage (actinolite-biotite-plagioclase-almandine) of the Detour Lake deposit (Canada) makes it an ideal study area due to maximum temperatures reaching 550°C, exceeding the conditions for plastic deformation in pyrite (450°C). The world-class Detour Lake deposit, containing 16.4 Moz of Au at 1 g/t, is a Neoarchean orogenic gold ore body located in the northern Abitibi district within the Superior Province. The mine is situated along the high strain, sub-vertical ductile-brittle Sunday Lake Deformation Zone (SLDZ) parallel to the broadly E-W trending Abitibi greenstone belt. Herein we combine orientation contrast (OC) forescatter imaging, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and 2D laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) trace element pyrite mapping to evaluate the influence of pyrite brittle and plastic deformation on the release of trace elements during syn-metamorphic gold remobilization. Local misorientation patterns in pyrite exhibit parallel bands that can be described by continuous rotation around one of the axes, whereas higher strain areas reveal more heterogeneous misorientation patterns and the development of low-angle grain boundaries with late fractures indicative of dislocation creep and strain hardening. These late fractures are an important micro-structural setting for gold and clusters of precious

  1. Temperature Distribution and Thermal Deformation of the Crystallization Roller Based on the Direct Thermal-Structural Coupling Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Liping; He, Zhu; Li, Baokuan; Zhou, Kun; Sun, Ke

    2017-03-01

    The temperature distribution and the thermal deformation of the crystallization roller have a significant effect on the forming process of the thin steel strip. Finite element analysis has been used to simulate the temperature distribution and the thermal deformation in a crystallization roller through the direct thermal-structural coupling analysis method. Various parameters, such as different rotational velocities, diverse locations of cooling water pipes, and typical velocities of cooling water have been systematically investigated. It is found that the temperature and the equivalent stress of the outer surface reach the steady state after 30 s of rotations, and they are influenced remarkably by the factors of rotational velocity and cooling water pipe depth. Meanwhile, the radial displacement approaches the steady state after 300 s of revolutions and is significantly affected by the cooling water velocity.

  2. The formation, structure, and properties of the Au-Co alloys produced by severe plastic deformation under pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolmachev, T. P.; Pilyugin, V. P.; Ancharov, A. I.; Chernyshov, E. G.; Patselov, A. M.

    2016-02-01

    The mechanical alloying of Au-Co mixtures, which are systems with high positive mixing enthalpy, is studied following high-pressure torsion deformation at room and cryogenic temperatures. X-ray diffractometry in synchrotron radiation and scanning microscopy are used to investigate the sequence of structural changes in the course of deforming the mixtures up to the end state of the fcc substitutional solid solution based on gold. The mechanical properties of the alloys are measured both during mixture processing and after mechanical alloying. Microfractographic studies are performed. Factors that facilitate the solubility of Co in Au, namely, increased processing pressure, cobalt concentration in a charge mixture, true strain, and temperature decreased to cryogenic level have been identified.

  3. Temperature Distribution and Thermal Deformation of the Crystallization Roller Based on the Direct Thermal-Structural Coupling Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Liping; He, Zhu; Li, Baokuan; Zhou, Kun; Sun, Ke

    2016-12-01

    The temperature distribution and the thermal deformation of the crystallization roller have a significant effect on the forming process of the thin steel strip. Finite element analysis has been used to simulate the temperature distribution and the thermal deformation in a crystallization roller through the direct thermal-structural coupling analysis method. Various parameters, such as different rotational velocities, diverse locations of cooling water pipes, and typical velocities of cooling water have been systematically investigated. It is found that the temperature and the equivalent stress of the outer surface reach the steady state after 30 s of rotations, and they are influenced remarkably by the factors of rotational velocity and cooling water pipe depth. Meanwhile, the radial displacement approaches the steady state after 300 s of revolutions and is significantly affected by the cooling water velocity.

  4. An ecological model of the Northern and Central Adriatic Sea: Analysis of ecosystem structure and fishing impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coll, Marta; Santojanni, Alberto; Palomera, Isabel; Tudela, Sergi; Arneri, Enrico

    2007-08-01

    A trophic mass-balance model was developed to characterise the food web structure and functioning of the Northern and Central Adriatic Sea and to quantify the ecosystem impacts of fishing during the 1990s. Forty functional groups were described, including target and non-target fish and invertebrate groups, and three detritus groups (natural detritus, discards and by-catch of cetaceans and marine turtles). Results highlighted that there was an important coupling between pelagic-benthic production of plankton, benthic invertebrates and detritus. Organisms located at low and medium trophic levels, (i.e. benthic invertebrates, zooplankton and anchovy), as well as dolphins, were identified as keystone groups of the ecosystem. Jellyfish were an important element in terms of consumption and production of trophic flows within the ecosystem. The analysis of trophic flows of zooplankton and detritus groups indirectly underlined the importance of the microbial food web in the Adriatic Sea. Fishing activities inflicted notable impacts on the ecosystem during the 1990s, with a high gross efficiency of the fishery, a high consumption of fishable production, high exploitation rates for various target and non target species, a low trophic level of the catch and medium values of primary production required to sustain the fishery. Moreover, the analysis of Odum's ecological indicators highlighted that the ecosystem was in a low-medium developmental stage. Bottom trawling ( Strascico), mid-water trawling ( Volante) and beam trawling ( Rapido) fleets had the highest impacts on both target and non target ecological groups. On the contrary, purse seining ( Lampara) showed medium to low impacts on the ecosystem; cetaceans, marine turtles and sea birds were not significantly involved in competition with fishing activity.

  5. Ductile deformation, boudinage and low angle normal faults. An overview of the structural variability at present-day rifted margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerc, Camille; Jolivet, Laurent; Ringenbach, Jean-Claude; Ballard, Jean-François

    2016-04-01

    High quality industrial seismic profiles acquired along most of the world's passive margins present stunningly increased resolution that leads to unravel an unexpected variety of structures. An important benefit of the increased resolution of recent seismic profiles is that they provide an unprecedented access to the processes occurring in the middle and lower continental crust. We present a series of so far unreleased profiles that allow the identification of various rift-related geological processes such as crustal boudinage, ductile shear and low angle detachment faulting. The lower crust in passive margins appears much more intensely deformed than usually represented. At the foot of both magma-rich and magma-poor margins, we observe clear indications of ductile deformation of the deep continental crust along large-scale shallow dipping shear zones. These shear zones generally show a top-to-the-continent sense of shear consistent with the activity of overlying continentward dipping normal faults observed in the upper crust. This pattern is responsible for a migration of the deformation and associated sedimentation and/or volcanic activity toward the ocean. In some cases, low angle shear zones define an anastomosed pattern that delineates boudin-like structures. The interboudins areas seem to localize the maximum of deformation. The lower crust is intensely boudinaged and the geometry of those boudins seems to control the position and dip of upper crustal normal faults. We present some of the most striking examples (Uruguay, West Africa, Barents sea…) and discuss their implications for the time-temperature-subsidence history of the margins.

  6. From ductile to brittle deformation: structural development and strain distribution along a crustal-scale shear zone in SW Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torvela, Taija; Ehlers, Carl

    2010-07-01

    This study demonstrates the impact of variations in overall crustal rheology on crustal strength in relatively high P- T conditions at mid- to lower mid-crustal levels. In a crustal-scale shear zone, along-strike variations in the rheological competence result in large-scale deformation partitioning and differences in the deformation style and strain distribution. The structural behaviour of the crustal-scale Sottunga-Jurmo shear zone (SJSZ) in SW Finland is described. The shear zone represents a discontinuity between the amphibolite-to-granulite facies, dome-and-basin style crustal block to the north and the amphibolite facies rocks with dominantly steeply dipping structures to the south. The overall deformation style and resulting strains along the shear zone are greatly affected by the local lithology. The results of this study also have implications for the current tectonic models of the Palaeoproterozoic Fennoscandia. The most important implication is that the SJSZ, together with other structurally related shear zones, compartmentalised the far-field stresses, so that the late ductile structures within and south of the SJSZ can be allocated to a convergence from the south as late as ~1.79 Ga rather than to the Nordic orogeny from the west-northwest. It is further suggested that at ~1.79 Ga the stress regime was still compressive/transpressive and that the ~1.79 Ga magmatism in Åland at least initiated in a compressive setting. No extension or orogenic collapse, therefore, occurred in the Åland area while the rocks still were within the ductile regime.

  7. Late Pleistocene-Holocene earthquake-induced slumps and soft-sediment deformation structures in the Acequion River valley, Central Precordillera, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perucca Laura P

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Evidence of earthquake-induced liquefaction features in the Acequión river valley, central western Argentina, is analysed. Well-preserved soft-sediment deformation structures are present in Late Pleistocene deposits; they include two large slumps and several sand dikes, convolutions, pseudonodules, faults, dish structures and diapirs in the basal part of a shallow-lacustrine succession in the El Acequión River area. The water-saturated state of these sediments favoured deformation.

  8. Effect of Changes in Seasonal Rain Regime on Coastal Ecosystem Structure and Aquaculture Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosimo, S.; Melaku Canu, D.; Libralato, S.; Cossarini, G.; Giorgi, F.

    2008-12-01

    A downscaling experiment linked climate forcing produced by a Regional Climate Model for Europe to a 3D high resolution coupled transport biogeochemical model for the Lagoon of Venice, which in turn forced: a) a food web model for evaluation of cascading effects on ecosystem structure and b) a population dynamic bioenergetic filter feeders bivalvae model for evaluation of effects on aquaculture activities. The hierarchy of models was used to compare result for a reference situation (RF, 1961-1990) with results for two future IPCC scenarios (2071-2100), representing market oriented and local sustainability policies (scenarios A2 and B2, respectively). Future climate projections suggest that, locally, annual mean rain will not change much but the seasonal patterns will likely do so. Summer and spring will be more dry and winter and autumn more rainy. This will potentially increase winter nutrient concentrations but -because of unfavourable timing - primary and secondary productions will decrease, and nutrient surplus will be exported from the Lagoon of Venice to the Adriatic Sea. The impacts on higher trophic levels could be softened thanks to presence of alternative energy pathways and role of omnivory. However, in our future scenario of the lagoon food web the suitability for higher trophic level organisms seems lower. A more detailed analysis on clam aquaculture indicates that this activity will suffer the decrease of primary productivity, and point to the need of implementation of proper aquaculture management policies. In the light of adaptive management. These policies cannot be a straightfoward extrapolation of present practises, but need to be defined basing on future conditions.

  9. Environmental conditions and biotic interactions influence ecosystem structure and function in a drying stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludlam, J.P.; Magoulick, D.D.

    2010-01-01

    Benthic consumers influence stream ecosystem structure and function, but these interactions depend on environmental context. We experimentally quantified the effects of central stoneroller minnows (Campostoma anomalum (Rafinesque) and Meek's crayfish (Orconectes meeki meeki (Faxon)) on benthic communities using electric exclusion quadrats in Little Mulberry Creek before (June) and during (August) seasonal stream drying. Unglazed ceramic tiles were deployed in June and August to measure periphyton and invertebrate abundance, and leafpack decomposition and primary production were also measured in August. Relationships between stoneroller and crayfish density and the size of consumer effects were evaluated with multiple linear regression models. Average chlorophyll a abundance was greater on exposed than exclusion tiles in August, but not in June. Sediment dry mass, periphyton ash-free dry mass (AFDM), and chironomid densities on tiles did not differ among treatments in either period. Leaf packs decayed faster in exposed than exclusion treatments (kexposed = 0.038 ?? 0.013, kexclusion = 0.007 ?? 0.002), but consumer effects were stronger in some pools than others. Leafpack invertebrate biomass and abundance and tile primary productivity did not differ among treatments. Consumer effects on chlorophyll a were related to crayfish and stoneroller density, and effects on chironomid density were related to stoneroller density. These results contrast with a previous exclusion experiment in Little Mulberry Creek that demonstrated strong consumer effects. The influence of stream drying on consumer effects appears to have been reduced by strong spates, underscoring the importance of conducting multi-year studies to determine the magnitude of variability in ecological interactions. ?? US Government: USGS 2010.

  10. Importance of storm events in controlling ecosystem structure and function in a Florida Gulf Coast estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, S. E.; Cable, J.E.; Childers, D.L.; Coronado-Molina, C.; Day, J.W.; Hittle, C.D.; Madden, C.J.; Reyes, E.; Rudnick, D.; Sklar, F.

    2004-01-01

    From 8/95 to 2/01, we investigated the ecological effects of intra- and inter-annual variability in freshwater flow through Taylor Creek in southeastern Everglades National Park. Continuous monitoring and intensive sampling studies overlapped with an array of pulsed weather events that impacted physical, chemical, and biological attributes of this region. We quantified the effects of three events representing a range of characteristics (duration, amount of precipitation, storm intensity, wind direction) on the hydraulic connectivity, nutrient and sediment dynamics, and vegetation structure of the SE Everglades estuarine ecotone. These events included a strong winter storm in November 1996, Tropical Storm Harvey in September 1999, and Hurricane Irene in October 1999. Continuous hydrologic and daily water sample data were used to examine the effects of these events on the physical forcing and quality of water in Taylor Creek. A high resolution, flow-through sampling and mapping approach was used to characterize water quality in the adjacent bay. To understand the effects of these events on vegetation communities, we measured mangrove litter production and estimated seagrass cover in the bay at monthly intervals. We also quantified sediment deposition associated with Hurricane Irene's flood surge along the Buttonwood Ridge. These three events resulted in dramatic changes in surface water movement and chemistry in Taylor Creek and adjacent regions of Florida Bay as well as increased mangrove litterfall and flood surge scouring of seagrass beds. Up to 5 cm of bay-derived mud was deposited along the ridge adjacent to the creek in this single pulsed event. These short-term events can account for a substantial proportion of the annual flux of freshwater and materials between the mangrove zone and Florida Bay. Our findings shed light on the capacity of these storm events, especially when in succession, to have far reaching and long lasting effects on coastal ecosystems such

  11. Constrained Hartree-Fock Theory and Study of Deformed Structures of Closed Shell Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praharaj, Choudhury

    2016-03-01

    We have studied some N or Z = 50 nuclei in a microscopic model with effective interaction in a reasonably large shell model space. Excitation of particles across 50 shell closure leads to well-deformed excited prolate configurations. The potential energy surfaces of nuclei are studied using Hartree-Fock theory with quadrupole constraint to explore the various deformed configurations of N = 50 nuclei 82Ge , 84Se and 86Kr . Energy spectra are calculated from various intrinsic states using Peierls-Yoccoz angular momentum projection technique. Results of spectra and electromagnetic moments and transitions will be presented for N = 50 nuclei and for Z = 50 114Sn nucleus. Supported by Grant No SB/S2/HEP-06/2013 of DST.

  12. Crystal structure, thermal and compositional deformations of {beta}-CsB{sub 5}O{sub 8}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bubnova, R. [Institute of the Silicate Chemistry Russian Academy of Sciences, Ul. Odoevskogo, 24/2, 199155, St Petersburg (Russian Federation); Dinnebier, R.E. [Max-Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstrasse 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Filatov, S.; Anderson, J. [Saint Petersburg State University, University Emb., 7/9, 199034, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2007-02-15

    The crystal structure of {beta}-CsB{sub 5}O{sub 8} has been determined from X-ray powder diffraction data using synchrotron radiation: Pbca, a = 7.8131(3) Aa, b=12.0652(4) Aa, c=14.9582(4) Aa, Z=8, {rho}{sub calc}=2.967 g/cm{sup 3}, R-p=0.076, R-wp=0.094. {beta}-CsB{sub 5}O{sub 8} was found to be isostructural with {beta}-KB{sub 5}O{sub 8} and {beta}-RbB{sub 5}O{sub 8}. The crystal structure consists of a double interlocking framework built up from B-O pentaborate groups. The crystal structure exhibits a highly anisotropic thermal expansion: {alpha}{sub a}=53, {alpha}{sub b}=16, {alpha}{sub c}=14 .10{sup -6}/K; the anisotropy may be caused by partial straightening of the screw chains of the pentaborate groups. The similarity of the thermal and compositional (Cs-Rb-K substitution) deformations of CsB{sub 5}O{sub 8} is revealed: increasing the radius of the metal by 0.01 Aa leads to the same deformations of the crystal structure as increasing the temperature by 35 C. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  13. Influence of deformation temperature on structural variation and shape-memory effect of a thermoplastic semi-crystalline multiblock copolymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Yan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A multiblock copolymer termed as PCL-PIBMD, consisting of crystallizable poly(ε-caprolactone (PCL segments and crystallizable poly(3S-isobutyl-morpholine-2,5-dione (PIBMD segments, has been reported as a material showing a thermally-induced shape-memory effect. While PIBMD crystalline domains act as netpoints to determine the permanent shape, both PCL crystalline domains and PIBMD amorphous domains, which have similar transition temperatures (Ttrans can act as switching domains. In this work, the influence of the deformation temperature (Tdeform = 50 or 20°C, which was above or below Ttrans, on the structural changes of PCL-PIBMD during uniaxial deformation and the shapememory properties were investigated. Furthermore, the relative contribution of crystalline PCL and PIBMD amorphous phases to the fixation of the temporary shape were distinguished by a toluene vapor treatment approach. The results indicated that at 50°C, both PCL and PIBMD amorphous phases can be orientated during deformation, resulting in thermallyinduced crystals of PCL domains and joint contribution to the switching domains. In contrast at 20°C, the temporary shape was mainly fixed by PCL crystals generated via strain-induced crystallization.

  14. Wetland-stream ecosystems of the western Kentucky coalfield: environmental disturbance and the shaping of aquatic community structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, P.L. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of surface mining effluents of the shaping of aquatic community structure in wetland-stream ecosystems of the western Kentucky coalfield were examined. Three variously impacted drainage systems were utilized for the investigation of cause-and-effect relationships. Clear Creek wetland-stream ecosystem had a uniformly low pH, high conductivity and high dissolved minerals load linked to the oozing of old, unreclaimed surface mine spoils. Cypress Creek wetland-stream ecosystem exhibited a slug-pulsing of mine drainage effluents tied to active surface mining limited to the headwaters region. Henderson Sloughs-Pond Creek wetland-stream ecosystem had no mining impact and was utilized as a comparison site. Macroinvertebrate taxa and diversity were considerably lowered in the systems receiving mine drainage. The Shannon-Weaver diversity index (H) was 0.61 for Clear Creek, 1.80 for Cypress Creek and 2.01 for Henderson Sloughs. Large numbers of chironomid larvae dominated the benthic community of Clear Creek while mayflies, caddisflies and crustaceans were the major components of the Cypress Creek community. Henderson Sloughs-Pond Creek had an even more diverse community of mayflies, caddisflies, crustaceans, molluscs and odonates. Fishes followed the same general trend, being almost absent in Clear Creek (H - 0.47), slightly depressed in Cypress Creek (H = 1.74) and generally diverse in Henderson Sloughs (H = 2.37).

  15. Soft-sediment deformation structures in the Mio-Pliocene Misaki Formation within alternating deep-sea clays and volcanic ashes (Miura Peninsula, Japan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumder, Rajat; van Loon, A. J. (Tom); Malviya, Vivek P.; Arima, Makoto; Ogawa, Yujuro

    2016-10-01

    The Mio-Pliocene Misaki Formation of the Miura Group (Miura Peninsula, Japan) shows an extremely wide variety of soft-sediment deformation structures. The most common deformation structures are load casts and associated flame structures, dish-and-pillar structures, synsedimentary faults, multilobated convolutions, chaotic deformation structures, sedimentary veins and dykes, and large-scale slides and slump scars. The formation, which accumulated in a deep-sea environment (2000-3000 m), is well exposed in and around Jogashima; it consists of relative thin (commonly dm-scale) alternations of deep-marine fine-grained sediments and volcanic ejecta that are, as a rule, coarse-grained. Since the formation represents fore-arc deposits of the Izu-Bonin and the Honsu arc collision zone, it might be expected that tectonic activity also played a role as a trigger of the soft-sediment deformation structures that abound in these sediments. This is indicated, indeed, by the abundance of soft-sediment deformations over large lateral distances that occur in numerous beds that are sandwiched between undeformed beds. On the basis of their characteristics and the geological context, these layers can be explained satisfactorily only by assuming deformation triggered by seismicity, which must be related to the Izu-Bonin and Honsu arc collision. The layers thus form deep-marine seismites.

  16. Global Ecosystem Restoration Index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez, Miguel; Garcia, Monica; Fernandez, Nestor

    2015-01-01

    The Global ecosystem restoration index (GERI) is a composite index that integrates structural and functional aspects of the ecosystem restoration process. These elements are evaluated through a window that looks into a baseline for degraded ecosystems with the objective to assess restoration...

  17. Measuring structure deformations of a composite glider by optical means with on-ground and in-flight testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakunowicz, Jerzy; Święch, Łukasz; Meyer, Ralf

    2016-12-01

    In aeronautical research experimental data sets of high quality are essential to verify and improve simulation algorithms. For this reason the experimental techniques need to be constantly refined. The shape, movement or deformation of structural aircraft elements can be measured implicitly in multiple ways; however, only optical, correlation-based techniques are able to deliver direct high-order and spatial results. In this paper two different optical metrologies are used for on-ground preparation and the actual execution of in-flight wing deformation measurements on a PW-6U glider. Firstly, the commercial PONTOS system is used for static tests on the ground and for wind tunnel investigations to successfully certify an experimental sensor pod mounted on top of the test bed fuselage. Secondly, a modification of the glider is necessary to implement the optical method named image pattern correlation technique (IPCT), which has been developed by the German Aerospace Center DLR. This scientific technology uses a stereoscopic camera set-up placed inside the experimental pod and a stochastic dot matrix applied to the area of interest on the glider wing to measure the deformation of the upper wing surface in-flight. The flight test installation, including the preparation, is described and results are presented briefly. Focussing on the compensation for typical error sources, the paper concludes with a recommended procedure to enhance the data processing for better results. Within the presented project IPCT has been developed and optimized for a new type of test bed. Adapted to the special requirements of the glider, the IPCT measurements were able to deliver a valuable wing deformation data base which now can be used to improve corresponding numerical models and simulations.

  18. Deformation in the Bolivian Subandes: a reconstruction of geologic structures along two transects across the Andean Front in Southern Bolivia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadeen, Xennephone; Zeilinger, Gerold

    2016-04-01

    The Southern Bolivian Subandes is a highly tectonically active region in the Andes since deformation began approx. 10 Ma ago. The study area is located in the Southern Bolivian Subandes southwest of Santa Cruz. Observations were taken along two transects with each being around 100 km long. They stretch from the Subandes-Interandean boundary into the Chaco Plain. The northern transect extends from Abapó in the Chaco Plain and it continues west near Vallegrande and ends just west of Pucara near La Higuera. The southern transect initiates near Charagua in the Chaco Plain. Then it continues west through Villa Vaca Guzmán and ends around 25 km west of Monteagudo. Structural and stratigraphic data were collected along the two transects. The locations of major geologic structures such as thrust faults, anticlines and synclines were mapped. The map along with the data from the two cross sections was then used to generate a 3D model of the Subandean fold and thrust belt between Abapó and Monteagudo. The cross sections were than restored to quantify the amount of shortening that had occurred over the past 10 million years. The southern transect has undergone 65 km of shortening while 50 to 80 km of shortening have transpired along the less constrain northern transect. The estimated rate of deformation averages at 8 mm/yr. The timing of deformation may differ between the two transects. Deformation may have initiated earlier or undergone at a faster rate in the northern transect than in the southern transect. It is also possible that the decollement is shallower in the western portion of the northern transect. We observe that the east propagating anticlines verge to the west. This may be due to the anticlines being cut by exposed or blind thrust faults and then rotated counterclockwise. They rotate while piggybacking on younger thrust faults that developed and propagate to the east of the anticlines. We postulate deformation continues to propagate eastward into the Chaco

  19. Structure, Behavior, Function as a Framework For Teaching and Learning about Complexity In Ecosystems: Lessons from Middle School Classrooms (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hmelo-Silver, C.; Gray, S.; Jordan, R.

    2010-12-01

    Complex systems surround us, and as Sabelli (2006) has argued, understanding complex systems is a critical component of science literacy. Understanding natural and designed systems are also prominent in the new draft science standards (NRC, 2010) and therefore of growing importance in the science classroom. Our work has focused on promoting an understanding of one complex natural system, aquatic ecosystems, which given current events, is fast becoming a requisite for informed decision-making as citizens (Jordan et al. 2008). Learners have difficulty understanding many concepts related to complex natural systems (e.g., Hmelo-Silver, Marathe, & Liu, 2007; Jordan, Gray, Liu, Demeter, & Hmelo-Silver, 2009). Studies of how students think about complex ecological systems (e.g; Hmelo-Silver, Marathe, & Liu, 2007; Hogan, 2000, Hogan & Fisherkeller, 1996: Covitt & Gunkel, 2008) have revealed difficulties in thinking beyond linear flow, single causality, and visible structure. Helping students to learn about ecosystems is a complex task that requires providing opportunities for students to not only engage directly with ecosystems but also with resources that provide relevant background knowledge and opportunities for learners to make their thinking visible. Both tasks can be difficult given the large spatial and temporal scales on which ecosystems operate. Additionally, visible components interact with often invisible components which can obscure ecosystem processes for students. Working in the context of aquatic ecosystems, we sought to provide learners with representations and simulations that make salient the relationship between system components. In particular, we provided learners with opportunities to experience both the micro-level and macro-level phenomena that are key to understanding ecosystems (Hmelo-Silver, Liu, Gray, & Jordan, submitted; Liu & Hmelo-Silver, 2008; Jacobson & Wilensky, 2006). To accomplish this, we needed to help learners make connections across

  20. Subgrain and dislocation structure changes in hot-deformed high-temperature Fe-Ni austenitic alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ducki, K.J.; Rodak, K.; Hetmanczyk, M.; Kuc, D

    2003-08-28

    The influence of plastic deformation on the substructure of a high-temperature austenitic Fe-Ni alloy has been presented. Hot-torsion tests were executed at constant strain rates of 0.1 and 1.0 s{sup -1}, at testing temperatures in the range 900-1150 deg. C. The examination of the microstructure was carried out, using transmission electron microscopy. Direct measurements on the micrographs allowed the calculation of structural parameters: the average subgrain area, and the mean dislocation density. A detailed investigation has shown that the microstructure is inhomogeneous, consisting of dense dislocation walls, subgrains and recrystallized regions.

  1. Experimental investigation of the influence on static and cyclic deformation of structural soft clay of stress level

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yunmin; CHEN Yingping; HUANG Bo

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the experimental results performed to study the static and cyclic deformation behavior of undisturbed and remolded soft clays sampling from Xiaoshan.The consolidation tests indicated that the vertical strains of undisturbed soft clay could be divided into three stages with load increasing,however,the remolded clays were almost independent of stress level.The two cut-off points of these three stages are the preconsolidation stress and the structural yielding stress of the original clay,which could be determined by shear wave velocity measurement.The strains developed during cyclic tests of undisturbed and remolded soft clay,both having one turning point under different amplitude of cyclic stress.The strain developed slowly and stayed at a low level at the early stage,but developed quickly in a different way when the turning points were achieved and finally became great.The turning strains changed with different cyclic stress amplitudes,but they almost fell on a linear line whether undisturbed or remolded.Furthermore,the turning points of the remolded clay all fell on the same line of different confining stresses,including which of the undisturbed soft clay under confining pressure was larger than structural yielding stress.It was also found that the deformation characteristic of undisturbed and remolded Xiaoshan clay tend to be consistent when the structure of undisturbed soft clay is damaged.

  2. A unified mathematical framework and an adaptive numerical method for fluid-structure interaction with rigid, deforming, and elastic bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Amneet Pal Singh; Bale, Rahul; Griffith, Boyce E.; Patankar, Neelesh A.

    2013-10-01

    Many problems of interest in biological fluid mechanics involve interactions between fluids and solids that require the coupled solution of momentum equations for both the fluid and the solid. In this work, we develop a mathematical framework and an adaptive numerical method for such fluid-structure interaction (FSI) problems in which the structure may be rigid, deforming, or elastic. We employ an immersed boundary (IB) formulation of the problem that permits us to avoid body conforming discretizations and to use fast Cartesian grid solvers. Rigidity and deformational kinematic constraints are imposed using a formulation based on distributed Lagrange multipliers, and a conventional IB method is used to describe the elasticity of the immersed body. We use Cartesian grid adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) to discretize the equations of motion and thereby obtain a solution methodology that efficiently captures thin boundary layers at fluid-solid interfaces as well as flow structures shed from such interfaces. This adaptive methodology is validated for several benchmark problems in two and three spatial dimensions. In addition, we use this scheme to simulate free swimming, including the maneuvering of a two-dimensional model eel and a three-dimensional model of the weakly electric black ghost knifefish.

  3. Palaeoseismicity in relation to basin tectonics as revealed from soft-sediment deformation structures of the Lower Triassic Panchet formation, Raniganj basin (Damodar valley), eastern India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abhik Kundu; Bapi Goswami; Patrick G Eriksson; Abhijit Chakraborty

    2011-02-01

    The Raniganj basin in the Damodar valley of eastern India is located within the riftogenic Gondwana Master-Basin. The fluvio-lacustrine deposits of the Lower Triassic Panchet Formation of the Damodar valley in the study area preserve various soft-sediment deformation structures such as slump folds, convolute laminae, flame structures, dish-and-pillar structures, sandstone dykes, pseudonodules and syn-sedimentary faults. Although such soft-sediment deformation structures maybe formed by various processes, in the present area the association of these structures, their relation to the adjacent sedimentary rocks and the tectonic and depositional setting of the formation suggest that these structures are seismogenic. Movements along the basin margin and the intra-basinal faults and resultant seismicity with moderate magnitude (2–5 on Richter scale) are thought to have been responsible for the soft-sediment deformations.

  4. Micro-Structural Evolution and Size-Effects in Plastically Deformed Single Crystals: Strain Gradient Continuum Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Naaman, Salim Abdallah

    , to focus on their ability to capture realistic micro-structural evolution. This challenge is the main focus of the present thesis, which takes as starting point a non-work conjugate type back stress based higher order crystal plasticity theory. Within this framework, several possibilities for the back......An extensive amount of research has been devoted to the development of micro-mechanics based gradient plasticity continuum theories, which are necessary for modeling micron-scale plasticity when large spatial gradients of plastic strain appear. While many models have proven successful in capturing...... the macroscopic effects related to strain gradients, most predict smooth micro-structures. The evolution of dislocation micro-structures, during plastic straining of ductile crystalline materials, is highly complex and nonuniform. Published experimental measurements on deformed metal crystals show distinct...

  5. Soft-sediment deformation structures in seismically affected deep-sea Miocene turbidites (Cilento Basin, southern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valente Alessio

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Soft-sediment deformation structures (SSDS are widespread in the upper part of the S. Mauro Formation (Cilento Group, Middle-Late Miocene. The succession is represented mainly by thick and very thick, massive, coarse-grained sandstones, deposited by rapid sedimentation of high-density turbidity currents. The most common SSDS are short pillars, dishes, sedimentary sills and convolutions. They occur mostly in the upper parts of sandstone beds. Vertical tubes of 4-5 cm in diameter and up to 50 cm long constitute the most striking structures. They begin in the middle part of sandstone beds, which are basically massive or contain faint dish structures. These tubes can bifurcate upwards and/ or pass into bedding-parallel veins or dikes. The vertical tubes sometimes form sand volcanoes on the then sedimentary surface.

  6. 3D EBSD charactyerization of deformation structures in commercial purity aluminum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fengxiang, Lin; Godfrey, A.; Juul Jensen, Dorte

    2010-01-01

    diffraction. Techniques to carefully align the sample and to accurately measure the thickness of the material removed in each serial section are described. A new method for stacking the two dimensional maps together to produce a three dimensional visualization of the microstructure is presented. The data...... are analyzed in terms of the deformation-induced orientation spread within each grain. In particular the advantage of using three dimensional data, as opposed to two dimensional data, is illustrated, by inclusion of information about the three dimensional morphology of a grain and its neighbors....

  7. X-ray Diffractions of Deformation Structure in Polycrystalline Fe-32Mn-5Si Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    T he change of microstructure with strain was investigated in a Fe-32Mn-5Si austenitic alloy at room temperature by X-raydiffraction profile analysis. The experimental results show that the Fe-32Mn-5Si alloy is deformed by the strain-induced γ→εtransformation and the twinning except dislocation slip at room temperature. The amount of strain-induced ε-martensite, thestacking fault probability and the twinning probability all exhibit parabolic relationship with increasing strain. The stackingfault probability is higher than the twinning probability.

  8. Electronic Transport Through Carbon Nanotubes: Effects of Structural Deformation and the Tube Chirality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiti, Amitesh; Svizhenko, Alexei; Anantram, M. P.; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Atomistic simulations using a combination of classical force field and Density-Functional-Theory (DFT) show that carbon atoms remain essentially sp2 coordinated in either bent tubes or tubes pushed by an atomically sharp AFM tip. Subsequent Green's-function-based transport calculations reveal that for armchair tubes there is no significant drop in conductance, while for zigzag tubes the conductance can drop by several orders of magnitude in AFM-pushed tubes. The effect can be attributed to simple stretching of the tube under tip deformation, which opens up an energy gap at the Fermi surface.

  9. Magnetic, structural and geochronologic evidence bearing on volcanic sources and Oligocene Deformation of Ash Flow Tuffs, northeast Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, H. C.; MacDonald, W. D.; Hayatsu, A.

    1991-02-01

    Magnetic properties of mid-Tertiary volcanic rocks west of Jiggs in northeast Nevada were investigated for the purposes of interpreting igneous, structural, and tectonic processes in this part of the Basin and Range province. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) patterns reflect flow fabrics and suggest previously unknown sources for these ash flow tuffs. Paleomagnetic and structural evidence suggest counterclockwise relative rotation of the southern part of the area with respect to the north. New stratigraphic, chemical and K-Ar isotopic data support these interpretations. Dacite to rhyolite ash flow tuffs of the Indian Well Formation were subdivided into two main units: the lower and predominant tuff of Jiggs (35.8-37.0 Ma) and the unconformably overlying but areally restricted tuff of Hackwood (30.8 Ma). The Jiggs unit has two polarities whereas the Hackwood has only a reversed polarity remanence. Together these units with tilt correction define a pole (92°E, 87°N, dp = 6°, dm = 8°) for approximately 30-37 Ma. This pole is concordant with coeval North American reference poles, indicating that this zone of approximately 30 km NS extent has not undergone significant vertical axis rotation relative to the North American reference. Andesite lavas of normal magnetic polarity and of 32.5-Ma age characterize the Diamond Hills immediately to the south. We interpret this region, from both structural evidence and discordant paleomagnetic direction, to have rotated approximately 25° counterclockwise relative to the Indian Well volcanic units to the north. The apparent rotation of the Diamond Hills is possibly the result of drag on the left-lateral Garcia fault which limits the Diamond Hills on the southwest. Analysis of AMS data suggests, by patterns of the K1 axes, two distinct sources for the Jiggs unit: a northern buried source and a central partially buried source. Lithologic evidence consistent with proximal vent facies is found near the latter source. An

  10. Density, distribution, and genetic structure of grizzly bears in the Cabinet-Yaak Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macleod, Amy C.; Boyd, Kristina L; Boulanger, John; Royle, J. Andrew; Kasworm, Wayne F.; Paetkau, David; Proctor, Michael F; Annis, Kim; Graves, Tabitha A.

    2016-01-01

    The conservation status of the 2 threatened grizzly bear (Ursus arctos) populations in the Cabinet-Yaak Ecosystem (CYE) of northern Montana and Idaho had remained unchanged since designation in 1975; however, the current demographic status of these populations was uncertain. No rigorous data on population density and distribution or analysis of recent population genetic structure were available to measure the effectiveness of conservation efforts. We used genetic detection data from hair corral, bear rub, and opportunistic sampling in traditional and spatial capture–recapture models to generate estimates of abundance and density of grizzly bears in the CYE. We calculated mean bear residency on our sampling grid from telemetry data using Huggins and Pledger models to estimate the average number of bears present and to correct our superpopulation estimates for lack of geographic closure. Estimated grizzly bear abundance (all sex and age classes) in the CYE in 2012 was 48–50 bears, approximately half the population recovery goal. Grizzly bear density in the CYE (4.3–4.5 grizzly bears/1,000 km2) was among the lowest of interior North American populations. The sizes of the Cabinet (n = 22–24) and Yaak (n = 18–22) populations were similar. Spatial models produced similar estimates of abundance and density with comparable precision without requiring radio-telemetry data to address assumptions of geographic closure. The 2 populations in the CYE were demographically and reproductively isolated from each other and the Cabinet population was highly inbred. With parentage analysis, we documented natural migrants to the Cabinet and Yaak populations by bears born to parents in the Selkirk and Northern Continental Divide populations. These events supported data from other sources suggesting that the expansion of neighboring populations may eventually help sustain the CYE populations. However, the small size, isolation, and inbreeding documented by this study

  11. Pre-lithification structures, deformation mechanisms, and fabric ellipsoids in slumped turbidites from the Pigeon Point Formation, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Scott R.; Tobisch, Othmar T.

    1993-06-01

    Paterson, S.R. and Tobisch, O.T. 1993. Pre-lithification structures, deformation mechanisms, and fabric ellipsoids in slumped turbidites from the Pigeon Point Formation, California. Tectonophysics, 222: 135-149. Quantitative fabric, structural, and microstructural analyses of pre-lithification folds, foliations, and lineations formed by slumping of turbidite sequences in the Cretaceous Pigeon Point Formation, California, provide a useful comparison with strain and microstructures developed in lithified and tectonically deformed turbidites. Our results indicate the following: (1) multiple generations of folds, cleavages, and lineations can develop prior to any post-lithification tectonic deformation (2) individual grains in sandstones have variable axial ratios, but the ratios and orientations of large populations of grains define fabric ellipsoids with small axial ratios ( ave. = 1.25:1.13:1) (3) phyllosilicate grains define moderate flattening fabrics (reflecting 20-40% shortening or volume loss), with the intensity of alignment partly controlled by the percent of quartz and feldspar grains (4) the fabric ellipsoids in sand-rich layers largely reflect deposition and slumping: pre- and post-slump compactions did not occur, in sand-rich units but did align clay particles in mud-siltstone units, and (5) intra-grain microstructures in quartz and feldspar (e.g., undulose extinction, subgrains) are inherited or recycled features rather than representing effects of post-lithification strains. Our data also suggest that prelithification slumping occurred by pervasive grain rotation and grain boundary sliding in saturated sands with some local movement of material along bedding horizons. A likely model for the folding and associated fabrics is that buckling and fold-hinge flattening drove fluid expulsion, which in turn caused local grain-scale realignment, transposition of bedding, and the development of an axial planar cleavage in the hinge zones. Continued fluid flow was

  12. Indirect effects of invasive species affecting the population structure of an ecosystem engineer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waser, A.M.; Splinter, W.; van der Meer, J.

    2015-01-01

    Species invasion is of increasing concern as non-native species often have negative impacts on ecosystems that they were introduced to. Invaders negatively affect the abundance of native species due to direct interactions like predation and competition. Additionally, invaders may benefit native biot

  13. Composites based on cellulose fiber nonwovens and a water soluble polymer 1. Structure and strength-deformation characteristics of cellulose fiber nonwovens and structural characteristics of the composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerpakovska, D.; Kalnins, M.

    2012-03-01

    The results of a study on the strength-deformation characteristics (tensile elastic modulus, ultimate strength, elongation at break, and punching and tearing strengths) of two kinds of cellulose fiber nonwovens (CFNs) with dissimilar void content and different geometrical parameters of cellulose fibers are discussed. The structural characteristics of composites prepared by impregnation with poly(vinyl alcohol) water solutions are analyzed, too. Composites with volume fractions of polymer up to 0.4% and volume fractions of voids up to 0.3% were prepared. Filling of voids by the polymer occurred without significant changes in the structure of CFNs. The fraction of closed voids increased with polymer content.

  14. Towards the determination of deformation rates - pinch-and-swell structures as a natural and simulated paleo-strain rate gage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Max; Poulet, Thomas; Karrech, Ali; Regenauer-Lieb, Klaus; Herwegh, Marco

    2014-05-01

    Layered rocks deformed under viscous deformation conditions frequently show boudinage, a phenomenon that results from differences in effective viscosity between the involved layers. In the case of continuous necking of a mechanically stiffer layer embedded in a weaker matrix, symmetric boudins are interpreted as the result of dominant visco-plastic deformation (Goscombe et al., 2004). However, information on the physical conditions, material properties and deformation processes are yet unknown. Natural samples deformed under low-grade (Trelatively high extensional strains. REFERENCES Austin, N. and Evans, B. (2007). Paleowattmeters: A scaling relation for dynamically recrystallized grain size. Geology, 35. Goscombe, B.D., Passchier, C.W. and Hand, M. (2004). Boudinage classification: End-member boudin types and modified boudin structures, Journal of Structural Geology, 26. Herwegh, M., Poulet, T., Karrech, A. and Regenauer-Lieb, K. (in press). From transient to steady state deformation and grain size: A thermodynamic approach using elasto-visco-plastic numerical modeling. Journal of Geophysical Research. Karrech, A., Regenauer-Lieb, K. and Poulet, T. (2011a). A Damaged visco-plasticity model for pressure and temperature sensitive geomaterials. Journal of Engineering Science 49. Regenauer-Lieb, K. and Yuen, D. (2004). Positive feedback of interacting ductile faults from coupling of equation of state, rheology and thermal-mechanics. Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, 142. Schmalholz, S.M. and Maeder, X. (2012). Pinch-and-swell structure and shear zones in viscoplastic layers. Journal of Structural Geology, 34.

  15. Fluid–structure coupling analysis of deformation and stress in impeller of an axial-flow pump with two-way passage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Pei

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Axial-flow pump with a two-way passage has been widely employed in irrigation and drainage projects. Because of the shape of the two-way inlet passage, the impeller easily induces vibration due to unstable turbulent flow. This vibration results in structural cracks and even hinders the safe operation of the pump. Deformation and stress distributions in the impeller were calculated using two-way coupled fluid–structure interaction simulations, and a quantitative analysis of blade deformation and stress is carried out to determine the structure critical region. The results show that the values of deformation and stress significantly decrease with an increasing flow rate and a decreasing head, and the maximum total deformation can be found in the impeller rim, while the maximum equivalent stress can be obtained near the impeller hub. The total deformations in the blade rim decrease from blade leading edge to trailing edge, and the equivalent stress in the blade hub initially increases and then declines, and in the end, it rapidly increases from the blade outlet to inlet. These results reveal the deformation and stress in the impeller to ensure reliability and specific theoretical guidance for the structural optimization design of a pump device.

  16. Influence of severe plastic deformation on the structure and properties of ultrahigh carbon steel wire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leseur, D R; Sherby, O D; Syn, C K

    1999-07-01

    Ultrahigh-carbon steel wire can achieve very high strength after severe plastic deformation, because of the fine, stable substructures produce. Tensile strengths approaching 6000 MPa are predicted for UHCS containing 1.8%C. This paper discusses the microstructural evolution during drawing of UHCS wire, the resulting strength produced and the factors influencing fracture. Drawing produces considerable alignment of the pearlite plates. Dislocation cells develop within the ferrite plates and, with increasing strain, the size normal to the axis ({lambda}) decreases. These dislocation cells resist dynamic recovery during wire drawing and thus extremely fine substructures can be developed ({lambda} < 10 nm). Increasing the carbon content reduces the mean free ferrite path in the as-patented wire and the cell size developed during drawing. For UHCS, the strength varies as {lambda}{sup {minus}5}. Fracture of these steels was found to be a function of carbide size and composition. The influence of processing and composition on achieving high strength in these wires during severe plastic deformation is discussed.

  17. Deformation quantization of principal bundles

    CERN Document Server

    Aschieri, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    We outline how Drinfeld twist deformation techniques can be applied to the deformation quantization of principal bundles into noncommutative principal bundles, and more in general to the deformation of Hopf-Galois extensions. First we twist deform the structure group in a quantum group, and this leads to a deformation of the fibers of the principal bundle. Next we twist deform a subgroup of the group of authomorphisms of the principal bundle, and this leads to a noncommutative base space. Considering both deformations we obtain noncommutative principal bundles with noncommutative fiber and base space as well.

  18. Large-scale variation in combined impacts of canopy loss and disturbance on community structure and ecosystem functioning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasman P Crowe

    Full Text Available Ecosystems are under pressure from multiple human disturbances whose impact may vary depending on environmental context. We experimentally evaluated variation in the separate and combined effects of the loss of a key functional group (canopy algae and physical disturbance on rocky shore ecosystems at nine locations across Europe. Multivariate community structure was initially affected (during the first three to six months at six locations but after 18 months, effects were apparent at only three. Loss of canopy caused increases in cover of non-canopy algae in the three locations in southern Europe and decreases in some northern locations. Measures of ecosystem functioning (community respiration, gross primary productivity, net primary productivity were affected by loss of canopy at five of the six locations for which data were available. Short-term effects on community respiration were widespread, but effects were rare after 18 months. Functional changes corresponded with changes in community structure and/or species richness at most locations and times sampled, but no single aspect of biodiversity was an effective predictor of longer-term functional changes. Most ecosystems studied were able to compensate in functional terms for impacts caused by indiscriminate physical disturbance. The only consistent effect of disturbance was to increase cover of non-canopy species. Loss of canopy algae temporarily reduced community resistance to disturbance at only two locations and at two locations actually increased resistance. Resistance to disturbance-induced changes in gross primary productivity was reduced by loss of canopy algae at four locations. Location-specific variation in the effects of the same stressors argues for flexible frameworks for the management of marine environments. These results also highlight the need to analyse how species loss and other stressors combine and interact in different environmental contexts.

  19. Social Movements and Ecosystem Services - the Role of Social Network Structure in Protecting and Managing Urban Green Areas in Stockholm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Ernstson

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Exploitation and degradation of urban green areas reduce their capacity to sustain ecosystem services. In protecting and managing these areas, research has increasingly focused on actors in civil society. Here, we analyzed an urban movement of 62 civil-society organizations - from user groups, such as boating clubs and allotment gardens, to culture and nature conservation groups - that have protected the Stockholm National Urban Park. We particularly focused on the social network structure of the movement, i.e., the patterns of interaction between movement organizations. The results reveal a core-periphery structure where core and semi-core organizations have deliberately built political connections to authorities, whereas the periphery gathers all user groups involved in day-to-day activities in the park. We show how the core-periphery structure has facilitated collective action to protect the park, but we also suggest that the same social network structure might simultaneously have constrained collaborative ecosystem management. In particular, user groups with valuable local ecological knowledge have not been included in collaborative arenas. Our case points out the inherent double-nature of all social networks as they facilitate some collective actions, yet constrain others. The paper argues for incorporating social network structure in theories and applications of adaptive governance and co-management.

  20. Long-term simulation of large deformation, mechano-chemical fluid-structure interactions in ALE and fully Eulerian coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, S.; Richter, T.; Wick, T.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we develop numerical schemes for mechano-chemical fluid-structure interactions with long-term effects. We investigate a model of a growing solid interacting with an incompressible fluid. A typical example for such a situation is the formation and growth of plaque in blood vessels. This application includes two particular difficulties: First, growth may lead to very large deformations, up to full clogging of the fluid domain. We derive a simplified set of equations including a fluid-structure interaction system coupled to an ODE model for plaque growth in Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) coordinates and in Eulerian coordinates. The latter novel technique is capable of handling very large deformations up to contact. The second difficulty stems from the different time scales: while the dynamics of the fluid demand to resolve a scale of seconds, growth typically takes place in a range of months. We propose a temporal two-scale approach using local small-scale problems to compute an effective wall stress that will enter a long-scale problem. Our proposed techniques are substantiated with several numerical tests that include comparisons of the Eulerian and ALE approaches as well as convergence studies.

  1. Ramifications of structural deformations on collapse loads of critically cracked pipe bends under in-plane bending and internal pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasidharan, Sumesh; Arunachalam, Veerappan; Subramaniam, Shanmugam [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Tiruchirappalli (India)

    2017-02-15

    Finite-element analysis based on elastic-perfectly plastic material was conducted to examine the influence of structural deformations on collapse loads of circumferential through-wall critically cracked 90 .deg. pipe bends undergoing in-plane closing bending and internal pressure. The critical crack is defined for a through-wall circumferential crack at the extrados with a subtended angle below which there is no weakening effect on collapse moment of elbows subjected to in-plane closing bending. Elliptical and semioval cross sections were postulated at the bend regions and compared. Twice-elastic-slope method was utilized to obtain the collapse loads. Structural deformations, namely, ovality and thinning, were each varied from 0% to 20% in steps of 5% and the normalized internal pressure was varied from 0.2 to 0.6. Results indicate that elliptic cross sections were suitable for pipe ratios 5 and 10, whereas for pipe ratio 20, semioval cross sections gave satisfactory solutions. The effect of ovality on collapse loads is significant, although it cancelled out at a certain value of applied internal pressure. Thinning had a negligible effect on collapse loads of bends with crack geometries considered.

  2. -Deformed nonlinear maps

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ramaswamy Jaganathan; Sudeshna Sinha

    2005-03-01

    Motivated by studies on -deformed physical systems related to quantum group structures, and by the elements of Tsallis statistical mechanics, the concept of -deformed nonlinear maps is introduced. As a specific example, a -deformation procedure is applied to the logistic map. Compared to the canonical logistic map, the resulting family of -logistic maps is shown to have a wider spectrum of interesting behaviours, including the co-existence of attractors – a phenomenon rare in one-dimensional maps.

  3. RETRACTED: The Nonlinear Compressive Response and Deformation of an Auxetic Cellular Structure under In-Plane Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available At the request of the Author, the following article Zhang, W, Hou, W, Hu, Ping and Ma, Z (2014 The Nonlinear Compressive Response and Deformation of an Auxetic Cellular Structure under In-Plane Loading Advances in Mechanical Engineering published 17 November 2014. doi: 10.1155/2014/214681has been retracted due to errors discovered by the authors. On Page 3, the definition of component force in Equation 4 is incorrect. (2 On Page 4, the definition of component force in Equation 11 is incorrect. Moreover this equation should not have parameterM(length of cell wall, because a mistake was made in the process of calculation. Because of the above reasons, the conclusion obtained from the mechanical model is incorrect and should instead state that the Elastic Buckling and Plastic Collapse are both yield modes of this structure (3 On Page 5, the FEA model used in this article is not appropriate, because the deformation of single cell is not homogeneous, which means that the geometrical non-linear effect on single cell model is greater. So in the actual whole structure we may not obtain the results that were described in Page 6 Paragraph 2. (4 The data in figures 8 (page 6 and 9 (page 7 is incorrect and the values of effective Young’s modulus and plateau stress are much larger than reasonable values. The definition of effective stress is wrong in the FEA model, which means the effective stress should be calculated by the total width of cell instead of length of horizontal cell wall. For example, in Figure 8, the plateau stress can reach 140Mpa, this is not reasonable because there are many holes in this cellular structure, and its mechanical properties should be much lower than material properties of cell wall. The reasonable plateau stress should be around 2Mpa. The authors takes responsibility for these errors and regret the publication of invalid results. The nonlinear compressive response and deformation of an auxetic cellular structure that has

  4. THE STRUCTURE OF THE LITHOSPHERIC MANTLE OF THE SIBERAIN CRATON AND SEISMODYNAMICS OF DEFORMATION WAVES IN THE BAIKAL SEISMIC ZONE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Stepashko

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available  The evolution and specific features of seismogynamics of the Baikal zones are reviewed in the context of interactions between deep deformation waves and the regional structure of the lithospheric mantle. The study is based on a model of the mantle structure with reference to chemical compositions of mantle peridotites from ophiolotic series located in the south-western framing of the Siberian craton (Fig. 1. The chemical zonation of the lithospheric mantle at the regional scale is determined from results of analyses of the heterogeneity of compositions of peridotites (Fig. 2, Table 1 and variations of contents of whole rock major components, such as iron, magnesium and silica (Fig. 3. According to spatial variations of the compositions of peridotites, the mantle has the concentric zonal structure, and the content of SiO2 is regularly decreasing, while concentrations of FeO∑ and MgO are increasing towards the centre of such structure (Fig. 4. This structure belongs to the mantle of the Siberian craton, which deep edge extends beyond the surface contour of the craton and underlies the north-western segment of the Central Asian orogenic belt.Results of the studies of peridotites of the Baikal region are consistent with modern concepts [Snyder, 2002; O’Reilly, Griffin, 2006; Chen et al., 2009] that suggest that large mantle lenses underlie the Archaean cratons (Fig. 5. The lenses are distinguished by high-density ultrabasic rocks and compose high-velocity roots of cratons which have remained isolated from technic processes. Edges of the mantle lenses may extend a few hundred kilometers beyond the limits of the cratons and underlie orogenic belts that frame the cratons, and this takes place in the south-western segment of the Siberian craton.The revealed structure of the lithospheric mantle is consistent with independent results of seismic and magmatectonical studies of the region. The Angara geoblock is located above the central part of the

  5. Strength and Deformation Rate of Plate Boundaries: The Rheological Effects of Grain Size Reduction, Structure, and Serpentinization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montesi, L.; Gueydan, F.

    2016-12-01

    Global strain rate maps reveal 1000-fold contrasts between plate interiors, oceanic or continental diffuse plate boundaries and narrow plate boundaries. Here, we show that rheological models based on the concepts of shear zone localization and the evolution of rock structure upon strain can explain these strain rate contrasts. Ductile shear zones constitute a mechanical paradox in the lithosphere. As every plastic deformation mechanism is strain-rate-hardening, ductile rocks are expected to deform at low strain rate and low stress (broad zone of deformation). Localized ductile shear zones require either a localized forcing (locally high stress) or a thermal or structural anomaly in the shear zone; either can be inherited or develop progressively as rocks deform. We previously identified the most effective process at each depth level of the lithosphere. In the upper crust and middle crust, rocks fabric controls localization. Grain size reduction is the most efficient mechanism in the uppermost mantle. This analysis can be generalized to consider a complete lithospheric section. We assume strain rate does not vary with depth and that the depth-integrated strength of the lithospheric does not change over time, as the total force is controlled by external process such as mantle convection and plate and slab buoyancy. Reducing grain size from a coarse value typical of undeformed peridotite to a value in agreement with the stress level (piezometer) while letting that stress vary from depth to depth (the integrated stress remains the same) increases the lithospheric strain rate by about a factor of 1000. This can explain the development of diffuse plate boundaries. The slightly higher strain rate of continental plate boundary may reflect development of a layered rock fabric in the middle crust. Narrow plate boundaries require additional weakening process. The high heat flux near mid-ocean ridge implies a thin lithosphere, which enhances stress (for constant integrated

  6. Wasp waist or beer belly? Modeling food web structure and energetic control in Alaskan marine ecosystems, with implications for fishing and environmental forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaichas, Sarah; Aydin, Kerim; Francis, Robert C.

    2015-11-01

    The Eastern Bering Sea (EBS) and Gulf of Alaska (GOA) continental shelf ecosystems show some similar and some distinctive groundfish biomass dynamics. Given that similar species occupy these regions and fisheries management is also comparable, similarities might be expected, but to what can we attribute the differences? Different types of ecosystem structure and control (e.g. top-down, bottom-up, mixed) can imply different ecosystem dynamics and climate interactions. Further, the structural type identified for a given ecosystem may suggest optimal management for sustainable fishing. Here, we use information on the current system state derived from food web models of both the EBS and the GOA combined with dynamic ecosystem models incorporating uncertainty to classify each ecosystem by its structural type. We then suggest how this structure might be generally related to dynamics and predictability. We find that the EBS and GOA have fundamentally different food web structures both overall, and when viewed from the perspective of the same commercially and ecologically important species in each system, walleye pollock (Gadus chalcogrammus). EBS food web structure centers on a large mass of pollock, which appears to contribute to relative system stability and predictability. In contrast, GOA food web structure features high predator biomass, which contributes to a more dynamic, less predictable ecosystem. Mechanisms for climate influence on pollock production in the EBS are increasingly understood, while climate forcing mechanisms contributing to the potentially destabilizing high predator biomass in the GOA remain enigmatic. We present results of identical pollock fishing and climate-driven pollock recruitment simulations in the EBS and GOA which show different system responses, again with less predictable response in the GOA. Overall, our results suggest that identifying structural properties of fished food webs is as important for sustainable fisheries management as

  7. Eighty-five million years of Pacific Ocean gyre ecosystem structure: long-term stability marked by punctuated change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibert, Elizabeth; Norris, Richard; Cuevas, Jose; Graves, Lana

    2016-05-25

    While the history of taxonomic diversification in open ocean lineages of ray-finned fish and elasmobranchs is increasingly known, the evolution of their roles within the open ocean ecosystem remains poorly understood. To assess the relative importance of these groups through time, we measured the accumulation rate of microfossil fish teeth and elasmobranch dermal denticles (ichthyoliths) in deep-sea sediment cores from the North and South Pacific gyres over the past 85 million years (Myr). We find three distinct and stable open ocean ecosystem structures, each defined by the relative and absolute abundance of elasmobranch and ray-finned fish remains. The Cretaceous Ocean (pre-66 Ma) was characterized by abundant elasmobranch denticles, but low abundances of fish teeth. The Palaeogene Ocean (66-20 Ma), initiated by the Cretaceous/Palaeogene mass extinction, had nearly four times the abundance of fish teeth compared with elasmobranch denticles. This Palaeogene Ocean structure remained stable during the Eocene greenhouse (50 Ma) and the Eocene-Oligocene glaciation (34 Ma), despite large changes in the overall accumulation of both groups during those intervals, suggesting that climate change is not a primary driver of ecosystem structure. Dermal denticles virtually disappeared from open ocean ichthyolith assemblages approximately 20 Ma, while fish tooth accumulation increased dramatically in variability, marking the beginning of the Modern Ocean. Together, these results suggest that open ocean fish community structure is stable on long timescales, independent of total production and climate change. The timing of the abrupt transitions between these states suggests that the transitions may be due to interactions with other, non-preserved pelagic consumer groups.

  8. Multi-matrix loop equations: algebraic & differential structures and an approximation based on deformation quantization

    CERN Document Server

    Krishnaswami, G S

    2006-01-01

    Large-N multi-matrix loop equations are formulated as quadratic difference equations in concatenation of gluon correlations. Though non-linear, they involve highest rank correlations linearly. They are underdetermined in many cases. Additional linear equations for gluon correlations, associated to symmetries of action and measure are found. Loop equations aren't differential equations as they involve left annihilation, which doesn't satisfy the Leibnitz rule with concatenation. But left annihilation is a derivation of the commutative shuffle product. Moreover shuffle and concatenation combine to define a bialgebra. Motivated by deformation quantization, we expand concatenation around shuffle in powers of q, whose physical value is 1. At zeroth order the loop equations become quadratic PDEs in the shuffle algebra. If the variation of the action is linear in iterated commutators of left annihilations, these quadratic PDEs linearize by passage to shuffle reciprocal of correlations. Remarkably, this is true for r...

  9. Effects of structure on deformation and strength characteristics of transversely isotropic man-made geomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usoltseva, OM; Tsoi, PA; Semenov, VN

    2017-02-01

    The laboratory tests on uniaxial and triaxial (Karman scheme) compression of bedded specimens (made of equivalent man-made geomaterial, meta-siltstone and shale) has allowed deriving relations between the strength and deformation characteristics and the bedding angle of the specimens. The elasticity and strength are assessed in accordance with the theoretical model by Salamon–Tien and the Hoek–Brown failure criterion. For the bedded geomedia (man-made geomaterial), the Salamon–Tien model yields a satisfactory estimate of the elastic characteristics (elasticity modulus, Poisson’s ratio). Based on the use of the Hoek–Brown criterion, the authors have derived a strength parameter independent of the lateral pressure.

  10. BEARING STRUCTURE AND VERTEBRAL DEFORMATIONS IN CHILDREN OF THE FAR NORTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. T. Batrshin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 4350 children of indigenous and nonindigenous population of the Far North were examined by computer optical topography. They were divided into 3 groups: 500 children – the indigenous population: the Khanty, Mansi, Nenets, who live in rural areas, 450 – aborigines living in urban areas, 3400 people – the non-indigenous children (migrants. Distinctive features in the bearing form and in prevalence of vertebral deformations were revealed. The indigenous population has the expressed crosssection sizes of a trunk and good indicators of a bearing, children of migrants – a trunk with the expressed longitudinal sizes and the worst indicators of a bearing. Prevalence of a scoliosis in I group – 3,4 %, in II – 5,1 %, and in III – 9,3 %.

  11. Do differences in food web structure between organic and conventional farms affect the ecosystem service of pest control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macfadyen, Sarina; Gibson, Rachel; Polaszek, Andrew; Morris, Rebecca J; Craze, Paul G; Planqué, Robert; Symondson, William O C; Memmott, Jane

    2009-03-01

    While many studies have demonstrated that organic farms support greater levels of biodiversity, it is not known whether this translates into better provision of ecosystem services. Here we use a food-web approach to analyse the community structure and function at the whole-farm scale. Quantitative food webs from 10 replicate pairs of organic and conventional farms showed that organic farms have significantly more species at three trophic levels (plant, herbivore and parasitoid) and significantly different network structure. Herbivores on organic farms were attacked by more parasitoid species on organic farms than on conventional farms. However, differences in network structure did not translate into differences in robustness to simulated species loss and we found no difference in percentage parasitism (natural pest control) across a variety of host species. Furthermore, a manipulative field experiment demonstrated that the higher species richness of parasitoids on the organic farms did not increase mortality of a novel herbivore used to bioassay ecosystem service. The explanation for these differences is likely to include inherent differences in management strategies and landscape structure between the two farming systems.

  12. Contrasting Structures and Deformational History of Syntectonic Granites of Campina Grande and Serra Redonda, Borborema Province, NE Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Wilians de Oliveira Rodrigues

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The Campina Grande and Serra Redonda Granites are intrusive along the contact of the Paleoproterozoic basement(Alto Moxotó Domain with the Tonian gneisses (Alto Pajeú Domain of the Borborema Province (northeast Brazil. TheCampina Grande Granite (U-Pb age = 581± 2 Ma shows a concentric oval-shaped structure whereas the Serra RedondaGranite (U-Pb age = 576 ± 3 Ma has a tabular shape, elongated in the NE-SW direction. The plutons are separated bythe left-lateral Galante transcurrent shear zone. In this study, the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS was appliedto 64 outcrops of granites to determine the internal structures of these plutons and to explore the relationship betweenmagmatism and deformation in an orogenic setting. The magnetic fabrics are concordant with the metamorphic structure ofthe host rocks. Strike-slip shear zones controlled the emplacement of the Serra Redonda Granite, as indicated by sigmoidalfoliation, defining shear bands associated with the Galante shear zone. In contrast, the magmatic/magnetic fabric of theCampina Grande granite seems to have been produced by body (ascensional forces. The pluton displays an inward dipping, concentric planar fabric parallel to the wall rock contact and lineations highly oblique to the foliation trend. The fabric of the Campina Grande pluton is consistent with a magma moving over a ramp dipping to southwest, with the lineation at high angle to the NE-trending flow direction. The contrasting structures of the plutons reflect the episodic nature of orogenic deformation, which was punctuated by the alternation of weak and strong strains, affecting the fabric development of the syntectonic intrusions.

  13. Evidence for fast seismic lid structure beneath the Californian margin and its implication on regional plate deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, V. H.; Graves, R. W.; Wei, S.; Helmberger, D. V.

    2015-12-01

    The lithospheric structure of the Pacific and North American plates play an important role in modulating plate deformation along the California margin. Pure path models indicate that the Pacific plate has a fast thick (80km) lid overlaying a strong low velocity zone (LVZ) extending to beyond 300 km depth. In contrast, the North America structure is characterized by a relatively thin (25-35km) lid and a shallow LVZ. Vertical ray paths have similar travel times across the plate boundary for the two models, making resolution of the transitional structure difficult. Earthquakes such as the 2014 March 10 Mw 6.8 Mendocino and 2014 August 25 Mw 6.0 Napa events recorded at regional distances across California provide an opportunity to study horizontal paths and track the lateral variation in the lower crust-uppermost mantle structure under the Californian margin. Observations from both Napa and Mendocino events show direct SH-wave arrivals at Southern California Seismic Network (SCSN) stations are systematically earlier (up to 10 s) for coastal and island stations relative to inland sites. The shift in SH arrival times may be due to features such as varying crustal thickness, varying upper mantle velocity and the presence of a fast seismic lid. To test the different hypotheses, we perform extensive forward modeling using both 1-D frequency-wavenumber and 3-D finite-difference approaches. The model that best fits the SH arrival times has a fast lid (Vs = 4.7 km/s) underlying the whole California margin, with the lid increasing in thickness from east to west to a maximum thickness about 70 km in the western offshore region. The fast, thick seismic lid lends strength and rigidity to the Pacific plate lithosphere in contrast with the weaker North American continental plate, which influences the overall plate deformation along the Californian margin and is in agreement with GPS measurements.

  14. Millennial climatic fluctuations are key to the structure of last glacial ecosystems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Huntley

    Full Text Available Whereas fossil evidence indicates extensive treeless vegetation and diverse grazing megafauna in Europe and northern Asia during the last glacial, experiments combining vegetation models and climate models have to-date simulated widespread persistence of trees. Resolving this conflict is key to understanding both last glacial ecosystems and extinction of most of the mega-herbivores. Using a dynamic vegetation model (DVM we explored the implications of the differing climatic conditions generated by a general circulation model (GCM in "normal" and "hosing" experiments. Whilst the former approximate interstadial conditions, the latter, designed to mimic Heinrich Events, approximate stadial conditions. The "hosing" experiments gave simulated European vegetation much closer in composition to that inferred from fossil evidence than did the "normal" experiments. Given the short duration of interstadials, and the rate at which forest cover expanded during the late-glacial and early Holocene, our results demonstrate the importance of millennial variability in determining the character of last glacial ecosystems.

  15. Millennial climatic fluctuations are key to the structure of last glacial ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntley, Brian; Allen, Judy R M; Collingham, Yvonne C; Hickler, Thomas; Lister, Adrian M; Singarayer, Joy; Stuart, Anthony J; Sykes, Martin T; Valdes, Paul J

    2013-01-01

    Whereas fossil evidence indicates extensive treeless vegetation and diverse grazing megafauna in Europe and northern Asia during the last glacial, experiments combining vegetation models and climate models have to-date simulated widespread persistence of trees. Resolving this conflict is key to understanding both last glacial ecosystems and extinction of most of the mega-herbivores. Using a dynamic vegetation model (DVM) we explored the implications of the differing climatic conditions generated by a general circulation model (GCM) in "normal" and "hosing" experiments. Whilst the former approximate interstadial conditions, the latter, designed to mimic Heinrich Events, approximate stadial conditions. The "hosing" experiments gave simulated European vegetation much closer in composition to that inferred from fossil evidence than did the "normal" experiments. Given the short duration of interstadials, and the rate at which forest cover expanded during the late-glacial and early Holocene, our results demonstrate the importance of millennial variability in determining the character of last glacial ecosystems.

  16. Coseismic deformation due to the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake: influence of 3-D elastic structure around Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashima, Akinori; Becker, Thorsten W.; Freed, Andrew M.; Sato, Hiroshi; Okaya, David A.

    2016-09-01

    We investigated the effects of elastic heterogeneity on coseismic deformation associated with the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake, Japan, using a 3-D finite element model, incorporating the geometry of regional plate boundaries. Using a forward approach, we computed displacement fields for different elastic models with a given slip distribution. Three main structural models are considered to separate the effects of different kinds of heterogeneity: a homogeneous model, a two-layered model with crust-mantle stratification, and a crust-mantle layered model with a strong subducting slab. We observed two counteracting effects: (1) On large spatial scales, elastic layering with increasing rigidity with depth leads to a decrease in surface displacement. (2) An increase in rigidity from above the slab interface to below causes an increase in surface displacement, because the weaker hanging wall deforms to accommodate coseismic slip. Results for slip inversions associated with the Tohoku-oki earthquake show that slip patterns are modified when comparing homogeneous and heterogeneous models. However, the maximum slip only changes slightly: It increases from 38.5 m in the homogeneous to 39.6 m in the layered case and decreases to 37.3 m when slabs are introduced. Potency, i.e., the product of slip and fault area, changes accordingly. Layering leads to inferred slip distributions that are broader and deeper compared to the homogeneous case, particularly to the south of the overall slip maximum. The introduction of a strong slab leads to a reduction in slip around the slip maximum near the trench. We also find that details of the vertical deformation patterns for heterogeneous models are sensitive to the Poisson's ratio. While elastic heterogeneity does therefore not have a dramatic effect on bulk quantities such as inferred potency, the mechanical response of a layered medium with a slab does lead to a systematically modified slip response, and such effects may bias studies of

  17. Food web structure and vulnerability of a deep-sea ecosystem in the NW Mediterranean Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Tecchio, Samuele; Coll, Marta; Christensen, Villy; Company, Joan B.; Ramírez-Llodra, Eva; Sardà, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing fishing pressure on the continental margins of the oceans, and this raises concerns about the vulnerability of the ecosystems thriving there. The current knowledge of the biology of deep-water fish species identifies potential reduced resilience to anthropogenic disturbance. However, there are extreme difficulties in sampling the deep sea, resulting in poorly resolved and indirectly obtained food-web relationships. Here, we modelled the flows and biomasses of a Mediterrane...

  18. Fully exploitation of SBAS-DInSAR deformation time series for assessing structural damage: the case study of Rome, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonano, Manuela; Arangio, Stefania; Calò, Fabiana; Di Mauro, Maria; Marsella, Maria; Manunta, Michele

    2014-05-01

    Remote sensing techniques have demonstrated to be effective tools to support natural and man-made risk mitigation activities. Among these, the Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Interferometry (DInSAR) technology is largely exploited in geoscience, oil and gas extraction, and landslide fields. Recently, thanks to the large availability of high resolution SAR systems (10 m or less), as well as to the development of advanced data processing techniques, DInSAR products have also started to be effectively used for applications in urban areas to detect localized displacements affecting single buildings and infrastructures. The advanced DInSAR technique referred to as Small Baseline Subset (SBAS) (Lanari et al., 2004) allows us to generate very long deformation time series, by exploiting large SAR datasets spanning up to 20 years (Bonano et al., 2012). Thanks to its capability to investigate wide areas, the SBAS-DInSAR technique is particularly suitable to remotely analyse the structural conditions of buildings located in densely urbanized zones. In this work, we fully exploit the results achieved over the city of Rome, Italy, through the well-established SBAS-DInSAR approach, aimed at performing a quantitative assessment of structural damage in urban areas affected by ground deformation (Arangio et al., 2013). More in details, we present an innovative methodology that integrates the SBAS-DInSAR measurements within an existing model, in order to assess the damage, and possibly estimate the future structural conditions, of single buildings affected by significant foundation settlements. In particular, a semi-empirical approach, based on a laminated beam model (Finno et al., 2005), is applied to investigate the damage of buildings located in the southern part of the city. The obtained results are in substantial agreement with in situ surveys, proving that the presented approach is an effective tool for the preliminary evaluation of the structural conditions in

  19. Food-web and ecosystem structure of the open-ocean and deep-sea environments of the Azores, NE Atlantic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telmo Morato

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Marine Strategy Framework Directive intends to adopt ecosystem-based management for resources, biodiversity and habitats that puts emphasis on maintaining the health of the ecosystem alongside appropriate human use of the marine environment, for the benefit of current and future generations. Within the overall framework of ecosystem-based management, ecosystem models are tools to evaluate and gain insights in ecosystem properties. The low data availability and complexity of modelling deep-water ecosystems has limited the application of ecosystem models to few deep-water ecosystems. Here, we aim to develop an ecosystem model for the deep-sea and open ocean in the Azores exclusive economic zone with the overarching objective of characterising the food-web and ecosystem structure of the ecosystem. An ecosystem model with 45 functional groups, including a detritus group, two primary producer groups, eight invertebrate groups, 29 fish groups, three marine mammal groups, a turtle and a seabird group was built. Overall data quality measured by the pedigree index was estimated to be higher than the mean value of all published models. Therefore, the model was built with source data of an overall reasonable quality, especially considering the normally low data availability for deep-sea ecosystems. The total biomass (excluding detritus of the modelled ecosystem for the whole area was calculated as 24.7 t km-². The mean trophic level for the total marine catch of the Azores was estimated to be 3.95, similar to the trophic level of the bathypelagic and medium-size pelagic fish. Trophic levels for the different functional groups were estimated to be similar to those obtained with stable isotopes and stomach contents analyses, with some exceptions on both ends of the trophic spectra. Omnivory indices were in general low, indicating prey speciation for the majority of the groups. Cephalopods, pelagic sharks and toothed whales were identified as groups with

  20. Comparison of Brazed Residual Stress and Thermal Deformation between X-Type and Pyramidal Lattice Truss Sandwich Structure: Neutron Diffraction Measurement and Simulation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wenchun; Wei, Zhiquan; Luo, Yun; Zhang, Weiya; Woo, Wanchuck

    2016-06-01

    This paper uses finite element method and neutron diffraction measurement to study the residual stress in lattice truss sandwich structure. A comparison of residual stress and thermal deformation between X-type and pyramidal lattice truss sandwich structure has been carried out. The residual stresses are concentrated in the middle joint and then decreases gradually to both the ends. The residual stresses in the X-type lattice truss sandwich structure are smaller than those in pyramidal structure. The maximum longitudinal and transverse stresses of pyramidal structure are 220 and 202 MPa, respectively, but they decrease to 190 and 145 MPa for X-type lattice truss sandwich structure, respectively. The thermal deformation for lattice truss sandwich panel structure is of wave shape. The X-type has a better resistance to thermal deformation than pyramidal lattice truss sandwich structure. The maximum wave deformation of pyramidal structure (0.02 mm) is about twice as that of X-type (0.01 mm) at the same brazing condition.

  1. A Study on the Hot Deformation Behavior of 47Zr-45Ti-5Al-3V Alloy with Initial Lamellar α Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yuanbiao; Ji, Liyuan; Duan, Jingli; Liu, Wenchang; Zhang, Jingwu; Liu, Riping

    2016-09-01

    The hot deformation behavior of the 47Zr-45Ti-5Al-3V (wt pct) alloy with initial lamellar α structure was investigated by compression tests in the temperature range of 823 K to 1073 K (550 °C to 800 °C) and strain rate range of 10-3 to 100 s-1. In the α + β phase field, the flow curves exhibited a continuous flow softening. The extent of flow softening first decreased with increasing strain rate from 10-3 to 10-1 s-1, and then increased with further increasing strain rate to 100 s-1. In the single β phase field, the flow curves exhibited a pronounced stress drop at the very beginning of deformation at low temperatures and high strain rates. The magnitude of the stress drop increased with decreasing deformation temperature and increasing strain rate. At higher temperatures and lower strain rates, the flow curves exhibited typical characteristics of dynamic recrystallization. A hyperbolic-sine Arrhenius-type equation was used to characterize the dependence of the flow stress on deformation temperature and strain rate. The activation energy for deformation at different strains was calculated. In the α + β phase field, the activation energy for deformation increased from 333 to 355 kJ/mol with increasing strain, and then decreased to 312 kJ/mol. In the single β phase, the activation energy for deformation decreased from 169 to 136 kJ/mol with increasing strain.

  2. A Study on the Hot Deformation Behavior of 47Zr-45Ti-5Al-3V Alloy with Initial Lamellar α Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yuanbiao; Ji, Liyuan; Duan, Jingli; Liu, Wenchang; Zhang, Jingwu; Liu, Riping

    2016-12-01

    The hot deformation behavior of the 47Zr-45Ti-5Al-3V (wt pct) alloy with initial lamellar α structure was investigated by compression tests in the temperature range of 823 K to 1073 K (550 °C to 800 °C) and strain rate range of 10-3 to 100 s-1. In the α + β phase field, the flow curves exhibited a continuous flow softening. The extent of flow softening first decreased with increasing strain rate from 10-3 to 10-1 s-1, and then increased with further increasing strain rate to 100 s-1. In the single β phase field, the flow curves exhibited a pronounced stress drop at the very beginning of deformation at low temperatures and high strain rates. The magnitude of the stress drop increased with decreasing deformation temperature and increasing strain rate. At higher temperatures and lower strain rates, the flow curves exhibited typical characteristics of dynamic recrystallization. A hyperbolic-sine Arrhenius-type equation was used to characterize the dependence of the flow stress on deformation temperature and strain rate. The activation energy for deformation at different strains was calculated. In the α + β phase field, the activation energy for deformation increased from 333 to 355 kJ/mol with increasing strain, and then decreased to 312 kJ/mol. In the single β phase, the activation energy for deformation decreased from 169 to 136 kJ/mol with increasing strain.

  3. What are the effects of macroalgal blooms on the structure and functioning of marine ecosystems? A systematic review protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyons Devin A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anthropogenic activities are believed to have caused an increase in the magnitude, frequency, and extent of macroalgal blooms in marine and estuarine environments. These blooms may contribute to declines in seagrasses and non-blooming macroalgal beds, increasing hypoxia, and reductions in the diversity of benthic invertebrates. However, they may also provide other marine organisms with food and habitat, increase secondary production, and reduce eutrophication. The objective of this systematic review will be to quantify the positive and negative impacts of anthropogenically induced macroalgal blooms in order to determine their effects on ecosystem structure and functioning, and to identify factors that cause their effects to vary. Methods We will search a number of online databases to gather empirical evidence from the literature on the impacts of macroalgal blooms on: (1 species richness and other univariate measures of biodiversity; (2 productivity and abundance of algae, plants, and animals; and (3 biogeochemical cycling and other flows of energy and materials, including trophic interactions and cross-ecosystem subsidies. Data from relevant studies will be extracted and used in a random effects meta-analysis in order to estimate the average effect of macroalgal blooms on each response of interest. Where possible, sub-group analyses will be conducted in order to evaluate how the effects of macroalgal blooms vary according to: (1 which part of the ecosystem is being studied (e.g. which habitat type, taxonomic group, or trophic level; (2 the size of blooms; (3 the region in which blooms occurred; (4 background levels of ecosystem productivity; (5 physical and chemical conditions; (6 aspects of study design and quality (e.g. lab vs. field, experimental vs. observational, degree of replication; and (7 whether the blooms are believed to be anthropogenically induced or not.

  4. Reducing Uncertainty In Ecosystem Structure Inventories From Spaceborne Lidar Using Alternate Spatial Sampling Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefsky, M. A.; Ramond, T.; Weimer, C. S.

    2010-12-01

    Current and proposed spaceborne lidar sensors sample the land surface using observations along transects in which consecutive observations in the along-track dimension are either contiguous (e.g. VCL, DESDynI, Livex) or spaced (ICESat). These sampling patterns are inefficient because multiple observations are made of a spatially autocorrelated phenomenon (i.e. vegetation patches) while large areas of the landscape are left un-sampled. This results in higher uncertainty in estimates of average ecosystem structure than would be obtained using either random sampling or sampling in regular grids. We compared three sampling scenarios for spaceborne lidar: five transects spaced every 850 m across-track with contiguous 25m footprints along-track, the same number of footprints distributed randomly, and a hybrid approach that retains the central transect of contiguous 25m footprints and distributes the remainder of the footprints into a grid with 178 m spacing. We used simulated ground tracks at four latitudes for a realistic spaceborne lidar mission and calculated the amount of time required to achieve 150 m spacing between transects and the number of near-coincident observations for each scenario. We used four lidar height datasets collected using the Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (La Selva, Costa Rica, Sierra Nevada, California, Duke Forest, North Carolina and Harvard Forest, Massachusetts) to calculate the standard error of estimates of landscape height for each scenario. We found that a hybrid sampling approach reduced the amount of time required to reach a transect spacing of 150 m by a factor of three at all four latitudes, and that the number of near-coincident observations was greater by a factor of five at the equator and at least equal throughout the range of latitudes sampled. The standard error of landscape height was between 2 and 2.5 times smaller using either hybrid or random sampling than using transect sampling. As the pulses generated by a spaceborne

  5. Control over structure-specific flexibility improves anatomical accuracy for point-based deformable registration in bladder cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wognum, S.; Chai, X.; Hulshof, M. C. C. M.; Bel, A. [Department of Radiotherapy, Academic Medical Center, Meiberdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bondar, L.; Zolnay, A. G.; Hoogeman, M. S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Erasmus Medical Center, Groene Hilledijk 301, 3075 EA Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: Future developments in image guided adaptive radiotherapy (IGART) for bladder cancer require accurate deformable image registration techniques for the precise assessment of tumor and bladder motion and deformation that occur as a result of large bladder volume changes during the course of radiotherapy treatment. The aim was to employ an extended version of a point-based deformable registration algorithm that allows control over tissue-specific flexibility in combination with the authors' unique patient dataset, in order to overcome two major challenges of bladder cancer registration, i.e., the difficulty in accounting for the difference in flexibility between the bladder wall and tumor and the lack of visible anatomical landmarks for validation. Methods: The registration algorithm used in the current study is an extension of the symmetric-thin plate splines-robust point matching (S-TPS-RPM) algorithm, a symmetric feature-based registration method. The S-TPS-RPM algorithm has been previously extended to allow control over the degree of flexibility of different structures via a weight parameter. The extended weighted S-TPS-RPM algorithm was tested and validated on CT data (planning- and four to five repeat-CTs) of five urinary bladder cancer patients who received lipiodol injections before radiotherapy. The performance of the weighted S-TPS-RPM method, applied to bladder and tumor structures simultaneously, was compared with a previous version of the S-TPS-RPM algorithm applied to bladder wall structure alone and with a simultaneous nonweighted S-TPS-RPM registration of the bladder and tumor structures. Performance was assessed in terms of anatomical and geometric accuracy. The anatomical accuracy was calculated as the residual distance error (RDE) of the lipiodol markers and the geometric accuracy was determined by the surface distance, surface coverage, and inverse consistency errors. Optimal parameter values for the flexibility and bladder weight

  6. Deciphering structures and deformation of the Obuom Gold Prospect, Central Ashanti Belt of Ghana: A lithostructural approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunoo, Samuel; Manu, J.; Olarewaju, V. O.; Asiedu, D. K.; Nude, P. M.

    2016-12-01

    The Obuom Gold Prospect is located in the central part of the Paleoproterozoic Birimian Ashanti belt of southwest Ghana. The prospect is approximately 45 km2 and is underlain by basalt, andesite and dacite volcanic beds, graphitic and chlorite phyllites of sedimentary origin and granites. Published works on the Obuom geological terrane, using gravity models, showed that, the structures are more complex than previously thought and may involve multiple thrust slices. This research identified two deformational episodes; the first has a remarkable sinistral sense probably synchronous with an Eoeburnean event with the second, an overprint of dextral shearing during the Eburnean event. The first episode, Do1 is characterized by NW-SE compression which resulted in subvertical NE-SW trending S1 axial plane metamorphic foliation in tight to isoclinal F1 folds with NW-SE trending L1 lineations. The second episode, Do2 indicates continuous shortening which produced nearly upright F2 folds with east-west striking axial planes, slight plunging hinges and associated subparallel crenulation cleavages. The first deformational event Do1 which represent NW-SE compression is observed affecting only the Sefwi Group. The Do2 resulting from N-S compression affected both the Sefwi and Kumasi Groups.

  7. Basal Complex and Basal Venation of Odonata Wings: Structural Diversity and Potential Role in the Wing Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabi, H.; Ghoroubi, N.; Malaki, M.; Darvizeh, A.; Gorb, S. N.

    2016-01-01

    Dragonflies and damselflies, belonging to the order Odonata, are known to be excellent fliers with versatile flight capabilities. The ability to fly over a wide range of speeds, high manoeuvrability and great agility are a few characteristics of their flight. The architecture of the wings and their structural elements have been found to play a major role in this regard. However, the precise influence of individual wing components on the flight performance of these insects remains unknown. The design of the wing basis (so called basal complex) and the venation of this part are responsible for particular deformability and specific shape of the wing blade. However, the wing bases are rather different in representatives of different odonate groups. This presumably reflects the dimensions of the wings on one hand, and different flight characteristics on the other hand. In this article, we develop the first three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) models of the proximal part of the wings of typical representatives of five dragonflies and damselflies families. Using a combination of the basic material properties of insect cuticle, a linear elastic material model and a nonlinear geometric analysis, we simulate the mechanical behaviour of the wing bases. The results reveal that although both the basal venation and the basal complex influence the structural stiffness of the wings, it is only the latter which significantly affects their deformation patterns. The use of numerical simulations enabled us to address the role of various wing components such as the arculus, discoidal cell and triangle on the camber formation in flight. Our study further provides a detailed representation of the stress concentration in the models. The numerical analysis presented in this study is not only of importance for understanding structure-function relationship of insect wings, but also might help to improve the design of the wings for biomimetic micro-air vehicles (MAVs). PMID:27513753

  8. Formation of diapiric structure in the deformation zone, central Indian Ocean: A model from gravity and seismic reflection data

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K S Krishna; D Gopala Rao; Yu P Neprochnov

    2002-03-01

    Analyses of bathymetry, gravity and seismic reflection data of the diffusive plate boundary in the central Indian Ocean reveal a new kind of deformed structure besides the well-reported structures of long-wavelength anticlinal basement rises and high-angle reverse faults. The structure (basement trough) has a length of about 150 km and deepens by up to 1 km from its regional trend (northward dipping). The basement trough includes a rise at its center with a height of about 1.5 km. The rise is about 10 km wide with rounded upper surface and bounded by vertical faults. A broad free-air gravity low of about 20 mGal and a local high of 8 mGal in its center are associated with the identified basement trough and rise structure respectively. Seismic results reveal that the horizontal crustal compression prevailing in the diffusive plate boundary might have formed the basement trough possibly in early Pliocene time. Differential loading stresses have been generated from unequal crust/sediment thickness on lower crustal and upper mantle rocks. A thin semi-ductile serpentinite layer existing near the base of the crust that is interpreted to have been formed at mid-ocean ridge and become part of the lithosphere, may have responded to the downward loading stresses generated by the sediments and crustal rocks to inject the serpentinites into the overlying strata to form a classic diapiric structure.

  9. Constraining the Late Mesozoic and Early Tertiary Tectonic Evolution of Southern Mexico: Structure and Deformation History of the Tierra Caliente Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral-Cano; Draper; Lang; Harrison

    2000-07-01

    We analyze the structure and assess the deformation history of the Tierra Caliente Metamorphic Complex (TCMC) of southern Mexico, where Laramide accretion of exotic terranes is in debate. The TCMC consists of a south-plunging antiform fault that is bounded on both its eastern and western flanks. Tierra Caliente Metamorphic Complex rocks show at least two phases of compressional deformation. The first and most prominent records a mean tectonic transport direction of 068 degrees. This phase is responsible for east-verging asymmetrical folding and thrusting of both metamorphic and superjacent sedimentary rocks. The second phase has an average transport direction of 232 degrees and is restricted to the western portion of the TCMC. A third phase is responsible for normal faulting. Lack of discernible deformation before Late Cretaceous time indicates that the main deformation phase is coincident with Laramide orogenesis elsewhere in the North American Cordillera. The stratigraphy, structure, and deformational history of the TCMC do not require accretion of exotic terranes. We explain the Mesozoic tectonostratigraphic evolution of the TCMC in terms of deposition and deformation of Mesozoic volcanic and sedimentary strata over the attenuated continental crust of the North American plate.

  10. Shatter cones and planar deformation features confirm Santa Marta in Piauí State, Brazil, as an impact structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Grace Juliana Gonçalves; Vasconcelos, Marcos Alberto Rodrigues; Crósta, Alvaro Penteado; Reimold, Wolf Uwe; Góes, Ana Maria; Kowitz, Astrid

    2014-10-01

    A total of 184 confirmed impact structures are known on Earth to date, as registered by the Earth Impact Database. The discovery of new impact structures has progressed in recent years at a rather low rate of about two structures per year. Here, we introduce the discovery of the approximately 10 km diameter Santa Marta impact structure in Piauí State in northeastern Brazil. Santa Marta is a moderately sized complex crater structure, with a raised rim and an off-center, approximately 3.2 km wide central elevated area interpreted to coincide with the central uplift of the impact structure. The Santa Marta structure was first recognized in remote sensing imagery and, later, by distinct gravity and magnetic anomalies. Here, we provide results obtained during the first detailed ground survey. The Bouguer anomaly map shows a transition from a positive to a negative anomaly within the structure along a NE-SW trend, which may be associated with the basement signature and in parts with the signature developed after the crater was formed. Macroscopic evidence for impact in the form of shatter cones has been found in situ at the base around the central elevated plateau, and also in the interior of fractured conglomerate boulders occurring on the floor of the surrounding annular basin. Planar deformation features (PDFs) are abundant in sandstones of the central elevated plateau and at scattered locations in the inner part of the ring syncline. Together, shatter cones and PDFs provide definitive shock evidence that confirms the impact origin of Santa Marta. Crystallographic orientations of PDFs occurring in multiple sets in quartz grains are indicative of peak shock pressures of 20-25 GPa in the rocks exposed at present in the interior of the crater. In contrast to recent studies that have used additional, and sometimes highly controversial, alleged shock recognition features, Santa Marta was identified based on well-understood, traditional shock evidence.

  11. Deformation of Ordered Mesoporous Silica Structures on Exposure to High Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John B. Lowe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ordered mesoporous silica materials are of interest for a wide range of applications. In many of these, elevated temperatures are used either in the preparation of the material or during its use. Therefore, an understanding of the effect of high temperature treatments on these materials is desirable. In this work, a detailed structural study is performed on silicas with three representative pore structures: a 2-D hexagonal pore arrangement (SBA-15, a continuous 3D cubic bimodal pore structure (KIT-6, and a 3D large cage pore structure (FDU-12. Each silica is studied as prepared and after treatment at a series of temperatures between 300 and 900°C. Pore structures are imaged using Transmission Electron Microscopy. This technique is used in conjunction with Small-Angle X-ray Diffraction, gas physisorption, and 29Si solid state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. Using these techniques, the pore size distributions, the unit cell dimensions of the mesoporous structures, and the relative occupancy of the distinct chemical environments of Si within them are cross correlated for the three silicas and their evolution with treatment temperature is elucidated. The physical and chemical properties before, during, and after collapse of these structures at high temperatures are described as are the differences in behavior between the three silica structures.

  12. Structural-scale levels of development of inelastic martensitic deformation during isothermal loading of submicrocrystalline titanium nickelide in premartensitic condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakach, G. P.; Dudarev, E. F., E-mail: dudarev@spti.tsu.ru; Skosyrskii, A. B. [National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Maletkina, T. Yu., E-mail: t.maletkina@yandex.ru [National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, Tomsk, 634003 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    The results are presented of an experimental investigation into the regularities and mechanisms of the development of thermoelastic martensitic transformation in submicrocrystalline alloy Ti{sub 49.4}Ni{sub 50.6} with different ways of thermo-power actions using the methods of optical microscopy in situ and X-ray diffraction. The peculiarities of localization of martensite transformation at the meso- and macroscale levels in this alloy with submicrocrystalline structure are considered. Experimental data on the relay mechanism of propagation of the martensitic transformation are presented. The interrelation between the localization of the martensitic transformation on the meso-and macroscale levels and deformation behavior under isothermal loading alloy Ti{sub 49.4}Ni5{sub 0.6} in submicrocrystalline condition are shown and discussed.

  13. A NEW DESIGN IMPROVEMENT OF MICROSTRIP U-SHAPE ANTENNA FOR BANDWIDTH ENHANCEMENT USING EBG STRUCTURE DEFORMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUDHAKAR SRIVASTAVA

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to design a low profile, conformal, small size antenna with high bandwidth along with good compromise in other factors like gain, directivity, efficiency etc. A U-shape patch antenna with suitable geometry is taken to provide good response of bandwidth about 30 % at centre frequency 2.025 GHz.using FR-4 glass epoxy material, on insertion of EBG structure, creating deformities at ground plane side, the band width of the antenna is improved tremendously about 49.36 % at centre frequency 2.35 GHz. The new design of antenna is found suitable for various wireless communications for S-band. The design approach & Simulation results are shown with the help of MOM based full wave simulator IE3D.

  14. Micro-structure and chemical composition of vateritic deformities occurring in the bivalve Corbicula fluminea (Müller, 1774).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenzel, Max; Harper, Elizabeth M

    2011-05-01

    Vateritic deformities occurring in the invasive heterodont bivalve Corbicula fluminea from several locations in the UK were characterised in detail for the first time using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and different geochemical techniques (electron microprobe, ICP-AES, and mass spectrometry). Large volumes of vaterite are produced abnormally in the animals' shells in the form of yellow-green bulges. These are distinguished from the aragonitic parts of the shell by their characteristic micro-structures, content of organic material, trace elemental composition and carbon stable isotope signatures. The most commonly observed micro-structures include columnar vaterite, lamellar vaterite and different irregular structures occurring in all parts of the shell. There are indications that organic material is present largely as intracrystalline impurities or nano-scale phases and not as envelopes around microstructural units. These micro-structures are novel, nothing equivalent having yet been described for other vateritic systems. Euhedral vaterite crystals also occur occasionally. The vaterite has generally higher Mg/Ca and lower Na/Ca, K/Ca than the aragonite. In addition, δ¹³C is also always lower. Microstructural characteristics would suggest loss of biological control probably due to physiological stress(es) inducing the switch to vaterite production. The vaterite might be stabilised by its higher content of organic material and magnesium.

  15. An Immersed Boundary Finite-Element Solver for Flow-Induced Deformation of Soft Structures with Application in Cardiac Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Rajneesh; Mittal, Rajat

    2011-11-01

    The modeling of complex biological phenomena such as cardiac mechanics is challenging. It involves complex three dimensional geometries, moving structure boundaries inside the fluid domain and large flow-induced deformations of the structure. We present a fluid-structure interaction solver (FSI) which couples a sharp-interface immersed boundary method for flow simulation with a powerful finite-element based structure dynamics solver. An implicit partitioned (or segregated) approach is implemented to ensure the stability of the solver. We validate the FSI solver with published benchmark for a configuration which involves a thin elastic plate attached to a rigid cylinder. The frequency and amplitude of the oscillations of the plate are in good agreement with published results and non-linear dynamics of the plate and its coupling with the flow field are discussed. The FSI solver is used to understand left-ventricular hemodynamics and flow-induced dynamics of mitral leaflets during early diastolic filling and results from this study are presented.

  16. DECAY RATE OF SAINT-VENANT END EFFECTS FOR PLANE DEFORMATIONS OF PIEZOELECTRIC-PIEZOMAGNETIC SANDWICH STRUCTURES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Xue; Jinxi Liu

    2010-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the decay of Saint-Venant end effects for plane deformations of piezoelectric (PE)-piezomagnetic (PM) sandwich structures,where a PM layer is located between two PE layers with the same material properties or reversely.The end of the sandwich structure is subjected to a set of self-equilibrated magneto-electro-elastic loads.The upper and lower surfaces of the sandwich structure are mechanically free,electrically open or shorted as well as magnetically open or shorted.Firstly the constitutive equations of PE materials and PM materials for plane strain are given and normalized.Secondly,the simplified state space approach is employed to arrange the constitutive equations into differential equations in a matrix form.Finally,by using the transfer matrix method,the characteristic equations for eigenvalues or decay rates are derived.Based on the obtained characteristic equations,the decay rates for the PE-PM-PE and PM-PE-PM sandwich structures are calculated.The influences of the electromagnetic boundary conditions,material properties of PE layers and volume fraction on the decay rates are discussed in detail.

  17. Distributed deformation structures in shallow water carbonates subsiding through a simple stress field (Jandaira Formation, NE Brazil)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertotti, Giovanni; Bisdom, Kevin; Bezerra, Hilario; Reijmer, John; Cazarin, Carol

    2016-04-01

    Despite the scarcity of major deformation structures such as folds and faults, the flat-lying, post-rift shallow water carbonates of the Jandaira Formation (Potiguar Basin, NE Brazil) display well-organized fracture systems distributed of tens of km2. Structures observed in the outcropping carbonates are sub-vertical, generally N-S trending mode I and hybrid veins and barren fractures, sub-vertical roughly E-W trending stylolites and sub-horizontal stylolites. These features developed during subsidence in a simple and constant stress field characterized by, beside gravity, a significant horizontal stress probably of tectonic origin. The corresponding depth curves have different origin and slopes and, therefore, cross each other resulting in position of the principal stresses which change with depth. As a result, the type and amount of fractures affecting subsiding rocks change despite the fact that the far-field stresses remain constant. Following early diagenesis and porosity elimination in the first 100-200m depth, Jandaira carbonates experienced wholesale fracturing at depths of 400-800m resulting in a network of NNW-NE trending fractures partly organized in conjugate sets with a low interfault angle and a sub-vertical intersection, and sub-vertical stylolites roughly perpendicular to the fractures. Intense fluid circulation was activated as a consequence through the carbonates. With increasing subsidence, sub-horizontal stylolites formed providing calcite which precipitated in the open fractures transforming them in veins. The Jandaira formation lost thereby the permeability it had reached during the previous stage. Because of the lack of major deformation, the outcrops of the Jandaira Formation is an excellent analog for carbonate reservoirs in the Middle East, South Atlantic and elsewhere.

  18. Impacts of fish farm pollution on ecosystem structure and function of tropical headwater streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Rodrigo dos Santos; Aguiar, Anna Carolina Fornero; Boëchat, Iola Gonçalves; Gücker, Björn

    2013-03-01

    We investigated the impacts of effluent discharge from small flow-through fish farms on stream water characteristics, the benthic invertebrate community, whole-system nitrate uptake, and ecosystem metabolism of three tropical headwater streams in southeastern Brazil. Effluents were moderately, i.e. up to 20-fold enriched in particulate organic matter (POM) and inorganic nutrients in comparison to stream water at reference sites. Due to high dilution with stream water, effluent discharge resulted in up to 2.0-fold increases in stream water POM and up to 1.8-fold increases in inorganic nutrients only. Moderate impacts on the benthic invertebrate community were detected at one stream only. There was no consistent pattern of effluent impact on whole-stream nitrate uptake. Ecosystem metabolism, however, was clearly affected by effluent discharge. Stream reaches impacted by effluents exhibited significantly increased community respiration and primary productivity, stressing the importance of ecologically sound best management practices for small fish farms in the tropics.

  19. Fine-Scale Structure of the Moho From Receiver Functions: Effects of a Deforming Crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandt, G.; Gilbert, H.; Ozacar, A.; Owens, T. J.

    2004-12-01

    Andrija Mohorovicic, a Croatian seismologist, is credited with the first estimation in 1906 of crustal thickness using the critically refracted phase Pn. The crust-mantle boundary has become commonly known as the Moho and its depth, structure, formation, and evolution remains an important research topic in seismology, petrology, and tectonics. Other seismic phases sensitive to Moho depth and structure are the converted phases Ps and Sp, and the associated 2p1s and 1p2s reverberation phases that are isolated in receiver function waveforms. With sufficient station coverage, multiple receiver functions can be migrated and stacked into cross-sections of the crust. Crustal cross-sections from tectonically active regions reveal dramatic variations in amplitude and frequency content of Moho phases that we associate with fine-scale structure, and possibly anisotropy at the crust-mantle boundary. The Moho amplitude or "brightness" is a measure of the crust-mantle impedance contrast, thickness and structure within the crust-mantle boundary, and effects of scattering from 3D structure. Processes directly related to these Moho structures include crustal thickening, crustal extension, crustal flow, delamination or convective removal, and eclogitization. Therefore, the fine-scale seismological structure of the Moho is an important constraint in regional tectonic reconstructions. Examples of receiver function crustal images and their tectonic implications from the western US, South American Andes, and the Tibetan plateau will be reviewed.

  20. Use of a deformable atlas to identify cryptic critical structures in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C Weksberg

    Full Text Available Dose constraints for traditional neural critical structures (e.g. optic chiasm, brain stem are a standard component of planning radiation therapy to the central nervous system. Increasingly, investigators are becoming interested in accounting for the dose delivered to other non-target neural structures (e.g. hippocampi, which are not easily identified on axial imaging. In this pilot study, a commercially available digital atlas was used to identify cryptic neural structures (hippocampus, optic radiations, and visual cortices in 6 patients who received intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT as part of multimodal management of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM. The patient's original IMRT plans were re-optimized, with avoidance parameters for the newly identified critical structures. Re-optimization was able to reduce both mean and maximum dose to the volumes of interest, with a more pronounced effect for contralateral structures. Mean dose was reduced by 11% and 3% to contralateral and ipsilateral structures, respectively, with comparable reduction in maximum dose of 10% and 2%, respectively. Importantly, target coverage was not compromised, with an average change in coverage of 0.2%. Overall, our results demonstrate the feasibility of incorporating tools for cryptic critical structure identification into the treatment planning process for GBM.

  1. High-resolution deep sequencing reveals biodiversity, population structure, and persistence of HIV-1 quasispecies within host ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin Li

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deep sequencing provides the basis for analysis of biodiversity of taxonomically similar organisms in an environment. While extensively applied to microbiome studies, population genetics studies of viruses are limited. To define the scope of HIV-1 population biodiversity within infected individuals, a suite of phylogenetic and population genetic algorithms was applied to HIV-1 envelope hypervariable domain 3 (Env V3 within peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a group of perinatally HIV-1 subtype B infected, therapy-naïve children. Results Biodiversity of HIV-1 Env V3 quasispecies ranged from about 70 to 270 unique sequence clusters across individuals. Viral population structure was organized into a limited number of clusters that included the dominant variants combined with multiple clusters of low frequency variants. Next generation viral quasispecies evolved from low frequency variants at earlier time points through multiple non-synonymous changes in lineages within the evolutionary landscape. Minor V3 variants detected as long as four years after infection co-localized in phylogenetic reconstructions with early transmitting viruses or with subsequent plasma virus circulating two years later. Conclusions Deep sequencing defines HIV-1 population complexity and structure, reveals the ebb and flow of dominant and rare viral variants in the host ecosystem, and identifies an evolutionary record of low-frequency cell-associated viral V3 variants that persist for years. Bioinformatics pipeline developed for HIV-1 can be applied for biodiversity studies of virome populations in human, animal, or plant ecosystems.

  2. The Structural Evolution of the Calabrian Forearc: A Multidisciplinary Approach to Investigating Time-Transgressive Deformation in a Subduction-Rollback System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, Margaret A.

    This dissertation investigates the temporal and spatial variations in deformation of the Calabrian forearc during the evolution of the subduction-rollback system. In addition to contributing new data to the area, I develop three strategies for understanding recent and active deformation by linking long-term structural data with short-term geomorphological data. First, setting a "baseline" of deformation is important when studying plate boundaries. Through the structural mapping of an uplifted forearc basin, I conclude that rapid rollback is characterized by tectonic quiescence in the Calabrian forearc when it is located far from collision (from ~12 Ma -- ~5 Ma). This "baseline" provides a framework from which I interpret younger phases of deformation. In the middle Pliocene (~5-4 Ma), an arc-parallel shortening event characterizes the first stage of forearc collision in my field area. These folded sediments are later tilted, but structural data from the field cannot constrain the age or structure responsible for this youngest phase of deformation. The Neto River dissects this tilted surface opening up the possibly of linking structural data with geomorphic data from river erosion. I collected a transect of river sediment samples for 10Be analysis to determine variation in catchment-wide erosion rates through the modern day deformation. I, then, developed a numerical model that describes changes in erosion rate through time with the structural growth of the tilted surface. The model is the first of its kind to use catchment-wide erosion rates to constrain a structural model. The model results constrain the age of the beginning of deformation to 850 ka and suggest that a fold with a migrating hinge caused tilting of the surface. The model provides the basis for my hypothesis that the forearc is experiencing an arc-perpendicular shortening strain, which contradicts conclusions from GPS data and the well-documented extension in the western part of the forearc. To

  3. The magnitude of lost ecosystem structure and function in urban streams and the effectiveness of watershed-based management (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smucker, N. J.; Detenbeck, N. E.; Kuhn, A.

    2013-12-01

    Watershed development is a leading cause of stream impairment and increasingly threatens the availability, quality, and sustainability of freshwater resources. In a recent global meta-analysis, we found that measures of desirable ecological structure (e.g., algal, macroinvertebrate, and fish communities) and functions (e.g., metabolism, nutrient uptake, and denitrification) in streams with developed watersheds were only 23% and 34%, respectively, of those in minimally disturbed reference streams. As humans continue to alter watersheds in response to growing and migrating populations, characterizing ecological responses to watershed development and management practices is urgently needed to inform future development practices, decisions, and policy. In a study of streams in New England, we found that measures of macroinvertebrate and algal communities had threshold responses between 1-10% and 1-5% impervious cover, respectively. Macroinvertebrate communities had decreases in sensitive taxa and predators occurring from 1-3.5% and transitions in trophic and habitat guilds from 4-9% impervious cover. Sensitive algal taxa declined at 1%, followed by increases in tolerant taxa at 3%. Substantially altered algal communities persisted above 5% impervious cover and were dominated by motile taxa (sediment resistant) and those with high nutrient demands. Boosted regression tree analysis showed that sites with >65% and ideally >80% forest and wetland cover in near-stream buffers were associated with a 13-34% decrease in the effects of watershed impervious cover on algal communities. While this reduction is substantial, additional out-of-stream management efforts are needed to protect and restore stream ecosystems (e.g., created wetlands and stormwater ponds), but understanding their effectiveness is greatly limited by sparse ecological monitoring. Our meta-analysis found that restoration improved ecological structure and functions in streams by 48% and 14%, respectively, when

  4. Variable-Domain Displacement Transfer Functions for Converting Surface Strains into Deflections for Structural Deformed Shape Predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, William L.; Fleischer, Van Tran

    2015-01-01

    Variable-Domain Displacement Transfer Functions were formulated for shape predictions of complex wing structures, for which surface strain-sensing stations must be properly distributed to avoid jointed junctures, and must be increased in the high strain gradient region. Each embedded beam (depth-wise cross section of structure along a surface strain-sensing line) was discretized into small variable domains. Thus, the surface strain distribution can be described with a piecewise linear or a piecewise nonlinear function. Through discretization, the embedded beam curvature equation can be piece-wisely integrated to obtain the Variable-Domain Displacement Transfer Functions (for each embedded beam), which are expressed in terms of geometrical parameters of the embedded beam and the surface strains along the strain-sensing line. By inputting the surface strain data into the Displacement Transfer Functions, slopes and deflections along each embedded beam can be calculated for mapping out overall structural deformed shapes. A long tapered cantilever tubular beam was chosen for shape prediction analysis. The input surface strains were analytically generated from finite-element analysis. The shape prediction accuracies of the Variable- Domain Displacement Transfer Functions were then determined in light of the finite-element generated slopes and deflections, and were fofound to be comparable to the accuracies of the constant-domain Displacement Transfer Functions

  5. Ecosystem services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trista Patterson

    2014-01-01

    Since its inception, the ecosystem service approach has stimulated interest from numerous planning, management, and partnership perspectives. To date, however, research that quantifies ecosystem services in the study area (in the form of explicit ecosystem service studies) has been limited. This chapter reviews and synthesizes the concept of ecosystem services,...

  6. Insight into the structural deformations of beta-cyclodextrin caused by alcohol cosolvents and guest molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haiyang; Ge, Chunling; van der Spoel, David; Feng, Wei; Tan, Tianwei

    2012-03-29

    Beta-cyclodextrin (β-CD) is an ideal candidate for a host molecule, and it is used as such in drug delivery and separation technology. The structural behavior of free β-CD and host-guest complexes of β-CD with two isoflavonoid isomers (puerarin and daidzin) in aqueous alcohol solutions, covering methanol, ethanol, 2-propanol, and 1-propanol, was investigated through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The MD results highlighted aspects of the structural flexibility and rigidity of β-CD in different alcohol solutions. The alcohol residence time within the β-CD cavity, solvent distribution around β-CD, and guest-induced structural changes were analyzed. Interaction with puerarin endowed β-CD with a more rigid structure than with daidzin and a weaker ternary complex β-CD/puerarin/alcohol was formed with a local participation of water molecules. The retention behavior of puerarin and daidzin on a β-CD-coupled medium was determined via chromatographic experiments and simulation results provided a structural explanation for such interactions.

  7. Structural plasticity: how intermetallics deform themselves in response to chemical pressure, and the complex structures that result.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berns, Veronica M; Fredrickson, Daniel C

    2014-10-06

    Interfaces between periodic domains play a crucial role in the properties of metallic materials, as is vividly illustrated by the way in which the familiar malleability of many metals arises from the formation and migration of dislocations. In complex intermetallics, such interfaces can occur as an integral part of the ground-state crystal structure, rather than as defects, resulting in such marvels as the NaCd2 structure (whose giant cubic unit cell contains more than 1000 atoms). However, the sources of the periodic interfaces in intermetallics remain mysterious, unlike the dislocations in simple metals, which can be associated with the exertion of physical stresses. In this Article, we propose and explore the concept of structural plasticity, the hypothesis that interfaces in complex intermetallic structures similarly result from stresses, but ones that are inherent in a defect-free parent structure, rather than being externally applied. Using DFT-chemical pressure analysis, we show how the complex structures of Ca2Ag7 (Yb2Ag7 type), Ca14Cd51 (Gd14Ag51 type), and the 1/1 Tsai-type quasicrystal approximant CaCd6 (YCd6 type) can all be traced to large negative pressures around the Ca atoms of a common progenitor structure, the CaCu5 type with its simple hexagonal 6-atom unit cell. Two structural paths are found by which the compounds provide relief to the Ca atoms' negative pressures: a Ca-rich pathway, where lower coordination numbers are achieved through defects eliminating transition metal (TM) atoms from the structure; and a TM-rich path, along which the addition of spacer Cd atoms provides the Ca coordination environments greater independence from each other as they contract. The common origins of these structures in the presence of stresses within a single parent structure highlights the diverse paths by which intermetallics can cope with competing interactions, and the role that structural plasticity may play in navigating this diversity.

  8. Changes in canopy structure and ant assemblages affect soil ecosystem variables as a foundation species declines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kendrick, Joseph A.; Ribbons, Relena Rose; Classen, Aimee Taylor

    2015-01-01

    (richness and abundance) of ants increases rapidly as T. canadensis is lost from the stands. Because ants live and forage at the litter-soil interface, we hypothesized that environmental changes caused by hemlock loss (e.g., increased light and warmth at the forest floor, increased soil pH) and shifts...... in ant species composition would interact to alter soil ecosystem variables. In the Harvard Forest Hemlock Removal Experiment (HF-HeRE), established in 2003, T. canadensis in large plots were killed in place or logged and removed to mimic adelgid infestation or salvage harvesting, respectively. In 2006......, we built ant exclosure subplots within all of the canopy manipulation plots to examine direct and interactive effects of canopy change and ant assemblage composition on soil and litter variables. Throughout HF-HeRE, T. canadensis was colonized by the adelgid in 2009, and the infested trees are now...

  9. Changes in canopy structure and ant assemblages affect soil ecosystem variables as a foundation species declines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kendrick, Joseph A.; Ribbons, Relena Rose; Classen, Aimee Taylor;

    2015-01-01

    in ant species composition would interact to alter soil ecosystem variables. In the Harvard Forest Hemlock Removal Experiment (HF-HeRE), established in 2003, T. canadensis in large plots were killed in place or logged and removed to mimic adelgid infestation or salvage harvesting, respectively. In 2006......, we built ant exclosure subplots within all of the canopy manipulation plots to examine direct and interactive effects of canopy change and ant assemblage composition on soil and litter variables. Throughout HF-HeRE, T. canadensis was colonized by the adelgid in 2009, and the infested trees are now...... declining. The experimental removal of T. canadensis from the canopy was associated with an increase in the rate of cellulose decomposition by >50%, and exclosure of ants from subplots directly reduced their soil nitrate availability by 56%. Partial least squares path models revealed sequential interactive...

  10. New type of brittle deformations: two-axial turn structure of fractures in the Kovdor carbonatite intrusion (NW Russia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhirov, Dmitry

    2017-04-01

    The Earth's crust is known for a few types of structural fissuring and faults organization. First of all, this is an orthogonal or some kind of non-orthogonal fissuring network with a various number of systems. The hierarchic model is also popular since it stipulates a regular arrangement and collateral subordination of several ranks of elements relative to each other, and a general fault and/or shear zone. An axis-symmetric fissuring structure is developed in the central (ring)-type massifs and some other geological bodies. It is formed due to the progressive turn of adjoining fissure planes around the massif symmetry axis (mostly vertical) at a discrete angle (within 5-15° on the average depending on the scale and internal structural features). The investigation of the fault tectonics in the Kovdor carbonatite intrusion (NW Russia) has resulted in the identification of a new brittle deformations type. It is formed due to the simultaneous turn of fissure planes at discrete angles around two orthogonal guiding lines (axes), where one is represented by a vertical massif symmetry axis (L1), and the other axis (L2) lies horizontally in the fracture plane. Nonetheless, the rotation along the both axes is codirectional, i.e., when moving counterclockwise around the L1 axis, the L2 rotation is also counterclockwise. If we very tentatively consider a fissure as an ellipse, and take into account the whole assemblage of long and short axes, the overall picture of their spatial distribution generates a screw conoid or ordinary helicoid type structure. It will be shown as an S-shaped plane poles chain in the stereogram. A sequence of large scale fissures (longer than 100 meters), which are 25 to 100 meters apart from each other and regularly vary in strike and dip angle, is mapped in the open pit of the Kovdor apatite-magnetite deposit. The accuracy of positioning for each fissure is a few centimeters in measurement spots, with a deviation from its actual surface due to the

  11. Influence of chemosynthetic ecosystems on nematode community structure and biomass in the deep eastern Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Lampadariou

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Mud volcanoes are a~special type of cold seeps where life is based on chemoautotrophic processes. They are considered to be extreme environments and are characterized by unique megafaunal and macrofaunal communities. However, very few studies on mud volcanoes taking into account the smaller meiobenthic communities have been carried out. Two mud volcanoes were explored during the MEDECO (MEditerranean Deep-sea ECOsystems cruise (2007 with the remotely operated vehicle (ROV Victor-6000: Amsterdam, located south of Turkey between 1700 and 2000 m depth (Anaximander mud field; and Napoli, south of Crete, located along the Mediterranean Ridge at about 2000 m depth (Olimpi mud field. The major aim of this study was to describe distributional patterns of meiofaunal communities and nematode assemblages from different seep microhabitats. Meiofaunal taxa and nematode assemblages at both mud volcanoes differed significantly from other Mediterranean sites in terms of standing stocks, dominance and species diversity. Density and biomass values were significantly higher at the seep sites, particularly at Amsterdam. Patterns of nematode diversity, the dominant meiofaunal taxon, varied, displaying both very high or very low species richness and dominance, depending on the microhabitat studied. The periphery of the Lamellibrachia and bivalve shell microhabitats of Napoli exhibited the highest species richness, while the reduced sediments of Amsterdam yielded a species-poor nematode community dominated by two successful species, one belonging to the genus Aponema and the other to the genus Sabatieria. Analysis of β-diversity showed that microhabitat heterogeneity of mud volcanoes contributed substantially to the total nematode species richness in the eastern Mediterranean Sea. These observations indicate a strong influence of mud volcanoes and cold-seep ecosystems on the meiofaunal communities and nematode assemblages.

  12. Rheo-Raman microscope: Tracking molecular structures as a function of deformation and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plog, Jan P.; Meyer, Matt; De Vito, Francesca; Soergel, Fritz; Kotula, Anthony

    2016-05-01

    The Rheo-Raman Microscope combines rheology, Raman spectroscopy and polarization light microscopy and provides comprehensive insight into a material's bulk as well as micro structural properties under well defined and reproducible conditions such as temperature or shear profiles. The simultaneous acquisition with three independent analytical methods is advantageous for investigation of structural changes occurring for example in gelation, melting or crystallization. Details of this hyphenated instrumentation as well as selected results including temperature induced melting of a polymer emulsion and crystallization of a polymer melt are presented in this contribution.

  13. [The nasal valve area: structure, function, clinical aspects and treatment. Sulsenti's technic for correction of valve deformities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulsenti, G; Palma, P

    1989-01-01

    The nasal valve and nasal valve area are two entities which should not be confused. The nasal valve area is the narrowest portion of the nasal passage. It is bounded: medially by the septum; superiorly and laterally by the caudal margin of the upper lateral cartilage and its fibro-adipose attachment to the pyriform aperture ('empty triangle'); inferiorly by the floor of the pyriform aperture. The nasal valve, on the other hand, is the specific slit-like segment between the caudal margin of the upper lateral cartilage and the septum. From a physiological and surgical point of view, this distinction is fundamental. The nasal valve area is the site of the highest nasal resistance. Therefore, small deformities of the valve area may severely impair the dynamics of nasal air flow. Rhinomanometry and nasal endoscopy permit the best definition of valve pathophysiology. After having discussed the various surgical techniques reported in the literature, the authors present an original technique for the surgical correction of valvular deformities. It is completely performed through Cottle's hemitransfixion incision. The technique has several advantages: a) performance of only one incision, sufficient to visualize the entire nasal valve and cartilaginous vault, thus minimizing the risk of scar tissue formation; b) through the space thus created it is possible not only to correct the entire septum, but also to inspect and easily reach the structures constituting the nasal valve area; c) it is possible to use various types of grafts to support or reconstruct the valve area; d) it is possible to reach the key area as well as to do lateral osteotomies: all variations in shape and position of the nasal pyramid may be performed in order to normalize direction and pressures of nasal air flow: e) through the retrograde undermining of the lower lateral cartilages the resistance of the cul-de-sacs may be optimally adjusted; f) it is possible to change the shape, size and position of the

  14. Structural changes in VT1-0 titanium induced by deformation during explosion welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarova, E. B.; Esikov, M. A.; Gontarenko, A. S.; Sameishcheva, T. S.

    2012-09-01

    The hardening of VT1-0 titanium is studied during the formation of a multilayer material by explosion welding. The structural transformations in titanium plates are analyzed by metallographic and electron-microscopic methods. The mechanical properties of the welded multilayer titanium stacks are estimated using static and dynamic mechanical tests.

  15. A biomechanical analysis of the vertebral and rib deformities in structural scoliosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuizen, AG; Klein, JP; Webb, PJ; Nijenbanning, G; Cool, JC; von Horn, [No Value

    1999-01-01

    Although the structural changes occurring in the scoliotic spine have been reported as early as the 19th century, the descriptions and biomechanical explanations have not always been complete and consistent. In this study, three-dimensionally rendered CT images of two human skeletons with a scolioti

  16. A biomechanical analysis of the vertebral and rib deformities in structural scoliosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuizen, AG; Klein, JP; Webb, PJ; Nijenbanning, G; Cool, JC; von Horn, [No Value

    1999-01-01

    Although the structural changes occurring in the scoliotic spine have been reported as early as the 19th century, the descriptions and biomechanical explanations have not always been complete and consistent. In this study, three-dimensionally rendered CT images of two human skeletons with a scolioti

  17. Structural mechanisms as revealed by real time mechano optical behavior of polylactic acid films in uni and biaxial deformation and heat setting processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Xuesong

    In this study, structural development during PLA film processing was investigated with a new instrumented biaxial stretcher capable of real time monitoring of true stress, true strain and in-plane as well as out-of-plane birefringence under fast deformation rates. The effects of stretching rate and mode on mechano-optical behaviors and correspondent morphology development were investigated. At low deformation levels, a linear regime I associated with orientation of amorphous chains was observed in all modes of deformation. Following regime I, a steeper regime II associated with stress induced crystallization was observed during uniaxial constrained width (UCW) stretching under low rates before birefringence begins to level off in regime III due to finite extensibility of chains. During UCW stretching under high rate, regime I transformed directly into regime III, and this is associated with the formation of a very stable nematic mesophase. Direct transformation from regime I to regime III is observed during simultaneous biaxial (SIM) stretching under all rates. The kinetics of structural changes during heat setting from a pre-oriented state was investigated by rapid tracking of in and out-of-plane birefringence of pre-oriented films with a new instrumented annealing chamber capable of fast sample insertion and removal. Development of birefringence, which reflects overall chain orientation, and associated structural evolution during constrained annealing of extended PLA films were clarified. Structural evolution is determined by the competition between chain relaxation and registration of segments into well oriented nuclei that grow during annealing, leading to formation of a long range network of chains that arrests the chains in their oriented state. At low deformation the temporal evolution of birefringence first involves relaxation followed by a rapid increase associated with crystallization. The initial relaxation disappears with increase in deformation in the

  18. Does competition among ecosystem engineering species result in tradeoffs in the production of ecosystem services?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Production of ecosystem services depends on the ecological community structure at a given location. Ecosystem engineering species (EES) can strongly determine community structure, but do they consequently determine the production of ecosystem services? We explore this question ...

  19. Active deformation and shallow structure of the Wagner, Consag, and Delfín Basins, northern Gulf of California, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persaud, Patricia; Stock, Joann M.; Steckler, Michael S.; MartíN-Barajas, Arturo; Diebold, John B.; GonzáLez-FernáNdez, Antonio; Mountain, Gregory S.

    2003-07-01

    Oblique rifting began synchronously along the length of the Gulf of California at 6 Ma, yet there is no evidence for the existence of oceanic crust or a spreading transform fault system in the northern Gulf. Instead, multichannel seismic data show a broad shallow depression, ˜70 × 200 km, marked by active distributed deformation and six ˜10-km-wide segmented basins lacking well-defined transform faults. We present detailed images of faulting and magmatism based on the high resolution and quality of these data. The northern Gulf crust contains a dense (up to 18 faults in 5 km) complex network of mainly oblique-normal faults, with small offsets, dips of 60-80° and strikes of N-N30°E. Faults with seafloor offsets of tens of meters bound the Lower and two Upper Delfín Basins. These subparallel basins developed along splays from a transtensional zone at the NW end of the Ballenas Transform Fault. Twelve volcanic knolls were identified and are associated with the strands or horsetails from this zone. A structural connection between the two Upper Delfín Basins is evident in the switching of the center of extension along axis. Sonobuoy refraction data suggest that the basement consists of mixed igneous sedimentary material, atypical of mid-ocean ridges. On the basis of the near-surface manifestations of active faulting and magmatism, seafloor spreading will likely first occur in the Lower Delfín Basin. We suggest the transition to seafloor spreading is delayed by the lack of strain-partitioned and focused deformation as a consequence of shear in a broad zone beneath a thick sediment cover.

  20. Fabrication, Characterization, And Deformation of 3D Structural Meta-Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montemayor, Lauren C.

    Current technological advances in fabrication methods have provided pathways to creating architected structural meta-materials similar to those found in natural organisms that are structurally robust and lightweight, such as diatoms. Structural meta-materials are materials with mechanical properties that are determined by material properties at various length scales, which range from the material microstructure (nm) to the macro-scale architecture (mum -- mm). It is now possible to exploit material size effect, which emerge at the nanometer length scale, as well as structural effects to tune the material properties and failure mechanisms of small-scale cellular solids, such as nanolattices. This work demonstrates the fabrication and mechanical properties of 3-dimensional hollow nanolattices in both tension and compression. Hollow gold nanolattices loaded in uniaxial compression demonstrate that strength and stiffness vary as a function of geometry and tube wall thickness. Structural effects were explored by increasing the unit cell angle from 30° to 60° while keeping all other parameters constant; material size effects were probed by varying the tube wall thickness, t, from 200nm to 635nm, at a constant relative density and grain size. In-situ uniaxial compression experiments reveal an order-of-magnitude increase in yield stress and modulus in nanolattices with greater lattice angles, and a 150% increase in the yield strength without a concomitant change in modulus in thicker-walled nanolattices for fixed lattice angles. These results imply that independent control of structural and material size effects enables tunability of mechanical properties of 3-dimensional architected meta-materials and highlight the importance of material, geometric, and microstructural effects in small-scale mechanics. This work also explores the flaw tolerance of 3D hollow-tube alumina kagome nanolattices with and without pre-fabricated notches, both in experiment and simulation

  1. The Keurusselkä impact structure, Finland-Impact origin confirmed by characterization of planar deformation features in quartz grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrière, Ludovic; Raiskila, Selen; Osinski, Gordon R.; Pesonen, Lauri J.; Lehtinen, Martti

    2010-03-01

    Although the meteorite impact origin of the Keurusselkä impact structure (central Finland) has been established on the basis of the occurrence of shatter cones, no detailed microscopic examination of the impactites from this structure has so far been made. Previous microscope investigations of in situ rocks did not yield any firm evidence of shock features (Raiskila et al. 2008; Kinnunen and Hietala 2009). We have carried out microscopic observations on petrographic thin sections from seven in situ shatter cone samples and report here the discovery of planar fractures (PFs) and planar deformation features (PDFs) in quartz and feldspar grains. The detection and characterization of microscopic shock metamorphic features in the investigated samples substantiates a meteorite impact origin for the Keurusselkä structure. The crystallographic orientations of 372 PDF sets in 276 quartz grains were measured, using a universal stage (U-stage) microscope, for five of the seven distinct shatter cone samples. Based on our U-stage results, we estimate that investigated shatter cone samples from the Keurusselkä structure have experienced peak shock pressures from approximately 2 GPa to slightly less than 20 GPa for the more heavily shocked samples. The decoration of most of the PDFs with fluid inclusions also indicates that these originally amorphous shock features were altered by postimpact processes. Finally, our field observations indicate that the exposed surface corresponds to the crater floor; it is, however, difficult to estimate the exact diameter of the structure and the precise amount of material that has been eroded since its formation.

  2. Non-Archimedean mathematical analysis methods in description of deformation of structurally inhomogeneous geomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrikov, SV; Mikenina, OA; Revuzhenko, AF

    2017-02-01

    Under analysis is an approach to mathematical modeling of structurally inhomogeneous rocks considering structural hierarchy and internal self-balanced stresses. The fields of stresses and strains at various scale levels of rock mass medium are characterized using the non-Archimedean analysis methods. It is shown that such model describes accumulationtion of elastic energy in the form of internal self-balanced stresses on a micro-scale. The finite element algorithm and a computer program are developed to solve plane boundary-value problems. The calculated data on compression of a rock specimen are reported. The paper shows that the behavior of plastic strain zones largley depends on the pre-set initital micro-stresses.

  3. Ecosystem Processes at the Watershed Scale: Stability and Resilience of Catchment Spatial Structure and Function to Disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, L. E.

    2015-12-01

    Ecohydrological systems evolve spontaneously in response to geologic, hydroclimate and biodiversity drivers. The stability and resilience of these systems to multiple disturbances can be addressed over specific temporal extents, potentially embedded within long term transience in response to geologic or climate change. The limits of ecohydrological resilience of system state in terms of vegetation canopy and soil catenae and the space/time distribution of water, carbon and nutrient cycling is determined by a set of critical feedbacks and potential substitutions of plant functional forms in response to disturbance. The ability of forest systems to return to states functionally similar to states prior to major disturbance, or combinations of multiple disturbances, is a critical question given increasing hydroclimate extremes, biological invasions, and human disturbance. Over the past century, forest landscape ecological patterns appear to have the ability to recover from significant disturbance and re-establish similar hydrological and ecological function in humid, biodiverse regions such as the southern Appalachians, and potentially drier forest ecosystems. Understanding and prediction of past and future long term dynamics requires explicit representation of spatial and temporal feedbacks and dependencies between hydrological, ecosystem and geomorphic processes, and the spatial pattern of species or plant functional type (PFT). Comprehensive models of watershed ecohydrological resilience requires careful balance between the level of process and parameter detail between the interacting components, relative to the structure, organization, space and time scales of the landscape.

  4. Law for Country: the Structure of Warlpiri Ecological Knowledge and Its Application to Natural Resource Management and Ecosystem Stewardship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miles C. C. Holmes

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Indigenous Ecological Knowledge (IEK is deeply encoded in social processes. Our research shows that from an Indigenous perspective, IEK is a way of living whose core aim is to sustain the healthy functioning of people and country through relationships of reciprocity. However, IEK is often portrayed more prosaically as a body of knowledge about the environment. We introduce a framework, called ngurra-kurlu, that enables appreciation of indigenous perspectives on IEK. The framework was identified from the collaborative work of the authors with Warlpiri aboriginal elders in the Tanami Desert region of central Australia. Ngurra-kurlu facilitates cross-cultural understanding by distilling, from a complex cultural system, the five distinct conceptual categories that comprise IEK: law, skin, ceremony, language, and country. The framework enables engagement with nuanced environmental knowledge because it synthesizes, for cross-cultural audiences, all the key areas of knowledge and practice in which IEK is located. In particular, the framework highlights how social systems mediate the transmission, deployment, and regulation of environmental knowledge in on-ground situations, including collaborative natural resource management. Although the framework was generated in relation to one indigenous group, the epistemological structure of Warlpiri IEK is relevant throughout Australia, and the framework can be applied internationally to the emerging interest in fostering ecosystem stewardship in which the cultural connections between people and place are an integral part of ecosystems management.

  5. Characterizing twist grain boundaries in BCC Nb by molecular simulation: Structure and shear deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zeng-Hui; Feng, Ya-Xin; Shang, Jia-Xiang

    2016-05-01

    Atomic scale modeling was used to study the structure, energy and shear behaviors of (110) twist grain boundaries (TWGBs) in body-centered cubic Nb. The relation between grain boundary energy (GBE) and the twist angle θ agrees well with the Read-Shockley equation in low-angle range. At higher angles, the GBEs show no distinct trend with the variation of the twist angle or the density of coincident lattice sites. All (110) twist boundaries can be classified into two types: low-angle grain boundaries (LAGBs) and high-angle grain boundaries (HAGBs). LAGBs contain a hexagonal dislocation network (HDN) which is composed of 1/2 [ 111 ], 1/2 [ 1 bar 1 bar 1 ] and [001] screw dislocations. HAGBs can be classified into three sub-types further: special boundaries with low Σ, boundaries in the vicinity of special boundaries with similar structures and ordinary HAGBs consisting of periodic patterns. Besides, a dependence of grain boundary shear response vs the twist angle over the entire twist angle range is obtained. Pure sliding behavior is found at all TWGBs. When θ < 12°, the flow stress of LAGBs is found to be correlated with the HDNs and decreases with the increasing twist angle. For ordinary HAGBs, the magnitude of flow stress is around 0.8-1.0 GPa and the twist angle has little effect on the anisotropy mobility. For special grain boundaries with low Σ, the boundary structures govern the GBEs and shear motion behavior significantly.

  6. Serviceability limit state related to excessive lateral deformations to account for infill walls in the structural model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. S. ALVA

    Full Text Available Brazilian Codes NBR 6118 and NBR 15575 provide practical values for interstory drift limits applied to conventional modeling in order to prevent negative effects in masonry infill walls caused by excessive lateral deformability, however these codes do not account for infill walls in the structural model. The inclusion of infill walls in the proposed model allows for a quantitative evaluation of structural stresses in these walls and an assessment of cracking in these elements (sliding shear diagonal tension and diagonal compression cracking. This paper presents the results of simulations of single-story one-bay infilled R/C frames. The main objective is to show how to check the serviceability limit states under lateral loads when the infill walls are included in the modeling. The results of numerical simulations allowed for an evaluation of stresses and the probable cracking pattern in infill walls. The results also allowed an identification of some advantages and limitations of the NBR 6118 practical procedure based on interstory drift limits.

  7. Large-Deformation Curling Actuators Based on Carbon Nanotube Composite: Advanced-Structure Design and Biomimetic Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Luzhuo; Weng, Mingcen; Zhou, Zhiwei; Zhou, Yi; Zhang, Lingling; Li, Jiaxin; Huang, Zhigao; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Changhong; Fan, Shoushan

    2015-12-22

    In recent years, electroactive polymers have been developed as actuator materials. As an important branch of electroactive polymers, electrothermal actuators (ETAs) demonstrate potential applications in the fields of artificial muscles, biomimetic devices, robotics, and so on. Large-shape deformation, low-voltage-driven actuation, and ultrafast fabrication are critical to the development of ETA. However, a simultaneous optimization of all of these advantages has not been realized yet. Practical biomimetic applications are also rare. In this work, we introduce an ultrafast approach to fabricate a curling actuator based on a newly designed carbon nanotube and polymer composite, which completely realizes all of the above required advantages. The actuator shows an ultralarge curling actuation with a curvature greater than 1.0 cm(-1) and bending angle larger than 360°, even curling into a tubular structure. The driving voltage is down to a low voltage of 5 V. The remarkable actuation is attributed not only to the mismatch in the coefficients of thermal expansion but also to the mechanical property changes of materials during temperature change. We also construct an S-shape actuator to show the possibility of building advanced-structure actuators. A weightlifting walking robot is further designed that exhibits a fast-moving motion while lifting a sample heavier than itself, demonstrating promising biomimetic applications.

  8. On the Global Structure of Deformed Yang-Mills Theory and QCD(adj) on R^3XS^1

    CERN Document Server

    Anber, Mohamed M

    2015-01-01

    Spatial compactification on R^{3}XS^1_L at small S^1-size L often leads to a calculable vacuum structure, where various "topological molecules" are responsible for confinement and the realization of the center and discrete chiral symmetries. Within this semiclassically calculable framework, we study how distinct theories with the same SU(N_c)/Z_k gauge group (labeled by "discrete theta-angles") arise upon gauging of appropriate Z_k subgroups of the one-form global center symmetry of an SU(N_c) gauge theory. We determine the possible Z_k actions on the local electric and magnetic effective degrees of freedom, find the ground states, and use domain walls and confining strings to give a physical picture of the vacuum structure of the different SU(N_c)/Z_k theories. Some of our results reproduce ones from earlier supersymmetric studies, but most are new and do not invoke supersymmetry. We also study a further finite-temperature compactification to R^{2}XS^1_betaXS^1_L. We argue that, in deformed Yang-Mills theory...

  9. Optically induced lattice deformations, electronic structure changes, and enhanced superconductivity in YBa2Cu3O6.48

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Mankowsky

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Resonant optical excitation of apical oxygen vibrational modes in the normal state of underdoped YBa2Cu3O6+x induces a transient state with optical properties similar to those of the equilibrium superconducting state. Amongst these, a divergent imaginary conductivity and a plasma edge are transiently observed in the photo-stimulated state. Femtosecond hard x-ray diffraction experiments have been used in the past to identify the transient crystal structure in this non-equilibrium state. Here, we start from these crystallographic features and theoretically predict the corresponding electronic rearrangements that accompany these structural deformations. Using density functional theory, we predict enhanced hole-doping of the CuO2 planes. The empty chain Cu dy2-z2 orbital is calculated to strongly reduce in energy, which would increase c-axis transport and potentially enhance the interlayer Josephson coupling as observed in the THz-frequency response. From these results, we calculate changes in the soft x-ray absorption spectra at the Cu L-edge. Femtosecond x-ray pulses from a free electron laser are used to probe changes in absorption at two photon energies along this spectrum and provide data consistent with these predictions.

  10. Structural analysis and deformation characteristics of the Yingba metamorphic core complex, northwestern margin of the North China craton, NE Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Congyuan; Zhang, Bo; Han, Bao-Fu; Zhang, Jinjiang; Wang, Yang; Ai, Sheng

    2017-01-01

    The presence of the Yingba (Yinggete-Bagemaode) metamorphic core complex (MCC) is confirmed near the Sino-Mongolian border in China. We report its structural evolution and the rheological features of ductile shear zones within this complex. Three deformations (Ds, Dm, and Db) since the Late Jurassic are identified. Ds is characterized by ductile structures that resulted from early NW-oriented, low-angle, extensional ductile shearing. Dm is associated with partial melting and magmatic diapirism, which accelerated the formation of the dome-like geometry of the Yingba MCC. Synchronously with or slightly subsequently to Ds and Dm, the Yingba MCC was subjected to brittle, extensional faulting (Db), which was accompanied by the exhumation of the lower crust and the formation of supracrustal basins. The ductile shearing (Ds) developed under greenschist-to amphibolite-facies metamorphic conditions (400-650 °C), as indicated by microstructures in quartz and feldspar, quartz [c] axis fabrics, and two-feldspar geothermometry. The mean kinematic vorticity estimates of 48-62% show a pure shear-preferred flow during Ds. The Yingba MCC provides an excellent sample that recorded an intermediate to high temperature shearing, which also implies the widely extensional regime in northeastern Asia at that time.

  11. High spin structures in the $A\\approx 40$ mass region: from superdeformation to extreme deformation and clusterization (an example of $^{28}$Si)

    CERN Document Server

    Afanasjev, A V

    2016-01-01

    The search for extremely deformed structures in the yrast and near-yrast region of $^{28}$Si has been performed within the cranked relativistic mean field theory up to spin $I=20\\hbar$. The fingerprints of clusterization are seen (well pronounced) in the superdeformed (hyperdeformed) configurations.

  12. Seismically-induced soft-sediment deformation structures associated with the Magallanes-Fagnano Fault System (Isla Grande de Tierra del Fuego, Argentina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onorato, M. Romina; Perucca, Laura; Coronato, Andrea; Rabassa, Jorge; López, Ramiro

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, evidence of paleoearthquake-induced soft-sediment deformation structures associated with the Magallanes-Fagnano Fault System in the Isla Grande de Tierra del Fuego, southern Argentina, has been identified. Well-preserved soft-sediment deformation structures were found in a Holocene sequence of the Udaeta pond. These structures were analyzed in terms of their geometrical characteristics, deformation mechanism, driving force system and possible trigger agent. They were also grouped in different morphological types: sand dykes, convolute lamination, load structures and faulted soft-sediment deformation features. Udaeta, a small pond in Argentina Tierra del Fuego, is considered a Quaternary pull-apart basin related to the Magallanes-Fagnano Fault System. The recognition of these seismically-induced features is an essential tool for paleoseismic studies. Since the three main urban centers in the Tierra del Fuego province of Argentina (Ushuaia, Río Grande and Tolhuin) have undergone an explosive growth in recent years, the results of this study will hopefully contribute to future analyses of the seismic risk of the region.

  13. Constrained hierarchical least square nonlinear equation solvers. [for indefinite stiffness and large structural deformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padovan, J.; Lackney, J.

    1986-01-01

    The current paper develops a constrained hierarchical least square nonlinear equation solver. The procedure can handle the response behavior of systems which possess indefinite tangent stiffness characteristics. Due to the generality of the scheme, this can be achieved at various hierarchical application levels. For instance, in the case of finite element simulations, various combinations of either degree of freedom, nodal, elemental, substructural, and global level iterations are possible. Overall, this enables a solution methodology which is highly stable and storage efficient. To demonstrate the capability of the constrained hierarchical least square methodology, benchmarking examples are presented which treat structure exhibiting highly nonlinear pre- and postbuckling behavior wherein several indefinite stiffness transitions occur.

  14. Structure of Hamiltonian Matrix and the Shape of Eigenfunctions: Nuclear Octupole Deformation Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XING Yong-Zhong; LI Jun-Qing; LIU Fang; ZUO Wei

    2002-01-01

    The structure of a Hamiltonian matrix for a quantum chaotic system, the nuclear octupole deformationmodel, has been discussed in detail. The distribution of the eigenfunctions of this system expanded by the eigenstates ofa quantum integrable system is studied with the help ofgeneralized Brillouin-Wigner pcrturbation theory. The resultsshow that a significant randomness in this distribution can be observed when its classical counterpart is under the strongchaotic condition. The averaged shape of the eigenfunctions fits with the Gaussian distribution only when the effects ofthe symmetry have been removed.

  15. Lower plate deformation structures along the Costa Rica erosive plate boundary - results from IODP Expedition 344 (CRISP 2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandstätter, Jennifer; Kurz, Walter; Micheuz, Peter; Krenn, Kurt

    2015-04-01

    The primary objective of Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 344 offshore the Osa Peninsula in Costa Rica was to sample and quantify the material entering the seismogenic zone of the Costa Rican erosive subduction margin. Fundamental to this objective is an understanding of the nature of both the subducting Cocos plate crust and of the overriding Caribbean plate. The subducting Cocos plate is investigated trying to define its hydrologic system and thermal state. The forearc structures recorded by the sediment deposited on the forearc, instead, document periods of uplift and subsidence and provide important information about the process of tectonic erosion that characterizes the Costa Rica margin. Offshore the western margin of Costa Rica, the oceanic Cocos plate subducts under the Caribbean plate, forming the southern end of the Middle America Trench. Subduction parameters including the age, convergence rate, azimuth, obliquity, morphology, and slab dip all vary along strike. The age of the Cocos plate at the Middle America Trench decreases from 24 Ma offshore the Nicoya Peninsula to 15 Ma offshore the Osa Peninsula. Subduction rates vary from 70 mm/y offshore Guatemala to 90 mm/y offshore southern Costa Rica. Convergence obliquity across the trench varies from offshore Nicaragua, where it is as much as 25° oblique, to nearly orthogonal southeast of the Nicoya Peninsula. Passage of the Cocos plate over the Galapagos hotspot created the aseismic Cocos Ridge, an overthickened welt of oceanic crust. This ridge is ~25 km thick, greater than three times normal oceanic crustal thickness. During IODP Expedition 344, the incoming Cocos plate was drilled at sites U1381 and U1414. Site U1381 is located ~4.5 km seaward of the deformation front offshore the Osa Peninsula and Caño Island. It is located on a local basement high. Basement relief often focuses fluid flow, so data from this site are likely to document the vigor of fluid flow in this area. Site U

  16. On the Karst Ecosystem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁道先

    2001-01-01

    In this paper the author gives a definition of the karst ecosystem and discusses the characteristics of the karst environment and karst ecosystem and the relationship between life and the karst environment. Finally he clarifies the structure, driving force and functions of the karst system.``

  17. Shear deformation plate continua of large double-layered space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hefzy, M. S.; Nayfeh, A. H.

    1984-01-01

    The energy equivalence to construct equivalent continua for the actual lattice structure is described. An energy equivalent continuum is defined as that which has the same amount of strain and kinetic energies stored in it as the original lattice structure when both are subjected to the same loading conditions. The equivalent continuum is characterized by its strain and kinetic energies from which the constitutive relations and the equations of motion can be derived. A simple method to model large rigid jointed lattices as continuous media with couple stresses is presented. The transition from the discrete system to the continuous medium is achieved by expanding the displacements and the rotations of the nodal points in a Taylor series about a suitable chosen origin. Basic kinematic assumptions are introduced to insure that the assumptions used in deriving the governing equations of the modeled continuum are satisfied. The number of terms retained in the Taylor series expansion will depend upon the properties to be evaluated. This implies that the kind of continuum needed to model from the discrete lattice, before the actual properties are derived was to predetermined.

  18. Image-based dynamic deformation monitoring of civil engineering structures from long ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrhart, Matthias; Lienhart, Werner

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we report on the vibration and displacement monitoring of civil engineering structures using a state of the art image assisted total station (IATS) and passive target markings. By utilizing the telescope camera of the total station, it is possible to capture video streams in real time with 10fps and an angular resolution of approximately 2″/px. Due to the high angular resolution resulting from the 30x optical magnification of the telescope, large distances to the object to be monitored are possible. The laser distance measurement unit integrated in the total station allows to precisely set the camera's focus position and to relate the angular quantities gained from image processing to units of length. To accurately measure the vibrations and displacements of civil engineering structures, we use circular target markings rigidly attached to the object. The computation of the targets' centers is performed by a least squares adjustment of an ellipse according to the Gauß-Helmert model from which the parameters of the ellipse and their standard deviations are derived. In laboratory experiments, we show that movements can be detected with an accuracy of better than 0.2mm for single frames and distances up to 30m. For static applications, where many video frames can be averaged, accuracies of better than 0.05mm are possible. In a field test on a life-size footbridge, we compare the vibrations measured by the IATS to reference values derived from accelerometer measurements.

  19. Emergy and ecosystem complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulgiati, Sergio; Brown, Mark T.

    2009-01-01

    The question "What drives complexity?" is addressed in this paper. To answer this question, we explore the way energy and material resources of different quality flow through ecosystems and support, directly and indirectly, ecosystems growth and development. Processes of resource transformation throughout the ecosystem build order, cycle materials, generate and sustain information. Energy drives all these processes and energetic principles explain much of what is observed, including energy degradation according to the laws of thermodynamics. Emergy, a quantitative measure of the global environmental work supporting ecosystem dynamics, is used here in order to provide a deeper understanding of complexity growth and decline in ecosystems. Ecosystem complexity is discussed in this paper in relation to changes in structure, organization and functional capacity, as explained by changes in emergy, empower, and transformity.

  20. Effect of microstructure on the elasto-viscoplastic deformation of dual phase titanium structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Tugce; Rollett, Anthony D.

    2017-08-01

    The present study is devoted to the creation of a process-structure-property database for dual phase titanium alloys, through a synthetic microstructure generation method and a mesh-free fast Fourier transform based micromechanical model that operates on a discretized image of the microstructure. A sensitivity analysis is performed as a precursor to determine the statistically representative volume element size for creating 3D synthetic microstructures based on additively manufactured Ti-6Al-4V characteristics, which are further modified to expand the database for features of interest, e.g., lath thickness. Sets of titanium hardening parameters are extracted from literature, and The relative effect of the chosen microstructural features is quantified through comparisons of average and local field distributions.

  1. Microbial Fingerprints of Community Structure Correlate with Changes in Ecosystem Function Induced by Perturbing the Redox Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, A. L.; Ford, R. M.; Vallino, J. J.; Herman, J. S.; Hornberger, G. M.

    2001-12-01

    Restoration of high-quality groundwater has been an elusive engineering goal. Consequently, natural microbially-mediated reactions are increasingly relied upon to degrade organic contaminants, including hydrocarbons and many synthetic compounds. Of concern is how the introduction of an organic chemical contaminant affects the indigenous microbial communities, the geochemistry of the aquifer, and the function of the ecosystem. The presence of functional redundancy in microbial communities suggests that recovery of the community after a disturbance such as a contamination event could easily result in a community that is similar in function to that which existed prior to the contamination, but which is compositionally quite different. To investigate the relationship between community structure and function we observed the response of a diverse microbial community obtained from raw sewage to a dynamic redox environment using an aerobic/anaerobic/aerobic cycle. To evaluate changes in community function CO2, pH, ammonium and nitrate levels were monitored. A phylogenetically-based DNA technique (tRFLP) was used to assess changes in microbial community structure. Principal component analysis of the tRFLP data revealed significant changes in the composition of the microbial community that correlated well with changes in community function. Results from our experiments will be discussed in the context of a metabolic model based the biogeochemistry of the system. The governing philosophy of this thermodynamically constrained metabolic model is that living systems synthesize and allocate cellular machinery in such a way as to "optimally" utilize available resources in the environment. The robustness of this optimization-based approach provides a powerful tool for studying relationships between microbial diversity and ecosystem function.

  2. Glacio-tectonic thrust and deformation structures in the Vejle Fjord, Denmark revealed by high-resolution subbottom-profile data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Katrine Juul; Boldreel, Lars Ole; Wahlgreen, Katrine Bak;

    Surface geomorphological features and partial cliff exposures up till now represent the predominant source of information of glaciation related deformation in Denmark. In this study we apply high-resolution marine reflection seismic data from the Vejle Fjord area, supported by gravity and Rumohr...... of the fjord. To the north, the deformation is expressed by complex internal reflection patterns within discrete sedimentary units including faults and smaller thrust-structures and associated small-scale folding. Channel incisions and clear reflection relations (i.e. truncations, onlaps and downlaps) reveal...... indicating severe deformation which most likely reflects ice progression from a southerly direction; for instance by the Young Baltic Ice Stream c. 19-17 ka. A thick and undisturbed build-out sequence can be observed to the north and in front of the thrust-belt probably representing meltwater sedimentation...

  3. Effect of Anisotropic Velocity Structure on Acoustic Emission Source Location during True-Triaxial Deformation Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghofrani Tabari, Mehdi; Goodfellow, Sebastian; Young, R. Paul

    2016-04-01

    Although true-triaxial testing (TTT) of rocks is now more extensive worldwide, stress-induced heterogeneity due to the existence of several loading boundary effects is not usually accounted for and simplified anisotropic models are used. This study focuses on the enhanced anisotropic velocity structure to improve acoustic emission (AE) analysis for an enhanced interpretation of induced fracturing. Data from a TTT on a cubic sample of Fontainebleau sandstone is used in this study to evaluate the methodology. At different stages of the experiment the True-Triaxial Geophysical Imaging Cell (TTGIC), armed with an ultrasonic and AE monitoring system, performed several velocity surveys to image velocity structure of the sample. Going beyond a hydrostatic stress state (poro-elastic phase), the rock sample went through a non-dilatational elastic phase, a dilatational non-damaging elasto-plastic phase containing initial AE activity and finally a dilatational and damaging elasto-plastic phase up to the failure point. The experiment was divided into these phases based on the information obtained from strain, velocity and AE streaming data. Analysis of the ultrasonic velocity survey data discovered that a homogeneous anisotropic core in the center of the sample is formed with ellipsoidal symmetry under the standard polyaxial setup. Location of the transducer shots were improved by implementation of different velocity models for the sample starting from isotropic and homogeneous models going toward anisotropic and heterogeneous models. The transducer shot locations showed a major improvement after the velocity model corrections had been applied especially at the final phase of the experiment. This location improvement validated our velocity model at the final phase of the experiment consisting lower-velocity zones bearing partially saturated fractures. The ellipsoidal anisotropic velocity model was also verified at the core of the cubic rock specimen by AE event location of

  4. Non-Redfield carbon and nitrogen cycling in the Arctic: Effects of ecosystem structure and dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Kendra L.; Wallace, Douglas W. R.; Smith, Walker O.; Skoog, Annelie; Lara, RubéN.; Gosselin, Michel; Falck, Eva; Yager, Patricia L.

    1999-02-01

    The C:N ratio is a critical parameter used in both global ocean carbon models and field studies to understand carbon and nutrient cycling as well as to estimate exported carbon from the euphotic zone. The so-called Redfield ratio (C:N = 6.6 by atoms) [Redfield et al., 1963] is widely used for such calculations. Here we present data from the NE Greenland continental shelf that show that most of the C:N ratios for particulate (autotrophic and heterotrophic) and dissolved pools and rates of transformation among them exceed Redfield proportions from June to August, owing to species composition, size, and biological interactions. The ecosystem components that likely comprised sinking particles and had relatively high C:N ratios (geometric means) included (1) the particulate organic matter (C:N = 8.9) dominated by nutrient-deficient diatoms, resulting from low initial nitrate concentrations (approximately 4 μM) in Arctic surface waters; (2) the dominant zooplankton, herbivorous copepods (C:N = 9.6), having lipid storage typical of Arctic copepods; and (3) copepod fecal pellets (C:N = 33.2). Relatively high dissolved organic carbon concentrations (median 105 μM) were approximately 25 to 45 μM higher than reported for other systems and may be broadly characteristic of Arctic waters. A carbon-rich dissolved organic carbon pool also was generated during summer. Since the magnitude of carbon and nitrogen uncoupling in the surface mixed layer appeared to be greater than in other regions and occurred throughout the productive season, the C:N ratio of particulate organic matter may be a better conversion factor than the Redfield ratio to estimate carbon export for broad application in northern high-latitude systems.

  5. Understanding relationships between morphology and ecosystem structure in a shallow tidal basins of Venice lagoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuseppina Persichillo, Maria; Taramelli, Andrea; Valentini, Emiliana; Filipponi, Federico; Meisina, Claudia; Zucca, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    Coastal wetlands represent complex ecosystems prone to continue fluctuation of their internal equilibrium. They are valuable natural resources characterized by the continue interactions between geomorphological and biological components. Their adaptation to changing conditions is highly dependent on the rate and extent of spatial and temporal processes and their responses are still poorly understood. According to this, the vulnerability assessment to natural and human made hazard have became fundamental to analyse the resilience of these areas, their ability to cope with the impacts from externally driven forces or the efforts needed to minimize the impacts (Gitay et al., 2011). The objective of this research is to develop a comprehensive and replicable method through the application of Multi-Source data analysis, based on the integration of Earth Observation data and field survey, to analyse a shallow tidal basin of salt marshes, located in the northern part of the Venice lagoon. The study site is characterised by relatively elevated areas colonized by halophytic vegetation, and tidal flats, with not vegetated areas, characterized by lower elevations. Sub-pixel processing techniques (Spectral Mixing Analysis - SMA) were used to analyse the spatial distribution of both vegetation and sediments typology. Furthermore the classifications were assayed in terms of spatial (Power law) and temporal (Empirical Orthogonal Functions) patterns, in order to find the main characteristics of the aforementioned spatial trends and their variation over time. The principal aim is to study the spatio-temporal evolution of this coastal wetland area, in order to indentify tipping points, namely thresholds, beyond which the system reaches critical state and the main climatic, hydrodynamic and morphological variables that may influence and increase this behaviour. This research represents a new approach to study the geomorphological processes and to improve the management and

  6. A numerical approach for simulating fluid structure interaction of flexible thin shells undergoing arbitrarily large deformations in complex domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilmanov, Anvar, E-mail: agilmano@umn.edu [Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55414 (United States); Le, Trung Bao, E-mail: lebao002@umn.edu [Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55414 (United States); Sotiropoulos, Fotis, E-mail: fotis@umn.edu [Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55414 (United States); Department of Civil, Environmental and Geo-Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55414 (United States)

    2015-11-01

    We present a new numerical methodology for simulating fluid–structure interaction (FSI) problems involving thin flexible bodies in an incompressible fluid. The FSI algorithm uses the Dirichlet–Neumann partitioning technique. The curvilinear immersed boundary method (CURVIB) is coupled with a rotation-free finite element (FE) model for thin shells enabling the efficient simulation of FSI problems with arbitrarily large deformation. Turbulent flow problems are handled using large-eddy simulation with the dynamic Smagorinsky model in conjunction with a wall model to reconstruct boundary conditions near immersed boundaries. The CURVIB and FE solvers are coupled together on the flexible solid–fluid interfaces where the structural nodal positions, displacements, velocities and loads are calculated and exchanged between the two solvers. Loose and strong coupling FSI schemes are employed enhanced by the Aitken acceleration technique to ensure robust coupling and fast convergence especially for low mass ratio problems. The coupled CURVIB-FE-FSI method is validated by applying it to simulate two FSI problems involving thin flexible structures: 1) vortex-induced vibrations of a cantilever mounted in the wake of a square cylinder at different mass ratios and at low Reynolds number; and 2) the more challenging high Reynolds number problem involving the oscillation of an inverted elastic flag. For both cases the computed results are in excellent agreement with previous numerical simulations and/or experiential measurements. Grid convergence tests/studies are carried out for both the cantilever and inverted flag problems, which show that the CURVIB-FE-FSI method provides their convergence. Finally, the capability of the new methodology in simulations of complex cardiovascular flows is demonstrated by applying it to simulate the FSI of a tri-leaflet, prosthetic heart valve in an anatomic aorta and under physiologic pulsatile conditions.

  7. A numerical approach for simulating fluid structure interaction of flexible thin shells undergoing arbitrarily large deformations in complex domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmanov, Anvar; Le, Trung Bao; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2015-11-01

    We present a new numerical methodology for simulating fluid-structure interaction (FSI) problems involving thin flexible bodies in an incompressible fluid. The FSI algorithm uses the Dirichlet-Neumann partitioning technique. The curvilinear immersed boundary method (CURVIB) is coupled with a rotation-free finite element (FE) model for thin shells enabling the efficient simulation of FSI problems with arbitrarily large deformation. Turbulent flow problems are handled using large-eddy simulation with the dynamic Smagorinsky model in conjunction with a wall model to reconstruct boundary conditions near immersed boundaries. The CURVIB and FE solvers are coupled together on the flexible solid-fluid interfaces where the structural nodal positions, displacements, velocities and loads are calculated and exchanged between the two solvers. Loose and strong coupling FSI schemes are employed enhanced by the Aitken acceleration technique to ensure robust coupling and fast convergence especially for low mass ratio problems. The coupled CURVIB-FE-FSI method is validated by applying it to simulate two FSI problems involving thin flexible structures: 1) vortex-induced vibrations of a cantilever mounted in the wake of a square cylinder at different mass ratios and at low Reynolds number; and 2) the more challenging high Reynolds number problem involving the oscillation of an inverted elastic flag. For both cases the computed results are in excellent agreement with previous numerical simulations and/or experiential measurements. Grid convergence tests/studies are carried out for both the cantilever and inverted flag problems, which show that the CURVIB-FE-FSI method provides their convergence. Finally, the capability of the new methodology in simulations of complex cardiovascular flows is demonstrated by applying it to simulate the FSI of a tri-leaflet, prosthetic heart valve in an anatomic aorta and under physiologic pulsatile conditions.

  8. Precise Timing of Caledonian Structural Deformation Chronology and Its Implications in Southeast Qilian Mountains, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Guangming; Lei Dongning

    2007-01-01

    The middle Qilian orogenic belt and Lajishan orogenic belt, both of which were formed in the Caledonian, strike NW-SE direction across southeast Qilian Mountains and their basement consists of pre-Caledonian metamorphic rocks with lozenge-shaped ductile shear zones in the crystalline basement. The blunt angle between the conjugated ductile shear zones ranges from 104° to 114°, indicating approximate 210° of the maximum principal stress. The plateau ages of muscovite 40Ar/39Ar obtained from the mylonitized rocks in the ductile shear zones of Jinshaxia-Hualong-Keque massif within the middle Qilian massif are (405.1±2.4) Ma and (418.3±2.8) Ma, respectively. The chronology data confirm the formation of ductile shear zones in the Caledonian basement metamorphic rocks during the Caledonian orogeny. Furthermore, on the basis of basement rock study, precise timing for the dosing of the Late Paleozoic volcanic basin (or island-arc basin) and Lajishan ocean basin is determined. This provides us a new insight into the closing of ocean basin in the structural evolution of orogenic belt.

  9. Effect of Structural Heterogeneity on In Situ Deformation of Dissimilar Weld Between Ferritic and Austenitic Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, M.; Santosh, R.; Das, S. K.; Das, G.; Mahato, B.; Korody, J.; Kumar, S.; Singh, P. K.

    2015-08-01

    Low-alloy steel and 304LN austenitic stainless steel were welded using two types of buttering material, namely 309L stainless steel and IN 182. Weld metals were 308L stainless steel and IN 182, respectively, for two different joints. Cross-sectional microstructure of welded assemblies was investigated. Microhardness profile was determined perpendicular to fusion boundary. In situ tensile test was performed in scanning electron microscope keeping low-alloy steel-buttering material interface at the center of gage length. Adjacent to fusion boundary, low-alloy steel exhibited carbon-depleted region and coarsening of matrix grains. Between coarse grain and base material structure, low-alloy steel contained fine grain ferrite-pearlite aggregate. Adjacent to fusion boundary, buttering material consisted of Type-I and Type-II boundaries. Within buttering material close to fusion boundary, thin cluster of martensite was formed. Fusion boundary between buttering material-weld metal and weld metal-304LN stainless steel revealed unmixed zone. All joints failed within buttering material during in situ tensile testing. The fracture location was different for various joints with respect to fusion boundary, depending on variation in local microstructure. Highest bond strength with adequate ductility was obtained for the joint produced with 309L stainless steel-buttering material. High strength of this weld might be attributed to better extent of solid solution strengthening by alloying elements, diffused from low-alloy steel to buttering material.

  10. Ionic conductivity, structural deformation, and programmable anisotropy of DNA origami in electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chen-Yu; Hemmig, Elisa A; Kong, Jinglin; Yoo, Jejoong; Hernández-Ainsa, Silvia; Keyser, Ulrich F; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2015-02-24

    The DNA origami technique can enable functionalization of inorganic structures for single-molecule electric current recordings. Experiments have shown that several layers of DNA molecules, a DNA origami plate, placed on top of a solid-state nanopore is permeable to ions. Here, we report a comprehensive characterization of the ionic conductivity of DNA origami plates by means of all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and nanocapillary electric current recordings. Using the MD method, we characterize the ionic conductivity of several origami constructs, revealing the local distribution of ions, the distribution of the electrostatic potential and contribution of different molecular species to the current. The simulations determine the dependence of the ionic conductivity on the applied voltage, the number of DNA layers, the nucleotide content and the lattice type of the plates. We demonstrate that increasing the concentration of Mg(2+) ions makes the origami plates more compact, reducing their conductivity. The conductance of a DNA origami plate on top of a solid-state nanopore is determined by the two competing effects: bending of the DNA origami plate that reduces the current and separation of the DNA origami layers that increases the current. The latter is produced by the electro-osmotic flow and is reversible at the time scale of a hundred nanoseconds. The conductance of a DNA origami object is found to depend on its orientation, reaching maximum when the electric field aligns with the direction of the DNA helices. Our work demonstrates feasibility of programming the electrical properties of a self-assembled nanoscale object using DNA.

  11. Structural evolution of the Sarandí del Yí Shear Zone, Uruguay: kinematics, deformation conditions and tectonic significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oriolo, S.; Oyhantçabal, P.; Heidelbach, F.; Wemmer, K.; Siegesmund, S.

    2015-10-01

    The Sarandí del Yí Shear Zone is a crustal-scale shear zone that separates the Piedra Alta Terrane from the Nico Pérez Terrane and the Dom Feliciano Belt in southern Uruguay. It represents the eastern margin of the Río de la Plata Craton and, consequently, one of the main structural features of the Precambrian basement of Western Gondwana. This shear zone first underwent dextral shearing under upper to middle amphibolite facies conditions, giving rise to the reactivation of pre-existing crustal fabrics in the easternmost Piedra Alta Terrane. Afterwards, pure-shear-dominated sinistral shearing with contemporaneous magmatism took place under lower amphibolite to upper greenschist facies conditions. The mylonites resulting from this event were then locally reactivated by a cataclastic deformation. This evolution points to strain localization under progressively retrograde conditions with time, indicating that the Sarandí del Yí Shear Zone represents an example of a thinning shear zone related to the collisional to post-collisional evolution of the Dom Feliciano Belt that occurred between the Meso- to Neoproterozoic (>600 Ma) and late Ediacaran-lower Cambrian times.

  12. Deformation and Recrystallization Behavior of the Cast Structure in Large Size, High Strength Steel Ingots: Experimentation and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadha, K.; Shahriari, D.; Tremblay, R.; Bhattacharjee, P. P.; Jahazi, M.

    2017-07-01

    Constitutive modeling of the ingot breakdown process of large size ingots of high strength steel was carried out through comprehensive thermomechanical processing using Gleeble 3800® thermomechanical simulator, finite element modeling (FEM), optical and electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD). For this purpose, hot compression tests in the range of 1473 K to 1323 K (1200 °C to 1050 °C) and strain rates of 0.25 to 2 s-1 were carried out. The stress-strain curves describing the deformation behavior of the dendritic microstructure of the cast ingot were analyzed in terms of the Arrhenius and Hansel-Spittel models which were implemented in Forge NxT 1.0® FEM software. The results indicated that the Arrhenius model was more reliable in predicting microstructure evolution of the as-cast structure during ingot breakdown, particularly the occurrence of dynamic recrystallization (DRX) process which was a vital parameter in estimating the optimum loads for forming of large size components. The accuracy and reliability of both models were compared in terms of correlation coefficient (R) and the average absolute relative error (ARRE).

  13. Deformation and Recrystallization Behavior of the Cast Structure in Large Size, High Strength Steel Ingots: Experimentation and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadha, K.; Shahriari, D.; Tremblay, R.; Bhattacharjee, P. P.; Jahazi, M.

    2017-09-01

    Constitutive modeling of the ingot breakdown process of large size ingots of high strength steel was carried out through comprehensive thermomechanical processing using Gleeble 3800® thermomechanical simulator, finite element modeling (FEM), optical and electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD). For this purpose, hot compression tests in the range of 1473 K to 1323 K (1200 °C to 1050 °C) and strain rates of 0.25 to 2 s-1 were carried out. The stress-strain curves describing the deformation behavior of the dendritic microstructure of the cast ingot were analyzed in terms of the Arrhenius and Hansel-Spittel models which were implemented in Forge NxT 1.0® FEM software. The results indicated that the Arrhenius model was more reliable in predicting microstructure evolution of the as-cast structure during ingot breakdown, particularly the occurrence of dynamic recrystallization (DRX) process which was a vital parameter in estimating the optimum loads for forming of large size components. The accuracy and reliability of both models were compared in terms of correlation coefficient (R) and the average absolute relative error (ARRE).

  14. Estimates of changes of structural parameters of forest ecosystems in decoding high resolution satellite images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri F. Rozhkov

    2016-05-01

    distribution in the long-term monitoring of forest ecosystems status ( for example of the forest restoration process after fire impact. The rate of forest recovery was determined within the burned fragment with an area of 6.98 sq. km

  15. Seismic structure across the Caledonian Deformation Front along MONA LISA profile 1 in the southeastern North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramovitz, Tanni; Thybo, Hans; MONA LISA Working Group

    1998-03-01

    Seismic data from the MONA LISA (Marine and Onshore North Sea Acquisition for Lithospheric Seismic Analysis) project in the southeastern North Sea image the Caledonian Deformation Front (CDF), which is the collisional suture between Baltica to the north and east and Avalonia to the south and west. The NS-trending MONA LISA normal-incidence reflection profile 1 was recorded to 26 s twt. Coincident wide-angle data were acquired on nine ocean bottom hydrophones and several onshore mobile seismographs along and off the profile. The model of compressional seismic velocity shows three different crustal types: (a) a typical three-layered shield-type crust below the Ringkøbing Fyn High to the north: (b) a highly complex transitional crust in the central part; and (c) a two-layered crust of Caledonian origin to the south. Sharp and strong normal-incidence and wide-angle reflections from Moho were recorded south of the Caledonian Deformation Front in contrast to less distinct reflections further north. S-dipping crustal reflections from 4 to 11 s twt over ˜70 km horizontal distance terminate at Moho and coincide with a change in the seismic velocity structure. This indicates northward obduction of Avalonian crust. Non-migrated normal-incidence seismic sections show crossing weak N-dipping and stronger S-dipping reflections to 20 s twt from the uppermost mantle. We propose a tectonic model where the closure of the Tornquist Sea took place along a N-dipping subduction zone which was later overprinted by a late-or post-Caledonian S-dipping shear zone. Sub-Moho velocities are 7.8-7.9 km/s under 34-35-km-thick Baltica crust and 8.1-8.3 km/s under 25-26-km-thick Caledonian crust. The sub-horizontal Moho across the Caledonian collision zone implies late- or post-Caledonian re-equilibration of the seismological Moho. We interpret the low-velocity upper mantle (7.8-8.1 km/s) to the north as former Baltica lower crust in eclogite facies after pressure-induced metamorphism as a

  16. Ecosystem Jenga!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umphlett, Natalie; Brosius, Tierney; Laungani, Ramesh; Rousseau, Joe; Leslie-Pelecky, Diandra L.

    2009-01-01

    To give students a tangible model of an ecosystem and have them experience what could happen if a component of that ecosystem were removed; the authors developed a hands-on, inquiry-based activity that visually demonstrates the concept of a delicately balanced ecosystem through a modification of the popular game Jenga. This activity can be…

  17. Natural ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleishman, Erica; Belnap, Jayne; Cobb, Neil; Enquist, Carolyn A.F.; Ford, Karl; MacDonald, Glen; Pellant, Mike; Schoennagel, Tania; Schmit, Lara M.; Schwartz, Mark; van Drunick, Suzanne; Westerling, Anthony LeRoy; Keyser, Alisa; Lucas, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Natural Ecosystems analyzes the association of observed changes in climate with changes in the geographic distributions and phenology (the timing of blossoms or migrations of birds) for Southwestern ecosystems and their species, portraying ecosystem disturbances—such as wildfires and outbreaks of forest pathogens—and carbon storage and release, in relation to climate change.

  18. Ecosystem Jenga!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umphlett, Natalie; Brosius, Tierney; Laungani, Ramesh; Rousseau, Joe; Leslie-Pelecky, Diandra L.

    2009-01-01

    To give students a tangible model of an ecosystem and have them experience what could happen if a component of that ecosystem were removed; the authors developed a hands-on, inquiry-based activity that visually demonstrates the concept of a delicately balanced ecosystem through a modification of the popular game Jenga. This activity can be…

  19. Tracing Lithospheric Structure Using Flexural Rigidity in South America: Implications for Intra-Continental Deformation and Subduction Geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Gussinye, M.; Lowry, A. R.; Watts, A. B.; Phipps Morgan, J.

    2006-12-01

    The effective elastic thickness of the lithosphere, Te, is a proxy for its flexural rigidity, which primarily depends on thermal gradient and composition. As such Te maps reflect lithospheric structure. We present here a new Te map of South America generated using a compilation of satellite and terrestrial gravity data and a multitapered Bouguer coherence technique. Our Te map reflects the terrane structure of the continent, and correlates well with other published proxies for lithospheric structure: areas with high Te have, in general, high mantle shear wave velocity and low heat flow. Te is high (> 70 km) within the old, stable cratonic nuclei (> ~ 1.5 Ga old); lower Te occurs in areas repeatedly reactivated as major sutures, rift zones and at sites of hotspot magmatism. These areas concentrate most of the intracontinental seismicity and have high heat flow and low seismic velocity, implying that intra-continental deformation repeatedly focuses within thin, hot and hence weak lithosphere and that cratonic interiors are strong enough to inhibit tectonism. Along the Andean chain, Te illuminates interactions between the subducting slab and the pre-existing terrane structure. In the forearc, conductive cooling of the upper plate by the subducting slab primarily controls the rigidity, so that Te is largest (~ 40 km) where the oceanic plate is oldest and coldest (~ 20° S). In the central Andes, Te is relatively low (~ 20 km) along the volcanic chain and the Altiplano and Puna plateaus. We interpret these low Te values to reflect a shallow (70-100 km), hot and possible water-saturated asthenosphere that may extend to the western limit of the Eastern cordillera. Finally, regions of flat slab, located to the North and South of the plateaus, are characterized by high Te. Based on published tomographic results which indicate that the upper plate in the Chile flat slab segment is cratonic, we suggest that the lithospheric structure of the upper plate may influence the

  20. Deformed Algebras and Generalizations of Independ