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Sample records for deflecting rf cavity

  1. Comparison of electromagnetic, thermal and mechanical calculations with rf test results in rf-dipole deflecting/crabbing cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, HyeKyoung [JLAB, ODU; De Silva, Subashini U. [ODU; Delayen, Jean R. [ODU, JLAB

    2013-12-01

    The current requirements of higher gradients and strict dimensional constraints in the emerging applications have required the designing of compact deflecting and crabbing rf structures. The superconducting rf-dipole cavity is one of the first novel compact designs with attractive properties such as higher gradients, higher shunt impedance and widely separated higher order modes. The recent tests performed on proof-of-principle designs of the rf-dipole geometry at 4.2 K and 2.0 K in the vertical test area at Jefferson Lab have proven the designs to achieve higher gradients with higher intrinsic quality factors and easily processed multipacting conditions. The cavity characteristics, such as pressure sensitivity and Lorentz force detuning, were studied using ANSYS before the fabrication. These characteristics were measured during the cavity test. The comparison between the simulation and the measurement provides insight how the simulation can be used for design and fabrication of future cavities.

  2. Deflecting RF cavity design for a recirculating linac based facility for ultrafast X-ray science (LUX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Derun; Corlett, J.N.

    2003-01-01

    We report on superconducting deflecting RF cavity designs for a Recirculating Linac Based Facility for Ultrafast X-ray Science (LUX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The deflecting cavities operate in the lowest dipole mode and are required to produce a temporal correlation within flat electron bunches, as needed for x-ray compression in crystal optics. Deflecting voltage of up to 8.5-MV is required at 3.9-GHz. We present a 7-cell cavity design in this paper. Seven such cavities are required to generate the 8.5 MV deflecting voltage. Longitudinal and transverse impedance from LOM (lower order mode) and HOM (higher order mode) are simulated using the MAFIA code. Short-range and long-range wakefield excited through these impedances are calculated. Beam loading effects of the deflecting mode and LOM modes are estimated. Q values of the LOM monopole modes in the cavity may need to be damped to be below 10 4 -10 5 levels in order to maintain the required energy spread

  3. New compact TEM-type deflecting and crabbing rf structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. Delayen

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A new type of rf structure for the deflection and crabbing of particle beams is presented. The structure is comprised of a number of parallel TEM resonant lines operating in opposing phase from each other. One of its advantages is its compactness compared to conventional crabbing cavities operating in the TM_{110} mode, thus allowing low frequency designs. This geometry would also be effective for the deflection of beams propagating at velocities substantially less than that of light.

  4. SPS RF Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    The picture shows one of the two initially installed cavities. The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities. Initially only two cavities were installed, a third cavity was installed in 1978 and a forth one in 1979. The number of power amplifiers was also gradually increased: by end 1980 there were 8 500 kW units combined in pairs to feed each of the 4 cavities with up to about 1 MW RF power, resulting in a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. See also 7412017X, 7411048X, 7505074.

  5. SPS RF Accelerating Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    This picture shows one of the 2 new cavities installed in 1978-1979. The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities. Initially only two cavities were installed, a third cavity was installed in 1978 and a forth one in 1979. The number of power amplifiers was also increased: to the first 2 MW plant a second 2 MW plant was added and by end 1979 there were 8 500 kW units combined in pairs to feed each of the 4 cavities with up to about 1 MW RF power, resulting in a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. See also 7412016X, 7412017X, 7411048X

  6. ISR RF cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    In each ISR ring the radiofrequency cavities were installed in one 9 m long straight section. The RF system of the ISR had the main purpose to stack buckets of particles (most of the time protons)coming from the CPS and also to accelerate the stacked beam. The installed RF power per ring was 18 kW giving a peak accelerating voltage of 20 kV. The system had a very fine regulation feature allowing to lower the voltage down to 75 V in a smooth and well controlled fashion.

  7. Coupler induced monopole component and its minimization in deflecting cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. K. Ambattu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Deflecting cavities are used in particle accelerators for the manipulation of charged particles by deflecting or crabbing (rotating them. For short deflectors, the effect of the power coupler on the deflecting field can become significant. The particular power coupler type can introduce multipole rf field components and coupler-specific wakefields. Coupler types that would normally be considered like standard on-cell coupler, waveguide coupler, or mode-launcher coupler could have one or two rf feeds. The major advantage of a dual-feed coupler is the absence of monopole and quadrupole rf field components in the deflecting structure. However, a dual-feed coupler is mechanically more complex than a typical single-feed coupler and needs a splitter. For most applications, deflecting structures are placed in regions where there is small space hence reducing the size of the structure is very desirable. This paper investigates the multipole field components of the deflecting mode in single-feed couplers and ways to overcome the effect of the monopole component on the beam. Significant advances in performance have been demonstrated. Additionally, a novel coupler design is introduced which has no monopole field component to the deflecting mode and is more compact than the conventional dual-feed coupler.

  8. Novel deflecting cavity design for eRHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Q.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    2011-07-25

    To prevent significant loss of the luminosity due to large crossing angle in the future ERL based Electron Ion Collider at BNL (eRHIC), there is a demand for crab cavities. In this article, we will present a novel design of the deflecting/crabbing 181 MHz superconducting RF cavity that will fulfil the requirements of eRHIC. The quarter-wave resonator structure of the new cavity possesses many advantages, such as compact size, high R{sub t}/Q, the absence of the same order mode and lower order mode, and easy higher order mode damping. We will present the properties and characteristics of the new cavity in detail. As the accelerator systems grow in complexity, developing compact and efficient deflecting cavities is of great interest. Such cavities will benefit situations where the beam line space is limited. The future linac-ring type electron-ion collider requires implementation of a crab-crossing scheme for both beams at the interaction region. The ion beam has a long bunches and high rigidity. Therefore, it requires a low frequency, large kicking angle deflector. The frequency of the deflecting mode for the current collider design is 181 MHz, and the deflecting angle is {approx}5 mrad for each beam. At such low frequency, the previous designs of the crab cavities will have very large dimensions, and also will be confronted by typical problems of damping the Lower Order Mode (LOM), the Same Order Mode (SOM), and as usual, the Higher Order Modes (HOM). In this paper we describe how one can use the concept of a quarter-wave (QW) resonator for a deflecting/crabbing cavity, and use its fundamental mode to deflect the beam. The simplicity of the cavity geometry and the large separation between its fundamental mode and the first HOM make it very attractive.

  9. Scaling relations for a beam-deflecting TM110 mode in an asymmetric cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, H.

    1989-01-01

    A deflecting mode in an rf cavity caused by an aperture of the coupling hole from a waveguide is studied. If the coupling hole was a finite size, the rf modes in the cavity can be distorted. We consider the distorted mode as a sum of the accelerating mode, and the deflecting mode. The finite-size coupling hole can be considered as radiating dipole sources in a closed cavity. Following the prescription given by H. Bethe, the relative strength of the deflecting mode TM 110 to the accelerating TM 010 mode is calculated by decomposing the dipole source field into cavity eigenmodes. Scaling relations are obtained as a function of the coupling hole radius. 2 refs., 6 figs

  10. Transverse instability excited by rf deflecting modes for PEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, A.W.; Yao, C.Y.

    1979-11-01

    We have looked at the possible transverse instability effects which are caused by the deflecting modes of the rf cavities in PEP. The results are obtained by applying the expression of the instability damping rate. We have assumed that there equal bunches equally spaced in PEP. We have worked out the equivalent for a single bunch beam. The effect of chromaticity ξ is included as a frequency shift in the bunch mode spectra. We rewrite this result in terms of the transverse wake field instead of the impedance. We include an application of the Sacherer formalism to the case of resistive wall. The resulting expression of the damping rate contains two terms. The first term corresponds to the effect of the short wake fields; it agrees with the result of the head-tail instability as derived by Sands. A numerical estimate of this resistive-wall head tail case for PEP is given. It re-confirms that the resistive wall instability is not a serious problem for PEP. The second term gives the effect of long wake fields and it agrees with the result of Courant and Sessler. 10 refs., 2 figs

  11. A Three-Cell Superconducting Deflecting Cavity Design for the ALS at LBNL

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Jiaru; Chen Huai Bi; Li, Derun; Zheng, Shuxin

    2005-01-01

    Deflecting RF cavities can be used to generate sub-pico-second x-rays by creating correlations between longitudinal and transverse phase space of electron bunches in radiation devices. Up to 2-MV defecting voltage at 1.5-GHz is required for 1.9-GeV electron beam at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at LBNL. We present a conceptual design for a 1.5-GHz three-cell superconducting RF cavity and its coupler. The cavity geometry and deflecting shunt impedance are optimized using MAFIA code. The cavity impedance from lower and higher order modes (LOM and HOM) are computed. Possible schemes for damping most harmful LOM and HOM modes are discussed and simulated.

  12. Degreasing and cleaning superconducting RF Niobium cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauchmiller, Michael; Kellett, Ron; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    The purpose and scope of this report is to detail the steps necessary for degreasing and cleaning of superconducting RF Niobium cavities in the A0 clean room. It lists the required equipment and the cleaning procedure.

  13. DESIGN, PROTOTYPE AND MEASUREMENT OF A SINGLE-CELL DEFLECTING CAVITY FOR THE ADVANCED PHOTON SOURCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haipeng Wang, Guangfeng Cheng, Gianluigi Ciovati, Peter Kneisel, Robert Rimmer, Kai Tian, Larry Turlington, Alireza Nassiri, Geoff Waldschmidt

    2009-05-01

    After the design optimization of a squashed elliptical shape, single-cell, superconducting (SC) deflecting cavity at 2.815 GHz, a copper prototype has been bench measured to determine its rf properties and the effectiveness of waveguide damping of parasitic modes [1]. RF cold tests were also performed at 2K on niobium single-cell and two-cell prototype cavities. Details of impedance calculation using wakefiled analysis of the single-cell cavity are shown to meet the strict 200 mA beam stability requirement of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Lab where a total of 16 single-cell cavities will be divided into two cryomodule. The design of higher-order mode (HOM) waveguide damping, the simulations of the Lorenz force detuning, and the prototype of on-cell damping are presented.

  14. Prototype storage cavity for LEP accelerating RF

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    The principle of an RF storage cavity was demonstrated with this prototype, working at 500 MHz. The final storage cavities were larger, to suit the LEP accelerating frequency of 352.2 MHz. Cu-tubes for watercooling are brazed onto the upper half, the lower half is to follow. See also 8006061, 8109346, 8407619X, and Annual Report 1980, p.115.

  15. Tunable Q-Factor RF Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balcazar, Mario D. [Fermilab; Yonehara, Katsuya [Fermilab; Moretti, Alfred [Fermilab; Kazakevitch, Gregory [Fermilab

    2018-01-01

    Intense neutrino beam is a unique probe for researching beyond the standard model. Fermilab is the main institution to produce the most powerful and widespectrum neutrino beam. From that respective, a radiation robust beam diagnostic system is a critical element in order to maintain the quality of the neutrino beam. Within this context, a novel radiation-resistive beam profile monitor based on a gasfilled RF cavity is proposed. The goal of this measurement is to study a tunable Qfactor RF cavity to determine the accuracy of the RF signal as a function of the quality factor. Specifically, measurement error of the Q-factor in the RF calibration is investigated. Then, the RF system will be improved to minimize signal error.

  16. RF BREAKDOWN STUDIES USING PRESSURIZED CAVITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Rolland

    2014-09-21

    Many present and future particle accelerators are limited by the maximum electric gradient and peak surface fields that can be realized in RF cavities. Despite considerable effort, a comprehensive theory of RF breakdown has not been achieved and mitigation techniques to improve practical maximum accelerating gradients have had only limited success. Part of the problem is that RF breakdown in an evacuated cavity involves a complex mixture of effects, which include the geometry, metallurgy, and surface preparation of the accelerating structures and the make-up and pressure of the residual gas in which plasmas form. Studies showed that high gradients can be achieved quickly in 805 MHz RF cavities pressurized with dense hydrogen gas, as needed for muon cooling channels, without the need for long conditioning times, even in the presence of strong external magnetic fields. This positive result was expected because the dense gas can practically eliminate dark currents and multipacting. In this project we used this high pressure technique to suppress effects of residual vacuum and geometry that are found in evacuated cavities in order to isolate and study the role of the metallic surfaces in RF cavity breakdown as a function of magnetic field, frequency, and surface preparation. One of the interesting and useful outcomes of this project was the unanticipated collaborations with LANL and Fermilab that led to new insights as to the operation of evacuated normal-conducting RF cavities in high external magnetic fields. Other accomplishments included: (1) RF breakdown experiments to test the effects of SF6 dopant in H2 and He gases with Sn, Al, and Cu electrodes were carried out in an 805 MHz cavity and compared to calculations and computer simulations. The heavy corrosion caused by the SF6 components led to the suggestion that a small admixture of oxygen, instead of SF6, to the hydrogen would allow the same advantages without the corrosion in a practical muon beam line. (2) A

  17. New achievements in RF cavity manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lippmann, G.; Pimiskern, K.; Kaiser, H.

    1993-01-01

    Dornier has been engaged in development, manufacturing and testing of Cu-, Cu/Nb- and Nb-cavities for many years. Recently, several different types of RF cavities were manufactured. A prototype superconducting (s.c.) B-Factory accelerating cavity (1-cell, 500 MHz) was delivered to Cornell University, Laboratory of Nuclear Studies. A second lot of 6 s.c. cavities (20-cell, 3000 MHz) was fabricated on contract from Technical University of Darmstadt for the S-DALINAC facility. Finally, the first copper RF structures (9-cell, 1300 MHz) for TESLA were finished and delivered to DESY, two s.c. niobium structures of the same design are in production. Highlights from the manufacturing processes of these cavities are described and first performance results will be reported

  18. PEP-II RF cavity revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimmer, R.A.; Koehler, G.; Li, D.; Hartman, N.; Folwell, N.; Hodgson, J.; Ko, K.; McCandless, B.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the results of numerical simulations of the PEP-II RF cavity performed after the completion of the construction phase of the project and comparisons are made to previous calculations and measured results. These analyses were performed to evaluate new calculation techniques for the HOM distribution and RF surface heating that were not available at the time of the original design. These include the use of a high frequency electromagnetic element in ANSYS and the new Omega 3P code to study wall losses, and the development of broadband time domain simulation methods in MAFIA for the HOM loading. The computed HOM spectrum is compared with cavity measurements and observed beam-induced signals. The cavity fabrication method is reviewed, with the benefit of hindsight, and simplifications are discussed

  19. Deflecting modes of the side-coupled cavity structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inagaki, Shigemi.

    1990-11-01

    The deflecting modes of the 805 MHz side-coupled cavity structure with the relativistic factor 0.566 are studied. Our main concern is the dispersion properties among different configurations of side-coupling cells and their interpretations. It is shown that the ninety degree side-coupling cell configuration, so to speak, the Mickey Mouse configuration has a merit in reducing the HEM 1 passband. Another concern is the magnitude of the transverse coupling impedance around the synchronization condition. It is shown that the existence of the coupling cell introduces the nonuniformity of the deflecting mode and gives different impedance relative to the beam axis and that the coupling impedance at π/10 exceeds 50 MΩ/m if the quality value of the mode is around 12000

  20. Pressurized rf cavities in ionizing beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Freemire

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A muon collider or Higgs factory requires significant reduction of the six dimensional emittance of the beam prior to acceleration. One method to accomplish this involves building a cooling channel using high pressure gas filled radio frequency cavities. The performance of such a cavity when subjected to an intense particle beam must be investigated before this technology can be validated. To this end, a high pressure gas filled radio frequency (rf test cell was built and placed in a 400 MeV beam line from the Fermilab linac to study the plasma evolution and its effect on the cavity. Hydrogen, deuterium, helium and nitrogen gases were studied. Additionally, sulfur hexafluoride and dry air were used as dopants to aid in the removal of plasma electrons. Measurements were made using a variety of beam intensities, gas pressures, dopant concentrations, and cavity rf electric fields, both with and without a 3 T external solenoidal magnetic field. Energy dissipation per electron-ion pair, electron-ion recombination rates, ion-ion recombination rates, and electron attachment times to SF_{6} and O_{2} were measured.

  1. Microscopic investigation of RF surfaces of 3 GHz niobium accelerator cavities following RF processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graber, J.; Barnes, P.; Flynn, T.; Kirchgessner, J.; Knobloch, J.; Moffat, D.; Muller, H.; Padamsee, H.; Sears, J.

    1993-01-01

    RF processing of Superconducting accelerating cavities is achieved through a change in the electron field emission (FE) characteristics of the RF surface. The authors have examined the RF surfaces of several single-cell 3 GHz cavities, following RF processing, in a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The RF processing sessions included both High Peak Power (P ≤ 50 kW) pulsed processing, and low power (≤ 20 W) continuous wave processing. The experimental apparatus also included a thermometer array on the cavity outer wall, allowing temperature maps to characterize the emission before and after RF processing gains. Multiple sites have been located in cavities which showed improvements in cavity behavior due to RF processing. Several SEM-located sites can be correlated with changes in thermometer signals, indicating a direct relationship between the surface site and emission reduction due to RF processing. Information gained from the SEM investigations and thermometry are used to enhance the theoretical model of RF processing

  2. High field conditioning of cryogenic RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, M.; Debiak, T.; Lom, C.; Shephard, W.; Sredniawski, J.

    1993-01-01

    Space-based and other related accelerators have conditioning and operation requirements that are not found in most machines. The use of cryogenic copper, relatively poor vacuum, and limited power storage and operating time put unusual demands on the high-field conditioning process and present some concerns. Two CW cryogenic engineering model open-quotes sparkerclose quotes cavities have been fabricated and tested to fairly high field levels. Tests included initial and repeated conditioning as well as sustained RF operations. The two cavities were an engineering model TDL and an engineering model RFQ. Both cavities operated at 425 MHz. The DTL was conditioned to 46 MV/m at 100% duty factor (CW) at cryogenic temperature. This corresponds to a gap voltage of 433 kV and a real estate accelerating gradient (energy gain/total cavity length) of 6.97 MV/m. The authors believe this to be record performance for cryo CW operation. During cryo pulsed operation, the same cavity reached 48 MV/m with 200 μsec pulses at 0.5% DF. The RFQ was conditioned to 30 MV/m CW at cryo, 85 kV gap voltage. During a brief period of cryo pulsed operation, the RFQ operated at 46 MV/m, or 125 kV gap voltage. Reconditioning experiments were performed on both cavities and no problems were encountered. It should be noted that the vacuum levels were not very stringent during these tests and no special cleanliness or handling procedures were followed. The results of these tests indicate that cavities can run CW without difficulty at cryogenic temperatures at normal conservative field levels. Higher field operation may well be possible, and if better vacuums are used and more attention is paid to cleanliness, much higher fields may be attainable

  3. Criteria for vacuum breakdown in rf cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peter, W.; Faehl, R.J.; Kadish, A.; Thode, L.E.

    1983-01-01

    A new high-voltage scaling based on Kilpatrick's criterion is presented that suggests that voltages more than twice the Kilpatrick limit can be obtained with identical initial conditions of vacuum and surface cleanliness. The calculations are based on the experimentally observed decrease in secondary electron emission with increasing ion-impact energy above 100 keV. A generalized secondary-emission package has been developed to simulate actual cavity dynamics in conjunction with our 2 1/2-dimensional fully electromagnetic particle-in-cell code CEMIT. The results are discussed with application to the suppression of vacuum breakdown in rf accelerator devices

  4. Rf drive system for the CEBAF superconducting cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fugitt, J.A.; Moore, T.L.

    1986-01-01

    To obtain the maximum accelerating gradient, the CEBAF RF system uses an individually controlled RF drive chain for each superconducting cavity. This allows one to adjust each cavity to its individual maximum field. Due to material purity and manufacturing tolerances of the cavities, it is expected that this maximum value will be distributed over an almost 2 to 1 gradient range. The requirement for precise individual phase and gradient control of 420 superconducting accelerating cavities, is accomplished through the use of individual fault tolerant RF drive chains and self monitoring control electronics. This might be thought of as the Phased Array approach to accelerator RF systems

  5. The splitring loaded RF-cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Eckhard; Klein, Horst

    1984-07-01

    Experimental and theoretical work was done on the splitring loaded resonant rf-cavity. Formulae are derived for the determination of the resonance frequencies, Rp-value and shunt impedance dependent on the resonator geometry. The calculations were verified by experiments carried out by the authors as well as by measurements reported in literature. The theoretical and experimental optimizations were incorporated in a construction of a normal-conducting section laid out for a resonance frequency of 108 MHz, a particle velocity corresponding to β = v/ c = 0.057 and with an Rp-value of 14.5 MΩ producing an acceleration voltage of 1 MV. This resonator is part of a small postaccelerator, installed at the Frankfurt single-ended 7 MV CN Van de Graaff generator and has been tested with a particle beam.

  6. RF cavity using liquid dielectric for tuning and cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovic, Milorad [Warrenville, IL; Johnson, Rolland P [Newport News, VA

    2012-04-17

    A system for accelerating particles includes an RF cavity that contains a ferrite core and a liquid dielectric. Characteristics of the ferrite core and the liquid dielectric, among other factors, determine the resonant frequency of the RF cavity. The liquid dielectric is circulated to cool the ferrite core during the operation of the system.

  7. VERY HIGH RESOLUTION RF CAVITY BPM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, Marc C

    2003-05-27

    Linear collider (LC) interaction region beam sizes and component position stability requirements are expected to be a few nanometers[1]. It is important to show that the related tolerances can be achieved, with an electron beam if possible. Using recently developed component stabilization technology, very high-resolution beam position monitors (BPM's), and the ultra-low emittance beam at the KEK ATF, we plan to demonstrate the required stabilization. Our first step is to develop high-resolution RF cavity beam position monitors, using either C or X band frequencies. A C-band cavity BPM with a resolution of 25 nm has been reported in tests at FFTB [2]. By correcting for the effects of non-axial trajectories and using both position and angle BPM movers, we expect to be able to demonstrate a resolution of 2 to 3 nm over a dynamic range of {+-} 20 {micro}m. We report on the progress of the tests here.

  8. RF kicker cavity to increase control in common transport lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas, David R.; Ament, Lucas J. P.

    2017-04-18

    A method of controlling e-beam transport where electron bunches with different characteristics travel through the same beam pipe. An RF kicker cavity is added at the beginning of the common transport pipe or at various locations along the common transport path to achieve independent control of different bunch types. RF energy is applied by the kicker cavity kicks some portion of the electron bunches, separating the bunches in phase space to allow independent control via optics, or separating bunches into different beam pipes. The RF kicker cavity is operated at a specific frequency to enable kicking of different types of bunches in different directions. The phase of the cavity is set such that the selected type of bunch passes through the cavity when the RF field is at a node, leaving that type of bunch unaffected. Beam optics may be added downstream of the kicker cavity to cause a further separation in phase space.

  9. Development and application of 3D RF cavity code MAFIA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Tieta

    1992-01-01

    The design of a asymmetric RF cavity requires a code that can treat 3D structure. This paper describes the characteristics, functions and applications of the 3D RF cavity computer-aided design (CAD) program MAFIA. The 3D geometry design of non-axial symmetric RF cavity with a coupler is realized by CAD method. A kind of data input is presented that can save not only machine memory, but also the CPU time, and large programs can be run on a medium-small size machine. The numerical simulation of a L-band RF cavity is presented and the modeling results agree well with its experimental values. We have also compared electric properties of the RF cavity with variant geometry by applying 3D numerical and graphic simulations. The influence on electric and magnetic fields by adding a input coupler or HOM coupler at the side of a RF cavity is analysed. Adding a coupler to a RF cavity can cause the change of resonance frequency. A method that can compensate the variation of frequency is also presented

  10. Finite element analyses for RF photoinjector gun cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marhauser, F.

    2006-01-01

    This paper details electromagnetical, thermal and structural 3D Finite Element Analyses (FEA) for normal conducting RF photoinjector gun cavities. The simulation methods are described extensively. Achieved results are presented. (orig.)

  11. Investigation of Microscopic Materials Limitations of Superconducting RF Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anlage, Steven [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2014-07-23

    The high-field performance of SRF cavities is often limited by breakdown events below the intrinsic limiting surface fields of Nb, and there is abundant evidence that these breakdown events are localized in space inside the cavity. Also, there is a lack of detailed understanding of the causal links between surface treatments and ultimate RF performance at low temperatures. An understanding of these links would provide a clear roadmap for improvement of SRF cavity performance, and establish a cause-and-effect ‘RF materials science’ of Nb. We propose two specific microscopic approaches to addressing these issues. First is a spatially-resolved local microwave-microscope probe that operates at SRF frequencies and temperatures to discover the microscopic origins of breakdown, and produce quantitative measurements of RF critical fields of coatings and films. Second, RF Laser Scanning Microscopy (LSM) has allowed visualization of RF current flow and sources of nonlinear RF response in superconducting devices with micro-meter spatial resolution. The LSM will be used in conjunction with surface preparation and characterization techniques to create definitive links between physical and chemical processing steps and ultimate cryogenic microwave performance. We propose to develop RF laser scanning microscopy of small-sample Nb pieces to establish surface-processing / RF performance relations through measurement of RF current distributions on micron-length scales and low temperatures.

  12. COMPARISON OF RF CAVITY TRANSPORT MODELS FOR BBU SIMULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilkyoung Shin,Byung Yunn,Todd Satogata,Shahid Ahmed

    2011-03-01

    The transverse focusing effect in RF cavities plays a considerable role in beam dynamics for low-energy beamline sections and can contribute to beam breakup (BBU) instability. The purpose of this analysis is to examine RF cavity models in simulation codes which will be used for BBU experiments at Jefferson Lab and improve BBU simulation results. We review two RF cavity models in the simulation codes elegant and TDBBU (a BBU simulation code developed at Jefferson Lab). elegant can include the Rosenzweig-Serafini (R-S) model for the RF focusing effect. Whereas TDBBU uses a model from the code TRANSPORT which considers the adiabatic damping effect, but not the RF focusing effect. Quantitative comparisons are discussed for the CEBAF beamline. We also compare the R-S model with the results from numerical simulations for a CEBAF-type 5-cell superconducting cavity to validate the use of the R-S model as an improved low-energy RF cavity transport model in TDBBU. We have implemented the R-S model in TDBBU. It will improve BBU simulation results to be more matched with analytic calculations and experimental results.

  13. Comparison Of RF Cavity Transport Models For BBU Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Ilkyoung; Yunn, Byung; Satogata, Todd; Ahmed, Shahid

    2011-01-01

    The transverse focusing effect in RF cavities plays a considerable role in beam dynamics for low-energy beamline sections and can contribute to beam breakup (BBU) instability. The purpose of this analysis is to examine RF cavity models in simulation codes which will be used for BBU experiments at Jefferson Lab and improve BBU simulation results. We review two RF cavity models in the simulation codes elegant and TDBBU (a BBU simulation code developed at Jefferson Lab). elegant can include the Rosenzweig-Serafini (R-S) model for the RF focusing effect. Whereas TDBBU uses a model from the code TRANSPORT which considers the adiabatic damping effect, but not the RF focusing effect. Quantitative comparisons are discussed for the CEBAF beamline. We also compare the R-S model with the results from numerical simulations for a CEBAF-type 5-cell superconducting cavity to validate the use of the R-S model as an improved low-energy RF cavity transport model in TDBBU. We have implemented the R-S model in TDBBU. It will improve BBU simulation results to be more matched with analytic calculations and experimental results.

  14. An RF input coupler for a superconducting single cell cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fechner, B.; Ouchi, Nobuo; Kusano, Joichi; Mizumoto, Motoharu; Mukugi, Ken; Krawczyk, F.

    1999-03-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute proposes a high intensity proton accelerator for the Neutron Science Project. A superconducting linac is a main option for the high energy part of the accelerator. Design and development work for the superconducting accelerating cavities (resonant frequency of 600 MHz) is in progress. Superconducting cavities have an advantage of very high accelerating efficiency because RF wall loss is very small and much of the RF power fed to the cavity is consumed for the beam acceleration. On the other hand, an RF input coupler for the superconducting cavity has to be matched to the beam loading. Therefore, estimation of coupling coefficient or external quality factor (Qext) of the RF input coupler is important for the design of the couplers. In this work, Qext's were calculated by the electromagnetic analysis code (MAFIA) and were compared with those by the measurements. A β (ratio of the particle velocity to the light velocity) = 0.5 single-cell cavity with either axial coupler or side coupler was used in this work. In the experiments, a model cavity made by copper is applied. Both 2- and 3-dimensional calculations were performed in the axial coupler geometry and the results were compared. The agreements between calculated and measured values are good and this method for calculation of Qext is confirmed to be proper for the design of the RF input couplers. (author)

  15. Frequency control of RF booster cavity in TRIUMF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fong, K.; Laverty, M.

    1993-01-01

    A booster is used in the TRIUMF cyclotron to increase the energy gain per turn for beam orbits corresponding to energies greater than 370 MeV. It operates at 92.24 MHz, the 4 th harmonic of the cyclotron main rf, and at a nominal voltage of 150 kV. Excitation is provided by a 90 kW rf system that is phase locked to the main rf. When the main rf is interrupted due to sparking or other causes, a controller built into the low frequency source of the booster rf system disables the phase-locked loop, and reconfigures the source as a temperature stabilized oscillator operating at the last locked frequency. When the cyclotron rf is restored it usually will be at different frequency. The oscillator tunes automatically to this new frequency. The acquisition time is extended by the controller to match the response time of the mechanical tuner in the cavity

  16. Superconducting rf cavities for accelerator application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proch, D.

    1988-01-01

    The subject of this paper is a review of superconducting cavities for accelerator application (β = 1). The layout of a typical accelerating unit is described and important parameters are discussed. Recent cavity measurements and storage ring beam tests are reported and the present state of the art is summarized

  17. Preparation and handling of superconducting RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuya, Takaaki

    1990-01-01

    The present paper outlines the recent preparation methods for superconducting cavities used in various laboratories and universities, and reports the problems of the cavity fabrication at KEK as an example of mass production. Preparation and handling are first addressed, focusing on material, fabrication, surface treatment, rinsing, clean environment, and heat treatment. Cavity production at KEK is then described, centering on defects on the surface and clean environments. Field gradients of more than 20 MV/m have been obtained by 1.5-3 GHz single cavities, for multi-cell cavities Eacc of 10 MV/m are available at any frequency range. The successful construction of thirty-two cavities for TRISTAN at KEK is due to the careful checking of the surface and quality control of all processes against the surface defects and contaminations. Eacc of 5 MV/m has been achieved by 94 % of the TRISTAN cavities at the first cold test, but 6 % of them had to be reworked because of the surface defects. These defects could not be detected by an X-ray photograph or visual inspections during the fabrication processes. (N.K.)

  18. High power RF test of an 805 MHz RF cavity for a muon cooling channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Derun; Corlett, J.; MacGill, R.; Rimmer, R.; Wallig, J.; Zisman, M.; Moretti, A.; Qian, Z.; Wu, V.; Summers, D.; Norem, J.

    2002-01-01

    We present recent high power RF test results on an 805 MHz cavity for a muon cooling experiment at Lab G in Fermilab. In order to achieve high accelerating gradient for large transverse emittance muon beams, the cavity design has adopted a pillbox like shape with 16 cm diameter beam iris covered by thin Be windows, which are demountable to allow for RF tests of different windows. The cavity body is made from copper with stiff stainless steel rings brazed to the cavity body for window attachments. View ports and RF probes are available for visual inspections of the surface of windows and cavity and measurement of the field gradient. Maximum of three thermo-couples can be attached to the windows for monitoring the temperature gradient on the windows caused by RF heating. The cavity was measured to have Q 0 of about 15,000 with copper windows and coupling constant of 1.3 before final assembling. A 12 MW peak power klystron is available at Lab G in Fermilab for the high power test. The cavity and coupler designs were performed using the MAFIA code in the frequency and the time domain. Numerical simulation results and cold test measurements on the cavity and coupler will be presented for comparisons

  19. Fabrication process for the PEP II RF cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franks, R.M.; Rimmer, R.A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Schwarz, H. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    1997-06-05

    This paper presents the major steps used in the fabrication of the 26 RF Cavities required for the PEP-II B-factory. Several unique applications of conventional processes have been developed and successfully implemented: electron beam welding (EBW), with minimal porosity, of .75 inch (19 mm) copper cross-sections; extensive 5-axis milling of water channels; electroplating of .37 inch (10 mm) thick OFE copper; tuning of the cavity by profiling beam noses prior to final joining with the cavity body; and machining of the cavity interior, are described here.

  20. Higher order mode damping in Kaon factory RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enegren, T.; Poirier, R.; Griffin, J.; Walling, L.; Thiessen, H.A.; Smythe, W.R.

    1989-05-01

    Proposed designs for Kaon factory accelerators require that the rf cavities support beam currents on the order of several amperes. The beam current has Fourier components at all multiples of the rf frequency. Empty rf buckets produce additional components at all multiples of the revolution frequency. If a Fourier component of the beam coincides with the resonant frequency of a higher order mode of the cavity, which is inevitable if the cavity has a large frequency swing, significant excitation of this mode can occur. The induced voltage may then excite coupled bunch mode instabilities. Effective means are required to damp higher order modes without significantly affecting the fundamental mode. A mode damping scheme based on coupled transmission lines has been investigated and is report

  1. Cavity RF mode analysis using a boundary-integral method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jong, M.S. de; Adams, F.P.

    1993-01-01

    A 3-dimensional boundary-integral method has been developed for rf cavity mode analysis. A frequency-dependent, homogeneous linear matrix equation is generated from a variant of the magnetic field integral equation (MFIE) where the domain of integration is a closed surface specifying the rf envelope of the cavity. Frequencies at which the MFIE has non-zero solutions are mode frequencies of the cavity, and the solutions are the corresponding surface magnetic field distributions. The MFIE can then be used to calculate the electric and magnetic field at any other point inside the cavity. Forward iteration is used to find the largest complex eigenvalue of the matrix at a specific frequency. This eigenvalue is 1 when the frequency corresponds to a cavity rf resonance. The matrix equivalent of the MFIE is produced by approximating the cavity surface by a set of perfectly conducting surface elements, and assuming that the surface magnetic field has constant amplitude on each element. The method can handle cavities with complex symmetries, and be easily integrated with finite-element heat-transfer and stress analysis codes

  2. Mechanical Study of Superconducting Parallel-Bar Deflecting/Crabbing Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. Park, J.R. Delayen, S.U. De Silva

    2011-07-01

    The superconducting parallel-bar deflecting/crabbing cavities have improved properties compared to conventional cavity structures. It is currently being considered for number of applications. The mechanical design analysis is performed on two designs of the 499 MHz parallel-bar deflecting cavity for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade. The main purpose of the mechanical study is to examine the structural stability of the cavities under the operating conditions in the accelerators. The study results will suggest the need for additional structural strengthening. Also the study results will help to develop a concept of the tuning method. If the cavity is to be installed in the accelerator it should satisfy a certain design parameters due to the safety requirements (for example, pressure system requirements) which are much severe condition than the actual operating condition.

  3. Accelerating RF cavity of the Booster

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1981-01-01

    Each of the 4 PS Booster rings has a single accelerating cavity. It consists of 2 quarter-wave ferrite-loaded resonators. There are 2 figure-of-eight loops on the ferrite loads for tuning the frequency throughout the acceleration cycle, from 3 to 8 MHz (from 50 MeV at injection to the original Booster energy of 800 MeV, 2 GeV today). The cavities have a flat design, to fit the ring-to-ring distance of 36 cm. The tube for forced-air cooling is visible in the left front. See also 8301084.

  4. Accelerating RF cavity of the Booster

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1983-01-01

    Each of the 4 PS Booster rings has a single accelerating cavity.It consists of 2 quarter-wave ferrite-loaded resonators. 2 figure-of-eight loops tune the frequency throughout the accelerating cycle, from 3 to 8 MHz (from 50 MeV at injection to the original Booster energy of 800 MeV, 2 GeV today). The cavities have a flat design, to fit the ring-to-ring distance of 36 cm, and are forced-air cooled. The 2 round objects in the front-compartments are the final-stage power-tetrodes. See also 8111095.

  5. Tuning the rf cavity by using a detuning loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y.M.; Keane, J.; Batchelor, K.

    1985-09-01

    The tuning of the rf cavity with a coupling loop connected to a variable capacitor or an open or shorted coaxial line is described. Two kinds of equivalent circuits are described and some of the calculations of Δf and Q vs capacitance curves are given. At 52 MHz the maximum practical tuning range is about 100 KHz, if the parameters of tuning circuit are chosen properly so that the Q of the accelerating cavity does not decrease too much

  6. A New RF System for the CEBAF Normal Conducting Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Hovater, C; Hofler, A; Lahti, G; Musson, J; Plawski, T

    2004-01-01

    The CEBAF Accelerator at Jefferson Lab is a 6 GeV five pass electron accelerator consisting of two superconducting linacs joined by independent magnetic transport arcs. CEBAF also has numerous normal conducting cavities for beam conditioning in the injector and for RF extraction to the experimental halls. The RF systems that presently control these cavities are becoming expensive to maintain, therefore a replacement RF control system is now being developed. For the new RF system, cavity field control is maintained digitally using an FPGA which contains the feedback algorithm. The system incorporates digital down conversion, using quadrature under-sampling at an IF frequency of 70 MHz. The VXI bus-crate was chosen as the operating platform because of its excellent RFI/EMI properties and its compatibility with the EPICS control system. The normal conducting cavities operate at both the 1497 MHz accelerating frequency and the sub-harmonic frequency of 499 MHz. To accommodate this, the new design will use differe...

  7. R.F. cavity design for the NSLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batchelor, K.; Galayda, J.; Hawrylak, R.

    1981-01-01

    The r.f cavity design for the Booster, vuv ring and x-ray ring of the NSLS is described together with the mechanical design of tuners, coupling and monitoring loops and the temperature control systems. The results of higher order mode measurements as compared with Superfish calculations are also presented

  8. RF-cavity for the X-ray generator NESTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Androsov, V.P.; Gvozd, A.M.; Karnaukhov, I.M.; Telegin, Yu.N.; Chernov, K.N.; Ostreyko, G.N.; Sedlyarov, I.K.

    2007-01-01

    In the Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology 225 MeV electron storage ring NESTOR is under development. The paper describes the design and parameters of a 700 MHz cavity that has been fabricated at BINP for the NESTOR RF-system. Now the low-power and vacuum tests of the cavity are under way at BINP. We present here the results of 3D simulations of the cavity with ANSYS code. The problem of multibunch instabilities in NESTOR is also discussed

  9. First prototype Copper-Niobium RF Superconducting Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    This is the first RF superconducting cavity made of copper with a very thin layer of pure niobium deposited on the inner wall by sputtering. This new developpment lead to a considerable increase of performance and stability of superconducting cavities and to non-negligible economy. The work was carried out in the ISR workshop. This technique was adopted for the LEP II accelerating cavities. At the centre is Cristoforo Benvenuti, inventor of this important technology, with his assistants, Nadia Circelli and Max Hauer, carrying the sputtering electrode. See also 8209255, 8312339.

  10. Early prototype of a superconducting RF cavity for LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1979-01-01

    As early as 1979, before LEP became an approved project, studies were located in the ISR Division. Although Cu-cavities were foreseen, certainly for the 1st energy-stage, superconducting cavities were explored as a possible alternative for the 2nd energy-stage. This began with very basic studies of manufacture and properties of Nb-cavities. This one, held by Mr.Girel, was made from bulk Nb-sheet, 2.5 mm thick. It was dimensioned for tests at 500 MHz (LEP accelerating RF was 352.2 MHz). See also 8004204, 8007354, 8209255, 8210054, 8312339.

  11. HOM Coupler Optimisation for the Superconducting RF Cavities in ESS

    CERN Document Server

    Ainsworth, R; Calaga, R

    2012-01-01

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) will be the world’s most powerful next generation neutron source. It consists of a linear accelerator, target, and instruments for neutron experiments. The linac is designed to accelerate protons to a final energy of 2.5 GeV, with an average design beam power of 5 MW, for collision with a target used to produce a high neutron flux. A section of the linac will contain Superconducting RF (SCRF) cavities designed at 704 MHz. Beam induced HOMs in these cavities may drive the beam unstable and increase the cryogenic load, therefore HOM couplers are installed to provide sufficient damping. Previous studies have shown that these couplers are susceptible to multipacting, a resonant process which can absorb RF power and lead to heating effects. This paper will show how a coupler suffering from multipacting has been redesigned to limit this effect. Optimisation of the RF damping is also discussed.

  12. Effects of surface damage on rf cavity operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hassanein

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available We describe a model of damage in rf cavities and show how this damage can limit cavity operation. We first present a review of mechanisms that may or may not affect the ultimate fields that can be obtained in rf cavities, assuming that mechanical stress explains the triggers of rf breakdown events. We present a method of quantifying the surface damage caused by breakdown events in terms of the spectrum of field enhancement factors, β, for asperities on the surface. We then model an equilibrium that can develop between damage and conditioning effects, and show how this equilibrium can determine cavity performance and show experimental evidence for this mechanism. We define three functions that quantify damage, and explain how the parameters that determine performance can be factored out and measured. We then show how this model can quantitatively explain the dependence of cavity performance on material, frequency, pulse length, gas, power supply, and other factors. The examples given in this paper are derived from a variety of incomplete data sets, so we outline an experimental program that should improve these predictions, provide mechanisms for comparing data from different facilities, and fill in many gaps in the existing data.

  13. Early 500 MHz prototype LEP RF Cavity with superposed storage cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1981-01-01

    The principle of transferring the RF power back and forth between the accelerating cavity and a side-coupled storage cavity was demonstrated with this 500 MHz prototype. In LEP, the accelerating frequency was 352.2 MHz, and accelerating and storage cavities were consequently larger. See also 8002294, 8006061, 8407619X, and Annual Reports 1980, p.115; 1981, p.95; 1985, vol.I, p.13.

  14. High gain proportional rf control stability at TESLA cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmar Vogel

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Fast proportional rf control is used as the basis for rf field regulation in actual linear accelerator projects like the international linear collider (ILC and the European x-ray free electron laser (XFEL based on TESLA technology. Additional control loops improve the field regulation by treating repetitive effects and compensating the beam loading. Nevertheless, the ability for high gain operation of the fast loops is desirable for the strong suppression of nonpredictive and nonrepetitive disturbances. TESLA cavities host nine fundamental modes (FMs where only one is used for beam acceleration. The unwanted FMs have a significant influence on the proportional rf control loop stability at high gains. Within this paper, the stability of proportional rf control loops taking the FMs and digitalization effects into account will be discussed in detail together with measures enabling a significant increase of the gain values.

  15. Superconducting RF Cavities Past, Present and Future

    CERN Document Server

    Chiaveri, Enrico

    2003-01-01

    In the last two decades many laboratories around the world, notably Argonne (ANL), TJNAF (formerly CEBAF), CERN, DESY and KEK, decided to develop the technology of superconducting (SC) accelerating cavities. The aim was either to increase the accelerator energy or to save electrical consumption or both. This technology has been used extensively in the operating machines showing good performances and strong reliability. At present, the technology using bulk niobium (Nb) or Nb coated on copper (Cu) is mature enough to be applied for many different applications, such as synchrotron light sources and spallation neutron drivers. Results, R&D work and future projects will be presented with emphasis on application to linear accelerators.

  16. Status of superconducting RF cavity development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, K.W.

    1989-01-01

    For several reasons, a brief historical review seems appropriate at this time. The twenty-fifth anniversary of the first acceleration of beam with a superconducting cavity will occur shortly [1,2,3]. Also, the scope of accelerator applications of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) devices has, within the last few months, begun to increase rapidly [4] - to the point that it seems likely that early expectations for this technology will largely be fulfilled. Since the object is to accelerate beam, a simple one parameter measure of the technology is the total of how much beam has been accelerated. Figure 1 shows the total accumulated voltage in tests and/or operation of superconducting accelerating cavities with beam, up to the time indicated, as reported in the open literature [4-35]. This parameter has been divided into two terms: first, the subtotal for electron accelerating velocity-of-light structures, and second the subtotal for low-velocity, ion accelerating structures. To restate: each of these terms represents as a function of time an integrated, accumulative total voltage produced by SRF hardware and demonstrated with beam. 56 refs., 4 figs

  17. Multipactor in crossed rf fields on the cavity equator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valery Shemelin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Multipactor discharge in an accelerating superconducting elliptic cavity occurs usually near its equator. As simulations show, the dimensions of the trajectories of multipacting electrons are very small compared to the dimensions of a cavity. This feature gives a way for solving explicit equations of motion instead of cumbersome simulations. Electric and magnetic fields near the cavity equator are presented in a form of expansions up to the third power of coordinates. Comparisons with numerical calculations of fields made with the SLANS code for the TESLA cavity cells, as well as with the analytical solution for a spherical cavity, are done. These fields are used for solving the equations of motion of electrons in crossed rf fields near the equator. Based on the analysis of these equations, general features of multipacting in this area are obtained. Results are compared with simulations and experimental data. The experimental formulas for multipacting zones are explained and their dependence on the cavity geometries is shown. Because of small sizes of electron trajectories, the influence of the weld seams is taken into account. This suggests a possible explanation of multipacting in a cavity which was not found by simulations. The developed approach allows evaluation of multipacting in a cavity without its simulations but after an analysis of fields in the equatorial region. These fields can be computed by any code used for cavity calculation.

  18. Travelling Wave Structure of an SPS RF Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1974-01-01

    The RF cavities for acceleration of particles in the SPS have a travelling-wave structure. They operate at a fixed frequency of 200 MHz (h = 4620). With a quality factor of Q = 100, the bandwidth covers the small frequency swing for the acceleration of protons from as low as 10 GeV to the top energy of 450 GeV. Later on, for the acceleration of ions, with a larger frequency swing, turn-to-turn phase jumps did the trick. Two cavities, each consisting of 5 tank sections, were installed in long straight section 3. Each cavity is driven by a power amplifier of 750 kW CW (1 MW pulsed). Another 2 cavities were added later on. See also 7411033 and 7802190.

  19. RF Characterization of Niobium Films for Superconducting Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Aull† , S; Doebert, S; Junginger, T; Ehiasarian, AP; Knobloch, J; Terenziani, G

    2013-01-01

    The surface resistance RS of superconductors shows a complex dependence on the external parameters such as temperature, frequency or radio-frequency (RF) field. The Quadrupole Resonator modes of 400, 800 and 1200 MHz allow measurements at actual operating frequencies of superconducting cavities. Niobium films on copper substrates have several advantages over bulk niobium cavities. HIPIMS (High-power impulse magnetron sputtering) is a promising technique to increase the quality and therefore the performance of niobium films. This contribution will introduce CERNs recently developed HIPIMS coating apparatus. Moreover, first results of niobium coated copper samples will be presented, revealing the dominant loss mechanisms.

  20. Microscopic Investigation of Materials Limitations of Superconducting RF Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anlage, Steven [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2017-08-04

    Our overall goal is to contribute to the understanding of defects that limit the high accelerating gradient performance of Nb SRF cavities. Our approach is to develop a microscopic connection between materials defects and SRF performance. We developed a near-field microwave microscope to establish this connection. The microscope is based on magnetic hard drive write heads, which are designed to create very strong rf magnetic fields in very small volumes on a surface.

  1. Simulation of plasma loading of high-pressure RF cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Computational Science Initiative; Samulyak, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Computational Science Initiative; Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Applied Mathematics and Statistics; Yonehara, K. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Freemire, B. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States)

    2018-01-11

    Muon beam-induced plasma loading of radio-frequency (RF) cavities filled with high pressure hydrogen gas with 1% dry air dopant has been studied via numerical simulations. The electromagnetic code SPACE, that resolves relevant atomic physics processes, including ionization by the muon beam, electron attachment to dopant molecules, and electron-ion and ion-ion recombination, has been used. Simulations studies have also been performed in the range of parameters typical for practical muon cooling channels.

  2. Simulation of plasma loading of high-pressure RF cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, K.; Samulyak, R.; Yonehara, K.; Freemire, B.

    2018-01-01

    Muon beam-induced plasma loading of radio-frequency (RF) cavities filled with high pressure hydrogen gas with 1% dry air dopant has been studied via numerical simulations. The electromagnetic code SPACE, that resolves relevant atomic physics processes, including ionization by the muon beam, electron attachment to dopant molecules, and electron-ion and ion-ion recombination, has been used. Simulations studies have been performed in the range of parameters typical for practical muon cooling channels.

  3. RF field control for Kaon Factory booster cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craig, S.T.; de Jong, M.S.

    1992-08-01

    A conceptual design is developed for control of the Kaon Factory booster rf accelerating fields. This design addresses control of cavity: tuning, voltage amplitude, and voltage phase angle. Time-domain simulations were developed to evaluate the proposed controllers. These simulations indicate that adequate tuning performance can be obtained with the combination of adaptive feed forward and proportional feedback control. Voltage amplitude and voltage phase can be adequately controlled using non-adaptive feed forward and proportional feedback control. (Author) (figs., tabs.)

  4. On losses caused in RF cavities by longitudinal electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halbritter, J.

    1976-02-01

    Rf modes with large longitudinal electric fields (div E vector unequal to 0) at the cavity wall systematically show worse rf properties than modes with div E vector identical with 0; e.g. enlarged rf residual losses. While magnetic residual losses R sub(res) proportional f 2 are due to uncharged inhomogeneities in the oxide coating the metal, the electric residual losses R sub(orthogonal) occur via charged states in the oxide: the recharging of those states by tunnel exchange causes excitation across the energy gap of the superconductor yielding residual losses at high rf field strengths. The interaction of E sub(orthogonal) with the charges generate (longitudinal) phonons showing up as contribution to R sub(orthogonal). The resulting R sub(orthogonal) increases with E sub(orthogonal) and is nearly independent of frequency f, indicating the importance of R sub(orthogonal) for low frequency sc cavities, especially at high field strengths. In addition R sub(orthogonal) can account for the observed large residual losses of strip line modes in narrow junctions and joints between superconductors. (orig.) [de

  5. Transverse deflections in a cavity due to the short-range longitudinal wake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bane, K

    2003-01-01

    Consider an ultra-relativistic electron bunch passing through a (cylindrically symmetric) multi-cell linac cavity that is filled with fundamental mode rf. It is well known that this bunch--on entering the cavity--experiences a focusing kick, and--on exiting the cavity--a defocusing kick, even though the mode is cylindrically symmetric. The effects of these kicks in linacs tend to be significant only in low energy regions. Tracking computer programs such as MAD [1] and LIAR [2] include a simple model of these kicks, one based on calculations of W.H. Panofsky [3]. According to this model the effect is represented by two thin lenses positioned at the ends of the cavity, with the strength of the lenses dependent on the accelerating gradient in the cavity. However, a beam will itself excite wakefields that modify its energy gain in a cavity, a modification that depends also on longitudinal position within the bunch. The program LIAR extends Panofsky's rf kick model to include this modification to the effective gradient experienced by different parts of the beam. In this report we investigate how the wakefields affect the rf cavity kicks. In particular, we are interested in the case when the wakefields are a significant perturbation to the problem, such as when, for example, the beam traverses an empty cavity (one with no rf). In this report we have shown that one can calculate the transverse kicks when one knows the time-dependent variation of the longitudinal wake forces on axis. The variation in gradient due to wakefields, however, will in general differ from that due to normal rf acceleration. In particular, transients at the ends of structures, and--for constant gradient structures--an increase in gradient amplitude from beginning to end of the cavity, will mean that the model of focusing/defocusing edges, used for rf acceleration, will be inaccurate. Finally, we conclude that the method LIAR uses to treat the effect of rf focusing in the presence of wakefields on

  6. Deflection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hatami

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, deflection prediction of a cantilever beam subjected to static co-planar loading is investigated using the Differential Transformation Method (DTM and the Homotopy Perturbation Method (HPM. An axial compressive force, FA, and a transverse force, QA, are applied to the beam. It is considered that these forces are follower forces, i.e., they will rotate with the end section of the beam during the deformation, and they will remain tangential and perpendicular at all times, respectively. Comparison between DTM and HPM through numerical results demonstrates that DTM can be an exact and highly efficient procedure for solving these kind of problems. Also the influence of the effect of some parameters appeared in mathematical formulations such as area moment of inertia (I, Young’s modulus (E, transverse force (QA and compressive force (FA on slope variation are investigated in the present study. The results show that slope parameter as well as compressive force increases. By increasing the QA, slope parameter is increased significantly. By increasing the E, due to stiffness of the material, slope variation is decreased. It is evident that when the size of the beam section increases, the area moment of inertia (I will be increased and so the slope variation will be decreased.

  7. Localization of rf breakdowns in a standing wave cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faya Wang

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available At SLAC, a five-cell, normal-conducting, L-band (1.3 GHz, standing-wave (SW cavity was built as a prototype positron capture accelerator for the ILC. The structure met the ILC gradient goal but required extensive rf processing. When rf breakdowns occurred, a large variation was observed in the decay rate of the stored energy in the cavity after the input power was shut off. It appeared that the breakdowns were isolating sections of the cavity, and that the trapped energy in those sections was then partitioned among its natural modes, producing a distinct beating pattern during the decay. To explore this phenomenon further, an equivalent circuit model of cavity was created that reproduces well its normal operating characteristics. The model was then used to compute the spectra of trapped energy for different numbers of isolated cells. The resulting modal patterns agree well with those of the breakdown data, and thus such a comparison appears to provide a means of identifying the irises on which the breakdowns occurred.

  8. Physics design of APT linac with normal conducting rf cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nath, S.; Billen, J.H.; Stovall, J.E.; Takeda, Harunori; Young, L.M.

    1996-01-01

    The accelerator based production of tritium calls for a high-power, cw proton linac. Previous designs for such a linac use a radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ), followed by a drift-tube linac (DTL) to an intermediate energy and a coupled-cavity linc (CCL) to the final energy. The Los Alamos design uses a high-energy (6.7 MeV) RFQ followed by the newly developed coupled-cavity drift-tube linac (CCDTL) and a CCL. This design accommodates external electromagnetic quadrupole lenses which provide a strong uniform focusing lattice from the end of the RFQ to the end of the CCL. The cell lengths in linacs of traditional design are typically graded as a function of particle velocity. By making groups of cells symmetric in both the CCDTL and CCL, the cavity design as well as mechanical design and fabrication is simplified without compromising the performance. At higher energies, there are some advantages of using superconducting rf cavities. Currently, such schemes are under vigorous study. This paper describes the linac design based on normal conducting cavities and presents simulation results

  9. Experimental studies of light emission phenomena in superconducting RF cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony, P.L. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Delayen, J.R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport, News, VA 23606 (United States); Center for Accelerator Science, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA, 23529 (United States); Fryberger, D., E-mail: fryberger@slac.stanford.ed [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Goree, W.S. [2G Enterprises, Pacific Grove, CA 93950 (United States); Mammosser, J. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport, News, VA 23606 (United States); Szalata, Z.M.; Weisend, J.G. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2009-12-21

    Experimental studies of light emission phenomena in superconducting RF cavities, which we categorize under the general heading of cavity lights, are described. The cavity lights data, which were obtained using a small CCD video camera, were collected in a series of nine experimental runs ranging from approx1/2 to approx2 h in duration. The video data were recorded on a standard VHS tape. As the runs progressed, additional instrumentation was added. For the last three runs a LabVIEW-controlled data acquisition system was included. These runs furnish evidence for several, possibly related, light emission phenomena. The most intriguing of these is what appear to be small luminous objects <=1.5 mm in size, freely moving about in the vacuum space, generally without wall contact, as verified by reflections of the tracks in the cavity walls. In addition, on a number of occasions, these objects were observed to bounce off of the cavity walls. The wall-bounce aspect of most of these events was clearly confirmed by pre-bounce and post-bounce reflections concurrent with the tracks. In one of the later runs, a mode of behavior was observed that was qualitatively different from anything observed in the earlier runs. Perhaps the most perplexing aspect of this new mode was the observation of as many as seven luminous objects arrayed in what might be described as a macromolecular formation, coherently moving about in the interior of the cavity for extended periods of time, evidently without any wall contact. It is suggested that these mobile luminous objects are without explanation within the realm of established physics. Some remarks about more exotic theoretical possibilities are made, and future plans are discussed.

  10. Calculation of RF Properties of the Third Harmonic Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Rothemund, K; Van Rienen, U

    2004-01-01

    Recently a third harmonic structure has been proposed for the injector of the TTF-FEL to avoid nonlinear distortions in the longitudinal phase space. This structure, consists of four nine cell TESLA-like cavities. For the use of this structure in combination with the TTF-FEL it might be interesting to investigate higher order modes (HOM) in the structure and their effect on the beam dynamics. The complexity of the structure, four nine cell cavities assembled with four input couplers and eight HOM-couplers, results in an extremely high numerical effort for full 3D modelling. Therefor Coupled S-Parameter Calculation (CSC) [1] has been applied. This method is based on the scattering parameter description of the rf components found with field solving codes or analytically for components of special symmetry. This paper presents the results of the calculation of rf properties (e.g. scattering parameters, Q-values) of the complete four times nine cell structure equipped with all input- and HOM-couplers.

  11. FPC and Hi-Pass Filter HOM Coupler Design for the RF Dipole Crab Cavity for the LHC HiLumi Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Z; Delayen, Jean Roger; De Silva, S U; Park, HyeKyoung; Olave, R G

    2015-01-01

    A 400-MHz compact RF dipole (RFD) crab cavity design was jointly developed by Old Dominion University and SLAC under the support of US LARP program for the LHC HiLumi upgrade. The RFD cavity design is consisted of a rounded-square tank and two ridged deflecting poles, operating with a TE11-like dipole mode, which is the lowest mode of the cavity. A prototype RFD cavity is being manufactured and will be tested on the SPS beam line at CERN. The coaxial fundamental Power Coupler (FPC) of the prototype cavity was re-optimized to minimizing the power heating on the coupler internal antenna. A hi-pass filter HOM damping coupler was developed to achieve the required wakefield damping while maintaining a compact size to fit into the beam line space. In this paper, we will discuss the details of the RF optimization and tolerance analyses of the FPC and HOM couplers.

  12. Handbook for Gas Filled RF Cavity Aficionados'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tollestrup, A.V.; Chung, Moses; Yonehara, Katsuya; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    The use of hydrogen gas filled RF cavities in muon cooling channels has been proposed by Rolland Johnson. Impressive results have been obtained toward attaining high voltage gradients and rapid training in preliminary tests done at the FNAL MTA facility. However, so far it has not been possible to test them under conditions where they were subject to the transversal of a high intensity particle beam. This note is an attempt to bring together a description of some of the pertinent physical processes that take place in the dilute plasma that is generated in the hydrogen gas by the beam. Two effects dominate. The first is that the free electrons generated can load down the cavity and transfer its energy to heating the gas. The second is a question of what happens to the plasma in the longer term. There is an enormous literature on the subject of the subject of dilute hydrogen plasmas and we can tap into this information in order to understand and predict the behavior of the cavity.

  13. Niobium superconducting rf cavity fabrication by electrohydraulic forming

    CERN Document Server

    Cantergiani, E.; Léaux, F.; Perez Fontenla, A.T.; Prunet, S.; Dufay-Chanat, L.; Koettig, T.; Bertinelli, F.; Capatina, O.; Favre, G.; Gerigk, F.; Jeanson, A. C.; Fuzeau, J.; Avrillaud, G.; Alleman, D.; Bonafe, J.; Marty, P.

    2016-01-01

    Superconducting rf (SRF) cavities are traditionally fabricated from superconducting material sheets or made of copper coated with superconducting material, followed by trim machining and electron-beam welding. An alternative technique to traditional shaping methods, such as deep-drawing and spinning, is electrohydraulicforming (EHF). InEHF, half-cells areobtainedthrough ultrahigh-speed deformation ofblank sheets, using shockwaves induced in water by a pulsed electrical discharge. With respect to traditional methods, such a highly dynamic process can yield interesting results in terms of effectiveness, repeatability, final shape precision, higher formability, and reduced springback. In this paper, the first results of EHFon high purity niobium are presented and discussed. The simulations performed in order to master the multiphysics phenomena of EHF and to adjust its process parameters are presented. The microstructures of niobium half- cells produced by EHFand by spinning have been compared in terms of damage...

  14. Collective Effects in the TLS Storage Ring after the Installation of Superconducting RF Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Chou, Ping J; Hsu, Kuo-Tung; Kuo, Chin-Cheng; Wang, Chaoen; Wang, Min-Huey

    2005-01-01

    A superconducting rf cavity designed by Cornell University was installed in the storage ring at Taiwan Light Source in December of 2004. The purpose of rf system upgrade is to achieve a stored beam current of 400 mA without collective instabilities caused by high-order-modes of rf cavities. Beam measurements related to collective effects are performed. Results are compared with those measured prior to the rf system upgrade. Theoretical studies on collective effects after the rf upgrade are also presented.

  15. Design of RF power coupler for superconducting cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutsaev, S. V.; Kelly, M. P.; Ostroumov, P. N.

    2012-11-01

    A new power coupler has been designed and is being prototyped by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for use with any of the ANL proposed superconducting (SC) half- or quarter-wave cavities for SARAF [1] and Project-X [2]. The 50 Ohm coaxial capacitive coupler is required to operate in the CW regime with up to 15 kW of forward power and under any condition for the reflected power. A key feature is a moveable copper plated stainless steel bellows which will permit up to 3 cm of axial stroke and adjustment of the external quality factor by roughly one order of magnitude in the range of 105 to 106. The mechanical and vacuum design includes two ceramic windows, one operating at room temperature and another at 70 Kelvin. The two window design allows the portion of the coupler assembled onto the SC cavity in the clean room to be compact and readily cleanable. Other design features include thermal intercepts to provide a large margin for RF heating and a mechanical guide assembly to operate cold and under vacuum with high reliability.

  16. State of the art couplers for superconducting RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isidoro E. Campisi

    2002-01-01

    Fundamental power couplers for RF particle accelerators are the most important components that interface with the accelerating structures. In the case of superconducting cavities, the main function of providing the appropriate amount of power to the cavity's fields and to the beams is dwarfed by the requirements that the couplers must meet in order to harmoniously blend into the vacuum, cryogenic, and electromagnetic environment. Recently, a lot of progress has been made in the areas critical to the successful design, construction, and operation of fundamental power couplers. Simulations are now routinely performed that allow the prediction of electromagnetic, multipacting, thermal, and mechanical properties of couplers. From these studies, better designs have been conceived which can minimize potential problems ahead of construction. Judicious use of materials and the implementation of clean practices and of careful conditioning have gradually increased the power levels at which couplers can safely operate. Machine operation at hundreds of kilowatts has been achieved in CW at KEK and Cornell, and in a pulsed mode at the TESLA Test Facility (TTF). Test stand operations in CW at the megawatt level (Accelerator for the Production of Tritium) and in pulse mode at a peak power of 2 MW (Spallation Neutron Source, TTF version II) have been achieved. The recent progress indicates that the understanding of the behavior of fundamental power couplers is rapidly increasing and that optimal designs are being developed which will allow in the future to attain routinely megawatt power levels necessary for high beam power machines under construction and under study

  17. Characteristics and fabrication of a 499 MHz superconducting deflecting cavity for the Jefferson Lab 12 geV Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 499 MHz parallel bar superconducting deflecting cavity has been designed and optimized for a possible implementation at the Jefferson Lab. Previously the mechanical analysis, mainly stress, was performed. Since then pressure sensitivity was studied further and the cavity parts were fabricated. The prototype cavity is not completed due to the renovation at Jefferson Lab which resulted in the temporary shutdown of the electron beam welding facility. This paper will present the analysis results and facts encountered during fabrication. The unique geometry of the cavity and its required mechanical strength present interesting manufacturing challenges.

  18. RF multipole implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Latina, A

    2012-01-01

    The electromagnetic radio-frequency (RF) field of accelerating structures and crab-cavities can exhibit transverse field components due to asymmetries in the azimuthal direction of the element geometry. Tracking simulations must be performed to evaluate the impact of such transverse RF deflections on the beam dynamics. In an ultra-relativistic regime where the Panofsky-Wenzel theorem is applicable, these RF deflections can be modeled via a multipolar expansion of the generating RF field similarly to what is done with static magnetic elements. The element implementing such RF multipolar fields has been called RF multipole. In this note we present an analytical formulation of a thin RF multipole Hamiltonian, and we explicitly calculate the RF kick and the elements of its first- and second- order transfer matrices. Also, we present the implementation of the corresponding code in MAD-X, plus some tests of tracking, simplecticity, consistency, and reflected maps that we successfully applied to verify the correctne...

  19. Niobium superconducting rf cavity fabrication by electrohydraulic forming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Cantergiani

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Superconducting rf (SRF cavities are traditionally fabricated from superconducting material sheets or made of copper coated with superconducting material, followed by trim machining and electron-beam welding. An alternative technique to traditional shaping methods, such as deep-drawing and spinning, is electrohydraulic forming (EHF. In EHF, half-cells are obtained through ultrahigh-speed deformation of blank sheets, using shockwaves induced in water by a pulsed electrical discharge. With respect to traditional methods, such a highly dynamic process can yield interesting results in terms of effectiveness, repeatability, final shape precision, higher formability, and reduced springback. In this paper, the first results of EHF on high purity niobium are presented and discussed. The simulations performed in order to master the multiphysics phenomena of EHF and to adjust its process parameters are presented. The microstructures of niobium half-cells produced by EHF and by spinning have been compared in terms of damage created in the material during the forming operation. The damage was assessed through hardness measurements, residual resistivity ratio (RRR measurements, and electron backscattered diffraction analyses. It was found that EHF does not worsen the damage of the material during forming and instead, some areas of the half-cell have shown lower damage compared to spinning. Moreover, EHF is particularly advantageous to reduce the forming time, preserve roughness, and to meet the final required shape accuracy.

  20. Niobium superconducting rf cavity fabrication by electrohydraulic forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantergiani, E.; Atieh, S.; Léaux, F.; Perez Fontenla, A. T.; Prunet, S.; Dufay-Chanat, L.; Koettig, T.; Bertinelli, F.; Capatina, O.; Favre, G.; Gerigk, F.; Jeanson, A. C.; Fuzeau, J.; Avrillaud, G.; Alleman, D.; Bonafe, J.; Marty, P.

    2016-11-01

    Superconducting rf (SRF) cavities are traditionally fabricated from superconducting material sheets or made of copper coated with superconducting material, followed by trim machining and electron-beam welding. An alternative technique to traditional shaping methods, such as deep-drawing and spinning, is electrohydraulic forming (EHF). In EHF, half-cells are obtained through ultrahigh-speed deformation of blank sheets, using shockwaves induced in water by a pulsed electrical discharge. With respect to traditional methods, such a highly dynamic process can yield interesting results in terms of effectiveness, repeatability, final shape precision, higher formability, and reduced springback. In this paper, the first results of EHF on high purity niobium are presented and discussed. The simulations performed in order to master the multiphysics phenomena of EHF and to adjust its process parameters are presented. The microstructures of niobium half-cells produced by EHF and by spinning have been compared in terms of damage created in the material during the forming operation. The damage was assessed through hardness measurements, residual resistivity ratio (RRR) measurements, and electron backscattered diffraction analyses. It was found that EHF does not worsen the damage of the material during forming and instead, some areas of the half-cell have shown lower damage compared to spinning. Moreover, EHF is particularly advantageous to reduce the forming time, preserve roughness, and to meet the final required shape accuracy.

  1. Technical training: RF superconductivity and accelerator cavity applications

    CERN Document Server

    Technical Training

    2016-01-01

    We are happy to announce a new training course organised by the TE-VSC group in the field of the physics and applications of superconductors. The course provides an overview and update of the theory of radiofrequency and superconductors:   RF Superconductivity and Accelerator Cavity Applications https://cern.ch/course/?164VAC19 One timetable only:  Tuesday, 8 March 2016: from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday, 9 March 2016: from 9.30 a.m to 11.30 a.m. Thursday, 10 March 2016: from 9.30 a.m to 11.30 a.m. Monday, 14 March 2016: from 9.30 a.m to 11.30 a.m. Tuesday, 15 March 2016: from 9.30 a.m to 11.30 a.m. Wednesday, 16 March 2016: from 9.30 a.m to 11.30 a.m. Thursday, 17 March 2016: from 9.30 a.m to 11.30 a.m. Target audience: Experts in radiofrequency or solid state physics (PhD level). Pre-requisites: Basic knowledge of quantum physics and superc...

  2. Microphonics detuning compensation in 3.9 GHZ superconducting RF cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruben Carcagno et al.

    2003-10-20

    Mechanical vibrations can detune superconducting radio frequency (SCRF) cavities unless a tuning mechanism counteracting the vibrations is present. Due to their narrow operating bandwidth and demanding mechanical structure, the 13-cell 3.9GHz SCRF cavities for the Charged Kaons at Main Injector (CKM) experiment at Fermilab are especially susceptible to this microphonic phenomena. We present early results correlating RF frequency detuning with cavity vibration measurements for CKM cavities; initial detuning compensation results with piezoelectric actuators are also presented.

  3. Cryogenic rf test of the first SRF cavity etched in an rf Ar/Cl2 plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, J.; Palczewski, A.; Popović, S.; Valente-Feliciano, A.-M.; Im, Do; Phillips, H. L.; Vušković, L.

    2017-12-01

    An apparatus and a method for etching of the inner surfaces of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) accelerator cavities are described. The apparatus is based on the reactive ion etching performed in an Ar/Cl2 cylindrical capacitive discharge with reversed asymmetry. To test the effect of the plasma etching on the cavity rf performance, a 1497 MHz single cell SRF cavity was used. The single cell cavity was mechanically polished and buffer chemically etched and then rf tested at cryogenic temperatures to provide a baseline characterization. The cavity's inner wall was then exposed to the capacitive discharge in a mixture of Argon and Chlorine. The inner wall acted as the grounded electrode, while kept at elevated temperature. The processing was accomplished by axially moving the dc-biased, corrugated inner electrode and the gas flow inlet in a step-wise manner to establish a sequence of longitudinally segmented discharges. The cavity was then tested in a standard vertical test stand at cryogenic temperatures. The rf tests and surface condition results, including the electron field emission elimination, are presented.

  4. Study of Electron Swarm in High Pressure Hydrogen Gas Filled RF Cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonehara, K.; Chung, M.; Jansson, A.; Moretti, A.; Popovic, M.; Tollestrup, A.; Alsharo'a, M.; Johnson, R.P.; Notani, M.; Oka, T.; Wang, H.

    2010-01-01

    A high pressure hydrogen gas filled RF cavity has been proposed for use in the muon collection system for a muon collider. It allows for high electric field gradients in RF cavities located in strong magnetic fields, a condition frequently encountered in a muon cooling channel. In addition, an intense muon beam will generate an electron swarm via the ionization process in the cavity. A large amount of RF power will be consumed into the swarm. We show the results from our studies of the HV RF breakdown in a cavity without a beam and present some results on the resulting electron swarm dynamics. This is preliminary to actual beam tests which will take place late in 2010.

  5. Auto-tuning systems for J-PARC LINAC RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Z.; Kobayashi, T.; Fukui, Y.; Futatsukawa, K.; Michizono, S.; Yamaguchi, S.; Anami, S.; Suzuki, H.; Sato, F.; Shinozaki, S.; Chishiro, E.

    2014-01-01

    The 400-MeV proton linear accelerator (LINAC) at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) consists of 324-MHz low-β and 972-MHz high-β accelerator sections. From October 2006 to May 2013, only the 324-MHz low-β accelerator section was in operation. From the summer of 2013 the J-PARC LINAC was upgraded by installing the 972-MHz high-β accelerator section, and the proton beam was successfully accelerated to 400 MeV in January 2014. Auto-tuning systems for the J-PARC LINAC RF cavities have been successfully developed. A first generation design, an auto-tuning system using a mechanical tuner controller, was developed and operated for the first 3 years. Then the second-generation auto-tuning system was developed using a new approach to the RF cavity warm-up process, and this was applied to the accelerator operation for the subsequent 4 years. During the RF cavity warm-up process in this system, the mechanical tuner is constantly fixed and the input RF frequency is automatically tuned to the cavity resonance frequency using the FPGA (Field-Programmable Gate Array) of the digital feedback RF control system. After the input power level reaches the required value, input RF frequency tuning is stopped and it is switched to the operation frequency. Then, the mechanical tuner control begins operation. This second-generation auto-tuning system was extremely effective for the 324-MHz cavity operation. However, if we apply this approach to the 972-MHz RF cavities, an interlock due to the RF cavity reflection amplitude occasionally occurs at the end of the warm-up process. In order to solve this problem a third generation novel auto-tuning system was successfully developed in December 2013 and applied to the operation of the J-PARC LINAC, including the 972-MHz ACS RF cavities. During the warm-up process both the mechanical tuner controller and the input RF frequency tuning are in operation, and good matching between the input RF frequency and the RF cavity is

  6. Beam Test of a Dielectric Loaded High Pressure RF Cavity for Use in Muon Cooling Channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freemire, Ben [IIT, Chicago; Bowring, Daniel [Fermilab; Kochemirovskiy, Alexey [Chicago U.; Moretti, Alfred [Fermilab; Peterson, David [Fermilab; Tollestrup, Alvin [Fermilab; Torun, Yagmur [IIT, Chicago; Yonehara, Katsuya [Fermilab

    2016-06-01

    Bright muon sources require six dimensional cooling to achieve acceptable luminosities. Ionization cooling is the only known method able to do so within the muon lifetime. One proposed cooling channel, the Helical Cooling Channel, utilizes gas filled radio frequency cavities to both mitigate RF breakdown in the presence of strong, external magnetic fields, and provide the cooling medium. Engineering constraints on the diameter of the magnets within which these cavities operate dictate the radius of the cavities be decreased at their nominal operating frequency. To accomplish this, one may load the cavities with a larger dielectric material. A 99.5% alumina ring was inserted in a high pressure RF test cell and subjected to an intense proton beam at the MuCool Test Area at Fermilab. The results of the performance of this dielectric loaded high pressure RF cavity will be presented.

  7. Superconducting Multi-Cell Deflecting Cavity for Short-Pulse X-Ray Generation at the Advanced Photon Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.J. Waldschmidt, L.H. Morrison, R. Nassiri, R.A. Rimmer, K. Tian, H. Wang

    2009-05-01

    A superconducting multi-cell cavity for the production of short x-ray pulses at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) has been explored as an alternative to a single-cell cavity design in order to improve the packing factor and potentially reduce the number of high-power RF systems and low-level RF controls required. The cavity will operate at 2815 MHz in the APS storage ring and will require heavy damping of parasitic modes to maintain stable beam operation. Novel on-cell dampers, attached directly to the cavity body, have been utilized by taking advantage of the magnetic field null on the equatorial plane in order to enhance damping. Design issues and simulation results will be discussed.

  8. Design of rf-cavities in the funnel of accelerators for transmutation technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krawczyk, F.L.; Bultman, N.K.; Chan, K.D.C.; Martineau, R.L.; Nath, S.; Young, L.M.

    1994-01-01

    Funnels are a key component of accelerator structures proposed for transmutation technologies. In addition to conventional accelerator elements, specialized rf-cavities are needed for these structures. Simulations were done to obtain their electromagnetic field distribution and to minimize the rf-induced heat loads. Using these results a structural and thermal analysis of these cavities was performed to insure their reliability at high average power and to determine their cooling requirements. For one cavity the thermal expansion data in return was used to estimate the thermal detuning

  9. Buffer Chemical Polishing and RF Testing of the 56 MHz SRF Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrill,A.

    2009-01-01

    The 56 MHz cavity presents a unique challenge in preparing it for RF testing prior to construction of the cryomodule. This challenge arises due to the physical dimensions and subsequent weight of the cavity, and is further complicated by the coaxial geometry, and the need to properly chemically etch and high pressure rinse the entire inner surface prior to RF testing. To the best of my knowledge, this is the largest all niobium SRF cavity to be chemically etched and subsequently tested in a vertical dewar at 4K, and these processes will be the topic of this technical note.

  10. Research and development of an ultra clean surface for RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miwa, Hajime; Ikeda, Tokumi; Suzuki, Takafusa; Kurosawa, Kiyosi; Kako, Eiji; Noguchi, Shuichi; Saito, Kenji; Kneisel, P.

    1993-01-01

    Suppression of field emission is essentially important in order to attain higher accelerating gradients. Therefore, elimination of residual dust particles on the inner surface of RF cavities is necessary. Surface of a niobium cavity was simulated in silicon wafers, and analysis of dust particles was performed by a particle counter used for semiconductor industries. Experimental results in various surface treatments and applications to niobium cavities are described in this paper. (author)

  11. Design of inductively detuned RF extraction cavities for the Relativistic Klystron Two Beam Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henestroza, E.; Yu, S.S.; Li, H.

    1995-04-01

    An inductively detuned traveling wave cavity for the Relativistic Klystron Two Beam Accelerator expected to extract high RF power at 11. 424 GHz for the 1 TeV Center of Mass Next Linear Collider has been designed. Longitudinal beam dynamics studies led to the following requirements on cavity design: (a) Extraction of 360 MW of RF power with RF component of the current being 1.15 kAmps at 11.424 GHz, (b) Inductively detuned traveling wave cavity with wave phase velocity equal to 4/3 the speed of light, (c) Output cavity with appropriate Q ext and eigenfrequency for proper matching. Furthermore, transverse beam dynamics require low shunt impedances to avoid the beam break-up instability. We describe the design effort to meet these criteria based on frequency-domain and time-domain computations using 2D- and 3D- electromagnetic codes

  12. Metallurgical analysis and RF losses in superconducting niobium thin film cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Bloess, D; Mahner, E; Nakai, H; Weingarten, Wolfgang; Bosland, P; Mayer, J; Van Loyen, L

    1996-01-01

    Copper cavities with a thin niobium film as used in the large electron positron collider LEP would be also attractive for future linear colliders, provided the decrease of the Q-value with the accelerating gradient can be reduced. We aim at extracting the important parameters that govern this decrease. The dependence on the RF frequency is studied by exciting 500 MHz and 1500 MHz cavities in different modes. In addition we combined RF measurements for two 1500 MHz cavities of different RF performance with microscopic tests (AFM, TEM) on samples cut out of the same cavities. Their micro-structural characterisation in plan-view allows to extract the grain size and the defect densities.

  13. Elliptical superconducting RF cavities for FRIB energy upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Contreras, C.; Plastun, A. S.; Rathke, J.; Schultheiss, T.; Taylor, A.; Wei, J.; Xu, M.; Xu, T.; Zhao, Q.; Gonin, I. V.; Khabiboulline, T.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Yakovlev, V. P.

    2018-04-01

    The multi-physics design of a five cell, βG = 0 . 61, 644 MHz superconducting elliptical cavity being developed for an energy upgrade in the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) is presented. The FRIB energy upgrade from 200 MeV/u to 400 MeV/u for heaviest uranium ions will increase the intensities of rare isotope beams by nearly an order of magnitude. After studying three different frequencies, 1288 MHz, 805 MHz, and 644 MHz, the 644 MHz cavity was shown to provide the highest energy gain per cavity for both uranium and protons. The FRIB upgrade will include 11 cryomodules containing 5 cavities each and installed in 80-meter available space in the tunnel. The cavity development included extensive multi-physics optimization, mechanical and engineering analysis. The development of a niobium cavity is complete and two cavities are being fabricated in industry. The detailed design of the cavity sub-systems such as fundamental power coupler and dynamic tuner are currently being pursued. In the overall design of the cavity and its sub-systems we extensively applied experience gained during the development of 650 MHz low-beta cavities at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) for the Proton Improvement Plan (PIP) II.

  14. RF cavity R and D at LBNL for the NLC Damping Rings, FY2000/2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimmer, R.A.; Atkinson, D.; Corlett, J.N.; Koehler, G.; Li, D.; Hartman, N.; Rasson, J.; Saleh, T.; Weidenbach, W.

    2001-01-01

    This report contains a summary of the R and D activities at LBNL on RF cavities for the NLC damping rings during fiscal years 2000/2001. This work is a continuation of the NLC RF system R and D of the previous year [1]. These activities include the further optimization and fine tuning of the RF cavity design for both efficiency and damping of higher-order modes (HOMs). The cavity wall surface heating and stresses were reduced at the same time as the HOM damping was improved over previous designs. Final frequency tuning was performed using the high frequency electromagnetic analysis capability in ANSYS. The mechanical design and fabrication methods have been developed with the goals of lower stresses, fewer parts and simpler assembly compared to previous designs. This should result in substantial cost savings. The cavity ancillary components including the RF window, coupling box, HOM loads, and tuners have been studied in more detail. Other cavity options are discussed which might be desirable to either further lower the HOM impedance or increase the stored energy for reduced transient response. Superconducting designs and the use of external ''energy storage'' cavities are discussed. A section is included in which the calculation method is summarized and its accuracy assessed by comparisons with the laboratory measurements of the PEP-II cavity, including errors, and with the beam-sampled spectrum

  15. High-Gradient Breakdown in Normal-Conducting RF Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Wuensch, Walter

    2002-01-01

    Over the last few years it has become apparent that RF breakdown and the damage that it can cause are critical issues for normal-conducting high-energy linear colliders. Substantial efforts to address RF breakdown issues have been launched within the linear-collider community. The ideas about the physics of breakdown, experimental results, methods to increase achievable gradients and methods to avoid damage that have emerged from the studies are reviewed.

  16. Researches on bake effect on RF superconducting cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Jiankui; Zhao Kui; Zhu Feng

    2005-01-01

    The Q-slope at high gradient affects the performance of superconducting cavity greatly. Recent researches show that low temperature (100-150) degree C heat treatment (bake) has positive effects on the performance of superconducting cavities. A lot of cavity tests are analyzed based on bake treatment. The average gradient E acc,max and E acc at Q=1 x 10 10 are increased by more than 3.5 MV/m. Q at E acc,max is increased and the Q-slope is improved. Analysis on bake temperature shows that higher bake temperature leads to higher Q value. Comparison of BCP and EP cavities shows that at least 60-80 μm EP is needed for BCP surface. More than 10-15 μm removal of the surface by BCP will degrade the performance of an EP cavity. Oxygen diffusion model is used to illustrate bake effect. (authors)

  17. Vacuum RF Breakdown of Accelerating Cavities in Multi-Tesla Magnetic Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowring, Daniel [Fermilab; Freemire, Ben [IIT, Chicago; Kochemirovskiy, Alexey [Chicago U.; Lane, Peter [IIT, Chicago; Moretti, Alfred [Fermilab; Palmer, Mark [Fermilab; Peterson, David [Fermilab; Tollestrup, Alvin [Fermilab; Torun, Yagmur [IIT, Chicago; Yonehara, Katsuya [Fermilab

    2016-06-01

    Ionization cooling of intense muon beams requires the operation of high-gradient, normal-conducting RF structures within multi-Tesla magnetic fields. The application of strong magnetic fields has been shown to lead to an increase in vacuum RF breakdown. This phenomenon imposes operational (i.e. gradient) limitations on cavities in ionization cooling channels, and has a bearing on the design and operation of other RF structures as well, such as photocathodes and klystrons. We present recent results from Fermilab's MuCool Test Area (MTA), in which 201 and 805 MHz cavities were operated at high power both with and without the presence of multi-Tesla magnetic fields. We present an analysis of damage due to breakdown in these cavities, as well as measurements related to dark current and their relation to a conceptual model describing breakdown phenomena.

  18. 3 GHz Barrel Open Cavity (BOC) RF pulse compressor for CTF3

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Peter

    2004-01-01

    A prototype 3 GHz RF pulse compressor, based on a single 'Barrel shaped Open Cavity' (BOC), was designed, manufactured and successfully high power tested into a RF load. It is now planned to install five such devices in the CTF3 drive beam linac currently being built at CERN. A specific feature of the BOC is the so-called "whispering gallery" mode which has a high internal Q-factor. Contrary to other cavity-based pulse compressors, such as SLED or LIPS, with this mode one can operate in a resonant rotating wave regime. Consequently, when used as an RF pulse compressor a single BOC is sufficient, whereas the LIPS and SLED schemes require two cavities and a 3-dB hybrid. A short description of the BOC and the results of high power operation specific to the CTF3 drive beam linac are presented.

  19. A Four-Cell Periodically HOM-Damped RF Cavity for High Current Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, G; Wang, H

    2004-01-01

    A periodically Higher Order Mode (HOM) damped RF cavity is a weakly coupled multi-cell RF cavity with HOM couplers periodically mounted between the cells. It was studied as an alternative RF structure between the single cell cavity and superstructure cavity in high beam current application requiring strong damping of the HOMs. The acceleration mode in this design is the lowest frequency mode (Zero Mode) in the pass band, in contrast to the traditional “π” acceleration mode. The acceleration mode of a four-cell Zero Mode cavity has been studied along with the monopole and dipole HOMs. Some HOMs have been modeled in HFSS with waveguide HOM couplers, which were subsequently verified by MAFIA time domain analysis. To understand the tuning challenge for the weakly coupled cavity, ANSYS and SUPERFISH codes were used to simulate the cavity frequency sensitivity and field flatness change within proper tuning range, which will influence the design of the tuner structure. This paper presen...

  20. rf breakdown with external magnetic fields in 201 and 805 MHz cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. B. Palmer

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Neutrino factory and muon collider cooling lattices require both high gradient rf cavities and strong focusing solenoids. Experiments have shown that there may be serious problems operating rf in the required magnetic fields. Experimental observations using vacuum rf cavities in magnetic fields are discussed, current published models of breakdown with and without magnetic fields are briefly summarized, and some of their predictions compared with observations. A new theory of magnetic field dependent breakdown is presented. It is proposed that electrons emitted by field emission on asperities on one side of a cavity are focused by the magnetic field to the other side where they induce mechanical fatigue leading to cavity surface damage in small spots. Metal is then electrostatically drawn from the molten spots, becomes vaporized and ionized by field emission from the remaining damage, and causes breakdown. The theory is fitted to existing 805 MHz data and predictions are made for performance at 201 MHz. The model predicts breakdown gradients significantly below those specified for either the International Scoping Study neutrino factory or a muon collider. Possible solutions to these problems are discussed, including designs for magnetically insulated rf in which the cavity walls are designed to be parallel to chosen magnetic field contour lines and consequently damage from field emission is expected to be suppressed. An experimental program that could study these problems and their possible solution is outlined. We also mention the use of high pressure gas as an alternative possible solution.

  1. Frequency-feedback tuning for single-cell cavity under rf heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepp, J.D.; Bridges, J.F.

    1993-01-01

    A tuning system is described that is being used to match the source frequency of a high-power klystron on the resonant frequency of the prototype single-cell cavity for the 7-GeV Advance Photon Source (APS) storage ring. Typically a water-cooled piston tuner is required to adjust the reactive component of the cavity's impedance to minimize reflected power back to the RF drive source. As the cavity watts expand due to RF heating, the resonant frequency decreases. Adjusting the source frequency to follow the cavity resonant frequency is a convenient method used to condition the cavity (for vacuum) at high power levels, in this case, 1 MV gap voltage at 100 kW power level. The tuning system consists of two coupling ports, a phase detector, a digitizing I/O system, and a DC coupled FM-modulated RF source. Proportional Integral Derivative (PID) loop parameters for the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) software are calculated, and data is presented showing the damped response to peturbations on the loop. The timing system presented here does not need water-cooling, has no moving parts to wear out, and has an inherently faster response time. Its one limitation is the digitizing sampling rate. The only limitation in tuning range is the bandwidth of the RF source

  2. Beam Profile Measurement in MTA Beam Line for High Pressure RF Cavity Beam Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jana, M.R.; Bross, A.; Chung, M.; Greer, S.; Johnstone, C.; Kobilarcik, T.; Koizumi, G.; Leonova, M.; Moretti, A.; Popovic, M.; Schwartz, T.

    2012-01-01

    Recent High Pressure RF (HPRF) cavity experiment at MuCool Test Area (MTA) has used 400 MeV Linac proton beam to study the beam loading effect. When the energetic proton beam passes through the cavity, it ionizes the inside gas and produces the electrons. These electrons consume RF power inside the cavity. Number of electrons produced per cm inside the cavity (at 950 psi Hydrogen gas) per incident proton is ∼ 1200. The measurement of beam position and profile are necessary. MTA is flammable gas (Hydrogen) hazard zone so we have developed a passive beam diagnostic instrument using Chromox-6 scintillation screen and CCD camera. This paper presents quantitative information about beam position and beam profile. Neutral density filter was used to avoid saturation of CCD camera. Image data is filtered and fitted with Gaussian function to compute the beam size. The beam profile obtained from scintillation screen shall be compared with multi-wire beam profile.

  3. A Two-Frequency RF Cavity for the PSI Low Emittance Gun

    CERN Document Server

    Raguin, J Y; Li, K S B; Pedrozzi, M

    2005-01-01

    In the Low Emittance Gun (LEG) under development at PSI an extremely bright electron beam is produced from a field emission array and then rapidly accelerated in a diode configuration up to 1 MeV with gradients of the order of 250 to 500 MV/m. The electronic emission from such a cold cathode allows normalized intrinsic emittance below 0.1 mm.mrad well suited for X-ray FELs or linear collider applications. The diode is followed by an L-band RF-gun like cavity to further accelerate the beam. A third harmonic field is superposed to the fundamental [1] 1.5 GHz pi-mode field to minimize the RF emittance. We report here on the design of such a two-frequency RF cavity with some details on the RF coupling and possible tuning mechanisms. Beam dynamics studies, performed with PARMELA and the fully self-consistent code MAFIA, are presented and compared with the results obtained for an RF cavity excited with the fundamental frequency only.

  4. Multiplacting analysis on 650 MHz, BETA 0.61 superconducting RF LINAC cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seth, Sudeshna; Som, Sumit; Mandal, Aditya; Ghosh, Surajit; Saha, S.

    2013-01-01

    Design, analysis and development of high-β multi-cell elliptical shape Superconducting RF linac cavity has been taken up by VECC, Kolkata as a part of IIFC collaboration. The project aims to provide the-art technology achieving very high electric field gradient in superconducting linac cavity, which can be used in high energy high current proton linear accelerator to be built for ADSS/SNS programme in India and in Project-X at Fermilab, USA. The performance of this type of superconducting RF structure can be greatly affected due to multipacting when we feed power to the cavity. Multipacting is a phenomenon of resonant electron multiplication in which a large number of electrons build up an electron Avalanche which absorbs RF Energy leading to remarkable power losses and heating of the walls, making it impossible to raise the electric field by increasing the RF Power. Multipacting analysis has been carried out for 650 MHz, β=0.61, superconducting elliptical cavity using 2D code MultiPac 2.1 and 3 D code CST particle studio and the result is presented in this paper. (author)

  5. Proton acceleration by RF TE{sub 11} mode in a cylindrical cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobajima, Masaaki; Yoshikawa, Kiyoshi; Ohnishi, Masami; Yamamoto, Yasushi; Masuda, Kai [Kyoto Univ., Uji (Japan). Inst. of Advanced Energy

    1997-03-01

    We found that protons are accelerated significantly by RF TE{sub 11} mode in a cylindrical cavity. In this method, protons get the perpendicular kinetic energy, so we thought it might be a compact accelerator, and studied the feasibility by numerical simulation. (author)

  6. RF cavities of CESAR (2 MeV electron storage ring).

    CERN Multimedia

    Service Photo; CERN PhotoLab

    1968-01-01

    RF cavity. There were 2 identical ones: one for stacking (accumulation) procedures; the other for scanning with "empty buckets" (measurement of beam density distribution). Both were operated at h=2 (2nd harmonic of the revolution frequency), i.e. at around 24.4 MHz. Voltage, frequency and phase were programmed with analogue circuits.

  7. CESAR, 2 MeV electron storage ring; construction period; RF cavity.

    CERN Multimedia

    Service Photo; CERN PhotoLab

    1962-01-01

    RF cavity. There were 2 identical ones: one for stacking (accumulation) procedures; the other for scanning with "empty buckets" (measurement of beam density distribution). Both were operated at h=2 (2nd harmonic of the revolution frequency), i.e. at around 24.4 MHz. Voltage, frequency and phase were programmed with analogue circuits.

  8. Effects of high solenoidal magnetic fields on rf accelerating cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Moretti

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available We have measured the effects of high (0–4.5 T magnetic fields on the operating conditions of 805 MHz accelerating cavities, and discovered that the maximum accelerating gradient drops as a function of the axial magnetic field. While the maximum gradient of any cavity is governed by a number of factors including conditioning, surface topology and materials, we argue that J×B forces within the emitters are the mechanism for enhanced breakdown in magnetic fields. The pattern of emitters changes over time and we show an example of a bright emitter which disappears during a breakdown event. We also present unique measurements of the distribution of enhancement factors, β, of secondary emitters produced in breakdown events during conditioning. We believe these secondary emitters can also be breakdown triggers, and the secondary emitter spectrum helps to determine the maximum operating field.

  9. Fiber Optic Based Thermometry System for Superconducting RF Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kochergin, Vladimir [Microxact Inc.

    2013-05-06

    Thermometry is recognized as the best technique to identify and characterize losses in SRF cavities. The most widely used and reliable apparatus for temperature mapping at cryogenic temperatures is based on carbon resistors (RTDs). The use of this technology on multi-cell cavities is inconvenient due to the very large number of sensors required to obtain sufficient spatial resolution. Recent developments make feasible the use of multiplexible fiber optic sensors for highly distributed temperature measurements. However, sensitivity of multiplexible cryogenic temperature sensors was found extending only to 12K at best and thus was not sufficient for SRF cavity thermometry. During the course of the project the team of MicroXact, JLab and Virginia Tech developed and demonstrated the multiplexible fiber optic sensor with adequate response below 20K. The demonstrated temperature resolution is by at least a factor of 60 better than that of the best multiplexible fiber optic temperature sensors reported to date. The clear path toward at least 10times better temperature resolution is shown. The first to date temperature distribution measurements with ~2.5mm spatial resolution was done with fiber optic sensors at 2K to4K temperatures. The repeatability and accuracy of the sensors were verified only at 183K, but at this temperature both parameters significantly exceeded the state of the art. The results of this work are expected to find a wide range of applications, since the results are enabling the whole new testing capabilities, not accessible before.

  10. Sparking limits, cavity loading, and beam breakup instability associated with high-current rf linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faehl, R.J.; Lemons, D.S.; Thode, L.E.

    1982-01-01

    The limitations on high-current rf linacs due to gap sparking, cavity loading, and the beam breakup instability are studied. It appears possible to achieve cavity accelerating gradients as high as 35 MV/m without sparking. Furthermore, a linear analysis, as well as self-consistent particle simulations of a multipulsed 10 kA beam, indicated that only a negligible small fraction of energy is radiated into nonfundamental cavity modes. Finally, the beam breakup instability is analyzed and found to be able to magnify initial radial perturbations by a factor of no more than about 20 during the beam transit time through a 1 GeV accelerator

  11. Analysis of the impacts of mechanical errors on the RF performance of a single spoke cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Zhongyuan; Lu Xiangyang; Zhang Baocheng; Quan Shengwen; He Feisi; Zhao Kui

    2010-01-01

    Mechanical errors can not be avoided in fabrication. They will cause geometry errors and have impacts on the cavity performance. This paper systematically analyzes the impacts of mechanical errors on the RF performance of Peking University single spoke cavity. The various kinds of shape and size errors are considered, the influences on the resonation frequency and field flatness are studied by numerical simulation and the theoretical models are analyzed. The results show that the single spoke cavity is robust with respect to the mechanical tolerance. It also indicates the most essential factors for fabrication. (authors)

  12. Rf transfer in the Coupled-Cavity Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makowski, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    A significant technical problem associated with the Coupled-Cavity Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator is the transfer of RF energy from the drive accelerator to the high-gradient accelerator. Several concepts have been advanced to solve this problem. This paper examines one possible solution in which the drive and high-gradient cavities are directly coupled to one another by means of holes in the cavity walls or coupled indirectly through a third intermediate transfer cavity. Energy cascades through the cavities on a beat frequency time scale which must be made small compared to the cavity skin time but large compared to the FEL pulse length. The transfer is complicated by the fact that each of the cavities in the system can support many resonant modes near the chosen frequency of operation. A generalized set of coupled-cavity equations has been developed to model the energy transfer between the various modes in each of the cavities. For a two cavity case transfer efficiencies in excess of 95% can be achieved. 3 refs., 2 figs

  13. High current electron beam acceleration in dielectric-filled RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faehl, R.J.; Keinigs, R.K.

    1996-01-01

    The acceleration of charged particles in radio frequency (RF) cavities is a widely used mode in high energy accelerators. Advantages include very high accelerating gradients and very stable phase control. A traditional limitation for such acceleration has been their use for intense, high current beam generation. This constraint arises from the inability to store a large amount of electromagnetic energy in the cavity and from loading effects of the beam on the cavity. The authors have studied a simple modification to transcend these limitations. Following Humphries and Huang, they have conducted analytic and numerical investigations of RF accelerator cavities in which a high dielectric constant material, such as water, replaces most of the cavity volume. This raises the stored energy in a cavity of given dimensions by a factor var-epsilon/var-epsilon 0 . For a water fill, var-epsilon/var-epsilon 0 ∼ 80, depending on the frequency. This introduction of high dielectric constant material into the cavity reduces the resonant frequencies by a factor of (var-epsilon/var-epsilon 0 ) 1/2 . This reduced operating frequency mans that existing high efficiency power supplies, at lower frequencies, can be used for an accelerator

  14. Cryomodule tests of four Tesla-like cavities in the Superconducting RF Test Facility at KEK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiji Kako

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A 6-m cryomodule including four Tesla-like cavities was developed, and was tested in the Superconducting RF Test Facility phase-I at KEK. The performance as a total superconducting cavity system was checked in the cryomodule tests at 2 K with high rf power. One of the four cavities achieved a stable pulsed operation at 32  MV/m, which is higher than the operating accelerating gradient in the ILC. The maximum accelerating gradient (E_{acc,max⁡} obtained in the vertical cw tests was maintained or slightly improved in the cryomodule tests operating in a pulse mode. Compensation of the Lorentz force detuning at 31  MV/m was successfully demonstrated by a piezo tuner and predetuning.

  15. A non-resonant RF cavity loaded with amorphous alloy for proton cancer therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Makita, Y; Nayayama, T; Tsuchidate, H; Tsukishima, C; Yoshida, K

    1999-01-01

    A non-resonant RF cavity loaded with amorphous alloy cores has been designed and tested. The cavity has a re-entrant structure loaded with 8 amorphous alloy toroidal core and its characteristic impedance is designed as 450 Omega . The RF power is fed by 1 kW solid state amplifier using a step-up transformer with 1:9 impedance ratio. In the high power test, an accelerating gap voltage of more than 900 V was measured with input power of 1 kW in the frequency range of 1 to 10 MHz. The voltage standing wave ratio (VSWR) was less than 2.0. The results prove that the cavity may be used successfully within a compact proton synchrotron for a cancer therapy facility. (3 refs).

  16. Relativistic Stern-Gerlach Interaction in an RF Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conte,M.; Luccio, A. U.; Pusterla, M.

    2009-05-01

    The general expression of the Stern-Gerlach (SG) force is deduced for a relativistic charged spin-1/2 particle which travels inside a time varying magnetic field. This result was obtained either by means of two Lorentz boosts or starting from Dirac's equation. Then, the utilization of this interaction for attaining the spin states separation is reconsidered in a new example using a new radio-frequency arrangement. On the basis of the previous estimates, we feel ready to propose the time varying SG interaction as a method for attaining a spin state separation of an unpolarized beam of, say (anti)protons, since the energy of particles with opposite spin orientations will differ and beams in the two states can be separated. In a first stage of the study of a sensible practical design, we intend to proceed with numerical simulations. As a first step, we intend to verify the correctness of Eqs.(42) and (43) setting once {beta}{sub ph} = 2 and then {beta}{sub ph} = 3, in a cavity where the field line pattern can be realistically controlled. Beyond the verification of the present theory, there is also the aim of studying the effects generated by the spin precession inside the cavity, that we did not yet address in this note. Next, we shall consider a spin splitter scheme based on the lattice of an existing or planned (anti)proton ring endowed with an array of splitting cavities. The principal aim of the latter implementations is to check the mixing effect of the longitudinal phase-plane filamentation, i.e. the actual foe which could frustrate the entire spin splitting process.

  17. Mechanical design upgrade of the APS storage ring rf cavity tuner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, J.; Bromberek, D.; Kang, Y.

    1997-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring (SR) rf system employs four banks of four spherical, single-cell resonant cavities. Each cavity is tuned by varying the cavity volume through insertion/retraction of a copper piston located at the circumference of the cavity and oriented perpendicular to the accelerator beam. During the commissioning of the APS SR, the tuners and cavity tuner ports were prone to extensive arcing and overheating. The existing tuners were modified to eliminate the problems, and two new, redesigned tuners were installed. In both cases marked improvements were obtained in the tuner mechanical performance. As measured by tuner piston and flange surface temperatures, tuner heating has been reduced by a factor of five in the new version. Redesign considerations discussed include tuner piston-to-housing alignment, tuner piston and housing materials and cooling configurations, and tuner piston sliding electrical contacts. The tuner redesign is also distinguished by a modular, more maintainable assembly

  18. RF cavity R and D at LBNL for the NLC damping rings, FY1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimmer, R.A.; Corlett, J.N.; Koehler, G.; Li, D.; Hartman, N.; Rasson, J.; Saleh, T.

    1999-01-01

    This report contains a summary of the R and D activities at LBNL on RF cavities for the NLC damping rings during fiscal year19999. These activities include the optimization of the RF design for both efficiency and damping of higher-order (HOMs), by systematic study of the cavity profile, the effect of the beam pipe diameter, nosecone angle and gap, the cross section and position of the HOM damping waveguides and the coupler. The effect of the shape of the HOM waveguides and their intersection with the cavity wall on the local surface heating is also an important factor, since it determines the highest stresses in the cavity body. This was taken into account during the optimization so that the stresses could be reduced at the same time as the HOP damping was improved over previous designs. A new method of calculating the RF heating was employed, using a recently released high frequency electromagnetic element in ANSYS. This greatly facilitates the thermal and stress analysis of the design and fabrication methods have been developed with the goals of lower stresses, fewer parts and simpler assembly compared to previous designs. This should result in substantial cost savings. Preliminary designs are described for the cavity ancillary components including the RF window, HOM loads, and tuners. A preliminary manufacturing plan is included, with an initial estimate of the resource requirements. Other cavity options are discussed which might be desirable to either lower the R/Q, for reduced transient response, or lower the residual HOM impedance to reduce coupled-bunch growth rates further still

  19. Study of a power coupler for superconducting RF cavities used in high intensity proton accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souli, M.

    2007-07-01

    The coaxial power coupler needed for superconducting RF cavities used in the high energy section of the EUROTRANS driver should transmit 150 kW (CW operation) RF power to the protons beam. The calculated RF and dielectric losses in the power coupler (inner and outer conductor, RF window) are relatively high. Consequently, it is necessary to design very carefully the cooling circuits in order to remove the generated heat and to ensure stable and reliable operating conditions for the coupler cavity system. After calculating all type of losses in the power coupler, we have designed and validated the inner conductor cooling circuit using numerical simulations results. We have also designed and optimized the outer conductor cooling circuit by establishing its hydraulic and thermal characteristics. Next, an experiment dedicated to study the thermal interaction between the power coupler and the cavity was successfully performed at CRYOHLAB test facility. The critical heat load Qc for which a strong degradation of the cavity RF performance was measured leading to Q c in the range 3 W-5 W. The measured heat load will be considered as an upper limit of the residual heat flux at the outer conductor cold extremity. A dedicated test facility was developed and successfully operated for measuring the performance of the outer conductor heat exchanger using supercritical helium as coolant. The test cell used reproduces the realistic thermal boundary conditions of the power coupler mounted on the cavity in the cryo-module. The first experimental results have confirmed the excellent performance of the tested heat exchanger. The maximum residual heat flux measured was 60 mW for a 127 W thermal load. As the RF losses in the coupler are proportional to the incident RF power, we can deduce that the outer conductor heat exchanger performance is continued up to 800 kW RF power. Heat exchanger thermal conductance has been identified using a 2D axisymmetric thermal model by comparing

  20. RF Design of Normal Conducting 704 MHz and 2.1 GHz Cavities for LEReC Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Binping [Brookhaven Natl. Lab.; Belomestnykh, Sergey [SUNY, Stony Brook; Ben-Zvi, Ilan [RIKEN BNL; Blaskiewicz, Michael [RIKEN BNL; Brennan, Joseph [RIKEN BNL; Brutus, Jean Clifford [RIKEN BNL; Fedotov, Alexei [RIKEN BNL; Hahn, Harald [Brookhaven; McIntyre, Gary [RIKEN BNL; Pai, Chien [RIKEN BNL; Smith, Kevin [RIKEN BNL; Tuozzolo, Joseph [RIKEN BNL; Veshcherevich, Vadim [Cornell U., CLASSE; Wu, Qiong [RIKEN BNL; Xin, Tianmu [RIKEN BNL; Xu, Wencan [RIKEN BNL; Zaltsman, Alex [RIKEN BNL

    2016-06-01

    To improve RHIC luminosity for heavy ion beam energies below 10 GeV/nucleon, the Low Energy RHIC electron Cooler (LEReC) is currently under development at BNL. Two normal conducting cavities, a single cell 704 MHz cavity and a 3 cell 2.1 GHz third harmonic cavity, will be used in LEReC for energy spread correction. Currently these two cavities are under fabrication. In this paper we report the RF design of these two cavities.

  1. Asymmetric focusing study from twin input power couplers using realistic rf cavity field maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulliford, Colwyn; Bazarov, Ivan; Belomestnykh, Sergey; Shemelin, Valery

    2011-03-01

    Advanced simulation codes now exist that can self-consistently solve Maxwell’s equations for the combined system of an rf cavity and a beam bunch. While these simulations are important for a complete understanding of the beam dynamics in rf cavities, they require significant time and computing power. These techniques are therefore not readily included in real time simulations useful to the beam physicist during beam operations. Thus, there exists a need for a simplified algorithm which simulates realistic cavity fields significantly faster than self-consistent codes, while still incorporating enough of the necessary physics to ensure accurate beam dynamics computation. To this end, we establish a procedure for producing realistic field maps using lossless cavity eigenmode field solvers. This algorithm incorporates all relevant cavity design and operating parameters, including beam loading from a nonrelativistic beam. The algorithm is then used to investigate the asymmetric quadrupolelike focusing produced by the input couplers of the Cornell ERL injector cavity for a variety of beam and operating parameters.

  2. Asymmetric focusing study from twin input power couplers using realistic rf cavity field maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colwyn Gulliford

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Advanced simulation codes now exist that can self-consistently solve Maxwell’s equations for the combined system of an rf cavity and a beam bunch. While these simulations are important for a complete understanding of the beam dynamics in rf cavities, they require significant time and computing power. These techniques are therefore not readily included in real time simulations useful to the beam physicist during beam operations. Thus, there exists a need for a simplified algorithm which simulates realistic cavity fields significantly faster than self-consistent codes, while still incorporating enough of the necessary physics to ensure accurate beam dynamics computation. To this end, we establish a procedure for producing realistic field maps using lossless cavity eigenmode field solvers. This algorithm incorporates all relevant cavity design and operating parameters, including beam loading from a nonrelativistic beam. The algorithm is then used to investigate the asymmetric quadrupolelike focusing produced by the input couplers of the Cornell ERL injector cavity for a variety of beam and operating parameters.

  3. Comparison of Measured and Calculated Coupling between a Waveguide and an RF Cavity Using CST Microwave Studio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Shi; H. Chen; S. Zheng; D. Li; R.A. Rimmer; H. Wang

    2006-06-26

    Accurate predications of RF coupling between an RF cavity and ports attached to it have been an important study subject for years for RF coupler and higher order modes (HOM) damping design. We report recent progress and a method on the RF coupling simulations between waveguide ports and RF cavities using CST Microwave Studio in time domain (Transit Solver). Comparisons of the measured and calculated couplings are presented. The simulated couplings and frequencies agree within {approx} 10% and {approx} 0.1% with the measurements, respectively. We have simulated couplings with external Qs ranging from {approx} 100 to {approx} 100,000, and confirmed with measurements. The method should also work well for higher Qs, and can be easily applied in RF power coupler designs and HOM damping for normal-conducting and superconducting cavities.

  4. Comparison of Measured and Calculated Coupling between a Waveguide and an RF Cavity Using CST Microwave Studio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J. Shi; H. Chen; S. Zheng; D. Li; R.A. Rimmer; H. Wang

    2006-01-01

    Accurate predications of RF coupling between an RF cavity and ports attached to it have been an important study subject for years for RF coupler and higher order modes (HOM) damping design. We report recent progress and a method on the RF coupling simulations between waveguide ports and RF cavities using CST Microwave Studio in time domain (Transit Solver). Comparisons of the measured and calculated couplings are presented. The simulated couplings and frequencies agree within ∼ 10% and ∼ 0.1% with the measurements, respectively. We have simulated couplings with external Qs ranging from ∼ 100 to ∼ 100,000, and confirmed with measurements. The method should also work well for higher Qs, and can be easily applied in RF power coupler designs and HOM damping for normal-conducting and superconducting cavities

  5. Automatic Phase Calibration for RF Cavities using Beam-Loading Signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelen, J. P. [Fermilab; Chase, B. E. [Fermilab

    2017-10-01

    Precise calibration of the cavity phase signals is necessary for the operation of any particle accelerator. For many systems this requires human in the loop adjustments based on measurements of the beam parameters downstream. Some recent work has developed a scheme for the calibration of the cavity phase using beam measurements and beam-loading however this scheme is still a multi-step process that requires heavy automation or human in the loop. In this paper we analyze a new scheme that uses only RF signals reacting to beam-loading to calculate the phase of the beam relative to the cavity. This technique could be used in slow control loops to provide real-time adjustment of the cavity phase calibration without human intervention thereby increasing the stability and reliability of the accelerator.

  6. Development of a Solid State RF Amplifier in the kW Regime for Application with Low Beta Superconducting RF Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Piel, Christian; Borisov, A; Kolesov, Sergej; Piel, Helmut

    2005-01-01

    Projects based on the use of low beta superconducting cavities for ions are under operation or development at several labs worldwide. Often these cavities are individually driven by RF power sources in the kW regime. For an ongoing project a modular 2 kW, 176 MHz unconditionally stable RF amplifier for CW and pulsed operation was designed, built, and tested. Extended thermal analysis was used to develop a water cooling system in order to optimize the performance of the power transistors and other thermally loaded components. The paper will outline the design concept of the amplifier and present first results on the test of the amplifier with a superconducting cavity.

  7. Vacuum characteristics of the RF-cavity for TRISTAN main ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, H.

    1987-10-01

    Vacuum characteristics of the RF-cavity for TRISTAN main ring were tested. An APS (Alternating Periodic Structure) 18-cell cavity unit was made of low carbon steel S25C, and inner surface was electro-plated with copper of 100 μm in a pyrophosphorous-acid bath. After 24-hours bake-out at 140 deg C by a boiler, the outgassing rate of a test cavity was mainly dominated by the hydrogen permeation from the cooling water channel through the low carbon steel wall into the vacuum. By the use of anti-corrosion agent, the outgassing rate of the test cavity was decreased down to 1 x 10 -13 Torr · l/sec · cm 2 , after the bake-out at 140 deg C for 24 hours. After hydrogen degassing at 140 deg C for 10-days, the APS cavity unit was baked at 140 deg C for 24 hours, the ultimate pressure of the cavity reached down to 6 x 10 -10 Torr, and 2.7 x 10 -10 Torr, pumped by four 300 l/sec ion-pumps and by two 300 l/sec ion-pumps and two Ti-sublimation pumps with liquid nitrogen shroud respectively. The APS cavity unit was conditioned up to 250 kW/9-cell for 36 hours pumped by four 300 l/sec ion pumps, the ultimate pressure of the cavity was 5 x 10 -9 Torr with the RF power of 150 kW/9-cell on. (author)

  8. Applications of ferrites and ferromagnets in tuning rf cavities for accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanna, S.M.

    1994-01-01

    Traditionally ferrites have been used in accelerators for tuning rf cavities and in nonreciprocal devices controlling the power flow in rf accelerating systems. Recently, the development of cavity tuners based on perpendicularly biased ferrites has shown good progress. Yttrium iron garnet (YIG) is gradually replacing the traditional Ni Zn ferrites. The use of conventional parallel-biased Ni Zn ferrites for varying the frequency of accelerating cavities has the disadvantage of high saturation magnetization (4πM s ). This precludes practical operation in low magnetic loss regions. Different substitutions have been used with YIG to reduce its 4πM s , making it a practical candidate for perpendicular biasing operating in the saturation region. In addition, YIG is known for its low dielectric and magnetic losses. In this paper we give a short review of development in accelerator cavity tuners based on perpendicularly biased iron garnet ferrites. We use the operation of a 52 MHz stripline-based YIG tuner which we have tested at BNL as an example to demonstrate the advantages of using YIG in cavity tuners. We also discuss magnetic tuning techniques based on magnetostriction of Ni

  9. Third harmonic cavity design and RF measurements for the Frascati DAΦNE collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Alesini

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Third harmonic passive RF cavities have been proposed for installation in both rings of the DAΦNE factory collider to improve the Touschek lifetime and to increase the Landau damping. This paper illustrates the design of the harmonic cavities. The main requirements were to obtain a relatively low R/Q factor and a quality factor Q as high as possible to satisfy beam dynamics requirements and to damp all the higher order mode (HOM to a harmless level in order to avoid multibunch instabilities. A spherical shape of the cavity central body has been chosen as an optimum compromise between a high Q resonator and a low R/Q factor. HOM suppression has been provided by a ferrite ring damper designed for the superconducting cavities of the high energy ring of the KEK-B factory. The design and electromagnetic properties of the resonant modes have been studied with MAFIA and HFSS codes. Cavities have been made of aluminum and the RF measurements have been performed to characterize them. The measurements are in a good agreement with numerical simulations results, demonstrating a satisfactory HOM damping.

  10. High Powered Tests of Dielectric Loaded High Pressure RF Cavities for Use in Muon Cooling Channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freemire, Ben [IIT, Chicago; Bowring, Daniel [Fermilab; Kochemirovskiy, Alexey [Chicago U.; Moretti, Alfred [Fermilab; Peterson, David [Fermilab; Tollestrup, Alvin [Fermilab; Torun, Yagmur [IIT, Chicago; Yonehara, Katsuya [Fermilab

    2016-06-01

    Bright muon sources require six dimensional cooling to achieve acceptable luminosities. Ionization cooling is the only known method able to do so within the muon lifetime. One proposed cooling channel, the Helical Cooling Channel, utilizes gas filled radio frequency cavities to both mitigate RF breakdown in the presence of strong, external magnetic fields, and provide the cooling medium. Engineering constraints on the diameter of the magnets within which these cavities operate dictate the radius of the cavities be decreased at their nominal operating frequency. To accomplish this, one may load the cavities with a larger dielectric material. Alumina of purities ranging from 96 to 99.8% was tested in a high pressure RF test cell at the MuCool Test Area at Fermilab. The results of breakdown studies with pure nitrogen gas, and oxygen-doped nitrogen gas indicate the peak surface electric field on the alumina ranges between 10 and 15 MV/m. How these results affect the design of a prototype cooling channel cavity will be discussed.

  11. Analysis of a grid window structure for RF cavities in a Muon cooling channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladran, A.; Li, D.; Moretti, A.; Rimmer, R.; Staples, J.; Virostek, S.; Zisman, M.

    2003-01-01

    We report on the electromagnetic and thermal analysis of a grid window structure for high gradient, low frequency RF cavities. Windows may be utilized to close the beam iris and increase shunt impedance of closed-cell RF cavities. This work complements previous work presented for windows made of solid beryllium foil. An electromagnetic and thermal analysis of the thin wall tubes in a grid pattern was conducted using both MAFIA4 and ANSYS finite element analyses. The results from both codes agreed well for a variety of grid configurations and spacing. The grid configuration where the crossing tubes touched was found to have acceptable E-Fields and H-Fields performance. The thermal profiles for the grid will also be shown to determine a viable cooling profile

  12. Digital Design Of The LHC Low Level rf The Tuning System For The Superconducting Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Baudrenghien, P; Ciapala, Edmond; Molendijk, J C; Olsen, R; Sorokoletov, R; Weierud, F

    2006-01-01

    The low level RF systems for the LHC are based extensively on digital technology, not only to achieve the required performance and stability but also to provide full remote control and diagnostics facilities needed since most of the RF system is inaccessible during operation. The hardware is based on modular VME with a specially designed P2 backplane for timing distribution, fast data interchange and low noise linear power supplies. Extensive design re-use and the use of graphic FPGA design tools have streamlined the design process. A milestone was the test of the tuning system for the superconducting cavities. The tuning control module is based on a 2M gate FPGA with on-board DSP. Its design and functionality are described, including features such as automatic cavity measurements. Work is ongoing on completion of other modules and building up complete software and diagnostics facilities.

  13. Testing of inductive output tube based RF amplifier for 650 MHz SRF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandal, A.; Som, S.; Manna, S.K.; Ghosh, S.; Seth, S.; Thakur, S.K.; Saha, S.; Panda, U.S.

    2012-01-01

    A 650 MHz IOT based RF amplifier has been developed in VECC. It can be used to power several cavity modules in high energy high current proton linear accelerator to be built for ADSS programme in India and in Project-X at Fermilab, USA. The IOT based amplifier requires different powers supplies, water cooling and forced air cooling for its operation. A Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) based interlocks has been incorporated to take care of systematic on/off of the power supplies and driver amplifier, water flow, air flow and other interlocks for the safe operation of the RF System. In addition to that EPICS based RF operating console and data logging/monitoring system has been added. (author)

  14. High-power, solid-state rf source for accelerator cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaughan, D.R.; Mols, G.E.; Reid, D.W.; Potter, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    During the past few years the Defense and Electronics Center of Westinghouse Electric Corporation has developed a solid-state, 250-kW peak, rf amplifier for use with the SPS-40 radar system. This system has a pulse length of 60 μs and operates across the frequency band from 400 to 450 MHz. Because of the potential use of such a system as an rf source for accelerator applications, a collaborative experiment was initiated between Los Alamos National Laboratory and Westinghouse to simulate the resonant load conditions of an accelerator cavity. This paper describes the positive results of that experiment as well as the solid-state amplifier architecture. It also explores the future of high-power, solid-state amplifiers as rf sources for accelerator structures

  15. RF Feedback Analysis for 4 cavities per klystron in PEP-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corredoura, P.; Tighe, R.

    1994-06-01

    Lattice changes in the PEP-II high energy ring have made the concept of driving four cavities with a single klystron an attractive option. This paper examines the topology from a RF feedback point of view. Sources of error are identified and their magnitudes are estimated. The effect on the performance of the longitudinal impedance reducing feedback loops is calculated using control theory and Mathematica

  16. Resonance frequency control of RF normal conducting cavity using gradient estimator of reflected power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leewe, R.; Shahriari, Z.; Moallem, M.

    2017-10-01

    Control of the natural resonance frequency of an RF cavity is essential for accelerator structures due to their high cavity sensitivity to internal and external vibrations and the dependency of resonant frequency on temperature changes. Due to the relatively high radio frequencies involved (MHz to GHz), direct measurement of the resonant frequency for real-time control is not possible by using conventional microcontroller hardware. So far, all operational cavities are tuned using phase comparison techniques. The temperature dependent phase measurements render this technique labor and time intensive. To eliminate the phase measurement, reduce man hours and speed up cavity start up time, this paper presents a control theme that relies solely on the reflected power measurement. The control algorithm for the nonlinear system is developed through Lyapunov's method. The controller stabilizes the resonance frequency of the cavity using a nonlinear control algorithm in combination with a gradient estimation method. Experimental results of the proposed system on a test cavity show that the resonance frequency can be tuned to its optimum operating point while the start up time of a single cavity and the accompanied man hours are significantly decreased. A test result of the fully commissioned control system on one of TRIUMF's DTL tanks verifies its performance under real environmental conditions.

  17. RF cavities for the positron accumulator ring (PAR) of the Advanced Photon Source (APS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Y.W.; Nassiri, A.; Bridges, J.F.; Smith, T.L.; Song, J.J.

    1995-01-01

    The cavities for the dual frequency system of the APS PAR are described. The system uses two frequencies: a 9.78MHz fundamental system for the particle accumulation and a 117.3MHz twelfth harmonic system for the bunch compression. The cavities have been built, installed, tested, and used for storing the beam in the PAR for about a year. The fundamental cavity is a reentrant coaxial type with a capacitive loading plunger and has 1.6m length. The harmonic cavity is a symmetrical reentrant coaxial type and is 0.8m long. Ferrite tuners are used for frequency tuning. During the accumulation period, the ferrite tuner of the harmonic cavity works as a damper to disable the cavity. During an injection cycle the 9.78MHz system accumulates 24 positron bunches in a bucket and the 117.3MHz system compresses the bunch into a shorter bunch. Measurements were made on the rf properties of the cavities

  18. RF tests of an 805 MHz pillbox cavity at Lab G of Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Derun; Corlett, J.; MacGill, R.; Wallig, J.; Zisman, M.; Moretti, A.; Qian, Z.; Wu, V.; Rimmer, R.; Norem, J.; Torun, Y.

    2003-01-01

    We report recent high power RF tests on an 805 MHz RF pillbox cavity with demountable windows for beam apertures at Lab G of Fermilab, a dedicated facility for testing of MUCOOL (muon cooling) components. The cavity is installed inside a superconducting solenoidal magnet. A 12 MW peak RF power klystron is used for the tests. The cavity has been processed both with and without magnetic field. Without magnetic field, a gradient of 34 MV/m was reached rather quickly with very low sparking rate. In a 2.5 T solenoidal field, a 16 MV/m gradient was achieved, and it had to take many weeks of conditioning. Strong multipacting effects associated with high radiation levels were measured during the processing with the magnetic field. More recently Be windows with TiN-coated surface have been installed and tested at conditions of with and without the external magnetic field. A conservative 16 MV/m gradient without magnetic field was reached quickly as planned. Less multipacting was observed during the conditioning, it indicated that the TiN-coated surface on the windows had indeed helped to reduce the secondary electron emissions significantly. A modest gradient of 16.5 MV/m was finally achieved with magnet on in solenoidal mode and the field up to 4 T. Preliminary inspection on Be windows surface found no damage at all, in comparison with Cu windows where substantial surface damage was found. Preliminary understanding of conditioning cavity in a strong magnetic field has been developed. More through window and cavity surface inspection is under way

  19. Beam instability induced by rf deflectors in the combiner ring of the CLIC test facility and mitigation by damped deflecting structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Alesini

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In the CTF3 (CLIC test facility 3 run of November 2007, a vertical beam instability has been found in the combiner ring during operation. After a careful analysis, the source of the instability has been identified in the vertical deflecting modes trapped in the rf deflectors and excited by the beam passage. A dedicated tracking code that includes the induced transverse wakefield and the multibunch multipassage effects has been written and the results of the beam dynamics analysis are presented in the paper. The mechanism of the instability was similar to the beam breakup in a linear accelerator or in an energy recovery linac. The results of the code allowed identifying the main key parameters driving such instability and allowed finding the main knobs to mitigate it. To completely suppress such beam instability, two new rf deflectors have been designed, constructed, and installed in the ring. In the new structures the frequency separation between the vertical and horizontal deflecting modes has been increased, changing the position of the rods inside the cells, and special antennas have been inserted to absorb the power released by the beam to the modes. The deflectors have been made in aluminum to reduce the costs and delivery time and have been successfully tested and installed in the ring. The design, the realization procedures, and the rf test results are illustrated.

  20. Reduction of field emission in superconducting cavities with high power pulsed RF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graber, J.; Crawford, C.; Kirchgessner, J.; Padamsee, H.; Rubin, D.; Schmueser, P.

    1994-01-01

    A systematic study is presented of the effects of pulsed high power RF processing (HPP) as a method of reducing field emission (FE) in superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities to reach higher accelerating gradients for future particle accelerators. The processing apparatus was built to provide up to 150 kW peak RF power to 3 GHz cavities, for pulse lengths from 200 μs to 1 ms. Single-cell and nine-cell cavities were tested extensively. The thermal conductivity of the niobium for these cavities was made as high as possible to ensure stability against thermal breakdown of superconductivity. HPP proves to be a highly successful method of reducing FE loading in nine-cell SRF cavities. Attainable continuous wave (CW) fields increase by as much as 80% from their pre-HPP limits. The CW accelerating field achieved with nine-cell cavities improved from 8-15 MV/m with HPP to 14-20 MV/m. The benefits are stable with subsequent exposure to dust-free air. More importantly, HPP also proves effective against new field emission subsequently introduced by cold and warm vacuum ''accidents'' which admitted ''dirty'' air into the cavities. Clear correlations are obtained linking FE reduction with the maximum surface electric field attained during processing. In single cells the maximums reached were E peak =72 MV/m and H peak =1660 Oe. Thermal breakdown, initiated by accompanying high surface magnetic fields is the dominant limitation on the attainable fields for pulsed processing, as well as for final CW and long pulse operation. To prove that the surface magnetic field rather than the surface electric fields is the limitation to HPP effectiveness, a special two-cell cavity with a reduced magnetic to electric field ratio is successfully tested. During HPP, pulsed fields reach E peak =113 MV/m (H peak =1600 Oe) and subsequent CW low power measurement reached E peak =100 MV/m, the highest CW field ever measured in a superconducting accelerator cavity. ((orig.))

  1. High gradient tests of an 88 MHz RF cavity for muon cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, C; Gerigk, F; Marques-Balula, J; Vretenar, M

    2006-01-01

    The scheme for a Muon Cooling channel developed at CERN in the frame of Neutrino Factory studies foresees the use of 44 and 88 MHz cavities operating at a real-estate gradient as high as 4 MV/m. To assess the feasibility of this scheme, including high-gradient operation at relatively low frequency and the production and handling of high RF peak powers, a test stand was assembled at CERN. It included an 88 MHz resonator reconstructed from a 114 MHz cavity previously used for lepton acceleration in the PS, a 2.5 MW final amplifier made out of an old linac unit improved and down-scaled in frequency, and a PS spare amplifier used as driver stage. After only 160 hours of conditioning the cavity passed the 4 MV/m level, with local peak surface field in the gap exceeding 25 MV/m (2.4 times the Kilpatrick limit). The gradient was limited by the amplifier power, the maximum RF peak output power achieved during the tests being 2.65 MW. This paper presents the results of the tests, including an analysis of field emissio...

  2. Time-of-flight electron energy loss spectroscopy using TM110 deflection cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Verhoeven

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate the use of two TM110 resonant cavities to generate ultrashort electron pulses and subsequently measure electron energy losses in a time-of-flight type of setup. The method utilizes two synchronized microwave cavities separated by a drift space of 1.45 m. The setup has an energy resolution of 12 ± 2 eV FWHM at 30 keV, with an upper limit for the temporal resolution of 2.7 ± 0.4 ps. Both the time and energy resolution are currently limited by the brightness of the tungsten filament electron gun used. Through simulations, it is shown that an energy resolution of 0.95 eV and a temporal resolution of 110 fs can be achieved using an electron gun with a higher brightness. With this, a new method is provided for time-resolved electron spectroscopy without the need for elaborate laser setups or expensive magnetic spectrometers.

  3. Superconducting RF cavities and magnets for a 4-TeV energy muon collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu, Q.S.; Green, M.; Neuffer, D.; Summers, D.; Simrock, S.; Willen, E.

    1997-01-01

    The accelerators must take the muon beams from ∼ 100 MeV to 2 TeV energies within the muon lifetime for a 4 TeV energy muon collider. These constraints plus the muon decay heating seriously challenge the designs of the superconducting RF (SRF) cavities and magnets in the accelerators and collider ring. The multiple superconducting recirculation linac and the very rap8id-cycling superconducting synchrotron approach are both studied. The authors briefly introduce the technical considerations and preliminary designs of the SRF systems and magnets

  4. Biased HiPIMS technology for superconducting rf accelerating cavities coating

    CERN Document Server

    G. Rosaz, G.; Sonato, D.; Calatroni, S.; Ehiasarian, A.; Junginger, T.; Taborelli, M.

    2016-01-01

    In the last few years the interest of the thin film science and technology community on High Impulse Power Magnetron Sputtering (HIPIMS) coatings has steadily increased. HIPIMS literature shows that better thin film morphology, denser and smoother films can be achieved when compared with standard dc Magnetron Sputtering (dcMS) coating technology. Furthermore the capability of HIPIMS to produce a high quantity of ionized species can allow conformal coatings also for complex geometries. CERN already studied the possibility to use such a coating method for SRF accelerating cavities. Results are promising but not better from a RF point of view than dcMS coatings. Thanks to these results the next step is to go towards a biased HiPIMS approach. However the geometry of the cavities leads to complex changes in the coating setup in order to apply a bias voltage. Coating system tweaking and first superconducting properties of biased samples are presented.

  5. Wakefield and RF Kicks Due to Coupler Asymmetry in TESLA-Type Accelerating Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bane, K.L.F.; Adolphsen, C.; Li, Z.; /SLAC; Dohlus, M.; Zagorodnov, I.; /DESY; Gonin, I.; Lunin, A.; Solyak, N.; Yakovlev, V.; /Fermilab; Gjonaj, E.; Weiland, T.; /Darmstadt, Tech. Hochsch.

    2008-07-07

    In a future linear collider, such as the International Linear Collider (ILC), trains of high current, low emittance bunches will be accelerated in a linac before colliding at the interaction point. Asymmetries in the accelerating cavities of the linac will generate fields that will kick the beam transversely and degrade the beam emittance and thus the collider performance. In the main linac of the ILC, which is filled with TESLA-type superconducting cavities, it is the fundamental (FM) and higher mode (HM) couplers that are asymmetric and thus the source of such kicks. The kicks are of two types: one, due to (the asymmetry in) the fundamental RF fields and the other, due to transverse wakefields that are generated by the beam even when it is on axis. In this report we calculate the strength of these kicks and estimate their effect on the ILC beam. The TESLA cavity comprises nine cells, one HM coupler in the upstream end, and one (identical, though rotated) HM coupler and one FM coupler in the downstream end (for their shapes and location see Figs. 1, 2) [1]. The cavity is 1.1 m long, the iris radius 35 mm, and the coupler beam pipe radius 39 mm. Note that the couplers reach closer to the axis than the irises, down to a distance of 30 mm.

  6. Studies of niobium and development of niobium resonant RF cavities for accelerator driven system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondal, Jayanta

    2013-01-01

    The present approach for the fabrication of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities is to roll and deep draw sheets of polycrystalline high-purity niobium. Jefferson Laboratory pioneered the use of large-grain/single-crystal Nb directly sliced from an ingot for the fabrication of single-crystal high-purity Nb SRF cavities. The large grain/single crystal niobium has several potential advantages over the polycrystalline niobium and has become a viable alternative to the standard fine grain (ASTM grain size>6 μm), high purity (RRR ≥ 250 ) niobium for the fabrication of high-performance SRF cavities for particle accelerators. The present study includes the prototype single cell low beta cavity design, fabrication, EB welding and low temperature RF test at 2K. In this study also the medium field Q-Slope has been analyzed with the help of an added non linear term in Heabel's analytical model and a linear increase of surface resistance Rs with the magnetic field

  7. Mechanical and thermal analysis of beryllium windows for RF cavities in a muon cooling channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Derun; Ladran, A.; Lozano, D.; Rimmer, R.

    2002-01-01

    Thin beryllium windows (foils) may be utilized to increase shunt impedance of closed-cell RF cavities. These windows are subject to ohmic heating from RF currents. The resulting temperature gradients in the windows can produce out of plane displacements that detune the cavity frequency. The window displacement can be reduced or eliminated by pre-stressing the foils in tension. Because of possible variations during manufacture, it is important to quantify the actual prestress of a Be window before it is put into service. We present the thermal and mechanical analyses of such windows under typical operating conditions and describe a simple non-destructive means to quantify the pre-stress using the acoustic signature of a window. Using finite element analysis, thin plate theory and physical measurements of the vibration modes of a window we attempted to characterize the actual Be window pre-stress in a small number of commercially sourced windows (30% of yield strength is typical). This method can be used for any window material and size, but this study focused on 16 cm diameter Be Windows ranging in thickness from 125 microns to 508 microns and with varying pre-stresses. The method can be used to nondestructively test future Be windows for the desired prestress

  8. Optimization of the RF cavity heat load and trip rates for CEBAF at 12 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, He [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Roblin, Yves R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Freyberger, Arne P. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Krafft, Geoffrey A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Terzic, Balsa P. [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2017-05-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility at JLab has 200 RF cavities in the north linac and the south linac respectively after the 12 GeV upgrade. The purpose of this work is to simultaneously optimize the heat load and the trip rate for the cavities and to reconstruct the pareto-optimal front in a timely manner when some of the cavities are turned down. By choosing an efficient optimizer and strategically creating the initial gradients, the pareto-optimal front for no more than 15 cavities down can be re-established within 20 seconds.

  9. On a possibility of using a superconducting cavity in the RF system of the storage ring LESR-N100

    CERN Document Server

    Androsov, V P; Telegin, Yu P

    2002-01-01

    In the Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology the design project of the 200 MeV electron storage ring LESR-N100 is under development. The essential feature of this facility is the large beam energy spread (of about 1%). To ensure a reasonable beam lifetime the RF-system should provide the accelerating voltage of about 0.5 MV, while the total energy losses do not exceed approx 700 eV/turn. The power dissipated in two 700 MHz normal-conducting (NC) cavities much exceeds the power transmitted to the beam. We considered a possibility to use in LESR-N100 a high-Q superconducting RF-cavity (SRF-cavity) in which the dissipated power is the same order of magnitude as the beam-transmitted power. The studies show that the system with SRF-cavity cannot operate in the standard mode when the cavity is matched to the power transmission line at some nominal beam current. The optimal operation mode with high overcoupling is proposed that requires the RF-power one order of magnitude less than in the case of Nc-cavities.

  10. Research and development on superconducting cavities. The Saclay contribution to the 7. Workshop on RF superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-04-01

    The technology of beam acceleration by superconducting cavities is maturing quickly, as evidenced by its ever wider application to accelerators. Every two years, accelerator physicists currently developing this technology meet in a 'Workshop on RF Superconductivity', to share the latest results in the field. The seventh edition of this Workshop, held in France and organized jointly by CEA and CNRS, gathered 165 researchers from all countries. The publication collects the whole papers presented by the Saclay laboratory (DSM DAPNIA, Service d'Etudes des Accelerateurs) during this Workshop. It is intended to give a picture of the scope and quality of the results obtained by the laboratory during the last two years. 20 items are indexed individually for the INIS database. (K.A.)

  11. Structural and superconducting properties of sputter-deposited niobium films for applications in RF accelerating cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Peck, M A

    2000-01-01

    The present work presents the results of a systematic study of superconducting and structural properties of niobium films sputter deposited onto the inner walls of radiofrequency copper resonators. The measured superconducting quantities include the surface resistance, the critical temperature, the penetration depth and the upper and lower critical fields. In addition to films grown with different discharge gases (Xe, Kr, Ar, Ne and Ar-Ne mixtures) and to films grown on substrates prepared under different conditions, the study also includes massive niobium cavities. The surface resistance is analysed in terms of its dependence on the temperature and on the rf field amplitude and, when possible, compared to theoretical predictions. In general, good agreement with BCS theory is observed. All experimental results are presented in the form of a simple, but adequate parameterisation. The residual resistance is observed to be essentially uncorrelated with the other variables, but strongly dependent on the macroscop...

  12. High Pressure Gas Filled RF Cavity Beam Test at the Fermilab MuCool Test Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freemire, Ben [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2013-05-01

    The high energy physics community is continually looking to push the limits with respect to the energy and luminosity of particle accelerators. In the realm of leptons, only electron colliders have been built to date. Compared to hadrons, electrons lose a large amount of energy when accelerated in a ring through synchrotron radiation. A solution to this problem is to build long, straight accelerators for electrons, which has been done with great success. With a new generation of lepton colliders being conceived, building longer, more powerful accelerators is not the most enticing option. Muons have been proposed as an alternative particle to electrons. Muons lose less energy to synchrotron radiation and a Muon Collider can provide luminosity within a much smaller energy range than a comparable electron collider. This allows a circular collider to be built with higher attainable energy than any present electron collider. As part of the accelerator, but separate from the collider, it would also be possible to allow the muons to decay to study neutrinos. The possibility of a high energy, high luminosity muon collider and an abundant, precise source of neutrinos is an attractive one. The technological challenges of building a muon accelerator are many and diverse. Because the muon is an unstable particle, a muon beam must be cooled and accelerated to the desired energy within a short amount of time. This requirement places strict requisites on the type of acceleration and focusing that can be used. Muons are generated as tertiary beams with a huge phase space, so strong magnetic fields are required to capture and focus them. Radio frequency (RF) cavities are needed to capture, bunch and accelerate the muons. Unfortunately, traditional vacuum RF cavities have been shown to break down in the magnetic fields necessary for capture and focusing.

  13. The application of system identification techniques to an R.F. Cavity tuning loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mestha, L.K.

    1989-09-01

    System identification is the terminology used for the process of characterising a given control system. A mathematical representation of the frequency response characteristic is obtained to utilise all the known design techniques to arrange the feed-back loop to meet required control performance criterion. This is known as parametric system identification. The intention of this paper is to speed up the process of identifying the R.F. Cavity tuning system of the 800 MeV accelerator, ISIS. While achieving this goal the computer must not disturb noticeably the normal function set out by the system. This task of automatic characterisation is necessary so that a self-adapting feed-back loop can be arranged to adjust itself without human interference and meet severe R.F. tuning requirements on ISIS. In any case the results of parametric identifications are useful in designing a robust feed-back loop with appropriate gain and phase margins. The approach using a Pseudo Random Signal is currently practised in Process Industries. (author)

  14. Beam collimation and energy spectrum compression of laser-accelerated proton beams using solenoid field and RF cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teng, J.; Gu, Y.Q.; Zhu, B.; Hong, W.; Zhao, Z.Q.; Zhou, W.M.; Cao, L.F.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new method of laser produced proton beam collimation and spectrum compression using a combination of a solenoid field and a RF cavity. The solenoid collects laser-driven protons efficiently within an angle that is smaller than 12 degrees because it is mounted few millimeters from the target, and collimates protons with energies around 2.3 MeV. The collimated proton beam then passes through a RF cavity to allow compression of the spectrum. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations demonstrate the proton beam transport in the solenoid and RF electric fields. Excellent energy compression and collection efficiency of protons are presented. This method for proton beam optimization is suitable for high repetition-rate laser acceleration proton beams, which could be used as an injector for a conventional proton accelerator

  15. Beam collimation and energy spectrum compression of laser-accelerated proton beams using solenoid field and RF cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, J.; Gu, Y. Q.; Zhu, B.; Hong, W.; Zhao, Z. Q.; Zhou, W. M.; Cao, L. F.

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a new method of laser produced proton beam collimation and spectrum compression using a combination of a solenoid field and a RF cavity. The solenoid collects laser-driven protons efficiently within an angle that is smaller than 12 degrees because it is mounted few millimeters from the target, and collimates protons with energies around 2.3 MeV. The collimated proton beam then passes through a RF cavity to allow compression of the spectrum. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations demonstrate the proton beam transport in the solenoid and RF electric fields. Excellent energy compression and collection efficiency of protons are presented. This method for proton beam optimization is suitable for high repetition-rate laser acceleration proton beams, which could be used as an injector for a conventional proton accelerator.

  16. Harmonic Kicker RF Cavity for the Jefferson Lab Electron-Ion Collider EM Simulation, Modification, and Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overstreet, Sarah; Wang, Haipeng

    2017-09-01

    An important step in the conceptual design for the future Jefferson Lab Electron-Ion Collider (JLEIC) is the development of supporting technologies for the Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) Electron Cooling Facility. The Harmonic Radiofrequency (RF) kicker cavity is one such device that is responsible for switching electron bunches in and out of the Circulator Cooling Ring (CCR) from and to the ERL, which is a critical part of the ion cooling process. Last year, a half scale prototype of the JLEIC harmonic RF kicker model was designed with resonant frequencies to support the summation of 5 odd harmonics (95.26 MHz, 285.78 MHz, 476.30 MHz, 666.82 MHz, and 857.35 MHz); however, the asymmetry of the kicker cavity gives rise to multipole components of the electric field at the electron-beam axis of the cavity. Previous attempts to symmetrize the electric field of this asymmetrical RF cavity have been unsuccessful. The aim of this study is to modify the existing prototype for a uniform electric field across the beam pathway so that the electron bunches will experience nearly zero beam current loading. In addition to this, we have driven the unmodified cavity with the harmonic sum and used the wire stretching method for an analysis of the multipole electric field components.

  17. Improvement of RF performance for AlGaN/GaN HEMT by using a cavity structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen; Yu, Xinxin; Zhou, Jianjun; Chen, Dunjun; Zhang, Kai; Kong, Cen; Lu, Haiyan; Kong, Yuechan; Li, Zhonghui; Chen, Tangsheng

    2016-12-01

    A novel method of improving RF performance for AlGaN/GaN HEMT by introducing a cavity structure under the gate-head of the T-shaped gate is proposed, which can effectively reduce the parasitic gate capacitance. The device with cavity structure presents quite similar DC characteristics with the conventional device without cavity, including a maximum drain current density of 1.16 A/mm, a peak transconductance of 424 mS/mm and a slightly degraded two-terminal breakdown voltage of 29 V. However, in comparison with the device without cavity, the device with cavity presents the significant improvements in small signal characteristics, with the fT increasing from 60 GHz to 84 GHz and the fmax increasing from 93 GHz to 104 GHz.

  18. RF cavity design exploiting a new derivative-free trust region optimization approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel-Karim S.O. Hassan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article, a novel derivative-free (DF surrogate-based trust region optimization approach is proposed. In the proposed approach, quadratic surrogate models are constructed and successively updated. The generated surrogate model is then optimized instead of the underlined objective function over trust regions. Truncated conjugate gradients are employed to find the optimal point within each trust region. The approach constructs the initial quadratic surrogate model using few data points of order O(n, where n is the number of design variables. The proposed approach adopts weighted least squares fitting for updating the surrogate model instead of interpolation which is commonly used in DF optimization. This makes the approach more suitable for stochastic optimization and for functions subject to numerical error. The weights are assigned to give more emphasis to points close to the current center point. The accuracy and efficiency of the proposed approach are demonstrated by applying it to a set of classical bench-mark test problems. It is also employed to find the optimal design of RF cavity linear accelerator with a comparison analysis with a recent optimization technique.

  19. Systematic cavity design approach for a multi-frequency gyrotron for DEMO and study of its RF behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalaria, P. C., E-mail: parth.kalaria@partner.kit.edu; Avramidis, K. A.; Franck, J.; Gantenbein, G.; Illy, S.; Pagonakis, I. Gr. [Institute for Pulsed Power and Microwave Technology (IHM), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Thumm, M.; Jelonnek, J. [Institute for Pulsed Power and Microwave Technology (IHM), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Institute of High Frequency Techniques and Electronics (IHE), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2016-09-15

    High frequency (>230 GHz) megawatt-class gyrotrons are planned as RF sources for electron cyclotron resonance heating and current drive in DEMOnstration fusion power plants (DEMOs). In this paper, for the first time, a feasibility study of a 236 GHz DEMO gyrotron is presented by considering all relevant design goals and the possible technical limitations. A mode-selection procedure is proposed in order to satisfy the multi-frequency and frequency-step tunability requirements. An effective systematic design approach for the optimal design of a gradually tapered cavity is presented. The RF-behavior of the proposed cavity is verified rigorously, supporting 920 kW of stable output power with an interaction efficiency of 36% including the considerations of realistic beam parameters.

  20. Final Technical Report on STTR Project DE-FG02-02ER86145 Pressurized RF Cavities for Muon Ionization Cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rolland Johnson

    2006-01-01

    This project was to design and build an RF test cell (TC), which could be operated at 800 MHz, filled with high pressure gases including hydrogen, at temperatures down to that of liquid nitrogen, in strong magnetic fields, in a strong radiation environment, and with interchangeable electrodes, in order to examine the use of high-pressure RF cavities for muon beam cooling

  1. Final Technical Report on STTR Project DE-FG02-02ER86145 Pressurized RF Cavities for Muon Ionization Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Rolland

    2006-07-13

    This project was to design and build an RF test cell (TC), which could be operated at 800 MHz, filled with high pressure gases including hydrogen, at temperatures down to that of liquid nitrogen, in strong magnetic fields, in a strong radiation environment, and with interchangeable electrodes, in order to examine the use of high-pressure RF cavities for muon beam cooling.

  2. Status of rf development work on a ferrite tuned amplifier cavity for the TRIUMF KAON factory booster ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poirier, R.L.; Enegren, T.

    1987-01-01

    Of the five synchrotron rings in the proposed TRIUMF KAON factory, the Booster ring to accelerate the proton beam from 440 MeV to 3 GeV has the most demanding rf requirements, primarily because of the relatively large frequency swing of 46.1 MHz to 61.1 MHz at a high repetition rate of 50 Hz. In the current reference design, the Booster lattice has twelve 3.9 m drift spaces with 2.5 m in each drift space available for installation of rf cavities to provide a required effective acceleration voltage of up to 600 kV per turn i.e. 50 kV per cavity. Design and development studies of a suitable cavity-amplifier system are in progress. For the initial reference design a system based on the one used in the Fermilab booster synchrotron has been chosen. That is, a double-gap drift-tube cavity with parallel-biased ferrite tuners and excited with a directly coupled Eimac Y567B tetrode. To meet the tuning and voltage requirements within the various mechanical and other constraints such as tube-to-gap voltage ratio, ferrite power density and available space, the reference design had to be further modified and a cold model of the cavity and tuners was constructed from copper-covered cardboard cylinders. From the results of the cold model measurements a new reference design was established and design work has begun on a full power prototype of the cavity-amplifier system

  3. Study of quality and field limitation of superconducting 1.3 GHz 9-Cell RF-cavities at DESY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlander, Felix

    2013-01-15

    The European XFEL and the International Linear Collider are based on superconducting rf cavities made of niobium. Their advantages are low ohmic losses which allow high duty cycles and the possibility to use a large beam aperture which is substantial to prevent wake fields at high current accelerators. To reach the theoretical limits of superconducting cavities, it is required to understand the present performance limitations. These are field emission, thermal breakdown (quench) and the ohmic losses dependent on the accelerating field, which are expressed in the quality factor. As the limiting mechanisms themselves are understood in general, the origin of the quench is often unclear. To determine the quench locations, a localisation tool for thermal breakdown using the second sound in superfluid helium has been installed at the cavity test facility at DESY and the results for a sample of about 30 cavities have been examined. The features of the distribution of the quench locations have been analysed and it has been found that the quench locations are in the area of the highest surface magnetic field and not necessarily at the equator of the cells. The data sample has been extended in an attempt to characterise the average behaviour of the quality factor related to the accelerating field. An analysis of the surface resistance of individual cavities shows that a recently developed model for the surface resistance of niobium is not able to describe the measurement in all detail, but the application of an additional mechanism showed promising results.

  4. Upgrade of the cryogenic infrastructure of SM18, CERN main test facility for superconducting magnets and RF cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perin, A.; Dhalla, F.; Gayet, P.; Serio, L.

    2017-12-01

    SM18 is CERN main facility for testing superconducting accelerator magnets and superconducting RF cavities. Its cryogenic infrastructure will have to be significantly upgraded in the coming years, starting in 2019, to meet the testing requirements for the LHC High Luminosity project and for the R&D program for superconducting magnets and RF equipment until 2023 and beyond. This article presents the assessment of the cryogenic needs based on the foreseen test program and on past testing experience. The current configuration of the cryogenic infrastructure is presented and several possible upgrade scenarios are discussed. The chosen upgrade configuration is then described and the characteristics of the main newly required cryogenic equipment, in particular a new 35 g/s helium liquefier, are presented. The upgrade implementation strategy and plan to meet the required schedule are then described.

  5. The CEBAF RF Separator System Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovater, J.; Mark Augustine; Al Guerra; Richard Nelson; Robert Terrell; Mark Wissmann

    2004-01-01

    The CEBAF accelerator uses RF deflecting cavities operating at the third sub-harmonic (499 MHz) of the accelerating frequency (1497 MHz) to ''kick'' the electron beam to the experimental halls. The cavities operate in a TEM dipole mode incorporating mode enhancing rods to increase the cavity's transverse shunt impedance [1]. As the accelerators energy has increased from 4 GeV to 6 GeV the RF system, specifically the 1 kW solid-state amplifiers, have become problematic, operating in saturation because of the increased beam energy demands. Two years ago we began a study to look into replacement for the RF amplifiers and decided to use a commercial broadcast Inductive Output Tube (IOT) capable of 30 kW. The new RF system uses one IOT amplifier on multiple cavities as opposed to one amplifier per cavity as was originally used. In addition, the new RF system supports a proposed 12 GeV energy upgrade to CEBAF. We are currently halfway through the upgrade with three IOTs in operation and the remaining one nearly installed. This paper reports on the new RF system and the IOT performance

  6. Beam-loading compensation in a proton linac cavity: study and design of a RF level regulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sitbon, Victor

    1971-01-01

    In 1969, Saturne Synchrotron's Van de Graaff injector was replaced by a 20 MeV proton linac. During normal operation, the required current is greater than 20 mA. A beam-loading compensation being necessary, specially because of the 600 μs pulse length, it was decided to study a feedback system. After a theoretical study of the real RF field build up in the cavity, a dynamic measurement of the driving loop input impedance was undertaken. A feedback circuit was then constructed, which is now operating on the 20 MeV linac; its design and performance as well as the preliminary studies are described. (author) [fr

  7. Characterization technique for long optical fiber cavities based on beating spectrum of multi-longitudinal mode fiber laser and beating spectrum in the RF domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adib, George A.; Sabry, Yasser M.; Khalil, Diaa

    2016-03-01

    The characterization of long fiber cavities is essential for many systems to predict the system practical performance. The conventional techniques for optical cavity characterization are not suitable for long fiber cavities due to the cavities' small free spectral ranges and due to the length variations caused by the environmental effects. In this work, we present a novel technique to characterize long fiber cavities using multi-longitudinal mode fiber laser source and RF spectrum analyzer. The fiber laser source is formed in a ring configuration, where the fiber laser cavity length is chosen to be 15 km to ensure that the free spectral range is much smaller than the free spectral range of the characterized passive fiber cavities. The method has been applied experimentally to characterize ring cavities with lengths of 6.2 m and 2.4 km. The results are compared to theoretical predictions with very good agreement.

  8. Mechanical Analysis of the 400 MHz RF-Dipole Crabbing Cavity Prototype for LHC High Luminosity Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Silva, Subashini U. [ODU; Park, HyeKyoung [ODU, JLAB; Delayen, Jean R. [ODU, JLAB; Li, Z. [SLAC

    2013-12-01

    The proposed LHC high luminosity upgrade requires two crabbing systems in increasing the peak luminosity, operating both vertically and horizontally at two interaction points of IP1 and IP5. The required system has tight dimensional constraints and needs to achieve higher operational gradients. A proof-of-principle 400 MHz crabbing cavity design has been successfully tested and has proven to be an ideal candidate for the crabbing system. The cylindrical proof-of-principle rf-dipole design has been adapted in to a square shaped design to further meet the dimensional requirements. The new rf-dipole design has been optimized in meeting the requirements in rf-properties, higher order mode damping, and multipole components. A crabbing system in a cryomodule is expected to be tested on the SPS beam line prior to the test at LHC. The new prototype is required to achieve the mechanical and thermal specifications of the SPS test followed by the test at LHC. This paper discusses the detailed mechanical and thermal analysis in minimizing Lorentz force detuning and sensitivity to liquid He pressure fluctuations.

  9. Optimal design of a microring cavity optical modulator for efficient RF-to-optical conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlichman, Yossef; Khilo, Anatol; Popović, Miloš A

    2018-02-05

    The efficiency of optical sideband generation with a microring resonator modulator as a function of modulator parameters is studied taking into account the photon dynamics inside the resonator. The best achievable modulation efficiency is determined for any choice of the resonator intrinsic quality factor, and analytic solutions for the optimum modulator parameters, namely the coupling coefficient and the detuning between the frequencies of the input laser light and the microring resonance, are provided. This analysis is carried out both for a narrowband RF signal, in which case the modulator is optimized for the center frequency of this signal, and for wideband signals, when high conversion efficiency over a wide range of RF frequencies is desired. The obtained results are expected to be useful coherent optical links, direct detection RF receivers, and optical wavelength converters.

  10. Design of coupler for the NSLS-II storage ring superconducting RF cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeddulla, M.; Rose, J.

    2011-03-28

    NSLS-II is a 3GeV, 500mA, high brightness, 1 MW beam power synchrotron facility that is designed with four superconducting cavities working at 499.68 MHz. To operate the cavities in over-damped coupling condition, an External Quality Factor (Qext) of {approx}65000 is required. We have modified the existing coupler for the CESR-B cavity which has a Qext of {approx}200,000 to meet the requirements of NSLS-II. CESR-B cavity has an aperture coupler with a coupler 'tongue' connecting the cavity to the waveguide. We have optimized the length, width and thickness of the 'tongue' as well as the width of the aperture to increase the coupling using the three dimensional electromagnetic field solver, HFSS. Several possible designs will be presented. We have modified the coupler of the CESR-B cavity to be used in the storage ring at the NSLS-II project using HFSS and verified using CST Microwave Studio. Using a combination of increasing the length and width of the coupler tongue and increasing the width of the aperture, the external Q of the cavity coupler was decreased to {approx}65000 as required for the design of the NSLS-II storage ring design.

  11. Reduced length design of 9.8 MHz RF accelerating cavity for the positron accumulator ring (PAR) of the Advanced Photon Source (APS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Y.W.; Bridges, J.F.; Kustom, R.L.

    1993-07-01

    A 9.8-MHz RF accelerating cavity is developed for the first harmonic system in the APS PAR and an aluminum unit is tested. The design goal si 40 kV at the accelerating gap, Q-factor of {approximately} 7,000 for the accelerating mode, 1.2-m diameter, 1.6-m length with good mechanical strength and stability. The design employs no dielectric or ferrite loading for tuning. The cavity is a plunger-loaded reentrant coaxial structure; the end of the inner conductor facing the wall has a piston-shaped loading structure which consists of a circular disk and a cylinder. The RF characteristic of the cavity was investigated using the URMEL-T and MAFIA programs. Compared with a coaxial structure with lumped element capacitive loading, this design gives improved RF characteristics.

  12. Investigation of Plasma Etching for Superconducting RF Cavities Surface Preparation. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuskovic, Leposava

    2009-01-01

    Our results show that plasma-treated samples are comparable or superior to a BCP sample, both in the size of features and sharpness of the boundaries between individual features at the surface. Plasma treatment of bulk Nb cavities is a promising technique for microwave cavities preparation used in particle acceleration application. Etching rates are sufficiently high to enable efficient removal of mechanically damaged surface layer with high reproducibility. No impurities are deposited on the bulk Nb surface during plasma treatment. Surface topology characteristic are promising for complex cavity geometry, since discharge conforms the profile of the reaction chamber. In view of these experimental results, we propose plasma treatment for producing microwave cavities with high Q factor instead of using bulk Nb treated with wet etching process.

  13. RF properties of 700 MHz, β= 0.42 elliptical cavity for high current ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-27

    ADSS) that will be mainly utilized for the transmutation of nuclear waste and enrichment of U233. Design and development of superconducting medium velocity cavity has been taken up as a part of the accelerator-driven ...

  14. Third harmonic rf cavity for transition crossing in the Main Ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhat, C.M.

    1992-08-01

    This paper reports the present status and future plans of the implementation of the transition crossing RF harmonic system at Fermilab. The test is being carried out in the Main Ring (MR) which is used as a 150 GeV injector to the Tevatron

  15. 3-D electromagnetic and thermo-mechanical simulation of a RF cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Launay, F

    2003-01-01

    A 3-D thermo-mechanical study of the edge of entrance blade of IPHI's RFQ was conducted by means of I-DEAS code. The aim is to compare the temperatures reached, the constraints, and the deformations calculated on the basis of RF power density stored on the blade obtained by means of two different electromagnetic computational codes, SOPRANO and MAFIA.

  16. Mirror-smooth surfaces and repair of defects in superconducting RF cavities by mechanical polishing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, C. A. [Fermilab; Cooley, L. D. [Fermilab

    2012-11-22

    Mechanical techniques for polishing the inside surface of niobium superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities have been systematically explored. By extending known techniques to fine polishing, mirror-like finishes were produced, with <15 nm RMS (root mean square) roughness over 1 mm2 scan area. This is an order of magnitude less than the typical roughness produced by the electropolishing of niobium cavities. The extended mechanical polishing (XMP) process was applied to several SRF cavities which exhibited equator defects that caused quench at <20 MV m-1 and were not improved by further electropolishing. Cavity optical inspection equipment verified the complete removal of these defects, and minor acid processing, which dulled the mirror finish, restored performance of the defective cells to the high gradients and quality factors measured for adjacent cells when tested with other harmonics. This innate repair feature of XMP could be used to increase manufacturing yield. Excellent superconducting properties resulted after initial process optimization, with quality factor Q of 3 × 1010 and accelerating gradient of 43 MV m-1 being attained for a single-cell TESLA cavity, which are both close to practical limits. Several repaired nine-cell cavities also attained Q > 8 × 109 at 35 MV m-1, which is the specification for the International Linear Collider. Future optimization of the process and pathways for eliminating requirements for acid processing are also discussed.

  17. New results of development on high efficiency high gradient superconducting rf cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Rongli [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Li, Z. K. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hao, Z. K. [Peking Univ., Beijing (China); Liu, K. X. [Peking Univ., Beijing (China); Zhao, H. Y. [OTIC, Ningxia (China); Adolphsen, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    We report on the latest results of development on high-efficiency high-gradient superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. Several 1-cell cavities made of large-grain niobium (Nb) were built, processed and tested. Two of these cavities are of the Low Surface Field (LSF) shape. Series of tests were carried out following controlled thermal cycling. Experiments toward zero-field cooling were carried out. The best experimentally achieved results are Eacc = 41 MV/m at Q0 = 6.5×1010 at 1.4 K by a 1-cell 1.3 GHz large-grain Nb TTF shape cavity and Eacc = 49 MV/m at Q0 = 1.5×1010 at 1.8 K by a 1-cell 1.5 GHz large-grain Nb CEBAF upgrade low-loss shape cavity.

  18. Optical surface properties and their RF limitations of European XFEL cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenskat, Marc

    2017-04-15

    The inner surface of superconducting cavities plays a crucial role to achieve highest accelerating fields and low losses. The industrial fabrication of cavities for the European X-Ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) and the International Linear Collider (ILC) HiGrade Research Project allowed for an investigation of this interplay. For the serial inspection of the inner surface, the optical inspection robot OBACHT was constructed and to analyze the large amount of data, represented in the images of the inner surface, an image processing and analysis code was developed and new variables to describe the cavity surface were obtained. This quantitative analysis identified vendor specific surface properties which allow to perform a quality control and assurance during the production. In addition, a strong negative correlation of ρ=-0.93 with a significance of 6σ of the integrated grain boundary area ΣA versus the maximal achievable accelerating field E{sub acc,max} has been found.

  19. R&D for the Post-EP Processes of Superconducting RF Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeki, Takayuki [KEK; Funahashi, Y. [KEK; Hayano, H. [KEK; Kato, Seigo [KEK; Nishiwaki, Michiru [KEK; Sawabe, Motoaki [KEK; Ueno, Kenji [KEK; Watanabe, K. [KEK; Antoine, Claire [CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette; Berry, Stefurn [CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette; Eozenou, F. [CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette; Gasser, Y. [CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette; Visentin, B. [CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette; Clemens, William A. [JLAB; Geng, Rongli [JLAB; Manus, Robert [JLAB; Tyagi, Puneet [GUAS/AS, Ibaraki

    2009-11-01

    The Electro-Polishing (EP) process is the best candidate of final surface treatment for the production of ILC cavities. Nevertheless, the broad distribution of the gradient caused by field emitters in cavities is sitll a serious problem for the EP process. A candidate source of field emitter is the sulfur component which is produced in the EP process and remains the inner-surface of cavities. We studied the effect of Ethanole- and degreaser-rinse processes after the EP process by a unique method. Moreover, we tried to test the sponge cleaning as the post-EP process to remove the field emitter inside the cavcity. This article describe the results of series tests of the post-EP process at KEK.

  20. R&D for the Sponge Cleaning of Superconducting RF Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeki, T; Hayano, H; Kato, S; Nishiwaki, M; Sawabe, M; Ueno, K; Watanabe, K; Clemens, W A; Geng, R L

    2009-05-01

    The Electro-polishing process is the best candidate of final surface treatment for the production of ILC cavities. Nevertheless, the broad distribution of the gradient caused by field emitters in cavities is sitll a serious problem for the EP process. Ethanole- and degreaser-rinse processes after the EP process were found to be effective to decrease the field emmitter in recent studies, however, these are not perfect yet. We tried to test the sponge cleaning as the post EP process to remove the field emitter inside the cavcity. This article describe the results of series tests with a proto-type sponge-cleaning tool for single-cell cavity at KEK.

  1. Physical properties and structure of large grain/single crystal niobium for superconducting RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermakov, A; Jelezov, I; Singer, X; Singer, W; Wen, H; Spiwek, M; Viswanathan, G B; Levit, V; Fraser, H L

    2008-01-01

    The R and D program on superconducting cavities fabricated from electron beam melted large grain/single crystal (LG/SC) niobium discs explores it's potential for production of approximately 1000 cavities for the European XFEL. Thermal, electrical, mechanical properties, crystal orientation and structure are investigated with the aim to make the fabrication procedure more efficient. In opposite to fine grain niobium the thermal conductivity of LG/SC has a pronounced maximum at 2K. Calculation found a correlation between thermal conductivity enhancement and phonon scattering at the grain boundaries. Detected enhancement is very susceptible to plastic deformation that can cause the complete elimination of the low temperature peak. The final annealing at 800 deg. C of cavities made from large grain niobium is necessary for hydrogen outgassing, as well as for the thermal conductivity enhancement due to stress relaxation and recovery of crystal defects introduced at the cavity fabrication. The effects of annealing temperature up to 1200 deg. C, heating rate, and holding time on the structure recovery after rolling are also established. Total elongation at the uniaxial tensile tests for LG is very high (50-110%) and depends significantly on the load direction, because only very few grains are in the gage length. The elongation after fracture by bi-axial testing (bulging test) for LG is lower (<15%) yet sufficient for deep drawing of half-cells. Metallographic investigation of and electron beam welding tests on, niobium single crystals show that an appropriate disc enlargement and annealing can be done without destruction of the single crystal. These tests showed that a cavity can be produced without grain boundaries even in the welding area. On base of the results a fabrication method of single crystal cavities is proposed

  2. RF properties of 700 MHz, β= 0.42 elliptical cavity for high current ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ADSS) that will be mainly utilized for the transmutation of nuclear waste and enrichment of U233. Design and development of superconducting medium velocity cavity has been taken up as a part of the accelerator-driven subcritical system ...

  3. Optical surface properties and their RF limitations of European XFEL cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenskat, Marc

    2017-10-01

    The inner surface of superconducting cavities plays a crucial role to achieve highest accelerating fields and low losses. The industrial fabrication of cavities for the European X-ray Free Electron Laser and the International Linear Collider HiGrade Research Project allowed for an investigation of this interplay. For the serial inspection of the inner surface, the optical inspection robot ’optical bench for automated cavity inspection with high resolution on short timescales’ OBACHT was constructed and to analyze the large amount of data, represented in the images of the inner surface, an image processing and analysis code was developed and new variables to describe the cavity surface were obtained. This quantitative analysis identified vendor-specific surface properties which allow the performance of quality control and assurance during production. In addition, a strong negative correlation of ρ =-0.93 with a significance of 6 σ of the integrated grain boundary area \\sum {A} versus the maximal achievable accelerating field {{E}}{acc,\\max } has been found.

  4. Surface characterization of Nb samples electropolished with real superconducting rf accelerator cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Zhao

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We report the results of surface characterizations of niobium (Nb samples electropolished together with a single cell superconducting radio-frequency accelerator cavity. These witness samples were located in three regions of the cavity, namely at the equator, the iris, and the beam pipe. Auger electron spectroscopy was utilized to probe the chemical composition of the topmost four atomic layers. Scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x ray for elemental analysis was used to observe the surface topography and chemical composition at the micrometer scale. A few atomic layers of sulfur (S were found covering the samples nonuniformly. Niobium oxide granules with a sharp geometry were observed on every sample. Some Nb-O granules appeared to also contain sulfur.

  5. PSpice modeling of broadband RF cavities for transient and frequency domain simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harzheim, Jens [Institut fuer Theorie Elektromagnetischer Felder, Fachgebiet Beschleunigertechnik, TU Darmstadt (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    In the future accelerator facility FAIR, Barrier-Bucket Systems will play an important role for different longitudinal beam manipulations. As the function of this type of system is to provide single sine gap voltages, the components of the system have to operate in a broad frequency range. To investigate the different effects and to design the different system components, the whole Barrier-Bucket System is to be modeled in PSpice. While for low power signals, the system shows linear behavior, nonlinear effects arise at higher amplitudes. Therefore, simulations in both, frequency and time domain are needed. The highly frequency dependent magnetic alloy ring cores of the future Barrier-Bucket cavity have been mod eled in a first step and based on these models, the whole cavity was analyzed in PSpice. The simulation results show good agreement with former measurements.

  6. Thermal design studies in superconducting rf cavities: Phonon peak and Kapitza conductance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Aizaz

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Thermal design studies of superconducting radio frequency (SRF cavities involve two thermal parameters, namely the temperature dependent thermal conductivity of Nb at low temperatures and the heat transfer coefficient at the Nb-He II interface, commonly known as the Kapitza conductance. During the fabrication process of the SRF cavities, Nb sheet is plastically deformed through a deep drawing process to obtain the desired shape. The effect of plastic deformation on low temperature thermal conductivity as well as Kapitza conductance has been studied experimentally. Strain induced during the plastic deformation process reduces the thermal conductivity in its phonon transmission regime (disappearance of phonon peak by 80%, which may explain the performance limitations of the defect-free SRF cavities during their high field operations. Low temperature annealing of the deformed Nb sample could not recover the phonon peak. However, moderate temperature annealing during the titanification process recovered the phonon peak in the thermal conductivity curve. Kapitza conductance measurements for the Nb-He II interface for various surface topologies have also been carried out before and after the annealing. These measurements reveal consistently increased Kapitza conductance after the annealing process was carried out in the two temperature regimes.

  7. RF transport

    CERN Document Server

    Choroba, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with the techniques of transport of high-power radiofrequency (RF) power from a RF power source to the cavities of an accelerator. Since the theory of electromagnetic waves in waveguides and of waveguide components is very well explained in a number of excellent text books it will limit itself on special waveguide distributions and on a number of, although not complete list of, special problems which sometimes occur in RF power transportation systems.

  8. Rf Feedback free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brau, Charles A.; Swenson, Donald A.; Boyd, Jr., Thomas J.

    1981-01-01

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser which use rf feedback to enhance efficiency. Rf energy is extracted from an electron beam by decelerating cavities and returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to lower the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  9. Development of a multi-scale simulation model of tube hydroforming for superconducting RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H.S.; Sumption, M.D.; Bong, H.J.; Lim, H.; Collings, E.W.

    2017-01-01

    This work focuses on finite element modeling of the hydroforming process for niobium tubes intended for use in superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. The hydroforming of tubular samples into SRF-relevant shapes involves the complex geometries and loading conditions which develop during the deformation, as well as anisotropic materials properties. Numerical description of the process entails relatively complex numerical simulations. A crystal plasticity (CP) model was constructed that included the evolution of crystallographic orientation during deformation as well as the anisotropy of tubes in all directions and loading conditions. In this work we demonstrate a multi-scale simulation approach which uses both microscopic CP and macroscopic continuum models. In this approach a CP model (developed and implemented into ABAQUS using UMAT) was used for determining the flow stress curve only under bi-axial loading in order to reduce the computing time. The texture of the materials obtained using orientation imaging microscopy (OIM) and tensile test data were inputs for this model. Continuum FE analysis of tube hydroforming using the obtained constitutive equation from the CP modeling was then performed and compared to the results of hydraulic bulge testing. The results show that high quality predictions of the deformation under hydroforming of Nb tubes can be obtained using CP-FEM based on their known texture and the results of tensile tests. The importance of the CP-FEM based approach is that it reduces the need for hydraulic bulge testing, using a relatively simple computational approach.

  10. RF-chopper for the JHF proton linac

    CERN Document Server

    Fu Shin Ian

    2000-01-01

    An RF-chopper possesses merits in both its high deflecting field and compactness. For this reason, it is suitable for chopping a high-current beam in a medium-energy beam-transport line (MEBT) of an ion linear accelerator. The JHF linac, as a high-current H sup - accelerator with an average current of up to 0.2 mA or higher in the second phase, took these advantages of the RF-chopper in its design. Two RF-deflecting cavities as the chopper will be used in the MEBT just downward of the 3-MeV 324-MHz RFQ. A 324-MHz RF-chopper cavity has been designed with optimization for a fast rise/fall time, which is an essential requirement for the chopper in a high-current accelerator in order to avoid radioactivity induced by the lost particles due to insufficient chopping during the transient time. The rise time can be less than 8 ns by means of a pair of ports with large coupling loops. In this paper, the details concerning the R and D of the RF-chopper are presented. Some RF properties calculated with MAFIA and HFSS co...

  11. Proposal to negotiate a collaboration agreement related to the application of novel cavity fabrication techniques and Nb/Cu sputter coating technology in the field of superconducting RF for the Future Circular Collider (FCC) study

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    Proposal to negotiate a collaboration agreement related to the application of novel cavity fabrication techniques and Nb/Cu sputter coating technology in the field of superconducting RF for the Future Circular Collider (FCC) study

  12. Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mother's bacteria from being passed to the child. Treatment of Cavities Fluoride Fillings Root canal or tooth extraction If ... to help the world be well. From developing new therapies that treat and prevent disease to helping people ...

  13. Dynamics and performance of the free electron laser at Super-Aco with a harmonic RF cavity set on 500 MHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nutarelli, D.

    2000-01-01

    This work is dedicated to the development of the potentialities of the free electron laser that has been installed on the storage ring Super-Aco at Orsay university. We have studied the dynamics of the electron beam inside a harmonic RF cavity set on 500 MHz. The impact of the geometric characteristics of the optical cavity on the transverse overlapping between laser radiation and the electron beam has been studied in details. An important part of the work has been the assessment of the optical characterization of the dielectric multi-layer mirrors of the cavity. For that purpose a complete system has been designed to assess the changes in optical properties of mirrors during laser operation. Another important part of this work was the study of the interaction process between laser radiation and the electron bunch leading to saturation. This interaction process has been simulated through a new model and some predictions given by this model have been successfully confronted to experimental data. The installation of the harmonic RF cavity has led to a significant increase of the laser radiation gain and the value of the mean power of the laser radiation has reached 300 mW. An interesting application of this technique is the generation of high energy gamma photons through Compton backscattering. A collimated 35 MeV-energy photon beam has been produced at Super-Aco with a rate of 5.10 6 photons per second. (A.C.)

  14. The CEBAF separator cavity resonance control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M. Wissmann; C. Hovater; A. Guerra; T. Plawski

    2005-01-01

    The CEBAF energy upgrade will increase the maximum beam energy from 6 GeV to 12 GeV available to the experimental halls. RF deflection cavities (separators) are used to direct the electron beam to the three halls. The resulting increase in RF separator cavity gradient and subsequent increase in RF power needed for these higher energies will require the cavities to have active resonance control. Currently, at the present 4 to 6 GeV energies, the cavities are tuned mechanically and then stabilized with Low Conductivity Water (LCW) which is maintained at a constant temperature of 95 Fahrenheit. This approach is no longer feasible and an active resonance control system that controls both water temperature and flow has been designed and built. The system uses a commercial PLC with embedded PID controls to regulate water temperature and flow to the cavities. The system allows the operator to remotely adjust temperature/flow and consequently cavity resonance for the full range of beam energies. Ultimately, closed loop control will be maintained by monitoring each cavity's reflected power. This paper describes this system

  15. Electron beam combination by RF deflectors Tolerance and requirements

    CERN Document Server

    Corsini, R

    2002-01-01

    In the framework of the new Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) Test Facility CTF3, it is planned to perform a demonstration of the bunch frequency multiplication process on which the CLIC drive beam generation scheme is based. This process relies on the combination of electron bunch trains in isochronous rings using RF deflecting cavities. Specific requirements are imposed on both the beam characteristics and the RF amplitude and phase in the deflectors. In this paper, we study and specify these requirements in the case of the Preliminary Phase of CTF3.

  16. Status of the ILC Crab Cavity Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burt, G.; Dexter, A.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech.; Beard, C.; Goudket, P.; McIntosh, P.; /Daresbury; Bellantoni, L.; /Fermilab; Grimm, T.; Li, Z.; Xiao, L.; /SLAC

    2011-10-20

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) will require two dipole cavities to 'crab' the electron and positron bunches prior to their collision. It is proposed to use two 9 cell SCRF dipole cavities operating at a frequency of 3.9 GHz, with a transverse gradient of 3.8MV/m in order to provide the required transverse kick. Extensive numerical modelling of this cavity and its couplers has been performed. Aluminium prototypes have been manufactured and tested to measure the RF properties of the cavity and couplers. In addition single cell niobium prototypes have been manufactured and tested in a vertical cryostat. The International Collider (ILC) [1] collides bunches of electrons and positrons at a crossing angle of 14 mrad. The angle between these bunches causes a loss in luminosity due to geometric effects [2]. The luminosity lost from this geometric effect can be recovered by rotating the bunches into alignment prior to collision. One possible method of rotating the bunches is to use a crab cavity [3]. A crab cavity is a transverse defecting cavity, where the phase of the cavity is such that the head and tail of the bunch receive equal and opposite kicks. As the bunches are only 500 nm wide in the horizontal plane, the cavity phase must be strictly controlled to avoid the bunch centre being deflected too much. In order to keep the phase stability within the required limits it is required that the cavity be superconducting to avoid thermal effects in both the cavity and its RF source. At the location of the crab cavity in the ILC there is only 23 cm separation between the centre of the cavity and the extraction line, hence the cavity must be small enough to fit in this space. This, along with the difficulty of making high frequency SRF components, set the frequency of the cavity to 3.9 GHz.

  17. Electromagnetic and mechanical design of gridded radio-frequency cavity windows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alsharo' a, Mohammad M. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2004-12-01

    Electromagnetic, thermal and structural analyses of radio-frequency (RF) cavities were performed as part of a developmental RF cavity program for muon cooling. RF cavities are necessary to provide longitudinal focusing of the muons and to compensate for their energy loss. Closing the cavity ends by electrically conducting windows reduces the power requirement and increases the on-axis electric field for a given maximum surface electric field. Many factors must be considered in the design of RF cavity windows. RF heating can cause the windows to deform in the axial direction of the cavity. The resulting thermal stresses in the window must be maintained below the yield stress of the window material. The out-of-plane deflection must be small enough so that the consequent frequency shift is tolerable. For example, for an 805 MHz cavity, the out-of-plane deflection must be kept below 25 microns to prevent the frequency of the cavity from shifting more than 10 kHz. In addition, the window design should yield smooth electric and magnetic fields, terminate field leakage beyond the window, and minimize beam scattering. In the present thesis, gridded-tube window designs were considered because of their high structural integrity. As a starting point in the analysis, a cylindrical pillbox cavity was considered as a benchmark problem. Analytical and finite element solutions were obtained for the electric and magnetic fields, power loss density, and temperature profile. Excellent agreement was obtained between the analytical and finite element results. The finite element method was then used to study a variety of gridded-tube windows. It was found that cooling of the gridded-tube windows by passing helium gas inside the tubes significantly reduces the out-of-plane deflection and the thermal stresses. Certain tube geometries and grid patterns were found to satisfy all of the design requirements.

  18. Electromagnetic and mechanical design of gridded radio-frequency cavity windows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alsharoa, Mohammad M.

    2004-01-01

    Electromagnetic, thermal and structural analyses of radio-frequency (RF) cavities were performed as part of a developmental RF cavity program for muon cooling. RF cavities are necessary to provide longitudinal focusing of the muons and to compensate for their energy loss. Closing the cavity ends by electrically conducting windows reduces the power requirement and increases the on-axis electric field for a given maximum surface electric field. Many factors must be considered in the design of RF cavity windows. RF heating can cause the windows to deform in the axial direction of the cavity. The resulting thermal stresses in the window must be maintained below the yield stress of the window material. The out-of-plane deflection must be small enough so that the consequent frequency shift is tolerable. For example, for an 805 MHz cavity, the out-of-plane deflection must be kept below 25 microns to prevent the frequency of the cavity from shifting more than 10 kHz. In addition, the window design should yield smooth electric and magnetic fields, terminate field leakage beyond the window, and minimize beam scattering. In the present thesis, gridded-tube window designs were considered because of their high structural integrity. As a starting point in the analysis, a cylindrical pillbox cavity was considered as a benchmark problem. Analytical and finite element solutions were obtained for the electric and magnetic fields, power loss density, and temperature profile. Excellent agreement was obtained between the analytical and finite element results. The finite element method was then used to study a variety of gridded-tube windows. It was found that cooling of the gridded-tube windows by passing helium gas inside the tubes significantly reduces the out-of-plane deflection and the thermal stresses. Certain tube geometries and grid patterns were found to satisfy all of the design requirements

  19. CERN News: Slow ejection efficiency at the PS; Vacuum tests on the ISR; Fire in the neutrino beam-line; Prototype r.f . cavity for the Booster; Crane-bridge in ISR experimental hall; Modifications to the r.f . system at the PS

    CERN Multimedia

    1969-01-01

    CERN News: Slow ejection efficiency at the PS; Vacuum tests on the ISR; Fire in the neutrino beam-line; Prototype r.f . cavity for the Booster; Crane-bridge in ISR experimental hall; Modifications to the r.f . system at the PS

  20. Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Additional Content Medical News Cavities ˈkav-ət-ē (Dental Caries) By James T. Ubertalli, DMD, Private Practice, Hingham, ... access to dental care, and better treatment for tooth decay and periodontal disease. When teeth are lost, chewing is greatly hindered, and speaking ...

  1. Successful development of innovative fabrication technique based on laser welding, for superconducting RF cavities - results and path ahead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khare, Prashant; Upadhyay, B.N.; Dwivedi, Jishnu

    2013-01-01

    Superconducting radio frequency (SCRF) cavities are the heart of any particle accelerator based on SCRF technology. All over the world, efforts are being made to develop a technique which can bring down the cost and time of fabrication of these cavities. The present day fabrication method of SCRF cavities uses Electron beam welding (EBW) technique. The cavities fabricated by this method turn out to be expensive and take long fabrication time. To overcome such difficulties related with EBW process, an innovative concept for fabrication of SCRF cavities based on laser welding was formulated at RRCAT. International patent application was immediately launched for this work, to protect intellectual property rights of DAE

  2. Radio frequency plasma method for uniform surface processing of RF cavities and other three-dimensional structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popovic, Svetozar; Upadhyay, Janardan; Vuskovic, Leposava; Phillips, H. Lawrence; Valente-Feliciano, Anne-Marie

    2017-12-26

    A method for efficient plasma etching of surfaces inside three-dimensional structures can include positioning an inner electrode within the chamber cavity; evacuating the chamber cavity; adding a first inert gas to the chamber cavity; regulating the pressure in the chamber; generating a plasma sheath along the inner wall of the chamber cavity; adjusting a positive D.C. bias on the inner electrode to establish an effective plasma sheath voltage; adding a first electronegative gas to the chamber cavity; optionally readjusting the positive D.C. bias on the inner electrode reestablish the effective plasma sheath voltage at the chamber cavity; etching the inner wall of the chamber cavity; and polishing the inner wall to a desired surface roughness.

  3. The CEBAF Separator Cavity Resonance Control System

    CERN Document Server

    Wissmann, Mark J; Hovater, Curt; Plawski, Tomasz

    2005-01-01

    The CEBAF energy upgrade from 6 GeV to 12GeV will increase the range of beam energies available to the experimental halls. RF deflection cavities (separators) are used to direct the electron beam to the three experimental halls. Consequently with the increase in RF separator cavity gradient needed for the higher energies, RF power will also increase requiring the cavities to have active resonance control. At the 6 GeV energy, the cavities are tuned mechanically and then stabilized with Low Conductivity Water (LCW), which is maintained at constant temperature of 95o Fahrenheit. This is no longer feasible and an active resonance control system, that controls both water temperature and flow has been built. The system uses a commercial PLC with embedded PID controls to control water temperature and flow to the cavities. The system allows the operator to remotely adjust temperature/flow and consequently cavity resonance for the full range of beam energies. Ultimately closed loop control will be maintained by monit...

  4. Higher order mode damping in a five-cell superconducting rf cavity with a photonic band gap coupler cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey A. Arsenyev

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a study of higher order mode (HOM damping in the first multicell superconducting radio-frequency (SRF cavity with a photonic band gap (PBG coupler cell. Achieving higher average beam currents is particularly desirable for future light sources and particle colliders based on SRF energy-recovery linacs (ERLs. Beam current in ERLs is limited by the beam breakup instability, caused by parasitic HOMs interacting with the beam in accelerating cavities. A PBG cell incorporated in an accelerating cavity can reduce the negative effect of HOMs by providing a frequency selective damping mechanism, thus allowing significantly higher beam currents. The five-cell cavity with a PBG cell was designed and optimized for HOM damping. Monopole and dipole HOMs were simulated. The SRF cavity was fabricated and tuned. External quality factors for some HOMs were measured in a cold test. The measurements agreed well with the simulations.

  5. Cavity types

    CERN Document Server

    Gerigk, Frank

    2011-01-01

    In the field of particle accelerators the most common use of RF cavities is to increase the particle velocity of traversing particles. This feature makes them one of the core ingredients of every accelerator, and in the case of linear accelerators they are even the dominant machine component. Since there are many different types of accelerator, RF cavities have been optimized for different purposes and with different abilities, e.g., cavities with fixed or variable RF frequency, cavities for short or long pulses/CW operation, superconducting and normal-conducting cavities. This lecture starts with a brief historical introduction and an explanation on how to get from Maxwell's equations to a simple cavity. Then, cavities will be classified by the type of mode that is employed for acceleration, and an explanation is given as to why certain modes are used in particular cavity types. The lecture will close with a comparison of normal versus superconducting cavities and a few words on the actual power consumption ...

  6. A beamline design and data acquisition with the 20-MeV, 20-ps electron beam for the higher-order mode studies of the APS SR-rf cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, J.; Nassiri, A.; Daly, R.

    1993-01-01

    A beamline has been designed and assembled to use the ANL Chemistry Division 20-MeV electron linac for the testing of higher-order mode excitation and damping in rf cavities. The beamline consists of two sections (a beam collimating section with a 1.5 inches-OD vacuum line, and a cavity test section with a 3 inches-OD vacuum line), separated by two double aluminum foil windows. The beam diagnostics consist of a stripline beam position monitor, integrating current transformers, fluorescent screens, and a Faraday cup. EPICS (Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System) is used for beamline control, monitoring, and data acquisition. Also described is the diagnostic system used for beam image capture and analysis using EPICS-controlled hardware and PV-WAVE software. The rf cavity measurement will be described in a separate paper

  7. Study of a power coupler for superconducting RF cavities used in high intensity proton accelerator; Etude et developpement d'un coupleur de puissance pour les cavites supraconductrices destinees aux accelerateurs de protons de haute intensite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souli, M

    2007-07-15

    The coaxial power coupler needed for superconducting RF cavities used in the high energy section of the EUROTRANS driver should transmit 150 kW (CW operation) RF power to the protons beam. The calculated RF and dielectric losses in the power coupler (inner and outer conductor, RF window) are relatively high. Consequently, it is necessary to design very carefully the cooling circuits in order to remove the generated heat and to ensure stable and reliable operating conditions for the coupler cavity system. After calculating all type of losses in the power coupler, we have designed and validated the inner conductor cooling circuit using numerical simulations results. We have also designed and optimized the outer conductor cooling circuit by establishing its hydraulic and thermal characteristics. Next, an experiment dedicated to study the thermal interaction between the power coupler and the cavity was successfully performed at CRYOHLAB test facility. The critical heat load Qc for which a strong degradation of the cavity RF performance was measured leading to Q{sub c} in the range 3 W-5 W. The measured heat load will be considered as an upper limit of the residual heat flux at the outer conductor cold extremity. A dedicated test facility was developed and successfully operated for measuring the performance of the outer conductor heat exchanger using supercritical helium as coolant. The test cell used reproduces the realistic thermal boundary conditions of the power coupler mounted on the cavity in the cryo-module. The first experimental results have confirmed the excellent performance of the tested heat exchanger. The maximum residual heat flux measured was 60 mW for a 127 W thermal load. As the RF losses in the coupler are proportional to the incident RF power, we can deduce that the outer conductor heat exchanger performance is continued up to 800 kW RF power. Heat exchanger thermal conductance has been identified using a 2D axisymmetric thermal model by comparing

  8. A New Vacuum Brazing Route for Niobium-316L Stainless Steel Transition Joints for Superconducting RF Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Abhay; Ganesh, P.; Kaul, R.; Bhatnagar, V. K.; Yedle, K.; Ram Sankar, P.; Sindal, B. K.; Kumar, K. V. A. N. P. S.; Singh, M. K.; Rai, S. K.; Bose, A.; Veerbhadraiah, T.; Ramteke, S.; Sridhar, R.; Mundra, G.; Joshi, S. C.; Kukreja, L. M.

    2015-02-01

    The paper describes a new approach for vacuum brazing of niobium-316L stainless steel transition joints for application in superconducting radiofrequency cavities. The study exploited good wettability of titanium-activated silver-base brazing alloy (CuSil-ABA®), along with nickel as a diffusion barrier, to suppress brittle Fe-Nb intermetallic formation, which is well reported during the established vacuum brazing practice using pure copper filler. The brazed specimens displayed no brittle intermetallic layers on any of its interfaces, but instead carried well-distributed intermetallic particles in the ductile matrix. The transition joints displayed room temperature tensile and shear strengths of 122-143 MPa and 80-113 MPa, respectively. The joints not only exhibited required hermeticity (helium leak rate treatment at 873 K (suppresses Q-disease in niobium cavities), without any noticeable degradation in the microstructure and the hermeticity. The joints retained their leak tightness even after undergoing ten thermal cycles between the room temperature and the liquid nitrogen temperature, thereby establishing their ability to withstand service-induced low cycle fatigue conditions. The study proposes a new lower temperature brazing route to form niobium-316L stainless steel transition joints, with improved microstructural characteristics and acceptable hermeticity and mechanical properties.

  9. Formulation of electromagnetic-wave analysis by boundary element method and its application to the analysis of RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washizu, Masao; Tanabe, Yoshio.

    1986-01-01

    In a system handling the electromagnetic waves of large power such as the cavity resonator for a high energy accelerator and the high frequency heater for a nuclear fusion apparatus, the margin in the thermal and mechanical design of a wave guide system cannot be taken large, accordingly, the detailed analysis of electromagnetic waves is required. When the analysis in a general form is carried out, boundary element method may be a useful method of solution. This time, the authors carried out the formulation of steady electromagnetic wave problems by boundary element method, and it was shown that the formulation was able to be carried out under the physically clear boundary condition also in this case, and especially in the case of a perfect conductor system, a very simple form was obtained. In this paper, first, the techniques of formulation in a general case, and next, as a special case, the formulation for a perfect conductor system are described. Taking the analysis of the cavity resonators of cylindrical and rectangular parallelepiped forms as examples, the comparison with the analytical solution was carried out. (Kako, I.)

  10. Vertical cold test of the crab cavity with a co-axial beam pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Y.; Hara, K.; Hosoyama, K.; Kabe, A.; Kojima, Y.; Nakai, H.; Inoue, M.; Ohkubo, K.

    2003-01-01

    A crab cavity was designed for the KEKB electron-positron collider-accelerator. The aim of this cavity is to deflect the beam bunch and realize the crab-crossing scheme. The cavity, operating in the TM110 mode, has a squashed cell with a co-axial beam pipe coupling scheme to extract the lowest order mode (TM010). Operating voltage should be high enough to deflect a beam bunch for a finite beam-crossing angle. For the R and D of this complicated structure, we have fabricated a prototype cavity and a simplified inner conductor for the co-axial beam pipe structure. We tested the RF performance of the cavity with the inner conductor in a vertical cryostat. During the tests, a serious Q-degradation was observed, which is so called Hydrogen Q-disease'. A calorimetric RF loss measurement showed that the loss at the inner conductor is a cause of the Q-degradation. We applied a quick cool-down procedure to the inner conductor and achieved a required deflecting voltage. (author)

  11. RF power transport

    CERN Document Server

    Choroba, S

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the techniques of transport of high-power RF from an RF power source to the cavities of an accelerator. Since the theory of electromagnetic waves in waveguides and of waveguide components is very well explained in a number of excellent text books it will limit itself to special waveguide distributions and to some special problems which sometimes occur in RF power transportation systems.

  12. RF feedback for KEKB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezura, Eizi; Yoshimoto, Shin-ichi; Akai, Kazunori [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1996-08-01

    This paper describes the present status of the RF feedback development for the KEK B-Factory (KEKB). A preliminary experiment concerning the RF feedback using a parallel comb-filter was performed through a choke-mode cavity and a klystron. The RF feedback has been tested using the beam of the TRISTAN Main Ring, and has proved to be effective in damping the beam instability. (author)

  13. A new measurement tool for characterization of superconducting rf accelerator cavities using high-performance LTS SQUIDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vodel, W [Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, 07743 Jena (Germany); Neubert, R [Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, 07743 Jena (Germany); Nietzsche, S [Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, 07743 Jena (Germany); Seidel, P [Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, 07743 Jena (Germany); Knaack, K [DESY Hamburg (Germany); Wittenburg, K [DESY Hamburg (Germany); Peters, A [Heidelberger Ionenstrahl-Therapiezentrum, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2007-11-15

    This paper presents a new system to measure very low currents in an accelerator environment, using a cryogenic current comparator (CCC). In principle a CCC is a conventional current transformer using the high-performance SQUID technology to sense the magnetic fields caused by the beam current. Since the system is sensitive on a pA level, it is an optimum device to detect dark currents of superconducting cavities. The system presented here is designed for the test facilities of the superconducting accelerator modules for the European XFEL at the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY) in Hamburg. Measurements in a quiet environment showed that an intrinsic noise level of the CCC of 40 pA Hz{sup -1/2} could be achieved.

  14. Introduction to RF linear accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Pichoff, N

    2006-01-01

    After a short introduction to applications of RF linacs and their advantages and drawbacks as opposed to circular accelerators, the model of RF resonant cavities and their excitation by RF sources or beam is introduced. Then beam dynamics notions, essential to linacs, such as transit-time factor, synchronism, r.m.s. properties, matching and mismatching in linear or nonlinear forces, are presented.

  15. Particle beam and crabbing and deflecting structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delayen, Jean [Yorktown, VA

    2011-02-08

    A new type of structure for the deflection and crabbing of particle bunches in particle accelerators comprising a number of parallel transverse electromagnetic (TEM)-resonant) lines operating in opposite phase from each other. Such a structure is significantly more compact than conventional crabbing cavities operating the transverse magnetic TM mode, thus allowing low frequency designs.

  16. Dielectric supported radio-frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, David U. L.; Lee, Terry G.

    2000-01-01

    A device which improves the electrical and thermomechanical performance of an RF cavity, for example, in a disk-loaded accelerating structure. A washer made of polycrystalline diamond is brazed in the middle to a copper disk washer and at the outer edge to the plane wave transformer tank wall, thus dissipating heat from the copper disk to the outer tank wall while at the same time providing strong mechanical support to the metal disk. The washer structure eliminates the longitudinal connecting rods and cooling channels used in the currently available cavities, and as a result minimizes problems such as shunt impedance degradation and field distortion in the plane wave transformer, and mechanical deflection and uneven cooling of the disk assembly.

  17. Liquid Metal Droplet and Micro Corrugated Diaphragm RF-MEMS for reconfigurable RF filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irshad, Wasim

    detail and have proved pivotal to this work. The second part of the dissertation focuses on the Liquid Metal Droplet RF-MEMS. A novel tunable RF MEMS resonator that is based upon electrostatic control over the morphology of a liquid metal droplet (LMD) is conceived. We demonstrate an LMD evanescent-mode cavity resonator that simultaneously achieves wide analog tuning from 12 to 18 GHz with a measured quality factor of 1400-1840. A droplet of 250-mum diameter is utilized and the applied bias is limited to 100 V. This device operates on a principle called Electro-Wetting On Dielectric (EWOD). The liquid metal employed is a non-toxic eutectic alloy of Gallium, Indium and Tin known as Galinstan. This device also exploits interfacial surface energy and viscous body forces that dominate at nanoliter scale. We then apply our Liquid Metal Droplet (LMD) RF-MEMS architecture to demonstrate a continuously tunable electrostatic Ku-Band Filter. A 2-pole bandpass filter with measured insertion loss of less than 0.4dB and 3dB FBW of 3.4% is achieved using a Galinstan droplet of 250mum diameter and bias limited to 100V. We demonstrate that the LMD is insensitive to gravity by performing inversion and tilt experiments. In addition, we study its thermal tolerance by subjecting the LMD up to 150° C. The third part of the dissertation is dedicated to the Micro-Corrugated Diaphragm (MCD) RF-MEMS. We present an evanescent-mode cavity bandpass filter with state-of-the-art RF performance metrics like 4:1 tuning ratio from 5 to 20 GHz with less than 2dB insertion loss and 2-6% 3dB bandwidth. Micro-Corrugated Diaphragm (MCD) is a novel electrostatic MEMS design specifically engineered to provide large-scale analog deflections necessary for such continuous and wide tunable filtering with very high quality factor. We demonstrate a 1.25mm radius and 2mum thick Gold MCD which provides 30mum total deflection with nearly 60% analog range. We also present a detailed and systematic MCD design

  18. The LHC superconducting cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Boussard, Daniel; Häbel, E; Kindermann, H P; Losito, R; Marque, S; Rödel, V; Stirbet, M

    1999-01-01

    The LHC RF system, which must handle high intensity (0.5 A d.c.) beams, makes use of superconducting single-cell cavities, best suited to minimizing the effects of periodic transient beam loading. There will be eight cavities per beam, each capable of delivering 2 MV (5 MV/m accelerating field) at 400 MHz. The cavities themselves are now being manufactured by industry, using niobium-on-copper technology which gives full satisfaction at LEP. A cavity unit includes a helium tank (4.5 K operating temperature) built around a cavity cell, RF and HOM couplers and a mechanical tuner, all housed in a modular cryostat. Four-unit modules are ultimately foreseen for the LHC (two per beam), while at present a prototype version with two complete units is being extensively tested. In addition to a detailed description of the cavity and its ancillary equipment, the first test results of the prototype will be reported.

  19. RF Pulsed Heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pritzkau, David P.

    2002-01-03

    RF pulsed heating is a process by which a metal is heated from magnetic fields on its surface due to high-power pulsed RF. When the thermal stresses induced are larger than the elastic limit, microcracks and surface roughening will occur due to cyclic fatigue. Pulsed heating limits the maximum magnetic field on the surface and through it the maximum achievable accelerating gradient in a normal conducting accelerator structure. An experiment using circularly cylindrical cavities operating in the TE{sub 011} mode at a resonant frequency of 11.424 GHz is designed to study pulsed heating on OFE copper, a material commonly used in normal conducting accelerator structures. The high-power pulsed RF is supplied by an X-band klystron capable of outputting 50 MW, 1.5 {micro}s pulses. The test pieces of the cavity are designed to be removable to allow testing of different materials with different surface preparations. A diagnostic tool is developed to measure the temperature rise in the cavity utilizing the dynamic Q change of the resonant mode due to heating. The diagnostic consists of simultaneously exciting a TE{sub 012} mode to steady-state in the cavity at 18 GHz and measuring the change in reflected power as the cavity is heated from high-power pulsed RF. Two experimental runs were completed. One run was executed at a calculated temperature rise of 120 K for 56 x 10{sup 6} pulses. The second run was executed at a calculated temperature rise of 82 K for 86 x 10{sup 6} pulses. Scanning electron microscope pictures show extensive damage occurring in the region of maximum temperature rise on the surface of the test pieces.

  20. Simulations of S-band RF gun with RF beam control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnyakov, A. M.; Levichev, A. E.; Maltseva, M. V.; Nikiforov, D. A.

    2017-08-01

    The RF gun with RF control is discussed. It is based on the RF triode and two kinds of the cavities. The first cavity is a coaxial cavity with cathode-grid assembly where beam bunches are formed, the second one is an accelerating cavity. The features of such a gun are the following: bunched and relativistic beams in the output of the injector, absence of the back bombarding electrons, low energy spread and short length of the bunches. The scheme of the injector is shown. The electromagnetic field simulation and longitudinal beam dynamics are presented. The possible using of the injector is discussed.

  1. Rf Station For Ion Beam Staking In Hirfl-csr

    CERN Document Server

    Arbuzov, V S; Bushuev, A A; Dranichnikov, A N; Gorniker, E I; Kendjebulatov, E K; Kondakov, A A; Kondaurov, M; Kruchkov, Ya G; Krutikhin, S A; Kurkin, G Ya; Mironenko, L A; Motygin, S V; Osipov, V N; Petrov, V M; Pilan, Andrey M; Popov, A M; Rashenko, V V; Selivanov, A N; Shteinke, A R; Vajenin, N F

    2004-01-01

    BINP has developed and produced the RF station for Institute of Modern Physics (IMP), Lanzhou, China, for multipurpose accelerator complex with electron cooling. The RF station will be used for accumulation of ion beams in the main ring of the system. It was successfully tested in IMP and installed into the main accelerator ring of the complex. The RF station includes accelerating RF cavity and RF power generator with power supplies. The station works within frequency range 6.0 - 14.0 MHz, maximum voltage across the accelerating gap of the RF cavity - 20 kV. In the RF cavity the 200 VNP ferrite is utilized. A residual gas pressure in vacuum chamber does not exceed 2,5E-11 mbar. Maximum output power of the RF generator 25 kW. The data acquisition and control of the RF station is based on COMPACT - PCI bus and provides all functions of monitoring and control.

  2. Unbalanced field RF electron gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofler, Alicia

    2013-11-12

    A design for an RF electron gun having a gun cavity utilizing an unbalanced electric field arrangement. Essentially, the electric field in the first (partial) cell has higher field strength than the electric field in the second (full) cell of the electron gun. The accompanying method discloses the use of the unbalanced field arrangement in the operation of an RF electron gun in order to accelerate an electron beam.

  3. Relativistic gravitational deflection of photons

    CERN Document Server

    Saca, J M

    2002-01-01

    A relativistic analysis of the deflection of a light ray due to a massive attractive centre is here developed by solving a differential equation of the orbit of photons. Results are compared with a widely known approximate formula for the deflection obtained by Einstein in 1916. Finally, it is concluded that the results here obtained, although very close to Einstein's values, could stand out as a conclusive reference for comparison with future direct measurements of the deflection.

  4. Compact linac-driven light sources utilizing mm-period RF undulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toufexis, F.; Dolgashev, V. A.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Tantawi, S. G.

    2017-08-01

    Conventional synchrotron light sources and Free-Electron Lasers (FELs) utilize permanent magnet undulators with periods on the order of a few centimeters, and to generate X-rays they need GeV scale electron beam energies. Such facilities are very large and expensive. Inverse Compton scattering sources use a laser beam as an undulator with micrometer periods and produce X-ray energies on the order of tens of keV. These sources operate with MeV scale beam energies, and therefore they are much more compact. However, their average photon flux is typically small, especially in the EUV and soft X-ray regime. We present a novel compact linac-driven light source, which could produce both incoherent and FEL radiation depending on its configuration. This source is based on a mm-period RF undulator. The RF undulator is a mm-wave cavity resonating at a deflecting mode. The source operates as follows: a train of electron bunches is generated in a thermionic X-band RF injector. These bunches are accelerated in an X-band linac and then interact with the RF undulator. The RF power that feeds the undulator is extracted from the electron beam in a decelerating RF structure, located downstream of the undulator. As an example, a light source with a 91.392 GHz RF undulator and a 129 MeV electron beam can generate incoherent EUV radiation at 13.5 nm. Such a light source could be less than 6 m long, and potentially be used for EUV mask metrology. Similar approach will enable soft X-Ray imaging.

  5. RF accelerating unit installed in the PSB

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1972-01-01

    RF accelerating unit installed in the PSB ring between two bending magnets. Cool air from a heat exchanger is injected into the four cavities from the central feeder and the hot air recirculated via the lateral ducts.

  6. Geometric formula for prism deflection

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    unity, the deflection simply equals the product of the refractive power n − 1 and the base-to-height ratio of the prism ... Over three centuries ago, Isaac Newton used a glass prism to separate constituent colours in a beam of sunlight. ... governs deflections produced by prisms of refractive index n. The refractive power, n − 1, of ...

  7. RF study and 3-D simulations of a side-coupling thermionic RF-gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimjaem, S.; Kusoljariyakul, K.; Thongbai, C.

    2014-01-01

    A thermionic RF-gun for generating ultra-short electron bunches was optimized, developed and used as a source at a linac-based THz radiation research laboratory of the Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Chiang Mai University, Thailand. The RF-gun is a π/2-mode standing wave structure, which consists of two S-band accelerating cells and a side-coupling cavity. The 2856 MHz RF wave is supplied from an S-band klystron to the gun through the waveguide input-port at the cylindrical wall of the second cell. A fraction of the RF power is coupled from the second cell to the first one via a side-coupling cavity. Both the waveguide input-port and the side-coupling cavity lead to an asymmetric geometry of the gun. RF properties and electromagnetic field distributions inside the RF-gun were studied and numerically simulated by using computer codes SUPERFISH 7.19 and CST Microwave Studio 2012 © . RF characterizations and tunings of the RF-gun were performed to ensure the reliability of the gun operation. The results from 3D simulations and measurements are compared and discussed in this paper. The influence of asymmetric field distributions inside the RF-gun on the electron beam properties was investigated via 3D beam dynamics simulations. A change in the coupling-plane of the side-coupling cavity is suggested to improve the gun performance

  8. Method of electron emission control in RF guns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khodak, I.V.; Kushnir, V.A.

    2001-01-01

    The electron emission control method for a RF gun is considered.According to the main idea of the method,the additional resonance system is created in a cathode region where the RF field strength could be varied using the external pulse equipment. The additional resonance system is composed of a coaxial cavity coupled with a RF gun cylindrical cavity via an axial hole. Computed results of radiofrequency and electrodynamic performances of such a two-cavity system and results of the RF gun model pilot study are presented in. Results of particle dynamics simulation are described

  9. Method of electron emission control in RF guns

    CERN Document Server

    Khodak, I V

    2001-01-01

    The electron emission control method for a RF gun is considered.According to the main idea of the method,the additional resonance system is created in a cathode region where the RF field strength could be varied using the external pulse equipment. The additional resonance system is composed of a coaxial cavity coupled with a RF gun cylindrical cavity via an axial hole. Computed results of radiofrequency and electrodynamic performances of such a two-cavity system and results of the RF gun model pilot study are presented in. Results of particle dynamics simulation are described.

  10. Niobium superconducting cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    This 5-cell superconducting cavity, made from bulk-Nb, stems from the period of general studies, not all directed towards direct use at LEP. This one is dimensioned for 1.5 GHz, the frequency used at CEBAF and also studied at Saclay (LEP RF was 352.2 MHz). See also 7908227, 8007354, 8209255, 8210054, 8312339.

  11. Status of 174 MHz RF system for BEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biryuchevsky, Yu.A.; Gorniker, E.I.; Kendjebulatov, E.K.; Krutikhin, S.A.; Kurkin, G.Ya.; Petrov, V.M.; Pilan, A.M.

    2012-01-01

    The new RF system for the BEP storage ring (which is an injector of VEPP-2000 accelerating complex) will increase the particles energy in the BEP from 0.9 to 1 GeV. RF system operates at a frequency of 174 MHz and consists of an accelerating cavity, RF power generator and control system.

  12. Electromagnetic deflection of spinning particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costella, J.P.; McKellar, B.H.J.

    1991-09-01

    Many applications use uniform magnetic fields to deflect charged particles into accurately known orbits. It is shown that particles with a magnetic dipole moment will also suffer an anomalous deflection in such fields if their energy is higher than a certain threshold. The closeness of the electron's g-factor to 2 leads to a sizeable decrease in its threshold energy, to such an extent that the effect could play a significant role in current high-energy accelerators. 18 refs

  13. RF system design for the PEP-II B Factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, H.; Rimmer, R.

    1994-06-01

    The paper presents an overview of the design of the RF system for the PEP-II B Factory. An RF station consists of either two or four single-cell cavities driven by a 1.2 MW klystron through a waveguide distribution network. A variety of feedback loops stabilize the RF and its interaction with the beam. System parameters and all the relevant parameters of klystron and cavities are given

  14. Accoustic Localization of Breakdown in Radio Frequency Accelerating Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, Peter Gwin [IIT, Chicago

    2016-07-01

    Current designs for muon accelerators require high-gradient radio frequency (RF) cavities to be placed in solenoidal magnetic fields. These fields help contain and efficiently reduce the phase space volume of source muons in order to create a usable muon beam for collider and neutrino experiments. In this context and in general, the use of RF cavities in strong magnetic fields has its challenges. It has been found that placing normal conducting RF cavities in strong magnetic fields reduces the threshold at which RF cavity breakdown occurs. To aid the effort to study RF cavity breakdown in magnetic fields, it would be helpful to have a diagnostic tool which can localize the source of breakdown sparks inside the cavity. These sparks generate thermal shocks to small regions of the inner cavity wall that can be detected and localized using microphones attached to the outer cavity surface. Details on RF cavity sound sources as well as the hardware, software, and algorithms used to localize the source of sound emitted from breakdown thermal shocks are presented. In addition, results from simulations and experiments on three RF cavities, namely the Aluminum Mock Cavity, the High-Pressure Cavity, and the Modular Cavity, are also given. These results demonstrate the validity and effectiveness of the described technique for acoustic localization of breakdown.

  15. Pulsed rf systems for large storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, P.B.

    1979-03-01

    The possibility is considered that by using a pulsed rf system a substantial reduction can be made in the rf power requirement for the next generation of large storage rings. For a ring with a sufficiently large circumference, the time between bunch passages, T/sub b/, can exceed the cavity filling time, T/sub f/. As the ratio T/sub b//T/sub f/ increases, it is clear that at some point the average power requirement can be reduced by pulsing the rf to the cavities. In this mode of operation, the rf power is turned on a filling time or so before the arrival of a bunch and is switched off again at the time of bunch passage. There is no rf energy in the accelerating structure, and hence no power dissipation, for most of the period between bunches

  16. SPS RF System Amplifier plant

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    The picture shows a 2 MW, 200 MHz amplifier plant with feeder lines. The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities. Initially only two cavities were installed, a third cavity was installed in 1978 and a forth one in 1979. The number of power amplifiers was also increased: to the first 2 MW plant a second 2 MW plant was added and by end 1979 there were 8 500 kW units combined in pairs to feed each of the 4 cavities with up to about 1 MW RF power, resulting in a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. See also 7412016X, 7412017X, 7411048X.

  17. RF Processing Experience with the GTF Prototype RF Gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmerge, J.F.

    2010-01-01

    The SSRL Gun Test Facility (GTF) was built to develop a high brightness electron injector for the LCLS and has been operational since 1996. A total of five different metal cathodes (4 Cu and 1 Mg) have been installed on the GTF gun. The rf processing history with the different cathodes will be presented including peak field achieved at the cathode. The LCLS gun is intended to operate at 120 MV/m and fields up to 140 MV/m have been achieved in the GTF gun. After installing a new cathode the number of rf pulses required to reach 120 MV/m is approximately 5-10 million. Total emitted dark current and Fowler Nordheim plots are also shown over the life of the cathode. The GTF photo-injector gun is an S-band standing-wave structure, with two resonant cavities and an intervening thick washer (Figure 1). The flat, back wall of the first cavity is a copper plate that serves as photocathode when illuminated with ultraviolet light from a pulsed, high-power laser. RF power enters the gun through an iris on the outer wall of the second cavity, and is coupled to the first through the axial opening of the washer. The first cavity is often referred to as a half cell, because its full-cell length has been truncated by the cathode plate and the second cavity is called the full cell. The gun is designed to operate in a π mode, with the peak field on axis in each cell approximately equal. The maximum in the half cell occurs at the cathode, and in the full cell near the center of the cavity. The field profile and tuning procedures are discussed in a separate tech note (1).

  18. RF MEMS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of the switch were measured to be −0.43 dB, −25 dB and −21 dB, respectively ... The two ends of the CPW lines are RF ports of the switch. ... (b) Top view of the actuator showing segments comprising one of the four crableg beams. The short segments l1 and l4 are attached to the actuator and the rigid anchor, respectively.

  19. Digital Cavity Resonance Monitor, alternative method of measuring cavity microphonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomasz Plawski; G. Davis; Hai Dong; J. Hovater; John Musson; Thomas Powers

    2005-01-01

    As is well known, mechanical vibration or microphonics in a cryomodule causes the cavity resonance frequency to change at the vibration frequency. One way to measure the cavity microphonics is to drive the cavity with a Phase Locked Loop. Measurement of the instantaneous frequency or PLL error signal provides information about the cavity microphonic frequencies. Although the PLL error signal is available directly, precision frequency measurements require additional instrumentation, a Cavity Resonance Monitor (CRM). The analog version of such a device has been successfully used for several cavity tests [1]. In this paper we present a prototype of a Digital Cavity Resonance Monitor designed and built in the last year. The hardware of this instrument consists of an RF downconverter, digital quadrature demodulator and digital processor motherboard (Altera FPGA). The motherboard processes received data and computes frequency changes with a resolution of 0.2 Hz, with a 3 kHz output bandwidth

  20. A blade deflection monitoring system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    A wind turbine blade comprising a system for monitoring the deflection of a wind turbine blade is described. The system comprises a wireless range-measurement system, having at least one wireless communication device located towards the root end of the blade and at least one wireless communication...

  1. Geometric formula for prism deflection

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    For a prism of refractive index close to unity, the deflection simply equals the product of the refractive power − 1 and the base-to-height ratio of the prism, regardless of the apex angle. The base and height of the prism are measured respectively along and perpendicular to the direction of beam propagation within the ...

  2. SPS accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1976-01-01

    The SPS started up with 2 accelerating cavities (each consisting of 5 tank sections) in LSS3. They have a 200 MHz travelling wave structure (see 7411032 and 7802190) and 750 kW of power is fed to each of the cavities from a 1 MW tetrode power amplifier, located in a surface building above, via a coaxial transmission line. Clemens Zettler, builder of the SPS RF system, is standing at the side of one of the cavities. In 1978 and 1979 another 2 cavities were added and entered service in 1980. These were part of the intensity improvement programme and served well for the new role of the SPS as proton-antiproton collider. See also 7411032, 8011289, 8104138, 8302397.

  3. The high power RF system for the KEK booster synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezura, Eizi; Nakanishi, Hiroshi; Kudo, Kikuo; Toda, Makoto; Ebihara, Kiyokazu.

    1977-03-01

    Design features and procedures of the high power RF system for the KEK booster synchrotron are described. The system consists of an RF power amplifier, a ferrite-loaded accelerating cavity and an automatic cavity-tuning system. The RF voltage program and the ferrite properties, which are the determining factors for the general design and the operational performance of the system, are discussed. Procedures for estimating the power requirements are presented for both the RF power amplifier and the ferrite bias supply. A general description of the system is also given. (auth.)

  4. An rf separated kaon beam from the Main Injector: Superconducting aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.A. Edwards

    1998-11-01

    ThE report is intended to focus on the superconducting aspects of a potential separated kaon beam facility for the Main Injector, and most of this document reflects that emphasis. However, the RF features cannot be divorced from the overall beam requirements, and so the next section is devoted to the latter subject. The existing optics design that meets the needs of the two proposed experiments is outliied, and its layout at Fermilab is shown. The frequency and deflection gradient choices present implementation dMiculties, and the section closes with some commentary on these issues. Sec. 3 provides an introduction to cavity design considerations, and, in particular carries forward the discussion of resonator shape and frequency selection. The R&D program is the subject of Sec. 4. Provisional parameter choices will be summarized. Initial steps toward cavity fabrication based `on copper models have been taken. The next stages in cavity fabrication will be reviewed in some detail. The infrastructure needs and availability will be discussed. Sec. 5 discusses what maybe characterized as the in~edlents of a point design. At this writing, some aspects are clear and some are not. The basic systems are reasonably clear and are described. The final section presents a cost and schedule estimate for both the Ft&D and production phase. Some supporting material and elaboration is provided in the Appendices.

  5. Superconducting niobium cavity with cooling fins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isagawa, Shigeru.

    1978-04-01

    Cooling efficiency of a superconducting cavity is shown to be improved by applying a fin structure. Internal heating can be suppressed in a certain degree and the higher rf field is expected to be reached on surfaces of the cavity which is immersed in superfluid He 4 liquid. The rf measurements were made on a C-band niobium cavity with cylindrical and circular fins around the wall. Fields of 39 mT and 25 MV/m were attained for TM 010 mode cavity after surface treatments including high temperature annealing in a UHV furnace. (auth.)

  6. AIDA: Asteroid Impact & Deflection Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, A. F.; Galvez, A.; Carnelli, I.; Michel, P.; Rivkin, A.; Reed, C.

    2012-12-01

    To protect the Earth from a hazardous asteroid impact, various mitigation methods have been proposed, including deflection of the asteroid by a spacecraft impact. AIDA, consisting of two mission elements, the Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) and the Asteroid Impact Monitoring (AIM) mission, is a demonstration of asteroid deflection. To date, there has been no such demonstration, and there is major uncertainty in the result of a spacecraft impact onto an asteroid, that is, the amount of deflection produced by a given momentum input from the impact. This uncertainty is in part due to unknown physical properties of the asteroid surface, such as porosity and strength, and in part due to poorly understood impact physics such that the momentum carried off by ejecta is highly uncertain. A first mission to demonstrate asteroid deflection would not only be a major step towards gaining the capability to mitigate an asteroid hazard, but in addition it would return unique information on an asteroid's strength, other surface properties, and internal structure. This information return would be highly relevant to future human exploration of asteroids. We report initial results of the AIDA joint mission concept study undertaken by the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory and ESA with support from NASA centers including Goddard, Johnson and Jet Propulsion Laboratory. For AIDA, the DART spacecraft impactor study is coordinated with an ESA study of the AIM mission, which would rendezvous with the same asteroid to measure effects of the impact. Unlike the previous Don Quijote mission study performed by ESA in 2005-2007, DART envisions an impactor spacecraft to intercept the secondary member of a binary near-Earth asteroid. DART includes ground-based observations to measure the deflection independently of the rendezvous spacecraft observations from AIM, which also measures deflection and provides detailed characterization of the target asteroid. The joint mission AIDA

  7. Design of RF system for CYCIAE-230 superconducting cyclotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Zhiguo, E-mail: bitbearAT@hotmail.com; Ji, Bin; Fu, Xiaoliang; Cao, Xuelong; Zhao, Zhenlu; Zhang, Tinajue

    2017-05-11

    The CYCIAE230 is a low-current, compact superconducting cyclotron designed for proton therapy. The Radio Frequency system consists of four RF cavities and applies second harmonic to accelerate beams. The driving power for the cavity system is estimated to be approximately 150 kW. The LLRF controller is a self-made device developed and tested at low power using a small-scale cavity model. In this paper, the resonator systems of an S.C. cyclotron in history are reviewed. Contrary to those RF systems, the cavities of the CYCIAE230 cyclotron connect two opposite dees. Two high-power RF windows are included in the system. Each window carries approximately 75 kW RF power from the driver to the cavities. Thus, the RF system for the CY-CIAE230 cyclotron is operated in driven push–pull mode. The two-way amplifier-coupler-cavity systems are operated with approximately the same amount of RF power but 180° out of phase compared with each other. The design, as well as the technical advantage and limitations of this operating mode, of the CYCIAE230 cyclotron RF system is analyzed.

  8. Hydroforming of elliptical cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Singer

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Activities of the past several years in developing the technique of forming seamless (weldless cavity cells by hydroforming are summarized. An overview of the technique developed at DESY for the fabrication of single cells and multicells of the TESLA cavity shape is given and the major rf results are presented. The forming is performed by expanding a seamless tube with internal water pressure while simultaneously swaging it axially. Prior to the expansion the tube is necked at the iris area and at the ends. Tube radii and axial displacements are computer controlled during the forming process in accordance with results of finite element method simulations for necking and expansion using the experimentally obtained strain-stress relationship of tube material. In cooperation with industry different methods of niobium seamless tube production have been explored. The most appropriate and successful method is a combination of spinning or deep drawing with flow forming. Several single-cell niobium cavities of the 1.3 GHz TESLA shape were produced by hydroforming. They reached accelerating gradients E_{acc} up to 35  MV/m after buffered chemical polishing (BCP and up to 42  MV/m after electropolishing (EP. More recent work concentrated on fabrication and testing of multicell and nine-cell cavities. Several seamless two- and three-cell units were explored. Accelerating gradients E_{acc} of 30–35  MV/m were measured after BCP and E_{acc} up to 40  MV/m were reached after EP. Nine-cell niobium cavities combining three three-cell units were completed at the company E. Zanon. These cavities reached accelerating gradients of E_{acc}=30–35  MV/m. One cavity is successfully integrated in an XFEL cryomodule and is used in the operation of the FLASH linear accelerator at DESY. Additionally the fabrication of bimetallic single-cell and multicell NbCu cavities by hydroforming was successfully developed. Several NbCu clad single-cell and

  9. Emittance investigation of RF photo-injector

    CERN Document Server

    Yang Mao Rong; Li Zheng; Li Ming; Xu Zhou

    2002-01-01

    A high-power laser beam illuminates a photocathode surface placed on an end wall of an RF cavity. The emitted electrons are accelerated immediately to a relativistic energy by the strong RF find in the cavity. But space charge effect induces beam emittance growth especially near the cathode where the electrons are still nonrelativistic. The author analyzes the factors which lead the transverse emittance growth and method how to resolve this problem. After introducing solenoidal focusing near the photocathode, the beam emittance growth is suppressed dramatically. The beam emittance is given also after compensation and simulation results. The measurements show these results are coincident

  10. Elevator deflections on the icing process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Randall K.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of elevator deflection of the horizontal stabilizer for certain icing parameters is investigated. Elevator deflection can severely change the lower and upper leading-edge impingement limits, and ice can accrete on the elevator itself. Also, elevator deflection had practically no effect on the maximum local collection efficiency. It is shown that for severe icing conditions (large water droplets), elevator deflections that increase the projected height of the airfoil can significantly increase the total collection efficiency of the airfoil.

  11. Atom Probe Tomography Studies of RF Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Norem, Jim; Sebastian, Jason; Seidman, David N

    2005-01-01

    We are constructing a facility which combines an atom probe field ion microscope with a multi-element, in-situ deposition and surface modification capability. This system is dedicated to rf studies and the initial goal will be to understand the properties of evaporative coatings: field emission, bonding interdiffusion etc, to suppress breakdown and dark currents in normal cavities. We also hope to use this system to look more generally at interactions of surface structure and high rf fields. We will present preliminary data on structures relevant to normal and superconducting rf systems.

  12. Shunt resistance for deflecting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Shigeru

    1981-01-01

    The SOR-RING main magnet system consists of 8 deflecting magnets and 4 sets of three quadrupole magnets, each. The stability of magnet current is about 0.02 percent per day. The currents of magnets are adjustable simultaneously. The current-magnetic field relation for a deflecting magnet was measured. The magnetic field of 11.4 kG was obtained at the current of 470 A. This field corresponds to the electron energy of 376 MeV for the present SOR-RING. For the fine adjustment of the field of deflecting magnets, shunt resistors were equipped parallel to the magnet coils. The magnet current is adjustable by varying the value of resistance. The maximum adjustable range of the current is 1 percent. The field intensity was measured in relation to shunt resistance with a rotating coil flux meter. A slight difference was observed between the designed and the measured values. However this difference did not affect on the practical operation of SOR-RING. (Kato, T.)

  13. Engineering interactions between long-lived cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yvonne; Rosenblum, Serge; Reinhold, Philip; Wang, Chen; Axline, Christopher; Frunzio, Luigi; Girvin, Steven M.; Jiang, Liang; Mirrahimi, Mazyar; Devoret, Michel H.; Schoelkopf, Robert J.

    The availability of large Hilbert dimensions and outstanding coherence properties make superconducting cavities promising systems for storing quantum information. Recent experiments in cQED has demonstrated that redundantly encoding logical qubits in such cavities is a hardware-efficient approach toward error-correctable quantum memories. In order to tap into the power of these protected memories for quantum information processing, robust inter-cavity operations are required. A simple way to realise such operations between two cavities is using the non-linearity of the Josephson junction. To do so, we adopt a multi-cavity architecture where a fixed-frequency, single junction transmon simultaneously couples to two highly coherent 3D cavities. Using only external RF drives, we demonstrate transmon-cavity as well as cavity-cavity SWAP operations and show that such interactions are essential building blocks for implementing multi-cavity conditional logics.

  14. An innovating method to measure bridge deflection using interference-based sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Peter; Wang, Lutang; Comanici, Maria Iulia

    2012-04-01

    The Vibrofiber sensor is a Fabry-Perot cavity formed between two broad band fiber gratings creating interference fringes. It was introduced three years ago to monitor the vibration and temperature rise of the stator end winding in a power generator.(1) This paper will discuss the use of Vibrofiber to monitor the deflection of the bridge under adverse conditions: wide temperature swings, excess load, strong winds, earth quake, etc. The fringes in these cavity sensors have features like peaks and valleys which are sensitive to temperature and strain. When the bridge becomes overloaded, we are interested in knowing the extent of the deflection. In addition, we might want to locate the cause of the overload. A simple Sagnac FBG interferometer has been invented to provide such diagnostics. A pair of long fibers with such cavity sensors can be installed on the underside of the target bridge segment between two supporting columns. The objective is to monitor the deflection together with any distortion of the bridge deck. Each of the 2 long fiber segments has a pair of cavity sensors, one measures the deflection as a result of the excess strain, and the other measures temperature and provides compensation for the deflection data. An array of cavity sensors with different center wavelengths will be used to support the typical multi-segment bridge structure. The interrogation unit is based on a tunable laser that can hop to different ITU grids. A separate DFB laser will run a grating based Sagnac interferometer, measuring weight in motion, identifying the speed and the make of vehicle in traffic and provide deflection diagnostics. Overloaded trucks and speeding vehicles can be captured and tagged for corrective actions. The interrogation unit is equipped with wireless Ethernet communication enabling the monitoring of many bridges from a central location and similarly warning can be initiated to alert the central traffic control ahead of any problems.

  15. Upgrade of the Cryogenic CERN RF Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Pirotte, O; Brunner, O; Inglese, V; Koettig, T; Maesen, P; Vullierme, B

    2014-01-01

    With the large number of superconducting radiofrequency (RF) cryomodules to be tested for the former LEP and the present LHC accelerator a RF test facility was erected early in the 1990’s in the largest cryogenic test facility at CERN located at Point 18. This facility consisted of four vertical test stands for single cavities and originally one and then two horizontal test benches for RF cryomodules operating at 4.5 K in saturated helium. CERN is presently working on the upgrade of its accelerator infrastructure, which requires new superconducting cavities operating below 2 K in saturated superfluid helium. Consequently, the RF test facility has been renewed in order to allow efficient cavity and cryomodule tests in superfluid helium and to improve its thermal performances. The new RF test facility is described and its performances are presented.

  16. Modeling and simulation of Indus-2 RF feedback control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, D.; Bagduwal, P.S.; Tiwari, N.; Lad, M.; Hannurkar, P.R.

    2012-01-01

    Indus-2 synchrotron radiation source has four RF stations along with their feedback control systems. For higher beam energy and current operation amplitude and phase feedback control systems of Indus-2 are being upgraded. To understand the behaviour of amplitude and phase control loop under different operating conditions, modelling and simulation of RF feedback control system is done. RF cavity baseband I/Q model has been created due to its close correspondence with actual implementation and better computational efficiency which makes the simulation faster. Correspondence between cavity baseband and RF model is confirmed by comparing their simulation results. Low Level RF (LLRF) feedback control system simulation is done using the same cavity baseband I/Q model. Error signals are intentionally generated and response of the closed loop system is observed. Simulation will help us in optimizing parameters of upgraded LLRF system for higher beam energy and current operation. (author)

  17. PASTA - An RF Phase and Amplitude Scan and Tuning Application

    CERN Document Server

    Galambos, J; Deibele, C; Henderson, S

    2005-01-01

    To assist the beam commissioning in the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linac, a general purpose RF tuning application has been written to help set RF phase and amplitude. It follows the signature matching procedure described in Ref.* The method involves varying an upstream Rf cavity amplitude and phase settings and comparing the measured downstream beam phase responses to model predictions. The model input for cavity phase and amplitude calibration and for the beam energy are varied to best match observations. This scheme has advantages over other RF tuning techniques of not requiring intercepting devices (e.g. Faraday Cups), and not being restricted to a small linear response regime near the design values. The application developed here is general and can be applied to different RF structure types in the SNS linac. Example applications in the SNS Drift Tube Linac (DTL) and Coupled Cavity Linac (CCL) structures will be shown.

  18. Development of large grain cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Singer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available DESY activities on 1.3 GHz tesla shape single cell and nine-cell large grain (LG resonators are presented; results of the past five years are covered. The R&D program explores the potential for production of elliptical superconducting cavities. The main efforts have been devoted to material investigation, development of LG disk production, cavity fabrication from this material, and a search for appropriate treatment. More than 250 LG disks are manufactured; several single cell and 11 nine-cell resonators are produced and rf tested after buffered chemical polishing and after additional electropolishing. A maximum accelerating gradient of approximately 45  MV/m for this type of cavity was achieved in two resonators. Two of the LG cavities have been installed and are currently being used in the FLASH accelerator operation. Assembly of a cryomodule, consisting of LG cavities only, is in the works. Perspectives of the LG cavity application are discussed.

  19. Measures to alleviate the back bombardment effect of thermionic rf electron gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Y.; Xie, J.

    1991-01-01

    Thermionic rf electron gun finds application as a high brightness electron source for rf linacs. However, cathode heating from back-bombardment effect causes a ramp in the macro-pulse beam current and limit the usable pulse width. Three methods: ring cathode, magnetic deflection and laser assisted heating are studied in theory and in experiment. The results of these studies are reported

  20. RF superconductivity for accelerators. 2. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padamsee, H. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Lab. of Nuclear Studies; Knobloch, J. [BESSY GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Hays, T. [Cosmic Consulting, Gore, VA (United States)

    2008-07-01

    This book introduces some of the key ideas of RF Superconductivity by using a pedagogic approach, and presents a comprehensive overview of the field. It is divided into four parts. The first part introduces the basic concepts of microwave cavities for particle acceleration. The second part is devoted to the observed behavior of superconducting cavities. In the third part, general issues connected with beam-cavity interaction and related issues for critical components are covered. The final part discusses applications of superconducting cavities to frontier accelerators of the future, drawing heavily on examples that are in their most advanced stage. Each part of the book ends in a problems section to illustrate and amplify text material as well as to draw on example applications of superconducting cavities to existing and future accelerators. From the Contents: - Basics - Performance of Superconducting Cavities - Couplers and Tuners - Frontier Accelerators. (orig.)

  1. SPS RF System:Tetrodes and Waveguides

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    The picture shows part of a RF power generating plant. The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities. Initially only two cavities were installed, a third cavity was installed in 1978 and a forth one in 1979. The number of power amplifiers was also gradually increased: by end 1980 there were 8 500 kW units combined in pairs to feed each of the 4 cavities with up to about 1 MW RF power, resulting in a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. See also 7412016X, 7412017X, 7411048X.

  2. Studies of RF Breakdown of Metals in Dense Gases

    CERN Document Server

    Hanlet, Pierrick M; Ankenbrandt, Charles; Johnson, Rolland P; Kaplan, Daniel; Kuchnir, Moyses; Moretti, Alfred; Paul, Kevin; Popovic, Milorad; Yarba, Victor; Yonehara, Katsuya

    2005-01-01

    A study of RF breakdown of metals in gases has begun as part of a program to develop RF cavities filled with dense hydrogen gas to be used for muon ionization cooling. A pressurized 800 MHz test cell has been used at Fermilab to compare the conditioning and breakdown behavior of copper, molybdenum, chromium, and beryllium electrodes as functions of hydrogen and helium gas density. These results are compared to the predicted or known RF breakdown behavior of these metals in vacuum.

  3. RF system for the super conducting proton linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Touchi, Y.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce the several types of RF sources used for proton liner accelerators. Also we discus the undesirable characteristics of super-conducting cavities, and the influence of the large beam loading for an accelerating field. We propose the RF system for the super-conducting proton linear accelerators using the Diacrode or IOT taking these effects into account. (author)

  4. Overview and status of RF systems for the SSC Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mynk, J.; Grippe, J.; Cutler, R.I.; Rodriguez, R.

    1993-05-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Linear Accelerator (Linac) produces a 600-MeV, 35-μs, H-beam at a 10-Hz repetition rate. The beam is accelerated by a series of RF cavities. These consist of a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ), two bunchers, and four Drift Tube Linac (DTL) tanks at 427.617 MHz, and two bunchers, nine side-coupled Linac modules, and an energy compressor at 1282.851 MHz. The RFQ amplifier and the low-frequency buncher cavity amplifiers use gridded tubes, while the other cavities use klystron amplifier systems. The RF control system consists of a reference line and cavity feedback and feedforward loops for each amplifier. The RF amplifier system for each of these accelerator cavities is described, and the current status of each system is presented

  5. Toroidal 12 cavity klystron : a novel approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazarika, A.B.R.

    2013-01-01

    A toroidal 12 cavity klystron is designed to provide with high energy power with the high frequency microwave RF- plasma generated from it. The cavities are positioned in clock hour positions. The theoretical modeling and designing is done to study the novel approach. (author)

  6. Superconducting rf activities at Cornell University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padamsee, H.; Hakimi, M.; Kirchgessner, J.

    1988-01-01

    Development of rf superconductivity for high energy accelerators has been a robust activity at the Cornell Laboratory of Nuclear Studies (LNS) for many years. In order to realize the potential of rf superconductivity, a two-pronged approach has been followed. On the one hand accelerator applications were selected where the existing state-of-the art of superconducting rf is competitive with alternate technologies, then LNS engaged in a program to design, construct and test suitable superconducting cavities, culminating in a full system test in an operating accelerator. On the second front the discovery and invention of ideas, techniques and materials required to make superconducting rf devices approach the ideal in performance has been aggressively pursued. Starting with the development of superconducting cavities for high energy electron synchrotrons, the technology was extended to high energy e + e - storage rings. The LE5 cavity design has now been adopted for use in the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). When completed, this project will be one of the largest applications of SRF technology, using 440 LE5 modules[4]. In the last two years, the cavity design and the technology have been transferred to industry and CEBAF. Cornell has tested the early industrial prototypes and cavity pairs. LNS has developed, in collaboration with CEBAF, designs and procedures for cavity pair and cryomodule assembly and testing. Advanced research for future electron accelerators is badly needed if particle physicists hope to expand the energy frontier. Superconducting cavity technology continues to offer attractive opportunities for further advances in achievable voltage at reasonable cost for future accelerators. For Nb, the full potential implies an order of magnitude increase over current capabilities. 20 references, 11 figures

  7. Upgraded cavities for the positron accumulator ring of the APS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Y.W.; Jiang, X.; Mangra, D.

    1997-01-01

    Upgraded versions of cavities for the APS positron accumulator ring (PAR) have been built and are being tested. Two cavities are in the PAR: a fundamental 9.8-MHz cavity and a twelfth harmonic 117.3-MHz cavity. Both cavities have been manufactured for higher voltage operation with improved Q-factors, reliability, and tuning capability. Both cavities employ current-controlled ferrite tuners for control of the resonant frequency. The harmonic cavity can be operated in either a pulsed mode or a CW mode. The rf properties of the cavities are presented

  8. The CEBAF RF separator system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovater, C.; Arnold, G.; Fugitt, J.; Harwood, L.; Kazimi, R.; Lahti, G.; Mammosser, J.; Nelson, R.; Piller, C.; Turlington, L.

    1996-01-01

    The 4 GeV CEBAF accelerator at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) is arranged in a five-pass racetrack configuration, with two superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) linacs joined by independent magnetic transport arcs. The 1497 MHz continuous electron beam is composed of three interlaced variable-intensity 499 MHz beams that can be independently directed from any of the five passes to any of the three experimental halls. Beam extraction is made possible by a system of nine warm sub-harmonic separator cavities capable of delivering a 100 urad kick to any pass at a maximum machine energy of 6 GeV. Each separator cavity is a half-wavelength, two cell design with a high transverse shunt impedance and a small transverse dimension. The cavities are powered by 1 kW solid state amplifiers operating at 499 MHz. Cavity phase and gradient control are provided through a modified version of the same control module used for the CEBAF SRF cavity controls. The system has recently been tested while delivering beam to Hall C. In this paper we present a description of the RF separator system and recent test results with beam. (author)

  9. SPL RF Coupler Cooling Efficiency

    CERN Document Server

    Bonomi, R; Montesinos, E; Parma, V; Vande Craen, A

    2014-01-01

    Energy saving is an important challenge in accelerator design. In this framework, reduction of heat loads in a cryomodule is of fundamental importance due to the small thermodynamic efficiency of cooling at low temperatures. In particular, care must be taken during the design of its critical components (e.g. RF couplers, coldwarm transitions). In this framework, the main RF coupler of the Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) cryomodule at CERN will not only be used for RF powering but also as the main mechanical support of the superconducting cavities. These two functions have to be accomplished while ensuring the lowest heat in-leak to the helium bath at 2 K. In the SPL design, the RF coupler outer conductor is composed of two walls and cooled by forced convection with helium gas at 4.5 K. Analytical, semi-analytical and numerical analyses are presented in order to defend the choice of gas cooling. Temperature profiles and thermal performance have been evaluated for different operating conditions; a sensitivit...

  10. Coeliac cavity ultrasonic diagnosis apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, O.; Suwaki, T.

    1983-07-05

    A coeliac cavity ultrasonic diagnosis apparatus is disclosed which includes an ultrasonic transducer or scanner portion adapted to be inserted into a coeliac cavity to effect a sector scan of an ultrasonic beam to produce an ultrasonic image of internal tissues and in which the ultrasonic oscillator on the one hand and an ultrasonic reflecting mirror and rotary disc on the other hand are relatively rotated so as to effect the sector scan of the ultrasonic beam and the rotary angle of the rotary disc is detected so as to obtain a deflecting angle of the ultrasonic beam and a display on a cathode ray tube of a precise ultrasonic picture image.

  11. Novel Geometries for the LHC Crab Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. Hall, G. Burt, C. Lingwood, R. Rimmer, H. Wang

    2010-05-23

    The planned luminosity upgrade to LHC is likely to necessitate a large crossing angle and a local crab crossing scheme. For this scheme crab cavities align bunches prior to collision. The scheme requires at least four such cavities, a pair on each beam line either side of the interaction point (IP). Upstream cavities initiate rotation and downstream cavities cancel rotation. Cancellation is usually done at a location where the optics has re-aligned the bunch. The beam line separation near the IP necessitates a more compact design than is possible with elliptical cavities such as those used at KEK. The reduction in size must be achieved without an increase in the operational frequency to maintain compatibility with the long bunch length of the LHC. This paper proposes a suitable superconducting variant of a four rod coaxial deflecting cavity (to be phased as a crab cavity), and presents analytical models and simulations of suitable designs.

  12. Novel Geometries for the LHC Crab Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. Hall,G. Burt,C. Lingwood,Robert Rimmer,Haipeng Wang; Hall, B. [CI Lancaster University (Great Britain); Burt, G. [CI Lancaster University (Great Britain); Lingwood, C. [CI Lancaster University (Great Britain); Rimmer, Robert [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Wang, Haipeng [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2010-05-01

    The planned luminosity upgrade to LHC is likely to necessitate a large crossing angle and a local crab crossing scheme. For this scheme crab cavities align bunches prior to collision. The scheme requires at least four such cavities, a pair on each beam line either side of the interaction point (IP). Upstream cavities initiate rotation and downstream cavities cancel rotation. Cancellation is usually done at a location where the optics has re-aligned the bunch. The beam line separation near the IP necessitates a more compact design than is possible with elliptical cavities such as those used at KEK. The reduction in size must be achieved without an increase in the operational frequency to maintain compatibility with the long bunch length of the LHC. This paper proposes a suitable superconducting variant of a four rod coaxial deflecting cavity (to be phased as a crab cavity), and presents analytical models and simulations of suitable designs.

  13. Field distribution analysis in deflecting structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paramonov, V.V. [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-02-15

    Deflecting structures are used now manly for bunch rotation in emittance exchange concepts, bunch diagnostics and to increase the luminosity. The bunch rotation is a transformation of a particles distribution in the six dimensional phase space. Together with the expected transformations, deflecting structures introduce distortions due to particularities - aberrations - in the deflecting field distribution. The distributions of deflecting fields are considered with respect to non linear additions, which provide emittance deteriorations during a transformation. The deflecting field is treated as combination of hybrid waves HE{sub 1} and HM{sub 1}. The criteria for selection and formation of deflecting structures with minimized level of aberrations are formulated and applied to known structures. Results of the study are confirmed by comparison with results of numerical simulations.

  14. Direct RF modulation transmitter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fukuda, Shuichi; Nauta, Bram

    2013-01-01

    PROBLEM TO BE SOLVED: To provide a direct RF modulation transmitter capable of saving more power consumption. SOLUTION: The direct RF modulation transmitter comprises: a passive mixer circuit 100 which inputs digital baseband data D of 1 bit, inverted data DN, a first RF signal, and a second RF

  15. Investigation of superconducting niobium 1170 MHz cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anashin, V.V.; Bibko, S.I.; Fadeyev, E.I.

    1988-01-01

    The design, fabrication and experiments with superconducting L-band single cell cavities are described. These cavities model a cell of an accelerating RF structure. The cavities have been fabricated from technical grade and higher purity grade sheet niobium using deep-drawing, electron beam welding and chemical polishing. They have spherical geometry and are excited in the TM 010 mode. A computerized set-up was used for cavity tests. Qo=1.5 x 10 9 and E acc = 4.3 MV/m were obtained in the cavity made of higher purity grade niobium. 6 references, 8 figures, 3 tables

  16. Design of 325 MHz spoke cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sha Peng; Huang Hong; Dai Jianping; Zu Guoquan; Li Han

    2012-01-01

    Spoke cavity can be used in the low-energy section of the proton accelerator. It has many significant advantages: compact structure, high value of R/Q, etc. The ADS (Accelerator Driven System) project will adopt many spoke cavities with different β values. Therefore, IHEP has began the research of β=0.14, 325 MHz spoke cavity. In this pa per, the dimensions, RF performances and mechanical properties of it are studied. (authors)

  17. Measurement of Deflection Line on Bridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Rudolf; Štroner, Martin

    2013-12-01

    Prestressed concrete bridges are very sensitive to the increase in long-term deflections. Reliable forecasts of deflections of bridge structures during construction and durability are crucial for achieving good durability. The main results of measurements are the changes of the deflection line of the bridge structures, which places special demands on the measurement procedure. Results from measurements are very useful for the improvement of mathematical prediction methods of behaviour of long span prestressed concrete structures.

  18. RF characterization and testing of ridge waveguide transitions for RF power couplers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Jose, Mentes; Singh, G.N. [Ion Accelerator Development Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Kumar, Girish [Department of Electrical Engineering, IIT Bombay, Mumbai 400076,India (India); Bhagwat, P.V. [Ion Accelerator Development Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2016-12-01

    RF characterization of rectangular to ridge waveguide transitions for RF power couplers has been carried out by connecting them back to back. Rectangular waveguide to N type adapters are first calibrated by TRL method and then used for RF measurements. Detailed information is obtained about their RF behavior by measurements and full wave simulations. It is shown that the two transitions can be characterized and tuned for required return loss at design frequency of 352.2 MHz. This opens the possibility of testing and conditioning two transitions together on a test bench. Finally, a RF coupler based on these transitions is coupled to an accelerator cavity. The power coupler is successfully tested up to 200 kW, 352.2 MHz with 0.2% duty cycle.

  19. High-Q ferrite-tuned cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlini, R.D.; Thiessen, H.A.; Potter, J.M.; Earley, L.M.

    1983-01-01

    Rapid cycling proton synchrotrons, such as the proposed LAMPF II accelerator, require approximately 10 MV per turn rf with 17% tuning range near 50 MHz. The traditional approach to ferrite-tuned cavities uses a ferrite which is longitudinally biased (rf magnetic field parallel to bias field). This method leads to unacceptably high losses in the ferrite. At Los Alamos, we are developing a cavity with transverse bias (rf magnetic field perpendicular to the bias field) that makes use of the tensor permeability of the ferrite. Initial tests of a small (10-cm-diam) quarter-wave singly re-entrant cavity tuned by several different ferrites indicate that the losses in the ferrite can be made negligible compared with the losses due to the surface resistivity of the copper cavity

  20. Superconducting RF for energy-recovery linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liepe, M.; Knobloch, J.

    2006-01-01

    Since superconducting RF for particle accelerators made its first appearance in the 1970s, it has found highly successful application in a variety of machines. Recent progress in this technology has made so-called Energy-Recovery Linacs (ERLs)-originally proposed in 1965-feasible, and interest in this type of machine has increased enormously. A superconducting linac is the driving heart of ERLs, and emittance preservation and cost efficiency is of utmost importance. The resulting challenges for the superconducting cavity technology and RF field control are manifold. In March 2005 the first international workshop on ERLs was held at Newport News, VA, to explore the potential of ERLs and to discuss machine-physics and technology challenges and their solutions. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art in superconducting RF and RF control for ERLs, and summarizes the discussions of the SRF working group on this technology during the ERL2005 workshop

  1. Low-level rf system for the AGS Light Ion Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovarik, V.; Ahrens, L.; Barton, D.S.; Frankel, R.; Otis, A.; Pope, D.; Pritsker, M.; Raka, E.; Warkentien, R.

    1987-01-01

    The new low level rf system for the light ion acceleration program features direct digital control of a phase continuous rf synthesizer clocked by finite changes in the B field. The system, its operation and testing are described. The system covers the complete rf frequency range and switches over from single cavity acceleration to multiple cavity acceleration with no beam loss. It also switches from the programmed drive to the normal bootstrap system

  2. Accelerating Rf Station For Hirfl-csr, Lanzhou, China

    CERN Document Server

    Arbuzov, V S; Dranichnikov, A N; Gorniker, E I; Kondakov, A A; Kondaurov, M; Kruchkov, Ya G; Krutikhin, S A; Kurkin, G Ya; Mironenko, L A; Motygin, S V; Osipov, V N; Petrov, V M; Pilan, Andrey M; Popov, A M; Sedlyarov, I K; Selivanov, A N; Shteinke, A R; Vajenin, N F

    2004-01-01

    In accordance with the plan of cooperation with the Institute of Modern Physics (IMP), Lanzhou, China, the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (BINP), Novosibirsk, Russia has produced and supplied an accelerating RF station for the multipurpose Cooling Storage Ring system (CSR), which is being constructed at IMP. The RF station had been tested at IMP site and now is installed into the Main Ring of the facilities. The RF station operates in the frequency range of 0.25~1.7 MHz. Maximum accelerating voltage is 8 kV. The resonance frequency of the RF cavity is tuned in the whole frequency range by biasing of ferrites, which are used in the cavity. Ferrites of 600NN type were produced by a firm manufacture "Magneton", St. Petersburg. The pressure in the cavity vacuum chamber is lower, than 3·10-11

  3. Indirect method of measuring changes of EM field in RF-gun cavity for XFEL accelerator (Pośrednia metoda pomiaru zmian pola we wnęce działa elektronowego akceleratora XFEL)

    CERN Document Server

    Pozniak, K; Zabolotny, W; Koehler, W; Stephan, F; Simrock, S

    2009-01-01

    In the paper an RF-gun control system is described. Difficulties caused by the impossibility to observe directly the field gradient are mentioned. Calibration nd measurement procedure is discussed. A mathematical model, which provides a way to calculate the desired signal from the indirect measurements is developed and analyzed. This model is supported by both measurements and simulations discussed in the final part of the paper. Research done with participation of Ph.D. students.

  4. rf beam-current, -phase, and -position monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, L.

    1984-01-01

    A prototype rf beam monitor has been tested on the Racetrack Microtron's (RTM) 100 kV injector beam line at the National Bureau of Standards (NBS). This beam monitor is capable of measuring the current, the relative phase, and the position of the beam. The beam is bunched at 2380 MHz for acceleration by the linac in the injector beam line. This train of beam bunches passing through the beam monitor cavities excites the cavities at this resonance frequency of 2380 MHz. Probes in the cavities couple some of the beam-excited rf power out of the cavities. This rf power can be amplified if necessary and then analyzed by a double balanced mixer (DBM). The DBM can also be used as a phase detector. The effective shunt impedance of the cavities was measured with the CW beam. For the position monitor cavity, the shunt impedance is proportional to the displacement from the axis. The measured response of the prototype rf beam current monitor setup is a linear function of beam current. Response of the rf beam-position monitor is also shown

  5. RF tuning system for superconducting cyclotron at VECC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandal, Aditya; Som, S.; Pal, Saikat; Seth, S.; Mukherjee, A.K.; Gangopadhyay, P.; Prasad, J.S.; Raj, P.R.; Manna, S.K.; Banerjee, M.; Krishnaiah, K.V.; Maskawade, S.; Saha, M.S.; Biswas, S.; Panda, Umashakar

    2009-01-01

    The RF system of Superconducting cyclotron at VECC has operational frequency 9-27 MHz. It has three numbers of tunable rf amplifier cavities as well as six numbers of tunable Main resonant cavities. RF tuning system takes care of movement of nine stepper motor based sliding short movement and hydraulic driven three coupling capacitors and three trimmer capacitors. The PC-based stepper motor controlled sliding short movement system has positional accuracy of around 20 micron and PC-based hydraulically driven couplers and trimmers system has 10 micron positional accuracy. The RF power is capacitively coupled to the dee (accelerating electrode) of the main resonant cavity through Coupler (Coupling capacitor). The coupling capacitor is used to match the impedance of the main resonant cavity to the 50 Ohm output impedance of final RF power amplifier. Trimmer capacitor operates in closed loop for the adjustment of cavity phase variation arising due to temperature variation and beam loading of the cavity. Coupler can travel 100 mm. and trimmer has 20 mm. travels. A PLC based PID control system has been developed for positional control of the coupler and trimmer. One position control mode of trimmer is same as coupling capacitor and another is velocity control mode. Velocity control mode operates in close-loop. The positional data of different frequencies of nine stepper motors and three coupling capacitors are stored in a database. (author)

  6. A deflectable guiding catheter for real-time MRI-guided interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Jamie A.; Saikus, Christina E.; Ratnakaya, Kanishka; Wu, Vincent; Sonmez, Merdim; Faranesh, Anthony Z.; Colyer, Jessica H.; Lederman, Robert J.; Kocaturk, Ozgur

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To design a deflectable guiding catheter that omits long metallic components yet preserves mechanical properties to facilitate therapeutic interventional MRI procedures. Materials and Methods The catheter shaft incorporated Kevlar braiding. 180° deflection was attained with a 5 cm nitinol slotted tube, a nitinol spring, and a Kevlar pull string. We tested three designs: passive, passive incorporating an inductively-coupled coil, and active receiver. We characterized mechanical properties, MRI properties, RF induced heating, and in vivo performance in swine. Results Torque and tip deflection force were satisfactory. Representative procedures included hepatic and azygos vein access, laser cardiac septostomy, and atrial septal defect crossing. Visualization was best in the active configuration, delineating profile and tip orientation. The passive configuration could be used in tandem with an active guidewire to overcome its limited conspicuity. There was no RF-induced heating in all configurations under expected use conditions in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion Kevlar and short nitinol component substitutions preserved mechanical properties. The active design offered the best visibility and usability but reintroduced metal conductors. We describe versatile deflectable guiding catheters with a 0.057” lumen for interventional MRI catheterization. Implementations are feasible using active, inductive, and passive visualization strategies to suit application requirements. PMID:22128071

  7. Dental cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... acids in plaque damage the enamel covering your teeth. It also creates holes in the tooth called cavities. Cavities usually do not hurt, unless they grow very large and affect nerves or cause a tooth fracture. An untreated cavity can lead to an infection ...

  8. Recycler barrier RF buckets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, C.M.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The Recycler Ring at Fermilab uses a barrier rf systems for all of its rf manipulations. In this paper, I will give an overview of historical perspective on barrier rf system, the longitudinal beam dynamics issues, aspects of rf linearization to produce long flat bunches and methods used for emittance measurements of the beam in the RR barrier rf buckets. Current rf manipulation schemes used for antiproton beam stacking and longitudinal momentum mining of the RR beam for the Tevatron collider operation are explained along with their importance in spectacular success of the Tevatron luminosity performance.

  9. RF Preparation for Beam in 2009

    CERN Document Server

    Ciapala, Edmond

    2009-01-01

    Modifications to the ACS cavity tuning systems should be completed early in 2009. First tests on the power and low level RF systems will be done with waveguide shorts, as the cavities will be warm and the RUX45 tunnel roof blocks will still be open to allow transport of quadrupoles into sector 3-4. Any co-activity with magnet transport will need to be avoided till the installation of sector 3-4 is completed. Well before beam, the cavities will need to be cooled down and tuning and calibration checked. A period of cavity conditioning will certainly also be required. After cavity conditioning there will be a final check on the cavity tuning and RF feedback systems. These activities all require availability of 4.5 K cryogenics, in sectors 3-4 and 4-5. The beam control systems in UX45 will also be checked as far as possible before beam, together with remote controls and signal monitoring systems. A description of this work, the times needed for the various activities and a planning will be presented. Work on the ...

  10. Cavity-cavity conditional logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, Serge; Gao, Yvonne Y.; Reinhold, Philip; Wang, Chen; Axline, Christopher; Frunzio, Luigi; Girvin, Steven M.; Jiang, Liang; Mirrahimi, Mazyar; Devoret, Michel H.; Schoelkopf, Robert J.

    In a superconducting circuit architecture, the highest coherence times are typically offered by 3D cavities. Moreover, these cavities offer a hardware-efficient way of redundantly encoding quantum information. While single-qubit control on a cavity has already been demonstrated, there is a need for a universal two-qubit gate between such cavities. In this talk, we demonstrate a cavity-cavity gate by parametric pumping on a fixed-frequency transmon interacting with the two cavities. Every gate application lowers the state fidelity by only 1%, while maintaining an entangling rate on-off ratio of 29dB. Additionally, we show that the gate is applicable not only to qubits consisting of single photons, but also to more complex encodings. These results illustrate the usefulness of cavities beyond the mere storage of quantum information, and pave the way towards gates between error-corrected logical qubits.

  11. Some Operational Characteristics of CEBAF RF Windows at 2K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L. Phillips; C. Reece; T. Powers; V. Nguyen-Tuong

    1993-01-01

    A CEBAF superconducting rf cavity was instrumented to examine RF window behavior at 2K. Of special interest was window performance at levels of cavity power dissipation considerably above normal operating conditions. A variety of transient electronic activity was observed to occur at or near the rf window, including the emission of light, a precipitous increase in reflected power, and interesting cooperative effects between window and cavity. Typically, the initiation of this activity at the window is correlated with the presence of a high x-ray and energetic electron flux at the window produced by the cavity. Electronic activity at the window can occasionally trigger the sudden disappearance of all stored energy in the cavity, herein referred to as an ''electronic quench.'' Variable decays of up to 40 mu-sec have been observed between the onset of window activity and the decay of the cavity field, which can occur in less than 200 nsec and is always accompanied by an intense pulse o f x-rays. When the cavity is off resonance with negligible stored energy, rf fields at the window can be increased even further without the appearance of these effects

  12. Some operational characteristics of CEBAF RF windows at 2K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, L.; Reece, C.; Powers, T.; Nguyen-Tuong, V.

    1993-01-01

    A CEBAF superconducting RF cavity was instrumented to examine RF window behavior at 2K. Of special interest was window performance at levels of cavity power dissipation considerably above normal operating conditions. A variety of transient electronic activity was observed to occur at or near the rf window, including the emission of light, a precipitous increase in reflected power, and interesting cooperative effects between the window and cavity. Typically, the initiation of this activity at the window is correlated with the presence of a high x-ray and energetic electron flux at the window produced by the cavity. Electronic activity at the window can occasionally trigger the sudden disappearance of all stored energy in the cavity, herein referred to as an open-quotes electronic quenchclose quotes. Variable delays of up to 40 μsec have been observed between the onset of window activity and the decay of the cavity field, which can occur in less than 200 nsec and is always accompanied by an intense pulse of x-rays. When the cavity is off resonance with negligible stored energy, rf fields at the window can be increased even further without the appearance of these effects

  13. Test Results of the 3.9 GHz Cavity at Fermilab

    CERN Document Server

    Solyak, N

    2004-01-01

    Fermilab is developing two types of 3.9 GHz superconducting cavities to improve performances of A0 and TTF photoinjectors. In frame of this project we have built and tested two nine-cell copper models and one 3-cell niobium accelertating cavity and series of deflecting cavities. Properties of the high order modes were carefully studied in a chain of two copper cavities at room temperature. High gradient performance were tested at helium temperature. Achieved gradients and surface resistances are exceed goal parameters. In paper we discuss results of cold tests of the 3-cell accelerating and deflecting cavities.

  14. Superconducting accelerating cavity for KEK B-factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuya, T.; Asano, K.; Mitsunobu, S.; Tajima, T.; Takahashi, T.; Ishi, Y.; Kijima, Y.; Murai, T.; Sennyu, K.

    1996-01-01

    KEKB is an asymmetric collider of 3.5 GeV x 8 GeV with the circulating beams of 2.6 A(e - ) and 1.1 A(e + ). These high currents require the RF cavities which have sufficiently damped higher order modes (HOMs), because RF cavities are the main source of the ring impedance that can cause the single bunch and coupled bunch instabilities. Another problem is a multibunch instability due to the accelerating mode. Two types of accelerating cavities are under development for the RF system of KEKB: a new normal conducting cavity (ARES) and a superconducting (SC) cavity. In this paper, recent activity of an SC accelerating cavity for KEKB is reported. (K.A.)

  15. Tha AGS Booster high frequency rf system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, R.; Cameron, P.; Damn, R.

    1988-01-01

    A high level rf system, including a power amplifier and cavity has been designed for the AGS Booster. It covers a frequency range of 2.4 to 4.2 Mhz and will be used to accelerate high intensity proton, and low intensity polarized proton beams to 1.5 GeV and heavy ions to 0.35 GeV per nucleon. A total accelerating voltage of up to 90kV will be provided by two cavities, each having two gaps. The internally cross-coupled, pushpull cavities are driven by an adjacently located power amplifier. In order to accommodate the high beam intensity, up to 0.75 /times/ 10 13 protons per bunch, a low plate resistance power tetrode is used. The tube anode is magnetically coupled to one of the cavity's two paralleled cells. The amplifier is a grounded cathode configuration driven by a remotely located solid state amplifier

  16. The AGS booster high frequency rf system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, R.; Cameron, P.; Kamn, R.; Goldman, M.; Jablonski, E.; Keane, J.; McNerney, A.; Meth, M.; Plotkin, M.; Puglisi, M.; Ratti, A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports on a high level RF system, which includes a power amplifier and cavity designed for the AGS Booster. It covers a frequency range of 2.4 to 4.2 MHz and will be used to accelerate high intensity proton, and low intensity polarized proton beams to 1.5 GeV and heavy ions to 0.35 GeV per nucleon. A total accelerating voltage of up to 90kV will be provided by two cavities, each having two gaps. The internally cross-coupled, pushpull cavities are driven by an adjacently located power amplifier. In order to accommodate the high beam intensity, up to 0.75 x 10 13 protons per bunch, a low plate resistance power tetrode is used. The tube anode is magnetically coupled to one of the cavity's two paralleled cells. The amplifier is a grounded cathode configuration driven by a remotely located solid state amplifier

  17. Development of new S-band RF window for stable high-power operation in linear accelerator RF system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Youngdo; Lee, Byung-Joon; Kim, Seung-Hwan; Kong, Hyung-Sup; Hwang, Woonha; Roh, Sungjoo; Ryu, Jiwan

    2017-09-01

    For stable high-power operation, a new RF window is developed in the S-band linear accelerator (Linac) RF systems of the Pohang Light Source-II (PLS-II) and the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory X-ray Free-Electron Laser (PAL-XFEL). The new RF window is designed to mitigate the strength of the electric field at the ceramic disk and also at the waveguide-cavity coupling structure of the conventional RF window. By replacing the pill-box type cavity in the conventional RF window with an overmoded cavity, the electric field component perpendicular to the ceramic disk that caused most of the multipacting breakdowns in the ceramic disk was reduced by an order of magnitude. The reduced electric field at the ceramic disk eliminated the Ti-N coating process on the ceramic surface in the fabrication procedure of the new RF window, preventing the incomplete coating from spoiling the RF transmission and lowering the fabrication cost. The overmoded cavity was coupled with input and output waveguides through dual side-wall coupling irises to reduce the electric field strength at the waveguide-cavity coupling structure and the possibility of mode competitions in the overmoded cavity. A prototype of the new RF window was fabricated and fully tested with the Klystron peak input power, pulse duration and pulse repetition rate of 75 MW, 4.5 μs and 10 Hz, respectively, at the high-power test stand. The first mass-produced new RF window installed in the PLS-II Linac is running in normal operation mode. No fault is reported to date. Plans are being made to install the new RF window to all S-band accelerator RF modules of the PLS-II and PAL-XFEL Linacs. This new RF window may be applied to the output windows of S-band power sources like Klystron as wells as the waveguide windows of accelerator facilities which operate in S-band.

  18. Superconducting RF activities at Cornell University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchgessner, J.; Moffat, D.; Padamsee, H.; Rubin, D.; Sears, J.; Shu, Q.S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper outlines the RF superconductivity research and development work that has taken place at Cornell Laboratory of Nuclear Studies over the past years. The work that has been performed since the last RF superconductivity workshop is emphasized together with a discussion of the direction of future efforts. Past work is summarized first, focusing on research and development activities in the area of RF superconductivity. Superconducting TeV linear collider is then discussed focusing on the application of superconducting RF to a future TeV linear collider. Linear collider structure development is then described centering on the development of a simpler (thereby cheaper) structure for a TeV linear collider. B-factory with superconducting RF is outlined focusing on the formulation of a conceptual design for a B-factory. B-factory structure development is discussed in relation to the advancement in the capability of SC cavities to carry beam currents of several amperes necessary for a high luminosity storage ring. High gradients are discussed as the key to the realization of a high energy superconducting linac or a superconducting RF B-factory. (N.K.)

  19. SRF and RF systems for LEReC Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belomestnykh, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Ben-Zvi, I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Brutus, J. C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Fedotov, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); McIntyre, G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Polizzo, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Smith, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Than, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tuozzolo, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Veshcherevich, V. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Wu, Q. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Xiao, B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Xu, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Zaltsman, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-03

    The Low Energy RHIC electron Cooling (LEReC) is under development at BNL to improve RHIC luminosity at low energies. It will consist of a short electron linac and two cooling sections, one for blue and one for yellow rings. For the first stage of the project, LEReC-I, we will install a 704 MHz superconducting RF cavity and three normal conducting cavities operating at 9 MHz, 704 MHz and 2.1 GHz. The SRF cavity will boost the electron beam energy up to 2 MeV. The warm cavities will be used to correct the energy spread introduced in the SRF cavity. The paper describes layouts of the SRF and RF systems, their parameters and status.

  20. Capture cavity II results at FNAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branlard, Julien; Chase, Brian; Cancelo, G.; Carcagno, R.; Edwards, H.; Fliller, R.; Hanna, B.; Harms, Elvan; Hocker, A.; Koeth, T.; Kucera, M.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    As part of the research and development towards the International Linear Collider (ILC), several test facilities have been developed at Fermilab. This paper presents the latest Low Level RF (LLRF) results obtained with Capture Cavity II (CCII) at the ILC Test Accelerator (ILCTA) test facility. The main focus will be on controls and RF operations using the SIMCON based LLRF system developed in DESY [1]. Details about hardware upgrades and future work will be discussed.

  1. Experimental analysis of surface finish in normal conducting cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrebini-Esfahani, A.; Aslaninejad, M.; Ristic, M.; Long, K.

    2017-10-01

    A normal conducting 805 MHz test cavity with an in built button shaped sample is used to conduct a series of surface treatment experiments. The button enhances the local fields and influences the likelihood of an RF breakdown event. Because of their smaller sizes, compared to the whole cavity surface, they allow practical investigations of the effects of cavity surface preparation in relation to RF breakdown. Manufacturing techniques and steps for preparing the buttons to improve the surface quality are described in detail. It was observed that even after the final stage of the surface treatment, defects on the surface of the cavities still could be found.

  2. Mexico North-South Deflections (DMEX97)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This 2' surface deflection of the vertical grid for Mexico, and North-Central is the DMEX97 model. The computation used about one million terrestrial and marine...

  3. Alaska North-South Deflections (DEFLEC96)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This 2' x 4' surface deflection of the vertical grid for Alaska is the DEFLEC96 model. The computation used about 1.1 million terrestrial and marine gravity data...

  4. Mexico East-West Deflections (DMEX97)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This 2' surface deflection of the vertical grid for Mexico, and North-Central is the DMEX97 model. The computation used about one million terrestrial and marine...

  5. Measurement methods of building structures deflections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wróblewska Magdalena

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Underground mining exploitation is leading to the occurrence of deformations manifested by, in particular, sloping terrain. The structures situated on the deforming subsoil are subject to uneven subsidence which is leading in consequence to their deflection. Before a building rectification process takes place by, e.g. uneven raising, the structure's deflection direction and value is determined so that the structure is restored to its vertical position as a result of the undertaken remedial measures. Deflection can be determined by applying classical as well as modern measurement techniques. The article presents examples of measurement methods used considering the measured elements of building structures’ constructions and field measurements. Moreover, for a given example of a mining area, the existing deflections of buildings were compared with mining terrain sloping.

  6. ULYSSES JUPITER HISCALE DEFLECTED ELECTRONS COUNTS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set consists of HISCALE Deflected Electron (DE) measurements taken during the Ulysses Jupiter encounter 1991-12-31 to 1992-02-16. This includes 1 hour...

  7. Optical measurement of unducted fan blade deflections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurkov, A. P.

    1990-01-01

    A nonintrusive optical method for measuring unducted fan (or propeller) blade deflections is described and evaluated. The measurement does not depend on blade surface reflectivity. Deflection of a point at the leading edge and a point at the trailing edge in a plane nearly perpendicular to the pitch axis is obtained with a single light beam generated by a low-power, helium-neon laser. Quantitative analyses are performed from taped signals on a digital computer. Averaging techniques are employed to reduce random errors. Measured static deflections from a series of high-speed wind tunnel tests of a counterrotating unducted fan model are compared with available, predicted deflections, which are also used to evaluate systematic errors.

  8. Alaska East-West Deflections (DEFLEC96)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This 2' x 4' surface deflection of the vertical grid for Alaska is the DEFLEC96 model. The computation used about 1.1 millionterrestrial and marine gravity data held...

  9. Internal torsion resistance in deflected shafts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud T. El-Sayed

    2017-06-01

    The objective of the present work was to estimate the effect of internal torsional resistance in shafts which is caused by deflection, for the reason that it has the upper hand on misalignment problem. With the aim of fulfilling this objective, an experimental rig has been constructed to verify the existence of the torsional resistance in deflected shafts and its variation with the rotation angle.

  10. Light deflection in gadolinium molybdate ferroelastic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staniorowski, Piotr; Bornarel, Jean

    2000-01-01

    The deflection of a He-Ne light beam by polydomain gadolinium molybdate (GMO) crystals has been studied with respect to incidence angle α i on the sample at room temperature. The A and B deflected beams do not cross each other during the α i variation, in contrast to results and calculations previously published. The model using the Fresnel equation confirms this result. The model presented is more accurate for numerical calculation than that using the Huygens construction. (author)

  11. Experimental study of rf pulsed heating

    CERN Document Server

    Laurent, L; Nantista, C; Dolgashev, V; Higashi, Y; Aicheler, M; Tantawi, S; Wuensch, W

    2011-01-01

    Cyclic thermal stresses produced by rf pulsed heating can be the limiting factor on the attainable reliable gradients for room temperature linear accelerators. This is especially true for structures that have complicated features for wakefield damping. These limits could be pushed higher by using special types of copper, copper alloys, or other conducting metals in constructing partial or complete accelerator structures. Here we present an experimental study aimed at determining the potential of these materials for tolerating cyclic thermal fatigue due to rf magnetic fields. A special cavity that has no electric field on the surface was employed in these studies. The cavity shape concentrates the magnetic field on one flat surface where the test material is placed. The materials tested in this study have included oxygen free electronic grade copper, copper zirconium, copper chromium, hot isostatically pressed copper, single crystal copper, electroplated copper, Glidcop (R), copper silver, and silver plated co...

  12. Rugged Ceramic Window for RF Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neubauer, Michael; Johnson, Rolland P.; Rimmer, Robert; Elliot, Tom; Stirbet, Mircea

    2009-01-01

    High-current RF cavities that are needed for many accelerator applications are often limited by the power transmission capability of the pressure barriers (windows) that separate the cavity from the power source. Most efforts to improve RF window design have focused on alumina ceramic, the most popular historical choice, and have not taken advantage of new materials. Alternative window materials have been investigated using a novel Merit Factor comparison and likely candidates have been tested for the material properties which will enable construction in the self-matched window configuration. Window assemblies have also been modeled and fabricated using compressed window techniques which have proven to increase the power handling capability of waveguide windows. Candidate materials have been chosen to be used in fabricating a window for high power testing at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility.

  13. Fan Blade Deflection Measurement and Analyses Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehmed, Oral; Janetzke, David C.

    1997-01-01

    Steady deflection measurements were taken of two identical NASA/Pratt & Whitney-designed fan blades while they were rotating in a vacuum in NASA Lewis Research Center's Dynamic Spin Facility. The one-fifth-scale fan blades, which have a tip diameter of 22 in. and a pinroot retention, are of sparshell construction and were unducted for this test. The purpose of the test was to measure the change of the radial deflection of the blade tip and blade angle at selected radial stations along the blade span with respect to rotational speed. The procedure for radial deflection measurement had no precedent and was newly developed for this test. Radial deflection measurements were made to assure adequate tip clearance existed between the fan blades and the duct for a follow-on wind tunnel test. Also, blade angle deflection measurements were desired before pitchsetting parts for the wind tunnel test were finish machined. During the test, laser beams were aimed across the blade path into photodiodes to give signals that were used to determine blade angle change or tip radial deflection. These laser beams were set parallel to the spin axis at selected radial stations.

  14. Investigation of an Ultrafast Harmonic Resonant RF Kicker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yulu [Univ. of Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China)

    2016-10-01

    An Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) based multi-turn electron Circulator Cooler Ring (CCR) is envisaged in the proposed Jefferson Lab Electron Ion Collider (JLEIC) to cool the ion bunches with high energy (55 MeV), high current (1.5 A), high repetition frequency (476.3 MHz), high quality magnetized electron bunches. A critical component in this scheme is a pair of ultrafast kickers for the exchange of electron bunches between the ERL and the CCR. The ultrafast kicker should operate with the rise and fall time in less than 2.1 ns, at the repetition rate of ~10s MHz, and should be able to run continuously during the whole period of cooling. These -and-fall time being combined together, are well beyond the state-of-art of traditional pulsed power supplies and magnet kickers. To solve this technical challenge, an alternative method is to generate this high repetition rate, fast rise-and-fall time short pulse continuous waveform by summing several finite number of (co)sine waves at harmonic frequencies of the kicking repetition frequency, and these harmonic modes can be generated by the Quarter Wave Resonater (QWR) based multifrequency cavities. Assuming the recirculator factor is 10, 10 harmonic modes (from 47.63 MHz to 476.3 MHz) with proper amplitudes and phases, plus a DC offset are combined together, a continuous short pulse waveform with the rise-and-fall time in less than 2.1 ns, repetition rate of 47.63 MHz waveform can be generated. With the compact and matured technology of QWR cavities, the total cost of both hardware development and operation can be reduced to a modest level. Focuse on the technical scheme, three main topics will be discussed in this thesis: the synthetization of the kicking pulse, the design and optimization of the deflecting QWR multi-integer harmonic frequency resonator and the fabrication and bench measurements of a half scale copper prototype. In the kicking pulse synthetization part, we begin with the Fourier Series expansion of an ideal

  15. R & D of a Gas-Filled RF Beam Profile Monitor for Intense Neutrino Beam Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yonehara, K. [Fermilab; Backfish, M. [Fermilab; Moretti, A. [Fermilab; Tollestrup, A. V. [Fermilab; Watts, A. [Fermilab; Zwaska, R. M. [Fermilab; Abrams, R. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Cummings, M. A.; Dudas, A. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Johnson, R. P. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Kazakevich, G. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Neubauer, M. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Liu, Q. [Case Western Reserve U.

    2017-05-01

    We report the R&D of a novel radiation-robust hadron beam profile monitor based on a gas-filled RF cavity for intense neutrino beam experiments. An equivalent RF circuit model was made and simulated to optimize the RF parameter in a wide beam intensity range. As a result, the maximum acceptable beam intensity in the monitor is significantly increased by using a low-quality factor RF cavity. The plan for the demonstration test is set up to prepare for future neutrino beam experiments.

  16. Possible High Power Limitations From RF Pulsed Heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pritzkau, David P.

    1998-01-01

    One of the possible limitations to achieving high power in RF structures is damage to metal surfaces due to RF pulsed heating. Such damage may lead to degradation of RF performance. An experiment to study RF pulsed heating on copper has been developed at SLAC. The experiment consists of operating two pillbox cavities in the TE 011 mode using a 50 MW X-Band klystron. The estimated temperature rise of the surface of copper is 350 C for a power input of 20 MW to each cavity with a pulse length of 1.5 microseconds. Preliminary results from an experiment performed earlier are presented. A revised design for continued experiments is also presented along with relevant theory and calculations

  17. Linear collider RF structure design using ARGUS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwok Ko

    1991-01-01

    In a linear collider, both the driving system (klystrons) and the accelerating system (linac) consists of RF structures that are inherently three-dimensional. These structures which are responsible for power input/output, have to satisfy many requirements in order that instabilities, beam or RF related, are to be avoided. At the same time, system efficiencies have to be maintained at optimal to minimize cost. Theoretical analysis on these geometrically complex structures are difficult and until recently, numerical solutions have been limited. At SLAC, there has been a continuing and close collaboration among accelerator physicists, engineers and numericists to integrate supercomputing into the design procedure which involves 3-D RF structures. The outcome is very encouraging. Using the 3-D/electromagnetic code ARGUS (developed by SAIC) on the Cray computers at NERSC in conjunction with supporting theories, a wide variety of critical components have been simulated and evaluated. Aside from structures related to the linear collider, the list also includes the RF cavity for the proposed Boson Factory and the anode circuit for the Cross-Field Amplifier, once considered as an alternative to the klystron as a possible power source. This presentation will focus on two specific structures: (1) the klystron output cavity; and (2) the linac input coupler. As the results demonstrate, supercomputing is fast becoming a viable technology that could conceivably replace actual cold-testing in the near future

  18. Experimental study of rf pulsed heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Laurent

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic thermal stresses produced by rf pulsed heating can be the limiting factor on the attainable reliable gradients for room temperature linear accelerators. This is especially true for structures that have complicated features for wakefield damping. These limits could be pushed higher by using special types of copper, copper alloys, or other conducting metals in constructing partial or complete accelerator structures. Here we present an experimental study aimed at determining the potential of these materials for tolerating cyclic thermal fatigue due to rf magnetic fields. A special cavity that has no electric field on the surface was employed in these studies. The cavity shape concentrates the magnetic field on one flat surface where the test material is placed. The materials tested in this study have included oxygen free electronic grade copper, copper zirconium, copper chromium, hot isostatically pressed copper, single crystal copper, electroplated copper, Glidcop®, copper silver, and silver plated copper. The samples were exposed to different machining and heat treatment processes prior to rf processing. Each sample was tested to a peak pulsed heating temperature of approximately 110°C and remained at this temperature for approximately 10×10^{6} rf pulses. In general, the results showed the possibility of pushing the gradient limits due to pulsed heating fatigue by the use of copper zirconium and copper chromium alloys.

  19. Rf stability, control and bunch lengthening in electron synchrotron storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachtel, J.M.

    1989-09-01

    A self-consistent theory for nonlinear longitudinal particle motion and rf cavity excitation in a high energy electron storage ring is developed. Coupled first order equations for the motion of an arbitrary number of particles and for the field in several rf cavities are given in the form used in control system theory. Stochastic quantum excitation of synchrotron motion is included, as are the effects of rf control system corrections. Results of computations for double cavity bunch lengthening are given. 11 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  20. RF resonant beam polarimetry: Analysis using quantized operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mane, S. R.; MacKay, W. W.

    2017-12-01

    The concept of so-called 'rf resonant beam polarimetry' has been proposed as a potentially fast, accurate and nondestructive technique for measuring the spin polarization of stored polarized beams. The published analyses have employed a semiclassical treatment for the cavity rf fields and also the particle spin. We revisit the problem, using quantized operators for the cavity rf field, and also treat the particle spin as a quantum operator. With suitable approximations, the quantum model can be solved exactly, yielding so-called 'vacuum Rabi oscillations.' Using our solution of the quantum model, we are able to offer more precise quantitative estimates for the energy and number of photons emitted into the cavity per unit time. Our treatment employing quantized operators yields significantly different conclusions from the semiclassical analysis.

  1. Influence of a distribution of deflecting-mode frequencies on the transient dynamics of cumulative beam breakup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohn, C.L.; Delayen, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    A distribution of deflecting-mode frequencies in the constituent cavities of a linear accelerator can lead to Q-independent damping of cumulative beam breakup. A probability density for the deflecting-mode frequencies generates an effective transverse wake function. The effective wake function can be used to calculate the transient dynamics of cumulative beam breakup within the framework of a continuum approximation provided the transverse beam displacement changes little over the correlation length of the deflecting-mode frequencies as the beam moves down the linac. We adopt this approach to show that the damping induced by the effective wake function causes the rate of approach to the steady state to depend strongly on the operative probability density for the deflecting-mode frequencies

  2. RF high voltage performance of RF transmission line components on the DIII-D Fast Wave Current Drive (FWCD) system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, S.W.; Callis, R.W.; Cary, W.P.; Phelps, D.A.; Ponce, D.; Baity, F.W.; Barber, G.

    1995-01-01

    The performance of the high voltage rf components of the DIII-D Fast Wave Current Drive System (FWCD) have been evaluated under various conditions of insulator configuration, insulator material, insulating gas and gas pressure. The insulator materials that have been investigated are alumina, steatite, pyrex, quartz, and teflon. The results of this evaluation are discussed in this paper. Additionally a rf high potter was developed to aid in the evaluation of rf high voltage components. The high potter consists of a 50 Ω, 1/4 wavelength cavity with a variable position short and a 50 ohm matched tap at one end of the cavity. With this configuration rf voltages were generated in excess of 100 kVp in the frequency range 30 to 60 MHz

  3. RF high voltage performance of RF transmission line components on the DIII-D Fast Wave Current Drive (FWCD) System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, S.W.; Callis, R.W.; Cary, W.P.; Phelps, D.A.; Ponce, D.; Baity, F.W.; Barber, G.

    1995-12-01

    The performance of the high voltage rf components of the DIII-D Fast Wave Current Drive System (FWCD) have been evaluated under various conditions of insulator configuration, insulator material, insulating gas and gas pressure. The insulator materials that have been investigated are alumina, steatite, pyrex, quartz, and teflon. The results of this evaluation are discussed in this paper. Additionally a rf high potter was developed to aid in the evaluation of rf high voltage components. The high potter consists of a 50 Ω, 1/4 wavelength cavity with a variable position short and a 50 ohm matched tap at one end of the cavity. With this configuration rf voltages were generated in excess of 100 kVp in the frequency range 30 to 60 MHz

  4. Dynamic performance of the RHIC acceleration RF system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirki, Werner [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-04-01

    The RHIC accelerating rf system operates at 26.7 MHz and has to provide as its name suggests the power and agility to accelerate the beams from injection up to the end energy and to hand them off to the storage rf system. This note discusses methods to simulate the dynamic behavior of the accelerating cavity system and gives results for the amplitude and phase transient in response to fast changes of the reference signal.

  5. Beam orbit control in TESLA superconducting cavities from dipole mode measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paparella, R.

    2006-09-01

    The knowledge of the electromagnetic interaction between a beam and the surrounding vacuum chamber is necessary in order to optimize the accelerator performance in terms of stored current. Many instability phenomena may occur in the machine because of the fields produced by the beam and acting back on itself. Basically, these fields, wake-fields, produce an extra voltage, affecting the longitudinal dynamics, and a transverse kick which deflects the beam. In this thesis we present the results of theoretical and experimental investigations to demonstrate the possibility of using the dipolar wake fields of the superconducting accelerating to measure the beam transverse position. After an introduction to the ILC project and to the TESLA technology, of superconducting RF cavities, we will approach the problem from an analytical point of view in chapter 2. The expression of the wake fields in a cylindrical cavity will be investigated and the electromagnetic field modes derived from Maxwell equations in an original way. Graphical solutions of a Matlab program simulating the fields due to a particle passing through a pill-box cavity along a generic path will be shown. The interaction of the beam with higher order modes (HOM) in the TESLA cavities has been studied in the past at the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) in order to determine whether the modes with the highest loss factor are sufficiently damped. Starting from the results obtained before 2003, HOM signals has been better observed and examined in order to use dipole modes to find the electric center of each cavity in the first TTF accelerating module. The results presented in chapter 3 will show that by monitoring the HOM signal amplitude for two polarizations of a dipole mode, one can measure electrical center of the modes with a resolution of 50 μm. Moreover, a misalignment of the first TTF module with respect to the gun axis has been predicted using cavity dipole modes. Alternatives to this method are described in

  6. accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    On the inside of the cavity there is a layer of niobium. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment.

  7. Status of RF superconductivity at Argonne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, K.W.

    1990-01-01

    Development of a superconducting slow-wave structures began at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in 1971, and led to the first superconducting heavy-ion linac (ATLAS - the Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerator System). The Physics Division at ANL has continued to develop superconducting RF technology for accelerating heavy-ions, with the result that the linac has been in an almost continuous process of upgrade and expansion. In 1987, the Engineering Physics Division at ANL began developing of superconducting RF components for the acceleration of high-brightness proton and deuterium beams. The two divisions collaborate in work on several applications of RF superconductivity, and also in work to develop the technology generally. The present report briefly describes major features of the superconducting heavy-ion linac (very-low-velocity superconducting linac, positive ion injector), proton accelerating structures (superconducting resonant cavities for acceleration of high-current proton and deuteron beams, RF properties of oxide superconductors), and future work. Both divisions expect to continue a variety of studies, frequently in collaboration, to advance the basic technology of RF superconductivity. (N.K.)

  8. Superconducting niobium in high rf magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, G.

    1988-01-01

    The benefit of superconducting cavities for accelerator applications depends on the field and Q/sub 0/ levels which can be achieved reliably in mass producible multicell accelerating structures. The presently observed field and Q/sub 0/ limitations are caused by anomalous loss mechanisms which are not correlated with the intrinsic properties of the pure superconductor but rather due to defects or contaminants on the superconducting surface. The ultimate performance levels of clean superconducting cavities built from pure Nb will be given by the rf critical field and the surface resistance of the superconductor. In the first part of this paper a short survey is given of the maximum surface magnetic fields achieved in single-cell cavities. The results of model calculations for the thermal breakdown induced by very small defects and for the transition to the defect free case is discussed in part 2. In the last chapter, a discussion is given for the rf critical field of Nb on the basis of the Ginzburg-Landau Theory. It is shown that not only purity but also the homogeneity of the material should become important for the performance of superconducting Nb cavities at field levels beyond 100mT. Measurement results of the upper critical field for different grades of commercially available Nb sheet materials are given. 58 references, 20 figures, 1 table

  9. The properties of on-axis coupled structure RF gun

    CERN Document Server

    Oda, F; Nakayama, A; Koike, H; Tanabe, E

    2000-01-01

    Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd. (KHI) has developed the compact IR FEL device, which adopts a combination of a newly designed RF gun with a thermionic cathode and an alpha-magnet as an injector. The accelerating mode of the S-band RF gun is a pi/2 standing wave mode. The coupling cell is located on the beam axis, the so-called on-axis coupled structure (OCS). The cavity shape was designed by using electromagnetic field analytical codes. The OCS RF gun was manufactured and the electromagnetic properties were measured. The results show good agreement with the simulations.

  10. RF phase focusing in portable X-band, linear accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.H.; Deruyter, H.; Fowkes, W.R.; Potter, J.W.; Schonberg, R.G.; Weaver, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    In order to minimize the size and weight of the x-ray or neutron source for a series of portable radiographic linear accelerators, the x-ray head was packaged separately from the rest of the system and consists of only the linac accelerating structure, electron gun, built-in target, collimator, ion pump and an RF window. All the driving electronics and cooling are connected to the x-ray head through flexible waveguide, cables, and waterlines. The x-ray head has been kept small and light weight by using the RF fields for radial focusing, as well as for longitudinal bunching and accelerating the beam. Thus, no external, bulky magnetic focusing devices are required. The RF focusing is accomplished by alternating the sign of the phase difference between the RF and the beam and by tapering from cavity to cavity the magnitude of the buncher field levels. The former requires choosing the right phase velocity taper (mix of less than vp=c cavities) and the latter requires the right sizing of the cavity to cavity coupling smiles (irises)

  11. radiofrequency cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1988-01-01

    The pulse of a particle accelerator. 128 of these radio frequency cavities were positioned around CERN's 27-kilometre LEP ring to accelerate electrons and positrons. The acceleration was produced by microwave electric oscillations at 352 MHz. The electrons and positrons were grouped into bunches, like beads on a string, and the copper sphere at the top stored the microwave energy between the passage of individual bunches. This made for valuable energy savings as it reduced the heat generated in the cavity.

  12. Breaking and Moving Hotspots in a Large Grain Nb Cavity with a Laser Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciovati, G.; Cheng, G.; Flood, R. J.; Jordan, K.; Kneisel, P.; Morrone, M. L.; Turlington, L.; Wilson, K. M.; Zhang, S.; Anlage, S. M.; Gurevich, A. V.; Nemes, G.; Baldwin, C.

    2011-07-25

    Magnetic vortices pinned near the inner surface of SRF Nb cavities are a possible source of RF hotspots, frequently observed by temperature mapping of the cavities outer surface at RF surface magnetic fields of about 100 mT. Theoretically, we expect that the thermal gradient provided by a 10 W green laser shining on the inner cavity surface at the RF hotspot locations can move pinned vortices to different pinning locations. The experimental apparatus to send the beam onto the inner surface of a photoinjector-type large-grain Nb cavity is described. Preliminary results on the changes in thermal maps observed after applying the laser heating are also reported.

  13. Calibration of optical cantilever deflection readers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Zhiyu; Seeley, Tim; Kossek, Sebastian; Thundat, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    Because of its ultrahigh sensitivity, the optical lever detection method similar to that used in the atomic force microscope (AFM) has been widely employed as a standard technique for measuring microcantilever deflection. Along with the increasing interest in using the microcantilever as a sensing platform, there is also a requirement for a reliable calibration technique. Many researchers have used the concept of optical lever detection to construct microcantilever deflection readout instruments for chemical, physical, and biological detection. However, without an AFM piezo z scanner, it is very difficult to precisely calibrate these instruments. Here, we present a step-by-step method to conveniently calibrate an instrument using commercially available piezoresistive cantilevers. The experimental results closely match the theoretical calculation. Following this procedure, one can easily calibrate any optical cantilever deflection detection system with high reproducibility, precision, and reliability. A detailed discussion of the optical lever readout system design has been addressed in this article

  14. RF Power Generation in LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Brunner, O C; Valuch, D

    2003-01-01

    The counter-rotating proton beams in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will be captured and then accelerated to their final energies of 2 x 7 TeV by two identical 400 MHz RF systems. The RF power source required for each beam comprises eight 300 kW klystrons. The output power of each klystron is fed via a circulator and a waveguide line to the input coupler of a single-cell super-conducting (SC) cavity. Four klystrons are powered by a 100 kV, 40A AC/DC power converter, previously used for the operation of the LEP klystrons. A five-gap thyratron crowbar protects the four klystrons in each of these units. The technical specification and measured performance of the various high-power elements are discussed. These include the 400MHz/300kW klystrons with emphasis on their group delay and the three-port circulators, which have to cope with peak reflected power levels up to twice the simultaneously applied incident power of 300 kW. In addition, a novel ferrite loaded waveguide absorber, used as termination for port No...

  15. A new technique for RF distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madrak, Robyn; Wildman, David

    2014-07-01

    For independent phase and amplitude control, RF cavities are often driven by one power source per cavity. In many cases it would be advantageous in terms of cost to instead use one higher power source for many cavities. Vector modulators have been developed, which, when used with a single source provide for the independent phase and amplitude control which would have been otherwise lost. The key components of these vector modulators are a novel type of phase shifter — adjustable fast phase shifters with perpendicularly biased garnets. The vector modulators have been constructed and used with a single klystron in a 3.4 MeV test linac to successfully accelerate proton beam.

  16. Characterisation of a Mechanical Deflection Sensor

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Miyambo, M

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available -time duration, which is integrated over time to provide the total measured impulse of a shallow-buried explosive charge near-field blast (Snyman et al, 2006). The Mechanical Deflection Sensor (MDS) was developed by the CSIR LS, in conjunction with Conical...? to measure the positive dynamic deformation response over time of the vehicle?s hull. The MDS captures the response of the centre of the plate by breaking the PC board in the Teflon housing. APPARATUS AND METHODS The Mechanical Deflection Sensor Figure 1...

  17. Modulator considerations for the SNS RF system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tallerico, P.J.; Reass, W.A.

    1998-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is an intense neutron source for neutron scattering experiments. The project is in the research stage, with construction funding beginning next year. The SNS is comprised of an ion source, a 1,000 MeV, H - linear accelerator, an accumulator ring, a neutron producing target, and experimental area to utilize the scattering of the neutrons. The linear accelerator is RF driven, and the peak beam current is 27 mA and the beam duty factor is 5.84%. The peak RF power required is 104 MW, and the H - beam pulse length is 0.97 ms at a 60 Hz repetition rate. The RF pulses must be about 0.1 ms longer than the beam pulses, due to the Q of the accelerating cavities, and the time required to establish control of the cavity fields. The modulators for the klystrons in this accelerator are discussed in this paper. The SNS is designed to be expandable, so the beam power can be doubled or even quadrupled in the future. One of the double-power options is to double the beam pulse length and duty factor. The authors are specifying the klystrons to operate in this twice-duty-factor mode, and the modulator also should be expandable to 2 ms pulses at 60 Hz. Due to the long pulse length and low RF frequency of 805 MHz, the klystron power is specified at 2.5 MW peak, and the RF system will have 56 klystrons at 805 MHz, and three 1.25 MW peak power klystrons at 402.5 MHz for the low energy portion of the accelerator. The low frequency modulators are conventional floating-deck modulation anode control systems

  18. RF design of a C-band compact spherical RF pulse compressor for SXFEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zongbin; Fang, Wencheng; Gu, Qiang; Zhao, Zhentang

    2017-08-01

    A new C-band (5712 MHz) compact spherical radio frequency (RF) pulse compressor was designed for the Soft X-ray Free Electron Laser facility (SXFEL) at the Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics (SINAP), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS). Using only one high Q0 spherical RF resonant cavity which works on two TE113 modes and a dual-mode polarized coupler, this pulse compressor could achieve an average power gain of 3.8. Associated with the C-band accelerator, an energy gain of 1.85 with the coupling coefficient of 4.9 could be achieved. Particularly it could make the output power stable. This paper presents the scheme of the C-band spherical pulse compressor, as well as the RF design and details of the frequency sensitivities and machining considerations.

  19. Determining large deflections in rectangular combined loaded ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this study, large deflection of cantilever beams of Ludwick type material subjected to a combined loading consisting of a uniformly distributed load and one vertical concentrated load at the free end was investigated. In calcula- tions, both material and geometrical non-linearity have been considered. Horizon-.

  20. Protecting a Ball-Bearing-Deflection Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhr, George A.

    1987-01-01

    Deflectometer probe monitors deflection of ball-bearing race in liquid oxygen with aid of small window or diaphragm. Diaphragm or window isolates optical deflectometer from liquid oxygen or other fluid in ball bearing. At high pressures, diaphragm integral part of housing preferable to window, since there would be no leakage.

  1. Determining large deflections in rectangular combined loaded ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (Bisshopp & Drucker 1945; Scott et al 1955; Lau 1982; Rao & Rao 1986; Baker 1993; Lee et al 1993; Frisch-Fay 1962; Fertis 1999). Prathap and Varadan (1976) had calculated large deflections in cantilever beams made of non-linear Ramberg–Osgood type material on which concentrated load effected on the free end.

  2. Optical forces through guided light deflections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palima, Darwin; Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Vizsnyiczai, Gaszton

    2013-01-01

    . In this work we look into the object shaping aspect and its potential for controlled optical manipulation. Using a simple bent waveguide as example, our numerical simulations show that the guided deflection of light efficiently converts incident light momentum into optical force with one order...

  3. Study on the multi-pass, multi-bunch beam breakup for 9-cell TESLA cavities in ERL

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Si; Huang, Sen-Lin; Li, Yong-Ming; Feng, Li-Wen; Zhu, Feng; Quan, Sheng-Wen; Liu, Ke-Xin; Chen, Jia-Er

    2013-01-01

    Generally, Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) needs special designed high current superconducting RF cavities. In this paper, the threshold current of BBU for compact ERL facilities with 9-cell Tesla type cavities are investigated. The results show that it is feasible to adopt 9-cell Tesla cavity for compact ERL test facilities with just a few cavities and beam current around tens mA.

  4. Experience with the PEP-II RF System at High Beam Currents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corredoura, Paul L.

    2000-07-06

    The PEP-II Factory Low-Level RF System (LLRF) is a fully programmable VXI based design running under an EPICS control environment. Several RF feedback loops are used to control longitudinal coupled-bunch modes driven by the accelerating mode of the RF cavities. This paper updates the performance of the LLRF system as beam currents reach design levels. Modifications which enhance the stability, diagnostics, and overall operational performance are described. Recent data from high current operation is included.

  5. Microfluidic stretchable RF electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shi; Wu, Zhigang

    2010-12-07

    Stretchable electronics is a revolutionary technology that will potentially create a world of radically different electronic devices and systems that open up an entirely new spectrum of possibilities. This article proposes a microfluidic based solution for stretchable radio frequency (RF) electronics, using hybrid integration of active circuits assembled on flex foils and liquid alloy passive structures embedded in elastic substrates, e.g. polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). This concept was employed to implement a 900 MHz stretchable RF radiation sensor, consisting of a large area elastic antenna and a cluster of conventional rigid components for RF power detection. The integrated radiation sensor except the power supply was fully embedded in a thin elastomeric substrate. Good electrical performance of the standalone stretchable antenna as well as the RF power detection sub-module was verified by experiments. The sensor successfully detected the RF radiation over 5 m distance in the system demonstration. Experiments on two-dimensional (2D) stretching up to 15%, folding and twisting of the demonstrated sensor were also carried out. Despite the integrated device was severely deformed, no failure in RF radiation sensing was observed in the tests. This technique illuminates a promising route of realizing stretchable and foldable large area integrated RF electronics that are of great interest to a variety of applications like wearable computing, health monitoring, medical diagnostics, and curvilinear electronics.

  6. Beam-Based Procedures for RF Guns

    CERN Document Server

    Krasilnikov, Mikhail; Grabosch, H J; Hartrott, Michael; Hui Han, Jang; Miltchev, Velizar; Oppelt, Anne; Petrosyan, Bagrat; Staykov, Lazar; Stephan, Frank

    2005-01-01

    A wide range of rf photo injector parameters has to be optimized in order to achieve an electron source performance as required for linac based high gain FELs. Some of the machine parameters can not be precisely controlled by direct measurements, whereas the tolerance on them is extremely tight. Therefore, this should be met with beam-based techniques. Procedures for beam-based alignment (BBA) of the laser on the photo cathode as well as solenoid alignment have been developed. They were applied at the Photo Injector Test facility at DESY Zeuthen (PITZ) and at the photo injector of the VUV-FEL at DESY Hamburg. A field balance of the accelerating mode in the 1 ½ cell gun cavity is one of the key beam dynamics issues of the rf gun. Since no direct field measurement in the half and full cell of the cavity is available for the PITZ gun, a beam-based technique to determine the field balance has been proposed. A beam-based rf phase monitoring procedure has been developed as well.

  7. First Test Results of the 4-ROD Crab Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Ambattu, P; Burt, G; Calaga, R; Capatina, O; Calatroni, S; Ciapala, E; Doherty, D; Ferreira, L; Jensen, E; Hall, B; Lingwood, C; Maesen, P; Mongelluzzo, A; Renaglia, T; Therasse, M

    2013-01-01

    The first compact prototype crab cavity with the 4rod geometry has undergone surface treatment and cold testing. Due to the complex geometry and unique fabrication procedure, RF validation of the field at beyond the nominal operating voltage at a sufficiently high Q0 is an important pre-requisite. Preliminary results of the first cold tests are presented along with cavity performance at different stages of the cavity processing is described.

  8. Cuspal Deflection of Premolars Restored with Bulk-Fill Composite Resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behery, Haytham; El-Mowafy, Omar; El-Badrawy, Wafa; Saleh, Belal; Nabih, Sameh

    2016-01-01

    This in vitro study compared cuspal deflection of premolars restored with three bulk-fill composite resins to that of incrementally-restored ones with a low-shrinkage silorane-based restorative material. Forty freshly-extracted intact human upper premolars were used. Reference points at buccal and palatal cusp tips were acid-etched and composite rods were horizontally bonded to them (TPH-Spectra-HV, Dentsply). Two acrylic resin guiding paths were made for each premolar to guide beaks of a digital micrometer used for cuspal deflection measurements. Standardized MOD cavities, 3 mm wide bucco-lingually and 3.5 mm deep, were prepared on each premolar. Prepared teeth were then equally divided into four groups (n = 10) and each group was assigned to one of four composite resin (QuiXX, Dentsply; X-tra fil, Voco; Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill, Ivoclar Vivadent; low-shrinkage Filtek LS, 3M/ESPE). Adper Single Bond-Plus, 3M/ESPE was used with all bulk-fill restoratives. LS-System Adhesive, 3M/ESPE was used with Filtek LS. For each prepared premolar, cuspal deflection was measured in microns as the difference between two readings between reference points before and after restoration completion. Means and SDs were calculated and data statistically-analyzed using One-way ANOVA and Tukey's test. Filtek LS showed the lowest mean cuspal deflection value 6.4(0.84)μm followed by Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill 10.1(1.2) μm and X-tra fil 12.4(1.35)μm, while QuiXX showed the highest mean 13(1.05)μm. ANOVA indicated significant difference among mean values of groups (p composite resins tested. Filtek LS had the lowest significant mean cuspal deflection in comparison to all tested bulk-fill restoratives. The use of Tetric EvoCeram Bulk fill composite resin restorative for class II MOD cavities resulted in reduced cuspal deflection in comparison to the two other bulk-fill composite resins tested. The silorane-based Filtek LS restorative resulted in the least cuspal deflection in

  9. TM01 mode accelerating cavity optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manca, J.J.; Knapp, E.A.

    1978-08-01

    The cost of an accelerator depends greatly upon the effective use of rf power for particle acceleration. Before completing an accelerator design, an optimization of the accelerating cells relative to the effective shunt impedance should be made to measure the structure's efficiency in providing a high and effective acceleration of particles for a given rf power. Optimization of the accelerating cell resonant at f/sub r/ = 1350 MHz (TM 01 mode) relative to the maximum effective shunt impedance ZT 2 was performed at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory using the computer program SUPERFISH. The study was parametric; one parameter was changed while the others were held constant. Frequency adjustments were made by changing the cavity radius. Results presented in this report can be used to design similar cavities at different resonant frequencies or to design a more complicated cavity (TM 02 mode) for the disk and washer structure

  10. Geolocation of RF signals

    CERN Document Server

    Progri, Ilir

    2011-01-01

    ""Geolocation of RF Signals - Principles and Simulations"" offers an overview of the best practices and innovative techniques in the art and science of geolocation over the last twenty years. It covers all research and development aspects including theoretical analysis, RF signals, geolocation techniques, key block diagrams, and practical principle simulation examples in the frequency band from 100 MHz to 18 GHz or even 60 GHz. Starting with RF signals, the book progressively examines various signal bands - such as VLF, LF, MF, HF, VHF, UHF, L, S, C, X, Ku, and, K and the corresponding geoloca

  11. Mechanical design of RFQ resonator cavities in the 400-MHz frequency range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansborough, L.D.; Potter, J.M.; Wilson, N.G.

    1981-01-01

    Many RFQ resonator-cavity design concepts have been proposed in the 400-MHz frequency range. Los Alamos has been evaluating RFQ resonator-cavity designs that provide acceptable combinations of necessary mechanical features, easy tunability and long-term stability. Four RFQ resonator test cavities have been fabricated to test rf joints between the RFQ vanes and the resonator cavity. Two of these joints (the C-seal and the rf clamp-joint) allow vane movement for tuning. These test data, and the design of the present generation of RFQ resonator cavities, are presented

  12. Ultrafast harmonic rf kicker design and beam dynamics analysis for an energy recovery linac based electron circulator cooler ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulu Huang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available An ultrafast kicker system is being developed for the energy recovery linac (ERL based electron circulator cooler ring (CCR in the proposed Jefferson Lab Electron Ion Collider (JLEIC, previously named MEIC. In the CCR, the injected electron bunches can be recirculated while performing ion cooling for 10–30 turns before the extraction, thus reducing the recirculation beam current in the ERL to 1/10−1/30 (150  mA-50  mA of the cooling beam current (up to 1.5 A. Assuming a bunch repetition rate of 476.3 MHz and a recirculating factor of 10 in the CCR, the kicker is required to operate at a pulse repetition rate of 47.63 MHz with pulse width of around 2 ns, so that only every 10th bunch in the CCR will experience a transverse kick while the rest of the bunches will not be disturbed. Such a kicker pulse can be synthesized by ten harmonic modes of the 47.63 MHz kicker pulse repetition frequency, using up to four quarter wavelength resonator (QWR based deflecting cavities. In this paper, several methods to synthesize such a kicker waveform will be discussed and a comparison of their beam dynamics performance is made using ELEGANT. Four QWR cavities are envisaged with high transverse shunt impedance requiring less than 100 W of total rf power for a Flat-Top kick pulse. Multipole fields due to the asymmetry of this type of cavity are analyzed. The transverse emittance growth due to the sextupole component is simulated in ELEGANT. Off-axis injection and extraction issues and beam optics using a multicavity kick-drift scheme will also be discussed.

  13. Embedded software for the CEBAF RF Control Module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahti, G.; Ashkenazi, I.; West, C.; Morgan, B.

    1991-01-01

    The CEBAF accelerator control system employs a distributed computer strategy. As part of this strategy, the RF control sub-system uses 342 RF Control Modules, one for each of four warm section beam forming cavities (i.e., choppers, buncher, capture) and 338 superconducting accelerating cavities. Each control module has its own microprocessor, which provides local intelligence to automatically control over 100 parameters, while keeping the user interface simple. The microprocessor controls analog and digital I/O, including the phase and gradient section, high power amplifier (HPA), and interlocks. Presently, the embedded code is used to commission the 14 RF control modules in the injector. This paper describes the operational experience of this complex real-time control system

  14. Numerical design of an rf-coupling Iris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanaki, H.

    1991-07-01

    For an rf coupler of an rf system in high-quality transmission an analytical method may be applied to treat the design problem, if a coupling hole between cavities or waveguides is small enough. However, in most cases of accelerator engineering the dimensions of the coupling slots are not so small compared with the size of a cavity and a waveguide. Numerical design of rf coupling slots for a few cases is tried basically according to Henke's method using an equivalent circuit to treat the matching of microwave components, but taking account of beam loading expressed by the coupling coefficient β. The MAFIA code has been applied for the design. (R.P.) 5 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs

  15. An rf modulated electron gun pulser for linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legg, R.; Hartline, R.

    1991-01-01

    Present linac injector designs often make use of sub-harmonic prebuncher cavities to properly bunch the electron beam before injection into a buncher and subsequent accelerating cavities. This paper proposes an rf modulated thermionic gun which would allow the sub-harmonic buncher to be eliminated from the injector. The performance parameters for the proposed gun are 120 kV operating voltage, macropulse duration-single pulse mode 2 nsec, multiple pulse mode 100 nsec, rf modularing frequency 500 MHz, charge per micropulse 0.4 nC, macropulse repetition frequency 10 Hz (max). The gun pulser uses a grid modulated planar triode to drive the gun cathode. The grid driver takes advantage of recently developed modular CATV rf drivers, high performance solid state pulser devices, and high-frequency fiber optic transmitters for telecommunications. Design details are presented with associated SPICE runs simulating operation of the gun

  16. High power RF systems for the BNL ERL project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaltsman, A.; Lambiase, R.

    2011-03-28

    The Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) project, now under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory, requires two high power RF systems. The first RF system is for the 703.75 MHz superconducting electron gun. The RF power from this system is used to drive nearly half an Ampere of beam current to 2 MeV. There is no provision to recover any of this energy so the minimum amplifier power is 1 MW. It consists of 1 MW CW klystron, transmitter and power supplies, 1 MW circulator, 1 MW dummy load and a two-way power splitter. The second RF system is for the 703.75 MHz superconducting cavity. The system accelerates the beam to 54.7 MeV and recovers this energy. It will provide up to 50 kW of CW RF power to the cavity. It consists of 50 kW transmitter, circulator, and dummy load. This paper describes the two high power RF systems and presents the test data for both.

  17. Reconfigurable RF Filters Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Space Micro proposes to build upon our existing space microelectronics and hardening technologies and products, to research and develop a novel rad hard/tolerant RF...

  18. RF radiation safety handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitchen, Ronald.

    1993-01-01

    Radio frequency radiation can be dangerous in a number of ways. Hazards include electromagnetic compatibility and interference, electro-explosive vapours and devices, and direct effects on the human body. This book is a general introduction to the sources and nature of RF radiation. It describes the ways in which our current knowledge, based on relevant safety standards, can be used to safeguard people from any harmful effects of RF radiation. The book is designed for people responsible for, or concerned with, safety. This target audience will primarily be radio engineers, but includes those skilled in other disciplines including medicine, chemistry or mechanical engineering. The book covers the problems of RF safety management, including the use of measuring instruments and methods, and a review of current safety standards. The implications for RF design engineers are also examined. (Author)

  19. Microbunching and RF Compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venturini, M.; Migliorati, M.; Ronsivalle, C.; Ferrario, M.; Vaccarezza, C.

    2010-01-01

    Velocity bunching (or RF compression) represents a promising technique complementary to magnetic compression to achieve the high peak current required in the linac drivers for FELs. Here we report on recent progress aimed at characterizing the RF compression from the point of view of the microbunching instability. We emphasize the development of a linear theory for the gain function of the instability and its validation against macroparticle simulations that represents a useful tool in the evaluation of the compression schemes for FEL sources.

  20. Status of the CERN-Karlsruhe superconducting RF particle separator

    CERN Document Server

    Bauer, W; Dammertz, G; Grundner, M; Husson, L; Lengeler, H; Rathgeber, E

    1975-01-01

    Measurements of single cavity sections and of two joined sections are reported. The problem of storing heat treated sections until final assembly has been investigated. Flooding a cavity at room temperature with nitrogen deteriorates its performance, after the cavity was once excited to a peak electric field of 30 MV/m, corresponding to a peak magnetic field of 850 G and a deflecting field of 5.5 Mv/m. This effect is assumed to be due to a sensibilization of the surface oxides by field emission electrons. The effect is not observed after an electric field of up to 15 MV/m and it also does not appear when the cavity is flooded with argon. (14 refs).

  1. RF Measurement Concepts

    CERN Document Server

    Caspers, F

    2014-01-01

    For the characterization of components, systems and signals in the radiofrequency (RF) and microwave ranges, several dedicated instruments are in use. In this article the fundamentals of the RF signal techniques are discussed. The key element in these front ends is the Schottky diode which can be used either as a RF mixer or as a single sampler. The spectrum analyser has become an absolutely indispensable tool for RF signal analysis. Here the front end is the RF mixer as the RF section of modern spectrum analyses has a ra ther complex architecture. The reasons for this complexity and certain working principles as well as limitations are discussed. In addition, an overview of the development of scalar and vector signal analysers is given. For the determination of the noise temperature of a one-port and the noise figure of a two-port, basic concepts and relations are shown as well as a brief discussion of commonly used noise-measurement techniques. In a further part of this article the operating principles of n...

  2. Laser photo-cathode RF-gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washio, Masakazu

    2006-01-01

    High quality beam generation project based on High-Tech Research Center Project, which has been approved by Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology in 1999, has been conducted by advanced research institute for science and engineering, Waseda University. In the project, laser photo-cathode RF-gun has been selected for the high quality electron beam source. RF cavities with low dark current, which were made by diamond turning technique have been successfully manufactured. The low emittance electron beam was realized by choosing the modified laser injection technique. The obtained normalized emittance was about 3 mm mrad at 100 pC of electron charge. The soft X-ray beam generation with the energy of 370 eV, which is in the energy region of so-called 'water window', by inverse Compton scattering has been performed by the collision between IR laser and the low emittance electron beams. (author)

  3. Deflection evaluation using time-resolved radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, D.A.; Lucero, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    Time-resolved radiography is the creation of an x-ray image for which both the start-exposure and stop-exposure times are known with respect to the event under study. The combination of image and timing are used to derive information about the event. The authors have applied time-resolved radiography to evaluate motions of explosive-driven events. In the particular application discussed in this paper, the author's intent is to measure maximum deflections of the components involved. Exposures are made during the time just before to just after the event of interest occurs. A smear or blur of motion out to its furthest extent is recorded on the image. Comparison of the dynamic images with static images allows deflection measurements to be made

  4. Study of luminous phenomena observed on contaminated metallic surfaces submitted to high RF fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maissa, S.; Junquera, T.; Fouaidy, M.; Le Goff, A.; Bonin, B.; Luong, M.; Safa, H.; Tan, J.

    1995-01-01

    The RF field emission from a sample subjected to high RF fields in a copper cavity has been investigated. The study is focused on the luminous emissions occurring on the RF surface simultaneously with the electron emission. The optical apparatus attached to the cavity permits to observe the evolution of the emitters and the direct effects of the surface conditioning. Also, the parameters of the emitted radiation (intensity, glowing duration, spectral distribution) may provide additional informations on the field emission phenomena. Some results concerning samples intentionally contaminated with particles (metallic or dielectric) are presented. (K.A.)

  5. RF upgrade program in LHC injectors and LHC machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, E.

    2012-01-01

    The main themes of the RF upgrade program are: the Linac4 project, the LLRF-upgrade and the study of a tuning-free wide-band system for PSB, the upgrade of the SPS 800 MHz amplifiers and beam controls and the upgrade of the transverse dampers of the LHC. Whilst LHC Splice Consolidation is certainly the top priority for LS1, some necessary RF consolidation and upgrade is necessary to assure the LHC performance for the next 3- year run period. This includes: 1) necessary maintenance and consolidation work that could not fit the shorter technical stops during the last years, 2) the upgrade of the SPS 200 MHz system from presently 4 to 6 cavities and possibly 3) the replacement of one LHC cavity module. On the longer term, the LHC luminosity upgrade requires crab cavities, for which some preparatory work in SPS Coldex must be scheduled during LS1. (author)

  6. Electronics for the control of the rf system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellegrin, J.L.; Schwarz, H.

    1980-03-01

    This note describes the operation of the major components used for controlling the phase and the field level of the PEP rf cavities. The block diagram of one rf station is decomposed into several control loops: each cavity has a tuners' servo loop which maintains the frequency constant and also keeps the field of each cell at the same level; the total gap voltage developed by a pair of cavities is obeying the command of the gap voltage controller; finally, the phase variation along the amplification chain and the klystron are compensated by a phase lock loop. The design criteria of each loop are set forth and the circuit implementation and test results are presented. The purpose of this report is to acquaint interested people with the design philosophy and to allow them to evaluate the capabilities of this system and its behavior during operation of the machine. 5 refs., 16 figs

  7. Study of CSR longitudinal bunch compression cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Dayu; Li Peng; Liu Yong; Xie Qingchun

    2009-01-01

    The scheme of longitudinal bunch compression cavity for the Cooling Storage Ring (CSR)is an important issue. Plasma physics experiments require high density heavy ion beam and short pulsed bunch,which can be produced by non-adiabatic compression of bunch implemented by a fast compression with 90 degree rotation in the longitudinal phase space. The phase space rotation in fast compression is initiated by a fast jump of the RF-voltage amplitude. For this purpose, the CSR longitudinal bunch compression cavity, loaded with FINEMET-FT-1M is studied and simulated with MAFIA code. In this paper, the CSR longitudinal bunch compression cavity is simulated and the initial bunch length of 238 U 72+ with 250 MeV/u will be compressed from 200 ns to 50 ns.The construction and RF properties of the CSR longitudinal bunch compression cavity are simulated and calculated also with MAFIA code. The operation frequency of the cavity is 1.15 MHz with peak voltage of 80 kV, and the cavity can be used to compress heavy ions in the CSR. (authors)

  8. Cavity Optomechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Kippenberg, T. J.; Vahala, K. J.

    2007-01-01

    The coupling of mechanical and optical degrees of freedom via radiation pressure has been a subject of early research in the context of gravitational wave detection. Recent experimental advances have allowed studying for the first time the modifications of mechanical dynamics provided by radiation pressure. This paper reviews the consequences of back-action of light confined in whispering-gallery dielectric micro-cavities, and presents a unified treatment of its two manifestations: notably th...

  9. A NEW THERMIONIC RF ELECTRON GUN FOR SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutsaev, Sergey; Agustsson, R.; Hartzell, J; Murokh, A.; Nassiri, A.; Savin, E.; Smirnov, A.V.; Smirnov, A. Yu; Sun, Y.; Verma, A; Waldschmidt, Geoff; Zholents, A.

    2017-06-02

    A thermionic RF gun is a compact and efficient source of electrons used in many practical applications. RadiaBeam Systems and the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory collaborate in developing of a reliable and robust thermionic RF gun for synchrotron light sources which would offer substantial improvements over existing thermionic RF guns and allow stable operation with up to 1A of beam peak current at a 100 Hz pulse repetition rate and a 1.5 μs RF pulse length. In this paper, we discuss the electromagnetic and engineering design of the cavity and report the progress towards high power tests of the cathode assembly of the new gun.

  10. A numerical study of emittance growths in RF guns

    CERN Document Server

    Masuda, K; Sobajima, M; Kitagaki, J; Ohnishi, M; Toku, H; Yoshikawa, K

    1999-01-01

    A beam with greatly reduced emittance is required for further improvements of FELs, in particular, for FELs of shorter wavelengths, and of narrower bandwidths. From this viewpoint, the BNL/SLAC/UCLA 1.6-cell S-band photocathode RF gun performance characteristics were calculated, first in order to evaluate what may contribute to the emittance growths in photocathode RF guns. We developed an RF gun to produce an electron beam with an extremely low emittance, by using a 2-D simulation code. It is found that, by optimizing the laser injection phase, the drive laser spot radius and the cavity shape around the laser spot, the beam emittance by the 1.6-cell RF gun can be greatly reduced to 2.1 pi mm mrad, from the previous 4.4 pi mm mrad of the original shape.

  11. Electron dynamics in RF sources with a laser controlled emission

    CERN Document Server

    Khodak, I V; Metrochenko, V V

    2001-01-01

    Photoemission radiofrequency (RF) electron sources are sources of electron beams with extremely high brightness. Beam bunching processes in such devices are well studied in case when laser pulse duration is much lower of rf oscillation period.At the same time photoemission RF guns have some merits when operating in 'long-pulse' mode. In this case the laser pulse duration is much higher of rf oscillation period but much lower of rise time of oscillations in a gun cavity. Beam parameters at the gun output are compared for photoemission and thermoemission cathode applications. The paper presents results of a beam dynamics simulation in such guns with different resonance structures. Questions connected with defining of the current pulse peak value that can be obtained in such guns are discussed.

  12. Analytical & Experimental Study of Radio Frequency Cavity Beam Profile Monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balcazar, Mario D. [Fermilab; Yonehara, Katsuya [Fermilab

    2017-10-22

    The purpose of this analytical and experimental study is multifold: 1) To explore a new, radiation-robust, hadron beam profile monitor for intense neutrino beam applications; 2) To test, demonstrate, and develop a novel gas-filled Radio-Frequency (RF) cavity to use in this monitoring system. Within this context, the first section of the study analyzes the beam distribution across the hadron monitor as well as the ion-production rate inside the RF cavity. Furthermore a more effecient pixel configuration across the hadron monitor is proposed to provide higher sensitivity to changes in beam displacement. Finally, the results of a benchtop test of the tunable quality factor RF cavity will be presented. The proposed hadron monitor configuration consists of a circular array of RF cavities located at a radial distance of 7cm { corresponding to the standard deviation of the beam due to scatering { and a gas-filled RF cavity with a quality factor in the range 400 - 800.

  13. PEP-II RF feedback system simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tighe, R. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    A model containing the fundamental impedance of the PEP-II cavity along with the longitudinal beam dynamics and RF feedback system components is in use. It is prepared in a format allowing time-domain as well as frequency-domain analysis and full graphics capability. Matlab and Simulink are control system design and analysis programs (widely available) with many built-in tools. The model allows the use of compiled C-code modules for compute intensive portions. We desire to represent as nearly as possible the components of the feedback system including all delays, sample rates and applicable nonlinearities. (author)

  14. Digital low level RF control system for the DESY TTF VUV-FEL Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayvazyan, V.; Choroba, S.; Matyushin, A.; Moeller, G.; Petrosyan, G.; Rehlich, K.; Simrock, S.N.; Vetrov, P.

    2005-01-01

    In the RF system for the Vacuum Ultraviolet Free Electron Laser (VUV-FEL) Linac each klystron supplies RF power to up to 32 cavities. The superconducting cavities are operated in pulsed mode and high accelerating gradients close to the performance limit. The RF control of the cavity fields to the level of 10 -4 for amplitude and 0.1 degree for phase however presents a significant technical challenge due to the narrow bandwidth of the cavities which results in high sensitivity to perturbations of the resonance frequency by mechanical vibrations (microphonics) and Lorenz force detuning. The VUV-FEL Linac RF control system employs a completely digital feedback system to provide flexibility in the control algorithms, precise calibration of the accelerating field vector-sum, and extensive diagnostics and exception handling capabilities. The RF control algorithm is implemented in DSP (Digital Signal Processor) firmware and DOOCS (Distributed Object Oriented Control System) servers. The RF control system design objectives are discussed. Hardware and software design of the DSP based RF control are presented. (orig.)

  15. Temperature Mapping of Nitrogen-doped Niobium Superconducting Radiofrequency Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makita, Junki [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Ciovati, Gianluigi [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Dhakal, Pashupati [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    It was recently shown that diffusing nitrogen on the inner surface of superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavities at high temperature can improve the quality factor of the niobium cavity. However, a reduction of the quench field is also typically found. To better understand the location of rf losses and quench, we used a thermometry system to map the temperature of the outer surface of ingot Nb cavities after nitrogen doping and electropolishing. Surface temperature of the cavities was recorded while increasing the rf power and also during the quenching. The results of thermal mapping showed no precursor heating on the cavities and quenching to be ignited near the equator where the surface magnetic field is maximum. Hot-spots at the equator area during multipacting were also detected by thermal mapping.

  16. Apparatus and process for passivating an SRF cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao; Wallace, John P

    2014-12-02

    An apparatus and process for the production of a niobium cavity exhibiting high quality factors at high gradients is provided. The apparatus comprises a first chamber positioned within a second chamber, an RF generator and vacuum pumping systems. The process comprises placing the niobium cavity in a first chamber of the apparatus; thermally treating the cavity by high temperature in the first chamber while maintaining high vacuum in the first and second chambers; and applying a passivating thin film layer to a surface of the cavity in the presence of a gaseous mixture and an RF field. Further a niobium cavity exhibiting high quality factors at high gradients produced by the method of the invention is provided.

  17. Investigation and Prediction of RF Window Performance in APT Accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphries, S. Jr.

    1997-01-01

    The work described in this report was performed between November 1996 and May 1997 in support of the APT (Accelerator Production of Tritium) Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The goal was to write and to test computer programs for charged particle orbits in RF fields. The well-documented programs were written in portable form and compiled for standard personal computers for easy distribution to LANL researchers. They will be used in several APT applications including the following. Minimization of multipactor effects in the moderate β superconducting linac cavities under design for the APT accelerator. Investigation of suppression techniques for electron multipactoring in high-power RF feedthroughs. Modeling of the response of electron detectors for the protection of high power RF vacuum windows. In the contract period two new codes, Trak-RF and WaveSim, were completed and several critical benchmark etests were carried out. Trak-RF numerically tracks charged particle orbits in combined electrostatic, magnetostatic and electromagnetic fields. WaveSim determines frequency-domain RF field solutions and provides a key input to Trak-RF. The two-dimensional programs handle planar or cylindrical geometries. They have several unique characteristics

  18. Summary of the 3rd workshop on high power RF-systems for accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigg, P.K.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this workshop was to bring together experts from the field of CW and high average power RF systems. The focus was on operational and reliability issues of high-power amplifiers using klystrons and tubes, large power supplies; as well as cavity design and low-level RF and feedback control systems. All these devices are used in synchrotron radiation facilities, high power linacs and collider rings, and cyclotrons. Furthermore, new technologies and their applications were introduced, amongst other: high power solid state amplifiers, IOT amplifiers, and high voltage power supplies employing solid state controllers/crowbars. Numerical methods for complete rf-field modeling of complex RF structures like cyclotrons were presented, as well as integrated RF-cavity designs (electro-magnetic fields and mechanical structure), using numerical methods. (author)

  19. Introduction to Superconducting RF Structures and the Effect of High Pressure Rinsing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajima, Tsuyoshi [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-30

    This presentation begins by describing RF superconductivity and SRF accelerating structures. Then the use of superconducting RF structures in a number of accelerators around the world is reviewed; for example, the International Linear Collider (ILC) will use ~16,000 SRF cavities with ~2,000 cryomodules to get 500 GeV e⁺/e⁻ colliding energy. Field emission control was (and still is) a very important practical issue for SRF cavity development. It has been found that high-pressure ultrapure water rinsing as a final cleaning step after chemical surface treatment resulted in consistent performance of single- and multicell superconducting cavities.

  20. A 166.6 MHz superconducting rf system for the HEPS storage ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, P.; Hao, X.; Huang, T.; Li, Z.; Lin, H.; Meng, F.; Mi, Z.; Sun, Y.; Wang, G.; Wang, Q.; Zhang, X.

    2017-07-01

    A superconducting 166.6 MHz quarter-wave beta=1 cavity was recently proposed for the High Energy Photon Source (HEPS), a 6 GeV kilometer-scale light source. Four 166.6 MHz cavities will be used for main acceleration in the newly planned on-axis beam injection scheme realized by a double-frequency RF system. The fundamental frequency, 166.6 MHz, was dictated by the fast injection kicker technology and the preference of using 499.8 MHz SC RF cavity as the third harmonic. Each 166.6 MHz cavity will be operated at 4.2 K providing 1.2 MV accelerating voltage and 150 kW of power to the electron beam. The input coupler will use single-window coaxial type graded up to 200 kW CW power. Each cavity will be equipped with a 200 kW solid-state amplifier and digital low-level RF system. This paper describes the 166.6 MHz RF system with a focus on the design and optimization of the RF cavity and its ancillaries, the LLRF system and the status of the solid-state amplifiers.

  1. The RF system for the 70 MeV linac injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Planner, C.W.

    1975-12-01

    The Radio Frequency System for the 70 MeV Linac Injector for Nimrod is required to power the four Accelerating Cavities and the Buncher and Debuncher Cavities. The frequency of operation is 202.5 MHz and is determined by the use of existing equipment from the redundant 50 MeV Proton Linac for the second and third accelerating cavities and the buncher and de-buncher cavities. The subject is discussed under the following headings: low power drive chain; RF feed lines; cavity field level stabilisation. Circuit diagrams are presented. (U.K.)

  2. Basics of RF electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Gallo, A

    2011-01-01

    RF electronics deals with the generation, acquisition and manipulation of high-frequency signals. In particle accelerators signals of this kind are abundant, especially in the RF and beam diagnostics systems. In modern machines the complexity of the electronics assemblies dedicated to RF manipulation, beam diagnostics, and feedbacks is continuously increasing, following the demands for improvement of accelerator performance. However, these systems, and in particular their front-ends and back-ends, still rely on well-established basic hardware components and techniques, while down-converted and acquired signals are digitally processed exploiting the rapidly growing computational capability offered by the available technology. This lecture reviews the operational principles of the basic building blocks used for the treatment of high-frequency signals. Devices such as mixers, phase and amplitude detectors, modulators, filters, switches, directional couplers, oscillators, amplifiers, attenuators, and others are d...

  3. Digital control of the superconducting cavities for the LEP energy upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavallari, G.; Ciapala, E.

    1992-01-01

    The superconducting (SC) cavities for the LEP200 energy upgrade will be installed in units of 16 as for the present copper cavity system. Similar equipment will be used for RF power generation and distribution, for the low-level RF system and for digital control. The SC cavities and their associated equipment however require different interface hardware and new control software. To simplify routine operation control of the SC cavity units is made to resemble as closely as possible that of the existing units. Specific controls for the SC cavities at the equipment level, the facilities available and the integration of the SC cavity units into the LEP RF control system are described. (author)

  4. Wakefield calculation for superconducting TM110 cavity without azimuthal symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellantoni, Leo; /Fermilab; Burt, Graeme; /Lancaster U.

    2006-08-01

    The 3.9GHz TM{sub 110} mode deflecting cavity developed at FNAL has many applications, including use as a longitudinal bunch profile diagnostic, and as a crab cavity candidate for the ILC. These applications involve beams with substantial time structure. For the 13-cell version intended for the bunch profile application, long-range wakes have been evaluated in the frequency domain and short-range wakes have been evaluated in the time domain. Higher-order interactions of the main field in the cavity with the beam have also been parameterized. Pedagogic derivations are included as appendices.

  5. Conventional RF system design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puglisi, M.

    1994-01-01

    The design of a conventional RF system is always complex and must fit the needs of the particular machine for which it is planned. It follows that many different design criteria should be considered and analyzed, thus exceeding the narrow limits of a lecture. For this reason only the fundamental components of an RF system, including the generators, are considered in this short seminar. The most common formulas are simply presented in the text, while their derivations are shown in the appendices to facilitate, if desired, a more advanced level of understanding. (orig.)

  6. The AGS Booster high frequency rf system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, R.T.; Cameron, P.; Eng, W.; Goldman, M.A.; Jablonski, E.; Kasha, D.; Keane, J.; McNerney, A.; Meth, M.; Plotkin, M.; Puglisi, M.; Ratti, A.; Spitz, R.

    1991-01-01

    A high level rf system, including a power amplifier and cavity, has been designed and built for the AGS Booster. It covers a frequency range of 2.4 to 4.2 MHz and will be used to accelerate high intensity protons. Low intensity polarized protons and heavy ions, to the 1.5 GeV level. A total accelerating voltage of up to 90 kV will be provided by two cavities, each having two gaps. The internally cross coupled, pushpull cavities are driven by an adjacently located power amplifier. In order to accommodate beam intensities up to 0.75 x 10 13 protons per bunch, a low plate resistance power tetrode is used. The tube anode is magnetically coupled to one of the cavity's two parallel cells. The amplifier is a grounded cathode configuration driven by a remotely located solid-state amplifier. It has been tested in the laboratory at full gap voltage with satisfactory results. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  7. The AGS Booster high frequency RF system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, R.T.; Cameron, P.; Eng, W.; Goldman, M.A.; Jablonski, E.; Kasha, D.; Keane, J.; McNerney, A.; Meth, M.; Plotkin, M.; Puglisi, M.; Ratti, A.; Spitz, R.

    1991-01-01

    A high level RF system, including a power amplifier and cavity, has been designed and built for the AGS Booster. It covers a frequency range of 2.4 to 4.2 MHz and will be used to accelerate high intensity protons, low intensity polarized protons and heavy ions, to the 1.5 GeV level. A total accelerating voltage of up to 90 kV will be provided by two cavities, each having two gaps. The internally cross-coupled, pushpull cavities are driven by an adjacently located power amplifier. In order to accommodate beam intensities up to 0.75 x 10 13 protons per bunch, a low plate resistance power tetrode is used. The tube anode is magnetically coupled to one of the cavity's two parallel cells. The amplifier is a grounded cathode configuration driven by a remotely located solid-state amplifier. It has been tested in the laboratory at full gap voltage with satisfactory results

  8. Development of electron beam deflection circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leo Kwee Wah; Lojius Lombigit; Abu Bakar Ghazali; Azaman

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a development of a power supply circuit to deflect and move the electron beam across the window of the Baby electron beam machine. It comprises a discussion of circuit design, its assembly and the test results. A variety of input and output conditions have been tested and it was found that the design is capable to supply 1.0 A with 50Hz on X-axis coil and 0.4A with 500Hz on Y-axis coil. (Author)

  9. NSF tandem stack support structure deflection characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.

    1979-12-01

    Results are reported of load tests carried out on the glass legs of the insulating stack of the 30 MV tandem Van de Graaff accelerator now under construction at Daresbury Laboratory. The tests to investigate the vulnerability of the legs when subjected to tensile stresses were designed to; establish the angle of rotation of the pads from which the stresses in the glass legs may be calculated, proof-test the structure and at the same time reveal any asymmetry in pad rotations or deflections, and to confirm the validity of the computer design analysis. (UK)

  10. Optical beam deflection sensor: design and experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, João M S; Marques, Renan B; Kitano, Cláudio; Rodrigues, Nicolau A S; Riva, Rudimar

    2017-10-01

    In this work, we present a double-pass optical beam deflection sensor and its optical design method. To accomplish that, a mathematical model was proposed and computational simulations were performed, in order to obtain the sensor's characteristic curves and to analyze its behavior as function of design parameters. The mathematical model was validated by comparison with the characteristic curves acquired experimentally. The sensor was employed to detect acoustic pulses generated by a pulsed laser in a sample surface, in order to show its potential for monitoring applications handling high energy input as laser welding or laser ablation.

  11. Design of 650 MHz, β=0.61, 5-cell SRF cavity and development of single cell niobium cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seth, Sudeshna; Som, Sumit; Bhattacharyya, Pranab

    2015-01-01

    In India, DAE laboratories and other institutes are now actively involved in research and development activities on SRF cavities and associated technologies for the proposed high current, high energy proton linear accelerators like ISNS/IADS and also for the FERMILAB PIP-II program under Indian institutions-Fermilab collaboration (IIFC). As part of the above activities, VECC, Kolkata, has been involved in the design, analysis and development of a 650 MHz, β=0.61, 5-cell elliptical shape Superconducting RF linac cavity. RF design involves optimization of the geometry to get acceptable values of field enhancement factors (magnetic and electric), R/Q , Geometric factor, coupling factor and field flatness. This paper describes the RF design using 2-D superfish and 3-D CST Microwave studio and multipacting analysis using 2-D Multipac2.1 and 3-D CST Particle Studio. A prototype 1-cell aluminum cavity and a prototype 5-cell copper cavity have been fabricated using die-punch assembly designed for fabrication of elliptical half-cells to check the procedures for forming and to make sure the desired frequency and field flatness could be obtained. RF characterization has been carried out for both the prototypes using Vector Network Analyzer and Bead pull measurement set up.The fabrication of a single-cell niobium cavity has been carried out indigenously and with the help of Electron Beam Welding (EBW) facility at IUAC, New Delhi. CMM measurement and RF characterization of the niobium half cells and full cell cavities have been carried out. This paper describes the development and measurement of prototype cavities and single cell niobium cavity. (author)

  12. Compact rf polarizer and its application to pulse compression systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Franzi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel method of reducing the footprint and increasing the efficiency of the modern multi-MW rf pulse compressor. This system utilizes a high power rf polarizer to couple two circular waveguide modes in quadrature to a single resonant cavity in order to replicate the response of a traditional two cavity configuration using a 4-port hybrid. The 11.424 GHz, high-Q, spherical cavity has a 5.875 cm radius and is fed by the circularly polarized signal to simultaneously excite the degenerate TE_{114} modes. The overcoupled spherical cavity has a Q_{0} of 9.4×10^{4} and coupling factor (β of 7.69 thus providing a loaded quality factor Q_{L} of 1.06×10^{4} with a fill time of 150 ns. Cold tests of the polarizer demonstrated good agreement with the numerical design, showing transmission of -0.05  dB and reflection back to the input rectangular WR 90 waveguide less than -40  dB over a 100 MHz bandwidth. This novel rf pulse compressor was tested at SLAC using XL-4 Klystron that provided rf power up to 32 MW and generated peak output power of 205 MW and an average of 135 MW over the discharged signal. A general network analysis of the polarizer is discussed as well as the design and high power test of the rf pulse compressor.

  13. Real-time cavity simulator-based low-level radio-frequency test bench and applications for accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Feng; Michizono, Shinichiro; Miura, Takako; Matsumoto, Toshihiro; Liu, Na; Wibowo, Sigit Basuki

    2018-03-01

    A Low-level radio-frequency (LLRF) control systems is required to regulate the rf field in the rf cavity used for beam acceleration. As the LLRF system is usually complex, testing of the basic functions or control algorithms of this system in real time and in advance of beam commissioning is strongly recommended. However, the equipment necessary to test the LLRF system, such as superconducting cavities and high-power rf sources, is very expensive; therefore, we have developed a field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-based cavity simulator as a substitute for real rf cavities. Digital models of the cavity and other rf systems are implemented in the FPGA. The main components include cavity baseband models for the fundamental and parasitic modes, a mechanical model of the Lorentz force detuning, and a model of the beam current. Furthermore, in our simulator, the disturbance model used to simulate the power-supply ripples and microphonics is also carefully considered. Based on the presented cavity simulator, we have established an LLRF system test bench that can be applied to different cavity operational conditions. The simulator performance has been verified by comparison with real cavities in KEK accelerators. In this paper, the development and implementation of this cavity simulator is presented first, and the LLRF test bench based on the presented simulator is constructed. The results are then compared with those for KEK accelerators. Finally, several LLRF applications of the cavity simulator are illustrated.

  14. Beam Pipe HOM Absorber for 750 MHz RF Cavity Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Rolland; Neubauer, Michael

    2014-10-29

    This joint project of Muons, Inc., Cornell University and SLAC was supported by a Phase I and Phase II grant monitored by the SBIR Office of Science of the DOE. Beam line HOM absorbers are a critical part of future linear colliders. The use of lossy materials at cryogenic temperatures has been incorporated in several systems. The design in beam pipes requires cylinders of lossy material mechanically confined in such a way as to absorb the microwave energy from the higher-order modes and remove the heat generated in the lossy material. Furthermore, the potential for charge build-up on the surface of the lossy material requires the conductivity of the material to remain consistent from room temperature to cryogenic temperatures. In this program a mechanical design was developed that solved several design constraints: a) fitting into the existing Cornell load vacuum component, b) allowing the use of different material compositions, c) a thermal design that relied upon the compression of the lossy ceramic material without adding stress. Coating experiments were performed that indicated the design constraints needed to fully implement this approach for solving the charge build-up problem inherent in using lossy ceramics. In addition, the ACE3P program, used to calculate the performance of lossy cylinders in beam pipes in general, was supported by this project. Code development and documentation to allow for the more wide spread use of the program was a direct result of this project was well.

  15. Development of Low Level RF Control Systems for Superconducting Heavy Ion Linear Accelerators, Electron Synchrotrons and Storage Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Aminov, Bachtior; Kolesov, Sergej; Pekeler, Michael; Piel, Christian; Piel, Helmut

    2005-01-01

    Since 2001 ACCEL Instruments is supplying low level RF control systems together with turn key cavity systems. The early LLRF systems used the well established technology based on discrete analogue amplitude and phase detectors and modulators. Today analogue LLRF systems can make use of advanced vector demodulators and modulators combined with a fast computer controlled analogue feed back loop. Feed forward control is implemented to operate the RF cavity in an open loop mode or to compensate for predictable perturbations. The paper will introduce the general design philosophy and show how it can be adapted to different tasks as controlling a synchrotron booster nc RF system at 500 MHz, or superconducting storage ring RF cavities, as well as a linear accelerator at 176 MHz formed by a chain of individually driven and controlled superconducting λ/2 cavities.

  16. A copper 3.9 GHz TM110 cavity for emittance exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koeth, T.W.; /Rutgers U., Piscataway; Fliller, R.P., III; Bellantoni, L.; Edwards, D.A.; Edwards, H.T.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    An experiment is being developed at the FNAL Photoinjector Lab to demonstrate the exchange of longitudinal emittance with a transverse horizontal emittance. The longitudinal electric field of a TM{sub 110} cavity vanishes on axis and increases linearly with transverse displacement. This 'shearing' electric field is pivotal to the exchange. The design of this TM{sub 110} cavity is a variant of the Fermilab 3.9 GHz superconducting deflecting mode cavity; however, the cavity was constructed of OFHC copper. The authors report on the construction, field flatness, polarization and high power testing of a TM{sub 110} cavity.

  17. Design of 250-MW CW RF system for APT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rees, D.

    1997-01-01

    The design for the RF systems for the APT (Accelerator Production of Tritium) proton linac will be presented. The linac produces a continuous beam power of 130 MW at 1300 MeV with the installed capability to produce up to a 170 MW beam at 1700 MeV. The linac is comprised of a 350 MHz RFQ to 7 MeV followed in sequence by a 700 MHz coupled-cavity drift tube linac, coupled-cavity linac, and superconducting (SC) linac to 1700 MeV. At the 1700 MeV, 100 mA level the linac requires 213 MW of continuous-wave (CW) RF power. This power will be supplied by klystrons with a nominal output power of 1.0 MW. 237 kystrons are required with all but three of these klystrons operating at 700 MHz. The klystron count includes redundancy provisions that will be described which allow the RF systems to meet an operational availability in excess of 95 percent. The approach to achieve this redundancy will be presented for both the normal conducting (NC) and SC accelerators. Because of the large amount of CW RF power required for the APT linac, efficiency is very important to minimize operating cost. Operation and the RF system design, including in-progress advanced technology developments which improve efficiency, will be discussed. RF system performance will also be predicted. Because of the simultaneous pressures to increase RF system reliability, reduce tunnel envelope, and minimize RF system cost, the design of the RF vacuum windows has become an important issue. The power from a klystron will be divided into four equal parts to minimize the stress on the RF vacuum windows. Even with this reduction, the RF power level at the window is at the upper boundary of the power levels employed at other CW accelerator facilities. The design of a 350 MHz, coaxial vacuum window will be presented as well as test results and high power conditioning profiles. The transmission of 950 kW, CW, power through this window has been demonstrated with only minimal high power conditioning

  18. A Bridge Deflection Monitoring System Based on CCD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baohua Shan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For long-term monitoring of the midspan deflection of Songjiazhuang cloverleaf junction on 309 national roads in Zibo city, this paper proposes Zhang’s calibration-based DIC deflection monitoring method. CCD cameras are used to track the change of targets’ position, Zhang’s calibration algorithm is introduced to acquire the intrinsic and extrinsic parameters of CCD cameras, and the DIC method is combined with Zhang’s calibration algorithm to measure bridge deflection. The comparative test between Zhang’s calibration and scale calibration is conducted in lab, and experimental results indicate that the proposed method has higher precision. According to the deflection monitoring scheme, the deflection monitoring software for Songjiazhuang cloverleaf junction is developed by MATLAB, and a 4-channel CCD deflection monitoring system for Songjiazhuang cloverleaf junction is integrated in this paper. This deflection monitoring system includes functions such as image preview, simultaneous collection, camera calibration, deflection display, and data storage. In situ deflection curves show a consistent trend; this suggests that the proposed method is reliable and is suitable for the long-term monitoring of bridge deflection.

  19. Remote RF Battery Charging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, H.J.; Pop, V.; Op het Veld, J.H.G.; Vullers, R.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    The design of a remote RF battery charger is discussed through the analysis and design of the subsystems of a rectenna (rectifying antenna): antenna, rectifying circuit and loaded DC-to-DC voltage (buck-boost) converter. Optimum system power generation performance is obtained by adopting a system

  20. RF power amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Albulet, Mihai

    2001-01-01

    This text presents a full account of RF amplifiers and provides a thorough understanding of power amplifier principles and their applications. This comprehensive book covers all important design techniques for power amplifiers and includes mathematical derivations and the assumptions used to develop design rules.

  1. AC/RF Superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi [JLAB

    2015-02-01

    This contribution provides a brief introduction to AC/RF superconductivity, with an emphasis on application to accelerators. The topics covered include the surface impedance of normal conductors and superconductors, the residual resistance, the field dependence of the surface resistance, and the superheating field.

  2. RF CMOS reliability simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sasse, G.T.; Acar, M.; Kuper, F.G.; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    2008-01-01

    We present a simulation approach to assess the reliability of an RF CMOS circuit under user conditions, based on existing DC degradation models for gate-oxide breakdown and hot-carrier degradation. The simulator allows for lifetime prediction of circuits that can withstand multiple breakdown events.

  3. Progress in diagnostic techniques for sc cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reece, C.E.

    1988-01-01

    While routinely achieved performance characteristics of superconducting cavities have now reached a level which makes them useful in large scale applications, achieving this level has come only through the knowledge gained by systematic studies of performance limiting phenomena. Despite the very real progress that has been made, the routine performance of superconducting cavities still falls far short of both the theoretical expectations and the performance of a few exception examples. It is the task of systematically applied diagnostic techniques to reveal additional information concerning the response of superconducting surfaces to applied RF fields. Here recent developments in diagnostic techniques are discussed. 18 references, 12 figures

  4. The MuCool Test Area and RF Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torun, Y.; Huang, D.; Norem, J.; Palmer, Robert B.; Stratakis, Diktys; Bross, A.; Chung, M.; Jansson, A.; Moretti, A.; Yonehara, K.; Li, D.

    2010-01-01

    The MuCool RF Program focuses on the study of normal conducting RF structures operating in high magnetic field for applications in muon ionization cooling for Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders. Here we give an overview of the program, which includes a description of the test facility and its capabilities, the current test program, and the status of a cavity that can be rotated in the magnetic field, which allows for a detailed study of the maximum stable operating gradient vs. magnetic field strength and angle.

  5. Summary of the Argonne Workshop on High Gradient RF

    CERN Document Server

    Norem, J

    2004-01-01

    Workshop on High Gradient rf was held at Argonne from October 7 - 9, 2003. This workshop reviewed the problems encountered when a number of accelerator technologies approached the high gradient limits. The aim of the workshop was to involve materials scientists and try to look at trigger mechanisms and surface interactions, in addition to reviewing progress. Talks were presented on superconducting rf, progress with high and low frequency copper cavities, and dielectrics. The focus was on both experimental and theoretical aspects of the problem. The overall picture presented at the workshop will be summarized.

  6. The Los Alamos VXI-based modular RF control system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jachim, S.P.; Ziomek, C.; Natter, E.F.; Regan, A.H.; Hill, J.; Eaton, L.; Gutscher, W.D.; Curtin, M.; Denney, P.; Hansberry, E.; Brooks, T.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of the Los Alamos modular RF control system, which provides high-performance feedback and/or feedforward control of RF accelerator cavities. This is a flexible, modular control system which has been realized in the industry-standard VXI cardmodular format. A wide spectrum of system functionality can be accommodated simply by incorporating only those modules and features required for a particular application. The fundamental principles of the design approach are discussed. Details of the VXI implementation are given, including the system architecture and interfaces, performance capabilities, and available features.

  7. The Los Alamos VXI-based modular RF control system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jachim, S.P.; Ziomek, C.; Natter, E.F.; Regan, A.H.; Hill, J.; Eaton, L.; Gutscher, W.D.; Curtin, M.; Denney, P.; Hansberry, E.; Brooks, T.

    1993-06-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of the Los Alamos modular RF control system, which provides high-performance feedback and/or feedforward control of RF accelerator cavities. This is a flexible, modular control system which has been realized in the industry-standard VXI cardmodular format. A wide spectrum of system functionality can be accommodated simply by incorporating only those modules and features required for a particular application. The fundamental principles of the design approach are discussed. Details of the VXI implementation are given, including the system architecture and interfaces, performance capabilities, and available features.

  8. ACCELERATORS: Design of a 450 MHz β = 0.2 single spoke cavity at PKU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhong-Yuan; Lu, Xiang-Yang; Zhao, Kui

    2009-04-01

    The design of a 450 MHz β = 0.2 superconducting single spoke cavity has been finished at Peking University. A theoretical model and a numerical simulation are used to study the relationship between the RF performance and the geometric parameters of the cavity. In this paper, the optimization of the spoke cavity is described in detail. The RF simulation gives the optimum parameters Epk/Eacc of 2.65 and Bpk/Eacc of 5.22 mT/(MV/m). The mechanical properties of the cavity are also studied. Two stiff ribs are used to offer a credible mechanical stability.

  9. The quest for high-gradient superconducting cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padamsee, H.

    1999-01-01

    Superconducting RF cavities excel in applications requiring continuous waves or long pulse voltages. Since power losses in the walls of the cavity increase as the square of the accelerating voltage, copper cavities become uneconomical as demand for high continuous wave voltage grows with particle energy. For these reasons, RF superconductivity has become an important technology for high energy and high luminosity accelerators. The state of art in performance of sheet metal niobium cavities is best represented by the statistics of more than 300 5-cell, 1.5-GHz cavities built for CEBAF. Key aspects responsible for the outstanding performance of the CEBAF cavities set are the anti-multipactor, elliptical cell shape, good fabrication and welding techniques, high thermal conductivity niobium, and clean surface preparation. On average, field emission starts at the electric field of 8.7 MV/m, but there is a large spread, even though the cavities received nominally the same surface treatment and assembly procedures. In some cavities, field emission was detected as low as 3 MV/m. In others, it was found to be as high as 19 MV/m. As we will discuss, the reason for the large spread in the gradients is the large spread in emitter characteristics and the random occurrence of emitters on the surface. One important phenomenon that limits the achievable RF magnetic field is thermal breakdown of superconductivity, originating at sub-millimeter-size regions of high RF loss, called defects. Simulation reveal that if the defect is a normal conducting region of 200 mm radius, it will break down at 5 MV/m. Producing high gradients and high Q in superconducting cavities demands excellent control of material properties and surface cleanliness. The spread in gradients that arises from the random occurrence of defects and emitters must be reduced. It will be important to improve installation procedures to preserve the excellent gradients now obtained in laboratory test in vertical cryostats

  10. Light deflection and Gauss-Bonnet theorem: definition of total deflection angle and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakida, Hideyoshi

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, we re-examine the light deflection in the Schwarzschild and the Schwarzschild-de Sitter spacetime. First, supposing a static and spherically symmetric spacetime, we propose the definition of the total deflection angle α of the light ray by constructing a quadrilateral Σ^4 on the optical reference geometry M^opt determined by the optical metric \\bar{g}_{ij}. On the basis of the definition of the total deflection angle α and the Gauss-Bonnet theorem, we derive two formulas to calculate the total deflection angle α ; (1) the angular formula that uses four angles determined on the optical reference geometry M^opt or the curved (r, φ ) subspace M^sub being a slice of constant time t and (2) the integral formula on the optical reference geometry M^opt which is the areal integral of the Gaussian curvature K in the area of a quadrilateral Σ ^4 and the line integral of the geodesic curvature κ _g along the curve C_{Γ}. As the curve C_{Γ}, we introduce the unperturbed reference line that is the null geodesic Γ on the background spacetime such as the Minkowski or the de Sitter spacetime, and is obtained by projecting Γ vertically onto the curved (r, φ ) subspace M^sub. We demonstrate that the two formulas give the same total deflection angle α for the Schwarzschild and the Schwarzschild-de Sitter spacetime. In particular, in the Schwarzschild case, the result coincides with Epstein-Shapiro's formula when the source S and the receiver R of the light ray are located at infinity. In addition, in the Schwarzschild-de Sitter case, there appear order O(Lambda;m) terms in addition to the Schwarzschild-like part, while order O(Λ) terms disappear.

  11. Nano-fabricated superconducting radio-frequency composites, method for producing nano-fabricated superconducting rf composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norem, James H.; Pellin, Michael J.

    2013-06-11

    Superconducting rf is limited by a wide range of failure mechanisms inherent in the typical manufacture methods. This invention provides a method for fabricating superconducting rf structures comprising coating the structures with single atomic-layer thick films of alternating chemical composition. Also provided is a cavity defining the invented laminate structure.

  12. RF Design Optimization for New Injector Cryounit at CEBAF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Haipeng; Cheng, Guangfeng; Hannon, Fay E.; Hofler, Alicia S.; Kazimi, Reza; Preble, Joe; Rimmer, Robert A.

    2013-06-01

    A new injector superconducting RF (SRF) cryounit with one new 2-cell, B=0.6 cavity plus one refurbished 7-cell, B=0.97, C100 style cavity has been re-designed and optimized for the engineering compatibility of existing module for CEBAF operation. The optimization of 2-cell cavity shape for longitudinal beam dynamic of acceleration from 200keV to 533keV and the minimization of transverse kick due to the waveguide couplers to less than 1 mrad have been considered. Operating at 1497MHz, two cavities has been designed into a same footprint of CEBAF original quarter cryomodule to deliver an injection beam energy of 5MeV in less than 0.27{degree} rms bunch length and a maximum energy spread of 5keV.

  13. Hydroforming of Tesla Cavities at Desy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, W.; Kaiser, H.; Singer, X.; Gonin, I.; Zhelezov, I.; Khabibullin, T.; Kneisel, P.; Saito, K.

    2000-01-01

    Since several years the development of seamless niobium cavity fabrication by hydro forming is being pursued at DESY. This technique offers the possibility of lower cost of fabrication and perhaps better rf performance of the cavities because of the elimination of electron-beam welds, which in the standard fabrication technique have sometimes lead to inferior cavity performance due to defects. Several single cell 1300 MHz cavities have been formed from high purity seamless niobium tubes, which are under computer control expanded with internal pressure while simultaneously being swaged axially. The seamless tubes have been made by either back extrusion and flow forming or by spinning or deep drawing. Standard surface treatment techniques such as high temperature post purification, buffered chemical polishing (BCP), electropolishing (EP) and high pressure ultra pure water rinsing (HPR) have been applied to these cavities. The cavities exhibited high Q - values of 2 x 10 10 at 2K and residual resistances as low as 3 n(Omega) after the removal of a surface layer of app. 100 (micro)m by BCP. Surprisingly, even at high gradients up to the maximum measured values of E acc ∼ 33 MV/m the Q-value did not decrease in the absence of field emission as often observed. After electropolishing of additional 100 (micro)m one of the cavities reached an accelerating gradient of E acc (ge) 42 MV/m

  14. Low power RF beam control electronics for the LEB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mestha, L.K.; Mangino, J.; Brouk, V.; Uher, T.; Webber, R.C.

    1993-05-01

    Beam Control Electronics for the Low Energy Booster (LEB) should provide a fine reference phase and frequency for the High Power RF System. Corrections applied on the frequency of the rf signal will reduce dipole synchrotron oscillations due to power supply regulation errors, errors in frequency source or errors in the cavity voltage. It will allow programmed beam radial position control throughout the LEB acceleration cycle. Furthermore the rf signal provides necessary connections during, adiabatic capture of the beam as injected into the LEB by the Linac and will guarantee LEB rf phase synchronism with the Medium Energy Booster (MEB) rf at a programmed time in the LEB cycle between a unique LEB bucket and a unique MEB bucket. We show in this paper a design and possible interfaces with other subsystems of the LEB such as the beam instrumentation, High Power RF Stations, global accelerator controls and the precision timing system. The outline of various components of the beam control system is also presented followed by some test results

  15. Fundamental Frequency Tuning and Its Influence on LHC 200MHz ACN Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Linnecar, Trevor Paul R; Tückmantel, Joachim; CERN. Geneva. SPS and LHC Division

    2001-01-01

    To study the influence of the tuner on the fundamental mode frequency, the Q factor as well as the shunt impedance of the LHC 200MHz ACN cavities, 3D simulations have been done in the frequency domain using MAFIA. Curves giving the variation of RF frequency and other RF parameters with tuner position relative to the inner surface of the cavity have been obtained for the fundamental mode. This paper details the simulation results.

  16. A new awakening for accelerator cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Imagine: an accelerator unbound by length; one that can bring a beam up to the TeV level in just a few hundred metres. Sounds like a dream? Perhaps not for long. At CERN’s Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE), physicists may soon be working to bring this contemporary fairy-tale to life.   The AWAKE experiment in the CNGS facility. Wherever you find a modern linear particle accelerator, you’ll find with it a lengthy series of RF accelerating cavities. Although based on technology first developed over half a century ago, RF cavities have dominated the accelerating world since their inception. However, new developments in plasma accelerator systems may soon be bringing a new player into the game. By harnessing the power of wakefields generated by beams in plasma cells, physicists may be able to produce accelerator gradients of many GV/m –  hundreds of times higher than those achieved in current RF cavities. “Plasma wakef...

  17. Design study of a low-emittance high-repetition rate thermionic rf gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opanasenko, A.; Mytrochenko, V.; Zhaunerchyk, V.; Goryashko, V. A.

    2017-05-01

    We propose a novel gridless continuous-wave radiofrequency (rf) thermionic gun capable of generating nC ns electron bunches with a rms normalized slice emittance close to the thermal level of 0.3 mm mrad. In order to gate the electron emission, an externally heated thermionic cathode is installed into a stripline-loop conductor. Two high-voltage pulses propagating towards each other in the stripline-loop overlap in the cathode region and create a quasielectrostatic field gating the electron emission. The repetition rate of pulses is variable and can reach up to one MHz with modern solid-state pulsers. The stripline attached to a rf gun cavity wall has with the wall a common aperture that allows the electrons to be injected into the rf cavity for further acceleration. Thanks to this innovative gridless design, simulations suggest that the bunch emittance is approximately at the thermal level after the bunch injection into the cavity provided that the geometry of the cathode and aperture are properly designed. Specifically, a concave cathode is adopted to imprint an Ƨ-shaped distribution onto the beam transverse phase-space to compensate for an S-shaped beam distribution created by the spherical aberration of the aperture-cavity region. In order to compensate for the energy spread caused by rf fields of the rf gun cavity, a 3rd harmonic cavity is used. A detailed study of the electrodynamics of the stripline and rf gun cavity as well as the beam optics and bunch dynamics are presented.

  18. Novel H-type rf deflector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. Senichev

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work we developed a new rf deflector based on the H resonator, which differs from previous ones in its design, the type of rf fundamental mode and the possibility of providing the π-mode standing wave for the beam in the deflection system. Because of the last aspect, the transverse shunt impedance of this deflector is much higher in comparison with its analogues. This idea was originally intended for application in the funneling system of the European Spallation Source, but we later found many additional applications, in particular, as the bunch separator after the electron and proton linear accelerators. We studied the beam dynamics and the electrodynamics and optimized the device parameters in the assumed range of frequency of 150–700 MHz for the proton beam and 1000–1500 MHz for the electron beam. To make the final choice we analyzed rf deflectors of different designs. We manufactured the experimental sample tested at the low rf power level.

  19. Dual deflectable beam strip engine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulgeroff, C. R.; Zuccaro, D. E.; Kami, S.; Schnelker, D. E.; Ward, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    This paper describes a dual beam thruster that has been designed, constructed, and tested. The system is suitable for two-axes attitude control and is comprised of two orthogonal strips, each capable of producing 0.30 mlb thrust and beam deflections of more than plus or minus 20 deg. The nominal specific impulse for the thruster is 5000 sec, and the thrust level from each strip can be varied from 0 to 100%. Neutralizer filaments that were developed and life tested over 2000 hours producing more than 40 mA of electron emission per watt of input power are also discussed. The system power required for clean ionizers is approximately 200 W.

  20. Coherent Bichromatic Force Deflection of Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyryev, Ivan; Baum, Louis; Aldridge, Leland; Yu, Phelan; Eyler, Edward E.; Doyle, John M.

    2018-02-01

    We demonstrate the effect of the coherent optical bichromatic force on a molecule, the polar free radical strontium monohydroxide (SrOH). A dual-frequency retroreflected laser beam addressing the X˜2Σ+↔A˜2Π1 /2 electronic transition coherently imparts momentum onto a cryogenic beam of SrOH. This directional photon exchange creates a bichromatic force that transversely deflects the molecules. By adjusting the relative phase between the forward and counterpropagating laser beams we reverse the direction of the applied force. A momentum transfer of 70 ℏk is achieved with minimal loss of molecules to dark states. Modeling of the bichromatic force is performed via direct numerical solution of the time-dependent density matrix and is compared with experimental observations. Our results open the door to further coherent manipulation of molecular motion, including the efficient optical deceleration of diatomic and polyatomic molecules with complex level structures.

  1. Pulsed rf operation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puglisi, M.; Cornacchia, M.

    1981-01-01

    The need for a very low final amplifier output impedance, always associated with class A operation, requires a very large power waste in the final tube. The recently suggested pulsed rf operation, while saving a large amount of power, increases the inherent final amplifier non linearity. A method is presented for avoiding the large signal non linear analysis and it is shown how each component of the beam induced voltage depends upon all the beam harmonics via some coupling coefficients which are evaluated

  2. The RF experimental program in the Fermilab mucool test area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norem, J.; Sandstrom, R.; Bross, A.; Moretti, A.; Qian, Z.; Torun, Y.; Rimmer, R.; Li, D.; Zisman, M.S.; Johnson, R.

    2005-01-01

    The rf RandD program for high-gradient, low frequency cavities to be used in muon cooling systems is underway in the Fermilab MUCOOL Test Area. Cavities at 805 and 201 MHz are used for tests of conditioning techniques, surface modification and breakdown studies. This work has the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) as its immediate goal and efficient muon cooling systems for neutrino sources and muon colliders as the long term goal. We study breakdown and dark current production under a variety of conditions

  3. The RF Experimental Program in the Fermilab MUCOOL Test Area

    CERN Document Server

    Norem, Jim; Johnson, Rolland P; Li, Derun; Moretti, Alfred; Qian, Zubao; Rimmer, Robert; Sandstrom, Rikard; Torun, Yagmur; Zisman, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The rf R&D program for high gradient, low frequency cavities to be used in muon cooling systems is underway in the Fermilab Muon Test Area. Cavities at 805 and 201 MHz are used for tests of conditioning techniques, surface modification and breakdown studies. This work has the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) as its immediate goal and efficient muon cooling systems for neutrino sources and muon colliders as the long term goal. We study breakdown, and dark current productions under a variety of conditions.

  4. Beam dynamics studies for transverse electromagnetic mode type rf deflectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Shahid; Krafft, Geoffrey A.; Deitrick, Kirsten; De Silva, Subashini U.; Delayen, Jean R.; Spata, Michael; Tiefenback, Michael; Hofler, Alicia; Beard, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    We have performed three-dimensional simulations of beam dynamics for transverse electromagnetic mode (TEM) type RF deflectors: normal- and super-conducting. The compact size of these cavities as compared to the conventional TM 110 type structures is more attractive particularly at low frequency. Highly concentrated electromagnetic fields between the parallel bars provide strong electrical stability to the beam for any mechanical disturbance. An array of six 2-cell normal conducting cavities or a single cell superconducting structure is enough to produce the required vertical displacement at the target point. Both the normal and super-conducting structures show very small emittance dilution due to the vertical kick of the beam.

  5. Beam dynamics studies for transverse electromagnetic mode type rf deflectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahid Ahmed

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We have performed three-dimensional simulations of beam dynamics for transverse electromagnetic mode (TEM type rf deflectors: normal and superconducting. The compact size of these cavities as compared to the conventional TM_{110} type structures is more attractive particularly at low frequency. Highly concentrated electromagnetic fields between the parallel bars provide strong electrical stability to the beam for any mechanical disturbance. An array of six 2-cell normal conducting cavities or a single cell superconducting structure is enough to produce the required vertical displacement at the target point. Both the normal and superconducting structures show very small emittance dilution due to the vertical kick of the beam.

  6. Safety Management for the Cryogenic System of Superconducting RF System

    CERN Document Server

    Kao, Sheau-Ping; Hsiao, Feng-Zone; Wang, Jau-Ping

    2005-01-01

    The installation of the helium cryogenic system for the superconducting RF cavity and magnet were finished in the National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center (NSRRC) at the end of October 2002. The first phase of this program will be commissioned at the end of 2004. This was the first large scale cryogenic system in Taiwan. The major hazards to personnel are cryogenic burn and oxygen deficient. To avoid the injury of the operators and meet the requirements of local laws and regulations, some safety measures must be adopted. This paper will illustrate the methods of risk evaluation and the safety control programs taken at NSRRC to avoid and reduce the hazards from the cryogenic system of the superconducting RF cavity and magnet system.

  7. Arcing phenomena on CEBAF RF-windows at cryogenic temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, T.; Kneisel, P.; Allen, R.

    1995-01-01

    During the CEBAF commissioning tests some of the superconducting cavities had light emitting discharges (arcing) which were observed in the guard vacuum space between a warm polymeric rf window and the cold ceramic rf window. A dedicated off-line test system was implemented to investigate the conditions under which arcing may occur and to gain some understanding of the mechanisms leading to this phenomenon through optical spectral analysis. This paper reports on the photoemission spectra observed during the dedicated tests on a single cell 1500 MHz niobium cavity with a ceramic window operated at 10 MV/m and 2 K. The light emission was detected using a spectrometer with an intensified photodiode array. The effect of moving the window away from the beam line using a waveguide elbow is reported. 12 refs

  8. Canceling evanescent waves in high-energy superconducting rf linacs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvinenko, Vladimir N.

    2010-05-01

    Many future projects plan using high-current, high-energy, multipass energy-recovery linacs that are based on superconducting rf (SRF) cavities. The necessity of ensuring the transverse stability of the beam in such accelerators imposes strict limits on the high order modes (HOMs) impedances, and demands effective HOM damping. The latter requirement often precludes achieving a high real-estate accelerating gradient in such structures. The modular structure of long SRF linacs also requires incorporating vacuum flanges; however, these flanges have surface contacts and cannot tolerate strong rf fields. Locating them in the low-field areas of the linac structure may involve considerably elongating the intermodular interfaces, a change that would reduce the linac’s real-estate accelerating gradient. In this paper, I propose a novel method to resolve this issue, using compact interconnects between the SRF cavities wherein to locate effective HOM dampers and vacuum flanges.

  9. Design and Simulation of RF MEMS Switch for Wireless Communication Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girija Sravani K.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we have reported the design and analysis of a novel bulk-silicon fabricated RF MEMS capacitive switch. This RF switch has a short response time, low power consumption, and an IC compatible design. To lower the driving voltage and insertion loss, multiple geometries for the movable beam, membrane, and air gap are investigated using Software tool Comsol Multiphysics. Potential thermal stresses and deflection of the cantilever due to the application of forces have been investigated. Performance of the device under the application of forces also studied using the software.

  10. Design and test results of the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) RF systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rees, D.; Bradley, J. III; Cummings, K.; Lynch, M.; Regan, A.; Rohlev, T.; Roybal, W.; Wang, Y.M.

    1998-01-01

    The Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) being constructed at Los Alamos will serve as the prototype for the low energy section of the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) accelerator. The APT accelerator requires over 200 RF systems each with a continuous wave output power of 1 MW. The reliability and availability of these RF systems is critical to the successful operation of the APT plant and prototypes of these systems are being developed and demonstrated on LEDA. The RF system design for LEDA includes three, 1.2 MW, 350 MHz continuous wave (CW), RF systems driving a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) and one, 1.0 MW, CW, RF system driving a coupled-cavity drift tube linac (CCDTL). This paper presents the design and test results for these RF systems including the klystrons, cathode power supply, circulators, RF vacuum windows, accelerator field and resonance control system, and RF transmission components. The three RF systems driving the RFQ use the accelerating structure as a power combiner, and this places some unique requirements on the RF system. These requirements and corresponding operational implications will be discussed

  11. 201 MHz Cavity R and D for MUCOOL and MICE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Derun; Virostek, Steve; Zisman, Michael; Norem, Jim; Bross, Alan; Moretti, Alfred; Norris, Barry; Torun, Yagmur; Phillips, Larry; Rimmer, Robert; Stirbet, Mircea; Reep, Michael; Summers, Don

    2006-01-01

    We describe the design, fabrication, analysis and preliminary testing of the prototype 201 MHz copper cavity for a muon ionization cooling channel. Cavity applications include the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) as well as cooling channels for a neutrino factory or a muon collider. This cavity was developed by the US muon cooling (MUCOOL) collaboration and is being tested in the MUCOOL Test Area (MTA) at Fermilab. To achieve a high accelerating gradient, the cavity beam irises are terminated by a pair of curved, thin beryllium windows. Several fabrication methods developed for the cavity and windows are novel and offer significant cost savings as compared to conventional construction methods. The cavity's thermal and structural performances are simulated with an FEA model. Preliminary high power RF commissioning results will be presented

  12. M10.3.1: LHC crab cavity specifications completed

    CERN Document Server

    Ciapala, E

    2010-01-01

    • The starting point of Sub-task 1 is to determine the full LHC system requirements for the crab cavity system. This milestone concerns completion of basic specifications for the crab cavity system. This comprises the beam requirements, the cavity impedance constraints, the operating conditions and constraints, the layout and integration constraints in LHC and very importantly machine protection issues. The specifications of the cavity itself and its ancillaries follow from these system requirements and on the technology chosen for the cavity design. • The beam requirements result from the known parameters of the LHC upgrade lattice and the expected LHC beam parameters at ultimate bunch intensity. There are boundary conditions imposed by certain beam parameters such as the bunch length and intensity and by the machine layout, mainly the available beam pipe separations at the proposed cavity positions. Requirements on RF noise and stability are tight, to avoid emittance blow-up. Machine protection issues a...

  13. LHC crab cavity specifications milestone: M10.3.1

    CERN Document Server

    Calaga, R; Jensen, E; McIntosh, P; Shaposhnikova, E; Tuckmantel, J; Zimmermann, F

    2010-01-01

    The starting point of Sub-task 1 is to determine the full LHC system requirements for the crab cavity system. This milestone concerns completion of basic specifications for the crab cavity system. This comprises the beam requirements, the cavity impedance constraints, the operating conditions and constraints, the layout and integration constraints in LHC and very importantly machine protection issues. The specifications of the cavity itself and its ancillaries follow from these system requirements and on the technology chosen for the cavity design. The beam requirements result from the known parameters of the LHC upgrade lattice and the expected LHC beam parameters at ultimate bunch intensity. There are boundary conditions imposed by certain beam parameters such as the bunch length and intensity and by the machine layout, mainly the available beam pipe separations at the proposed cavity positions. Requirements on RF noise and stability are tight, to avoid emittance blow-up. Machine protection issues arise fro...

  14. A database for superconducting cavities for the TESLA Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gall, P.D.; Goessel, A.; Gubarev, V.; Iversen, J.

    2006-01-01

    We look back on 10 years experience using a database for superconducting cavities for the TESLA Test Facility (TTF). The database was developed to collect data of every preparation step and measurement in order to optimize cavity production and preparation techniques to meet the ambitious goal of high accelerating gradients at high quality factors. Data from 110 superconducting 9-cell cavities, 50 single cell cavities, several 2- to 7-cell cavities and about 60 RF couplers were collected in the database. In addition, company measurements on sub-assemblies and parts forming the next 30 9-cell cavities were stored, thus establishing the database as part of a quality management system. This database is dynamically accessible via an extensive graphical web-interface based on ORACLE products, which enables the users to select and analyse the collected data easily from anywhere

  15. Particle tracking code of simulating global RF feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mestha, L.K.

    1991-09-01

    It is well known in the ''control community'' that a good feedback controller design is deeply rooted in the physics of the system. For example, when accelerating the beam we must keep several parameters under control so that the beam travels within the confined space. Important parameters include the frequency and phase of the rf signal, the dipole field, and the cavity voltage. Because errors in these parameters will progressively mislead the beam from its projected path in the tube, feedback loops are used to correct the behavior. Since the feedback loop feeds energy to the system, it changes the overall behavior of the system and may drive it to instability. Various types of controllers are used to stabilize the feedback loop. Integrating the beam physics with the feedback controllers allows us to carefully analyze the beam behavior. This will not only guarantee optimal performance but will also significantly enhance the ability of the beam control engineer to deal effectively with the interaction of various feedback loops. Motivated by this theme, we developed a simple one-particle tracking code to simulate particle behavior with feedback controllers. In order to achieve our fundamental objective, we can ask some key questions: What are the input and output parameters? How can they be applied to the practical machine? How can one interface the rf system dynamics such as the transfer characteristics of the rf cavities and phasing between the cavities? Answers to these questions can be found by considering a simple case of a single cavity with one particle, tracking it turn-by-turn with appropriate initial conditions, then introducing constraints on crucial parameters. Critical parameters are rf frequency, phase, and amplitude once the dipole field has been given. These are arranged in the tracking code so that we can interface the feedback system controlling them

  16. The Model and Simulations of the LHC 400 MHz Cavity Controller

    CERN Document Server

    Holma, J

    2007-01-01

    The LHC RF consists of eight superconducting single-cell 400.8 MHz cavities per beam, with each cavity driven by a 300 kW klystron via a circulator and waveguide. As the LHC is a high current collider (nominal 0.6 A DC), the challenge is to keep the effective impedance of the cavity at a minimum and to reduce all sources of RF noise that may degrade the beam lifetime (target value in excess of ten hours). In order to achieve this each klystron-cavity chain has a Cavity Controller implementing three Low Level loops: RF feedback, Tuner loop and Klystron loop. This note presents simulation models for the non-linear klystron, the cavity, the RF feedback, the tuner loop and the klystron loop. A model for the tuner mechanics based on measured step responses is also derived. The gains and time constants are optimized for the various loops. For the RF feedback and the tuner loop, the simulations are in excellent agreement with measurements done on a full-size test set-up including klystron and cavity. For the klystro...

  17. Medium Power 352 MHZ solid state pulsed RF amplifiers for the CERN LINAC4 Project

    CERN Document Server

    Broere, J; Gómez Martínez, Y; Rossi, M

    2011-01-01

    Economic, modular and highly linear pulsed RF amplifiers have recently been developed to be used for the three buncher cavities in the CERN Linac4. The amplifiers are water-cooled and can provide up to 33 kW pulsed RF Power, 1.5 ms pulse length and 50 Hz repetition rate. Furthermore a 60 kW unit is under construction to provide the required RF Power for the debuncher cavity. The concept is based on 1.2 kW RF power modules using the latest 6th generation LDMOS technology. For integration into the CERN control environment the amplifiers have an internal industrial controller, which will provide easy control and extended diagnostic functions. This paper describes the construction, performance, including linearity, phase stability and EMC compliance tests

  18. RF gauging efforts with liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen as applicable to subcritical space vehicle systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, H. E.; Ott, W.; Stanley, N.

    1974-01-01

    The RF gauging concept is based on the interaction between a fluid dielectric medium in an enclosed metallic cavity and electromagnetic fields set up within that cavity. In RF gauging systems, the fundamental measurement relies on the interpretation of changes in the resonant RF frequencies of an enclosed tank as the mass of the propellant contained in the tank is changed. In addition to a discussion of the basic principles of operation of these systems, the study presents a description of the current breadboard implementation with typical test arrangements, along with supporting test data. The experimental testing of the RF gauging technique for liquid cryogen mass gauging indicates that this technique is a feasible approach to liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen gauging under all attitude or reduced gravity environments.

  19. A proton microbeam deflection system to scan target surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heck, D.

    1978-12-01

    A system to deflect the proton beam within the Karlsruhe microbeam setup is described. The deflection is achieved whithin a transverse electrical field generated between parallel electrodes. Their tension is controlled by a pattern generator, thus enabling areal and line scans with a variable number of scan points at variable scan speed. The application is demonstrated at two different examples. (orig.) [de

  20. A 700 MHZ, 1 MW CW RF System for a FEL 100mA RF Photoinjector

    CERN Document Server

    Roybal, William; Reass, William; Rees, Daniel; Tallerico, Paul J; Torrez, Phillip A

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a 700 MHz, 1 Megawatt CW, high efficiency klystron RF system utilized for a Free Electron Laser (FEL) high-brightness electron photoinjector (PI). The E2V klystron is mod-anode tube that operates with a beam voltage of 95 kV. This tube, operating with a 65% efficiency, requires ~96 watts of input power to produce in excess of 1 MW of output power. This output drives the 3rd cell of a 2½-cell, p-mode PI cavity through a pair of planar waveguide windows. Coupling is via a ridge-loaded tapered waveguide section and "dog-bone" iris. This paper will present the design of the RF, RF transport, coupling, and monitoring/protection systems that are required to support CW operations of the 100 mA cesiated, semi-porous SiC photoinjector.

  1. Preparations for Upgrading the RF Systems of the PS Booster

    CERN Document Server

    Albright, Simon; Shaposhnikova, Elena

    2016-01-01

    The accelerators of the LHC injector chain need to be upgraded to provide the HL-LHC beams. The PS Booster, the first synchrotron in the LHC injection chain, uses three different RF systems (first, second and up to tenth harmonic) in each of its four rings. As part of the LHC Injector Upgrade the current ferrite RF systems will be replaced with broadband Finemet cavities, increasing the flexibility of the RF system. A Finemet test cavity has been installed in Ring 4 to investigate its effect on machine performance, especially beam stability, during extensive experimental studies. Due to large space charge impedance Landau damping is lost through most of the cycle in single harmonic operation, but is recovered when using the second harmonic and controlled longitudinal emittance blow-up. This paper compares beam parameters during acceleration with and without the Finemet test cavity. Comparisons were made using beam measurements and simulations with the BLonD code based on a full PS Booster impedance model. Thi...

  2. Enhanced Method for Cavity Impedance Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank Marhauser, Robert Rimmer, Kai Tian, Haipeng Wang

    2009-05-01

    With the proposal of medium to high average current accelerator facilities the demand for cavities with extremely low Higher Order Mode (HOM) impedances is increasing. Modern numerical tools are still under development to more thoroughly predict impedances that need to take into account complex absorbing boundaries and lossy materials. With the usually large problem size it is preferable to utilize massive parallel computing when applicable and available. Apart from such computational issues, we have developed methods using available computer resources to enhance the information that can be extracted from a cavities? wakefield computed in time domain. In particular this is helpful for a careful assessment of the extracted RF power and the mitigation of potential beam break-up or emittance diluting effects, a figure of merit for the cavity performance. The method is described as well as an example of its implementation.

  3. Impacts of Deflection Nose on Ballistic Trajectory Control Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The deflection of projectile nose is aimed at changing the motion of the projectile in flight with the theory of motion control and changing the exterior ballistics so as to change its range and increase its accuracy. The law of external ballistics with the deflectable nose is considered as the basis of the design of a flight control system and an important part in the process of projectile development. Based on the existing rigid external ballistic model, this paper establishes an external ballistic calculation model for deflectable nose projectile and further establishes the solving programs accordingly. Different angle of attack, velocity, coefficients of lift, resistance, and moment under the deflection can be obtained in this paper based on the previous experiments and emulation researches. In the end, the author pointed out the laws on the impaction of external ballistic trajectory by the deflection of nose of the missile.

  4. Intelligent deflection routing in buffer-less networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeri, Soroush; Trajković, Ljiljana

    2015-02-01

    Deflection routing is employed to ameliorate packet loss caused by contention in buffer-less architectures such as optical burst-switched networks. The main goal of deflection routing is to successfully deflect a packet based only on a limited knowledge that network nodes possess about their environment. In this paper, we present a framework that introduces intelligence to deflection routing (iDef). iDef decouples the design of the signaling infrastructure from the underlying learning algorithm. It consists of a signaling and a decision-making module. Signaling module implements a feedback management protocol while the decision-making module implements a reinforcement learning algorithm. We also propose several learning-based deflection routing protocols, implement them in iDef using the ns-3 network simulator, and compare their performance.

  5. Study on the causes and methods of influencing concrete deflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ying; Zhou, Xiang; Tang, Jinyu

    2017-09-01

    Under the long-term effect of static load on reinforced concrete beam, the stiffness decreases and the deformation increases with time. Therefore, the calculation of deflection is more complicated. According to the domestic and foreign research results by experiment the flexural deflection of reinforced concrete, creep, age, the thickness of the protective layer, the relative slip, the combination of steel yielding factors of reinforced concrete deflection are summarized, analyzed the advantages and disadvantages of the traditional direct measurement of deflection, that by increasing the beam height, increasing the moment of inertia, ncrease prestressed reinforcement ratio, arching, reduce the load, and other measures to reduce the deflection of prestressed construction, improve the reliability of structure.

  6. Load Deflection Characteristics of Nickel Titanium Initial Archwires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Aghili

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess and compare the characteristics of commonly used initial archwires by their load deflection graphs.Materials and Methods: This study tested three wire designs namely copper nickel titanium (CNT, nickel titanium (NiTi, and multi-strand NiTi (MSNT archwires engaged in passive self-ligating (PSL brackets, active self-ligating (ASL brackets or conventional brackets. To evaluate the mechanical characteristics of the specimens, a three-point bending test was performed. The testing machine vertically applied force on the midpoint of the wire between the central incisor and canine teeth to obtain 2 and 4mm of deflection. The force level at maximum deflection and characteristics of plateau (the average plateau load and the plateau length were recorded. Two-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test were used at P <0.05 level of significance.Results: Force level at maximum deflection and plateau length were significantly affected by the amount of deflection. The type of archwires and brackets had significant effects on force level at maximum deflection, and plateau length. However, the bracket type had no significant effect on the average plateau force.Conclusion: With any type of brackets in deflections of 2 and 4mm, MSNT wire exerted the lowest while NiTi wire exerted the highest force level at maximum deflection and plateau phase. The force level at maximum deflection and the plateau length increased with raising the amount of primary deflection; however the average plateau force did not change significantly.

  7. RF current sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, James A.; Sparks, Dennis O.

    1998-11-10

    An RF sensor having a novel current sensing probe and a voltage sensing probe to measure voltage and current. The current sensor is disposed in a transmission line to link all of the flux generated by the flowing current in order to obtain an accurate measurement. The voltage sensor is a flat plate which operates as a capacitive plate to sense voltage on a center conductor of the transmission line, in which the measured voltage is obtained across a resistance leg of a R-C differentiator circuit formed by the characteristic impedance of a connecting transmission line and a capacitance of the plate, which is positioned proximal to the center conductor.

  8. RF Synthesis without Inductors

    OpenAIRE

    Kong, Long

    2016-01-01

    Recent developments in RF receiver design have eliminated all on-chip inductors except for that used in the local oscillator. This dissertation addresses the “last inductor” problem and proposes both integer-N and fractional-N synthesizer architectures that achieve a phase noise and figure of merit (FOM) comparable to those of LC-VCO-based realizations.A new wideband integer-N synthesizer is introduced to sufficiently suppress the ring’s phase noise. It employs an exclusive-OR (XOR) phase det...

  9. RF impedance measurement calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, P.J.; Song, J.J.

    1993-01-01

    The intent of this note is not to explain all of the available calibration methods in detail. Instead, we will focus on the calibration methods of interest for RF impedance coupling measurements and attempt to explain: (1). The standards and measurements necessary for the various calibration techniques. (2). The advantages and disadvantages of each technique. (3). The mathematical manipulations that need to be applied to the measured standards and devices. (4). An outline of the steps needed for writing a calibration routine that operated from a remote computer. For further details of the various techniques presented in this note, the reader should consult the references

  10. Experimental study on the luminous radiation associated to the field emission of samples submitted to high RF fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maissa, S.; Junquera, T.; Fouaidy, M.; Le Goff, A.; Luong, M.; Tan, J.; Bonin, B.; Safa, H.

    1996-01-01

    The accelerating gradient of the RF cavities is limited by the strong field emission (FE) of electrons stemming from the metallic walls. Previous experiments evidenced luminous radiations associated with electron emission of cathodes subjected to intense DC electric field. These observations invoked the proposal of new theoretical models of the field emission phenomenon. This experimental study extends the previous DC works to the RF case. A special copper RF cavity has been developed equipped with an optical window and a removable sample. It has been designed for measuring both electron current and luminous radiation emitted by the sample, subjected to maximum RF electric field. The optical apparatus attached to the cavity permits to characterize the radiation in terms of intensity, glowing duration and spectral distribution. The results concerning different niobium or copper samples, whom top was either scratched or intentionally contaminated with metallic or dielectric particles are summarized. (author)

  11. Digital Measurement System for the HIE-Isolde Superconducting Accelerating Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Elias, Michal

    Extensive R&D efforts are being invested at CERN into the fundamental science of the RF superconductivity, cavity design, niobium sputtering, coating and RF properties of superconducting cavities. Fast and precise characterization and measurements of RF parameters of the newly produced cavities is essential for advances with the cavity production. The currently deployed analogue measurement system based on an analogue phase discriminators and tracking RF generators is not optimal for efficient work at the SM18 superconducting cavity test stand. If exact properties of the cavity under test are not known a traditional feedback loop will not be able to find resonant frequency in a reasonable time or even at all. This is mainly due to a very high Q factor. The resonance peak is very narrow (fraction of a Hz at 100 MHz). If the resonant frequency is off by several bandwidths, small changes of the cavity field during the tuning will not be measureable. Also cavity field will react only very slowly to any change...

  12. A Bench Measurement of the Energy Loss of a Stored Beam to a Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sands, M; Rees, J.; /SLAC

    2016-12-19

    A rather simple electronic bench experiment is proposed for obtaining a measure of the impulse energy loss of a stored particle bunch to an rf cavity or other vacuum-chamber structure--the so-called "cavity radiation". The proposed method is analyzed in some detail.

  13. Synthesis of focusing-and-deflection columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szilagyi, M.; Mui, P.H.

    1995-01-01

    Szilagyi and Szep have demonstrated that focusing lenses of high performances can be constructed from a column of circular plate electrodes. Later, Szilagyi modified that system to include dipole, quadrupole, and octupole components by partitioning each plate into eight equal sectors. It has already been shown that the additional quadrupole components can indeed bring about substantial improvements in the focusing of charged particle beams. In this article, that design procedure is expanded to construct columns capable of both focusing and deflecting particle beams by just introducing additional dipole components. In this new design, the geometry of the system remains unchanged. The only extra complication is the demand for more individual controls of the sector voltages. Two sample designs, one for negative ions and one for electrons, are presented showing that in both cases a ±2.3 mrad diverging beam can be focused down to a spot of less than 50 nm in radius over a scanning circular area of radius 0.25 mm. The details of the two systems are given in Sec. IV along with the source conditions. The performance of the negative ion system is found to be comparable to the published data. For the relativistic electron system, the interaction of individual components to reduce various aberrations is investigated. copyright 1995 American Vacuum Society

  14. Segmented trapped vortex cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammel, Jr., Leonard Paul (Inventor); Pennekamp, David Lance (Inventor); Winslow, Jr., Ralph Henry (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An annular trapped vortex cavity assembly segment comprising includes a cavity forward wall, a cavity aft wall, and a cavity radially outer wall there between defining a cavity segment therein. A cavity opening extends between the forward and aft walls at a radially inner end of the assembly segment. Radially spaced apart pluralities of air injection first and second holes extend through the forward and aft walls respectively. The segment may include first and second expansion joint features at distal first and second ends respectively of the segment. The segment may include a forward subcomponent including the cavity forward wall attached to an aft subcomponent including the cavity aft wall. The forward and aft subcomponents include forward and aft portions of the cavity radially outer wall respectively. A ring of the segments may be circumferentially disposed about an axis to form an annular segmented vortex cavity assembly.

  15. Atom-field interaction in the single-quantum limit in a two dimensional travelling-wave cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youn, Sun Hyun; Chough, Young Tak; An, Kyung Won

    2003-01-01

    We analyze the interaction of an atom with two dimensional travelling-wave cavity modes in the strong coupling region, with the quantized atomic center of mass motion taken into account. Analytic and numerical calculation shows that the atom in two independent pairs of travelling wave modes can be made to interact only with a particular travelling mode by matching the initial momentum and the detuning of the cavities. We also numerically investigate the atomic momentum deflection in the cavities

  16. Study of medium beta elliptical cavities for CADS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Liangjian; Zhang, Shenghu; Li, Yongming; Wang, Ruoxu; Guo, Hao; Zhang, Cong; Jia, Huan; Jiang, Tiancai; Li, Chunlong; He, Yuan

    2016-02-01

    The China Accelerator-Driven Sub-critical System (CADS) is a high intensity proton facility to dispose of nuclear waste and generate electric power. CADS is based on a 1.5 GeV, 10 mA CW superconducting (SC) linac as a driver. The high energy section of the linac is composed of two families of SC elliptical cavities which are designed with geometrical beta 0.63 and 0.82. In this paper, the 650 MHz β=0.63 SC elliptical cavity is studied, including cavity optimization, multipacting, high order modes (HOMs) and generator RF power calculation. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (91426303)

  17. Heating of Particulates by RF Magnetic Field and RF Electric Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wilkin; Bosman, Herman; Lau, Y. Y.; Gilgenbach, R. M.

    2004-11-01

    Microwave heating is an important industrial heating process for certain niche applications such as the sintering of ceramics and rubber vulcanization, and has potential uses in the treatment of mineral ores, heating of reagents and catalysts in chemical reactions, and regeneration of molecular sieves. Here, we examine microwave heating by placing a small, spherical particulate of a general complex permittivity and permeability at the center of a perfectly conducting spherical cavity. The dispersion relation for both the TE mode and TM mode is solved exactly. The damping rates of these modes immediately give the degree of absorption by the rf electric field and by the rf magnetic field, over a wide range of parameters, and from quasi-static to very high frequencies. It is found that, in general, whenever the resistive skin depth is much less than the radius of the particulate, heating by the rf magnetic field always dominates, whether the particulate is magnetic or nonmagnetic. Simple scaling laws have been derived and will be presented [H. Bosman et al., APL (to be published)].

  18. rf experiments on PLT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosea, J.; Wilson, J.R.; Hooke, W.

    1986-01-01

    A variety of rf experiments are being conducted on PLT in order to explore rf techniques which could improve tokamak performance parameters. Of special importance are the studies of ion Bernstein wave (IBW) heating, lower hybrid MHD stabilization and electron heating, down-shifted electron cyclotron heating, and fast wave current drive. Ion Bernstein wave heating results at modest power indicate that the particle confinement time could be enhanced relative to that for fast wave heating in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) and neutral beam heating. At these power levels a conclusive determination of energy confinement scaling with power cannot yet be given. Central sawtooth and m = 1 MHD stabilization is being obtained with centrally peaked lower hybrid (LH) current drive and the central electron temperature is peaking to values (approx.5 keV) well outside the bounds of ''profile consistency.'' In this case the electron energy confinement is apparently increased relative to the ohmic value. The production of relativistic electrons via heating at the down-shifted electron cyclotron (EC) frequency is found to be consistent with theoretical predictions and lends support to the use of this method for heating in relatively high magnetic field devices

  19. RF Breakdown in Normal Conducting Single-Cell Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolgashev, V.A.; Nantista, C.D.; Tantawi, S.G.; Higashi, Y.; Higo, T.

    2006-01-01

    Operating accelerating gradient in normal conducting accelerating structures is often limited by rf breakdown. The limit depends on multiple parameters, including input rf power, rf circuit, cavity shape and material. Experimental and theoretical study of the effects of these parameters on the breakdown limit in full scale structures is difficult and costly. We use 11.4 GHz single-cell traveling wave and standing wave accelerating structures for experiments and modeling of rf breakdown behavior. These test structures are designed so that the electromagnetic fields in one cell mimic the fields in prototype multicell structures for the X-band linear collider. Fields elsewhere in the test structures are significantly lower than that of the single cell. The setup uses matched mode converters that launch the circular TM 01 mode into short test structures. The test structures are connected to the mode launchers with vacuum rf flanges. This setup allows economic testing of different cell geometries, cell materials and preparation techniques with short turn-around time. Simple 2D geometry of the test structures simplifies modeling of the breakdown currents and their thermal effects

  20. Experimental and theoretical investigations of a 17 GHz RF gun

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, W J; Kreischer, K E; Pedrozzi, M; Shapiro, M A; Temkin, R J

    1999-01-01

    We report on experimental and theoretical investigations of a 17 GHz RF photocathode electron gun. This is the first photocathode electron gun to operate at a frequency above 2.856 GHz. The 1.5 cell, pi mode, copper cavity was tested with 50 ns pulses from a 17.150 GHz klystron amplifier built by Haimson Research Corp. A Bragg filter was used at the RF gun to reduce the reflection of parasitic modes back into the klystron. Coupling hole theory in conjunction with cold test measurements was used to determine the field profile in the RF gun. The particle in cell code MAGIC as well as coupled envelope equations were used to simulate the beam dynamics in the RF gun. With power levels of 4 MW, the on axis electric field at the cathode exceeds 300 MV/m, corresponding to an average accelerating gradient of 200 MV/m over the first half cell of the gun. Breakdown was observed at power levels above 5 MW. Electron bunches were produced by 20 mu J, 1 ps UV laser pulses impinging on the RF gun copper photocathode and were...

  1. Industrialization of Superconducting RF Accelerator Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiniger, Michael; Pekeler, Michael; Vogel, Hanspeter

    2012-01-01

    Superconducting RF (SRF) accelerator technology has basically existed for 50 years. It took about 20 years to conduct basic R&D and prototyping at universities and international institutes before the first superconducting accelerators were built, with industry supplying complete accelerator cavities. In parallel, the design of large scale accelerators using SRF was done worldwide. In order to build those accelerators, industry has been involved for 30 years in building the required cavities and/or accelerator modules in time and budget. To enable industry to supply these high tech components, technology transfer was made from the laboratories in the following three regions: the Americas, Asia and Europe. As will be shown, the manufacture of the SRF cavities is normally accomplished in industry whereas the cavity testing and module assembly are not performed in industry in most cases, yet. The story of industrialization is so far a story of customized projects. Therefore a real SRF accelerator product is not yet available in this market. License agreements and technology transfer between leading SRF laboratories and industry is a powerful tool for enabling industry to manufacture SRF components or turnkey superconducting accelerator modules for other laboratories and users with few or no capabilities in SRF technology. Despite all this, the SRF accelerator market today is still a small market. The manufacture and preparation of the components require a range of specialized knowledge, as well as complex and expensive manufacturing installations like for high precision machining, electron beam welding, chemical surface preparation and class ISO4 clean room assembly. Today, the involved industry in the US and Europe comprises medium-sized companies. In Japan, some big enterprises are involved. So far, roughly 2500 SRF cavities have been built by or ordered from industry worldwide. Another substantial step might come from the International Linear Collider (ILC) project

  2. Strategy to prevent surface deflections for automotive sheet metal parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinschenk, A.; Volk, W.

    2017-09-01

    Surface deflections are undesirable in automotive outer panels because they disturb their visual appearance. As a consequence, the geometry of the deep drawing tool is manually adjusted during tryout until the produced parts do not display any surface deflections. The aim of this paper is to reduce this time-consuming and cost-intensive tryout by slightly changing the geometry of the tool in an early state of the product development process to lower the risk of surface deflections. Therefore, this paper shows the influence of geometrical parameters of the deep drawing tool on the occurrence of surface deflections. A multiple curved outer panel with a door handle depression is chosen for the investigation. Typically, so-called “teddy bear ears” occur around the depression. The sheet metal material AA6016 with a sheet thickness of 1.0 mm is used. Numerical simulations of the draw operation and springback are performed in AutoForm. An analysis of the curvature before and after springback is used to detect surface deflections. The influence of the stresses and curvatures on the appearance of surface deflections is analyzed. For the experimental validation, stoning is used to detect surface deflections on a physical part. A very good agreement between the numerical and experimental results was obtained. The results show that the existence of surface deflections strongly depends on the initial curvature of the part and the appearance depends on the distribution of minor stresses. It is possible to reduce the risk of surface deflections during the design phase by changing the geometry.

  3. Single-side electron multipacting at the photocathode in rf guns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang-Hui Han

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple electron impacting (multipacting can take place in rf fields when the rf components are composed of materials with a secondary electron yield greater than one. In rf gun cavities, multipacting may change the properties of the vacuum components or even damage them. First systematic measurements of the multipacting occurring in a photocathode rf gun were made at the Fermilab/NICADD Photoinjector Laboratory in 2000. The multipacting properties were found to depend on the cathode material and the solenoid field configuration. In this study, we measure the multipacting properties in more detail and model the secondary electron generation for numerical simulation. Measurements and simulations for the photoinjectors at Fermilab and DESY are compared. The multipacting takes place at the photocathode in rf guns and is categorized as single-side multipacting. In a low rf field, the electrons emitted from the cathode area do not leave the gun cavity within one rf cycle and have an opportunity to travel back and hit the cathode. The solenoid field distribution in the vicinity of the cathode changes the probability of electron bombardment of the cathode and makes a major contribution to the multipacting behavior.

  4. A conceptual design of the RF system for the NSP high intensity proton accelerator at JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chishiro, Etsuji; Kusano, Joichi; Mizumoto, Motoharu; Touchi, Yutaka; Kaneko, Hiroshi; Takado, Hiroshi; Sawada, Junichi

    1999-03-01

    JAERI has been proposing the Neutron Science Project which aims at exploring the fields of basic science and nuclear technology using a high power spallation neutron source. The neutron source will be driven by a high intensity linear accelerator with an energy of 1.5 GeV and an average beam current of 5.33 mA and beam power of 8 MW. The RF system for the accelerator consists of a high-energy accelerator part and a low energy accelerator part. The maximum RF power requirements at the high and low energy accelerator parts are 25 MW and 8.3 MW, respectively. In this report, we describe the conceptual design of the RF system. In the low energy accelerator part, we estimated the requirement for the high-power amplifier tube and made the basis design for RF components. In the high energy accelerator part, we studied the effect of tuning errors, Lorentz forces and microphonics in the superconducting cavity. We calculated the klystron efficiency and supply power in the arrangement of where one klystron distributes the RF power to four cavities. We also considered an IOT RF system. Finally, we describe the electrical capacity and quantity of cooling water in the RF system. (author)

  5. Surface processing for bulk niobium superconducting radio frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, M. P.; Reid, T.

    2017-04-01

    The majority of niobium cavities for superconducting particle accelerators continue to be fabricated from thin-walled (2-4 mm) polycrystalline niobium sheet and, as a final step, require material removal from the radio frequency (RF) surface in order to achieve performance needed for use as practical accelerator devices. More recently bulk niobium in the form of, single- or large-grain slices cut from an ingot has become a viable alternative for some cavity types. In both cases the so-called damaged layer must be chemically etched or electrochemically polished away. The methods for doing this date back at least four decades, however, vigorous empirical studies on real cavities and more fundamental studies on niobium samples at laboratories worldwide have led to seemingly modest improvements that, when taken together, constitute a substantial advance in the reproducibility for surface processing techniques and overall cavity performance. This article reviews the development of niobium cavity surface processing, and summarizes results of recent studies. We place some emphasis on practical details for real cavity processing systems which are difficult to find in the literature but are, nonetheless, crucial for achieving the good and reproducible cavity performance. New approaches for bulk niobium surface treatment which aim to reduce cost or increase performance, including alternate chemical recipes, barrel polishing and ‘nitrogen doping’ of the RF surface, continue to be pursued and are closely linked to the requirements for surface processing.

  6. An Independently Tunable Cells Thermionic RF Gun (ITC-RF GUN) for Sub-Picosecond Short Pulse

    CERN Document Server

    Hama, H; Kawai, M; Tanaka, T

    2005-01-01

    As a result of simulation study so far, a specific feature has been found in the longitudinal dynamics in thermionic RF guns. At the beginning of beam extraction, the head of the electrons from a cathode is followed immediately by the electrons just behind, which is extracted by the higher electric field than that at the head of the beam train. Thus later electrons would get velocity faster than the head of the electrons, so that the electrons are expected to concentrates onto the head of the beam under certain conditions such as the gun geometry and the strength of the RF field. In order to investigate this velocity-bunching like effect, a prototype thermionic RF gun was designed and its characteristics have been studied by a 3-D simulation code based on a FDTD (finite difference time demain) method. The gun is consists of two independentlly power feeding S-band RF cavities, and can be operated at modes with different power ratio and phase between two RFs. This paper report the thermionic RF gun is expected ...

  7. Tuning of External Q And Phase for The Cavities of A Superconducting Linear Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Katalev, V V

    2004-01-01

    The RF power required for a certain gradient of a superconducting cavity depends on the beam current and coupling between the cavity and waveguide. The coupling with the cavity may be changed by variation of Qext. Different devices can be used to adjust Qext or phase. In this paper three stub and E-H tuners are compared and their usability for the RF power distribution system for the superconducting accelerator of the European Xray laser and the TESLA linear collider is considered. The tuners were analyzed by using the scattering matrix. Advantages and limitations of the devices are presented.

  8. Cryogenic studies of rf accelerating structures, vintage 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liska, D.; Uher, J.; Potter, J.

    1986-01-01

    Cryogenically cooled rf cavity studies were undertaken at Los Alamos in 1978 to test the effectiveness of reduced temperature on the Q-enhancement of 450-MHz drift-tube linac structures. A complete facility was set up to do high power tests, not only at liquid nitrogen (LN 2 ) temperature but with liquid hydrogen (LH 2 ) as well. The cavity, Dewar, klystron test stand, and a remote outdoor enclosure were constructed. Hydrogen safety approval for the tests was obtained. Unfortunately, the hydrogen tests were never done. However, the cavity was tested at high power in LN 2 and a Q-enhancement of 2.02 was recorded, compared to 2.7 expected theoretically. This work is now continuing with improved measuring techniques using some of the same apparatus. It is the purpose of this paper to report on the early work and to reference its continuation today

  9. High Power test for the first PIMS Cavity for LINAC4

    CERN Document Server

    Gerigk, F; Giguet, J M; Wegner, R

    2011-01-01

    The first cavity of the PI Mode Structure (PIMS) section of Linac4 has been high power tested at Linac4 conditions and under high average power to simulate the operating conditions of Linac4 as a high duty cycle injector for the SPL. The PIMS section consists of 12 seven cell cavities, which accelerate the Linac4 beam from 102 MeV to 160 MeV at an RF frequency of 352.2 MHz. The cell length is constant per cavity but is adapted to the particle speed from cavity to cavity.

  10. Result of MHI 2-Cell Seamless Dumb-Bell Cavity Vertical Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okihira, K. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd, Mihara, Hiroshima, 729-0393, Japan; Hara, H. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd, Mihara, Hiroshima, 729-0393, Japan; Ikeda, N. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd, Mihara, Hiroshima, 729-0393, Japan; Inoue, F. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd, Mihara, Hiroshima, 729-0393, Japan; Sennyu, K. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd, Mihara, Hiroshima, 729-0393, Japan; Geng, Rongli [JLAB; Rimmer, Robert A. [JLAB; Kako, E. [KEK

    2014-12-01

    MHI have supplied several 9-cell cavities for STF (R&D of ILC project at KEK) and have been considering production method for stable quality and cost reduction, seamless dumb-bell cavity was one of them. We had fabricated a 2 cell seamless dumb-bell cavity for cost reduction and measured RF performance in collaboration with JLab, KEK and MHI. Surface treatment recipe for ILC was applied for MHI 2-cell cavity and vertical test was performed at JLab. The cavity reached Eacc=32.4MV/m after BCP and EP. Details of the result are reported.

  11. Analysis of the cool down related cavity performance of the European XFEL vertical acceptance tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenskat, Marc; Schaffran, J.

    2017-09-15

    For the European X-Ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) cavity production, the cold radio-frequency (RF) test of the cavities at 2 K after delivery from the two vendors was the mandatory acceptance test. It has been previously reported, that the cool down dynamics of a cavity across T{sub c} has a significant influence on the observed intrinsic quality factor Q{sub 0}, which is a measure of the losses on the inner cavity surface. A total number of 367 cool downs is used to analyze this correlation and we show that such a correlation is not observed during the European XFEL cavity production.

  12. In situ Measurements of the SPS 200MHz Accelerating Cavity III

    CERN Document Server

    Kramer, Patrick; Caspers, Fritz; Vollinger, Christine; Montesinos, Eric; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2015-01-01

    The main 200MHz travelling wave RF system of the SPS consists of two 5-tank and two 4-tank cavities. This system will be modified during LS 2, and the preparation work has already started. The 5 tank 200MHz travelling wave cavity III was measured in reflection. This Internal Note presents results obtained for the matching of cavity and feeder line, by looking at both frequency and time domain data. Techniques for estimating the feeder line attenuation are also presented.

  13. A new rf structure for intermediate-velocity particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billen, J.H.; Krawczyk, F.L.; Wood, R.L.; Young, L.M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes an rf structure with high shunt impedance and good field stability for particle velocities o.1 ≤ β ≤ 0.5. Traditionally, the drift-tube linac (DTL) has been the structure of choice for this velocity range. The new structure, called a coupled-cavity drift-tube linac (CCDTL), combines features of the Alvarez DTL and the π-mode coupled-cavity linac (CCL). Each accelerating cavity is a two-cell, 0-mode DTL. The center-to-center distance between gaps is γλ. Adjacent accelerating cavities have oppositely directed electric fields, alternating in phase by 180 degrees. The chain of cavities operates in a π/2 structure mode so the coupling cavities are nominally unexcited. We will discuss 2-D and 3-D electromagnetic code calculations, and some initial measurements on a low-power model of a CCDTL. We will compare shunt impedance calculations for DTL, CCL, and CCDTL structures. The CCDTL has potential application for a wide range of ion linacs. For example, high-intensity proton linacs could use the CCDTL instead of a DTL up to an energy of about 200 MeV. Another example is a stand-alone, low-duty, low-current, very high gradient, proton, cancer therapy machine. The advantage for this application would be a saving in the cost of the machine because the linac would be short

  14. RF breakdown by toroidal helicons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Bounded whistlers are well-known for their efficient plasma production capabilities in thin cylindrical tubes. In this paper we shall present their radio frequency (RF) breakdown and discharge sustaining capabilities in toroidal systems. Pulsed RF power in the electronmagnetohy- drodynamic (EMHD) frequency ...

  15. RF breakdown by toroidal helicons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bounded whistlers are well-known for their efficient plasma production capabilities in thin cylindrical tubes. In this paper we shall present their radio frequency (RF) breakdown and discharge sustaining capabilities in toroidal systems. Pulsed RF power in the electronmagnetohydrodynamic (EMHD) frequency regime is fed to ...

  16. Beam Fields in an Integrated Cavity, Coupler and Window Configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weathersby, Stephen; Novokhatski, Alexander; /SLAC

    2010-02-10

    In a multi-bunch high current storage ring, beam generated fields couple strongly into the RF cavity coupler structure when beam arrival times are in resonance with cavity fields. In this study the integrated effect of beam fields over several thousand RF periods is simulated for the complete cavity, coupler, window and waveguide system of the PEP-II B-factory storage ring collider. We show that the beam generated fields at frequencies corresponding to several bunch spacings for this case gives rise to high field strength near the ceramic window which could limit the performance of future high current storage rings such as PEP-X or Super B-factories.

  17. Refurbishments of RF systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baelde, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    This document describes the activities of the R.F. System group during the years 1995-1996 in the frame of the refurbishment of the control system at GANIL accelerator. Modifications concerning the following sub-assemblies are mentioned: 1. voltage standards; 2. link card between the step by step motor control and the local control systems; 3. polarization system; 4. computer software for different operations. Also reported is the installation of ECR 4 source for the CO2. In this period the R2 Regrouping system has been installed, tested and put into operation. Several problems concerning the mechanical installation of the coupling loop and other problems related to the electronics operation were solved. The results obtained with the THI machine are presented

  18. Beam induced RF heating

    CERN Document Server

    Salvant, B; Arduini, G; Assmann, R; Baglin, V; Barnes, M J; Bartmann, W; Baudrenghien, P; Berrig, O; Bracco, C; Bravin, E; Bregliozzi, G; Bruce, R; Bertarelli, A; Carra, F; Cattenoz, G; Caspers, F; Claudet, S; Day, H; Garlasche, M; Gentini, L; Goddard, B; Grudiev, A; Henrist, B; Jones, R; Kononenko, O; Lanza, G; Lari, L; Mastoridis, T; Mertens, V; Métral, E; Mounet, N; Muller, J E; Nosych, A A; Nougaret, J L; Persichelli, S; Piguiet, A M; Redaelli, S; Roncarolo, F; Rumolo, G; Salvachua, B; Sapinski, M; Schmidt, R; Shaposhnikova, E; Tavian, L; Timmins, M; Uythoven, J; Vidal, A; Wenninger, J; Wollmann, D; Zerlauth, M

    2012-01-01

    After the 2011 run, actions were put in place during the 2011/2012 winter stop to limit beam induced radio frequency (RF) heating of LHC components. However, some components could not be changed during this short stop and continued to represent a limitation throughout 2012. In addition, the stored beam intensity increased in 2012 and the temperature of certain components became critical. In this contribution, the beam induced heating limitations for 2012 and the expected beam induced heating limitations for the restart after the Long Shutdown 1 (LS1) will be compiled. The expected consequences of running with 25 ns or 50 ns bunch spacing will be detailed, as well as the consequences of running with shorter bunch length. Finally, actions on hardware or beam parameters to monitor and mitigate the impact of beam induced heating to LHC operation after LS1 will be discussed.

  19. Magnetic Flux Expulsion Studies in Niobium SRF Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Posen, Sam [Fermilab; Checchin, Mattia [Fermilab; Crawford, Anthony [Fermilab; Grassellino, Anna [Fermilab; Martinello, Martina [Fermilab; Melnychuk, Oleksandr [Fermilab; Romanenko, Alexander [Fermilab; Sergatskov, Dmitri [Fermilab; Trenikhina, Yulia [Fermilab

    2016-06-01

    With the recent discovery of nitrogen doping treatment for SRF cavities, ultra-high quality factors at medium accelerating fields are regularly achieved in vertical RF tests. To preserve these quality factors into the cryomodule, it is important to consider background magnetic fields, which can become trapped in the surface of the cavity during cooldown and cause Q₀ degradation. Building on the recent discovery that spatial thermal gradients during cooldown can significantly improve expulsion of magnetic flux, a detailed study was performed of flux expulsion on two cavities with different furnace treatments that are cooled in magnetic fields amplitudes representative of what is expected in a realistic cryomodule. In this contribution, we summarize these cavity results, in order to improve understanding of the impact of flux expulsion on cavity performance.

  20. Cavity Voltage Phase Modulation MD blocks 3 and 4

    CERN Document Server

    Mastoridis, T; Butterworth, A; Molendijk, J; Tuckmantel, J

    2013-01-01

    The LHC RF/LLRF system is currently setup for extremely stable RF voltage to minimize transient beam loading effects. The present scheme cannot be extended beyond nominal beam current since the demanded power would push the klystrons to saturation. For beam currents above nominal (and possibly earlier), the cavity phase modulation by the beam (transient beam loading) will not be corrected, but the strong RF feedback and One-Turn Delay feedback will still be active for RF loop and beam stability in physics. To achieve this, the voltage set point should be adapted for each bunch. The goal of these MDs was to test thefirmware version of an iterative algorithm that adjusts the voltage set point to achieve the optimal phase modulation for klystron forward power considerations.

  1. Rf superconducting devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartwig, W.H.; Passow, C.

    1975-01-01

    Topics discussed include (1) the theory of superconductors in high-frequency fields (London surface impedance, anomalous normal surface resistance, pippard nonlocal theory, quantum mechanical model, superconductor parameters, quantum mechanical calculation techniques for the surface, impedance, and experimental verification of surface impedance theories); (2) residual resistance (separation of losses, magnetic field effects, surface resistance of imperfect and impure conductors, residual loss due to acoustic coupling, losses from nonideal surfaces, high magnetic field losses, field emission, and nonlinear effects); (3) design and performance of superconducting devices (design considerations, materials and fabrication techniques, measurement of performance, and frequency stability); (4) devices for particle acceleration and deflection (advantages and problems of using superconductors, accelerators for fast particles, accelerators for particles with slow velocities, beam optical devices separators, and applications and projects under way); (5) applications of low-power superconducting resonators (superconducting filters and tuners, oscillators and detectors, mixers and amplifiers, antennas and output tanks, superconducting resonators for materials research, and radiation detection with loaded superconducting resonators); and (6) transmission and delay lines

  2. Cryogenic test of double quarter wave crab cavity for the LHC High luminosity upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Alberty, L. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Belomestnykh, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Ben-Zvi, I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Calaga, R. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Cullen, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Capatina, O. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Hammons, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Li, Z. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Marques, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Skaritka, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Verdu-Andres, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wu, Q. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-03

    A Proof-of-Principle (PoP) Double Quarter Wave Crab Cavity (DQWCC) was designed and fabricated for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade. A vertical cryogenic test has been done at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL). The cavity achieved 4.5 MV deflecting voltage with a quality factor above 3×109. We report the test results of this design.

  3. Lateral deflection of the SOL plasma during a giant ELM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landman, I.S.; Wuerz, H.

    2001-01-01

    In recent H-mode experiments at JET with giant ELMs a lateral deflection of hot tokamak plasma striking the divertor plate has been observed. This deflection can effect the divertor erosion caused by the hot plasma irradiation. Based on the MHD model for the vapor shield plasma and the hot plasma, the Seebeck effect is analyzed for explanation of the deflection. At t=-∞ both plasmas are at rest and separated by a boundary parallel to the target. The interaction between plasmas develops gradually ('adiabatically') as exp(t/t 0 ) with t 0 ∼10 2 μs the ELM duration time. At inclined impact of the magnetized hot plasma a toroidal current develops in the interaction zone of the plasmas. The JxB force accelerates the interacting plasmas in the lateral direction. The cold plasma motion essentially compensates the current. The magnitude of the hot plasma deflection is comparable to the observed one

  4. Hawaiian Islands East-West Deflections (DEFLEC96)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This 2' surface deflection of the vertical grid for the Principal Hawaiian Islands is the DEFLEC96 model. The computation used about 61,000 terrestrial and marine...

  5. PR/VI North-South Deflections (DEFLEC96)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This 2' surface deflection of the vertical grid for Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands is distributed as the DEFLEC96 model. The computation used about 26,000...

  6. Hawaiian Islands North-South Deflections (DEFLEC96)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This 2' surface deflection of the vertical grid for the Principal Hawaiian Islands is the DEFLEC96 model. The computation used about 61,000 terrestrial and marine...

  7. High bandwidth deflection readout for atomic force microscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steininger, Juergen; Bibl, Matthias; Yoo, Han Woong; Schitter, Georg

    2015-10-01

    This contribution presents the systematic design of a high bandwidth deflection readout mechanism for atomic force microscopes. The widely used optical beam deflection method is revised by adding a focusing lens between the cantilever and the quadrant photodetector (QPD). This allows the utilization of QPDs with a small active area resulting in an increased detection bandwidth due to the reduced junction capacitance. Furthermore the additional lens can compensate a cross talk between a compensating z-movement of the cantilever and the deflection readout. Scaling effects are analyzed to get the optimal spot size for the given geometry of the QPD. The laser power is tuned to maximize the signal to noise ratio without limiting the bandwidth by local saturation effects. The systematic approach results in a measured -3 dB detection bandwidth of 64.5 MHz at a deflection noise density of 62fm/√Hz.

  8. PR/VI East-West Deflections (DEFLEC96)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This 2' surface deflection of the vertical grid for Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands is distributed as the DEFLEC96 model. The computation used about 26,000...

  9. Deflection routing scheme for GMPLS-based OBS networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eid, Arafat; Mahmood, Waqar; Alomar, Anwar

    2010-01-01

    is not applicable in such an integrated solution. This is due to the existence of already established Label Switched Paths (LSPs) between edge nodes in a GMPLS-based OBS network which guide the Data Burst Headers (DBHs) through the network. In this paper we propose a novel deflection routing scheme which can...... be implemented in GMPLS-based OBS Control Plane. In this scheme, deflection routes or LSPs are designed and pre-established for the whole network. The ingress nodes are responsible for enabling DBHs for deflection at contending core ports prior to DBHs transmission. Moreover, we propose an object extension...... for Path and Resv messages of the RSVP-TE protocol to be able to utilize both messages for deflection labels dissemination. The scheme simulation results show reduction in data bursts blocking probability....

  10. U.S. North-South Deflections (DEFLEC96)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This 2' surface deflection of the vertical grid for the conterminous United States is the DEFLEC96 model. The computationused about 1.8 million terrestrial and...

  11. U.S. East-West Deflections (DEFLEC96)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This 2' surface deflection of the vertical grid for the conterminous United States is the DEFLEC96 model. The computationused about 1.8 million terrestrial and...

  12. Measurement of vertical track deflection from a moving rail car.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    The University of Nebraska has been conducting research sponsored by the Federal Railroad Administrations Office of Research and Development to develop a system that measures vertical track deflection/modulus from a moving rail car. Previous work ...

  13. New Control Structure of the 10 MHz RF System in the CERN PS

    CERN Document Server

    Damerau, H

    2013-01-01

    The 10MHz cavities comprise the main RF system in the CERN PS and the only one that allows acceleration. In total 11 tunable cavities (10 operational and a hot spare, grouped into 3+1 tuning groups and up to presently 6 voltage program groups) are distributed all around the circumference of the PS ring. Next to the RF drive signal each of the cavities is controlled by a voltage program and timing pulses to open and close the relays to short-circuit the cavity gaps. These control signals are presently generated by a dedicated hardware matrix. It translates voltage functions and relay timing pulses per cavity group into functions and timings per cavity. However, due to its central position in the RF beam control system, the dedicated hardware matrix can cause significant downtime in case of a major hardware failure. Instead of upgrading the existing obsolete hardware, this note suggests a replacement by standard controls hardware and dedicated application software. Thanks to advanced software concepts like “M...

  14. Multi-Mode Cavity Accelerator Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Yong [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Hirshfield, Jay Leonard [Omega-P R& D, Inc., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2016-11-10

    This project aimed to develop a prototype for a novel accelerator structure comprising coupled cavities that are tuned to support modes with harmonically-related eigenfrequencies, with the goal of reaching an acceleration gradient >200 MeV/m and a breakdown rate <10-7/pulse/meter. Phase I involved computations, design, and preliminary engineering of a prototype multi-harmonic cavity accelerator structure; plus tests of a bimodal cavity. A computational procedure was used to design an optimized profile for a bimodal cavity with high shunt impedance and low surface fields to maximize the reduction in temperature rise ΔT. This cavity supports the TM010 mode and its 2nd harmonic TM011 mode. Its fundamental frequency is at 12 GHz, to benchmark against the empirical criteria proposed within the worldwide High Gradient collaboration for X-band copper structures; namely, a surface electric field Esurmax< 260 MV/m and pulsed surface heating ΔTmax< 56 °K. With optimized geometry, amplitude and relative phase of the two modes, reductions are found in surface pulsed heating, modified Poynting vector, and total RF power—as compared with operation at the same acceleration gradient using only the fundamental mode.

  15. CERN Developments for 704 MHz Superconducting Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Capatina, O; Aviles Santillana, I; Arnau Izquierdo, G; Bonomi, R; Calatroni, S; Chambrillon, J; Gerigk, F; Garoby, R; Guinchard, M; Junginger, T; Malabaila, M; Marques Antunes Ferreira, L; Mikulas, S; Parma, V; Pillon, F; Renaglia, T; Schirm, K; Tardy, T; Therasse, M; Vacca, A; Valverde Alonso, N; Vande Craen, A

    2013-01-01

    The Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) is an R&D effort coordinated by CERN in partnership with other international laboratories. It is aiming at developing key technologies for the construction of a multi-megawatt proton linac based on state-of-the-art RF superconducting technology, which would serve as a driver in new physics facilities for neutrinos and/or Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB). Amongst the main objectives of this R&D effort, is the development of 704 MHz bulk niobium beta=1 elliptical cavities, operating at 2 K with a maximum accelerating gradient of 25 MV/m, and the testing of a string of cavities integrated in a machine-type cryomodule. The cavity together with its helium tank had to be carefully designed in coherence with the innovative design of the cryomodule. New fabrication methods have also been explored. Five such niobium cavities and two copper cavities are in fabrication. The key design aspects are discussed, the results of the alternative fabrication methods presented and the stat...

  16. Double deflection system for an electron beam device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, N.W.; Crewe, A.V.

    1978-01-01

    A double deflection scanning system for electron beam instruments is provided embodying a means of correcting isotropic coma, and anisotropic coma aberrations induced by the magnetic lens of such an instrument. The scanning system deflects the beam prior to entry into the magnetic lens from the normal on-axis intersection of the beam with the lens according to predetermined formulas and thereby reduces the aberrations

  17. A Micromechanical RF Channelizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgul, Mehmet

    The power consumption of a radio generally goes as the number and strength of the RF signals it must process. In particular, a radio receiver would consume much less power if the signal presented to its electronics contained only the desired signal in a tiny percent bandwidth frequency channel, rather than the typical mix of signals containing unwanted energy outside the desired channel. Unfortunately, a lack of filters capable of selecting single channel bandwidths at RF forces the front-ends of contemporary receivers to accept unwanted signals, and thus, to operate with sub-optimal efficiency. This dissertation focuses on the degree to which capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical resonators can achieve the aforementioned RF channel-selecting filters. It aims to first show theoretically that with appropriate scaling capacitive-gap transducers are strong enough to meet the needed coupling requirements; and second, to fully detail an architecture and design procedure needed to realize said filters. Finally, this dissertation provides an actual experimentally demonstrated RF channel-select filter designed using the developed procedures and confirming theoretical predictions. Specifically, this dissertation introduces four methods that make possible the design and fabrication of RF channel-select filters. The first of these introduces a small-signal equivalent circuit for parallel-plate capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical resonators that employs negative capacitance to model the dependence of resonance frequency on electrical stiffness in a way that facilitates the analysis of micromechanical circuits loaded with arbitrary electrical impedances. The new circuit model not only correctly predicts the dependence of electrical stiffness on the impedances loading the input and output electrodes of parallel-plate capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical device, but does so in a visually intuitive way that identifies current drive as most appropriate for

  18. Implications of resin-based composite (RBC) restoration on cuspal deflection and microleakage score in molar teeth: Placement protocol and restorative material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Lauren E J; Politi, Ioanna; Al-Fodeh, Rami S; Fleming, Garry J P

    2017-09-01

    To assess the cuspal deflection of standardised large mesio-occluso-distal (MOD) cavities in third molar teeth restored using conventional resin-based composite (RBC) or their bulk fill restorative counterparts compared with the unbound condition using a twin channel deflection measuring gauge. Following thermocycling, the cervical microleakage of the restored teeth was assessed to determine marginal integrity. Standardised MOD cavities were prepared in forty-eight sound third molar teeth and randomly allocated to six groups. Restorations were placed in conjunction with (and without) a universal bonding system and resin restorative materials were irradiated with a light-emitting-diode light-curing-unit. The dependent variable was the restoration protocol, eight oblique increments for conventional RBCs or two horizontal increments for the bulk fill resin restoratives. The cumulative buccal and palatal cuspal deflections from a twin channel deflection measuring gauge were summed, the restored teeth thermally fatigued, immersed in 0.2% basic fuchsin dye for 24h, sectioned and examined for cervical microleakage score. The one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) identified third molar teeth restored using conventional RBC materials had significantly higher mean total cuspal deflection values compared with bulk fill resin restorative restoration (all prestored teeth had significantly the lowest microleakage scores compared with Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill (bonded and non-bonded) teeth (all prestoratives behave in a similar manner when used to restore standardised MOD cavities in third molar teeth. It would appear that light irradiation of individual conventional RBCs or bulk fill resin restoratives may be problematic such that material selection is vital in the absence of clinical data. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Post mitigation impact risk analysis for asteroid deflection demonstration missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggl, Siegfried; Hestroffer, Daniel; Thuillot, William; Bancelin, David; Cano, Juan L.; Cichocki, Filippo

    2015-08-01

    Even though mankind believes to have the capabilities to avert potentially disastrous asteroid impacts, only the realization of mitigation demonstration missions can validate this claim. Such a deflection demonstration attempt has to be cost effective, easy to validate, and safe in the sense that harmless asteroids must not be turned into potentially hazardous objects. Uncertainties in an asteroid's orbital and physical parameters as well as those additionally introduced during a mitigation attempt necessitate an in depth analysis of deflection mission designs in order to dispel planetary safety concerns. We present a post mitigation impact risk analysis of a list of potential kinetic impactor based deflection demonstration missions proposed in the framework of the NEOShield project. Our results confirm that mitigation induced uncertainties have a significant influence on the deflection outcome. Those cannot be neglected in post deflection impact risk studies. We show, furthermore, that deflection missions have to be assessed on an individual basis in order to ensure that asteroids are not inadvertently transported closer to the Earth at a later date. Finally, we present viable targets and mission designs for a kinetic impactor test to be launched between the years 2025 and 2032.

  20. Observing Bridge Dynamic Deflection in Green Time by Information Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chengxin; Zhang, Guojian; Zhao, Yongqian; Chen, Mingzhi

    2018-01-01

    As traditional surveying methods are limited to observe bridge dynamic deflection; information technology is adopted to observe bridge dynamic deflection in Green time. Information technology used in this study means that we use digital cameras to photograph the bridge in red time as a zero image. Then, a series of successive images are photographed in green time. Deformation point targets are identified and located by Hough transform. With reference to the control points, the deformation values of these deformation points are obtained by differencing the successive images with a zero image, respectively. Results show that the average measurement accuracies of C0 are 0.46 pixels, 0.51 pixels and 0.74 pixels in X, Z and comprehensive direction. The average measurement accuracies of C1 are 0.43 pixels, 0.43 pixels and 0.67 pixels in X, Z and comprehensive direction in these tests. The maximal bridge deflection is 44.16mm, which is less than 75mm (Bridge deflection tolerance value). Information technology in this paper can monitor bridge dynamic deflection and depict deflection trend curves of the bridge in real time. It can provide data support for the site decisions to the bridge structure safety.