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Sample records for definitive mineralogical analysis

  1. MINERALOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    20152310 Hao Penghao(National Defense Key Discipline Lab.of Nuclear Waste and Environmental Safety,Southwest University of Science and Technology,Mianyang 621010,China);Lu Xirui Structural Evolvement and the Capability of Resistance toγ-Ray Irradiation on Zircon Originated from the North Qaidam(Journal of Mineralogy and Petrology,

  2. MINERALOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    <正>20130742 Huang Dubin (School of Geoscience and Surveying Engineering , China University of Mining and Technology , Beijing 100083 , China); Guan Xinbang Study on the Minera-logical Features of Chloritoid in Hongmiaoling Formation of Dongshan , Tanzhesi , West Beijing , China (Acta Mineralogica Sinica , ISSN1000-4734 , CN52-1045/P

  3. MINERALOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>20112225Du Guangpeng(Shanghai Jianqiao College,Shanghai 201319,China);Fan Jianliang Characteristics of Raman Spectral of Calcite Group Minerals(Journal of Mineralogy and Petrology,ISSN1001 - 6872, CN51-1143/TD,30(4),2010,p.32-35, 2illus.,2tables,6refs.)

  4. MINERALOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>20080144 Ma Guohua(Southwest University of Science and Technology,Mianyang 621002,China);Peng Tongjiang A Study of Chrysotile Asbestos Nanotube Synthesized by Hydrothermal Reaction(Journal of Mineralogy and Petrology,ISSN1001-6872,CN51-1143/TD,27(1),2007,p.40-45,2 illus.,2 photos,11 refs.)

  5. Combined mineralogical and EXAFS characterization of polluted sediments for the definition of technological variables and constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigatti, M. F.; Elmi, C.; Laurora, A.; Malferrari, D.; Medici, L.

    2009-04-01

    An extremely severe aspect, both from environmental and economic viewpoint, is the management of polluted sediments removed from drainage and irrigation canals. Canals, in order to retain their functionality over the time, need to have their beds, periodically cleaned from sediments there accumulating. The management of removed sediments is extremely demanding, also from an economical perspective, if these latter needs to be treated as dangerous waste materials, as stated in numerous international standards. Furthermore the disposal of such a large amount of material may introduce a significant environmental impact as well. An appealing alternative is the recovery or reuse of these materials, for example in brick and tile industry, after obviously the application of appropriate techniques and protocols that could render these latter no longer a threat for human health. The assessment of the effective potential danger for human health and ecosystem of sediments before and after treatment obviously requires both a careful chemical and mineralogical characterization and, even if not always considered in the international standards, the definition of the coordination shell of heavy metals dangerous for human health, as a function of their oxidation state and coordination (e.g. Cr and Pb), and introducing technological constraints or affecting the features of the end products. Fe is a good representative for this second category, as the features of the end product, such as color, strongly depend not only from Fe concentration but also from its oxidation state, speciation and coordination. This work will first of all provide mineralogical characterization of sediments from various sampling points of irrigation and drainage canals of Po river region in the north-eastern of Italy. Samples were investigated with various approaches including X-ray powder diffraction under non-ambient conditions, thermal analysis and EXAFS spectroscopy. Obtained results, and in particular

  6. Polishing surgical metal pieces, granulomatosis and mineralogical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catinon, Mickaël; Chemarin, C; Roux, E; Cavalin, C; Rosental, P-A; Thivolet-Bejui, F; Vincent, M

    2016-08-01

    This report describes the case of a 44-year-old man with pulmonary nodules whose histological analysis initially suggested tuberculosis. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MT) culture was negative and a questionnaire revealed a professional activity of brushing and polishing surgical instruments without any protection for 7 years.  A mineralogical analysis by optical and electron microscopy was performed on both a healthy lung tissue biopsy and a lung nodule in a paraffin block. Electron microscopy analysis revealed the presence of metal particles (iron oxide, titanium oxide, aluminum oxide and steel) in both samples. This study suggests that mineralogical analysis combined with a questionnaire on dust exposure could help redirect the diagnosis of a dust-related disease.

  7. THEMIS analysis of Olympus Mons' mineralogical makeup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, N. D.

    2016-12-01

    Olympus Mons is the largest shield volcano in our known solar system. In previous studies, the composition of the basaltic lava flows on Olympus Mons was shown to be similar to the composition of those lava flows of Earth's shield volcanoes. It has been suggested that basalt located near volcanoes contained bacteria living below the surface of the Earth. In this pilot study, the effect of Olympus Mons' aspect (i.e. north- vs. south-facing slope) on its mineral composition was examined. Imagery from Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), onboard the 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft, were used because Olympus Mons' size and surface roughness hinder rover exploration. After removing transmission errors and performing an atmospheric correction, the THEMIS images were ready to be analyzed via a mineral spectral library. Using Arizona State University's Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) derived mineral spectral library, the images were classified in ENVI. These classifications were verified using ASU's GIS tool, Java Mission-planning and Analysis for Remote Sensing (JMARS) and TES. Results show a significant amount of silicates located throughout the sampled areas of Olympus Mons. The results also show differences in the mineral composition and in the geological features on Olympus Mons' surface. The minerals vanadinite and halloysite were shown to be prevalent on the sampled southern portions of Olympus Mons, but were sparse on the sampled northern portions. Previous studies suggested that the mineral ilmenite, which this study found in high concentrations on the sampled northern portions of Olympus Mons, might serve as a food source for iron-oxidizing and iron-scavenging bacteria. Future research should focus on better understanding these concentrations on Olympus Mons to see if these minerals play a role in the potential bacterial presence on Olympus Mons.

  8. X-Ray Diffraction and Fluorescence Instrument for Mineralogical Analysis at the Lunar Surface Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop LUNA, a compact and lightweight X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) / X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) instrument for mineralogical analysis of regolith, rock...

  9. X-Ray Diffraction and Fluorescence Instrument for Mineralogical Analysis at the Lunar Surface Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a compact and lightweight X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) / X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) instrument for analysis of mineralogical composition of regolith,...

  10. Optimization and Quality Control of Automated Quantitative Mineralogy Analysis for Acid Rock Drainage Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Pooler

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Low ore-grade waste samples from the Codelco Andina mine that were analyzed in an environmental and mineralogical test program for acid rock drainage prediction, revealed inconsistencies between the quantitative mineralogical data (QEMSCAN® and the results of geochemical characterizations by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS, LECO® furnace, and sequential extractions. For the QEMSCAN® results, biases were observed in the proportions of pyrite and calcium sulfate minerals detected. An analysis of the results indicated that the problems observed were likely associated with polished section preparation. Therefore, six different sample preparation protocols were tested and evaluated using three samples from the previous study. One of the methods, which involved particle size reduction and transverse section preparation, was identified as having the greatest potential for correcting the errors observed in the mineralogical analyses. Further, the biases in the quantities of calcium sulfate minerals detected were reduced through the use of ethylene glycol as a polishing lubricant. It is recommended that the sample preparation methodology described in this study be used in order to accurately quantify percentages of pyrite and calcium sulfate minerals in environmental mineralogical studies which use automated mineralogical analysis.

  11. A Mexican kaolin deposit: XANES characterization, mineralogical phase analysis and applications

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez, A.; Garza, L. L.; L. M. Torres; Vázquez, F.; López, W.

    2009-01-01

    A kaolin obtained from Villa de Reyes, a region near to San Luis Potosí (México) was characterized by means of X-ray powder diffraction (XRD, optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-Ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (XANES), thermal analysis (DTA/TGA), dilatometry (DIL), and chemical analysis. Mineralogical and morphological characteristics of the mineral are presented. The kaolin sample was formed mainly by kaolinite, but other minor phase...

  12. XRF Analysis of mineralogical matrix effects and differences between pulverized and fused ferromanganese slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VALENTINA ZIVANOVIC

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Determination and analysis is only as good as the sample preparation that preceded it. Even the most sophisticated analysis is worthless if it follows sloppy sampling and poor preparation. Whether one does plasma emission, infrared or X-ray fluorescence or another spectroscopic technique, it is essential to get reproducible and accurate analysis. This paper shows the effect of mineralogical matrix differences in quantitative measurements by XRF of the main elements (Al, Ca, Mg, Si, Mn and K as oxides of ferromanganese alloy slag. Fused and pulverized slag show a significant difference in XRF microstructure, micro heterogeneity and mineralogy although the results of measurements between pulverized and fused slag, expressed as a percentage of the main elements, is not different. Other analytical techniques such as ICP-OES and classical gravimetric and titrimetric were also used for checking the XRF calibration accuracy

  13. Mineralogical analysis of attic dust samples for contamination source identification in an industrial area, Ajka, Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Völgyesi, Péter; Jordan, Gyozo; Gosar, Mateja; Szabó, Csaba; Miler, Miloš; Kónya, Péter; Bartha, András

    2013-04-01

    The post-war centrally directed economy forced massive heavy industry in Hungary, producing huge amount of wastes and pollution. Long-term airborne emissions from mining, coal-fired power plants and alumina industry have left the legacy of widely distributed contamination around industrial areas and nearby settlements in the Ajka region. Recent research suggests that significant amount of airborne pollutants, deposited in the urban environment, can be efficiently studied by attic dust analysis. The sampling strategy followed a grid-based stratified random sampling design and 30 samples were collected in 27 houses (at least 30 years old) in a 8x8 grid of the 64 km2 project area. In order to determine the pollution potential of attic dust samples, geochemical and mineralogical analyses were performed. The main aim of the mineralogical analyses was to study the phase composition of the dust particles and to identify potential anthropogenic sources. The total concentrations of the toxic elements (As, Pb, Cd, Cu, Ni and Zn) were measured with ICP-OES and mercury content was analyzed with atomic absorption spectrometry. Phase analyses of the samples were carried out by the means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-Ray diffraction (XRD) methods. Laser particle size analyzer was used to measure the grain size of attic dust particles. Results showed that the studied attic dust in the Ajka urban area was contaminated mostly by Hg, Pb and Zn with contents ranging between 0.1-2 ppm, 42.5-881 ppm and 90.2-954 ppm, respectively. However, the study of extreme data values (statistical outliers) has shown that at certain points airborne dust can be extremely contaminated also with Cd (0.4-11.7 ppm). The size of the attic dust particles varied between 0.2 and 113 µm. Based on the SEM/EDS and XRD analysis, the most frequently identified mineralogical phases were quartz, calcite, gypsum and Fe- and Al-bearing phases. Fe

  14. An x-ray diffraction method for semiquantitative mineralogical analysis of chilean nitrate ore

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, C.; George, J.; Ericksen, E.

    1997-01-01

    Computer analysis of X-ray diffraction (XRD) data provides a simple method for determining the semiquantitative mineralogical composition of naturally occurring mixtures of saline minerals. The method herein described was adapted from a computer program for the study of mixtures of naturally occurring clay minerals. The program evaluates the relative intensities of selected diagnostic peaks for the minerals in a given mixture, and then calculates the relative concentrations of these minerals. The method requires precise calibration of XRD data for the minerals to be studied and selection of diffraction peaks that minimize inter-compound interferences. The calculated relative abundances are sufficiently accurate for direct comparison with bulk chemical analyses of naturally occurring saline mineral assemblages.

  15. Spectral analysis for the mineralogical characterization of planosols in NE Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Diego; Souza, Deorgia; Rocha, Washington

    2016-04-01

    This paper aims to conduct a spectral characterization in two soil profiles located in the northeast of Brazil proposing relations between the pedogenetic evolution and the environmental settings generated from the characteristics of Planosols analyzed and the presence of minerals identified by spectral pattern obtained in a laboratory. The methodological procedures were divided into the characterization of the study area, theoretical framework, field work with sampling, sample preparation, measurement in the laboratory, processing of spectral data, analysis and interpretation of results and a vegetation index calculation for aid in the environmental characterization. It is possible to see that: i) both profiles have similar spectral characterized patterns; ii) the horizons A and E show higher reflectance compared with B and C; iii) Minerals 2: 1 and 1: 1, such as montmorillonite and kaolinite can be identified; iv) Planosols are fragile to erosion. In both profiles, the C horizon less weathered and B horizon iluvial show intense absorption bands at 1400nm, 1900nm and 2200nm. These absorption bands indicate the existence of mineralogy 2: 1 on the horizons of the soils analyzed. In both profiles were found small peaks absorption in 2265nm, corresponding to gibbsite. The occurrence of this type of mineral is more common in highly weathered soils or old surfaces of erosion, which is reflected in small intensities of absorption observed in this analysis since these are of little-weathered soils of the Brazilian semiarid region. Spectral analysis and morphology described in the two profiles show difficulties for the growth of vegetation, which is consistent with NDVI values found, ranging from -0.32 to 0.61with a predominance of 0.19. These factors lead to the intensification of erosion. Erosion is characterized as one of the main indicators of environmental degradation, causing loss of important elements of the soil, which creates consequently a reduction in fertility

  16. A Mexican kaolin deposit: XANES characterization, mineralogical phase analysis and applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Martínez, A; Garza, L. L; Torres, L. M; Vázquez, F; López, W

    2009-01-01

    .... Mineralogical and morphological characteristics of the mineral are presented. The kaolin sample was formed mainly by kaolinite, but other minor phases were also detected such as quartz, cristobalite, tridymite, and dolomite...

  17. Feasibility of ASD AgriSpec analysis to indicate mineralogy of a potential shale gas reservoir from west Lancashire, UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Claire; Hough, Edward; Kemp, Simon; Cave, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Mudrocks rich in organic matter present an attractive exploration target for unconventional gas and oil. The mid-Carboniferous (Visean - Bashkirian) Bowland Shale is developed in a series of fault-bound basins and is considered the principal accumulation of gas-prone shales in the UK. One risk with exploitation of shales is that the rocks may exhibit ductile behaviour and will not respond in an optimal way to hydraulic stimulation programmes. The brittle behaviour of the rock is strongly influenced by mineralogical composition. Approximately 15 m of core from the lower part of the Bowland Shale, has been used to test the feasibility of using Natural Infra-Red (NIR) Spectrometry to characterise the mineralogy of the shale, and compared to analysis using standard XRD techniques (both whole-rock and <2 micron) to confirm the mineralogical constituents of the rock. Clay mineralogy has been the main focus, as their presence within the shale may affect the 'frackability' of the shale. Clay minerals are also easily detected using NIR spectrometry as they display distinctive absorption features in the Short Wave Infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum. The benefits of using a handheld NIR spectrometer (AgriSpec) is that it provides a rapid, non-destructive and highly portable method for characterising clay mineralogy. This method may represent a simple solution to the initial characterisation of what are challenging rocks to characterise: thick accumulations (locally in excess of 3500 m) with few marker horizons to enable correlation between basins. Results demonstrate that clay minerals such as dickite, kaolinite and smectite (as well as other characteristic minerals such as siderite; calcite and gypsum) can be identified within the Bowland Shale using this technique.

  18. Mineralogical analysis of dust collected from typical recycling line of waste printed circuit boards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fangfang; Zhao, Yuemin; Zhang, Tao; Duan, Chenlong; Wang, Lizhang

    2015-09-01

    As dust is one of the byproducts originating in the mechanical recycling process of waste printed circuit boards such as crushing and separating, from the viewpoints of resource reuse and environmental protection, an effective recycling method to recover valuable materials from this kind of dust is in urgent need. In this paper, detailed mineralogical analysis on the dust collected from a typical recycling line of waste printed circuit boards is investigated by coupling several analytical techniques. The results demonstrate that there are 73.1wt.% organic matters, 4.65wt.% Al, 4.55wt.% Fe, 2.67wt.% Cu and 1.06wt.% Pb in the dust, which reveals the dust is worthy of reuse and harmful to environment. The concentration ratios of Fe, Mn and Zn can reach 12.35, 12.33 and 6.67 respectively by magnetic separation. The yield of dust in each size fraction is nonuniform, while the yield of -0.75mm size fraction is up to 51.15wt.%; as the particle size decreases, the content of liberated metals and magnetic materials increase, and metals are mainly in elemental forms. The F, Cl and Br elements combing to C in the dust would make thermal treatment dangerous to the environment. Based on these results, a flowsheet to recycle the dust is proposed.

  19. Quantitative Mineralogical Analysis of Mars Analogues Using CHEMIN Data and Rietveld Refinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bish, D. L.; Sarrazin, P.; Chipera, S. J.; Vaniman, D. T.; Blake, D.

    2004-01-01

    Mineralogical analysis is a critical component of planetary surface exploration. Chemical data alone leave serious gaps in our understanding of the surfaces of planets where complex minerals may form in combination with H, S, and halogens. On such planets (e.g., Mars) a single chemical composition may represent a range of mineral assemblages. For example, Viking chemical analyses of excavated duricrust indicate that Mg and S are correlated and 10% MgSO4 (anhydrous weight) is a likely cementing agent. Pathfinder chemical data support a similar abundance of MgSO4 in the most altered materials. However, there are many possible Mg-sulfates with widely varying hydration states (including dehydrated and 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, 5-, 6-, and 7-hydrates). In addition, other sulfate minerals such as gypsum (CaSO4 .2H2O) and other salts containing Cl may also exist. X-ray diffraction (XRD) has the ability to decipher mixtures of these phases that would be difficult, if not impossible to unravel using only chemical or spectral data.

  20. Mineralogy in Geotechnical Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Namdar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The several investigations on soils by different researchers have been executed, but research on soil mechanical propertiesbased on mineralogy is very meager, in this regard the author intention is employee of natural minerals for evaluation of soilcohesion, it may leads to developments of a soil with appropriates characteristics in permeability, transmitting load, resistingagainst deformation and settlement. This paper deals with analysis of soil cohesion based on mineralogy. The result revealedcohesion of a plastic soil could be improve by mineral presented in an non plastic soil, and also carbonate has negative affecton soil cohesion and some other soil minerals also have same affect on cohesion that required to be more investigate.

  1. Mobile Geochemistry Instrument Package Facility (MGIPF) for In Situ Mineralogical and Chemical Analysis of Planetary Surface Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingelhöfer, G.; Romstedt, J.; Henkel, H.; Michaelis, H.; Brückner, J.; D'Uston, C.

    A first order requirement for any spacecraft mission to land on a solid planetary or moon surface is instrumentation for in-situ mineralogical and chemical analysis 2 Such analysis provide data needed for primary classification and characterization of surface materials present We will discuss a mobile instrument package we have developed for in-situ investigations under harsh environmental conditions like on Mercury or Mars This Geochemistry Instrument Package Facility is a compact box also called payload cab containing three small advanced geochemistry mineralogy instruments the chemical spectrometer APXS the mineralogical M o ssbauer spectrometer MIMOS II 3 and a textural imager close-up camera The payload cab is equipped with two actuating arms with two degrees of freedom permitting precision placement of all instruments at a chosen sample This payload cab is the central part of the small rover Nanokhod which has the size of a shoebox 1 The Nanokhod rover is a tethered system with a typical operational range of sim 100 m Of course the payload cab itself can be attached by means of its arms to any deployment device of any other rover or deployment device 1 Andre Schiele Jens Romstedt Chris Lee Sabine Klinkner Rudi Rieder Ralf Gellert G o star Klingelh o fer Bodo Bernhardt Harald Michaelis The new NANOKHOD Engineeering model for extreme cold environments 8th International symposium on Artificial Intelligence Robotics and Automation in Space 5 - 9 September 2005

  2. Process mineralogy IX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petruk, W.; Hagni, R.D.; Pignolet-Brandom, S.; Hausen, D.M. (eds.) (Canada Centre for Mineral and Energy Technology, Ottawa, ON (Canada))

    1990-01-01

    54 papers are presented under the headings: keynote address; process mineralogy applications to mineral processing; process mineralogy applications to gold; process mineralogy applications to pyrometallurgy and hydrometallurgy; process mineralogy applications to environment and health; and process mineralogy applications to synthetic materials. Subject and author indexes are provided. Three papers have been abstracted separately.

  3. The Evolution of Definitions for Nursing Informatics: A Critical Analysis and Revised Definition

    OpenAIRE

    Staggers, Nancy; Thompson, Cheryl Bagley

    2002-01-01

    Despite the fact that nursing informatics is entering its third decade as a specialty within nursing, many definitions still exist to describe the field. This paper offers a rationale for a definition for nursing informatics and a critical analysis of past definitions. An organizing framework of technology-oriented, conceptual, and role-oriented definitions is used to critique these definitions. Subsequently, a revised definition is proposed. This evolutionary definition integrates critical c...

  4. A study of ancient pottery by means of X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, multivariate statistics and mineralogical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papachristodoulou, Christina [Nuclear Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Ioannina, 451 10 Ioannina (Greece); Oikonomou, Artemios [Composite Materials Laboratory, Department of Materials' Science and Engineering, University of Ioannina, 451 10 Ioannina (Greece); Ioannides, Kostas [Nuclear Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Ioannina, 451 10 Ioannina (Greece); Gravani, Konstantina [Archaelogy Section, Department of History-Archaeology, University of Ioannina, 451 10 Ioannina (Greece)

    2006-07-28

    Energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy was used to determine the composition of 64 potsherds from the Hellenistic settlement of Orraon, in northwestern Greece. Data classification by principal components analysis revealed four distinct groups of pottery, pointing to different local production practices rather than different provenance. The interpretation of statistical grouping was corroborated by a complementary X-ray diffraction analysis. Compositional and mineralogical data, combined with archaeological and materials' science criteria, allowed addressing various aspects of pottery making, such as selection of raw clays, tempers and firing conditions.

  5. A study of ancient pottery by means of X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, multivariate statistics and mineralogical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papachristodoulou, Christina; Oikonomou, Artemios; Ioannides, Kostas; Gravani, Konstantina

    2006-07-28

    Energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy was used to determine the composition of 64 potsherds from the Hellenistic settlement of Orraon, in northwestern Greece. Data classification by principal components analysis revealed four distinct groups of pottery, pointing to different local production practices rather than different provenance. The interpretation of statistical grouping was corroborated by a complementary X-ray diffraction analysis. Compositional and mineralogical data, combined with archaeological and materials' science criteria, allowed addressing various aspects of pottery making, such as selection of raw clays, tempers and firing conditions.

  6. Miniature robotic sample analysis lab for planetary in situ mineralogy and microbiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruzelecky, Roman; Wong, Brian; Haddad, Emile; Jamroz, Wes; Cloutis, Edward; Strong, Kimberly; Ghafoor, Nadeem; Jessen, Sean

    The current Martian surface conditions are relatively inhospitable, with average diurnal temperature ranges from 170 K to 268 K, a low air pressure of about 7 to 10 mbar consisting mainly of CO2 and negligible ozone to moderate the UV portion of the incident solar radiation. The intense UV effectively sterilizes the surface, and in combination with the low air pressure, makes any unbound surface liquid water unstable. However, there is mounting evidence to support the notion that the near subsurface of Mars may differ dramatically from the uppermost surface. The Inukshuk landed Mars mission, as initially developed under a pre-Phase A study for the Canadian Space Agency, focuses on the search for hydrated mineralogy and subsurface water sites that can provide evidence of past or present life. The mission will be achieved using a miniature suite of complementary spectral instruments operating in collaboration with a robotic tethered mole drill system for the systematic in situ subsurface exploration of the planetary mineralogy, water content and microbiology. The Inukshuk mission will, for the first time, study variations in the Mars subsurface characteristics and composition in detail at different locations. These will be correlated with the current planetary boundary layer conditions using an elevating Skycam platform and surface stand-off measurement capabilities. The subsurface analysis will be provided using a miniature bore-hole probe integrated within the mole driller and interfaced to the rover-based instrument suite using an IR fiber-optic link. This will allow subsurface mapping of the stratigraphy and composition in steps of a few mm to depths beyond 1 m. During the drilling, the bore-hole probe will be shielded using a wiper/shutter system. The in situ bore-hole analysis has an advantage for detecting biomarkers for astrobiology on Mars in that the alteration of the sample by surface radiation can be minimized. The bore-hole sample analysis will employ

  7. The CheMin Mineralogy Instrument on Mars Science Laboratory: Analysis of Clays and Sulfates at Gale Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, D. F.; CheMin Science Team

    2011-12-01

    A principal goal of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover is to identify and characterize present or past habitable environments on Mars. Mineralogy is important in this regard because minerals are thermodynamic phases, stable under specific (and known) conditions of temperature, pressure and composition. By determining the mineralogical composition of a rock or soil, one can often deduce the conditions under which it formed or its subsequent diagenetic or metamorphic history. The CheMin instrument on MSL will return accurate mineral determinations and quantitative mineralogical information from scooped soil samples and drilled rock powders collected at Gale crater during Curiosity's 1-Mars-year nominal mission. Individual analyses will require several hours over one or more Mars sols. For typical well-ordered minerals, CheMin will have a Minimum Detection Limit (MDL) of 4X MDL (12%). The resolution of the diffraction patterns is 0.3° 2θ. This performance is sufficient to allow for the detection and quantification of virtually all minerals. Orbital imagery and analysis of reflectance spectra from Gale Crater reveal a wealth of mineralogical and morphological features suggestive of ancient habitable environments and water. CheMin is quite capable of discriminating and quantifying the clay and sulfate mineralogies expected within the landing ellipse and in the strata of the central mound, the primary target at Gale. Both polyhydrated and monohydrated (kieserite) sulfate minerals are distributed in mappable strata at Gale. Virtually all hydrated and nonhydrated sulfates are uniquely identifiable and quantifiable with CheMin. Breadboard and commercial equivalents of the CheMin instrument have already been used extensively in evaporite field localities ranging from Death Valley to Antarctica and Spitsbergen; at all these sites the identification and characterization of sulfate, carbonate, and halide mineralogy has been comparable to that of laboratory

  8. Mineralogical Analysis of the Oppia Quadrangle of Asteroid (4) Vesta: Evidence for Occurrence of Moderate-Reflectance Hydrated Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, F.; Frigeri, A.; Combe, J.-Ph.; Zambon, F.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Ammannito, E.; Longobardo, A.; Hoffmann, M.; Nathues, A.; Garry, W. B.; Blewett, D. T.; Pieters, C. M.; Palomba, E.; Stephan, K.; McFadden, L. A.; McSween, H. Y.; Russell, C. T.; Raymond, C. A.

    2015-01-01

    Quadrangle Av-10 'Oppia' is one of five quadrangles that cover the equatorial region of asteroid (4) Vesta. This quadrangle is notable for the broad, spectrally distinct ejecta that extend south of the Oppia crater. These ejecta exhibit the steepest ('reddest') visible spectral slope observed across the asteroid and have distinct color properties as seen in multispectral composite images. Compared to previous works that focused on the composition and nature of unusual ('orange') ejecta found on Vesta, here we take into account a broader area that includes several features of interest, with an emphasis on mineralogy as inferred from data obtained by Dawn's Visible InfraRed mapping spectrometer (VIR). Our analysis shows that the older northern and northeastern part of Av-10 is dominated by howardite-like material, while the younger southwestern part, including Oppia and its ejecta blanket, has a markedly eucritic mineralogy. The association of the mineralogical information with the geologic and topographic contexts allows for the establishment of relationships between the age of the main formations observed in this quadrangle and their composition. A major point of interest in the Oppia quadrangle is the spectral signature of hydrous material seen at the local scale. This material can be mapped by using high-resolution VIR data, combined with multispectral image products from the Dawn Framing Camera (FC) so as to enable a clear correlation with specific geologic features. Hydrated mineral phases studied previously on Vesta generally correlate with low-albedo material delivered by carbonaceous asteroids. However, our analysis shows that the strongest OH signature in Av-10 is found in a unit west of Oppia, previously mapped as 'light mantle material' and showing moderate reflectance and a red visible slope. With the available data we cannot yet assess the presence of water in this material. However, we offer a possible explanation for its origin.

  9. A Mexican kaolin deposit: XANES characterization, mineralogical phase analysis and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez, A.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A kaolin obtained from Villa de Reyes, a region near to San Luis Potosí (México was characterized by means of X-ray powder diffraction (XRD, optical microscopy (OM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray fluorescence (XRF, X-Ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (XANES, thermal analysis (DTA/TGA, dilatometry (DIL, and chemical analysis. Mineralogical and morphological characteristics of the mineral are presented. The kaolin sample was formed mainly by kaolinite, but other minor phases were also detected such as quartz, cristobalite, tridymite, and dolomite. The high content of volcanic glass detected, by optical microscopy, revealed an incomplete kaolinization process of the raw material. The reddish color of the kaolin was associated with the free iron content in the form of limonite [FeO(OH], which was determined by XANES. The influence of the particle size on the whiteness of kaolin was evaluated. Dilatometric analysis revealed a strong thermal expansion between 110 y 240 °C, which would difficult the use of this material in traditional ceramic applications. On the other hand the presence of glass and high temperature phases of SiO2, such as cristobalite and tridymite will favor its use in the cement industry.El caolín obtenido de Villa de Reyes, una región cercana a San Luis Potosí, México, fue caracterizado por las siguientes técnicas: difracción de rayos-X en polvos (DRX, microscopía óptica (MO, microscopía electrónica de barrido (MEB, fluorescencia de rayos-X (FRX, espectroscopía de absorción de rayos-X (XANES, análisis térmico (DTA/TGA, dilatometría (DIL y análisis químico. Los resultados del análisis mineralógico mediante DRX mostraron un mineral constituido principalmente de caolinita, con una contribución minoritaria de cuarzo, cristobalita, tridimita y dolomita. El análisis por microscopía óptica reveló un alto contenido de material amorfo volcánico, indicando una caolinización incompleta del material v

  10. In Situ Mineralogical Analysis of Planetary Materials Using X-Ray Diffraction and X-Ray Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrazin, P.; Blake, D.; Vaniman, D.; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Remote observations of Mars have led scientists to believe that its early climate was similar to that of the early Earth, having had abundant liquid water and a dense atmosphere. One of the most fascinating questions of recent times is whether simple bacterial life developed on Mars (as it did on the Earth) during this early element period. Analyses of SNC meteorites have broadened considerably our knowledge of the chemistry of certain types of Martian rocks, underscoring the tantalizing possibility of early hydrothermal systems and even of ancient bacterial life. Detailed analyses of SNC meteorites in Terrestrial laboratories utilize the most sophisticated organic, isotopic and microscopic techniques in existence. Indeed; it is unlikely that the key biogenic indicators used in McKay et al (ibid) could be identified by a remote instrument on the surface of Mars. As a result, it is probable that any robotic search for evidence of an ancient Martian biosphere will have as its focus the identification of key minerals in likely host rocks rather than the direct detection of organic or isotopic biomarkers. Even on a sample return mission, mineralogical screening will be utilized to choose the most likely candidate rocks. X-ray diffraction (XRD) is the only technique that can provide a direct determination of the crystal structures of the phases present within a sample. When many different crystalline phases are present, quantitative analysis is better constrained if used in conjunction with a determination of elemental composition, obtainable by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) using the same X-ray source as for XRD. For planetary surface analysis, a remote instrument combining XRD and XRF could be used for mineralogical characterization of both soils and rocks. We are designing a remote XRD/XRF instrument with this objective in mind. The instrument concept pays specific attention to constraints in sample preparation, weight, volume, power, etc. Based on the geometry of a

  11. Depth Profiling of Dark and Light Green Bacan: Construction of Material Characters Models from Elemental Analysis and Mineralogical Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizky Arief Shobirin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We have demonstrated the evolutional depth profiling methods for local minerals of Bacan in order to establish the sold price and maintenance of minerals sector in Indonesia. The depth profiling methods was performed by elemental analysis and mineralogical characterisation using X-ray fluorescence (XRF and X-ray diffraction (XRD. We refined materials parameters then constructed the materials models to describe the difference of materials characters. These results described that the brighter Bacan minerals having higher distortion parameters that provided information of higher piezoelectricity, optical activity, and enantiomorphism characters, and the darker Bacan minerals having much higher foreign elements abundance, expanded atomic bond lengths, pseudo-symmetric, and larger crystallite size which reflects its crystal formation chronology.

  12. Low Hesperian PCO2 constrained from in situ mineralogical analysis at Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow, Thomas F.; Haberle, Robert M.; Blake, David F.; Des Marais, David J.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Fairén, Alberto G.; Grotzinger, John P.; Stack, Kathryn M.; Mischna, Michael A.; Rampe, Elizabeth B.; Siebach, Kirsten L.; Sutter, Brad; Vaniman, David T.; Vasavada, Ashwin R.

    2017-01-01

    Carbon dioxide is an essential atmospheric component in martian climate models that attempt to reconcile a faint young sun with planetwide evidence of liquid water in the Noachian and Early Hesperian. In this study, we use mineral and contextual sedimentary environmental data measured by the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Rover Curiosity to estimate the atmospheric partial pressure of CO2 (PCO2) coinciding with a long-lived lake system in Gale Crater at ∼3.5 Ga. A reaction–transport model that simulates mineralogy observed within the Sheepbed member at Yellowknife Bay (YKB), by coupling mineral equilibria with carbonate precipitation kinetics and rates of sedimentation, indicates atmospheric PCO2 levels in the 10s mbar range. At such low PCO2 levels, existing climate models are unable to warm Hesperian Mars anywhere near the freezing point of water, and other gases are required to raise atmospheric pressure to prevent lake waters from being lost to the atmosphere. Thus, either lacustrine features of Gale formed in a cold environment by a mechanism yet to be determined, or the climate models still lack an essential component that would serve to elevate surface temperatures, at least locally, on Hesperian Mars. Our results also impose restrictions on the potential role of atmospheric CO2 in inferred warmer conditions and valley network formation of the late Noachian. PMID:28167765

  13. Remote compositional analysis of lunar olivine-rich lithologies with Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacson, P.J.; Pieters, C.M.; Besse, S.; Clark, R.N.; Head, J.W.; Klima, R.L.; Mustard, J.F.; Petro, N.E.; Staid, M.I.; Sunshine, J.M.; Taylor, L.A.; Thaisen, K.G.; Tompkins, S.

    2011-01-01

    A systematic approach for deconvolving remotely sensed lunar olivine-rich visible to near-infrared (VNIR) reflectance spectra with the Modified Gaussian Model (MGM) is evaluated with Chandrayaan-1 Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M 3) spectra. Whereas earlier studies of laboratory reflectance spectra focused only on complications due to chromite inclusions in lunar olivines, we develop a systematic approach for addressing (through continuum removal) the prominent continuum slopes common to remotely sensed reflectance spectra of planetary surfaces. We have validated our continuum removal on a suite of laboratory reflectance spectra. Suites of olivine-dominated reflectance spectra from a small crater near Mare Moscoviense, the Copernicus central peak, Aristarchus, and the crater Marius in the Marius Hills were analyzed. Spectral diversity was detected in visual evaluation of the spectra and was quantified using the MGM. The MGM-derived band positions are used to estimate the olivine's composition in a relative sense. Spectra of olivines from Moscoviense exhibit diversity in their absorption features, and this diversity suggests some variation in olivine Fe/Mg content. Olivines from Copernicus are observed to be spectrally homogeneous and thus are predicted to be more compositionally homogeneous than those at Moscoviense but are of broadly similar composition to the Moscoviense olivines. Olivines from Aristarchus and Marius exhibit clear spectral differences from those at Moscoviense and Copernicus but also exhibit features that suggest contributions from other phases. If the various precautions discussed here are weighed carefully, the methods presented here can be used to make general predictions of absolute olivine composition (Fe/Mg content). Copyright ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  14. Evolved Gas Analysis and X-Ray Diffraction of Carbonate Samples from the 2009 Arctic Mars Analog Svalbard Expedition: Implications for Mineralogical Inferences from the Mars Science Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdam, A. C.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Blake, D. F.; Ming, D. W.; Franz, H. B.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Steele, A.

    2010-01-01

    The 2009 Arctic Mars Analog Svalbard Expedition (AMASE) investigated several geologic settings using methodologies and techniques being developed or considered for future Mars missions, such as the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), ExoMars, and Mars Sample Return (MSR). AMASE-related research comprises both analyses conducted during the expedition and further analyses of collected samples using laboratory facilities at a variety of institutions. The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite, which will be part of the Analytical Laboratory on MSL, consists of a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS), a gas chromatograph (GC), and a tunable laser spectrometer (TLS). An Evolved Gas Analysis Mass Spectrometer (EGA-MS) was used during AMASE to represent part of the capabilities of SAM. The other instrument included in the MSL Analytical Laboratory is CheMin, which uses X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) to perform quantitative mineralogical characterization of samples. Field-portable versions of CheMin were used during the AMASE 2009. Here, we discuss the preliminary interpretation of EGA and XRD analyses of selected AMASE carbonate samples and implications for mineralogical interpretations from MSL. Though CheMin will be the primary mineralogical tool on MSL, SAM EGA could be used to support XRD identifications or indicate the presence of volatile-bearing minerals which may be near or below XRD detection limits. Data collected with instruments in the field and in comparable laboratory setups (e.g., the SAM breadboard) will be discussed.

  15. Textural and Mineralogical Analysis of Volcanic Rocks by µ-XRF Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germinario, Luigi; Cossio, Roberto; Maritan, Lara; Borghi, Alessandro; Mazzoli, Claudio

    2016-06-01

    In this study, µ-XRF was applied as a novel surface technique for quick acquisition of elemental X-ray maps of rocks, image analysis of which provides quantitative information on texture and rock-forming minerals. Bench-top µ-XRF is cost-effective, fast, and non-destructive, can be applied to both large (up to a few tens of cm) and fragile samples, and yields major and trace element analysis with good sensitivity. Here, X-ray mapping was performed with a resolution of 103.5 µm and spot size of 30 µm over sample areas of about 5×4 cm of Euganean trachyte, a volcanic porphyritic rock from the Euganean Hills (NE Italy) traditionally used in cultural heritage. The relative abundance of phenocrysts and groundmass, as well as the size and shape of the various mineral phases, were obtained from image analysis of the elemental maps. The quantified petrographic features allowed identification of various extraction sites, revealing an objective method for archaeometric provenance studies exploiting µ-XRF imaging.

  16. Introduction to Mineralogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knittle, Elise

    A course in mineralogy is a rite of passage for most undergraduate Earth sciences majors. As fluency with minerals is so basic for deciphering a range of geologic processes, many Earth scientists can recall long hours in the lab memorizing mineral samples, their chemical formulae and crystal systems, and perhaps staring through a petrographic microscope wondering, what exactly is 2V? In this venerable field with so many classic textbooks, one might ask why another mineralogy text is warranted.Introduction to Mineralogy is organized in a traditional way, with Part I covering the topics of symmetry, crystallography, crystal chemistry and structure, and crystal growth. Part II covers physical properties of minerals and methods for studying mineral structures and chemistry (including optical mineralogy and x-ray diffraction), and Part III presents the systematic mineralogy of all of the mineral groups.

  17. The use of SEM/EDS method in mineralogical analysis of ordinary chondritic meteorite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breda Mirtič

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersiveX-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS for determination of mineral phases according to their stoichiometry and assessment of mineral composition of ordinary chondritic meteorite. For the purposes of this study, H3 type ordinary chondritic meteorite Abbott was selected. SEM/EDS allows identification and characterisation of mineralphases, whose size is below the resolution of an optical microscope. Mineral phases in chondrules and interstitial matrix were located in backscattered electron (BSE mode and were assessed from atomic proportions of constituent elements, obtained by the EDS analysis. SEM/EDS analyses of mineral phases showed that Abbott meteorite is characterised by Fe-rich (Fe, Ni-alloy kamacite, Fe-sulphide troilite or pyrrhotite, chromite, Mg-rich olivine, orthopyroxene bronzite or hypersthene, clinopyroxene Al-diopside, acid plagioclase oligoclase, accessory mineral chlorapatite and secondary minerals Fe-hydroxides (goethite or lepidocrocite. Results of semi-quantitative analyses confirmed that most of analysed mineralphases conform well to stoichiometric minerals with minor deviations of oxygen from stoichiometric proportions. Comparison between mineral phases in chondrules and interstitial matrix was also performed, however it showed no significant differences in elemental composition.Differences in chemical composition between minerals in interstitial matrix and chondrules are sometimes too small to be discernedby the SEM/EDS, therefore knowledge of SEM/EDS capabilities is important for correct interpretation of chondrite formation.

  18. Lunar Sinuous Rilles: Analysis of Morphology, Topography, and Mineralogy, and Implications for a Thermal Erosion Origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, D. M.; Head, J. W.; Wilson, L.

    2009-12-01

    erosion as an origin for sinuous rilles and to distinguish between those features associated with thermal erosion and those formed by other processes. Our initial studies have focused on Rima Hadley and Rima Prinz and also include sinuous rilles observed on the Aristarchus Plateau and in other lunar regions. Topographic profiles were collected for Rima Hadley and Rima Prinz using high resolution Apollo orthotopographic maps (1:50,000). Hadley Rille is characterized by a v-shaped channel <1.5 km wide and ~300 m deep, and the channel has smooth, rimless edges and an uphill slope of 2.7 m/km. Rima Prinz is characterized by a u-shaped channel <2 km wide and 150 m deep, and the channel also has smooth, rimless edges and a downward slope of 5.7 m/km. The rimless margins of these sinuous rilles support a thermally erosive origin, though further analysis of these characteristics will better constrain interpretations of the origin of sinuous rilles. References: [1] Hulme, G., 1973, Mod. Geol., 4, 107-117 [2] Carr, M. H., 1974, Icarus, 22, 1-23 [3] Williams, D. A., et al., 2000, JGR, 105, 20,189-20,205 [4] Head, J. W. and Wilson, L., 1980, 11th LPSC, 426-427 [5] Wilson, L. and Head, J. W., 1980, 11th LPSC, 1260-1262.

  19. Natural weathering in dry disposed ash dump: Insight from chemical, mineralogical and geochemical analysis of fresh and unsaturated drilled cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinyemi, S A; Akinlua, A; Gitari, W M; Khuse, N; Eze, P; Akinyeye, R O; Petrik, L F

    2012-07-15

    Some existing alternative applications of coal fly ash such as cement manufacturing; road construction; landfill; and concrete and waste stabilisation use fresh ash directly collected from coal-fired power generating stations. Thus, if the rate of usage continues, the demand for fresh ash for various applications will exceed supply and use of weathered dry disposed ash will become necessary alternative. As a result it's imperative to understand the chemistry and pH behaviour of some metals inherent in dry disposed fly ash. The bulk chemical composition as determined by XRF analysis showed that SiO2, Al2O3 and Fe2O3 were the major oxides in fresh ash and unsaturated weathered ashes. The unsaturated weathered ashes are relatively depleted in CaO, Fe2O3, TiO2, SiO2, Na2O and P2O5 due to dissolution and hydrolysis caused by chemical interaction with ingressing CO2 from the atmosphere and infiltrating rain water. Observed accumulations of Fe2O3, TiO2, CaO, K2O, Na2O and SO3 and Zn, Zr, Sr, Pb, Ni, Cr and Co in the lower layers indicate progressive downward movement through the ash dump though at a slow rate. The bulk mineralogy of unsaturated weathered dry disposed ash, as determined by XRD analysis, revealed quartz and mullite as the major crystalline phases; while anorthite, hematite, enstatite, lime, calcite, and mica were present as minor mineral phases. Pore water chemistry revealed a low concentration of readily soluble metals in unsaturated weathered ashes in comparison with fresh ash, which shows high leachability. This suggests that over time the precipitation of transient minor secondary mineral phases; such as calcite and mica might retard residual metal release from unsaturated weathered ash. Chloride and sulphate species of the water soluble extracts of weathered ash are at equilibrium with Na+ and K+; these demonstrate progressive leaching over time and become supersaturated at the base of unsaturated weathered ash. This suggests that the ash dump does not

  20. General Meta-Models to Analysis of Software Architecture Definitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GholamAli Nejad HajAli Irani

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available An important step for understanding the architecture will be obtained by providing a clear definition from that. More than 150 valid definitions presented for identifying the software architecture. So an analogy among them is needed to give us a better understanding on the existing definitions. In this paper an analysis over different issues of current definitions is provided based on the incorporated elements. In conjunction with this objective first, the definitions are collected and, after conducting an analysis over them, are broken into different constituent elements which are shown in one table. Then some selected parameters in the table are classified into groups for comparison purposes. Then all parameters of each individual group are specified and compared with each other. This procedure is rendered for all groups respectively. Finally, a meta-model is developed for each group. The aim is not to accept or reject a specific definition, but rather is to contrast the definitions and their respective constituent elements in order to construct a background for gaining better perceptions on software architecture which in turn can benefit the introduction of an appropriate definition.

  1. Mineralogical and Geochemical Analysis of Howardite DaG 779: understanding geological evolution of asteroid (4) Vesta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcel Müller, Christian; Mengel, Kurt; Singh Thangjam, Guneshwar; Weckwerth, Gerd

    2016-04-01

    The HED meteorites, a clan of stony achondrites, are believed to originate from asteroid (4) Vesta (e.g. Mittlefehldt et al. (2015)). Recent evolution models (e.g. Toplis et al. (2013)) and observations from Dawn spacecraft data (e.g., Prettyman et al. (2013)) indicate that diogenites form the lower crust and uppermost mantle of (4) Vesta. Deep seated material excavated by large impacts such as the Rheasilvia- and Veneneiaforming event should be present in howardites. We analysed a slice of howardite DaG 779 which had been recovered from the Libyan Desert in 1999 and was briefly described by Grossmann (2000). The data presented here include electron microprobe, bulk-rock XRD and XRF as well as trace element analysis by ICP-MS and INA. The petrographic results confirm earlier observations that DaG 779 is polymict and mainly contains diogenite and eucrite clasts. Mass balance calculations using bulk-rock and microprobe major element data reveal a modal mineralogy of 77% orthopyroxene, 8% plagioclase, 7% clinopyroxene and 2% spinels, the rest being olivine, SiO2-phases, sulphides, and native Fe(Ni). When compared with the element compilation recently reported by Mittlefehldt (2015) the 39 trace element analysed here (including REE and PGE) confirm that this howardite is clearly dominated by diogenite. Beside the modal petrographic information, a number of more detailed observations obtained from microprobe investigations reveal fresh and recrystallized glasses, troilite-orthopyroxene symplectites from a mixed silicate-sulphide melt giving rise to graphic intergrowths as well as vermicular and reticular FeS in highly disrupted clasts. While the origin of the FeS in these clasts is not clear yet, its particular shape and distribution indicates that this mineral has been (partially) molten and recrystallized from a sulphide melt. The silicate minerals around these FeS occurrences are recrystallized but there is no indication for a partial silicate melt. Further

  2. XRD and mineralogical analysis of gypsum dunes at White Sands National Monument, New Mexico and applications to gypsum detection on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafuente, B.; Bishop, J. L.; Fenton, L. K.; King, S. J.; Blake, D.; Sarrazin, P.; Downs, R.; Horgan, B. H.

    2013-12-01

    A field portable X-ray Diffraction (XRD) instrument was used at White Sands National Monument to perform in-situ measurements followed by laboratory analyses of the gypsum-rich dunes and to determine its modal mineralogy. The field instrument is a Terra XRD (Olympus NDT) based on the technology of the CheMin (Chemistry and Mineralogy) instrument onboard the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover Curiosity which is providing the mineralogical and chemical composition of scooped soil samples and drilled rock powders collected at Gale Crater [1]. Using Terra at White Sands will contribute to 'ground truth' for gypsum-bearing environments on Mars. Together with data provided by VNIR spectra [2], this study clarifies our understanding of the origin and history of gypsum-rich sand dunes discovered near the northern polar region of Mars [3]. The results obtained from the field analyses performed by XRD and VNIR spectroscopy in four dunes at White Sands revealed the presence of quartz and dolomite. Their relative abundance has been estimated using the Reference Intensity Ratio (RIR) method. For this study, particulate samples of pure natural gypsum, quartz and dolomite were used to prepare calibration mixtures of gypsum-quartz and gypsum-dolomite with the 90-150μm size fractions. All single phases and mixtures were analyzed by XRD and RIR factors were calculated. Using this method, the relative abundance of quartz and dolomite has been estimated from the data collected in the field. Quartz appears to be present in low amounts (2-5 wt.%) while dolomite is present at percentages up to 80 wt.%. Samples from four dunes were collected and prepared for subsequent XRD analysis in the lab to estimate their composition and illustrate the changes in mineralogy with respect to location and grain size. Gypsum-dolomite mixtures: The dolomite XRD pattern is dominated by an intense diffraction peak at 2θ≈36 deg. which overlaps a peak of gypsum, This makes low concentrations of dolomite

  3. In situ mineralogical-chemical analysis of Martian materials at landing/roving sites by active and passive remote sensing methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neukum, G.; Lehmann, F.; Regner, P.; Jaumann, R.

    1988-01-01

    Remote sensing of the Martian surface from the ground and from orbiting spacecraft has provided some first-order insight into the mineralogical-chemical composition and the weathering state of Martian surface materials. Much more detailed information can be gathered from performing such measurements in situ at the landing sites or from a rover in combination with analogous measurements from orbit. Measurements in the wavelength range of approximately 0.3 to 12.0 micrometers appear to be suitable to characterize much of the physical, mineralogical, petrological, and chemical properties of Martian surface materials and the weathering and other alteration processes that have acted on them. It is of particular importance to carry out measurements at the same time over a broad wavelength range since the reflectance signatures are caused by different effects and hence give different and complementing information. It appears particularly useful to employ a combination of active and passive methods because the use of active laser spectroscopy allows the obtaining of specific information on thermal infrared reflectance of surface materials. It seems to be evident that a spectrometric survey of Martian materials has to be focused on the analysis of altered and fresh mafic materials and rocks, water-bearing silicates, and possibly carbonates.

  4. The Mineralogy of Martian Dust: Design and Analysis Considerations for an X-Ray Diffraction/X-Ray Fluorescence (XRD/XRF) Instrument for Exobiological Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, David; Vaniman, David; Bish, David; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    A principal objective of Mars exploration is the search for evidence of past life which may have existed during an earlier clement period of Mars history. We would like to investigate the history of surface water activity (which is a requirement for all known forms of life) by identifying and documenting the distribution of minerals which require water for their formation or distribution. A knowledge of the mineralogy of the present Martian surface would help to identify areas which, due to the early activity of water, might have harbored ancient life. It would be desirable to establish the presence and characterize the distribution of hydrated minerals such as clays, and of minerals which are primarily of sedimentary origin such as carbonates, silica and evaporites. Mineralogy, which is more critical to exobiological exploration than is simple chemical analysis (absent the detection of organics), will remain unknown or will at best be imprecisely constrained unless a technique sensitive to mineral structure such as powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) is employed. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  5. Field Characterization of the Mineralogy and Organic Chemistry of Carbonates from the 2010 Arctic Mars Analog Svalbard Expedition by Evolved Gas Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdam, A. C.; Ten Kate, I. L.; Stern, J. C.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Blake, D. F.; Morris, R. V.; Steele, A.; Amundson, H. E. F.

    2011-01-01

    The 2010 Arctic Mars Analog Svalbard Expedition (AMASE) investigated two geologic settings using methodologies and techniques being developed or considered for future Mars missions, such as the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), ExoMars, and Mars Sample Return. The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) [1] instrument suite, which will be on MSL, consists of a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS), a gas chromatograph (GC), and a tunable laser mass spectrometer (TLS); all will be applied to analyze gases created by pyrolysis of samples. During AMASE, a Hiden Evolved Gas Analysis-Mass Spectrometer (EGA-MS) system represented the EGA-MS capability of SAM. Another MSL instrument, CheMin, will use x-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray fluorescence (XRF) to perform quantitative mineralogical characterization of samples [e.g., 2]. Field-portable versions of CheMin were used during AMASE. AMASE 2010 focused on two sites that represented biotic and abiotic analogs. The abiotic site was the basaltic Sigurdfjell vent complex, which contains Mars-analog carbonate cements including carbonate globules which are excellent analogs for the globules in the ALH84001 martian meteorite [e.g., 3, 4]. The biotic site was the Knorringfjell fossil methane seep, which featured carbonates precipitated in a methane-supported chemosynthetic community [5]. This contribution focuses on EGA-MS analyses of samples from each site, with mineralogy comparisons to CheMin team results. The results give insight into organic content and organic-mineral associations, as well as some constraints on the minerals present.

  6. Environmental Mineralogical Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@Basic properties, including surface absorption, porous filtration, ion exchange, heat effect and chemical solubility of environmental mineralogical materials, are widely applied to the pollution prevention environment improvement. The pollunian prevenition environmenr means the quality improvement of surface water, groundwater, river, lake and ground reservoir: the improvement of soil, the disposal of nuclear waste, the purification of domestic sewage, the collection of smoke and dust and the treatment of waste water. The prospective investigation and utilization of environmental mineralogical materials have been dealt with in more detail by the author of this paper with emphases on the prevention and control of soil contamination by heavy metals, on the quality im provement and treatment of surface water and groundwater,and on the collection of smoke and dust arising from burning coals.

  7. Sulfide Mineralogy and Geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilles, John

    2007-02-01

    Reviews in Mineralogy and Geochemistry Series, Volume 61 David J. Vaughan, Editor Geochemical Society and Mineralogical Society of America; ISBN 0-939950-73-1 xiii + 714 pp.; 2006; $40. Sulfide minerals as a class represent important minor rock-forming minerals, but they are generally known as the chief sources of many economic metallic ores. In the past two decades, sulfide research has been extended to include important roles in environmental geology of sulfide weathering and resultant acid mine drainage, as well as in geomicrobiology in which bacteria make use of sulfides for metabolic energy sources. In the latter respect, sulfides played an important role in early evolution of life on Earth and in geochemical cycling of elements in the Earth's crust and hydrosphere.

  8. A shale rock physics model for analysis of brittleness index, mineralogy and porosity in the Barnett Shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhiqi; Li, Xiang-Yang; Liu, Cai; Feng, Xuan; Shen, Ye

    2013-04-01

    We construct a rock physics workflow to link the elastic properties of shales to complex constituents and specific microstructure attributes. The key feature in our rock physics model is the degrees of preferred orientation of clay and kerogen particles defined by the proportions of such particles in their total content. The self-consistent approximation method and Backus averaging method are used to consider the isotropic distribution and preferred orientation of compositions and pores in shales. Using the core and well log data from the Barnett Shale, we demonstrate the application of the constructed templates for the evaluation of porosity, lithology and brittleness index. Then, we investigate the brittleness index defined in terms of mineralogy and geomechanical properties. The results show that as clay content increases, Poisson's ratio tends to increase and Young's modulus tends to decrease. Moreover, we find that Poisson's ratio is more sensitive to the variation in the texture of shales resulting from the preferred orientation of clay particles. Finally, based on the constructed rock physics model, we calculate AVO responses from the top and bottom of the Barnett Shale, and the results indicate predictable trends for the variations in porosity, lithology and brittleness index in shales.

  9. ON RUBIN'S HARMONIC ANALYSIS AND ITS RELATED POSITIVE DEFINITE FUNCTIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Néji Bettaibi; Kamel Mezlini; Moufida El Guénichi

    2012-01-01

    In this paper,a new formulation of the Rubin's q-translation is given,which leads to a reliable q-harmonic analysis.Next,related q-positive definite functions are introduced and studied,and a Bochner's theorem is proved.

  10. Applied Mineralogy: A Critical Review and 5-Year Plan for Its Strategic Use within Teck

    OpenAIRE

    Nichola Ann McKay

    2015-01-01

    A strategic business case analysis and five-year plan are presented here for the Teck Applied Mineralogy group in Trail, British Columbia. Applied mineralogy is a key technical competency for Teck Resources that adds value in the fields of process mineralogy supporting optimization at the mining operations, and in ore characterization supporting evaluation of greenfield and brownfield properties. This 2016-2020 business plan for the applied mineralogy group is cognisant of the current mining ...

  11. TEM analysis of the internal structures and mineralogy of Asian dust particles and the implications for optical modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Y. Jeong

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Mineral dust interacts with incoming/outgoing electromagnetic radiation in the atmosphere. This interaction depends on the microphysical properties of the dust particles, including size, mineral composition, external morphology, and internal structure. Ideally all these properties should be accounted for in dust remote sensing, the modeling of single-scattering properties, and radiative effect assessment. There have been many reports on the microphysical characterizations of mineral dust, but no investigations of the internal structures or mineral composition of individual dust particles. We explored the interiors of Asian dust particles using the combined application of focused ion beam thin-slice preparation and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The results showed that individual dust particles consisted of numerous mineral grains, which were organized into several types of internal structure: single and polycrystalline cores of quartz, feldspars, calcite, and amphibole often with oriented clay coatings; individual clay agglomerates of nano-thin clay platelets showing preferred to random orientations commonly with coarser mineral inclusions; and platy coarse phyllosilicates (muscovite, biotite, and chlorite. Micron to submicron pores were scattered throughout the interior of particles. Clays in the coatings and agglomerates were dominated by nano-thin platelets of the clay minerals of illite-smectite series including illite, smectite, and their mixed layers with subordinate kaolinite and clay-size chlorite. Submicron iron oxide grains, dominantly goethite, were distributed throughout the clay agglomerates and coatings. Unlike the common assumptions and simplifications, we found that the analyzed dust particles were irregularly shaped with birefringent, polycrystalline, and polymineralic heterogeneous compositions. Accounting for this structural and mineralogical makeup may improve the remote sensing retrieval of dust and the

  12. TEM analysis of the internal structures and mineralogy of Asian dust particles and the implications for optical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, G. Y.; Nousiainen, T.

    2014-07-01

    Mineral dust interacts with incoming/outgoing electromagnetic radiation in the atmosphere. This interaction depends on the microphysical properties of the dust particles, including size, mineral composition, external morphology, and internal structure. Ideally all of these properties should be accounted for in the remote sensing of dust, the modeling of single-scattering properties, and radiative effect assessment. There have been many reports on the microphysical characterizations of mineral dust, but no investigations of the internal structures of individual dust particles. We explored the interiors of Asian dust particles using the combined application of focused ion beam thin-slice preparation and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The results showed that individual dust particles consisted of numerous mineral grains, which were organized into several types of internal structure: single and polycrystalline cores of quartz, feldspars, calcite, and amphibole often with oriented clay coatings; individual clay agglomerates of nano-thin clay platelets showing preferred to random orientations common with coarser mineral inclusions; and platy coarse phyllosilicates (muscovite, biotite, and chlorite). Micron to submicron pores were scattered throughout the interior of particles. Clays in the coatings and agglomerates were dominated by nano-thin platelets of the clay minerals of illite-smectite series including illite, smectite, and their mixed layers with subordinate kaolinite and clay-sized chlorite. Submicron iron oxide grains, dominantly goethite, were distributed throughout the clay agglomerates and coatings. Unlike the common assumptions and simplifications, we found that the analyzed dust particles were irregularly shaped with birefringent, polycrystalline, and polymineralic heterogeneous compositions. Accounting for this structural and mineralogical makeup may improve the remote sensing retrieval of dust and the evaluation of radiation effects

  13. SITE-94. Mineralogy of the Aespoe site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Karin [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Technical Environmental Planning

    1996-12-01

    The water composition has several impacts on the repository. It will influence the behaviour of the engineered materials (e.g. corrosion). It may also determine the possible solubility and speciation of released radionuclides. It also acts as a transport medium for the released elements. The groundwater composition and the potential development of the composition due to the presence of the repository as well as due to external variations is thus an important issue in a safety analysis. The development of the groundwater composition is strongly dependent on reactions with the minerals present in water bearing fractures. Here equilibrium chemistry may be of importance, but also reaction kinetics is important to the long-term behaviour. Within the SITE-94 project, a safety analysis is performed for the conditions at the Aespoe site. The mineralogy of the area has been evaluated from drill cores at various places at the site. In this report a recommendation for selection of mineralogy to be used in geochemical modelling of the repository is given. Calcite and iron containing minerals dominate the fracture filling mineralogy at the Aespoe site. Some typical fracture filling mineralogies may be identified in the fractures: epidote, chlorite, calcite, hematite, some illite/smectite + quartz, fluorite, pyrite and goethite. In addition to these a number of minor minerals are found in the fractures. Uncertainties in the fracture filling data may be due to problems when taking out the drill cores. Drilling water may remove important clay minerals and sealed fractures may be reopened mechanically and treated as water conducting fractures. The problem of determining the variability of the mineralogy along the flow paths also remains. This problem will never be solved when the investigation is performed by drilling investigation holes

  14. Journal of Mineralogical and Petrological Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Official journal of Japan Association of Mineralogical Sciences (JAMS), focusing on mineralogical and petrological sciences and their related fields. Journal of Mineralogical and Petrological Sciences (JMPS) is the successor journal to both “Journal of Mineralogy, Petrology and Economic Geology” and “Mineralogical Journal”. Journal of Mineralogical and Petrological Sciences (JMPS) is indexed in the ISI database (Thomson Reuters), the Science Citation Index-Expanded, Current Contents/Physical, Chemical & Earth Sciences, and ISI Alerting Services.

  15. Sedimentology, diagenesis, clay mineralogy and sequential analysis model of Upper Paleocene evaporite-carbonate ramp succession from Tamerza area (Gafsa Basin: Southern Tunisia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messadi, Abdel Majid; Mardassi, Besma; Ouali, Jamel Abdennaceur; Touir, Jamel

    2016-06-01

    Integrated sedimentological studies, diagenesis, sequential analysis and clay mineralogy on the Upper Paleocene rocks in Tamerza area provide important information on the reconstruction of the depositional basin, cyclicity, and paleoclimatic contexts. Facies analysis and petrographic studies have led to the recognition of nine facies that were deposited in three facies belts: Sebkha, inner ramp and outer ramp summarized in a carbonate ramp model: Homoclinal ramp under an arid climate. The upward and lateral changes in thickness and composition show a general regressive trend that records a transition from an outer ramp to Sebkha, creating different types of confinement. The facies stacking patterns constitute several kinds of meter-scale, shallowing-upward cycles. Nine different types of depositional cycles and several models of Sebkha sequences were defined. These different types of facies, characterized within the Thelja Formation, compose seven depositional sequences, mainly made of carbonates, marls and evaporates. Detailed multi approach analysis provides important information on evaporitic sequence stratigraphy. In carbonates beds, the diagenetic analysis provides an overview and chronology of diagenetic processes. A particular attention was paid to early stage cementation which enables us to characterize better the depositional environments. In addition to cementation, other features define the diagenetic history. X-ray diffraction reveals the presence of smectite suggesting an arid climate. Moreover, the clinoptilolite and the frequency of primary dolomite indicate different degrees of confinement. The seven depositional sequences showing a hierarchical organization of many cycles, as described above, suggested that eustatic sea level oscillations caused by cyclic perturbations of the Earth's orbit play a fundamental role in determining the formation of hierarchical cyclic rhythmicity.

  16. Comparison among chemical, mineralogical and physical analysis from alluvial clays from counties of Southwest of Minas Gerais state (Brazil); Comparacao entre as analises quimicas, mineralogicas e tecnologicas das argilas aluvionares de alguns municipios do sudoeste de Minas Gerais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaspar Junior, L.A., E-mail: lineo.gaspar@unifal-mg.edu.br [Universidade Federal de Alfenas (UNIALFENAS), MG (Brazil). Instituto de Ciencias da Natureza; Varajao, A.F.D.C. [Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto (UFOP), MG (Brazil). Escola de Minas; Souza, M.H.O. [Universidade Federal de Uberlandia (UFU), MG (Brazil). Departamento de Geografia; Moreno, M.M.T. [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Rio Claro, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Petrologia e Metalogenia

    2011-07-01

    The studied area is located in the southwestern portion of Minas Gerais State, encompassing the counties of Alfenas, Areado, Machado, Poco Fundo, Campestre, Serrania, Monte Belo, Bandeira do Sul, Botelhos and Cabo Verde. This region is dominated by strongly weathered pre-cambrian rocks in association with colluvial-alluvial sediments. The present work consisted in a comparison among the mineralogical (X-Ray Diffraction), textural (Laser Granulometry), chemical (X-Ray Fluorescence) and technological (mechanical resistance, water absorption, etc, made in specimen tests) properties of the clays collected on potteries located in these counties. The mineralogical and chemical analysis displayed the kaolinitic nature of the clays from this region, showing also small amount of interlayered clays and large amount of quartz. The best results of physical analysis were obtained for clays from the counties of Cabo Verde and Monte Belo due to the presence of lower values of SiO{sub 2} (quartz) associated with a finer particle size distribution. (author)

  17. Automated Quantitative Rare Earth Elements Mineralogy by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindern, Sven; Meyer, F. Michael

    2016-09-01

    Increasing industrial demand of rare earth elements (REEs) stems from the central role they play for advanced technologies and the accelerating move away from carbon-based fuels. However, REE production is often hampered by the chemical, mineralogical as well as textural complexity of the ores with a need for better understanding of their salient properties. This is not only essential for in-depth genetic interpretations but also for a robust assessment of ore quality and economic viability. The design of energy and cost-efficient processing of REE ores depends heavily on information about REE element deportment that can be made available employing automated quantitative process mineralogy. Quantitative mineralogy assigns numeric values to compositional and textural properties of mineral matter. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with a suitable software package for acquisition of backscatter electron and X-ray signals, phase assignment and image analysis is one of the most efficient tools for quantitative mineralogy. The four different SEM-based automated quantitative mineralogy systems, i.e. FEI QEMSCAN and MLA, Tescan TIMA and Zeiss Mineralogic Mining, which are commercially available, are briefly characterized. Using examples of quantitative REE mineralogy, this chapter illustrates capabilities and limitations of automated SEM-based systems. Chemical variability of REE minerals and analytical uncertainty can reduce performance of phase assignment. This is shown for the REE phases parisite and synchysite. In another example from a monazite REE deposit, the quantitative mineralogical parameters surface roughness and mineral association derived from image analysis are applied for automated discrimination of apatite formed in a breakdown reaction of monazite and apatite formed by metamorphism prior to monazite breakdown. SEM-based automated mineralogy fulfils all requirements for characterization of complex unconventional REE ores that will become

  18. Hybrid Powder - Single Crystal X-Ray Diffraction Instrument for Planetary Mineralogical Analysis of Unprepared Samples Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a planetary exploration XRD/XRF instrument based on a hybrid diffraction approach that complements powder XRD analysis, similar to that of the...

  19. The analysis and rationale behind the upgrading of existing standard definition thermal imagers to high definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goss, Tristan M.

    2016-05-01

    With 640x512 pixel format IR detector arrays having been on the market for the past decade, Standard Definition (SD) thermal imaging sensors have been developed and deployed across the world. Now with 1280x1024 pixel format IR detector arrays becoming readily available designers of thermal imager systems face new challenges as pixel sizes reduce and the demand and applications for High Definition (HD) thermal imaging sensors increases. In many instances the upgrading of existing under-sampled SD thermal imaging sensors into more optimally sampled or oversampled HD thermal imaging sensors provides a more cost effective and reduced time to market option than to design and develop a completely new sensor. This paper presents the analysis and rationale behind the selection of the best suited HD pixel format MWIR detector for the upgrade of an existing SD thermal imaging sensor to a higher performing HD thermal imaging sensor. Several commercially available and "soon to be" commercially available HD small pixel IR detector options are included as part of the analysis and are considered for this upgrade. The impact the proposed detectors have on the sensor's overall sensitivity, noise and resolution is analyzed, and the improved range performance is predicted. Furthermore with reduced dark currents due to the smaller pixel sizes, the candidate HD MWIR detectors are operated at higher temperatures when compared to their SD predecessors. Therefore, as an additional constraint and as a design goal, the feasibility of achieving upgraded performance without any increase in the size, weight and power consumption of the thermal imager is discussed herein.

  20. Phobos surface spectra mineralogical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajola, M.; Lazzarin, M.; Dalle Ore, C. M.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Roush, T. L.; Pendleton, Y.; Bertini, I.; Magrin, S.; Carli, C.; La Forgia, F.; Barbieri, C.

    2014-04-01

    A mineralogical model composed of a mixture of Tagish Lake meteorite (TL) and Pyroxene Glass (PM80) was presented in [1] to explain the surface reflectance of Phobos from 0.25 to 4.0 μm. The positive results we obtained, when comparing the OSIRIS data [2] extended in wavelength to include the [3,4] spectra, forced us to perform a wider comparison between our TL-PM80 model and the CRISM and OMEGA Phobos spectra presented in [5]. Such spectra cover three different regions of interest (ROIs) situated in the Phobos sub-Mars hemisphere: the interior of the Stickney crater, its eastern rim, and its proximity terrain southeast of the Reldresal crater. We decided to vary the percentage mixture of the components of our model (80% TL, 20% PM80), between pure TL and pure PM80, by means of the radiative transfer code based on the [6] formulation of the slab approximation. Once this spectral range was derived, see Fig. 1, we attempted to compare it with the [5] spectra between 0.4 and 2.6 μm, i.e. below the thermal emitted radiation, to see if any spectral match was possible. We observed that CRISM scaled spectra above 1.10 μm fall within pure Tagish Lake composition and the [1] model. The CRISM data below 1.10 μm present more discrepancies with our models, in particular for the Stickney's rim spectrum. Nevertheless the TL and PM80 components seem to be good mineralogical candidates on Phobos. We performed the same analysis with the OMEGA data and, again, we found out that the Stickney's rim spectrum lies out of our model range, while the two remaining spectra still lie between pure TL and 80% TL - 20% PM80, but indicating that a different, more complicated mixture is expected in order to explain properly both the spectral trend and the possible absorption bands located above 2.0 μm. Within this analysis, we point out that a big fraction of TL material (modeled pure or present with a minimum percentage of 80% mixed together with 20% PM80) seems to explain Phobos spectral

  1. Geochemical and Mineralogical Proxies for characterizing Tsunami and Paleotsunami Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löwhagen, L.; Jankaew, K.; Kylander, M. E.; Skelton, A.; Wohlfarth, B.

    2015-12-01

    In this study we show how geochemistry and mineralogy can be used to correlate between previously dated tsunami and paleotsunami deposits in western Thailand. We do this based on cores from three parallel swales along a transect from the shoreline inland. Stratigraphy, together with geochemical and mineralogical analyses was used to correlate between tsunami and paleotsunami layers at these sites. Using element biplots (Ti-Zr, Ti-Y and Zr-Y) and mineralogical constraints, source signatures of each of the tsunami and paleotsunami layers were used to correlate between sand layers representing the 2004 tsunami and sand layers representing at least three paleotsunamis. Based on our correlations between these swales, we predict different inundation distances and directions for these paleotsunamis. Our study shows that a combination of geochemical and mineralogical analysis provides a powerful tool for correlation between tsunami and paleotsunami layers.

  2. Long-range transport of giant particles in Asian dust identified by physical, mineralogical, and meteorological analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Y. Jeong

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Giant particles transported over long distances are generally of limited concern in atmospheric studies due to their low number concentrations in mineral dust and possible local origin. However, they can play an important role in regional circulation of earth materials due to their enormous volume concentration. Asian dust laden with giant particles was observed in Korea on 31 March 2012, after a migration of about 2000 km across the Yellow Sea from the Gobi Desert. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM revealed that 20% of the particles exceeded 10 μm in equivalent sphere diameter, with a maximum of 60 μm. The median diameter from the number distribution was 5.7 μm, which was larger than the diameters recorded of 2.5 and 2.9 μm in Asian dust storms in 2010 and 2011, respectively, and was consistent with independent optical particle counter data. Giant particles (> 10 μm contributed about 89% of the volume of the dust in the 2012 storm. Illite-smectite series clay minerals were the major mineral group followed by quartz, plagioclase, K-feldspar, and calcite. The total phyllosilicate content was ~ 52%. The direct long-range transport of giant particles was confirmed by calcite nanofibers closely associated with clays in a submicron scale identified by high-resolution SEM and transmission electron microscopy. Since giant particles consisted of clay agglomerates and clay-coated quartz, feldspars, and micas, the mineral composition varied little throughout the fine ( 20 μm size bins. Analysis of the synoptic conditions of the 2012 dust event and its migration indicated that the mid-tropospheric strong wind belt directly stretching to Korea induced rapid transport of the dust, delivering giant particles. Giant dust particles with high settling velocity would be the major input into the terrestrial and marine sedimentary and ecological systems of East Asia and the western Pacific. Analysis of ancient aeolian deposits in Korea suggested the common

  3. The Impact of Various Definitions of "Policy" on the Nature and Outcomes of Policy Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guba, Egon G.

    The impact of various definitions of the term "policy" on the nature and outcomes of policy analysis is illustrated by noting a variety of definitions which are implied in the literature. These definitions are applied to exemplar policy arenas to note their differential effect. The policy arenas discussed include the community…

  4. Talc pneumoconiosis: a pathologic and mineralogic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, A E; Pooley, F D; Griffiths, D M; Mitha, R; Craighead, J E; Ruttner, J R

    1992-12-01

    Seventeen cases of "talc pneumoconiosis" were examined pathologically and mineralogically to ascertain whether a true talc pneumoconiosis existed and also to compare these results in primary, secondary, and tertiary exposures. Mineralogic analyses were performed on wet tissue or tissue blocks by a variety of techniques, including analytical transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction. Overall, the pathologic appearance of the tissues was similar in primary, secondary, and tertiary exposures, although ferruginous bodies and foreign body giant cells were not always present in cases caused by secondary exposures. Mixed dust fibrotic lesions were found in two cases in which there were substantial quantities of quartz present. There was great variation in the minerals found within the lung tissues. Several cases showed significant quantities of mica and kaolin in addition to talc. One case consisted predominantly of mica and in fact could be regarded as "mica pneumoconiosis"; this diagnosis was correctly attributed because of the mineralogic findings. Tremolite fibers were found in only two cases. Substantial quantities of crocidolite and amosite fibers were found in one case. This study shows that "talcosis" frequently represents disease associated with a variety of minerals and that talc is a common denominator. It shows also the usefulness of lung dust mineral analysis, particularly in secondary industries, for evaluating the cause of a pathologic reaction when exposures are especially complex.

  5. What is sexual satisfaction? Thematic analysis of lay people's definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoal, Patrícia Monteiro; Narciso, Isabel de Santa Bárbara; Pereira, Nuno Monteiro

    2014-01-01

    Sexual satisfaction is an important indicator of sexual health and is strongly associated with relationship satisfaction. However, research exploring lay definitions of sexual satisfaction has been scarce. We present thematic analysis of written responses of 449 women and 311 men to the question "How would you define sexual satisfaction?" The participants were heterosexual individuals with a mean age of 36.05 years (SD = 8.34) involved in a committed exclusive relationship. In this exploratory study, two main themes were identified: personal sexual well-being and dyadic processes. The first theme focuses on the positive aspects of individual sexual experience, such as pleasure, positive feelings, arousal, sexual openness, and orgasm. The second theme emphasizes relational dimensions, such as mutuality, romance, expression of feelings, creativity, acting out desires, and frequency of sexual activity. Our results highlight that mutual pleasure is a crucial component of sexual satisfaction and that sexual satisfaction derives from positive sexual experiences and not from the absence of conflict or dysfunction. The findings support definitions and models of sexual satisfaction that focus on positive sexual outcomes and the use of measures that incorporate items linked to personal and dyadic sexual rewards for both men and women.

  6. Mineralogy and instrumental neutron activation analysis of seven National Bureau of Standards and three Instituto de Pesquisas Tecnologicas clay reference samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosterman, John W.; Flanagan, F.J.; Bragg, Anne; Doughten, M.W.; Filby, R.H.; Grimm, Catherine; Mee, J.S.; Potts, P.J.; Rogers, N.W.

    1987-01-01

    The concentrations of 3 oxides and 29 elements in 7 National Bureau of Standards (NBS) and 3 Instituto de Pesquisas Techno16gicas (IPT) reference clay samples were etermined by instrumental neutron activation analysis. The analytical work was designed to test the homogeneity of constituents in three new NBS reference clays, NBS-97b, NBS-98b, and NBS-679. The analyses of variance of 276 sets of data for these three standards show that the constituents are distributed homogeneously among bottles of samples for 94 percent of the sets of data. Three of the reference samples (NBS-97, NBS-97a, and NBS-97b) are flint clays; four of the samples (NBS-98, NBS-98a, NBS-98b, and IPT-32) are plastic clays, and three of the samples (NBS-679, IPT-28, and IPT-42) are miscellaneous clays (both sedimentary and residual). Seven clays are predominantly kaolinite; the other three clays contain illite and kaolinite in the approximate ratio 3:2. Seven clays contain quartz as the major nonclay mineral. The mineralogy of the flint and plastic clays from Missouri (NBS-97a and NBS-98a) differs markedly from that of the flint and plastic clays from Pennsylvania (NBS-97, NBS-97b, NBS-98, and NBS-98b). The flint clay NBS-97 has higher average chromium, hafnium, lithium, and zirconium contents than its replacement, reference sample NBS-97b. The differences between the plastic clay NBS-98 and its replacement, NBS-98b, are not as pronounced. The trace element contents of the flint and plastic clays from Missouri, NBS-97a and NBS-98a, differ significantly from those of the clays from Pennsylvania, especially the average rare earth element (REE) contents. The trace element contents of clay sample IPT-32 differ from those of the other plastic clays. IPT-28 and IPT-42 have some average trace element contents that differ not only between these two samples but also from all the other clays. IPT-28 has the highest summation of the average REE contents of the 10 samples. The uranium content of NBS-98a, 46

  7. A Synchrotron-based Facility for Location and In-situ Chemical and Mineralogical Analysis of ~10 mm Particles From Comets and Asteroids Returned to Earth in Aerogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, G. J.; Lanzirotti, A.; Sutton, S. R.

    In January 2006, NASA's Stardust spacecraft is expected to deliver to Earth more than 1,000 dust particles collected in aerogel capture cells from the coma of Comet Wild-2. These dust particles, which impacted the aerogel surface at ˜ 6 km/sec, are expected to produce cone-shaped entry tracks, each about 100 to 200 times as long as the particle diameter, with the particle at the end of the track. However, weak particles may fragment during capture, leaving debris along the sides of the entry track. In addition, the impact of numerous sub-micron, carbon-rich particles (like the CHON particles identified by the Giotto and VEGA spacecraft at Comet Halley) may discolor the surface of the aerogel, interfering with the visual location/identification of the captured particles. Extraction of these particles from the aerogel will, eventually, be required in order to perform analyses that cannot be performed in-situ. However, extraction involves the risk of particle contamination or particle loss. For this reason, we have developed techniques to employ a synchrotron-based x-ray microprobe and x-ray diffraction facility on Beamline X26A of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory for the in-situ chemical and mineralogical characterization of the Wild-2 particles and particles returned in aerogel capture cells on future space missions. This facility is designed to perform: 3-D particle location by detection of Fe-fluorescence from ˜ 10 μ m particles, in case carbon-rich debris reduces the optical transparency of the aerogel, semi-quantitative x-ray fluorescence chemical analysis on particles ˜ 10 μ m in size for the elements from Ca to Sr, mineral identification by x-ray diffraction on particles ˜ 10 μ m in size, oxidation state characterization by X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopy of Fe, Cr, etc. in ˜ 10 μ m particles, chemical analysis of fragments and vapor deposited along the entry track, to reconstruct

  8. Formalizing the definition of meta-analysis in Molecular Ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ArchMiller, Althea A; Bauer, Eric F; Koch, Rebecca E; Wijayawardena, Bhagya K; Anil, Ammu; Kottwitz, Jack J; Munsterman, Amelia S; Wilson, Alan E

    2015-08-01

    Meta-analysis, the statistical synthesis of pertinent literature to develop evidence-based conclusions, is relatively new to the field of molecular ecology, with the first meta-analysis published in the journal Molecular Ecology in 2003 (Slate & Phua 2003). The goal of this article is to formalize the definition of meta-analysis for the authors, editors, reviewers and readers of Molecular Ecology by completing a review of the meta-analyses previously published in this journal. We also provide a brief overview of the many components required for meta-analysis with a more specific discussion of the issues related to the field of molecular ecology, including the use and statistical considerations of Wright's FST and its related analogues as effect sizes in meta-analysis. We performed a literature review to identify articles published as 'meta-analyses' in Molecular Ecology, which were then evaluated by at least two reviewers. We specifically targeted Molecular Ecology publications because as a flagship journal in this field, meta-analyses published in Molecular Ecology have the potential to set the standard for meta-analyses in other journals. We found that while many of these reviewed articles were strong meta-analyses, others failed to follow standard meta-analytical techniques. One of these unsatisfactory meta-analyses was in fact a secondary analysis. Other studies attempted meta-analyses but lacked the fundamental statistics that are considered necessary for an effective and powerful meta-analysis. By drawing attention to the inconsistency of studies labelled as meta-analyses, we emphasize the importance of understanding the components of traditional meta-analyses to fully embrace the strengths of quantitative data synthesis in the field of molecular ecology. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Joint M3 and Diviner Analysis of the Mineralogy, Glass Composition, and Country Rock Content of Pyroclastic Deposits in Oppenheimer Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Kristen A.; Horgan, Briony H. N.; Greenhagen, Benjamin T.; Allen, Carlton C.; Paige, David A.; Bell, James F., III

    2013-01-01

    Here we present our analysis of the near- and mid-infrared spectral properties of pyroclastic deposits within the floor fractured Oppenheimer Crater that are hypothesized to be Vulcanian in origin. These are the first results of our global study of lunar pyroclastic deposits aimed at constraining the range of eruption processes on the Moon. In the near-infrared, we have employed a new method of spectral analysis developed in Horgan et al. (2013) of the 1 ?m iron absorption band in Chandrayaan-1 Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) spectra. By analyzing both the position and shape of the 1 ?m band we can detect and map the distribution of minerals, glasses, and mixtures of these phases in pyroclastic deposits. We are also using mid-infrared spectra from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment to develop 200 m/pixel Christiansen Feature (CF) maps, which correlate with silica abundance. One of the benefits of using CF maps for analysis of pyroclastic deposits is that they can be used to detect silicic country rock that may have been emplaced by Vulcanian-style eruptions, and are sensitive to iron abundance in glasses, neither of which is possible in the near-infrared. M3 analysis reveals that the primary spectral endmembers are low-calcium pyroxene and iron-bearing glass, with only minor high-calcium pyroxene, and no detectable olivine. The large deposit in the south shows higher and more extensive glass concentrations than the surrounding deposits. We interpret the M3 spectra of the pyroclastic deposits as indicating a mixture of low-calcium pyroxene country rock and juvenile glass, and no significant olivine. Analysis of Diviner CF maps of the Oppenheimer crater floor indicates an average CF value of 8.16, consistent with a mixture of primarily plagioclase and some pyroxene. The average CF values of the pyroclastic deposits range from 8.31 in the SW to 8.24 in the SE. Since CF values within the deposits are as high as 8.49, the lower average CF

  10. Determinative Mineralogy: An Essential Component of Planetary Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bish, D. T.; Vaniman, D. T.; Blake, D. F.; Green, J. R.; Johnston, C. T.; Kelly-Serrato, B. A.; Ming, D. W.; Papike, J. J.; Yen, A. S.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2002-08-01

    Mineralogy is a fundamental characteristic of extraterrestrial bodies because different mineral assemblages can be used to characterize present and past conditions of the atmosphere, the surface, the crust, and the deep interior of a planet. Many tools are used in space exploration, and the exploration of extraterrestrial mineralogy is no exception. The tools that are needed include remote observations, in-situ analysis with landed instruments, and analysis of returned samples in laboratories on Earth. In a balanced exploration program, all three sources of data are necessary. Likewise, no one method will provide the information needed to understand the makeup and history of extraterrestrial bodies. This paper is intended as a starting point for the development of truly integrated mineralogic instrumentation efforts that will combine the diverse capabilities of many analytical methods.

  11. Workplace harassment: a test of definitional criteria derived from an analysis of research definitions and Canadian social definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claybourn, Marvin; Spinner, Barry; Malcom, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    Public awareness of the occurrence and effects of workplace harassment continues to grow. However, despite increasing awareness, ambiguity remains about how harassment is defined and, consequently, how to determine whether a questionable situation should be judged as harassment. For this research we reviewed definitions of workplace harassment and identified four elements that were frequently included as criteria for making judgments of whether harassment had occurred (i.e., repetition, intent, perceived intent, consequences). In two separate studies, fictional scenarios were used to evaluate the extent to which participants' judgments about harassment were affected by the presence or absence of the four elements. Ratings of the scenarios provided by student participants (study one; N=160) and a convenience sample of community participants (study two; N=292) with varying levels of work experience and diverse professional backgrounds were analysed. According to our results the four elements significantly influenced participants' judgments of harassment. The intent of the harasser had the strongest and most consistent effect on harassment judgements and whether the behaviour was repeated had the weakest and least consistent effect. In addition to the unique effects of the individual elements, significant interactions between the elements emerged and suggest that harassment judgements depend on the interplay of a variety of factors. Though the results of these studies add to the growing body of research that focuses on defining workplace harassment, they also highlight the need for additional research in the area.

  12. Competing definitions: a public policy analysis of the federal recreational fee demonstration program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas A. E. More

    2003-01-01

    Problem definition theory specifies that however controls the definition of a problem is in a unique position to control debate over the issue, influence others, and determine the problem's place on the agenda. This paper uses a rhetorical analysis and a questionnaire survey of congressional aides to examine the federal Recreational Fee Demonstration Program....

  13. Definitive Chemoradiotherapy in Elderly Cervical Cancer Patients: A Multiinstitutional Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guler, Ozan Cem; Sari, Sezin Yuce; Birgi, Sumerya Duru; Gultekin, Melis; Yildiz, Ferah; Onal, Cem

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the prognostic factors for survival and treatment-related toxicities in older (≥65 years) cervical cancer patients treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy. In addition, we sought to compare the outcomes between the older elderly (≥75 years) and their younger old counterparts (age, 65-74 years). We retrospectively reviewed medical records from 269 biopsy-proven nonmetastatic cervical cancer patients treated with external radiotherapy and intracavitary brachytherapy at the departments of radiation oncology in 2 different universities. The prognostic factors for survival, local control, and distant metastasis (DM) were analyzed. The median follow-up time was 38.8 months (range, 1.5-175.5 months) for the entire cohort and 70.0 months (range, 6.1-175.7 months) for survivors. The 2- and 5-year overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), and cause-specific survival rates were 66% and 42%, 63% and 39%, and 72% and 55%, respectively. Patients 75 years or older showed significantly worse OS compared with patients aged 65 to 74 years but showed no significant difference in DFS. The 2- and 5-year local control rates were 86% and 71%, respectively. The incidences of DMs at 2 and 5 years were 22% and 30%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, vaginal infiltration and lymph node metastasis were predictive of OS, DFS, local recurrence, and DM. Concomitant chemotherapy was predictive of OS, DFS, and local recurrence, and larger tumor (>4 cm) was a significant prognostic factor for local recurrence. None of the patients had toxicity that necessitated the discontinuation of radiotherapy. All patients were evaluable for acute toxicity, and no grade higher than 3 adverse events occurred during external beam radiation therapy or brachytherapy. Although age limited the delivery of aggressive treatment, concurrent chemoradiotherapy in elderly patients associated with improved outcomes similar as in younger counterparts without

  14. Mineralogical and geochemical study of mud volcanoes in north ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJL

    Key word: Mud volcano, clay mineralogy, geochemistry, mud breccias, North Moroccan Atlantic margin. INTRODUCTION .... The geochemical analysis of the metals shows a high Ti ..... smectite evolved into an illite, or because the initial source is not .... Pinheiro LM, Kopf A, Boetius A (2006): Microbial methane turnover at.

  15. Preliminary Results on Magnetic Mineralogy and Elemental Composition of Meteorites from Geological Museum of Kazan University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzina, D. M.; Nurgaliev, D. K.; Gareev, B. I.; Batalin, G. A.; Silantev, V. V.

    2016-08-01

    Thermomagnetic analysis (magnetic mineralogy) and Micro X-ray Fluorescence analysis (mapping) were made for collection of meteorites. As a result we have elements distribution on surface of meteorites and Fe-Ni presence in meteorites.

  16. Analysis of agreement among definitions of metabolic syndrome in nondiabetic Turkish adults: a methodological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bersot Thomas P

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We aimed to explore the agreement among World Health Organization (WHO, European Group for the Study of Insulin Resistance (EGIR, National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP, American College of Endocrinology (ACE, and International Diabetes Federation (IDF definitions of the metabolic syndrome. Methods 1568 subjects (532 men, 1036 women, mean age 45 and standard deviation (SD 13 years were evaluated in this cross-sectional, methodological study. Cardiometabolic risk factors were determined. Insulin sensitivity was calculated by HOMA-IR. Agreement among definitions was determined by the kappa statistic. ANOVA and post hoc Tukey's test were used to compare multiple groups. Results The agreement between WHO and EGIR definitions was very good (kappa: 0.83. The agreement between NCEP, ACE, and IDF definitions was substantial to very good (kappa: 0.77–0.84. The agreement between NCEP or ACE or IDF and WHO or EGIR definitions was fair (kappa: 0.32–0.37. The age and sex adjusted prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 38% by NCEP, 42% by ACE and IDF, 20% by EGIR and 19% by WHO definition. The evaluated definitions were dichotomized after analysis of design, agreement and prevalence: insulin measurement requiring definitions (WHO and EGIR and definitions not requiring insulin measurement (NCEP, ACE, IDF. One definition was selected from each set for comparison. WHO-defined subjects were more insulin resistant than subjects without the metabolic syndrome (mean and SD for log HOMA-IR, 0.53 ± 0.14 vs. 0.07 ± 0.23, respectively, p 0.05, but lower log HOMA-IR values (p Conclusion The metabolic syndrome definitions that do not require measurement of insulin levels (NCEP, ACE and IDF identify twice more patients with insulin resistance and increased Framingham risk scores and are more useful than the definitions that require measurement of insulin levels (WHO and EGIR.

  17. Oral Definitions of Newly Learned Words: An Error Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Sara C.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined and compared patterns of errors in the oral definitions of newly learned words. Fifteen 9- to 11-year-old children with language learning disability (LLD) and 15 typically developing age-matched peers inferred the meanings of 20 nonsense words from four novel reading passages. After reading, children provided oral definitions…

  18. MINERALOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>20110079 Ding Kuiying(Weifang Entry-Exit Inspection and Quarantine Bureau of the People’s Republic of China,Weifang 261041,China);Zhu Maoxu The Effect of Low Molecular Weight Organic Acids to Phosphate Adsorption by Hydroxyaluminum/Iron-Montmorillonite Complexes(Acta Mineralogica Sinica,ISSN1000-4734,CN52-1045/P,30(1),2010,p.56-62,4 illus.,3 tables,13 refs.)Key words:organic acids,montmorillonit

  19. MINERALOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    <正>20090867 Chen Quanli(Gemmological Institute, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074,China);Qi Lijian Thermal Property of the Apatite Pseudomorphic Turquoise(Earth Science,ISSN1000-2383, CN42-1233/P,33(3),2008,p.416-422, 6 illus.,1 table,11 refs.)

  20. MINERALOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    <正>20090143 Cao Ke (Research Center for Tibeten Plateau Geology, School of Earth Sciences and Resources, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083, China); Li Xianghui Cretaceous Clay Minerals and Paleoclimate in Sichuan Basin (Acta Geologica Sinica, ISSN0001-5717, CN11-1951, 82(1), 2008, p.115-123, 3 illus., 3 tables, 30 refs., with English abstract)

  1. MINERALOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    20150124Ji Liming(Key Laboratory of Petroleum Resources Research of Gansu Province,Lanzhou 730000,China);Ma Xiangxian Relationship between Methane Adsorption Capacity of Clay Minerals and Micropore Volume(Natural Gas Geoscience,ISSN1672-1926,CN62-1177/TE,25(2),2014,p.141-152,7illus.,4tables,21refs.)Key words:clay minerals The pore size,surface area and methane adsorption isotherm of clay-rich rocks are measured.Clay minerals mainly contain micropore of 3~100nm,and have two main in-

  2. Quartz as votive and building material within the megalithic funerary complex of Palacio III (Almadén de la Plata, Seville: contextual and mineralogical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forteza González, Matilde

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines an assemblage of quartz objects, such as crystals (rock crystal and prase and pebbles, that were found in two spatially and chronologically different contexts of the Palacio III megalithic complex (Almadén de la Plata, Seville, Spain excavated by the universities of Seville and Southampton between 2001 and 2002. Firstly, these objects are described macroscopically from a mineralogical and crystallographic point of view. When possible, samples are studied by X-ray diffraction and SEM in order to determine their mineralogical and chemical composition. Secondly, other similar instances, in which quartz and rock crystal objects have been found among the grave goods of funerary contexts of southern Iberian, are described. Finally, we propose a series of interpretations for these objects, both from a functional as well as a symbolical perspective, assessing the significance of their presence in spatially discrete and chrono-culturally distant contexts.

    Este trabajo examina un conjunto de objetos de cuarzo, tales como monocristales (variedades cristal de roca y prasio y cantos rodados, encontrados en dos contextos arqueológicos espacial y cronológicamente distintos del complejo megalítico de Palacio III (Almadén de la Plata, Sevilla, excavado por las universidades de Sevilla y Southampton entre 2001 y 2002. Estos objetos se describen, en primer lugar, desde un punto de vista macroscópico atendiendo a sus características mineralógicas y cristalográficas. Se han utilizado técnicas difractométricas y de microscopía electrónica de barrido sobre las muestras inalteradas para determinar su composición mineralógica y química. A continuación se listan y describen casos de ítems semejantes registrados en contextos funerarios de la Prehistoria Reciente del Sur de la Península Ibérica. Finalmente se valoran distintas interpretaciones para los mismos, desde un punto de vista tanto funcional como simbólico, discuti

  3. Petro-mineralogy and geochemistry as tools of provenance analysis on archaeological pottery: Study of Inka Period ceramics from Paria, Bolivia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szilágyi, V.; Gyarmati, J.; Tóth, M.; Taubald, H.; Balla, M.; Kasztovszky, Zs.; Szakmány, Gy.

    2012-07-01

    This paper summarized the results of comprehensive petro-mineralogical and geochemical (archeometrical) investigation of Inka Period ceramics excavated from Inka (A.D. 1438-1535) and Late Intermediate Period (A.D. 1000/1200-1438) sites of the Paria Basin (Dept. Oruro, Bolivia). Applying geological analytical techniques we observed a complex and important archaeological subject of the region and the era, the cultural-economic influence of the conquering Inkas in the provincial region of Paria appearing in the ceramic material. According to our results, continuity and changes of raw material utilization and pottery manufacturing techniques from the Late Intermediate to the Inka Period are characterized by analytical methods. The geological field survey provided efficient basis for the identification of utilized raw material sources. On the one hand, ceramic supply of both eras proved to be based almost entirely on local and near raw material sources. So, imperial handicraft applied local materials but with sophisticated imperial techniques in Paria. On the other hand, Inka Imperial and local-style vessels also show clear differences in their material which suggests that sources and techniques functioned already in the Late Intermediate Period subsisted even after the Inka conquest of the Paria Basin. Based on our geological investigations, pottery supply system of the Paria region proved to be rather complex during the Inka Period.

  4. Automatic, exploratory mineralogical mapping of CRISM imagery using summary product signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allender, Elyse; Stepinski, Tomasz F.

    2017-01-01

    Martian spectroscopic and mineralogical analysis is usually performed using Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) browse products - false color images which show the spatial distribution of absorption features at key wavelengths. This manual, time-consuming method is ill-suited for exploratory surveys of a large number of images - for such surveys an automatic methodology is needed. In this paper we propose a method for exploratory but fully automatic mineralogical mapping of CRISM images. In our approach pixels are characterized by vectors of CRISM summary product values instead of spectral functions, and mineralogical units are discovered using a clustering principle. Moreover, the rare class discovery algorithm DEMUD is used in place of a standard clustering algorithm to identify mineralogical units - enabling the identification of only scientifically interesting, possibly rare, mineralogical deposits. The method outputs a map for each site showing the spatial distribution of mineralogical units - areas characterized by similar mineralogy. It also provides, without using a spectral library, semantic labels for each unit. We envision our method as a focus-of-attention tool to facilitate fast exploratory surveys of a large number of images. An analyst needs only to examine manually regions within an image where our pipeline indicates the existence of mineral units of interest. In this paper the method for our computational pipeline is described in detail and its performance is evaluated using a sample of 20 CRISM images - the mineralogical content of which is known from manual analysis. We find that our pipeline identifies most deposits found through manual analysis as well as some additional deposits which were not targeted by those analyses. Overall, we conclude that our fully automatic mineralogical mapper works well for exploratory purposes. Thus, it adds a new, valuable functionality to existing tools for CRISM imagery analysis.

  5. Mineralogical Composition of the Mexican Ordinary Chondrite Type Meteorite: A Raman, Infrared and XRD Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrooumov, M.

    2016-08-01

    The Raman microprobe (RMP), infrared (IR) and XRD analysis have been applied to the examination of mineralogical composition of seven mexican meteorites: Aldama, Cosina, El Pozo, Escalon, Nuevo Mercurio,Pacula, Zapotitlan Salinas.

  6. Mineralogical and Thermal Analyses of a Bangle Shard from Harrappa, an Indus Valley Settlement in Pakistan

    CERN Document Server

    Kayani, Saheeb Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    In this research study we present initial results of a recent project in which mineralogical and thermal analysis were carried out on a terracotta bangle shard from Harrappa. We were surprised to find bentonite clay as the major constituent of the bangle shard. Also we have used knowledge of the mineralogical structure determined through X-ray diffraction and results of thermal analysis to predict value of firing temperature of the bangle shard.

  7. Impact of heatwave on mortality under different heatwave definitions: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhiwei; FitzGerald, Gerard; Guo, Yuming; Jalaludin, Bin; Tong, Shilu

    2016-01-01

    Heatwave effects on human health and wellbeing is a great public health concern, especially in the context of climate change. However, no universally consistent heatwave definition is available. A systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted to assess the heatwave definitions used in the literature published up to 1st April 2015 by searching five databases (PubMed, ProQuest, ScienceDirect, Scopus, and Web of Science). Random-effects models were used to pool the effects of heatwave on total and cardiorespiratory mortality by different heatwave definitions. Existing evidence suggests a significant impact of heatwave on mortality, but the magnitude of the effect estimates varies under different heatwave definitions. Heatwave-related mortality risks increased by 4% (using "mean temperatures ≥95th percentile for ≥2days" as a heatwave definition), 3% (mean temperatures ≥98th percentile for ≥2days), 7% (mean temperatures ≥99th percentile for ≥2days) and 16% (mean temperatures ≥97th percentile for ≥5days). Heatwave intensity plays a relatively more important role than duration in determining heatwave-related deaths. Heatwaves significantly increase mortality across the globe, but the effect estimates vary with the definition of heatwaves. City- or region-specific heat health early warning systems based on identified local heatwave definitions may be optimal for protecting and preventing people from the adverse impacts of future heatwaves.

  8. Definitions and Explication of the "Social Pediatrics" Concept: Results of the Terminological Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Ustinova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Our aim was to clarify and standardize the definitions of the term "social pediatrics."Methods: Terminological analysis, functional interpretative content analysis and method of expert assessments.Results: We found 86 definitions of the term "social pediatrics" in the Russian and foreign scientific sources (1939 to 2015. The earliest publication (1945 on social pediatrics was found in the PubMed database. After excluding duplicate and similar definitions, 24 logical definitions were included in the final analysis. Between 1970 and 1979, the highest number of foreign publications related to social pediatrics (PubMed was found giving the grounds for considering this period the time of the official development of social pediatrics as a branch of science and practice abroad.Discussion: The definitions under the study compose a picture of a broader interpretation of the term "social pediatrics" in Europe, including different children healthcare levels (state, public, individual, while, for example, in Canada, the emphasis shifts towards a purely practical sphere — primary medical care with social pediatrics applied to vulnerable groups of children. Content analysis identified the main categories of social pediatrics in the presented definitions that were recorded in the developed matrix table.Conclusion: Based on the conceptual and categorical apparatus of social pediatrics, including a "holistic approach to healthcare," "social determinants of children's health," "preventive component," "children in difficult circumstances of life," "multidisciplinary approach/interagency cooperation," "system approach (to the organization of healthcare," "health support," "psychosocial support," and "rights of the child," we introduced our own definition of social pediatrics. Preventive component of social pediatrics is recognized as one of the most important features according to both the content analysis and experts.

  9. Extensions of positive definite functions applications and their harmonic analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Jorgensen, Palle E T; Tian, Feng

    2016-01-01

    This monograph deals with the mathematics of extending given partial data-sets obtained from experiments; Experimentalists frequently gather spectral data when the observed data is limited, e.g., by the precision of instruments; or by other limiting external factors. Here the limited information is a restriction, and the extensions take the form of full positive definite function on some prescribed group. It is therefore both an art and a science to produce solid conclusions from restricted or limited data. While the theory of is important in many areas of pure and applied mathematics, it is difficult for students and for the novice to the field, to find accessible presentations which cover all relevant points of view, as well as stressing common ideas and interconnections. We have aimed at filling this gap, and we have stressed hands-on-examples.

  10. DYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF FLEXIBLE BODY WITH DEFINITE MOVING ATTITUTE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Yuan-ming; ZHANG Wei; SONG Tian-xia; CHEN Chuan-yao

    2006-01-01

    The nonlinear dynamic control equation of a flexible multi-body system with definite moving attitude is discussed. The motion of the aircraft in space is regarded as known and the influence of the flexible structural members in the aircraft on the motion and attitude of the aircraft is analyzed. By means of a hypothetical mode, the deformation of flexible members is regarded as composed of the line element vibration in the axial direction of rectangular coordinates in space. According to Kane's method in dynamics, a dynamic equation is established, which contains the structural stiffness matrix that represents the elastic deformation and the geometric stiffness matrix that represents the nonlinear deformation of the deformed body. Through simplification the dynamic equation of the influence of the planar flexible body with a windsurfboard structure on the spacecraft motion is obtained. The numerical solution for this kind of equation can be realized by a computer.

  11. WORK ANALYSIS IN ORGANIZATIONS – DEFINITION, USES AND METHODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Valéria Steil

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Work analysis is a process used to understand what the important tasks of the job are, how they are performed, and what human attributes are necessary to carry them out successfully. Work analysis is an attempt to develop a theory of human behavior about the job in question to support management decisions. This paper defines work analysis, discusses its main uses in organizations, and presents the objects of study and the methods of work analysis. This paper also discusses how work analysis is done, considering the following steps:  types of data to be collected, data sources, data collecting methods, summary of the information and work analysis reports. This paper ends with the differentiation of work analysis and individual modeling skills and brings arguments to endorse work analysis as an intervention of work and organizational psychology.

  12. Equivalence of the Traditional and Non-Standard Definitions of Concepts from Real Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Cowles

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available ACL2(r is a variant of ACL2 that supports the irrational real and complex numbers. Its logical foundation is based on internal set theory (IST, an axiomatic formalization of non-standard analysis (NSA. Familiar ideas from analysis, such as continuity, differentiability, and integrability, are defined quite differently in NSA–some would argue the NSA definitions are more intuitive. In previous work, we have adopted the NSA definitions in ACL2(r, and simply taken as granted that these are equivalent to the traditional analysis notions, e.g., to the familiar epsilon-delta definitions. However, we argue in this paper that there are circumstances when the more traditional definitions are advantageous in the setting of ACL2(r, precisely because the traditional notions are classical, so they are unencumbered by IST limitations on inference rules such as induction or the use of pseudo-lambda terms in functional instantiation. To address this concern, we describe a formal proof in ACL2(r of the equivalence of the traditional and non-standards definitions of these notions.

  13. Mineralogical and geological study of quaternary deposits and weathering profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Gi Young; Lee, Bong Ho [Andong National Univ., Andong (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-01-15

    Movement history of a quaternary reverse fault cutting marine terrace deposit and tertiary bentonite in the Yangnammyon, Gyoungju city was studied by the mineralogical and microtextural analysis of the fault clays and weathered terrace deposits. Two types of fault clays were identified as greenish gray before the deposition of the marine terrace deposits and reddish brown after deposition. Greenish gray fault clay is composed mostly of smectite probably powdered from bentonite showing at least two events of movement from microtextures. After the bentonite was covered by quaternary marine gravel deposits, the reverse fault was reactivated cutting marine gravel deposits to form open spaces along the fault plane which allowed the hydrological infiltration of soil particles and deposition of clays in deep subsurface. The reddish brown 'fault' clays enclosed the fragments of dark brown ultrafine varved clay, proving two events of faulting, and slicken sides bisecting reddish brown clays suggest another faulting event in the final stage. Mineralogical and microtextural analysis of the fault clay show total five events of faulting, which had not been recognized even by thorough conventional paleoseismological investigation using trench, highlighting the importance of microtextural and mineralogical analysis in paleoseismology.

  14. Olivine-dominated Asteroids: Mineralogy and Origin

    CERN Document Server

    Sanchez, Juan A; Kelley, Michael S; Cloutis, Edward A; Bottke, William F; Nesvorný, David; Lucas, Michael P; Hardersen, Paul S; Gaffey, Michael J; Abell, Paul A; Corre, Lucille Le

    2013-01-01

    Olivine-dominated asteroids are a rare type of objects formed either in nebular processes or through magmatic differentiation. The analysis of meteorite samples suggest that at least 100 parent bodies in the main belt experienced partial or complete melting and differentiation before being disrupted. However, only a few olivine-dominated asteroids, representative of the mantle of disrupted differentiated bodies, are known to exist. Due to the paucity of these objects in the main belt their origin and evolution have been a matter of great debate over the years. In this work we present a detailed mineralogical analysis of twelve olivine-dominated asteroids. Within our sample we distinguish two classes, one that we call pure-olivine asteroids and another referred to as olivine-rich asteroids. For the pure-olivine asteroids the olivine chemistry was found to range from ~ Fo49 to Fo70, consistent with the values measured for brachinites and R chondrites. In the case of the olivine-rich asteroids we determined thei...

  15. Economic analysis in medical education: definition of essential terms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Kieran

    2014-10-01

    Medical education is expensive. There is a growing interest in the subject of cost and value in medical education. However, in the medical education literature, terms are sometimes used loosely - and so there is a need for basic grounding in the meaning of commonly used and important terms in medical education economics. The purpose of this article is to define some terms that are frequently used in economic analysis in medical education. In this article, terms are described, and the descriptions are followed by a worked example of how the terms might be used in practice. The following terms are described: opportunity cost, total cost of ownership, sensitivity analysis, viewpoint, activity-based costing, efficiency, technical efficiency, allocative efficiency, price and transaction costs.

  16. Fracture mineralogy of the Forsmark site. SDM-Site Forsmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstroem, Bjoern (Dept. of Earth Sciences, Univ. of Goeteborg (Sweden)); Tullborg, Eva-Lena (Terralogica AB, Graabo (Sweden)); Smellie, John (Conterra AB, Luleaa (Sweden)); MacKenzie, Angus B. (SUERC, Scottish Enterprise Technology Park, East Kilbride (United Kingdom)); Suksi, Juhani (Dept. of Chemistry, Univ. of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland))

    2008-08-15

    Detailed investigations of the fracture mineralogy and altered wall rock have been carried out as part of the site characterisation programme between 2003 and 2007 at Forsmark. The results have been published in a number of P-reports and in contributions to scientific journals. This report summarises and evaluates the data obtained during the detailed fracture mineralogical studies. The report includes descriptions of the identified fracture minerals and their chemical composition. A sequence of fracture mineralisations has been distinguished and provides information of the low to moderate temperature (brittle) geological and hydrogeological evolution at the site. Special focus has been paid to the chemical and stable isotopic composition of calcite to obtain palaeohydrogeological information. Chemical analyses of bulk fracture filling material have been carried out to identify possible sinks for certain elements and also to reveal the presence of minor phases rich in certain elements which have not been possible to detect by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Statistical analysis of the mineralogy in fractures outside deformation zones (i.e. within fracture domains FFM01, FFM02, FFM03 and FFM06) have been carried out concerning variation of fracture mineral distribution at depth and in different fracture domains. Uranium contents and uranium-series isotopes have been analysed on fracture coating material from hydraulically conductive fractures. Such analyses are also available from the groundwaters and the results are combined in order to reveal recent (< 1 Ma) removal/deposition of uranium in the fracture system. The redox conditions in the fracture system have been evaluated based on mineralogical and chemical indicators as well as Moessbauer analyses

  17. Multi-level segment analysis: definition and applications in turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lipo

    2015-11-01

    The interaction of different scales is among the most interesting and challenging features in turbulence research. Existing approaches used for scaling analysis such as structure-function and Fourier spectrum method have their respective limitations, for instance scale mixing, i.e. the so-called infrared and ultraviolet effects. For a given function, by specifying different window sizes, the local extremal point set will be different. Such window size dependent feature indicates multi-scale statistics. A new method, multi-level segment analysis (MSA) based on the local extrema statistics, has been developed. The part of the function between two adjacent extremal points is defined as a segment, which is characterized by the functional difference and scale difference. The structure function can be differently derived from these characteristic parameters. Data test results show that MSA can successfully reveal different scaling regimes in turbulence systems such as Lagrangian and two-dimensional turbulence, which have been remaining controversial in turbulence research. In principle MSA can generally be extended for various analyses.

  18. Mineralogical analysis of Brazilian ceramic sedimentary clays used in red ceramic Análise mineralógica de argilas sedimentares brasileiras usadas em cerâmica vermelha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. P. Souza

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The present work focuses on the mineralogical analysis of sedimentary clay material samples collected from deposits located in the Campos dos Goytacazes-RJ (Brazil region. These samples are representative and widely used by the ceramic plants in production of bricks and roofing tiles. The samples were selected with the objective of analyzing their characteristics regarding chemical composition, loss on ignition, X-ray diffraction, morphology, particle size, plasticity and thermal analysis. The sedimentary red clays have low amount of SiO2, high amount of Al2O3, and high loss on ignition. In addition, it was found that the character of the clays is typically kaolinitic.O presente trabalho é focado sobre a análise mineralógica de amostras de argilas sedimentares coletadas de depósitos localizados na região de Campos dos Goytacazes-RJ (Brasil. Estas amostras são representativas e largamente usadas na produção de blocos cerâmicos e telhas. As amostras foram selecionadas com o intuito de analisar suas características com respeito à composição química, perda ao fogo, difração de raios X, morfologia, análise de tamanho de partícula, plasticidade e análise térmica. As argilas vermelhas sedimentares têm baixa quantidade de SiO2, alta quantidade de Al2O3 e alta perda ao fogo. Além disso, foi determinado que o caráter das argilas é tipicamente caulinítico.

  19. Revised mineralogic summary of Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bish, D.L.; Chipera, S.J.

    1989-03-01

    We have evaluated three-dimensional mineral distribution at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, using quantitative x-ray powder diffraction analysis. All data were obtained on core cuttings, or sidewall samples obtained from drill holes at and around Yucca Mountain. Previously published data are included with corrections, together with new data for several drill holes. The new data presented in this report used the internal standard method of quantitative analysis, which yields results of high precision for the phases commonly found in Yucca Mountain tuffs including opal-CT and glass. Mineralogical trends with depth previously noted are clearly shown by these new data. Glass occurrence is restricted almost without exception to above the present-day static water level (SWL), although glass has been identified below the SWL in partially zeolitized tuffs. Silica phases undergo well-defined transitions with depth, with tridymite and cristobalite occurring only above the SWL, opal-CT occurring with clinoptilolite-mordenite tuffs, and quartz most abundant below the SWL. Smectite occurs in small amounts in most samples but is enriched in two distinct zones. These zones are at the top of the vitric nonwelded base of the Tiva Canyon Member and at the top of the basal vitrophyre of the Topopah Spring Member. Our data support the presence of several zones of mordenite and clinoptilolite-heulandite as shown previously. New data on several deep clinoptililite-heulandite samples coexisting with analcime show that they are heulandite. Phillipsite has not been found in any Yucca Mountain samples, but erionite and chabazite have been found once in fractures. 21 refs., 17 figs.

  20. Gold process mineralogy: Objectives, techniques, and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Joe Y.; Cabri, Louis J.

    2004-07-01

    The extractive metallurgy of gold is largely driven by mineralogical factors such as gold particle size; association with other minerals; coatings; presence of cyanicides, oxygen consumers, and preg-robbers; presence of refractory gold minerals; and locking of submicroscopic gold in sulfide and sulfarsenide mineral structures. Gold process mineralogy addresses all issues related to gold ore processing by the detailed study of an ore or a mill product. The methodology is widely used as a predictive tool in feasibility studies and during the process development stage, and as a trouble-shooting tool for mineral processing and hydrometallurgical operations.

  1. Iron Solubility Depending on the Mineralogical Composition of Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journet, E.; Desboeufs, K.; Chevaillier, S.; Caquineau, S.

    2008-12-01

    Dust deposition in open ocean is recognised as an important supply of iron for phytoplankton community. Various previous studies have shown an extremely variable solubility (0,01-80%) and numerous factors influencing this solubility, as suspended particules concentration, chemical and photochemical atmospheric process, aerosol sources (Maholwald et al., 2005). Despite these numerous studies, any factor of influence seems to be dominant enough to enable a comprehensive parameterization of iron solubility. Recently, dissolution experiment have been conducted on pure mineral that composed dust, like illite, feldpars, smectite and iron (hydr-)oxide. This study has shown that iron solubility is extremely dependent on the mineral that is considered. Iron coming from aluminosilicates is much more soluble that iron derived from iron (hyd-)oxides (Journet et al., 2008). According to these results, dissolution experiments have been led on dust particles collected in different source areas, in West Africa, and after transport, in tropical Atlantic Ocean. These experiments show that iron solubility is very low, always under 0,6%, in agreement with others observations in these regions (e.g. Baker et al., 2006). Furthermore, from bulk mineralogical analysis of the dust samples, iron solubility in source areas seems exclusively dependent on the mineralogical composition of dust particle. The greater iron solubilities (0,3%) corresponds to dust originated from central Sahara (Algeria, Lybia, Tunisia) where smectite are abundant in comparison to the others studied area (Sahel and Western Sahara) where iron mainly comes from iron (hydr-)oxide and illite. In this case, iron solubility does not exceed 0,13%. From comparison between these results and the lab data issued from Journet et al. (2008), a parameterization to estimate iron solubility from mineralogical composition of dust has been established and validated. Far from the source, iron solubility is usually greater than dust

  2. Satellite power systems (SPS) concept definition study. Volume 7: SPS program plan and economic analysis, appendixes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, G.

    1978-01-01

    Three appendixes in support of Volume 7 are contained in this document. The three appendixes are: (1) Satellite Power System Work Breakdown Structure Dictionary; (2) SPS cost Estimating Relationships; and (3) Financial and Operational Concept. Other volumes of the final report that provide additional detail are: Executive Summary; SPS Systems Requirements; SPS Concept Evolution; SPS Point Design Definition; Transportation and Operations Analysis; and SPS Technology Requirements and Verification.

  3. Applied behavior analysis as intervention for autism: definition, features and philosophical concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Síglia Pimentel Höher Camargo

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorder (ASD is a lifelong pervasive developmental disorder with no known causes and cure. However, educational and behavioral interventions with a foundation in applied behavior analysis (ABA have been shown to improve a variety of skill areas such as communication, social, academic, and adaptive behaviors of individuals with ASD. The goal of this work is to present the definition, features and philosophical concepts that underlie ABA and make this science an effective intervention method for people with autism.

  4. Silicate mineralogy at the surface of Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namur, Olivier; Charlier, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    NASA's MESSENGER spacecraft has revealed geochemical diversity across Mercury's volcanic crust. Near-infrared to ultraviolet spectra and images have provided evidence for the Fe2+-poor nature of silicate minerals, magnesium sulfide minerals in hollows and a darkening component attributed to graphite, but existing spectral data is insufficient to build a mineralogical map for the planet. Here we investigate the mineralogical variability of silicates in Mercury's crust using crystallization experiments on magmas with compositions and under reducing conditions expected for Mercury. We find a common crystallization sequence consisting of olivine, plagioclase, pyroxenes and tridymite for all magmas tested. Depending on the cooling rate, we suggest that lavas on Mercury are either fully crystallized or made of a glassy matrix with phenocrysts. Combining the experimental results with geochemical mapping, we can identify several mineralogical provinces: the Northern Volcanic Plains and Smooth Plains, dominated by plagioclase, the High-Mg province, strongly dominated by forsterite, and the Intermediate Plains, comprised of forsterite, plagioclase and enstatite. This implies a temporal evolution of the mineralogy from the oldest lavas, dominated by mafic minerals, to the youngest lavas, dominated by plagioclase, consistent with progressive shallowing and decreasing degree of mantle melting over time.

  5. Influence of mineralogical and heavy metal composition on natural radionuclide concentrations in the river sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, G; Ramasamy, V; Meenakshisundaram, V; Venkatachalapathy, R; Ponnusamy, V

    2011-10-01

    The natural radiation level has been determined for the sediment samples of the Ponnaiyar River with an aim of evaluating the radiation hazard. The mineralogical characterizations of the sediments have been carried out using the Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic technique. The relative distribution of major minerals is determined by calculating extinction coefficient. The concentration and spatial distribution of heavy metals (Pb, Cr, Cu, Zn and Ni) have been studied to understand the heavy metal contamination and its level of toxicity. To evaluate the potential toxicity, heavy metal concentrations are compared with different toxicological and geological reference values. The comparison results suggest that the present metals create an adverse effect on the aquatic ecosystems associated with this river. To assess the sediment contamination due to the studied heavy metals, the Pollution Load Index (PLI) is calculated. Multivariate Statistical analyses (Pearson Correlation, Cluster and Factor analysis) were carried out between the parameters obtained from radioactivity, mineralogical and geochemical analysis to know the existing relations. Obtained results showed that the effect of mineralogy on level of radioactivity should be significant. However, mineralogy effect on heavy metal composition in the sediments should be limited, indicating that other factors such as vicinity of the pollution sources are more important. Also, the influence of mineralogical characterization on level of radioactivity is significant, whereas the influence of the heavy metal composition on level of radioactivity should be limited.

  6. Women's empowerment in Pakistan-definitions and enabling and disenabling factors: a secondary data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante-Gavino, Maria Irma; Rattani, Salma; Khan, Kausar

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore Pakistani women's definition of women's empowerment, including its enabling and disenabling factors. Through understanding empowerment, interventions may be developed for women to be empowered. Transcriptions of 35 interviews from a previous study were reanalyzed through secondary data analysis. The themes of economic stability, social acceptability, educational achievement, and family harmony emerged for the concept of definition of empowerment. Themes for enabling factors were strength of personality and openness of mind. Disenabling factors had sociocultural influences, religious misinterpretations, and dominant ideology as themes. Pakistani women hold on to their customs, traditions, and religion tenaciously. The views of empowerment leading to the themes were expressed as true for their lives.

  7. The CheMin XRD on the Mars Science Laboratory Rover Curiosity: Construction, Operation, and Quantitative Mineralogical Results from the Surface of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, David F.

    2015-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory mission was launched from Cape Canaveral, Florida on Nov. 26, 2011 and landed in Gale crater, Mars on Aug. 6, 2012. MSL's mission is to identify and characterize ancient "habitable" environments on Mars. MSL's precision landing system placed the Curiosity rover within 2 km of the center of its 20 X 6 km landing ellipse, next to Gale's central mound, a 5,000 meter high pile of laminated sediment which may contain 1 billion years of Mars history. Curiosity carries with it a full suite of analytical instruments, including the CheMin X-ray diffractometer, the first XRD flown in space. CheMin is essentially a transmission X-ray pinhole camera. A fine-focus Co source and collimator transmits a 50µm beam through a powdered sample held between X-ray transparent plastic windows. The sample holder is shaken by a piezoelectric actuator such that the powder flows like a liquid, each grain passing in random orientation through the beam over time. Forward-diffracted and fluoresced X-ray photons from the sample are detected by an X-ray sensitive Charge Coupled Device (CCD) operated in single photon counting mode. When operated in this way, both the x,y position and the energy of each photon are detected. The resulting energy-selected Co Kalpha Debye-Scherrer pattern is used to determine the identities and amounts of minerals present via Rietveld refinement, and a histogram of all X-ray events constitutes an X-ray fluorescence analysis of the sample.The key role that definitive mineralogy plays in understanding the Martian surface is a consequence of the fact that minerals are thermodynamic phases, having known and specific ranges of temperature, pressure and composition within which they are stable. More than simple compositional analysis, definitive mineralogical analysis can provide information about pressure/temperature conditions of formation, past climate, water activity and the like. Definitive mineralogical analyses are necessary to establish

  8. Novel Visualization Approaches in Environmental Mineralogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, C. D.; Lopano, C. L.; Hummer, D. R.; Heaney, P. J.; Post, J. E.; Kubicki, J. D.; Sofo, J. O.

    2006-05-01

    Communicating the complexities of atomic scale reactions between minerals and fluids is fraught with intrinsic challenges. For example, an increasing number of techniques are now available for the interrogation of dynamical processes at the mineral-fluid interface. However, the time-dependent behavior of atomic interactions between a solid and a liquid is often not adequately captured by two-dimensional line drawings or images. At the same time, the necessity for describing these reactions to general audiences is growing more urgent, as funding agencies are amplifying their encouragement to scientists to reach across disciplines and to justify their studies to public audiences. To overcome the shortcomings of traditional graphical representations, the Center for Environmental Kinetics Analysis is creating three-dimensional visualizations of experimental and simulated mineral reactions. These visualizations are then displayed on a stereo 3D projection system called the GeoWall. Made possible (and affordable) by recent improvements in computer and data projector technology, the GeoWall system uses a combination of computer software and hardware, polarizing filters and polarizing glasses, to present visualizations in true 3D. The three-dimensional views greatly improve comprehension of complex multidimensional data, and animations of time series foster better understanding of the underlying processes. The visualizations also offer an effective means to communicate the complexities of environmental mineralogy to colleagues, students and the public. Here we present three different kinds of datasets that demonstrate the effectiveness of the GeoWall in clarifying complex environmental reactions at the atomic scale. First, a time-resolved series of diffraction patterns obtained during the hydrothermal synthesis of metal oxide phases from precursor solutions can be viewed as a surface with interactive controls for peak scaling and color mapping. Second, the results of

  9. CCD-Based XRD/XRF for Determining Environmental Mineralogy on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaniman, D. T.; Bish, D. L.; Blake, D. F.; Chipera, S. J.

    2000-01-01

    Health effects from Martian dusts will be a concern for any manned Mars missions. Nuisance dusts plagued the Apollo astronauts, but dusts of more hazardous mineralogy, in habitats occupied by Mars astronauts weakened by a long-duration mission, may be more than a nuisance. Chemical hazards in Martian regolith attributable to S, Cl, Br, Cd, and Pb are known or strongly suspected to be present, but terrestrial studies of the health effects of dusts indicate that accurate determination of mineralogy is a critical factor in evaluating inhalation hazards. Mineral inhalation hazards such as the Group-I carcinogenic zeolite erionite, which is demonstrated to cause mesothelioma, cannot be identified by chemical analysis alone. Studies of palagonite analogs raise the possibility that erionite may occur on Mars. In addition to health effects concerns, environmental mineralogy has significant importance in resource extraction, groundwater use, and sustained agriculture. The high sulfur and chlorine content of Martian regolith will affect all of these uses, but the nature of mineralogic reservoirs for S and Cl will determine their uptake and concentration in extracted groundwater and in agricultural applications of regolith. Wet chemistry experiments planned for the Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) will define some of the consequences of water/soil interaction, but an understanding of the mineralogic basis for water-rock reactions is needed to understand the mechanisms of reaction and to apply the results of a few experiments to larger scales and different conditions.

  10. Correlating Mineralogy and Amino Acid Contents of Milligram-Scale Murchison Carbonaceous Chondrite Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Aaron, S.; Berger, Eve L.; Locke, Darren R.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2015-01-01

    Amino acids, the building blocks of proteins, have been found to be indigenous in most of the carbonaceous chondrite groups. The abundances of amino acids, as well as their structural, enantiomeric and isotopic compositions differ significantly among meteorites of different groups and petrologic types. This suggests that there is a link between parent-body conditions, mineralogy and the synthesis and preservation of amino acids (and likely other organic molecules). However, elucidating specific causes for the observed differences in amino acid composition has proven extremely challenging because samples analyzed for amino acids are typically much larger ((is) approximately 100 mg powders) than the scale at which meteorite heterogeneity is observed (sub mm-scale differences, (is) approximately 1-mg or smaller samples). Thus, the effects of differences in mineralogy on amino acid abundances could not be easily discerned. Recent advances in the sensitivity of instrumentation have made possible the analysis of smaller samples for amino acids, enabling a new approach to investigate the link between mineralogical con-text and amino acid compositions/abundances in meteorites. Through coordinated mineral separation, mineral characterization and highly sensitive amino acid analyses, we have performed preliminary investigations into the relationship between meteorite mineralogy and amino acid composition. By linking amino acid data to mineralogy, we have started to identify amino acid-bearing mineral phases in different carbonaceous meteorites. The methodology and results of analyses performed on the Murchison meteorite are presented here.

  11. Mineralogy and Surface Composition of Asteroids

    CERN Document Server

    Reddy, Vishnu; Thomas, Cristina A; Moskovitz, Nicholas A; Burbine, Thomas H

    2015-01-01

    Methods to constrain the surface mineralogy of asteroids have seen considerable development during the last decade with advancement in laboratory spectral calibrations and validation of our interpretive methodologies by spacecraft rendezvous missions. This has enabled the accurate identification of several meteorite parent bodies in the main asteroid belt and helped constrain the mineral chemistries and abundances in ordinary chondrites and basaltic achondrites. With better quantification of spectral effects due to temperature, phase angle, and grain size, systematic discrepancies due to non-compositional factors can now be virtually eliminated for mafic silicate-bearing asteroids. Interpretation of spectrally featureless asteroids remains a challenge. This paper presents a review of all mineralogical interpretive tools currently in use and outlines procedures for their application.

  12. Mineralogical Evolution in Extreme Debris Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Kate

    2015-10-01

    Young (10-200 Myr), luminous (fractional luminosity on the order of 1.E-2) extreme debris disks provide a unique opportunity to explore exo-asteriod and exo-planetesimal collisions during the oligarchic and chaotic phases of terrestrial planet-building. We propose to obtain low-resolution grism spectra of four extreme debris disks to document and characterize the mineralogy changes in the mid-IR region where strong peaks originating from silica and forsterite dust can be easily identified. The proposed observations will supplement our on-going warm Spitzer monitoring program studying disk variability at 3.6 and 4.5 microns, provide immediate insights on the long-term mineralogical evolution in comparison with the existing Spitzer IRS spectra, and will bridge to similar studies that JWST will provide in the near future.

  13. An unpublished text of Jovellanos about mineralogy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge ORDAZ GARGALLO

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available An unpublished manuscript of Gaspar Melchor de Jovellanos about the history of mineralogy, written during his captivity in Bellver Castle (Palma de Mallorca is presented and analyzed. In this writing the importance of the chemical knowledge as a source of other branches of science and its applications in different fields of agriculture, mining and industry is considered. The author made a historical synthesis reviewing the men of science that contributed in a great extent to the advance of the chemistry and mineralogy. The text clearly supports the new contributions of Lavoisier and other supporters of experimentation as a scientific method, which agrees with Jovellanos’ ideas about the development of the «useful» sciences for the progress of the countries.

  14. An unpublished text of Jovellanos about mineralogy

    OpenAIRE

    Ordaz Gargallo, Jorge; Gutiérrez Claverol, Manuel; De Lorenzo Álvarez, Elena

    2012-01-01

    An unpublished manuscript of Gaspar Melchor de Jovellanos about the history of mineralogy, written during his captivity in Bellver Castle (Palma de Mallorca) is presented and analyzed. In this writing the importance of the chemical knowledge as a source of other branches of science and its applications in different fields of agriculture, mining and industry is considered. The author made a historical synthesis reviewing the men of science that contributed in a great extent to the advance of t...

  15. Advanced Turbine Systems Program, Conceptual Design and Product Development. Task 6, System definition and analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    The strategy of the ATS program is to develop a new baseline for industrial gas turbine systems for the 21st century, meeting the buying criteria of industrial gas turbine end users, and having growth potential. These criteria guided the Solar ATS Team in selecting the system definition described in this Topical Report. The key to selecting the ATS system definition was meeting or exceeding each technical goal without negatively impacting other commercial goals. Among the most crucial goals are the buying criteria of the industrial gas turbine market. Solar started by preliminarily considering several cycles with the potential to meet ATS program goals. These candidates were initially narrowed based on a qualitative assessment of several factors such as the potential for meeting program goals and for future growth; the probability of successful demonstration within the program`s schedule and expected level of funding; and the appropriateness of the cycle in light of end users` buying criteria. A first level Quality Function Deployment (QFD) analysis then translated customer needs into functional requirements, and ensured favorable interaction between concept features. Based on this analysis, Solar selected a recuperated cycle as the best approach to fulfilling both D.O.E. and Solar marketing goals. This report details the design and analysis of the selected engine concept, and explains how advanced features of system components achieve program goals. Estimates of cost, performance, emissions and RAMD (reliability, availability, maintainability, durability) are also documented in this report.

  16. A "naturally sweet" definition: an analysis of the sugar association's definition of the natural as a terministic screen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiss, Sarah N

    2015-01-01

    The political nature of sugar as a cultural commodity can be traced back for centuries. While the issues surrounding sugar consumption have changed, power struggles still exist as stakeholders struggle to identify, make sense of, and manage the relationship between sugar and obesity. I explore the rhetorical contributions of the Sugar Association to public understandings of sweeteners. Specifically, I argue that the Sugar Association positioned sugar as the best choice for consumers by positioning their sweetener within a definition of the natural that the organization constructs. I draw on Burke's (1966) notion of terministic screens as a theoretical framework through which sugar was positioned as the best sweetener option and HFCS and artificial sweeteners were isolated as unnatural and, therefore, unwise choices for consumers. Then, I argue that the association's definition of "the natural" was strategically ambiguous, serving to distinguish sugar from other sweeteners. I conclude by evaluating the soundness and sustainability of the association's discursive contributions to public understandings of health and its implications for key stakeholders in the sweetener community.

  17. Risk stratification of periprocedural myocardial infarction after percutaneous coronary intervention: Analysis based on the SCAI definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dong; Li, Yiping; Yin, Dong; He, Yuan; Chen, Changzhe; Song, Chenxi; Yan, Ruohua; Zhu, Chen'gang; Xu, Bo; Dou, Kefei

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the predictors of and generate a risk prediction method for periprocedural myocardial infarction (PMI) after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) using the new PMI definition proposed by the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI). The SCAI-defined PMI was found to be associated with worse prognosis than the PMI diagnosed by other definitions. However, few large-sample studies have attempted to predict the risk of SCAI-defined PMI. A total of 3,371 patients (3,516 selective PCIs) were included in this single-center retrospective analysis. The diagnostic criteria for PMI were set according to the SCAI definition. All clinical characteristics, coronary angiography findings and PCI procedural factors were collected. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify independent predictors of PMI. To evaluate the risk of PMI, a multivariable risk score (PMI score) was constructed with incremental weights attributed to each component variable according to their estimated coefficients. PMI occurred in 108 (3.1%) of all patients. Age, multivessel treatment, at least one bifurcation treatment and total treated lesion length were independent predictors of SCAI-defined PMI. PMI scores ranged from 0 to 20. The C-statistic of PMI score was 0.71 (95% confidence interval: 0.66-0.76). PMI rates increased significantly from 1.96% in the non-high-risk group (PMI score PMI score ≥ 10) (P PMI. The PMI score could help identify patients at high risk of PMI after PCI. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Analysis of "anti-crisis strategy" definition essence and its role in enterprise anti-crisis management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Тетяна Олександрівна Ставерська

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of existing research of the category essence of "anti-crisis strategy" is given, the main essential features are revealed. These features are best matching its content. Existing approaches to determine the definition of "anti-crisis strategy" are systematized and summarized. Based on the allocation of essential features of anti-crisis strategy, the author’s generalized definition of this category is formulated considering the trajectory of the turbulent processes in environment

  19. X-ray diffraction results from mars science laboratory: Mineralogy of rocknest at Gale crater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bish, D.L.; Blake, D.F.; Vaniman, D.T.; Chipera, S.J.; Morris, R.V.; Ming, D.W.; Treiman, A.H.; Sarrazin, P.; Morrison, S.M.; Downs, R.T.; Achilles, C.N.; Yen, A.S.; Bristow, T.F.; Crisp, J.A.; Morookian, J.M.; Farmer, J.D.; Rampe, E.B.; Stolper, E.M.; Spanovich, N.; MSL Science Team, the

    2013-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity scooped samples of soil from the Rocknest aeolian bedform in Gale crater. Analysis of the soil with the Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) x-ray diffraction (XRD) instrument revealed plagioclase (~An57), forsteritic olivine (~Fo62), augite, and pigeonite, w

  20. Systems Analysis, Scenario Construction and Consequence Analysis Definition for SITE-94

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, N.A.; Robinson, P. [Intera Information Technologies Ltd (United Kingdom); Andersson, Johan; Wingefors, S. [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden); Skagius, K.; Wiborgh, M. [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Wene, C.O. [Chalmers Inst. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    1995-06-01

    SITE-94 is a performance assessment of a hypothetical repository at a real site. The main objective of the project is to determine how site specific data should be assimilated into the performance assessment process and to evaluate how uncertainties inherent in site characterization will influence performance assessment results. This report uses scenario definition work as a vehicle to introduce the systems approach to performance assessment which has been developed and tested in SITE-94 and which constitutes one of the main advances made during the project. The results of the application of the methodology are presented separately, in the SITE-94 Summary Report. 40 refs, 21 figs, 12 tabs.

  1. Mineralogy and geochemistry of soils from glass houses and solariums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulgariu, Dumitru; Filipov, Feodor; Rusu, Constantin; Bulgariu, Laura

    2010-05-01

    The experimental studies have been performed on soil samples from Copou-Iaşi, Bacău and Bârlad (România) glass houses. We have specially follow the aspects concerning to the distribution of occurrence forms, composition and structure of mineral and organic components, and the genetic correlations between these in conditions of soils from glass houses, respectively. The results regarding the distribution tendencies on profile and the correlations between mineral and organic components of studied soils have been correlated with the results of microscopic, spectral (IR and Raman) and X-ray diffraction studies, and with the results of thermodynamic modelling of mineral equilibriums and dynamics of pedogenesis processes, in conditions of soils from glass houses. The utilization of intensive cultivation technologies of vegetables in glass houses determined the degradation of morphological, physical and chemical characteristics of soils, by fast evolution of salted processes (salinization and / or sodization), compaction, carbonatation, eluviation-illuviation, frangipane formation, stagnogleization, gleization, etc. Under these conditions, at depth of 30-40 cm is formed a compact and impenetrable horizon with frangipane characteristics, expresses more or less. The aspects about the formation of frangipane horizon in soils from glasshouses are not yet sufficiently know. Whatever of the formation processes, the frangipane horizons determined a sever segregation in pedo-geochemical evolution of soils from glasshouses, with very important consequences on the agrochemical quality of these soils. The soils from glass houses are characterized by a very large variability of mineralogy and chemistry, which are traduced by intense modifications of superior horizons, in many cases there are conditions for the apparition of new pedogenetic horizons through new-pedogenesis processes. Under these conditions the definition of some general characteristics of soils from glasshouses is

  2. On the definition of innovation in design: Using network analysis to explore complex concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Reszka Pinheiro

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper, aiming at understanding the different definitions of innovation in the design domain, mapped all of its citations in one of the journals that best reflects its research state of art. This quantitative and qualitative exploratory study was conducted by using a variant of content analysis technique and the network analysis technique. Based on the 13 appropriate papers found, 163 semantic categories were discerned and fully connected in a network composed of 8 clusters. According to this framework, innovation in the design domain refers primarily to the socially accepted alternatives adopted by companies to tackle the present problems and the future risks, especially through the development of new tailor-made products to satisfy market needs.

  3. Drag/thrust analysis of jet-propelled transonic transport aircraft; definition of physical drag components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Destarac, D. [Office National d' Etudes et de Recherches Aerospatiales (ONERA), 92 - Chatillon (France); Van der Vooren, J. [Senior research scientist, retired, Hoekse Waard (Netherlands)

    2004-09-01

    Drag/thrust analysis of jet-propelled transonic transport aircraft on the basis of calculated viscous flow is discussed. Unique definitions for viscous drag plus wave drag and for induced drag are established. The concept of additive through flow drag is introduced. Drag/thrust bookkeeping is given attention. All drag components can be calculated in the flow region adjacent to the aircraft, where numerical accuracy is expectingly highest. Uniform handling of complex aircraft configurations is brought within reach. Near-field/far-field drag balances are exact. Computational aspects are discussed, in particular the elimination of spurious drag sources. Numerical examples are given for a wing-body and for a wing-body-pylon-nacelle configuration. In either case, the spurious drag sources are eliminated. Acceptable agreement is obtained for the total drag in the first case, and for the installation drag in the second case. Extension of the analysis presented to propeller-driven transport aircraft is straightforward. (author)

  4. The Definition of the Scalar Product: An Analysis and Critique of a Classroom Episode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Colin; de Villiers, Michael

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present, analyse and critique an episode from a secondary school lesson involving an introduction to the definition of the scalar product. Although the teacher attempted to be explicit about the difference between a definition and a theorem, emphasizing that a definition was just an arbitrary assumption, a student rejected the…

  5. 3D intrathoracic region definition and its application to PET-CT analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheirsilp, Ronnarit; Bascom, Rebecca; Allen, Thomas W.; Higgins, William E.

    2014-03-01

    Recently developed integrated PET-CT scanners give co-registered multimodal data sets that offer complementary three-dimensional (3D) digital images of the chest. PET (positron emission tomography) imaging gives highly specific functional information of suspect cancer sites, while CT (X-ray computed tomography) gives associated anatomical detail. Because the 3D CT and PET scans generally span the body from the eyes to the knees, accurate definition of the intrathoracic region is vital for focusing attention to the central-chest region. In this way, diagnostically important regions of interest (ROIs), such as central-chest lymph nodes and cancer nodules, can be more efficiently isolated. We propose a method for automatic segmentation of the intrathoracic region from a given co-registered 3D PET-CT study. Using the 3D CT scan as input, the method begins by finding an initial intrathoracic region boundary for a given 2D CT section. Next, active contour analysis, driven by a cost function depending on local image gradient, gradient-direction, and contour shape features, iteratively estimates the contours spanning the intrathoracic region on neighboring 2D CT sections. This process continues until the complete region is defined. We next present an interactive system that employs the segmentation method for focused 3D PET-CT chest image analysis. A validation study over a series of PET-CT studies reveals that the segmentation method gives a Dice index accuracy of less than 98%. In addition, further results demonstrate the utility of the method for focused 3D PET-CT chest image analysis, ROI definition, and visualization.

  6. GACT: a Genome build and Allele definition Conversion Tool for SNP imputation and meta-analysis in genetic association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulovari, Arvis; Li, Dawei

    2014-07-19

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have successfully identified genes associated with complex human diseases. Although much of the heritability remains unexplained, combining single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotypes from multiple studies for meta-analysis will increase the statistical power to identify new disease-associated variants. Meta-analysis requires same allele definition (nomenclature) and genome build among individual studies. Similarly, imputation, commonly-used prior to meta-analysis, requires the same consistency. However, the genotypes from various GWAS are generated using different genotyping platforms, arrays or SNP-calling approaches, resulting in use of different genome builds and allele definitions. Incorrect assumptions of identical allele definition among combined GWAS lead to a large portion of discarded genotypes or incorrect association findings. There is no published tool that predicts and converts among all major allele definitions. In this study, we have developed a tool, GACT, which stands for Genome build and Allele definition Conversion Tool, that predicts and inter-converts between any of the common SNP allele definitions and between the major genome builds. In addition, we assessed several factors that may affect imputation quality, and our results indicated that inclusion of singletons in the reference had detrimental effects while ambiguous SNPs had no measurable effect. Unexpectedly, exclusion of genotypes with missing rate > 0.001 (40% of study SNPs) showed no significant decrease of imputation quality (even significantly higher when compared to the imputation with singletons in the reference), especially for rare SNPs. GACT is a new, powerful, and user-friendly tool with both command-line and interactive online versions that can accurately predict, and convert between any of the common allele definitions and between genome builds for genome-wide meta-analysis and imputation of genotypes from SNP-arrays or deep

  7. Temperature buffer test. Hydro-mechanical and chemical/ mineralogical characterizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aakesson, Mattias; Olsson, Siv; Dueck, Ann; Nilsson, Ulf; Karnland, Ola [Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden); Kiviranta, Leena; Kumpulainen, Sirpa [BandTech Oy, Helsinki (Finland); Linden, Johan [Aabo Akademi, Aabo (Finland)

    2012-01-15

    The Temperature Buffer Test (TBT) is a joint project between SKB/ANDRA and supported by ENRESA (modeling) and DBE (instrumentation), which aims at improving the understanding and to model the thermo-hydro-mechanical behavior of buffers made of swelling clay submitted to high temperatures (over 100 deg C) during the water saturation process. The test has been carried out in a KBS-3 deposition hole at Aspo HRL. It was installed during the spring of 2003. Two steel heaters (3 m long, 0.6 m diameter) and two buffer arrangements have been investigated: the lower heater was surrounded by rings of compacted Wyoming bentonite only, whereas the upper heater was surrounded by a composite barrier, with a sand shield between the heater and the bentonite. The test was dismantled and sampled during the winter of 2009/2010. This report presents the hydro-mechanical and chemical/mineralogical characterization program which was launched subsequent to the dismantling operation. The main goal has been to investigate if any significant differences could be observed between material from the field experiment and the reference material. The field samples were mainly taken from Ring 4 (located at the mid-section around the lower heater), in which the temperature in the innermost part reached 155 deg C. The following hydro-mechanical properties have been determined for the material (test technique within brackets): hydraulic conductivity (swelling pressure device), swelling pressure (swelling pressure device), unconfined compression strength (mechanical press), shear strength (triaxial cell) and retention properties (jar method). The following chemical/mineralogical properties (methods within brackets) were determined: anion analysis of water leachates (IC), chemical composition (ICP/AES+MS, EGA), cation exchange capacity (CEC, Cu-trien method) and exchangeable cations (exchange with NH4, ICPAES), mineralogical composition (XRD and FTIR), element distribution and microstructure (SEM and

  8. Drought in a human-modified world: reframing drought definitions, understanding, and analysis approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Loon, Anne F.; Stahl, Kerstin; Di Baldassarre, Giuliano; Clark, Julian; Rangecroft, Sally; Wanders, Niko; Gleeson, Tom; Van Dijk, Albert I. J. M.; Tallaksen, Lena M.; Hannaford, Jamie; Uijlenhoet, Remko; Teuling, Adriaan J.; Hannah, David M.; Sheffield, Justin; Svoboda, Mark; Verbeiren, Boud; Wagener, Thorsten; Van Lanen, Henny A. J.

    2016-09-01

    In the current human-modified world, or Anthropocene, the state of water stores and fluxes has become dependent on human as well as natural processes. Water deficits (or droughts) are the result of a complex interaction between meteorological anomalies, land surface processes, and human inflows, outflows, and storage changes. Our current inability to adequately analyse and manage drought in many places points to gaps in our understanding and to inadequate data and tools. The Anthropocene requires a new framework for drought definitions and research. Drought definitions need to be revisited to explicitly include human processes driving and modifying soil moisture drought and hydrological drought development. We give recommendations for robust drought definitions to clarify timescales of drought and prevent confusion with related terms such as water scarcity and overexploitation. Additionally, our understanding and analysis of drought need to move from single driver to multiple drivers and from uni-directional to multi-directional. We identify research gaps and propose analysis approaches on (1) drivers, (2) modifiers, (3) impacts, (4) feedbacks, and (5) changing the baseline of drought in the Anthropocene. The most pressing research questions are related to the attribution of drought to its causes, to linking drought impacts to drought characteristics, and to societal adaptation and responses to drought. Example questions include (i) What are the dominant drivers of drought in different parts of the world? (ii) How do human modifications of drought enhance or alleviate drought severity? (iii) How do impacts of drought depend on the physical characteristics of drought vs. the vulnerability of people or the environment? (iv) To what extent are physical and human drought processes coupled, and can feedback loops be identified and altered to lessen or mitigate drought? (v) How should we adapt our drought analysis to accommodate changes in the normal situation (i.e. what

  9. Detailed description of oil shale organic and mineralogical heterogeneity via fourier transform infrared mircoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Kathryn E.; Birdwell, Justin E.; Foster, Michael; Gutierrez, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Mineralogical and geochemical information on reservoir and source rocks is necessary to assess and produce from petroleum systems. The standard methods in the petroleum industry for obtaining these properties are bulk measurements on homogenized, generally crushed, and pulverized rock samples and can take from hours to days to perform. New methods using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy have been developed to more rapidly obtain information on mineralogy and geochemistry. However, these methods are also typically performed on bulk, homogenized samples. We present a new approach to rock sample characterization incorporating multivariate analysis and FTIR microscopy to provide non-destructive, spatially resolved mineralogy and geochemistry on whole rock samples. We are able to predict bulk mineralogy and organic carbon content within the same margin of error as standard characterization techniques, including X-ray diffraction (XRD) and total organic carbon (TOC) analysis. Validation of the method was performed using two oil shale samples from the Green River Formation in the Piceance Basin with differing sedimentary structures. One sample represents laminated Green River oil shales, and the other is representative of oil shale breccia. The FTIR microscopy results on the oil shales agree with XRD and LECO TOC data from the homogenized samples but also give additional detail regarding sample heterogeneity by providing information on the distribution of mineral phases and organic content. While measurements for this study were performed on oil shales, the method could also be applied to other geological samples, such as other mudrocks, complex carbonates, and soils.

  10. Comparative mineralogical characteristics of red soils from South Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlena Yaneva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to compare mineralogical composition of red soils, formed on marbles in South Bulgaria. We used mineralogical analysis of heavy and light mineral fraction in immersion under polarizing microscope and X-ray diffraction analysis of bulk sample and clay fraction. Three test polygons, located in South Bulgaria were examined: Petrovo, Nova Lovcha and Dobrostan, which are characterized with different latitude, altitude, and exposition. Three or more sites from each polygon were sampled and analyzed. The red soils are formed on white and gray calcite and calcite-dolomite marbles, impure silicate-rich marbles and only in one site – on marble breccias. We determined the following mineral phases in red soils: calcite, dolomite, quarts, and feldspars, mica, illite-type mica, illite, smectite, vermiculite-smectite, and kaolinite. Heavy minerals are represented by amphibole, titanite and epidote, and minor amounts of zircon, garnet, tourmaline, rutile, pyroxene, andalusite, kyanite, sillimanite and apatite. Opaque minerals are predominantly goethite and hematite. Plant tissue is abundant in light fraction from the uppermost soil horizons. Analyses of heavy mineral fraction show presence of metamorphic and igneous minerals which indicate participation of weathering products from other rock types in the nearby area. The types of heavy minerals in soils depend more on composition of parent rocks and geomorphic position than on climate type. Soils from Nova Lovcha show similar composition, but the quantity of goethite and hematite significantly increase in soil from plain. Typical high-metamorphic minerals as andalusite, kyanite and sillimanite present only in Nova Lovcha, while garnet dominates in Petrovo and opaque minerals - in Dobrostan. Red soils, formed on slopes, where erosion prevails over accumulation, contain more illite, smectite and vermiculite-smectite, and very few or no kaolinite, whereas the kaolinite is dominant in soils

  11. Analysis of the link between a definition of sustainability and the life cycle methodologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Andreas; Herrmann, Ivan Tengbjerg; Bjørn, Anders

    2013-01-01

    , is presented and detailed to a level enabling an analysis of the relation to the impact categories at midpoint level considered in life cycle (LC) methodologies.The interpretation of the definition of sustainability as outlined in Our Common Future (WCED 1987) suggests that the assessment of a product......'s sustainability is about addressing the extent to which product life cycles affect poverty levels among the current generation, as well as changes in the level of natural, human and produced and social capital available for the future population. It is shown that the extent to which product life cycles affect...... poverty to some extent is covered by impact categories included in existing SLCA approaches. It is also found that the extent to which product life cycles affect natural capital is well covered by LCA, and human capital is covered by both LCA and SLCA but in different ways. Produced capital is not to any...

  12. IAEA CRP on HTGR Uncertainty Analysis: Benchmark Definition and Test Cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerhard Strydom; Frederik Reitsma; Hans Gougar; Bismark Tyobeka; Kostadin Ivanov

    2012-11-01

    Uncertainty and sensitivity studies are essential elements of the reactor simulation code verification and validation process. Although several international uncertainty quantification activities have been launched in recent years in the LWR, BWR and VVER domains (e.g. the OECD/NEA BEMUSE program [1], from which the current OECD/NEA LWR Uncertainty Analysis in Modelling (UAM) benchmark [2] effort was derived), the systematic propagation of uncertainties in cross-section, manufacturing and model parameters for High Temperature Reactor (HTGR) designs has not been attempted yet. This paper summarises the scope, objectives and exercise definitions of the IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on HTGR UAM [3]. Note that no results will be included here, as the HTGR UAM benchmark was only launched formally in April 2012, and the specification is currently still under development.

  13. Analysis of risk factors for schizophrenia with two different case definitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Holger J; Tidselbak Larsen, Janne; Mors, Ole

    2015-01-01

    Different case definitions of schizophrenia have been used in register based research. However, no previous study has externally validated two different case definitions of schizophrenia against a wide range of risk factors for schizophrenia. We investigated hazard ratios (HRs) for a wide range...... of risk factors for ICD-10 DCR schizophrenia using a nationwide Danish sample of 2,772,144 residents born in 1955-1997. We compared one contact only (OCO) (the case definition of schizophrenia used in Danish register based studies) with two or more contacts (TMC) (a case definition of at least 2 inpatient...... contacts with schizophrenia). During the follow-up, the OCO definition included 15,074 and the TMC 7562 cases; i.e. half as many. The TMC case definition appeared to select for a worse illness course. A wide range of risk factors were uniformly associated with both case definitions and only slightly higher...

  14. Military Service Member and Veteran Reintegration: A Conceptual Analysis, Unified Definition, and Key Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnitsky, Christine A; Fisher, Michael P; Blevins, Cara L

    2017-01-01

    Returning military service members and veterans (MSMVs) may experience a variety of stress-related disorders and challenges when reintegrating from the military to the community. Facilitating the reintegration, transition, readjustment and coping, and community integration, of MSMVs is a societal priority. To date, research addressing MSMV reintegration has not identified a comprehensive definition of the term or defined the broader context within which the process of reintegration occurs although both are needed to promote valid and reliable measurement of reintegration and clarify related challenges, processes, and their impact on outcomes. Therefore, this principle-based concept analysis sought to review existing empirical reintegration measurement instruments and identify the problems and needs of MSMV reintegration to provide a unified definition of reintegration to guide future research, clinical practice, and related services. We identified 1,459 articles in the health and social sciences literature, published between 1990 and 2015, by searching multiple electronic databases. Screening of abstracts and full text review based on our inclusion/exclusion criteria, yielded 117 articles for review. Two investigators used constant conceptual comparison to evaluate relevant articles independently. We examined the term reintegration and related terms (i.e., transition, readjustment, community integration) identifying trends in their use over time, analyzed the eight reintegration survey instruments, and synthesized service member and veteran self-reported challenges and needs for reintegration. More reintegration research was published during the last 5 years (n = 373) than in the previous 10 years combined (n = 130). The research suggests coping with life stresses plays an integral role in military service member and veteran post-deployment reintegration. Key domains of reintegration include individual, interpersonal, community organizations, and societal factors

  15. Military Service Member and Veteran Reintegration: A Conceptual Analysis, Unified Definition, and Key Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnitsky, Christine A.; Fisher, Michael P.; Blevins, Cara L.

    2017-01-01

    Returning military service members and veterans (MSMVs) may experience a variety of stress-related disorders and challenges when reintegrating from the military to the community. Facilitating the reintegration, transition, readjustment and coping, and community integration, of MSMVs is a societal priority. To date, research addressing MSMV reintegration has not identified a comprehensive definition of the term or defined the broader context within which the process of reintegration occurs although both are needed to promote valid and reliable measurement of reintegration and clarify related challenges, processes, and their impact on outcomes. Therefore, this principle-based concept analysis sought to review existing empirical reintegration measurement instruments and identify the problems and needs of MSMV reintegration to provide a unified definition of reintegration to guide future research, clinical practice, and related services. We identified 1,459 articles in the health and social sciences literature, published between 1990 and 2015, by searching multiple electronic databases. Screening of abstracts and full text review based on our inclusion/exclusion criteria, yielded 117 articles for review. Two investigators used constant conceptual comparison to evaluate relevant articles independently. We examined the term reintegration and related terms (i.e., transition, readjustment, community integration) identifying trends in their use over time, analyzed the eight reintegration survey instruments, and synthesized service member and veteran self-reported challenges and needs for reintegration. More reintegration research was published during the last 5 years (n = 373) than in the previous 10 years combined (n = 130). The research suggests coping with life stresses plays an integral role in military service member and veteran post-deployment reintegration. Key domains of reintegration include individual, interpersonal, community organizations, and societal factors

  16. Mineralogical Signatures in Electrically Coupled Marine Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauermeister, A.; Gorby, Y. A.; Schramm, J.

    2014-12-01

    'Electric cable bacteria' are organisms of the family Desulfobulbaceaethat exhibit a novel method of electron transport. Cells form conductive filaments that function like electric wires, transferring electrons over distances of more than 1 cm from deep sulfidic sediments to oxygen or other electron acceptors near the soil/water interface. The rate of electron transfer across redox boundaries far exceeds that of diffusion limited processes and generates pH gradients that can significantly influence geochemical reactions, leading to the formation of distinct mineralogical profiles unlikely to be created by abiotic means. Electrically coupled sediments are characterized by carbonate and iron sulfide dissolution reactions occurring at depth and formation of carbonate and metal oxide crusts at the surface, exhibiting a reverse pattern compared to conventional sediment geochemistry. Our research seeks to address the following questions: How prevalent are electric cable bacteria in diverse environments? How do biogeochemical conditions such as ion concentration influence mineral formation? Do biogenic minerals participate in charge transfer? What is the importance of electric charge transfer in the subsurface or other low energy habitats? Can mineral banding patterns caused by cable bacteria activity be preserved in the geologic record? With this research we hope to further elucidate the impact of biologically-induced electric fields on the mineralogy of sediments.

  17. Topographical mineralogy of the Bamble sector, south Norway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijland, T.G.; Zwaan, J.C.; Touret, L.

    1998-01-01

    The Bamble sector of southern Norway is a classic high grade metamorphic gneiss region, which provided specimens to many mineralogical collections all over the world. The topographical mineralogy of this area is described and reviewed. All minerals known to occur in the area are listed according to

  18. Sand and clay mineralogy of sal forest soils of the Doon Siwalik Himalayas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mukesh; R K Manhas; A K Tripathi; A K Raina; M K Gupta; S K Kamboj

    2011-02-01

    The peteromineralogical characterization of the soil was carried out for the 12 soil profiles exposed in the Shorea robusta dominated forests of the Siwalik forest division, Dehradun. The quartz was observed as the dominating light mineral fraction (64–80%) in all the profiles studied. Biotite, hornblende, zircon, tourmaline, rutile and opaques comprising of iron minerals constituted the heavy mineral fraction (20%). The mineralogy of both the sand and clay fractions revealed a mixed mineralogy. The clay minerals in the order of their dominance were vermiculite, illite, kaolinite and mixed layer minerals. The presence of vermiculite and illite in appreciable quantities indicates that these were synthesized from the K-rich soil solution, as orthoclase and micas were present in significant quantities in the sand minerals. The mineral suites identified in the study shows that the geological, climatological and topographical factors of the region collectively played a dominant role in their formation and transformation. After critical appraisal of the results, it may be deduced that the mineralogical composition, physicochemical properties and total elemental analysis of the soils do not show any deficiency of the bases and other plant nutrients in general. The inherent fertility of the soil is good as indicated by the sand and clay mineralogy of the soil and the biotite and feldspar together with the mica is an important source of nutrients for the vegetation in the soils of the Doon valley.

  19. The definition of the scalar product: an analysis and critique of a classroom episode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Colin; de Villiers, Michael

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present, analyse and critique an episode from a secondary school lesson involving an introduction to the definition of the scalar product. Although the teacher attempted to be explicit about the difference between a definition and a theorem, emphasizing that a definition was just an arbitrary assumption, a student rejected the teacher's definition in favour of his own alternative. With reference to this particular case, we seek to explore some ways in which teachers can introduce mathematical definitions to students so as to support, rather than attempt to circumvent, their mathematical sense making. In this regard, we believe that it is important to develop learning opportunities for students which help them to gain some appreciation of important structural and historical reasons that underpin the definitional choices made.

  20. Mineralogy and composition of the oceanic mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putirka, Keith; Ryerson, F.J.; Perfit, Michael; Ridley, W. Ian

    2011-01-01

    The mineralogy of the oceanic basalt source region is examined by testing whether a peridotite mineralogy can yield observed whole-rock and olivine compositions from (1) the Hawaiian Islands, our type example of a mantle plume, and (2) the Siqueiros Transform, which provides primitive samples of normal mid-ocean ridge basalt. New olivine compositional data from phase 2 of the Hawaii Scientific Drilling Project (HSDP2) show that higher Ni-in-olivine at the Hawaiian Islands is due to higher temperatures (T) of melt generation and processing (by c. 300°C) related to the Hawaiian mantle plume. DNi is low at high T, so parental Hawaiian basalts are enriched in NiO. When Hawaiian (picritic) parental magmas are transported to shallow depths, olivine precipitation occurs at lower temperatures, where DNi is high, leading to high Ni-in-olivine. Similarly, variations in Mn and Fe/Mn ratios in olivines are explained by contrasts in the temperatures of magma processing. Using the most mafic rocks to delimit Siqueiros and Hawaiian Co and Ni contents in parental magmas and mantle source compositions also shows that both suites can be derived from natural peridotites, but are inconsistent with partial melting of natural pyroxenites. Whole-rock compositions at Hawaii and Siqueiros are also matched by partial melting experiments conducted on peridotite bulk compositions. Hawaiian whole-rocks have elevated FeO contents compared with Siqueiros, which can be explained if Hawaiian parental magmas are generated from peridotite at 4-5 GPa, in contrast to pressures of slightly greater than 1 GPa for melt generation at Siqueiros; these pressures are consistent with olivine thermometry, as described in an earlier paper. SiO2-enriched Koolau compositions are reproduced if high-Fe Hawaiian parental magmas re-equilibrate at 1-1·5 GPa. Peridotite partial melts from experimental studies also reproduce the CaO and Al2O3 contents of Hawaiian (and Siqueiros) whole-rocks. Hawaiian magmas have TiO2

  1. Surface chemistry and mineralogy. [of planet Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banin, A.; Clark, B. C.; Waenke, H.

    1992-01-01

    The accumulated knowledge on the chemistry and mineralogy of Martian surface materials is reviewed. Pertinent information obtained by direct analyses of the soil on Mars by the Viking Landers, by remote sensing of Mars from flyby and orbiting spacecraft, by telescopic observations from earth, and through detailed analyses of the SNC meteorites presumed to be Martian rocks are summarized and analyzed. A compositional model for Mars soil, giving selected average elemental concentrations of major and trace elements, is suggested. It is proposed that the fine surface materials on Mars are a multicomponent mixture of weathered and nonweathered minerals. Smectite clays, silicate mineraloids similar to palagonite, and scapolite are suggested as possible major candidate components among the weathered minerals.

  2. Stable NRM and mineralogy in Allende - Chondrules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasilewski, P. J.; Saralker, C.

    The main objective of the present investigation is related to a description of the magnetic and mineralogic contrasts between chondrules which have a natural remanent magnetization (NRM) vector that is ultrastable during alternating field (AF) demagnetization, and those which have unstable NRM vectors when subjected to the same treatment. The results presented in the present investigation together with new magnetic results from Allende listed in a summary provided by Wasilewski (1981) are used as a basis to argue that the stable NRM in Allende was acquired during a sulfidation event. Attention is given to magnetic phases in Allende, experimental results obtained in magnetic studies conducted with 20 chondrules, and a magnetization model for Allende.

  3. Social and Ecological Systems as an Object of Ecological Territorial Marketing: Analysis and Synthesis of Definitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasiya Sergeevna Strekalova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article the marketing role in a sustainable development of territories and the solution of problems of environmental protection is proved, lack of difficult integration of concept ecological and place marketing on micro- and mesolevels is established. The comparative analysis of approaches to the formation of a conceptual basis of the theory of social and ecological systems as the methodological basis of ecological place marketing is carried out. The braking factors of the formulation of the definitions of monoaspect describing interaction of supersystems of the nature, society and the economy connected with difficulty of their universal use in research of other disciplinary or interdisciplinary profile are assigned. It is expedient to use institutional evolutionary E. Ostrom’s approach to interpretation of social and ecological systems. It is proved that such systems are characterized by the increased level of system integration and interdependence of their elements which are difficult for decomposition into separate objects of management; domination of informal institutes and heterogeneity of institutional structure which determines the high level of uncertainty and operational expenses, congenital from them. The author assigned the methodological principles of the marketing analysis of the social and ecological systems founded on the principles of a continuity of social and natural processes, heterogeneity of a subject and structure of object, an economic causal relationship, stakeholdering, evolutionary character and transformation of the market of the social and ecological relations.

  4. Clay mineralogy in agrochernozems of western Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papish, I. Ya.; Chizhikova, N. P.; Poznyak, S. P.; Varlamov, E. B.

    2016-10-01

    The mineralogy of clay fractions separated from deep low-humus deep-gleyic loamy typical agrochernozems on loess-like loams of the Upper Bug and Dniester uplands in the Central Russian loess province of Ukraine consists of complex disordered interstratifications with the segregation of mica- and smectite-type layers (hereafter, smectite phase), tri- and dioctahedral hydromicas, kaolinite, and chlorite. The distribution of the clay fraction is uniform. The proportions of the layered silicates vary significantly within the profile: a decrease in the content of the smectite phase and a relative increase in the content of hydromicas up the soil profile are recorded. In the upper horizons, the contents of kaolinite and chlorite increase, and some amounts of fine quartz, potassium feldspars, and plagioclases are observed. This tendency is observed in agrochernozems developed on the both Upper Bug and Dniester uplands. The differences include the larger amounts of quartz, potassium feldspars, and plagioclases in the clay material of the Upper Bug Upland, while the contents of the smectite phase in the soil profiles of the areas considered are similar. An analogous mineral association is noted in podzolized agrochernozems on loess-like deposits in the Cis-Carpathian region of the Southern Russian loess province developed on the Prut-Dniester and Syan-Dniester uplands. The distribution of particle-size fractions and the mineralogy of the clay fraction indicate the lithogenic heterogeneity of the soil-forming substrate. When the drifts change, the mineral association of the soils developed within the loess-like deposits gives place to minerals dominated by individual smectite with some mica-smectite inter stratifications, hydromicas, and chlorite.

  5. Analysis of definition «social responsibility» and its intergrated interpretation in pharmacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. О. Tkachenko

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available It is not possible to introduce the basic principles of social responsibility (SR by domestic pharmaceutical enterprises without analysis of international experience. There is no unified and authoritative definition of social responsibility concept in business. It is scientific polemics that fills the concept of social responsibility with different content, it is stipulated by methodological competition of theoretical approaches from different points of view: sociology, management and economics, law, philosophy, etc. Transformation of social values and priorities requires a change in management practices, ensuring the integration of principles, methods and SR instruments in the activity of pharmaceutical companies. The aim of the work was to study and create approaches to the understanding of social responsibility, determination of its content in the pharmaceutical sector. Materials and methods: We used such methods of investigations: analysis and synthesis of information sources of data, marketing analysis, concerning understanding of social responsibility, determining its nature in the pharmaceutical sector. In this work components of the conception were analyzed in various aspects and their integration into the definition of SR business. To accomplish the appropriate corporate civil role, the firm must fulfill obligations – economical - to earn enough profit for its own joint-stock fund to satisfy shareholders, to provide products to satisfy buyers, to create new jobs and new material values for their own business, to promote innovation, legal - to stick to the Law, ethical - to be moral, honest, fair and respect people rights, to avoid harm or social injustice; philanthropic - to carry out useful work for the community. Despite the huge number of approaches in the determining of SR, all the approaches are identical in the same thing: SRB - it is the responsibility of the company (the firm to all physical and legal persons which it deals

  6. First X-Ray Diffraction Results from Mars Science Laboratory: Mineralogy of Rocknest Aeolian Bedform at Gale Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bish, D. L.; Blake, D. F.; Vaniman, D. T.; Chipera, S. J.; Sarrazin, P.; Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Treiman, A. H.; Downs, R. T.; Morrison, S. M.; Yen, A. S.; Achilles, C. N.; Morookian, J. M.; Farmer, J. D.; Crisp, J. A.; Rampe, E. B.; Stolper, E. M.; DesMarais, D. J.; Spanovich, N.; Anderson, R. C.

    2013-01-01

    Numerous orbital and landed observations of the martian surface suggest a reasonably uniform martian soil composition, likely as a result of global aeolian mixing [1, 2]. Chemical data for martian soils are abundant [e.g., 2, 3], and phase information has been provided by lander thermal emission and Moessbauer spectroscopic measurements [3, 4, 5, 6]. However, until now no X-ray diffraction (XRD) data were available for martian soil nor has XRD ever been used on another body apart from Earth. XRD is generally considered the most definitive method for determining the crystalline phases in solid samples, and it is the method of choice for determining mineralogy. CheMin s first XRD analysis on Mars coincided with the 100th anniversary of the discovery of X-ray diffraction by von Laue. Curiosity delivered scooped samples of loose, unconsolidated material ("soil") acquired from an aeolian bedform at the Rocknest locality to instruments in the body of the rover (the laboratory). Imaging shows that the soil has a range of particle sizes, of 1-2 mm and smaller, presumably representing contributions from global, regional, and local sources.

  7. Definition of the thermographic regions of interest in cycling by using a factor analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priego Quesada, Jose Ignacio; Lucas-Cuevas, Angel Gabriel; Salvador Palmer, Rosario; Pérez-Soriano, Pedro; Cibrián Ortiz de Anda, Rosa M.a.

    2016-03-01

    Research in exercise physiology using infrared thermography has increased in the last years. However, the definition of the Regions of Interest (ROIs) varies strongly between studies. Therefore, the aim of this study was to use a factor analysis approach to define highly correlated groups of thermographic ROIs during a cycling test. Factor analyses were performed based on the moment of measurement and on the variation of skin temperatures as a result of the cycling exercise. 19 male participants cycled during 45 min at 50% of their individual peak power output with a cadence of 90 rpm. Infrared thermography was used to measure skin temperatures in sixteen ROIs of the trunk and lower limbs at three moments: before, immediately after and 10 min after the cycling test. Factor analyses were used to identify groups of ROIs based on the skin absolute temperatures at each moment of measurement as well as on skin temperature variations between moments. All the factor analyses performed for each moment and skin temperature variation explained more than the 80% of the variance. Different groups of ROIs were obtained when the analysis was based on the moment of measurement or on the effect of exercise on the skin temperature. Furthermore, some ROIs were grouped in the same way in both analyses (e.g. the ROIs of the trunk), whereas other regions (legs and their joints) were grouped differently in each analysis. Differences between groups of ROIs are related to their tissue composition, muscular activity and capacity of sweating. In conclusion, the resultant groups of ROIs were coherent and could help researchers to define the ROIs in future thermal studies.

  8. Mineralogical determination in situ of a highly heterogeneous material using a miniaturized laser ablation mass spectrometer with high spatial resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubeck, Anna; Tulej, Marek; Ivarsson, Magnus; Broman, Curt; Riedo, Andreas; McMahon, Sean; Wurz, Peter; Bengtson, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Techniques enabling in situ elemental and mineralogical analysis on extraterrestrial planets are strongly required for upcoming missions and are being continuously developed. There is ample need for quantitative and high-sensitivity analysis of elemental as well as isotopic composition of heterogeneous materials. Here we present in situ spatial and depth elemental profiles of a heterogeneous rock sample on a depth-scale of nanometres using a miniaturized laser ablation mass spectrometer (LMS) designed for planetary space missions. We show that the LMS spectra alone could provide highly detailed compositional, three-dimensional information and oxidation properties of a natural, heterogeneous rock sample. We also show that a combination of the LMS and Raman spectroscopy provide comprehensive mineralogical details of the investigated sample. These findings are of great importance for future space missions where quick, in situ determination of the mineralogy could play a role in the process of selecting a suitable spot for drilling.

  9. From the Definitions of Mental Phenomena towards the Analysis of Developmental Perspectives of Actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malanov S.V.

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper addresses the issue of diversity of definitions of mental phenomena and methodological approaches to their exploration. It is argued that monistic construction of psychological knowledge is essential and requires drawing consistent conclusions about mental functioning in living organisms from the laws of evolution or, as in the case with humans, from the laws of anthropogenesis and historical development of humankind. The paper describes two main patterns of scientific analysis which consider mental phenomena as processes and functions that are: a localized in and generated by the brain on the basis of ‘information processing mechanisms’; b localized between the living organisms and objects, ensuring their orientation in the outer world. The paper also discusses the problem of evolutionary development of functions responsible for orientation and interaction with the environment in animals. It highlights the ontogenetic stages of integration of language means into the organization of practices and mental actions in humans and analyses the main patterns in the development of actions, as well as the grounds for selecting operations of which they consist and which correspond with traditionally described mental functions.

  10. Meteorite falls in Bulgaria: Reappraisal of mineralogy, chemistry, and classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekov, Vesselin; Rochette, Pierre; Gattacceca, JéRôMe

    2017-08-01

    We present a summary of the mineralogy, mineral chemistry, and magnetic characteristics of all the five Bulgarian meteorite falls. We report the first mineralogical descriptions, chemical analyses, and magnetic measurements of the Konevo (1931) and Silistra (1917) meteorites. We classify Konevo as LL5, and Silistra as an ungrouped achondrite with HED affinities. Pavel (1966; previously classified as an H5) is reclassified as H3-anomalous. We also provide precise mineralogy and mineral chemistry of the Virba meteorite (1873, L6), and more details on the mineral chemistry of Gumoschnik (1904, H5).

  11. Mineralogy of S-complex Asteroids using Reflectance and Thermal Infrared Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, S. S.; Emery, J. P.; Marchis, F.; Enriquez, E.; Assafin, M.

    2013-12-01

    The S-type asteroids display an astounding diversity in mineralogy. They range from monomineralic olivine to complex olivine/pyroxene assemblages to basaltic assemblages. These materials are thought to be representative of an entire range of bodies that span essentially unmelted to bodies that experienced complete melting and igneous differentiation. Hence, the diverse silicate mineralogy for the S-type asteroids traces the thermal history of the asteroids a few Myr after formation. As such, determining the composition of S-type asteroids is a powerful investigative tool for understanding the post-accretionary thermal evolution, partial melting, and differentiation of the asteroids in the early Solar System. Moreover, the Sq and S(IV) are thought to be the parent bodies of ordinary chondrites (OCs), and therefore represent essentially unmelted or un-thermally processed materials. The mineralogy of these relatively unprocessed asteroids thus provide a window into investigating primitive Solar System materials, which were the building blocks of the terrestrial planets. The mineralogy of S-complex asteroids is typically determined using the 1- and 2-μm absorption bands related to olivine and pyroxene. Comparing the band centers, depths, and areas of these two features (i.e., band analysis) to calibrated laboratory data yields the general silicate mineralogy. Based on the near-infrared (NIR) band analysis, the S-type asteroids can be divided into seven subtypes, S(I - VII), with S(I)s being monomineralic olivine (mantle matieral), S(IV)s being analogous to OCs (primitive silicate material), and S(VII)s being basaltic material (igneously processed crustal material). The mid-infrared (MIR) thermal emission from asteroid surfaces exhibits a suite of silicate features due to Si-O stretching and O-Si-O bending vibrations near 10 and 18 μm, respectively. Marchis et al. (2012) demonstrated that the S-type asteroids exhibit diversity in their MIR emission. We seek to examine

  12. Patient-reported outcome measures in pediatric epilepsy: a content analysis using World Health Organization definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Salva; Fayed, Nora; Ronen, Gabriel M

    2014-09-01

    Patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures that assess the effect of epilepsy on children's lives include the concepts of health, health-related quality of life (HRQOL), and quality of life (QOL). They also contain varied health and health-related content. Our objectives were to identify what generic and epilepsy-specific PRO instruments are used in childhood epilepsy research and to make explicit their conceptual approach and biopsychosocial content. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PsycINFO were searched from 2001 to 2011 for PRO measures used in pediatric epilepsy. Measures were analyzed on an item-by-item basis according to World Health Organization (WHO) definitions of QOL and the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health for Children and Youth (ICF-CY) biopsychosocial health framework to distinguish the conceptual approach within each measure. The health content analysis coded each item according to specific ICF-CY components of body function, activity and participation, environment, or personal factors to determine the health content for each measure. Three generic and 13 epilepsy-specific PRO measures were identified; 10 of 16 measures utilized a biopsychosocial health approach rather than an HRQOL or QOL approach. Content analysis showed that in 11 of 16 measures, >25% of the items represented participation and activity components of the ICF-CY, whereas a high proportion of environment items were found in only one epilepsy-specific measure. This comprehensive review provides information aiding clinicians and researchers in the selection of the appropriate PRO instruments for children with epilepsy on the basis of content. Most epilepsy-specific and generic PROs use a biopsychosocial health approach as opposed to a subjective HRQOL/QOL approach to measurement. Clinicians and researchers must be aware of these concepts and content when intending to measure outcomes validly. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 International League Against Epilepsy.

  13. Composition, mineralogy, and porosity of multiple asteroid systems from visible and near-infrared spectral data

    OpenAIRE

    Lindsay, S.S.; Marchis, F.; Emery, J.P.; Enriquez Rascon, J.E.; Assafin, M.

    2015-01-01

    We provide a taxonomic and compositional characterization of Multiple Asteroid Systems (MASs) located in the main belt (MB) using visible and near-infrared (0.45-2.5 um) spectral data of 42 MB MASs. The mineralogical analysis is applied to determine meteorite analogs for the MASs, which, in turn, are applied to the MAS density measurements of Marchis et al. (2012) to estimate the system porosity. The macroporosities are used to evaluate the primary MAS formation hypotheses. The visible observ...

  14. Geochemistry and mineralogy of mafic Icelandic hyaloclastites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudak, M. R.; Feineman, M. D.; Eyer, C.; Bindeman, I. N.; Sigmarsson, O.

    2016-12-01

    Hyaloclastite in the crust may be a cryptic contaminant contributing to some volatile-rich Icelandic basalts and in some places reach 2.5 km1. Hyaloclastites are highly fragmented composites of lithics, glass, and crystals in a palagonite matrix that form as a result of magma-ice or magma-water interactions. These rocks have high water content and porosity and a high initial glass content, which makes them susceptible to rapid alteration by ambient or hydrothermal waters and potentially fast digestion by magmas. Due to low density and ductility, they have the potential to stall ascending mantle-derived magmas to form sills, and in the process may contribute exotic volatile or fluid-mobile components. We have characterized the geochemistry and mineralogy of 18 hyaloclastite samples from the Reykjanes Peninsula (RP), Vestmannajyar, and the southern coast of Iceland. Major and trace elements were obtained using ICP-AES and ICP-MS, respectively, and mineralogy was determined by XRD. Loss on ignition is highly variable (0.44 - 15.7 wt.%) and positively correlated with alkali loss reflected in the Chemical Index of Alteration [34.8 - 51.3; CIA = Al2O3/(Al2O3+CaO+Na2O+K2O)]. Primitive mantle normalized multi-element plots for RP hyaloclastites are broadly similar to those for unaltered RP Holocene basalts. Two samples have trace element profiles resembling those of picrites in the region. The samples from the south coast and Vestmannaeyjar have OIB-like enrichments similar to local Holocene basalts. Five well-sorted hyaloclastite samples have broad humps in their XRD patterns from 20-50° 2q. These samples contain only primary magmatic mineral phases (plagioclase, olivine, and pyroxene), if any, while other hyaloclastites contain both primary phases and secondary alteration phases including halite, calcite, clays, chlorite, and zeolites. Preliminary O and H isotope investigation demonstrates large ranges in both parameters. Future work will include oxygen isotope analyses

  15. Magnetic mineralogy of the Mercurian lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, B. E.; Feinberg, J. M.; Johnson, C. L.

    2016-11-01

    Mercury and Earth are the only inner solar system planets with active, internally generated dynamo magnetic fields. The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission recently detected magnetic fields on Mercury that are consistent with lithospheric magnetization. We investigate the physical and chemical environment of Mercury's lithosphere, past and present, to establish the conditions under which magnetization may have been acquired and modified. Three factors are particularly crucial to the determination of crustal composition and iron mineralogy: redox conditions in the planet's crust and mantle, the iron content of the lithosphere, and, for any remanent magnetization, the temperature profile of the lithosphere and its evolution over time. We explore potential mechanisms for remanence acquisition and alteration on Mercury, whose surface environment is both hot and highly reducing. The long-term thermal history of Mercury's crust plays an important role in the longevity of any remanent crustal magnetization, which may be subject to remagnetization through thermal, viscous, and shock mechanisms. This thermal and compositional framework is used both to constrain plausible candidate minerals that could carry magnetic remanence on Mercury and to evaluate their capacity to acquire and retain sufficient magnetization to be detectable from satellite orbit. We propose that iron metal and its alloys are likely to be the dominant contributors to induced and remanent magnetization in Mercury's lithosphere, with additional contributions from iron silicides, sulfides, and carbides.

  16. The mineralogy of ordinary chondrites and implications for asteroid spectrophotometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcsween, Harry Y., Jr.; Bennett, Marvin E., III; Jarosewich, Eugene

    1991-01-01

    Published data from bulk chemical analyses of 94 ordinary chondrites are compiled in a table of normative mineralogy and discussed in detail. Significant variations in olivine, pyroxene, and metal abundance ratios are found within each chondrite class and attributed to redox processes superimposed on initial differences in metal/silicate ratios. The use of the diagrams constructed here to predict the mineralogic characteristics of asteroids on the basis of spectrophotometric observations is suggested.

  17. Space biology initiative program definition review. Trade study 5: Modification of existing hardware (COTS) versus new hardware build cost analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, L. Neal; Crenshaw, John, Sr.; Davidson, William L.; Blacknall, Carolyn; Bilodeau, James W.; Stoval, J. Michael; Sutton, Terry

    1989-01-01

    The JSC Life Sciences Project Division has been directly supporting NASA Headquarters, Life Sciences Division, in the preparation of data from JSC and ARC to assist in defining the Space Biology Initiative (SBI). GE Government Services and Horizon Aerospace have provided contract support for the development and integration of review data, reports, presentations, and detailed supporting data. An SBI Definition (Non-Advocate) Review at NASA Headquarters, Code B, has been scheduled for the June-July 1989 time period. In a previous NASA Headquarters review, NASA determined that additional supporting data would be beneficial to determine the potential advantages in modifying commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) hardware for some SBI hardware items. In order to meet the demands of program implementation planning with the definition review in late spring of 1989, the definition trade study analysis must be adjusted in scope and schedule to be complete for the SBI Definition (Non-Advocate) Review. The relative costs of modifying existing commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) hardware is compared to fabricating new hardware. An historical basis for new build versus modifying COTS to meet current NMI specifications for manned space flight hardware is surveyed and identified. Selected SBI hardware are identified as potential candidates for off-the-shelf modification and statistical estimates on the relative cost of modifying COTS versus new build are provided.

  18. X-ray diffraction results from Mars Science Laboratory: mineralogy of Rocknest at Gale crater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bish, D L; Blake, D F; Vaniman, D T; Chipera, S J; Morris, R V; Ming, D W; Treiman, A H; Sarrazin, P; Morrison, S M; Downs, R T; Achilles, C N; Yen, A S; Bristow, T F; Crisp, J A; Morookian, J M; Farmer, J D; Rampe, E B; Stolper, E M; Spanovich, N

    2013-09-27

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity scooped samples of soil from the Rocknest aeolian bedform in Gale crater. Analysis of the soil with the Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) x-ray diffraction (XRD) instrument revealed plagioclase (~An57), forsteritic olivine (~Fo62), augite, and pigeonite, with minor K-feldspar, magnetite, quartz, anhydrite, hematite, and ilmenite. The minor phases are present at, or near, detection limits. The soil also contains 27 ± 14 weight percent x-ray amorphous material, likely containing multiple Fe(3+)- and volatile-bearing phases, including possibly a substance resembling hisingerite. The crystalline component is similar to the normative mineralogy of certain basaltic rocks from Gusev crater on Mars and of martian basaltic meteorites. The amorphous component is similar to that found on Earth in places such as soils on the Mauna Kea volcano, Hawaii.

  19. A comprehensive physico-chemical, mineralogical and morphological characterization of Indian mineral wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedam, Vidyadhar V; Jha, Rajesh; Labhasetwar, Pawan; Engelsen, Christian J

    2013-08-01

    This paper provides a comprehensive characterization of mineral waste such as fly ash, bottom ash, slag and construction demolition (C&D) collected from four different thermal power plants, three steel plants and three C&D waste generation sites in India. To determine utilisation potential and environmental concerns, as received fly ash, bottom ash, slag and C&D waste were analysed for physico-chemical, mineralogical and morphological properties. The physico-chemical properties analysed include pH, moisture content, acid insoluble residue, loss on ignition(LOI), carbon content, fineness, chloride content, sulphate content, reactive silica content, XRF and heavy metal analysis. Morphological and mineralogical characteristics were investigated using scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray. Particle size distribution was obtained using particle size analyser. The material analysed has different compositions and were selected with a view to determine their suitability for different applications in cement and concrete industry and for further research studies.

  20. Confidence Hills Mineralogy and Chemin Results from Base of Mt. Sharp, Pahrump Hills, Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, P. D.; Bish, D. L.; Blake, D. F.; Vaniman, D. T.; Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Rampe, E. B.; Achilles, C. N.; Chipera, S. J.; Treiman, A. H.; hide

    2015-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover Curiosity recently completed its fourth drill sampling of sediments on Mars. The Confidence Hills (CH) sample was drilled from a rock located in the Pahrump Hills region at the base of Mt. Sharp in Gale Crater. The CheMin X-ray diffractometer completed five nights of analysis on the sample, more than previously executed for a drill sample, and the data have been analyzed using Rietveld refinement and full-pattern fitting to determine quantitative mineralogy. Confidence Hills mineralogy has several important characteristics: 1) abundant hematite and lesser magnetite; 2) a 10 angstrom phyllosilicate; 3) multiple feldspars including plagioclase and alkali feldspar; 4) mafic silicates including forsterite, orthopyroxene, and two types of clinopyroxene (Ca-rich and Ca-poor), consistent with a basaltic source; and 5) minor contributions from sulfur-bearing species including jarosite.

  1. Mineralogy and Microstructures of Shock-Induced Melt Veins in Chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Thomas G.

    2000-01-01

    The applicability of phase equilibrium data to the interpretation of shock-induced melt veins can only be tested by a detailed study of melt- vein mineralogy to see how high-pressure assemblages vary as a function of shock conditions inferred from other indicators. We have used transmission electron microscopy (TEM), analytical electron microscopy (AEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron microprobe analysis (EMA) and optical petrography to characterize the mineralogy, microstructures, and compositions of melt veins and associated high-pressure minerals in shocked chondrites and SNC meteorites. In the processes, we have gained a better understanding of what melt veining can tell us about shock conditions and we have discovered new mineral phases in chondritic and SNC meteorites.

  2. Quantitative x-ray diffraction mineralogy of Los Angeles basin core samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, James R.; McIntyre, Brandie R.; Edwards, Brian D.; Lakota, Orion I.

    2006-01-01

    This report contains X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of mineralogy for 81 sediment samples from cores taken from three drill holes in the Los Angeles Basin in 2000-2001. We analyzed 26 samples from Pier F core, 29 from Pier C core, and 26 from the Webster core. These three sites provide an offshore-onshore record across the Southern California coastal zone. This report is designed to be a data repository; these data will be used in further studies, including geochemical modeling as part of the CABRILLO project. Summary tables quantify the major mineral groups, whereas detailed mineralogy is presented in three appendices. The rationale, methodology, and techniques are described in the following paper.

  3. On the Evolution of Dust Mineralogy, From Protoplanetary Disks to Planetary Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Oliveira, Isa; Pontoppidan, Klaus M; van Dishoeck, Ewine F; Augereau, Jean-Charles; Merin, Bruno

    2011-01-01

    Mineralogical studies of silicate features emitted by dust grains in protoplanetary disks and Solar System bodies can shed light on the progress of planet formation. The significant fraction of crystalline material in comets, chondritic meteorites and interplanetary dust particles indicates a modification of the almost completely amorphous ISM dust from which they formed. The production of crystalline silicates thus must happen in protoplanetary disks, where dust evolves to build planets and planetesimals. Different scenarios have been proposed, but it is still unclear how and when this happens. This paper presents dust grain mineralogy of a complete sample of protoplanetary disks in the young Serpens cluster. These results are compared to those in the young Taurus region and to sources that have retained their protoplanetary disks in the older Upper Scorpius and Eta Chamaeleontis stellar clusters, using the same analysis technique for all samples. This comparison allows an investigation of the grain mineralo...

  4. Impact of pulp and paper mill effluents and solid wastes on soil mineralogical and physicochemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Gopi; Bhattacharyya, Krishna G

    2015-03-01

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the impact of the effluents and the solid wastes generated by a giant pulp and paper mill in the northeastern part of India on soil mineralogy of the area. The impacts were monitored by analysis of soil samples from seven sites located in the potential impact zone and a control site where any kind of effluent discharge or solid waste dumping was absent. The soil belonged to medium texture type (sandy clay loam, sandy loam, loamy sand, and silt loam), and the soil aggregate analysis indicated higher levels of organic carbon, pH, electrical conductivity, effective cation exchange capacity, and mean weight diameter at sites receiving effluents and solid wastes from the pulp and paper mill. Depletion in soil silica level and in feldspar and quartz contents and rise in iron and calcium contents at the sites receiving effluents from the pulp and paper mill indicated significant influence on soil mineralogy. The soil contained a mixture of minerals consisting of tectosilicates (with silicate frameworks as in quartz or feldspar), phylosilicates (layered clays like kaolinite, smectite, chlorite, illite, etc.), and carbonates. Absence of pure clay minerals indicated a state of heterogeneous intermediate soil clay transformation. The significance of the mixed mineralogy in relation to the disposal of effluents and dumping of solid wastes is discussed in details.

  5. [Can informal employment be compared in South America? Analysis of its definition, measurement and classification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Marisol E; Tarafa Orpinell, Gemma; Jódar Martínez, Pere; Benach, Joan

    2015-01-01

    To characterize and analyze the situation of informal employment with regard to its definition, measurement and classification in South American countries. A literature review was conducted from four databases and grey literature through a scoping review, which included reports from international organizations and from the 12 countries in South America. The data were analyzed by evaluating content and establishing similarities among countries. The data reviewed showed a disparity in the definitions used, although many countries define informal employment as workers with no contract. Most countries measured informal employment through household surveys, but due to the differences in classifications, the information found was heterogeneous, with little standardization among registries. Therefore, the data could not be compared at a regional level. The definition of the International Labour Organization was not useful to study informal employment in the countries studied. The definition should include protected and unprotected workers. An appropriate and specific definition of informal employment would allow nuances to be studied within the concept, revealing the loopholes faced by most of the population working informally. The key to meaningful comparisons within the study region is to incorporate common indicators among local registration systems (measurement) in order to determine the public health impact in the informally employed population. Copyright © 2014 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Mineralogical Study of Zard Koh and Kulli Koh Iron Ore Deposits of Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SULTAN AHMED KHOSO

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Zard Koh and Kulli Koh are two recently discovered iron ore deposits, existing in the Chagai district, Balochistan, Pakistan. PSM (Pakistan Steel Mill Limited is interested to utilize these ore deposits at priority. Purpose of the present study was to assess the mineralogy of the Zard Koh and Kulli Koh iron ore deposits, as it plays a vital role in the selection of an appropriate processing method. The mineralogical study of ore deposits was carried out by XRD (X-Ray Diffraction, XRF (X-Ray Fluorescence, SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope attached with EDS (Energy Dispersive Spectroscope and SM (Stereomicroscope techniques. Results indicated that the Zard Koh ore is mainly composed of 60.15% maghemite, 23.57% pyrite, 4.07% chlorite, 10.30% grossular and 1.65% admontite minerals. The chemical analysis revealed that Zard Koh iron ore contains an average of 54.27% Fe, 12.73% S, 8.70% Si, 3.07% Al, 4.07% Ca, and 2.16% Mg. Similarly, the mineralogical study of the Kulli Koh iron ore indicated that, ore is containing 51.16% hematite, 29.24% quartz, 8.89% dravite, and 8.76% kaolinite minerals. Elemental analysis of different samples indicated that Kulli Koh iron ore contains an average composition of 40.23% Fe, 20.67% Si, 3.44% Ca, 3.81% Al and 3.25% Mg. Mineralogical study of the Zard Koh and Kulli Koh iron ore deposits suggested that these ore deposits can be beneficiated costeffectively by using magnetic separation techniques.

  7. Mineralogical Studies Related to Endemic Diseases in Rural P. R. China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkin, H. E.; Zheng, B.; Finkelman, R. B.

    2003-12-01

    Domestic combustion of coal for heating and cooking is mostly confined to the world's developing countries and probably involves about 1 billion persons in China, India, Indonesia, and Africa. Various endemic diseases affecting millions of people involving arsenic, selenium, and fluorine poisoning have been associated with domestic coal combustion in rural China. We have investigated the relationship between mineralized coals (and stone coals) and disease occurrences in Guizhou and Hubei Provinces. The mineralogy of the coals has been studied by a wide variety of techniques, including optical petrography, scanning electron microscopy, electron microprobe analysis, ion probe, Synchrotron XANES-EXAFS, and Raman spectroscopy. Arsenic enrichment (up to 3 weight percent) in Upper Permian Longtan Formation coals, southwestern Guizhou Province, occurs in both 3+ and 5+ valence states. Arsenic occurs in arsenopyrite, pyrite, Al-phosphate, scorodite, Fe-oxides, and as an organically-bound species. Fluorine poisoning, much more widespread than arsenic-poisoning, is related to burning F-rich coals and F-rich clays as admixtures. Mineralogical and chemical analysis suggests that the clays contain the fluorine probably substituting for the hydroxyl group. Localized selenium poisoning in Hubei Province is related to Se-rich stone coals. The selenium occurs as a native element and in rare mandarinoite. In these three cases, knowledge of the paragenesis and mineralogy of the element enrichment in coal was vital to help understand and mitigate the endemic diseases. For the situation concerning arsenic and selenium poisoning, suspect coals have been identified and mining from these deposits has been curtailed. Fluorine has been a much more difficult problem for the local public health officials as both the coal and clay in the burning admixture can contain high fluorine. Regional geochemical and mineralogical studies will help to define coal and clay with low fluorine, suitable for

  8. Temperature buffer test. Hydro-mechanical and chemical/ mineralogical characterizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aakesson, Mattias; Olsson, Siv; Dueck, Ann; Nilsson, Ulf; Karnland, Ola [Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden); Kiviranta, Leena; Kumpulainen, Sirpa [BandTech Oy, Helsinki (Finland); Linden, Johan [Aabo Akademi, Aabo (Finland)

    2012-01-15

    The Temperature Buffer Test (TBT) is a joint project between SKB/ANDRA and supported by ENRESA (modeling) and DBE (instrumentation), which aims at improving the understanding and to model the thermo-hydro-mechanical behavior of buffers made of swelling clay submitted to high temperatures (over 100 deg C) during the water saturation process. The test has been carried out in a KBS-3 deposition hole at Aspo HRL. It was installed during the spring of 2003. Two steel heaters (3 m long, 0.6 m diameter) and two buffer arrangements have been investigated: the lower heater was surrounded by rings of compacted Wyoming bentonite only, whereas the upper heater was surrounded by a composite barrier, with a sand shield between the heater and the bentonite. The test was dismantled and sampled during the winter of 2009/2010. This report presents the hydro-mechanical and chemical/mineralogical characterization program which was launched subsequent to the dismantling operation. The main goal has been to investigate if any significant differences could be observed between material from the field experiment and the reference material. The field samples were mainly taken from Ring 4 (located at the mid-section around the lower heater), in which the temperature in the innermost part reached 155 deg C. The following hydro-mechanical properties have been determined for the material (test technique within brackets): hydraulic conductivity (swelling pressure device), swelling pressure (swelling pressure device), unconfined compression strength (mechanical press), shear strength (triaxial cell) and retention properties (jar method). The following chemical/mineralogical properties (methods within brackets) were determined: anion analysis of water leachates (IC), chemical composition (ICP/AES+MS, EGA), cation exchange capacity (CEC, Cu-trien method) and exchangeable cations (exchange with NH4, ICPAES), mineralogical composition (XRD and FTIR), element distribution and microstructure (SEM and

  9. Comparison of three local frame definitions for the kinematic analysis of the fingers and the wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goislard de Monsabert, B; Visser, J M A; Vigouroux, L; Van der Helm, F C T; Veeger, H E J

    2014-08-22

    Because the hand is a complex poly-articular limb, numerous methods have been proposed to investigate its kinematics therefore complicating the comparison between studies and the methodological choices. With the objective of overcoming such issues, the present study compared the effect of three local frame definitions on local axis orientations and joint angles of the fingers and the wrist. Three local frames were implemented for each segment. The "Reference" frames were aligned with global axes during a static neutral posture. The "Landmark" frames were computed using palpated bony landmarks. The "Functional" frames included a flexion-extension axis estimated during functional movements. These definitions were compared with regard to the deviations between obtained local segment axes and the evolution of joint (Cardan) angles during two test motions. Each definition resulted in specific local frame orientations with deviations of 15° in average for a given local axis. Interestingly, these deviations produced only slight differences (below 7°) regarding flexion-extension Cardan angles indicating that there is no preferred method when only interested in finger flexion-extension movements. In this case, the Reference method was the easiest to implement, but did not provide physiological results for the thumb. Using the Functional frames reduced the kinematic cross-talk on the secondary and tertiary Cardan angles by up to 20° indicating that the Functional definition is useful when investigating complex three-dimensional movements. Globally, the Landmark definition provides valuable results and, contrary to the other definitions, is applicable for finger deformities or compromised joint rotations.

  10. RETROSPECTIVE ANALYSIS OF THE DEFINITION OF THE CONCEPT “LABOUR MARKET”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kseniya K. Lukyanova

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the main approaches of scholars of economics to the definitions of the concepts “market” and “labour market”, analyzes the views of representatives of classical, neo-classical school, monetarism, Marxism, interprets the Marxist theory of employment. It is revealed that the combination of views of representatives of the neoclassical direction of market theory and Marxist theory allows better understanding and explaining the value of the market as an efficient means of interrelationship between buyers and sellers. The author also discusses institutional theory, gives the definition of the concept “institution”. It was determined that the main challenge of the labour market is to ensure optimal mobility of the working population and the satisfaction of demand for labour. Taking into account the diversity of the concepts “labour market” and “labour force market”, the author defines their unity and contradictions. It was found that the identification of the essential characteristics of the labour market is provided by the existing research in the modern world and domestic literature approaches to the definition of the labor market, the structure and principles of its formation. It was found that the labour market is a very complex, multi-faceted system of social and legal relations and is seen as a sphere, mechanism, system, space. The author analyzes interpretations of the concept “labour market” by various academic economists, develops a comprehensive table of definitions of the concept “labour market”. The author found that neither of these definitions is not a “correct” or “incorrect” – each of them can be useful depending on the context, i.e. on what kind of processes are studied, which tasks are affected, and what conclusions and recommendations assumed to develop. The author suggests her own definition of the concept “labour market”.

  11. Mineralogy maketh mountains: Granitic landscapes shaped by dissolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggleton, Richard A.

    2017-05-01

    In tectonically quiet regions, the shape of the landscape is controlled by the erosion resistance of the rocks. Erosion largely depends on the release of particles from the weathering rock, which in turn requires a degree of dissolution of the more soluble grains. The rate of dissolution of the common rock forming minerals allows the construction of a numerical Rock Weatherability Scale (RWS) based on the rock's modal mineralogical analysis. Applied regionally to three granitic landscape regions of the Bega Valley of southern New South Wales, the Tate Batholith and Featherbed Volcanics of north Queensland, and granitoids in the Beaufort region of Victoria, the mean elevation of the larger plutons in each region correlates highly (r = 0.83-0.93) with their RWS. Variation in composition within a pluton also shows there is a clear connection between changes in RWS and relief within the pluton. From these results it is apparent that the landscape of such granitic terrains is determined very largely by mineral dissolution rates, with plagioclase composition and content being a major factor.

  12. Mineralogy of the Martian Surface: Crustal Composition to Surface Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustard, John F.

    1997-01-01

    The main results have been published in the refereed literature, and thus this report serves mainly to summarize the main findings and indicate where the detailed papers may be found. Reflectance spectroscopy has been an important tool for determining the mineralogic makeup of the near surface materials on Mars. Analysis of the spectral properties of the surface have demonstrated that these attributes are heterogeneous from the coarse spatial but high spectral resolution spectra obtained with telescopes to the high spatial but coarse spectral resolution Viking data (e.g. Arvidson et al., 1989; McEwen et al., 1989). Low albedo materials show strong evidence for the presence of igneous rock forming minerals while bright materials are generally interpreted as representing heavily altered crustal material. How these materials are physically and genetically related has important implications for understanding martian surface properties and processes, weathering histories and paths, and crustal composition. The goal of this research is to characterize the physical and chemical properties of low albedo materials on Mars and the relationship to intermediate and high albedo materials. Fundamental science questions to be pursued include: (1) the observed distributions of soil, rock, and dust a function of physical processes or weathering and (2) different stages of chemical and physical alteration fresh rock identified. These objectives will be addressed through detailed analyses and modelling of the ISM data from the Phobos-2 mission with corroborating evidence of surface composition and properties provided by data from the Viking mission.

  13. Systematic review and meta-analysis of validation studies on a diabetes case definition from health administrative records.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron Leong

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Health administrative data are frequently used for diabetes surveillance. We aimed to determine the sensitivity and specificity of a commonly-used diabetes case definition (two physician claims or one hospital discharge abstract record within a two-year period and their potential effect on prevalence estimation. METHODS: Following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA guidelines, we searched Medline (from 1950 and Embase (from 1980 databases for validation studies through August 2012 (keywords: "diabetes mellitus"; "administrative databases"; "validation studies". Reviewers abstracted data with standardized forms and assessed quality using Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS criteria. A generalized linear model approach to random-effects bivariate regression meta-analysis was used to pool sensitivity and specificity estimates. We applied correction factors derived from pooled sensitivity and specificity estimates to prevalence estimates from national surveillance reports and projected prevalence estimates over 10 years (to 2018. RESULTS: The search strategy identified 1423 abstracts among which 11 studies were deemed relevant and reviewed; 6 of these reported sensitivity and specificity allowing pooling in a meta-analysis. Compared to surveys or medical records, sensitivity was 82.3% (95%CI 75.8, 87.4 and specificity was 97.9% (95%CI 96.5, 98.8. The diabetes case definition underestimated prevalence when it was ≤10.6% and overestimated prevalence otherwise. CONCLUSION: The diabetes case definition examined misses up to one fifth of diabetes cases and wrongly identifies diabetes in approximately 2% of the population. This may be sufficiently sensitive and specific for surveillance purposes, in particular monitoring prevalence trends. Applying correction factors to adjust prevalence estimates from this definition may be helpful to increase accuracy of estimates.

  14. Sediment mineralogy in the Bay of Havana (Cuba): its relation to natural and anthropogenic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Turiel, J. L.; Chinchón, J. S.; Maldonado, A.

    1996-02-01

    The mineralogical analysis by means of X-ray diffraction of the surficial sediments from the Bay of Havana (Cuba) allows us to identify and quantify the presence of quartz, feldspars, calcite, magnesium calcite, aragonite and dolomite. The distribution of these minerals permits us to distinguish the occurrence of five sedimentary environments (coastal marine, transitional bay-marine, bay, prodelta and Luyanó Drain environments) and related them to the general trends of sedimentary dynamics in the bay. The mineralogy of the coastal marine sediments is dominated by the composition of the local calcareous substratum, i.e., by magnesium calcite and dolomite. These minerals are associated with aragonite in the transitional environment existing between the marine and the bay environments. The sediments in the bay show high contents of aragonite and calcite, while quartz and feldspars are in important quantities in the sediments from the prodelta environments. These mineralogical features are consistent with the natural processes occuring in the Bay of Havana, while the composition of the sediments from the Luyanó Drain environment seem affected by the anthropogenic supply of this drain, showing very high contents of calcitic biogenic products.

  15. Arsenic mineralogy and mobility in the arsenic-rich historical mine waste dump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippi, Michal; Drahota, Petr; Machovič, Vladimír; Böhmová, Vlasta; Mihaljevič, Martin

    2015-12-01

    A more than 250 year-old mine dump was studied to document the products of long-term arsenopyrite oxidation under natural conditions in a coarse-grained mine waste dump and to evaluate the environmental hazards associated with this material. Using complementary mineralogical and chemical approaches (SEM/EDS/WDS, XRD, micro-Raman spectroscopy, pore water analysis, chemical extraction techniques and thermodynamic PHREEQC-2 modeling), we documented the mineralogical/geochemical characteristics of the dumped arsenopyrite-rich material and environmental stability of the newly formed secondary minerals. A distinct mineralogical zonation was found (listed based on the distance from the decomposed arsenopyrite): scorodite (locally associated with native sulfur pseudomorphs) plus amorphous ferric arsenate (AFA/pitticite), kaňkite, As-bearing ferric (hydr)oxides and jarosite. Ferric arsenates and ferric (hydr)oxides were found to dissolve and again precipitate from downward migrating As-rich solutions cementing rock fragments. Acidic pore water (pH3.8) has elevated concentrations of As with an average value of about 2.9 mg L(-1). Aqueous As is highly correlated with pH (R2=0.97, pdump and underlying soil has been found to be very effective, suggesting limited environmental impact of the mine waste dump on the surrounding soil ecosystems.

  16. Georgia marble at the Minnesota State Capitol The Effects of Mineralogy and Climate on Durability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitenack, Paul; Shotwell, L. Brad; Scheffler, Michael J.

    2016-11-01

    Based on visual observations and tests made of Georgia marble units that have been in service at the historic Minnesota State Capitol for 110 years, a fielddiscernible correlation exists between marble unit mineralogical composition and unit weathering performance. Field studies noted over the course of a five-year restoration project of the capitol exterior were used to categorize the original marble cladding into four perceptible types, which were evaluated by field testing that suggested a correlation between the textural and mineralogical differences within the marble and its long-term durability. To test this theory, field-issued repair assignments made during an exterior marble restoration project at the capitol were examined statistically. The nature and frequency of assigned repairs were compared to the type of marble from which they were originally fabricated to determine whether a correlation existed. The results of this comparison provided convincing statistical verification of the link between mineralogy and durability. This hypothesis was then verified through detailed petrographic analysis in a laboratory setting, which determined that marble consisting of a smaller, more interlocked grain configuration that was more dolomitic than calcitic in its basic chemistry consistently proved to be more durable in weathering performance over time. The paper describes the process followed by the authors to categorize and study the distinct varieties of Georgia marble present on the Minnesota State Capitol, and how this information was used to guide the restoration process with the intent of maximizing the anticipated service life of new marble replacements.

  17. The mineralogy and chemistry of fine-grained sediments, Morphou Bay, Cyprus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Neal

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The mineralogy and chemistry of the less than 20μm fraction of marine sediments at Morphou Bay, north-west Cyprus, are presented to characterise fine-grained sediment supplies from basic and ultrabasic rocks of the Troodos Massif within a typological setting. The sediments comprise a mixture of smectite, illite, kaolinite and iron rich chlorite. They also contain amorphous iron oxides/hydroxides, calcite (with some magnesium substitution for calcium and an amphibole. Spatial patterns in mineralogy occur: the near-shore sediments are rich in smectite, chlorite, amphibole and amorphous iron oxides/hydroxides, while the offshore sediments are rich in illite and calcite. The sediments are calcium, magnesium, iron, aluminium and potassium bearing, due to the presence of significant amounts of calcite (for Ca, clay minerals and aluminium and iron oxides/hydroxides. Potassium is present within the micaceous mineral illite, but it is also contained within other phases that are difficult to pinpoint. Statistical analysis reveals that the chemical composition of the sediments broadly follows the mineralogy with the dominant feature being related to spatial changes in the mineralogy. The patterns of change reflect a three component mix of clay-sized sediment types: (1 localised lithogenous sources rich in smectite with subsidiary amounts of amorphous iron oxides/hydroxides and amphibole, from Cyprus, the Troodos in particular, (2 illite rich and smectite chlorite and chlorite bearing material of lithogenous origin from other parts of the eastern Mediterranean and (3 calcite, mainly of marine origin. Keywords: smectite, illite, chlorite, kaolinite, calcite, sediments, Morphou Bay, Troodos, Cyprus, Mediterranean, calcium, potassium, magnesium, iron, silicon, phosphorus.

  18. Geochemical and mineralogical fingerprints to distinguish the exploited ferruginous mineralisations of Grotta della Monaca (Calabria, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimuccio, Luca Antonio; Rodrigues, Nelson; Larocca, Felice; Pratas, João; Amado, Ana Margarida; de Carvalho, Luís A. E. Batista

    2017-02-01

    This study examines the geochemical and mineralogical variations in the ferruginous mineralisations that crop out within Grotta della Monaca, which is considered to be the most striking and best known example of a prehistoric iron mine-cave from the southern Apennines (Calabria, Italy). Previous archaeological research identified three local and distinct ancient exploitation phases of these ferruginous mineralisations: (1) an Upper Palaeolithic phase; (2) a Late Neolithic phase; and (3) a post-Medieval phase. These materials, which have various forms of complex mineralogical admixtures and range in colour from yellow-orange to red and darker brown shades, mainly consist of iron oxides/hydroxides (essentially goethite and lepidocrocite), which are often mixed with subordinate and variable amounts of other matrix components (carbonates, sulphates, arsenates, silicates and organic matter). Such ferruginous mineralisations generally correspond to geochemically heterogeneous massive dyke/vein/mammillary/stratiform facies that are exposed within the local caves along open fractures and inclined bedding planes and that partially cover cave wall niches/notches/pockets and ceiling cupolas/holes. Selected samples/sub-samples are analysed through a multi-technique approach with a handheld portable X-ray Fluorescence, X-ray Diffraction, micro-Raman and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscope (both conventional and attenuated total reflection), which is combined with subsequent multivariate statistical analysis of the elemental concentration data. The geochemical and mineralogical results are used to individualise similar compositional clusters. As expected, the identified groups, each of which has very specific geochemical-mineralogical "fingerprints" and spatial distributions, enable us to identify the sampled ferruginous mineralisations. These specific mineral resources can be compared to similar raw materials that are found in other neighbouring archaeological sites, with

  19. Mineralogy and Microbial Survival During Carbon Sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santillan, E. U.; Gilbert, K.; Bennett, P.

    2010-12-01

    When CO2 is sequestered in deep saline aquifers, a region of high dissolved CO2 surrounds the supercritical CO2 plume. While microbial life will doubtless be perturbed as a result of the CO2 injection, survival may be possible in the region of high dissolved CO2. Mineralogy of the aquifer may influence which microorganisms survive by providing substrates for lithotrophic microbes and determining the competitiveness of microbes in the subsurface. Iron-rich minerals like hematite, for example, provide a terminal electron acceptor for dissimilatory iron reducing bacteria (DIRB) that is essential for their respiration. Mineral dissolution may also provide toxicity for microbes providing increased concentration of toxic elements like Al in groundwater as a result of feldspar or clay dissolution. We investigated, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a model DIRB, grown in the presence of representative minerals found in deep saline aquifers including carbonate minerals, silicate minerals, and clays. Cultures were subjected to 20 to 25 atm of CO2 at 30° C for 2 to 8 hours in modified Parr reactors. Cultures were plated to determine viability after CO2 stress and imaged using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). Preliminary results show that MR-1 grown in the presence of dolomite and subjected to 20 atm of CO2 for 2 hours results in decreased viability in comparison to cells grown with hematite or no minerals present. This suggests there is selective toxicity with dolomite, possibly due to an increase in dissolved Mg. Additionally, ESEM imaging revealed a change in cell morphology from plump rods to thin, pointy cells after incubating in CO2 for 8 hours at 25 atm. This change in cell morphology may be the result of cell damage due to CO2 stress. This material is based upon work supported as part of the Center for Frontiers of Subsurface Energy Security, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic

  20. Diagenetic Mineralogy at Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaniman, David; Blake, David; Bristow, Thomas F.; Chipera, Steve; Gellert, Ralf; Ming, Douglas; Morris, Richard; Rampe, E. B.; Rapin, William

    2015-01-01

    Three years into exploration of sediments in Gale crater on Mars, the Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity has provided data on several modes and episodes of diagenetic mineral formation. Curiosity determines mineralogy principally by X-ray diffraction (XRD), but with supporting data from thermal-release profiles of volatiles, bulk chemistry, passive spectroscopy, and laser-induced breakdown spectra of targeted spots. Mudstones at Yellowknife Bay, within the landing ellipse, contain approximately 20% phyllosilicate that we interpret as authigenic smectite formed by basalt weathering in relatively dilute water, with associated formation of authigenic magnetite as in experiments by Tosca and Hurowitz [Goldschmidt 2014]. Varied interlayer spacing of the smectite, collapsed at approximately 10 A or expanded at approximately 13.2 A, is evidence of localized diagenesis that may include partial intercalation of metal-hydroxyl groups in the approximately 13.2 A material. Subsequent sampling of stratigraphically higher Windjana sandstone revealed sediment with multiple sources, possible concentration of detrital magnetite, and minimal abundance of diagenetic minerals. Most recent sampling has been of lower strata at Mount Sharp, where diagenesis is widespread and varied. Here XRD shows that hematite first becomes abundant and products of diagenesis include jarosite and cristobalite. In addition, bulk chemistry identifies Mg-sulfate concretions that may be amorphous or crystalline. Throughout Curiosity's traverse, later diagenetic fractures (and rarer nodules) of mm to dm scale are common and surprisingly constant and simple in Ca-sulfate composition. Other sulfates (Mg,Fe) appear to be absent in this later diagenetic cycle, and circumneutral solutions are indicated. Equally surprising is the rarity of gypsum and common occurrence of bassanite and anhydrite. Bassanite, rare on Earth, plays a major role at this location on Mars. Dehydration of gypsum to bassanite in the

  1. Postoperative versus definitive chemoradiation in early-stage anal cancer. Results of a matched-pair analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, B.; Menzel, M.; Bamberg, M.; Weinmann, M. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Breucha, G. [Kreiskrankenhaus Hechingen, Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Surgery

    2012-07-15

    Background and purpose: The goal of the present study was to comparatively assess the results of definitive chemoradiation (CRT) with or without previous macroscopically complete resection in patients with early-stage node-negative (T1-2 N0) anal carcinoma. Patients and methods: A total of 20 patients with T1-2 N0 anal carcinoma who received radiotherapy (RT) with or without chemotherapy following incidental R0/1 tumor resection (S/CRT group) were selected. These were matched to 20 comparable patients who underwent definitive chemoradiation without previous surgery (CRT group). Major objectives of this analysis were treatment outcomes in terms of locoregional tumor control (LRC), overall survival (OS), colostomy-free survival, and toxicity. Results: Patients treated postoperatively received significantly lower RT doses (median 54.0 Gy vs. 59.7 Gy; p < 0.001) and less frequently concomitant chemotherapy than those treated definitely. The 5-year LRC and 5-year OS rates were 97.5% and 90.0%, respectively, without significant differences between the S/CRT and the CRT groups. The distribution of acute and late toxicities was comparable, and the 5-year colostomy-free survival was 95% in both groups. Conclusion: This matched-pair comparison of incidental R0/1 resection plus dose-reduced CRT with standard definitive CRT of early-stage anal cancer shows similar treatment results. Thus, dose-reduced RT with or without chemotherapy may be considered in R0/1 resected patients with T1-2 N0 anal carcinoma. (orig.)

  2. Fall, mineralogy and chemistry of Nathdwara H6 chondrite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Agarwal

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We report here for the first time the composition and mineralogical studies on a new meteorite, which fell in Dhayala ki Chappar (24°58′N, 73°48′27″E 5 km NW of Nathdwara in south Rajasthan, India, on Dec. 25th, 2012. Mineralogical and compositional studies were carried out on a representative piece of the Nathdwara meteorite sample. The mineralogical composition of the meteorite has been found to be olivine (42−45 vol.%, feldspar (10−15 vol.%, orthopyroxene (23−25 vol.%, troilite (6−8 vol.%, and titanium bearing minerals (6−8 vol.%. Our investigations show that the Nathdwara meteorite belongs to H6 group of ordinary chondrites.

  3. Fall, mineralogy and chemistry of Nathdwara H6 chondrite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    V. Agarwal; G. Parthasarathy; M.S. Sisodia; N. Bhandari

    2014-01-01

    We report here for the first time the composition and mineralogical studies on a new meteorite, which fell in Dhayala ki Chappar (24º58'N, 73º48'27'' E) 5 km NW of Nathdwara in south Rajasthan, India, on Dec. 25th, 2012. Mineralogical and compositional studies were carried out on a representative piece of the Nathdwara meteorite sample. The mineralogical composition of the meteorite has been found to be olivine (42-45 vol.%), feldspar (10-15 vol.%), orthopyroxene (23-25 vol.%), troilite (6-8 vol.%), and titanium bearing minerals (6-8 vol.%). Our investigations show that the Nathdwara meteorite belongs to H6 group of ordinary chondrites.

  4. Impact of mineralogical heterogeneity on reactive transport modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Min; Shabaninejad, Mehdi; Mostaghimi, Peyman

    2017-07-01

    Impact of mineralogical heterogeneity of rocks in reactive modelling is investigated by applying a pore scale model based on the Lattice Boltzmann and Finite Volume Methods. Mass transport, chemical reaction and solid structure modification are included in the model. A two-dimensional mineral map of a sandstone rock is acquired using the imaging technique of QEMSCAN SEM with Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). The mineralogical heterogeneity is explored by conducting multi-mineral reaction simulations on images containing various minerals. The results are then compared with the prediction of single mineral dissolution modelling. Dissolution patterns and permeability variations of multi-mineral and single mineral reactions are presented. The errors of single mineral reaction modelling are also estimated. Numerical results show that mineralogical heterogeneity can cause significant errors in permeability prediction, if a uniform mineral distribution is assumed. The errors are smaller in high Péclet regimes than in low Péclet regimes in this sample.

  5. Mineralogy of the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sewards, T.; Williams, M.L.; Keil, K. (New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

    1991-03-01

    This report characterizes the mineralogy of the Culebra Member of the Rustler Formation based on studies of samples from cores of eight boreholes surrounding the WIPP repository. This investigation has three main goals: to obtain accurate modal compositions of all the samples selected; to investigate both the lateral and vertical variation of the mineralogy of the Culebra unit; and, to characterize water-bearing fracture surfaces in particular detail. The Culebra Dolomite member of the Rustler Formation is mineralogically and texturally heterogeneous, both vertically and horizontally. Although the predominant mineral is dolomite, important constituents of the formation are clay, quartz, gypsum, and calcite. Trace minerals include halite, phyllosilicates of metamorphic origin, feldspar, and pyrite. 24 refs., 90 figs., 27 tabs.

  6. Mineralogy of Rocks and Sediments at Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achilles, Cherie; Downs, Robert; Blake, David; Vaniman, David; Ming, Doug; Rampe, Elizabeth; Morris, Dick; Morrison, Shaunna; Treiman, Allan; Chipera, Steve; Yen, Albert; Bristow, Thomas; Craig, Patricia; Hazen, Robert; Crisp, Joy; Grotzinger, John; Des Marias, David; Farmer, Jack; Sarrazin, Philippe; Morookian, John Michael

    2017-04-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover, Curiosity, is providing in situ mineralogical, geochemical, and sedimentological assessments of rocks and soils in Gale crater. Since landing in 2012, Curiosity has traveled over 15 km, providing analyses of mudstones and sandstones to build a stratigraphic history of the region. The CheMin X-ray diffraction (XRD) instrument is the first instrument on Mars to provide quantitative mineralogical analyses of drilled powders and scooped sediment based on X-ray crystallography. CheMin identifies and determines mineral abundances and unit-cell parameters of major crystalline phases, and identifies minor phases at abundances >1 wt%. In conjunction with elemental analyses, CheMin-derived crystal chemistry allows for the first calculations of crystalline and amorphous material compositions. These mineralogy, crystal chemistry, and amorphous chemistry datasets are playing central roles in the characterization of Gale crater paleoenvironments. CheMin has analyzed 17 rock and sediment samples. In the first phase of the mission, Curiosity explored the sedimentary units of Aeolis Palus (Bradbury group), including two mudstones from Yellowknife Bay. CheMin analyses of the Yellowknife Bay mudstones identified clay minerals among an overall basaltic mineral assemblage. These mineralogical results, along with imaging and geochemical analyses, were used to characterize an ancient lacustrine setting that is thought to have once been a habitable environment. Following the investigations of the Bradbury group, Curiosity arrived at the lower reaches of Aeolis Mons, commonly called Mt. Sharp. A strategic sample campaign was initiated, drilling bedrock at primary sandstone and show decreased abundances of feldspar and pyroxene, and an increase in the amorphous component, specifically high-silica phases. The Murray formation is the most sampled stratigraphic unit in Gale crater. Composed mainly of finely laminated mudstones and interpreted as lacustrine

  7. Notas de mineralogía parte I

    OpenAIRE

    Henao Vásquez, Martha

    1987-01-01

    Resumen: El presente trabajo, llamado "Notas de mineralogía, parte I", es un resumen y recopilación de temas de varios textos, notas y de la misma experiencia docente. Existen dos razones que motivan la elaboración de estas notas, y son: en primer lugar, un requisito parcial para la promoción a la categoría de Profesor Asistente de la Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional, y en segundo, por ser la mineralogía una asignatura esencial en programas tales como geología, ingeniería de geol...

  8. MINERALOGICAL FEATURES OF ULTRAMAFIC HYPOXENOLITHS IN ALKALI-RICH PORPHYRY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xianfan; YANG Zhengxi; LIU Jiaduo; ZHANG Chengjiang; WU Dechao; LI Youguo

    2003-01-01

    Ultramafic hypoxenoliths found in the alkali-rich porphyry in the Liuhe Village, Heqing, Yunnan,China, are of great significance in understanding the origin and evolution of the porphyry. This paper discusses the mineralogical features of the hypoxenoliths. It shows that the xenoliths are characterized by the upper mantle rocks modified to certain extent by the enriched mantle fluid metasomatism in the mantle environment, with the enriched mantle property of Iow-degree partial melting. This constitutes the important mineralogical evidence for the petrogenesis and mineralization of alkali-rich porphyry.

  9. Reconstructing the Holocene depositional environments along the northern coast of Sfax (Tunisia): Mineralogical and sedimentological approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamourou, Ali; Touir, Jamel; Fagel, Nathalie

    2017-05-01

    A sedimentological and mineralogical study of sedimentary cores allowed reconstructing the evolution of depositional environments along the Northern coast of Sfax (Tunisia). The aim of this research work is to identify the factors controlling the sedimentation from the Holocene to the Present time. Three 30-m sediment cores collected by drilling at 30 m water depth were analyzed for their color, magnetic susceptibility signal, grain size by laser diffraction, organic matter content by loss of ignition, carbonate content by calcimetry and mineralogy by X-ray diffraction on bulk powder and clay <2 μm. They broadly present the same sedimentological and mineralogical features. Microscopical observations of petrographic slides allowed identifying six main sedimentary facies. Bulk mineralogical assemblages comprised clay minerals, quartz, calcite, gypsum and K-feldspars were examined. Considerable change was observed in the carbonate content that mimicked the bioclaste abundance and diluted the detrital minerals (clay minerals, quartz and feldspars). The gypsum mainly occurred in the lower sedimentary columns (SC12 and SC9) and in the upper/middle of core SC6. The clay fraction was made of a mixture of kaolinite, illite, smectite and palygorskite with no clear variation through core depth. Both grain-size parameters and magnetic susceptibility profile showed a sharp transition in the upper 2-5 m of the sedimentological columns. Coarse, sandy to gravely sediments characterized by a low magnetic susceptibility signal were replaced by fine bioclastic-rich clayey sediments. The analysis of vertical succession of depositional facies revealed a fluvial depositional environment (coastal plain) basically marked by fluvial channels and inundation plains at the bottom of all cores. However, core-top sediments recorded a littoral marine environment with sand depositions rich in gastropods, lamellibranches and algæ. Depositional facies, sedimentological and mineralogical

  10. Mineralogy: a modern approach to teaching a traditional discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, G. W.

    2011-12-01

    Mineralogy has traditionally been a primary component in undergraduate geoscience curriculum. In recent years, there has been a trend in which mineralogy and petrology have been combined into Earth Materials courses. This is unfortunate as these disciplines each have much to offer students, and content once considered essential is eliminated out of necessity. Mineralogy is still fundamental to students' understanding of the Earth and Earth processes. Using a modern approach to time-honored concepts, I teach a quarter-long Introductory Mineralogy class offered through the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego. Student evaluations of this course unequivocally indicate a high degree of learning and interest in the material, confirming that mineralogy continues to be a valuable class into the 21st century. While much of the content remains similar to what has been taught over the last century, my strategy involves a well-balanced approach to old and new. The first third of the course is background including the relevance of mineralogy, crystal chemistry, and crystallography; the second third of the course is systematic mineralogy using the Dana system; the last third of the course is devoted to understanding optical mineralogy, using modern analytical equipment such as XRD and SEM, and learning to use the petrographic microscope. Throughout the quarter, a strong emphasis is placed on the importance of hand-sample identification. Field work, traditionally not emphasized in mineralogy courses, has been re-introduced to the curriculum. I use modern technology to facilitate and support student learning. A lecture-based approach is employed with carefully crafted and organized PowerPoint presentations. PowerPoint lectures can be effective and highly engaging. The key is to ensure that the lectures are not overly reliant on text, instead relying on diagrams, charts, photos, and embedded media such as 3-D animations (ex. to teach

  11. Overlap of food addiction and substance use disorders definitions: analysis of animal and human studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hone-Blanchet, Antoine; Fecteau, Shirley

    2014-10-01

    Food has both homeostatic and hedonic components, which makes it a potent natural reward. Food related reward could therefore promote an escalation of intake and trigger symptoms associated to withdrawal, suggesting a behavioral parallel with substance abuse. Animal and human theoretical models of food reward and addiction have emerged, raising further interrogations on the validity of a bond between Substance Use Disorders, as clinically categorized in the DSM 5, and food reward. These models propose that highly palatable food items, rich in sugar and/or fat, are overly stimulating to the brain's reward pathways. Moreover, studies have also investigated the possibility of causal link between food reward and the contemporary obesity epidemic, with obesity being potentiated and maintained due to this overwhelming food reward. Although natural rewards are a hot topic in the definition and categorization of Substance Use Disorders, proofs of concept and definite evidence are still inconclusive. This review focuses on available results from experimental studies in animal and human models exploring the concept of food addiction, in an effort to determine if it depicts a specific phenotype and if there is truly a neurobiological similarity between food addiction and Substance Use Disorders. It describes results from sugar, fat and sweet-fat bingeing in rodent models, and behavioral and neurobiological assessments in different human populations. Although pieces of behavioral and neurobiological evidence supporting a food addiction phenotype in animals and humans are interesting, it seems premature to conclude on its validity.

  12. Measuring Connectivity in Linear Multivariate Processes: Definitions, Interpretation, and Practical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Faes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This tutorial paper introduces a common framework for the evaluation of widely used frequency-domain measures of coupling (coherence, partial coherence and causality (directed coherence, partial directed coherence from the parametric representation of linear multivariate (MV processes. After providing a comprehensive time-domain definition of the various forms of connectivity observed in MV processes, we particularize them to MV autoregressive (MVAR processes and derive the corresponding frequency-domain measures. Then, we discuss the theoretical interpretation of these MVAR-based connectivity measures, showing that each of them reflects a specific time-domain connectivity definition and how this results in the description of peculiar aspects of the information transfer in MV processes. Furthermore, issues related to the practical utilization of these measures on real-time series are pointed out, including MVAR model estimation and significance assessment. Finally, limitations and pitfalls arising from model mis-specification are discussed, indicating possible solutions and providing practical recommendations for a safe computation of the connectivity measures. An example of estimation of the presented measures from multiple EEG signals recorded during a combined visuomotor task is also reported, showing how evaluation of coupling and causality in the frequency domain may help describing specific neurophysiological mechanisms.

  13. Exploratory analysis regarding the domain definitions for computer based analytical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raicu, A.; Oanta, E.; Barhalescu, M.

    2017-08-01

    Our previous computer based studies dedicated to structural problems using analytical methods defined the composite cross section of a beam as a result of Boolean operations with so-called ‘simple’ shapes. Using generalisations, in the class of the ‘simple’ shapes were included areas bounded by curves approximated using spline functions and areas approximated as polygons. However, particular definitions lead to particular solutions. In order to ascend above the actual limitations, we conceived a general definition of the cross sections that are considered now calculus domains consisting of several subdomains. The according set of input data use complex parameterizations. This new vision allows us to naturally assign a general number of attributes to the subdomains. In this way there may be modelled new phenomena that use map-wise information, such as the metal alloys equilibrium diagrams. The hierarchy of the input data text files that use the comma-separated-value format and their structure are also presented and discussed in the paper. This new approach allows us to reuse the concepts and part of the data processing software instruments already developed. The according software to be subsequently developed will be modularised and generalised in order to be used in the upcoming projects that require rapid development of computer based models.

  14. Mineralogy of iron microbial mats from Loihi Seamount

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandy Marie Toner

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Extensive mats of Fe oxyhydroxides and associated Fe-oxidizing microbial organisms form in diverse geochemical settings – freshwater seeps to deep-sea vents – where ever opposing Fe(II-oxygen gradients prevail. The mineralogy, reactivity, and structural transformations of Fe oxyhydroxides precipitated from submarine hydrothermal fluids within microbial mats remains elusive in active and fossil systems. In response, a study of Fe microbial mat formation at the Loihi Seamount was conducted to describe the physical and chemical characteristics of Fe-phases using extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, synchrotron radiation X-ray total scattering, low-temperature magnetic measurements, and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Particle sizes of 3.5-4.6 nm were estimated from magnetism data, and coherent scattering domain sizes as small as 1.6 nm are indicated by pair distribution function (PDF analysis. Disorder in the nanostructured Fe-bearing phases results in limited intermediate-range structural order: less than that of standard 2-line ferrihydrite (Fh, except for the Pohaku site. The short-range ordered natural Fh (FhSRO phases were stable at 4 °C in the presence of oxygen for at least 1 year and during 400 oC treatment. The observed stability of the FhSRO is consistent with magnetic observations that point to non-interacting nanoparticles. PDF analyses of total scattering data provide further evidence for FhSRO particles with a poorly ordered silica coating. The presence of coated particles explains the small coherent scattering domain for the mat minerals, as well as the stability of the minerals over time and against heating. The mineral properties observed here provide a starting point from which progressively older and more extensively altered iron deposits may be examined, with the ultimate goal of improved interpretation of past biogeochemical conditions and diagenetic processes.

  15. Mineralogy and geochemistry of Bobov Dol coals, Bulgaria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vassilev, S.V.; Yossifova, M.G.; Vassileva, C.G. (Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria). Inst. of Applied Mineralogy)

    1994-10-01

    The mineralogy, elemental composition and modes of occurrence of 49 elements in nine composite samples of Bobov Dol high-ash coals were studied by optical microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry and chemical analysis. The major minerals were quartz, kaolinite, illite, plagioclase and K-feldspar and the minor minerals and phases were pyrite, marcasite, siderite, calcite, dolomite, gypsum, muscovite, montmorillonite and volcanic glass. The accessory minerals include a wide variety of minerals, such as galena, pyrrhotite, magnetite, hematite, goethite, chromite, rutile, anatase, corundum, gibbsite, biotite, chlorite, zircon, enstatite, garnet, jarosite, alunite, barite, polyhalite, aragonite, ankerite, witherite, apatite, halite and sylvite. The modes of occurrence and some genetic peculiarities of the above-mentioned minerals are described. Thirty-three elements occurred in concentrations higher than the respective Clarke values; especially S, Rb, Nb, Hf, Zn, Cu, Pb, Mn, Ti and U. The concentration trends and modes of occurrence of the trace elements are also discussed. In decreasing order of significance, the trace elements probably occur as element-organic compounds, as impurities in the mineral constituents, as major components in the minerals, as major and impurity components in the inorganic amorphous constituents, and in the fluid constituents. The Bobov Dol coals have undergone complex syngetenic, diagenetic and epigenetic mineralization processes associated with hydrothermal and volcanic activities. These processes were also accompanied by intensive tectonic movements, and possibly, by a later change from continental to marine sedimentation in the area after burial of the coal. 38 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs., 5 plates.

  16. CONTRAST IN CLAY MINERALOGY AND THEIR EFFECT ON ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    Petroleum Operations Department, Ministry of Mines and Energy, P.O. Box 486, Kotebe ... mineralogy impact on porosity permeability and other reservoir ..... iron is present as ferric oxides and enters into the crystal lattice of the clay or makes ...

  17. Mineralogy and geochemistry of density-separated Greek lignite fractions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iordanidis, A.; Doesburg, van J.D.J.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, lignite samples were collected from the Ptolemais region, northern Greece, homogenized, crushed to less than I nun, and separated in three density fractions using heavy media. The mineralogical investigation of the density fractions showed a predominance of pyrite in the light fractio

  18. Mineralogy and geochemistry of bauxite and bentonite deposits from Mozambique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dos Muchangos, A.C.

    2000-01-01

    Results of mineralogical and geochemical studies of bauxites, kaolinitic clays and bentoniteS from Mozambique are presented in this thesis. The bauxite and kaolinitic clay deposits in Penhalonga area (in the central western part of Mozambique) are associated with Precambrian magmatic rocks and the b

  19. Mineralogical Results from the Mars Science Laboratory Rover Curiosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, David Frederick.

    2017-01-01

    NASA's CheMin instrument, the first X-ray Diffractometer flown in space, has been operating on Mars for nearly five years. CheMin was first to establish the quantitative mineralogy of the Mars global soil (1). The instrument was next used to determine the mineralogy of a 3.7 billion year old lacustrine mudstone, a result that, together with findings from other instruments on the MSL Curiosity rover, documented the first habitable environment found on another planet (2). The mineralogy of this mudstone from an ancient playa lake was also used to derive the maximum concentration of CO2 in the early Mars atmosphere, a surprisingly low value that calls into question the current theory that CO2 greenhouse warming was responsible for the warm and wet environment of early Mars. CheMin later identified the mineral tridymite, indicative of silica-rich volcanism, in mudstones of the Murray formation on Mt. Sharp. This discovery challenges the paradigm of Mars as a basaltic planet and ushers in a new chapter of comparative terrestrial planetology (3). CheMin is now being used to systematically sample the sedimentary layers that comprise the lower strata of Mt. Sharp, a 5,000 meter sequence of sedimentary rock laid down in what was once a crater lake, characterizing isochemical sediments that through their changing mineralogy, document the oxidation and drying out of the Mars in early Hesperian time.

  20. Mineralogy and geochemistry of bauxite and bentonite deposits from Mozambique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dos Muchangos, A.C.

    2000-01-01

    Results of mineralogical and geochemical studies of bauxites, kaolinitic clays and bentoniteS from Mozambique are presented in this thesis. The bauxite and kaolinitic clay deposits in Penhalonga area (in the central western part of Mozambique) are associated with Precambrian magmatic rocks and the b

  1. Clay mineralogy of the mud banks of Cochin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, R.R.; Murty, P.S.N.

    The mineralogy of the sediments constituting the mud banks formed off Cochin, Kerala, India was studied. The clay mineral composition was used as a means of understanding the nature and source of origin of the muds. Fine fraction of the mud samples...

  2. Environmental factors of urinary stones mineralogy, Khouzestan Province, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarasvandi, Alireza; Carranza, E. J. M.; Heidari, Majid; Mousapour, Esmaeil

    2014-09-01

    Urinary stone diseases in the Khouzestan province (southwest Iran) are growing in number and it required extensive studies on various factors of the urinary stones formation in this province. In this research, in addition to distribution of urinary stones in different areas of province, the role of bioenvironmental (race), climate (temperature) and geology (water hardness) factors in urinary stones diversity has been studied. Mineralogical studied using X-ray diffraction showed that uricite and whewellite are the most frequency mineral phases. Struvite, Cystine, hydroxyapatite, weddellite, and Niahite can be observed as urinary stones, too. These data show that the urinary stone in the Khouzestan province can divide into 7 groups: calcium oxalate, phosphate, calcium oxalate/ phosphate, Urate, Urate/calcium, Urate/calcium oxalate/phosphate, Cystine/calcium oxalate. Also the results which attained from temperature effect investigation on the mineralogy of urinary stones, confirms that from Mediterranean sub-humid climates (northeastern area) to warm and dry climates (south and southwest area), calcium oxalate stones and urate stones concentration decreases and increases respectively. Comparison of data related to the drinking water hardness and mineralogy of urinary stones in different areas of Khouzestan province show that the combination of drinking water (especially water hardness) affects mineralogy of urinary stones in some areas (such az Ramhormoz and Hendijan). Finally, the data suggest that frequency of calcium oxalate in women is more than that of men. Moreover, there is direct relationship between the age (>45 years) and the increase in frequency of Urate minerals.

  3. Variations in the Fe mineralogy of bright Martian soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murchie, Scott; Mustard, John; Erard, Stephane; Geissler, Paul; Singer, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Bright regions on Mars are interpreted as 'soil' derived by chemical alteration of crustal rocks, whose main pigmentary component is ferric oxide or oxyhydroxide. The mineralogy and mineralogic variability of ferric iron are important evidence for the evolution of Martian soil: mineralogy of ferric phases is sensitive to chemical conditions in their genetic environments, and the spatial distributions of different ferric phases would record a history of both chemical environments and physical mixing. Reflectance spectroscopic studies provide several types of evidence that discriminate possible pigmentary phases, including the position of a crystal field absorption near 0.9 microns and position and strengths of absorptions in the UV-visible wavelength region. Recent telescopic spectra and laboratory measurements of Mars soil analogs suggest that spectral features of bright soil can be explained based on a single pigmentary phase, hematite (alpha-Fe2O3), occurring in both 'nanophase' and more crystalline forms. Here we report on a systematic investigation of Martian bright regions using ISM imaging spectrometer data, in which we examined spatial variations in the position and shape of the approximately 0.9 microns absorption. We found both local and regional heterogeneities that indicate differences in Fe mineralogy. These results demonstrate that bright soils do not represent a single lithology that has been homogenized by eolian mixing, and suggest that weathering of soils in different geologic settings has followed different physical and chemical pathways.

  4. Models as an Aid to Courses in Crystallography and Mineralogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, K. T.

    1983-01-01

    Three models used in teaching crystallography/mineralogy at the University of Technology (Papua, New Guinea) are described. These include stereographic projection model, optical indicatrix models for Istropic/Anisotropic minerals, and model showing effect of anisotropic minerals under crossed polars. Photographs of the models are also included.…

  5. Mineralogy and geochemistry of density-separated Greek lignite fractions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iordanidis, A.; Doesburg, van J.D.J.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, lignite samples were collected from the Ptolemais region, northern Greece, homogenized, crushed to less than I nun, and separated in three density fractions using heavy media. The mineralogical investigation of the density fractions showed a predominance of pyrite in the light fractio

  6. Elemental composition and mineralogical characteristics of coastal marine sediments of Tutuila, American Samoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, R J; Peshut, P J; Lasorsa, Brenda K

    2010-06-01

    Surface sediment samples were collected from 5 pristine coastal areas and 1 potentially contaminated coastal site on Tutuila, the main island of American Samoa, an isolated island group in the South Pacific Ocean. Samples were analysed for total element analysis (15 elements) and mineralogy. The results indicated no evidence of trace element contamination at any site, including Pago Pago Harbour. Inter-site variations could be explained assuming the sediments consisted predominantly of coralline sand and rubble with varying quantities of basaltic materials derived from local catchments.

  7. Clay mineralogy in different geomorphic surfaces in sugarcane areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, L.; Marques, J., Jr.

    2012-04-01

    The crystallization of the oxides and hydroxides of iron and aluminum and kaolinite of clay fraction is the result of pedogenetic processes controlled by the relief. These minerals have influence on the physical and chemical attributes of soil and exhibit spatial dependence. The pattern of spatial distribution is influenced by forms of relief as the geomorphic surfaces. In this sense, the studies aimed at understanding the relationship between relief and the distribution pattern of the clay fraction attributes contribute to the delineation of specific areas of management in the field. The objective of this study was to evaluate the spatial distribution of oxides and hydroxides of iron and aluminum and kaolinite of clay fraction and its relationship with the physical and chemical attributes in different geomorphic surfaces. Soil samples were collected in a transect each 25 m (100 samples) and in the sides of the same (200 samples) as well as an area of 500 ha (1 sample each six hectare). Geomorphic surfaces (GS) in the transect were mapped in detail to support mapping the entire area. The soil samples were taken to the laboratory for chemical, physical, and mineralogical analysis, and the pattern of spatial distribution of soil attributes was obtained by statistics and geostatistics. The GS I is considered the oldest surface of the study area, with depositional character, and a slope ranging from 0 to 4%. GS II and III are considered to be eroded, and the surface II plan a gentle slope that extends from the edge of the surface until the beginning of I and III. The crystallographic characteristics of the oxides and hydroxides of iron and aluminum and kaolinite showed spatial dependence and the distribution pattern corresponding to the limits present of the GS in the field. Surfaces I and II showed the best environments to the degree of crystallinity of hematite and the surface III to the greatest degree of crystallinity of goethite agreeing to the pedoenvironment

  8. Bringing Definitions into High Definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, John

    2010-01-01

    Why do definitions play such a central role in mathematics? It may seem obvious that precision about the terms one uses is necessary in order to use those terms reasonably (while reasoning). Definitions are chosen so as to be definite about the terms one uses, but also to make both the statement of, and the reasoning to justify, theorems as…

  9. Unsupervised definition of the tibia-femoral joint regions of the human knee and its applications to cartilage analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamez-Peña, José G.; Barbu-McInnis, Monica; Totterman, Saara

    2006-03-01

    Abnormal MR findings including cartilage defects, cartilage denuded areas, osteophytes, and bone marrow edema (BME) are used in staging and evaluating the degree of osteoarthritis (OA) in the knee. The locations of the abnormal findings have been correlated to the degree of pain and stiffness of the joint in the same location. The definition of the anatomic region in MR images is not always an objective task, due to the lack of clear anatomical features. This uncertainty causes variance in the location of the abnormality between readers and time points. Therefore, it is important to have a reproducible system to define the anatomic regions. This works present a computerized approach to define the different anatomic knee regions. The approach is based on an algorithm that uses unique features of the femur and its spatial relation in the extended knee. The femur features are found from three dimensional segmentation maps of the knee. From the segmentation maps, the algorithm automatically divides the femur cartilage into five anatomic regions: trochlea, medial weight bearing area, lateral weight bearing area, posterior medial femoral condyle, and posterior lateral femoral condyle. Furthermore, the algorithm automatically labels the medial and lateral tibia cartilage. The unsupervised definition of the knee regions allows a reproducible way to evaluate regional OA changes. This works will present the application of this automated algorithm for the regional analysis of the cartilage tissue.

  10. Economics definitions, methods, models, and analysis procedures for Homeland Security applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehlen, Mark Andrew; Loose, Verne William; Vargas, Vanessa N.; Smith, Braeton J.; Warren, Drake E.; Downes, Paula Sue; Eidson, Eric D.; Mackey, Greg Edward

    2010-01-01

    This report gives an overview of the types of economic methodologies and models used by Sandia economists in their consequence analysis work for the National Infrastructure Simulation & Analysis Center and other DHS programs. It describes the three primary resolutions at which analysis is conducted (microeconomic, mesoeconomic, and macroeconomic), the tools used at these three levels (from data analysis to internally developed and publicly available tools), and how they are used individually and in concert with each other and other infrastructure tools.

  11. Definitely Life but not Definitively

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Joan D.; Perry, Randall S.

    2006-12-01

    Although there have been attempts at a definition of life from many disciplines, none is accepted by all as definitive. Some people believe that it is impossible to define ‘life’ adequately at the moment. We agree with this point of view on linguistic grounds, examining the different types of definition, the contexts in which they are used and their relative usefulness as aids to arriving at a scientific definition of life. We look at some of the more recent definitions and analyse them in the light of our criteria for a good definition. We argue that since there are so many linguistic and philosophical difficulties with such a definition of life, what is needed is a series of working descriptions, which are suited to the audience and context in which they are used and useful for the intended purpose. We provide some ideas and examples of the forms these may take.

  12. Mineralogical analysis of metallurgical slags - an approach about its application in electric arc furnace slags; Analise mineral de escorias siderurgicas - uma abordagem sobre sua aplicabilidade em escorias de aciaria eletrica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenzi, Joao Cassio Romero; Vilela, Antonio Cezar Faria; Strohaecker, Telmo Roberto [Rio Grande do Sul Univ., Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Engenharia Metalurgica e dos Materiais

    1996-12-31

    There are many factors to be considered for the consolidation of the study about slags by structural and microstructural analysis techniques of theirs mineral components. Besides the lack of some basic understanding of slags, factors as the cooling rate, the chemical composition, the crystallinity and porosity degrees, taking samples and preparing specimens procedures, among others can be listed. This work presents the development of a procedure for taking samples and preparing specimens of electric arc furnace slags for optical microscopy, and some results obtained by X-ray powder diffraction and electron probe micro analyzer (WDS and EDS) analysis techniques. among the obtained results, are the identification of the superiority of the dry grinding technique used in this study over the wet grinding procedures as well as that the sequence optical microscopy -> X-ray powder diffraction -> electron probe micro analyzer presents good results on the mineral identification of electric arc furnace slags. (author) 11 refs., 20 figs., 7 tabs.

  13. Mineralogical and Biogeochemical Characteristics of Rhodolith from Wu Island, Jeju-do, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Y.; Kang, S.; Roh, E. H.

    2012-12-01

    This study focused on investigation of mineralogical and biogeochemical characteristics of the rhodoliths and examination of the rhodolith origin whether they were formed by chemical or biological processes. Rhodoliths are free-living forms of calcareous, coralline red algae formed under specific environmental conditions, but their formation processes are still controversial. The rhodoliths and sea water were sampled at Seogwang-ri coast in the western part of Wu Island, Jeju-do, Korea. The chemical compositions and pHs of sea water were measured by ICP-AES and pH meter. Microorganisms enriched from rhodoliths were aerobically cultured at room temperature in D-1 media containing various concentrations (0, 30, 100 mM) of Ca and Mg-acetate, and the microorganisms were analyzed by 16S rRNA gene DGGE analysis to confirm microbial diversity. Mineralogical characteristics of the rhodoliths and precipitates formed by the enriched microorganisms were determined by XRF, XRD, and SEM-EDS analyses. The sea water had a range of pH 6 to 7, and consisted of approximately 400 mg/L of Ca and 1200 mg/L of Mg which are low to form carbonate minerals by chemical process in natural environments. XRF and XRD analyses showed the rhodoliths mainly consisted of 46% CaO and 5 % MgO and mineralogy is Mg-rich calcite. A 16S rRNA sequence analysis showed the enriched microorganisms contained a carbonate forming microorganism, Proteus mirabilis. The enriched microorganisms precipitated carbonate minerals using D-1 media containing Ca- and Mg-acetate (30, 100 mM) and mineralogy of the precipitated carbonate mineral was Mg-rich calcite, whereas the microorganisms did not form carbonate minerals without Ca- and Mg-acetate in D-1 media. SEM-EDS analyses showed that the Mg-rich calcite formed by the microorganisms had a rhombohedron shape. And the Mg-rich calcite consisted of Ca, Si and Mg with extracellular polymeric substance (EPS). These results indicate that the rhodoliths at Seogwang-ri coast

  14. Mineralogy of crater Haulani on dwarf planet Ceres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, Federico; Zambon, Francesca; Raponi, Andrea; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Ammannito, Eleonora; Capria, Maia Teresa; Giacomo Carrozzo, Filippo; Ciarniello, Mauro; Combe, Jean-Philippe; Formisano, Michelangelo; Hoffmann, Martin; Krohn, Katrin; Longobardo, Andrea; McFadden, Lucy Ann; Y McSween, Harry; Nathues, Andreas; Palomba, Ernesto; Pieters, Carle; Stephan, Katrin; Russell, Christopher T.; Raymond, Carol; Dawn/VIR Team

    2016-10-01

    On dwarf planet Ceres, several high-albedo units are visible at the local scale. Haulani crater, located in the equatorial quadrangle having the same name, is one of the notable bright units highlighted by the Dawn spacecraft since its first approach to Ceres in early 2015. Due to the images obtained by the Dawn Framing Camera, it was possible to reveal that Haulani's bright material displays a very small or even negative ("blue") spectral slope in the range from the visible to the near infrared light, which is a peculiar occurrence compared to the average surface of Ceres.Hyperspectral images returned by the Visible and InfraRed mapping spectrometer (VIR) onboard Dawn enabled a detailed mineralogical analysis of the Haulani crater area. Already at the spatial resolution of the Survey phase (~1.1 km/px), and even more so during HAMO (~0.38 km/px) and LAMO (~0.10 km/px) mission phases, Haulani crater shows considerable spectral variability. The spectral features centered at 2.7 and 3.06 µm, respectively indicative of the presence of hydrous minerals and ammoniated phyllosilicates, show a decrease of band depth in the floor and in the bright ejecta corresponding to the blue spectral slope. Spectral signatures at 3.4 and ~4 µm, indicative of carbonates, also show a moderate variability. Finally, Haulani shows the highest thermal contrast over the entire surface of Ceres, which may be linked to the albedo and texture of the material excavated by the impact, combined with its compactness in specific areas such as pitted terrain.The application of a spectral unmixing model on VIR data acquired in Survey and HAMO suggests that the observed spectral variations might be due to substantial differences in grain size, rather than to significant variations in composition. However, a comprehensive analysis shall include LAMO data acquired at higher pixel resolution.AcknowledgementsThis work is supported by the Italian Space Agency (ASI). VIR was funded and coordinated by the

  15. Use of fuzzy edge single-photon emission computed tomography analysis in definite Alzheimer's disease - a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rusina Robert

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Definite Alzheimer's disease (AD requires neuropathological confirmation. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT may enhance diagnostic accuracy, but due to restricted sensitivity and specificity, the role of SPECT is largely limited with regard to this purpose. Methods We propose a new method of SPECT data analysis. The method is based on a combination of parietal lobe selection (as regions-of-interest (ROI, 3D fuzzy edge detection, and 3D watershed transformation. We applied the algorithm to three-dimensional SPECT images of human brains and compared the number of watershed regions inside the ROI between AD patients and controls. The Student's two-sample t-test was used for testing domain number equity in both groups. Results AD patients had a significantly reduced number of watershed regions compared to controls (p Conclusions Our non-invasive, relatively low-cost, and easy method can contribute to a more precise diagnosis of AD.

  16. A new analysis method for very high definition Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes as applied to the CAT telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Le Bohec, S; Punch, M; Barrau, A; Bazer-Bachi, R; Cabot, H; Chounet, L M; Debiais, G; Dezalay, J P; Djannati-Ataï, A; Dumora, D; Espigat, P; Fabre, B; Fleury, P; Fontaine, G; George, R; Ghesquière, C; Goret, P; Gouiffes, C; Grenier, I A; Iacoucci, L; Malet, I; Meynadier, C; Munz, F; Palfrey, T A; Paré, E; Pons, Y; Québert, J; Ragan, K; Renault, C; Rivoal, M; Rob, L; Schovanek, P; Smith, D; Tavernet, J P; Vrana, J

    1998-01-01

    A new method of shower-image analysis is presented which appears very powerful as applied to those Cherenkov Imaging Telescopes with very high definition imaging capability. It provides hadron rejection on the basis of a single cut on the image shape, and simultaneously determines the energy of the electromagnetic shower and the position of the shower axis with respect to the detector. The source location is also reconstructed for each individual gamma-ray shower, even with one single telescope, so for a point source the hadron rejection can be further improved. As an example, this new method is applied to data from the CAT (Cherenkov Array at Themis) imaging telescope, which has been operational since Autumn, 1996.

  17. Mineralogical discrimination of the pleistocene loess/paleosol sections in Srijem and Baranja, Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galović, Lidija; Peh, Zoran

    2016-06-01

    Previous investigations of the mineralogical composition of loess sections (loess, loess-like sediments, paleosols, alluvial intercalations) in the Carpathian Basin have concluded that the Danube River is the dominant control on the loessitic parent material. These investigations also identify a significant role for the Danube's tributaries in creating local variations. The north-south alignment of these sections forms a transect from the central part of the Carpathian Basin to its southern edge. In this work, the mineral origin of loess sediments was identified by using the multivariate statistical method of discriminant function analysis. Two models were constructed based on the modal composition as the suite of predictor (independent) variables: one is using geographic location as the a priori grouping criterion (SECTION); another employing the difference between the sampling media (LITHOLOGY). Both of the examined discriminant models demonstrate the existence of the mixing zones. The Erdut section is a clear mixture of the mineralogies at the other studied locations, while loesses appear generally intermediate in mineralogy between alluvium and paleosol. The main rationale for the observed difference in modal composition between the Šarengrad and other analyzed sections is the proximity of the Šarengrad section to the Sava River floodplain and Dinaric Ophiolite Zone (DOZ), both important source areas for aeolian sediments in the southern edge of the Carpathian Basin that transport material from the Central Bosnian Mountains unit of DOZ. Chemically, the most resistant heavy minerals together with opaque minerals are exclusively associated with paleosols, being typical products of geochemical pedogenic processes.

  18. On the relationship between luminescence excitation spectra and feldspar mineralogy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poolton, N.R.J.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Johnsen, O.

    1996-01-01

    Feldspar minerals can be used as naturally occurring radiation dosemeters, with dose assessment commonly using luminescence techniques. Since many feldspars contain radioactive K-40, knowledge of the mineralogy of the luminescent samples being measured is of high importance. Most feldspars contain...... more than trace amounts of highly luminescent Fe3+ impurities, and this article examines the relationship between features of the luminescence excitation spectrum of this ion with sample mineralogy. It is demonstrated that there is a near linear correspondence between the plagioclase feldspar...... groups. The results are compared with properties of the excitation spectra dose-dependent optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) in order to compare the chemical environment of the OSL donor defect, and the isolated Fe3+ centres....

  19. Olivine-dominated asteroids: Mineralogy and origin

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchez, Juan A.; Reddy, Vishnu; Kelley, Michael S.; Cloutis, Edward A.; Bottke, William F.; Nesvorný, David; Lucas, Michael P.; Hardersen, Paul S.; Gaffey, Michael J.; Abell, Paul A.; Corre, Lucille Le

    2013-01-01

    Olivine-dominated asteroids are a rare type of objects formed either in nebular processes or through magmatic differentiation. The analysis of meteorite samples suggest that at least 100 parent bodies in the main belt experienced partial or complete melting and differentiation before being disrupted. However, only a few olivine-dominated asteroids, representative of the mantle of disrupted differentiated bodies, are known to exist. Due to the paucity of these objects in the main belt their or...

  20. Mineralogy and cooling history of magnesian lunar granulite 67415

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Hiroshi; Miyamoto, Masamichi

    1993-01-01

    Apollo granulite 67415 was investigated by mineralogical techniques to gain better understanding of cooling histories of lunar granulities. Cooling rates were estimated from chemical zoning of olivines in magnesian granulitic clasts by computer simulation of diffusion processes. The cooling rate of 10 deg C/yr obtained is compatible with a model of the granulite formation, in which the impact deposit was cooled from high temperature or annealed, at the depth of about 25 m beneath the surface.

  1. The Influence of Mineralogy on Recovering Organic Acids from Mars Analogue Materials Using the One-Pot Derivatization Experiment on the Sample Analysis at Mars(SAM) Instrument Suite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalport, Fabien; Glavin, Daniel P.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Bish, D.; Blake, D.; Coll, P.; Szopa, C.; Buch, A.; McAdam, A.; Dworkin, J. P.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2012-01-01

    The search for complex organic molecules on Mars, including important biomolecules such as amino acids and carboxylic acids, will require a chemical extraction and a derivatization step to transform these organic compounds into species that are sufficiently volatile to be detected by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS). We have developed a ''one-pot'' extraction and chemical derivatization protocol using N-methyl-N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA) and dimethylformamide (DMF) for the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) experiment instrument suite on NASA's the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission. The temperature and duration of the derivatization reaction, pre-concentration of chemical derivatives, and gas chromatographic separation parameters have been optimized under SAM instrument design constraints. MTBSTFA/DMF extraction and derivatization at 300 1C for several minutes of a variety of terrestrial Mars analog materials facilitated the detection of amino acids and carboxylic acids in a surface soil sample collected from the Atacama Desert and a carbonate-rich stromatolite sample from Svalbard. However, the rapid reaction of MTBSTFA with water in several analog materials that contained high abundances of hydrated minerals, and the possible deactivation of derivatized compounds by iron oxides, as detected by XRD/XRF using the CheMin field unit Terra, proved to be highly problematic for the direct extraction of organics using MTBSTFA. The combination of pyrolysis and two different wet-chemical derivatization methods employed by SAM should enable a wide range of organic compounds to be detected by GCMS if present on Mars.

  2. Definition of regional dependence of activity antioxidative enzymes means of the dispersive analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoly T. Bykov

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In article application of the dispersive analysis for an estimation of dependence of activity antioxidative enzymes from region of constant residing, age, sex and the disease diagnosis is considered.

  3. Martian Surface Mineralogy from Rovers with Spirit, Opportunity, and Curiosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Richard V.

    2016-01-01

    Beginning in 2004, NASA has landed three well-instrumented rovers on the equatorial martian surface. The Spirit rover landed in Gusev crater in early January, 2004, and the Opportunity rover landed on the opposite side of Mars at Meridian Planum 21 days later. The Curiosity rover landed in Gale crater to the west of Gusev crater in August, 2012. Both Opportunity and Curiosity are currently operational. The twin rovers Spirit and Opportunity carried Mossbauer spectrometers to determine the oxidation state of iron and its mineralogical composition. The Curiosity rover has an X-ray diffraction instrument for identification and quantification of crystalline materials including clay minerals. Instrument suites on all three rovers are capable of distinguishing primary rock-forming minerals like olivine, pyroxene and magnetite and products of aqueous alteration in including amorphous iron oxides, hematite, goethite, sulfates, and clay minerals. The oxidation state of iron ranges from that typical for unweathered rocks and soils to nearly completely oxidized (weathered) rocks and soils as products of aqueous and acid-sulfate alteration. The in situ rover mineralogy also serves as ground-truth for orbital observations, and orbital mineralogical inferences are used for evaluating and planning rover exploration.

  4. Error rates in forensic DNA analysis: definition, numbers, impact and communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloosterman, Ate; Sjerps, Marjan; Quak, Astrid

    2014-09-01

    Forensic DNA casework is currently regarded as one of the most important types of forensic evidence, and important decisions in intelligence and justice are based on it. However, errors occasionally occur and may have very serious consequences. In other domains, error rates have been defined and published. The forensic domain is lagging behind concerning this transparency for various reasons. In this paper we provide definitions and observed frequencies for different types of errors at the Human Biological Traces Department of the Netherlands Forensic Institute (NFI) over the years 2008-2012. Furthermore, we assess their actual and potential impact and describe how the NFI deals with the communication of these numbers to the legal justice system. We conclude that the observed relative frequency of quality failures is comparable to studies from clinical laboratories and genetic testing centres. Furthermore, this frequency is constant over the five-year study period. The most common causes of failures related to the laboratory process were contamination and human error. Most human errors could be corrected, whereas gross contamination in crime samples often resulted in irreversible consequences. Hence this type of contamination is identified as the most significant source of error. Of the known contamination incidents, most were detected by the NFI quality control system before the report was issued to the authorities, and thus did not lead to flawed decisions like false convictions. However in a very limited number of cases crucial errors were detected after the report was issued, sometimes with severe consequences. Many of these errors were made in the post-analytical phase. The error rates reported in this paper are useful for quality improvement and benchmarking, and contribute to an open research culture that promotes public trust. However, they are irrelevant in the context of a particular case. Here case-specific probabilities of undetected errors are needed

  5. Definition of distance for nonlinear time series analysis of marked point process data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwayama, Koji, E-mail: koji@sat.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Research Institute for Food and Agriculture, Ryukoku Univeristy, 1-5 Yokotani, Seta Oe-cho, Otsu-Shi, Shiga 520-2194 (Japan); Hirata, Yoshito; Aihara, Kazuyuki [Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan)

    2017-01-30

    Marked point process data are time series of discrete events accompanied with some values, such as economic trades, earthquakes, and lightnings. A distance for marked point process data allows us to apply nonlinear time series analysis to such data. We propose a distance for marked point process data which can be calculated much faster than the existing distance when the number of marks is small. Furthermore, under some assumptions, the Kullback–Leibler divergences between posterior distributions for neighbors defined by this distance are small. We performed some numerical simulations showing that analysis based on the proposed distance is effective. - Highlights: • A new distance for marked point process data is proposed. • The distance can be computed fast enough for a small number of marks. • The method to optimize parameter values of the distance is also proposed. • Numerical simulations indicate that the analysis based on the distance is effective.

  6. Geometric diffusions as a tool for harmonic analysis and structure definition of data: diffusion maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coifman, R R; Lafon, S; Lee, A B; Maggioni, M; Nadler, B; Warner, F; Zucker, S W

    2005-05-24

    We provide a framework for structural multiscale geometric organization of graphs and subsets of R(n). We use diffusion semigroups to generate multiscale geometries in order to organize and represent complex structures. We show that appropriately selected eigenfunctions or scaling functions of Markov matrices, which describe local transitions, lead to macroscopic descriptions at different scales. The process of iterating or diffusing the Markov matrix is seen as a generalization of some aspects of the Newtonian paradigm, in which local infinitesimal transitions of a system lead to global macroscopic descriptions by integration. We provide a unified view of ideas from data analysis, machine learning, and numerical analysis.

  7. DEFINITION AND ANALYSIS OF MOTION ACTIVITY AFTER-STROKE PATIENT FROM THE VIDEO STREAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yu. Katayev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes an approach to the assessment of motion activity of man in after-stroke period, allowing the doctor to get new information to give a more informed recommendations on rehabilitation treatment than in traditional approaches. Consider description of the hardware-software complex for determination and analysis of motion activity after-stroke patient for the video stream. The article provides a description of the complex, its algorithmic filling and the results of the work on the example of processing of the actual data. The algorithms and technology to significantly accelerate the gait analysis and improve the quality of diagnostics post-stroke patients.

  8. An unpublished text of Jovellanos about mineralogy Notas inéditas de Jovellanos sobre mineralogía

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge ORDAZ GARGALLO

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An unpublished manuscript of Gaspar Melchor de Jovellanos about the history of mineralogy, written during his captivity in Bellver Castle (Palma de Mallorca is presented and analyzed. In this writing the importance of the chemical knowledge as a source of other branches of science and its applications in different fields of agriculture, mining and industry is considered. The author made a historical synthesis reviewing the men of science that contributed in a great extent to the advance of the chemistry and mineralogy. The text clearly supports the new contributions of Lavoisier and other supporters of experimentation as a scientific method, which agrees with Jovellanos’ ideas about the development of the «useful» sciences for the progress of the countries.Se presenta y analiza un manuscrito inédito de Gaspar Melchor de Jovellanos sobre la historia de la mineralogía, que redactó durante su cautiverio en el Castillo de Bellver (Palma de Mallorca. En el escrito considera de gran importancia los conocimientos químicos como fuente de otras ramas del saber científico y sus aplicaciones en distintos ámbitos de la agricultura, minería e industria. El autor hace una síntesis histórica repasando los hombres de ciencia que en mayor medida contribuyeron al avance de la química y la mineralogía. El texto apoya claramente las nuevas aportaciones de Lavoisier y otros químicos partidarios de la experimentación como método científico, y es acorde con las ideas de Jovellanos acerca del cultivo de las ciencias «útiles» para el progreso de los pueblos.

  9. An unpublished text of Jovellanos about mineralogy Notas inéditas de Jovellanos sobre mineralogía

    OpenAIRE

    Ordaz Gargallo, Jorge; Gutiérrez Claverol, Manuel; De Lorenzo Álvarez, Elena

    2012-01-01

    An unpublished manuscript of Gaspar Melchor de Jovellanos about the history of mineralogy, written during his captivity in Bellver Castle (Palma de Mallorca) is presented and analyzed. In this writing the importance of the chemical knowledge as a source of other branches of science and its applications in different fields of agriculture, mining and industry is considered. The author made a historical synthesis reviewing the men of science that contributed in a great extent to the advance of t...

  10. Combined Chemical and Mineralogical Evidence for Heavy Metal Binding in Mining- and Smelting-Affected Alluvial Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A. VAN(E)K; V. ETTLER; T. GRYGAR; L. BOR(U)VKA; O. (S)EBEK; O. DR(A)BEK

    2008-01-01

    The binding of metallic contaminants (Pb, Cd, and Zn) and As on soil constituents was studied on four highly con-taminated alluvial soil profiles from the mining/smelting district of Pribram (Czech Republic) using a combination of mineralogical and chemical methods. Sequential extraction analysis (SEA) was supplemented by mineralogical investi-gation of both bulk samples and hcavy mineral fractions using X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy with an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (SEM/EDS). The mineralogy of Fe and Mn oxides was studied by voltammetry of microparticles (VMP) and diffuse reflectance spectrometry (DRS). Zinc and Pb were predominantly were detected in soils by XRD and SEM/EDS. In contrast, Cd was the most mobile contaminant and was predominantly present in the exchangeable fraction. Arsenic was bound to the residual and reducible fractions (corresponding to Fe oxides or to unidentified Fe-Pb arsenates). SEM/EDS observations indicate the predominant affinity of Pb for Mn oxides,and to a lesser extent, for Fe oxidcs. Thus, a more suitable SEA procedure should be used for these mining-affected soils to distinguish between the contaminant fraction bound to Mn oxides and Fe oxides.

  11. Cost benefit analysis in diagnostic radiology: glossary and definitions; Nutzen, Kosten und Analytik in der diagnostischen Radiologie: Definitionen und Glossar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golder, W. [Freie Univ. Berlin (Germany). Abt. Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin

    1999-01-01

    Cost efficiency analyses in clinical radiology require the application of methods and techniques that are not yet part of the academic qualifications of the specialists. The procedures used are borrowed from economics, decision theory, applied social sciences, epidemiology and statistics. Many expressions hail from the angloamerican literature and are presently not yet germanized unequivocally. This survey is intended to present main terms of cost efficiency analysis in the English version as well as a German translation, to give a clear definition and, if necessary, explanatory notes, and to illustrate their application by means of concrete radiologic examples. The selection of the terms is based on the hierarchical models of health technology assessment resp. clinical outcome research by Fryback and Thronbury resp. Maisey and Hutton. In concrete terms, both the differences between benefit, outcomes, and utility and the differences between effectiveness, efficacy and efficiency and the differences between direct, indirect, intangible, and marginal costs are explained. True cost efficiency analysis is compared with cost effectiveness analysis, cost identification analysis, cost minimization analysis, and cost utility analysis. Applied social sciences are represented by the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 and the QALY conception. From decision theory both the analysis of hypothetical alternatives and the Markov model are taken. Finally, sensitivity analysis and the procedures of combined statistical evaluation of comparable results (meta-analysis) are quoted. (orig.) [Deutsch] Kosten-Nutzen-Analysen in der klinischen Radiologie erfordern den Einsatz von Methoden und Techniken, die nicht zum akademischen Ruestzeug der Fachvertreter gehoeren. Die verschiedenen Verfahren sind der Volkswirtschaftslehre, der Entscheidungstheorie, den angewandten Sozialwissenschaften, der Epidemiologie und der Statistik entlehnt. Viele Termini kommen aus dem angloamerikanischen

  12. Decision Support System Requirements Definition for Human Extravehicular Activity Based on Cognitive Work Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Matthew James; McGuire, Kerry M; Feigh, Karen M

    2017-06-01

    The design and adoption of decision support systems within complex work domains is a challenge for cognitive systems engineering (CSE) practitioners, particularly at the onset of project development. This article presents an example of applying CSE techniques to derive design requirements compatible with traditional systems engineering to guide decision support system development. Specifically, it demonstrates the requirements derivation process based on cognitive work analysis for a subset of human spaceflight operations known as extravehicular activity. The results are presented in two phases. First, a work domain analysis revealed a comprehensive set of work functions and constraints that exist in the extravehicular activity work domain. Second, a control task analysis was performed on a subset of the work functions identified by the work domain analysis to articulate the translation of subject matter states of knowledge to high-level decision support system requirements. This work emphasizes an incremental requirements specification process as a critical component of CSE analyses to better situate CSE perspectives within the early phases of traditional systems engineering design.

  13. Mineralogical, textural, structural and geochemical aspects of Nakhlak lead mine, Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Jazi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Nakhlak lead mine is located at the Nakhlak mountain 55 km NE of Anarak town in Isfahan province. The mineralogy is simple; galena and barite are the main primary minerals and cerussite is the main secondary mineral. Sphalerite, pyrite, chalcopyrite, tetrahedrite-tennantite and acanthite occur as minor and trace mineral inclusions in galena. Secondary minerals are anglesite, plattnerite, wulfenite and malachite. The host rock has undergone a pre-mineralization dolomitization process. Four types of dolomite have been identified which saddle dolomite is the most distinguished. Open space filling textures occur in the form of breccia, cockade, crustification and colloform. Analysis of the galena samples indicates presence of many trace elements in galena among which silver is the most important. Element pairs such as Ag-As, Zn-Cd, As-Cu and As-Sb are highly correlated. This correlation may be explained by the presence of inclusions. Ag-Sb-Bi ternary diagram indicates that galena samples from Nakhlak are rich in Ag and Sb and poor in Bi. Sb/Bi (3773 ratio in galena is suggestive of a low temperature of formation for the deposit. The Upper Cretaceous carbonate host rocks and their dolomitization, the stratabound and epigenetic mineralization, the absence of igneous activity, the open space filling texture, the simple mineralogy and geochemistry all point to a Mississippi valley type model for the Nakhlak Pb deposit.

  14. Mass Concentration and Mineralogical Characteristics Aerosol Particles Collected at Dunhuang During ACE-Asia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Measurements were performed in spring 2001 and 2002 to determine the characteristics of soil dust in the Chinese desert region of Dunhuang, one of the ground sites of the Asia-Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia). The mean mass concentrations of total suspended particle matter during the spring of 2001 and 2002 were 317 μg m-3 and 307 μg m-3, respectively. Eleven dust storm events were observed with a mean aerosol concentration of 1095 μg m-3, while the non-dusty days with calm or weak wind speed had a background aerosol loading of 196 μg m-3 on average in the springtime.The main minerals detected in the aerosol samples by X-ray diffraction were illite, kaolinite, chlorite, quartz,feldspar, calcite and dolomite. Gypsum, halite and amphibole were also detected in a few samples. The mineralogical data also show that Asian dust is characterized by a kaolinite to chlorite (K/C) ratio lower than 1 whereas Saharan dust exhibits a K/C ratio larger than 2. Air mass back-trajectory analysis show that three families of pathways are associated with the aerosol particle transport to Dunhuang, but these have similar K/C ratios, which further demonstrates that the mineralogical characteristics of Asian dust are different from African dust.

  15. Mineralogy of Stardust Track 112 Particle: Relation to Amoeboid Olivine Aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, M.; Fagan, T.; Mikouchi, T.; Miyamoto, M.; Zolensky, M.; Ohsumi, K.

    2012-01-01

    The successful analysis of comet 81P/Wild 2 particles returned by the Stardust mission has revealed that the Wild 2 dust contains abundant silicate grains that are much larger than interstellar grains and appear to have formed in the inner regions of the solar nebula [1]. Wild 2 particles include minerals which are isotopically and mineralogically similar to CAIs [e.g., 2, 3] and chondrules [e.g., 4] in chondrites. In addition, particles similar to amoeboid olivine aggregates (AOAs) also have been discovered [5, 6,7]. C2067,2,112,1 is a terminal particle recovered from track #112 (T112). Nakamura-Messenger et al. [7] showed that the forsterite grain in T112 has O-16 enrichment of approximately 40 0/00 (vs. SMOW) and possibly formed together with AOAs. In this study, we have examined the mineralogy of the T112 particle and compared the possible relationships between T112 and AOAs in primitive meteorites.

  16. Chemical and Mineralogical study of Nabataean painted pottery from Petra, Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alawneh, Firas; Bala'awi, Fadi

    Nabataean pottery is distinguished by the thinness of its walls, which were sometimes only 1.5 mm thick. It was a pinkish/red color, often decorated by hand with dark brown flower and leaf designs. The typical (egg-shell) shallow open bowls productions were very difficult to make on the potter's wheel, demonstrating how skilled their craftsmen were Nabataean painted pottery from Petra Jordan were examined in order to determine the mineralogical characteristics of the raw pigment materials used for their production and to elucidate the ceramic manufacturing technologies employed. Optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM-EDS) were the analytical techniques used. The initial examination of the ceramic shreds in optical microscopy showed all samples to be identical in their paint and paste textures. The mineralogical composition of the paste (unpainted outer surface) is typical of a clay poor in calcium and fired at moderate-high temperature in an oxidizing atmosphere. The paste is composed of quartz, plagioclase, potassium feldspar, hematite, dolomite, and calcite. The latter two phases might be attributed to post-depositional contamination, since examination with both optical and scanning electron microscopes show fine carbonate particles deposited in the pores and cracks of the shred. The paint on the inner surface of the vessel, on the other hand is composed of hematite as a major phase with only some quartz and plagioclase.

  17. Top-down and bottom-up definitions of human failure events in human reliability analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boring, Ronald Laurids [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-10-01

    In the probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) used in the nuclear industry, human failure events (HFEs) are determined as a subset of hardware failures, namely those hardware failures that could be triggered by human action or inaction. This approach is top-down, starting with hardware faults and deducing human contributions to those faults. Elsewhere, more traditionally human factors driven approaches would tend to look at opportunities for human errors first in a task analysis and then identify which of those errors is risk significant. The intersection of top-down and bottom-up approaches to defining HFEs has not been carefully studied. Ideally, both approaches should arrive at the same set of HFEs. This question is crucial, however, as human reliability analysis (HRA) methods are generalized to new domains like oil and gas. The HFEs used in nuclear PRAs tend to be top-down—defined as a subset of the PRA—whereas the HFEs used in petroleum quantitative risk assessments (QRAs) often tend to be bottom-up—derived from a task analysis conducted by human factors experts. The marriage of these approaches is necessary in order to ensure that HRA methods developed for top-down HFEs are also sufficient for bottom-up applications.

  18. Petrographical and mineralogical analysis of coal after biological leaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kupka Daniel

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available For coal utilization the sulphur content is a decisive parameter for the quality of the coal. In many countries clean coal technologies have to be applied on the basis of regulations concerning fuel quality and emission standards for dust, CO, SO2 and NOx in the flue gas. It becomes quite obvious that it is always preferable to keep the sulphur levels in coal at a minimum. Bacterial oxidation of the sulphur present in coal could well be thought of as an effective alternative.Desulphurization by bacteria Thiobacillus ferrooxidans was applied to coal sample from Sokolov mine. Bacteria growing in batch culture on ferrous iron at initial pH 1.6 were harvested at the later growth phase. The ferric iron precipitates were separated from the cells by centrifugation and the rest medium by membrane filtration. Cell pellet captured on the filter was washed by hydrochloric acid and distilled water and finally suspended in fresh Waksmann & Joffe medium. The medium was previously acidified by 5M H2SO4 to pH 2. Initial concentration of sulphates in medium was 1.8 g L-1. Desulphurization of coal was studied in a stirred batch reactor at 10% w/v pulp density in diluted H2SO4 at pH = 2.The effect of bacterial leaching on mineral and organic matter of coal was followed by optical microscopy. Petrographic evaluation of the coal matter samples consisted of the determination of reflectance of gelified huminite macerals (R0, determination of maceral group contents of huminite, liptinite, inertinite and determination of the mineral content with emphasis on the various forms of iron sulphides. The sample examined were brown coal with higher liptinite and pyrite contents. The huminite reflectance of 0,33 % is corresponding to the lignitic metatype. Huminite concentration is 65,7 % and is the most abundant maceral group. The maceral ulminite and densinite contributes to the high huminite content. The concentration of attrinite, who be pass to liptodetrinite, textinite, gelinite and corpohuminite contents does not exceed 5 %. The maceral composition of liptinite was determined by a fluorescence measurement. The remaining liptinite macerals, i.e. liptodetrinite and bituminite, resinite, cutinite and fluorinite are accessories. The content of inertinite (fusinite, sklerotinite and inertodetrinite is low (4,5 %.Coal contains sulphur in inorganic form (mainly pyrite and marcasite and sulphur in organic form. Biological lixiviation has caused relatively significant change in FeS2, in some cases full or part elimination of dispersed framboids at mineralised detrite as well as at huminite macerals resulting in empty holes and hudge FeS2 grains were slightly disintegrated at the surface or dike - pyrite was relased irregularly after lixiviation.

  19. The mineralogical and fabric analysis of ancient pottery artifacts

    OpenAIRE

    R. Palanivel; Rajesh Kumar,U.

    2011-01-01

    The present investigation is carried out to estimate the firing temperature and conditions of firing of ancient pottery shreds excavated recently from Sembiankandiyur, Tamil Nadu, India. FTIR and XRD studies have been attempted on these shreds to characterize the mineral composition of the pottery artifacts in respect of their different physical attributes. The firing temperature and conditions were inferred from the mineral phases of the samples exhibited by the infrared spectra and X-ray di...

  20. Alite-ye'elimite cement: Synthesis and mineralogical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Suhua [State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing 210009 (China); Snellings, Ruben [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Institute of Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Fédéral de Lausanne, Station 12, CH-1015 Ecublens (Switzerland); Li, Xuerun [State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing 210009 (China); Shen, Xiaodong, E-mail: xdshen@njut.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing 210009 (China); Scrivener, Karen L. [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Institute of Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Fédéral de Lausanne, Station 12, CH-1015 Ecublens (Switzerland)

    2013-03-15

    Alite-ye'elimite cement is an alternative cement that combines desirable characteristics of calcium sulfoaluminate cements and Portland cement in that it shows improved strength development at early age while retaining high portlandite contents. The key problem in the clinkering process is to produce the alite-ye'elimite phase assemblage so that both phases can co-exist. In this study, a new synthesis method is proposed to achieve the coexistence of alite and ye'elimite consisting of a secondary heat treatment step at 1250 °C after regular Portland clinker firing at 1450 °C. Quantitative X-ray powder diffraction and electron microscopy were used to analyze the phase composition of clinker before and after the secondary heat treatment. The results show that ye'elimite develops during secondary heat treatment of calcium sulphate enriched clinker by reaction of C{sub 3}A and sulphate phases. Additional ferrite is formed as result of rejection of Fe originally in solid solution with C{sub 3}A during ye'elimite formation.

  1. Definition of coordinate system for three-dimensional data analysis in the foot and ankle.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Green, Connor

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Three-dimensional data is required to have advanced knowledge of foot and ankle kinematics and morphology. However, studies have been difficult to compare due to a lack of a common coordinate system. Therefore, we present a means to define a coordinate frame in the foot and ankle and its clinical application. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We carried out ten CT scans in anatomically normal feet and segmented them in a general purpose segmentation program for grey value images. 3D binary formatted stereolithography files were then create and imported to a shape analysis program for biomechanics which was used to define a coordinate frame and carry out morphological analysis of the forefoot. RESULTS: The coordinate frame had axes standard deviations of 2.36 which are comparable to axes variability of other joint coordinate systems. We showed a strong correlation between the lengths of the metatarsals within and between the columns of the foot and also among the lesser metatarsal lengths. CONCLUSION: We present a reproducible method for construction of a coordinate system for the foot and ankle with low axes variability. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: To conduct meaningful comparison between multiple subjects the coordinate system must be constant. This system enables such comparison and therefore will aid morphological data collection and improve preoperative planning accuracy.

  2. Experimental protocol for the kinematic analysis of the hand: definition and repeatability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpinella, I; Mazzoleni, P; Rabuffetti, M; Thorsen, R; Ferrarin, M

    2006-06-01

    A quantitative and objective method based on the optoelectronic kinematic analysis of hand segments and on the calculation of global and partial parameters, which provide measures of the degree of long finger and thumb extension is proposed for the evaluation of the hand's voluntary range of motion and maximal opening of the fingers and thumb. To test the precision and repeatability of the method, the protocol was applied on 14 healthy subjects (28 hands). The proposed parameters are repeatable and show a precision between 5.5 degrees and 10.4 degrees (mean value: 7.3 degrees), comparable to values obtained with other methods. Advantages of the present approach include simultaneous analysis of all fingers, absence of cumbersome connecting cables and no need for individually customized devices. The method, also applied to the paretic hands of two hemiplegic stroke patients before and after electrical stimulation of the wrist and finger extensor muscles, has shown encouraging results for its clinical feasibility and utility in addition to functional tests.

  3. Neuroretinitis -- definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007624.htm Neuroretinitis - definition To use the sharing features on this page, ... this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D.A.M.'s editorial ...

  4. Mineralogical, crystallographic and morphological characteristics of natural kaolins from the Ivory Coast (West Africa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sei, J.; Morato, F.; Kra, G.; Staunton, S.; Quiquampoix, H.; Jumas, J. C.; Olivier-Fourcade, J.

    2006-10-01

    Thirteen clay samples from four deposits in the Ivory Coast (West Africa) were studied using X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis and chemical analysis. Mineralogical, crystallographic and morphological characteristics of these samples are given. Kaolinite is the principal mineral but other minerals are present in small quantities: illite, quartz, anatase and iron oxides (oxides and oxyhydroxides). The crystallographic, morphological and surface characteristics are influenced by the presence of these impurities. In particular, the presence of iron oxides was associated with reduced structural ordering and thermal stability of kaolinite and increased specific surface area. These clays could be used in the ceramics industry to make tiles and bricks, and also in agronomy as supports for chemical fertilizers or for environmental protection by immobilising potentially toxic waste products.

  5. Market Definition

    OpenAIRE

    Kaplow, Louis

    2014-01-01

    Market definition has long held a central place in competition law. This entry surveys recent analytical work that has called the market definition paradigm into question on a number of fronts: whether the process is feasible, whether market share threshold tests are coherent, whether the hypothetical monopolist test in merger guidelines is counterproductive, and whether and when the frequent focus on cross-elasticities is useful.

  6. Mineralogical characteristics of airborne particles collected in Beijing during a severe Asian dust storm period in spring 2002

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAO LongYi; LI WeiJun; YANG ShuShen; SHI ZongBo; L(U) SenLin

    2007-01-01

    Asian dust storm (ADS) samples were collected on March 20, 2002 in Beijing, China. High-resolution field emission scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray detector (FESEM-EDX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to study the morphology, chemical compositions, number-size distributions and mineralogical compositions of ADS particles. The mineral particles were major components in the ADS samples, accounting for 94% by number. The XRD analysis indicated that the dust particles were dominated by clay (40.3%), and quartz (19.5%), followed by plagioclase (8.4%), calcite (7.5%), K-feldspar (1.5%), hematite (0.9%), pyrite (0.9%), hornblende (0.4%) and gypsum (0.3%), with a certain amount of noncrystalline materials (20.3%). Clay minerals were mainly illite/smectite mixed layers (78%), followed by illite (9%), kaolinite (6%), and Chlorite (7%). In addition to these main minerals,FESEM-EDX also detected some trace minerals, such as dolomite, pyrite, thenardite, as well as heavy minerals represented by rutile, ilmenite and apatite. The mineralogical compositions of the 2002-03-20Asian dust storm and the Saharan dust plumes were similar but the clay mineralogy showed a great distinction, with the illite/smectite mixed layers being common in the Asian dust storm but illite being common in the Saharan dust plumes.

  7. Mineralogical characteristics of airborne particles collected in Beijing during a severe Asian dust storm period in spring 2002

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Asian dust storm (ADS) samples were collected on March 20,2002 in Beijing,China. High-resolution field emission scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray detector (FESEM-EDX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to study the morphology,chemical compositions,number-size dis-tributions and mineralogical compositions of ADS particles. The mineral particles were major compo-nents in the ADS samples,accounting for 94% by number. The XRD analysis indicated that the dust particles were dominated by clay (40.3%),and quartz (19.5%),followed by plagioclase (8.4%),calcite (7.5%),K-feldspar (1.5%),hematite (0.9%),pyrite (0.9%),hornblende (0.4%) and gypsum (0.3%),with a certain amount of noncrystalline materials (20.3%). Clay minerals were mainly illite/smectite mixed lay-ers (78%),followed by illite (9%),kaolinite (6%),and chlorite (7%). In addition to these main minerals,FESEM-EDX also detected some trace minerals,such as dolomite,pyrite,thenardite,as well as heavy minerals represented by rutile,ilmenite and apatite. The mineralogical compositions of the 2002-03-20 Asian dust storm and the Saharan dust plumes were similar but the clay mineralogy showed a great distinction,with the illite/smectite mixed layers being common in the Asian dust storm but illite being common in the Saharan dust plumes.

  8. Adaptation of a canopy reflectance model for sub-aqueous vegetation: Definition and sensitivity analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plummer, S.E. [NERC/RSADU, Cambridgeshire (United Kingdom); Malthus, T.J. [Univ. of Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Clark, C.D. [Univ. of Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    1997-06-01

    Seagrass meadows are a key component of shallow coastal environments acting as a food resource, nursery and contributing to water oxygenation. Given the importance of these meadows and their susceptibility to anthropogenic disturbance, it is vital that the extent and growth of seagrass is monitored. Remote sensing techniques offer the potential to determine biophysical characteristics of seagrass. This paper presents observations on the development and testing of an invertible model of seagrass canopy reflectance. The model is an adaptation of a land surface reflectance model to incorporate the effects of attenuation and scattering of incoming radiative flux in water. Sensitivity analysis reveals that the subsurface reflectance is strongly dependent on the water depth, vegetation amount, the parameter which we wish to determine, and turbidity respectively. By contrast the chlorophyll concentration of water and gelbstoff are relatively unimportant. Water depth and turbidity need to be known or accommodated in any inversion as free parameters.

  9. Multi-level segment analysis: definition and application in turbulent systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L. P.; Huang, Y. X.

    2015-06-01

    For many complex systems the interaction of different scales is among the most interesting and challenging features. It seems not very successful to extract the physical properties in different scale regimes by the existing approaches, such as the structure-function and Fourier spectrum method. Fundamentally, these methods have their respective limitations, for instance scale mixing, i.e. the so-called infrared and ultraviolet effects. To make improvements in this regard, a new method, multi-level segment analysis (MSA) based on the local extrema statistics, has been developed. Benchmark (fractional Brownian motion) verifications and the important case tests (Lagrangian and two-dimensional turbulence) show that MSA can successfully reveal different scaling regimes which have remained quite controversial in turbulence research. In general the MSA method proposed here can be applied to different dynamic systems in which the concepts of multiscale and multifractality are relevant.

  10. Multi-level segment analysis: definition and application in turbulent systems

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, L P

    2015-01-01

    For many complex systems the interaction of different scales is among the most interesting and challenging features. It seems not very successful to extract the physical properties in different scale regimes by the existing approaches, such as structure-function and Fourier spectrum method. Fundamentally these methods have their respective limitations, for instance scale mixing, i.e. the so-called infrared and ultraviolet effects. To make improvement in this regard, a new method, multi-level segment analysis (MSA) based on the local extrema statistics, has been developed. Benchmark (fractional Brownian motion) verifications and the important case tests (Lagrangian and two-dimensional turbulence) show that MSA can successfully reveal different scaling regimes, which has been remaining quite controversial in turbulence research. In general the MSA method proposed here can be applied to different dynamic systems in which the concepts of multiscaling and multifractal are relevant.

  11. Thoracic cavity definition for 3D PET/CT analysis and visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheirsilp, Ronnarit; Bascom, Rebecca; Allen, Thomas W; Higgins, William E

    2015-07-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET) serve as the standard imaging modalities for lung-cancer management. CT gives anatomical details on diagnostic regions of interest (ROIs), while PET gives highly specific functional information. During the lung-cancer management process, a patient receives a co-registered whole-body PET/CT scan pair and a dedicated high-resolution chest CT scan. With these data, multimodal PET/CT ROI information can be gleaned to facilitate disease management. Effective image segmentation of the thoracic cavity, however, is needed to focus attention on the central chest. We present an automatic method for thoracic cavity segmentation from 3D CT scans. We then demonstrate how the method facilitates 3D ROI localization and visualization in patient multimodal imaging studies. Our segmentation method draws upon digital topological and morphological operations, active-contour analysis, and key organ landmarks. Using a large patient database, the method showed high agreement to ground-truth regions, with a mean coverage=99.2% and leakage=0.52%. Furthermore, it enabled extremely fast computation. For PET/CT lesion analysis, the segmentation method reduced ROI search space by 97.7% for a whole-body scan, or nearly 3 times greater than that achieved by a lung mask. Despite this reduction, we achieved 100% true-positive ROI detection, while also reducing the false-positive (FP) detection rate by >5 times over that achieved with a lung mask. Finally, the method greatly improved PET/CT visualization by eliminating false PET-avid obscurations arising from the heart, bones, and liver. In particular, PET MIP views and fused PET/CT renderings depicted unprecedented clarity of the lesions and neighboring anatomical structures truly relevant to lung-cancer assessment.

  12. The advanced model definition and analysis of orthodontic parameters on 3D digital models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majstorović Nemanja V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction/Objective. Digital 3D modeling is slowly becoming an everyday orthodontic practice, and after two decades of research and development it is a basic element of e-orthodontics. The aim of this study was development and use of geometric entities on 3D digital models for diagnosing, planning and monitoring of orthodontic therapy, by using CAD (computer aided design systems. Methods. Statistical analysis and synthesis of 54 orthodontic parameters (28 in the upper and 26 in the lower jaw, defining three hypotheses and their testing, the application of the t-test. Results. All three hypotheses are confirmed, convenience of using geometric entities, higher accuracy of 3D digital models, and more substantial displacement of teeth in the first six months of therapy (Student’s t-test. After the first six months, distances in the x–y plane (occlusal plane were bigger in both the upper and the lower jaw; additionally, the distances in the y–z plane (medial plane decreased on the left and right side, so we can say that the first phase of therapy had success and that both jaws are wider. At the next four controls, parameters showed slight progress that was not statistically significant. Overall, after 11 months of therapy, there was a considerable improvement in the x–y plane, while changes in distances of clinical crown heights were very small. This could be explained by the fact that, during therapy, by using different arches, upper molars were pushed inside, toward the palate. Analyzing 3D computer models, we could notice that in this plane displacement of the upper left first molar was larger. Conclusion. The use of geometric entities for defining orthodontic parameters gives us new possibilities for accurate and reliable analysis of patient’s orthodontic condition.

  13. Fault imprint in clay units: magnetic fabric, structural and mineralogical signature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Eva; Homberg, Catherine; Schnyder, Johann; Person, Alain; du Peloux1, Arthur; Dick, Pierre

    2014-05-01

    Fault-induced deformations in clay units can be difficult to decipher because strain markers are not always visible at outcrop scale or using geophysical methods. Previous studies have indicated that the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (ASM) provides a powerful and rapid technique to investigate tectonic deformation in clay units even when they appear quite homogenous and undeformed at the outcrop scale (Lee et al. 1990, Mattei et al. 1997). We report here a study based on ASM, structural analysis and magnetic and clay mineralogy from two boreholes (TF1 and ASM1)drilled horizontally in the Experimental Station of Tournemire of the Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) in Aveyron (France). The boreholes intersect a N-S trending strike-slip fault from west to east. The ASM study indicates the evolution of the magnetic fabric from the undeformed host rock to the fault core. Also, all the fractures cutting the studied interval of the core have been measured as well as the slip vectors which are generally well preserved. In the two boreholes, the undeformed sediments outside the fault zone are characterized by an oblate fabric, a sub-vertical minimum susceptibility axis (k3) perpendicular to the bedding plane and without magnetic lineation. Within the fault zone, a tilt in the bedding plane has been observed in two boreholes TF1 and ASM1. In addition, in the TF1 core, the fault area presents a tectonic fabric characterized by a triaxial AMS ellipsoid. Moreover, the magnetic lineation increases and k3 switches from a vertical to a sub-horizontal plane. This kind of fabric has not been observed in borehole ASM1. The structural analysis of the individual fractures making the fault zone indicates a complex tectonic history with different imprint in the two fault segments cut by the two boreholes. The large majority of fractures correspond to dextral strike-slip faults but normal and reverse movements were observed and are more or less

  14. Orbital transfer vehicle concept definition and system analysis study, 1985. Volume 5: Work breakdown structure and dictionary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, James H.; Callan, Daniel R.

    1985-01-01

    To establish consistency and visibility within the Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV) program, a preliminary work breakdown structure (WBS) and dictionary were developed. The dictionary contains definitions of terms to be used in conjunction with the WBS so that a clear understanding of the content of the hardware, function, and cost elements may be established. The OTV WBS matrix is a two-dimensional structure which shows the interrelationship of these dimensions: the hardware elements dimension and the phase and function dimension. The dimension of time cannot be shown graphically, but must be considered. Each cost entry varies with time so that it is necessary to know these cost values by year for budget planning and approval as well as for establishing cost streams for discounting purposes in the economic analysis. While a multiple dimensional approach may at first appear complex, it actually provides benefits which outweigh any concern. This structural interrelationship provides the capability to view and analyze the OTV costs from a number of different financial and management aspects. Cost may be summed by hardware groupings, phases, or functions. The WBS may be used in a number of dimensional or single listing format applications.

  15. Dose-volume analysis for respiratory toxicity in intrathoracic esophageal cancer patients treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy using extended fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Satoshi; Myojin, Miyako; Shimizu, Shinichi; Fujino, Masaharu; Takahashi, Hiroaki; Shirato, Hiroki; Ito, Yoichi M; Ishikawa, Masayori; Hosokawa, Masao

    2013-11-01

    We evaluated the relationship between dosimetric parameters (DPs) and the incidence of radiation pneumonitis (RP) and investigated the feasibility of a proposed treatment planning technique with the potential of reducing RP in esophageal cancer patients treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy using extended fields. A total of 149 patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer were prospectively enrolled for extended-field radiotherapy (EFRT) to three-field regional lymphatics between September 2004 and June 2009. We retrospectively reviewed 86 consecutive patients who were treated with a total dose of 50.4 Gy (plus an optional 9 Gy boost) and were available for dose-volume analysis. Lung DPs of patients in the Grade 0-1 RP (RPG≤1) group and the Grade 2-5 RP (RPG≥2) group were compared. We compared the proposed plan with the conventional plan to 50.4 Gy on DPs for each case. Of these 86 patients, 10 (12%) developed RPG≥2 (Grade 2, n = 2 patients; Grade 3, n = 3; Grade 4, n = 3; Grade 5, n = 2). The patients in the RPG≤1 group showed significantly lower (P RPG≥2 group. There were two advantages gained from the proposed plan for V5 (<55%) and V10 (< 37%) values and the conformity of the PTV. The increase in the volume of the lung exposed to low doses of EFRT was found to be associated with the incidence of RP. Our proposed plan is likely to reduce the incidence of RP.

  16. Mineralogy of dust deposited during the Harmattan season in Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Changling; Breuning-Madsen, Henrik; Awadzi, Theodore W.

    2007-01-01

    In Ghana, a dust-laden Harmattan wind blows from the Sahara in the period November to March. Some of the dust is trapped in the vegetation, in lakes and other inland waters, and a little on the bare land, whereas the rest of the dust is blown further away to the Ivory Coast or out into the Atlantic....... This conclusion is supported by the clay mineralogy of the samples. However, the pH of the dust is significantly higher than that of the local soils, indicating that a substantial amount of the dust comes from the Sahara....

  17. Iron mineralogy across the oxycline of a lignite mine lake

    OpenAIRE

    Miot, Jennyfer; Lu, Shipeng; Morin, Guillaume; Adra, Areej,; Benzerara, Karim; Küsel, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Iron-rich pelagic aggregates of microbial origin named “iron snow” are formed in the water column of some acidic lignite mine lakes. We investigated the evolution of Fe mineralogy across the oxycline of the Lusatian lake 77, Germany at two sampling sites differing by their pH and mixing profiles. The central basin (CB) of this lake shows a dimictic water regime with a non-permanent anoxic deep layer and a homogeneous acidic pH all over the water column (pH 3). In contr...

  18. Mineralogy and geochemistry of atmospheric particulates in western Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmady-Birgani, Hesam; Mirnejad, Hassan; Feiznia, Sadat; McQueen, Ken G.

    2015-10-01

    This study investigates the mineralogy and physico-chemical properties of atmospheric particulates collected at Abadan (southwestern Iran) near the Persian Gulf coast and Urmia (northwestern Iran) during ambient and dust events over 6 months (winter 2011; spring 2012). Particle sizes collected were: TSP (total suspended particulates); PM10 (particulates Al, Mg, Na, Cl, P, S, Ca, K, Fe, Ti, and Si, mostly reflecting calcite, quartz, aluminosilicates, clays, gypsum and halite. Additionally, As, Pb, Zn, Mn, Sc, Nd, W, Ce, La, Ba and Ni were detected in TSP, PM10 and PM2.5 samples collected during dust events.

  19. Notas de mineralogía: parte II

    OpenAIRE

    Henao Vásquez, Martha

    2001-01-01

    El presente trabajo se ha realizado con el propósito de contribuir a la formación mineralógica de los estudiantes que cursan la asignatura N.5140 Mineralogía, de los programas curriculares de ingeniería de minas y metalurgia. Se sintetizan en él los rasgos característicos y descripciones particulares de las especies minerales de mayor importancia y significado, tanto económico como petrográfico, que ayudan sustancialmente en su caracterización e identificación. El modelo descriptivo que...

  20. 对健美操定义的分析%Analysis on Definition of Aerobics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    研究目的:为科学合理的教学和训练提供一定指导,为健美操理论体系的完善与规范提供参考。研究方法:文献资料法、逻辑分析法。研究结论:健美操是一项以有氧运动为基础,以人体自身为对象,以健美为目标,以身体练习为内容,以艺术创造为手段,以健、力、美为特征,融体操、舞蹈、音乐、美于一体,具有独特的创新性、鲜明的节奏性和综合的力度性,达到健身、健美和健心的效果,具有竞技性、娱乐性和观赏性的一门体育学科。%Research purposes:Aimed to provide scientific and reasonable teaching and training of guiding,for the perfection of the aerobics theoretical system and provide some reference specification. Research methods:literature data method, logic analysis method. Research conclusions: Aerobics is a sport discipline, which is based on aerobic exercise, takes human bodies as an object, aims to be strong and handsome, uses physical exercises for content, takes artistic creation as a method, and characterizes by health, strength, and beauty. It includes gymnastics, dance, music, and beauty, and performs unique creative, distinctive rhythm and comprehensive strength. Its purpose is that people can have fitness and healthy heart. And it has characters of competition,recreation and appreciation.

  1. The Development of the Chemin Mineralogy Instrument and Its Deployment on Mars (and Latest Results from the Mars Science Laboratory Rover Curiosity)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, David F.

    2014-01-01

    The CheMin instrument (short for "Chemistry and Mineralogy") on the Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity is one of two "laboratory quality" instruments on board the Curiosity rover that is exploring Gale crater, Mars. CheMin is an X-ray diffractometer that has for the first time returned definitive and fully quantitative mineral identifications of Mars soil and drilled rock. I will describe CheMin's 23-year development from an idea to a spacecraft qualified instrument, and report on some of the discoveries that Curiosity has made since its entry, descent and landing on Aug. 6, 2012, including the discovery and characterization of the first habitable environment on Mars.

  2. Integrated geographic information systems (IGIS) analysis and definition of the tectonic framework of northern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez Pina, Carlos Manuel

    Crustal rupture structures reactivated in the course of the tectonic history of northern Mexico are the surface expressions of planes of weakness, in the form of simple or composite rectilinear features or slightly curved, defined as lineaments. Unless otherwise defined as strike-slip faults, lineaments are part of parallel and sub-parallel oblique convergent or oblique divergent tectonic zones cross cutting the Sierra Madre Occidental and northern Mexico, in a NW trend. These shear zones are the response to the oblique subduction of the Farallon plate beneath North America. Kinematic analysis of five selected sites in northern Mexico, three basins and two compressional shear zones, proved possible a combination of shear mechanism diagram and models from analogue materials, with satellite imagery and geographic information systems, as an aid to define strike-slip fault motion. This was done using a reverse engineering process by comparing geometries. One of the sites assessed, involving the Parras Basin, Coahuila Block (CB), San Marcos fault, a postulated PBF-1 fault, allowed for palinpastic reconstruction of the CB that corroborated the results of the vector motion defined, in addition to an extension of ˜25% in a northwest southeast direction. A GIS-based compilation and georeferenced regional structural studies by several researchers were used as ground control areas (GCA); their interpolation and interpretation, resulted in a tectonic framework map of northern Mexico. In addition, shaded relief models overlaid by the lineaments / fault layer allowed structural analyses of basins related to these major structures. Two important results were obtained from this study: the Tepehuanes-San Luis-fault (TSL) and the Guadalupe fault, named herein, displaces the Villa de Reyes graben, and the Aguascalientes graben, respectively, to the SE, confirming their left lateral vector motion; afterwards TSL was displaced south by the right lateral strike slip Taxco-San Miguel de

  3. Mineralogy and thermal properties of clay from Slatina (Ub, Serbia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milosevic, Maja; Logar, Mihovil; Kaludjerovic, Lazar; Jelic, Ivana

    2017-04-01

    The "Slatina" deposit, Ub, Serbia was opened in 1965 and represents one of few deposits exploited by "Kopovi" a.d., Ub, company. Deposit is composed of clay layers belonging to Neogene sediments that are widespread transgressive over granitoid rocks of Cer mountain and Paleozoic and Mesozoic sediments. Clay is mostly of illite-montmorillonite-kaolinite type and they are generally used as ceramic materials while some of the layers are used as fire-resistant materials. In this study we present mineralogical and thermal characterization of two samples to determine their application as industrial materials. Chemical and mineral composition was determined using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), X-ray diffraction (XRD) on powder and oriented samples, infrared spectroscopy (IR) and granulometry. Cationic exchange capacity (CEC) and specific surface area (SSA) was determined using spectrophotometry and methylene blue (MB). Thermal properties where determined by gravimetry (120, 350, 600 and 1000 oC) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). Quantitative mineral composition obtained by Rietveld refinement of combined chemical and XRD data shows that the sample 1(SC) is mainly smectite-illite (45%) and kaolinite (14%) clay with 19% of quartz, 10% feldspars and 7% of limonite, while sample 2(SV) is smectite-illite (43%) and kaolinite (11%) clay with 10% of quartz, 15% feldspars and 7% of limonite. Both samples have low content of impurities (carbonate minerals). Medium grain size (μm) goes from 1.02 (SSA = 104 m2/g) for sample 1(SC) to 0.71 (SSA = 117 m2/g) for sample 2(SV) while their CEC is 12.7 and 14.9 mmol/100g for 1(SC) and 2(SV) respectively. IR spectra of the samples shows larger amount of smectite clays with quartz and carbonate minerals for both samples which is in accordance with XRD data. DTA data shows couple of events that are endothermic. First one (100-200 oC) is associated with loss of moisture and constitutive water, second

  4. Power Extension Package (PEP) system definition extension, orbital service module systems analysis study. Volume 10: PEP project plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Contents: project plan summary; project and mission objectives; related studies and technology support activities; technical summary; management; procurement approach; project definition items and schedule; resources; management review; controlled items; and safety, reliability, and quality assurance.

  5. Power Extension Package (PEP) system definition extension, orbital service module systems analysis study. Volume 3: PEP analysis and tradeoffs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    The objectives, conclusions, and approaches for accomplishing 19 specific design and analysis activities related to the installation of the power extension package (PEP) into the Orbiter cargo bay are described as well as those related to its deployment, extension, and retraction. The proposed cable handling system designed to transmit power from PEP to the Orbiter by way of the shuttle remote manipulator system is described and a preliminary specification for the gimbal assembly, solar array drive is included.

  6. Chemical Mineralogy, Geochemical Characterization and Petrography of the Cambumbia Stock, Northern Andes, South America, Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas Lequerica, Salvador; María Jaramillo Mejía, José; Concha Perdomo, Ana Elena; Jimenez Quintero, Camilo

    2013-04-01

    The Cambumbia Stock is located on the western flank of the Central Cordillera of the northern Andes, South America. The goals of this study were to characterize the mineral chemistry, the geochemical composition and the petrography of the Cambumbia igneous body and to establish its petrogenesis. We collected 41 samples, selected 28 for thin section petrographic analysis, 14 for whole rock elementary chemical determination by ICP-MS and 4 for chemical mineralogy by LA-ICP(JEOL JXA-8200). Petrographically the samples were classified as 30 % hornblende-gabbro, 30% pyroxene-gabbros, 10% diorites, 10% olivine-gabbro, 7% gabbronorites, 7% tonalities and 3% norite, 3% wehrlite, the rock varies from medium to coarse hipidiomorfic and holocristaline texture, with local microporfiritic texture. Spot elemental chemical analysis of the some minerals in 4 samples show the range of the major elemental composition is plagioclase (labradorite), clinopyroxene (augite), horblende (magnesiohornblende), olivine (fayalite())Chemical mineralogy shows the variety of minerals in this rock, essential minerals correspond to bytownite, augite, magnesio-honblende, fallaite and titanite. We conclude base on the SiO2 Vs Total Alkalis graph that the samples correspond to the sub-alkaline series with low K content, mainly in the calc-alkaline series. By using the SiO2 vs TiO2, Th/Yb vs Ta/Yb and Zr/117-Th-Nb/16 diagrams it was determined that these rocks were generated in two geotectonic environments: one type MOR (extension) and other island arc (subduction, compression). Recently, a U/Pb age was obtained by the Universidad de Caldas in zircon in 2009 (not published data), yielded an age of 233.41 ± 3.4 Ma (Carnian - Upper Triassic). Petrographic geochemical and geochronology comparisons between the rocks of Cambumbia Stock and Diorite and Gabbro El Pueblito (located about 25 km to the north-west) and with U/Pb age 231 ± 8 may postulate a possible genetic link between them. These ages are

  7. Coupling among Microbial Communities, Biogeochemistry, and Mineralogy across Biogeochemical Facies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stegen, James C.; Konopka, Allan; McKinely, Jim; Murray, Christopher J.; Lin, Xueju; Miller, Micah D.; Kennedy, David W.; Miller, Erin A.; Resch, Charles T.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2016-07-29

    Physical properties of sediments are commonly used to define subsurface lithofacies and these same physical properties influence subsurface microbial communities. This suggests an (unexploited) opportunity to use the spatial distribution of facies to predict spatial variation in biogeochemically relevant microbial attributes. Here, we characterize three biogeochemical facies—oxidized, reduced, and transition—within one lithofacies and elucidate relationships among facies features and microbial community biomass, diversity, and community composition. Consistent with previous observations of biogeochemical hotspots at environmental transition zones, we find elevated biomass within a biogeochemical facies that occurred at the transition between oxidized and reduced biogeochemical facies. Microbial diversity—the number of microbial taxa—was lower within the reduced facies and was well-explained by a combination of pH and mineralogy. Null modeling revealed that microbial community composition was influenced by ecological selection imposed by redox state and mineralogy, possibly due to effects on nutrient availability or transport. As an illustrative case, we predict microbial biomass concentration across a three-dimensional spatial domain by coupling the spatial distribution of subsurface biogeochemical facies with biomass-facies relationships revealed here. We expect that merging such an approach with hydro-biogeochemical models will provide important constraints on simulated dynamics, thereby reducing uncertainty in model predictions.

  8. Preliminary description of small block mineralogical features, data report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glassley, W., LLNL

    1998-02-03

    The large block heater test, to be conducted at Fran Ridge (Lin et al., 1994), is designed to provide a database with which to test codes that simulate hydrological, geochemical, and geomechanical processes that may occur within the repository block. The geochemical processes that may occur include rock-water interaction within the matrix of fracture bounded blocks, and with the minerals that line fractures (see, for example, Buscheck and Nitao, 1992,1993ab, 1994; Glassley, 1993). As a first step in evaluating these interactions, characterization of the fractures, and of the matrix that is adjacent to those fractures, must be completed Characterization of the fractures and matrix before the large block test is started will allow a `baseline` set of data to be collected that will describe the properties of the large block prior to the test. After the test is completed, the block will be dismembered and characterization of the matrix and fractures will be repeated. Changes in matrix and fracture mineralogies will allow documentation of the mineralogical consequences of rock-water interaction resulting from heating of tuff under the conditions of the test.

  9. Mineralogical, chemical and toxicological characterization of urban air particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čupr, Pavel; Flegrová, Zuzana; Franců, Juraj; Landlová, Linda; Klánová, Jana

    2013-04-01

    Systematic characterization of morphological, mineralogical, chemical and toxicological properties of various size fractions of the atmospheric particulate matter was a main focus of this study together with an assessment of the human health risks they pose. Even though near-ground atmospheric aerosols have been a subject of intensive research in recent years, data integrating chemical composition of particles and health risks are still scarce and the particle size aspect has not been properly addressed yet. Filling this gap, however, is necessary for reliable risk assessment. A high volume ambient air sampler equipped with a multi-stage cascade impactor was used for size specific particle collection, and all 6 fractions were a subject of detailed characterization of chemical (PAHs) and mineralogical composition of the particles, their mass size distribution and genotoxic potential of organic extracts. Finally, the risk level for inhalation exposure associated to the carcinogenic character of the studied PAHs has been assessed. The finest fraction (<0.45 μm) exhibited the highest mass, highest active surface, highest amount of associated PAHs and also highest direct and indirect genotoxic potentials in our model air sample. Risk assessment of inhalation scenario indicates the significant cancer risk values in PM 1.5 size fraction. This presented new approach proved to be a useful tool for human health risk assessment in the areas with significant levels of air dust concentration.

  10. Mineralogy and stable isotope geochemistry of hydrothermally altered oceanic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stakes, D.S.; O'Neil, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    Mineralogical and isotopic variations observed in altered glassy and crystalline rocks from the East Pacific Rise and the Mid-Atlantic Ridge provide information about the temperatures of alteration and seawater/rock ratios for various hydrothermal regimes within the oceanic crust. A systematic increase in alteration temperature is evident for the glassy rocks in the sequence: (1) nontronite and celadonite vesicle fillings (35??C), (2) saponite-rich pillow breccias (130-170??C), (3) calcite-rich greenstone breccias and epidote-rich greenstone (200-350??C). These results include the highest temperatures thus far reported for saponite formation. The "seawater-dominated" hydrothermal alteration process that formed the saponite-rich pillow breccias is characterized by high water/rock ratios (>50:1), low to moderate temperatures, a seawater origin of most of the carbon in vein calcites (??13 C ??? 0) and the predominance of Fe-rich saponite and calcite as secondary phases. Greenstones (chlorite-quartz-epidote) and greenstone breccias (chlorite-quartz-albite-calcite) are altered in a "rock-dominated" system with lower water/rock ratios (50:1 to isotopic composition to alter the overlying glassy rocks to the observed mineralogies as well as being the source of metal-rich deposits associated with the oceanic spreading centers. ?? 1982.

  11. Mineralogical Study of Hydrated IDPs: X-Ray Diffraction and Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, K.; Keller, L. P.; Nakamura, T.; Noguchi, T.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2004-01-01

    Chondritic hydrated interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) comprise up to 50% of all IDPs collected in the stratosphere [1]. Hydrated IDPs are generally believed to be derived from asteroidal sources that have undergone aqueous alteration. However, the high C contents of hydrated IDPs (by 2 to 6X CI levels [2,3]) indicate that they are probably not derived from the same parent bodies sampled by the known chondritic meteorites. Some hydrated IDPs exhibit large deuterium enrichments [4] similar to those observed in anhydrous IDPs. Both anhydrous and hydrated IDPs contain a variety of anhydrous minerals such as silicates, sulfides, oxides, and carbonates. Controversies on hydrated IDPs still exist regarding their formation, history, and relationship to other primitive solar system materials, because of the lack of a systematic series of analysis on individual hydrated IDPs. In this study, we combine our observations of the bulk mineralogy, mineral/ organic chemistry in order to derive a more complete picture of hydrated IDPs.

  12. Mineralogical Characterization of Baptistina Asteroid Family: Implications for K/T Impactor Source

    CERN Document Server

    Reddy, Vishnu; Lazzaro, Daniela; Michtchenko, Tatiana A; Gaffey, Michael J; Kelley, Michael S; Diniz, Thais Mothé; Candal, Alvaro Alvarez; Moskovitz, Nicholas A; Cloutis, Edward A; Ryan, Erin L; 10.1016/j.icarus.2011.08.027

    2011-01-01

    Bottke et al. (2007) linked the catastrophic formation of Baptistina Asteroid Family (BAF) to the K/T impact event. This linkage was based on dynamical and compositional evidence, which suggested the impactor had a composition similar to CM2 carbonaceous chondrites. However, our recent study (Reddy et al. 2009) suggests that the composition of (298) Baptistina is similar to LL-type ordinary chondrites rather than CM2 carbonaceous chondrites. This rules out any possibility of it being related to the source of the K/T impactor, if the impactor was of CM-type composition. Mineralogical study of asteroids in the vicinity of BAF has revealed a plethora of compositional types suggesting a complex formation and evolution environment. A detailed compositional analysis of 16 asteroids suggests several distinct surface assemblages including ordinary chondrites (Gaffey SIV subtype), primitive achondrites (Gaffey SIII subtype), basaltic achondrites (Gaffey SVII subtype and V-type), and a carbonaceous chondrite. Based on ...

  13. Effect of grain-coating mineralogy on nitrate and sulfate storage in the unsaturated zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, T.J.; Fishman, N.S.; Baehr, A.L.

    2009-01-01

    Unsaturated-zone sediments and the chemistry of shallow groundwater underlying a small (???8-km2) watershed were studied to identify the mechanisms responsible for anion storage within the Miocene Bridgeton Formation and weathered Coastal Plain deposits in southern New Jersey. Lower unsaturated-zone sediments and shallow groundwater samples were collected and concentrations of selected ions (including NO3- and SO42-) from 11 locations were determined. Grain size, sorting, and color of the lower unsaturated-zone sediments were determined and the mineralogy of these grains and the composition of coatings were analyzed by petrographic examination, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive analysis of x-rays, and quantitative whole-rock x-ray diffraction. The sediment grains, largely quartz and chert (80-94% w/w), are coated with a very fine-grained (Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  14. 基于CTMC的工作流网过程定义性能分析%Performance Analysis of Wf-Net Process Definition Based on CTMC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁飞云; 封蕾; 夏清国

    2011-01-01

    为了达到简化分析过程定义的运行时间复杂度的目的,采用构造工作流网过程定义((PN),i)覆盖图而获得连续时间SPN((PN),i)对应的CTMC状态空间的分析方法,计算出((PN),i)中每个可达标识的稳定概率P[Mi],得到过程定义的平均运行时间T.该方法只与过程定义中变迁服务时间和工作流网的过程逻辑有关,克服了涉及工作流管理系统和工作流执行引擎选择的局限性.通过实例验证了该分析方法的优越性,并得出过程定义时间性能分析方法.%In order to simplify the runtime complexity of analyzing the process definition in the system, the workflow net (Wf-Net) process definition( -PN,i) overlay was structured to obtain the analysis method of CTMC state space corresponding to continuous time SPN(-PN,i) , calculate the stability probability(-P[Mi ]) for each reachable marking in (-PN , i) , and obtain the average runtime T of the process definition. This method is related only to the two key factors : changes of the service time in the process definition and the process logic of workflow net. It overcame the limitation of the workflow management system and the workflow execution engines. The superiority of this method was confirmed by examples. The time performance analysis method for process definition was obtained.

  15. Mineralogy of the clay fraction of Alfisols in two slope curvatures: III - spatial variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Arantes Camargo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A good knowledge of the spatial distribution of clay minerals in the landscape facilitates the understanding of the influence of relief on the content and crystallographic attributes of soil minerals such as goethite, hematite, kaolinite and gibbsite. This study aimed at describing the relationships between the mineral properties of the clay fraction and landscape shapes by determining the mineral properties of goethite, hematite, kaolinite and gibbsite, and assessing their dependence and spatial variability, in two slope curvatures. To this end, two 100 × 100 m grids were used to establish a total of 121 regularly spaced georeferenced sampling nodes 10 m apart. Samples were collected from the layer 0.0-0.2 m and analysed for iron oxides, and kaolinite and gibbsite in the clay fraction. Minerals in the clay fraction were characterized from their X-ray diffraction (XRD patterns, which were interpreted and used to calculate the width at half height (WHH and mean crystallite dimension (MCD of iron oxides, kaolinite, and gibbsite, as well as aluminium substitution and specific surface area (SSA in hematite and goethite. Additional calculations included the goethite and hematite contents, and the goethite/(goethite+hematite [Gt/(Gt+Hm] and kaolinite/(kaolinite+gibbsite [Kt/(Kt+Gb] ratios. Mineral properties were established by statistical analysis of the XRD data, and spatial dependence was assessed geostatistically. Mineralogical properties differed significantly between the convex area and concave area. The geostatistical analysis showed a greater number of mineralogical properties with spatial dependence and a higher range in the convex than in the concave area.

  16. Mineralogy, 57Fe Mössbauer spectra and magnetization of chalcolithic pottery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, R.; Masch, L.; Pohl, J.; Schmidbauer, E.

    2005-06-01

    Three chalcolithic pottery sherds, paint removed from the surface of each sherd, and an unheated red pigment (Tell-Halaf culture, Turkey) were analysed within the frame of archaeometric studies using mineralogical methods, 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy, magnetization and rotational hysteresis data. From mineralogical results, the individual minerals forming the cores of the sherds were determined. It was found that the sherds are lime-rich. High temperature X-ray analysis on comparable Ca-rich material showed that the established composition is consistent with a firing temperature of 750-950°C. Apart from the pigment, each Mössbauer spectrum of Fe-bearing components consists of dominating paramagnetic doublets, arising mostly from silicate phases, and of a six-line pattern with reduced intensity, due to ferri- and/or antiferromagnetic Fe-oxide phases. For three samples, an Fe3+ silicate component of the spectra is clearly dominating, which points to oxidizing conditions during firing. For the others Fe2+ and Fe3+ components occur in about equal intensities. For the pigment, the magnetic sextet is of similar intensity to the Fe3+ silicate component. From magnetic analysis of ferrimagnetic phases it follows that a low percentage of particles of solid solutions γ-Fe2O3 Fe3O4 exist, probably in part ≤0.1 μm in diameter. The ferrimagnetic particles of at least one paint are probably covered by a thin layer of hematite as found from rotational hysteresis data. An attempt is made to draw conclusions from the experimental results, regarding the firing conditions of the sherds and paints.

  17. Mineralogical and Organo-Geochemical Properties of the Denizli (sw Turkey) Coals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banu Koralay, Demet; Koralay, Tamer

    2016-04-01

    Coal samples for this study were systematically collected from the Yeşilyuva town of Denizli (SW Turkey) province. In order to be evaluated in terms of their mineralogic composition, source rock potential, total organic carbon (TOC, %), and thermal maturity. To find out the mineralogical composition of the Yeşilyuva coals, X-Ray Diffractometer (XRD) analysis was performed. Quartz, feldspar, calcite, pyrite, gypsum and clay minerals are determined in XRD analysis as the mineral matter in Yeşilyuva coals. The organo-geochemical results of samples suggest that the Yeşilyuva coals have excellent source rock quantity according to total organic carbon (TOC, %) contents (ranging from 8.82 to 43.80 wt. %), indicating that their present circumstances in the basin that preferred production and preservation of organic matter. According to genetic potential (GP, averaging 37.42 mg hydrocarbon/g rock), S1 (averaging 2.11 mg hydrocarbon/g rock) and S2 (averaging 35.31 mg hydrocarbon/g rock) values, all the coal samples show good to excellent source rock potential. The hydrogen index (HI) and S2/S3 values of Yeşilyuva coals range from 43 to 171 mg HC/g TOC and 0.64 to 2.83, respectively. These values indicate that all the coal samples have gas potential. Determination of the thermal maturity is based on production index (PI) and Tmax values, and the potential source rock is considered immature for PI values Mineral composition, Organo-Geochemical properties. Total Organic Carbon (TOC), Hydrocarbon Potential Acknowledgement: This study was financially supported by The Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey (TUBITAK, project number 114Y668)

  18. Mineralogical controls on NMR rock surface relaxivity: A case study of the Fontainebleau Sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livo, Kurt

    Pore size distribution is derived from nuclear magnetic resonance, but is scaled by surface relaxivity. While nuclear magnetic resonance studies generally focus on the difficulty of determining pore size distribution in unconventional shale reservoirs, there is a lack of discussion concerning pure quartz sandstones. Long surface relaxivity causes complications analyzing nuclear magnetic resonance data for pore size distribution determination. Currently, I am unaware of research that addresses the complicated pore size distribution determination in long relaxing, pure sandstone formations, which is essential to accurate downhole petrophysical modeling. The Fontainebleau sandstone is well known for its homogenous mineralogical makeup and wide range of porosity and permeability. The Hibernia sandstone exhibits a similar mineralogy and is characterized by a similar and porosity-permeability range to the Fontainebleau sandstones, but with a significantly higher portion of clay minerals (1-6%). I present systematic petrophysical properties such as porosity, pore size distribution from nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation times, permeability, and volumetric magnetic susceptibility to aide in characterization of the Fontainebleau sandstone. Analysis of collected nuclear magnetic resonance data is then compared to other petrophysical studies from literature such as helium porosity and permeability, magnetic susceptibility, and electrical conductivity. I find that the lack of impurities on the grain surfaces of pure quartz samples imparts a lower surface relaxivity as compared to clay containing sandstones and makes nuclear magnetic resonance analysis more complex. Thus, inverted nuclear magnetic resonance data from cleaner outcrop samples incorrectly models pore size distribution without accounting for wider surface relaxivity variation and is improperly used when characterizing the Fontainebleau sandstone. This is further supported by evidence from less

  19. Universal definition of loss to follow-up in HIV treatment programs: a statistical analysis of 111 facilities in Africa, Asia, and Latin America.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin H Chi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Although patient attrition is recognized as a threat to the long-term success of antiretroviral therapy programs worldwide, there is no universal definition for classifying patients as lost to follow-up (LTFU. We analyzed data from health facilities across Africa, Asia, and Latin America to empirically determine a standard LTFU definition.At a set "status classification" date, patients were categorized as either "active" or "LTFU" according to different intervals from time of last clinic encounter. For each threshold, we looked forward 365 d to assess the performance and accuracy of this initial classification. The best-performing definition for LTFU had the lowest proportion of patients misclassified as active or LTFU. Observational data from 111 health facilities-representing 180,718 patients from 19 countries-were included in this study. In the primary analysis, for which data from all facilities were pooled, an interval of 180 d (95% confidence interval [CI]: 173-181 d since last patient encounter resulted in the fewest misclassifications (7.7%, 95% CI: 7.6%-7.8%. A secondary analysis that gave equal weight to cohorts and to regions generated a similar result (175 d; however, an alternate approach that used inverse weighting for cohorts based on variance and equal weighting for regions produced a slightly lower summary measure (150 d. When examined at the facility level, the best-performing definition varied from 58 to 383 d (mean=150 d, but when a standard definition of 180 d was applied to each facility, only slight increases in misclassification (mean=1.2%, 95% CI: 1.0%-1.5% were observed. Using this definition, the proportion of patients classified as LTFU by facility ranged from 3.1% to 45.1% (mean=19.9%, 95% CI: 19.1%-21.7%.Based on this evaluation, we recommend the adoption of ≥180 d since the last clinic visit as a standard LTFU definition. Such standardization is an important step to understanding the reasons that underlie patient

  20. The Rietveld method applied to the quantitative mineralogical analysis of some soil samples from Argentina Aplicación del método de Rietveld al análisis mineral��gico cuantitativo de algunas muestras de suelos de la Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella M Zabala

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The mineralogical quantification of soils species is mainly obtained by analysis of X-ray diffraction (XRD patterns. The classic method, for these analyses, is limited to semi quantitative determinations due to the overlapping of different specie's peaks and processes of absorption of the constituents, the wide range of particle size distribution, etc. The use of the Rietveld method for XRD quantitative analysis, in mixtures of minerals, has allowed to improve the accuracy of the quantitative results and to extend it to complex systems, as soils, transforming it in a meaningful tool for soils investigation. In this work, quantitative results obtained by the application of classic and Rietveld methods, are compared in different soils samples from Argentina. A set of mixtures of minerals with similar composition to three studied samples, was also quantified by Rietveld method, with absolute error lower than 3%. Obtained results indicate that quantitative analysis by Rietveld method, can improve the results found by XRD classic method and may be used for the quantitative determination of soil minerals.La cuantificación mineralógica de componentes del suelo es obtenida principalmente por análisis de espectros de difracción de rayos X (DRX. El método clásico aplicado para dicho análisis está limitado a determinaciones semi-cuantitativas debido a la superposición de picos de las distintas especies y procesos de absorción de los constituyentes, el amplio rango de distribución de tamaño de partícula, etc. El uso del método de Rietveld para el análisis cuantitativo por DRX, en mezclas de minerales, ha permitido mejorar la exactitud de los resultados cuantitativos y extenderlo a sistemas complejos, como lo son los suelos, transformándose en una herramienta significativa para su investigación. En este trabajo se comparan los resultados cuantitativos obtenidos por la aplicación del método clásico y de Rietveld, a diferentes muestras de

  1. A local reaction at or near injection site: case definition and guidelines for collection, analysis, and presentation of immunization safety data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidudu, Jane; Kohl, Katrin S; Halperin, Scott; Hammer, Sandra Jo; Heath, Paul T; Hennig, Renald; Hoet, Bernard; Rothstein, Edward; Schuind, Anne; Varricchio, Frederick; Walop, Wikke

    2008-12-09

    The need for developing a case definition and guidelines for a local reaction at or near the injection site, methods for the development of the case definition and guidelines as an adverse event following immunization as well as the rationale for selected decisions about the case definition for a local reaction at or near the injection site are explained in the Preamble section. The case definition is structured in 2 levels of diagnostic certainty: level 1 includes any description of morphological or physiological change at or near the injection site that is described or identified by a healthcare provider. Level 2 is any description of morphological or physiological change at or near injection site that is described by any other person. In Guidelines section, the working group recommends to enable meaningful and standardized data collection, analysis, and presentation of information about a local reaction at or near the injection site. However, implementation of all guidelines might not be possible in all settings. The availability of information may vary depending upon resources, geographic region, and whether the source of information is a prospectively designed clinical trial, a post-marketing surveillance or epidemiologic study, or an individual report of a local reaction at injection site.

  2. Effects of diabetes definition on global surveillance of diabetes prevalence and diagnosis: a pooled analysis of 96 population-based studies with 331,288 participants

    OpenAIRE

    Gaspoz, Jean-Michel; Guessous, Idris

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes has been defined on the basis of different biomarkers, including fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 2-h plasma glucose in an oral glucose tolerance test (2hOGTT), and HbA1c. We assessed the effect of different diagnostic definitions on both the population prevalence of diabetes and the classification of previously undiagnosed individuals as having diabetes versus not having diabetes in a pooled analysis of data from population-based health examination surveys in different regions.

  3. Matched Cohort Analysis of Outcomes of Definitive Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahn, Shannon, E-mail: shannonkahn@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Jani, Ashesh; Edelman, Scott; Rossi, Peter; Godette, Karen; Landry, Jerome; Anderson, Cynthia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To compare the biochemical outcome and toxicity scores of men with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and prostate cancer with a matched control population with negative or unknown HIV status when treated with external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: A single-institution database of men with prostate cancer treated with EBRT from 1999 to 2009 was reviewed. Thirteen men with HIV were identified and matched to 2 control patients according to age, race, T stage, prostate-specific antigen level, Gleason score, RT dose, intensity-modulated RT vs. three-dimensional conformal RT, and whole-pelvis vs. prostate-only RT, for a total of 39 cases. The median follow-up time was 39 months (range, 3-110 months). Results: The 4-year biochemical failure (BF)-free survival rate was 87% in the HIV-positive group vs. 89% in the controls (p = 0.94). Pre- and post-RT viral loads were found to be predictive of BF (p = 0.04 and p = 0.04, respectively). No men with HIV died, whereas 2 in the control group died of causes unrelated to prostate cancer. Acute and chronic genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity were less in the HIV-positive patients than in controls (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, p = 0.003, and p < 0.001, respectively). The HIV-positive men experienced an average decline in CD4 count of 193 cells/mm{sup 3}. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that men with HIV treated with EBRT have a similar risk of BF; however, high viral loads may contribute to an increased risk. This analysis supports that HIV-positive men with prostate cancer can be treated with definitive EBRT with similar disease control and toxicity outcomes as in the general population.

  4. Restructuring: definition analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vynnyk, Tetyana Mykhaylivna

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The essence of restructuring is defined as the internal structure changes, whichchoice depends on deviation of production process, structure of organization, structure and qualityof property, structure of capital for the enterprise future active development or search of theoptimal status. The following features of restructuring are distinguished: the economic potentialgrowth of the enterprise; changes of the internal structure irrespectively of the reason ofrestructuring; eliminating (maximum limitation the negative influence of external factors on thefinancial state of enterprise. The non-restructuring measures are systemized; the trends ofreforming are differentiated. Restructuring, technical reequipping, reconstruction, andmodernization are structural reforms. Privatization, nationalization, and reprivatization are basicreforms. It is found out that restructuring process depends on the legal person (subject, makingdecision.

  5. Arsenic mineralogy and mobility in the arsenic-rich historical mine waste dump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filippi, Michal, E-mail: filippi@gli.cas.cz [Institute of Geology, The Czech Academy of Sciences, v.v.i., Rozvojová 269, 165 00 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Drahota, Petr [Institute of Geochemistry, Mineralogy and Mineral Resources, Faculty of Science, Charles University, Albertov 6, 128 43 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Machovič, Vladimír [Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, Technická 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Böhmová, Vlasta [Institute of Geology, The Czech Academy of Sciences, v.v.i., Rozvojová 269, 165 00 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Mihaljevič, Martin [Institute of Geochemistry, Mineralogy and Mineral Resources, Faculty of Science, Charles University, Albertov 6, 128 43 Prague 2 (Czech Republic)

    2015-12-01

    A more than 250 year-old mine dump was studied to document the products of long-term arsenopyrite oxidation under natural conditions in a coarse-grained mine waste dump and to evaluate the environmental hazards associated with this material. Using complementary mineralogical and chemical approaches (SEM/EDS/WDS, XRD, micro-Raman spectroscopy, pore water analysis, chemical extraction techniques and thermodynamic PHREEQC-2 modeling), we documented the mineralogical/geochemical characteristics of the dumped arsenopyrite-rich material and environmental stability of the newly formed secondary minerals. A distinct mineralogical zonation was found (listed based on the distance from the decomposed arsenopyrite): scorodite (locally associated with native sulfur pseudomorphs) plus amorphous ferric arsenate (AFA/pitticite), kaňkite, As-bearing ferric (hydr)oxides and jarosite. Ferric arsenates and ferric (hydr)oxides were found to dissolve and again precipitate from downward migrating As-rich solutions cementing rock fragments. Acidic pore water (pH 3.8) has elevated concentrations of As with an average value of about 2.9 mg L{sup −1}. Aqueous As is highly correlated with pH (R{sup 2} = 0.97, p < 0.001) indicating that incongruent dissolution of ferric arsenates controls dissolved As well as the pH of the percolating waste solution. Arsenic released from the dissolution of ferric arsenates into the pore water is, however, trapped by latter and lower-down precipitating jarosite and especially ferric (hydr)oxides. The efficiency of As sequestration by ferric (hydr)oxides in the waste dump and underlying soil has been found to be very effective, suggesting limited environmental impact of the mine waste dump on the surrounding soil ecosystems. - Highlights: • More than 250 year-old arsenopyrite-rich mine waste dump was studied. • Mineral transformation and the environmental stability of different secondary arsenic mineral phases were assessed. • High efficiency of As

  6. The Connection between the Properties of Elements and Compounds; Mineralogical-Crystallochemical Classification of Elements

    OpenAIRE

    Godovikov, Alexander A.; Hariya, Yu

    1987-01-01

    The described mineralogical-crystallochemical classification bears some similar features with geochemical classification of elements. This similarity emphasizes a greater importance in conforming the vast practical data on petrology. The present classification also bears some resemblance to the technical classification of elements by Berg (1929). The similarity seems logical since the mineralogical. crystallochemical classification of elements unites them on the basis of crystallochemical sim...

  7. Definition of Entity Authentication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Naveed; Jensen, Christian D.

    2010-01-01

    Authentication is considered a pre-requisite for communication security, but the definition of authentication is generally not agreed upon. Many attacks on authentication protocols are the result of misunderstanding of the goals of authentication. This state of affairs indicate limitations...... in theoretical understanding of the meanings of authentication. We provide a new insight in this direction and formalize it in CFPS (Common Framework for authentication Protocols' Specifications). CFPS provides a precise scope of definition for authentication protocols, which could make the design and analysis...

  8. Mineralogical characterization of the argillaceous material from the Municipality of Santa Barbara, Para, Brazil; Caracterizacao mineralogica de material argiloso proveniente do municipio de Santa Barbara, Para, Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hildebrando, E.A., E-mail: edemarino@ufpa.b [Universidade Federal do Para (UFPA), Maraba, PA (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia de Materiais. Lab. de Materiais Ceramicos; Sheller, T.; Angelica, R.S. [Universidade Federal do Para (UFPA), Belem, PA (Brazil). Fac. de Geologia. Inst. de Geociencias; Neves, R.S. [Universidade Federal do Para (UFPA), Belem, PA (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia Quimica. Inst. de Tecnologia

    2009-07-01

    In the present work were investigated mineralogical phases in a material with argillaceous characteristic of the region of Genipauba, Santa Barbara, State of Para. Characterization of the collected sample was performed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential thermal analysis (DTA), thermogravimetric analysis (TG) and infrared spectroscopy (IR). The results of the assays indicate the presence of the clay minerals like kaolinite and muscovite, as well as minerals as quartz and anatase. (author)

  9. "Let's take back our roots through Science". The Sicilian Sulfur: a mineralogical treasure to rediscover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, Bianca

    2015-04-01

    Mineralogical Museum and participation to laboratory activities, especially focussing on the identification of sulfates and chlorates minerals and on the observation of samples of different kind of rocks coming from the outcropping areas. ➢ a trip to the Floristella Geopark, instituted on the area of one of the oldest sulfur mine and most eloquent site of industrial archeology and scenario of the fighting for the workers' social rescue. The project can be experienced as a virtual journey through the geological time but also as a dramatic picture of the hard working conditions into the mines. Students are motivated and engaged to learn about geological processes using their whole scientific competences. Nevertheless, expected learning outcomes will be the final awareness to manage responsibly natural resources, even because of the strong impact on social daylife. That's we can definitely say how to take back our roots through Science!

  10. Sand sources and transport pathways for the San Francisco Bay coastal system, based on X-ray diffraction mineralogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, James R.; Mizell, Kira; Barnard, Patrick L.; Barnard, P.L.; Jaffee, B.E.; Schoellhamer, D.H.

    2013-01-01

    The mineralogical compositions of 119 samples collected from throughout the San Francisco Bay coastal system, including bayfloor and seafloor, area beaches, cliff outcrops, and major drainages, were determined using X-ray diffraction (XRD). Comparison of the mineral concentrations and application of statistical cluster analysis of XRD spectra allowed for the determination of provenances and transport pathways. The use of XRD mineral identifications provides semi-quantitative compositions needed for comparisons of beach and offshore sands with potential cliff and river sources, but the innovative cluster analysis of XRD diffraction spectra provides a unique visualization of how groups of samples within the San Francisco Bay coastal system are related so that sand-sized sediment transport pathways can be inferred. The main vector for sediment transport as defined by the XRD analysis is from San Francisco Bay to the outer coast, where the sand then accumulates on the ebb tidal delta and also moves alongshore. This mineralogical link defines a critical pathway because large volumes of sediment have been removed from the Bay over the last century via channel dredging, aggregate mining, and borrow pit mining, with comparable volumes of erosion from the ebb tidal delta over the same period, in addition to high rates of shoreline retreat along the adjacent, open-coast beaches. Therefore, while previously only a temporal relationship was established, the transport pathway defined by mineralogical and geochemical tracers support the link between anthropogenic activities in the Bay and widespread erosion outside the Bay. The XRD results also establish the regional and local importance of sediment derived from cliff erosion, as well as both proximal and distal fluvial sources. This research is an important contribution to a broader provenance study aimed at identifying the driving forces for widespread geomorphic change in a heavily urbanized coastal-estuarine system.

  11. The Dlr Solar Furnace - A Facility For Astrophysical and Mineralogical Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauerborn, M.; Neumann, A.; Seboldt, W.; Klerner, S.

    The energy of solar radiation can be used to cause thermal or photochemical effects in the irradiated materials. The DLR Solar Furnace in Cologne is a facility that concentrates the direct solar radiation (concentration factor up to 5200 suns) for research experiments. It offers many different possibilities of using concentrated solar radiation to scientists and industrial users. For astrophysical and mineralogical applications a vacuum chamber with a special design and different instruments for measurements were developed, installed in the solar furnace and tested in experiments with small solid samples. The goal of the first project was to simulate the formation of so-called `chondrules' - constituents of meteorites - by "flash- heating" appropriate mineral samples with the concentrated beam of the solar furnace. The samples were melted and solidified subsequently by controlled cooling. The experiments had to be carried out under vacuum or controlled oxygen fugacity. Some results are presented as part of the paper "DYNAMIC CRYSTALLIZATION EXPERIMENTS USING CONVENTIONAL and SOLAR FURNACE TECHNIQUES - IMPLICATIONS FOR THE FORMATION of REFRACTORY FORSTERITE IN CHONDRITES", submitted to this conference. In a second series of experiments a slightly varied design was used to cause thermal reduction of samples of metal oxide and of lunar regolith simulate. The goal of this ongoing activity is to produce oxygen by pyrolysis. The process is conducted under high vacuum. The paper describes the facility with its properties and presents first results of the mentioned experiments. The two projects are co-operations between the High Flux Solar Furnace of DLR in Cologne (a department of the Solar Technology Division) and the Mission Architecture and Advanced Technologies Section (a department of the Institute of Space Sensor Technology and Planetary Exploration of DLR). In the first experiments and in the sample analysis the Institute of Mineralogy and Geochemistry of the

  12. Mineralogy of air-pollution-control residues from a secondary lead smelter: environmental implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettler, Vojtech; Johan, Zdenek; Baronnet, Alain; Jankovsky, Filip; Gilles, Christian; Mihaljevic, Martin; Sebek, Ondrej; Strnad, Ladislav; Bezdicka, Petr

    2005-12-01

    The mineralogy and solubility of air-pollution-control (APC) residues from a secondary lead (Pb) smelter have been studied on samples from the Príbram smelter, Czech Republic, recycling car batteries, with the emphasis on their potential environmental effect. The presence of dominant anglesite (PbSO4) and laurionite (Pb(OH)Cl) was observed in a sintered residue from after-burning chambers (800-1000 degrees C). In contrast, low-temperature Pb-bearing phases, such as KCl x 2PbCl2 and caracolite (Na3Pb2(SO4)3Cl), were detected in the major APC residue from bag-type fabric filters. Metallic elements, zinc (Zn), cadmium (Cd), and tin (Sn) were found homogeneously distributed within this residue. The formation of anglesite, cotunnite (PbCl2), (Zn,Cd)2SnO4, and (Sb,As)2O3 was observed during the sintering of this APC residue at 500 degrees C in a rotary furnace. The 168 h leaching test on filter residue, representing the fraction that may escape the flue gas treatment system, indicated rapid release of Pb and other contaminants. Caracolite and KCl x 2PbCl2 are significantly dissolved, and anglesite and cotunnite form the alteration products, as was confirmed by mineralogical analysis and PHREEQC-2 modeling. The observed Pb-bearing chlorides have significantly higher solubility than anglesite and, following emission from the smelter stack, can readily dissolve, transferring Pb into the environmental milieu (soils, water, inhabited areas).

  13. Mineralogical data on bat guano deposits from three Romanian caves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Giurgiu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Mineralogical studies performed on crusts, nodules and earthy masses from the Romanian caves Gaura cu Muscă, Gaura Haiducească and Peștera Zidită have revealed the presence of three different phosphate associations. The minerals have been identified by means of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. Five phosphates have been identified in the samples, with hydroxylapatite the only common mineral in all the three caves. Brushite, taranakite, leucophosphite and variscite are the other phosphates identified. Associated minerals include gypsum, calcite, quartz and illite-group minerals. Aside from differences in the lithology, the occurrences of the different phosphate minerals indicate variable pH and humidity conditions near or within the guano accumulations.

  14. Chemical and mineralogical characterizations of a copper converter slag

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A copper converter slag was examined chemically and mineralogically to determine its existing phases, in particular those containing Co and Cu. The slag consists predominantly of fayalite and magnetite, together with some glass,chalcocite, and metallic copper. Copper is entrapped in the slag mostly as chalcocite and metallic copper, as well as trace copper oxide. There was no indication of any independent Co mineral in the slag, but Co was found to be enriched in fayalite and megnetite as solid solution, although Co was detected in all the phases of the slag by SEM-EDX (scanning electron microscopy equipped with model EDAX-9100 energy dispersive spectrometer) and WDS (model WDX-2A X-ray wave-length dispersive spectrometer).

  15. Roles of Mineralogical Phases in Aqueous Carbonation of Steelmaking Slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huining Zhang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Mineralogical phases of steelmaking slags have significant influences on the carbonation of the slags. In this paper, the effects of temperature and reaction time on the conversion of calcium-related phases and the carbonation degree of a slag sample were studied. The experimental conditions were a liquid-to-solid ratio of 20 mL/g, a carbon dioxide flow rate of 1 L/min and a slag particle size of 38–75 μm. The results show that the optimum carbonation temperature and reaction time are 60 °C and 90 min, respectively, and calcite phase content is about 26.78% while the conversion rates of Ca3Al2O6, CaSiO3, Ca2SiO4 and free CaO are about 40%, 42.46%, 51% and 100%, respectively, and the carbon dioxide sequestration efficiency is about 170 g/kg slag.

  16. Mineralogical effects on the detectability of the postperovskite boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grocholski, Brent; Catalli, Krystle; Shim, Sang-Heon; Prakapenka, Vitali

    2016-03-01

    The discovery of a phase transition in Mg-silicate perovskite (Pv) to postperovskite (pPv) at lowermost mantle pressure-temperature (P - T) conditions may provide an explanation for the discontinuous increase in shear wave velocity found in some regions at a depth range of 200 to 400 km above the core-mantle boundary, hereafter the D'' discontinuity. However, recent studies on binary and ternary systems showed that reasonable contents of Fe2+ and Al for pyrolite increase the thickness (width of the mixed phase region) of the Pv - pPv boundary (400-600 km) to much larger than the D'' discontinuity (≤ 70 km). These results challenge the assignment of the D'' discontinuity to the Pv - pPv boundary in pyrolite (homogenized mantle composition). Furthermore, the mineralogy and composition of rocks that can host a detectable Pv → pPv boundary are still unknown. Here we report in situ measurements of the depths and thicknesses of the Pv → pPv transition in multiphase systems (San Carlos olivine, pyrolitic, and midocean ridge basaltic compositions) at the P - T conditions of the lowermost mantle, searching for candidate rocks with a sharp Pv - pPv discontinuity. Whereas the pyrolitic mantle may not have a seismologically detectable Pv → pPv transition due to the effect of Al, harzburgitic compositions have detectable transitions due to low Al content. In contrast, Al-rich basaltic compositions may have a detectable Pv - pPv boundary due to their distinct mineralogy. Therefore, the observation of the D'' discontinuity may be related to the Pv → pPv transition in the differentiated oceanic lithosphere materials transported to the lowermost mantle by subducting slabs.

  17. Mineralogical effects on the detectability of the postperovskite boundary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grocholski, Brent; Catalli, Krystle; Shim, Sang-Heon; Prakapenka, Vitali (UC); (MIT)

    2017-05-02

    The discovery of a phase transition in Mg-silicate perovskite (Pv) to postperovskite (pPv) at lowermost mantle pressure-temperature (P - T) conditions may provide an explanation for the discontinuous increase in shear wave velocity found in some regions at a depth range of 200 to 400 km above the core-mantle boundary, hereafter the D{double_prime} discontinuity. However, recent studies on binary and ternary systems showed that reasonable contents of Fe{sup 2+} and Al for pyrolite increase the thickness (width of the mixed phase region) of the Pv - pPv boundary (400-600 km) to much larger than the D{double_prime} discontinuity ({le} 70 km). These results challenge the assignment of the D{double_prime} discontinuity to the Pv - pPv boundary in pyrolite (homogenized mantle composition). Furthermore, the mineralogy and composition of rocks that can host a detectable Pv {yields} pPv boundary are still unknown. Here we report in situ measurements of the depths and thicknesses of the Pv {yields} pPv transition in multiphase systems (San Carlos olivine, pyrolitic, and midocean ridge basaltic compositions) at the P - T conditions of the lowermost mantle, searching for candidate rocks with a sharp Pv - pPv discontinuity. Whereas the pyrolitic mantle may not have a seismologically detectable Pv {yields} pPv transition due to the effect of Al, harzburgitic compositions have detectable transitions due to low Al content. In contrast, Al-rich basaltic compositions may have a detectable Pv - pPv boundary due to their distinct mineralogy. Therefore, the observation of the D{prime} discontinuity may be related to the Pv {yields} pPv transition in the differentiated oceanic lithosphere materials transported to the lowermost mantle by subducting slabs.

  18. Mineralogy of Selected Paddy Soils in Southeastern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    F.L.WANG; P.M.HUANG

    1997-01-01

    Limited information is available concerning the mineralogy of paddy soils in the southeastern China, Using chemical methods in conjunction with X-ray diffractometry,we studied the mineral composition of three paddy soils:Jinghua (paddy soil on Quaternary red clay),Fuyang (Hapl-percogenic loamy paddy soil),and Shaoxing(gleyic clayey paddy soil).All the soils contained quartz,mica,vermiculite,chlorite and kaolinite ,and the distribution of these minerals varied with soil prticle size fractions.The clay fraction of the Fuyang and Shaoxing soils aso contained smectite.Although X-ray data did not show the presence of smectite in the Jinghua soil,this mineral was identified by the chemical method.suggesting a transitional property of the mineral in the soil.Hydroxy-Al interlayered minerals were also present in the clay fraction.The amount of smectite in the soils was 31.6(Shaoxing),16.5(Fuyang),and 21.4(Jinghua)g kg-1;for vermiculite it was 33.3(Shaoxing),16.5(Fuyang),and 8.5(Jinghua) g kg-1,Smectite was only Found in the clay fraction,In contrast,amounts of vermiculite in soil particle size fractions were 3.0-11.4(sand), 2.1-6.0(coarse silt),4.6-18.9(medium silt),0.9-40.0(fine silt),and 17.0-108(clay)g kg-1,The amount of noncrystalline aluminosilicates in the soils in g kg-1 decreased in the order:Shaoxing(2.4)>Jinghua (1.9)>Fuyang(1.7).This study has provided useful mineralogical information that is fundamental in future development of management strategies of soils.

  19. A cost-effectiveness analysis to illustrate the impact of cost definitions on results, interpretations and comparability of pharmacoeconomic studies in the US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunis, Sandra L

    2009-01-01

    There is a lack of a uniform proxy for defining direct medical costs in the US. This potentially important source of variation in modelling and other types of economic studies is often overlooked. The extent to which increased expenditures for an intervention can be offset by reductions in subsequent service costs can be directly related to the choice of cost definitions. To demonstrate how different cost definitions for direct medical costs can impact results and interpretations of a cost-effectiveness analysis. The IMS-CORE Diabetes Model was used to project the lifetime (35-year) cost effectiveness in the US of one pharmacological intervention 'medication A' compared with a second 'medication B' (both unspecified) for type 2 diabetes mellitus. The complications modelled included cardiovascular disease, renal disease, eye disease and neuropathy. The model had a Markov structure with Monte Carlo simulations. Utility values were derived from the published literature. Complication costs were obtained from a retrospective database study that extracted anonymous patient-level data from (primarily private payer) adjudicated medical and pharmaceutical claims. Costs for pharmacy services, outpatient services and inpatient hospitalizations were included. Cost definitions for complications included charged, allowed and paid amounts, and for medications included both wholesale acquisition cost (WAC) and average wholesale price (AWP). Costs were reported in year 2007 values. The cost-effectiveness results differed according to the particular combination of cost definitions employed. The use of charges greatly increased costs for complications. When the analysis incorporated WAC medication prices with charged amounts for complication costs, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) for medication A versus medication B was $US6337 per QALY. When AWP prices were used with charged amounts, medication A became a dominant treatment strategy, i.e. lower costs with greater

  20. simDEF: definition-based semantic similarity measure of gene ontology terms for functional similarity analysis of genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesaranghader, Ahmad; Matwin, Stan; Sokolova, Marina; Beiko, Robert G

    2016-05-01

    Measures of protein functional similarity are essential tools for function prediction, evaluation of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) and other applications. Several existing methods perform comparisons between proteins based on the semantic similarity of their GO terms; however, these measures are highly sensitive to modifications in the topological structure of GO, tend to be focused on specific analytical tasks and concentrate on the GO terms themselves rather than considering their textual definitions. We introduce simDEF, an efficient method for measuring semantic similarity of GO terms using their GO definitions, which is based on the Gloss Vector measure commonly used in natural language processing. The simDEF approach builds optimized definition vectors for all relevant GO terms, and expresses the similarity of a pair of proteins as the cosine of the angle between their definition vectors. Relative to existing similarity measures, when validated on a yeast reference database, simDEF improves correlation with sequence homology by up to 50%, shows a correlation improvement >4% with gene expression in the biological process hierarchy of GO and increases PPI predictability by > 2.5% in F1 score for molecular function hierarchy. Datasets, results and source code are available at http://kiwi.cs.dal.ca/Software/simDEF CONTACT: ahmad.pgh@dal.ca or beiko@cs.dal.ca Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Composition, Mineralogy, and Porosity of Multiple Asteroid Systems from Visible and Near-infrared Spectral Data

    CERN Document Server

    Lindsay, Sean S; Emery, Joshua P; Enriquez, J Emilio; Assafin, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    We provide a taxonomic and compositional characterization of Multiple Asteroid Systems (MASs) located in the main belt (MB) using visible and near-infrared (0.45-2.5 um) spectral data of 42 MB MASs. The mineralogical analysis is applied to determine meteorite analogs for the MASs, which, in turn, are applied to the MAS density measurements of Marchis et al. (2012) to estimate the system porosity. The macroporosities are used to evaluate the primary MAS formation hypotheses. The visible observing campaign includes 25 MASs obtained using the SOAR telescope with the Goodman High Throughput Spectrometer. The infrared observing campaign includes 34 MASs obtained using the NASA IRTF with the SpeX spectragraph. The MASs are classified using the Bus-DeMeo taxonomic system. We perform a NIR spectral band parameter analysis using a new analysis routine, the Spectral Analysis Routine for Asteroids (SARA). The SARA routine determines band centers, areas, and depths by utilizing the diagnostic absorption features near 1- ...

  2. Mineralogy and geochemistry of the Jurassic coals from the Gheshlagh mine, Eastern Alborz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholam Hossein Shamanian

    2015-10-01

    mine, the frequency of pyrite is moderately low. In addition, the availability of carbonates in the host rocks provides buffering capacity for acid produced by oxidation in this area. This investigation has led to a better understanding of coals and their roof and floor lithologies in the Gheshlagh coal mine. Acknowledgment The authors wish to thank the Iran Minerals Production and Supply Company (Project No. 30716 and the Department of Geology, Faculty of Sciences at the Golestan University for financial assistance and all necessary resources needed to carry out this research. References Bullock J.H., Cathcard J.D., and Betteron W.J., 2002. Analytical methods utilized by the United States analysis of coal and coal-combustion products, Geological Survey for the United States Geological Survey, Denver, Report 389, 15 pp. Gluskoter H.J., Ruch R.R., Miller W.C., Cahill, R.A., Dreher G.B., and Kuhn J.K., 1977. Trace elements in coal: occurrence and distribution, Illinois State Geological Survey, Illinois, Report 499, 115 pp. Goodarzi F., Sanei H., Stasiuk L.D., Bagheri- Sadeghi H., and Reyes J., 2006. A preliminary study of mineralogy and geochemistry of four coal samples from northern Iran. International Journal of Coal Geology, 65 (1-2 35-50. Swaine D. J., 1990. Trace Elements in Coal, Butterworths, London, 278 pp. Yazdi M., and Esmaeilnia A.S., 2004. Geochemical properties of Coal in the Lushan Coalfield of Iran, International Journal of Coal Geology, 60 (1 73-79.

  3. Reconstruction of the palaeoenvironment using biomarkers and clay mineralogy in loess deposits of northern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Shahriari

    2016-10-01

    -chemical properties, clay mineralogy and n-alkane biomarkers were used. Results and Discussion: Results of soil texture analysis showed silt particles were dominant (more than 50 % in the modern soil profiles and loess-paleosol sequences which confirmed aeolian source of loess deposit. Clay content increased while silt content decrease in more strongly developed palaeosol horizons which it may reflected weathering processes of clay and/or its translocation. The modern soil profiles were classified as Entisols, Inceptisols, Mollisols and Alfisols which shows impact of climate as an important soil formation factor in the studied area. Clay mineralogy results in two loess-palaeosol sequences showed that illite, chlorite, kaolinite and smectite are dominant in these deposits. Mineralogical changes in the soil horizons are consistent with morphology and soil evaluation, so smectite, illite-smectite (mixed layer and vermiculite minerals were dominant minerals in more strongly developed palaeosol horizons indicating to high precipitation and good vegetation cover (e.g., forest. The n-alkane biomarker results in the modern soil profiles showed, the average chain length (ACL and (nC31+nC33/(nC27+nC29 ratio are very efficient parameters for reconstruction of vegetation, therefore these parameters were used to unravel the palaeovegation in loess-palaeosol sequences. In both sections n-alkane biomarkers studies showed vegetation changes in different periods. These changes were most intense in Nowdeh loess-palaeosol sequence, so grassland and shrub in profil1 (Bk horizon and profile 2 (ABk horizon palaeosols (with illite dominance changes to forest in profile 2 (AB horizon with smectite dominance and profile 3 (Btky horizon with smectite dominance and vermiculite presence palaeosols. Agh Band section had one palaeosol including two horizons (Bw and Bk which based on n-alkane specifications the Bw-horizon indicates grass/shrub vegetation (alsosmectite presence. It could indicate favorable

  4. Geology, mineralogy and geochemistry of Ferezneh ferromanganese anomaly, east of Sangan mines complex, NE Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazi Mazhari

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The Ferezneh prospect area is one of the eastern anomalies of Khaf’s Sangan iron mine. The Sangan mines complex is located within the Khaf-Kashmar-Bardeskan volcano-plutonic and metallogenic belt in northeastern Iran. The Sangan mine is the largest Fe skarn in western Asia, having a proven reserve of over 1000 Mt iron ore @ 53% Fe (Golmohammadi et al., 2015 and consisting of three parts; western, central and eastern Sangan, each part including several anomalies. In this study, Ferezneh (North and West prospect area which is an eastern anomaly of the Sangan iron ore is discussed. Ferezneh anomaly is located in 60°36'7" - 60°34'27"E and 34°30'47" - 34°29'46"N, 35 km south of the city of Taybad, 10 km southeast of Karat and 1.5 km southwest of Ferezneh village. The purpose of this study was to prepare a geologic map for separation and identification of the intrusions, determining their relationships with mineralization, distinguishing the type of mineralization, mineralogy, petrology and geochemistry of the mineral deposits, and finally their relationship with other major Sangan’s deposits. Materials and methods In order to achieve the objectives of the study: 1- 140 thin sections of the intrusive rocks, marble limestone and dolomite, as well as 40 polished sections of ore were taken in an area of 9.5 km2. Mineralogy and mineralization studies were performed in the Economic Geology Laboratory of Ferdowsi University of Mashhad. 2- A few samples were selected for X-ray diffraction analysis in order to ensure accuracy of mineralogical studies and were sent to Binalood Laboratory in Tehran. 3- In addition to major and minor elements geochemistry study of the ores, 10 samples were sent to East Amitis Laboratory in Mashhad for XRF analysis and also to Canada S.G.S Laboratory for ICP-MS analysis. Discussion and results Mineralization in the Ferezneh prospect area was limited to iron and manganese oxides in the form of massive and

  5. Interpretability of Multivariate Brain Maps in Linear Brain Decoding: Definition, and Heuristic Quantification in Multivariate Analysis of MEG Time-Locked Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kia, Seyed Mostafa; Vega Pons, Sandro; Weisz, Nathan; Passerini, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Brain decoding is a popular multivariate approach for hypothesis testing in neuroimaging. Linear classifiers are widely employed in the brain decoding paradigm to discriminate among experimental conditions. Then, the derived linear weights are visualized in the form of multivariate brain maps to further study spatio-temporal patterns of underlying neural activities. It is well known that the brain maps derived from weights of linear classifiers are hard to interpret because of high correlations between predictors, low signal to noise ratios, and the high dimensionality of neuroimaging data. Therefore, improving the interpretability of brain decoding approaches is of primary interest in many neuroimaging studies. Despite extensive studies of this type, at present, there is no formal definition for interpretability of multivariate brain maps. As a consequence, there is no quantitative measure for evaluating the interpretability of different brain decoding methods. In this paper, first, we present a theoretical definition of interpretability in brain decoding; we show that the interpretability of multivariate brain maps can be decomposed into their reproducibility and representativeness. Second, as an application of the proposed definition, we exemplify a heuristic for approximating the interpretability in multivariate analysis of evoked magnetoencephalography (MEG) responses. Third, we propose to combine the approximated interpretability and the generalization performance of the brain decoding into a new multi-objective criterion for model selection. Our results, for the simulated and real MEG data, show that optimizing the hyper-parameters of the regularized linear classifier based on the proposed criterion results in more informative multivariate brain maps. More importantly, the presented definition provides the theoretical background for quantitative evaluation of interpretability, and hence, facilitates the development of more effective brain decoding algorithms

  6. Interpretability of Multivariate Brain Maps in Linear Brain Decoding: Definition, and Heuristic Quantification in Multivariate Analysis of MEG Time-Locked Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kia, Seyed Mostafa; Vega Pons, Sandro; Weisz, Nathan; Passerini, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Brain decoding is a popular multivariate approach for hypothesis testing in neuroimaging. Linear classifiers are widely employed in the brain decoding paradigm to discriminate among experimental conditions. Then, the derived linear weights are visualized in the form of multivariate brain maps to further study spatio-temporal patterns of underlying neural activities. It is well known that the brain maps derived from weights of linear classifiers are hard to interpret because of high correlations between predictors, low signal to noise ratios, and the high dimensionality of neuroimaging data. Therefore, improving the interpretability of brain decoding approaches is of primary interest in many neuroimaging studies. Despite extensive studies of this type, at present, there is no formal definition for interpretability of multivariate brain maps. As a consequence, there is no quantitative measure for evaluating the interpretability of different brain decoding methods. In this paper, first, we present a theoretical definition of interpretability in brain decoding; we show that the interpretability of multivariate brain maps can be decomposed into their reproducibility and representativeness. Second, as an application of the proposed definition, we exemplify a heuristic for approximating the interpretability in multivariate analysis of evoked magnetoencephalography (MEG) responses. Third, we propose to combine the approximated interpretability and the generalization performance of the brain decoding into a new multi-objective criterion for model selection. Our results, for the simulated and real MEG data, show that optimizing the hyper-parameters of the regularized linear classifier based on the proposed criterion results in more informative multivariate brain maps. More importantly, the presented definition provides the theoretical background for quantitative evaluation of interpretability, and hence, facilitates the development of more effective brain decoding algorithms

  7. Mineralogical Study of Workable Material Coming from Mina Fe Ciudad Rodrigo; Estudio mineralogico del material beneficiable procedente de la Mina Fe. Ciudad Rodrigo (Salamanca)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mingarro Martin, E.

    1962-07-01

    A mineralogical analysis is made to ascertain the effects of acid bleaching on normalized conditions. Uranium is mainly found under uranotile, pitchblende and autunite form with an average assay of 0.4 p. ct. The loss of uranium in tailings under current conditions of attach, mainly is due to pitchblende resistance, being practically no leachable, and to uranium absorption by hydrated iron oxides and colloidal ores. This last problem will be discussed in a next paper. (Author) 5 refs.

  8. Influence of the chemical, physical and mineralogical characteristics on the three latosoils compacting; Influencia das caracteristicas quimicas, fisicas e mineralogicas na compactacao de tres latossolos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Rafael Braganca Alves [Vicosa Univ., MG (Brazil). Dept. de Solos. E-mail: raphael@solos.ufv.br; Fontes, Luiz Eduardo Ferreira; Costa, Liovando Marciano da [Vicosa Univ., MG (Brazil). Dept. de Solos. E-mail: luizfontes@solos.ufv.br

    1997-07-01

    This work studies the behavior of three brazilian latosoils (Purple, Una and yellow latosoils) concerning to the tendency of compacting, by using the trail analysis for evaluation of the physical, chemical, mineralogical and other compacting estimation effects on this process. Two conditions of soil use were considered: intensive cultivation, with field evaluation which indicates the compacting and not worked area, with natural forest or old and abandoned reforesting.

  9. Ancient mortars from Cape Verde: mineralogical and physical characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Fernando; Costa, Cristiana; Velosa, Ana; Quintela, Ana; Terroso, Denise; Marques, Vera

    2014-05-01

    Times and locations of different building constructions means different knowledge, habits, different construction methods and materials. The study and safeguarding of the architectural heritage takes nowadays a progressive importance as a vehicle for transmission of cultures and history of nations. The coatings are of great importance in the durability of a building due to the protective role of the masonry. The compatibility between the materials with which they are executed (masonry, mortar and grout settlement) promotes the proper functioning of the wall and a consequent increase in durability. Therefore, it becomes important to study and characterize the mortar coating of buildings to know its characteristics and to use compatible materials in the rehabilitation and maintenance of buildings. This study aims to characterize the chemical, physical, mechanical and mineralogical mortar samples collected in buildings in three islands of Cape Verde, for the conservation, rehabilitation and preservation of them. The collected samples belong to buildings constructed in the end of XIX century and in the beginning of XX century. In order to characterize the mortar samples some tests was made, such as X-Ray Diffraction, X- Ray Fluorescence, acid attack and mechanical strength. The samples were divided into three groups depending on origin; so we have a first group collected on the island of Santiago, the second on the island of Saint Vincent and the third on the island of Santo Antao. The samples are all carbonated, but Santiago samples have a lower carbonates content. In terms of insoluble residue (from the acid attack) it was concluded that the samples have similar value ranging from 9 to 26%. The compressive strength of the mortars have a range between 1.36 and 4.55 MPa, which is related to the presence of more binder in samples with higher resistance. The chemical and mineralogical analyzes showed that these consist of lime mortars (binder), natural pozzolan and

  10. Mineralogical Controls on Carbon Cycling in a Floodplain Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, B.; Dwivedi, D.; Steefel, C. I.; Spycher, N.; Fox, P. M.; Nico, P. S.

    2016-12-01

    With the overarching goal of understanding mineral-organic-microbe interactions on carbon and nutrient cycles, we are developing a reactive transport model that includes carbon (C) pools and transformations, a realistic treatment of protected C pools, multiple decomposition pathways, and radiocarbon (14C) dynamics. The objective of the modeling is to understand the impact of mineralogy on carbon turnover and residence times in a floodplain site in Rifle, CO. Previous studies have identified naturally reduced zones (NRZs) in the saturated zone of the Rifle site to be C hotspots and regions characterized by diffusion-limited transport and high rates of microbially-mediated biogeochemical reactions. Detailed characterization of the soil organic matter in both the NRZ and non-NRZ sediments at the Rifle site including radiocarbon dating, and extraction and chemical characterization of mineral-bound pool of organic matter, is used to inform the modeling. In this study, we describe the development of a coupled unsaturated-saturated flow and biogeochemical reactive transport model of the Rifle site along a two-dimensional cross-section (parallel to groundwater flow). The biogeochemical reaction network includes representations of bacterial and fungal activity, archetypal polymer and monomer carbon substrate groups, kinetic and equilibrium mineral precipitation and dissolution reactions, and aqueous and surface complexation. We use this model to explore fungal and bacterial community emergence at the site and compare organo-mineral interactions across NRZ and non-NRZ regions. Observed 14C profiles suggest that sediment-associated carbon in NRZ locations is much older than both the depositional age of the floodplain sediments and dissolved organic carbon in the groundwater. Model simulations were able to capture the observed soil organic matter (SOM) and ∆14C profiles across the Rifle site. Modeling results show higher lignin content in the NRZ sediments and greater Fe

  11. Modelling Active Faults in Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA) with OpenQuake: Definition, Design and Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weatherill, Graeme; Garcia, Julio; Poggi, Valerio; Chen, Yen-Shin; Pagani, Marco

    2016-04-01

    The Global Earthquake Model (GEM) has, since its inception in 2009, made many contributions to the practice of seismic hazard modeling in different regions of the globe. The OpenQuake-engine (hereafter referred to simply as OpenQuake), GEM's open-source software for calculation of earthquake hazard and risk, has found application in many countries, spanning a diversity of tectonic environments. GEM itself has produced a database of national and regional seismic hazard models, harmonizing into OpenQuake's own definition the varied seismogenic sources found therein. The characterization of active faults in probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) is at the centre of this process, motivating many of the developments in OpenQuake and presenting hazard modellers with the challenge of reconciling seismological, geological and geodetic information for the different regions of the world. Faced with these challenges, and from the experience gained in the process of harmonizing existing models of seismic hazard, four critical issues are addressed. The challenge GEM has faced in the development of software is how to define a representation of an active fault (both in terms of geometry and earthquake behaviour) that is sufficiently flexible to adapt to different tectonic conditions and levels of data completeness. By exploring the different fault typologies supported by OpenQuake we illustrate how seismic hazard calculations can, and do, take into account complexities such as geometrical irregularity of faults in the prediction of ground motion, highlighting some of the potential pitfalls and inconsistencies that can arise. This exploration leads to the second main challenge in active fault modeling, what elements of the fault source model impact most upon the hazard at a site, and when does this matter? Through a series of sensitivity studies we show how different configurations of fault geometry, and the corresponding characterisation of near-fault phenomena (including

  12. Ocean-Continent Subduction within the Paleotethyan Archiopeligic Ocean from Mineralogical Evidence of Muztag Ophiolite, Eastern Kunlun Mountain, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lan Chaoli; Li Jiliang; He Shunli

    2005-01-01

    Former studies show that the Muztag ophiolite, outcropped in the East Kunlun area of Xinjiang, formed in a supra-subduction zone environment. This study is to gain more information about the type of subduction zone. Through field work, thin section observation and microprobe analysis, petrological and mineralogical characteristics of the metamorphic peridotites of this ophiolite are obtained. Although the olivines of metamorphic peridotites appear in three textures of metamorphic relict, metamorphic recrystallizations and orthopyroxene-melting crystallizations by thin-section observations, they have stable and low Fo range of 87.8-89.5 by microprobe analysis. The orthopyroxenes show metamorphic relict and melting relict textures, with a low En of 88-90 and a wide range of Al2O3 content, from 2.90 wt% to 5.13 wt%. The spinels develop anhedral-subhedral textures, with Cr#(=Cr/(Cr+Al)) focusing on two ranges of 0.508-0.723 and 0.100-0.118, respectively. Based on these petrological and mineralogical observations, and combined with the era and tectonic setting for the Muztag ophiolite, it can be concluded that the ophiolite formed in a supra-subduction zone where the oceanic crust subducted down to the continental arc with a thick continental crust, and resulted from ocean-continent subduction within the Paleotethyan archiopelagic ocean in the East Kunlun area of Xinjiang.

  13. Romanian definite article revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorin Paliga

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available I shall attempt to resume a long, almost endless discussion: the origin of the Romanian definite article. Any grammar of Romanian or any comparative grammar the Romance languages (e. g. Tagliavini 1977 always observes that Romanian, an iso­ lated case in the Romance family, has an agglutinated definite article. The typology is not indeed rare: Bulgarian, Albanian, Armenian, Basque and Swedish witness the same mechanism. We cannot approach the topic by analysing all these languages, yet a comparative analysis would be finally useful. In our case, it is obvious that Romanian cannot be isolated from Albanian and Bulgarian. A potential solution must explain the situation in ALL these three "Balkanic" languages, even if Romanian is not Balkanic stricto sensu1. The paper shall focus on the deep roots of the Romanian and Albanian definite arti­ cle, its typological relations with other linguistic areas, and shall attempt to explain this isolated situation in the field of Romance linguistics. For sure, the Romanian definite article mainly reflects the Latin heritage. Nevertheless, by saying only this, the tableau is not complete: some forms are not Latin but Pre-Latin, Thracian. This paper will try to substantiate this assertion.

  14. Carbonate mineralogy and faunal relationship in tropical shallow water marine sediments: Cape Comorin, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Hashimi, N.H.; Nair, R.R.; Kidwai, R.M.; Rao, V.P.

    The carbonate mineralogy of Recent sediments from the western and eastern continental shelves around Cape Comorin off the southern tip of India was determined by X-ray diffraction analyses. The results show that in the sediments where benthic...

  15. Geochemical and mineralogical maps for soils of the conterminous United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Geochemical and mineralogical maps along with a histogram, boxplot, and empirical cumulative distribution function plot for each element or mineral whose data are...

  16. Mineralogical aspects of Morro de Seis Lagos deposit (Amazonas, Brazil).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takehara, Lucy; Almeida, Marcelo; Silveira, Francisco

    2014-05-01

    The alkaline body Morro dos Seis Lagos, situated in the northwest Amazonian region, is a Nb bearing deposit formed by thick lateritic regolith as circular geological feature about 5 km in diameter. The host rock of this deposit is an intensely weathered siderite carbonatite. The alkaline intrusion body was formed during the late Mesozoic and enriched during the Cenozoic by process of denudation of the surrounding rocks and formation of lateritic cover with thickness in the order of hundreds of meters. In this process, enrichment of Nb, Fe, Ti, Mn, P and rare earth elements (REE) occurred where the lateritic regolith represents the major Nb mineralization, with estimated inferred reserves of 2.9 billion ton@ 2.8 % Nb2O5, one of the largest deposits of Nb in the world. The mineralogical composition of the lateritic regolith has the predominance of the goethite and hematite, followed by oxy - hydroxides of Mn, Ti - Nb oxides, pyrochlore, cerianite and phosphates. The lateritic regolith samples showed high contents of Fe2O3 40 %, and is followed by elevated Th concentration, which locally has concentration higher than (18%). Another REE mineral is the cerianite. The main manganese minerals are hollandite, romanechite (BaMn9O16[OH4] - mixtures of manganese oxides) and amorphous Mn oxy - hydroxides. The higher concentration of MnO2 (about 40 %) is restricted to manganesiferous range, where manganese minerals occur as layers and filling voids, indicating strong remobilization by later process.

  17. Mineralogical characterization of airborne individual particulates in Beijing PM10

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Sen-lin; SHAO Long-yi; WU Ming-hong; JIAO Zheng

    2006-01-01

    This work mainly focuses on the mineralogical study of particulate matter(PM10) in Beijing. Samples were collected on polycarbonate filter from April, 2002 to March, 2003 in Beijing urban area. Scanning electronic microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray(SEM/EDX) was used to investigate individual mineral particles in Beijing PM10. 1454 individual mineral particulates from 48 samples were analysed by SEM/EDX. The results revealed that mineral particulates were complex and heterogeneous. 38kinds of minerals in PM10 were identified. The clay minerals, of annual average percentage of 30.1% , were the main composition among the identified minerals, and illite/smectite was the main composition in clay minerals, reaching up to 35%. Annual average percentage of quartz, calcite, compound particulates, carbonates were 13.5%, 10.9%, 11.95%, 10.31%, respectively. Annual average percentage less than 10% were gypsum, feldspar, dolomite, and so on. Fluorite, apatite, halite, barite and chloridize zinc (ZnCl2) were firstly identified in Beijing PM10. Sulfurization was found on surface of mineral particles, suggested extensive atmospheric reaction in air during summer.

  18. Chemical, Mineralogical, and Morphological Properties of Steel Slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irem Zeynep Yildirim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Steel slag is a byproduct of the steelmaking and steel refining processes. This paper provides an overview of the different types of steel slag that are generated from basic-oxygen-furnace (BOF steelmaking, electric-arc-furnace (EAF steelmaking, and ladle-furnace steel refining processes. The mineralogical and morphological properties of BOF and electric-arc-furnace-ladle [EAF(L] slag samples generated from two steel plants in Indiana were determined through X-Ray Diffraction (XRD analyses and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM studies. The XRD patterns of both BOF and EAF(L slag samples were very complex, with several overlapping peaks resulting from the many minerals present in these samples. The XRD analyses indicated the presence of free MgO and CaO in both the BOF and EAF(L slag samples. SEM micrographs showed that the majority of the sand-size steel slag particles had subangular to angular shapes. Very rough surface textures with distinct crystal structures were observed on the sand-size particles of BOF and EAF(L slag samples under SEM. The characteristics of the steel slag samples considered in this study are discussed in the context of a detailed review of steel slag properties.

  19. Mineralogy of Pyroxene and Olivine in the Almahata Sitta Ureilite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikouchi, T.; Zolensky, M.; Takeda, H.; Hagiya, K.; Ohsumi, K; Satake, W.; Kurihara, T.; Dept. of Physics; Shaddad, M. H.

    2010-01-01

    The Almahata Sitta meteorite (hereafter "Alma") is the first example of a recovered asteroidal sample that fell to earth after detection still in the orbit (2008TC3 asteroid), and thus is critical to understand the relationship between meteorites and their asteroidal parent bodies [1]. Alma is a polymict ureilite showing a fine-grained brecciated texture with variable lithologies from black, porous to denser, white stones [1]. It is an anomalous ureilite because of wide compositional ranges of silicates with abundant pores often coated by vapor-deposit crystals [1]. Nevertheless, Alma has general similarities to all ureilites because of reduction textures of silicates suggestive of rapid cooling from high temperature as well as heterogeneous oxygen isotope compositions [e.g., 1-5]. Alma is especially unique because it spans the compositional range of known ureilites [1]. In this abstract we report detailed mineralogical and crystallographic investigations of two different fragments to further constrain its thermal history with regards to the nature of the ureilite parent body.

  20. Mineralogy and microstructure of sintered lignite coal fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marina Ilic; Christopher Cheeseman; Christopher Sollars; Jonathan Knight [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    2003-02-01

    Lignite coal fly ash from the 'Nikola Tesla' power plant in Yugoslavia has been characterised, milled, compacted and sintered to form monolithic ceramic materials. The effect of firing at temperatures between 1130 and 1190{sup o}C on the density, water accessible porosity, mineralogy and microstructure of sintered samples is reported. This class C fly ash has an initial average particle size of 82 {mu}m and contains siliceous glass together with the crystalline phases quartz, anorthite, gehlenite, hematite and mullite. Milling the ash to an average particle size of 5.6 m, compacting and firing at 1170{sup o}C for 1 h produces materials with densities similar to clay-based ceramics that exhibit low water absorption. Sintering reduces the amount of glass, quartz, gehlenite and anhydrite, but increases formation of anorthite, mullite, hematite and cristobalite. SEM confirms the formation of a dense ceramic at 1170{sup o}C and indicates that pyroplastic effects cause pore formation and bloating at 1190{sup o}C. 23 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Chemical, Mineralogical, and Physical Properties of Martian Dust and Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.

    2017-01-01

    Global and regional dust storms on Mars have been observed from Earth-based telescopes, Mars orbiters, and surface rovers and landers. Dust storms can be global and regional. Dust is material that is suspended into the atmosphere by winds and has a particle size of 1-3 micrometer. Planetary scientist refer to loose unconsolidated materials at the surface as "soil." The term ''soil'' is used here to denote any loose, unconsolidated material that can be distinguished from rocks, bedrock, or strongly cohesive sediments. No implication for the presence or absence of organic materials or living matter is intended. Soil contains local and regional materials mixed with the globally distributed dust by aeolian processes. Loose, unconsolidated surface materials (dust and soil) may pose challenges for human exploration on Mars. Dust will no doubt adhere to spacesuits, vehicles, habitats, and other surface systems. What will be the impacts on human activity? The objective of this paper is to review the chemical, mineralogical, and physical properties of the martian dust and soil.

  2. A geochemical and mineralogical approach to environmental protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Memmi, I. [Siena Univ., Siena (Italy). Dipt. di Scienze della Terra; Hunziker, J.C. [UNIL BFSH-2 CH, Institut de Mineralogie, Lausanne (Switzerland); Panichi, C. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, International Institute for Geothermal Research, Ghezzano, PI (Italy)

    2000-07-01

    Chemical pollution of the biospheric environment by human activity has become a problem of regional and global scale. There is no doubt that the contribution of geochemistry and mineralogy in defining the extent of this problem and estimating its long-term effects on life-forms is fundamental. Most of the environmental pollution problems arise from human activity associated with the exploitation and utilisation of the Earth's resources, involving minerals and fluids in some way. These problems include waste generated by mining activity, industrial, domestic, and nuclear waste. Particular problems can arise form the use of minerals and rocks in buildings and monuments. The relationship between minerals and human health represents a special case. Minerals can, on the one hand, create a problem; but, on the other hand, due to their peculiar structural properties of potentially hazardous and also useful minerals, capable of adsorbing or neutralizing any toxic, acid and undesirable components. Geochemistry can make important contributions in defining background concentrations, in mapping and accounting for dispersion patterns, in understanding the chemical interaction of pollutants with natural dissolved constituents and mineral matter, in estimating residence times and the extent to which geochemical processes will remove pollutants from the environment.

  3. Notes on Lithology, Mineralogy, and Production for Lunar Simulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickman, D. L.; Stoeser, D. B.; Benzel, W. M.; Schrader, C. M.; Edmunson, J. E.

    2011-01-01

    The creation of lunar simulants requires a very broad range of specialized knowledge and information. This document covers several topic areas relevant to lithology, mineralogy, and processing of feedstock materials that are necessary components of the NASA lunar simulant effort. The naming schemes used for both terrestrial and lunar igneous rocks are discussed. The conflict between the International Union of Geological Sciences standard and lunar geology is noted. The rock types known as impactites are introduced. The discussion of lithology is followed by a brief synopsis of pyroxene, plagioclase, and olivine, which are the major mineral constituents of the lunar crust. The remainder of the text addresses processing of materials, particularly the need for separation of feedstock minerals. To illustrate this need, the text includes descriptions of two norite feedstocks for lunar simulants: the Stillwater Complex in Montana, United States, and the Bushveld Complex in South Africa. Magnetic mineral separations, completed by Hazen Research, Inc. and Eriez Manufacturing Co. for the simulant task, are discussed.

  4. Mineralogy and Oxygen Isotope Compositions of an Unusual Hibonite-Perovskite Refractory Inclusion from Allende

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, L. P.; Snead, C.; Rahman, Z.; McKeegan, K. D.

    2012-01-01

    Hibonite-rich Ca- and Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) are among the earliest formed solids that condensed in the early nebula. We discovered an unusual refractory inclusion from the Allende CV3 chondrite (SHAL) containing an approx 500 micron long single crystal of hibonite and co-existing coarse-grained perovskite. The mineralogy and petrography of SHAL show strong similarities to some FUN inclusions, especially HAL. Here we report on the mineralogy, petrography, mineral chemistry and oxygen isotopic compositions in SHAL.

  5. Skeletal mineralogy of coral recruits under high temperature and pCO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Foster

    2016-03-01

    Our results show that elevated pCO2 alone is unlikely to drive changes in the skeletal mineralogy of young corals. Not having an ability to switch from aragonite to calcite precipitation may leave corals and ultimately coral reef ecosystems more susceptible to predicted ocean acidification. An important area for prospective research would be the investigation of the combined impact of high pCO2 and reduced Mg ∕ Ca ratio on coral skeletal mineralogy.

  6. Mineralogical characteristic of rutile from Bonče, Republic of Macedonia

    OpenAIRE

    Sijakova-Ivanova, Tena; Boev, Blazo

    2014-01-01

    This paper gives mineralogical characteristic of rutile. Several samplesof rutile were collected for research by Scanning electron microscopy (SEM),coupled with an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) and X-raydiffraction (XRD). SEM is especially useful because it gives elemental,mineralogical and morphological data at the same time. X-ray diffraction(XRD) is known as the best method for the identification and quantification ofminerals The instrument used was a XRD Schimadzu 6100. Coppe...

  7. Applied mineralogy of the constituent clays of the mineral wastes from the coal mines in the Teruel mining zone; Mineralogia aplicada de arcillas constitutivas de esteriles en minas de carbon de la zona minera de Teruel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastida, J.; Lopez Buendia, A.M.; Serrano, J.; De La Torre, J.; Sienes, M. [Univ. Valencia, Valencia (Spain). Dept. de Geologia

    1993-12-31

    The coals of the district of Teruel (NE Spain) presents as mine wastes several industrial minerals and rocks (sands, kaolins, clays, Al-sulfates,...) the mining of which would be interesting. The aim of this work is the mineralogical and ceramic characterisation of these clays. So mineralogical and petrographical data as well as technological data concerning granulometry, chemical analysis and Atteberg index have been used in order to compare these clays with those analysed and typified in previous works and with those actually used as ceramic raw materials in the NE of Teruel. 26 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Detection and context of hydrated mineralogy in the Tyrrhena Terra region, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Haan, J.; Zegers, T. E.; van Ruitenbeek, F. J. A.; van der Werff, H. M. A.; Rossi, A.

    2008-09-01

    Introduction The discovery of phyllosilicates on Mars [1] has had major implications on the perceived geologic and climatologic evolution of Mars [2]. Not only do phyllosilicates represent a `wet' period on Mars, they might also represent a potentially favorable environment for life. The phyllosilicates have so far exclusively been found in or close to ancient Noachian highland terrain. Those phyllosilicate deposits studied (e.g. [3]) show a clear association between hydrated mineralogy and heavily eroded and crater-saturated outcrops. Phyllosilicates on Earth are associated with a wide variety of geological processes (volcanism, metamorphism, hydrothermal alteration, sedimentation). The occurrence of phyllosilicates on Mars may be equally diverse in nature. To be able to place constraints on the early Martian environment, the processes by which these phyllosilicates formed need to be reconstructed. To derive this information from individual phyllosilicate deposits, it is necessary to interpret their composition in relation to their geological context and relative time relationships. We conducted such an integrated hyperspectral and geological study of the Tyrrhena Terra region. Data products ad methods HRSC data products (both image at 12 m/pixel and stereo-derived DTMs) are used for examining geologic cross-cutting relationships, geomorphologic landforms and visual determination of unit boundaries. Odyssey THEMIS nighttime TIR images are analyzed for spatial variations in thermal inertia. Where available, HRSC is supplemented by higher-resolution visible observations of CTX or MOC. Hyperspectral analysis is conducted using data from the OMEGA hyperspectral instrument. In order to batch-process large amounts of OMEGA data, an IDL/ENVI tool was developed on top of the existing SOFT04, distributed by PSA. The applied atmospheric correction assumes that atmospheric contributions are multiplicative, and follow a power-law distribution with altitude [4]. The ratio of

  9. Some fundamental definitions of the elastic parameters for homogenous isotropic linear materials in road design and analysis

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Beer, Morris

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available during tensile (or compressive) tests conducted on a sample of the material. Young’s Modulus is named after Thomas Young, the 18th Century British scientist. The SI unit of modulus of elasticity, E is the pascal. Given the large values typical of many... stream_source_info De Beer_2008.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 31159 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name De Beer_2008.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 1 Some fundamental definitions...

  10. Some fundamental definitions of the elastic parameters for homogeneous isotropic linear elastic materials in pavement design and analysis

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Beer, Morris

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available during tensile (or compressive) tests conducted on a sample of the material. Young’s Modulus is named after Thomas Young, the 18th Century British scientist. The SI unit of modulus of elasticity, E is the pascal. Given the large values typical of many... stream_source_info De Beer1_2008.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 31159 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name De Beer1_2008.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 1 Some fundamental definitions...

  11. RESIDUES FROM COAL CONVERSION AND UTILIZATION: ADVANCED MINERALOGICAL CHARACTERIZATION AND DISPOSED BYPRODUCT DIAGENESIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory J. McCarthy; Dean G. Grier

    2001-01-01

    Prior to the initiation of this study, understanding of the long-term behavior of environmentally-exposed Coal Combustion By-Products (CCBs) was lacking in (among others) two primary areas addressed in this work. First, no method had been successfully applied to achieve full quantitative analysis of the partitioning of chemical constituents into reactive or passive crystalline or noncrystalline compounds. Rather, only semi-quantitative methods were available, with large associated errors. Second, our understanding of the long-term behavior of various CCBs in contact with the natural environment was based on a relatively limited set of study materials. This study addressed these areas with two objectives, producing (1) a set of protocols for fully quantitative phase analysis using the Rietveld Quantitative X-ray Diffraction (RQXRD) method and (2) greater understanding of the hydrologic and geochemical nature of the long-term behavior of disposed and utilized CCBs. The RQXRD technique was initially tested using (1) mixtures of National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) crystalline standards, and (2) mixtures of synthetic reagents simulating various CCBs, to determine accuracy and precision of the method, and to determine the most favorable protocols to follow in order to efficiently quantify multi-phase mixtures. Four sets of borehole samples of disposed or utilized CCBs were retrieved and analyzed by RQXRD according to the protocols developed under the first objective. The first set of samples, from a Class F ash settling pond in Kentucky disposed for up to 20 years, showed little mineralogical alteration, as expected. The second set of samples, from an embankment in Indiana containing a mixture of chain-grate (stoker) furnace ash and fluidized bed combustion (FBC) residues, showed formation of the mineral thaumasite, as observed in previously studied exposed FBC materials. Two high-calcium CCBs studied, including a dry-process flue gas desulfurization

  12. Constraints on the Mineralogy of Gale Crater Mudstones from MSL SAM Evolved Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdam, A. C.; Sutter, B.; Franz, H. B.; Hogancamp, J. V. (Clark); Knudson, C. A.; Andrejkovicova, S.; Archer, P. D.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Ming, D. W.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2017-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) and Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instruments on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) have analysed more than 150 micron fines from 14 sites at Gale Crater. Here we focus on the mudstone samples. Two were drilled from sites John Klein (JK) and Cumberland (CB) in the Sheepbed mudstone. Six were drilled from Murray Formation mudstone: Confidence Hills (CH), Mojave (MJ), Telegraph Peak (TP), Buckskin (BK), Oudam (OU), Marimba (MB). SAM's evolved gas analysis mass spectrometry (EGA-MS) detected H2O, CO2, O2, H2, SO2, H2S, HCl, NO, and other trace gases, including organic fragments. The identity and evolution temperature of evolved gases can support CheMin mineral detection and place constraints on trace volatile-bearing phases or phases difficult to characterize with X-ray diffraction (e.g., amorphous phases). Here we will focus on SAM H2O data and comparisons to SAM-like analyses of key reference materials.

  13. Technical note: Mineralogical, chemical, morphological, and optical interrelationships of mineral dust re-suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelbrecht, Johann P.; Moosmüller, Hans; Pincock, Samuel; Jayanty, R. K. M.; Lersch, Traci; Casuccio, Gary

    2016-08-01

    This paper promotes an understanding of the mineralogical, chemical, and physical interrelationships of re-suspended mineral dusts collected as grab samples from global dust sources. Surface soils were collected from arid regions, including the southwestern USA, Mali, Chad, Morocco, Canary Islands, Cabo Verde, Djibouti, Afghanistan, Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, UAE, Serbia, China, Namibia, Botswana, Australia, and Chile. The particulate mass fractions, an aerodynamic particle size analyzer, and a three-wavelength (405, 532, 781 nm) photoacoustic instrument with integrating reciprocal nephelometer for monitoring absorption and scattering coefficients during the dust re-suspension process. Filter sampling media included Teflon® membrane and quartz fiber filters for chemical analysis and Nuclepore® filters for individual particle analysis by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The 75, material. Also shown are differences in SSA of the kaolinite/hematite/goethite samples from Mali and those from colloidal soils elsewhere. Results from this study can be integrated into a database of mineral dust properties, for applications in climate modeling, remote sensing, visibility, health (medical geology), ocean fertilization, and impact on equipment.

  14. Mineralogy, geochemistry and pyrite content of Bulgarian subbituminous coals, Pernik Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostova, I.; Petrov, O.; Kortenski, J. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria). Inst. of Applied Mineralogy

    1996-08-01

    The mineralogy and geochemistry of Pernik subbituminous coals (coal bed A) and some genetic peculiarities related to the mineral formation were studied. The mineral matter of the coal consists chiefly of pyrite, kaolinite, siderite, quartz and calcite. Other minerals (dolomite, ankerite, plagioclase and some sulphates) are present in minor amounts, some occurring as accessory single crystals. Pyrite is them main mineral in these coals and exhibits a large array of textures and morphology. Isolated and clustered euhedral, bacterial and inorganic framboidal, cluster-like, homogeneous and microconcretional massive, infilling and replacing anhedral, and cleat-filling and fracture-filling infiltrational pyrite types were observed. Four stages of mineralization were distinguished: pyrite-kaolinite, pyrite, pyrte-siderite and sulphate stages. The amount of pyrite present in two sections of coal bed A was determined by quantitative powder X-ray diffraction analysis. The concentrations of 37 trace elements were determined. As, Cu, Co, Ni, Zn, Pb, V, Ti, Mo Rb, Cr and Mn are typomorphic for this coal. On the basis of their relation to organic or inorganic matter, four groups of trace elements were subdivided; and on the basis of cluster analysis four associations were differentiated. 19 refs., 31 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Mineralogy and Microbial Diversity of the Microbialites in the Hypersaline Storr's Lake, the Bahamas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Varun G.; Wronkiewicz, David J.; Mormile, Melanie R.; Foster, Jamie S.

    2016-04-01

    Microbialites found in the low-light-intensity, hypersaline waters of Storr's Lake (SL), San Salvador Island, the Bahamas, were investigated with respect to their morphology, mineralogy, and microbial diversity. Previously described microbialite morphologies, as well as a newly identified "multi-cuspate" morphology, were observed at various depths. Electron microscopy analysis revealed the presence of angular, blocky, and needle-shaped crystals with mineralized cyanobacterial filaments and remains of exopolymeric substances. X-ray diffraction studies confirmed the presence of both Mg-calcite and aragonite in the plateau-mushroom and pinnacle mound microbialites, whereas only Mg-calcite was identified in the other microbialite morphotypes. A comprehensive molecular analysis using barcoded pyrosequencing of five different microbial mat communities identified at least 12 dominant bacterial phyla. Cyanobacteria were generally low in abundance and ranged from ˜0.01% in the deeper pinnacle mounds to ˜3.2% in the shallow calcareous knobs. Other photosynthetic members included green nonsulfur bacteria of the phylum Chloroflexi and purple sulfur bacteria of the class Gammaproteobacteria. All mat types contained significant amounts of sulfate-reducing and dehalogenating bacteria. The low light intensity reaching the deeper microbialites, the lack of dominant cyanobacteria, and the abundance of sulfate reducers and Chloroflexi collectively suggest that sulfate reduction and anoxygenic photosynthetic processes influence the carbonate biomineralization process in these systems.

  16. A Synchrotron-Based Facility for the in-situ Location, Chemical and Mineralogical Characterization of ~10 um Particles Captured in Aerogel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flynn, G.; Sutton, S; Lanzirotti, A

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Stardust mission collected dust from the coma of Comet Wild-2 on January 2nd, 2004, by direct capture into aerogel cells that flew through the dust coma at 6 km/s. Stardust collected several hundred comet particles >10 {mu}m in size. These comet samples were delivered to Earth on January 15th, 2006. We developed a facility at the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory (Upton, NY, USA) for the in-situ characterization of 10 {mu}m particles collected in aerogel. These analytical instruments allow us to perform extensive chemical, mineralogical, and size-frequency characterization of particles captured in aerogel. These analyses are conducted without any invasive extraction, minimizing the possibility of contamination or particle loss during preparation. This facility was used to determine the chemical composition, the oxidation state, the mineralogy and to provide an indication of the grain size of the Wild-2 particles before they were removed from the aerogel. This information provides a catalog of particle types, allowing a more reasoned allocation of the particles to subsequent investigators based on a relatively detailed knowledge of the chemical composition and mineralogy of each particle. These measurements allowed a comparison of the chemical and mineralogical properties of the Wild-2 particles with other types of extraterrestrial materials, including interplanetary dust particles and meteorites. The success of in-situ analysis for Wild 2 particles demonstrates that synchrotron-based facilities will be important for the analysis of particles collected in aerogel on future earth-orbiting satellites and spacecraft.

  17. Timescales of carbon turnover in soils with mixed crystalline mineralogies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khomo, Lesego; Trumbore, Susan E.; Bern, Carleton R.; Chadwick, Oliver A.

    2017-01-01

    Organic matter–mineral associations stabilize much of the carbon (C) stored globally in soils. Metastable short-range-order (SRO) minerals such as allophane and ferrihydrite provide one mechanism for long-term stabilization of organic matter in young soil. However, in soils with few SRO minerals and a predominance of crystalline aluminosilicate or Fe (and Al) oxyhydroxide, C turnover should be governed by chemisorption with those minerals. Here, we correlate mineral composition from soils containing small amounts of SRO minerals with mean turnover time (TT) of C estimated from radiocarbon (14C) in bulk soil, free light fraction and mineral-associated organic matter. We varied the mineral amount and composition by sampling ancient soils formed on different lithologies in arid to subhumid climates in Kruger National Park (KNP), South Africa. Mineral contents in bulk soils were assessed using chemical extractions to quantify Fe oxyhydroxides and SRO minerals. Because of our interest in the role of silicate clay mineralogy, particularly smectite (2 : 1) and kaolinite (1 : 1), we separately quantified the mineralogy of the clay-sized fraction using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and measured 14C on the same fraction. Density separation demonstrated that mineral associated C accounted for 40–70 % of bulk soil organic C in A and B1 horizons for granite, nephelinite and arid-zone gabbro soils, and > 80 % in other soils. Organic matter strongly associated with the isolated clay-sized fraction represented only 9–47 % of the bulk soil C. The mean TT of C strongly associated with the clay-sized fraction increased with the amount of smectite (2 : 1 clays); in samples with > 40 % smectite it averaged 1020 ± 460 years. The C not strongly associated with clay-sized minerals, including a combination of low-density C, the C associated with minerals of sizes between 2 µm and 2 cm (including Fe oxyhydroxides as coatings), and C removed from clay

  18. Timescales of carbon turnover in soils with mixed crystalline mineralogies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khomo, Lesego; Trumbore, Susan; Bern, Carleton R.; Chadwick, Oliver A.

    2017-01-01

    Organic matter-mineral associations stabilize much of the carbon (C) stored globally in soils. Metastable short-range-order (SRO) minerals such as allophane and ferrihydrite provide one mechanism for long-term stabilization of organic matter in young soil. However, in soils with few SRO minerals and a predominance of crystalline aluminosilicate or Fe (and Al) oxyhydroxide, C turnover should be governed by chemisorption with those minerals. Here, we correlate mineral composition from soils containing small amounts of SRO minerals with mean turnover time (TT) of C estimated from radiocarbon (14C) in bulk soil, free light fraction and mineral-associated organic matter. We varied the mineral amount and composition by sampling ancient soils formed on different lithologies in arid to subhumid climates in Kruger National Park (KNP), South Africa. Mineral contents in bulk soils were assessed using chemical extractions to quantify Fe oxyhydroxides and SRO minerals. Because of our interest in the role of silicate clay mineralogy, particularly smectite (2 : 1) and kaolinite (1 : 1), we separately quantified the mineralogy of the clay-sized fraction using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and measured 14C on the same fraction. Density separation demonstrated that mineral associated C accounted for 40-70 % of bulk soil organic C in A and B1 horizons for granite, nephelinite and arid-zone gabbro soils, and > 80 % in other soils. Organic matter strongly associated with the isolated clay-sized fraction represented only 9-47 % of the bulk soil C. The mean TT of C strongly associated with the clay-sized fraction increased with the amount of smectite (2 : 1 clays); in samples with > 40 % smectite it averaged 1020 ± 460 years. The C not strongly associated with clay-sized minerals, including a combination of low-density C, the C associated with minerals of sizes between 2 µm and 2 cm (including Fe oxyhydroxides as coatings), and C removed from clay-sized material by 2 % hydrogen peroxide had

  19. Clay mineralogy and magnetic susceptibility of Oxisols in geomorphic surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Arantes Camargo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies analyzing the variability of clay minerals and magnetic susceptibility provide data for the delineation of site-specific management areas since many of their attributes are important to agronomy and the environment. This study aimed to evaluate the spatial variability of clay minerals, magnetic susceptibility, adsorbed phosphorus and physical attributes in Oxisols of sandstones in different geomorphic surfaces. For that purpose, soil samples were collected every 25 m along a transect located within the area where the geomorphic surfaces were identified and mapped. The transect occupied the central portion of 500 ha, where it was also sampled for density purposes with one sample per six hectares. Soil samples were collected at a depth of 0.0-0.2 m. The results of the physical, chemical, mineralogical and magnetic susceptibility analyses were subjected to statistical and geostatistical analyses. The nature of the clay minerals and magnetic susceptibility was dependent on the variation of the soil parent material. High values of magnetic susceptibility were associated with the presence of maghemite and magnetite of coarse size. The spatial variability of crystallinity and the content of Fe oxides, as well as magnetic susceptibility, were dependent on the age of the geomorphic surfaces. The youngest surface had greater spatial variability of these attributes. The iron (goethite and hematite and aluminum (gibbsite oxides in the youngest geomorphic surface influenced the low values of soil density and high values of total pore volume, micropores and P adsorption. The characterization of the spatial variability of Fe oxides and susceptibility allowed for the delineation of homogeneous areas.

  20. Corrosion mineralogy of an 1800 Spanish piece of eight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craig, J.R. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Dept. of Geological Sciences, Blacksburg, Virginia (United States); Callahan, J.E. [Appalachain State Univ., Dept. of Geology, Boone, North Carolina (United States); Kimbell, J.T. [Tavernier, Florida (United States); Solberg, T.N. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Dept. of Geological Sciences, Blacksburg, Virginia (United States)

    2002-04-01

    Spanish colonial eight real silver coins, commonly called Pieces of Eight, were used throughout the Spanish-speaking world for hundreds of years. We undertook a detailed mineralogical, textural, and chemical investigation of an 1800 Carlos IIII eight real coin recovered from the wreck of the Spanish frigate Santa Leocadia, which sank on the rocky shore of Ecuador on November 16, 1800, with a loss of more than 140 lives and of 2,100,000 pesos of gold and silver coins. The coin is a typical eight real piece, composed of about 90% Ag and 10% Cu. It was buried in elastic sediments beneath the oxidized zone, such that it reacted with sulfur released by sulfate-reducing bacteria. Consequently, the coin has been totally encapsulated in a mixture of sand, gravel, and shell fragments cemented by metal sulfides. The residual coin consists of silver with small interspersed micrometric grains of copper. Reaction of the dissolved metal with the bacterially generated diagenetic sulfur in the intergranular fluids resulted in extensive cementation of the sediment particles by Ag and Cu sulfides. In the 1-mm zone immediately adjacent to the coin, Cu-bearing acanthite occurs as concentric layers with intervening zones of sand and clay. Beyond this zone, acanthite formed from Ag dissolved from the coin occurs as a more or less continuous interstitial cement with local small islands of covellite, CuS. Copper also occurs as films of Cu carbonate on quartz grains, as isolated grains of jalpaite Ag{sub 3}CuS{sub 2}, stromeyerite AgCuS, mckinstryite (Ag,Cu){sub 2}S, and as atacamite Cu{sub 2}C1(OH){sub 3}, which rim and replace detrital carbonate grains. (author)

  1. Petrography and mineralogy of new lunar meteorite MIL090036

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Lanfang; CHEN Hongyi; MIAO Bingkui; XIA Zhipeng; YAO Jie

    2014-01-01

    MIL090036 is a previously unknown meteorite (a feldspathic lunar breccia) that was discovered in Antarctica. The detailed petrography and mineralogy of this meteorite forms the subject of this paper. It has a typical clastic texture that consists of various types of rock debris (e.g. anorthosite, gabbroic anorthosite, gabbro, regolith breccia, troctolite, microporphyritic crystalline impact melt and compound clasts), mineral crystal fragments (e.g. pyroxenes, plagioclase, olivine and ilmenite) and feldspathic glass clasts. The ifne-grained recrystallized minerals and mineral clasts are cemented together in a glassy groundmass. The anorthite content of plagioclase in the gabbro (An81-83) and anorthosite (An88-93) both have relatively low calcium content compared to those from other breccias (An90-98). The pyroxene composition (Fs12-35 Wo3-44 En22-79) in the rock debris, crystal mineral clasts and anorthositic glass clasts are relatively iron-deifcient compared to those from gabbro debris with melt glass (Fs37-65 Wo10-29 En21-49) and groundmass (Fs18-69 Wo3-45 En14-50). In contrast, the pyroxene grains in the gabbroic anorthosite display a narrow compositional range (Fs24-27 Wo7-14 En59-69). Olivine grains in mineral fragments and the groundmass have a wider compositional range (Fo57-79) than those in the rock debris (Fo67-77). The Fe/Mn ratio in olivine is in the range of 47 to 83 (average 76) and 76 to 112 (average 73) in pyroxenes, and hence classify within the lunar ifeld. The characteristics of texture, mineral assemblage and compositions suggest that MIL090036 possibly originated from a region beyond that of the Apollo and Luna samples. Further study of MIL090036 is therefore likely to lead to a better understanding of the geological processes on the Moon and the chemical composition of the lunar crust.

  2. Chemical-mineralogical characterisation of coarse recycled concrete aggregate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limbachiya, M C; Marrocchino, E; Koulouris, A

    2007-01-01

    The construction industry is now putting greater emphasis than ever before on increasing recycling and promoting more sustainable waste management practices. In keeping with this approach, many sectors of the industry have actively sought to encourage the use of recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) as an alternative to primary aggregates in concrete production. The results of a laboratory experimental programme aimed at establishing chemical and mineralogical characteristics of coarse RCA and its likely influence on concrete performance are reported in this paper. Commercially produced coarse RCA and natural aggregates (16-4 mm size fraction) were tested. Results of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyses showed that original source of RCA had a negligible effect on the major elements and a comparable chemical composition between recycled and natural aggregates. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses results indicated the presence of calcite, portlandite and minor peaks of muscovite/illite in recycled aggregates, although they were directly proportioned to their original composition. The influence of 30%, 50%, and 100% coarse RCA on the chemical composition of equal design strength concrete has been established, and its suitability for use in a concrete application has been assessed. In this work, coarse RCA was used as a direct replacement for natural gravel in concrete production. Test results indicated that up to 30% coarse RCA had no effect on the main three oxides (SiO2, Al2O3 and CaO) of concrete, but thereafter there was a marginal decrease in SiO2 and increase in Al2O3 and CaO contents with increase in RCA content in the mix, reflecting the original constituent's composition.

  3. East African magadi (trona): flouride concentration and mineralogical composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Joan M.

    1999-08-01

    Magadi from Lake Magadi, Kenya, Lake Natron, Tanzania, Lake Katwe, Uganda, El-Atrun, Sudan and efflorescent crust from the soil surface (scooped magadi) from northern Tanzania have been analysed chemically to determine fluoride and carbonates concentrations and by X-ray diffraction to determine the mineralogical composition. Magadi from Lake Natron and Lake Magadi are found to be very similar consisting mainly of trona (CO 32- + HCO 3- > 10.4 meq [g magadi] -1) mixed with halite and either kogarkoite or villaumite, respectively, resulting in fluoride concentrations up to 8.7 mg F - [g magadi] -1. The scooped magadi is not as pure with respect to trona as the crystalline magadi, but the fluoride content is of same order of magnitude (0.23-5.1 mg F - [g magadi] -1). The scooped magadi consists of trona (CO 32- + HCO 3 = 3.5-9.5 meq [g magadi] -1) with different mixtures of halite, quartz, villiaumite, kogarkoite and thermonatrite. No fluoride containing minerals are identified in magadi from Uganda and Sudan, probably due to the very low fluoride concentrations of 0.02 and < O.24 mg (g magadi) -1, respectively, indicating that these samples are not contaminated with fluoride. The Sudanese magadi is a different mixture of trona, halite and quartz resulting in a variation in the carbonate concentration of 4.6-11.9 meq (g magadi) -1. The magadi from Lake Katwe consists of trona (CO 32- + HCO 3- = 7.0 meq [g magadi] -1) mixed with burkeite and halite.

  4. Fault rock mineralogy and fluid flow in the Coso Geothermal Field, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davatzes, N. C.; Hickman, S. H.

    2005-12-01

    The minerals that comprise fault rock, their grain shapes, and packing geometry are important controls on fault zone properties such as permeability, frictional strength, and slip behavior. In this study we examine the role of mineralogy and deformation microstructures on fluid flow in a fault-hosted, fracture-dominated geothermal system contained in granitic rocks in the Coso Geothermal Field, CA. Initial examination of the mineralogy and microstructure of fault rock obtained from core and surface outcrops reveals three fault rock types. (1) Fault rock consisting of kaolinite and amorphous silica that contains large connected pores, dilatant brittle fractures, and dissolution textures. (2) Fault rock consisting of foliated layers of chlorite and illite-smectite separated by slip surfaces. (3) Fault rock consisting of poorly sorted angular grains, characterized by large variations in grain packing (pore size), and crack-seal textures. These different fault rocks are respectively associated with a high permeability upper boiling zone for the geothermal system, a conductively heated "caprock" at moderate to shallow depth associated with low permeability, and a deeper convectively heated region associated with enhanced permeability. Outcrop and hand-sample scale mapping, XRD analysis, and SEM secondary electron images of fault gouge and slip surfaces at different stages of development (estimated shear strain) are used to investigate the processes responsible for the development and physical properties of these distinct fault rocks. In each type of fault rock, mineral dissolution and re-precipitation in conjunction with the amount and geometry of porosity changes induced by dilation or compaction are the key controls on fault rock development. In addition, at the contacts between slip surfaces, abrasion and resulting comminution appear to influence grain size, sorting, and packing. Macroscopically, we expect the frictional strength of these characteristic fault rocks

  5. WhatisKT wiki: a case study of a platform for knowledge translation terms and definitions — descriptive analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McKibbon Kathleen Ann

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background More than a hundred terms, often with unclear definitions and varying emphases, are used by health research and practice communities across the world who are interested in getting the best possible evidence applied (e.g., knowledge translation, implementation science, diffusion of innovations, and technology transfer. This makes finding published evidence difficult and can result in reduced, misinterpreted, or challenging interactions among professionals. Open dialogue and interaction among various professionals is needed to achieve consolidation of vocabulary. We use case report methods to describe how we sought to build an online tool to present the range of terms and facilitate the dialogue process across groups and disciplines interested in harnessing research evidence for healthcare. Methods We used a wiki platform from Wikispaces to present the problem of terminology and make a case and opportunity for collaboration on usage. Wikis are web sites where communities of users can collaborate online to build content and discuss progress. We gathered terms related to getting research into practice, sought published definitions, and posted these on the wiki (WhatisKT http://whatiskt.wikispaces.com/. We built the wiki in mid-2008 and promoted it through various groups and publications. This report describes the content of the site, our promotion efforts, use of the site, and how the site was used for collaboration up to the end of 2011. Results The WhatisKT wiki site now includes more than 120 pages. Traffic to the site has increased substantially from an average of 200 monthly visits in 2008 to 1700 in 2011. Visitors from 143 countries viewed the wiki in 2011, compared with 12 countries in 2008. However, most use has been limited to short term accesses of about 40 seconds per visit, and discussion of consolidation and solidifying terminology is conspicuously absent. Conclusions Although considerable interest exists in the

  6. The influence of natural pozzolana mineralogical composition in the properties of blended cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gener Rizo, M.

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available The pozzolana activity is the main property of the active additions but, in order to select them, we have to consider - between other factors- its mineralogical composition with a great influence, not only in the active component, but also in other cement properties. In the present work we have studied 4 different Cuban natural pozzolanes, characterized with the help of X ray diffraction and with thermic and chemical analysis. The pozzolanic activity was also evaluated through a chemical and physicomechanic method. Some cements were prepared with different contents of each one of the pozzolanics, and analysed their physicomechanic and chemical properties. Finally, we found that the pozzolanics mineralogical composition has a great influence in the pozzolanic activity and in the properties of mixed cements. Also we found that it 5 possible to obtain the best resistances in the time and the smaller needs of water when the vitreous phase prevail in the additions.

    La actividad puzolánica es la propiedad fundamental de las adiciones activas, pero para la selección de la misma se debe considerar, entre otros factores, su composición mineralógica, que influye no sólo en los constituyentes activos, sino también en muchas propiedades de los cementos. En el presente trabajo, como material puzolánico se estudiaron 4 puzolanas naturales cubanas, las cuales fueron caracterizadas mediante difracción de Rayos X, análisis térmico y análisis químico; se evaluó, además, la actividad puzolánica mediante un método químico y otro físico-mecánico. Se prepararon cementos con diferentes contenidos de cada una de las puzolanas y se analizaron sus propiedades químicas y físico-mecánicas. Se concluye que la composición mineralógica de las puzolanas influye de forma determinante en la actividad puzolánica y en las propiedades de los cementos mezclados; que los mejores desarrollos de resistencias en el tiempo y los menores requerimientos

  7. Chemical characterization, nano-particle mineralogy and particle size distribution of basalt dust wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalmora, Adilson C. [Laboratory of Environmental Researches and Nanotechnology Development, Centro Universitário La Salle, Mestrado em Avaliação de Impactos Ambientais em Mineração. Victor Barreto, 2288 Centro 92010-000, Canoas, RS (Brazil); Institute for Environmental Assessment and Water Studies (IDÆA), Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), C/Jordi Girona 18-26, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Ramos, Claudete G.; Oliveira, Marcos L.S. [Laboratory of Environmental Researches and Nanotechnology Development, Centro Universitário La Salle, Mestrado em Avaliação de Impactos Ambientais em Mineração. Victor Barreto, 2288 Centro 92010-000, Canoas, RS (Brazil); Teixeira, Elba C. [Fundação Estadual de Proteção Ambiental Henrique Luis Roessler, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Kautzmann, Rubens M.; Taffarel, Silvio R. [Laboratory of Environmental Researches and Nanotechnology Development, Centro Universitário La Salle, Mestrado em Avaliação de Impactos Ambientais em Mineração. Victor Barreto, 2288 Centro 92010-000, Canoas, RS (Brazil); Brum, Irineu A.S. de [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Escola de Engenharia, Departamento de Metalurgia, Centro de Tecnologia, Av. Bento Gonçalves, 9500. Bairro Agronomia. CEP: 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); and others

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the geochemistry of basalt alteration is central to the study of agriculture systems. Various nano-minerals play an important role in the mobilization of contaminants and their subsequent uptake by plants. We present a new analytical experimental approach in combination with an integrated analytical protocol designed to study basalt alteration processes. Recently, throughout the world, ultra-fine and nano-particles derived from basalt dust wastes (BDW) during “stonemeal” soil fertilizer application have been of great concern for their possible adverse effects on human health and environmental pollution. Samples of BDW utilized were obtained from companies in the Nova Prata mining district in southern Brazil for chemical characterization and nano-mineralogy investigation, using an integrated application of advanced characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), High Resolution-Transmission Electron microscopy (HR-TEM)/Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS)/(selected-area diffraction pattern) SAED, Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM/EDS), and granulometric distribution analysis. The investigation has revealed that BDW materials are dominated by SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3,} with a complex micromineralogy including alkali feldspar, augite, barite, labradorite, hematite, heulandrite, gypsum, kaolinite, quartz, and smectite. In addition, we have identified a number of trace metals such as Cd, Cu, Cr, and Zn, that are preferentially concentrated into the finer, inhalable, dust fraction and, thus, could present a health hazard in the urban areas around the basalt mining zone. The implication of this observation is that use of these nanometric-sized particulates as soil fertilizer may present different health challenges to those of conventional fertilizers, inviting future work regarding the relative toxicities of these materials. Our investigation on the particle size distribution, nano

  8. Sedimentological, Mineralogical and Geochemical Characterization of Sand Dunes in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benaafi, Mohammed; Abdullatif, Osman

    2014-05-01

    Sedimentological, mineralogical, morphological and geochemical studies of sand dunes from ten locations in Saudi Arabia were conducted in order to determine the differences between them and to find out the provenance and tectonic setting of these sand dunes. Sixty seven samples were collected from different sand dunes types ranging in morphology from linear, barchans, parabolic to stars dunes. In overall, the sand dunes are fine to coarse grained mean grain size, moderately sorted, near symmetrical skewness with mesokurtic distribution characterized sand dunes in most locations. The sand dunes grains are subrounded in all locations except in the Red sea, Qassim, central Arabia and the eastern province which showed sub-angular grains. The main mineral compositions of studied aeolian sand dunes are quartz, feldspar, calcite, and mica. Quartz is the dominant mineral in locations with significant amount of feldspars and mica in Najran, Red sea and Central Arabia locations. Moreover, calcite is present in Sakaka and NW Empty Quarter (Jafurah). Basement related sand dunes in Najran, Central Arabia and Red sea locations are sub-mature in terms of their mineralogical maturity. Whereas, sand dunes in other locations are texturally mature except those from the Red sea which showed sub-mature sand. The sands are classified as quartz arenite, except in the basement related sand dunes in Najran, central Arabia and the Red sea are ranging from sub-arkose, sub-litharenite and lithraenite. Morphologically, parallel to sub-parallel sand ridges with NE-SW orientation occurred in east and north parts of Empty Quarter (Najran and Jafurah) and NW-SE orientation in Dahna and Nafud deserts in central and north regions of Saudi Arabia. Parabolic sand dunes characterized the Nafud desert (Hail, Sakaka, Tayma locations). Barchans and star sand dunes characterize the Empty Quarter (Jafurah). Major, trace, and rare earth elements studies were carried out to determine the composition

  9. Chemical characterization, nano-particle mineralogy and particle size distribution of basalt dust wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalmora, Adilson C; Ramos, Claudete G; Oliveira, Marcos L S; Teixeira, Elba C; Kautzmann, Rubens M; Taffarel, Silvio R; de Brum, Irineu A S; Silva, Luis F O

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the geochemistry of basalt alteration is central to the study of agriculture systems. Various nano-minerals play an important role in the mobilization of contaminants and their subsequent uptake by plants. We present a new analytical experimental approach in combination with an integrated analytical protocol designed to study basalt alteration processes. Recently, throughout the world, ultra-fine and nano-particles derived from basalt dust wastes (BDW) during "stonemeal" soil fertilizer application have been of great concern for their possible adverse effects on human health and environmental pollution. Samples of BDW utilized were obtained from companies in the Nova Prata mining district in southern Brazil for chemical characterization and nano-mineralogy investigation, using an integrated application of advanced characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), High Resolution-Transmission Electron microscopy (HR-TEM)/Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS)/(selected-area diffraction pattern) SAED, Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM/EDS), and granulometric distribution analysis. The investigation has revealed that BDW materials are dominated by SiO2, Al2O3, and Fe2O3, with a complex micromineralogy including alkali feldspar, augite, barite, labradorite, hematite, heulandrite, gypsum, kaolinite, quartz, and smectite. In addition, we have identified a number of trace metals such as Cd, Cu, Cr, and Zn, that are preferentially concentrated into the finer, inhalable, dust fraction and, thus, could present a health hazard in the urban areas around the basalt mining zone. The implication of this observation is that use of these nanometric-sized particulates as soil fertilizer may present different health challenges to those of conventional fertilizers, inviting future work regarding the relative toxicities of these materials. Our investigation on the particle size distribution, nano-particle mineralogy and chemical composition in

  10. Stratigraphy, mineralogy, and origin of layered deposits inside Terby crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansan, V.; Loizeau, D.; Mangold, N.; Le Mouélic, S.; Carter, J.; Poulet, F.; Dromart, G.; Lucas, A.; Bibring, J.-P.; Gendrin, A.; Gondet, B.; Langevin, Y.; Masson, Ph.; Murchie, S.; Mustard, J. F.; Neukum, G.

    2011-01-01

    The 174 km diameter Terby impact crater (28.0°S-74.1°E) located on the northern rim of the Hellas basin displays anomalous inner morphology, including a flat floor and light-toned layered deposits. An analysis of these deposits was performed using multiple datasets from Mars Global Surveyor, Mars Odyssey, Mars Express and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter missions, with visible images for interpretation, near-infrared data for mineralogical mapping, and topography for geometry. The geometry of layered deposits was consistent with that of sediments that settled mainly in a sub-aqueous environment, during the Noachian period as determined by crater counts. To the north, the thickest sediments displayed sequences for fan deltas, as identified by 100 m to 1 km long clinoforms, as defined by horizontal beds passing to foreset beds dipping by 6-10° toward the center of the Terby crater. The identification of distinct sub-aqueous fan sequences, separated by unconformities and local wedges, showed the accumulation of sediments from prograding/onlapping depositional sequences, due to lake level and sediment supply variations. The mineralogy of several layers with hydrated minerals, including Fe/Mg phyllosilicates, supports this type of sedimentary environment. The volume of fan sediments was estimated as >5000 km 3 (a large amount considering classical martian fan deltas such as Eberswalde (6 km 3)) and requires sustained liquid water activity. Such a large sedimentary deposition in Terby crater is characteristic of the Noachian/Phyllosian period during which the environment favored the formation of phyllosilicates. The latter were detected by spectral data in the layered deposits of Terby crater in three distinct layer sequences. During the Hesperian period, the sediments experienced strong erosion, possibly enhanced by more acidic conditions, forming the current morphology with three mesas and closed depressions. Small fluvial valleys and alluvial fans formed subsequently

  11. Geosynchronous platform definition study. Volume 4, Part 1: Traffic analysis and system requirements for the baseline traffic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    The traffic analyses and system requirements data generated in the study resulted in the development of two traffic models; the baseline traffic model and the new traffic model. The baseline traffic model provides traceability between the numbers and types of geosynchronous missions considered in the study and the entire spectrum of missions foreseen in the total national space program. The information presented pertaining to the baseline traffic model includes: (1) definition of the baseline traffic model, including identification of specific geosynchronous missions and their payload delivery schedules through 1990; (2) Satellite location criteria, including the resulting distribution of the satellite population; (3) Geosynchronous orbit saturation analyses, including the effects of satellite physical proximity and potential electromagnetic interference; and (4) Platform system requirements analyses, including satellite and mission equipment descriptions, the options and limitations in grouping satellites, and on-orbit servicing criteria (both remotely controlled and man-attended).

  12. Clay mineralogy, organic carbon burial, and redox evolution in Proterozoic oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosca, Nicholas J.; Johnston, David T.; Mushegian, Alexandra; Rothman, Daniel H.; Summons, Roger E.; Knoll, Andrew H.

    2010-03-01

    Clay minerals formed through chemical weathering have long been implicated in the burial of organic matter (OM), but because diagenesis and metamorphism commonly obscure the signature of weathering-derived clays in Precambrian rocks, clay mineralogy and its role in OM burial through much of geologic time remains incompletely understood. Here we have analyzed the mineralogy, geochemistry and total organic carbon (TOC) of organic rich shales deposited in late Archean to early Cambrian sedimentary basins. Across all samples we have quantified the contribution of 1 M and 1 Md illite polytypes, clay minerals formed by diagenetic transformation of smectite and/or kaolinite-rich weathering products. This mineralogical signal, together with corrected paleo-weathering indices, indicates that late Archean and Mesoproterozoic samples were moderately to intensely weathered. However, in late Neoproterozoic basins, 2 M1 illite/mica dominates clay mineralogy and paleo-weathering indices sharply decrease, consistent with an influx of chemically immature and relatively unweathered sediment. A late Neoproterozoic switch to micaceous clays is inconsistent with hypotheses for oxygen history that require an increased flux of weathering-derived clays (i.e., smectite or kaolinite) across the Precambrian-Cambrian boundary. Compared to previous studies, our XRD data display the same variation in Schultz Ratio across the late Neoproterozoic, but we show the cause to be micaceous clay and not pedogenic clay; paleo-weathering signals cannot be recovered from bulk mineralogy without this distinction. We find little evidence to support a link between these mineralogical variations and organic carbon in our samples and conclude that modal clay mineralogy cannot by itself explain an Ediacaran increase in atmospheric oxygen driven by enhanced OM burial.

  13. Mineralogical composition of the meteorite El Pozo (Mexico): a Raman, infrared and XRD study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrooumov, Mikhail; Hernández-Bernal, Maria del Sol

    2011-12-01

    The Raman (RMP), infrared (IR) and XRD analysis have been applied to the examination of mineralogical composition of El Pozo meteorite (an ordinary chondrite L5 type; village Valle of Allende, founded in State of Chihuahua, Mexico: 26°56'N and 105°24'W, 1998). RMP measurements in the range of 100-3500 cm(-1) revealed principal characteristic bands of the major minerals: olivine, two polymorph modifications of pyroxene (OPx and CPx) and plagioclase. Some bands of the minor minerals (hematite and goethite) were also identified. All these minerals were clearly distinguished using IR and XRD techniques. XRD technique has shown the presence of some metallic phases such as kamacite and taenite as well as troilite and chromite. These minerals do not have characteristic Raman spectra because Fe-Ni metals have no active modes for Raman spectroscopy and troilite is a weak Raman scatterer. Raman mapping microspectroscopy was a key part in the investigation of El Pozo meteorite's spatial distribution of the main minerals because these samples are structurally and chemically complex and heterogeneous. The mineral mapping by Raman spectroscopy has provided information for a certain spatial region on which a spatial distribution coexists of the three typical mineral assemblages: olivine; olivine+orthopyroxene; and orthopyroxene.

  14. MINERALOGY OF PRESOLAR SILICATE AND OXIDE GRAINS OF DIVERSE STELLAR ORIGINS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ann N.; Keller, Lindsay P.; Messenger, Scott, E-mail: lan-anh.n.nguyen@nasa.gov [Robert M. Walker Laboratory for Space Science, EISD Directorate, Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science, NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX 77058 (United States)

    2016-02-10

    We report the chemical and structural analysis of nine presolar silicate grains and one presolar oxide grain from the ungrouped chondrite Acfer 094 and the CR chondrite Queen Alexandra Range 99177. Oxygen isotopic analyses indicate that five of these grains condensed in the outflows of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, four have supernova (SN) origins, and one grain likely has a nova origin. Transmission electron microscopy studies show that most of the grains are amorphous with widely varying non-stoichiometric chemical compositions. Three crystalline AGB grains were identified: a clinoenstatite-containing grain assemblage, a Fe-rich olivine grain, and a nanocrystalline enstatite grain encased in an amorphous silicate shell. An amorphous stoichiometric enstatite (MgSiO{sub 3}) SN grain likely condensed as a crystal and was later rendered amorphous. We do not observe a systematic difference in the chemistries and mineralogies of presolar silicates from different stellar sources, suggesting that the grains formed under a similar range of conditions.

  15. Organo-mineral Interactions in Ultisols and Andosols with Contrasting Mineralogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    Organo-mineral associations play an important role in long-term stabilization of soil organic matter. To understand the role of soil minerals and major cations in organo-mineral interactions, we applied STXM-NEXAFS spectroscopy at C, N, Al and Si K-edges, as well as Ca and Fe L-edges, to conduct submicron-level investigations of the associations of C and C forms with Ca, Fe, Al and Si in soil clay fraction of Ultisols and Andosols with contrasting mineralogy. Ultisols were under agricultural use receiving input of limestone and mushroom compost, whereas Andosols were under natural vegetation. The poorly crystalline minerals such as allophane and ferrihydrite were rich in Andosols, while Ultisols were dominated by vermiculite, illite and kaolinite. STXM analysis showed a high spatial correlation between C and Ca in the Utisols. The major Ca forms in agricultural Ultisols were organic Ca. A variety of C forms such as phenols, heterocyclic compounds, carboxylamides were found in Ca-rich "hot spots" in Ultisols. In contrast a relatively uniform distribution of C and C forms on mineral surfaces was observed in Andosols, revolutionizing our view of heterogeneous distribution of OM in natural soil. The C forms associated with minerals were aromatic and carboxyl C. These results demonstrates the importance of Ca containing organic compounds in soil C sequestration in agricultural Ultisols, and highlights the important role of the poorly-crystalline soil minerals in soil organic matter sequestration in Andosols.

  16. Compositional diversity and geologic insights of the Aristarchus crater from Moon Mineralogy Mapper data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustard, J.F.; Pieters, C.M.; Isaacson, P.J.; Head, J.W.; Besse, S.; Clark, R.N.; Klima, R.L.; Petro, N.E.; Staid, M.I.; Sunshine, J.M.; Runyon, C.J.; Tompkins, S.

    2011-01-01

    The Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) acquired high spatial and spectral resolution data of the Aristarchus Plateau with 140 m/pixel in 85 spectral bands from 0.43 to 3.0 m. The data were collected as radiance and converted to reflectance using the observational constraints and a solar spectrum scaled to the Moon-Sun distance. Summary spectral parameters for the area of mafic silicate 1 and 2 m bands were calculated from the M3 data and used to map the distribution of key units that were then analyzed in detail with the spectral data. This analysis focuses on five key compositional units in the region. (1) The central peaks are shown to be strongly enriched in feldspar and are likely from the upper plagioclase-rich crust of the Moon. (2) The impact melt is compositionally diverse with clear signatures of feldspathic crust, olivine, and glass. (3) The crater walls and ejecta show a high degree of spatial heterogeneity and evidence for massive breccia blocks. (4) Olivine, strongly concentrated on the rim, wall, and exterior of the southeastern quadrant of the crater, is commonly associated the impact melt. (5) There are at least two types of glass deposits observed: pyroclastic glass and impact glass. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. Mineralogy, size, morphology and porosity of aggregates and their relationship with soil susceptibility to water erosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueiredo, M. do A, E-mail: mucfig@hotmail.com; Augustin, C.H.R.R. [Instituto de Geociencias, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Departamento de Geografia (Brazil)], E-mail: mucfig@hotmail.com; Fabris, J.D. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Departamento de Quimica, Instituto de Ciencias Exatas (Brazil)], E-mail: fabris@dedalus.lcc.ufmg.br

    1999-11-15

    Soil erosion has been considered as the main process related to losses of soil mass and decrease of productivity in cultivated lands as well as on e of the most important processes in landscape evolution. Attention has been paid to many pedological variables affecting intensity of erosion, but little to the influence of iron compounds on the type, size, shape and porosity of soil aggregates. In the present study, three lithopedodomains which were assumed to be closely related to the dominant lithology of the soil parent material, varying in the degree of water erosion intensity, were selected for further analysis which focused mainly on the influence of iron oxide mineralogy on the soil aggregation. Powder X-ray diffractometry, 80 K Moessbauer data and SEM images are used to correlate all these variables with observed erosion activity in the field. The present data indicate that the more the soil is rich in iron (hematite and/or goethite) or aluminium (gibbsite) (hydr)oxide, the smaller are its aggregates and is porous. Soils derived from metabasic rocks are much more susceptible to collapse under wetting than those from other lithologies. They have the highest iron and clay content. Schist-derived soil is richer in muscovite, has bigger aggregates and porous and are less prone to collapse, while the granite-derived soil presents relatively intermediate resistance, when humid.

  18. CHEMICAL AND MINERALOGICAL PROPERTIES OF ULTISOLS OF SASAMBA AREA, EAST KALIMANTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.H. Prasetyo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Ultisols are a major group of marginal soils extensively found in the upland area of Indonesia. To better understand the potential of the Ultisols developed from claystone and sandstone in the Sasamba Integrated Economical Development Area in East Kalimantan, chemical and mineralogical characteristics of 27 Ultisols pedons consisting of 76 topsoil and 118 subsoil samples were investigated. Besides analysis and interpretation of data, relationships of several soil characteristics were constructed using simple regression. The results indicated that Ultisols showed acid to very acid reaction, had low content of organic matter and low base saturation. Soils generally exhibited net negative charge, and the point of zero charge was reached at pH 3.6. Both potential and available phosphates were low, and there was a trend that amorphous aluminum was responsible for phosphate fixation. The low content of exchangeable potassium in topsoil and subsoil indicated a positive correlation with potential potassium. Clay mineral was composed chiefly of kaolinite, with small amounts of illite, vermiculite, and quartz. The domination of kaolinite and low organic matter content causes the soils to have low cation exchange capacity. Soil management in this area should be focused on building up and maintaining soil fertility, and applying appropriate soil conservation techniques to minimize erosion. To obtain sustained productivity, various soil amendments including the use of farm and/or green manure, liming with agricultural lime, and application of rock phosphate and K fertilizers were highly recommended.

  19. Geochemistry and Mineralogy of Tuff in Zhongliangshan Mine, Chongqing, Southwestern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Zou

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Coal-bearing strata that host rare metal deposits are currently a hot issue in the field of coal geology. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the mineralogy, geochemistry, and potential economic significance of rare metals in the late Permian tuff in Zhongliangshan mine, Chongqing, southwestern China. The methods applied in this study are X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF, inductively coupled mass spectrometry (ICP-MS, X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD plus Siroquant, and scanning electron microscopy in conjunction with an energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX. The results indicate that some trace elements including Li, Be, Sc, V, Cr, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Zr, Nb, Cd, Sb, REE, Hf, Ta, Re, Th, and U are enriched in the tuff from Zhongliangshan mine. The minerals in the tuff mainly include kaolinite, illite, pyrite, anatase, calcite, gypsum, quartz, and traces of minerals such as zircon, florencite, jarosite, and barite. The tuff is of mafic volcanic origin with features of alkali basalt. Some minerals including florencite, gypsum, barite and a portion of anatase and zircon have been derived from hydrothermal solutions. It is suggested that Zhongliangshan tuff is a potential polymetallic ore and the recovery of these valuable elements needs to be further investigated.

  20. Mineralogy of SNC Meteorite EET79001 by Simultaneous Fitting of Moessbauer Backscatter Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Richard V.; Agresti, D. G.

    2010-01-01

    We have acquired M ssbauer spectra for SNC meteorite EET79001 with a MIMOS II backscatter M ssbauer spectrometer [1] similar to those now operating on Mars as part of the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) missions. We are working to compare the Fe mineralogical composition of martian meteorites with in-situ measurements on Mars. Our samples were hand picked from the >1 mm size fraction of saw fines on the basis of lithology, color, and grain size (Table 1). The chips were individually analyzed at approx.300K by placing them on a piece of plastic that was in turn supported by the contact ring of the instrument (oriented vertically). Tungsten foil was used to mask certain areas from analysis. As shown in Figure 1, a variety of spectra was obtained, each resulting from different relative contributions of the Fe-bearing minerals present in the sample. Because the nine samples are reasonably mixtures of the same Fe-bearing phases in variable proportions, the nine spectra were fit simultaneously (simfit) with a common model, adjusting parameters to a single minimum chi-squared convergence criterion [2]. The starting point for the fitting model and values of hyperfine parameters was the work of Solberg and Burns [3], who identified olivine, pyroxene, and ferrous glass as major, and ilmenite and a ferric phase as minor (<5%), Fe-bearing phases in EET79001.

  1. Analysis on the Differences in Disadvantageous Students' Self-Definition of Poverty%贫困生自我贫困定义差异性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈绪清; 杨秀芹

    2012-01-01

    The self-identification of students from disadvantageous families is an important factor for consideration in the management of the poverty subsidy affairs,and their self-definition is an extension of self-identification.In fact,because of individual differences,their self-definition displays the differences of process stages and the differences of behavioral attitudes,which are important factors in poverty problem solving.Analysis on these differences can help to further improve their self-identify and to seek countermeasures to solve the problem.%贫困生自我贫困定义是贫困生资助工作的重要组成部分,是贫困生自我认定的延伸。事实上,贫困生自我贫困定义呈现出过程阶段差异和行为态度的差异性,是影响贫困生问题解决的重要因素。分析贫困生自我贫困定义差异性有助于进一步完善贫困生自我认定,对寻求解决贫困生问题对策具有一定的指导意义。

  2. Mineralogy of Soils from Different Agroecological Regions of Bangladesh : Region 18–Young Meghna Estuarine Floodplain

    OpenAIRE

    Akter, Fouzia; Moslehuddin, Abu Zofar Md; Kader, Mohammed Abdul; Sarker, Md. Mosharaf Hossain; Mori, Yuki

    2015-01-01

    Bangladesh is consisting of 30 Agroecological Regions (AEZs) and the applied agricultural research has been conducted based on this. In context of the lack of enough information on mineralogy based on AEZs, an attempt has been taken to study the mineralogy of important soils from all AEZs of Bangladesh in order to provide basic information for applied research. As part of this attempt, the mineralogy of twenty four soils from three representative soil series (Ramgati, Hatiya and Silonia) of A...

  3. Effects of soil composition and mineralogy on the bioaccessibility of arsenic from tailings and soil in gold mine districts of Nova Scotia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, Louise; Walker, Stephen R; Wragg, Joanna; Parsons, Michael B; Koch, Iris; Jamieson, Heather E; Reimer, Kenneth J

    2010-04-01

    Bioaccessibility tests and mineralogical analyses were performed on arsenic-contaminated tailings and soils from gold mine districts of Nova Scotia, Canada, to examine the links between soil composition, mineralogy, and arsenic bioaccessibility. Arsenic bioaccessibility ranges from 0.1% to 49%. A weak correlation was observed between total and bioaccessible arsenic concentrations, and the arsenic bioaccessibility was not correlated with other elements. Bulk X-ray absorption near-edge structure analysis shows arsenic in these near-surface samples is mainly in the pentavalent form, indicating that most of the arsenopyrite (As(1-)) originally present in the tailings and soils has been oxidized during weathering reactions. Detailed mineralogical analyses of individual samples have identified up to seven arsenic species, the relative proportions of which appear to affect arsenic bioaccessibility. The highest arsenic bioaccessibility (up to 49%) is associated with the presence of calcium-iron arsenate. Samples containing arsenic predominantly as arsenopyrite or scorodite have the lowest bioaccessibility (iron arsenates and arsenic-bearing iron(oxy)hydroxides) are associated with intermediate bioaccessibility (1 to 10%). The presence of a more soluble arsenic phase, even at low concentrations, results in increased arsenic bioaccessibility from the mixed arsenic phases associated with tailings and mine-impacted soils.

  4. Compositional diversity of near-, far-side transitory zone around Naonobu, Webb and Sinus Successus craters: Inferences from Chandrayaan-1 Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) data

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rishikesh Bharti; D Ramakrishnan; K D Singh

    2014-02-01

    This study investigated the potential of Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) data for studying compositional variation in the near-, far-side transition zone of the lunar surface. For this purpose, the radiance values of the M3 data were corrected for illumination and emission related effects and converted to apparent reflectance. Dimensionality of the calibrated reflectance image cube was reduced using Independent Component Analysis (ICA) and endmembers were extracted by using Pixel Purity Index (PPI) algorithm. The selected endmembers were linearly unmixed and resolved for mineralogy using United States Geological Survey (USGS) library spectra of minerals. These mineralogically resolved endmembers were used to map the compositional variability within, and outside craters using Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM) algorithm. Cross validation for certain litho types was attempted using band ratios like Optical Maturity (OMAT), Color Ratio Composite and Integrated Band Depth ratio (IBD). The identified lithologies for highland and basin areas match well with published works and strongly support depth related magmatic differentiation. Prevalence of pigeonite-basalt, pigeonite-norite and pyroxenite in crater peaks and floors are unique to the investigated area and are attributed to local, lateral compositional variability in magma composition due to pressure, temperature, and rate of cooling.

  5. User Guide to RockJock - A Program for Determining Quantitative Mineralogy from X-Ray Diffraction Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberl, D.D.

    2003-01-01

    RockJock is a computer program that determines quantitative mineralogy in powdered samples by comparing the integrated X-ray diffraction (XRD) intensities of individual minerals in complex mixtures to the intensities of an internal standard. Analysis without an internal standard (standardless analysis) also is an option. This manual discusses how to prepare and X-ray samples and mineral standards for these types of analyses and describes the operation of the program. Carefully weighed samples containing an internal standard (zincite) are ground in a McCrone mill. Randomly oriented preparations then are X-rayed, and the X-ray data are entered into the RockJock program. Minerals likely to be present in the sample are chosen from a list of standards, and the calculation is begun. The program then automatically fits the sum of stored XRD patterns of pure standard minerals (the calculated pattern) to the measured pattern by varying the fraction of each mineral standard pattern, using the Solver function in Microsoft Excel to minimize a degree of fit parameter between the calculated and measured pattern. The calculation analyzes the pattern (usually 20 to 65 degrees two-theta) to find integrated intensities for the minerals. Integrated intensities for each mineral then are determined from the proportion of each mineral standard pattern required to give the best fit. These integrated intensities then are compared to the integrated intensity of the internal standard, and the weight percentages of the minerals are calculated. The results are presented as a list of minerals with their corresponding weight percent. To some extent, the quality of the analysis can be checked because each mineral is analyzed independently, and, therefore, the sum of the analysis should approach 100 percent. Also, the method has been shown to give good results with artificial mixtures. The program is easy to use, but does require an understanding of mineralogy, of X-ray diffraction practice, and

  6. 国外生计渔业概念辨析%Analysis on Definition of Subsistence Fishery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐议; 陈园园

    2012-01-01

    Subsistence fishery is a basic type of fisheries in foreign fisheries management. In recent years, subsistence fisheries management issues have also been discussed in China. To better understand the concept, this paper analyzed the definition of subsistence fisheries in some countries and organizations, such as US, FAO and OECD. Followings are conclusions: (1) Subsistence fishery is defined differently in different countries or international organizations, but long-standing cultural practices or traditions are the most important basis for the definition of subsistence fishery; (2) In subsistence fishery of many countries, catch are mainly geared towards primarily personal or household consumption, which significantly distinguish subsistence fishery from commercial fishery. But the definitions of the personal or household consumption are different. And a complex, sophisticated and comprehensive monitor system for the disposal of catch is in need; (3) Subsistence fishery can be described by several different dimensions. Considering the applicability of management, it is very difficult to rigidly distinct subsistence fishery from commercial fishery only by one of them. So the subsistence fishery should be defined by consideration of a combination of many factors.%生计渔业是国外渔业分类的一种基本类型,近些年我国渔业管理研究领域也在探讨生计渔业管理问题。为厘清生计渔业的概念,本文对美国等国家以及FAO等国际组织有关生计渔业的概念界定进行了辨析,得到以下基本结论:(1)生计渔业在不同国家的界定不同,但传统作业习惯是各国界定生计渔业的共同基础;(2)渔获物主要用于个人或家庭消费是将生计渔业区别于商业渔业的主要内涵依据,但如何确定个人或家庭消费的范围存在差异性,且在管理上需要复杂、缜密和庞大的监测系统;(3)有诸多内涵性指标和外部表征可以

  7. Gaps Analysis of Integrating Product Design, Manufacturing, and Quality Data in The Supply Chain Using Model-Based Definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trainer, Asa; Hedberg, Thomas; Feeney, Allison Barnard; Fischer, Kevin; Rosche, Phil

    2016-01-01

    Advances in information technology triggered a digital revolution that holds promise of reduced costs, improved productivity, and higher quality. To ride this wave of innovation, manufacturing enterprises are changing how product definitions are communicated - from paper to models. To achieve industry's vision of the Model-Based Enterprise (MBE), the MBE strategy must include model-based data interoperability from design to manufacturing and quality in the supply chain. The Model-Based Definition (MBD) is created by the original equipment manufacturer (OEM) using Computer-Aided Design (CAD) tools. This information is then shared with the supplier so that they can manufacture and inspect the physical parts. Today, suppliers predominantly use Computer-Aided Manufacturing (CAM) and Coordinate Measuring Machine (CMM) models for these tasks. Traditionally, the OEM has provided design data to the supplier in the form of two-dimensional (2D) drawings, but may also include a three-dimensional (3D)-shape-geometry model, often in a standards-based format such as ISO 10303-203:2011 (STEP AP203). The supplier then creates the respective CAM and CMM models and machine programs to produce and inspect the parts. In the MBE vision for model-based data exchange, the CAD model must include product-and-manufacturing information (PMI) in addition to the shape geometry. Today's CAD tools can generate models with embedded PMI. And, with the emergence of STEP AP242, a standards-based model with embedded PMI can now be shared downstream. The on-going research detailed in this paper seeks to investigate three concepts. First, that the ability to utilize a STEP AP242 model with embedded PMI for CAD-to-CAM and CAD-to-CMM data exchange is possible and valuable to the overall goal of a more efficient process. Second, the research identifies gaps in tools, standards, and processes that inhibit industry's ability to cost-effectively achieve model-based-data interoperability in the pursuit of the

  8. Combined Raman/Infrared Reflectance Instrument for In Situ Mineral Analysis Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA's Science Instruments, Observatories, and Sensor Systems Roadmap calls for instruments capable of in situ mineralogical analysis in support of planetary...

  9. Geochemical and mineralogical characterization of a neutral, low-sulfide/high-carbonate tailings impoundment, Markušovce, eastern Slovakia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiller, Edgar; Petrák, Marián; Tóth, Roman; Lalinská-Voleková, Bronislava; Jurkovič, L'ubomír; Kučerová, Gabriela; Radková, Anežka; Sottník, Peter; Vozár, Jaroslav

    2013-11-01

    Tailings deposits generated from mining activities represent a potential risk for the aquatic environment through the release of potentially toxic metals and metalloids occurring in a variety of minerals present in the tailings. Physicochemical and mineralogical characteristics of tailings such as total concentrations of chemical elements, pH, ratio of acid-producing to acid-neutralizing minerals, and primary and secondary mineral phases are very important factors that control the actual release of potentially toxic metals and metalloids from the tailings to the environment. The aims of this study are the determination of geochemical and mineralogical characteristics of tailings deposited in voluminous impoundment situated near the village of Markušovce (eastern Slovakia) and identification of the processes controlling the mobility of selected toxic metals (Cu, Hg) and metalloids (As, Sb). The studied tailings have unique features in comparison with the other tailings investigated previously because of the specific mineral assemblage primarily consisting of barite, siderite, quartz, and minor sulfides. To meet the aims, samples of the tailings were collected from 3 boreholes and 15 excavated pits and subjected to bulk geochemical analyses (i.e., determination of chemical composition, pH, Eh, acid generation, and neutralization potentials) combined with detailed mineralogical characterization using optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron microprobe analysis (EMPA), and micro-X-ray diffraction (μ-XRD). Additionally, the geochemical and mineralogical factors controlling the transfer of potentially toxic elements from tailings to waters were also determined using short-term batch test (European norm EN 12457), sampling of drainage waters and speciation-equilibrium calculations performed with PHREEQC. The tailings mineral assemblage consists of siderite, barite, quartz, and dolomite. Sulfide minerals constitute only a minor proportion of the tailings

  10. Mineralogy and Petrology of Comet Wild 2 Nucleus Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zolensky, M E; Zega, T J; Yano, H; Wirick, S; Westphal, A J; Weisberg, M K; Weber, I; Warren, J L; Velbel, M A; Tsuchiyama, A; Tsou, P; Toppani, A; Tomioka, N; Tomeoka, K; Teslich, N; Taheri, M; Susini, J; Stroud, R; Stephan, T; Stadermann, F J; Snead, C J; Simon, S B; Siminovici, A; See, T H; Robert, F; Rietmeijer, F M; Rao, W; Perronnet, M C; Papanastassiou, D A; Okudaira, K; Ohsumi, K; Ohnishi, I; Nakanura-Messenger, K; Nakamura, T; Mostefaoui, S; Mikouchi, T; Meibom, A; Matrajt, G; Marcus, M A; Leroux, H; Lemelle, L; Le, L; Lanzirotti, A; Langenhorst, F; Krot, A N; Keller, L P; Kearsley, A T; Joswiak, D; Jacob, D; Ishii, H; Harvey, R; Hagiya, K; Grossman, L; Graham, G A; Gounelle, M; Gillet, P; Genge, M J; Flynn, G; Ferrior, T; Fallon, S; Ebel, D S; Dai, Z R; Cordier, P; Chi, M; Butterworth, A L; Brownlee, D E; Bridges, J C; Brennan, S; Brearley, A; Bradley, J P; Bleuet, P; Bland, P A; Bastien, R

    2006-10-11

    The bulk of the Wild 2 samples appear to be weakly-constructed mixtures of nanometerscale grains with occasional much larger (>1{micro}m) ferromagnesian silicates, Fe-Ni sulfides, Fe-Ni metal and accessory phases. The very wide range of olivine and low-Ca pyroxene compositions in Wild 2 require a wide range of formation conditions, probably reflecting different formation locations in the protoplanetary disk. The restricted compositional ranges of Fe-Ni sulfides, the wide range for silicates, and absence of hydrous phases indicate that Wild 2 experienced little or no aqueous alteration. Less abundant Wild 2 materials include a refractory particle, whose presence appears to require large-scale radial transport in the early protoplanetary disk. The nature of cometary solids is of fundamental importance to our understanding of the early solar nebula and protoplanetary history. Until now we have had to study comets from afar using spectroscopy, or settle for analyses of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) of uncertain provenance. We report here mineralogical and petrographic analyses of particles derived directly from Comet Wild 2. All of the Wild 2 particles we have thus far examined have been modified in various ways by the capture process. All particles that may have been loose aggregates, ''traveling sand piles'', disaggregated into individual components with the larger, denser components penetrating more deeply into the aerogel. Individual grains experienced a wide range of heating effects that range from excellent preservation to melting (Fig. 1); such behavior was expected (1, 2 ,3). What is remarkable is the extreme variability of these modifications and the fact that severely modified and unmodified materials can be found within a micrometer of each other, requiring tremendous local temperature gradients. Fortunately, we have an internal gauge of impact collection heating. Fe-Ni sulfides are ubiquitous in the Wild 2 samples, are very

  11. Mineralogy of two Cryosoils fromWestern Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abakumov, E.; Sapega, V.

    2009-04-01

    Investigations of Antarctic Cryosoils are very urgent now in context of finishing of International Polar Year, assessment of soil resources on the Sixth Continent and prognosis of soil evolution and stability in changing climate. Two soils were investigated on two climatic regions of Western Antarcica. The first was in continental climate (station "Russkaya" 74.45 S., 136.48 W.) and the second in the sea-shore ecoclimatic region (station "Leningradskaya", 69.30 S., 159.23 E.). In first case soils were described as thin (max 3 cm) coarse gravel low humus content layer, presented by sporadical spots of Cryosoils on the debrises of gneises iwth permafrost on the depth about 30 cm. The second soil was located in three polypedons situated in micro depressions on the gneises and basalts rocks with permafros depth about 35 cm. Soils was identified as Cryosoils on gneises, the solum thickness is more than 10 cm. On the base of soil mineralogical study the following peculiarities of Antarctic soils were revealed: - initial parent materials consists of quarts, spates, byotyte, granate and augite, - the ratio of coarse to thin fraction (on the diameter 1 mm) was 90:1 and 80:2 in Russkaya nad Leningradskaya stations correspondingly, which shows that the weathering process is more expressed in sea-shore ecoclimatic region. - "iron films" formation on the surface of stones, this process mostly expressed on the northern exposed slopes, which have a good insolation. Iron films presented by hetite and pyrolisite and mostly expessed in Russkaya station with extra-arid climate, - clay minerals was presented by: smectite (K-Na and Ca-Mg types), illite, chlorite and kaolinite, with some portion of mixedlayer fraction These data shows that the weathering process in very intensive and simultaneously going with new clay and amorphous minerals formation, in both cases of continental and sea-shore climatic environments. That is why it is possible to conclude that main soil formation process

  12. Mineralogy of the Santa Fe Tin deposit, Bolivia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Franco, Abigail; Alfonso, Pura; Canet, Carles; Garcia-Valles, Maite; Elvys Trujillo, Juan

    2014-05-01

    Santa Fe is a Sn-Zn-Pb-Ag ore deposit located in the Oruro district, Central Andean Tin Belt, Bolivia. Mineralization occurs in veins and disseminations. It is hosted in Silurian shales and greywackes. The sedimentary sequence is folded and unconformably covered by a volcanic complex of the Morococala Formation, mainly constituted by tuffs of Miocene age. A wide Nº40 shear zone and two systems of fracture are developed. A Nº40 fracture system, dipping 60ºW, which hosts Sn and Zn minerals, and other in the same direction but dipping 75ºE, which is related to Zn-Pb-Ag veins. The mineralization is associated to intrusive felsic magmatism. Although there are not intrusive rocks in Santa Fe, a dyke and the felsic San Pablo stock occur at a distance of about 10 km. In the present work we describe the geology and mineralogy of the Santa Fe deposit. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and electron microprobe analyses were used to characterize the minerals. Veins are filled with quartz and an ore mineral assemblage of cassiterite, sulfides and sulfosalts. Cassiterite constitutes the earliest formed mineralization. Preliminar microprobe analyses indicate that it is nearly pure, with negligible contents in Nb and Ta. Rutile occurs as a late phase associated with a late generation of cassiterite. It forms thin neddle-like crystals. In addition, Sn is also present in sulfides as stannite, stannoidite and kësterite. Other sulfides are pyrrhotite, pyrite, arsenopyrite, galena, sphalerite, marchasite and argentite. Bismuthinite and berndite are found nin trace amounts. Sulfosalts include tetrahedrite, myarhyrite, boulangerite, jamesonite, franckeite, zinckenite, cilindrite and andorite. Associated with the mineralization, several phosphate minerals are found filling cavities and small fractures. The most abundant are monacite (Ce,La,Nd,Th)PO4 and plumbogummite (PbAl3(PO4)2(OH)5•(H2O)). Crandallite CaAl3(PO4)2(OH)5•(H2O) and vivianite (Fe3+(PO4)2•8(H2O)) also

  13. Mapping soil magnetic susceptibility and mineralogy in Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menshov, Oleksandr; Pereira, Paulo; Kruglov, Oleksandr; Sukhorada, Anatoliy

    2017-04-01

    Soil suatainable planning is fundamental for agricultural areas. Soil mapping and modeling are increasingly used in agricultural areas in the entire world (Brevik et al., 2016). They are beneficial to land managers, to reduce soil degradation, increase soil productivity and their restoration. Magnetic susceptibility (MS) methods are low cost and accurate for the developing maps of agricultural areas.. The objective of this work is to identify the minerals responsible for MS increase in soils from the two study areas in Poltava and Kharkiv region. The thermomagnetic analyses were conducted using the KLY-4 with an oven apparatus. The hysteresis parameters were measured with the Rotating Magnetometer at the Geophysical Centre Dourbes, Belgium. The results showed that all of samples from Kharkiv area and the majortity of the samples collected in Poltava area represent the pseudo single domain (PSD) zone particles in Day plot. According to Hanesch et al. (2006), the transformation of goethite, ferrihydrite or hematite to a stronger ferrimagnetic phase like magnetite or maghemite is common in strongly magnetic soils with high values of organic carbon content. In our case of thermomagnetic study, the first peak on the heating curve near 260 ˚C indicates the presence of ferrihydrite which gradually transforms into maghemite (Jordanova et al., 2013). A further decrease in the MS identified on the heating curve may be related to the transformation of the maghemite to hematite. A second MS peak on the heating curve near 530 ˚C and the ultimate loss of magnetic susceptibility near 580 ˚C were caused by the reduction of hematite to magnetite. The shape of the thermomagnetic curves suggests the presence of single domain (SD) particles at room temperature and their transformation to a superparamagnetic (SP) state under heating. Magnetic mineralogical analyses suggest the presence of highly magnetic minerals like magnetite and maghemite as well as slightly magnetic goethite

  14. Mineralogic Zonation Within the Tuff Confining Unit, Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lance Prothro

    2005-09-01

    Recently acquired mineralogic data from drill hole samples in Yucca Flat show that the tuff confining unit (TCU) can be subdivided into three mineralogic zones based on the relative abundances of primary and secondary mineral assemblages. These zones are (1) an upper zone characterized by the abundance of the zeolite mineral clinoptilolite with lesser amounts of felsic and clay minerals; (2) a middle zone with felsic minerals dominant over clinoptilolite and clay minerals; and (3) a basal argillic zone where clay minerals are dominant over felsic minerals and clinoptilolite. Interpretation of the mineralogic data, along with lithologic, stratigraphic, and geophysical data from approximately 500 drill holes, reveals a three-layer mineralogic model for the TCU that shows all three zones are extensive beneath Yucca Flat. The mineralogic model will be used to subdivide the TCU in the Yucca Flat hydrostratigraphic framework model, resulting in a more accurate and versatile framework model. In addition, the identification of the type, quantity, and distribution of minerals within each TCU layer will permit modelers to better predict the spatial distribution and extent of contaminant transport from underground tests in Yucca Flat, at both the level of the hydrologic source term and the corrective action unit.

  15. Geochemical and mineralogical maps for soils of the conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David B.; Cannon, William F.; Woodruff, Laurel G.; Solano, Federico; Ellefsen, Karl J.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey began sampling in 2007 for a low-density (1 site per 1,600 square kilometers, 4,857 sites) geochemical and mineralogical survey of soils in the conterminous United States as part of the North American Soil Geochemical Landscapes Project. The sampling protocol for the national-scale survey included, at each site, a sample from a depth of 0 to 5 centimeters, a composite of the soil A horizon, and a deeper sample from the soil C horizon or, if the top of the C horizon was at a depth greater than 1 meter, a sample from a depth of approximately 80–100 centimeters. The elements by methods that yield the total or near-total elemental content. The major mineralogical components in the samples from the soil A and C horizons were determined by a quantitative X-ray diffraction method using Rietveld refinement. Sampling in the conterminous United States was completed in 2010, with chemical and mineralogical analyses completed in May 2013. The resulting data set provides an estimate of the abundance and spatial distribution of chemical elements and minerals in soils of the conterminous United States and represents a baseline for soil geochemistry and mineralogy against which future changes may be recognized and quantified. This report releases geochemical and mineralogical maps along with a histogram, boxplot, and empirical cumulative distribution function plot for each element or mineral.

  16. Baseband Transceiver Design of a High Definition Radio FM System Using Joint Theoretical Analysis and FPGA Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Sheng Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Advances in wireless communications have enabled various technologies for wireless digital communication. In the field of digital radio broadcasting, several specifications have been proposed, such as Eureka-147 and digital radio mondiale (DRM. These systems require a new spectrum assignment, which incurs heavy cost due to the depletion of the available spectrum. Therefore, the in-band on-channel (IBOC system has been developed to work in the same band with the conventional analog radio and to provide digital broadcasting services. This paper discusses the function and algorithm of the high definition (HD radio frequency modulation (FM digital radio broadcasting system. Content includes data format allocation, constellation mapping, orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM modulation of the transmitter, timing synchronization, OFDM demodulation, integer and fraction carrier frequency (integer carrier frequency offset (ICFO and fractional CFO (FCFO estimation, and channel estimation of the receiver. When we implement this system to the field programmable gate array (FPGA based on a hardware platform, both theoretical and practical aspects have been considered to accommodate the available hardware resources.

  17. Mineralogical and Geochemical Investigations in the Perm State University (1916 – 2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. G. Iblaminov

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The history of foundation and development of mineralogical and geochemical sciences on the Mineralogy and Petrography Department of the Perm State University for 100 years is presented. The achievements in the alluvial mineralogy and nanomineralogy are characterised. Relationship of development in the area of geochemical research on early stage with the European scientific school is discussed. The next stage is characterized by transition to investigations of trace elements and usage of the modern analytic base for environmental geochemistry. Petrographic and lithologic investigations have become the base for paleotectonic reconstruction of the Western Urals area. The study of distribution of mineral resources has been conducted on the base of specific minerageodynamic concept. The principles of minerageodinamic investigation of oil and gas basins, and methodology of reservoir study using modern technology were developed. The contribution of individual scientists in development in different scientific areas is illustrated.

  18. Investigationof Clay Mineralogy, Micromorphology and Evolution of Soils in Bajestan Playa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ghasemzadeh Ganjehie

    2017-03-01

    , pediment and clay flat. Considering the diversity of geomorphic units, 11 soil profiles were described and diffrenet soil layers and horizons were sampled. Undisturbed soil samples were taken micromorphological studies. Some horizons were selected for clay mineralogy analysis. The mineralogy of clay fraction was determined using X-ray diffraction method. Results and discution: All studied soils except the profiles in the pediment were classified in the Aridisols order. There were two geomorphic surfaces in alluvial fans. In the first geomorphic surface a soil with the Bk horizon buried a soil with red Btk horizon. In the second geomorphic surface, it seems that the erosion has been removed the overlying soil. The Bk horizon showed the maximum soil development in the clay flat and intermediate alluvial fan-clay flat landforms. Clay coating on sand in thin section was the evidence of clay illuviation in Btk horizon. Carbonate nodules associated with clay coating are the compound pedofeature in Btk horizon. These evidences reflect polygenetic nature of the soils and different period of climate change and soil formation. Smectite, mica, chlorite and palygorskite are the clay minerals in the studied soils. Similar to soils in arid regions of Iran, palygorskite was found in Bk, Bt and Bz horizons. The existence of Bk horizon in overlying soils, buried Btk horizon, removal of surface horizon in alluvial fan are the evidences of regressive and progressive of pedogenic processes in the study area. Btk horizon represents a warm and wetter and Bk horizon indicates a relatively wetter period in comparison to present time. Conclusion: Btk was the most developed horizon in the study area that occurred as buried paleosol in alluvial fan. Bk, Bw, By and Bz were the common horizon in other landforms. Clay coating and red color of Btk horizon might seem as indicators of hot and humid conditions in the past, during the argillic horizon formation. Covered carbonate nodules with clay coating

  19. Gefitinib in definitive management of esophageal or gastroesophageal junction cancer: a retrospective analysis of two clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohal, D P S; Rice, T W; Rybicki, L A; Rodriguez, C P; Videtic, G M M; Saxton, J P; Murthy, S C; Mason, D P; Phillips, B E; Tubbs, R R; Plesec, T; McNamara, M J; Ives, D I; Bodmann, J W; Adelstein, D J

    2015-01-01

    The role of epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition in resectable esophageal/gastroesophageal junction (E/GEJ) cancer is uncertain. Results from two Cleveland Clinic trials of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) and surgery are updated and retrospectively compared, the second study differing only by the addition of gefitinib (G) to the treatment regimen. Eligibility required a diagnosis of E/GEJ squamous cell or adenocarcinoma, with an endoscopic ultrasound stage of at least T3, N1, or M1a (American Joint Committee on Cancer 6th). Patients in both trials received 5-fluorouracil (1000 mg/m(2) /day) and cisplatin (20 mg/m(2) /day) as continuous infusions over days 1-4 along with 30 Gy radiation at 1.5 Gy bid. Surgery followed in 4-6 weeks; identical CCRT was given 6-10 weeks later. The second trial added G, 250 mg/day, on day 1 for 4 weeks, and again with postoperative CCRT for 2 years. Preliminary results and comparisons have been previously published. Clinical characteristics were similar between the 80 patients on the G trial (2003-2006) and the 93 patients on the no-G trial (1999-2003). Minimum follow-up for all patients was 5 years. Multivariable analyses comparing the G versus no-G patients and adjusting for statistically significant covariates demonstrated improved overall survival (hazard ratio [HR] 0.64, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.45-0.91, P = 0.012), recurrence-free survival (HR 0.61, 95% CI = 0.43-0.86, P = 0.006), and distant recurrence (HR 0.68, 95% CI = 0.45-1.00, P = 0.05), but not locoregional recurrence. Although this retrospective comparison can only be considered exploratory, it suggests that G may improve clinical outcomes when combined with CCRT and surgery in the definitive treatment of E/GEJ cancer.

  20. Requirements analysis notebook for the flight data systems definition in the Real-Time Systems Engineering Laboratory (RSEL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wray, Richard B.

    1991-01-01

    A hybrid requirements analysis methodology was developed, based on the practices actually used in developing a Space Generic Open Avionics Architecture. During the development of this avionics architecture, a method of analysis able to effectively define the requirements for this space avionics architecture was developed. In this methodology, external interfaces and relationships are defined, a static analysis resulting in a static avionics model was developed, operating concepts for simulating the requirements were put together, and a dynamic analysis of the execution needs for the dynamic model operation was planned. The systems engineering approach was used to perform a top down modified structured analysis of a generic space avionics system and to convert actual program results into generic requirements. CASE tools were used to model the analyzed system and automatically generate specifications describing the model's requirements. Lessons learned in the use of CASE tools, the architecture, and the design of the Space Generic Avionics model were established, and a methodology notebook was prepared for NASA. The weaknesses of standard real-time methodologies for practicing systems engineering, such as Structured Analysis and Object Oriented Analysis, were identified.

  1. Geochemical and mineralogical data for soils of the conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David B.; Cannon, William F.; Woodruff, Laurel G.; Solano, Federico; Kilburn, James E.; Fey, David L.

    2013-01-01

    In 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey initiated a low-density (1 site per 1,600 square kilometers, 4,857 sites) geochemical and mineralogical survey of soils of the conterminous United States as part of the North American Soil Geochemical Landscapes Project. Sampling and analytical protocols were developed at a workshop in 2003, and pilot studies were conducted from 2004 to 2007 to test and refine these recommended protocols. The final sampling protocol for the national-scale survey included, at each site, a sample from a depth of 0 to 5 centimeters, a composite of the soil A horizon, and a deeper sample from the soil C horizon or, if the top of the C horizon was at a depth greater than 1 meter, from a depth of approximately 80–100 centimeters. The elements by methods that yield the total or near-total elemental content. The major mineralogical components in the samples from the soil A and C horizons were determined by a quantitative X-ray diffraction method using Rietveld refinement. Sampling in the conterminous United States was completed in 2010, with chemical and mineralogical analyses completed in May 2013. The resulting dataset provides an estimate of the abundance and spatial distribution of chemical elements and minerals in soils of the conterminous United States and represents a baseline for soil geochemistry and mineralogy against which future changes may be recognized and quantified. This report (1) describes the sampling, sample preparation, and analytical methods used; (2) gives details of the quality control protocols used to monitor the quality of chemical and mineralogical analyses over approximately six years; and (3) makes available the soil geochemical and mineralogical data in downloadable tables.

  2. Mineralogical characterization of Brazilians attapulgite to magnetic nano composites uses; Caracterizacao mineralogica de atapulgitas brasileiras para utilizacao em nanocompositos magneticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Middea, Antonieta; Neumann, Reiner, E-mail: amiddea@cetem.gov.br [Centro de Tecnologia Mineral - CETEM, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Spinelli, Luciana S.; Lucas, Elizabete F. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Macromoleculas, Laboratorio de Macromoleculas e Coloides na Industria de Petroleo, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Magnetic polymeric nano composites represent a potential alternative in the treatment of contaminated water. This work aims to investigate the potential of uses of a Brazilian clay (an attapulgite), abundant in the northeast, in the preparation of polymeric nano composites for application in the removal of organic material present in aquifers, using magnetic field. The techniques used for mineralogical characterization were X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The results showed the presence of palyigorskite in all samples as well as other mineral phases (quartz, kaolinite, smectite and anatase). The microscopic analysis permitted to identify the fibrous appearance of palyigorskite. The presence of palyigorskite is a strong indication of the possible use of attapulgite in obtaining magnetic nano composites by the adsorption of iron ion to the surface. (author)

  3. Correlation of sedimentary units from grain-size and mineralogic analyses as a tool for constraining trench interpretations in palaeoseismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezquerro, Lope; Liesa, Carlos L.; Simón, José L.; Arlegui, Luis E.; Luzón, Aránzazu; Lafuente, Paloma

    2014-11-01

    In palaeoseismological trench studies, precise correlation of sedimentary units between fault blocks has an unquestionable value for accurately inferring the amounts of coseismic displacement and hence for assessing seismic hazard. A methodology based on laser analysis of particle size and mineralogic composition by X-ray diffraction is proposed in order to strengthen the correlation of sedimentary units in a trench excavated across the Concud Fault (central Iberian Chain, Spain). The surveyed sediments show sharp and multiple lateral facies changes, as well as inconsistent optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) ages. The results reinforce the correlation based on field inspection of lithologic and sedimentologic features. Moreover, they allow interpretation of rejuvenation of OSL ages of samples in the upthrown fault block, which has been attributed to partial erosion of sedimentary units, as evidenced by their smaller thickness and erosive boundaries. The correlated units are then used to estimate coseismic displacements for three palaeoseismic events.

  4. Mineralogical and chemical characterization of DD3 kaolin from the east of Algeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senoussi, H.; Osmani, H.; Courtois, C.; Bourahli, M. H.

    2016-08-01

    The mineralogical and chemical characteristics, based on X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy, of a kaolin known as DD3, from eastern Algeria were examined in the present study. The results showed that kaolin DD3 has an alumina content of 39%. The SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} molar ratio of 2.14 is close to that of a pure halloysite. The hematite concentration is relatively large and the flux oxides ratios remain as acceptable impurities. Microscopic observations showed a predominant tubular halloysite phase, flattened hexagonal platelets corresponding to the presence of kaolinite and its polymorphs (nacrite, dickite), and hydrated alumina. The SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} molar ratio and tubular DD3 suggest possible uses in technical ceramics and nano technology applications. Analysis by XRD revealed the presence of many phases. Thermal treatment at 450 degree centigrade and chemical treatment with HCl confirmed the presence of halloysite. The inclusion in the clay of organic molecules (dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), DMF, and diluted glycerol) showed that the DMSO led to expansion of the inter-planar distance. The intercalation by DMSO molecules resulted in a shift of the basal peak from 10 to 11.02 A and partial displacement of the peak from 3.35 to 3.65 A. These two peaks are characteristic of halloysite. The presence of residual nacrite was also confirmed by the shift of the peak observed at 3.35 A. A full analysis of the XRD patterns using the Match software, based on these results, showed that the DD3 clay consists of >60% halloysite. (Author)

  5. Mineralogy and Geochemistry of Granitic rocks within Lichen Hills, Outback Nunatak, Northern Victoria Land, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    KIM, T.; KIM, Y.; Lee, I.; Lee, J.; Woo, J.

    2015-12-01

    The study areas, Lichen Hills and Outback Nunatak are located in the Northern Victoria Land which is close to Pacific Ocean side of Transantarctic Mountain (TAM), Antarctica. According to the study of Zeller and Dreschoff (1990), the radioactivity values of Lichen hills and Frontier Mt. area in the Victoria Land were very high. To identify the geochemical characteristics of granitic rocks in these areas, 13 samples of Lichen Hills rocks and 4 samples of Outback Nunatak rocks are analyzed. For mineralogical study, samples were observed in macroscale as well as microscale including microscope electron probe analysis. Rock samples of Lichen Hills, Outback Nunatak are mainly leucogranite and granitic pegmatite. These rock samples are composed of quartz, k-feldspar, plagioclase, muscovite, garnet, tourmaline like granite. In SEM-EDS analysis, the observed light colored minerals show relatively high Th, U, Dy, Ce, Nb concentration. This suggests that rock samples may contain minerals such as fergusonite, monazite, thorite, allanite, karnasurtite which are considered to be REE-bearing minerals. Samples of related rocks have been analyzed in terms of major, trace and rare earth element (REE) concentrations using X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS). As concentration of SiO2 increase, Al2O3, TiO2, Fe2O3, MgO, P2O5 concentration decrease and Na2O, K2O, MnO concentration increase. Analyzed trace elements and REE are normalized using CI Chondrite, Primitive mantle. The normalized data show that LREE are enriched compared to HREE. The distinct negative anomalies of Eu, Sr are observed, indicating that rock-forming melts are fairly processed state of fractional crystallization. It means that Th, U, Nb, Ta are much enriched in the melts.

  6. Mineralogical characteristics of bentonites occurring in Ningcheng and Jianping area,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU; JaRang; MOON; YongHee; MOON; HiSoo

    2010-01-01

    This study is focused on the basic mineralogical and chemical characteristics of some selected samples from Jianping(JP) and Ningcheng(NC) area,China.These were studied using X-ray diffraction(XRD),expandability,Greene-Kelly test,specific surface area,cation exchange capacity(CEC),differential thermal analysis(DTA),and chemical analysis.The bulk samples consist of mainly montmorillonites along with appreciable amounts of cristobalite and with small amounts of quartz,feldspar and calcite.The basal spacings of montmorillonites in all these examined samples show at about 1.5 nm,indicating that pre-dominant cations were divalent.Mean crystallite thickness of the present sample lies from 0.449 to 0.710 nm(4.58-7.24 layers).As Greene-Kelly test,samples from Ningcheng area confirmed appreciable amount of beidellite component but samples from Jianping area did not contain anything about it.Surface area of samples varies from 671 to 766 m2 g-1 depending on the amounts of impurities.Analyzed CEC ranges from 70.30 to 82.75 meq 100g-1 in <2 μm size samples.The DTA curves are considered abnormal type.Samples from Ningcheng area show relatively higher amount of SiO2 than those from Jianping area,possibly due to difference of parent rock type.Trace element(Y,Nb,Ce and Zr) data are plotted on acidic to intermediate composition.It is apparent that no large chemical transfer would have been necessary during alteration.

  7. DEFINITION OF PERSPECTIVE DIRECTIONS OF TRANSFERT OF TECHNOLOGIES AT THE BASE OF SWOT-ANALYSIS OF SCIENTIFIC ORGANIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.F. Suhovey

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This article describes approbating at Sverdlovsk region methodic of analysis of strength and weakness sides of scientific organization. Using this methodic is give possibility to define perspective directions of foundation innovation infrastructure of region.

  8. Práctica de la mineralogía óptica

    OpenAIRE

    Parra Sánchez, Luis Norberto

    1986-01-01

    Resumen: El presente documento contiene los procedimientos más comunes de la mineralogía óptica acompañados de las tablas de mayor utilidad y por lo tanto lo único que pretende es agrupar técnicas y aclarar posibles dudas sobre el uso de la terminología. El contenido hace parte del curso regular de mineralogía óptica dictado en la Universidad Nacional y ha sido el resultado de varios años en la práctica de esta materia

  9. High-definition and intelligent video analysis system based on distributed and mixed structure%基于分布式混合架构体系的高清智能视频分析系统

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘治红; 陈伟; 雷雨能

    2015-01-01

    As the high-definition video has a large amount of data and high requirement of processing platform, an intelligent high-definition video system based on hardware platform with distributed and mixed structure including DSP, ARM and PC was proposed. It realized the functions including collection, coding, intelligent analysis, alarm, compress and network transmission for high-definition video which has 1 080 P definition and above. It provided the integration solution for intelligent analysis and processing of the high-definition video monitoring system.%针对高清视频流数据量大、对处理平台要求高的特点,提出基于DSP+ARM+PC搭建分布式混合架构体系的硬件平台,研制一种经济适用、性能稳定的高清智能视频分析系统,实现对1080 P及以上的高清视频流进行采集、编码、智能分析、报警、压缩、网络化传输等功能,为高清视频图像的智能分析处理提供一体化的解决方案。

  10. Residues from coal conversion and utilization: Advanced mineralogical characterization and disposed byproduct diagenesis. [Semiannual report, 1 Mar 1999--31 Aug 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory J. McCarthy; Dean G. Grier

    2000-01-01

    The goal of the project is to learn more about the phenomenon of coal conversion byproduct (CCB) diagenesis, first described by this group and co-workers at UND EERC seven years ago. CCB diagenesis is a change in the mineralogy that occurs after some CCBs are disposed in a landfill or utilized for a civil engineering application. Regulatory environmental tests and civil engineering tests are typically performed on as-generated CCBs, or on CCBs hydrated and cured for relatively short periods such as 7 or 28 days. One would like to know whether the results of these short-term tests will be valid years later. A change in mineralogy means a gain, loss or chemical redistribution of major, minor and trace elements, and alteration of physical properties. To attain this goal, two objectives were defined: (1) to develop improved methodology for quantitating mineralogy of these complex crystalline phase assemblages, and (2) to investigate the phenomenon of CCB diagenesis further by studying materials recovered from disposal landfills or civil engineering works. Objective 1--Hydrated CCBs are chemically and mineralogically complex, which makes quantitative mineralogy determination by conventional X-ray diffraction unusable or unreliable. The whole-pattern Rietveld quantitative X-ray diffraction (RQXRD) method, however, can overcome many of the problems and seems well suited to improve reliability. Two tasks were defined in the proposal: Task 1--Completion by October 1997. Prepare a reference set of CCBs for use in developing Rietveld QXRD. The reference materials will come primarily from in-house samples of advanced coal technology byproducts. The work will include SEM/EMPA characterization at UND EERC. Task 2--Completion by October 1997. Develop protocols for Rietveld QXRD analysis of CCBs. Make CCB structure data and protocols available on a Website. Determine levels of sensitivity, precision, and accuracy. Objective 2--Five types of CCBs disposed in landfills were studied

  11. Chemical and Mineralogical Characterization of a Hematite-bearing Ridge on Mauna Kea, Hawaii: A Potential Mineralogical Process Analog for the Mount Sharp Hematite Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, T. G.; Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Hamilton, J. C.; Adams, M.; Fraeman, A. A.; Arvidson, R. E.; Catalano, J. G.; Mertzman, S. A.

    2014-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover Curiosity landed in Gale Crater in August 2012 and is currently roving towards the layered central mound known as Mount Sharp [1]. Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) hyperspectral data indicate Mount Sharp contains an 5 km stratigraphic sequence including Fe-Mg smectites, hematite, and hydrated sulfates in the lower layers separated by an unconformity from the overlying anhydrous strata [1,2,3]. Hematite was initially detected in CRISM data to occur in the lower sulfate layers on the north side of the mound [2]. [3] further mapped a distinct hematite detection occurring as part of a 200 m wide ridge that extends 6.5 km NE-SW, approximately parallel with the base of Mount Sharp. It is likely a target for in-situ analyses by Curiosity. We document here the occurrence of a stratum of hematite-bearing breccia that is exposed on the Puu Poliahu cinder cone near the summit of Mauna Kea volcano (Hawaii) (Fig.1). The stratum is more resistant to weathering than surrounding material, giving it the appearance of a ridge. The Mauna Kea hematite ridge is thus arguably a potential terrestrial mineralogical and process analog for the Gale Crater hematite ridge. We are acquiring a variety of chemical and mineralogical data on the Mauna Kea samples, with a focus on the chemical and mineralogical information already available or planned for the Gale hematite ridge.

  12. Continental-scale patterns in soil geochemistry and mineralogy: results from two transects across the United States and Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, L.G.; Cannon, W.F.; Eberl, D.D.; Smith, D.B.; Kilburn, J.E.; Horton, J.D.; Garrett, R.G.; Klassen, R.A.

    2009-01-01

    In 2004, the US Geological Survey (USGS) and the Geological Survey of Canada (GSC) initiated a pilot study that involved collection of more than 1500 soil samples from 221 sites along two continental transects across Canada and the United States. The pilot study was designed to test and refine protocols for a soil geochemical survey of North America. The two transects crossed a wide array of soil parent materials, soil ages, climatic conditions, landforms, land covers and land uses. Sample sites were selected randomly at approximately 40-km intervals from a population defined as all soils of the continent. At each site, soils representing 0 to 5 cm depth, and the O, A, and C horizons, if present, were collected and analyzed for their near-total content of over 40 major and trace elements. Soils from 0–5 cm depth were also collected for analysis of organic compounds. Results from the transects confirm that soil samples collected at a 40-km spacing reveal coherent, continental- to subcontinental-scale geochemical and mineralogical patterns that can be correlated to aspects of underlying soil parent material, soil age and climate influence. The geochemical data also demonstrate that at the continental-scale the dominance of any of these major factors that control soil geochemistry can change across the landscape. Along both transects, soil mineralogy and geochemistry change abruptly with changes in soil parent materials. However, the chemical influence of a soil’s parent material can be obscured by changing climatic conditions. For the transects, increasing precipitation from west to east and increasing temperature from north to south affect both soil mineralogy and geochemistry because of climate effects on soil weathering and leaching, and plant productivity. Regional anomalous metal concentrations can be linked to natural variations in soil parent materials, such as high Ni and Cr in soils developed on ultramafic rocks in California or high P in soils formed on

  13. A Miniature Mineralogical Instrument for In-Situ Characterization of Ices and Hydrous Minerals at the Lunar Poles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrazin, P.; Blake, D.; Vaniman, D.; Bish, D.; Chipera, S.; Collins, S. A.

    2002-01-01

    Lunar missions over the past few years have provided new evidence that water may be present at the lunar poles in the form of cold-trapped ice deposits, thereby rekindling interest in sampling the polar regions. Robotic landers fitted with mineralogical instrumentation for in-situ analyses could provide unequivocal answers on the presence of crystalline water ice and/or hydrous minerals at the lunar poles. Data from Lunar Prospector suggest that any surface exploration of the lunar poles should include the capability to drill to depths of more than 40 cm. Limited data on the lunar geotherm indicate temperatures of approximately 245-255 K at regolith depths of 40 cm, within a range where water may exist in the liquid state as brine. A relevant terrestrial analog occurs in Antarctica, where the zeolite mineral chabazite has been found at the boundary between ice-free and ice-cemented regolith horizons, and precipitation from a regolith brine is indicated. Soluble halogens and sulfur in the lunar regolith could provide comparable brine chemistry in an analogous setting. Regolith samples collected by a drilling device could be readily analyzed by CheMin, a mineralogical instrument that combines X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) techniques to simultaneously characterize the chemical and mineralogical compositions of granular or powdered samples. CheMin can unambiguously determine not only the presence of hydrous alteration phases such as clays or zeolites, but it can also identify the structural variants or types of clay or zeolite present (e.g., well-ordered versus poorly ordered smectite; chabazite versus phillipsite). In addition, CheMin can readily measure the abundances of key elements that may occur in lunar minerals (Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Fe) as well as the likely constituents of lunar brines (F, Cl, S). Finally, if coring and analysis are done during the lunar night or in permanent shadow, CheMin can provide information on the chemistry and

  14. Mineralogy and geochemistry of trace and Rare Earth Element from the Manaila massive sulphide deposit (Eastern Carpathians, Romania)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldoveanu, S.; Iancu, O. G.; Kasper, H. U.

    2012-04-01

    Keywords: Eastern Carpathians, Mănăila deposit, REE, trace elements, pyrite The present paper deal with the mineralogy and trace elements geochemistry of sulphide deposits from Mănăila mine field located in NE area of Eastern Carpathians Mountains (Romania). The mineralization occurs within metamorphic rocks of Tulgheş terrane, part of Crystalline-Mezozoic zone of the Eastern Carpathians. The metamorphic rocks in Mănăila area consist of felsic metavolcanics rocks with quartzites and quartz-feldspathic rocks as prevailing types. The P-T metamorphic conditions are typical of greenschis facies with biotite and garnet (Mn-Grt) in mineral assemblage. The mineralogical study was performed using reflected light microscope and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) methods. Thus, the both methods show that the main sulphides minerals are represented by pyrite and chalcopyrite, being followed by sphalerite, galena and little amount of Cu sulphosalts (tetrahedrite and bournonite) and also by gangue minerals (quartz and carbonates). Pyrite occurs as large euhedral to subhedral grains in quartz and small rounded inclusion in chalcopyrite. The trace elements analysis was achieved on whole-rock samples and involved the determination of REE, LIL (Rb, Ba, Sr) and HFS (Y, Zr, Hf, U, Th, Nb, Ta) by ICP-MS method. The concentration of LIL and HFS trace elements in mineralized rocks decrease as follows: Ba > Bi > As > Sb > Co > Ga > Ni > Cd. Even if the barium contents in Mănăila ore is high, baritina (BaSO4) was not identified throught the mineralogical analyses carried out so far. The total rare earth element content (REE) of the samples from Mănăila range from 26.84 to 246.46 ppm. Chondrite - normalized REE patterns of the mineralized rocks show that the LREE are enriched in relation to the HREE. Also a positive Ce anomalies and negative Eu anomalies are present. Y/Ho and Zr/Hf ratios are close to the chondritic ratios indicating Charge-and-Radius-Controlled (CHARAC

  15. Impact of alternate definitions of fever resolution on the composite endpoint in clinical trials of empirical antifungal therapy for neutropenic patients with persistent fever: analysis of results from the Caspofungin Empirical Therapy Study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pauw, B.E. de; Sable, C.A.; Walsh, T.J.; Lupinacci, R.J.; Bourque, M.R.; Wise, B.A.; Nguyen, B.Y.; DiNubile, M.J.; Teppler, H.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sensitivity analyses were incorporated in a Phase III study of caspofungin vs. liposomal amphotericin B as empirical antifungal therapy for febrile neutropenic patients to determine the impact of varying definitions of fever resolution on response rates. METHODS: The primary analysis use

  16. Book review: The success of policy analysis studies: an actor perspective, a search for success definitions based on cases in the field of transport and infrastructure in The Netherlands / by Patricia G.J. Twaalfhoven. - Eburon, Delft, 1999

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klok, Pieter-Jan

    2001-01-01

    This doctoral dissertation is an attempt to formulate a theory on how different actors define the success of a policy analysis study and on the factors that underlie the various definitions of success. The choice for an actor perspective is motivated by the fact that many actors play different roles

  17. An Unsupervised Learning Approach for Facial Expression Recognition using Semi-Definite Programming and Generalized Principal Component Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    NAMIC), funded by the National Institutes of Health through the NIH Roadmap for Medical Research, Grant U54 EB005149. REFERENCES [1] Ekman , P., [ Emotion ...principal component analysis 1. INTRODUCTION The human face is a rich medium through which people communicate their emotions . Researchers have identified

  18. Sociocultural definitions of risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rayner, S.

    1990-10-01

    Public constituencies frequently are criticized by technical experts as being irrational in response to low-probability risks. This presentation argued that most people are concerned with a variety of risk attributes other than probability and that is rather irrational to exclude these from the definition and analysis of technological risk. Risk communication, which is at the heart of the right-to-know concept, is described as the creation of shared meaning rather than the mere transmission of information. A case study of utilities, public utility commissions, and public interest groups illustrates how the diversity of institutional cultures in modern society leads to problems for the creation of shared meanings in establishing trust, distributing liability, and obtaining consent to risk. This holistic approach to risk analysis is most appropriate under conditions of high uncertainty and/or decision stakes. 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  19. Mineralogical-Geochemical Peculiarities of Ores in Pyritaceous Fields of Filizchai Type in the Greater Caucasus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NOVRUZ A. NOVRUZOV

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Pyritaceous fields of the south slope of the Greater Caucasus confined to the Lower-Middle Jurassic sandy clayey deposits are: polygenic polychrone formations which were formed by a complex of hydrothermal sedimentary, hydrothermal metasomatic and hydrothermal metamorphogenic processes of ore formation. Filizchai pyritaceous polymetallic field is the largest in the region and can be characterized by diversity of texture-mineralogical types of ores, rich mineral composition and with geochemical spectrum. Some of the admixture components (Cd, In, Tl, Ga, Ge, Se, Hg are only in isomorphic forms in ores, others (Te, Bi, Au, Ag, Co, Sn, As along with it characterize in their own minerals. The Co is mainly concentrated in pyrite, pyrrhotine; Ag, Bi and also Te – in galenite and chalcopyrite; Se – in pyrite, pyrrhotine and galenite; in sphalerite (mainly in marmatite and chalcopyrite; Cd, Ga, Ge – in sphalerite, mainly in cleiophane; Au – in pyrite and chalcopyrite; Tl – in galenite and colloform pyrite. In all sulphides selenium prevails over tellurium (excepting the late chalcopyrite and cobalt over nickel. Maximum amount of cobalt is confined to pyrite from pyritaceous polymetallic ores and late generation of pyrrhotine. The nature of the connection between chemical elements in ores coordinates with determined stages of minerals formation. The main productive stage of ore formation bringing the main mass of gold, silver, rare and other precious components of ores are sulphosalt polymetallic stage of sulphur ploymetallic stage. Comparative analysis of absolute content of gold, silver and values of gold-silver relation in pyrite fields ores of region with appropriate values in meteorite standard indirectly indicates the relationship between gold-silver mineralization and assimilation crust source.

  20. Clay mineralogy of the Boda Claystone Formation (Mecsek Mts., SW Hungary)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Németh, Tibor; Máthé, Zoltán; Pekker, Péter; Dódony, István; Kovács-Kis, Viktória; Sipos, Péter; Cora, Ildikó; Kovács, Ivett

    2016-04-01

    Boda Claystone Formation (BCF) is the host rock of the planned site for high level nuclear waste repository inHungary. Samples representing the dominant rock types of BCF were studied: albitic claystone, claystone with high illite content, and analcime bearing claystone. Clay minerals in these three rock types were characterized by Xray powder diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and thermal analysis (DTA-TG), and the results were discussed from the point of view of the radionuclide sorption properties being studied in the future. Mineral compositions of bulk BCF samples vary in wide ranges. In the albitic sample, besides the dominant illite, few percent of chlorite represents the layer silicates in the clay fraction. Illite is the dominating phase in the illitic sample, with a few percent of chlorite. HRTEM study revealed that the thickness of illite particles rarely reaches 10 layers, usually are of 5-6 TOT layer thick. Illite crystals are generally thicker in the albitic sample than in the illitic one. The significant difference between the clay mineral characterisitics of the analcimous and the other two samples is that the former contains regularly interstratified chlorite/smectite beside the dominant illite. Based on the structural and chemical data two illite type minerals are present in the BCF samples: 1M polytype containing octahedral Fe and Mg besides Al, 2M polytype illite generally is free of Fe andMg. Close association of very thin illite plates and nanosized hematite crystals is typical textural feature for BCF. The goal of this study is to provide solid mineralogical basis for further studies focusing on radionuclide sorption properties.

  1. Clay mineralogy of the malmian source rock of the Vienna Basin: Effects on shale gas exploration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schicker, Andrea; Gier, Susanne; Herzog, Ulrich

    2010-05-01

    In an unique opportunity the diagenetic changes of clay minerals of a marlstone formation with only minor differences in provenance and depositional environment was studied from shallow (1400 m) to very deep (8550 m) burial. The clay mineralogy of 46 core samples from ten wells was quantified with X-ray diffraction in applying the mineral intensity factor (MIF)-method of Moore and Reynolds (1997). The clay fraction of the marlstone contains a prominent illite/smectite (I/S) mixed-layer mineral (20 to 70 wt%), illite (20 to 70 wt%), chlorite (0.5 to 12 wt%) and kaolinite (2 to 17 wt%). The amounts of I/S and kaolinite decrease with depth, whereas illite and chlorite increase. A gradual transformation of smectite to illite through mixed-layer I/S intermediates is recognized. With increasing depth the illite content in I/S intermediates increases from 25% to 90% in parallel the ordering of the mixed layer I/S changes from R0 (25% illite in I/S) to R1 (60-80% illite in I/S) to R3 (90% illite in I/S). R3 ordering prevails at depths greater than 4000 m and implies that the effect of the expandable mineral smectite is negligible. This paper covers a part of a shale gas feasibility study on the main Vienna Basin hydrocarbon source rock (Mikulov Formation, a Malmian marlstone) recently performed by OMV. Shale gas production usually is enabled by pumping fluids (mainly water) into a gas-mature source rock in order to generate fracture permeability. Expandable clays within the source rock can dramatically reduce stimulation effectiveness and gas production. Moore and Reynolds (1997) X-ray diffraction and the identification and analysis of clay minerals. Oxford University Press, New York, 378 p.

  2. Aqueous outcrops at Libya Montes, Mars: A close eye on morphology and mineralogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirsch, Daniela; Bishop, Janice L.; Voigt, Joana; Tornabene, Livio L.; Erkeling, Gino; Hiesinger, Harald; Jaumann, Ralf

    2015-04-01

    We present the results of a photogeological mapping, morphological and spectral analyses of a geologically diverse region at the border of Libya Montes and Isidis Planitia that were applied using coordinated analyses of mineralogy from CRISM images and surface features from HiRISE and CTX images, as well as topographical information from HRSC DTMs. The Libya Montes are part of the southern rim-complex of the Isidis impact basin on Mars. The region is characterized by pre-Noachian and Noachian aged highland rocks alternating with multiple sedimentary units of Noachian to Amazonian age, some of them heavily dissected by dense valley networks. The region experienced a complex history of impact, volcanic, tectonic, fluvial and aeolian modification processes resulting in the geology observed today. The geological history of the region as revealed by the analysis comprises an emplacement of olivine-rich lava onto ancient basaltic bedrock, which was later covered by pyroxene-rich caprock. This latter extended top unit might either represent lava layers, presumably originating from the Syrtis Major province, or indurated mud flows emplaced by mud volcanism. The analyses suggest that the ancient bedrock has been partially altered to Fe-/Mg-smectites through hydrothermal alteration (presumably triggered by the Isidis impact) and/or hydrous alteration caused by fluvial activity. These clays feature a variety of morphologies and stratigraphical exposures. Some outcrops of the Fe-rich and Mg-rich smectites are intermixed with carbonates in places. The carbonate detections suggest aqueous alteration that is associated with Mg-/Fe-rich fluids under a CO2-rich atmosphere. Al-smectite have also been detected in morphologically diverse outcrops and may have been formed later via alteration of pyroxene-bearing caprock. The variability in phyllosilicates and presence of carbonates implies a changing alteration environment.

  3. Mineralogical study of surface sediments in the western Arctic Ocean and their implications for material sources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Linsen; SHI Xuefa; LIU Yanguang; FANG Xisheng; CHEN Zhihua; WANG Chunjuan; ZOU Jianjun; HUANG Yuanhui

    2014-01-01

    Mineralogical analysis was performed on bulk sediments of 79 surface samples using X-ray diffraction. The analytical results, combined with data on ocean currents and the regional geological background, were used to investigate the mineral sources. Mineral assemblages in sediments and their distribution in the study area indicate that the material sources are complex. (1) Feldspar is abundant in the sediments of the middle Chukchi Sea near the Bering Strait, originating from sediments in the Anadyr River carried by the Anadyr Current. Sediments deposited on the western side of the Chukchi Sea are rich in feldspar. Compared with other areas, sediments in this region are rich in hornblende transported from volcanic and sedimentary rocks in Siberia by the Anadyr Stream and the Siberian Coastal Current. Sediments in the eastern Chukchi Sea are rich in quartz sourced from sediments of the Yukon and Kuskokwim rivers carried by the Alaska Coastal Current. Sediments in the northern Chukchi Sea are rich in quartz and carbonates from the Mackenzie River sediments. (2) Sediments of the southern and central Canada Basin contain little calcite and dolomite, mainly due to the small impact of the Beaufort Gyre carrying carbonates from the Canadian Arctic Islands. Compared with other areas, the mica content in the region is high, implying that the Laptev Sea is the main sediment source for the southern and central Canada Basin. In the other deep sea areas, calcite and dolomite levels are high caused by the input of large amounts of sediment carried by the Beaufort Gyre from the Canadian Arctic Islands (Banks and Victoria). The Siberian Laptev Sea also provides small amounts of sediment for this region. Furthermore, the Atlantic mid-water contributes some fine-grained material to the entire deep western Arctic Ocean.

  4. Mineralogical and chemical analyses of ancient glass beads from Taiwan and their implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Y. S.; Liu, Y. C.

    2015-12-01

    Large numbers of monochrome glass beads with different colors, shapes, and stylistics excavated from the archaeological sites of Taiwan, which were dated mainly from the 2nd century AD to the early Historical Period of Taiwan. Archaeologically, these glass beads were more prevalent in eastern and northern Taiwan and were generally believed to be non-native, as well as were brought into Taiwan through the maritime exchange and/or trade activities between Taiwan and Southeast Asia/China since the Neolithic Age. Nevertheless, ancient glass beads have been little studies in Taiwan, aspects of these glass beads are not well detailed. In this work, non-destructive micro-Raman spectroscopy and μXRF are used in combination to examine 56 ancient glass beads excavated from six archaeological sites, eastern Taiwan, to unravel the mineralogical and chemical compositions and to help decipher the raw materials used and the provenance of beads. Micro-Raman measurements indicate the presence of hematite, zincite, siderite, sphalerite, lead tin yellow type II, adularia, chalcedony, anatase, rutite, ankerite, graphite, calcite, etc. Hematite, zincite, siderite, sphalerite, lead tin yellow type II, and rutile were found to be colorants/opacifiers. Among these crystalline phases, lead tin yellow type II was first detected in the ancient glass bead unearthed from Taiwan, which is accordant with results of chemical analysis. The chemical results obtained by μXRF show SiO2, Al2O3, Na2O, K2O, MgO, CaO, and PbO as the most abundant oxides. It is found that Na2O, Na2O, K2O, Al2O3, and MgO are the main/minor fluxes. According to the results, the three most frequent types are mineral soda alumina glass, soda plant ash glass, and lead silicate glass. The provenance of ancient beads unearthed from archaeological sites of Taiwan is possibility of multiple sources.

  5. Mineralogical control of soil organic carbon persistence at the multidecadal time scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutfalla, Suzanne; Barré, Pierre; Bernard, Sylvain; Le Guillou, Corentin; Chenu, Claire

    2015-04-01

    One of the current challenges in understanding the long term persistence of organic carbon in soils is to assess how mineral surfaces, especially at small scale, can stabilize soil organic carbon (SOC). The question we address in this work is whether different mineral species stabilize different types of SOC. Here we used the unique opportunity offered by long term bare fallows to study in situ C dynamics in several fine fractions of a silty loam soil. Indeed, with no vegetation i.e. no external input of fresh C, the plant-free soil of the Versailles 42 Plots (INRA, France) has been progressively enriched in persistent SOC during the 80 years of bare fallow. To separate mineral phases of the clay size fraction we performed a size fractionation on samples taken from 4 different plots at 5 different dates (0, 10, 22, 52, and 79 years after the beginning of the BF) and analyzed the SOC in the different fractions thus obtained. First, the clay fraction (STXM at the carbon K edge of 280 eV, CLS Saskatoon, Canada) was used to get information on the distribution and the chemical speciation of the SOC in fractions with contrasted mineralogies. Data analysis is still ongoing and full results will be presented at EGU. First results show that the dynamics and quality of the SOC differ in the different clay fractions. SOC decay was greater in coarse clays compared to intermediate clays, SOC in the coarse clay fraction displaying more diversity than in the other fractions. SOC persistence at the multidecadal timescale also seems to be mineral dependent: smectite being more efficient at protecting carbon compared to illite.

  6. Mineralogy and pore water chemistry of a boiler ash from a MSW fluidized-bed incinerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodénan, F; Guyonnet, D; Piantone, P; Blanc, P

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents an investigation of the mineralogy and pore water chemistry of a boiler ash sampled from a municipal solid waste fluidized-bed incinerator, subject to 18 months of dynamic leaching in a large percolation column experiment. A particular focus is on the redox behaviour of Cr(VI) in relation to metal aluminium Al(0), as chromium may represent an environmental or health hazard. The leaching behaviour and interaction between Cr(VI) and Al(0) are interpreted on the basis of mineralogical evolutions observed over the 18-month period and of saturation indices calculated with the geochemical code PhreeqC and reviewed thermodynamic data. Results of mineralogical analyses show in particular the alteration of mineral phases during leaching (e.g. quartz and metal aluminium grains), while geochemical calculations suggest equilibria of percolating fluids with respect to specific mineral phases (e.g. monohydrocalcite and aluminium hydroxide). The combination of leaching data on a large scale and mineralogical analyses document the coupled leaching behaviour of aluminium and chromium, with chromium appearing in the pore fluids in its hexavalent and mobile state once metal aluminium is no longer available for chromium reduction.

  7. Arsenic in New England: Mineralogical and geochemical studies of sources and enrichment pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayuso, Robert A.; Foley, Nora K.

    2003-01-01

    Detailed mineralogical, geochemical and radiogenic isotopic studies of iron-sulfide and secondary iron oxy-hydroxide minerals in natural bedrock in coastal Maine and New Hampshire test the link between arsenic-rich sulfide minerals in bedrock and secondary oxy-hydroxide minerals. Samples were selected from over 70 bedrock localities, including 22 within the regionally extensive and sulfide-mineral-rich Penobscot Formation and 10 associated with mineral deposits from coastal New Hampshire and Maine, and coupled with data from drill core collected at several sites including areas where well waters contain anomalous As abundances (e.g., Northport, ME). The data were used to establish a diversity of primary and secondary mineralogical hosts for arsenic in bedrock of this part of New England. The studies show that bedrock mineralogy is critical to contributing arsenic to groundwater and suggest a number of mineralogical pathways for arsenic that define weathering processes. The studies show that lead isotopic compositions of the sulfides and iron oxy-hydroxides overlap and establish a genetic link between the sulfides and secondary minerals. The data and interpretive results were presented at Arsenic in New England -- A multidisciplinary Scientific Conference, Manchester, New Hampshire, May 29-31, 2002, sponsored by the New Hampshire Consortium on Arsenic, are available in abstract and poster (full size = 84 by 36 inch sheet) formats.

  8. Ground Truth Mineralogy vs. Orbital Observations at the Bagnold Dune Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achilles, C. N.; Downs, R. T.; Ming, D. W.; Rampe, E. B.; Morris, R. V.; Treiman, A. H.; Morrison, S. M.; Blake, D. F.; Vaniman, D. T.; Bristow, T. F.

    2017-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover, Curiosity, is analyzing rock and sediments in Gale crater to provide in situ sedimentological, geochemical, and mineralogical assessments of the crater's geologic history. Curiosity's recent traverse through an active, basaltic eolian deposit, informally named the Bagnold Dunes, provided the opportunity for a multi-instrument investigation of the dune field.

  9. Size, surface texture, chemical composition and mineralogy interrelations in ferromanganese nodules of central Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Banakar, V.K.; Pattan, J.N.; Jauhari, P.

    Fiftyseven ferromanganese nodules, classified into 3 size class (4,4-6 and 6-8 cm diam.), from the siliceous sediments of central Indian Ocean were analysed for transition metals and representative sample from each size class for mineralogy. Smaller...

  10. Christian Herrgen y la institucionalización de la mineralogía en Madrid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parra, Dolores

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the goals of the scientific policy of the governments of the Borbones were that of favors the disciplines subject to be applied for the necessary stimulus of the Spanish economy. Such it was the case of the Mineralogy, science that was developed and imparted in several scientific cultured institutions. One of these centers were the Cabinet of Natural History from Madrid, in which the work of the German specialist Christian Herrgen contributed to the institutionalization of the Spanish Mineralogy.

    Uno de los objetivos de la política científica de los gobiernos borbones fue la de potenciar aquellas disciplinas susceptibles de ser aplicadas en el necesario fomento de la economía española. Tal fue el caso de la Mineralogía, ciencia que fue desarrollada e impartida en varias instituciones científicas ilustradas. Uno de estos centros fue el Gabinete de Historia Natural de Madrid, en el que la labor del especialista alemán Christian Herrgen contribuyó a la institucionalización de la mineralogía española.

  11. Mineralogical Composition of Urinary Stones and Their Frequency in Patients: Relationship to Gender and Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnam Keshavarzi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This investigation reports the mineralogy and possible pathological significance of urinary stones removed from patients in Fars province, Iran. X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and polarizing microscope (PM techniques were used to investigate the mineralogical compositions of urinary stones. The identified mineral components include whewellite, weddellite, hydroxyapatite, uricite and cystine. These techniques revealed that the whewellite and uricite were the most common mineral phases. Platy-like/monoclinic whewellite, prismatic/monoclinic uric acid and hexagonal cystine crystals were revealed by SEM. Biominerals (calcium carbonate and quartz were also identified in PM images. Of the variables determining the type of precipitated minerals, the effects of pH on depositional conditions proved to be the most apparent parameter, as shown by occurrences and relationships among the studied minerals. Our results revealed the importance of detailed knowledge of mineralogical composition in assessing the effects of age and sex. The highest incidence of urinary stones was observed in the 40–60 age group. Calcium oxalate and uric acid stones are more frequent in men than women. Finally, the study concluded that knowledge of the mineralogical composition of urinary stones is important as it helps the scientific community to explain the chemistry and the etiology of the calculi in the urinary system.

  12. Mineralogical, Spectral, and Compositional Changes During Heating of Hydrous Carbonaceous Chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, T.; Matsuoka, M.; Yamashita, S.; Sato, Y.; Mogi, K.; Enokido, Y.; Nakata, A.; Okumura, S.; Furukawa, Y.; Zolensky, M.

    2017-01-01

    Hydrous carbonaceous chondrites experienced hydration and subsequent dehydration by heating, which resulted in a variety of mineralogical and spectral features [e. g., 1-6]. The degree of heating is classified according to heating stage (HS) II to IV based on mineralogy of phyllosilicates [2], because they change, with elevating temperature, to poorly crystal-line phases and subsequently to aggregates of small secondary anhydrous silicates of mainly olivine. Heating of hydrous carbonaceous chondrites also causes spectral changes and volatile loss [3-6]. Experimental heating of Murchison CM chondrite showed flattening of whole visible-near infrared spectra, especially weakening of the 3µm band strength [1, 4, 7]. In order to understand mineralogical, spectral, and compositional changes during heating of hydrous carbonaceous chondrites, we have carried out systematic investigation of mineralogy, reflectance spectra, and volatile composition of hydrated and dehydrated carbonaceous chondrites as well as experimentally-heated hydrous carbonaceous chondrites. In addition, we investigated reflectance spectra of tochilinite that is a major phase of CM chondrites and has a low dehydration temperature (250degC).

  13. Prediction of potential compressive strength of Portland clinker from its mineralogy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svinning, K.; Høskuldsson, Agnar; Justnes, H.

    2010-01-01

    Based on a statistical model first applied for prediction of compressive strength up to 28 d from the microstructure of Portland cement, potential compressive strength of clinker has been predicted from its mineralogy. The prediction model was evaluated by partial least squares regression. The mi...

  14. Mineralogy by X-ray Diffraction on Mars: The Chemin Instrument on Mars Science Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaniman, D. T.; Bristow, T. F.; Bish, D. L.; Ming, D. W.; Blake, D. F.; Morris, R. V.; Rampe, E. B.; Chipera, S. J.; Treiman, A. H.; Morrison, S. M.; Achilles, C. N.; Downs, R. T.; Farmer, J. D.; Crisp, J. A.; Morookian, J. M.; Des Marais, D. J.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Sarrazin, P.; Yen, A. S.

    2014-01-01

    To obtain detailed mineralogy information, the Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity carries CheMin, the first X-ray diffraction (XRD) instrument used on a planet other than Earth. CheMin has provided the first in situ XRD analyses of full phase assemblages on another planet.

  15. Mineralogical analyses in various caves from the Băile Herculane area, the Cerna Passage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ştefan Marincea

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we intend to show results from the mineralogical analyses performed on samples from three caves in the Baile Herculane area. All minerals presented here are described for the first time in the cave from which they were sampled.

  16. Ashes from oily sewage sludge combustion: chemistry, mineralogy and leaching properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Róbert Polc

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In the current paper the chemical and mineralogical properties of bottom ash and fly ash from oily sewage sludge combustion are investigated. The mineralogical composition and the morphology of ashes were determined by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD in combination with scanning electron microscopy with quantitative energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (SEM-EDX. In addition, a leaching test results are presented to shed light on the potential toxicity of studied materials and their impact on the environment is discussed. Both of the studied materials are final products of thermal oxidation at industrial sludge incinerator. This facility aims to sanitary disposal of mechanical and biological sludge from industrial wastewater treatment plant. Bottom ash and fly ash are relatively stable solid products with slightly different chemical and mineralogical composition that reflects their different origin – burning condition in furnace vs. flues gas cleaning technology. Leaching tests of both mentioned materials were implemented under laboratory conditions. The aim of the laboratory tests was to determine the possibility of the pollutants release into the environment. The data presented herein support the importance of detailed mineralogical and geochemical study for the better understanding of the leaching tests. The obtained results showed that both of the sewage sludge ash samples exceed the criteria for accepting waste in landfilles established for Slovakia.

  17. Weathering trends and parent material characteristics of polygenetic oxisols from Minas Gerais, Brazil: I. Mineralogy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muggler, C.C.; Buurman, P.; Doesburg, van J.D.J.

    2007-01-01

    In geologically stable areas in the tropics, climatic changes and geomorphic cycles give origin to polygenetic soils. Polygenesis involves new soil formation phases taking place on preweathered materials from previous phases, resulting in soils with rather similar chemical and mineralogical properti

  18. Mineralogical Characteristics of Specimens of a Meteorwrong Fall from NW Iran

    CERN Document Server

    Pourkhorsandi, Hamed

    2014-01-01

    In the early hours of October 22, 2011, people of a small town in NW Iran, called Khameneh (38{\\deg}11'47" N, 45{\\deg}38'14" E) noticed sounds of some colliding objects to home roofs and yard floors. Mineralogical investigations revealed the terrestrial and man-made origin of these stony samples.

  19. Geochemical and mineralogical data for soils of the conterminous United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey began a low-density (1 site per 1,600 sq. km., 4857 sites) geochemical and mineralogical survey of soils of the conterminous...

  20. Bronze Age pottery from the Aeolian Islands: definition of Temper Compositional Reference Units by an integrated mineralogical and microchemical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunelli, D.; Levi, S. T.; Fragnoli, P.; Renzulli, A.; Santi, P.; Paganelli, E.; Martinelli, M. C.

    2013-12-01

    An integrated microchemical-petrographic approach is here proposed to discriminate the provenance of archaeological pottery artefacts from distinct production centres. Our study focuses on a statistically significant sampling ( n=186) of volcanic temper-bearing potteries representative of the manufacturing and dispersion among the islands of the Aeolian Archipelago during the Bronze Age. The widespread establishment of new settlements and the abundant recovery of Aeolian-made ceramic in southern Italy attest for the increased vitality of the Archipelago during the Capo Graziano culture (Early Bronze Age-Middle Bronze Age 2; 2300-1430 BC). Potteries from three of the main known ancient communities (Lipari, Filicudi and Stromboli) have been studied integrating old collections and newly excavated material. Volcanic tempers have been first investigated through multivariate analyses of relative abundances of mineral and rock clasts along with petrographic characters. In addition, we performed in-situ mineral chemistry microanalyses by Electron Microprobe and Laser Ablation—Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry to assess major and trace element composition of the most common mineral phases. Four Temper Compositional Reference Units have been recognised based on compositional trends. Two units (AI and AX) are unequivocally distinct by their peculiar trace element enrichment and petrographic composition; they mostly contain samples from the sites of Lipari and Stromboli, respectively. Units AIV and AVIII, restricted to the sites of Filicudi and Stromboli, show distinct petrographic characters but overlapped geochemical fingerprints.

  1. Chemical and mineralogical analyses of a weathering mantle developing on peridotite of the mining area for nickel in Cerro Matoso, Colombia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncalves, C.M.; Fabris, J.D. [Departamento de Quimica, UFMG (Brazil)], E-mail: claudiag@dedalus.lcc.ufmg.br, E-mail: fabris@dedalus.lcc.ufmg.br; Pacheco Serrano, W.A. [Departamento de Fisica (Colombia)], E-mail: wpacheco@donato.uptc.edu.co

    1999-11-15

    Four samples were collected at several depths in a weathering mantle developing on peridotite, found in a mining area for nickel of Cerro Matoso, about 20 km southwest of Monte Libano, Department of Cordoba, Colombia. Samples represent the main stratigraphy of the mantle. Powder X-ray diffractometry, RT Moessbauer spectroscopy, saturation magnetization measurements and conventional chemical analysis on the whole and chemically treated samples, and on some of their magnetic extracts, were used to give some details of the main occurring mineralogical phases in the mantle, particular of the magnetic iron oxides.

  2. Soil depth map definition on a terraced slope for a following distributed, high resolution, numerical modelling analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camera, C.; Apuani, T.; Mele, M.; Kuriakose, S. L.; Giudici, M.

    2012-04-01

    The soil thickness represents a key data for every environmental analysis involving soil, but its determination is not always simple. In this particular case, the study area is represented by a small terraced slope (0.6 km2) of Valtellina (Northern Italy), and the soil depth map is necessary for a coupled hydrogeological-stability analysis in a raster environment. During this work geometrical/morphological and geostatistical interpolation techniques were tested to obtain a satisfying soil depth map. At the end, the final product has been validated with geo-electrical resistivity inverse models. In this particular context, the presence of dry-stone retaining walls is of primary importance, since they have an influence on the morphology of the entire area as well as on the physical processes of water infiltration and slope stability. In order to consider the dry-stone walls in the analysis, it is necessary to have base maps with an adequate resolution (cells 1 m x 1 m). Assuming that the walls might be founded on bedrock or in its proximity, it was decided to use the heights of walls and the distribution of rock outcrops as soil depth input data. It was impossible to obtain direct measures with the knocking pole method, being pebbles frequently presents in the backfill soil . Except zero depth values, 682 measures were performed. The initial data set was divided into two subsets in order to use one as training points (76 % of the total) and the second as test points (24 %). Various techniques were tested, from linear multiple regressions with environmental predictors, to ordinary kriging, regression kriging with the same environmental variables, and Gaussian stochastic simulations. At the end, the best result was obtained with co-kriging, using a soil depth class map drawn from the field measures as co-variable. The result is a little bit guided but it was the only solution to obtain a map that partially takes into account the morphology of the slope. To verify the

  3. Employment of method of economic analysis for definition of change in organisation and efficiency of agricultural productive cooperative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danuta Gonet

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The carried synthetic analysis of the first degree has exerted big ability for taking up of adjust operation for conditions of farming changing, it was as that creation of competitive superiority. Simplification of structure organisation (sown area, limiting of breeding of animal for swine flock with taking into consideration market condition, structures of organisations for farming about that in all analysed last years economic system contribute constant. Come into effect had influence on proceeding process specialisation, which has contributed to getting high productive result and by cooperative financial.

  4. Media Entrepreneurship: A Consensual Definition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khajeheian, Datis

    2017-01-01

    Media Entrepreneurship has been an ambiguous, unclear and controversial concept and despite of growing academic efforts in the last decade, it is still a poorly defined subject. This paper is an effort to fill this gap by providing a comprehensive definition of media entrepreneurship. Firstly......, a literature review conducted and entrepreneurship, media, opportunity and innovation as building blocks of media entrepreneurship explained. Then by using of a mixed of bibliographic method and a Delphi method with multi-stage analysis process, a consensual definition of media entrepreneurship proposed....... This definition integrates some key features of the emerging media environment such as distinction of content and platform, value delivery, opportunity development, non-monetary benefit, etc. It is expected that the findings of this research clear the ground for further researches in the field of media...

  5. Geochemical and Mineralogical Investigation for Carbon Capture and Storage, Within the Arbuckle Aquifer, Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, S.; Campbell, B.; Vega, M.; Barker, R. L.; Holubnyak, E.; Watney, W. L.

    2013-12-01

    A class VI permit site under U.S. Department of Energy has been proposed for carbon sequestration in south-central Kansas. In an effort to maintain environmental stability three wells have been drilled to basement rock, two being near the injection site, KGS 1-32 and KGS 1-28, and one being to the western annex, Cutter KGS #1. The western annex site, Cutter, is being utilized as a cross-comparison for mineralogical, geochemical, and structural component to the eastern sites in Wellington. A link will be determined of the continuity of three zones of interest: the Mississippian pay zone (3670'-3700'), a potential baffle zone in the upper Arbuckle (4400'-4550'), and the proposed CO2 injection zone (4900'-5050'). 11 depths within Cutter have been swabbed, and samples taken to investigate the chemistry of the subsurface formation water. The different depths will allow for a quantitative determination of how the brine composition varies with depth, and also provides a baseline for future monitoring. Initial chemical analysis by ICP-OES and HR-ICP-MS show a hyper saline brine (50,000-190,000TDS), dominated by Cl, Na, and Ca ions. pH ranges from 6.4 to 7.5, and total alkalinity from 124 and 378 mg/L of HCO¬3-. One complex, yet intriguing, species is Iron. It could potentially allow for further precipitation of the CO2¬ from the formation of Fe carbonates, such as siderite. Cores and thin sections were taken from a variety of depths ranging from 3681.9' to 5176.9' (Wellington) and 5564.3' to 7540.2' (Cutter). Dominant mineralogy consists of dolomite with varying forms of silicic intrusions, usually in the form of chert nodules with sulfide minerals and argillaceous materials in between. Extensive vugs and microfractures allow for varying porosity within each interval. Pay zone rocks typically display fine-grained cherty dolomite with subhedral to euhedral dolomite rhombs as well as oil stains oriented in parallel blotches. Characteristics such as high porosity and small

  6. Andic soils : mineralogical effect onto organic matter dynamics, organic matter effect onto mineral dynamics, or both?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basile-Doelsch, Isabelle; Amundson, Ronald; Balesdent, Jérome; Borschneck, Daniel; Bottero, Jean-Yves; Colin, Fabrice; de Junet, Alexis; Doelsch, Emmanuel; Legros, Samuel; Levard, Clément; Masion, Armand; Meunier, Jean-Dominique; Rose, Jérôme

    2014-05-01

    From a strictly mineralogical point of view, weathering of volcanic glass produces secondary phases that are short range ordered alumino-silicates (SRO-AlSi). These are imogolite tubes (2 to 3 nm of diameter) and allophane supposedly spheres (3.5 to 5 nm). Their local structure is composed of a curved gibbsite Al layer and Si tetrahedra in the vacancies (Q0). Proto-imogolites have the same local structure but are roof-shape nanoparticles likely representing the precursors of imogolite and allophanes (Levard et al. 2010). These structures and sizes give to the SRO-AlSi large specific surfaces and high reactivities. In some natural sites, imogolites and allophanes are formed in large quantities. Aging of these phases may lead to the formation of more stable minerals (halloysite, kaolinite and gibbsite) (Torn et al 1997). In natural environments, when the weathering of volcanic glass is associated with the establishment of vegetation, the soils formed are generally andosols. These soils are particularly rich in organic matter (OM), which is explained by the high ability of SRO-AlSi mineral phases to form bonds with organic compounds. In a first order "bulk" approach, it is considered that these bonds strongly stabilize the organic compounds as their mean age can reach more than 10 kyrs in some studied sites (Basile-Doelsch et al. 2005; Torn et al. 1997). However, the structure of the mineral phases present in andosols deserves more attention. Traditionally, the presence in the SRO-AlSi andosols was shown by selective dissolution approaches by oxalate and pyrophosphate. Using spectroscopic methods, mineralogical analysis of SRO-AlSi in andosols samples showed that these mineral phases were neither imogolites nor allophanes as originally supposed, but only less organized structures remained in a state of proto-imogolites (Basile-Doelsch al. 2005 ; Levard et al., 2012). The presence of OM would have an inhibitory effect on the formation of secondary mineral phases, by

  7. Phylomineralogy of the coralline red algae: correlation of skeletal mineralogy with molecular phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A M; Sutherland, J E; Kregting, L; Farr, T J; Winter, D J

    2012-09-01

    The coralline algae in the orders Corallinales and Sporolithales (subclass Corallinophycidae), with their high degree of mineralogical variability, pose a challenge to projections regarding mineralogy and response to ocean acidification. Here we relate skeletal carbonate mineralogy to a well-established phylogenetic framework and draw inferences about the effects of future changes in sea-water chemistry on these calcified red algae. A collection of 191 coralline algal specimens from New Zealand, representing 13 genera and 28 species, included members of three families: Corallinaceae, Hapalidiaceae, and Sporolithaceae. While most skeletal specimens were entirely calcitic (range: 73-100 wt.% calcite, mean 97 wt.% calcite, std dev=5, n=172), a considerable number contained at least some aragonite. Mg in calcite ranged from 10.5 to 16.4 wt.% MgCO(3), with a mean of 13.1 wt.% MgCO(3) (std dev=1.1, n=172). The genera Mesophyllum and Lithophyllum were especially variable. Growth habit, too, was related to mineralogy: geniculate coralline algae do not generally contain any aragonite. Mg content varied among coralline families: the Corallinaceae had the highest Mg content, followed by the Sporolithaceae and the Hapalidiaceae. Despite the significant differences among families, variation and overlap prevent the use of carbonate mineralogy as a taxonomic character in the coralline algae. Latitude (as a proxy for water temperature) had only a slight relationship to Mg content in coralline algae, contrary to trends observed in other biomineralising taxa. Temperate magnesium calcites, like those produced by coralline algae, are particularly vulnerable to ocean acidification. Changes in biomineralisation or species distribution may occur over the next few decades, particularly to species producing high-Mg calcite, as pH and CO(2) dynamics change in coastal temperate oceans.

  8. Skeletal mineralogy of coral recruits under high temperature and pCO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Foster

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aragonite, which is the polymorph of CaCO3 precipitated by modern corals during skeletal formation, has a higher solubility than the more stable polymorph calcite. This higher solubility leaves animals that produce aragonitic skeletons more vulnerable to anthropogenic ocean acidification. It is therefore, important to determine whether scleractinian corals have the plasticity to adapt and produce calcite in their skeletons in response to changing environmental conditions. Both high pCO2 and lower Mg / Ca ratios in seawater are thought to have driven changes in the skeletal mineralogy of major marine calcifiers in the past ∼540 myr. Experimentally reduced Mg / Ca ratios in ambient seawater have been shown to induce some calcite precipitation in both adult and newly settled modern corals, however, the impact of high pCO2 on the mineralogy of recruits is unknown. Here we determined the skeletal mineralogy of one-month old Acropora spicifera coral recruits grown under high temperature (+3 °C and pCO2 (∼900 μatm conditions, using X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. We found that newly settled coral recruits produced entirely aragonitic skeletons regardless of the treatment. Our results show that elevated pCO2 alone is unlikely to drive changes in the skeletal mineralogy of young corals. Not having an ability to switch from aragonite to calcite precipitation may leave corals and ultimately coral reef ecosystems more susceptible to predicted ocean acidification. An important area for prospective research would be to investigate the combined impact of high pCO2 and reduced Mg / Ca ratio on coral skeletal mineralogy.

  9. Mineral Supertrumps: A new card game to assist learning of mineralogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spandler, C.

    2015-12-01

    Mineralogy is considered one of the cornerstone subjects of geoscience curriculum. It provides the basic information from which we can understand the composition and behaviour of Earth and planetary materials, yet many students struggle to obtain adequate comprehension and knowledge of mineralogy during tertiary degree programs. Here, I introduce a new card game called "Mineral Supertrumps" that can be used to assist teaching of mineralogy at secondary and tertiary level. The card game is easy to learn and play, and is designed to promote active learning in a group environment. The game involves 3 to 6 people, and is similar to the "Top Trumps™" card games. The pack consists of 54 mineral cards, and 6 supertrump cards. Each mineral card includes information about the mineral such as the generic chemical formula, the classification, crystal system, the geological environment where the mineral is commonly found or formed, as well as information in the five playing categories (or trumps) of Hardness, Specific Gravity, Cleavage, Crustal Abundance, and Economic Value. The first three playing categories relate to distinct physical properties of the mineral, while last two categories rate the importance of the mineral in terms of abundance in the Earth's crust and value to modern societies. Results of a formal evaluation of the game by students in the second year of a tertiary geology program indicate that the game has clear benefits for learning about mineralogy. The majority of students enjoyed playing the game and considered it to be effective for enhancing learning about mineral properties and their application to other Earth Science disciplines. Therefore, inclusion of "Mineral Supertrumps" into Earth Science curriculum at secondary or tertiary level has the potential to redress the difficulties students face in learning of mineralogy, while requiring little to no adjustment to existing teaching programs.

  10. Phenotype definition in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winawer, Melodie R

    2006-05-01

    Phenotype definition consists of the use of epidemiologic, biological, molecular, or computational methods to systematically select features of a disorder that might result from distinct genetic influences. By carefully defining the target phenotype, or dividing the sample by phenotypic characteristics, we can hope to narrow the range of genes that influence risk for the trait in the study population, thereby increasing the likelihood of finding them. In this article, fundamental issues that arise in phenotyping in epilepsy and other disorders are reviewed, and factors complicating genotype-phenotype correlation are discussed. Methods of data collection, analysis, and interpretation are addressed, focusing on epidemiologic studies. With this foundation in place, the epilepsy subtypes and clinical features that appear to have a genetic basis are described, and the epidemiologic studies that have provided evidence for the heritability of these phenotypic characteristics, supporting their use in future genetic investigations, are reviewed. Finally, several molecular approaches to phenotype definition are discussed, in which the molecular defect, rather than the clinical phenotype, is used as a starting point.

  11. Definitions of oppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, R G

    1997-12-01

    How we begin to serve others as healthcare professionals and how it is we define underserved and oppressed peoples is important in understanding issues in the organization and allocation of health care. This exploration, based on feminist post-structuralist theory, explores how nurses formulate definitions of 'underserved' and 'vulnerable'. This study goes beyond prescribed definitions to locate meanings used to identify oppression. I present, through an analysis of a literature search, the context and construction of the terms 'vulnerable population' and 'medically underserved'. Professional nursing journals are the source of relevant text. The implications of working with particular understandings of the terms 'vulnerable' and 'underserved' is based on my assumption that healthcare providers need to critically focus on the personal and political meanings they attribute to the labels used to define the clients and communities with whom they work. The presentation of this material supports that the way we define 'vulnerable' and 'underserved' is related to how our work fighting racism, ageism, AIDS, poverty, homophobia, addiction, domestic violence, sexism and colonization is realized.

  12. Analysis of Organic Molecules Extracted from Mars Analogues and Influence of Their Mineralogy Using N-Methyl-N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)Trifluoroacetamide Derivatization Coupled with Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry in Preparation for the Sample Analysis at Mars Derivatization Experiment on the Mars Science Laboratory Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalport, F.; Glavin, D. P.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Bish, D.; Blake, D.; Coll, P.; Szopa, C.; Buch, A.; McAdam, A.; Dworkin, J. P.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2012-01-01

    The search for complex organic molecules on Mars, including important biomolecules such as amino acids and carboxylic acids will require a chemical extraction and derivatization step to transform these organic compounds into species that are sufficiently volatile to be detected by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS). We have developed, a one-pot extraction and chemical derivatization protocol using N-methyl-N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA) and dimethylformamide (DMF) for the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) experiment on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL). The temperature and duration the derivatization reaction, pre-concentration of chemical derivatives, and gas chromatographic separation parameters have been optimized under SAM instrument design constraints. MTBSTFA/DMF extraction and derivatization at 300 C for several minutes of a variety of terrestrial Mars analogue materials facilitated the detection of amino acids and carboxylic acids in a surface soil sample collected from the Atacama Desert and a carbonate-rich stromatolite sample from Svalbard. However, the rapid reaction of MTBSTFA with water in several analogue materials that contained high abundances of hydrated minerals and the possible deactivation of derivatized compounds by iron oxides, as detected by XRD/XRF using the CheMin field unit Terra, proved to be highly problematic for the direct extraction of organics using MTBSTFA, The combination of pyrolysis and two different chemical derivatization methods employed by SAM should enable a wide range of organic compounds to be detected by GCMS if present on Mars,

  13. Statistical analysis and definition of blockages-prediction formulae for the wastewater network of Oslo by evolutionary computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugarelli, Rita; Kristensen, Stig Morten; Røstum, Jon; Saegrov, Sveinung; Di Federico, Vittorio

    2009-01-01

    Oslo Vann og Avløpsetaten (Oslo VAV)-the water/wastewater utility in the Norwegian capital city of Oslo-is assessing future strategies for selection of most reliable materials for wastewater networks, taking into account not only material technical performance but also material performance, regarding operational condition of the system.The research project undertaken by SINTEF Group, the largest research organisation in Scandinavia, NTNU (Norges Teknisk-Naturvitenskapelige Universitet) and Oslo VAV adopts several approaches to understand reasons for failures that may impact flow capacity, by analysing historical data for blockages in Oslo.The aim of the study was to understand whether there is a relationship between the performance of the pipeline and a number of specific attributes such as age, material, diameter, to name a few. This paper presents the characteristics of the data set available and discusses the results obtained by performing two different approaches: a traditional statistical analysis by segregating the pipes into classes, each of which with the same explanatory variables, and a Evolutionary Polynomial Regression model (EPR), developed by Technical University of Bari and University of Exeter, to identify possible influence of pipe's attributes on the total amount of predicted blockages in a period of time.Starting from a detailed analysis of the available data for the blockage events, the most important variables are identified and a classification scheme is adopted.From the statistical analysis, it can be stated that age, size and function do seem to have a marked influence on the proneness of a pipeline to blockages, but, for the reduced sample available, it is difficult to say which variable it is more influencing. If we look at total number of blockages the oldest class seems to be the most prone to blockages, but looking at blockage rates (number of blockages per km per year), then it is the youngest class showing the highest blockage rate

  14. Issues in System Boundary Definition for Substance Flow Analysis: The Case of Nitrogen Cycle Management in Catalonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Bartrola

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The great complexity of the nitrogen cycle, including anthropogenic contributions, makes it necessary to carry out local studies, which allow us to identify the specific cause-effect links in a particular society. Models of local societies that are based on methods such as Substance Flow Analysis (SFA, which study and characterise the performance of metabolic exchanges between human society and the environment, are a useful tools for directing local policy towards sustainable management of the nitrogen cycle. In this paper, the selection of geographical boundaries for SFA application is discussed. Data availability and accuracy, and the possibility of linking the results with instructions for decision making, are critical aspects for proper scale selection. The experience obtained in the construction of the model for Catalonia is used to draw attention to the difficulties found in regional studies.

  15. Clinical, Radiological, Cytological and Biochemical Analysis of Pancreatic Cystic Lesions are Necessary prior to Definitive Therapeutic Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallikarjuna Uppara

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To retrospectively study the correlation between pre-operative morphological and biochemical features of resected pancreatic cystic lesions and predictive power of these features in relation to biological behaviour and final histology. Methods We reviewed the literature systematically to identify relevant variables that are in use to predict the biological nature of pancreatic cystic lesions and aid therapeutic planning. We designed a template encompassing all used variables to collate the available data of resected pancreatic cystic lesions from two centres. The collated data included clinico-pathological and biochemical data, pre-operative computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, Endoscopic ultrasound, positron emission tomography–computed tomography, Fine-needle aspiration analysis whenever available and correlated with the final post-operative histology. Pooled data was analysed using statistics and data 14 statistical software. Results Sixty-four patients with pre-operative diagnosis of pancreatic cystic lesions were identified. Twenty seven cases underwent endoscopic ultra sound - fine-needle aspiration as an adjunct to the radiological assessment to evaluate the nature of these noted PCLs and both cytological and biochemical analysis were carried out on the intra-cystic aspirate. The intra cystic carcinoembryonic antigen levels recorded a mean of 667.97 in the tested group with a standard deviation of 1934.38. Conclusion No single test is able to predict the nature or behaviour of pancreatic cystic lesions. The differences noted on specialist imaging can be very subtle and demand specialist interpretive skills and hence a panel of pre-operative testing with review at specialist multidisciplinary meeting is mandatory for all such cases.

  16. Definition of a family of tissue-protective cytokines using functional cluster analysis: a proof-of-concept study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela eMengozzi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of the tissue-protective activities of erythropoietin (EPO has underlined the importance of some cytokines in tissue protection, repair and remodeling. As such activities have been reported for other cytokines, we asked whether we could define a class of tissue-protective cytokines. We therefore explored a novel approach based on functional clustering. In this pilot study, we started by analyzing a small number of cytokines (30. We functionally classified the 30 cytokines according to their interactions by using the bioinformatics tool STRING (Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes, followed by hierarchical cluster analysis. The results of this functional clustering were different from those obtained by clustering cytokines simply according to their sequence. We previously reported that the protective activity of EPO in a model of cerebral ischemia was paralleled by an upregulation of synaptic plasticity genes, particularly early growth response 2 (EGR2. To assess the predictivity of functional clustering, we tested some of the cytokines clustering close to EPO (interleukin-11, IL-11; kit ligand, KITLG; leukemia inhibitory factor, LIF; thrombopoietin, THPO in an in vitro model of human neuronal cells for their ability to induce EGR2. Two of these, LIF and IL-11, induced EGR2 expression. Although these data would need to be extended to a larger number of cytokines and the biological validation should be done using more robust in vivo models, rather then just one cell line, this study shows the feasibility of this approach. This type of functional cluster analysis could be extended to other fields of cytokine research and help design biological experiments.

  17. Definition of a Family of Tissue-Protective Cytokines Using Functional Cluster Analysis: A Proof-of-Concept Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengozzi, Manuela; Ermilov, Peter; Annenkov, Alexander; Ghezzi, Pietro; Pearl, Frances

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of the tissue-protective activities of erythropoietin (EPO) has underlined the importance of some cytokines in tissue-protection, repair, and remodeling. As such activities have been reported for other cytokines, we asked whether we could define a class of tissue-protective cytokines. We therefore explored a novel approach based on functional clustering. In this pilot study, we started by analyzing a small number of cytokines (30). We functionally classified the 30 cytokines according to their interactions by using the bioinformatics tool STRING (Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes), followed by hierarchical cluster analysis. The results of this functional clustering were different from those obtained by clustering cytokines simply according to their sequence. We previously reported that the protective activity of EPO in a model of cerebral ischemia was paralleled by an upregulation of synaptic plasticity genes, particularly early growth response 2 (EGR2). To assess the predictivity of functional clustering, we tested some of the cytokines clustering close to EPO (interleukin-11, IL-11; kit ligand, KITLG; leukemia inhibitory factor, LIF; thrombopoietin, THPO) in an in vitro model of human neuronal cells for their ability to induce EGR2. Two of these, LIF and IL-11, induced EGR2 expression. Although these data would need to be extended to a larger number of cytokines and the biological validation should be done using more robust in vivo models, rather then just one cell line, this study shows the feasibility of this approach. This type of functional cluster analysis could be extended to other fields of cytokine research and help design biological experiments.

  18. Synthesis of zeolites from boiler fly ash: physical, chemical and mineralogical characterization; Sintese de zeolitas a partir de cinza volante de caldeiras: caracterizacao fisica, quimica e mineralogica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha Junior, C.A.F.; Santos, S.C.A.; Souza, C.A.G., E-mail: augustorocha2@gmail.com [Programa de Pos Graduacao em Engenharia Quimica (PPEQ-UFPA), Belem, PA (Brazil); Angelica, R.S.; Neves, R.F. [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Geologia e Geoquimica, Instituto de Geociencias (PPGG-IG-UFPA), Ananindeua, PA (Brazil)

    2012-01-15

    Along the years, worldwide industrial development has causing a growing generation of residues, bringing potentials environmental problems. A study of the characteristics of these wastes, as well as the development of techniques for their use in new processes becomes indispensable for the environment preservation. The main purpose of this work is to evaluate the possible use of two important industrial residues from the Amazon region for zeolite synthesis: (a) the fly ash (particle size < 100 {mu}m) that comes from burning of mineral coal in boiler; and (b) the micro silica, a by-product of the reaction between quartz and coal in the production of metallic silicon and alloys iron-silicon.The following chemical, physical and mineralogical characterization methods were carried out: X-ray diffractometry, X-ray fluorescence, scanning electron microscopy, granulometric analysis, differential thermal and thermogravimetric analysis (DTA-TG). The analyses were carried out at the following conditions: 60, 100, 150 and 190 deg C, Na{sub 2}O/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} molar ratio of 5 and Si/Al molar ratio ranging from 2.12 to 15, and reaction time of 24 h. The results of the fly characterization demonstrate its enormous potential as raw material for the zeolite synthesis. SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} represent more than 50% of its composition, mineralogical phases defined, low humidity content, low particle size (d{sub 90} < 10 {mu}m), among others. Mineralogical analyses of the synthesized products showed the formation of some zeolite types, as follow: analcime, phillipsite, sodalite, zeolite P and tobermorite. The results show that the mixture fly ash-micro silica in these reaction conditions point to a promising material for zeolite synthesis (author)

  19. On the dissemination and development of genetic mineralogy in China%成因矿物学在中国的传播与发展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李胜荣

    2013-01-01

    Genetic mineralogy is an important part of modern mineralogy.The following are the major components of genetic mineralogy:the temporal and spatial distribution of minerals and their assemblages,the linkage among various internal and external properties of minerals,the physico-chemical conditions of formation and transformation of minerals,the interaction between minerals and surrounding media and the macroscopic and microscopic signatures for these,and the genetic classification of minerals and the application of mineral genesis information.The ontogeny and phylogeny of minerals,their typomorphism,the thermobarometry,the paragenetic analysis and genetic classification of minerals constitute the discipline of genetic mineralogy,among which typomorphism is the core of the system.During the second half of the 20th century,the Chinese mineralogists led by Professor Guang-Yuan Chen made innovative advances and constituted genetic mineralogical groups,established the theoretical system of genetic mineralogy,brought forth 6 basic properties of mineral typomorphism and 4 rules for mineralogical mapping,and summarized the genetic typomorphism and ore-prospecting criteria of minerals from metamorphic and magmatic rock on a variety of mineral deposits including lead,zinc,iron,gold,mercury,fluorite and other deposits,thus efficiently guiding the geological research and ore prospecting in China.In the first decade of this century,parameters and methodology of mineralogical mapping have been further explored and improved developing convenient and fast means through the application of mineral magnetics and near infrared spectroscopy.Several regularities were discovered on the zoning,alteration in relation to depth,nature of mineralization as well as mineral typomorphism.The various factors related to the significance of mineral typomorphism were explained in depth in geodynamic and tectonic perspectives.A new branch of mineralogy-environmental biological mineralogy-gradually grew

  20. Mineralogical Mapping of Asteroid Itokawa using Calibrated Hayabusa AMICA images and NIRS Spectrometer Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Corre, Lucille; Becker, Kris J.; Reddy, Vishnu; Li, Jian-Yang; Bhatt, Megha

    2016-10-01

    The goal of our work is to restore data from the Hayabusa spacecraft that is available in the Planetary Data System (PDS) Small Bodies Node. More specifically, our objectives are to radiometrically calibrate and photometrically correct AMICA (Asteroid Multi-Band Imaging Camera) images of Itokawa. The existing images archived in the PDS are not in reflectance and not corrected from the effect of viewing geometry. AMICA images are processed with the Integrated Software for Imagers and Spectrometers (ISIS) system from USGS, widely used for planetary image analysis. The processing consists in the ingestion of the images in ISIS (amica2isis), updates to AMICA start time (sumspice), radiometric calibration (amicacal) including smear correction, applying SPICE ephemeris, adjusting control using Gaskell SUMFILEs (sumspice), projecting individual images (cam2map) and creating global or local mosaics. The application amicacal has also an option to remove pixels corresponding to the polarizing filters on the left side of the image frame. The amicacal application will include a correction for the Point Spread Function. The last version of the PSF published by Ishiguro et al. in 2014 includes correction for the effect of scattered light. This effect is important to correct because it can add 10% level in error and is affecting mostly the longer wavelength filters such as zs and p. The Hayabusa team decided to use the color data for six of the filters for scientific analysis after correcting for the scattered light. We will present calibrated data in I/F for all seven AMICA color filters. All newly implemented ISIS applications and map projections from this work have been or will be distributed to the community via ISIS public releases. We also processed the NIRS spectrometer data, and we will perform photometric modeling, then apply photometric corrections, and finally extract mineralogical parameters. The end results will be the creation of pyroxene chemistry and olivine

  1. 基于内容分析法的创新团队内涵解析%The Definition of Innovation Team Based on Content Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高虹; 王济干

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviewed the concepts of team,the meaning of innovation,innovation impetus,the process and rules of innovation based on the documentanalysis method. Meanwhile,it researched the definitions of innovation team from 190 articles by content analysis in order to extract the common attributes and essentialcharacteristics of innovation team so as to define and get more accurate understandingof innovation team.%基于文献分析法,对团队的概念进行了回顾,且对创新的含义、创新的动力及过程和规则方面进行追溯;运用内容分析法对190篇文献中有关“创新团队”的定义进行梳理,提取出创新团队的共有属性和本质特征,据此系统地给出本文对“创新团队”概念性的界定,以期获得对创新团队更为全面、精确的认识。

  2. Chemical and mineralogical analyses of planetary rocks using a laser ablation mass spectrometer for in situ space research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigitte Neuland, Maike; Mezger, Klaus; Riedo, Andreas; Tulej, Marek; Wurz, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The context chemical analysis is of considerable importance in space research. High resolution in situ studies of planetary materials can yield important information on surface heterogeneity, basic grain mineralogy and chemical composition of surface and subsurface. In turn, these data are the basis for our understanding of the physical and chemical processes which led to the formation and alteration of planetary material [1] [2]. A highly heterogeneous sample of Allende meteorite, representative for extraterrestrial material, is investigated by LMS, a miniature laser ablation mass spectrometer designed for space research [3]. In the current setup a fs-laser ablation ion source is applied, allowing chemical analysis with lateral resolution of about 10-15 μm and sub-micrometre depth resolution [4]. The reflectron TOF mass analyser is used to measure elemental and isotopic composition of the sampled surface. The LMS instrument supports mass resolution 400 and dynamic range of 108 [5]. In the current studies with the fs-ablation ion source significant improvements in the detection efficiency of several metals e.g., Ni, Co, and non-metals e.g., Si, P, S and O, was achieved comparing to our previous setup [6]. Also the values of sensitivity coefficients for these elements are determined to be close to one, which resulted in the substantial improvements of the quantitative element analysis of the sample. Since the ablation crater depth is expected to be about 1 nm/laser shot also the possible changes of the main element or isotope distribution in depth can be analysed to assess their influence on the mineralogical analysis [7]. Several areas on an Allende sample were investigated and the chemical composition across the surface was determined from the mass spectrometric analysis. Also accurate isotope analysis could be conducted for most of main elements with sufficiently high signal to noise ratio. Correlation of elements was conducted and yielded mineralogical maps

  3. Contribution of image analysis to the definition of explosibility of fine particles resulting from waste recycling process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gente, V.; La Marca, F.

    2007-09-01

    In waste recycling processes, the development of comminution technologies is one of the main actions to improve the quality of recycled products. This involves a rise in fine particles production, which could have some effects on explosibility properties of materials. This paper reports the results of experiments done to examine the explosibility of the fine particles resulting from waste recycling process. Tests have been conducted for the products derived from milling processes operated in different operative conditions. In particular, the comminution tests have been executed varying the milling temperature by refrigerant agents. The materials utilized in explosibility tests were different typologies of plastics coming from waste products (PET, ABS and PP), characterized by size lower than 1 mm. The results of explosibility tests, carried out by mean of a Hartmann Apparatus, have been compared with the data derived from image analysis procedure aimed to measure the morphological characteristics of particles. For each typology of material, the propensity to explode appears to be correlated not only to particle size, but also to morphological properties, linked to the operative condition of the milling process.

  4. Regular Mechanical Transformation of Rotations Into Translations: Part 1. Kinematic Analysis and Definition of the Basic Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadjieva, Emilia; Abadjiev, Valentin

    2017-06-01

    The science that study the processes of motions transformation upon a preliminary defined law between non-coplanar axes (in general case) axes of rotations or axis of rotation and direction of rectilinear translation by three-link mechanisms, equipped with high kinematic joints, can be treated as an independent branch of Applied Mechanics. It deals with mechanical behaviour of these multibody systems in relation to the kinematic and geometric characteristics of the elements of the high kinematic joints, which form them. The object of study here is the process of regular transformation of rotation into translation. The developed mathematical model is subjected to the defined task for studying the sliding velocity vector function at the contact point from the surfaces elements of arbitrary high kinematic joints. The main kinematic characteristics of the studied type motions transformation (kinematic cylinders on level, kinematic relative helices (helical conoids) and kinematic pitch configurations) are defined on the bases of the realized analysis. These features expand the theoretical knowledge, which is the objective of the gearing theory. They also complement the system of kinematic and geometric primitives, that form the mathematical model for synthesis of spatial rack mechanisms.

  5. 40 CFR 417.41 - Specialized definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... general definitions, abbreviations and methods of analysis set forth in 40 CFR part 401 shall apply to...-10 percent crude glycerine and 90-22 percent water that is a by-product of saponification or...

  6. 23 CFR 650.105 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS BRIDGES... of exceedance selected for the design of a highway encroachment. By definition, the highway will not... highway. (p) Risk analysis shall mean an economic comparison of design alternatives using expected...

  7. 40 CFR 424.51 - Specialized definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... STANDARDS FERROALLOY MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Other Calcium Carbide Furnaces Subcategory § 424.51... definitions, abbreviations and methods of analysis set forth in 40 CFR part 401 shall apply to this subpart....

  8. MINERALOGICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF SANDSTONE AND CLAY, NORTH-EAST CONSTANTINE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M BENYAMINA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The north-east area of Constantine has a very complex geological setting. The variety of sedimentary rocks such as sandstone and clay in abundance, represent a big importance in the industry and road infrastructure. The X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis, Scanning Electron Microscopy SEM/EDS, FTIR spectroscopy of sandstone and clay are required for qualitative and quantitative analysis of the existing phases. In addition, chemical analysis of the same samples is required to confirm the XRD, EDS (Energy Dispersive X ray Spectroscopy and FTIR spectroscopy results. The results of this multidisciplinary study, obtained by various analytical techniques, show a good agreement on the existing phases.

  9. Partial Remission Definition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Marie Louise Max; Hougaard, Philip; Pörksen, Sven

    2014-01-01

    of type 1 diabetes (T1D). Receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis was used to evaluate the predictive value of IDAA1c and age on partial C-peptide remission (stimulated C-peptide, SCP > 300 pmol/L). RESULTS: PR (IDAA1c ≤ 9) in the Danish and Hvidoere cohorts occurred in 62 vs. 61% (3 months......OBJECTIVE: To validate the partial remission (PR) definition based on insulin dose-adjusted HbA1c (IDAA1c). SUBJECTS AND METHODS: The IDAA1c was developed using data in 251 children from the European Hvidoere cohort. For validation, 129 children from a Danish cohort were followed from the onset...

  10. Mineralogical Study of a Biologically-Based Treatment System That Removes Arsenic, Zinc and Copper from Landfill Leachate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Khoshnoodi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Mineralogical characterization by X-ray diffraction (XRD and a high throughput automated quantitative evaluation of minerals by scanning electron microscopy (QEMSCAN was conducted on samples from a sulphate-reducing biochemical reactor (BCR treating high concentrations of metals (As, Zn, Cu in smelter waste landfill seepage. The samples were also subjected to energy dispersive X-ray (EDX analysis of specific particles. The bulk analysis results revealed that the samples consisted mainly of silicate and carbonate minerals. More detailed phase analysis indicated four different classes: zinc-arsenic sulphosalts/sulphates, zinc-arsenic oxides, zinc phosphates and zinc-lead sulphosalts/sulphates. This suggests that sulphates and sulphides are the predominant types of Zn and As minerals formed in the BCR. Sphalerite (ZnS was a common mineral observed in many of the samples. In addition, X-ray point analysis showed evidence of As and Zn coating around feldspar and amphibole particles. The presence of arsenic-zinc-iron, with or without cadmium particles, indicated arsenopyrite minerals. Copper-iron-sulphide particles suggested chalcopyrite (CuFeS2 and tennantite (Cu,Fe12As4S13. Microbial communities found in each sample were correlated with metal content to describe taxonomic groups associated with high-metal samples. The research results highlight mineral grains that were present or formed at the site that might be the predominant forms of immobilized arsenic, zinc and copper.

  11. Unsupervised Mineralogical Mapping for Fast Exploration of CRISM Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allender, E. J.; Stepinski, T.

    2014-07-01

    We propose an unsupervised analysis of CRISM TRDR imagery which generates maps displaying the locations of unique mineral classes and provides information for a posteriori interpretation of these classes.

  12. Analysis on definition and management process of Near-Miss%Near-Miss定义及管理流程分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王广宇

    2012-01-01

    Being the base of the safety pyramid, Near-Miss management is the most important method for corporation HSE management and even the whole corporation management. By taking off the bottom near-miss, the hazards will be managed in the maximum extent, the top event or incident will be prevented, corporation HSE KPI will be improved and the efficiency of corporation will be elevated. After contrast and analysis the Chinese translation for Near-Miss to "false alarm event" was defined. One whole Near-Miss management should comprise eight processes and no one should be ignored. Foregoing process decides the performance of the latter process. The maximization of near-miss management benefit will be obtained through the integrated near-miss management system, and it will e-ventually promote the HSE management level of corporation.%作为事故金字塔的基座,Near-Miss管理在企业HSE管理乃至整个企业管理中起着非常重要的作用.通过消除底部的Near-Miss,可以最大限度地消除隐患,避免顶端意外事件的发生,提升企业HSE业绩,提高企业的运行效率.通过比较分析,可将Near-Miss翻译为“虚惊事件”.一个完整的Near-Miss管理可分解为八个流程,每个流程缺一不可,且前面的流程决定了后面流程的完成情况.通过八个流程的充分运行,可以获得Near-Miss管理效益的最大化,最终提升企业的HSE管理水平.

  13. Comparative analysis of plant genomes allows the definition of the "Phytolongins": a novel non-SNARE longin domain protein family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedovato, Marco; Rossi, Valeria; Dacks, Joel B; Filippini, Francesco

    2009-11-04

    Subcellular trafficking is a hallmark of eukaryotic cells. Because of their pivotal role in the process, a great deal of attention has been paid to the SNARE proteins. Most R-SNAREs, or "longins", however, also possess a highly conserved, N-terminal fold. This "longin domain" is known to play multiple roles in regulating SNARE activity and targeting via interaction with other trafficking proteins. However, the diversity and complement of longins in eukaryotes is poorly understood. Our comparative genome survey identified a novel family of longin-related proteins, dubbed the "Phytolongins" because they are specific to land plants. Phytolongins share with longins the N-terminal longin domain and the C-terminal transmembrane domain; however, in the central region, the SNARE motif is replaced by a novel region. Phylogenetic analysis pinpoints the Phytolongins as a derivative of the plant specific VAMP72 longin sub-family and allows elucidation of Phytolongin evolution. "Longins" have been defined as R-SNAREs composed of both a longin domain and a SNARE motif. However, expressed gene isoforms and splice variants of longins are examples of non-SNARE motif containing longins. The discovery of Phytolongins, a family of non-SNARE longin domain proteins, together with recent evidence on the conservation of the longin-like fold in proteins involved in both vesicle fusion (e.g. the Trs20 tether) and vesicle formation (e.g. sigma and mu adaptin) highlight the importance of the longin-like domain in protein trafficking and suggest that it was one of the primordial building blocks of the eukaryotic membrane-trafficking machinery.

  14. Comparative analysis of plant genomes allows the definition of the "Phytolongins": a novel non-SNARE longin domain protein family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dacks Joel B

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Subcellular trafficking is a hallmark of eukaryotic cells. Because of their pivotal role in the process, a great deal of attention has been paid to the SNARE proteins. Most R-SNAREs, or "longins", however, also possess a highly conserved, N-terminal fold. This "longin domain" is known to play multiple roles in regulating SNARE activity and targeting via interaction with other trafficking proteins. However, the diversity and complement of longins in eukaryotes is poorly understood. Results Our comparative genome survey identified a novel family of longin-related proteins, dubbed the "Phytolongins" because they are specific to land plants. Phytolongins share with longins the N-terminal longin domain and the C-terminal transmembrane domain; however, in the central region, the SNARE motif is replaced by a novel region. Phylogenetic analysis pinpoints the Phytolongins as a derivative of the plant specific VAMP72 longin sub-family and allows elucidation of Phytolongin evolution. Conclusion "Longins" have been defined as R-SNAREs composed of both a longin domain and a SNARE motif. However, expressed gene isoforms and splice variants of longins are examples of non-SNARE motif containing longins. The discovery of Phytolongins, a family of non-SNARE longin domain proteins, together with recent evidence on the conservation of the longin-like fold in proteins involved in both vesicle fusion (e.g. the Trs20 tether and vesicle formation (e.g. σ and μ adaptin highlight the importance of the longin-like domain in protein trafficking and suggest that it was one of the primordial building blocks of the eukaryotic membrane-trafficking machinery.

  15. 46 CFR Appendix B to Part 154 - Stress Analyses Definitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Stress Analyses Definitions B Appendix B to Part 154... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Pt. 154, App. B Appendix B to Part 154—Stress Analyses Definitions The following are the standard definitions of stresses for the analysis of an...

  16. The association between TGF-β1 polymorphisms and radiation pneumonia in lung cancer patients treated with definitive radiotherapy: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiazhuo; Deng, Lei; Na, Feifei; Xue, Jianxin; Gao, Hui; Lu, You

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies investigating the association between TGF-β1 polymorphisms and Radiation Pneumonia (RP) risk have provided inconsistent results. The aim of our study was to assess the association between the TGF-β1 genes C509T, G915C and T869C polymorphisms and risk of RP in lung cancer patients treated with definitive radiotherapy. Two investigators independently searched the Medline, Embase, CNKI, and Chinese Biomedicine Databases for studies published before September 2013. Summary odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for TGF-β1 polymorphisms and RP were calculated in a fixed-effects model or a random-effects model when appropriate. Ultimately, each 7 studies were found to be eligible for meta-analyses of C509T, G915C and T869C, respectively. Our analysis suggested that the variant genotypes of T869C were associated with a significantly increased RP risk in dominant model (OR = 0.59, 95% CI = 0.45-0.79) and CT vs. TT model (OR = 0.47, 95% CI = 0.32-0.69). In the subgroup analyses by ethnicity/country, a significantly increased risk was observed among Caucasians. For C509T and G915C polymorphism, no obvious associations were found for all genetic models. This meta-analysis suggests that T869C polymorphism of TGF-β1 may be associated with RP risk only in Caucasians, and there may be no association between C509T and G915C polymorphism and RP risk.

  17. The association between TGF-β1 polymorphisms and radiation pneumonia in lung cancer patients treated with definitive radiotherapy: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiazhuo He

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous studies investigating the association between TGF-β1 polymorphisms and Radiation Pneumonia (RP risk have provided inconsistent results. The aim of our study was to assess the association between the TGF-β1 genes C509T, G915C and T869C polymorphisms and risk of RP in lung cancer patients treated with definitive radiotherapy. METHODS: Two investigators independently searched the Medline, Embase, CNKI, and Chinese Biomedicine Databases for studies published before September 2013. Summary odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs for TGF-β1 polymorphisms and RP were calculated in a fixed-effects model or a random-effects model when appropriate. RESULTS: Ultimately, each 7 studies were found to be eligible for meta-analyses of C509T, G915C and T869C, respectively. Our analysis suggested that the variant genotypes of T869C were associated with a significantly increased RP risk in dominant model (OR = 0.59, 95% CI = 0.45-0.79 and CT vs. TT model (OR = 0.47, 95% CI = 0.32-0.69. In the subgroup analyses by ethnicity/country, a significantly increased risk was observed among Caucasians. For C509T and G915C polymorphism, no obvious associations were found for all genetic models. CONCLUSION: This meta-analysis suggests that T869C polymorphism of TGF-β1 may be associated with RP risk only in Caucasians, and there may be no association between C509T and G915C polymorphism and RP risk.

  18. The causal roles of vitamin B12 and transcobalamin in prostate cancer: can Mendelian randomization analysis provide definitive answers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, Simon M; Metcalfe, Chris; Palmer, Tom M; Refsum, Helga; Lewis, Sarah J; Smith, George Davey; Cox, Angela; Davis, Michael; Marsden, Gemma; Johnston, Carole; Lane, J Athene; Donovan, Jenny L; Neal, David E; Hamdy, Freddie C; Smith, A David; Martin, Richard M

    2011-01-01

    Circulating vitamin B12 (cobalamin/B12) and total transcobalamin (tTC) have been associated with increased and reduced risk, respectively, of prostate cancer. Mendelian randomization has the potential to determine whether these are causal associations. We estimated associations of single nucleotide polymorphisms in B12-related genes (MTR, MTRR, FUT2, TCN2, TCN1, CUBN, and MUT) with plasma concentrations of B12, tTC, holo-transcobalamin, holo-haptocorrin, folate, and homocysteine and with prostate cancer risk in a case-control study (913 cases, 895 controls) nested within the UK-wide population-based ProtecT study of prostate cancer in men age 45-69 years. Instrumental variable (IV) analysis was used to estimate odds ratios for effects of B12 and tTC on prostate cancer. We observed that B12 was lower in men with FUT2 204G>A (rs492602), CUBN 758C>T (rs1801222) and MUT 1595G>A (rs1141321) alleles (PtrendG (rs1801198) allele (PtrendA and CUBN 758C>T were selected as instruments for B12; TCN2 776C>G for tTC. Conventional and IV estimates for the association of loge(B12) with prostate cancer were: OR=1.17 (95% CI 0.90-1.51), P=0.2 and OR=0.60 (0.16-2.15), P=0.4, respectively. Conventional and IV estimates for the association of loge(tTC) with prostate cancer were: OR=0.81 (0.54-1.20), P=0.3 and OR=0.41 (0.13-1.32), P=0.1, respectively. Confidence intervals around the IV estimates in our study were too wide to allow robust inference. Sample size estimates based on our data indicated that Mendelian randomization in this context requires much larger studies or multiple genetic variants that explain all of the variance in the intermediate phenotype. PMID:22199995

  19. Skin conductance and heart-rate responsivity to public speaking imagery among students with high and low self-reported fear: a comparative analysis of "response" definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesen, J M; McGlynn, F D

    1977-01-01

    The experiment evaluated the feasibility of using self-report measures of public speaking anxiety to select autonomically responsive Ss for behavior therapy research and the influence of E's definition of "response" on empirical generalizations derived from the study. Heartrate and skin conductance responses of Ss who scored high and of Ss who scored low on self-report fear measures were monitored during neutral and speech-related imagery. High-scoring Ss were more responsive than were low-scoring Ss, but the surplus responsivity was not cued uniquely by speech-related imagery. Examination of four definitions (transformations) of heart-rate response and five definitions of skin conductance response showed that different conclusions were yielded by differing response definitions. Implications of the findings for further research are presented.

  20. Infrared Spectroscopy for Rapid Characterization of Drill Core and Cutting Mineralogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvin, W. M.; Kratt, C.; Kruse, F. A.

    2009-12-01

    and hydroxides in geothermal drill samples. We are currently developing automated analysis techniques to convert this detailed spectral logging data into high-vertical-resolution mineral depth profiles that can be linked to lithology, stratigraphy, fracture zones and potential for geothermal production. Also in development are metrics that would link mapped mineralogy to known geothermometers such as Na-K, Mg depletion, discrimination among illite, montmorillonite, and beidellite, and kaolinite crystallinity. Identification of amorphous and crystalline silica components (chalcedony, crystobalite and quartz) can also constrain silica geothermometry. The degree of alteration and some mineral types have been shown to be a proxy for host rock permeability, natural circulation, and the potential for reservoir sealing. Analysis of alteration intensity is also under way. We will present a synthesis of results to date.

  1. Preliminary Results of Occurrence and Mineralogical Properties of Opals from Northwest part of Central Anatolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çalık, Ayten

    2016-04-01

    The study area, is located in northwest part of central Anatolian, consists of Eskişehir and Kütahya region where are important for finding occurrence of opaline silica mineralization as well as chalcedonic silica mineralization. In this study preliminary results of mineralogical properties of opals from four different area (Sabuncupınar, Belkavak, Gokçekısık and Derekoy), located between Eskisehir and Kutahya region, have been given. In the Kütahya region, dendritic opal nodules present in Pliocene pyroclastic rocks - Kanoturaǧı hill and white opals outcrop in stockwork veins with serpentinites in Küçükali hill around Sabuncupınar village. The mainly whitish - blue and gray opal nodules range from millimetres in diameter to about five and ten centimetres in Kanoturagı hill. White opals, called milky opal, are white color and present in veins within serpentinites. The Kanoturagı opal is made up of tiny spheres, the milky opal is made up tiny sphere with fibrous texture based on the SEM. Green opals present in Miocene pyroclastic rocks in Belkavak village. The Belkavak opals are greenish color and having a brecciated appearance. Opals outcrops around Sabuncu pınar and Belkavak villages consist of opal - CT, alpha quartz and, moganite, and a lesser amount of opal - C based on the results of XRD analysis. In the Eskişehir region, the dendritic opals occur as nodules in volcanogenetic conglomerates of Pliocene age in the Dereyalak area. The Dereyalak opals vary in size from millimetres in diameter to about ten centimetres. Their color are mainly white, beige, greenish, yellowish orange and black. On the other hand, Pliocene pyroclastic rocks are the host rock of opals in Gökçekısık village - Eskişehir. Gökçekısık Opals are mainly colorless, pale shades of yellow, whitish blue and gray colors and display a reinous to sub vitreous luster. Dereyalak dendiritic opals consist of opal - CT, opal - C and a lesser amount of alpha quartz and, moganite

  2. Deciphering the brittle evolution of SW Norway through a combined structural, mineralogical and geochronological approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiber, Thomas; Viola, Giulio; Fredin, Ola; Zwingmann, Horst; Wilkinson, Camilla Maya; Ganerød, Morgan

    2016-04-01

    SW Norway has experienced a complex brittle history after cessation of the Caledonian orogeny, and the recent discoveries of major hydrocarbon reserves in heavily fractured and weathered basement offshore SW Norway has triggered a renewed interest in understanding this complex tectonic evolution. In this contribution we present results from a multidisciplinary study combining lineament analysis, field work, paleo-stress inversion, mineralogical characterization and radiometric dating in the Bømlo area of SW Norway in order to develop a tectonic model for the brittle evolution of this important region. The study area mainly consists of the Rolvsnes granodiorite (U-Pb zircon age of ca. 466 Ma), which is devoid of penetrative ductile deformation features. The first identified brittle faults are muscovite-bearing top-to-the-NNW thrusts and E-W striking dextral strike-slip faults decorated with stretched biotite. These are mechanically compatible and are assigned to the same NNW-SSE transpressional regime. Ar-Ar muscovite and biotite dates of ca. 450 Ma (Late Ordovician) indicate fault activity in the course of a Taconian-equivalent orogenic event. During the subsequent Silurian Laurentia-Baltica collision variably oriented, lower-grade chlorite and epidote-coated faults formed in response to a ENE-WSW compressional stress regime. A large number of mainly N-S striking normal faults consist of variably thick fault gouge cores with illite, quartz, kaolinite, calcite and epidote mineralizations, accommodating mainly E-W extension. K-Ar dating of illites separated from representative fault gouges and zones of altered granodiorite constrain deformation ranging from the Permian to the Late Jurassic, indicating a long history of crustal extension where faults were repeatedly activated. In addition, a set of ca. SW-NE striking faults associated with alteration zones give Cretaceous dates, either representing a young phase of NW-SE extension or reactivation of previously formed

  3. Soil formation and mineralogy of a Rhodic Luvisol — insights from magnetic and geochemical studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordanova, Neli; Jordanova, Diana; Liu, Qingsong; Hu, Pengxiang; Petrov, Petar; Petrovský, Eduard

    2013-11-01

    Relict terra rossa soil from the most south-eastern part of Bulgaria, characterized by transitional Mediterranean climate, has been comprehensively studied by integrating magnetic, geochemical and spectroscopic methods to reveal the origin, pedogenic processes and phases in soil development of this particular soil type. The red colored Rhodic Luvisol is developed on metamorphosed Triassic limestones. Magnetic methods, which include thermomagnetic analysis of susceptibility, isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) acquisition and thermal demagnetization, IRM component analysis, hysteresis measurements, low-temperature (down to 10 K) IRM behavior, anhysteretic remanence and frequency dependent susceptibility, indicate the presence of three major magnetic phases - maghemite, hematite (Hm) and goethite (Gt). Hematite and goethite are identified also by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS). Depth variations of the ratio Hm/(Hm + Gt), deduced from the DRS spectra show higher hematite content in the upper soil horizons (A + B), while goethite's contribution is enriched in the lowermost part of the profile. A similar ratio, based on the established magnetic proxies for hematite and goethite, was constructed and its variations were compared with the DRS data. The magnetic proxy for Hm/(Hm + Gt) reflects the variations in the remanence-carrying mineral fraction of hematite and goethite and the obtained difference with the DRS data are ascribed to the presence of the paramagnetic (or superparamagnetic) goethite in the A and illuvial Bt1 and Bt2 horizons. The low ratio Feo/Fed between dithionite (Fed)- and oxalate (Feo)-extractable iron, and the large proportion of extractable iron with respect to total iron (Fed/Fetot) indicate an advanced degree of weathering. Depth variations of magnetic parameters and ratios (χlf, χfd, S-ratio) suggest magnetic enhancement with SP-SD maghemite grains, accompanied by magnetically stable magnetic carriers in the soil, while the parent

  4. Microstructure, porosity and mineralogy around fractures in Olkiluoto bedrock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuva, J. (ed.); Myllys, M.; Timonen, J. [Jyvaeskylae Univ. (Finland); Kelokaski, M.; Ikonen, J.; Siitari-Kauppi, M. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland); Lindberg, A. [Geological Survey of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Aaltonen, I.

    2012-01-15

    3D distributions of minerals and porosities were determined for samples that included waterconducting fractures. The analysis of these samples was performed using conventional petrography methods, electron microscopy, C-14-PMMA porosity analysis and X-ray tomography. While X-ray tomography proved to be a very useful method when determining the inner structure of the samples, combining tomography results with those obtained by other methods turned out to be difficult without very careful sample preparation design. It seems that the properties of rock around a water-conducting fracture depend on so many uncorrelated factors that no clear pattern emerged even for rock samples with a given type of fracture. We can conclude, however, that a combination of different analysis methods can be useful and used to infer novel structural information about alteration zones adjacent to fracture surfaces. (orig.)

  5. Microstructure, porosity and mineralogy around fractures in Olkiluoto bedrock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuva, J. (ed.); Myllys, M.; Timonen, J. [Jyvaeskylae Univ. (Finland); Kelokaski, M.; Ikonen, J.; Siitari-Kauppi, M. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland); Lindberg, A. [GTK Geological Survey of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Aaltonen, I.

    2012-01-15

    3D distributions of minerals and porosities were determined for samples that included waterconducting fractures. The analysis of these samples was performed using conventional petrography methods, electron microscopy, C-14-PMMA porosity analysis and X-ray tomography. While X-ray tomography proved to be a very useful method when determining the inner structure of the samples, combining tomography results with those obtained by other methods turned out to be difficult without very careful sample preparation design. It seems that the properties of rock around a water-conducting fracture depend on so many uncorrelated factors that no clear pattern emerged even for rock samples with a given type of fracture. We can conclude, however, that a combination of different analysis methods can be useful and used to infer novel structural information about alteration zones adjacent to fracture surfaces. (orig.)

  6. Integrating two spectral imaging systems in an automated mineralogy application

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Harris, D

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available A system for the automated analysis and sorting of mineral samples has been developed to assist in the concentration of heavy mineral samples in the diamond exploration process. These samples consist of irregularly shaped mineral grains ranging from...

  7. Chemical, mineralogical and ceramic properties of clays from Northern Santa Catarina, Brazil; Caracterizaco fisico-quimica de argilas da regiao norte de Santa Catarina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correia, S.L.; Bloot, E.L.; Folgueras, M.V., E-mail: sivaldo@joinville.udesc.b [Universidade do Estado de Santa Catarina (UDESC/CCT), Joinville, SC (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Tecnologicas; Hotza, D. [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC/EQA), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica

    2009-07-01

    Clay materials crop out in the northern Santa Catarina mining district were investigated in order to assess their potential in the ceramic industry. Four different clays (A, B, C and D) were selected. Their chemical composition was obtained by Xray fluorescence and their mineralogy by X-ray diffraction, coupled with numerical rational analysis. Their thermal behaviour was studied by differential thermal analysis. Technological testing consisted in a simulation of the industrial processing performed at a laboratory scale. The test pieces were obtained by pressing and fired in the range of 850-1200 deg C. In each case their technological properties were studied. The main mineralogical phases detected were kaolinite, quartz and mica. Hematite and feldspars may be present in the clays. The clays show two groups of particle sizes almost equally frequent in the range of 1 to 60 {mu}m. The northern Santa Catarina clays are suitable for the production of bricks and earthenware in the 900- 1100 deg C range. (author)

  8. Elemental and mineralogical study of earth-based pigments using particle induced X-ray emission and X-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nel, P.; Lynch, P. A.; Laird, J. S.; Casey, H. M.; Goodall, L. J.; Ryan, C. G.; Sloggett, R. J.

    2010-07-01

    Artwork and precious artefacts demand non-destructive analytical methodologies for art authentication, attribution and provenance assessment. However, structural and chemical characterisation represents a challenging problem with existing analytical techniques. A recent authentication case based on an Australian Aboriginal artwork, indicate there is substantial benefit in the ability of particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE), coupled with dynamic analysis (DA) to characterise pigments through trace element analysis. However, this information alone is insufficient for characterising the mineralogical residence of trace elements. For this reason a combined methodology based on PIXE and X-ray diffraction (XRD) has been performed to explore the benefits of a more comprehensive data set. Many Aboriginal paintings and artefacts are predominantly earth pigment based. This makes these cultural heritage materials an ideal case study for testing the above combined methodological approach on earth-based pigments. Samples of synthetic and naturally occurring earth-based pigments were obtained from a range of sources, which include Indigenous communities within Australia's Kimberley region. PIXE analyses using a 3 MeV focussed proton beam at the CSIRO nuclear microprobe, as well as laboratory-based XRD was carried out on the above samples. Elemental signature spectra as well as mineralogical data were used to assess issues regarding synthetic and naturally occurring earth pigments with the ultimate aim of establishing provenance.

  9. Acute respiratory distress syndrome: the Berlin Definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranieri, V Marco; Rubenfeld, Gordon D; Thompson, B Taylor; Ferguson, Niall D; Caldwell, Ellen; Fan, Eddy; Camporota, Luigi; Slutsky, Arthur S

    2012-06-20

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) was defined in 1994 by the American-European Consensus Conference (AECC); since then, issues regarding the reliability and validity of this definition have emerged. Using a consensus process, a panel of experts convened in 2011 (an initiative of the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine endorsed by the American Thoracic Society and the Society of Critical Care Medicine) developed the Berlin Definition, focusing on feasibility, reliability, validity, and objective evaluation of its performance. A draft definition proposed 3 mutually exclusive categories of ARDS based on degree of hypoxemia: mild (200 mm Hg Definition was empirically evaluated using patient-level meta-analysis of 4188 patients with ARDS from 4 multicenter clinical data sets and 269 patients with ARDS from 3 single-center data sets containing physiologic information. The 4 ancillary variables did not contribute to the predictive validity of severe ARDS for mortality and were removed from the definition. Using the Berlin Definition, stages of mild, moderate, and severe ARDS were associated with increased mortality (27%; 95% CI, 24%-30%; 32%; 95% CI, 29%-34%; and 45%; 95% CI, 42%-48%, respectively; P definition, the final Berlin Definition had better predictive validity for mortality, with an area under the receiver operating curve of 0.577 (95% CI, 0.561-0.593) vs 0.536 (95% CI, 0.520-0.553; P Definition for ARDS addresses a number of the limitations of the AECC definition. The approach of combining consensus discussions with empirical evaluation may serve as a model to create more accurate, evidence-based, critical illness syndrome definitions and to better inform clinical care, research, and health services planning.

  10. Mineralogical Changes in a Predominantly Fluviolacustrine Succession at Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampe, E. B.; Ming, D. W.; Grotzinger. J. P.; Bristow, T. F.; Blake, D. F.; Vaniman, D. T.; Chipera, S. J.; Gellert, R.; Morris, R. V.; Morrison, S. M.

    2017-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover landed in Gale crater in August 2012 to investigate the strata of lower Aeolis Mons (i.e., Mount Sharp) and characterize their depositional and diagenetic environments. Visible/short-wave infrared spectra from orbit of these strata show variations in phyllosilicate, sulfate, and Fe-oxide minerals, suggesting these units record environmental changes that occurred during the early Hesperian. Curiosity has traversed over 15 km and has climbed through Approx. 200 m of stratigraphic section, made up of predominantly fluviolacustrine (i.e., the Bradbury group and the Murray formation) and aeolian (i.e., the Stimson formation) units. Multiple geochemical and mineralogical instruments are onboard Curiosity to study these ancient rocks, including the Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instrument, which is an X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and X-ray fluorescence spectrometer, and the Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS).

  11. Introducción a la mineralogía en educación infantil.

    OpenAIRE

    Bertol Trenado, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Con el presente trabajo se tratará de llevar a cabo una práctica educativa con el fin de introducir a los alumnos de Educación Infantil en el mundo de la mineralogía. Primeramente, se hará referencia a la historia de la mineralogía, comentando algunos acontecimientos importantes. Además, se realizará una explicación sobre los conceptos de rocas y minerales, así como sus propiedades y características. Después, se expondrá detalladamente la programación planteada para los alumnos, añadiendo una...

  12. Moessbauer study of the Fe mineralogy in two different Argentine soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mijovilovich, A. [Departamento de Fisica, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (Argentina); Morras, H. [Instituto de Suelos, INTA-CIRN (Argentina); Causevic, H. [Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales (Argentina); Saragovi, C. [Departamento de Fisica, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (Argentina)

    1999-11-15

    Two Argentine soils featuring different characteristics and compositions (mollisols and ultisols) have been studied by Moessbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The first type has a weakly developed profile with a solum thickness of 40 cm; the Fe oxyhydroxides are present in low concentrations in mixtures with other slightly weathered minerals (e.g., quartz, feldspars, 2 : 1 phyllosilicates, etc.). The second one is a typic kandihumult, which is a highly weathered red coloured, deep soil. The Fe oxyhydroxides are abundant, mixed mainly with kaolinite clay minerals. Analyses of iron mineralogy show hematite and goethite in both soils. Their ratio is low in the first case and high in the last case. Magnetite-maghemite are also present in both situations, but in the mollisol their content is much lower than in the ultisol. The mineralogy found is related to the different lithological characteristics and processes of pedological evolution on both soils.

  13. Metasomatic Mechanism of Weathering-Pedogenesis of Carbonate Rocks: I. Mineralogical and Micro-Textural Evidence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱立军; 李景阳

    2002-01-01

    On the basis of mineralogical, geochemical and micro-textural studies of the typical sections of the red weathering crust of carbonate rocks in the subtropical karst areas of Guizhou Province and Guangxi Autonomous Region, we have found, either on a microscopic or on a macroscopical scale and in different positions of the sections, the most direct and most important mineralogical and micro-textural evidence for the development of metasomatism in the process of weathering-pedogenesis of numerous carbonate rocks. This paper also has expounded for the first time and systematically the mechanism of metasomatism involved in the process of weathering pedogenesis of carbonate rocks and proposed the sequence of mineral metasomatic evolution in the process of weathering-pedogenesis of carbonate rocks.

  14. Thermal Emission Spectra of Silica-coated Basalt and Considerations for Martian Surface Mineralogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, M. D.; Sharp, T. G.; Michalski, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    Among the most important discoveries made during the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) mission was that the rocky materials of Mars are broadly divisible into two distinct rock types. The geological significance of this finding is dependent on the mineralogy of these rock types as well as their geographic and stratigraphic positions. Much work has yet to be done to understand these relationships and the small-scale variability of these units. For now, it is worth considering various scenarios that could have resulted in Mars global-scale mineralogical dichotomy. Such work will make clearer what must be looked for in Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) and Thermal Imaging Spectrometer (THEMIS) data, what to test with other data sets, and what geological processes can be considered or ruled out as we advance with interpreting Martian geologic history. Here, we suggest that exogenic coatings of secondary silica on basaltic rocks may provide a plausible explanation for the newly discovered distribution of rock types.

  15. Mineralogical Variation of Chelyabinsk with Depth from the Surface of the Parent Meteoroid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, S.; Mikouchi, T.; Nagao, K.; Haba, M. K.; Hasegawa, H.; Komatsu, M.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2014-01-01

    The Chelyabinsk meteorite, which passed over the Chelyabinsk Oblast, Russia on Feb. 15th, 2013, brought serious damage by the shock wave and airburst. The diameter of the parent meteoroid is estimated to be approximately 20 m in diameter [1]. It was reported that the impact by this meteorite shower was 4,000 times as large as the TNT explosive and this was the largest airburst on Earth since the asteroid impact in Tunguska, Russia in 1908. The mineralogy and geochemical study of the recovered samples shows that Chelyabinsk is an LL5 chondrite [1]. In this study we analyzed several fragments of Chelyabinsk whose noble gas compositions have been measured and depths from the surface of the parent meteoroid were estimated [2]. We examined how mineralogical characteristics change with depth from the surface. This kind of study has never been performed and thus may be able to offer significant information about the evolution of meteorite parent bodies.

  16. Mineralogy, petrology and chemistry of ANT-suite rocks from the lunar highlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinz, M.; Keil, K.

    1977-01-01

    Anorthositic-noritic-troctolitic (ANT) rocks are the oldest and most abundant rocks of the lunar surface, and comprise about 90% of the suite of the lunar highlands. Consideration is given to the mineralogy, petrology, bulk chemistry, and origin of ANT-suite rocks. Problems associated in classifying and labeling lunar highland rocks because of textural complexities occurring from impact modifications are discussed. The mineralogy of ANT-suite rocks, dominated by plagioclase, olivine and pyrozene, and containing various minor minerals, is outlined. The petrology of ANT-suite rocks is reviewed along with the major element bulk composition of these rocks, noting that they are extremely depleted in K2O and P2O5. Various models describing the origin of ANT-suite rocks are summarized, and it is suggested that this origin involves a parental liquid of high-alumina basalt with low Fe/Fe+Mg.

  17. Characterisation of some Clays Used for Whiteware Ceramics I. Mineralogical composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Benea

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to obtain a semiquantitative mineralogical composition of raw materials used for whiteware ceramics, four different clay types were analysed by X-ray diffraction. Studies were carried out by using a combination of analyses of the bulk sample, and of the fine fraction. Using a well-established pre-treatment methodology (use of chemicals, ultrasonic treatment, dispersion procedures, clay mineral concentration by centrifugation and sedimentation, oriented and random powder preparation, cation saturation, expansion/dehydration methods, 12 X-ray diffractometer traces were obtained from each sample. Based on these informations it was possible to establish the qualitative mineralogical composition, and also a semiquantitative one using peak intensities and peak area corrected by various factors. Scanning electron microscopy was also used in order to illustrate the identified mineral phases.

  18. Expected Geochemical and Mineralogical Properties of Meteorites from Mercury: Inferences from Messenger Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCubbin, F. M.; McCoy, T. J.

    2016-01-01

    Meteorites from the Moon, Mars, and many types of asteroid bodies have been identified among our global inventory of meteorites, however samples of Mercury and Venus have not been identified. The absence of mercurian and venusian meteorites could be attributed to an inability to recognize them in our collections due to a paucity of geochemical information for Venus and Mercury. In the case of mercurian meteorites, this possibility is further supported by dynamical calculations that suggest mercurian meteorites should be present on Earth at a factor of 2-3 less than meteorites from Mars [1]. In the present study, we focus on the putative mineralogy of mercurian meteorites using data obtained from the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, which has provided us with our first quantitative constraints on the geochemistry of planet Mercury. We have used the MESSENGER data to compile a list of mineralogical and geochemical characteristics that a meteorite from Mercury is likely to exhibit.

  19. Incorporating Environmental and Sustainability Issues into the Curriculum in a Mineralogy Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, G. W.

    2013-12-01

    A traditional curriculum in mineralogy addresses classic subject matter such as crystal chemistry, crystallography, systematic mineralogy and optical mineralogy. This is entirely reasonable and appropriate, as these time-honored aspects of mineralogy are fundamental to students' understanding of Earth Materials; they are also important building blocks for an understanding of other geologic disciplines such as petrology, structural geology, and sedimentology. Due to the impressive breadth and amount of subject material that is covered in most mineralogy courses, time constraints do not allow instructors to branch out into more contemporary subjects. In our increasingly technologically-advanced (and crowded) modern society, issues pertaining to the environment and sustainability are at the forefront of scientific thought. In many introductory physical geoscience courses these issues are addressed and incorporated into the curriculum, thereby giving students valuable scientific background in modern environmental issues. However, in upper division classes (such as mineralogy) there is little time or motivation for instructors to add new content or to connect the course content with current environmental or societal concerns, even though there may be significant and meaningful opportunities to do so throughout the quarter or semester. Consequently, many students' understanding of environmental issues remains at an introductory or cursory level. In my mineralogy class at the University of California San Diego (UCSD), I teach a traditional curriculum with a modern approach that uses dynamic lectures, makes use of multimedia, and also utilizes current best teaching practices. As a department, we have recently made an increased effort to educate our students about environmental issues. Accordingly, I have integrated environmental and sustainability topics (when they are pertinent) into the curriculum as a regular component of the course. These topics typically relate to how

  20. Lack of cross-shelf transport of sediments on the western margin of India: Evidence from clay mineralogy

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaswamy, V.; Nair, R.R.

    transported long distances along the shelf, cross-shelf transport appears to be minimal. Confirmatory evidence of qualitative differences in outer and inner shelf clays is provided by sediment trap clay mineralogy on the outer shelf. Clay bound pollutant...

  1. Mineralogy and petrograghy of some tin, lithium and beryllium bearing albite-pegmatites near Doade, Galicia, Spain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hensen, B.J.

    1967-01-01

    The petrography and mineralogy of some Hercynian albite-pegmatites near Doade, Galicia, Spain is described. The mineral assemblage consists of albite, K-feldspar, quartz, muscovite, spodumene, petalite, cassiterite, beryl, columbitetantalite, montebrasite, apatite, eosphorite-childrenite, zircon, to

  2. Longitudinal evaluation of corticospinal tract in patients with resected brainstem cavernous malformations using high-definition fiber tractography and diffusion connectometry analysis: preliminary experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraji, Amir H; Abhinav, Kumar; Jarbo, Kevin; Yeh, Fang-Cheng; Shin, Samuel S; Pathak, Sudhir; Hirsch, Barry E; Schneider, Walter; Fernandez-Miranda, Juan C; Friedlander, Robert M

    2015-11-01

    Brainstem cavernous malformations (CMs) are challenging due to a higher symptomatic hemorrhage rate and potential morbidity associated with their resection. The authors aimed to preoperatively define the relationship of CMs to the perilesional corticospinal tracts (CSTs) by obtaining qualitative and quantitative data using high-definition fiber tractography. These data were examined postoperatively by using longitudinal scans and in relation to patients' symptomatology. The extent of involvement of the CST was further evaluated longitudinally using the automated "diffusion connectometry" analysis. Fiber tractography was performed with DSI Studio using a quantitative anisotropy (QA)-based generalized deterministic tracking algorithm. Qualitatively, CST was classified as being "disrupted" and/or "displaced." Quantitative analysis involved obtaining mean QA values for the CST and its perilesional and nonperilesional segments. The contralateral CST was used for comparison. Diffusion connectometry analysis included comparison of patients' data with a template from 90 normal subjects. Three patients (mean age 22 years) with symptomatic pontomesencephalic hemorrhagic CMs and varying degrees of hemiparesis were identified. The mean follow-up period was 37.3 months. Qualitatively, CST was partially disrupted and displaced in all. Direction of the displacement was different in each case and progressively improved corresponding with the patient's neurological status. No patient experienced neurological decline related to the resection. The perilesional mean QA percentage decreases supported tract disruption and decreased further over the follow-up period (Case 1, 26%-49%; Case 2, 35%-66%; and Case 3, 63%-78%). Diffusion connectometry demonstrated rostrocaudal involvement of the CST consistent with the quantitative data. Hemorrhagic brainstem CMs can disrupt and displace perilesional white matter tracts with the latter occurring in unpredictable directions. This requires the

  3. The Impact of Brachytherapy on Prostate Cancer-Specific Mortality for Definitive Radiation Therapy of High-Grade Prostate Cancer: A Population-Based Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen Xinglei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Keith, Scott W. [Division of Biostatistics, Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Mishra, Mark V.; Dicker, Adam P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Showalter, Timothy N., E-mail: timothy.showalter@jeffersonhospital.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: This population-based analysis compared prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM) in a cohort of patients with high-risk prostate cancer after nonsurgical treatment with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), brachytherapy (BT), or combination (BT + EBRT). Methods and Materials: We identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database patients diagnosed from 1988 through 2002 with T1-T3N0M0 prostate adenocarcinoma of poorly differentiated grade and treated with BT, EBRT, or BT + EBRT. During this time frame, the database defined high grade as prostate cancers with Gleason score 8-10, or Gleason grade 4-5 if the score was not recorded. This corresponds to a cohort primarily with high-risk prostate cancer, although some cases where only Gleason grade was recorded may have included intermediate-risk cancer. We used multivariate models to examine patient and tumor characteristics associated with the likelihood of treatment with each radiation modality and the effect of radiation modality on PCSM. Results: There were 12,745 patients treated with EBRT (73.5%), BT (7.1%), or BT + EBRT (19.4%) included in the analysis. The median follow-up time for all patients was 6.4 years. The use of BT or BT + EBRT increased from 5.1% in 1988-1992 to 31.4% in 1998-2002. Significant predictors of use of BT or BT + EBRT were younger age, later year of diagnosis, urban residence, and earlier T-stage. On multivariate analysis, treatment with either BT (hazard ratio, 0.66; 95% confidence interval, 0.49-0.86) or BT + EBRT (hazard ratio, 0.77; 95% confidence ratio, 0.66-0.90) was associated with significant reduction in PCSM compared with EBRT alone. Conclusion: In patients with high-grade prostate cancer, treatment with brachytherapy is associated with reduced PCSM compared with EBRT alone. Our results suggest that brachytherapy should be investigated as a component of definitive treatment strategies for patients with high-risk prostate cancer.

  4. Stadium IB - IIA cervical cancer patient’s survival rate after receiving definitive radiation and radical operation therapy followed by adjuvant radiation therapy along with analysis of factors affecting the patient’s survival rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruslim, S. K.; Purwoto, G.; Widyahening, I. S.; Ramli, I.

    2017-08-01