WorldWideScience

Sample records for definitive medical care

  1. 32 CFR 564.37 - Medical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Medical care. 564.37 Section 564.37 National... REGULATIONS Medical Attendance and Burial § 564.37 Medical care. (a) General. The definitions of medical care; policies outlining the manner, conditions, procedures, and eligibility for care; and the sources from...

  2. Medical Care during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1- to 2-Year-Old Medical Care During Pregnancy KidsHealth > For Parents > Medical Care During Pregnancy Print ... both moms and their babies. Prenatal Care Before Pregnancy Prenatal care should start before you get pregnant. ...

  3. Medical Care during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1- to 2-Year-Old Medical Care During Pregnancy KidsHealth > For Parents > Medical Care During Pregnancy A ... both moms and their babies. Prenatal Care Before Pregnancy Prenatal care should start before you get pregnant. ...

  4. "It Was Definitely Very Different": An evaluation of palliative care teaching to medical students using a mixed methods approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Alison H; Harrison, Amanda; Kumar, Koshila

    2015-01-01

    Given our ageing population and the increase in chronic disease, palliative care will become an increasingly important part of doctors' workloads, with implications for palliative care education. This study used a mixed methods strategy to evaluate second-year medical students' learning outcomes and experiences within a palliative care education program. Analysis of pre- and post-test scores showed a significant improvement in students' attitudinal scores, but no change in knowledge as measured by multiple-choice questions. Analysis of qualitative data revealed that students' learning experience was marked by a lack of clear learning objectives and experiential learning opportunities. Students also reported divergent reactions to death and dying and noted that palliative care was different from other areas of clinical medicine. This study revealed that palliative care teaching results in improved attitudes toward palliative care, reflecting the holistic and patient-focused nature of the palliative care curriculum.

  5. Spectator Medical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, L

    1992-01-01

    Recent world events-including the fear of terrorism during last year's Super Bowl-illustrate how vulnerable spectators can be to medical emergencies during sporting events. A physician who studies and coordinates crowd care for events ranging from the Super Bowl to local fairs gives tips on planning and executing a spectator medical plan.

  6. Primary Medical Care in Chile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scarpaci, Joseph L.

    Primary medical care in Chile: accessibility under military rule [Front Cover] [Front Matter] [Title Page] Contents Tables Figures Preface Chapter 1: Introduction Chapter 2: The Restructuring of Medical Care Financing in Chile Chapter 3: Inflation and Medical Care Accessibility Chapter 4: Help......-Seeking Behavior of the Urban Poor Chapter 5: Spatial Organization and Medical Care Accessibility Chapter 6: Conclusion...

  7. Adolf Hitler's medical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, D

    2005-02-01

    For the last nine years of his life Adolf Hitler, a lifelong hypochondriac had as his physician Dr Theodor Morell. Hitler's mood swings, Parkinson's disease, gastro-intestinal symptoms, skin problems and steady decline until his suicide in 1945 are documented by reliable observers and historians, and in Morell's diaries. The bizarre and unorthodox medications given to Hitler, often for undisclosed reasons, include topical cocaine, injected amphetamines, glucose, testosterone, estradiol, and corticosteroids. In addition, he was given a preparation made from a gun cleaner, a compound of strychnine and atropine, an extract of seminal vesicles, and numerous vitamins and 'tonics'. It seems possible that some of Hitler's behaviour, illnesses and suffering can be attributed to his medical care. Whether he blindly accepted such unorthodox medications or demanded them is unclear.

  8. Primary Medical Care in Chile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scarpaci, Joseph L.

    Primary medical care in Chile: accessibility under military rule [Front Cover] [Front Matter] [Title Page] Contents Tables Figures Preface Chapter 1: Introduction Chapter 2: The Restructuring of Medical Care Financing in Chile Chapter 3: Inflation and Medical Care Accessibility Chapter 4: Help...

  9. Medical Care and Your Newborn

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Medical Care and Your Newborn KidsHealth > For Parents > Medical Care and Your Newborn A A A What's ... doctor of the birth. If you had any medical problems during pregnancy, if your baby might have ...

  10. Medical Care and Your Newborn

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teaching Kids to Be Smart About Social Media Medical Care and Your Newborn KidsHealth > For Parents > Medical Care and Your Newborn Print A A A ... doctor of the birth. If you had any medical problems during pregnancy, if your baby might have ...

  11. Analyzing Medical Students' Definitions of Sex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talley, Heather; Cho, Janice; Strassberg, Donald S.; Rullo, Jordan E.

    2016-01-01

    An inaccurate definition of what constitutes sex can negatively impact the sexual health and wellbeing of patients. This study aimed to determine which behaviors medical students consider to be sex. Survey questions about various sexual behaviors were administered to medical students. All participants agreed that penile-vaginal penetration is sex.…

  12. Sensor Networks for Medical Care

    OpenAIRE

    Shnayder, Victor; Chen, Bor-rong; Lorincz, Konrad; Fulford-Jones, Thaddeus R. F.; Welsh, Matt

    2005-01-01

    Sensor networks have the potential to greatly impact many aspects of medical care. By outfitting patients with wireless, wearable vital sign sensors, collecting detailed real-time data on physiological status can be greatly simplified. However, there is a significant gap between existing sensor network systems and the needs of medical care. In particular, medical sensor networks must support multicast routing topologies, node mobility, a wide range of data rates and high degrees of reliabilit...

  13. Debt and Foregone Medical Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalousova, Lucie; Burgard, Sarah A.

    2013-01-01

    Most American households carry debt, yet we have little understanding of how debt influences health behavior, especially health care seeking. We examined associations between foregone medical care and debt using a population-based sample of 914 southeastern Michigan residents surveyed in the wake of the late-2000s recession. Overall debt and…

  14. Debt and Foregone Medical Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalousova, Lucie; Burgard, Sarah A.

    2013-01-01

    Most American households carry debt, yet we have little understanding of how debt influences health behavior, especially health care seeking. We examined associations between foregone medical care and debt using a population-based sample of 914 southeastern Michigan residents surveyed in the wake of the late-2000s recession. Overall debt and…

  15. Medical Secretaries’ Care of Records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bossen, Claus; Jensen, Lotte Groth; Witt, Flemming

    2012-01-01

    We describe the cooperative work of medical secretaries at two hospital departments, during the implementation of an electronic health record system. Medical secretaries' core task is to take care of patient records by ensuring that also do information gatekeeping and articulation work. The EHR...... implementation stressed their importance to the departments' work arrangements, coupled their work more tightly to that of other staff, and led to task drift among professions. information is complete, up to date, and correctly coded. Medical secretaries While medical secretaries have been relatively invisible...

  16. Medical homes: "where you stand on definitions depends on where you sit".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vest, Joshua R; Bolin, Jane N; Miller, Thomas R; Gamm, Larry D; Siegrist, Thomas E; Martinez, Luis E

    2010-08-01

    The medical home is a potentially transformative strategy to address issues of access, quality, and efficiency in the delivery of health care in the United States. While numerous organizations support a physician-driven definition, it is by no means the universally accepted definition. Several professional groups, payers, and researchers have offered differing, or nuanced, definitions of medical homes. This lack of consensus has contributed to uncertainty among providers about the medical home. We conducted a systematic review of the literature on the medical home and identified 29 professional, government, and academic sources offering definitions. While consensus appears to exist around a core of selected features, the medical home means different things to different people. The variation in definitions can be partly explained by the obligation of organizations to their members and whether the focus is on the patient or provider. Differences in definitions have implications at both the policy and practice levels.

  17. Medical Secretaries’ Care of Records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bossen, Claus; Jensen, Lotte Groth; Witt, Flemming

    2012-01-01

    We describe the cooperative work of medical secretaries at two hospital departments, during the implementation of an electronic health record system. Medical secretaries' core task is to take care of patient records by ensuring that also do information gatekeeping and articulation work. The EHR...... to health informatics and CSCW, this case study identifies their importance, and suggests that they and other non-clinical groups should be considered, when developing health care IT. We propose the term 'boundary-object trimming', to conceptualize their contributions to hospitals' cooperative work...

  18. Defining Medical Levels of Care for Exploration Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hailey, M.; Reyes, D.; Urbina, M.; Rubin, D.; Antonsen, E.

    2017-01-01

    NASA medical care standards establish requirements for providing health and medical programs for crewmembers during all phases of a mission. These requirements are intended to prevent or mitigate negative health consequences of long-duration spaceflight, thereby optimizing crew health and performance over the course of the mission. Current standards are documented in the two volumes of the NASA-STD-3001 Space Flight Human-System Standard document, established by the Office of the Chief Health and Medical Officer. Its purpose is to provide uniform technical standards for the design, selection, and application of medical hardware, software, processes, procedures, practices, and methods for human-rated systems. NASA-STD-3001 Vol. 1 identifies five levels of care for human spaceflight. These levels of care are accompanied by several components that illustrate the type of medical care expected for each. The Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) of the Human Research Program has expanded the context of these provided levels of care and components. This supplemental information includes definitions for each component of care and example actions that describe the type of capabilities that coincide with the definition. This interpretation is necessary in order to fully and systematically define the capabilities required for each level of care in order to define the medical requirements and plan for infrastructure needed for medical systems of future exploration missions, such as one to Mars.

  19. Physician empathy: Definition, outcome-relevance and its measurement in patient care and medical education [Ärztliche Empathie: Definition, Outcome-Relevanz und Messung in der Patientenversorgung und medizinischen Ausbildung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neumann, Melanie

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available [english] Objective: The present study gives a brief introduction into FurthermoreThe latter topic will be explored in detail as we conducted a pilot study on the German versions of two self-assessment instruments of empathy, which are mostly used in medical education research, namely the “Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy, Student Version” (JSPE-S and the “Interpersonal Reactivity Index” (IRI.Methods: We first present an overview of the current empirical and theoretical literature on the definition and outcome-relevance of PE. Additionally, we conducted basic psychometric analyses of the German versions of the JSPE-S and the IRI. Data for this analyses is based on a cross-sectional pilot-survey in N=44 medical students and N=63 students of other disciplines from the University of Cologne. Results: PE includes the of the patient as well as verbal and non-verbal , which should result in a helpful therapeutic action of the physician. Patients’ health outcomes in different healthcare settings can be improved considerably from a high quality empathic encounter with their clinician. Basic psychometric results of the German JSPE-S and IRI measures show first promising results.Conclusion: PE as an essential and outcome-relevant element in the patient-physician relationship requires more consideration in the education of medical students and, thus, in medical education research. The German versions of the JSPE-S and IRI measures seem to be promising means to evaluate these education aims and to conduct medical education research on empathy.[german] Ziel: Die vorliegende Studie gibt einen kurzen Überblick Des Weiteren werden Letzteres Thema wird ausführlich behandelt, da eine Pilotstudie zur Testung zwei deutscher Versionen von Selbsteinschätzungsinstrumenten durchgeführt wurde, die derzeit am häufigsten in der internationalen Medizinischen Ausbildungsforschung genutzt werden. Dazu gehören die “Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy

  20. 29 CFR 825.125 - Definition of health care provider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Definition of health care provider. 825.125 Section 825.125... Definition of health care provider. (a) The Act defines “health care provider” as: (1) A doctor of medicine... providing health care services. (b) Others “capable of providing health care services” include only:...

  1. Patient satisfaction with medical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Sadovoy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients’ evaluation of medical care is becoming more and more important due to expanding patient-centered care. For this purpose a complex index of patient satisfaction with healthcare is used. This parameter reflects the correspondence of actual healthcare services to patient’s expectations that were formed under the influence of cultural, social, economic factors, and personal experience of each patient. Satisfaction is a subjective parameter, thus, a grade of satisfaction is barely connected with quality of healthcare services itself. Moreover, medical organizations should always take into account specific features of each patient, since they can have an influence on customer attitude to medical services.This article comprises the review of publications studying determinants of patient satisfaction. In the course of the study, we analyzed data received by research teams from different countries.According to the review, we made some conclusions. First, determinants of patient satisfaction with healthcare can be divided in two groups. The first group of factors includes patients’ characteristics such as age, gender, ethnical and cultural features. However, researches from different countries revealed that there is a difference in the importance of factors belonging to this group and their influence on satisfaction of certain patient cohorts. The second group includes factors that belong to the process of healthcare services delivery and its organization. Moreover, it was found that patient satisfaction level is changing in a waveform. Thus, medical organization should not only try to increase patient satisfaction level but also maintain it. AS a result, it necessary to monitor patient satisfaction with healthcare services. That is why there is a distinct need for the development of a new tool or adaptation of existing instrument of satisfaction measurement, which would be unitized for all medical organizations in the Russian Federation 

  2. Medical care at the Super Bowl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, J M

    2000-06-01

    Although coordinating medical care at the Super Bowl is something that we look forward to and have a lot of fun doing, we take it very seriously and understand the importance of delivering medical care at what many people consider to be the greatest sporting event in the world. It is certainly one of the most watched and recognized events in the world and because of this, we attempt to set up a system that will allow for the best medical care available and standardization of this medical care through our experience within Medical Sports Group.

  3. Advance Care Planning: Medical Issues to Consider

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... condition is considered to be “end stage” when optimal medical care can no longer stabilize the medical ... may enable this person to recover, get needed sleep and rest, and resume functional capacity when off ...

  4. National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS) is designed to collect data on the utilization and provision of ambulatory care services in hospital...

  5. [Involvement of medical representatives in team medical care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirotsu, Misaki; Sohma, Michiro; Takagi, Hidehiko

    2009-04-01

    In recent years, chemotherapies have been further advanced because of successive launch of new drugs, introduction of molecular targeting, etc., and the concept of so-called Team Medical Care ,the idea of sharing interdisciplinary expertise for collaborative treatment, has steadily penetrated in the Japanese medical society. Dr. Naoto Ueno is a medical oncologist at US MD Anderson Cancer Center, the birthplace of the Team Medical Care. He has advocated the concept of ABC of Team Oncology by positioning pharmaceutical companies as Team C. Under such team practice, we believe that medical representatives of a pharmaceutical company should also play a role as a member of the Team Medical Care by providing appropriate drug use information to healthcare professionals, supporting post-marketing surveillance of treated patients, facilitating drug information sharing among healthcare professionals at medical institutions, etc.

  6. Medical Services: Medical, Dental, and Veterinary Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Aeromedical Epidemiological Data Repository to support research and clinical studies for aircrew medical standards and policy. (5) Be the designated...Edentulous areas requiring prostheses but not on an immediate basis. (4) Periodontal disease or periodontium exhibiting: (a) Requirement for oral...materials but for which protective coverage is indicated. (3) Periodontal diseases or periodontium exhibiting: (a) Acute gingivitis or pericoronitis. (b

  7. Organisational impact: Definition and assessment methods for medical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussel, Christophe; Carbonneil, Cédric; Audry, Antoine

    2016-02-01

    Health technology assessment (HTA) is a rapidly developing area and the value of taking non-clinical fields into consideration is growing. Although the health-economic aspect is commonly recognised, evaluating organisational impact has not been studied nearly as much. The goal of this work was to provide a definition of organisational impact in the sector of medical devices by defining its contours and exploring the evaluation methods specific to this field. Following an analysis of the literature concerning the impact of technologies on organisations as well as the medical literature, and also after reviewing the regulatory texts in this respect, the group of experts identified 12 types of organisational impact. A number of medical devices were carefully screened using the criteria grid, which proved to be operational and to differentiate properly. From the analysis of the practice and of the methods described, the group was then able to derive a few guidelines to successfully evaluate organisational impact. This work shows that taking organisational impact into consideration may be critical alongside of the other criteria currently in favour (clinically and economically). What remains is to confer a role in the decision-making process on this factor and one that meets the economic efficiency principle.

  8. The ecology of medical care in Beijing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Shao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We presented the pattern of health care consumption, and the utilization of available resources by describing the ecology of medical care in Beijing on a monthly basis and by describing the socio-demographic characteristics associated with receipt care in different settings. METHODS: A cohort of 6,592 adults, 15 years of age and older were sampled to estimate the number of urban-resident adults per 1,000 who visited a medical facility at least once in a month, by the method of three-stage stratified and cluster random sampling. Separate logistic regression analyses assessed the association between those receiving care in different types of setting and their socio-demographic characteristics. RESULTS: On average per 1,000 adults, 295 had at least one symptom, 217 considered seeking medical care, 173 consulted a physician, 129 visited western medical practitioners, 127 visited a hospital-based outpatient clinic, 78 visited traditional Chinese medical practitioners, 43 visited a primary care physician, 35 received care in an emergency department, 15 were hospitalized. Health care seeking behaviors varied with socio-demographic characteristics, such as gender, age, ethnicity, resident census register, marital status, education, income, and health insurance status. In term of primary care, the gate-keeping and referral roles of Community Health Centers have not yet been fully established in Beijing. CONCLUSIONS: This study represents a first attempt to map the medical care ecology of Beijing urban population and provides timely baseline information for health care reform in China.

  9. Veterans Medical Care: FY2010 Appropriations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-21

    medical services such as: medical, surgical, and mental health care, including care for substance abuse; prescription drugs, including over-the- counter...travel payments to eligible veterans were paid when specialized modes of transportation, such as ambulance or wheelchair van, were medically required...reimbursement who are traveling by special modes of transportation such as ambulance, air ambulance, wheelchair van, or to receive a compensation and pension

  10. Seeking health care through international medical tourism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eissler, Lee Ann; Casken, John

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was the exploration of international travel experiences for the purpose of medical or dental care from the perspective of patients from Alaska and to develop insight and understanding of the essence of the phenomenon of medical tourism. The study is conceptually oriented within a model of health-seeking behavior. Using a qualitative design, 15 Alaska medical tourists were individually interviewed. The data were analyzed using a hermeneutic process of inquiry to uncover the meaning of the experience. Six themes reflecting the experiences of Alaska medical tourists emerged: "my motivation," "I did the research," "the medical care I need," "follow-up care," "the advice I give," and "in the future." Subthemes further categorized data for increased understanding of the phenomenon. The thematic analysis provides insight into the experience and reflects a modern approach to health-seeking behavior through international medical tourism. The results of this study provide increased understanding of the experience of obtaining health care internationally from the patient perspective. Improved understanding of medical tourism provides additional information about a contemporary approach to health-seeking behavior. Results of this study will aid nursing professionals in counseling regarding medical tourism options and providing follow-up health care after medical tourism. Nurses will be able to actively participate in global health policy discussions regarding medical tourism trends. © 2013 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  11. Family and Medical Leave Act; Definition of Spouse. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-08

    The U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM) is revising the definition of spouse in its regulations on the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) as a result of the decision by the United States Supreme Court holding section 3 of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) unconstitutional. The new definition replaces the existing definition, which contains language from DOMA that refers to "a legal union between one man and one woman.'' The new definition permits Federal employees with same-sex spouses to use FMLA leave in the same manner as Federal employees with opposite-sex spouses.

  12. Autonomous medical care for exploration class space missions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Douglas; Smart, Kieran; Melton, Shannon; Polk, James D; Johnson-Throop, Kathy

    2008-04-01

    The US-based health care system of the International Space Station contains several subsystems, the Health Maintenance System, Environmental Health System and the Countermeasure System. These systems are designed to provide primary, secondary and tertiary medical prevention strategies. The medical system deployed in low Earth orbit for the International Space Station is designed to support a "stabilize and transport" concept of operations. In this paradigm, an ill or injured crewmember would be rapidly evacuated to a definitive medical care facility (DMCF) on Earth, rather than being treated for a protracted period on orbit. The medical requirements of the short (7 day) and long duration (up to 6 months) exploration class missions to the moon are similar to low Earth orbit class missions but also include an additional 4 to 5 days needed to transport an ill or injured crewmember to a DMCF on Earth. Mars exploration class missions are quite different in that they will significantly delay or prevent the return of an ill or injured crewmember to a DMCF. In addition the limited mass, power and volume afforded to medical care will prevent the mission designers from manifesting the entire capability of terrestrial care. National Aeronautics and Space Administration has identified five levels of care as part of its approach to medical support of future missions including the Constellation program. To implement an effective medical risk mitigation strategy for exploration class missions, modifications to the current suite of space medical systems may be needed, including new crew medical officer training methods, treatment guidelines, diagnostic and therapeutic resources, and improved medical informatics.

  13. National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) is a national survey designed to meet the need for objective, reliable information about the provision and use of...

  14. Computers, medical care and privacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresse, J

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes Physician Actuated Computerized Treatment (PACT) which provides paperless Medical Office Management (MOM) (1). Software, hardware and physician are fused to produce an on-line database medical management system containing medical records, clerical functions and bookkeeping. PACT developed in the 1980's, was financed entirely by private physicians in a working clinical environment. MOM operates on a mini-computer with a minimum of 10 MB hard disk and 16K of memory. Maximum system design is a function of cost and total desired on-line storage. User friendly screens can prompt the operator in English, Spanish, French, German and Italian. Data entry is in native language.

  15. Medical education and health care in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiely, J M

    1980-10-01

    Health care and medical education in Uganda, once the best in Black Africa, have been adversely affected by the economic, political, and social upheavals in this developing country during the past decade. Crop failures, inadequate public health measures, shortage of medical equipment and essential drugs, and lack of sufficient medical school faculty have resulted in a major crisis. Substantial aid from the medical profession in developed countries will be necessary to help restore medical practice and education to the level present before the regime of Idi Amin.

  16. Medical Care Cost Recovery National Database (MCCR NDB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Medical Care Cost Recovery National Database (MCCR NDB) provides a repository of summary Medical Care Collections Fund (MCCF) billing and collection information...

  17. Child Health and Access to Medical Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leininger, Lindsey; Levy, Helen

    2015-01-01

    It might seem strange to ask whether increasing access to medical care can improve children's health. Yet Lindsey Leininger and Helen Levy begin by pointing out that access to care plays a smaller role than we might think, and that many other factors, such as those discussed elsewhere in this issue, strongly influence children's health.…

  18. [Medication errors in Spanish intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, P; Martín, M C; Alonso, A; Gutiérrez, I; Alvarez, J; Becerril, F

    2013-01-01

    To estimate the incidence of medication errors in Spanish intensive care units. Post hoc study of the SYREC trial. A longitudinal observational study carried out during 24 hours in patients admitted to the ICU. Spanish intensive care units. Patients admitted to the intensive care unit participating in the SYREC during the period of study. Risk, individual risk, and rate of medication errors. The final study sample consisted of 1017 patients from 79 intensive care units; 591 (58%) were affected by one or more incidents. Of these, 253 (43%) had at least one medication-related incident. The total number of incidents reported was 1424, of which 350 (25%) were medication errors. The risk of suffering at least one incident was 22% (IQR: 8-50%) while the individual risk was 21% (IQR: 8-42%). The medication error rate was 1.13 medication errors per 100 patient-days of stay. Most incidents occurred in the prescription (34%) and administration (28%) phases, 16% resulted in patient harm, and 82% were considered "totally avoidable". Medication errors are among the most frequent types of incidents in critically ill patients, and are more common in the prescription and administration stages. Although most such incidents have no clinical consequences, a significant percentage prove harmful for the patient, and a large proportion are avoidable. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  19. [The definition of the medical clown's role with adult patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheyer, Rachel; Nuttman-Shwartz, Orit; Ziyoni, Herzel

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, the healthcare system has grown increasingly aware of the need to develop and adopt new models and intervention methods aimed at improving patients' quality of life. As part of this perception, medical clowns have been integrated into hospitals, primarily in work with children. Recently, there have been attempts to integrate clowns into work with adult patients in emergency rooms, but this intervention method has not yet been systematically implemented and studied. This article describes and examines the definition of the medical clown's role as an intervention strategy with adult outpatients suffering from chronic and life-threatening illnesses. The study is qualitative and based on a content analysis of the documentation of the work of two medical clowns over two years. The dominant theme arising from this analysis involves the definition of the clown's role within the medical space of the hospital and includes perspectives on his integration into the hospital's multidisciplinary medical staff and his impact on the staff and on patients and their families. The findings indicate that, from the clowns' point of view, integrated medical clowns as part of the medical team, would contribute to the functioning of both patients and staff. This is in accord with additional studies conducted recently in medical centers around the world. Since this is a pioneering study, there is room to further probe and research the medical clown's contribution to assisting and improving patients' and staff's quality of life and to develop ways of increasing his integration and professionalism.

  20. Care concept in medical and nursing students’ descriptions – Philosophical approach and implications for medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Dobrowolska

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available [b]introduction.[/b] Care is seen as something that is peculiar to the medical sciences but its meaning and status for physicians and nurses differs. objectives. The aim of this research was to learn how nursing and medical students understand and define care, and how their definition and views on their practice of caring change as they advance through their studies. [b]material and methods[/b]. The study was conducted among two groups of students: before and after their first practicum (n=102. Analysis of the students’ answers was carried out using Colaizzi’s phenomenological descriptive methodology, which means that a qualitative approach was used. [b]results[/b]. The qualitative analysis shows that the medical and nursing students define care in the same way, using 9 main categories: compassion, commitment, competence, confidence, conscience, communication, patience, courage and support. The nursing students viewed their caring to be within both practical and emotional dimensions and this was a core feature of their identity as nurses. Medical students, on the other hand, viewed the practical dimension of care as an additional activity. All the students in the study underlined the importance of having time to care and showed that, for them, ‘time’ in this context has a moral meaning. What was interesting to the research team centered on the initial attitudes to ‘caring’ from both medical and nursing students. [b]conclusions[/b]. We found that students of both nursing and medicine do not begin their studies with different attitudes and concepts of care. However, after their initial exposure to practical placements a process begins which forges different identities around the concept of care. This implies trends in the division of professional roles during their initial education.

  1. Primary medical care in Irish prisons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allwright Shane PA

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An industrial dispute between prison doctors and the Irish Prison Service (IPS took place in 2004. Part of the resolution of that dispute was that an independent review of prison medical and support services be carried out by a University Department of Primary Care. The review took place in 2008 and we report here on the principal findings of that review. Methods This study utilised a mixed methods approach. An independent expert medical evaluator (one of the authors, DT inspected the medical facilities, equipment and relevant custodial areas in eleven of the fourteen prisons within the IPS. Semistructured interviews took place with personnel who had operational responsibility for delivery of prison medical care. Prison doctors completed a questionnaire to elicit issues such as allocation of clinician's time, nurse and administrative support and resources available. Results There was wide variation in the standard of medical facilities and infrastructure provided across the IPS. The range of medical equipment available was generally below that of the equivalent general practice scheme in the community. There is inequality within the system with regard to the ratio of doctor-contracted time relative to the size of the prison population. There is limited administrative support, with the majority of prisons not having a medical secretary. There are few psychiatric or counselling sessions available. Conclusions People in prison have a wide range of medical care needs and there is evidence to suggest that these needs are being met inconsistently in Irish prisons.

  2. Origins of authority: the organization of medical care in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, R A

    1989-01-01

    Earlier research by Gardell and Gustafsson indicates a general discrepancy between perceived needs and organizational structure in Swedish somatic hospitals; the work organization directs the work process as if cure and medical treatment were the only appropriate goals in almost all kinds of health care settings. The standard organizational model for general hospitals, here named "the acute care model"--which is a merger of medical and administrative hierarchies--forces great segments of the staff into a work content that is neither appropriate for patients' needs nor satisfying for the personnel. The present study is a historical-sociological discourse in which the structural antecedents of the acute care model are traced. It gives an exposé of the main stages in the formation of the Swedish health care system from the middle ages to the present. In 1864 a regulation of the hospital boards was issued. This meant the definite consolidation of the acute care model and was in line with earlier developments, which were characterized by an incremental interorganizational activity demarcation that divided the core of institutional care into three branches: somatic hospitals, mental hospitals, and homes for the elderly. The driving forces in the formation of the total health care system are shown to be closely related to premedical and extramedical factors, such as military needs, mercantilism, and the emergence of the middle class.

  3. Medication as Infrastructure: Decentring Self-care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Danholt

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Drawing on science and technology studies (STS, and specifically the concept of infrastructure as conceptualised by Bowker and Star (2000; Star 1999, this paper argues and empirically demonstrates that self-care may be considered a practice that is thoroughly sociotechnical, material, distributed and de-centred. Comparing the practices related to medication in the treatment of asthma, type 2 diabetes and haemophilia, we show that in practice there is no ‘self’ in self-care. More specifically, the ‘self’ in self-care is an actor who is highly dependent on, and intertwined with infrastructures of care, in order to be self-caring. Infrastructures of care are the more or less embedded ‘tracks’ along which care may ‘run’, shaping and being shaped by actors and settings along the way. Obtaining prescriptions, going to the pharmacy, bringing medication home and administering it as parts of daily life are commonplace activities embedded in the fabric of life, especially for those living with a chronic condition. However, this procurement and emplacement of medication involves the establishment and ongoing enactment of infrastructures of care, that is, the connections between various actors and locations that establish caring spaces and caring selves. Locations and actors are included as allies in treating chronic conditions outside the clinical setting, but these infrastructures may also be ambiguous, with respect to their effects; they may simultaneously contribute to the condition’s management and neglect. Particularly precarious is management at the fringes of healthcare infrastructure, where allies, routines and general predictability are scarce. We conclude by arguing that these insights may induce a greater sensitivity to existing infrastructures and practices, when seeking to introduce new infrastructures of care, such as those promoted under the headings of ‘telemedicine’ and ‘healthcare IT’.

  4. Appropriate medical care for persons in detention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, I

    2003-03-01

    The people who are in detention are screened by the Medical Officer of the Prison and if they are found to be unwell, these prisoners will be accommodated in the sickbay and medical treatment will be provided. If their sickness needs further investigations and management, they will be sent to the Government Hospital. If the prisoners are found to have infectious or contagious diseases, steps will be taken to prevent the spread of these diseases to other prisoners in the prison. Prisoners are given time to exercise to maintain good health and their clothing are regularly washed to make sure that they will not contract skin diseases, e.g. scabies, ringworm, etc. The Prison Department since 1989 has increasing numbers of HIV positive prisoners. The Department complies with this problem by sending staff for courses, lectures and seminars so that they will be able to handle these prisoners more efficiently in the prison. When these HIV/AIDS prisoners' condition turns bad, they are usually transferred to a Government Hospital. Another of the Prison Department's prominent medical problem among the prisoners is drug addiction. Staff trained with skill and techniques are counselors for the drug related prisoners. Realizing and in anticipation that the sickbays in the prisons are going to be full of HIV/AIDS prisoners and drug related prisoners, special attention will be given to more allocation to upgrade the sickbays in the prison. White attires will be provided to the sick prisoners in the sickbays so that they will look neat and clean. More doctors, medical assistants and nurses will be employed so that appropriate medical care or rather more appropriate medical care can be provided to the sick prisoners in the prisons. The Prison Department is in the process of privatizing medical care for prisoners in the prison and the Department is also trying to convert some prisons to be medical prisons so that adequate medical care can be given to the sick prisoners.

  5. 32 CFR 732.22 - Recovery of medical care payments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recovery of medical care payments. 732.22... NONNAVAL MEDICAL AND DENTAL CARE Medical and Dental Care From Nonnaval Sources § 732.22 Recovery of medical... possible under workers compensation, no-fault insurance, or under medical payments insurance...

  6. Obstetric medical care in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, Laura A; Cote, Anne-Marie; Joseph, Geena; Firoz, Tabassum; Sia, Winnie

    2016-09-01

    Obstetric medicine is a growing area of interest within internal medicine in Canada. Canadians continue to travel broadly to obtain relevant training, particularly in the United Kingdom. However, there is now a sufficient body of expertise in Canada that a cadre of 'home-grown' obstetric internists is emerging and staying within Canada to improve maternity care. As this critical mass of practitioners grows, it is apparent that models of obstetric medicine delivery have developed according to local needs and patterns of practice. This article aims to describe the state of obstetric medicine in Canada, including general internal medicine services as the rock on which Canadian obstetric medicine has been built, the Canadian training curriculum and opportunities, organisation of obstetric medicine service delivery and the future.

  7. Medical errors recovered by critical care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykes, Patricia C; Rothschild, Jeffrey M; Hurley, Ann C

    2010-05-01

    : The frequency and types of medical errors are well documented, but less is known about potential errors that were intercepted by nurses. We studied the type, frequency, and potential harm of recovered medical errors reported by critical care registered nurses (CCRNs) during the previous year. : Nurses are known to protect patients from harm. Several studies on medical errors found that there would have been more medical errors reaching the patient had not potential errors been caught earlier by nurses. : The Recovered Medical Error Inventory, a 25-item empirically derived and internally consistent (alpha =.90) list of medical errors, was posted on the Internet. Participants were recruited via e-mail and healthcare-related listservs using a nonprobability snowball sampling technique. Investigators e-mailed contacts working in hospitals or who managed healthcare-related listservs and asked the contacts to pass the link on to others with contacts in acute care settings. : During 1 year, 345 CCRNs reported that they recovered 18,578 medical errors, of which they rated 4,183 as potentially lethal. : Surveillance, clinical judgment, and interventions by CCRNs to identify, interrupt, and correct medical errors protected seriously ill patients from harm.

  8. Caring to Care: Applying Noddings' Philosophy to Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmer, Dorene F; Hirsh, David A; Monie, Daphne; Weil, Henry; Richards, Boyd F

    2016-04-26

    The authors argue that Nel Noddings' philosophy, "an ethic of caring," may illuminate how students learn to be caring physicians from their experience of being in a caring, reciprocal relationship with teaching faculty. In her philosophy, Noddings acknowledges two important contextual continuities: duration and space, which the authors speculate exist within longitudinal integrated clerkships. In this Perspective, the authors highlight core features of Noddings' philosophy and explore its applicability to medical education. They apply Noddings' philosophy to a subset of data from a previously published longitudinal case study to explore its "goodness of fit" with the experience of eight students in the 2012 cohort of the Columbia-Bassett longitudinal integrated clerkship. In line with Noddings' philosophy, the authors' supplementary analysis suggests that students (1) recognized caring when they talked about "being known" by teaching faculty who "cared for" and "trusted" them; (2) responded to caring by demonstrating enthusiasm, action, and responsibility toward patients; and (3) acknowledged that duration and space facilitated caring relations with teaching faculty. The authors discuss how Noddings' philosophy provides a useful conceptual framework to apply to medical education design and to future research on caring-oriented clinical training, such as longitudinal integrated clerkships.

  9. Free medical care and consumer protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Aniket Deepak; Banerjee, Arunabha

    2011-01-01

    This paper will examine the question of whether patients, who receive free medical care, whether from private charitable or governmental hospitals, can claim rights as 'consumers' under the Consumer Protection Act, 1986. The issue will be discussed from a constitutional perspective as well as that of the law of torts.

  10. Medical liability and health care reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Leonard J; Morrisey, Michael A; Becker, David J

    2011-01-01

    We examine the impact of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) on medical liability and the controversy over whether federal medical reform including a damages cap could make a useful contribution to health care reform. By providing guaranteed access to health care insurance at community rates, the ACA could reduce the problem of under-compensation resulting from damages caps. However, it may also exacerbate the problem of under-claiming in the malpractice system, thereby reducing incentives to invest in loss prevention activities. Shifting losses from liability insurers to health insurers could further undermine the already weak deterrent effect of the medical liability system. Republicans in Congress and physician groups both pushed for the adoption of a federal damages cap as part of health care reform. Physician support for damages caps could be explained by concerns about the insurance cycle and the consequent instability of the market. Our own study presented here suggests that there is greater insurance market stability in states with caps on non-economic damages. Republicans in Congress argued that the enactment of damages caps would reduce aggregate health care costs. The Congressional Budget Office included savings from reduced health care utilization in its estimates of cost savings that would result from the enactment of a federal damages cap. But notwithstanding recent opinions offered by the CBO, it is not clear that caps will significantly reduce health care costs or that any savings will be passed on to consumers. The ACA included funding for state level demonstration projects for promising reforms such as offer and disclosure and health courts, but at this time the benefits of these reforms are also uncertain. There is a need for further studies on these issues.

  11. Reviewing the definition of crisis in dementia care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vroomen Janet MacNeil

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Crisis is a term frequently used in dementia care lacking a standardized definition. This article systematically reviews existing definitions of crisis in dementia care literature to create a standardized definition that can be utilized for research, policy and clinical practice. Methods We systematically searched for articles containing definitions of crisis in the context of dementia care. We created an operational framework of crisis based on retrieved definitions. Recommendations to address crisis situations were reviewed and classified according to care settings. Results Abstracts and titles of 1,113 articles, screened from PubMed and EMBASE, were narrowed down to 27 articles. After review, crisis in dementia was defined as a process where a stressor causes an imbalance requiring an immediate decision to be made which leads to a desired outcome and therefore a resolution of the crisis. If the crisis is not resolved, the cycle continues. Recommendations for resolving crisis involving persons with dementia and their caregivers include awareness therapy after diagnosis and increased contact with general practitioners, case manager consultations, caregiver support and education. Furthermore, nursing home staff should be attuned to the environmental, physical and psychological needs of persons with dementia. Conclusions This is the first article to review the definition of crisis in the context of dementia care. A review of the literature indicated that the definition of a crisis is idiosyncratic. Therefore, it is difficult to prevent or plan for all crises. We used an operational framework to compile types of crisis stressors and recommendations from the crisis literature based on three different perspectives; the person with the dementia, the caregiver and the healthcare providers.

  12. [Reliability of Primary Care computerised medication records].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Molina Sáez, Celia; Urbieta Sanz, Elena; Madrigal de Torres, Manuel; Piñera Salmerón, Pascual; Pérez Cárceles, María D

    2016-03-01

    To quantify and to evaluate the reliability of Primary Care (PC) computerised medication records of as an information source of patient chronic medications, and to identify associated factors with the presence of discrepancies. A descriptive cross-sectional study. General Referral Hospital in Murcia. Patients admitted to the cardiology-chest diseases unit, during the months of February to April 2013, on home treatment, who agreed to participate in the study. Evaluation of the reliability of Primary Care computerised medication records by analysing the concordance, by identifying discrepancies, between the active medication in these records and that recorded in pharmacist interview with the patient/caregiver. Identification of associated factors with the presence of discrepancies was analysed using a multivariate logistic regression. The study included a total of 308 patients with a mean of 70.9 years (13.0 SD). The concordance of active ingredients was 83.7%, and this decreased to 34.7% when taking the dosage into account. Discrepancies were found in 97.1% of patients. The most frequent discrepancy was omission of frequency (35.6%), commission (drug added unjustifiably) (14.6%), and drug omission (12.7%). Age older than 65 years (1.98 [1.08 to 3.64]), multiple chronic diseases (1.89 [1.04 to 3.42]), and have a narcotic or psychotropic drug prescribed (2.22 [1.16 to 4.24]), were the factors associated with the presence of discrepancies. Primary Care computerised medication records, although of undoubted interest, are not be reliable enough to be used as the sole source of information on patient chronic medications when admitted to hospital. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. The medical care system of Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffel, N K; Raffel, M W

    1988-01-01

    Medical care in Hungary has made significant progress since World War II in spite of other social priorities which have limited financial support of the health system. A shortage of hard currency in a high technological era is now having a particularly severe adverse impact on further development. Decentralized administration and local finance have, however, provided some room for progress. Preventive efforts are hampered by a deeply entrenched life style which is not conducive to improving the population's health status.

  14. Veterans Medical Care: FY2011 Appropriations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-21

    employees receiving preventative occupational immunizations such as Hepatitis A&B and flu vaccinations. 49 Department of Veterans Affairs, FY2011...such as Hepatitis A&B and flu vaccinations. Veterans Medical Care: FY2011 Appropriations Congressional Research Service 20 Formulation of VHA’s...1,977,000 1,225,000 Emergency appropriations- Gulf Coast Hurricanes (P.L. 109-148) — — — — 198,265 — — 198,265 Emergency appropriations- Avian Flu

  15. A Marxist view of medical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waitzkin, H

    1978-08-01

    Marxist studies of medical care emphasize political power and economic dominance in capitalist society. Although historically the Marxist paradigm went into eclipse during the early twentieth century, the field has developed rapidly during recent years. The health system mirrors the society's class structure through control over health institutions, stratification of health workers, and limited occupational mobility into health professions. Monopoly capital is manifest in the growth of medical centers, financial penetration by large corporations, and the "medical-industrial complex." Health policy recommendations reflect different interest groups' political and economic goals. The state's intervention in health care generally protects the capitalist economic system and the private sector. Medical ideology helps maintain class structure and patterns of domination. Comparative international research analyzes the effects of imperialism, changes under socialism, and contradictions of health reform in capitalist societies. Historical materialist epidemiology focuses on economic cycles, social stress, illness-generating conditions of work, and sexism. Health praxis, the disciplined uniting of study and action, involves advocacy of "nonreformist reforms" and concrete types of political struggle.

  16. Find Ryan White HIV/AIDS Medical Care Providers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Find Ryan White HIV/AIDS Medical Care Providers tool is a locator that helps people living with HIV/AIDS access medical care and related services. Users can...

  17. Training in data definitions improves quality of intensive care data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arts, DGT; Bosman, RJ; de Jonge, E; Joore, JCA; de Keizer, NF

    2003-01-01

    Background Our aim was to assess the contribution of training in data definitions and data extraction guidelines to improving quality of data for use in intensive care scoring systems such as the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II and Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS)

  18. Q-methodology: Definition and Application in Health Care Informatics

    OpenAIRE

    Valenta, Annette L.; Wigger, Ulrike

    1997-01-01

    Objective: To introduce the Q-methodology research technique to the field of health informatics. Q-methodology—the systematic study of subjectivity—was used to identify and categorize the opinions of primary care physicians and medical students that contributed to our understanding of their reasons for acceptance of and/or resistance to adapting information technologies in the health care workplace.

  19. Reliability of medical audit in quality assessment of medical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camacho Luiz Antonio Bastos

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Medical audit of hospital records has been a major component of quality of care assessment, although physician judgment is known to have low reliability. We estimated interrater agreement of quality assessment in a sample of patients with cardiac conditions admitted to an American teaching hospital. Physician-reviewers used structured review methods designed to improve quality assessment based on judgment. Chance-corrected agreement for the items considered more relevant to process and outcome of care ranged from low to moderate (0.2 to 0.6, depending on the review item and the principal diagnoses and procedures the patients underwent. Results from several studies seem to converge on this point. Comparisons among different settings should be made with caution, given the sensitivity of agreement measurements to prevalence rates. Reliability of review methods in their current stage could be improved by combining the assessment of two or more reviewers, and by emphasizing outcome-oriented events.

  20. Medical Care and Your 4- to 7-Month-Old

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Medical Care and Your 4- to 7-Month-Old KidsHealth > For Parents > Medical Care and Your 4- to 7-Month-Old ... regarding special baby care. Keep updating your child's medical record , listing information on growth and any problems ...

  1. 75 FR 62348 - Reimbursement Offsets for Medical Care or Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-08

    ....010, Veterans Nursing Home Care; 64.011, Veterans Dental Care; 64.012, Veterans Prescription Service..., Alcoholism, Claims Day care, Dental health, Drug abuse, Foreign relations, Government contracts, Grant... records, Homeless, Medical and dental schools, Medical devices, Medical research, Mental health [[Page...

  2. 32 CFR 1656.20 - Expenses for emergency medical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... reasonable expenses for emergency medical care, including hospitalization, of ASWs who suffer illness or... date on which the expense was incurred. (f) Cost of emergency medical care including hospitalization... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Expenses for emergency medical care. 1656.20...

  3. Expanded Medical Home Model Works for Children in Foster Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaudes, Paula Kienberger; Champagne, Vince; Harden, Allen; Masterson, James; Bilaver, Lucy A.

    2012-01-01

    The Illinois Child Welfare Department implemented a statewide health care system to ensure that children in foster care obtain quality health care by providing each child with a medical home. This study demonstrates that the Medical Home model works for children in foster care providing better health outcomes in higher immunization rates. These…

  4. Expanded Medical Home Model Works for Children in Foster Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaudes, Paula Kienberger; Champagne, Vince; Harden, Allen; Masterson, James; Bilaver, Lucy A.

    2012-01-01

    The Illinois Child Welfare Department implemented a statewide health care system to ensure that children in foster care obtain quality health care by providing each child with a medical home. This study demonstrates that the Medical Home model works for children in foster care providing better health outcomes in higher immunization rates. These…

  5. Medical and Para-Medical Personnel’ Perspectives on Home Health Care Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Stara

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available User-based research is strongly recommended in design for older adults. The aim of this paper is to focus the attention on the poorly explored role of medical and para-medical personnel’s perspective on home health care technologies using data that have been gained during the “Active Ageing At Home” (AA@H project. A focus group was organized at the National Institute of Health & Science on Ageing (INRCA in Italy. Results demonstrate that several challenges deserve a stronger effort by the whole research sector on ageing and technology: (1 a leading role of the participatory design process; (2 the assessment of the added value of health technologies through robust methods; (3 the definition of an unique identity and well established practices among disciplines; (4 the creation of favorable prerequisites and conditions to the technology uptake.

  6. Undergraduate medical education in emergency medical care: a nationwide survey at German medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckers, Stefan K; Timmermann, Arnd; Müller, Michael P; Angstwurm, Matthias; Walcher, Felix

    2009-05-12

    Since June 2002, revised regulations in Germany have required "Emergency Medical Care" as an interdisciplinary subject, and state that emergency treatment should be of increasing importance within the curriculum. A survey of the current status of undergraduate medical education in emergency medical care establishes the basis for further committee work. Using a standardized questionnaire, all medical faculties in Germany were asked to answer questions concerning the structure of their curriculum, representation of disciplines, instructors' qualifications, teaching and assessment methods, as well as evaluation procedures. Data from 35 of the 38 medical schools in Germany were analysed. In 32 of 35 medical faculties, the local Department of Anaesthesiology is responsible for the teaching of emergency medical care; in two faculties, emergency medicine is taught mainly by the Department of Surgery and in another by Internal Medicine. Lectures, seminars and practical training units are scheduled in varying composition at 97% of the locations. Simulation technology is integrated at 60% (n = 21); problem-based learning at 29% (n = 10), e-learning at 3% (n = 1), and internship in ambulance service is mandatory at 11% (n = 4). In terms of assessment methods, multiple-choice exams (15 to 70 questions) are favoured (89%, n = 31), partially supplemented by open questions (31%, n = 11). Some faculties also perform single practical tests (43%, n = 15), objective structured clinical examination (OSCE; 29%, n = 10) or oral examinations (17%, n = 6). Emergency Medical Care in undergraduate medical education in Germany has a practical orientation, but is very inconsistently structured. The innovative options of simulation technology or state-of-the-art assessment methods are not consistently utilized. Therefore, an exchange of experiences and concepts between faculties and disciplines should be promoted to guarantee a standard level of education in emergency medical care.

  7. Undergraduate medical education in emergency medical care: A nationwide survey at German medical schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timmermann Arnd

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since June 2002, revised regulations in Germany have required "Emergency Medical Care" as an interdisciplinary subject, and state that emergency treatment should be of increasing importance within the curriculum. A survey of the current status of undergraduate medical education in emergency medical care establishes the basis for further committee work. Methods Using a standardized questionnaire, all medical faculties in Germany were asked to answer questions concerning the structure of their curriculum, representation of disciplines, instructors' qualifications, teaching and assessment methods, as well as evaluation procedures. Results Data from 35 of the 38 medical schools in Germany were analysed. In 32 of 35 medical faculties, the local Department of Anaesthesiology is responsible for the teaching of emergency medical care; in two faculties, emergency medicine is taught mainly by the Department of Surgery and in another by Internal Medicine. Lectures, seminars and practical training units are scheduled in varying composition at 97% of the locations. Simulation technology is integrated at 60% (n = 21; problem-based learning at 29% (n = 10, e-learning at 3% (n = 1, and internship in ambulance service is mandatory at 11% (n = 4. In terms of assessment methods, multiple-choice exams (15 to 70 questions are favoured (89%, n = 31, partially supplemented by open questions (31%, n = 11. Some faculties also perform single practical tests (43%, n = 15, objective structured clinical examination (OSCE; 29%, n = 10 or oral examinations (17%, n = 6. Conclusion Emergency Medical Care in undergraduate medical education in Germany has a practical orientation, but is very inconsistently structured. The innovative options of simulation technology or state-of-the-art assessment methods are not consistently utilized. Therefore, an exchange of experiences and concepts between faculties and disciplines should be promoted to guarantee a standard

  8. Medical error and decision making: Learning from the past and present in intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucknall, Tracey K

    2010-08-01

    Human error occurs in every occupation. Medical errors may result in a near miss or an actual injury to a patient that has nothing to do with the underlying medical condition. Intensive care has one of the highest incidences of medical error and patient injury in any specialty medical area; thought to be related to the rapidly changing patient status and complex diagnoses and treatments. The aims of this paper are to: (1) outline the definition, classifications and aetiology of medical error; (2) summarise key findings from the literature with a specific focus on errors arising from intensive care areas; and (3) conclude with an outline of approaches for analysing clinical information to determine adverse events and inform practice change in intensive care. Database searches of articles and textbooks using keywords: medical error, patient safety, decision making and intensive care. Sociology and psychology literature cited therein. Critically ill patients require numerous medications, multiple infusions and procedures. Although medical errors are often detected by clinicians at the bedside, organisational processes and systems may contribute to the problem. A systems approach is thought to provide greater insight into the contributory factors and potential solutions to avoid preventable adverse events. It is recommended that a variety of clinical information and research techniques are used as a priority to prevent hospital acquired injuries and address patient safety concerns in intensive care. 2010 Australian College of Critical Care Nurses Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Emerging trends in the outsourcing of medical and surgical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Jennifer B; McGrath, Mary H; Maa, John

    2011-01-01

    As total health care expenditures are expected to constitute an increasing portion of the US gross domestic product during the coming years, the US health care system is anticipating a historic spike in the need for care. Outsourcing medical and surgical care to other nations has expanded rapidly, and several ethical, legal, and financial considerations require careful evaluation. Ultimately, the balance between cost savings, quality, and patient satisfaction will be the key determinant in the future of medical outsourcing.

  10. MEDICATION ERRORS IN ANESTHESIA AND CRITICAL CARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopal Reddy

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Medication errors are common throughout healthcare system and result in significant morbidity and mortality. Medication related incidents are a common form of reported medical errors. In theory they should never occur. These mistakes are also called “Never events”. Some of these are avoidable and preventable events. 50% of these mistakes are preventable. “India records 5.2 million medical injuries a year”. 1 The UN body quantified the number of surgeries taking place every year globally - 234 million. It said surgeries had become common, with one in every 25 people undergoing it at any given time. China conducted the highest number of surgeries followed by Russia and India. In developing countries, the death rate was nearly 10% for a major surgery. 1 All surgeries need one or other form of anaesthesia. Anaesthetic practice is unique because anaesthetists are personally responsible for al l the steps from drug preparation to drug administration. Therefore, they need to have heightened awareness of the risk factors which create conditions for drug errors to occur. 2 Anaesthesia is unusual in requiring the administration of several potent, dan gerous, rapidly acting drugs in a relatively brief timeframe. These drugs would be harmful if given without considerable care and attention to dose, timing and order of administration. These drugs are almost exclusively administered by Anaesthetists and th e drugs are rarely checked by anyone other than the anaesthetist before administration. Drug error in relation to anaesthesia may therefore be of particular interest both to the specialty and the wider population. 3

  11. INFORMATION SECURITY PROBLEMS OF SUCCESSION OF MEDICAL CARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Kharyk

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The problems of ensuring the succession and continuity of medical care were examined. The information and cyber matters of succession, in particular, information standards, resource management systems of medical institutions were analyzed. The idea of the need to develop standards for succession of medical care is emphasized.

  12. Medical Care and Your 1- to 2-Year-Old

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Medical Care and Your 1- to 2-Year-Old KidsHealth > For Parents > Medical Care and Your 1- to 2-Year-Old ... A The toddler months continue to bring the medical challenges of colds , scrapes and bruises, and other ...

  13. Medical Care and Your 1- to 3-Month-Old

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Medical Care and Your 1- to 3-Month-Old KidsHealth > For Parents > Medical Care and Your 1- to 3-Month-Old ... doctor gives you. At home, update your baby's medical record , tracking growth and any problems or illnesses. ...

  14. 20 CFR 702.407 - Supervision of medical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... furnished or to be furnished the employee, including whether the charges made by any medical care provider... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Supervision of medical care. 702.407 Section... AND HARBOR WORKERS' COMPENSATION ACT AND RELATED STATUTES ADMINISTRATION AND PROCEDURE Medical...

  15. Psychotropic Medication Management in a Residential Group Care Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spellman, Douglas F.; Griffith, Annette K.; Huefner, Jonathan C.; Wise, Neil, III; McElderry, Ellen; Leslie, Laurel K.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a psychotropic medication management approach that is used within a residential care program. The approach is used to assess medications at youths' times of entry and to facilitate decision making during care. Data from a typical case study have indicated that by making medication management decisions slowly, systematically,…

  16. Medication errors in elderly acute care--a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metsälä, Eija; Vaherkoski, Ulla

    2014-03-01

    Medication safety is a part of quality of care and patient safety. Old age brings many challenges for safe use of medication. In order to improve the prerequisites of medication safety in acute care of the elderly, we systematically reviewed studies to find out what kind of medication errors happen in elderly acute care. Cinahl, Medline, Cochrane, JBI Connect+ databases and Finnish healthcare databases Medic and Ohtanen were used in the search. The search was performed using both MeSH terms and keywords by the option 'search all text'. The original keywords were pharmacy or drugs, medical error or deviation and their Finnish synonyms. These keywords were united to the terms elderly, nursing or acute care or intensive care. Studies published between 2001 and 2011 were chosen. Medication errors mentioned in the studies were associated with (i) nursing competence, (ii) prescription- and patient-related factors, (iii) medication work organisation and nursing process and (iv) safety culture. This paper presents several practical implications for improving medication safety in the acute care of the elderly. The grey literature was not included because the authors wanted to limit to the best-quality research. In some studies, elderly acute care was not their exact context or the elderly formed only a part of study population. This may have undermined some types of medication errors typical to elderly acute care. To improve the prerequisites of medication, safety in acute care of the elderly management of the medication process should be improved. Also, cooperation within the medical team in making the medical care plans and checking out the medication of the elderly people should be improved. This is an important topic of lifelong education for nurses and other healthcare staff as well. © 2013 Nordic College of Caring Science. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Ghana--medical care amid economic problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, L

    1980-07-01

    Describing the pattern of disease encountered in primary health care (PHC) in Ghana and the facilities available to treat it, this discussion provides an account of the rapidly deteriorating economic situation and its effects on the inhabitants and on medical practice. During the 1977-79 period Ghana suffered severe economic and political difficulties, affecting work at the University Hospital in Legon, Ghana. The workload differs from that in developed countries in several ways: tropical diseases are common; the diseases of proverty are rife; diseases due to poor public health and an absence of some diseases, e.g., myocardial infarct and multiple sclerosis. There is no equivalent of the British general practioner, but there are 4 main sources of care: 54 government hospitals with 137 health centrs and health posts distributed around the country; 57 private but relatively low cost hospitals and clinics; exclusive, high cost private clinics; and traditional healers and herbalists practicing their art. Between 1976-79 the economy of Ghana went into a steep decline. Exact figures for inflation are difficult to come by; 15% per year was popularly quoted. The cedi (the Ghanaian unit of currency) was officially devalued. Goods became very scarce as well as expensive. Basic food items, spare parts for vehicles and other machinery, petroleum products, soap, and all medical supplies were hard to obtain. There was public unrest during this period. Strikes became frequent. Notable from the health perspective was a strike of all professionals, including doctors, in June 1977, strikes of government employed nurses in April 1978 and May 1979. The main events were 3 changes of government. Although exact data are not easy to obtain, the diseases of poverty appeared to be on the increase. Lack of money tended to keep those not entitled to free treatment away from private hospitals, but the deteriorating situation at the clinics seemed to more than compensate for this. Shortages

  18. MANPOWER FOR PRIMARY MEDICAL CARE IN IRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Motameni

    1973-03-01

    Full Text Available Iran is a large country with a total area of 1,645,000 square kilometers. The country’s population is estimated at about 31 millions. There is an uneven distribution of the population, varying from 2 to 50 per square kilometer. Sixty per cent of the total population (18 millions is living in nearly 66,000 small and large village’s scattered throughout the country. A total of 10,000 physicians provide the main source of medical manpower, however more than 40% of these physicians are located in the capital city of Teheran. The physician to population ratio for the country is about 1 per 3,000 and the figure reaches 100,000 in some rural areas. Each year a total of 600 graduates is added to the health manpower , but technical and socio-economic handicapping factors make the rural and low-income areas less attractive to the new graduates. In this paper the reconstruction of health services around the concept of Primary Medical Care has been reposed for the country’s health development. Taking into consideration the country’s special geographical and demographic features, two levels of primary care workers have been suggested; the first group with 4 year’s training in curative and preventive services, and the second group at grade 9 level in education. It is foreseen that the two afore-mentioned groups will form a network of auxiliaries to the physicians in extending health services to the remote areas of the country.

  19. How medical services mask provision of non-medical supportive care in palliative oncology ?

    OpenAIRE

    Buthion, Valérie; Moumjid, Nora; Margier, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES In the context of cancer, non-medical supportive care improves quality of life. While policymakers expect it to be cheaper than high-tech medical care, we hypothesized that it is in fact embedded in and camouflaged by hospital medical services. METHODS In a cross-sectional descriptive study, we conducted qualitative interviews with healthcare providers, patients and family caregivers in France. We first performed a functional analysis to identify non-medical supportive care functio...

  20. 42 CFR 34.7 - Medical and other care; death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Medical and other care; death. 34.7 Section 34.7... EXAMINATIONS MEDICAL EXAMINATION OF ALIENS § 34.7 Medical and other care; death. (a) An alien detained by or in... further care. (b) In case of the death of an alien, the body shall be delivered to the consular...

  1. Medication administration errors in an intensive care unit in Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Background Medication administration errors in patient care have been shown to be frequent and serious. Such errors are particularly prevalent in highly technical specialties such as the intensive care unit (ICU). In Ethiopia, the prevalence of medication administration errors in the ICU is not studied. Objective To assess medication administration errors in the intensive care unit of Jimma University Specialized Hospital (JUSH), Southwest Ethiopia. Methods Prospective observation based cross...

  2. Medical Care and Your 13- to 18-Year-Old

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Medical Care and Your 13- to 18-Year-Old ... school importance of regular physical activity continue Common Medical Problems Sports injuries and other problems, such as ...

  3. Consultation letters for medically unexplained physical symptoms in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoedeman, Rob; Blankenstein, Annette H.; van der Feltz-Cornelis, Christina M.; Krol, Boudien; Stewart, Roy; Groothoff, Johan W.; van der Feltz-Cornelis, CM

    2010-01-01

    Background In primary care between 10% and 35% of all visits concern patients with medically unexplained physical symptoms (MUPS). MUPS are associated with high medical consumption, significant disabilities and psychiatricmorbidity. Objectives To assess the effectiveness of consultation letters (CLs

  4. Late presentation of chronic viral hepatitis for medical care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mauss, Stefan; Pol, Stanislas; Buti, Maria

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We present two consensus definitions of advanced and late stage liver disease being used as epidemiological tools. These definitions can be applied to assess the morbidity caused by liver diseases in different health care systems. We focus is on hepatitis B and C virus infections, b...

  5. Situational analysis of palliative care education in thai medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvarnabhumi, Krishna; Sowanna, Non; Jiraniramai, Surin; Jaturapatporn, Darin; Kanitsap, Nonglak; Soorapanth, Chiroj; Thanaghumtorn, Kanate; Limratana, Napa; Akkayagorn, Lanchasak; Staworn, Dusit; Praditsuwan, Rungnirand; Uengarporn, Naporn; Sirithanawutichai, Teabaluck; Konchalard, Komwudh; Tangsangwornthamma, Chaturon; Vasinanukorn, Mayuree; Phungrassami, Temsak

    2013-01-01

    The Thai Medical School Palliative Care Network conducted this study to establish the current state of palliative care education in Thai medical schools. A questionnaire survey was given to 2 groups that included final year medical students and instructors in 16 Thai medical schools. The questionnaire covered 4 areas related to palliative care education. An insufficient proportion of students (defined as fewer than 60%) learned nonpain symptoms control (50.0%), goal setting and care planning (39.0%), teamwork (38.7%), and pain management (32.7%). Both medical students and instructors reflected that palliative care education was important as it helps to improve quality of care and professional competence. The percentage of students confident to provide palliative care services under supervision of their senior, those able to provide services on their own, and those not confident to provide palliative care services were 57.3%, 33.3%, and 9.4%, respectively. The lack of knowledge in palliative care in students may lower their level of confidence to practice palliative care. In order to prepare students to achieve a basic level of competency in palliative care, each medical school has to carefully put palliative care content into the undergraduate curriculum.

  6. Health and medical care in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodes, R M; Kloos, H

    1988-10-01

    Ethiopia is a country of 45 million people in northeast Africa. With a stagnant, agriculture-based economy and a per capita gross national product of $110 in 1984, it is one of the world's poorest nations. 70% of the children are mildly to severely malnourished, and 25.7% of children born alive die before the age of 5. Life expectancy is 41 years. The population is growing at the rate of 2.9%/year, but only 2% of the people use birth control. After the 1974 revolution, the socialist government nationalized land and created 20,000 peasant associations and kebeles (urban dwellers' associations), which are the units of local government. The government has set ambitious goals for development in all sectors, including health, but famine, near famine, forced resettlement programs, and civil war have prevented any real progress from being made. The government's approach to health care is based on an emphasis on primary health care and expansion of rural health services, but the Ministry of Health is allocated only 3.5% of the national budget. Ethiopia has 3 medical schools -- at Addis Ababa, Gondar, and the Jimma Institute of Health Sciences. Physicians are government employees but also engage in private practice. A major problem is that a large proportion of medical graduates emigrate. Ethiopia has 87 hospitals with 11,296 beds, which comes to 1 bed per 3734 people. There are 1949 health stations and 141 health centers, but many have no physician, and attrition among health workers is high due to lack of ministerial support. Health care is often dispensed legally or illegally by pharmacists. Overall, there is 1 physician for 57,876 people, but in the southwest and west central Ethiopia 1 physician serves between 200,000 and 300,000 people. In rural areas, where 90% of the population lives, 85% live at least 3 days by foot from a rural health unit. Immunization of 1-year olds against tuberculosis, diphtheria-pertussis-tetanus, poliomyelitis, and measles is 11, 6, 6, and

  7. Medical care epidemiology and unwarranted variation: the Israeli case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, David C; Goodman, Andrew A

    2017-01-01

    In an article in this Journal, Mendlovic and colleagues report on regional variation in medical care across Israeli regions. This study joins a growing literature demonstrating generally high variation in the provision of health care services within developed countries. This commentary summarizes the status of medical care epidemiology and its studies of unwarranted variation in health care, and provides a conceptual framework to guide future studies. Recommendations are offered for advancing studies in Israel that could guide policy development and clinical improvement.

  8. Medical foster care: what happens when children with medical complexity cannot be cared for by their families?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seltzer, Rebecca R; Henderson, Carrie M; Boss, Renee D

    2016-01-01

    Medical interventions for life-threatening pediatric conditions often oblige ongoing and complex medical care for survivors. For some children with medical complexity, their caretaking needs outstrip their parents' resources and abilities. When this occurs, the medical foster care system can provide the necessary health care and supervision to permit these children to live outside of hospitals. However, foster children with medical complexity experience extremes of social and medical risk, confounding their prognosis and quality of life beyond that of similar children living with biologic parents. Medical foster parents report inadequate training and preparation, perpetuating these health risks. Further, critical decisions that weigh the benefits and burdens of medical interventions for these children must accommodate complicated relationships involving foster families, caseworkers, biologic families, legal consultants, and clinicians. These variables can delay and undermine coordinated and comprehensive care. To rectify these issues, medical homes and written care plans can promote collaboration between providers, families, and agencies. Pediatricians should receive specialized training to meet the unique needs of this population. National policy and research agendas could target medical and social interventions to reduce the need for medical foster care for children with medical complexity, and to improve its quality for those children who do.

  9. [The medical technologist as a key professional in medical care in the 21st century].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwatani, Yoshinori

    2008-10-01

    The dynamic healthcare environment of Japan, including the rapidly aging population and the requirement of highly sophisticated and diverse medical care, induces strict financial conditions and increases the number of those seeking medical care. Therefore, medical professionals are now required to provide safe and effective medical care with limited medical resources. Recently, Japanese medical institutions have introduced the total quality management system, which was developed for better business management, to promote safe and effective management. However, there are two major drawbacks with the introduction of this system in the sector of medical care in Japan. First, the standardization of medical skills of medical professionals is greatly affected due to the presence of different education systems for the same medical profession except for medical doctors and pharmacologists. The education system for major medical professionals, such as nurses and medical and radiological technologists, must be standardized based on the university norms. Second, the knowledge-creating process among the medical professionals has been associated with many problems. The specialized fields are quite different among medical professionals. Therefore, common specialized fields must be established among major medical professions based on the specialization of medical doctors to promote their communication and better understanding. Considering the roles of medical professionals in medical care, medical doctors and nurses are the most responsible for monitoring, assessing, and guaranteeing the safety of medical care, and medical and radiological technologists are the most responsible for effective medical care. The current medical technologists are not only required to carry out clinical laboratory tests, but also be proactive and positive as well as have marked problem-solving abilities. They are expected to improve the diagnostic test systems in medical institutes for medical doctors

  10. Awareness and practices regarding bio-medical waste management among health care workers in a tertiary care hospital in Delhi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Bhagawati

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Health care institutions are generating large amount of Bio-Medical Waste (BMW, which needs to be properly segregated and treated. With this concern, a questionnaire based cross-sectional study was done to determine the current status of awareness and practices regarding BMW Management (BMWM and areas of deficit amongst the HCWs in a tertiary care teaching hospital in New Delhi, India. The correct responses were graded as satisfactory (more than 80%, intermediate (50–80% and unsatisfactory (less than 50%. Some major areas of deficit found were about knowledge regarding number of BMW categories (17%, mercury waste disposal (37.56% and definition of BMW (47%.

  11. Fatigue and the delivery of medical care

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, JFA

    2011-01-01

    Lack of sleep has well established effects on physiological, cognitive and behavioural functionality. Sleep deprivation can adversely affect clinical performance as severely as alcohol according to some sources. Sleep deficiency may be due to loss of one night’s sleep or repeated interruptions of sleep. Chronic sleep degrades the ability to recognise one’s ability to recognise the impairments induced by sleep loss. The problem of sleep deprivation has vexed acute medical practice for decades. Improvement has been painfully slow. The problem is that all 168 hours throughout every week of every year have to be covered and there are a finite number of doctors to shoulder the burden. There are many strongly held views about how best to provide night-time and week-end care. Constructive innovations are thin on the ground. The biggest gap is between administration and doctors with financial considerations being the limiting factor. It is, however, generally accepted on all sides that sleep loss and fatigue can have adverse effects on both patients and doctors.

  12. On Rural Medical Care and Health Undertaking Development during New Medical Reform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yi-huan

    2012-01-01

    Based on in-depth survey of township hospitals in Lushan County of Henan Province, this paper studies the development situations of rural medical care and health undertaking in the course of new medical reform. Results show that both rural medical institution and public health undertaking have considerable development in this course. Working capital situation gradually turns better. However, there are still problems and challenge of shortage of high quality medical care personnel, lack of employment mechanism, poor medical environment, and imperfect bidding and purchasing system of medicines. To further develop rural medical situation, it should improve medical environment, speed up informationization construction, and give prominence to functional orientation.

  13. 76 FR 68198 - Lists of Designated Primary Medical Care, Mental Health, and Dental Health Professional Shortage...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-03

    ... Administration Lists of Designated Primary Medical Care, Mental Health, and Dental Health Professional Shortage... designated as primary medical care, mental health, and dental health professional shortage areas (HPSAs) as... seven health professional types (primary medical care, dental, psychiatric, vision care,...

  14. The impact of managed care on graduate medical education and academic medical centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolognia, J L; Wintroub, B U

    1996-09-01

    The goal of this article is to examine the present and future impact of managed care on graduate medical education (GME) and academic medical centers. Obviously, the later 2 entities are closely intertwined and will share in the consequences of changes in our medical care systems. However, there are differences in the funding of medical schools as compared with GME provided by teaching hospitals, and an appreciation of the vital issues and concerns requires that each be discussed separately.

  15. Evaluating Documentation of Dietetic Care in Swedish Medical Records

    OpenAIRE

    Lövestam, Elin; Orrevall, Ylva; Koochek, Afsaneh; Karlström, Brita; Andersson, Agneta

    2013-01-01

    An adequate documentation in medical records is essential for patient safety and high quality care. The aim of this study was to evaluate documentation by dietitians in Swedish medical records. A retrospective audit of 147 dietetic notes in electronic medical records was performed. The audit focused at documentation of essential parts of the dietetic care, as well as other quality aspects such as lingual clarity and structure of the documentation. The nutrition intervention showed to be the m...

  16. [Medical care for Russian cosmonauts' health on the ISS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogomolov, V V; Kozlovskaia, I B; Alferova, I V; Egorov, A D; Kovachevich, I V

    2008-01-01

    Established with the personal participation of O.G. Gazenko, the Russian system of medical care for cosmonauts' health has been largely preserved till this day. The system was fully functional on board the orbital complex MIR and, with appropriate modifications, has been adopted as a core of the medical care for Russian members of the ISS crews. In the period of 2000-2008, 22 cosmonauts were members of 17 ISS increments from 140 to 216 days in duration. The main functions of the medical care system were to control health, physical and mental performance, and to support implementation of space researches. The flow of readaptation to the normal gravity was, in most cases similar to what has been typical on return from the Russian orbital stations; some deviations are accounted for by application of the in-flight countermeasures. The paper familiarizes reader with some aspects of the theoretical work of academician O.G. Gazenko in the field of medical care in space flight. It outlines the principles of ISS medical management. The integrated medical support system combines medical equipment and items available on the Russian and US segments; the integrated medical group consists of flight surgeons, medical experts and biomedical engineers of the international partners and coordinates planning and implementation of medical operations. Also, challenges of health care on the phase of ISS utilization are defined.

  17. Schizophrenia in the Netherlands: Continuity of Care with Better Quality of Care for Less Medical Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Lee, Arnold; de Haan, Lieuwe; Beekman, Aartjan

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with schizophrenia need continuous elective medical care which includes psychiatric treatment, antipsychotic medication and somatic health care. The objective of this study is to assess whether continuous elective psychiatric is associated with less health care costs due to less inpatient treatment. Methods Data concerning antipsychotic medication and psychiatric and somatic health care of patients with schizophrenia in the claims data of Agis Health Insurance were collected over 2008–2011 in the Netherlands. Included were 7,392 patients under 70 years of age with schizophrenia in 2008, insured during the whole period. We assessed the relationship between continuous elective psychiatric care and the outcome measures: acute treatment events, psychiatric hospitalization, somatic care and health care costs. Results Continuous elective psychiatric care was accessed by 73% of the patients during the entire three year follow-up period. These patients received mostly outpatient care and accessed more somatic care, at a total cost of €36,485 in three years, than those without continuous care. In the groups accessing fewer or no years of elective care 34%-68% had inpatient care and acute treatment events, while accessing less somatic care at average total costs of medical care from €33,284 to €64,509. Conclusions Continuous elective mental and somatic care for 73% of the patients with schizophrenia showed better quality of care at lower costs. Providing continuous elective care to the remaining patients may improve health while reducing acute illness episodes. PMID:27275609

  18. Harm in the absence of care: Towards a medical ethics that cares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinsen, Elin

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this article is to investigate the concept of care in contemporary medical practice and medical ethics. Although care has been hailed throughout the centuries as a crucial ideal in medical practice and as an honourable virtue to be observed in codes of medical ethics, I argue that contemporary medicine and medical ethics suffer from the lack of a theoretically sustainable concept of care and then discuss possible reasons that may help to explain this absence. I draw on the empirical studies of Carol Gilligan on care and connectedness as ontologically situated realities in human life. Based on a philosophical elaboration of her findings on the ethics of care emphasizing relationality, I try to show how the notion of 'relational ontology' originating from this stream of thought may be of help in developing a medical ethics that acknowledges care as a perspective to be observed in all interactions between physicians and patients.

  19. Nurses' perceptions of quality end-of-life care on an acute medical ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Genevieve; McClement, Susan; Daeninck, Paul

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports the findings of a study that generated a conceptual model of the nursing behaviours and social processes inherent in the provision of quality end-of-life care from the perspective of nurses working in an acute care setting. The majority of research examining the issue of quality end-of-life care has focused on the perspectives of patients, family members and physicians. The perspective of nurses has generally received minimal research attention, with the exception of those working within palliative or critical care. The vast majority of hospitalized patients, however, continue to be cared for and die on medical units. To date, little research has been conducted examining definitions and determinants of quality end-of-life care from the perspective of nurses working in acute adult medical settings. Grounded theory method was used in this study of 10 nurses working on acute medical units at two tertiary university-affiliated hospitals in central Canada. Data were collected during 2002 by interview and participant observation. The basic social problem uncovered in the data was that of nurses striving to provide high quality end-of-life care on an acute medical unit while being pulled in all directions. The unifying theme of 'Creating a haven for safe passage' integrated the major sub-processes into the key analytic model in this study. 'Creating a haven for safe passage' represents a continuum of behaviours and strategies, and includes the sub-processes of 'facilitating and maintain a lane change'; 'getting what's needed'; 'being there'; and 'manipulating the care environment'. The ability of nurses to provide quality end-of-life care on an acute medical unit is a complex process involving many factors related to the patient, family, healthcare providers and the context in which the provision of end-of-life care takes place.

  20. HIV viral suppression among persons with varying levels of engagement in HIV medical care, 19 US jurisdictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Stacy M; Hu, Xiaohong; Sweeney, Patricia; Johnson, Anna Satcher; Hall, H Irene

    2014-12-15

    Ongoing HIV medical care is vital in achieving and maintaining viral suppression. We examined viral suppression applying retention in care definitions used by various federal agencies. Using National HIV Surveillance System data from 19 US jurisdictions with complete CD4 and viral load reporting, we determined viral suppression among persons who met the National HIV/AIDS Strategy retention in care definition (≥2 visits ≥3 months apart; "retained in continuous care") and among those who had evidence of care but did not meet the definition ("engaged in care"). We also examined viral suppression among persons who met the Health and Human Services Core Indicator definition for retention. Of 338,959 persons living with diagnosed HIV infection in 19 areas in 2010, 63.7% received any care; of these, 19.7% were "engaged in care" and 80.3% were "retained in continuous care." Of those "engaged in care," 47.7% achieved viral suppression compared with 73.6% of persons "retained in continuous care." Significant differences were evident for all subpopulations within each care category; younger persons and blacks/African Americans had lower levels of viral suppression than their counterparts. Persons "engaged in care," regardless of sex, age, race/ethnicity, and transmission category, had significantly lower percentages of viral suppression than persons "retained in continuous care." Similar patterns of viral suppression were found for persons meeting the Health and Human Services definition compared with persons "retained in continuous care." Higher levels of engagement in care, including more frequent monitoring of CD4 and viral load, were associated with viral suppression.

  1. Russian medical care in the 1990s: a user's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, J V; Rusinova, N L

    1997-10-01

    This article examines medical utilization patterns and attitudes toward the medical care system among the citizens of Russia's second largest city, St. Petersburg. It focuses upon the extent to which both attitudes towards and usage of medical care institutions have changed in the immediate post-Soviet period. A particular concern has been to determine the degree to which utilization and perceptions vary across the socioeconomic status hierarchy. The data were collected in two stages: a mass survey (N = 1500) conducted in mid 1992 and intensive follow-up interviews (N = 44) conducted in late 1994. The findings indicate that urban Russians were very critical of their medical care system at the end of the Soviet period. Most feel that the system has deteriorated even further since the end of 1991, and they are particularly worried about the emergency care system and about hospital conditions. Although people believe that the system now includes more alternatives, very few have changed their medical utilization patterns to take advantage of these new possibilities. This is more a product of their perceived high cost than of principled opposition to "pay" medicine. The analysis also demonstrates the extent to which medical utilization differs by socioeconomic status. lower status individuals tend to utilize the formal medical care system. High status individuals seek help from a variety of sources and, in particular, rely much more heavily on informal connections to the medical care system. The medical help-seeking strategies of higher status groups have proven to be reasonably adaptable to the post-Soviet medical marketplace, while for others finding good quality medical care remains more problematic.

  2. Medical Service: 40 years of outpatient care

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    On 1st June 2005 the Medical Service will be celebrating its fortieth birthday. This will mark forty years of service to the health of CERN's personnel by the Medical Service's small team of doctors, nurses, laboratory assistants and secretaries. Since 1965, 27 280 medical files have been archived and computerised. The Medical Service. From left to right, front row : Mireille Vosdey, Marloeke Bol and Nicole De Matos. From left to right, back row : Katie Warrilow-Thomson, Dr Eric Reymond, Dr Véronique Fassnacht, Isabelle Auvigne and Françoise Lebrun-Klauser. The Medical Service was founded on 1st June 1965, with a staff of four: the doctor, Jean-Paul Diss, a nurse, a laboratory assistant and a secretary. Previously, a private medical practitioner had come to CERN to perform the medical check-ups on the personnel and the Fire Brigade was responsible for first aid. However, in view of increasing staff numbers and the specific needs of a Laboratory like CERN, an on-site Medical Service had become ess...

  3. The inconsistent definitions used for tuberculosis in the medical literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne Xavier Shandera

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to assess the confusion attendant with current definitions of extrapulmonary tuberculosis, pleural and miliary disease, a set of 37 papers published which analyzed disease states were assessed for how the terms adhered to official definitions of the American Thoracic Society, the World Health Organization, and the Centers for Disease Control. The findings showed uncertainties in the classification of extrapulmonary disease, a frequent inconsistency in the inclusion of pleural disease within pulmonary rather than extrapulmonary disease, and the ambivalent use of the terms pleural and disseminated tuberculosis. Further attention by editors and authors is needed in the use of tuberculosis definitions.

  4. [How do asylum seekers experience access to medical care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spura, Anke; Kleinke, Matthias; Robra, Bernt-Peter; Ladebeck, Nadine

    2017-04-01

    In Germany basic medical care for asylum seekers is organized outside the statutory health insurance system. Currently there are few empirically based statements on how asylum seekers experience their access to healthcare. The aim is therefore to evaluate their experiences with healthcare focussing on subjective health, utilisation and access to medical care, and experiences with medical care. Between August and November 2015, we performed 16 qualitative problem-oriented guided interviews with asylum seekers, who received or sought medical care in Saxony-Anhalt. The interpreter-assisted interviews were evaluated with content analysis. Access begins with a voucher for medical treatment issued by the social security office. Asylum seekers experience that procedure as onerous and incapacitating. These experiences influence subjective health and utilisation of medical help. If their efforts for treatment certificates are rejected, people increasingly resign. If medical treatment is achieved, they experience medical staff mostly as competent and friendly, in spite of language difficulties and time pressure. Reducing the "voucher bureaucracy" by uniform rules and practices may bring about a relief to access and utilisation of healthcare. Introducing an electronic health insurance card for asylum seekers would retransfer decision making about treatment needs from the welfare system into the medical system.

  5. Young Adults Seeking Medical Care: Do Race and Ethnicity Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... equal percentages of those within each racial and ethnic group had a usual source of medical care. However, ... in the past year. Within each racial and ethnic group, uninsured young adults were about three times as ...

  6. 5 CFR 792.209 - What is the definition of child care subsidy program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What is the definition of child care subsidy program? 792.209 Section 792.209 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT... Subsidy Program Legislation and to Whom Does It Apply? § 792.209 What is the definition of child care...

  7. 5 CFR 792.212 - What is the definition of a child care contractor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What is the definition of a child care contractor? 792.212 Section 792.212 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL... Legislation and to Whom Does It Apply? § 792.212 What is the definition of a child care contractor? Section...

  8. African-Americans' perceptions of health care provider cultural competence that promote HIV medical self-care and antiretroviral medication adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaston, Gina B

    2013-01-01

    Most studies of cultural competence in healthcare examine healthcare providers' definitions of cultural competence practices. This study is unique in that it examines the relationship between African-American patients' perceptions of the cultural competence of their HIV healthcare providers and the adherence of these patients to medical self-care and antiretroviral therapy (ART). This cross-sectional, exploratory, descriptive study was conducted at the Ruth Rothstein CORE Center in Chicago, Illinois. The sample consisted of 202 HIV-positive African-Americans who completed surveys during clinic visits. Multiple measures were used, including the Patient Assessments of Cultural Competency survey instrument developed by the Department of Health and Human Services Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Medical self-care was measured using the advice and instructions scale and the self-care symptom management for people living with HIV/AIDS categorical scale. ART adherence was measured using the Adherence Behaviors Self-Report and Adherence Self-Report scales. The data revealed many significant correlations between variables. The more patients believed that providers should integrate culture in HIV treatment; the better their reported health (F1,138=0.151, P=0.05) and the more they followed their provider's advice and instructions (medical self-care; F1,138=0.029, P=0.05). Participants who trusted their providers engaged in more medical self-care (F1,138=0.280, P=0.01). More shared treatment decisions were reported among participants who had higher levels of education (F1,127=0.337, P=0.05). Findings of this study indicate the need for increased attention to the role of cultural competence in HIV/AIDS care. Understanding patient perceptions of provider cultural competence has the potential to improve HIV treatment adherence and health outcomes.

  9. [The development of organization of medical social care of adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicherin, L P; Nagaev, R Ia

    2014-01-01

    The model of the subject of the Russian Federation is used to consider means of development of health protection and health promotion in adolescents including implementation of the National strategy of activities in interest of children for 2012-2017 approved by decree No761 of the President of Russia in June 1 2012. The analysis is carried out concerning organization of medical social care to this group of population in medical institutions and organizations of different type in the Republic of Bashkortostan. Nowadays, in 29 territories medical social departments and rooms, 5 specialized health centers for children, 6 clinics friendly to youth are organized. The analysis of manpower support demonstrates that in spite of increasing of number of rooms and departments of medical social care for children and adolescents decreasing of staff jobs both of medical personnel and psychologists and social workers occurs. The differences in priorities of functioning of departments and rooms of medical social care under children polyclinics, health centers for children and clinics friendly to youth are established. The questionnaire survey of pediatricians and adolescents concerning perspectives of development of adolescent service established significant need in development of specialized complex center. At the basis of such center problems of medical, pedagogical, social, psychological, legal profile related to specific characteristics of development and medical social needs of adolescents can be resolved. The article demonstrates organizational form of unification on the functional basis of the department of medical social care of children polyclinic and clinic friendly to youth. During three years, number of visits of adolescents to specialists of the center increases and this testifies awareness of adolescents and youth about activities of department of medical social care. The most percentage of visits of adolescents to specialists was made with prevention purpose. Among

  10. Health Care Practices for Medical Textiles in Government Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akubue, B. N.; Anikweze, G. U.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the health care practices for medical textiles in government hospitals Enugu State, Nigeria. Specifically, the study determined the availability and maintenance of medical textiles in government hospitals in Enugu State, Nigeria. A sample of 1200 hospital personnel were studied. One thousand two hundred…

  11. Nutritional care of medical inpatients: a health technology assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kruse Filip

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The inspiration for the present assessment of the nutritional care of medical patients is puzzlement about the divide that exists between the theoretical knowledge about the importance of the diet for ill persons, and the common failure to incorporate nutritional aspects in the treatment and care of the patients. The purpose is to clarify existing problems in the nutritional care of Danish medical inpatients, to elucidate how the nutritional care for these inpatients can be improved, and to analyse the costs of this improvement. Methods Qualitative and quantitative methods are deployed to outline how nutritional care of medical inpatients is performed at three Danish hospitals. The practices observed are compared with official recommendations for nutritional care of inpatients. Factors extraneous and counterproductive to optimal nutritional care are identified from the perspectives of patients and professional staff. A review of the literature illustrates the potential for optimal nutritional care. A health economic analysis is performed to elucidate the savings potential of improved nutritional care. Results The prospects for improvements in nutritional care are ameliorated if hospital management clearly identifies nutritional care as a priority area, and enjoys access to management tools for quality assurance. The prospects are also improved if a committed professional at the ward has the necessary time resources to perform nutritional care in practice, and if the care staff can requisition patient meals rich in nutrients 24 hours a day. At the kitchen production level prospects benefit from a facilitator contact between care and kitchen staff, and if the kitchen staff controls the whole food path from the kitchen to the patient. At the patient level, prospects are improved if patients receive information about the choice of food and drink, and have a better nutrition dialogue with the care staff. Better nutritional care of

  12. Civilian primary care prescribing psychologist in an army medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, David S

    2012-12-01

    The present article discusses the integration of a civilian prescribing psychologist into a primary care clinic at Madigan Army Medical Center. A description of the role of the prescribing psychologist in this setting is provided. The author asserts that integrating prescribing psychology into primary care can improve patient access to skilled behavioral health services including psychotherapeutic and psychopharmacologic treatment. Potential benefits to the primary care providers (PCPs) working in primary care clinics are discussed. The importance of collaboration between the prescribing psychologist and PCP is emphasized. Initial feedback indicates that integration of a prescribing psychologist into primary care has been well received in this setting.

  13. 42 CFR 456.143 - Content of medical care evaluation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Content of medical care evaluation studies. 456.143...: Medical Care Evaluation Studies § 456.143 Content of medical care evaluation studies. Each medical care evaluation study must— (a) Identify and analyze medical or administrative factors related to the...

  14. 42 CFR 456.243 - Content of medical care evaluation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Content of medical care evaluation studies. 456.243... Ur Plan: Medical Care Evaluation Studies § 456.243 Content of medical care evaluation studies. Each medical care evaluation study must— (a) Identify and analyze medical or administrative factors related...

  15. Introducing Medical Self-Care in the Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keever, Bill D.; Lelm, Kathy

    1984-01-01

    Medical self-care is the involvement of laypersons, on their own behalf, in health promotion and decision making, disease prevention, and disease detection and treatment. A description of a self-care course that was designed and taught at Western Illinois University is offered. Results of a postcourse evaluation are presented. (DF)

  16. 32 CFR 564.40 - Procedures for obtaining medical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... care in civilian medical treatment facilities at Federal expense is not authorized such care without...) Status while undergoing hospitalization. The ARNG status of an individual is not affected by virtue of his hospitalization. The provisions of AR 135-200 will apply. Determination of requirement for...

  17. Caring, Competence and Professional Identities in Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, Anna

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers the multiple discourses that influence medical education with a focus on the discourses of competence and caring. Discourses of competence are largely constituted through, and related to, biomedical and clinical issues whereas discourses of caring generally focus on social concerns. These discourses are not necessarily equal…

  18. [The place, role and importance of emergency medical care in the Serbian health care system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikić-Sovilj, Ljiljana

    2009-01-01

    Emergency medical assistance is immediate, the current medical support that is provided hurted person to avoid any possible harmful consequences for his life and health. Emergency medical aid is part of the health care system that is rarely thought, but is still expected to be available always and continuously in case of need. Emergency medical assistance should always be available throughout the territory where people live, because there is no adequate replacement. Emergency Medical Services and emergency medical transportation services are health care that is provided in terms of all persons in the state of medical urgency. In urgent or emergency conditions, health care can be provided on the site of injuries and disease or health institution. Cases of medical urgency are ranked by degrees. The first and most difficult level of medical urgency indicate all urgent pathological conditions, diseases, injuries and poisoning, which occur in the workplace and public places. To expect medical team of emergency medical assistance at the scene intervened medical urgency, it is necessary to make call it. Call the phone number refers to the 94. Call sent to this number to receive orderly dispatcher. Dispatchers are employees who perform their work in the dispatching center. They appear in the phone number 94, made the assessment and screening calls, worry about the degree of urgency, and the absorption team, which team is the nearest place of the event. After received calls they send expert medical teams to the place of accident. In the dispatching center work always doctor and medical technician. Emergency medical care cases is a great professional and educational challenge and imposes a constant need in education of doctors and the whole emergency medical teams. Education of all employees in the state of emergency care is required continualy and for students too to receive new knowledge in the field of medical urgency by various professional purposes.

  19. Toward Ubiquitous Communication Platform for Emergency Medical Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Kenichi; Morishima, Naoto; Kanbara, Masayuki; Sunahara, Hideki; Imanishi, Masami

    Interaction between emergency medical technicians (EMTs) and doctors is essential in emergency medical care. Doctors require diverse information related to a patient to provide efficient aid. In 2005, we started the Ikoma119 project and have developed a ubiquitous communication platform for emergency medical care called Mobile ER. Our platform, which is based on wireless internet technology, has such desirable properties as low-cost, location-independent service, and ease of service introduction. We provide an overview of our platform and describe the services that we have developed. We also discuss the remaining issues to realize our platform's actual operation.

  20. Reflection and Critical Thinking of Humanistic Care in Medical Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Jen Shiau

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to stress the importance and learning issues of humanistic care in medical education. This article will elaborate on the following issues: (1 introduction; (2 reflection and critical thinking; (3 humanistic care; (4 core values and teaching strategies in medical education; and (5 learning of life cultivation. Focusing on a specific approach used in humanistic care, it does so for the purpose of allowing the health professional to understand and apply the concepts of humanistic value in their services.

  1. Working on reform. How workers' compensation medical care is affected by health care reform.

    OpenAIRE

    Himmelstein, J; Rest, K

    1996-01-01

    The medical component of workers' compensation programs-now costing over $24 billion annually-and the rest of the nation's medical care system are linked. They share the same patients and providers. They provide similar benefits and services. And they struggle over who should pay for what. Clearly, health care reform and restructuring will have a major impact on the operation and expenditures of the workers' compensation system. For a brief period, during the 1994 national health care reform ...

  2. Medical Services: Nonphysician Health Care Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    of osteopathy ). (2) PAs may write routine orders on inpatients, using DA Form 4256 (Doctor’s Orders). (3) When required, inpatient treatment...of medicine or osteopathy , who are authorized and responsible for determining, starting, or altering the regimen of medical treatment provided to a

  3. [Responsibility in medical collaborations and care establishments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarda, F

    1998-01-01

    Criminal Law and Civil Law--that have a general application require personnel misconduct. However, the criminal liability of legal entities is now provided by the law. Public law only deals with the liability of the establishment as a consequence of a fault of the administrative service or of a personnel misconduct. The liability of the closest collaboration of the surgical team (Surgeon, Anaesthesist...) used to be transferred onto the surgeon. The liability of the surgeon is now autonomous but the latter still have a general duty of supervision. There is a wider application of collaboration. One is still liable for his faults but their is a duty of vigilance on partners together with a duty of mutual information of the medical practitioners who successively intervene. There is also a new liability for the lack of mobilisation of adequate skills. Curing Establishments are now considered as partners of the medical agreement and are often sued in case of deficiency of the organisation of medical attendance. The nursing homes shall have now to control the quality of the medical activity.

  4. [The role of motivation of medical personnel in system of medical care quality support].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogosian, S G; Sidorenkov, D A; Balokhina, S A; Orlov, A E

    2014-01-01

    The article considers causes of insufficient quality of medical care. The low motivation of paramedical personnel during medical services rendering is examined. The sociological survey data made it possible to analyze opinion of students of medical college as future paramedical personnel concerning attractiveness of this profession. Their social and material status was established. The notions concerning possibility of carrier and professional progress were established too. The factors hampering involvement of this category of professionals into public health system and negatively impacting medical care quality were analyzed.

  5. Reducing medication errors in critical care: a multimodal approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kruer RM

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Rachel M Kruer,1 Andrew S Jarrell,1 Asad Latif2,3 1Department of Pharmacy, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD, USA; 2Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA; 3Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality, Johns Hopkins Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: The Institute of Medicine has reported that medication errors are the single most common type of error in health care, representing 19% of all adverse events, while accounting for over 7,000 deaths annually. The frequency of medication errors in adult intensive care units can be as high as 947 per 1,000 patient-days, with a median of 105.9 per 1,000 patient-days. The formulation of drugs is a potential contributor to medication errors. Challenges related to drug formulation are specific to the various routes of medication administration, though errors associated with medication appearance and labeling occur among all drug formulations and routes of administration. Addressing these multifaceted challenges requires a multimodal approach. Changes in technology, training, systems, and safety culture are all strategies to potentially reduce medication errors related to drug formulation in the intensive care unit. Keywords: medication safety, drug design, drug formulation, patient safety

  6. Implications of the Definition of an Episode of Care Used in the Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellimoottil, Chad; Ryan, Andrew M; Hou, Hechuan; Dupree, James M; Hallstrom, Brian; Miller, David C

    2017-01-01

    Under the Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement (CJR) model, hospitals are held accountable for nearly all Medicare payments that occur during the initial hospitalization until 90 days after hospital discharge (ie, the episode of care). It is not known whether unrelated expenditures resulting from this "broad" definition of an episode of care will affect participating hospitals' average episode-of-care payments. To compare the CJR program's broad definition of an episode of care with a clinically narrow definition of an episode of care. We identified Medicare claims for 23 251 patients in Michigan who were Medicare beneficiaries and who underwent joint replacement during the period from 2011 through 2013 at hospitals located in metropolitan statistical areas. Using specifications from the CJR model and the clinically narrow Hospital Compare payment measure, we constructed episodes of care and calculated 90-day episode payments. We then compared hospitals' average 90-day episode payments using the 2 definitions of an episode of care and fit linear regression models to understand whether payment differences were associated with specific hospital characteristics (average Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services-hierarchical condition categories risk score, rural hospital status, joint replacement volume, percentage of Medicaid discharges, teaching hospital status, number of beds, percentage of joint replacements performed on African American patients, and median income of the hospital's county). We performed analyses from July 1 through October 1, 2015. The correlation and difference between average 90-day episode payments using the broad definition of an episode of care in the CJR model and the clinically narrow Hospital Compare definition of an episode of care. We identified 23 251 joint replacements (ie, episodes of care). The 90-day episode payments using the broad definition of the CJR model ranged from $17 349 to $29 465 (mean [SD] payment, $22 122

  7. Economic analysis in medical education: definition of essential terms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Kieran

    2014-10-01

    Medical education is expensive. There is a growing interest in the subject of cost and value in medical education. However, in the medical education literature, terms are sometimes used loosely - and so there is a need for basic grounding in the meaning of commonly used and important terms in medical education economics. The purpose of this article is to define some terms that are frequently used in economic analysis in medical education. In this article, terms are described, and the descriptions are followed by a worked example of how the terms might be used in practice. The following terms are described: opportunity cost, total cost of ownership, sensitivity analysis, viewpoint, activity-based costing, efficiency, technical efficiency, allocative efficiency, price and transaction costs.

  8. The electronic medical record system: health care marvel or morass?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, D C

    1998-01-01

    The author considers the potential advantages and disadvantages, as well as possible unintended consequences, of introducing electronic medical record systems in health care organizations. Special consideration is given to the issues such information systems raise concerning privacy, confidentiality, and quality of care from both patient and provider perspectives. The potential gains from computerizing medical records include the benefit of instantaneous availability of patients' medical history, treatment regimes, and current health status in routine and emergency clinical situations. Ease of access to this information should reduce adverse outcomes. The added value of a complete and up-to-date medical record immediately available to medical caregivers seems undeniable. The potential disadvantages include issues around patient confidentiality and unauthorized access to records, the enormous capital investment for computer hardware, and system maintenance.

  9. Military Medical Revolution: Prehospital Combat Casualty Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    new topical hemostatic agents had received clearance from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and were subjected to comprehensive studies in two...control resusci- tation (DCR), advanced airway maneuvers, and thoracic trau- ma management before arrival at a Role 2 facility led to the development of...this medical doctrine for catastrophic bleeding, airway protection, thoracic trauma management, and other clinical and nonclinical aspects are as follows

  10. Military Medical Care: Questions and Answers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-14

    providers, subject to regulations. Certain types of care, such as most dentistry and chiropractic services, are excluded. In addition to Tricare...myelogenous leukemia; tuberous sclerosis complex; autism ; psychological health and traumatic brain injury; amyotrophic lateral sclerosis; Gulf War...b FY 2009 c Autism 7.5 6.4 8 Breast Cancer 127.5 138 150 Gulf War Illness 0 10 8 Neurofibramatosis 10 8 10 Ovarian Cancer 10 10 20 Peer

  11. The Culture of General Palliative Nursing Care in Medical Departments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergenholtz, Heidi; Jarlbæk, Lene; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2015-01-01

    and the nurses' reflections on GPNC: (1) GPNC provided in a treatment setting, (2) transition to loving care and the licence to perform palliative care (PC) and (3) potential for team improvement. Conclusions: GPNC as a culture in medical departments seemed to be embedded in a setting not suited for dying...... patients. Palliative care was still practised according to the transition model of care, sharply dividing curative from palliative care, and was inappropriately conducted in a fragmented and individual-based way. The term ‘loving care’ was used as a ‘gate-opener’ to provide palliative care for the dying......Background: In many countries, approximately half of the population dies in hospital, making general palliative nursing care (GPNC) a core nursing task. GPNC in the hospital setting is described as challenging, however little is known about its actual practice. Aim: To explore the GPNC culture...

  12. Medical Assistant-based care management for high risk patients in small primary care practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freund, Tobias; Peters-Klimm, Frank; Boyd, Cynthia M.

    2016-01-01

    diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or chronic heart failure and a likelihood of hospitalization in the upper quartile of the population, as predicted by insurance data analysis. Intervention: We compared protocol-based care management including structured assessment, action planning......Background: Patients with multiple chronic conditions are at high risk of potentially avoidable hospital admissions, which may be reduced by care coordination and self-management support. Medical assistants are an increasingly available resource for patient care in primary care practices. Objective......: To determine whether protocol-based care management delivered by medical assistants improves patient care in patients at high risk of future hospitalization in primary care. Design: Two-year cluster randomized clinical trial. Setting: 115 primary care practices in Germany. Patients: 2,076 patients with type 2...

  13. CMOS IC design for wireless medical and health care

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Zhihua; Chen, Hong

    2014-01-01

    This book provides readers with detailed explanation of the design principles of CMOS integrated circuits for wireless medical and health care, from the perspective of two successfully-commercialized applications. Design techniques for both the circuit block level and the system level are discussed, based on real design examples. CMOS IC design techniques for the entire signal chain of wireless medical and health care systems are covered, including biomedical signal acquisition, wireless transceivers, power management and SoC integration, with emphasis on ultra-low-power IC design techniques. • Discusses CMOS integrated circuit design for wireless medical and health care, based on two successfully-commercialized medical and health care applications; • Describes design techniques for the entire signal chain of wireless medical and health care systems; • Focuses on techniques for short-range wireless communication systems; • Emphasizes ultra-low-power IC design techniques; • Enables readers to tu...

  14. New diagnostic and information technology for mobile medical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayne, C Gresham; Boling, Peter A

    2009-02-01

    Medicare reimbursement for home visits average around $100 without ancillaries, so making 10 home visits to prevent even a single $1,000 ambulance ride is cost-neutral for Medicare. Home medical care is only an added cost if it fails to offset acute care use. The government's demographic and financial pressure suggests a need to press ahead with the enhanced mobile care model, so the explosion in point-of-care devices should continue. The main challenge is to decide which ones provide dispositive value to patients.

  15. Addiction and the Utilization of Medical Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Ju Lin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the effect of different scales of addictive factors on the utilization of medical services in this paper using a two-part model. Data are from the 2005 National Health Interview Survey and the claims data in the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. The results show that personal addictive behavior is significantly associated with both outpatient and inpatient utilization. Moreover, our result implies that those who smoked at least 20 cigarettes per day might not visit a doctor until the illness was severe. It suggests that the government can accomplish these goals by promotion and education in order to increase public awareness of personal health.

  16. Modelling medical care usage under medical insurance scheme for urban non-working residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Linping; Tian, Wenhua; Tang, Weidong

    2013-06-01

    This research investigates and evaluates China's urban medical care usage for non-working residents using microsimulation techniques. It focuses on modelling medical services usage and simulating medical expenses on hospitalization treatments as well as clinic services for serious illness in an urban area for the period of 2008-2010. A static microsimulation model was created to project the impact of the medical insurance scheme. Four kinds of achievements have been made. For three different scenarios, the model predicted the hospitalization services costs and payments, as well as the balance of the social pool fund and the medical burden on families.

  17. Medical Malpractice Phenomena: Signals for Changing Medical and Health Care Values

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brødsgaard, I.; Moore, R.

    1990-01-01

    Excellent discussion of the economic factors such as medical malpractice and corporate medicine that have begun to interfere with the doctor-patient relationship and why this relationship is so essential in order to prevent medical malpractice. Issues of quality assurance are relevant to the doctor-patient...... relationship and the quality of health care....

  18. Guidelines for Primary Health Care teaching in undergraduate medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Marcos Piva Demarzo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available These are a set of guidelines built by the Brazilian Association of Medical Education (ABEM and the Brazilian Society of Family and Community Medicine (SBMFC with the aim of supporting medical schools in a practical and objective manner, when elaborating pedagogical-political projects on Primary Health Care (PHC. The advent of the Brazilian National Curricular Guidelines for Medical Education, which are approved by the Ministry of Education in 2001 have since improved the teaching of undergraduate medical students on PHC, but there are still wide variations in implementation and quality of it in medical curricula. These guidelines by ABEM/SBMFC partnership can exert considerable influence on medical curricula by establishing minimum requirements and core competencies for PHC in Brazil.

  19. 42 CFR 456.242 - UR plan requirements for medical care evaluation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...: Mental Hospitals Ur Plan: Medical Care Evaluation Studies § 456.242 UR plan requirements for medical care... medical care evaluation studies under paragraph (b)(1) of this section. (b) The UR plan must provide that... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false UR plan requirements for medical care...

  20. 42 CFR 456.142 - UR plan requirements for medical care evaluation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...: Hospitals Ur Plan: Medical Care Evaluation Studies § 456.142 UR plan requirements for medical care... medical care evaluation studies under paragraph (b)(1) of this section. (b) The UR plan must provide that... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false UR plan requirements for medical care...

  1. Consumerism: forcing medical practices toward patient-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozmon, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    Consumerism has been apart of many industries over the years; now consumerism may change the way many medical practices deliver healthcare. With the advent of consumer-driven healthcare, employers are shifting the decision-making power to their employees. Benefits strategies like health savings accounts and high-deductible insurance plans now allow the patients to control how and where they spend their money on medical care. Practices that seek to attract the more affluent and informed consumers are beginning to institute patient-centered systems designs that invite patients to actively participate in their healthcare. This article will outline the changes in the healthcare delivery system facing medical practices, the importance of patient-centered care, and six strategies to implement to change toward more patient-centered care.

  2. A Strategic Approach to Medical Care for Exploration Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canga, Michael A.; Shah, Ronak V.; Mindock, Jennifer A.; Antonsen, Erik L.

    2016-01-01

    Exploration missions will present significant new challenges to crew health, including effects of variable gravity environments, limited communication with Earth-based personnel for diagnosis and consultation for medical events, limited resupply, and limited ability for crew return. Providing health care capabilities for exploration class missions will require system trades be performed to identify a minimum set of requirements and crosscutting capabilities, which can be used in design of exploration medical systems. Medical data, information, and knowledge collected during current space missions must be catalogued and put in formats that facilitate querying and analysis. These data are used to inform the medical research and development program through analysis of risk trade studies between medical care capabilities and system constraints such as mass, power, volume, and training. Medical capability as a quantifiable variable is proposed as a surrogate risk metric and explored for trade space analysis that can improve communication between the medical and engineering approaches to mission design. The resulting medical system design approach selected will inform NASA mission architecture, vehicle, and subsystem design for the next generation of spacecraft.

  3. How community members and health professionals conceptualize medical emergencies: implications for primary care promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkin, Holley A; Tannebaum, Michael A; Cohen, Elizabeth L; Leslie, Travie; Williams, Nora; Haley, Leon L

    2012-12-01

    Access to continuous care through a primary care provider is associated with improved health outcomes, but many communities rely on emergency departments (EDs) for both emergent and non-emergent health problems. This article describes one portion of a community-based participatory research project and investigates the type of education that might be needed as part of a larger intervention to encourage use of a local primary care clinic. In this article we examine how people who live in a low-income urban community and the healthcare workers who serve them conceptualize 'emergency medical condition'. We conducted forum and focus group discussions with 52 community members and individual interviews with 32 healthcare workers. Our findings indicate that while community members share a common general definition of what constitutes a medical emergency, they also desire better guidelines for how to assess health problems as requiring emergency versus primary care. Pain, uncertainty and anxiety tend to influence their choice to use EDs rather than availability of primary care. Implications for increasing primary care use are discussed.

  4. Medical care reform: lessons from around the world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrer, J E

    1997-01-01

    Once again the United States is in a ferment of health policy reform. Proposals abound but sage observers remark that national health insurance has been "just around the corner" more than once in the last forty years. This time may be different, however. Proposals from all across the ideological spectrum are converging on the notion of "managed care" which is perhaps best known in its guise as a health maintenance organization (HMO). Other forms of managed care exist but they have neither the history nor the incentives found in traditional HMOs. The discussion on national health insurance (NHI) proposals has focused on financing issues to the virtual exclusion of public health concerns. In this article, the author addresses rural health and public hospitals in the United States; two problems that have been with us for a long time. Then articles examining the Canadian and English medical care systems are reviewed, illustrating some of the weaknesses of these approaches to national medical care. Research studies relating to Europe and the developing nations are next. Once again, these are intended to highlight public health problems found in differing medical care systems. Finally, the author examines utopian views of the United States medical care system of the future: the reform proposal offered by the National Association for Public Health Policy, the experimental policy in Washington State, and a vision of a planned system. The review is intended to draw together the lessons offered by public health policy research in other countries and the United States and apply them to the issue at hand: reforming the United States medical care system.

  5. Pioneers in trauma care at Harborview Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalen, Eileen; Hecker, Cynthia J; Butler, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Harborview Medical Center in Seattle has been home to the pioneering work of University of Washington (UW) Medicine physicians and staff who have led innovations to improve trauma care for more than 40 years. As the only level I adult and pediatric trauma center and regional burn center for Washington, Alaska, Montana, and Idaho, Harborview provides cares for more than 6500 critically injured trauma and burn patients per year. Our physicians, researchers and staff are recognized as national experts and as collaborative partners with nursing in the delivery of outstanding clinical care, research, and education. Beginning with the establishment of Seattle Medic One in the late 1960s, a groundbreaking program to train firefighters as paramedics, Harborview and the work of UW Medicine has been recognized locally and globally as a leader in every component of the ideal trauma system, as defined by the American College of Surgeons: prevention, access, acute hospital care, rehabilitation, education, and research activities.

  6. Comradery, community, and care in military medical ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Michael L

    2011-10-01

    Medical ethics prohibits caregivers from discriminating and providing preferential care to their compatriots and comrades. In military medicine, particularly during war and when resources may be scarce, ethical principles may dictate priority care for compatriot soldiers. The principle of nondiscrimination is central to utilitarian and deontological theories of justice, but communitarianism and the ethics of care and friendship stipulate a different set of duties for community members, friends, and family. Similar duties exist among the small cohesive groups that typify many military units. When members of these groups require medical care, there are sometimes moral grounds to treat compatriot soldiers ahead of enemy or allied soldiers regardless of the severity of their respective wounds.

  7. Medical Care of the Homeless: An American and International Issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleisch, Sheryl B; Nash, Robertson

    2017-03-01

    Homeless persons die significantly younger than their housed counterparts. In many cases, relatively straightforward primary care issues escalate into life-threatening, expensive emergencies. Poor health outcomes driven by negative interactions between comorbid symptoms meet the definition of a health syndemic in this population. Successful primary care of patients struggling with homelessness may result in long-term lifesaving measures along with decreased expenditure to hospital systems. This primary prevention requires patience, creativity, and acknowledgment that the source of many confounders may lay outside the control of these patients.

  8. End-of-life care in medical textbooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carron, A T; Lynn, J; Keaney, P

    1999-01-05

    Improvement in end-of-life care has become a demand of the public and a priority for health care professionals. Medical textbooks could support this improvement by functioning as educational resources and as reference material. In this paper, four widely used general medical textbooks are assessed for their coverage of nine content domains for 12 illnesses that often cause death; each domain in each disease and in each text was graded for presence and helpfulness of advice. Helpful information was rare, and only prognostication and medical treatments to alter the course of the disease were usually mentioned. Harrison's Textbook of Medicine, The Merck Manual, and Scientific American Medicine often mentioned at least a few of the domains in each disease, although not often in a way that would guide a clinician. Manual of Medical Therapeutics (The Washington Manual) includes little information about end-of-life care. Improvement seems possible. Short additions of information on end-of-life care would probably be effective. Many chapters discussed at length certain topics that are clearly optional; other textbooks addressed these topics only briefly. When dealing with end-of-life care, physicians should seek guidance from other sources and textbook authors and editors should improve the utility and completeness of their texts.

  9. Identifying predictors of satisfaction with access to medical care and quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jatulis, D E; Bundek, N I; Legorreta, A P

    1997-01-01

    Satisfaction with access to medical care and quality of care were compared using a survey instrument adapted from the Group Health Association of America Consumer Satisfaction Survey. Participants were members of a large health maintenance organization employed by an employer group (Company) and other non-company members (Control). Overall, members reported high satisfaction with both access to medical care and quality of care. There were no significant differences in satisfaction between Company and Control respondents. Stepwise regression identified the strongest predictor of satisfaction with access to care as ease of arranging appointments. Satisfaction with quality of care was predicted most strongly by outcomes of medical care. These findings indicate that items with which members are least satisfied (access to doctor after hours, office waiting time, and time for routine appointment) do not predict either satisfaction with access to care or satisfaction with quality of care. Managed care organizations must develop and utilize evidence-based evaluation tools such as this one to assess the quality of care.

  10. Studying co-medication patterns: the impact of definitions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tobi, H.; Faber, A.; Berg, van den P.B.; Drane, J.W.; Jong-van den Berg, de L.T.W.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To show the necessity of distinguishing several patterns of drug prescribing that may lead to co-medication. It is demonstrated how these different patterns can be investigated using large databases containing pharmacy data or reimbursement data. Methods Two examples illustrate how the parti

  11. Traveling abroad for medical care: U.S. medical tourists' expectations and perceptions of service quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiry, Michael; Vequist, David G

    2011-01-01

    The SERVQUAL scale has been widely used to measure service quality in the health care industry. This research is the first study that used SERVQUAL to assess U.S. medical tourists' expectations and perceptions of the service quality of health care facilities located outside the United States. Based on a sample of U.S. consumers, who had traveled abroad for medical care, the results indicated that there were significant differences between U.S. medical tourists' perceived level of service provided and their expectations of the service that should be provided for four of the five dimensions of service quality. Reliability had the largest service quality gap followed by assurance, tangibles, and empathy. Responsiveness was the only dimension without a significantly different gap score. The study establishes a foundation for future research on service quality in the rapidly growing medical tourism industry.

  12. [Structured medication management in primary care - a tool to promote medication safety].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, Cornelia; Freund, Tobias; Baldauf, Annika; Jank, Susanne; Ludt, Sabine; Peters-Klimm, Frank; Haefeli, Walter Emil; Szecsenyi, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Patients with chronic disease usually need to take multiple medications. Drug-related interactions, adverse events, suboptimal adherence, and self-medication are components that can affect medication safety and lead to serious consequences for the patient. At present, regular medication reviews to check what medicines have been prescribed and what medicines are actually taken by the patient or the structured evaluation of drug-related problems rarely take place in Germany. The process of "medication reconciliation" or "medication review" as developed in the USA and the UK aim at increasing medication safety and therefore represent an instrument of quality assurance. Within the HeiCare(®) project a structured medication management was developed for general practice, with medical assistants playing a major role in the implementation of the process. Both the structured medication management and the tools developed for the medication check and medication counselling will be outlined in this article; also, findings on feasibility and acceptance in various projects and experiences from a total of 200 general practices (56 HeiCare(®), 29 HiCMan,115 PraCMan) will be described. The results were obtained from questionnaires and focus group discussions. The implementation of a structured medication management intervention into daily routine was seen as a challenge. Due to the high relevance of medication reconciliation for daily clinical practice, however, the checklists - once implemented successfully - have been applied even after the end of the project. They have led to the regular review and reconciliation of the physicians' documentation of the medicines prescribed (medication chart) with the medicines actually taken by the patient.

  13. Surveillance definitions of infections in long-term care facilities: revisiting the McGeer criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Nimalie D; Ashraf, Muhammad S; Calder, Jennifer; Crnich, Christopher J; Crossley, Kent; Drinka, Paul J; Gould, Carolyn V; Juthani-Mehta, Manisha; Lautenbach, Ebbing; Loeb, Mark; Maccannell, Taranisia; Malani, Preeti N; Mody, Lona; Mylotte, Joseph M; Nicolle, Lindsay E; Roghmann, Mary-Claire; Schweon, Steven J; Simor, Andrew E; Smith, Philip W; Stevenson, Kurt B; Bradley, Suzanne F

    2012-10-01

    (See the commentary by Moro, on pages 978-980 .) Infection surveillance definitions for long-term care facilities (ie, the McGeer Criteria) have not been updated since 1991. An expert consensus panel modified these definitions on the basis of a structured review of the literature. Significant changes were made to the criteria defining urinary tract and respiratory tract infections. New definitions were added for norovirus gastroenteritis and Clostridum difficile infections.

  14. Continuity of Care Document (CCD) Enables Delivery of Medication Histories to the Primary Care Clinician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonaitis, Linas; Belsito, Anne; Cravens, Gary; Shen, Changyu; Overhage, J Marc

    2010-11-13

    The goal of the Enhanced Medication History (EMH) project is to provide medication histories to ambulatory primary care practices in the Indiana Network for Patient Care. Medications were aggregated from three different sources of pharmacy data (Medicaid, SureScripts, and the county health system of Indianapolis). Dispensing events were assembled into the Continuity of Care Document (CCD), and presented to clinicians as RxNorm Clinical Drugs. The EMH project completed 46 weeks of operation in a community health center in Indianapolis. Medication Histories were generated for 10498 office visits for 4449 distinct patients. Seven (of nine) attending physicians responded to a written survey and found the Medication Histories useful (3.9±0.4 on a scale of 1 to 5). Implementation of the EMH project demonstrated the successful use (as well as the challenging aspects) of the CCD and the RxNorm terminology in the outpatient clinical setting.

  15. Medical Researchers' Ancillary Care Obligations: The Relationship-Based Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Nate W

    2016-06-01

    In this article, I provide a new account of the basis of medical researchers' ancillary care obligations. Ancillary care in medical research, or medical care that research participants need but that is not required for the validity or safety of a study or to redress research injuries, is a topic that has drawn increasing attention in research ethics over the last ten years. My view, the relationship-based approach, improves on the main existing theory, Richardson and Belsky's 'partial-entrustment model', by avoiding its problematic restriction on the scope of health needs for which researchers could be obligated to provide ancillary care. Instead, it grounds ancillary care obligations in a wide range of morally relevant features of the researcher-participant relationship, including the level of engagement between researchers and participants, and weighs these factors against each other. I argue that the level of engagement, that is, the duration and intensity of interactions, between researchers and participants matters for ancillary care because of its connection to the meaningfulness of a relationship, and I suggest that other morally relevant features can be grounded in researchers' role obligations.

  16. 5 CFR 792.211 - What is the definition of a Federally sponsored child care center?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What is the definition of a Federally sponsored child care center? 792.211 Section 792.211 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT... Subsidy Program Legislation and to Whom Does It Apply? § 792.211 What is the definition of a Federally...

  17. Medical simulation in respiratory and critical care medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Godfrey; Ayas, Najib T; Griesdale, Donald E; Peets, Adam D

    2010-12-01

    Simulation-based medical education has gained tremendous popularity over the past two decades. Driven by the patient safety movement, changes in the educational opportunities available to trainees and the rapidly evolving capabilities of computer technology, simulation-based medical education is now being used across the continuum of medical education. This review provides the reader with a perspective on simulation specific to respiratory and critical care medicine, including an overview of historical and modern simulation modalities and the current evidence supporting their use.

  18. MEDICAL TOURISTS' EXPECTATIONS WHEN CHOOSING LITHUANIA FOR HEALTH CARE SERVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miglė Eleonora Černikovaitė

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose – Identify medical expectations of tourists choosing Lithuania as medical tourism country and to make comparative analysis with situation in Thailand. Medical tourism is one of the most promising fields of business in the world. International trade in medical services also has huge economic potential and gradually increasing outcome for the global economy (Bookman & Bookman, 2007. Major medical tourism destinations: Thailand, India, Singapore and Malaysia attracted more than 2.5 million medical travellers (United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific, 2008. Lithuania is among the major emerging markets in medical tourism that is increasing every year. This study showed that main factors of attracting tourist to Lithuania: fast service and exceptional patient care, the high-tech medical equipment, good prices both for medical and travel services. Comparing to Thailand situation, Lithuania is attractive to the most medical tourist, because of the good quality services with affordable prices and location, while people choosing Thailand – mainly is affected by advertising. The main recommendation for attracting medical tourists to Lithuania is to initiate the advertising campaign to the targeted audiences. Design/methodology/approach – The comparative analysis of scientific literature and empirical comparative quantitative research was executed for acquiring the expectations for medical tourists in Lithuania. Findings – Overview of health and medical tourism situation in Lithuania and other emerging markets. This study showed that main factors of attracting tourist to Lithuania: fast service and exceptional patient care, the high-tech medical equipment, good prices both for medical and travel services and other. Comparative empirical analysis of medical tourist expectations in Lithuania and Thailand. Comparing to Thailand situation, Lithuania is attractive to the most medical tourist, because of the good

  19. Perspectives on the value of advanced medical imaging: a national survey of primary care physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Christine M; Kramer, Erich; Colamonico, Jennifer; Duszak, Richard

    2015-05-01

    To understand perceptions of primary care physicians (PCPs) about the value of advanced medical imaging. A national quantitative survey of 500 PCPs was conducted using an online self-administered questionnaire. Questions focused on advanced medical imaging (CT, MRI, and PET) and its perceived impact on the delivery of patient care. Responses were stratified by physician demographics. Large majorities of the PCPs indicated that advanced imaging increases their diagnostic confidence (441; 88%); provides data not otherwise available (451; 90%); permits better clinical decision making (440; 88%); increases confidence in treatment choices (438; 88%), and shortens time to definitive diagnosis (430; 86%]). Most (424; 85%) believe that patient care would be negatively affected without access to advanced imaging. PCPs whose clinical careers predated the proliferation of advanced imaging modalities (>20 years of practice) assigned higher value to advanced imaging on several dimensions compared with younger physicians whose training overlapped widespread technology availability. By a variety of metrics, large majorities of PCPs believe that advanced medical imaging provides considerable value to patient care. Those whose careers predated the widespread availability of advanced imaging tended to associate it with even higher value. Copyright © 2015 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Toward a medical anthropology of sensations: definitions and research agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, Devon E; Howes, David; Kirmayer, Laurence J

    2008-06-01

    In this article, we outline the importance of a medical anthropology of sensations for theories of psychopathology and psychological healing. We define what is meant by ;sensation' (differentiating monomodal and polymodal sensations) and describe some of the mechanisms that generate and amplify sensations. We propose the heuristic use of the concepts of sensation schemas, sensation interpretants, and sensation scripts. We argue against the naive assumption that sensation experience is the same across cultures. Finally, we consider how healing may occur through 'sensation semiosis.'

  1. Caring for Children with Medical Complexity: Perspectives of Primary Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Carolyn C; Mangione-Smith, Rita; Simon, Tamara D

    2017-03-01

    To describe typical care experiences and key barriers and facilitators to caring for children with medical complexity (CMC) from the perspective of community primary care providers (PCPs). PCPs participating in a randomized controlled trial of a care-coordination intervention for CMC were sent a 1-time cross-sectional survey that asked PCPs to (1) describe their experiences with caring for CMC; (2) identify key barriers affecting their ability to care for CMC; and (3) prioritize facilitators enhancing their ability to provide care coordination for CMC. PCP and practice demographics also were collected. One hundred thirteen of 155 PCPs sent the survey responded fully (completion rate = 73%). PCPs endorsed that medical characteristics such as polypharmacy (88%), multiorgan system involvement (84%), and rare/unfamiliar diagnoses (83%) negatively affected care. Caregivers with high needs (88%), limited time with patients and caregivers (81%), and having a large number of specialists involved in care (79%) were also frequently cited. Most commonly endorsed strategies to improve care coordination included more time with patients/caregivers (84%), summative action plans (83%), and facilitated communication (eg, e-mail, phone meetings) with specialists (83%). Community PCPs prioritized more time with patients and their families, better communication with specialists, and summative action plans to improve care coordination for this vulnerable population. Although this study evaluated perceptions rather than actual performance, it provides insights to improve understanding of which barriers and facilitators ideally might be targeted first for care delivery redesign. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Marketing home health care medical services: the physician's view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, E J; Phelps, R A

    1993-01-01

    The authors surveyed physicians serving the Jackson, Mississippi home health care market. They identified problems and studied physician perceptions regarding services provided by home health care agencies, private duty nursing agencies, and durable medical equipment suppliers. Respondents perceived home health care as providing: (1) increased patient satisfaction, (2) greater patient convenience, (3) earlier discharge, and (4) lowered patient costs. They least liked: (1) lack of control and involvement in the patient caring process, (2) paperwork, (3) quality control potential, and the possibility that patient costs could increase. Two sets of implications for health care marketers are presented that involve both national and regional levels. Overall results indicate that a growing and profitable market segment exists and is being served in an effective and socially responsible manner.

  3. Hospital boards and medical specialists collaborating for quality of care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botje, D.; Plochg, T.; Klazinga, N.; Wagner, C.

    2012-01-01

    Context: In European countries policy briefs are stressing the importance of hospital governance for the quality of care. When governing towards quality it is essential for Hospital Boards to receive the proper information to do so. In the Netherlands, the national association for medical

  4. Hospital boards and medical specialists collaborating for quality of care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botje, D.; Plochg, T.; Klazinga, N.; Wagner, C.

    2012-01-01

    Context: In European countries policy briefs are stressing the importance of hospital governance for the quality of care. When governing towards quality it is essential for Hospital Boards to receive the proper information to do so. In the Netherlands, the national association for medical specialist

  5. Medi-Cal blamed for poor care in lawsuit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. Several sources are reporting a lawsuit filed in California alleging poor care in the state’s Medicaid program, Medi-Cal (1. The suit alleges that Medi-Cal failed to pay doctors enough to provide proper care. The suit was filed by five Latino residents on behalf of California’s 13 million lower-income residents, more than half of them Latinos. The suit alleges that "…California has created a separate and unequal system of health care, one for the insurance program with the largest proportion of Latinos (Medi-Cal, and one for the other principal insurance plans, whose recipients are disproportionately white.” The state budget includes $107 billion in state and federal funding for Medi-Cal this year, but the spending is not enough to restore reimbursement cuts made during the Great Recession of 2008. A proposal in the U.S. Senate to repeal the Affordable Health Care law (ACA, Obamacare could drastically reduce funding for Medicare and the …

  6. Medical Care and Your 2- to 3-Year-Old

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 8- to 12-Month-Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Medical Care and Your ... of keeping kids healthy and up to date on immunizations against many serious childhood diseases. Checkups also are a chance for you ...

  7. Medical students' attitudes towards the primary health care approach

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Medical students' attitudes towards the primary health care approach: what are they, how do they change and ... Journal Home > Vol 49, No 2 (2007) > ... The context of the research presented in this article is the new MBChB curriculum at the ...

  8. Team-based primary care: The medical assistant perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Bethany; Chien, Alyna T; Peters, Antoinette S; Rosenthal, Meredith B; Brooks, Joanna Veazey; Singer, Sara J

    2016-11-15

    Team-based care has the potential to improve primary care quality and efficiency. In this model, medical assistants (MAs) take a more central role in patient care and population health management. MAs' traditionally low status may give them a unique view on changing organizational dynamics and teamwork. However, little empirical work exists on how team-based organizational designs affect the experiences of low-status health care workers like MAs. The aim of this study was to describe how team-based primary care affects the experiences of MAs. A secondary aim was to explore variation in these experiences. In late 2014, the authors interviewed 30 MAs from nine primary care practices transitioning to team-based care. Interviews addressed job responsibilities, teamwork, implementation, job satisfaction, and learning. Data were analyzed using a thematic networks approach. Interviews also included closed-ended questions about workload and job satisfaction. Most MAs reported both a higher workload (73%) and a greater job satisfaction (86%) under team-based primary care. Interview data surfaced four mechanisms for these results, which suggested more fulfilling work and greater respect for the MA role: (a) relationships with colleagues, (b) involvement with patients, (c) sense of control, and (d) sense of efficacy. Facilitators and barriers to these positive changes also emerged. Team-based care can provide low-status health care workers with more fulfilling work and strengthen relationships across status lines. The extent of this positive impact may depend on supporting factors at the organization, team, and individual worker levels. To maximize the benefits of team-based care, primary care leaders should recognize the larger role that MAs play under this model and support them as increasingly valuable team members. Contingent on organizational conditions, practices may find MAs who are willing to manage the increased workload that often accompanies team-based care.

  9. Medical students' views and ideas about palliative care communication training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine M; Goldsmith, Joy; Ragan, Sandra L; Sanchez-Reilly, Sandra

    2010-02-01

    This study focused on the undergraduate medical student to identify views and ideas held toward palliative care communication training, pedagogical approaches to this training, and its perceived effectiveness and use in the medical field. Two focus groups consisting of fourth-year medical students were conducted, and their responses were analyzed using grounded theory categorization. Results indicated that students: (a) prefer to learn nonverbal communication techniques, (b) believe that natural ability and experience outweigh communication curriculum, (c) view the skill of breaking bad news as largely dependent on knowledge and expertise, and (d) prefer curriculum on palliative care and hospice to consist of information (eg, advance directives) rather than communication skills. Implications for these interpretive themes are discussed as well as future research and practice.

  10. A subtle governance: 'soft' medical leadership in English primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheaff, R; Rogers, A; Pickard, S; Marshall, M; Campbell, S; Sibbald, B; Halliwell, S; Roland, M

    2003-07-01

    In many countries governments are recruiting the medical profession into a more active, transparent regulation of clinical practice. Consequently the medical profession adapts the ways it regulates itself and its relationship to health system managers changes. This paper uses empirical research in English Primary Care Groups (PCGs) and Primary Care Trusts (PCTs) to assess the value of Courpasson's concept of soft bureaucracy as a conceptualisation of these changes. Clinical governance in PCGs and PCTs displays important parallels with governance in soft bureaucracies, but the concept of soft bureaucracy requires modification to make it more applicable to general practice. In English primary care, governance over rank-and-file doctors is exercised by local professional leaders rather than general managers, harnessing their colleagues' perception of threats to professional autonomy and self-regulation rather than fears of competition as the means of 'soft coercion'.

  11. [Management and organization of ambulatory medical care in a district].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, K; Keune, H G; Miethe, D; Ringel, M; Szkibik, B

    1990-01-01

    An analysis is given of the management and organization of out-patient medical care in 15 districts and of the District Physician's responsibilities as well as the profile of a District Health Department. Compared to the situation of a decade ago, substantial changes in the territorial health organization have occurred (decentralization, formation of care areas, affiliation of small health facilities to bigger ones). The District Physician's scope of responsibility is increasingly determined by activities within the framework of the District Council, the proportion of organizational work has increased. In order to be able to fulfill his tasks the District Physician needs the support of a special Health Department. Skeleton regulations for out-patient medical care are necessary.

  12. Pharmaceutical care in the Netherlands. History, definition and projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Mil, J.W F

    1996-01-01

    The evolving concept of Pharmaceutical Care knows different interpretations in a different countries. In the Netherlands community pharmacists already perform several functions which may be part of the Pharmaceutical Care concept. The Dutch concept of Pharmaceutical care is tested in the TOM and OMA

  13. Pharmaceutical care in the Netherlands. History, definition and projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Mil, J.W F

    1996-01-01

    The evolving concept of Pharmaceutical Care knows different interpretations in a different countries. In the Netherlands community pharmacists already perform several functions which may be part of the Pharmaceutical Care concept. The Dutch concept of Pharmaceutical care is tested in the TOM and

  14. Pharmaceutical care in the Netherlands. History, definition and projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Mil, J.W F

    1996-01-01

    The evolving concept of Pharmaceutical Care knows different interpretations in a different countries. In the Netherlands community pharmacists already perform several functions which may be part of the Pharmaceutical Care concept. The Dutch concept of Pharmaceutical care is tested in the TOM and OMA

  15. The Air Medical Leadership Congress: setting the health care agenda for the air medical community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Frank; Romig, Laurie; Hutton, Kevin; Petersen, Pat; Thomas, Stephen H; Wedel, Suzanne; Brozen, Reed

    2003-01-01

    Emergency air medical transport provides the means for critically ill or injured patients to rapidly access sophisticated medical flight teams and medical centers. However, issues such as surging emergency medical services helicopter accidents, expected pilot and nurse shortages, falling reimbursements, and new compliance regulations are now threatening these important but expensive transport services. Unless an industry strategy can be developed to address these and other threats, many medical flight programs may be forced to curtail the availability of these lifesaving services. On September 4-6, 2003, air medical leaders, experts, program managers, providers, and users of emergency air medical services gathered in Salt Lake City, Utah, to discuss and formulate recommendations to address the top issues that threaten the future of air medical transport services. This congress was open to anyone engaged in the field of air medical transport. This historic meeting resulted in a plan to enhance transport safety, foster appropriate utilization, improve in-flight medical care, maximize cost and reimbursement effectiveness, and develop strategies to reduce the adverse effects of new regulatory and compliance mandates. This article describes the significance of the Air Medical Leadership Congress and the 10-Point Plan method used to develop it.

  16. [Health status and medical care accessibility of single, homeless persons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trabert, G

    1997-06-01

    some sense to be "undesirable" as patients. Medical care offers for homeless people must be re-examined and changed appropriately in accordance with the requirements of the patients and the acceptability of the measures. Health care for the homeless is sorely needed. It is an urgent necessity to create special low-level acceptance medical care institutions. This health care service should be made available to homeless persons at the places where they gather (to set up a mobile medical service, medical streetwork, medical care ambulances). The interdisciplinary theme approach, which integrates the skills of physicians, nurses and social workers, is an invaluable strategy for establishing though and continuous care. Without good health, homeless people cannot resolve their other basic problems; and people simply cannot be healthy if they do not have a stable place to live.

  17. [The revised system of hospitalization for medical care and protection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuo, Yasuhisa

    2014-01-01

    The Act to Partially Amend the Act on Mental Health and Welfare for the Mentally Disabled was passed on June 13, 2013. Major amendments regarding hospitalization for medical care and protection include the points listed below. The guardianship system will be abolished. Consent by a guardian will no longer be required in the case of hospitalization for medical care and protection. In the case of hospitalization for medical care and protection, the administrators of the psychiatric hospital are required to obtain the consent of one of the following persons: spouse, person with parental authority, person responsible for support, legal custodian, or curator. If no qualified person is available, consent must be obtained from the mayor, etc. of the municipality. The following three obligations are imposed on psychiatric hospital administrators. (1) Assignment of a person, such as a psychiatric social worker, to provide guidance and counseling to patients hospitalized for medical care and protection regarding their postdischarge living environment. (2) Collaboration with community support entities that consult with and provide information as necessary to the person hospitalized, their spouse, a person with parental authority, a person responsible for support, or their legal custodian or curator. (3) Organizational improvements to promote hospital discharge. With regard to requests for discharge, the revised law stipulates that, in addition to the person hospitalized with a mental disorder, others who may file a request for discharge with the psychiatric review board include: the person's spouse, a person with parental authority, a person responsible for support, or their legal custodian or curator. If none of the above persons are available, or if none of them are able to express their wishes, the mayor, etc. of the municipality having jurisdiction over the place of residence of the person hospitalized may request a discharge. In order to promote transition to life in the

  18. Embedding care management in the medical home: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daaleman, Timothy P; Hay, Sherry; Prentice, Amy; Gwynne, Mark D

    2014-04-01

    Care managers are playing increasingly significant roles in the redesign of primary care and in the evolution of patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs), yet their adoption within day-to-day practice remains uneven and approaches for implementation have been minimally reported. We introduce a strategy for incorporating care management into the operations of a PCMH and assess the preliminary effectiveness of this approach. A case study of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Family Medicine Center used an organizational model of innovation implementation to guide the parameters of implementation and evaluation. Two sources were used to determine the effectiveness of the implementation strategy: data elements from the care management informatics system in the health record and electronic survey data from the Family Medicine Center providers and care staff. A majority of physicians (75%) and support staff (82%) reported interactions with the care manager, primarily via face-to-face, telephone, or electronic means, primarily for facilitating referrals for behavioral health services and assistance with financial and social and community-based resources. Trend line suggests an absolute decrease of 8 emergency department visits per month for recipients of care management services and an absolute decrease of 7.5 inpatient admissions per month during the initial 2-year implementation period. An organizational model of innovation implementation is a potentially effective approach to guide the process of incorporating care management services into the structure and workflows of PCMHs.

  19. Psychological Care in Nursing Education and Practice: A Search for Definition and Dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, Helena M.

    1999-01-01

    A literature review and analysis of nursing textbooks found little agreement on definition and dimensions of psychological care in nursing. Most texts stress the importance of patients' need for information and education, with less agreement about emotional care, counseling, assessment, and support. (SK)

  20. Accountable care organization readiness and academic medical centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, Scott A; Pahira, Jennifer J

    2014-09-01

    As academic medical centers (AMCs) consider becoming accountable care organizations (ACOs) under Medicare, they must assess their readiness for this transition. Of the 253 Medicare ACOs prior to 2014, 51 (20%) are AMCs. Three critical components of ACO readiness are institutional and ACO structure, leadership, and governance; robust information technology and analytic systems; and care coordination and management to improve care delivery and health at the population level. All of these must be viewed through the lens of unique AMC mission-driven goals.There is clear benefit to developing and maintaining a centralized internal leadership when it comes to driving change within an ACO, yet there is also the need for broad stakeholder involvement. Other important structural features are an extensive primary care foundation; concomitant operation of a managed care plan or risk-bearing entity; or maintaining a close relationship with post-acute-care or skilled nursing facilities, which provide valuable expertise in coordinating care across the continuum. ACOs also require comprehensive and integrated data and analytic systems that provide meaningful population data to inform care teams in real time, promote quality improvement, and monitor spending trends. AMCs will require proven care coordination and management strategies within a population health framework and deployment of an innovative workforce.AMC core functions of providing high-quality subspecialty and primary care, generating new knowledge, and training future health care leaders can be well aligned with a transition to an ACO model. Further study of results from Medicare-related ACO programs and commercial ACOs will help define best practices.

  1. [Current status of palliative care in medical oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Tsubasa; Ohta, Syuji; Seki, Nobuhiko; Eguchi, Kenji

    2010-06-01

    A team approach is efficient in palliative care for cancer patients. People suffered from cancer have a right to receive high-quality palliative care earlier in cancer treatment. In Japan the National Act for Strategy against Cancer was enacted in 2007. Systematic educational programs supported by the Ministry of Health Labor and Welfare has been conducted for medical staffs, home care staffs, local pharmacists, care managers etc. at core institutes in each district. Pain control is still major target for cancer palliative medicine. Recently various types of opioids can be used routinely in daily clinical setting for Japanese cancer patients. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) may also effective in some patients but further study for proving scientific evidence in CAM should be warranted. Tailor-maid pain control will be established in the near future with molecular based pharmacogenomics.

  2. [Medical care of injuries caused intentionally by domestic violence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Híjar-Medina, Martha; Flores-Regata, Lilí; Valdez-Santiago, Rosario; Blanco, Julia

    2003-01-01

    To describe and analyze the causes of emergency care services for intentional injuries, especially those caused by domestic violence, at four public hospitals in Mexico City. A cross-sectional study was conducted between January and April 1998, which included variables related with the victim, the aggressor, and the medical care provided to the victim. A questionnaire was applied to individuals who had been injured intentionally. Statistical analysis of data consisted of simple frequencies, the chi 2 test, and odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). A logistic regression model was also used to adjust for variables associated with the injury requiring emergency medical care. A total of 598 cases of intentional injuries were analyzed, 16% of which were due to domestic violence. Females were the most frequent victims (76%), followed by young people between 15 and 29 years old (46%). Variables associated with medical care due to injuries by domestic violence were: age 30 or older (OR 2.36, 95% CI 1.13-4.90), female gender (OR 8.60 95% CI 4.25-17.40), history of injuries (OR 4.93 95% CI 2.03-11.95), home as place of occurrence (OR 36.25 95% CI 16.59-79.18), and low education level (OR 2.33 95% CI 1.03-5.26). Study findings are consistent with those from other studies and call for enforcement of the Mexican Official Norm for Medical Care of Domestic Violence (Norma Oficial Mexicana para la Atención Médica de la Violencia Familiar) established in March 2000.

  3. [Opinion of medical and nursing students on the autonomy of adolescents in health care services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortes, P A; Kurita, G de P

    1998-12-01

    In an effort to better understand some of the ethical and legal dilemmas that health professionals face in their daily activities, this study identified and analyzed the opinions and expectations of medical and nursing students at the University of São Paulo, Brazil, regarding the autonomy of adolescents in receiving health care services. Over the 1995-1996 period, interviews were done with students in the first and last years of their programs in the School of Medicine and the School of Nursing of the University of São Paulo. The results from the first-year students were compared with those of the final-year students. The interview questions dealt with such issues as providing medical care to adolescents when a parent or guardian was not present, adolescents making their own decisions on health care services, the confidentiality of information that adolescents provide, the circumstances in which that information could be given to parents or guardians, and situations where there were conflicts between the decisions of parents and adolescents. Despite variations among the opinions and expectations of the students, the overall results suggest that most of the medical and nursing students do not accept the concept of "health adulthood" or autonomy for adolescents and that the students instead choose to rely on current legal definitions of adulthood.

  4. Commercial pressures on professionalism in american medical care: from Medicare to the Affordable Care Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmor, Theodore R; Gordon, Robert W

    2014-01-01

    Since the passage of Medicare, the self-regulation characteristic of professionalism in health care has come under steady assault. While Canadian physicians chose to relinquish financial autonomy, they have enjoyed far greater professional autonomy over their medical judgments than their U.S. counterparts who increasingly have their practices micromanaged. The Affordable Care Act illustrates the ways that managerial strategies and a market model of health care have shaped the financing and delivery of health care in the U.S., often with little or no evidence of their effectiveness.

  5. Definition of Professionalism by Different Groups of Health Care Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafiropoulos, George

    2017-01-01

    Professionalism is important in all service-providing professions. Professional bodies have extensive rules and regulations creating the foundations of the definition of professionalism, its meaning and these rules have to be followed. In view of this, healthcare students are given intensive training. A prospective study conducted in a District…

  6. The Ecology of Medical Care Among Israeli Military Aviators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Barak; Levy, Yuval; Yemini, Tal; Carmon, Erez; Erlich, Yifat; Hermoni, Doron

    2016-12-01

    The ecology of medical care model has been used in various populations with varying results. We aimed to apply this model in the population of Israeli Air Force (IAF) aviators. An anonymous questionnaire was presented to all Israeli Air Force aviators during their mandatory yearly check-up over 1 yr starting on November 26th, 2012. The questionnaire contained items on demographic, personal, and military details, as well as items on the presence of clinical symptoms, and various health care contacts in the previous month. We assessed the differences between career and reserve personnel using a X2 test. There were 325 aviators who completed the questionnaire (2 women, 132 reserves). Clinical symptoms were reported by 62.5% of the responders. Over half (52.6%) had any health care encounter: 23.7% with a dentist, 17.9% with non-MD therapists, 12.6% with a specialist, and 11.7% with a primary physician. A significant difference between reserve and career personnel was found only in primary care visits. Out of the aviators who reported having clinical symptoms, 70.9% did not visit a physician. Of those who did not seek medical care, 42.4% reported that the symptoms were viewed as unimportant, 41% thought they would disappear by themselves, 40.3% could not find time for treatment. Aviators in the IAF have similar rate of clinical symptoms as in other unselected populations. Those who report symptoms usually do not visit a physician for treatment. When they do seek advice it is mostly from non-MD practitioners.Gordon B, Levy Y, Yemini T, Carmon E, Erlich Y, Hermoni D. The ecology of medical care among Israeli military aviators. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2016; 87(12):1036-1040.

  7. Medical care economic risk: measuring financial vulnerability from spending on medical care

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O'Grady, Michael J. (Health policy expert); Wunderlich, Gooloo S

    2012-01-01

    .... Many Americans lack health care insurance of any kind, and many others with insurance are nonetheless exposed to financial risk because of high premiums, deductibles, co-pays, limits on insurance...

  8. Alcohol consumption in early adolescence and medical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrás Santiesteban, Tania

    2016-10-01

    Alcohol consumptionin adolescents is a risky behavior that can be prevented. Objective. To determine health care and alcohol consumption pattern in early adolescence and its relation to determinants of health (biological, environmental, social and health system factors). A qualitative-quantitative, crosssectional study was carried out in the four schools belonging to Popular Council 8 of Mario Gutiérrez Ardaya health sector in May, 2013. The study universe was made up of adolescents aged 10-14. The sample was determined through a simple randomized sampling. Surveys were administered to adolescents, parents, educators and senior health staff members to determine alcohol consumption, medical care quality and level of knowledge on the problem. A nominal group with health professionals was created. Two hundred and eighty eight adolescents were included. 54.5% were alcohol users, of which 30.2% were 10-11 years old. Those classified as low risk were prevailing (55.6%). 100% of the senior health staff expressed the need for a methodology of care. 90.4% of education staff considered adolescence as a vulnerable stage. Relatives reported that there should be adolescent-specific medical appointments (61.8%). The nominal group's most important opinions were based on the main features that a consultation for adolescents should have and on the problems hindering proper care. Alcohol consumption was considered high and early start prevailed. Insufficient care to early adolescents who use alcohol was made evident. Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría.

  9. Generic project definitions for improvement of health care delivery: a case-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemeijer, Gerard C; Does, Ronald J M M; de Mast, Jeroen; Trip, Albert; van den Heuvel, Jaap

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to create actionable knowledge, making the definition of process improvement projects in health care delivery more effective. This study is a retrospective analysis of process improvement projects in hospitals, facilitating a case-based reasoning approach to project definition. Data sources were project documentation and hospital-performance statistics of 271 Lean Six Sigma health care projects from 2002 to 2009 of general, teaching, and academic hospitals in the Netherlands and Belgium. Objectives and operational definitions of improvement projects in the sample, analyzed and structured in a uniform format and terminology. Extraction of reusable elements of earlier project definitions, presented in the form of 9 templates called generic project definitions. These templates function as exemplars for future process improvement projects, making the selection, definition, and operationalization of similar projects more efficient. Each template includes an explicated rationale, an operationalization in the form of metrics, and a prototypical example. Thus, a process of incremental and sustained learning based on case-based reasoning is facilitated. The quality of project definitions is a crucial success factor in pursuits to improve health care delivery. We offer 9 tried and tested improvement themes related to patient safety, patient satisfaction, and business-economic performance of hospitals.

  10. 'Redefining health care': medical homes or archipelagos to navigate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enthoven, Alain C; Crosson, Francis J; Shortell, Stephen M

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides an analysis of the structure of the health care delivery system, emphasizing physician group practices. The authors argue for comprehensive integrated delivery systems (IDSs). The jumping-off point for their analysis is the recently published Redefining Health Care: Creating Value-Based Competition on Results, by Michael Porter and Elizabeth Teisberg. The authors focus on the book's core idea that competitors should be freestanding integrated practice units (or "islands in archipelagos") versus IDSs (or "medical homes"). In any case, the authors contend that this issue should be resolved by competition to attract and serve informed, cost-conscious, responsible consumers on a level playing field.

  11. The hidden curriculum of the medical care for elderly patients in medical education: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiboom, Ariadne; Diedrich, Chantal; Vries, Henk De; Hertogh, Cees; Scheele, Fedde

    2015-01-01

    Despite more attention being given to geriatrics in medical curricula, few new physicians are seeking training in this field. So far, there has been no exploration of factors in the hidden curriculum that could potentially influence the persisting lack of interest in this field of medicine. To study this hidden curriculum in medical education in relation to medical care of elderly patients, the authors used a qualitative research design including participant observations on two internal medicine wards in a teaching hospital and semistructured interviews. The results showed that elderly patients with multiple problems are seen as frustrating and not interesting. Medical students were not stimulated to go into the totality of medical problems of elderly patients. They picked up a lot of disparaging remarks about these patients. The mainly negative attitudes demonstrated by role models, in particular the residents, may potentially influence the development of future doctors and their choice of career.

  12. The determinants of quality in procedural rural medical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Richard B; Veitch, Craig; Evans, Rebecca J

    2005-01-01

    A substantial proportion of health services for rural Australians is provided in rural health facilities by rurally based generalist health professionals. These services include procedural care within smaller rural hospitals, where teams of health professionals--medical practitioners, nurses and other support staff--work in teams to deliver a range of procedural services, both elective and urgent, that reduce the need for rural people to travel to major centres. Recent debate over the training of rural medical practitioners has focused on whether or not they need to provide procedural services, because current health service management policy appears to support the rationalisation and centralisation of service delivery in larger centres to contain costs and ensure high quality. Hence there is an assumption, without much evidence, that the quality of care in rural hospitals is lower than that provided in larger urban hospitals, although there is little agreement on just what aspects of care should be measured to indicate its quality. This article reports an exploration of multiple perspectives on what constitutes quality of care in rural procedural medical practice, as part of a broader study of the quality of care of a series of real clinical cases. During the collection of a series of 91 individual patient cases involving anaesthetic, obstetric or surgical procedures conducted in small rural hospitals, interviews were conducted with several participants in each case: the rural doctors; rural nurses; the rural patients; and family members of those patients. In addition to issues pertaining to each case, interviews explored the perspectives of individuals in each group on the broader question of what constitutes quality of care in a general sense. Their comments were subjected to qualitative thematic analysis using Atlas.ti software (Muhr T, ATLAS.ti Scientific Software Development; Berlin, Germany). In order to consider how to measure rural health care, the

  13. [Intercultural aspects of medical care for undocumented migrants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerda-Hegerl, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    In view of the cultural diversity in German society today, the time has long since come when medical care must adjust to its new clientele. This article provides an overview for doctors, medical personnel and psychologists of approaches, backgrounds and networks of migration to Germany, in particular over the little known undocumented migration. This migration has steadily increased in recent years. The author deals with the circumstances which create psychological problems for migrants and what happens when migrants living in this shadow world fall ill. In addition, the article offers an agenda for interculturally competent action in caring for documented and undocumented migrants. Dimensions of cultural differences such as collectivism versus individualism (most of the countries of origin of these migrants in Germany with or without documents are collectivistic) are explained along with differences in styles of communication. The following styles with their impact in actual practice are analyzed: indirect versus direct communication; emotional control versus expressiveness; functionalism versus relationship orientation.

  14. [Medical care, organ and tissue transplants, and targeted policies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Carlos Dimas Martins; Schramm, Fermin Roland

    2006-09-01

    This article reflects on the moral legitimacy of implementing public policies for targeting advanced medical care, specifically in the case of organ and tissue transplants. The article refers to two theoretical approaches: the theory of capabilities by Nussbaum and Sen and the bioethics of protection by Schramm and Kottow, considered complementary in this context. The article begins by characterizing the issue of resource scarcity in transplantation, as well as strategies to overcome this problem. Next, the capabilities approach and bioethics of protection are briefly presented. Finally, from the perspective of the above-mentioned ethical approaches, in situations of scarce health resources such as the Brazilian case, the author contends that it would be morally justified to adopt targeted policies in advanced medical care, including organ transplantation.

  15. Combat Injuries: Providing Medical Care for all Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-19

    honorably, the U.S. Government is morally responsible for providing basic health care for the treatment of combat related injuries . This obligation...the treatment of combat related injuries . This obligation extends to injuries incurred in the line of duty regardless of the service member’s...full medical benefits, but to ensure he or she gets treatment for combat injuries regardless of the discharge. If the injury occurred under

  16. Emergency Medical Services Capacity for Prehospital Stroke Care

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-09-05

    In this audio podcast, lead author and Preventing Chronic Disease’s 2013 Student Research Contest Winner, Mehul D. Patel, talks about his article on stroke care and emergency medical services.  Created: 9/5/2013 by Preventing Chronic Disease (PCD), National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 9/5/2013.

  17. Parametric estimation of medical care costs under conditions of censoring

    OpenAIRE

    Raikou, Maria; McGuire, Alistair

    2009-01-01

    This paper is concerned with a set of parametric estimators that attempt to provide consistent estimates of average medical care costs under conditions of censoring. The main finding is that incorporation of the inverse of the probability of an individual not being censored in the estimating equations is instrumental in deriving unbiased cost estimates. The success of the approach is dependent on the amount of available information on the cost history process. The value of this information in...

  18. Elective non-therapeutic intensive care and the four principles of medical ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Antoine; Audibert, Gérard; Guibet Lafaye, Caroline; Lafaye, Caroline Guibet; Puybasset, Louis; Mertes, Paul-Michel; Claudot, Frédérique

    2013-03-01

    The chronic worldwide lack of organs for transplantation and the continuing improvement of strategies for in situ organ preservation have led to renewed interest in elective non-therapeutic ventilation of potential organ donors. Two types of situation may be eligible for elective intensive care: patients definitely evolving towards brain death and patients suitable as controlled non-heart beating organ donors after life-supporting therapies have been assessed as futile and withdrawn. Assessment of the ethical acceptability and the risks of these strategies is essential. We here offer such an ethical assessment using the four principles of medical ethics of Beauchamp and Childress applying them in their broadest sense so as to include patients and their families, their caregivers, other potential recipients of intensive care, and indeed society as a whole. The main ethical problems emerging are the definition of beneficence for the potential organ donor, the dilemma between the duty to respect a dying patient's autonomy and the duty not to harm him/her, and the possible psychological and social harm for families, caregivers other potential recipients of therapeutic intensive care, and society more generally. Caution is expressed about the ethical acceptability of elective non-therapeutic ventilation, along with some proposals for precautionary measures to be taken if it is to be implemented.

  19. Organization of prehospital medical care for patients with cerebral stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolai Anatolyevich Shamalov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The main tasks of prehospital medical care are to make a correct diagnosis of stroke and to minimize patient transportation delays. Stroke is a medical emergency so all patients with suspected stroke must be admitted by a first arrived ambulance team to a specialized neurology unit for stroke patients. Most rapidly transporting the patient to hospital, as well as reducing the time of examination to verify the pattern of stroke are a guarantee of successful thrombolytic therapy that is the most effective treatment for ischemic stroke. Substantially reducing the time of in-hospital transfers (the so-called door-to-needle time allows stroke patients to be directly admitted to the around the clock computed tomography room, without being sent to the admission unit. Prehospital stroke treatment policy (basic therapy is to correct the body’s vital functions and to maintain respiration, hemodynamics, and water-electrolyte balance and it can be performed without neuroimaging verification of the pattern of stroke. The application of current organizational, methodical, and educational approaches is useful in improving the quality of medical care for stroke patients, in enhancing the continuity between prehospital and hospital cares, and in promoting new effective technologies in stroke therapy.

  20. Terrorism and the ethics of emergency medical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesik, N; Keim, M E; Iserson, K V

    2001-06-01

    The threat of domestic and international terrorism involving weapons of mass destruction-terrorism (WMD-T) has become an increasing public health concern for US citizens. WMD-T events may have a major effect on many societal sectors but particularly on the health care delivery system. Anticipated medical problems might include the need for large quantities of medical equipment and supplies, as well as capable and unaffected health care providers. In the setting of WMD-T, triage may bear little resemblance to the standard approach to civilian triage. To address these issues to the maximum benefit of our patients, we must first develop collective forethought and a broad-based consensus that these decisions must reach beyond the hospital emergency department. Critical decisions like these should not be made on an individual case-by-case basis. Physicians should never be placed in a position of individually deciding to deny treatment to patients without the guidance of a policy or protocol. Emergency physicians, however, may easily find themselves in a situation in which the demand for resources clearly exceeds supply. It is for this reason that emergency care providers, personnel, hospital administrators, religious leaders, and medical ethics committees need to engage in bioethical decision making before an acute bioterrorist event.

  1. Acute care in Tanzania: Epidemiology of acute care in a small community medical centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel M. Little

    2013-12-01

    Discussion: Respiratory infections, malaria, and skin or soft tissue infections are leading reasons for seeking medical care at a small community medical centre in Arusha, Tanzania, highlighting the burden of infectious diseases in this type of facility. Males may be more likely to present with trauma, burns, and laceration injuries than females. Many patients required one or no procedures to determine their diagnosis, most treatments administered were inexpensive, and most patients were discharged home, suggesting that providing acute care in this setting could be accomplished with limited resources.

  2. Working on reform. How workers' compensation medical care is affected by health care reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmelstein, J; Rest, K

    1996-01-01

    The medical component of workers' compensation programs-now costing over $24 billion annually-and the rest of the nation's medical care system are linked. They share the same patients and providers. They provide similar benefits and services. And they struggle over who should pay for what. Clearly, health care reform and restructuring will have a major impact on the operation and expenditures of the workers' compensation system. For a brief period, during the 1994 national health care reform debate, these two systems were part of the same federal policy development and legislative process. With comprehensive health care reform no longer on the horizon, states now are tackling both workers' compensation and medical system reforms on their own. This paper reviews the major issues federal and state policy makers face as they consider reforms affecting the relationship between workers' compensation and traditional health insurance. What is the relationship of the workers' compensation cost crisis to that in general health care? What strategies are being considered by states involved in reforming the medical component of workers compensation? What are the major policy implications of these strategies?

  3. Definition of problems of persons in sheltered care environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetzner, W. N.

    1979-01-01

    Innovations in health care using aerospace technologies are described. Voice synthesizer and voice recognition technologies were used in developing voice controlled wheel chairs and optacons. Telephone interface modules are also described.

  4. A Patient-Held Medical Record Integrating Depression Care into Diabetes Care

    OpenAIRE

    Noriko Satoh-Asahara; Hiroto Ito; Tomoyuki Akashi; Hajime Yamakage; Kazuhiko Kotani; Daisuke Nagata; Kazuyuki Nakagome; Mitsuhiko Noda

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE Depression is frequently observed in people with diabetes. The purpose of this study is to develop a tool for individuals with diabetes and depression to communicate their comorbid conditions to health-care providers. METHOD We searched the Internet to review patient-held medical records (PHRs) of patients with diabetes and examine current levels of integration of diabetes and depression care in Japan. RESULTS Eight sets of PHRs were found for people with diabetes. All PHRs included c...

  5. New Roles for Medical Assistants in Innovative Primary Care Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Susan A; Blash, Lisel K

    2017-02-01

    To identify and describe new roles for medical assistants (MAs) in innovative care models that improve care while providing training and career advancement opportunities for MAs. Primary data collected at 15 case study sites; 173 key informant interviews and de-identified secondary data on staffing, wages, patient satisfaction, and health outcomes. Researchers used snowball sampling and screening calls to identify 15 organizations using MAs in new roles. Conducted site visits from 2010 to 2012 and updated information in 2014. Thematic analysis explored key topics: factors driving MA role innovation, role description, training required, and wage gains. Categorized outcome data in patient and staff satisfaction, quality of care, and efficiency. New MA roles included health coach, medical scribe, dual role translator, health navigator, panel manager, cross-trained flexible role, and supervisor. Implementation of new roles required extensive training. MA incentives and enhanced compensation varied by role type. New MA roles are part of a larger attempt to reform workflow and relieve primary care providers. Despite some evidence of success, spread has been limited. Key challenges to adoption included leadership and provider resistance to change, cost of additional MA training, and lack of reimbursement for nonbillable services. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  6. Assessing organisational development in primary medical care using a group based assessment: the Maturity Matrix.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elwyn, G.; Rhydderch, M.; Edwards, A.; Hutchings, H.; Marshall, M.; Myres, P.; Grol, R.P.T.M.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To design and develop an instrument to assess the degree of organisational development achieved in primary medical care organisations. DESIGN: An iterative development, feasibility and validation study of an organisational assessment instrument. SETTING: Primary medical care

  7. Improving COPD Care in a Medically Underserved Primary Care Clinic: A Qualitative Study of Patient Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasser, Irene; Wang, Fei; Reardon, Jane; Vergara, Cunegundo D; Salvietti, Ralph; Acevedo, Myrtha; Santana, Blanca; Fortunato, Gil

    2016-10-01

    We conducted a focus group study in an urban hospital-based primary care teaching clinic serving an indigent and Hispanic (predominantly Puerto Rican) population in New England in order to learn how patients with Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (COPD) perceive their disease, how they experience their medical care, and the barriers they face managing their disease and following medical recommendations. The research team included medical doctors, nurses, a medical anthropologist, a clinical pharmacist, a hospital interpreter, and a systems analyst. Four focus groups were conducted in Spanish and English in April and May 2014. The demographic characteristics of the 25 focus group participants closely reflected the demographics of the total COPD clinic patients. The participants were predominantly female (72%) and Hispanic (72%) and had a median age of 63. The major themes expressed in the focus groups included: problems living with COPD; coping with complexities of comorbid illnesses; challenges of quitting smoking and maintaining cessation; dealing with second-hand smoke; beliefs and myths about quitting smoking; difficulty paying for and obtaining medications; positive experiences obtaining and managing medications; difficulties in using sleep machines at home; expressions of disappointment with the departure of their doctors; and overall satisfaction with the clinic health care providers. The study led to the creation of an action plan that addresses the concerns expressed by the focus study participants. The action plan is spearheaded by a designated bilingual and bicultural nurse and is now in operation.

  8. Boxing: medical care in and out of the ring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambrell, Robert C

    2007-10-01

    Boxing may well be the oldest sport known to mankind and probably the most controversial. Injuries are common in boxing, occurring most often to the head, neck, face, and hands. Brain injury, both acute and chronic, is the major risk for potential catastrophe. Medical care for the boxer extends beyond the competition in the boxing ring; the ringside physician is responsible for protecting both boxers and must make quick decisions about their continued participation based upon a limited examination. A thorough knowledge of the rules and regulations of boxing is necessary for the ringside physician to effectively care for the athlete. In spite of the perceived brutality associated with the sport, most injuries are minor, although serious injuries and deaths do occur, most commonly due to brain injury. Given the potential for catastrophic injury, the ringside physician must be prepared and equipped to care for the boxer.

  9. Canadian ethnographic study of sources and definitions of theological reflection in pastoral care and counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Thomas St James; Meakes, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    What are the sources and definitions of theological reflection developed by Canadian practitioners of pastoral care and counseling? This study is part of a larger qualitative research project on theological reflection. This research reviews the literature, describes the ethnographic method, and presents the findings with a sample of 75. Main sources are sacred texts, personal experience, experiences of clients, and traditions of faith group. Definitions are meaning making, discovering the divine and discipleship with recommendations for future research listed.

  10. Outcome disparities between medical personnel and nonmedical personnel patients receiving definitive surgery for colorectal cancer: a nationwide population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chia-Jen; Huang, Nicole; Lin, Chun-Chi; Lee, Yu-Ting; Hu, Yu-Wen; Yeh, Chiu-Mei; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Chou, Yiing-Jenq

    2015-01-01

    Disparities in quality of care have always been a major challenge in health care. Providing information to patients may help to narrow such disparities. However, the relationship between level of patient information and outcomes remains to be explored. More importantly, would better-informed patients have better outcomes through their choice of higher quality providers? We hypothesize that medical professionals may have better outcomes than nonmedical professionals following definitive surgery for colorectal cancer (CRC), and their choice of provider may mediate this relationship. We identified 61,728 patients with CRC receiving definitive surgery between 2005 and 2011 from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Medical professionals were identified via the registry for medical personnel. Indicators for surgical outcome such as emergency room (ER) visits within 30 days, medical expenses, length of hospital stay (LOS), and 5-year mortality were analyzed by using fixed and random effects multivariate regression models. Compared with nonmedical personnel CRC patients, a greater proportion of medical personnel received definitive surgery from higher volume surgeons (median 390 vs 311 within the study period) and/or in higher volume hospitals (median 1527 vs 1312 within the study period). CRC patients who are medical personnel had a shorter median LOS (12 vs 14 days), lower median medical expenses (112,687 vs 121,332 New Taiwan dollars), a lower ER visit rate within 30 days (11.3% vs 13.0%), and lower 5-year mortality. After adjusting for patient characteristics, medical personnel had a significantly lower hazard of 5-year mortality, and were significantly more likely to have a LOS shorter than 14 days than their nonmedical personnel counterparts. However, after adjusting for patient and provider characteristics, while medical personnel were significantly less likely to have a long LOS, no significant difference was observed in 5-year mortality between

  11. What sort of medical care is ideal? Differences in thoughts on medical care among residents of urban and rural/remote Japanese communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikai, Tomoki; Suzuki, Tomio; Oshima, Tamiki; Kanayama, Hitomi; Kusaka, Yukinori; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Terasawa, Hidekazu

    2017-09-01

    Studies of aspirational ideals of medical care generally focus on patients rather than on ordinary people receiving or not receiving medications at the time of interview. The literature has not accurately conveyed the distinct ideals in individual communities or undertaken inter-regional comparisons. This current qualitative study focused on ideal medical care as perceived by residents of distinct Japanese communities in their everyday lives. Between December 2011 and November 2012, one-on-one and group-based semi-structured interviews were conducted with 105 individuals, each of whom had continuously lived for 20 years or more in one of the four types of communities classified as either 'metropolitan area', 'provincial city', 'mountain/fishing village' or 'remote island' in Japan. Interviews were transcribed from digital audio recordings and then analysed (in tandem with non-verbal data including participants' appearances, attitudes and interview atmospheres) using constructivist grounded theory, in which we could get the voice and mind of the participant concerning ideal medical care. The common themes observed among the four community types included 'peace of mind because of the availability of medical care' and 'trust in medical professionals'. Themes that were characteristic of urban communities were the tendency to focus on the content of medical care, including 'high-level medical care', 'elimination of unnecessary medical care' and 'faster, cheaper medical care', whereas those that were characteristic of rural communities were the tendency to focus on lifestyle-oriented medical care such as 'support for local lifestyles', 'locally appropriate standards of medical care' and 'being free from dependence on medical care'. The sense of ideal medical care in urban communities tended to centre around the satisfaction with the content of medical care, whereas that in rural communities tended to centre around the ability to lead a secure life. By considering

  12. From Cure to Care: Assessing the Ethical and Professional Learning Needs of Medical Learners in a Care-Based Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Pippa; O'Reilly, Jane; Dojeiji, Sue; Blair, Richard; Harley, Anne

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the ethical and professional learning needs of medical trainees on clinical placements at a care-based facility, as they shifted from acute care to care-based philosophy. Using qualitative data analysis and grounded theory techniques, 12 medical learners and five clinical supervisors were interviewed. Five…

  13. From Cure to Care: Assessing the Ethical and Professional Learning Needs of Medical Learners in a Care-Based Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Pippa; O'Reilly, Jane; Dojeiji, Sue; Blair, Richard; Harley, Anne

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the ethical and professional learning needs of medical trainees on clinical placements at a care-based facility, as they shifted from acute care to care-based philosophy. Using qualitative data analysis and grounded theory techniques, 12 medical learners and five clinical supervisors were interviewed. Five…

  14. Five year report on the medical follow up of Marshallese receiving special medical care related to 1954 Bravo fallout radiation (January 1992--1996)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaswani, A.N.; Howard, J.E.

    1999-06-01

    This is the 17th and final report of the Marshall Islands Medical Program as carried out by the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The purpose of these publications has been to provide information on the medical status of 253 Marshallese exposed to radiation fallout in 1954. The medical program fulfills a commitment to disclose unique medical information relevant to public health. Details of the Bravo thermonuclear accident that caused the exposure have been published. A 1955 article in the Journal of the American Medical Association, which described the acute medical effects on the population that required special medical care, remains a definitive and relevant description of events. Marshallese participation in this Congressionally mandated program is voluntary. Throughout the 44 years of the program, each participating individual`s relevant medical findings, laboratory data, disease morbidity, and mortality have been published in the BNL reports in a manner preserving patient confidentiality. In each report, there has been an attempt to interpret these findings and to infer the role of radiation exposure in their development. An equally important aspect of the reports has been the presentation of data that allows for analyses of the medical consequences of the Marshallese exposure.

  15. Hospitals - MEDICAL_CARE_FACILITIES_MHMP_IN: Medical Care Facilities in Indiana, derived from Essential Facilities Data of the Multi-Hazard Mitigation Planning Data (The Polis Center, Point Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — MEDICAL_CARE_FACILITIES_MHMP_IN.SHP is a point shapefile that shows medical care facilities in Indiana. MEDICAL_CARE_FACILITIES_MHMP_IN.SHP was derived from the...

  16. Educational Implications of Nurse Practitioner Students and Medical Residents' Attitudes toward Managed Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breer, M. Lynn; Pohl, Joanne M.; Stommel, Manfred; Barkauskas, Violet H.; Schillo, Barbara; Oakley, Deborah

    2002-01-01

    Attitudes toward managed care of 431 medical residents and 153 advanced practice nursing students were compared. Medical students were more likely to agree that managed care emphasizes cost over quality and threatens autonomy. Nursing students were more likely to agree that it encourages preventive care. Medical students were less enthusiastic…

  17. 20 CFR 702.422 - Effect of failure to report on medical care after initial authorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... obtained in accordance with these regulations, a finding by the Director that a medical care provider has... authorization of such medical care provider. The effect of a final finding to this effect operates to release... award for the reasonable value of such medical care. Debarment of Physicians and Other Providers...

  18. Medical care utilization and costs on end-of-life cancer patients: The role of hospice care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hsiao-Ting; Lin, Ming-Hwai; Chen, Chun-Ku; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Tsai, Shu-Lin; Cheng, Shao-Yi; Chiu, Tai-Yuan; Tsai, Shih-Tzu; Hwang, Shinn-Jang

    2016-11-01

    Although there are 3 hospice care programs for terminal cancer patients in Taiwan, the medical utilization and expenses for these patients by programs have not been well-explored. The aim of this study was to examine the medical utilization and expenses of terminal cancer patients under different programs of hospice care in the last 90, 30, and 14 days of life.This was a retrospective observational study by secondary data analysis. By using the National Health Insurance claim database and Hospice Shared Care Databases. We identified cancer descents from these databases and classified them into nonhospice care and hospice care groups based on different combination of hospice care received. We then analyzed medical utilization including inpatient care, outpatient care, emergency room visits, and medical expenses by patient groups in the last 90, 30, and 14 days of life.Among 118,376 cancer descents, 46.9% ever received hospice care. Patients had ever received hospice care had significantly lower average medical utilization and expenses in their last 90, 30, and 14 days of life (all P hospice care group had significantly less medical utilization and expenses in the last 90, 30, and 14 days of life (all P hospice care program have different effects on medical care utilization reduction and cost-saving at different stage of the end of life of terminal cancer patients.

  19. Definitions of medication-overuse headache in population-based studies and their implications on prevalence estimates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergaard, Maria L.; Hansen, Ebba Holme; Glümer, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    Case definitions of medication-overuse headache (MOH) in population-based research have changed over time. This study aims to review MOH prevalence reports with respect to these changes, and to propose a practical case definition for future studies based on the ICHD-3 beta.......Case definitions of medication-overuse headache (MOH) in population-based research have changed over time. This study aims to review MOH prevalence reports with respect to these changes, and to propose a practical case definition for future studies based on the ICHD-3 beta....

  20. The Role of Medical Informatics in Primary Care Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PJ McCullagh

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the ability of a group of Primary Care professionals to acquire appropriate document retrieval skills, so that they can apply evidence based health care techniques to their various Primary Care roles. The participants, most of whom had little prior experience of the Internet, were enrolled on a two-year part-time Postgraduate Diploma / MSc in Primary Care. As part of the course, they took a compulsory 12-week module in Medical Informatics. A specific task was set: to find appropriate information on Meningococcal Meningitis and Public Health, by using National Library of Medicine's PUBMED bibliographic retrieval system and other unspecified Internet sources. A supplementary piece of coursework required the group to become information providers by providing tutorials on the world wide web. Analysis of the reports showed that the participants were able to learn and use the information tools successfully and that appropriate skills can be transferred in a short time. Overall nine were positive as to the benefits of the evidence-based approach contributing to local health care, with nine expressing mixed views and two having more negative opinions.

  1. Advancing Primary Care Use of Electronic Medical Records in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Zelmer

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In 2010, the federal government's Economic Action Plan funded Canada Health Infoway to co-invest with provinces, territories, and health care providers in electronic medical records (EMRs in primary care. The goal is to help improve access to care, quality of health services, and productivity of the health system, as well as to deliver economic benefits. The decision to fund EMRs was consistent with a long-term framework for digital health established in consultation with stakeholders across the country, spurred by analysis demonstrating the economic impact of such investments and data on Canada's low rate of EMR use in primary care compared with other countries. The decision reflected widespread public and stakeholder consensus regarding the importance of such investments. EMR adoption has more than doubled since 2006, with evaluations identifying efficiency and patient care benefits (e.g., reduced time managing laboratory test results and fewer adverse drug events in community-based practices. These benefits are expected to rise further as EMR adoption continues to grow and practices gain more experience with their use.

  2. Access and usability to medications: a proposal for an operational definition

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Research about accessibility to medicines through household surveys is very important in order to verify the reality and effectiveness of interventions done to increase the access of the population to the medications. Unfortunately, such studies, on top of being very few, have methodological problems, which mostly result from a lack of uniformity in the operational definitions of access and the differentiation with the dimensions of accessibility. The aim of this paper is to propose setti...

  3. Should Health Care Aides Assist With Medications in Long-Term Care?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mubashir Arain PhD

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of the study was to determine whether health care aides (HCAs could safely assist in medication administration in long-term care (LTC. Method: We obtained medication error reports from LTC facilities that involve HCAs in oral medication assistance and we analyzed Resident Assessment Instrument (RAI data from these facilities. Standard ratings of error severity were “no apparent harm,” “minimum harm,” and “moderate harm.” Results: We retrieved error reports from two LTC facilities with 220 errors reported by all health care providers including HCAs. HCAs were involved in 137 (63% errors, licensed practical nurses (LPNs/registered nurses (RNs in 77 (35%, and pharmacy in four (2%. The analysis of error severity showed that HCAs were significantly less likely to cause errors of moderate severity than other nursing staff (2% vs. 7%, chi-square = 5.1, p value = .04. Conclusion: HCAs’ assistance in oral medications in LTC facilities appears to be safe when provided under the medication assistance guidelines.

  4. Perception of Palliative Care among Medical Students in a Teaching Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samiksha Pandey

    2015-06-01

    Conclusions: The perception of palliative care medicine is low in first couple of year of medical study. It is increased in clinically exposed students but is surprisingly more in fourth year than final year undergraduate medical students. However, it should be included in undergraduate medical study. Keywords: medical students; palliative care; perception.

  5. Medication reconciliation interventions in ambulatory care: A scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Lisa; Su, Xinru Wendy; Crown, Natalie; Turple, Jennifer; Brown, Thomas E R; Walsh, Kate; John, Jessica; Rochon, Paula

    2016-11-15

    The published literature on medication reconciliation (MR) interventions, outcomes, and facilitators in ambulatory care settings is reviewed. A scoping review was conducted to characterize ambulatory care-based MR research in terms of study design, elements of interventions, and outcomes examined. English-language articles on comparative studies of MR programs targeting adults in ambulatory care settings were identified using data sources including MEDLINE, PreMEDLINE, EMBASE, and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts. For each study, steps undertaken in the MR process were extracted. The Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) taxonomy was used to classify types of interventions; taxonomies for reported outcomes and factors facilitating implementation of MR initiatives were developed by the authors. From among 2062 publications screened, 15 were included in the review. In 13 studies, multiple data sources were used to compile a "best possible medication history" (BPMH); however, the BPMH was shared with external healthcare providers in only 4 studies and with patients in only 5 studies. Most reported MR interventions were classified into two EPOC domains: professional (predominantly educational outreach visits and patient reminders) and organizational (predominantly provider-oriented interventions). Process outcomes were reported in 12 studies, with correct performance of MR being the most commonly evaluated process outcome, and 9 studies identified factors that facilitated MR implementation. Few studies have examined clinical outcomes of MR in ambulatory care settings, with the majority of pertinent reports focusing instead on process outcomes. Facilitators of successful MR interventions have been identified at the patient, staff, and clinic setting levels. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Stigma and difficulty accessing medical care in a sample of adults with serious mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrow, Laysha; Manderscheid, Ron; Mojtabai, Ramin

    2014-11-01

    Wellness of people with mental illness is increasingly a public health priority. This study examined factors associated with difficulties receiving medical care in adults with mental illness. In a sample of 1,670 adults with mental illness, we assessed difficulties in accessing medical care and stigma. A total of 465 (28%) participants reported difficulties in accessing medical care; 211 (13%) attributed difficulties in access to stigma. Lack of comprehensive medical care coverage and mental health symptoms were associated with increased odds of perceived difficulties in accessing medical care; personal empowerment was negatively associated with perceived difficulties attributed to stigma; education was positively associated. The findings highlight unmet need for medical care in this population and the need to recognize stigma as a barrier medical care. Interventions to empower patients and educate medical providers about wellness for people with serious mental illness could help to reduce barriers.

  7. How Medical Tourism Enables Preferential Access to Care: Four Patterns from the Canadian Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Jeremy; Johnston, Rory; Crooks, Valorie A; Morgan, Jeff; Adams, Krystyna

    2017-06-01

    Medical tourism is the practice of traveling across international borders with the intention of accessing medical care, paid for out-of-pocket. This practice has implications for preferential access to medical care for Canadians both through inbound and outbound medical tourism. In this paper, we identify four patterns of medical tourism with implications for preferential access to care by Canadians: (1) Inbound medical tourism to Canada's public hospitals; (2) Inbound medical tourism to a First Nations reserve; (3) Canadian patients opting to go abroad for medical tourism; and (4) Canadian patients traveling abroad with a Canadian surgeon. These patterns of medical tourism affect preferential access to health care by Canadians by circumventing domestic regulation of care, creating jurisdictional tensions over the provision of health care, and undermining solidarity with the Canadian health system.

  8. Family medicine in undergraduate medical curriculum: a cost-effective approach to health care in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Saima P

    2010-01-01

    Shifa College of Medicine introduced a two-week rotation in Family Medicine for their third-year medical students in 2008. The purpose of this study was to determine what impact it made on students and how many would consider becoming Family Physicians in future. A questionnaire-based prospective study conducted at Shifa College of Medicine, Islamabad during academic year 2008. A total of 46 students rotated in Family Medicine throughout the academic year-2008. Fifteen students were aware of Family Medicine as a specialty prior to starting their rotation, and only 3 expressed an interest to pursue Family Medicine as a future career. At the start of the rotation only 15 students were able to give correct definition of Family Medicine and on questioning whether it should be a part of the undergraduate curriculum, only 24 answered yes while the rest were unsure. After the rotation, a significant number of students (37%; p definition of Family Medicine as a humanistic approach of medicine with aim to prevent, treat and rehabilitate. About its utility in the undergraduate curriculum, 44 (96%) students believed it should be a regular feature in their curriculum, while 30 (65%) students agreed that their outlook towards patient care had changed. When asked what they learnt most during the rotation, students quoted empathy and development of communication skills. Family medicine rotation as part of undergraduate medical curriculum may help in fostering an interest among medical students in this newly emerging subspecialty which could have a profound effect on delivery of quality health care in this country.

  9. Features and application of wearable biosensors in medical care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajami, Sima; Teimouri, Fotooheh

    2015-01-01

    One of the new technologies in the field of health is wearable biosensor, which provides vital signs monitoring of patients, athletes, premature infants, children, psychiatric patients, people who need long-term care, elderly, and people in impassable regions far from health and medical services. The aim of this study was to explain features and applications of wearable biosensors in medical services. This was a narrative review study that done in 2015. Search conducted with the help of libraries, books, conference proceedings, through databases of Science Direct, PubMed, Proquest, Springer, and SID (Scientific Information Database). In our searches, we employed the following keywords and their combinations; vital sign monitoring, medical smart shirt, smart clothing, wearable biosensors, physiological monitoring system, remote detection systems, remote control health, and bio-monitoring system. The preliminary search resulted in 54 articles, which published between 2002 and 2015. After a careful analysis of the content of each paper, 41 sources selected based on their relevancy. Although the use of wearable in healthcare is still in an infant stage, it could have a magic effect on healthcare. Smart wearable in the technology industry for 2015 is one that is looking to be a big and profitable market. Wearable biosensors capable of continuous vital signs monitoring and feedback to the user will be significantly effective in timely prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and control of diseases. PMID:26958058

  10. Features and application of wearable biosensors in medical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sima Ajami

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the new technologies in the field of health is wearable biosensor, which provides vital signs monitoring of patients, athletes, premature infants, children, psychiatric patients, people who need long-term care, elderly, and people in impassable regions far from health and medical services. The aim of this study was to explain features and applications of wearable biosensors in medical services. This was a narrative review study that done in 2015. Search conducted with the help of libraries, books, conference proceedings, through databases of Science Direct, PubMed, Proquest, Springer, and SID (Scientific Information Database. In our searches, we employed the following keywords and their combinations; vital sign monitoring, medical smart shirt, smart clothing, wearable biosensors, physiological monitoring system, remote detection systems, remote control health, and bio-monitoring system. The preliminary search resulted in 54 articles, which published between 2002 and 2015. After a careful analysis of the content of each paper, 41 sources selected based on their relevancy. Although the use of wearable in healthcare is still in an infant stage, it could have a magic effect on healthcare. Smart wearable in the technology industry for 2015 is one that is looking to be a big and profitable market. Wearable biosensors capable of continuous vital signs monitoring and feedback to the user will be significantly effective in timely prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and control of diseases.

  11. Features and application of wearable biosensors in medical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajami, Sima; Teimouri, Fotooheh

    2015-12-01

    One of the new technologies in the field of health is wearable biosensor, which provides vital signs monitoring of patients, athletes, premature infants, children, psychiatric patients, people who need long-term care, elderly, and people in impassable regions far from health and medical services. The aim of this study was to explain features and applications of wearable biosensors in medical services. This was a narrative review study that done in 2015. Search conducted with the help of libraries, books, conference proceedings, through databases of Science Direct, PubMed, Proquest, Springer, and SID (Scientific Information Database). In our searches, we employed the following keywords and their combinations; vital sign monitoring, medical smart shirt, smart clothing, wearable biosensors, physiological monitoring system, remote detection systems, remote control health, and bio-monitoring system. The preliminary search resulted in 54 articles, which published between 2002 and 2015. After a careful analysis of the content of each paper, 41 sources selected based on their relevancy. Although the use of wearable in healthcare is still in an infant stage, it could have a magic effect on healthcare. Smart wearable in the technology industry for 2015 is one that is looking to be a big and profitable market. Wearable biosensors capable of continuous vital signs monitoring and feedback to the user will be significantly effective in timely prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and control of diseases.

  12. Patient Satisfaction in Malaysia’s Busiest Outpatient Medical Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurubaran Ganasegeran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to explore factors associated with patient satisfaction of outpatient medical care in Malaysia. A cross-sectional exit survey was conducted among 340 outpatients aged between 13 and 80 years after successful clinical consultations and treatment acquirements using convenience sampling at the outpatient medical care of Tengku Ampuan Rahimah Hospital (HTAR, Malaysia, being the country’s busiest medical outpatient facility. A survey that consisted of sociodemography, socioeconomic, and health characteristics and the validated Short-Form Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire (PSQ-18 scale were used. Patient satisfaction was the highest in terms of service factors or tangible priorities, particularly “technical quality” and “accessibility and convenience,” but satisfaction was low in terms of service orientation of doctors, particularly the “time spent with doctor,” “interpersonal manners,” and “communication” during consultations. Gender, income level, and purpose of visit to the clinic were important correlates of patient satisfaction. Effort to improve service orientation among doctors through periodical professional development programs at hospital and national level is essential to boost the country’s health service satisfaction.

  13. [Ambulatory medical care in Mexico: the cost for users].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arredondo, A; Nájera, P; Leyva, R

    1999-01-01

    To analyze the results of the National Health Survey (ENSA-II) as to the costs generated by the search and obtainment of ambulatory medical attention in various institutions of the private and public health sector. Information was raised from the health care cost indicators reported by the study population of the ENSA-II. The dependent variable was the direct expense for the consumer and the independent variables, the condition of being insured and the income. Variation significance levels were identified using the test by Duncan. The costs at national level in US dollar were: transport $2.20, medical visit $7.90, drugs $9.60, diagnostic studies $13.6; average total cost for ambulatory attention was $22.70. Empirical finding suggest a new direct and indirect cost-for-consumer analysis for the health care users. These costs represent an important burden on the family income, which worsens when users are not insured. Incorporation of the economic perspective to the analysis of public health issues should not be limited to the analysis of the health provider's expenses, particularly if the problems of equity and accessibility must be solved, which are at present characteristic of health care services in Mexico.

  14. Teaching Medical Students about Quality and Cost of Care at Case Western Reserve University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Headrick, Linda A.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    At Case Western University (Ohio), medical students critically analyze the quality and cost of asthma care in the community by studying patients in primary care practices. Each writes a case report, listing all medical charges and comparing them with guidelines for asthma care. Several recommendations for improved care have emerged. (MSE)

  15. Crowdfunding FOR MEDICAL CARE: Ethical Issues in an Emerging Health Care Funding Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Jeremy

    2016-11-01

    Crowdfunding websites allow users to post a public appeal for funding for a range of activities, including adoption, travel, research, participation in sports, and many others. One common form of crowdfunding is for expenses related to medical care. Medical crowdfunding appeals serve as a means of addressing gaps in medical and employment insurance, both in countries without universal health insurance, like the United States, and countries with universal coverage limited to essential medical needs, like Canada. For example, as of 2012, the website Gofundme had been used to raise a total of 8.8 million dollars (U.S.) for seventy-six hundred campaigns, the majority of which were health related. This money can make an important difference in the lives of crowdfunding users, as the costs of unexpected or uninsured medical needs can be staggering. In this article, I offer an overview of the benefits of medical crowdfunding websites and the ethical concerns they raise. I argue that medical crowdfunding is a symptom and cause of, rather than a solution to, health system injustices and that policy-makers should work to address the injustices motivating the use of crowdfunding sites for essential medical services. Despite the sites' ethical problems, individual users and donors need not refrain from using them, but they bear a political responsibility to address the inequities encouraged by these sites. I conclude by suggesting some responses to these concerns and future directions for research.

  16. Investigating concordance in diabetes diagnosis between primary care charts (electronic medical records and health administrative data: a retrospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chevendra Vijaya

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electronic medical records contain valuable clinical information not readily available elsewhere. Accordingly, they hold important potential for contributing to and enhancing chronic disease registries with the goal of improving chronic disease management; however a standard for diagnoses of conditions such as diabetes remains to be developed. The purpose of this study was to establish a validated electronic medical record definition for diabetes. Methods We constructed a retrospective cohort using health administrative data from the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences Ontario Diabetes Database linked with electronic medical records from the Deliver Primary Healthcare Information Project using data from 1 April 2006 - 31 March 2008 (N = 19,443. We systematically examined eight definitions for diabetes diagnosis, both established and proposed. Results The definition that identified the highest number of patients with diabetes (N = 2,180 while limiting to those with the highest probability of having diabetes was: individuals with ≥2 abnormal plasma glucose tests, or diabetes on the problem list, or insulin prescription, or ≥2 oral anti-diabetic agents, or HbA1c ≥6.5%. Compared to the Ontario Diabetes Database, this definition identified 13% more patients while maintaining good sensitivity (75% and specificity (98%. Conclusions This study establishes the feasibility of developing an electronic medical record standard definition of diabetes and validates an algorithm for use in this context. While the algorithm may need to be tailored to fit available data in different electronic medical records, it contributes to the establishment of validated disease registries with the goal of enhancing research, and enabling quality improvement in clinical care and patient self-management.

  17. Investigating concordance in diabetes diagnosis between primary care charts (electronic medical records) and health administrative data: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Stewart B; Glazier, Richard H; Tompkins, Jordan W; Wilton, Andrew S; Chevendra, Vijaya; Stewart, Moira A; Thind, Amardeep

    2010-12-23

    Electronic medical records contain valuable clinical information not readily available elsewhere. Accordingly, they hold important potential for contributing to and enhancing chronic disease registries with the goal of improving chronic disease management; however a standard for diagnoses of conditions such as diabetes remains to be developed. The purpose of this study was to establish a validated electronic medical record definition for diabetes. We constructed a retrospective cohort using health administrative data from the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences Ontario Diabetes Database linked with electronic medical records from the Deliver Primary Healthcare Information Project using data from 1 April 2006-31 March 2008 (N = 19,443). We systematically examined eight definitions for diabetes diagnosis, both established and proposed. The definition that identified the highest number of patients with diabetes (N = 2,180) while limiting to those with the highest probability of having diabetes was: individuals with ≥2 abnormal plasma glucose tests, or diabetes on the problem list, or insulin prescription, or ≥2 oral anti-diabetic agents, or HbA1c ≥6.5%. Compared to the Ontario Diabetes Database, this definition identified 13% more patients while maintaining good sensitivity (75%) and specificity (98%). This study establishes the feasibility of developing an electronic medical record standard definition of diabetes and validates an algorithm for use in this context. While the algorithm may need to be tailored to fit available data in different electronic medical records, it contributes to the establishment of validated disease registries with the goal of enhancing research, and enabling quality improvement in clinical care and patient self-management.

  18. The dislocation of medical dominance: making space for interprofessional care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleakley, Alan

    2013-09-01

    The historical transition of modern medicine from an autonomous profession to a team-based interprofessional practice can be described in terms of space rather than time, with "place" as the unit of analysis. Imagining modern medicine spatially was instigated by Foucault, who described medical dominance as a territorializing of both individual body spaces and public spaces--the former through the diagnostic medical gaze, the latter in a gaze of health surveillance. However, much has happened since Foucault's (1963) analysis. The diagnostic gaze has been dispersed to develop a collaborative gaze including patients and healthcare professionals; political interests have appropriated the public health gaze; and the medical profession is subject to democratic processes of accountability. Medicine has lost its territorial imperative as new "liquid" and "nomadic" work practices emerge, making space for interprofessional care. Such dislocation of medical dominance and its multiple relocations are poorly theorised. Deleuze and Guattari distinguish between "striated" and "smooth" spaces. Striated space is associated with hierarchies and boundaries, where smooth space includes boundary crossing and democratic collaboration. Smooth or liminal spaces in hospitals, such as corridors, can paradoxically act as catalysts for collaboration or assembly democracy, affording opportunities for improvised interprofessional encounters. Such encounters can act as an antidote to planned protocols or imperatives for interprofessional collaboration.

  19. Medication review and transitions of care: a case report of a decade-old medication error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comer, Rachel; Lizer, Mitsi

    2015-03-01

    A 69-year-old Caucasian male with a 25-year history of paranoid schizophrenia was brought to the emergency department because of violence toward the staff in his nursing facility. He was diagnosed with a urinary tract infection and was admitted to the behavioral health unit for medication stabilization. History included a five-year state psychiatric hospital admission and nursing facility placement. Because of poor cognitive function, the patient was unable to corroborate medication history, so the pharmacy student on rotation performed an in-depth chart review. The review revealed a transcription error in 2003 deleting amantadine 100 mg twice daily and adding amiodarone 100 mg twice daily. Subsequent hospitalization resulted in another transcription error increasing the amiodarone to 200 mg twice daily. All electrocardiograms conducted were negative for atrial fibrillation. Once detected, the consulted cardiologist discontinued the amiodarone, and the primary care provider was notified via letter and discharge papers. An admission four months later revealed that the nursing facility restarted the amiodarone. Amiodarone was discontinued and the facility was again notified. This case reviews how a 10-year-old medication error went undetected in the electronic medical records through numerous medication reconciliations, but was uncovered when a single comprehensive medication review was conducted.

  20. Opportunities to Support Medication Intake across Boundaries of Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdezoto, Nervo; Grönvall, Erik

    This paper depicts findings from a project focusing on designing medicine management support for nonclinical settings. In particular, we discuss how we can support older adults across boundaries of care in planning, informing, reminding and documenting activities. Additionally, we present opportu...... opportunities when designing for everyday medication management. We use MediFrame, a tablet based app that supports older adults in their medicine intake at home and findings from its Participatory Design process to support our argumentation.......This paper depicts findings from a project focusing on designing medicine management support for nonclinical settings. In particular, we discuss how we can support older adults across boundaries of care in planning, informing, reminding and documenting activities. Additionally, we present...

  1. Performance and palliative care: a drama module for medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey, Ewan James; Goddard, Jen; Jeffrey, David

    2012-12-01

    This paper describes an innovative 2 weeks module for medical students facilitated by drama educators and a palliative medicine doctor. The module incorporates drama, end-of-life care, teamwork and reflective practice. The module contents, practical aspects of drama teaching and learning outcomes are discussed. Various themes emerged from a study of Harold Pinter's play, The Caretaker, which were relevant to clinical practice: silence, power, communication, uncertainty and unanswered questions. Drama teaching may be one way of enhancing students' confidence, increasing self- awareness, developing ethical thinking and fostering teamworking.

  2. Defining medical information sciences: a health care science for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, S

    1984-01-01

    There exists a field; there are already researchers committed and busily at work; and there are meetings, journals, and organizations. Principal researchers in the field and those willing to lend their support should renew their efforts at crystallizing the identity of the field. In reviewing the nature of the field, there is a reasonable definition possible that is responsive to three fundamental constituents related to health care: the setting in which the care is provided, the patient to whom it is provided, and the health care professional by whom it is provided. Using these areas, we get a natural division of the field that is also historically and intuitively appealing. Using these divisions, research issues can be identified since information processing activities in the three categories become the areas to investigate. Instruction needs are similarly implied since one should have some understanding of each of these areas as part of a total health care science. In addition, understanding of the major information processing methodologies, combined with broad topics about the milieu appropriate for the professional, comprises a suitable graduate programme of study. By whatever title, the time is ripe to move forward on the enterprise to advance medical information science by self-identification and common support.

  3. Medical teleconferencing with high-definition video presentation on the 'usual' Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obuchi, Toshiro; Shima, Hiroji; Iwasaki, Akinori

    2013-06-01

    Although medical teleconferences on advanced academic networks have been common (Telemed J E Health 15:112-117, 1; Asian J Endosc Surg 3:185-188, 2; Surg Today 41:1579-1581, 3; Telemedicine development center of Asia. http://www.aqua.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp/eg/index.html . Accessed 6 March 2013, 4), reports regarding 'usual' Internet teleconferences or tele-lectures employing a telecommunication system for business use are very rare. Medical teleconferences and tele-lectures on the Internet were held three times between our institutions and other institutions, using the 'HD Com' made by Panasonic (HD Com. http://panasonic.biz/com/visual/ . Accessed 6 March 2013, 5), which is a high-definition telecommunication system for business tele-meeting. All of our medical telecommunications were successfully completed without any troubles. This system allows for all kinds of presentations using personal computers to be made from each station, so that discussions with high-definition surgical video presentation, which has recently been developed, could be effortlessly established despite the distance between institutions. Unlike telecommunication using advanced academic networks, this system can run without any need for specific engineering support, on the usual Internet. Medical telecommunication employing this system is likely to become common among ordinary hospitals in the near future.

  4. Implications of the 90-day episode definition used for the Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellimoottil, Chad; Ryan, Andrew M.; Hou, Hechuan; Dupree, James M.; Hallstrom, Brian; Miller, David C.

    2017-01-01

    Importance Under the Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement (CJR) model, hospitals are held accountable for nearly all Medicare payments that occur during the initial hospitalization through 90-days post-discharge (i.e., episode of care). It is unknown whether unrelated expenditures resulting from this “broad” episode definition will impact participating hospital’s average 90-day episode payments. Objective To compare the CJR program’s broad episode definition to a clinically-narrow episode definition Design We identified Medicare claims for patients in Michigan who underwent joint replacement from 2011 through 2013. Using specifications from the CJR model and the clinically-narrow Hospital Compare payment measure, we constructed episodes of care and calculated 90-day episode payments. We then compared hospitals’ average 90-day episode payments using the two episode definitions and fit linear regression models to understand whether payment differences were associated with specific hospital characteristics (average CMS-HCC risk score, rural hospital status, joint replacement volume, percentage of Medicaid discharges, teaching hospital status, number of beds, percentage of joint replacements performed on African American patients and median income of the hospital’s county). Setting All Michigan hospitals located in metropolitan statistical areas Participants Medicare beneficiaries Main Outcome and Measure(s) The correlation and difference between average 90-day episode payments using the broad CJR model episode definition and the clinically-narrow Hospital Compare episode definition. Results We identified 23,251 joint replacement episodes. 90-day episode payments using the broad CJR episode definition ranged from $17,349 to $29,465 (mean: $22,122, standard deviation: $2,600). Episode payments were slightly lower (mean: $21,670) when the Hospital Compare episode definition was used. Both methods were strongly correlated (r=0.99, p<0.001). The average

  5. Generic project definitions for improvement of health care delivery: A case-base approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niemeijer, G.C.; Does, R.J.M.M.; de Mast, J.; Trip, A.; van den Heuvel, J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this article is to create actionable knowledge, making the definition of process improvement projects in health care delivery more effective. Methods: This study is a retrospective analysis of process improvement projects in hospitals, facilitating a case-based reasoning a

  6. Generic project definitions for improvement of health care delivery: A case-base approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niemeijer, G.C.; Does, R.J.M.M.; de Mast, J.; Trip, A.; van den Heuvel, J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this article is to create actionable knowledge, making the definition of process improvement projects in health care delivery more effective. Methods: This study is a retrospective analysis of process improvement projects in hospitals, facilitating a case-based reasoning a

  7. Introducing managed care to the medical school curriculum: effect on student attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, T S; Baldor, R A; Casey, L M; Chuman, A; Lasser, D; Ehrlich, A; Gurwitz, J H

    1998-07-01

    In order to assess the effect of clinical training and didactic instruction on medical student attitudes toward managed care, we conducted a survey of all medical students at the midpoint of their third year clerkships at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. The students were exposed to clinical training in managed care settings and a 2-day required course on the principles underlying managed care. The main outcome measures were student attitudes toward the concepts of managed care, managed care organizations, and future careers in managed care. Students also assessed the attitudes of medical faculty toward managed care. Attitudes of students with previous clinical training in managed care settings did not differ from those of students without such exposure toward the concepts underlying managed care or managed care organizations and were less positive about careers in managed care. Student responses before and after the 2-day course on managed care demonstrated that attitudes moved in a significantly positive direction. Seventy-one percent of students reported that the opinions they had heard from medical faculty about managed care were negative. Preparing medical students to practice medicine effectively in managed care settings will require focused attention on managed care issues in the medical school curriculum and the combined efforts of academic health centers and managed care organizations.

  8. Are future medical oncologists sufficiently trained to communicate about palliative care? The medical oncology curriculum in Flanders, Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horlait, M; Van Belle, S; Leys, M

    2017-10-01

    Palliative care is considered an integral part of oncology and communicating this with patients is an unavoidable task for oncologists. This contribution investigated to what extent communication skills for communicating palliative care with patients are trained in the formal academic training program in medical oncology in Flanders, Belgium. The programme is based on the recommendations for a Global Core Curriculum in Medical Oncology, developed by The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) together with the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO). For this qualitative study, data were collected using document analysis from the ESMO/ASCO recommendations and the documents of the Flanders' medical oncology programme complemented with interviews with Flemish medical oncology trainees. Few recommendations for training communication skills to communicate about palliative care were found in the ASMO/ASCO recommendations and even less in the Flanders' programme documents. Trainees are mainly exposed to palliative care communication during the clinical practice of their training. Only very few lectures or seminars are devoted to palliative care and even less on communication about palliative care. They reported several barriers to communicate about palliative care. This study revealed promising developments for the training of Flemish medical oncologists to discuss palliative care. However, there is still a need for more theoretical training on palliative care complemented with communication skills trainings. Communication training in general needs to be fully integrated as a core skill within the medical curriculum at large and should be promoted as lifelong learning and competency development.

  9. Philosophical debates about the definition of death: who cares?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngner, S J; Arnold, R M

    2001-10-01

    Since the Harvard Committee's bold and highly successful attempt to redefine death in 1968 (Harvard Ad Hoc committee, 1968), multiple controversies have arisen. Stimulated by several factors, including the inherent conceptual weakness of the Harvard Committee's proposal, accumulated clinical experience, and the incessant push to expand the pool of potential organ donors, the lively debate about the definition of death has, for the most part, been confined to a relatively small group of academics who have created a large body of literature of which this issue of the Journal of Medicine and Philosophy is an example. Law and public policy, however, have remained essentially unaffected. This paper will briefly review the multiple controversies about defining death in an attempt to explain why they have and will remain unresolved in the academic community and have even less chance of being understood and resolved by politicians, legislators, and the general public. Considering this, we will end by suggesting the probable course of public policy and clinical practice in the decades ahead.

  10. THE ROLE OF HEALTH INSURANCE COMPANIES IN THE FINANCIAL PROVISION OF FREE MEDICAL CARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyudmila Valentinovna Tokun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the features of the mandatory health insurance, the financial resources of health care and the characteristics of the Russian health care system. The article defines the need to apply the SWOT-analysis to the activities of medical organizations, it analyses the interconnection between the criteria of quality, availability and payment for services and their accordance to the sector of economics, which produces or pays for the service. Goal / Objectives: The goal of this article is to study the compulsory health insurance system, its pros and cons in the health system. The objectives of this paper is to identify the sources of financing of compulsory health insurance, the definition of the stages of formation of financial flows, the designation of the role of insurance companies in the compulsory health insurance system, the study of the processes of formation of funds of health insurance companies, the definition of the role of the compulsory health insurance in the risk protection and study of the positive and negative aspects of the modern health care system. Methodology: Methods of comparison, analysis and synthesis are used in this article. Results: as a result of the conducted research authors have made conclusions about the need for the major changes in the financing of public health care. The scope of work of health insurance companies requires increase in number of staff , premises, additional hardware and software. Health insurance companies should be motivated to maintain the health of the population and its improvement. Conclusions: The results of this research can be used to build a system of motivation in the health insurance organizations.

  11. Medical Care Provided Under California's Workers' Compensation Program: Effects of the Reforms and Additional Opportunities to Improve the Quality and Efficiency of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, Barbara O; Timbie, Justin W; Sorbero, Melony E

    2011-01-01

    Since 2004, significant changes have been made to the California workers' compensation (WC) system. The Commission on Health and Safety and Workers' Compensation (CHSWC) asked the RAND Corporation to examine the impact that these changes have on the medical care provided to injured workers. This study synthesizes findings from interviews and available information regarding the implementation of the changes affecting WC medical care and identifies areas in which additional changes might increase the quality and efficiency of care delivered under the WC system. To improve incentives for efficiently providing medically appropriate care, California should revise its fee schedule allowances for services provided by hospitals to inpatients, freestanding ambulatory surgery centers, and physicians, create nonmonetary incentives for providing medically appropriate care in the medical provider network (MPN) context through more-selective contracting with providers and reducing medical review requirements for high-performing physicians; reduce incentives for inappropriate prescribing practices by curtailing in-office physician dispensing; and implement pharmacy benefit network regulations. To increase accountability for performance, California should revise the MPN certification process to place accountability for meeting MPN standards on the entity contracting with the physician network; strengthen Division of Workers' Compensation (DWC) authorities to provide intermediate sanctions for failure to comply with MPN requirements; and modify the Labor Code to remove payers and MPNs from the definition of individually identifiable data so that performance on key measures can be publicly available. To facilitate monitoring and oversight, California should provide DWC with more flexibility to add needed data elements to medical data reporting and provide penalties for a claim administrator failing to comply with the data-reporting requirements; require that medical cost

  12. Primary health care models: medical students’ knowledge and perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Judith Belle; French, Reta; McCulloch, Amy; Clendinning, Eric

    2012-03-01

    To explore the knowledge and perceptions of fourth-year medical students regarding the new models of primary health care (PHC) and to ascertain whether that knowledge influenced their decisions to pursue careers in family medicine. Qualitative study using semistructured interviews. The Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry at The University of Western Ontario in London. Participants Fourth-year medical students graduating in 2009 who indicated family medicine as a possible career choice on their Canadian Residency Matching Service applications. Eleven semistructured interviews were conducted between January and April of 2009. Data were analyzed using an iterative and interpretive approach. The analysis strategy of immersion and crystallization assisted in synthesizing the data to provide a comprehensive view of key themes and overarching concepts. Four key themes were identified: the level of students’ knowledge regarding PHC models varied; the knowledge was generally obtained from practical experiences rather than classroom learning; students could identify both advantages and disadvantages of working within the new PHC models; and although students regarded the new PHC models positively, these models did not influence their decisions to pursue careers in family medicine. Knowledge of the new PHC models varies among fourth-year students, indicating a need for improved education strategies in the years before clinical training. Being able to identify advantages and disadvantages of the PHC models was not enough to influence participants’ choice of specialty. Educators and health care policy makers need to determine the best methods to promote and facilitate knowledge transfer about these PHC models.

  13. Pediatric palliative care and pediatric medical ethics: opportunities and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feudtner, Chris; Nathanson, Pamela G

    2014-02-01

    The fields of pediatric palliative care (PPC) and pediatric medical ethics (PME) overlap substantially, owing to a variety of historical, cultural, and social factors. This entwined relationship provides opportunities for leveraging the strong communication skills of both sets of providers, as well as the potential for resource sharing and research collaboration. At the same time, the personal and professional relationships between PPC and PME present challenges, including potential conflict with colleagues, perceived or actual bias toward a palliative care perspective in resolving ethical problems, potential delay or underuse of PME services, and a potential undervaluing of the medical expertise required for PPC consultation. We recommend that these challenges be managed by: (1) clearly defining and communicating clinical roles of PPC and PME staff, (2) developing questions that may prompt PPC and PME teams to request consultation from the other service, (3) developing explicit recusal criteria for PPC providers who also provide PME consultation, (4) ensuring that PPC and PME services remain organizationally distinct, and (5) developing well-defined and broad scopes of practice. Overall, the rich relationship between PPC and PME offers substantial opportunities to better serve patients and families facing difficult decisions.

  14. [Participation as Target of Social Medicine and Nursing Care: - Legal Definition of Long-Term Care Dependency - Strategies to Prevent Long-Term Care Dependency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nüchtern, Elisabeth; Gansweid, Barbara; Gerber, Hans; von Mittelstaedt, Gert

    2017-01-01

    Objective: By the "Second Bill to Strengthen Long-Term Care", a new concept of long-term care dependency will be introduced, valid from 2017. Long-term care dependency according to Social Code XI will be defined covering more aspects than today. Therefore, the working group "Nursing Care" of the division "Social Medicine in Practice and Rehabilitation" in the German Society for Social Medicine and Prevention presents their results after working on the social medicine perspective of the definition and prevention of long-term care dependency. Methods: Both the definition and strategies to prevent long-term care dependency are systematically taken into consideration from the point of view of social medicine on the basis of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), as long-term care dependency means a defined condition of disability. Results: Both the current and the new concept of long-term care dependency focus activity limitations. The perspective of social medicine considers the interactions of health condition, its effects on daily activities and personal as well as environmental factors. From this point of view approaches for social benefits concerning prevention and rehabilitation can be identified systematically so as to work against the development and progression of long-term care dependency. The reference to the ICF can facilitate the communication between different professions. The new "graduation" of long-term care dependency would allow an international "translation" referring to the ICF. Conclusion: Experts from the field of social medicine as well as those of nursing care, care-givers and nursing researchers have in common the objective that persons in need of nursing care can participate in as many aspects of life of importance to them in an autonomous and self-determined way. The point of view of social medicine on long-term care dependency is fundamental for all occupational groups that are involved and for their

  15. [Challenges for the future of psychiatry and psychiatric medical care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Teruhiko

    2013-01-01

    In addition to the prolonged economic recession and global financial crisis, the Great East Japan Earthquake of March 2011 has caused great fear and devastation in Japan. In the midst of these, Japanese people have felt to lose the traditional values and common sense they used to share, and it has become necessary to build a new consciousness. Engaged in psychiatry and psychiatric care under these circumstances, we have to analyze the challenges we face and to brainstorm on appropriate prescriptions that can be applied to solve the problems. Five points in particular were brought up: [1] The persistently high number of suicides. [2] The increase in depression and overflowing numbers of patients visiting clinics and outpatient departments at hospitals. [3] The absolute shortage of child psychiatrists. [4] Little progress with the transition from hospitalization-centered to community-centered medical care. [5] The disappearance of beds for psychiatry patients from general hospitals. The situations surrounding these five issues were briefly analyzed and problems were pointed out. The following are five problems that psychiatry is facing: 1) A lack of large clinical trials compared to the rest of the world. 2) The drug lag and handling of global trials. 3) The lack of staff involved in education and research (in the field of psychiatry). 4) Following the DSM diagnostic criteria dogmatically, without differentiating therapeutics. 5) Other medical departments, the industry, patients, and their families are demanding objective diagnostic techniques. After analyzing the problems, and discussing to some extent what kind of prescription may be considered to solve the problems, I gave my opinion. (1) The first problem is the deep-rooted prejudice and discrimination against psychiatric disorders that continue to be present among Japanese people. The second problem is the government's policy of low remuneration (fees) for psychiatric services. The third problem, symbolic of the

  16. Acute Cardiovascular Care Association Position Paper on Intensive Cardiovascular Care Units: An update on their definition, structure, organisation and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnefoy-Cudraz, Eric; Bueno, Hector; Casella, Gianni; De Maria, Elia; Fitzsimons, Donna; Halvorsen, Sigrun; Hassager, Christian; Iakobishvili, Zaza; Magdy, Ahmed; Marandi, Toomas; Mimoso, Jorge; Parkhomenko, Alexander; Price, Susana; Rokyta, Richard; Roubille, Francois; Serpytis, Pranas; Shimony, Avi; Stepinska, Janina; Tint, Diana; Trendafilova, Elina; Tubaro, Marco; Vrints, Christiaan; Walker, David; Zahger, Doron; Zima, Endre; Zukermann, Robert; Lettino, Maddalena

    2017-08-01

    Acute cardiovascular care has progressed considerably since the last position paper was published 10 years ago. It is now a well-defined, complex field with demanding multidisciplinary teamworking. The Acute Cardiovascular Care Association has provided this update of the 2005 position paper on acute cardiovascular care organisation, using a multinational working group. The patient population has changed, and intensive cardiovascular care units now manage a large range of conditions from those simply requiring specialised monitoring, to critical cardiovascular diseases with associated multi-organ failure. To describe better intensive cardiovascular care units case mix, acuity of care has been divided into three levels, and then defining intensive cardiovascular care unit functional organisation. For each level of intensive cardiovascular care unit, this document presents the aims of the units, the recommended management structure, the optimal number of staff, the need for specially trained cardiologists and cardiovascular nurses, the desired equipment and architecture, and the interaction with other departments in the hospital and other intensive cardiovascular care units in the region/area. This update emphasises cardiologist training, referring to the recently updated Acute Cardiovascular Care Association core curriculum on acute cardiovascular care. The training of nurses in acute cardiovascular care is additionally addressed. Intensive cardiovascular care unit expertise is not limited to within the unit's geographical boundaries, extending to different specialties and subspecialties of cardiology and other specialties in order to optimally manage the wide scope of acute cardiovascular conditions in frequently highly complex patients. This position paper therefore addresses the need for the inclusion of acute cardiac care and intensive cardiovascular care units within a hospital network, linking university medical centres, large community hospitals, and smaller

  17. [Medical care for asylum seekers and refugees at the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf--A case series].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sothmann, Peter; Schmedt auf der Günne, Nina; Addo, Marylyn; Lohse, Ansgar; Schmiedel, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    As the number of refugees rises, medical care for refugees, asylum seekers and people with unclear residence status becomes a priority task for our health system. While access to health care is restricted for these groups of people in many German states, Hamburg provides unrestricted access to healthcare for refugees by handing out health insurance cards on arrival. Daily practice shows, however, that adequate medical care is still not always easy to achieve. In this case series we demonstrate that barriers to health care still exist on many levels. We discuss these barriers and further propose strategies to improve and to secure access to adequate health care.

  18. The longitudinal primary care clerkship at Harvard Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, A S; Feins, A; Rubin, R; Seward, S; Schnaidt, K; Fletcher, R H

    2001-05-01

    The primary care clerkship (PCC) at Harvard Medical School was established in 1997. The goals are to provide students with longitudinal experiences with patients and to include modern themes in the curriculum: managing illness and clinical relationships over time; finding the best available answers to clinical questions; preventing illness and promoting health; dealing with clinical uncertainty; getting the best outcomes with available resources; working in a health care team; and sharing decision making with patients. The PCC, a required course in the clinical years, meets one afternoon a week for nine months. Students spend three afternoons per month in primary care practices, where they see three to five patients per session and follow at least one patient ("longitudinal patient") over time. Classroom sessions, in both large- and small-group formats, promote a common educational philosophy and experience, and reinforce habits of problem-based learning established in the preclinical years. The students rated 74% of their preceptors excellent, especially praising their ability to facilitate and support good interpersonal relationships with patients, their ability to encourage students' independent evaluation of patients (as opposed to shadowing), and their enthusiasm for teaching. Students saw their longitudinal patients a mean of 4.8 times; 83% saw their patients at least three times. The PCC complements the curriculum of block clerkships in hospitals, and because the two are offered concurrently, students are required to come to terms with two substantially different cultures within medicine. Other medical schools are beginning to develop longitudinal clerkships to ensure that students have essential educational experiences that are difficult to achieve in block, hospital-based clerkships.

  19. Sustainability of professionals’ adherence to clinical practice guidelines in medical care: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ament, Stephanie M C; de Groot, Jeanny J A; Maessen, José M C; Dirksen, Carmen D; van der Weijden, Trudy; Kleijnen, Jos

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate (1) the state of the art in sustainability research and (2) the outcomes of professionals’ adherence to guideline recommendations in medical practice. Design Systematic review. Data sources Searches were conducted until August 2015 in MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) and the Guidelines International Network (GIN) library. A snowball strategy, in which reference sections of other reviews and of included papers were searched, was used to identify additional papers. Eligibility criteria Studies needed to be focused on sustainability and on professionals’ adherence to clinical practice guidelines in medical care. Studies had to include at least 2 measurements: 1 before (PRE) or immediately after implementation (EARLY POST) and 1 measurement longer than 1 year after active implementation (LATE POST). Results The search retrieved 4219 items, of which 14 studies met the inclusion criteria, involving 18 sustainability evaluations. The mean timeframe between the end of active implementation and the sustainability evaluation was 2.6 years (minimum 1.5–maximum 7.0). The studies were heterogeneous with respect to their methodology. Sustainability was considered to be successful if performance in terms of professionals’ adherence was fully maintained in the late postimplementation phase. Long-term sustainability of professionals’ adherence was reported in 7 out of 18 evaluations, adherence was not sustained in 6 evaluations, 4 evaluations showed mixed sustainability results and in 1 evaluation it was unclear whether the professional adherence was sustained. Conclusions (2) Professionals’ adherence to a clinical practice guideline in medical care decreased after more than 1 year after implementation in about half of the cases. (1) Owing to the limited number of studies, the absence of a uniform definition, the high risk of bias, and the mixed results of studies, no firm conclusion about the

  20. Preventing medication errors in transitions of care: A patient case approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ashley; Guirguis, Erenie; Grace, Yasmin

    2015-01-01

    To discuss common causes of medication errors occurring upon transitions of care and review key interventions that should be implemented to ensure effective communication and accurate completion of medication reconciliation. MEDLINE (1946 to November 2014) using MeSH terms medication errors, medication reconciliation, and nursing homes in addition to conventional text words, including transitions of care and medication safety; Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Network using search terms transitions of care, medication errors, and medication reconciliation; and relevant websites of national organizations pertaining to transitions of care and medication reconciliation. Limited to English-language journals with no limitation set on the year of publication for clinical trials, meta-analyses, and reviews. At the authors' discretion, preference was given to references focusing on pharmacists' role in transitions of care and medication reconciliation. Most medication errors stem from a lack of effective communication between health care providers during transitions of care. Part of successful communication and correct patient hand-off is completing accurate medication reconciliation. A patient case highlights a life-threatening medication error that occurred during a transition of care due to ineffective communication between a pharmacist and nurse while transferring medication information. To provide patients with accurate medication information, pharmacists should perform medication reconciliation upon transitions of care using The Joint Commission's five-step process. Pharmacists can conduct numerous interventions to prevent medication errors during transitions of care and ensure patient safety. Pharmacists are integral to evaluating the appropriateness of medication use, ensuring information is updated in the health record, and verbally communicating accurate information to other health professionals.

  1. A study of medication errors in a tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nrupal Patel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the nature and types of medication errors (MEs, to evaluate occurrence of drug-drug interactions (DDIs, and assess rationality of prescription orders in a tertiary care teaching hospital. Materials and Methods: A prospective, observational study was conducted in General Medicine and Pediatric ward of Civil Hospital, Ahmedabad during October 2012 to January 2014. MEs were categorized as prescription error, dispensing error, and administration error (AE. The case records and treatment charts were reviewed. The investigator also accompanied the staff nurse during the ward rounds and interviewed patients or care taker to gather information, if necessary. DDIs were assessed by Medscape Drug Interaction Checker software (version 4.4. Rationality of prescriptions was assessed using Phadke′s criteria. Results: A total of 1109 patients (511 in Medicine and 598 in Pediatric ward were included during the study period. Total number of MEs was 403 (36% of which, 195 (38% were in Medicine and 208 (35% were in Pediatric wards. The most common ME was PEs 262 (65% followed by AEs 126 (31%. A potential significant DDIs were observed in 191 (17% and serious DDIs in 48 (4% prescriptions. Majority of prescriptions were semirational 555 (53% followed by irrational 317 (30%, while 170 (17% prescriptions were rational. Conclusion: There is a need to establish ME reporting system to reduce its incidence and improve patient care and safety.

  2. Mental health provider perspectives regarding integrated medical care for patients with serious mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbourne, Amy M; Greenwald, Devra E; Bauer, Mark S; Charns, Martin P; Yano, Elizabeth M

    2012-11-01

    Integrated care for medical conditions is essential for persons with serious mental illness (SMI). This qualitative study describes mental health provider perspectives regarding barriers and facilitators of integrated care for patients with SMI. We interviewed providers from a national sample of Veterans Health Administration facilities that scored in the top or bottom percentile in medical care quality. Providers from high-performing sites reported substantial in-person contacts with general medical providers, while providers from low-performing sites reported stigma and limited communication with medical providers as major concerns. Interventions to improve mental health and medical provider communication may facilitate integrated care for persons with SMI.

  3. Patient Satisfaction with Hospital Inpatient Care: Effects of Trust, Medical Insurance and Perceived Quality of Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qunhong; Liu, Chaojie; Jiao, Mingli; Hao, Yanhua; Han, Yuzhen; Gao, Lijun; Hao, Jiejing; Wang, Lan; Xu, Weilan; Ren, Jiaojiao

    2016-01-01

    Objective Deteriorations in the patient-provider relationship in China have attracted increasing attention in the international community. This study aims to explore the role of trust in patient satisfaction with hospital inpatient care, and how patient-provider trust is shaped from the perspectives of both patients and providers. Methods We adopted a mixed methods approach comprising a multivariate logistic regression model using secondary data (1200 people with inpatient experiences over the past year) from the fifth National Health Service Survey (NHSS, 2013) in Heilongjiang Province to determine the associations between patient satisfaction and trust, financial burden and perceived quality of care, followed by in-depth interviews with 62 conveniently selected key informants (27 from health and 35 from non-health sectors). A thematic analysis established a conceptual framework to explain deteriorating patient-provider relationships. Findings About 24% of respondents reported being dissatisfied with hospital inpatient care. The logistic regression model indicated that patient satisfaction was positively associated with higher level of trust (OR = 14.995), lower levels of hospital medical expenditure (OR = 5.736–1.829 as compared with the highest quintile of hospital expenditure), good staff attitude (OR = 3.155) as well as good ward environment (OR = 2.361). But patient satisfaction was negatively associated with medical insurance for urban residents and other insurance status (OR = 0.215–0.357 as compared with medical insurance for urban employees). The qualitative analysis showed that patient trust—the most significant predictor of patient satisfaction—is shaped by perceived high quality of service delivery, empathic and caring interpersonal interactions, and a better designed medical insurance that provides stronger financial protection and enables more equitable access to health care. Conclusion At the core of high levels of patient dissatisfaction

  4. Readmission to medical intensive care units: risk factors and prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Yong Suk; Lee, Yeon Joo; Park, Jong Sun; Yoon, Ho Il; Lee, Jae Ho; Lee, Choon-Taek; Cho, Young-Jae

    2015-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to find factors related to medical intensive care unit (ICU) readmission and to develop a prediction index for determining patients who are likely to be readmitted to medical ICUs. We performed a retrospective cohort study of 343 consecutive patients who were admitted to the medical ICU of a single medical center from January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2012. We analyzed a broad range of patients' characteristics on the day of admission, extubation, and discharge from the ICU. Of the 343 patients discharged from the ICU alive, 33 (9.6%) were readmitted to the ICU unexpectedly. Using logistic regression analysis, the verified factors associated with increased risk of ICU readmission were male sex [odds ratio (OR) 3.17, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.29-8.48], history of diabetes mellitus (OR 3.03, 95% CI 1.29-7.09), application of continuous renal replacement therapy during ICU stay (OR 2.78, 95% CI 0.85-9.09), white blood cell count on the day of extubation (OR 1.13, 95% CI 1.07-1.21), and heart rate just before ICU discharge (OR 1.03, 95% CI 1.01-1.06). We established a prediction index for ICU readmission using the five verified risk factors (area under the curve, 0.76, 95% CI 0.66-0.86). By using specific risk factors associated with increased readmission to the ICU, a numerical index could be established as an estimation tool to predict the risk of ICU readmission.

  5. Pattern and cost of medical care for workers with schistosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamel, M I; Ghafar, Y A; Foda, N; Moemen, M

    2001-04-01

    This study describes the pattern of medical care provided to workers with schistosomiasis, estimate the total medical cost and to identify the proportional rates of sickness retirement attributed to schistosomiasis. The observational approach was adopted for this study 170 schistosomiasis workers and a similar number of controls were included in this study. An interviewing schedule and a special format were designed for collecting personal, medical and early retirement data. The results revealed that the mean total cost in the outpatient clinics was significantly higher for schistosomiasis workers than their controls (320.2 " 330.11 versus 210.8 " 260.01 L.E). The hospital cost was also higher for schistosomiasis workers compared with their controls (265.9 " 674.47 vs 195.8 " 629.72 L.E) but this differencewas not statistically significant. More than 80% of the total hospital cost was spent on bed cost. The average operative cost/worker was significantly higher among the schistosomiasis workers than the control workers (7.08 " 22.07 vs 2.35 " 5.2 L.E). The total medical cost (outpatient and hospital) was significantly higher for workers with schistosomiasis compared with their controls (586.02" 845.77 vs 406.57 " 694.34). The total number of workers who retired because of sickness disability other than schistosomiasis increased from 1994 to 1998 with a ratio of 2.54 while those who retired because of schistosomiasis and its complications increased with a ratio of 3.64.

  6. Medical Students' Opinions on Economic Aspects of the Health Care System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Mary W.

    1985-01-01

    Responses of 423 freshmen and 410 seniors at Jefferson Medical College to 15 questions on economic aspects of health care were compared. A majority of students considered major problems to be costs of medical care and medical education, malpractice claims, and patients' failure to assume responsibility for their health. (Author/SW)

  7. 38 CFR 17.52 - Hospital care and medical services in non-VA facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... or equipped to perform, and transfer to a public or private hospital which has the necessary staff or... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hospital care and medical... VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Use of Public Or Private Hospitals § 17.52 Hospital care and medical services in...

  8. Community health worker integration into the health care team accomplishes the triple aim in a patient-centered medical home: a Bronx tale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findley, Sally; Matos, Sergio; Hicks, April; Chang, Ji; Reich, Douglas

    2014-01-01

    Community health workers are ideally suited to the care coordination niche within the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) team, but there are few case studies detailing how to accomplish this integration. This qualitative study documents how community health workers (CHWs) were integrated into a PCMH in South Bronx, New York. Results show that integration was linked to clear definition of their care coordination role within the care team, meticulous recruitment, training and supervision by a senior CHW, shared leadership of the care management team, and documented value for money. By helping the team understand patients' backgrounds, constraints, and preferences, they helped everyone genuinely focus on the patient.

  9. Fly-By medical care: Conceptualizing the global and local social responsibilities of medical tourists and physician voluntourists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Jeremy; Dharamsi, Shafik; Crooks, Valorie A

    2011-04-06

    Medical tourism is a global health practice where patients travel abroad to receive health care. Voluntourism is a practice where physicians travel abroad to deliver health care. Both of these practices often entail travel from high income to low and middle income countries and both have been associated with possible negative impacts. In this paper, we explore the social responsibilities of medical tourists and voluntourists to identify commonalities and distinctions that can be used to develop a wider understanding of social responsibility in global health care practices. Social responsibility is a responsibility to promote the welfare of the communities to which one belongs or with which one interacts. Physicians stress their social responsibility to care for the welfare of their patients and their domestic communities. When physicians choose to travel to another county to provide medical care, this social responsibility is expanded to this new community. Patients too have a social responsibility to use their community's health resources efficiently and to promote the health of their community. When these patients choose to go abroad to receive medical care, this social responsibility applies to the new community as well. While voluntourists and medical tourists both see the scope of their social responsibilities expand by engaging in these global practices, the social responsibilities of physician voluntourists are much better defined than those of medical tourists. Guidelines for engaging in ethical voluntourism and training for voluntourists still need better development, but medical tourism as a practice should follow the lead of voluntourism by developing clearer norms for ethical medical tourism. Much can be learned by examining the social responsibilities of medical tourists and voluntourists when they engage in global health practices. While each group needs better guidance for engaging in responsible forms of these practices, patients are at a

  10. Definición del problema de la calidad de la atención médica y su abordaje científico: un modelo para la realidad mexicana A scientific approach to the definition of quality in medical care: a model for Mexican reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando M. Ramírez

    1995-09-01

    Full Text Available El presente estudio tiene como objetivo analizar el problema de la calidad de la atención médica en México, así como la evolución de la misma en las diferentes instituciones prestadoras de servicios de salud, y concluye que las estrategias de garantía de calidad de tipo descentralizado–participativo son la mejor opción para abordar el problema de la calidad en países como el nuestro, y que cualquier programa de calidad debe incluir cinco elementos fundamentales: La evaluación. la monitoréa, el diseño, el desarrollo y el cambio organizacional.This paper analyzes the problem of quality of medical care and its evolution in various health service institutions. It concludes that quality strategies for countries like Mexico should be of the decentralized/participant type, and that all quality programs in medical care should include five fundamental elements: evaluation, monitoring, design, development, and organizational change.

  11. Health Insurance, Medical Care, and Health Outcomes: A Model of Elderly Health Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhou; Gilleskie, Donna B.; Norton, Edward C.

    2009-01-01

    Prescription drug coverage creates a change in medical care consumption, beyond standard moral hazard, arising both from the differential cost-sharing and the relative effectiveness of different types of care. We model the dynamic supplemental health insurance decisions of Medicare beneficiaries, their medical care demand, and subsequent health…

  12. 48 CFR 831.7001-4 - Medical services and hospital care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... hospital care. 831.7001-4 Section 831.7001-4 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS... and Procedures 831.7001-4 Medical services and hospital care. (a) VA may pay the customary student... Government. (b) When the customary student's health fee does not cover medical services or hospital care, but...

  13. Health Insurance, Medical Care, and Health Outcomes: A Model of Elderly Health Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhou; Gilleskie, Donna B.; Norton, Edward C.

    2009-01-01

    Prescription drug coverage creates a change in medical care consumption, beyond standard moral hazard, arising both from the differential cost-sharing and the relative effectiveness of different types of care. We model the dynamic supplemental health insurance decisions of Medicare beneficiaries, their medical care demand, and subsequent health…

  14. Positive predictive value of a case definition for diabetes mellitus using automated administrative health data in children and youth exposed to antipsychotic drugs or control medications: a Tennessee Medicaid study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobo William V

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We developed and validated an automated database case definition for diabetes in children and youth to facilitate pharmacoepidemiologic investigations of medications and the risk of diabetes. Methods The present study was part of an in-progress retrospective cohort study of antipsychotics and diabetes in Tennessee Medicaid enrollees aged 6–24 years. Diabetes was identified from diabetes-related medical care encounters: hospitalizations, outpatient visits, and filled prescriptions. The definition required either a primary inpatient diagnosis or at least two other encounters of different types, most commonly an outpatient diagnosis with a prescription. Type 1 diabetes was defined by insulin prescriptions with at most one oral hypoglycemic prescription; other cases were considered type 2 diabetes. The definition was validated for cohort members in the 15 county region geographically proximate to the investigators. Medical records were reviewed and adjudicated for cases that met the automated database definition as well as for a sample of persons with other diabetes-related medical care encounters. Results The study included 64 cases that met the automated database definition. Records were adjudicated for 46 (71.9%, of which 41 (89.1% met clinical criteria for newly diagnosed diabetes. The positive predictive value for type 1 diabetes was 80.0%. For type 2 and unspecified diabetes combined, the positive predictive value was 83.9%. The estimated sensitivity of the definition, based on adjudication for a sample of 30 cases not meeting the automated database definition, was 64.8%. Conclusion These results suggest that the automated database case definition for diabetes may be useful for pharmacoepidemiologic studies of medications and diabetes.

  15. "Basic Medical Skills" - Evaluation of a primary care oriented course concept within the new medical curriculum in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fischer, Thomas

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: To increase the practical orientation of medical student education in Germany, we have introduced a new mandatory course into the 3rd study year. This course combines doctor-patient communication training sessions with practical skills such as taking blood, changing dressings, etc. The primary care point of view to these topics was emphasized. The study describes the course and an evaluation of its effects on basic medical skills.Methods: Learning progress was measured using an anonymous self-evaluation questionnaire. Students graded their own competence in each individual course element using a 1-6 point scale (1='excellent' to 6='insufficient'. To objectify the learning process with regards to both practical skills and communicative competence we performed an "Objective Structured Clinical Examination" (OSCE.Results: Complete data are available from 154 of the 193 students participating in the course (average age 23.7 ±2.7 years. With regards to their competence in taking a case history, participants rated themselves with an average score of 3.99 before the course and an improved average score of 2.42 afterwards (P<0.0001. Students gave themselves credit for definite improvement in practical skills as well. Neither gender, age nor earlier medical training had any effect of the self-evaluation. Results of self-reported questionnaires corresponded well with the test results of the OSCE (N=193. Female students had significantly better results in the global rating in the communicative sections of the OSCE test than their male counterparts. Overall, the general evaluation of the course (grade 1.93 and its value for later medical competence (1.97 were very high in comparison to the average values for medical seminars at this university.Conclusion: We found high effects on clinical competence both in self-reported evaluations of the course and in the OSCE. A longitudinal study is under way in order to investigate to what

  16. The integration of a telemental health service into rural primary medical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, G L; Boulger, J G; Hovland, J C; Hoven, N T

    2007-07-01

    Mental health care shortages in rural areas have resulted in the majority of services being offered through primary medical care settings. The authors argue that a paradigm shift must occur so that those in need of mental health care have reasonable, timely access to these services. Changes proposed include integrating mental health services into primary medical care settings, moving away from the traditional view of mental health care services (one therapist, one hour, and one client), and increasing the consultative role of psychologists and other mental health care providers in primary medical care. Characteristics of mental health providers that facilitate effective integration into primary medical care are presented. The results of a needs assessment survey and an example of a telemental health project are described. This project involved brief consultations with patients and their physicians from a shared care model using a broadband internet telecommunications link between a rural clinic and mental health service providers in an urban area.

  17. Medication management policy, practice and research in Australian residential aged care: Current and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluggett, Janet K; Ilomäki, Jenni; Seaman, Karla L; Corlis, Megan; Bell, J Simon

    2017-02-01

    Eight percent of Australians aged 65 years and over receive residential aged care each year. Residents are increasingly older, frailer and have complex care needs on entry to residential aged care. Up to 63% of Australian residents of aged care facilities take nine or more medications regularly. Together, these factors place residents at high risk of adverse drug events. This paper reviews medication-related policies, practices and research in Australian residential aged care. Complex processes underpin prescribing, supply and administration of medications in aged care facilities. A broad range of policies and resources are available to assist health professionals, aged care facilities and residents to optimise medication management. These include national guiding principles, a standardised national medication chart, clinical medication reviews and facility accreditation standards. Recent Australian interventions have improved medication use in residential aged care facilities. Generating evidence for prescribing and deprescribing that is specific to residential aged care, health workforce reform, medication-related quality indicators and inter-professional education in aged care are important steps toward optimising medication use in this setting.

  18. The medical home, preventive care screenings, and counseling for children: evidence from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaire, Melissa A; Bell, Janice F

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about the role of the medical home in promoting essential preventive health care services in the general pediatric population. This study examined associations between having a medical home and receipt of health screenings and anticipatory guidance. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of the 2004-2006 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS). Our sample included 21 055 children aged 0 to 17 years who visited a health care provider in the year prior to the survey. A binary indicator of the medical home was developed from 22 questions in MEPS, reflecting 4 of the 7 American Academy of Pediatrics' recommended components of the medical home: accessible, family-centered, comprehensive, and compassionate care. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine the association between the medical home and receipt of specific health screenings and anticipatory guidance, controlling for confounding variables. Approximately 49% of our study sample has a medical home. The medical home, defined when the usual source of care is a person or facility, is significantly associated with 3 health screenings (ie, weight, height, and blood pressure) and several anticipatory guidance topics (ie, advice about dental checkups, diet, exercise, car and bike safety), with odds ratios ranging from 1.26 to 1.54. The medical home is associated with increased odds of children receiving some health screenings and anticipatory guidance. The medical home may provide an opportunity to improve the delivery of these services for children. Copyright 2010 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Medication transitions and polypharmacy in older adults following acute care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamble JM

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available John-Michael Gamble,1,* Jill J Hall,2,* Thomas J Marrie,3 Cheryl A Sadowski,2 Sumit R Majumdar,4 Dean T Eurich5 1School of Pharmacy, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St John's, NL, 2Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, 3Faculty of Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, 4Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, 5School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada *These authors contributed equally to this work Background/objective: Medication changes at transitions of care and polypharmacy are growing concerns that adversely impact optimal drug use. We aimed to describe transitions and patterns of medication use before and 1 year after older patients were hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia, the second-most common reason for admission in North America. Materials and methods: This was an analysis of a population-based clinical registry of patients treated in any of the six hospitals or seven emergency departments in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, comprising 2,105 patients 65 years and older with community-acquired pneumonia who had survived at least 1 year. The prevalence of polypharmacy (five or more unique prescription drugs, as well as new use and persistence of common drug classes were assessed. Results: The mean age was 78 years (standard deviation 8 years, 50% were female, 62% were hospitalized, and 58% had severe pneumonia. Among the 2,105 patients, 949 (45% were using five or more medications prior to hospitalization, increasing to 1,559 (74% within 90 days postdischarge and remaining over 70% at 1 year. Overall, 1,690 (80% patients newly started and 1,553 (74% patients stopped at least one medication in the first 90 days of follow-up. The prevalence of the most common drug classes (ie, cardiovascular, alimentary/metabolism remained stable, with the exception of anti-infective agents, whereby 25% of patients were dispensed an anti-infective agent 3 months to 1 year

  20. Medical Management and Trauma-Informed Care for Children in Foster Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Samantha; Fortin, Kristine; Forkey, Heather

    2015-10-01

    Children enter foster care with a myriad of exposures and experiences, which can threaten their physical and mental health and development. Expanding evidence and evolving guidelines have helped to shape the care of these children over the past two decades. These guidelines address initial health screening, comprehensive medical evaluations, and follow-up care. Information exchange, attention to exposures, and consideration of how the adversities, which lead to foster placement, can impact health is crucial. These children should be examined with a trauma lens, so that the child, caregiver, and community supports can be assisted to view their physical and behavioral health from the perspective of what we now understand about the impact of toxic stress. Health care providers can impact the health of foster children by screening for the negative health consequences of trauma, advocating for trauma-informed services, and providing trauma-informed anticipatory guidance to foster parents. By taking an organized and comprehensive approach, the health care provider can best attend to the needs of this vulnerable population. Copyright © 2015 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Attributes of advanced practice registered nurse care coordination for children with medical complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cady, Rhonda G; Kelly, Anne M; Finkelstein, Stanley M; Looman, Wendy S; Garwick, Ann W

    2014-01-01

    Care coordination is an essential component of the pediatric health care home. This study investigated the attributes of relationship-based advanced practice registered nurse care coordination for children with medical complexity enrolled in a tertiary hospital-based health care home. Retrospective review of 2,628 care coordination episodes conducted by telehealth over a consecutive 3-year time period for 27 children indicated that parents initiated the majority of episodes and the most frequent reason was acute and chronic condition management. During this period, care coordination episodes tripled, with a significant increase (p care coordination model has potential for changing the health management processes for children with medical complexity.

  2. Focusing on Patient Safety: the Challenge of Securely Sharing Electronic Medical Records in Complex Care Continuums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Key, Diana; Ferneini, Elie M

    2015-09-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act's (PPACA) regulated approach to inclusive provision of care will increase the challenge health care administrators face ensuring secure communication and secure sharing of electronic medical records between divisions and care subcontractors. This analysis includes a summary overview of the PPACA; the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act (HCERA) of 2010; and required Essential Health Benefits (EHB). The analysis integrates an overview of how secure communication and secure sharing of electronic medical records will be essential to clinical outcomes across complex care continuums; as well as the actionable strategies health care leadership can employ to overcome associated IT security challenges.

  3. Electromagnetic interference from radio frequency identification inducing potentially hazardous incidents in critical care medical equipment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Togt, R. van der; Lieshout, E.J. van; Hensbroek, R.; Beinat, E.; Binnekade, J.M.; Bakker, P.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Context: Health care applications of autoidentification technologies, such as radio frequency identification (RFID), have been proposed to improve patient safety and also the tracking and tracing of medical equipment. However, electromagnetic interference (EMI) by RFID on medical devices has never

  4. Medical care transition planning and dental care use for youth with special health care needs during the transition from adolescence to young adulthood: a preliminary explanatory model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Donald L

    2014-05-01

    The aims of the study were to test the hypotheses that youth with special health care needs (YSHCN) with a medical care transition plan are more likely to use dental care during the transition from adolescence to young adulthood and that different factors are associated with dental utilization for YSHCN with and YSHCN without functional limitations. National Survey of CSHCN (2001) and Survey of Adult Transition and Health (2007) data were analyzed (N = 1,746). The main predictor variable was having a medical care transition plan, defined as having discussed with a doctor how health care needs might change with age and having developed a transition plan. The outcome variable was dental care use in 2001 (adolescence) and 2007 (young adulthood). Multiple variable Poisson regression models with robust standard errors were used to estimate covariate-adjusted relative risks (RR). About 63 % of YSHCN had a medical care transition plan and 73.5 % utilized dental care. YSHCN with a medical care transition plan had a 9 % greater RR of utilizing dental care than YSHCN without a medical care transition plan (RR 1.09; 95 % CI 1.03-1.16). In the models stratified by functional limitation status, having a medical care transition plan was significantly associated with dental care use, but only for YSHCN without functional limitations (RR 1.11; 95 % CI 1.04-1.18). Having a medical care transition plan is significantly associated with dental care use, but only for YSHCN with no functional limitation. Dental care should be an integral part of the comprehensive health care transition planning process for all YSHCN.

  5. Are you a Canadian thinking about going abroad for surgery or other medical care?

    OpenAIRE

    SFU Medical Tourism Research Group

    2012-01-01

    Are you considering going abroad for medical care? The Simon Fraser University Medical Tourism Research Group has developed the following guide to help inform your decision. This information sheet was developed in consultation with health workers, medical tourism professionals, and researchers in order to help you consider the pros and cons of engaging in medical tourism.

  6. [Geographical distribution of medical expenditure for the aged insured by National Health Insurance in secondary medical care areas in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T; Tanihara, S; Yanagawa, H

    1998-06-01

    To determine what factors affect medical expenditure for the aged insured by the National Health Insurance among secondary medical care areas. The original data of municipalities were combined and converted into the data of secondary medical areas. The original data included medical expenditure of the aged in 1994, medical supply factors per 100,000 population (numbers of doctors, numbers of general beds in hospitals, numbers of clinics, etc.) and socio-economic factors (income, proportion of employees for three sectors of industries, population density, average size of family, etc.). Medical expenditures for inpatients and outpatients were used separately as independent variables. The medical supply and socio-economic factors have been used as dependent variables. Multiple regression models were applied to clarify the differences in the contributing factors between inpatient and outpatient. 1. The maximum inpatient and outpatient medical expenditures for the aged are respectively 4 times and 2.6 times more expensive than minimum expenditures among secondary medical care areas. 2. The numbers of beds, income per capita, numbers of doctor, average size of family, proportion of employees for third level industry and income accounted for 57.4% of variance in inpatient medical expenditure of the aged. 3. The proportion of employees for first level industry, the numbers of beds and average members of family accounted for 21.4% of variance in outpatient medical expenditure of the aged. 4. Medical expenditure for inpatients related with medical supply and socioeconomic factors differently from that of outpatients.

  7. Impact of teaching session on concepts of palliative care in medical undergraduates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirisha Annavarapu

    2016-02-01

    Conclusions: Concept of palliative care was poor among medical undergraduates. Health care providers can overcome by knowledge construction, interrelation between practice and evidence based medicine. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(1.000: 188-191

  8. Medical health care professionals' assessments of oral health needs in children with disabilities: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallberg, Ulrika; Klingberg, Gunilla

    2005-10-01

    Good collaboration between medical and dental care is essential to provide not only good oral health care, but also more holistic care for children with disabilities. The aim was to explore and describe medical health care professionals' assessments and considerations of orofacial problems and treatment needs in children with disabilities and in their families. In-depth interviews focusing on orofacial function were carried out with 17 medical health care employees. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed in open and focused (selective) coding processes according to grounded theory. A core category was identified and named focusing on basic needs, showing that oral health care assessment was not on the agenda of medical health care professionals, but was instead viewed as a responsibility of parents or dentists. This study shows that oral health issues are not fully integrated in the medical care of children with disabilities. The omission of oral health issues from the medical agenda implies a risk of oral health problems in children with disabilities. To put the oral cavity and oral health on the medical agenda, dentists need to influence the undergraduate training of medical professionals and to initiate co-operation with the medical care system.

  9. Contributions of medical family therapy to the changing health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, William J; McDaniel, Susan H; Hepworth, Jeri

    2014-09-01

    Medical family therapy is a form of professional practice that uses a biopsychosocial approach and systemic family therapy principles in the collaborative treatment of individuals and families dealing with medical problems. It emerged out of the experience of family therapists working in primary medical care settings in the 1980s and 1990s. This article describes how contemporary medical family therapy can contribute to a transformed health care system in four areas: the patient experience of health care, the health of the population, the containment of health care costs, and enhanced practice environments. © 2014 FPI, Inc.

  10. Impact of managed care on the development of new medical technology: ethical concerns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Pamela; Saha, Subrata

    1995-10-01

    During the last three decades, development of new medical technology has been largely responsible for the spectacular advances in the diagnosis and treatment of many human diseases. This has contributed to improved medical care of our population. However, concerns have been raised that in today's managed care environment of health care, introduction of new medical technology will be difficult. Cost-sensitive health care providers should consider various ethical issues involved before demanding that only those technologies that save money and show highly positive cost benefit ratio will be reimbursed. The impact of such considerations on the innovations of new medical devices and their developments is discussed.

  11. Primary care careers among recent graduates of research-intensive private and public medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Phillip A; Xu, Shuai; Ayanian, John Z

    2013-06-01

    Despite a growing need for primary care physicians in the United States, the proportion of medical school graduates pursuing primary care careers has declined over the past decade. To assess the association of medical school research funding with graduates matching in family medicine residencies and practicing primary care. Observational study of United States medical schools. One hundred twenty-one allopathic medical schools. The primary outcomes included the proportion of each school's graduates from 1999 to 2001 who were primary care physicians in 2008, and the proportion of each school's graduates who entered family medicine residencies during 2007 through 2009. The 25 medical schools with the highest levels of research funding from the National Institutes of Health in 2010 were designated as "research-intensive." Among research-intensive medical schools, the 16 private medical schools produced significantly fewer practicing primary care physicians (median 24.1% vs. 33.4%, p private schools. In contrast, the nine research-intensive public medical schools produced comparable proportions of graduates pursuing primary care careers (median 36.1% vs. 36.3%, p = 0.87) and matching in family medicine residencies (median 7.4% vs. 10.0%, p = 0.37) relative to the other 66 public medical schools. To meet the health care needs of the US population, research-intensive private medical schools should play a more active role in promoting primary care careers for their students and graduates.

  12. Medication administration errors for older people in long-term residential care

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Older people in long-term residential care are at increased risk of medication prescribing and administration errors. The main aim of this study was to measure the incidence of medication administration errors in nursing and residential homes using a barcode medication administration (BCMA) system. Methods A prospective study was conducted in 13 care homes (9 residential and 4 nursing). Data on all medication administrations for a cohort of 345 older residents were recorde...

  13. Medical undergraduate primary care teaching across the UK: what is being taught?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boon, Veronica; Ridd, Matthew; Blythe, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    All UK medical schools use primary care settings to deliver their undergraduate courses. However there is no national undergraduate curriculum for primary care and it is thought that the learning objectives of primary care teaching vary considerably between medical schools. The overall aim was to establish what is being taught within and by primary care across UK medical schools. We did this by collating learning objectives from the primary care department at each school. In order to categorise and compare the list of learning objectives from each school we mapped the learning objectives to the postgraduate curriculum of the Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP). Cross sectional survey sent to heads of teaching of primary care at all 32 UK medical schools. GP teacher handbooks for primary care modules at each medical school were requested. Information was extracted based on key headings from the RCGP postgraduate curriculum. Topics taught by primary care at all medical schools include: consulting and communication skills, leading and working in teams, and developing yourself and others. Novel topics, taught at a few medical schools include: learning disability, genetics and multi-morbidity. The majority of medical schools address aspects of over half of the RCGP postgraduate curriculum headings in their learning objectives for primary care. This project provides valuable information about primary care teaching at an undergraduate level across the UK. Although it confirms widespread variation in learning objectives, it also highlights considerable common ground and opportunities for sharing teaching resources between schools.

  14. Rationalizing definitions and procedures for optimizing clinical care and public health in fetal death and stillbirth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, K S; Kinniburgh, Brooke; Hutcheon, Jennifer A; Mehrabadi, Azar; Dahlgren, Leanne; Basso, Melanie; Davies, Cheryl; Lee, Lily

    2015-04-01

    Despite the recent focus on stillbirth, there remains a profound need to address problems associated with the definitions and procedures related to fetal death and stillbirth. The current definition of fetal death, first proposed in 1950, needs to be updated to distinguish between the timing of fetal death (which has etiologic and prognostic significance) and the timing of stillbirth (ie, the delivery of the dead fetus). Stillbirth registration procedures, modeled after live birth registration and not death registration, also need to be modernized because they can be an unnecessary burden on some grieving families. The problems associated with fetal death definitions and stillbirth-associated procedures are highlighted by selective fetal reduction in multifetal pregnancy; in many countries, the fetus reduced at 10-13 weeks of gestation and delivered at term gestation requires stillbirth registration and a burial permit even if fetal remains cannot be identified. An international consensus is needed to standardize the definition of reportable fetal deaths; ideally this should be based on the timing of fetal death and should address the status of pregnancy terminations. In this article, we list propositions for initiating an international dialogue that will rationalize fetal death definitions, registration criteria, and associated procedures, and thereby improve clinical care and public health.

  15. Orientation of Medical Residents to the Psychosocial Aspects of Primary Care: Influence of Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenthal, Sherman; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A survey of 63 general medical residents found most accepted the psychosocial role of the primary care physician, found it most appropriate in ambulatory care settings, felt ambivalent about their ability to perform it, and assigned it secondary priority in patient care. More attention by training programs to ambulatory care and psychosocial…

  16. Comparison of stress among medical and not medical personnel in health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Mujakić

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Research Question (RQ: Does the opinion of the medical and non - medical staff varies on (1 the level of stress depending on seniority, (2 the staircase of stress in relation to education, and (3 how motivation affects the level of stress. Purpose: The purpose of the study is to determine whether in health care and higher education contribute to increased job stress. Also, we wanted to know whether they are more motivated workers are less exposed to occupational stress and / or employees with higher seniority also more exposed to stress. Method: We did quantitative research in public health institute. Overview of theoretical principles based on domestic and foreign professional literature. Articles and expert input was obtained in electronic databases ProQuest Online Information Service, Ebsco and SpringerLink. Statistical part of the study, we calculated the statistical program where we used the Mann - Whitney U- statistics and Wilcox W-statistics. Results: The results indicate that there is a statistical difference in understanding the importance of seniority and education on occupational stress among medical and non - medical sector. Employees in the medical sector more statistically argue that education and working life affect the career stress. We rejected our second hypothesis, which says that there is a difference between the two sectors regarding the impact of motivation on occupational stress. Both sectors they consider to be less motivated workers exposed to occupational stress. Organization: The survey can further highlight the risks that may be possible due to congestion and occupational stress. Society: positive influence on the social understanding of diversity obtained service of a single profession and thus routing problem in a disproportionate burden of healthcare workers. Healthcare professionals who work under less stress effectively and positively affect the quality of services rendered. Originality: This kind of research by

  17. [Role of pharmacists in the medical team--attempting palliative care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiguro, T; Takahashi, M; Kato, H; Abe, C; Shioya, A; Ishiguro, T; Yoshizawa, T; Yoshizawa, A

    1999-12-01

    The Pharmacy Department at our hospital is attempting to develop methods for palliative care, for example of cancer pain or smelly tumors. The participation of pharmacists on the medical team for home care is necessary, because the supply of proper drugs for patients' individual conditions is indispensable in palliative care. Communication between not only patients, but also between their families and us, as well as the maintenance of close contact with the medical team, are important in home care.

  18. Primary Care Providers’ experiences with Pharmaceutical Care-based Medication Therapy Management Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather L. Maracle, Pharm.D.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study explored primary care providers’ (PCPs experiences with the practice of pharmaceutical care-based medication therapy management (MTM. Qualitative, semi-structured interviews were conducted with six PCPs who have experiences working with MTM pharmacists for at least three years. The first author conducted the interviews that were audio-taped, transcribed, and coded independently. The codes were then harmonized via discussion and consensus with the other authors. Data were analyzed for themes using the hermeneutic-phenomenological method as proposed by Max van Manen. Three men and three women were interviewed. On average, the interviewees have worked with MTM pharmacists for seven years. The six (6 themes uncovered from the interviews included: (1 “MTM is just part of our team approach to the practice of medicine”: MTM as an integral part of PCPs’ practices; (2 “Frankly it’s education for the patient but it’s also education for me”: MTM services as a source of education; (3 “It’s not exactly just the pharmacist that passes out the medicines at the pharmacy”: The MTM practitioner is different from the dispensing pharmacist; (4 “So, less reactive, cleaning up the mess, and more proactive and catching things before they become so involved”: MTM services as preventative health care efforts; (5“I think that time is the big thing”: MTM pharmacists spend more time with patients; (6 “There’s an access piece, there’s an availability piece, there’s a finance piece”: MTM services are underutilized at the clinics. In conclusion, PCPs value having MTM pharmacists as part of their team in ambulatory clinics. MTM pharmacists are considered an important source of education to patients as well as to providers as they are seen as having a unique body of knowledge –medication expertise. All PCPs highly treasure the time and education provided by the MTM pharmacists, their ability to manage and adjust patients

  19. Medical Foster Homes: Can the Adult Foster Care Model Substitute for Nursing Home Care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Cari; Whitfield, Emily A

    2016-12-01

    To compare characteristics, healthcare use, and costs of care of veterans in the rapidly expanding Veterans Health Administration (VHA) medical foster home (MFH) with those of three other VHA long-term care (LTC) programs. Descriptive, unmatched study. VHA MFHs, home-based primary care (HBPC), community living centers (CLCs), and community nursing homes (CNHs). Veterans newly enrolled in one of the four LTC settings in calendar years 2010 or 2011. Using VA and Medicare data from fiscal years 2010 and 2011, demographic characteristics, healthcare use, and costs of 388 veterans in MFHs were compared with 26,037 of those in HBPC, 5,355 in CLCs, and 5,517 in CNHs in the year before and the year after enrollment. Veterans enrolled in the MFH program were more likely to be unmarried than those in other LTC programs and had higher levels of comorbidity and frailty than veterans receiving HBPC but had similar levels of comorbidity, frailty, and healthcare use as those in CLCs and CNHs. MFH veterans incurred lower costs than those in CNHs and CLCs. MFHs served a distinct subset of veterans with levels of comorbidity and frailty similar to those of veterans cared for in CLCs and CNHs at costs that were comparable to or lower than those of the VHA. Propensity-matched comparisons will be necessary to confirm these findings. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  20. Trauma-Informed Medical Care: Patient Response to a Primary Care Provider Communication Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Bonnie L; Saunders, Pamela A; Power, Elizabeth; Dass-Brailsford, Priscilla; Schelbert, Kavitha Bhat; Giller, Esther; Wissow, Larry; Hurtado de Mendoza, Alejandra; Mete, Mihriye

    2016-01-01

    Trauma exposure predicts mental disorders and health outcomes; yet there is little training of primary care providers about trauma's effects, and how to better interact with trauma survivors. This study adapted a theory-based approach to working with trauma survivors, Risking Connection, into a 6-hour CME course, Trauma-Informed Medical Care (TI-Med), to evaluate its feasibility and preliminary efficacy. We randomized four primary care sites to training or wait-list conditions; PCPs at wait-list sites were trained after reassessment. Primary care providers (PCPs) were Family Medicine residents (n = 17; 2 sites) or community physicians (n = 13; 2 sites). Outcomes reported here comprised a survey of 400 actual patients seen by the PCPs in the study. Patients, mostly minority, completed surveys before or after their provider received training. Patients rated PCPs significantly higher after training on a scale encompassing partnership issues. Breakdowns showed lower partnership scores for those with trauma or posttraumatic stress symptoms. Future studies will need to include more specific trauma-related outcomes. Nevertheless, this training is a promising initial approach to teaching trauma-informed communication skills to PCPs.

  1. Micro Data Analysis of Medical and Long-Term Care Utilization Among the Elderly in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Hideki; Horiguchi, Hiromasa; Matsuda, Shinya

    2010-01-01

    Japan is currently experiencing the most rapid population aging among all OECD countries. Increasing expenditures on medical care in Japan have been attributed to the aging of the population. Authors in the recent debate on end-of-life care and long-term care (LTC) cost in the United States and Europe have attributed time to death and non-medical care cost for the aged as a source of rising expenditures. In this study, we analyzed a large sample of local public insurance claim data to investigate medical and LTC expenditures in Japan. We examined the impact of aging, time to death, survivorship, and use of LTC on medical care expenditure for people aged 65 and above. On the basis of these findings, we conclude that age is a contributing factor to the rising expenditures on LTC, and that the contribution of aging to rising medical care expenditures should be distinguished according to survivorship. PMID:20948944

  2. Improving combat casualty care and field medicine: focus on the military medic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lorenzo, R A

    1997-04-01

    As military medicine in general copes with a rapidly changing world environment, so too must the backbone of the medical force, the enlisted medic. To meet these challenges, the training and utilization of military medics must match new and different missions. This paper will explore innovative approaches to training and preparing for combat casualty care and field medicine. The focus will fall on the education, evaluation, operations, patient-care skills, equipment, and telemedicine potential of the military medic. Future directions for study and development will be suggested. Exploration of the following may improve the capability of the military medic: (1) improved training to include advanced-level skills and interventions for combat casualty care and broader exposure to the casualties expected in operations other than war; (2) annual educational and periodic proficiency evaluation requirements; (3) strengthened medical control at all echelons; and (4) carefully selected additional equipment and technologies to enhance medical capabilities.

  3. [Career planning for explanation of clinical test results and program of inspections: developing medical technologists for team medical care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Misuko

    2013-04-01

    Current medical care is subdivided according to medical advances, and sophistication and new techniques are necessary. In this setting, doctors and nurses have been explaining to and consulting patients about their medical examinations; however, in recent years, medical technologists have performed these duties at the start of the team's medical care. Therefore, we think it is possible for patients to receive clear and convincing explanations. Most patients cannot understand their examination data, which are written using numbers and charts, etc. Recently, the Nagano Medical Technologist Society has been developing technologists who could explain examination results to patients. This development training included hospitality and communication. The certificate of completion will be issued in March when the program starts.

  4. [Health care waste management of potentially infectious medical waste by healthcare professionals in a private medical practice: a study of practices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunot, Alain; Thompson, Céline

    2010-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted with a sample of 278 health professionals (GPs and specialists, dentists, physical therapists and nurses) in a private medical practice in Paris to study the medical waste management practices related to the production and disposal of potentially hazardous health care waste. With the exception of physical therapists, most professionals produced medical waste (72% to 96,2% according to occupation), with a monthly median of 3 liters (inter-quartile range 1-15 liters). All sharp objects and needles were separated and 91% of them eliminated via a specific process for that sector. These percentages were respectively 84% and 69% concerning contaminated waste that was neither needles or used for cutting. 48% of the professionals reported the existence of documents that could track the disposal of their medical waste. To improve practice, professionals cited collection on-site at the office (74%) and reliability of the contracted service provider to collect the waste (59%). The study showed that health professionals need information on the regulations regarding potentially infectious medical waste, in particular on the traceability of its elimination. They also noted the lack of clarity and precision with regard to the definition of risk of infection: 31,7% of professionals only declare the production of sharp or cutting waste without having specified criteria for risk of infection.

  5. Psychiatric and Medical Health Care Policies in Juvenile Detention Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajer, Kathleen A.; Kelleher, Kelly; Gupta, Ravindra A.; Rolls, Jennifer; Gardner, William

    2007-01-01

    A study aims to examine the existing health care policies in U.S. juvenile detention centres. The results conclude that juvenile detention facilities have many shortfalls in providing care for adolescents, particularly mental health care.

  6. Promoting social responsibility amongst health care users: medical tourists’ perspectives on an information sheet regarding ethical concerns in medical tourism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Medical tourists, persons that travel across international borders with the intention to access non-emergency medical care, may not be adequately informed of safety and ethical concerns related to the practice of medical tourism. Researchers indicate that the sources of information frequently used by medical tourists during their decision-making process may be biased and/or lack comprehensive information regarding individual safety and treatment outcomes, as well as potential impacts of the medical tourism industry on third parties. This paper explores the feedback from former Canadian medical tourists regarding the use of an information sheet to address this knowledge gap and raise awareness of the safety and ethical concerns related to medical tourism. Results According to feedback provided in interviews with former Canadian medical tourists, the majority of participants responded positively to the information sheet and indicated that this document prompted them to engage in further consideration of these issues. Participants indicated some frustration after reading the information sheet regarding a lack of know-how in terms of learning more about the concerns discussed in the document and changing their decision-making. This frustration was due to participants’ desperation for medical care, a topic which participants frequently discussed regarding ethical concerns related to health care provision. Conclusions The overall perceptions of former medical tourists indicate that an information sheet may promote further consideration of ethical concerns of medical tourism. However, given that these interviews were performed with former medical tourists, it remains unknown whether such a document might impact upon the decision-making of prospective medical tourists. Furthermore, participants indicated a need for an additional tool such as a website for continued discussion about these concerns. As such, along with dissemination of the information sheet

  7. Promoting social responsibility amongst health care users: medical tourists' perspectives on an information sheet regarding ethical concerns in medical tourism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Krystyna; Snyder, Jeremy; Crooks, Valorie A; Johnston, Rory

    2013-12-06

    Medical tourists, persons that travel across international borders with the intention to access non-emergency medical care, may not be adequately informed of safety and ethical concerns related to the practice of medical tourism. Researchers indicate that the sources of information frequently used by medical tourists during their decision-making process may be biased and/or lack comprehensive information regarding individual safety and treatment outcomes, as well as potential impacts of the medical tourism industry on third parties. This paper explores the feedback from former Canadian medical tourists regarding the use of an information sheet to address this knowledge gap and raise awareness of the safety and ethical concerns related to medical tourism. According to feedback provided in interviews with former Canadian medical tourists, the majority of participants responded positively to the information sheet and indicated that this document prompted them to engage in further consideration of these issues. Participants indicated some frustration after reading the information sheet regarding a lack of know-how in terms of learning more about the concerns discussed in the document and changing their decision-making. This frustration was due to participants' desperation for medical care, a topic which participants frequently discussed regarding ethical concerns related to health care provision. The overall perceptions of former medical tourists indicate that an information sheet may promote further consideration of ethical concerns of medical tourism. However, given that these interviews were performed with former medical tourists, it remains unknown whether such a document might impact upon the decision-making of prospective medical tourists. Furthermore, participants indicated a need for an additional tool such as a website for continued discussion about these concerns. As such, along with dissemination of the information sheet, future research implications should

  8. The Nigerian health care system: Need for integrating adequate medical intelligence and surveillance systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menizibeya Osain Welcome

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : As an important element of national security, public health not only functions to provide adequate and timely medical care but also track, monitor, and control disease outbreak. The Nigerian health care had suffered several infectious disease outbreaks year after year. Hence, there is need to tackle the problem. This study aims to review the state of the Nigerian health care system and to provide possible recommendations to the worsening state of health care in the country. To give up-to-date recommendations for the Nigerian health care system, this study also aims at reviewing the dynamics of health care in the United States, Britain, and Europe with regards to methods of medical intelligence/surveillance. Materials and Methods : Databases were searched for relevant literatures using the following keywords: Nigerian health care, Nigerian health care system, and Nigerian primary health care system. Additional keywords used in the search were as follows: United States (OR Europe health care dynamics, Medical Intelligence, Medical Intelligence systems, Public health surveillance systems, Nigerian medical intelligence, Nigerian surveillance systems, and Nigerian health information system. Literatures were searched in scientific databases Pubmed and African Journals OnLine. Internet searches were based on Google and Search Nigeria. Results : Medical intelligence and surveillance represent a very useful component in the health care system and control diseases outbreak, bioattack, etc. There is increasing role of automated-based medical intelligence and surveillance systems, in addition to the traditional manual pattern of document retrieval in advanced medical setting such as those in western and European countries. Conclusion : The Nigerian health care system is poorly developed. No adequate and functional surveillance systems are developed. To achieve success in health care in this modern era, a system well grounded in routine

  9. [Internationalized medical care services increase need of health care providers to improve English communication skills].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chia-Ling

    2011-02-01

    English is the most important language used in international communication. Nurses today have significantly more opportunities to come into contact with clients of different nationalities. Therefore, English communication abilities are a critical to the effective care of foreign clients. Miscommunication due to language barriers can endanger the health and safety of foreign clients and hinder their access to healthcare resources. Basic English communicate skills allow nurses to better understand the feelings of foreign clients and to affect their satisfaction with healthcare services provided. The majority of clinical nurses in Taiwan are inadequately prepared to communicate with foreign clients or use English when delivering nursing care services. Although English is not an official language in Taiwan, strengthening English communication skills is necessary for Taiwan's healthcare service system. Faced with increasing numbers of foreign clients in their daily work, first-line nursing staffs need more training to improve English proficiency. In order to do so, support from the hospital director is the first priority. The second priority is to motivate nursing staffs to learn English; the third is to incorporate different English classes into the medical system and schedule class times to meet nurse scheduling needs; and the fourth is to establish international medical wards, with appropriate incentives in pay designed to attract and retain nursing staff proficient in English communication.

  10. Electronic Medical Record and Quality Ratings of Long Term Care Facilities Long-Term Care Facility Characteristics and Reasons and Barriers for Adoption of Electronic Medical Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Cheryl Andrea

    2013-01-01

    With the growing elderly population, compounded by the retirement of the babyboomers, the need for long-term care (LTC) facilities is expected to grow. An area of great concern for those that are seeking a home for their family member is the quality of care provided by the nursing home to the residents. Electronic medical records (EMR) are often…

  11. [Medical care unit -- a suitable instrument for ambulatory patient-adequate care and performance-related remuneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, P; Isensee, D; Gerlach, E; Gross, H

    2013-02-01

    The question of whether a medical care unit is an appropriate tool for outpatient care has been discussed for a long time. Our aim is to investigate whether the MCU is an effective instrument for outpatient care and adequate performance-related remuneration. This retro- and prospective overview of the work included statements on legal foundations for medical care units, for reimbursement of services in medical care units, the development of medical care centres in Germany and a listing of the specific advantages and disadvantages of an MCU. This article focuses on the generally applicable facts and complements them with examples from general, visceral and vascular surgery. The main quantitative data on medical centre statistics come from different publications of the National Association of Statutory Health Insurance for Physicians. From a legal point of view the instrument MCU allows the participating of ambulatory and stationary care in the framework of medical care contracts. This has been especially extended for stationary applications, including the spectrum of possibilities that can contribute under certain circumstances for the provision of medical care in underdeveloped regions. Freelancers can benefit primarily from financial risk and minimising bureaucratic routine. The remuneration for services performed in the MCU is analogous to that of other ambulatory care providers. Basically, there are no disadvantages, but a greater design freedom and opportunities for the generation of aggregates are visible. The number of MCU in Germany has quadrupled in the last five years, indicating an establishment of an outpatient care landscape. MCU offers from the patient's perspective, providers and policy specific advantages and disadvantages. Indeed the benefits outweigh the disadvantages, but this is not yet verified by qualitative studies. The question of the appropriateness of medical care units as outpatient care instrumentation must be considered differentially

  12. Medical tourism and its impact on the US health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forgione, Dana A; Smith, Pamela C

    2007-01-01

    The health care industry within the United States continues to face unprecedented increases in costs, along with the task of providing care to an estimated 46 million uninsured or underinsured patients. These patients, along with both insurers and employers, are seeking to reduce the costs of treatment through international outsourcing of medical and surgical care. Knows as medical tourism, this trend is on the rise, and the US health care system has not fully internalized the effects this will have on its economic structure and policies. The demand for low-cost health care services is driving patients to seek treatment on a globally competitive basis, while balancing important quality of care issues. In this article, we outline some of the issues facing legislators, health care policy makers, providers, and health service researchers regarding the impact of medical tourism on the US health care system.

  13. 78 FR 25304 - Siemens Medical Solutions, USA, Inc., Oncology Care Systems (Radiation Oncology), Including On...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-30

    ... Employment and Training Administration Siemens Medical Solutions, USA, Inc., Oncology Care Systems (Radiation Oncology), Including On-Site Leased Workers From Source Right Solutions, Concord, California, Now Located... 5, 2012, applicable to workers of Siemens Medical Solutions, USA, Inc., Oncology Care...

  14. Medication errors in outpatient setting of a tertiary care hospital: classification and root cause analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Basukala

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions: Learning more about medication errors may enhance health care professionals' ability to provide safe care to their patients. Hence, A focus on easy-to-use and inexpensive techniques for medication error reduction should be used to have the greatest impact. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2015; 4(6.000: 1235-1240

  15. 20 CFR 702.418 - Procedure for requesting medical care; employee's duty to notify employer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Procedure for requesting medical care; employee's duty to notify employer. 702.418 Section 702.418 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT STANDARDS... medical care; employee's duty to notify employer. (a) As soon as practicable, but within 30 days after...

  16. Non-medical prescribing versus medical prescribing for acute and chronic disease management in primary and secondary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Greg; George, Johnson; Maclure, Katie; Stewart, Derek

    2016-11-22

    A range of health workforce strategies are needed to address health service demands in low-, middle- and high-income countries. Non-medical prescribing involves nurses, pharmacists, allied health professionals, and physician assistants substituting for doctors in a prescribing role, and this is one approach to improve access to medicines. To assess clinical, patient-reported, and resource use outcomes of non-medical prescribing for managing acute and chronic health conditions in primary and secondary care settings compared with medical prescribing (usual care). We searched databases including CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, and five other databases on 19 July 2016. We also searched the grey literature and handsearched bibliographies of relevant papers and publications. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), cluster-RCTs, controlled before-and-after (CBA) studies (with at least two intervention and two control sites) and interrupted time series analysis (with at least three observations before and after the intervention) comparing: 1. non-medical prescribing versus medical prescribing in acute care; 2. non-medical prescribing versus medical prescribing in chronic care; 3. non-medical prescribing versus medical prescribing in secondary care; 4 non-medical prescribing versus medical prescribing in primary care; 5. comparisons between different non-medical prescriber groups; and 6. non-medical healthcare providers with formal prescribing training versus those without formal prescribing training. We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. Two review authors independently reviewed studies for inclusion, extracted data, and assessed study quality with discrepancies resolved by discussion. Two review authors independently assessed risk of bias for the included studies according to EPOC criteria. We undertook meta-analyses using the fixed-effect model where studies were examining the same treatment effect and to account for small sample sizes. We compared

  17. Adherence to Follow-Up Recommendations by Triathlon Competitors Receiving Event Medical Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy D. Joslin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. We sought to investigate triathlete adherence to recommendations for follow-up for participants who received event medical care. Methods. Participants of the 2011 Ironman Syracuse 70.3 (Syracuse, NY who sought evaluation and care at the designated finish line medical tent were contacted by telephone approximately 3 months after the initial encounter to measure adherence with the recommendation to seek follow-up care after event. Results. Out of 750 race participants, 35 (4.6% athletes received event medical care. Of these 35, twenty-eight (28/35; 80% consented to participate in the study and 17 (61% were available on telephone follow-up. Of these 17 athletes, 11 (11/17; 65% of participants reported that they had not followed up with a medical professional since the race. Only 5 (5/17; 29% confirmed that they had seen a medical provider in some fashion since the race; of these, only 2 (2/17; 12% sought formal medical follow-up resulting from the recommendation whereas the remaining athletes merely saw their medical providers coincidentally or as part of routine care. Conclusion. Only 2 (2/17; 12% of athletes who received event medical care obtained postrace follow-up within a one-month time period following the race. Event medical care providers must be aware of potential nonadherence to follow-up recommendations.

  18. Adherence to Follow-Up Recommendations by Triathlon Competitors Receiving Event Medical Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Jarem B.; Copeli, Nikoli

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. We sought to investigate triathlete adherence to recommendations for follow-up for participants who received event medical care. Methods. Participants of the 2011 Ironman Syracuse 70.3 (Syracuse, NY) who sought evaluation and care at the designated finish line medical tent were contacted by telephone approximately 3 months after the initial encounter to measure adherence with the recommendation to seek follow-up care after event. Results. Out of 750 race participants, 35 (4.6%) athletes received event medical care. Of these 35, twenty-eight (28/35; 80%) consented to participate in the study and 17 (61%) were available on telephone follow-up. Of these 17 athletes, 11 (11/17; 65%) of participants reported that they had not followed up with a medical professional since the race. Only 5 (5/17; 29%) confirmed that they had seen a medical provider in some fashion since the race; of these, only 2 (2/17; 12%) sought formal medical follow-up resulting from the recommendation whereas the remaining athletes merely saw their medical providers coincidentally or as part of routine care. Conclusion. Only 2 (2/17; 12%) of athletes who received event medical care obtained postrace follow-up within a one-month time period following the race. Event medical care providers must be aware of potential nonadherence to follow-up recommendations. PMID:28203462

  19. Acute medical assessment units: an efficient alternative to in-hospital acute medical care.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Watts, M

    2011-02-01

    Acute Medical Assessment Units (AMAUs) are being proposed as an alternative to congested Emergency Departments (EDs for the assessment of patients with a range of acute medical problems. We retrospectively reviewed the discharge destination of patients referred to a newly established AMAU during a six-month period. During the same period we contrasted activity in the ED for a similar group of patients. 1,562 patients were assessed in the AMAU. 196 (12.5%) were admitted to an in-patient bed and 1,148 (73.5%) were entered into specific diagnosis-driven out-patient pathways. 1,465 patients attended the ED and 635 (43.3%) were admitted. Out-patient alternatives to expensive in-patient care need to be provided at the \\'coal face" of acute referral. The AMAU provides this, and as a consequence admission rates are relatively low. This is achieved by directly communicating with GPs, accessing senior clinical decision makers, and providing immediate access to diagnostically driven outpatient pathways.

  20. Medical comorbidity, acute medical care use in late-life bipolar disorder: a comparison of lithium, valproate, and other pharmacotherapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rej, Soham; Yu, Ching; Shulman, Kenneth; Herrmann, Nathan; Fischer, Hadas D; Fung, Kinwah; Gruneir, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is associated with high rates of medical comorbidity, particularly in late life. Little is known about medical health service utilization and potential effects of bipolar pharmacotherapy. We hypothesized that lithium use would not be associated with higher rates of medical hospitalization. Population-based retrospective cohort study of 1388 bipolar disorder patients aged ≥66years discharged from a psychiatric hospitalization in Ontario, Canada, between 2006 and 2012. Patients were divided into lithium users, valproate users, and non-lithium/non-valproate users. The main outcome was acute non-psychiatric, medical/surgical hospitalization during 1-year follow-up. The rate of medical hospitalizations was 0.22 per patient-year. Time-to-medical hospitalization did not differ among lithium, valproate, and non-lithium/non-valproate users after adjusting for age, sex, past medical hospitalization, and antipsychotic use. Lithium, valproate, and non-lithium/non-valproate users did not differ markedly in terms of reason for medical hospitalization, 1-year acute medical health utilization outcomes, and medical comorbidity rates. There were high rates of health service use for medical conditions among older adults with bipolar disorder, but this did not appear to be associated with lithium use, compared to valproate and other medication use (e.g., antipsychotics). A proactive collaborative care approach may prevent medical service utilization in severe late-life bipolar disorder. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Young adults with spina bifida transitioned to a medical home: a survey of medical care in Jacksonville, Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera, Antonio M; Wood, David L; Keeley, Cortney; James, Hector E; Aldana, Philipp R

    2015-10-23

    OBJECT The transition of the young adult with spina bifida (YASB) from pediatric to adult health care is considered a priority by organized pediatrics. There is a paucity of transition programs and related studies. Jacksonville Health and Transition Services (JaxHATS) is one such transition program in Jacksonville, Florida. This study's purpose was to evaluate the health care access, utilization, and quality of life (QOL) of a group of YASBs who have transitioned from pediatric care. METHODS A survey tool addressing access to health care and quality of health and life was developed based on an established survey. Records of the Spinal Defects Clinic held at Wolfson Children's Hospital and JaxHATS Clinic were reviewed and YASBs (> 18 and spina bifida (SB) specialists; none reported difficulty or delays in obtaining health care. Only 2 patients required emergent care in the last year for an SB-related medical problem. Seven respondents reported very good to excellent QOL. Family, lifestyle, and environmental factors were also examined. CONCLUSIONS In this small group of YASBs with a medical home, easy access to care for medical conditions was the norm, with few individuals having recent emergency visits and almost all reporting at least a good overall QOL. Larger studies of YASBs are needed to evaluate the positive effects of medical homes on health and QOL in this population.

  2. Mothers’ Experiences of Participating in the Medical Care of their Child with Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korning Lund, Line; Bregnballe, Vibeke

    Background: Only a few research studies have addressed parents’ experiences of participating in the medical care and treatment of their child diagnosed with cancer. Objective: To explore how mothers of children diagnosed with cancer experienced participating in the medical care of their child both...... at hospital and at home. Design and methods: A qualitative study with a hermeneutical approach. The empirical data consisted of three semi-structured interviews with mothers of children diagnosed with cancer within the last three months. The interviews were analysed in accordance with Kvale and Brinkmann...... at home to prevent hospitalisation" and "Good training in the medical care is significant". Conclusion: In general, mothers experienced participating in the medical care as positive. However, in several aspects of the medical care, the mothers lacked support and guidance from the health professionals...

  3. The availability of medical care as an obligatory social health predictor of the population in Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yerugina M.V.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Problems of social conditionality of population health are a traditional topic to discuss both in medical and social sciences. Availability of health care is considered from the perspective of social factors of macro level, representing the widest context of social factors to health risk. In Russia, the increasing availability of health care for the population is considered as a priority of social policy. The authors of the review publications consider the trends of accessibility of medical care to the population of contemporary Russia. It is noted in the article that currently the availability and quality of medical care, pretentiousness of state assurances for free medical care, and their imbalance with available financial resources are considered as one of the major Russian health care problems.

  4. Nurses\\' perception of caring behaviors in intensive care units in hospitals of Lorestan University of Medical Sciences, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asadi SE

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Caring is the core of nursing however, different individules have different perceptions of it. Continuous assessment and measurement of caring behaviors results in the identification of their problems. The careful planning of interventions and problem solving will improve care. The aim of this study was to identify nurses' perception of caring behaviors in the intensive care units. Materials and Method: In this descriptive-analytic study, 140 nurses were selected from intensive care units of hospitals affiliated to Lorestan University of Medical Sciences, Iran, using the census method in 2012. The data collection tool was the Caring Behaviors Inventory for Elders (CBI-E. This questionnaire consisted of two parts including demographic information and 28 items related to care. Face and content validity of the Persian version of the questionnaire were provided by professionals, and after deletion of 4 items a 24-item questionnaire was provided. Cronbach's alpha coefficient was calculated to assess reliability (&alpha = 0.71. Data were analyzed using SPSS software version 18 and descriptive-analytic statistics (Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney test. Results: Based on the findings, nurses paid more attention to the physical–technical aspects (95.71 ± 12.76 of care in comparison to its psychosocial aspects (75.41 ± 27.91. Nurses had the highest score in care behavior of "timely performance of medical procedures and medication administration". Conclusion: Since nurses paid more attention to the technical aspects of care than its psychosocial aspects, by providing nurses with a correct perception of care, patients can be provided with needs-based care. This will increase patient satisfaction with nursing care, and indirectly result in the positive attitude of patients and society toward the nursing profession and its services. Moreover, nursing education officials can use these results to assist nurses in meeting

  5. Fly-By medical care: Conceptualizing the global and local social responsibilities of medical tourists and physician voluntourists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crooks Valorie A

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medical tourism is a global health practice where patients travel abroad to receive health care. Voluntourism is a practice where physicians travel abroad to deliver health care. Both of these practices often entail travel from high income to low and middle income countries and both have been associated with possible negative impacts. In this paper, we explore the social responsibilities of medical tourists and voluntourists to identify commonalities and distinctions that can be used to develop a wider understanding of social responsibility in global health care practices. Discussion Social responsibility is a responsibility to promote the welfare of the communities to which one belongs or with which one interacts. Physicians stress their social responsibility to care for the welfare of their patients and their domestic communities. When physicians choose to travel to another county to provide medical care, this social responsibility is expanded to this new community. Patients too have a social responsibility to use their community's health resources efficiently and to promote the health of their community. When these patients choose to go abroad to receive medical care, this social responsibility applies to the new community as well. While voluntourists and medical tourists both see the scope of their social responsibilities expand by engaging in these global practices, the social responsibilities of physician voluntourists are much better defined than those of medical tourists. Guidelines for engaging in ethical voluntourism and training for voluntourists still need better development, but medical tourism as a practice should follow the lead of voluntourism by developing clearer norms for ethical medical tourism. Summary Much can be learned by examining the social responsibilities of medical tourists and voluntourists when they engage in global health practices. While each group needs better guidance for engaging in

  6. Fly-By medical care: Conceptualizing the global and local social responsibilities of medical tourists and physician voluntourists

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Medical tourism is a global health practice where patients travel abroad to receive health care. Voluntourism is a practice where physicians travel abroad to deliver health care. Both of these practices often entail travel from high income to low and middle income countries and both have been associated with possible negative impacts. In this paper, we explore the social responsibilities of medical tourists and voluntourists to identify commonalities and distinctions that can be used to develop a wider understanding of social responsibility in global health care practices. Discussion Social responsibility is a responsibility to promote the welfare of the communities to which one belongs or with which one interacts. Physicians stress their social responsibility to care for the welfare of their patients and their domestic communities. When physicians choose to travel to another county to provide medical care, this social responsibility is expanded to this new community. Patients too have a social responsibility to use their community's health resources efficiently and to promote the health of their community. When these patients choose to go abroad to receive medical care, this social responsibility applies to the new community as well. While voluntourists and medical tourists both see the scope of their social responsibilities expand by engaging in these global practices, the social responsibilities of physician voluntourists are much better defined than those of medical tourists. Guidelines for engaging in ethical voluntourism and training for voluntourists still need better development, but medical tourism as a practice should follow the lead of voluntourism by developing clearer norms for ethical medical tourism. Summary Much can be learned by examining the social responsibilities of medical tourists and voluntourists when they engage in global health practices. While each group needs better guidance for engaging in responsible forms of these practices

  7. Factors associated with medication information in diabetes care: differences in perceptions between patients and health care professionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langst, G.; Seidling, H.M.; Stutzle, M.; Ose, D.; Baudendistel, I.; Szecsenyi, J.; Wensing, M.; Mahler, C.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: This qualitative study in patients with type 2 diabetes and health care professionals (HCPs) aimed to investigate which factors they perceive to enhance or impede medication information provision in primary care. Similarities and differences in perspectives were explored. METHODS: Eight sem

  8. Challenges of managing medications for older people at transition points of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manias, Elizabeth; Hughes, Carmel

    2015-01-01

    In clinical practice, pharmacists play a very important role in identifying and correcting medication discrepancies as older patients move across transition points of care. With increasing complexity of health care needs of older people, these discrepancies are likely to increase. The major concern with identifying and correcting medication discrepancies is that medication reconciliation is considered a retrospective problem--that is, dealing with medication discrepancies after they have occurred. It is argued here that a more proactive stance should be taken where doctors, nurses and pharmacists collectively work together to prevent medication discrepancies from happening in the first place. Improved involvement of patients and family members will help to facilitate better management of medications across transition points of care. Efficient use of information technology aids, such as electronic medication reconciliation tools, should also assist with organizational systems problems associated with the working culture, heavy workloads, and staff and skill mix of health professionals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. An Integrated Health Care Model in Medical Education: Interviews with Faculty and Administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tresolini, Carol P.; Shugars, Daniel A.

    1994-01-01

    Faculty and administrators of 22 medical schools were interviewed for their insights into development of an approach to health care and medical education that integrates psychosocial and biomedical perspectives. Results suggest medical curricula should address development of physicians' knowledge, attitudes, and skills in relationships with both…

  10. Medication error in anaesthesia and critical care: A cause for concern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilip Kothari

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Medication error is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in medical profession, and anaesthesia and critical care are no exception to it. Man, medicine, machine and modus operandi are the main contributory factors to it. In this review, incidence, types, risk factors and preventive measures of the medication errors are discussed in detail.

  11. Patients' attitudes to medical and psychosocial aspects of care in fertility clinics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, L; Holstein, B E; Boivin, J

    2003-01-01

    services for both men and women was high infertility-related stress in the marital, personal and social domain. CONCLUSIONS: A supportive attitude from medical staff and the provision of both medical and psychosocial information and support should be integral aspects of medical care in fertility clinics...

  12. Medication Abortion within a Student Health Care Clinic: A Review of the First 46 Consecutive Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, Emily M.; Bordoloi, Anita; Moorthie, Mydhili; Pela, Emily

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Medication abortion with mifepristone and misoprostol has been available in the United States since 2000. The authors reviewed the first 46 medication abortion cases conducted at a university-based student health care clinic to determine the safety and feasibility of medication abortion in this type of clinical setting. Participants:…

  13. Medication Abortion within a Student Health Care Clinic: A Review of the First 46 Consecutive Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, Emily M.; Bordoloi, Anita; Moorthie, Mydhili; Pela, Emily

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Medication abortion with mifepristone and misoprostol has been available in the United States since 2000. The authors reviewed the first 46 medication abortion cases conducted at a university-based student health care clinic to determine the safety and feasibility of medication abortion in this type of clinical setting. Participants:…

  14. The contributions of risk factor trends and medical care to cardiovascular mortality trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzati, Majid; Obermeyer, Ziad; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Mayosi, Bongani M; Elliott, Paul; Leon, David A

    2016-01-01

    Ischaemic heart disease, stroke, and other cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are responsible for an estimated 17.5 million annual deaths in the world. If account is taken of population aging, death rates from CVDs are estimated to be steadily decreasing in the world as a whole, and in regions with reliable trend data. The declines in high-income countries and some countries in Latin America have been ongoing for decades with no indication of slowing. In high-income countries, these positive trends have broadly coincided with, and benefited from, declines in smoking and physiological risk factors like blood pressure and serum cholesterol. Improvements in medical care, including effective primary prevention through management of physiological risk factors, better diagnosis and treatment of acute CVDs, and post-hospital care of those with prior CVDs, are also likely to have contributed to declining CVD event and death rates, especially in the past 40 years. However, the measured risk factor and treatment variables neither explain why the decline began when it did, nor much of the similarities and differences in the start time and rate of the decline across countries or between men and women. There have been sharp changes and fluctuations in CVDs in the former communist countries of Europe and the Soviet Union since the fall of communism in the early 1990s, with changes in volume and patterns of alcohol drinking, as a major cause of the rise in Russia and some other former Soviet countries. The challenge of reaching more definitive conclusions concerning the drivers of what constitutes one of the most remarkable international trends in adult mortality in the past half-century in part reflects the paucity of time trend data not only on disease incidence, risk factors, and clinical care, but also on other potential drivers, including infection and associated inflammatory processes throughout the lifecourse. PMID:26076950

  15. [The development of strategic management of high-tech surgical medical care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nechaev, V S; Krasnov, A V

    2013-01-01

    The high-tech surgical medical care is one of the most effective types of medical care in Russia. However high-tech surgical treatment very often is inaccessible for patients. The development of basics of strategic management of high-tech surgical care makes it possible to enhance availability of this type of care and to shorten the gap between volumes of rendered care and population needs. This approach can be resulted in decrease of disability and mortality of the most prevalent diseases of cardio-vascular diseases, malignant neoplasms, etc. The prerequisites can be developed to enhance life quality and increase longevity of population.

  16. Prescription data improve the medication history in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glintborg, Bente; Andersen, S K; Poulsen, H E

    2010-01-01

    Incomplete medication lists increase the risk of medication errors and adverse drug effects. In Denmark, dispensing data and pharmacy records are available directly online to treating physicians. We aimed (1) to describe if use of pharmacy records improved the medication history among patients...... consulting their general practitioner and (2) to characterise inconsistencies between the medication history reported by the patient and the general practitioner's recordings....

  17. Ethics of care in medical tourism: Informal caregivers' narratives of responsibility, vulnerability and mutuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, Rebecca; Crooks, Valorie A; Snyder, Jeremy

    2015-09-01

    This study examines the experiences of informal caregivers in medical tourism through an ethics of care lens. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 20 Canadians who had accompanied their friends or family members abroad for surgery, asking questions that dealt with their experiences prior to, during and after travel. Thematic analysis revealed three themes central to an ethics of care: responsibility, vulnerability and mutuality. Ethics of care theorists have highlighted how care has been historically devalued. We posit that medical tourism reproduces dominant narratives about care in a novel care landscape. Informal care goes unaccounted for by the industry, as it occurs in largely private spaces at a geographic distance from the home countries of medical tourists. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Factors Associated with Attitude and Knowledge Toward Hospice Palliative Care Among Medical Caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Yi Lee

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: Life and work experience improve the accuracy of medical staff in providing hospice palliative care. A culture-based, case-oriented continuing education program and a timely revision of the Hospice Palliative Care Article are recommended to increase the consistency between the principle and the practice of hospice palliative care.

  19. Effects of a Multimodule Curriculum of Palliative Care on Medical Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley S.L. Tsai

    2008-04-01

    Conclusion: A multimodule curriculum of palliative care for medical students can significantly improve their knowledge on principles of clinical management and beliefs about ethical decision-making in palliative care. As for changes in beliefs about ethical decision-making in palliative care, continued ethical and clinical training is required.

  20. Finding Medical Care for Colorectal Cancer Symptoms: Experiences among Those Facing Financial Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Maria D.; Siminoff, Laura A.

    2015-01-01

    Financial barriers can substantially delay medical care seeking. Using patient narratives provided by 252 colorectal cancer patients, we explored the experience of financial barriers to care seeking. Of the 252 patients interviewed, 84 identified financial barriers as a significant hurdle to obtaining health care for their colorectal cancer…

  1. Physician Perspectives on Providing Primary Medical Care to Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warfield, Marji Erickson; Crossman, Morgan K.; Delahaye, Jennifer; Der Weerd, Emma; Kuhlthau, Karen A.

    2015-01-01

    We conducted in-depth case studies of 10 health care professionals who actively provide primary medical care to adults with autism spectrum disorders. The study sought to understand their experiences in providing this care, the training they had received, the training they lack and their suggestions for encouraging more physicians to provide this…

  2. Feasibility of a self-administered survey to identify primary care patients at risk of medication-related problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makowsky MJ

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Mark J Makowsky,1 Andrew J Cave,2 Scot H Simpson1 1Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada Background and objectives: Pharmacists working in primary care clinics are well positioned to help optimize medication management of community-dwelling patients who are at high risk of experiencing medication-related problems. However, it is often difficult to identify these patients. Our objective was to test the feasibility of a self-administered patient survey, to facilitate identification of patients at high risk of medication-related problems in a family medicine clinic. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional, paper-based survey at the University of Alberta Hospital Family Medicine Clinic in Edmonton, Alberta, which serves approximately 7,000 patients, with 25,000 consultations per year. Adult patients attending the clinic were invited to complete a ten-item questionnaire, adapted from previously validated surveys, while waiting to be seen by the physician. Outcomes of interest included: time to complete the questionnaire, staff feedback regarding impact on workflow, and the proportion of patients who reported three or more risk factors for medication-related problems. Results: The questionnaire took less than 5 minutes to complete, according to the patient's report on the last page of the questionnaire. The median age (and interquartile range of respondents was 57 (45–69 years; 59% were women; 47% reported being in very good or excellent health; 43 respondents of 100 had three or more risk factors, and met the definition for being at high risk of a medication-related problem. Conclusions: Distribution of a self-administered questionnaire did not disrupt patients, or the clinic workflow, and identified an important proportion of patients at high risk of medication-related problems. Keywords: screening tool, pharmacists, primary

  3. Payment and Care for Hematopoietic Cellular Transplant Patients: Toward a Specialized Medical Home for Complex Care Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajewski, James L; McClellan, Mark B; Majhail, Navneet S; Hari, Parameswaran N; Bredeson, Christopher N; Maziarz, Richard T; LeMaistre, Charles F; Lill, Michael C; Farnia, Stephanie H; Komanduri, Krishna V; Boo, Michael J

    2017-09-26

    Patient-centered medical home models are fundamental to the advanced alternative payment models (APM) defined in the Medicare Access and Children's Health Insurance Plan (CHIP) Reauthorization Act (MACRA). The patient-centered medical home is a model of health care delivery supported by alternative payment mechanisms and designed to promote coordinated medical care that is simultaneously patient-centric and population-oriented. This transformative care model requires shifting reimbursement to include a per-patient payment intended to cover services not previously reimbursed such as disease management over time. Payment is linked to quality measures, including proportion of care delivered according to pre-defined pathways and demonstrated impact on outcomes. Some medical homes also include opportunities for shared savings by reducing overall costs of care. Recent proposals have suggested expanding the medical home model to specialized populations with complex needs because primary care teams may not have the facilities or the requisite expertise for their unique needs. An example of a successful care model that may provide valuable lessons for those creating specialty medical home models already exists in many hematopoietic cellular transplant (HCT) centers that deliver multidisciplinary, coordinated, and highly specialized care. The integration of care delivery in HCT centers has been driven by the specialty care their patients require and by the payment methodology preferred by the commercial payers, which has included bundling of both inpatient and outpatient care in the peri-transplant interval. Commercial payers identify qualified HCT centers based on accreditation status and comparative performance, enabled in part by center-level comparative performance data available within a national outcomes database mandated by the Stem Cell Therapeutic and Research Act of 2005. Standardization across centers has been facilitated via voluntary accreditation implemented by

  4. Documented intraoperative hypotension according to the three most common definitions does not match the application of antihypotensive medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franck, M; Radtke, F M; Prahs, C; Seeling, M; Papkalla, N; Wernecke, K-D; Spies, C D

    2011-01-01

    This observational study investigated which of the three most common definitions of intraoperative hypotension (IOH), reported in a published systematic literature review, were associated best with anaesthetists' administration of antihypo tensive medication (AHM). IOH and AHM use in anaesthetic procedures in a mixed surgical population (n = 2350) were also reviewed. The definitions were: arterial systolic blood pressure (SBP) 100 mmHg or a fall in SBP of > 30% of the preoperative SBP baseline; arterial SBP SBP of > 20% of the preoperative SBP. Accuracy of predicting AHM using these three definitions was 67%, 54% and 65%, respectively. Prediction by a new fourth definition, using an optimal threshold of minimal SBP falling to 24% of preoperative baseline, was 68% accurate. In multivariate logistic analysis, age, volatile versus intravenous anaesthetics, medical history of arterial hypertension and all four definitions of IOH were associated with intraoperative AHM, however IOH was not associated with postoperative in-patient stay. The three original definitions correlated poorly with the anaesthetist's judgement about applying AHM. Anaesthetists make complex decisions regarding the relevance of IOH, considering various perioperative factors in addition to SBP. Age, physical status and duration and type of surgery showed better correlations with postoperative in-patient stay than IOH.

  5. [The combination of "Careworks" insurance plan integrated with medical and long-term care insurance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumii, Hiroshi

    2006-11-01

    The social security system in Japan was greatly revolutionized when the long-term care insurance plan began in April 2000. Thus, Japan began the 21st century with two great social insurance plans, that is, medical care insurance and long-term care insurance. Each delivery system is divided: the medical care insurance plan is for the acute stage, and the long-term care is for the chronic stage. Both systems can be intended to cooperate to provide continuous care throughout life. The public health and welfare system has been trying hard to efficiently integrate the medical and long-term care insurance plans. However, it is necessary to establish a new insurance plan for ensuring the integrated adequacy of both insurance systems. One's life is destined to shift from medical care to long-term care at some point. As one ages or becomes disabled, it becomes difficult to lead an independent life with self-decision, and social support become necessary from third parties, instead of from the family or from one's own means. The society imposes the responsibility of payment of the medical and long-term care plan premiums on the individual throughout life. However, the structure of these insurance foundations should be combined under an integrated system, "Careworks", in order to also combine the concepts of length of life from the medicine and the respect of living from the long-term case to improve the social security of the life.

  6. Experiences of Emotion Management in Medical Care (Case Study: Toronto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Kianpour

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction   This study lies at the intersection of the sociology of emotions and medical sociology, investigating emotion management among a rather unknown category of medical personnel –Hospital Chaplains. Sociologists of emotions seek to understand how emotions can be socially influenced in terms of both experience and expression. They believe emotions can be influenced by such institutions as culture and religion. As a result, not only do societies and subcultures have different patterns of expressing emotions according to their own norms and characteristics, but there are also different ways of managing emotions in social institutions. For example, in North American healthcare system, hospital chaplaincy is institutionalized, like other members of the medical team, to provide spiritual and religious care, which is often accompanied with emotional support, requiring therefore emotion management. In order to explore emotional experiences that chaplains undergo as a result of working in hospital and dealing with people who are emotionally overwhelmed, the author utilized insights from interactional and symbolic interactionist, phenomenological, and ethnomethodological approaches within the sociology of emotions and spoke with different chaplains from five faith traditions. The aim was to understand how chaplains perform interpersonal emotion management, what techniques, strategies and skills are involved in dealing with people’s emotions, and how performing emotion management in healthcare institutions brings religion and spirituality at the forefront of a secular society.       Material and Methods   This is a qualitative study based on in-depth interviewing with hospital chaplains working in different hospitals in the Toronto area. Toronto has a large number of hospitals and medical/healthcare institutions, most of which have a spiritual care department in which a number of full-time and part-time chaplains work to provide

  7. Shifting subjects of health-care: placing "medical tourism" in the context of Malaysian domestic health-care reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormond, Meghann

    2011-01-01

    "Medical tourism" has frequently been held to unsettle naturalised relationships between the state and its citizenry. Yet in casting "medical tourism" as either an outside "innovation" or "invasion," scholars have often ignored the role that the neoliberal retrenchment of social welfare structures has played in shaping the domestic health-care systems of the "developing" countries recognised as international medical travel destinations. While there is little doubt that "medical tourism" impacts destinations' health-care systems, it remains essential to contextualise them. This paper offers a reading of the emergence of "medical tourism" from within the context of ongoing health-care privatisation reform in one of today's most prominent destinations: Malaysia. It argues that "medical tourism" to Malaysia has been mobilised politically both to advance domestic health-care reform and to cast off the country's "underdeveloped" image not only among foreign patient-consumers but also among its own nationals, who are themselves increasingly envisioned by the Malaysian state as prospective health-care consumers.

  8. Implementing a Pharmacist-Led Medication Management Pilot to Improve Care Transitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Root, PharmD, MS

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this project was to design and pilot a pharmacist-led process to address medication management across the continuum of care within a large integrated health-system.Summary: A care transitions pilot took place within a health-system which included a 150-bed community hospital. The pilot process expanded the pharmacist’s medication management responsibilities to include providing discharge medication reconciliation, a patient-friendly discharge medication list, discharge medication education, and medication therapy management (MTM follow-up.Adult patients with a predicted diagnosis-related group (DRG of congestive heart failure or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease admitted to the medical-surgical and intensive care units who utilized a primary care provider within the health-system were included in the pilot. Forty patients met the inclusion criteria and thirty-four (85% received an intervention from an inpatient or MTM pharmacist. Within this group of patients, 88 drug therapy problems (2.6 per patient were identified and 75% of the drug therapy recommendations made by the pharmacist were accepted by the care provider. The 30-day all-cause readmission rates for the intervention and comparison groups were 30.5% and 35.9%, respectively. The number of patients receiving follow-up care varied with 10 (25% receiving MTM follow-up, 26 (65% completing a primary care visit after their first hospital discharge, and 23 (58% receiving a home care visit.Conclusion: Implementation of a pharmacist-led medication management pilot across the continuum of care resulted in an improvement in the quality of care transitions within the health-system through increased identification and resolution of drug therapy problems and MTM follow-up. The lessons learned from the implementation of this pilot will be used to further refine pharmacy care transitions programs across the health-system.

  9. Obstetrics Patients' Assessment of Medical Students' Role in Their Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrane, Diane

    1988-01-01

    Obstetric patients rated the skills and assessed the roles of students caring for them during a clinical clerkship. They rated skills and attitudes high, generally, with lower ratings for their ability to answer questions and preparation to participate in care. Most felt students improved their care, primarily in supportive ways. (Author/MSE)

  10. Obstetrics Patients' Assessment of Medical Students' Role in Their Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrane, Diane

    1988-01-01

    Obstetric patients rated the skills and assessed the roles of students caring for them during a clinical clerkship. They rated skills and attitudes high, generally, with lower ratings for their ability to answer questions and preparation to participate in care. Most felt students improved their care, primarily in supportive ways. (Author/MSE)

  11. Availability of Heart Failure Medications in Hospice Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, Hillary D; Horney, Carolyn; Koets, David; Kutner, Jean S; Matlock, Daniel D

    2016-12-01

    Availability of cardiac medications in hospice for acute symptom management of heart failure is unknown. This study explored hospice approaches to cardiac medications for patients with heart failure. Descriptive study using a quantitative survey of 46 US hospice agencies and clinician interviews. Of 31 hospices that provided standard home medication kits for acute symptom management, only 1 provided medication with cardiac indications (oral furosemide). Only 22% of the hospice agencies had a specific cardiac medication kit. Just over half (57%) of the agencies could provide intravenous inotropic therapy, often in multiple hospice settings. Clinicians described an individualized approach to cardiac medications for patients with heart failure. This study highlights opportunities for practice guidelines that inform medical therapy for hospice patients with heart failure. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. A Narrow Definition of Insanity Opined by Medical Experts in the Oliver Smith Will Case in 1847

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremia Heinik

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Physicians specializing in the diagnosis and treatment of insane people (alienists emerged in the early 19th century and offered their expertise for the courts to consider in judgments of mental competence. In the Oliver Smith will case (1847, the competency of an attesting witness was contested on the issue of insanity. Four well-known alienists testified at trial. Although the insanity of the witness could have been viewed in broader terms, the experts used a narrow definition of insanity based primarily on the presence of delusions. These opinions were only partially consistent with contemporaneous medical notions of insanity and the broad definition of criminal responsibility. We suggest three explanatory factors for the narrow definition related to available medical knowledge, courtroom restrictions including the case itself, and mid-19th-century relationships between mental medicine and the law.

  13. Did the Olympics need more drugs? a doctor's reflection on providing medical care during Op OLYMPICS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro de Barros, James; Ross, D A

    2014-09-01

    This paper examines some of the medical problems arising from the successful deployment of Defence Medical Services personnel to Op OLYMPICS (mid-June 2012-September 2012). It does not aim to be all encompassing in its scope, but focuses on the most pressing issues affecting a junior military doctor's ability to work effectively under field conditions. This will entail a discussion about whether in a deployment such as Op OLYMPICS medical care should be based upon offering solely primary healthcare in medical centres or using Role 1 medical treatment facilities, which include primary healthcare and pre-hospital emergency care. The main recommendations arising from the deployment are: clinicians should deploy with a minimum of basic emergency drugs and equipment; a medical facility treating a large population at risk for a prolonged period should have a broad stock of medications available on site; and medical risk assessments must be performed on all Reservists during mobilisation.

  14. Coding patient emotional cues and concerns in medical consultations: the Verona coding definitions of emotional sequences (VR-CoDES).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, C.; Piccolo, L. del; Bensing, J.; Bergvik, S.; Haes, H. de; Eide, H.; Fletcher, I.; Goss, C.; Heaven, C.; Humphris, G.; Young-Mi, K.; Langewitz, W.; Meeuwesen, L.; Nuebling, M.; Rimondini, M.; Salmon, P.; Dulmen, S. van; Wissow, L.; Zandbelt, L.; Finset, A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To present the Verona Coding Definitions of Emotional Sequences (VR-CoDES CC), a consensus based system for coding patient expressions of emotional distress in medical consultations, defined as Cues or Concerns. Methods: The system was developed by an international group of communication

  15. A Review of the Construct of Demoralization: History, Definitions, and Future Directions for Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Sophie; Kissane, David W; Brooker, Joanne; Burney, Susan

    2016-02-01

    Demoralization has been the subject of discussion in relation to end-of-life care. It is characterized by hopelessness and helplessness due to a loss of purpose and meaning. The purpose of this review was to consolidate the conceptual understanding of demoralization and argue for its existence as a psychiatric syndrome. The history of the construct is explored, including the nature of existential distress and related psychological conditions that precipitate demoralization. Recent definitions of demoralization are described and differentiated from similar constructs. Future directions are highlighted, specifically in relation to the assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of demoralization in palliative care. Overall, demoralization is a clinically useful construct for those facing existential threat, guiding the clinician toward efforts to restore morale, meaning, and purpose.

  16. Role of nursing personnel in the system of medical and social care for aged population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunakova V.V.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Objective: The analysis of accessibility and quality of providing medical and social care for aged population. Methods: The analysis of the work of institutions of medical and social care has been carried out. According to the time-study of the working day of nurses the characteristics of nursing personnel have been determined. Results: Data on the arrangement of medical aid at home for aged patients of the Saratov region have been provided. The importance of nursing personnel in the system of complex medical and social care has been assessed and the main areas of nursing activity have been found out. Conclusion: The article has been stated that creation of quality control system for nursing personnel is of great necessity to provide effective medical and social care.

  17. Interoperable Medical Instrument Networking and Access System with Security Considerations for Critical Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz Gurkan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent influx of electronic medical records in the health care field, coupled with the need of providing continuous care to patients in the critical care environment, has driven the need for interoperability of medical devices. Open standards are needed to support flexible processes and interoperability of medical devices, especially in intensive care units. In this paper, we present an interoperable networking and access architecture based on the CAN protocol. Predictability of the delay of medical data reports is a desirable attribute that can be realized using a tightly-coupled system architecture. Our simulations on network architecture demonstrate that a bounded delay for event reports offers predictability. In addition, we address security issues related to the storage of electronic medical records. We present a set of open source tools and tests to identify the security breaches, and appropriate measures that can be implemented to be compliant with the HIPAA rules.

  18. An Update on Geriatric Medication Safety and Challenges Specific to the Care of Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koronkowski, Michael; Eisenhower, Christine; Marcum, Zachary

    2016-01-01

    The prescribing of drug therapies in older adults presents a number of safety challenges. The increased complexity of chronic care for older adults has led to polypharmacy and potentially inappropriate medication use, which can contribute to drug-induced diseases, adverse drug reactions, drug interactions, cognitive impairment, falls, hospitalization, and mortality. In this review, the authors discuss recent medication safety literature pertaining to the classes of medications commonly prescribed to older adults: anticholinergics, psychiatric medications, and antibiotics. Safety concerns associated with the use of these medications and the implications for long-term care practitioners are reviewed. The information provided can be used to inform and improve geriatric care delivered by practitioners across health care environments. PMID:27340375

  19. Allowing Family to be Family: End-of-Life Care in Veterans Affairs Medical Foster Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manheim, Chelsea E; Haverhals, Leah M; Jones, Jacqueline; Levy, Cari R

    2016-01-01

    The Medical Foster Home program is a unique long-term care program coordinated by the Veterans Health Administration. The program pairs Veterans with private, 24-hour a day community-based caregivers who often care for Veterans until the end of life. This qualitative study explored the experiences of care coordination for Medical Foster Home Veterans at the end of life with eight Veterans' family members, five Medical Foster Home caregivers, and seven Veterans Health Administration Home-Based Primary Care team members. A case study, qualitative content analysis identified these themes addressing care coordination and impact of the Medical Foster Home model on those involved: (a) Medical Foster Home program supports Veterans' families; (b) Medical Foster Home program supports the caregiver as family; (c) Veterans' needs are met socially and culturally at the end of life; and (d) the changing needs of Veterans, families, and caregivers at Veterans' end of life are addressed. Insights into how to best support Medical Foster Home caregivers caring for Veterans at the end of life were gained including the need for more and better respite options and how caregivers are compensated in the month of the Veteran's death, as well as suggestions to navigate end-of-life care coordination with multiple stakeholders involved.

  20. Availability and quality of specialized ophthalmologic medical care: assessment by patients living in rural areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Seraphimov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of restricted availability and quality of ophthalmologic medical care remains one of the main ones in the national healthcare. The article gives a comparative analysis of the opinions of rural residents of Leningrad region are in need of surgical treatment for ophthalmologic diseases, availability and quality of specialized medical care. A questionnaire was developed based on the methodology proposed by the Federal compulsory medical insurance Fund, through formal interviews of respondents of patients who received specialized ophthalmologic medical care in Leningrad region before opening of eye care hospitals for surgical treatment of cataract and glaucoma (148 patients and afterwards (320 patients. The results show that almost all patients who received treatment after the modernization of ophthalmologic offices are satisfied with the quality of medical care (completely satisfied – 91,3 %, quite satisfied – 7,6 %, which is significantly higher than the figures obtained in the survey of the patients before creation of specialized departments (t=3,6, p<0.05. Availability of medical care before reequipment of ophthalmologic departments in hospitals satisfied 62.8 % of respondents, and after the organization of activities of eye care hospitals – 75, 3 % (t=2,8, p<0.05. However, despite the new form of organization of medical aid, 27.5 % of the respondents are still not satisfied with its transport accessibility. Thus, patients receiving operative treatment of cataract are generally satisfied with the availability and quality of their medical services. Higher ratings of availability and quality of specialized eye medical care were received after opening of eye care hospitals for surgical treatment of cataract and glaucoma in Leningrad region.

  1. What is a Green Medical Care%什么是绿色医疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王吉善

    2011-01-01

    The paper put forward the concept of green medical care. Tthe green should include six medical aspects, including green medical environment, clean medical care, smooth process of service delivery, greater emphasis on patient safety, taking the initiative to reduce the medical - sources harm, and building doctor - patient harmony. The green medical care can help to implement the overall goal of health reform.%提出了绿色医疗的概念.认为绿色医疗应包含6个方面的内容,即绿色的就诊环境,是清洁的医疗,是畅通的服务流程,更加注重患者安全,主动减少医源伤害,共建医患和谐等.绿色医疗有助于医改总目标的实现.

  2. [Structured medication management in primary care - a tool to promote medication safety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahler, C.; Freund, T.; Baldauf, A.; Jank, S.; Ludt, S.; Peters-Klimm, F.; Haefeli, W.E.; Szecsenyi, J.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with chronic disease usually need to take multiple medications. Drug-related interactions, adverse events, suboptimal adherence, and self-medication are components that can affect medication safety and lead to serious consequences for the patient. At present, regular medication reviews to c

  3. ["Meet the AIX-PERTs." Emergency medical care at the beginning of the medical reform curriculum in Aachen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckers, S; Bickenbach, J; Fries, M; Hoffmann, N; Classen-Linke, I; Killersreiter, B; Wainwright, U; Kuhlen, R; Rossaint, R

    2004-06-01

    Extensive knowledge and skills in the basics of emergency medical care are of paramount importance for every physician and should therefore be an integral part of medical education. Regulations for medical licensure in Germany were revised by the administrative authorities in 2002 and as a consequence the Medical Faculty of the University of Aachen (Germany) decided to start the Medical Reform Curriculum Aachen. A multidisciplinary, problem-oriented and organ-related approach to medical education replaces the classical discrimination between basic and clinical sciences. With AIX-PERT (AIX-la-Chapelle Program for Emergency medical care and Resuscitation Training), a program consisting of problem-based learning sessions was developed for introduction to the first year students. Defined teaching objectives in emergency medicine are now incorporated in undergraduate medical education. The extremely positive evaluation of the new approach encouraged us to promote AIX-PERT further. In the future the effects of success of this approach will be assessed by longitudinal studies of skills and knowledge during the continuing curriculum.

  4. Other-regarding behavior and motivation in health care provision: an experiment with medical and non-medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig-Schmidt, Heike; Wiesen, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    Other-regarding motivation is a fundamental determinant of public service provision. In health care, one example is physicians who act benevolently towards their patients when providing medical services. Such patient-regarding motivation seems closely associated with a personal sacrifice that health service providers are willing to make. Surprisingly, evidence on physicians' motivation is rare. This paper contributes to the literature by investigating prospective physicians', in particular, medical students', motivations and behavior. We measure the willingness to sacrifice own profit in order to increase the patients' health benefit. We conduct the same analysis for non-medical students. In a controlled incentivized laboratory experiment, participants decide, in the role of physicians, on the provision of medical services under fee-for-service or capitation schemes. Overall, 42 medical students and 44 non-medical students participated in five experimental sessions conducted between 2006 and 2008. We find substantial differences under both payment systems: compared to medical students, students of non-medical majors are less patient-regarding, less willing to sacrifice their own profit, and they state less motivation to improve patients' health. This results in significantly lower patient health benefits. Some implications for health care policies in light of physician shortage and for physician payment systems are discussed.

  5. Costs of medically assisted reproduction treatment at specialized fertility clinics in the Danish public health care system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Terkel; Erb, Karin; Rizvanovic, Amra

    2014-01-01

    To examine the costs to the public health care system of couples in medically assisted reproduction.......To examine the costs to the public health care system of couples in medically assisted reproduction....

  6. [The role and place of pathology services in ensuring and improving the quality of medical care: Organizational and legal aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeev, I V

    2015-01-01

    The paper considers the legal and organizational issues of the activity of pathology services in improving medical care. It shows the main (diagnostic and medico-organizational) areas of pathology work to improve the quality of medical care.

  7. Beyond the medical home: Special Care Family Academy for children and youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrall, Roger S; Blumberg, Jody H; Beck, Stephanie; Bourgoin, Magdalena D; Votto, John J; Barton, Randall W

    2012-01-01

    Children and youth with special health care needs require more health care and related services and consequently incur more costs than other individuals. Implementation of the "medical home" concept has benefitted children with special needs, resulting in fewer unmet medical needs and more consistent health care delivery. As advances in health care have enabled an increasingly higher percentage of children with special needs to live far into adulthood, the transition from adolescence to adulthood poses new challenges in obtaining medical care, education, job training, and employment opportunities. A more comprehensive medical home paradigm for children with special needs is composed of three fundamental components: 1) home/community, 2) education, and 3) medical/dental care. These components should be developed equally and in parallel, emphasizing consumer advocacy, care coordination, education, life skills, and career development, to attain independent or minimally dependent living. This new model has been initiated at Hospital for Special Care in New Britain, Connecticut, in its Special Care Family Academy.

  8. A proposal for a worldwide definition of health resort medicine, balneology, medical hydrology and climatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutenbrunner, Christoph; Bender, Tamas; Cantista, Pedro; Karagülle, Zeki

    2010-09-01

    , and the use of climatic factors for therapy is called climatotherapy. Reflecting the effects of health resort medicine, it is important to take other environmental factors into account. These can be classified within the framework of the ICF (International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health). Examples include receiving health care by specialised doctors, being well educated (ICF-domain: e355), having an environment supporting social contacts (family, peer groups) (cf. ICF-domains: d740, d760), facilities for recreation, cultural activities, leisure and sports (cf. ICF-domain: d920), access to a health-promoting atmosphere and an environment close to nature (cf. ICF-domain: e210). The scientific field dealing with health resort medicine is called health resort sciences. It includes the medical sciences, psychology, social sciences, technical sciences, chemistry, physics, geography, jurisprudence, etc. Finally, this paper proposes a systematic international discussion of descriptions in the field of Health Resort Medicine, Balneology, Medical Hydrology and Climatology, and discusses short descriptive terms with the goal of achieving internationally accepted distinct terms. This task should be done via a structured consensus process and is of major importance for the publication of scientific results as well as for systematic reviews and meta-analyses.

  9. A proposal for a worldwide definition of health resort medicine, balneology, medical hydrology and climatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutenbrunner, Christoph; Bender, Tamas; Cantista, Pedro; Karagülle, Zeki

    2010-09-01

    hydrotherapy, and the use of climatic factors for therapy is called climatotherapy. Reflecting the effects of health resort medicine, it is important to take other environmental factors into account. These can be classified within the framework of the ICF (International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health). Examples include receiving health care by specialised doctors, being well educated (ICF-domain: e355), having an environment supporting social contacts (family, peer groups) (cf. ICF-domains: d740, d760), facilities for recreation, cultural activities, leisure and sports (cf. ICF-domain: d920), access to a health-promoting atmosphere and an environment close to nature (cf. ICF-domain: e210). The scientific field dealing with health resort medicine is called health resort sciences. It includes the medical sciences, psychology, social sciences, technical sciences, chemistry, physics, geography, jurisprudence, etc. Finally, this paper proposes a systematic international discussion of descriptions in the field of Health Resort Medicine, Balneology, Medical Hydrology and Climatology, and discusses short descriptive terms with the goal of achieving internationally accepted distinct terms. This task should be done via a structured consensus process and is of major importance for the publication of scientific results as well as for systematic reviews and meta-analyses.

  10. Medication administration errors for older people in long-term residential care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szczepura Ala

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Older people in long-term residential care are at increased risk of medication prescribing and administration errors. The main aim of this study was to measure the incidence of medication administration errors in nursing and residential homes using a barcode medication administration (BCMA system. Methods A prospective study was conducted in 13 care homes (9 residential and 4 nursing. Data on all medication administrations for a cohort of 345 older residents were recorded in real-time using a disguised observation technique. Every attempt by social care and nursing staff to administer medication over a 3-month observation period was analysed using BCMA records to determine the incidence and types of potential medication administration errors (MAEs and whether errors were averted. Error classifications included attempts to administer medication at the wrong time, to the wrong person or discontinued medication. Further analysis compared data for residential and nursing homes. In addition, staff were surveyed prior to BCMA system implementation to assess their awareness of administration errors. Results A total of 188,249 medication administration attempts were analysed using BCMA data. Typically each resident was receiving nine different drugs and was exposed to 206 medication administration episodes every month. During the observation period, 2,289 potential MAEs were recorded for the 345 residents; 90% of residents were exposed to at least one error. The most common (n = 1,021, 45% of errors was attempting to give medication at the wrong time. Over the 3-month observation period, half (52% of residents were exposed to a serious error such as attempting to give medication to the wrong resident. Error incidence rates were 1.43 as high (95% CI 1.32-1.56 p Conclusions The incidence of medication administration errors is high in long-term residential care. A barcode medication administration system can capture medication

  11. Transitions in Care: Medication Reconciliation in the Community Pharmacy Setting After Discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staci M. Williams, PharmD

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the feasibility of a workflow process in which pharmacists in an independent community pharmacy group conduct medication reconciliation for patients undergoing transitions in care.Methods: Three workflow changes were made to improve the medication reconciliation process in a group of three independent community pharmacies. Analysis of the process included workflow steps performed by pharmacy staff, pharmacist barriers encountered during the medication reconciliation process, number of medication discrepancies identified, and pharmacist comfort level while performing each medication reconciliation service.Key Findings: Sixty patient medication reconciliation services met the inclusion criteria for the study. Pharmacists were involved in all steps associated with the medication reconciliation workflow, and were the sole performer in four of the steps: verifying discharge medications with the pharmacy medication profile, resolving discrepancies, contacting the prescriber, and providing patient counseling. Pharmacists were least involved in entering medications into the pharmacy management system, performing that workflow step 13% of the time. The most common barriers were the absence of a discharge medication list (24% and patient not present during consultation (11%. A total of 231 medication discrepancies were identified, with an average of 3.85 medication discrepancies per discharge. Pharmacists’ comfort level performing medication reconciliation improved through the 13 weeks of the study.Conclusions: These findings suggest that medication reconciliation for patients discharged from hospitals and long term care facilities can be successfully performed in an independent community pharmacy setting. Because many medication discrepancies were identified during this transition of care, it is highly valuable for community pharmacists to perform medication reconciliation services.

  12. Integrated complex care coordination for children with medical complexity: A mixed-methods evaluation of tertiary care-community collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohen Eyal

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary care medical homes may improve health outcomes for children with special healthcare needs (CSHCN, by improving care coordination. However, community-based primary care practices may be challenged to deliver comprehensive care coordination to complex subsets of CSHCN such as children with medical complexity (CMC. Linking a tertiary care center with the community may achieve cost effective and high quality care for CMC. The objective of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of community-based complex care clinics integrated with a tertiary care center. Methods A before- and after-intervention study design with mixed (quantitative/qualitative methods was utilized. Clinics at two community hospitals distant from tertiary care were staffed by local community pediatricians with the tertiary care center nurse practitioner and linked with primary care providers. Eighty-one children with underlying chronic conditions, fragility, requirement for high intensity care and/or technology assistance, and involvement of multiple providers participated. Main outcome measures included health care utilization and expenditures, parent reports of parent- and child-quality of life [QOL (SF-36®, CPCHILD©, PedsQL™], and family-centered care (MPOC-20®. Comparisons were made in equal (up to 1 year pre- and post-periods supplemented by qualitative perspectives of families and pediatricians. Results Total health care system costs decreased from median (IQR $244 (981 per patient per month (PPPM pre-enrolment to $131 (355 PPPM post-enrolment (p=.007, driven primarily by fewer inpatient days in the tertiary care center (p=.006. Parents reported decreased out of pocket expenses (p© domains [Health Standardization Section (p=.04; Comfort and Emotions (p=.03], while total CPCHILD© score decreased between baseline and 1 year (p=.003. Parents and providers reported the ability to receive care close to home as a key benefit. Conclusions Complex

  13. [Treatment path of wound patient in the HUC medical care district].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepäntalo, Mauri; Ahokas, Terttuliisa; Heinänen, Tuula; Heiskanen-Kuisma, Kaija; Hietanen, Helvi; Juutilainen, Vesa; Iivanainen, Antti; Iso-Aho, Merja; Tukiainen, Erkki; Sane, Timo; Valtonen, Ville

    2009-01-01

    Unorganized care on chronic wounds is expensive. Resources are focused on the care of complicated wounds, although a significant proportion of the wounds could be prevented or treated at an early stage. Good care is cost-effective, a delayed care and inoperative treatment chain will waste money and resources. Specialization of medical and nursing staff in wound care will improve treatment outcome. Prerequisites for the necessary care must be guaranteed by creating a complete treatment path for problematic wounds in the capital region.

  14. Delayed entry into HIV medical care in a nationally representative sample of HIV-infected adults receiving medical care in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, McKaylee; Wei, Stanley C; Beer, Linda; Adedinsewo, Demilade; Stockwell, Sandra; Dombrowski, Julia C; Johnson, Christopher; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Before widespread antiretroviral therapy (ART), an estimated 17% of people delayed HIV care. We report national estimates of the prevalence and factors associated with delayed care entry in the contemporary ART era. We used Medical Monitoring Project data collected from June 2009 through May 2011 for 1425 persons diagnosed with HIV from May 2004 to April 2009 who initiated care within 12 months. We defined delayed care as entry >three months from diagnosis. Adjusted prevalence ratios (aPRs) were calculated to identify risk factors associated with delayed care. In this nationally representative sample of HIV-infected adults receiving medical care, 7.0% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 5.3-8.8) delayed care after diagnosis. Black race was associated with a lower likelihood of delay than white race (aPR 0.38). Men who have sex with women versus women who have sex with men (aPR 1.86) and persons required to take an HIV test versus recommended by a provider (aPR 2.52) were more likely to delay. Among those who delayed 48% reported a personal factor as the primary reason. Among persons initially diagnosed with HIV (non-AIDS), those who delayed care were twice as likely (aPR 2.08) to develop AIDS as of May 2011. Compared to the pre-ART era, there was a nearly 60% reduction in delayed care entry. Although relatively few HIV patients delayed care entry, certain groups may have an increased risk. Focus on linkage to care among persons who are required to take an HIV test may further reduce delayed care entry.

  15. The Use of Psychotropic Medication for Children in Foster Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crismon, M. Lynn; Argo, Tami

    2009-01-01

    The use of psychotropic medication for foster children is in itself not unique; however, these children are of particular interest because of the stress associated with their life situations. A thorough assessment of the child and family should occur before beginning these medications, and in general, they should only be used in the presence of a…

  16. Emergency Victim Care. A Textbook for Emergency Medical Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Trade and Industrial Education Service.

    This textbook for emergency medical personnel should be useful to fire departments, private ambulance companies, industrial emergency and rescue units, police departments, and nurses. The 30 illustrated chapters cover topics such as: (1) Emergency Medical Service Vehicles, (2) Safe Driving Practices, (3) Anatomy and Physiology, (4) Closed Chest…

  17. Improving appropriate medication use for older people in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwint, H.F.

    2013-01-01

    Clinical pharmacy interventions for older people with polypharmacy can be divided in dispensing services (aimed at support of medication management), e.g. multidose dispensing systems, and medication reviews (aimed at appropriateness of the pharmacotherapy. The objective of this thesis is to describ

  18. Improving appropriate medication use for older people in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwint, H.F.

    2013-01-01

    Clinical pharmacy interventions for older people with polypharmacy can be divided in dispensing services (aimed at support of medication management), e.g. multidose dispensing systems, and medication reviews (aimed at appropriateness of the pharmacotherapy. The objective of this thesis is to

  19. Psychotropic medication in a randomly selected group of citizens receiving residential or home care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Futtrup, Tina Bergmann; Helnæs, Ann Kathrine; Schultz, Hanne

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Treatment with one or more psychotropic medications (PMs), especially in the elderly, is associated with risk, and the effects of treatment are poorly validated. The aim of this article was to describe the use of PM in a population of citizens receiving either residential care or home...... care with focus on the prevalence of drug use, the combination of different PMs and doses in relation to current recommendations. METHODS: The medication lists of 214 citizens receiving residential care (122) and home care (92) were collected together with information on age, gender and residential...... number 2007-58-0015....

  20. The clash of medical civilizations: experiencing "primary care" in a neoliberal culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Brian

    2012-12-01

    An anthropologist describes how he found himself at the vortex of a "clash of medical civilizations:" neoliberalism and the international primary health care movement. His involvement in a $6 million social change initiative in medical education became a basis to unlock the hidden tensions, contradictions and movements within the "primary care" phenomenon. The essay is structured on five ethnographic stories, situated on a continuum from "natural" species-level primary care to "unnatural" neoliberal primary care. Food is an element of all tales. Taking the long view of history/prehistory permits us to better recognize ideological distortions in order to more capably transform medicine.

  1. Medical care utilization during 1 year prior to death in suicides motivated by physical illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jaelim; Lee, Won Joon; Moon, Ki Tae; Suh, Mina; Sohn, Jungwoo; Ha, Kyoung Hwa; Kim, Changsoo; Shin, Dong Chun; Jung, Sang Hyuk

    2013-05-01

    Many epidemiological studies have suggested that a variety of medical illnesses are associated with suicide. Investigating the time-varying pattern of medical care utilization prior to death in suicides motivated by physical illnesses would be helpful for developing suicide prevention programs for patients with physical illnesses. Suicides motivated by physical illnesses were identified by the investigator's note from the National Police Agency, which was linked to the data from the Health Insurance Review and Assessment. We investigated the time-varying patterns of medical care utilization during 1 year prior to suicide using repeated-measures data analysis after adjustment for age, gender, area of residence, and socioeconomic status. Among 1994 suicides for physical illness, 1893 (94.9%) suicides contacted any medical care services and 445 (22.3%) suicides contacted mental health care during 1 year prior to suicide. The number of medical care visits and individual medical expenditures increased as the date of suicide approached (psuicide significantly increased only in 40- to 64-year-old men (p=0.002), women suicides motivated by physical illnesses contacted medical care during 1 year prior to suicide, but many of them did not undergo psychiatric evaluation. This underscores the need for programs to provide psychosocial support to patients with physical illnesses.

  2. Medical care providers' perspectives on dental information needs in electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Amit; Shimpi, Neel; Mahnke, Andrea; Mathias, Richard; Ye, Zhan

    2017-05-01

    The authors conducted this study to identify the most relevant patient dental information in a medical-dental integrated electronic health record (iEHR) necessary for medical care providers to inform holistic treatment. The authors collected input from a diverse sample of 65 participants from a large, regional health system representing 13 medical specialties and administrative units. The authors collected feedback from participants through 11 focus group sessions. Two independent reviewers analyzed focus group transcripts to identify major and minor themes. The authors identified 336 of 385 annotations that most medical care providers coded as relevant. Annotations strongly supporting relevancy to clinical practice aligned with 18 major thematic categories, with the top 6 categories being communication, appointments, system design, medications, treatment plan, and dental alerts. Study participants identified dental data of highest relevance to medical care providers and recommended implementation of user-friendly access to dental data in iEHRs as crucial to holistic care delivery. Identification of the patients' dental information most relevant to medical care providers will inform strategies for improving the integration of that information into the medical-dental iEHR. Copyright © 2017 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Relationship between patient dependence and direct medical-, social-, indirect-, and informal-care costs in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darbà J

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Josep Darbà,1 Lisette Kaskens2 1Department of Economics, University of Barcelona, 2BCN Health Economics and Outcomes Research SL, Barcelona, Spain Objective: The objectives of this analysis were to examine how patients' dependence on others relates to costs of care and explore the incremental effects of patient dependence measured by the Dependence Scale on costs for patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD in Spain. Methods: The Co-Dependence in Alzheimer's Disease study is an 18 multicenter, cross-sectional, observational study among patients with AD according to the clinical dementia rating score and their caregivers in Spain. This study also gathered data on resource utilization for medical care, social care, caregiver productivity losses, and informal caregiver time reported in the Resource Utilization in Dementia Lite instrument and a complementary questionnaire. The data of 343 patients and their caregivers were collected through the completion of a clinical report form during one visit/assessment at an outpatient center or hospital, where all instruments were administered. The data collected (in addition to clinical measures also included sociodemographic data concerning the patients and their caregivers. Cost analysis was based on resource use for medical care, social care, caregiver productivity losses, and informal caregiver time reported in the Resource Utilization in Dementia Lite instrument and a complementary questionnaire. Resource unit costs were applied to value direct medical-, social-, and indirect-care costs. A replacement cost method was used to value informal care. Patient dependence on others was measured using the Dependence Scale, and the Cumulative Index Rating Scale was administered to the patient to assess multi-morbidity. Multivariate regression analysis was used to model the effects of dependence and other sociodemographic and clinical variables on cost of care. Results: The mean (standard deviation costs per patient

  4. Adult Day Care and Medical and Hospital Claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Neena L.; Blandford, Audrey A.

    1987-01-01

    Examined effect of adult day care (ADC) on utilization of health care practitioner and inpatient hospital services. Data from three separate ADC studies revealed that, when operative for some time, ADC may result in dramatic decreases in hospital inpatient stays. Findings warrant further research. (Author/NB)

  5. Primary Medical Care Provider Accreditation (PMCPA): pilot evaluation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campbell, S.M.; Chauhan, U.; Lester, H.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: While practice-level or team accreditation is not new to primary care in the UK and there are organisational indicators in the Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF) organisational domain, there is no universal system of accreditation of the quality of organisational aspects of care in the

  6. Nursing Home Stakeholder Views of Resident Involvement in Medical Care Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Theresa J.; Harrison, Tracie C.; Goodwin, James S.

    2017-01-01

    Demand by nursing home residents for involvement in their medical care, or, patient-centered care, is expected to increase as baby boomers begin seeking long-term care for their chronic illnesses. To explore the needs in meeting this proposed demand, we used a qualitative descriptive method with content analysis to obtain the joint perspective of key stakeholders on the current state of person-centered medical care in the nursing home. We interviewed 31 nursing home stakeholders: 5 residents, 7 family members, 8 advanced practice registered nurses, 5 physicians, and 6 administrators. Our findings revealed constraints placed by the long-term care system limited medical involvement opportunities and created conflicting goals for patient-centered medical care. Resident participation in medical care was perceived as low, but important. The creation of supportive educational programs for all stakeholders to facilitate a common goal for nursing home admission and to provide assistance through the long-term care system was encouraged. PMID:25721717

  7. Delay of medical care for symptomatic breast cancer: a literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Karla Unger-Saldaña; Claudia Infante-Castañeda

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to organize and summarize existing information on delayed medical attention for women with breast cancer and identify research needs in this area. This review is organized in six parts: origins and permanence of the message do not delay medical attention for potential cancer symptoms; definition and classification of breast cancer delay; impact of delay on breast cancer prognosis; factors related to breast cancer delay and the ways these have been studied; the s...

  8. Value as the key concept in the health care system: how it has influenced medical practice and clinical decision-making processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzorati, Chiara; Pravettoni, Gabriella

    2017-01-01

    In the last 10 years, value has played a key role in the health care system. In this concept, innovations in medical practice and the increasing importance of patient centeredness have contributed to draw the attention of the medical community. Nonetheless, a large consensus on the meaning of “value” is still lacking: patients, physicians, policy makers, and other health care professionals have different ideas on which component of value may play a prominent role. Yet, shared clinical decision-making and patient empowerment have been recognized as fundamental features of the concept of value. Different paradigms of health care system embrace different meanings of value, and the absence of common and widely accepted definition does not help to identify a unique model of care in health care system. Our aim is to provide an overview of those paradigms that have considered value as a key theoretical concept and to investigate how the presence of value can influence the medical practice. This article may contribute to draw attention toward patients and propose a possible link between health care system based on “value” and new paradigms such as patient-centered system (PCS), patient empowerment, and P5 medicine, in order to create a predictive, personalized, preventive, participatory, and psycho-cognitive model to treat patients. Indeed, patient empowerment, value-based system, and P5 medicine seem to shed light on different aspects of a PCS, and this allows a better understanding of people under care. PMID:28356752

  9. Value as the key concept in the health care system: how it has influenced medical practice and clinical decision-making processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzorati, Chiara; Pravettoni, Gabriella

    2017-01-01

    In the last 10 years, value has played a key role in the health care system. In this concept, innovations in medical practice and the increasing importance of patient centeredness have contributed to draw the attention of the medical community. Nonetheless, a large consensus on the meaning of "value" is still lacking: patients, physicians, policy makers, and other health care professionals have different ideas on which component of value may play a prominent role. Yet, shared clinical decision-making and patient empowerment have been recognized as fundamental features of the concept of value. Different paradigms of health care system embrace different meanings of value, and the absence of common and widely accepted definition does not help to identify a unique model of care in health care system. Our aim is to provide an overview of those paradigms that have considered value as a key theoretical concept and to investigate how the presence of value can influence the medical practice. This article may contribute to draw attention toward patients and propose a possible link between health care system based on "value" and new paradigms such as patient-centered system (PCS), patient empowerment, and P5 medicine, in order to create a predictive, personalized, preventive, participatory, and psycho-cognitive model to treat patients. Indeed, patient empowerment, value-based system, and P5 medicine seem to shed light on different aspects of a PCS, and this allows a better understanding of people under care.

  10. 42 CFR 421.501 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., training, or medical expertise of a licensed health care professional. Non-random prepayment complex... been paid. Provider-specific probe review means the complex medical review of a small sample of claims... PROGRAM MEDICARE CONTRACTING Medical Review § 421.501 Definitions. As used in this subpart—...

  11. Improving care planning and coordination for service users with medical co-morbidity transitioning between tertiary medical and primary care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranwell, K; Polacsek, M; McCann, T V

    2017-08-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Mental health service users with medical co-morbidity frequently experience difficulties accessing and receiving appropriate treatment in emergency departments. Service users frequently experience fragmented care planning and coordinating between tertiary medical and primary care services. Little is known about mental health nurses' perspectives about how to address these problems. WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: Emergency department clinicians' poor communication and negative attitudes have adverse effects on service users and the quality of care they receive. The findings contribute to the international evidence about mental health nurses' perspectives of service users feeling confused and frustrated in this situation, and improving coordination and continuity of care, facilitating transitions and increasing family and caregiver participation. Intervention studies are needed to evaluate if adoption of these measures leads to sustainable improvements in care planning and coordination, and how service users with medical co-morbidity are treated in emergency departments in particular. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: Effective planning and coordination of care are essential to enable smooth transitions between tertiary medical (emergency departments in particular) and primary care services for service users with medical co-morbidity. Ongoing professional development education and support is needed for emergency department clinicians. There is also a need to develop an organized and systemic approach to improving service users' experience in emergency departments. Introduction Mental health service users with medical co-morbidity frequently experience difficulties accessing appropriate treatment in medical hospitals, and often there is poor collaboration within and between services. Little is known about mental health nurses' perspectives on how to address these problems. Aim To explore mental health nurses

  12. The Integrated Medical Model: A Decision Support Tool for In-flight Crew Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Doug

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the development of an Integrated Medical Model (IMM) decision support tool for in-flight crew health care safety. Clinical methods, resources, and case scenarios are also addressed.

  13. Health Care Professionals’ Pain Narratives in Hospitalized Children’s Medical Records. Part 1: Pain Descriptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judy Rashotte

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although documentation of children’s pain by health care professionals is frequently undertaken, few studies have explored the nature of the language used to describe pain in the medical records of hospitalized children.

  14. Justice and care: the implications of the Kohlberg-Gilligan debate for medical ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, V A

    1992-12-01

    Carol Gilligan has identified two orientations to moral understanding; the dominant 'justice orientation' and the under-valued 'care orientation'. Based on her discernment of a 'voice of care', Gilligan challenges the adequacy of a deontological liberal framework for moral development and moral theory. This paper examines how the orientations of justice and care are played out in medical ethical theory. Specifically, I question whether the medical moral domain is adequately described by the norms of impartiality, universality, and equality that characterize the liberal ideal. My analysis of justice-oriented medical ethics, focuses on the libertarian theory of H.T. Engelhardt and the contractarian theory of R.M. Veatch. I suggest that in the work of E.D. Pellegrino and D.C. Thomasma we find not only a more authentic representation of medical morality but also a project that is compatible with the care orientation's emphasis on human need and responsiveness to particular others.

  15. Parent Perspective on Care Coordination Services for Their Child with Medical Complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhonda G. Cady

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The overarching goal of care coordination is communication and co-management across settings. Children with medical complexity require care from multiple services and providers, and the many benefits of care coordination on health and patient experience outcomes have been documented. Despite these findings, parents still report their greatest challenge is communication gaps. When this occurs, parents assume responsibility for aggregating and sharing health information across providers and settings. A new primary-specialty care coordination partnership model for children with medical complexity works to address these challenges and bridge communication gaps. During the first year of the new partnership, parents participated in focus groups to better understand how they perceive communication and collaboration between the providers and services delivering care for their medically complex child. Our findings from these sessions reflect the current literature and highlight additional challenges of rural families, as seen from the perspective of the parents. We found that parents appreciate when professional care coordination is provided, but this is often the exception and not the norm. Additionally, parents feel that the local health system’s inability to care for their medically complex child results in unnecessary trips to urban-based specialty care. These gaps require a system-level approach to care coordination and, consequently, new paradigms for delivery are urgently needed.

  16. Factors associated with medication information in diabetes care: differences in perceptions between patients and health care professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Längst G

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Gerda Längst,1 Hanna Marita Seidling,2,3 Marion Stützle,2,3 Dominik Ose,1 Ines Baudendistel,1 Joachim Szecsenyi,1 Michel Wensing,1,4 Cornelia Mahler1 1Department of General Practice and Health Services Research, University Hospital of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany; 2Cooperation Unit Clinical Pharmacy, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany; 3Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Pharmacoepidemiology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany; 4Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Scientific Institute for Quality of Healthcare, Nijmegen, the Netherlands Purpose: This qualitative study in patients with type 2 diabetes and health care professionals (HCPs aimed to investigate which factors they perceive to enhance or impede medication information provision in primary care. Similarities and differences in perspectives were explored.Methods: Eight semistructured focus groups were conducted, four with type 2 diabetes patients (n=25 and four with both general practitioners (n=13 and health care assistants (n=10. Sessions were audio and video recorded, transcribed verbatim, and subjected to computer-aided qualitative content analysis.Results: Diabetes patients and HCPs broadly highlighted similar factors as enablers for satisfactory medication information delivery. Perceptions substantially differed regarding impeding factors. Both patients and HCPs perceived it to be essential to deliver tailored information, to have a trustful and continuous patient–provider relationship, to regularly reconcile medications, and to provide tools for medication management. However, substantial differences in perceptions related to impeding factors included the causes of inadequate information, the detail required for risk-related information, and barriers to medication reconciliation. Medication self-management was a prevalent topic among patients, whereas HCPs’ focus was on fulfilling therapy and medication management responsibilities

  17. The standard of medical care under the Australian Civil Liability Acts: ten years on.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joseph

    2014-12-01

    It has been more than a decade since the modified Bolam test was legislatively enacted.by the Australian States following the medical indemnity crisis. Since its implementation, the modified Bolam test has been configured by judges as a defence to the common law standard of care in medical diagnosis and treatment. The article argues against this interpretation and suggests an alternative way of implementing this statutory test. It is proposed that the modified Bolam test ought to have been applied as a single yardstick to determine the required standard of care in diagnosis and treatment. Changes are also recommended to reform the test with a view to striking a balance between the interests of patients and doctors in medical disputes, and strengthening judicial supervision of the medical profession. These proposed reforms could resolve the shortcomings of the common law more effectively. They may also enhance the standard of medical care in Australia in the long run.

  18. Enabling joint commission medication reconciliation objectives with the HL7 / ASTM Continuity of Care Document standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolin, Robert H; Giannone, Gay; Schadow, Gunther

    2007-10-11

    We sought to determine how well the HL7/ASTM Continuity of Care Document (CCD) standard supports the requirements underlying the Joint Commission medication reconciliation recommendations. In particular, the Joint Commission emphasizes that transition points in the continuum of care are vulnerable to communication breakdowns, and that these breakdowns are a common source of medication errors. These transition points are the focus of communication standards, suggesting that CCD can support and enable medication related patient safety initiatives. Data elements needed to support the Joint Commission recommendations were identified and mapped to CCD, and a detailed clinical scenario was constructed. The mapping identified minor gaps, and identified fields present in CCD not specifically identified by Joint Commission, but useful nonetheless when managing medications across transitions of care, suggesting that a closer collaboration between the Joint Commission and standards organizations will be mutually beneficial. The nationally recognized CCD specification provides a standards-based solution for enabling Joint Commission medication reconciliation objectives.

  19. Medication errors in the intensive care unit: literature review using the SEIPS model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frith, Karen H

    2013-01-01

    Medication errors in intensive care units put patients at risk for injury or death every day. Safety requires an organized and systematic approach to improving the tasks, technology, environment, and organizational culture associated with medication systems. The Systems Engineering Initiative for Patient Safety model can help leaders and health care providers understand the complicated and high-risk work associated with critical care. Using this model, the author combines a human factors approach with the well-known structure-process-outcome model of quality improvement to examine research literature. The literature review reveals that human factors, including stress, high workloads, knowledge deficits, and performance deficits, are associated with medication errors. Factors contributing to medication errors are frequent interruptions, communication problems, and poor fit of health information technology to the workflow of providers. Multifaceted medication safety interventions are needed so that human factors and system problems can be addressed simultaneously.

  20. Medical innovation and age-specific trends in health care utilization: findings and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Albert; Wouterse, Bram; Slobbe, Laurentius C J; Boshuizen, Hendriek C; Polder, Johan J

    2012-01-01

    Health care utilization is expected to rise in the coming decades. Not only will the aggregate need for health care grow by changing demographics, so too will per capita utilization. It has been suggested that trends in health care utilization may be age-specific. In this paper, age-specific trends in health care utilization are presented for different health care sectors in the Netherlands, for the period 1981-2009. For the hospital sector we also explore the link between these trends and the state of medical technology. Using aggregated data from a Dutch health survey and a nationwide hospital register, regression analysis was used to examine age-specific trends in the probability of utilizing health care. To determine the influence of medical technology, the growth in age-specific probabilities of hospital care was regressed on the number of medical patents while adjusting for confounders related to demographics, health status, supply and institutional factors. The findings suggest that for most health care sectors, the trend in the probability of health care utilization is highest for ages 65 and up. Larger advances in medical technology are found to be significantly associated with a higher growth of hospitalization probability, particularly for the higher ages. Age-specific trends will raise questions on the sustainability of intergenerational solidarity in health care, as solidarity will not only be strained by the ageing population, but also might find itself under additional pressure as the gap in health care utilization between elderly and non-elderly grows over time. For hospital care utilization, this process might well be accelerated by advances in medical technology.

  1. Effects of a Multimodule Curriculum of Palliative Care on Medical Students

    OpenAIRE

    Stanley S.L. Tsai; Wen-Yu Hu; Hao-Hsiang Chang; Shan-Chwen Chang; Chin-Yu Chen; Tai-Yuan Chiu

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of educational intervention using a multimodule curriculum of palliative care on medical students, and to explore significant factors that influence improvement in beliefs of ethical decision-making. Methods: A total of 259 medical students enrolled in the “Family, Society and Medicine” course, and accepted a multimodule palliative care curriculum that included a 1-hour lecture, 1 hour of patient contact, 1 hour of literature readi...

  2. Medical Home Features of VHA Primary Care Clinics and Avoidable Hospitalizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jean; Rose, Danielle E; Canelo, Ismelda; Upadhyay, Anjali S; Schectman, Gordon; Stark, Richard; Rubenstein, Lisa V; Yano, Elizabeth M

    2013-09-01

    As the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) reorganizes providers into the patient-centered medical home, questions remain whether this model of care can demonstrate improved patient outcomes and cost savings. We measured adoption of medical home features by VHA primary care clinics prior to widespread implementation of the patient-centered medical home and examined if they were associated with lower risk and costs of potentially avoidable hospitalizations. Secondary patient data was linked to clinic administrative and survey data. Patient and clinic factors in the baseline year (FY2009) were used to predict patient outcomes in the follow-up year. 2,853,030 patients from 814 VHA primary care clinics Patient outcomes were measured by hospitalizations for an ambulatory care sensitive condition (ACSC) and their costs and identified through diagnosis and procedure codes from inpatient records. Clinic adoption of medical home features was obtained from the American College of Physicians Medical Home Builder®. The overall mean home builder score in the study clinics was 88 (SD = 13) or 69%. In adjusted analyses an increase of 10 points in the medical home adoption score in a clinic decreased the odds of an ACSC hospitalization for patients by 3% (P = 0.032). By component, higher access and scheduling (P = 0.004) and care coordination and transitions (P = 0.020) component scores were related to lower risk of an ACSC hospitalization, and higher population management was related to higher risk (P = 0.023). Total medical home features was not related to ACSC hospitalization costs among patients with at least one (P = 0.074). Greater adoption of medical home features by VHA primary care clinics was found to be significantly associated with lower risk of avoidable hospitalizations with access and scheduling and care coordination/transitions in care as key factors.

  3. Evidence for handheld electronic medical records in improving care: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Straus Sharon E; Wu Robert C

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Handheld electronic medical records are expected to improve physician performance and patient care. To confirm this, we performed a systematic review of the evidence assessing the effects of handheld electronic medical records on clinical care. Methods To conduct the systematic review, we searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and the Cochrane library from 1966 through September 2005. We included randomized controlled trials that evaluated effects on practitioner performance or...

  4. Health services research in workers' compensation medical care: policy issues and research opportunities.

    OpenAIRE

    Himmelstein, J; Buchanan, J L; Dembe, A E; Stevens, B

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe some of the unique aspects of medical care offered under workers' compensation insurance systems and discuss the major policy considerations relevant to health services researchers undertaking investigations in this area. BACKGROUND AND FINDINGS: State-based workers' compensation (WC) insurance systems requiring employers to pay for medical care and wage replacement for workplace injuries and illnesses were first developed between 1910 and 1920 in the United States. Emp...

  5. Standardised electronic information exchange between nurses in home care and GPs - the medication information processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyngstad, Merete; Melby, Line; Hellesø, Ragnhild

    2012-01-01

    Improving the transfer of medication information between home care nurses and patient's general practitioners (GP) is assessed as essential for ensuring safe care. In this paper, we report on a Norwegian study in which we investigated how home care nurses experienced using standardised electronic messages in their communication with the GPs. Standardised electronic solutions were developed and implemented to resolve gaps in the medication information processes when patients received nursing care in their homes. Data was collected combining focus group interviews and individual interviews with nurses from home care in two municipalities in Norway. The data was analysed using systematic text condensation. We found that the nurses reported mostly advantages, but also some disadvantages regarding accuracy, consistency, availability and efficiency in the medication information process when they used standardised electronic messages. Efforts to refine the electronic messages to achieve better work processes and patient safety should be addressed.

  6. Medical Care for Undocumented Immigrants: National and International Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Teresa L; Le, Thien-Kim; Henry-Okafor, Queen; Shah, Megha K

    2017-03-01

    The number of undocumented immigrants (UIs) varies worldwide, and most reside in the United States. With more than 12 million UIs in the United States, addressing the health care needs of this population presents unique challenges and opportunities. Most UIs are uninsured and rely on the safety-net health system for their care. Because of young age, this population is often considered to be healthier than the overall US population, but they have specific health conditions and risks. Adequate coverage is lacking; however, there are examples of how to better address the health care needs of UIs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Health care consumer's perception of the Electronic Medical Record ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, no research has been described in the literature regarding the user's perception of the clinical electronic medical ... Method: A structured questionnaire was developed, validated and utilized in this quantitative research project.

  8. Medical Care and Your 4- to 5-Year-Old

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of using car seats , closely watching kids around swimming pools , preventing poisoning , not smoking around kids, and using ... MORE ON THIS TOPIC Knowing Your Child's Medical History Fitness and Your 4- to 5-Year-Old ...

  9. Medical Care and Your 6- to 12-Year-Old

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... compared with other kids the same age and gender. The doctor will take a medical and family ... Talking to Your Child About Puberty Understanding Puberty Communication and Your 6- to 12-Year-Old Contact ...

  10. Medical Care and Your 2- to 3-Year-Old

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... infection Common Medical Problems Young children have an average of 6 to 8 colds a year, and also may have several bouts of diarrhea and vomiting, as well as ear infections. Sleep problems and behavior or discipline concerns are very ...

  11. Clinical metric and medication persistency effects: evidence from a Medicaid care management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Gregory D; Leary, Fredric; Medina, Wendie; Donnelly, Shawn; Warnick, Kathleen

    2015-02-01

    The objective was to estimate clinical metric and medication persistency impacts of a care management program. The data sources were Medicaid administrative claims for a sample population of 32,334 noninstitutionalized Medicaid-only aged, blind, or disabled patients with diagnosed conditions of asthma, coronary artery disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, or heart failure between 2005 and 2009. Multivariate regression analysis was used to test the hypothesis that exposure to a care management intervention increased the likelihood of having the appropriate medication or procedures performed, as well as increased medication persistency. Statistically significant clinical metric improvements occurred in each of the 5 conditions studied. Increased medication persistency was found for beta-blocker medication for members with coronary artery disease, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blocker and diuretic medications for members with heart failure, bronchodilator and corticosteroid medications for members with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and aspirin/antiplatelet medications for members with diabetes. This study demonstrates that a care management program increases the likelihood of having an appropriate medication dispensed and/or an appropriate clinical test performed, as well as increased likelihood of medication persistency, in people with chronic conditions.

  12. Pediatric сlinic of Odessa National Medical University: the quality of emergency medical care for children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.A. Starets

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. The purpose of the article is to discuss the issue of improving the quality of emergency care for children with the most common diseases. Materials and methods. The quality of medical care includes 6 characteristics: 1 effectiveness — evidencebased health care results in improved health outcomes; 2 relevancy: health care is delivered in a manner that maximizes resource use and avoids wasting and provided in a setting where skills and resources are appropriate to medical need; 3 accessibility: health care is provided timely, reasonable and affordable; 4 acceptability/patient-centered: health care provided takes into account the preferences and aspirations of individual service users; 5 equity: health care provided does not vary in quality because of personal characteristics or socioeconomic status; 6 safety: health care provided minimizes risks and harm to service users and providers. Results. The Intensive Care Unit (ICU started working in the Pediatric Clinic of the Odessa National Medical University on February 1, 2017. The main task of ICU is the treatment of children with emergency conditions (who needs monitoring of breathing and cardiac activity, oxygen therapy, large-volume rehydration therapy, etc. The patients admit to the ICU according the results of triage. Triage is the process of rapidly screening of sick children soon after their addmission to hospital and in ICU, in order to identify those with emergency signs — obstruc-ted breathing or severe respiratory distress; central cyanosis; signs of shock; signs of severe dehydration; those with priority signs — very high temperature, severe pallor, respiratory distress etc. The local guidelines for the most common diseases in children have been developed in the Pediatric Clinic. These local guidelines are based on: 1 modern national guidelines; 2 WHO: Pocket book of hospital care for children: guidelines for the management of common childhood illnesses (2013; clinical

  13. An Expanded Conceptual Framework of Medical Students' Primary Care Career Choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfarrwaller, Eva; Audétat, Marie-Claude; Sommer, Johanna; Maisonneuve, Hubert; Bischoff, Thomas; Nendaz, Mathieu; Baroffio, Anne; Junod Perron, Noëlle; Haller, Dagmar M

    2017-04-04

    In many countries, the number of graduating medical students pursuing a primary care career does not meet demand. These countries face primary care physician shortages. Students' career choices have been widely studied, yet many aspects of this process remain unclear. Conceptual models are useful to plan research and educational interventions in such complex systems.The authors developed a framework of primary care career choice in undergraduate medical education, which expands on previously published models. They used a group-based, iterative approach to find the best way to represent the vast array of influences identified in previous studies, including in a recent systematic review of the literature on interventions to increase the proportion of students choosing a primary care career. In their framework, students enter medical school with their personal characteristics and initial interest in primary care. They complete a process of career decision making, which is subject to multiple interacting influences, both within and outside medical school, throughout their medical education. These influences are stratified into four systems-microsystem, mesosystem, exosystem, and macrosystem-which represent different levels of interaction with students' career choices.This expanded framework provides an updated model to help understand the multiple factors that influence medical students' career choices. It offers a guide for the development of new interventions to increase the proportion of students choosing primary care careers and for further research to better understand the variety of processes involved in this decision.

  14. Diabetes empowerment, medication adherence and self-care behaviors in adults with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Tejada, Melba A; Campbell, Jennifer A; Walker, Rebekah J; Smalls, Brittany L; Davis, Kimberly S; Egede, Leonard E

    2012-07-01

    Evidence suggests that empowerment is an important factor to address everyday aspects of dealing with a chronic disease. This study evaluated the effect of diabetes empowerment on medication adherence and self-care behaviors in adults with type 2 diabetes. Data on 378 subjects with type 2 diabetes recruited from two primary care clinics in the southeastern United States were examined. Previously validated scales were used to measure diabetes empowerment, medication adherence, diabetes knowledge, and diabetes self-care behaviors (including diet, physical activity, blood sugar testing, and foot care). Multiple linear regression was used to assess the independent effect of diabetes empowerment on medication adherence and self-care behaviors controlling for relevant covariates. Eighty-three percent were non-Hispanic blacks, 69% were women, 22% were 65 years or older, 68% were not married, 26% had less than high school education, 60% were unemployed, 39% were uninsured, and 47% had a yearly income Empowerment had significant correlations with medication adherence (r=0.17, Pempowerment was significantly associated with medication adherence (β=-0.04, P=0.001), diabetes knowledge (β=0.09, P=0.012), diet (β=0.09, Pempowerment was related to better diabetes knowledge, medication adherence and improved self-care behaviors. Emphasis on empowerment and self-efficacy is relevant to improve outcomes in the management of diabetes.

  15. Community Oncology Medical Homes: Physician-Driven Change to Improve Patient Care and Reduce Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Teresa M; Webster, Jennifer A; Stevens, Laura A; Li, Tao; Kaplan, Cameron M; Graetz, Ilana; McAneny, Barbara L

    2015-11-01

    Although the patient-centered medical home is a well-established model of care for primary care providers, adoption by specialty providers has been relatively limited. Recently, there has been particular interest in developing specialty medical homes in medical oncology because of practice variation, care fragmentation, and high overall costs of care. In 2012, the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation awarded Innovative Oncology Business Solutions a 3-year grant for their Community Oncology Medical Home (COME HOME) program to implement specialty medical homes in seven oncology practices across the country. We report our early experience and lessons learned.Through September 30, 2014, COME HOME has touched 16,353 unique patients through triage encounters, patient education visits, or application of clinical pathways. We describe the COME HOME model and implementation timeline, profile use of key services, and report patient satisfaction. Using feedback from practice sites, we highlight patient-centered innovations and overall lessons learned.COME HOME incorporates best practices care driven by triage and clinical pathways, team-based care, active disease management, enhanced access and care, as well as financial support for the medical home infrastructure. Information technology plays a central role, supporting both delivery of care and performance monitoring. Volume of service use has grown steadily over time, leveling out in second quarter 2014. The program currently averages 1,265 triage encounters, 440 extended hours visits, and 655 patient education encounters per month.COME HOME offers a patient-centered model of care to improve quality and continuity of care. Copyright © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  16. Criteria of medical care evaluation in daily in-patient department in pediatrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grozdova T.U.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The research goal is to work out criteria for the evaluation of medical care quality. Materials included 386 medical cards of daily in-patients, 216 medical cards of in-patients; 602 cards of analysis of case histories; 4 computer data bases. Methods of mathematical statistics were successfully used in the study. The comparative method of data analysis was applied to the research work. Intensity of medical care in values from 0,1 to 0,5 conditional units corresponded to requirements of criterion of estimation of medical care quality. Parameters of medicinal treatment were close to the standards of treatment in interval from 44,4 to 100%, as criterion of quality of medical care. Specific weight of apparatus and instrumental researches constituted an interval from 7, 4% to 22, 6%, forming corresponding criterion. Interval of effectiveness according to standards of consultations is from 0, 26 to 1, 04 conditional units. In conclusion the article stated that the characteristics for criteria to evaluate medical care in daily in-patient departments were worked out on the basis of indices obtained during the research work

  17. Comorbidity in patients with diabetes mellitus: impact on medical health care utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Westert Gert P

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comorbidity has been shown to intensify health care utilization and to increase medical care costs for patients with diabetes. However, most studies have been focused on one health care service, mainly hospital care, or limited their analyses to one additional comorbid disease, or the data were based on self-reported questionnaires instead of health care registration data. The purpose of this study is to estimate the effects a broad spectrum of of comorbidities on the type and volume of medical health care utilization of patients with diabetes. Methods By linking general practice and hospital based registrations in the Netherlands, data on comorbidity and health care utilization of patients with diabetes (n = 7,499 were obtained. Comorbidity was defined as diabetes-related comorbiiabetes-related comorbidity. Multilevel regression analyses were applied to estimate the effects of comorbidity on health care utilization. Results Our results show that both diabetes-related and non diabetes-related comorbidity increase the use of medical care substantially in patients with diabetes. Having both diabeterelated and non diabetes-related comorbidity incrases the demand for health care even more. Differences in health care utilization patterns were observed between the comorbidities. Conclusion Non diabetes-related comorbidity increases the health care demand as much as diabetes-related comorbidity. Current single-disease approach of integrated diabetes care should be extended with additional care modules, which must be generic and include multiple diseases in order to meet the complex health care demands of patients with diabetes in the future.

  18. Comorbidity in patients with diabetes mellitus: impact on medical health care utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struijs, Jeroen N; Baan, Caroline A; Schellevis, Francois G; Westert, Gert P; van den Bos, Geertrudis AM

    2006-01-01

    Background Comorbidity has been shown to intensify health care utilization and to increase medical care costs for patients with diabetes. However, most studies have been focused on one health care service, mainly hospital care, or limited their analyses to one additional comorbid disease, or the data were based on self-reported questionnaires instead of health care registration data. The purpose of this study is to estimate the effects a broad spectrum of of comorbidities on the type and volume of medical health care utilization of patients with diabetes. Methods By linking general practice and hospital based registrations in the Netherlands, data on comorbidity and health care utilization of patients with diabetes (n = 7,499) were obtained. Comorbidity was defined as diabetes-related comorbiiabetes-related comorbidity. Multilevel regression analyses were applied to estimate the effects of comorbidity on health care utilization. Results Our results show that both diabetes-related and non diabetes-related comorbidity increase the use of medical care substantially in patients with diabetes. Having both diabeterelated and non diabetes-related comorbidity incrases the demand for health care even more. Differences in health care utilization patterns were observed between the comorbidities. Conclusion Non diabetes-related comorbidity increases the health care demand as much as diabetes-related comorbidity. Current single-disease approach of integrated diabetes care should be extended with additional care modules, which must be generic and include multiple diseases in order to meet the complex health care demands of patients with diabetes in the future. PMID:16820048

  19. [The expertise evaluation of organization of rendering of acute, emergency and urgent medical care in rural regions of Novosibirsk oblast'].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivaninskiĭ, O I; Sharapov, I V; Sadovoĭ, M A

    2013-01-01

    The most problematic spheres in the resource support of emergency medical care to rural residents are the completeness of staff of physicians in rural medical surgeries, community hospitals and departments of emergency medical care in central district hospitals. The provision of feldsher obstetrics posts with sanitary motor transport and medical equipment is yet another problematic sphere. The main troubles during provision of emergency medical care at feldsher obstetrics posts are related to surgery treatment. The organization of emergency and urgent medical care suffers of many unresolved problems related to informational program support at feldsher obstetrics posts, polyclinics of central district hospitals.

  20. Improving Patients\\\\\\' Care through Electronic Medical Error Reporting System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Rangraz Jeddi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Medical errors are unintentional acts that take place due to the negligence or lead to undesirable consequences in medical practice. The purpose of this study was to design a conceptual model for medical error reporting system. This applied descriptive cross-sectional research employed Delphi method carried out from 2012 to 2013. The study population was medical and paramedical personnel of health workers and paramedical personnel of hospitals, deputy of treatment, faculty members of Kashan University of Medical Sciences in addition to the internet and library resources. Sample size included 30 expert individuals in the field of medical errors. The one-stage stratified sampling procedure was used. The items with opposition ranging 0 to 25 were confirmed and those exceeding 50 were rejected whereas the items with the opposition 25 to 50 were reevaluated in the second session. This process continued for three times and the items that failed to be approved were eliminated in the model. Based on the results of this research, repeated informing about and reporting operation at on-line bases that have access to the incidence of error detected on time, identifying cause and damage due to the incidence reported confidential and anonymously immediately after the occurrence is necessary. Analysis of data quantitatively and qualitatively by using computer software is needed. Classifying the errors reports based on feedback provision according to the cause of error is needed. In addition, confidential report and possible manual retrieval were suggested It is essential to determine the means of reporting and items in the reporting form including time, cause and damage of medical error, media of reporting and method of recording and analysis.

  1. Intensive session: New approaches to medical issues in long-term care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messinger-Rapport, Barbara J; Morley, John E; Thomas, David R; Gammack, Julie K

    2007-09-01

    This article, based on a series of presentations at the American Medical Directors Association, briefly highlights new advances in medical areas of interest to long-term care physicians. The areas discussed are heart failure, vitamin D, falls, new treatments for diabetes mellitus, blood pressure measurement, anemia, clinical nutrition, pressure ulcers, Clostridium difficile, insomnia, and antipsychotic therapy.

  2. CONTROVERSY AND CONFLICTS DUE TO IMPROPER MEDICAL CARE AND LEGAL PRACTICE OF THEIR RESOLVING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. O. Perepechina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the analysis of the statistical data on the Russian Federation, showing how often controversy and conflicts due to improper medical care occurs in medical practice, as well as what are the ways to resolve them.

  3. First-Year Residents' Caring, Medical Knowledge, and Clinical Judgment in Relation to Laboratory Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarnold, Paul R.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A study of 36 first-year Northwestern University (Illinois) medical residents found that students' medical knowledge was a predictor of increased laboratory test use, that clinical judgment was a predictor of decreased laboratory use, and that level of caring was statistically unrelated to amount of laboratory use. (Author/MSE)

  4. Attitudes of Medical Students and Residents toward Care of the Elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muangpaisan, Weerasak; Intalapapron, Somboon; Assantachai, Prasert

    2008-01-01

    The research reported in this article examined attitudes toward the care of the elderly between and among medical students and residents in training. Data were collected with a 16-item attitude questionnaire. Participants were medical students in their introduction period (prior to clinical experience) and residents of the Department of Internal…

  5. Prescribing of asthma medication in primary care for children aged under 10

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schokker, Siebrig; Groenhof, Feikje; van der Veen, Willem Jan; van der Molen, Thys

    Objective: To evaluate prescriptions of asthma medication for children in primary care. Methods: Data on prescriptions of asthma medication for children aged 0-9 years were collected from a general practice-based network in the north eastern part of the Netherlands. Prevalence, incidence,

  6. Attitudes of Medical Students and Residents toward Care of the Elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muangpaisan, Weerasak; Intalapapron, Somboon; Assantachai, Prasert

    2008-01-01

    The research reported in this article examined attitudes toward the care of the elderly between and among medical students and residents in training. Data were collected with a 16-item attitude questionnaire. Participants were medical students in their introduction period (prior to clinical experience) and residents of the Department of Internal…

  7. 505 Effective Medicated Abdomen Wrapper Best External Care for Lingering Diseases Unconventional Product for Vigorous Health

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    505 Effective Medicated Abdomen Wrapper,a national patent product(patent num-ber 90202386.1),together with its serial products,has filled in the gaps in the field ofChina’s medical science and health care products.The development of the product wasbrought into line with the State Spark Programme by the State Commission for Science

  8. Reflections on an End-of-life Care Course for Preclinical Medical Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao-Hsiang Chang

    2009-08-01

    Conclusion: A 1-week multimodal curriculum for preclinical medical students can improve the knowledge and beliefs about ethical decision-making in managing terminally ill patients. Clinical skills of symptom management, especially pain control, and ethical decision-making regarding artificial nutrition and hydration should be emphasized in medical education, to promote students' competence in end-of-life care.

  9. Medical negligence. An overview of legal theory and neurosurgical practice: duty of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Nicholas V

    2014-04-01

    A working knowledge of the legal principles of medical negligence is helpful to neurosurgeons. It helps them to act in a "reasonable, responsible and logical" manner, that is a practice that is consistent with the surgical practice of their peers. This article will review and explain the relevant medical law in relation to duty of care with illustrative neurosurgical cases.

  10. Task analysis of IT-mediated medication management in outpatient care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stiphout, van F.; Zwart-van Rijkom, J.E.F.; Maggio, L.A.; Aarts, J.E.C.M.; Bates, D.W.; Gelder, van T.; Jansen, P.A.F.; Schraagen, J.M.C.; Egberts, A.C.G.; Braak, ter E.W.M.T.

    2015-01-01

    Aim Educating physicians in the procedural as well as cognitive skills of IT-mediated medication management could be one of the missing links for improvement of patient safety. We aimed to compose a framework of tasks that need to be addressed to optimize medication management in outpatient care. M

  11. Electromagnetic interference from radio frequency identification inducing potentially hazardous incidents in critical care medical equipment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Togt, R. van der; Lieshout, E.J. van; Hensbroek, R.; Beinat, E.; Binnekade, J.M.; Bakker, P.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Context: Health care applications of autoidentification technologies, such as radio frequency identification (RFID), have been proposed to improve patient safety and also the tracking and tracing of medical equipment. However, electromagnetic interference (EMI) by RFID on medical devices has never b

  12. Seniors managing multiple medications: using mixed methods to view the home care safety lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Ariella; Macdonald, Marilyn; Marck, Patricia; Toon, Lynn; Griffin, Melissa; Easty, Tony; Fraser, Kimberly; MacKinnon, Neil; Mitchell, Jonathan; Lang, Eddy; Goodwin, Sharon

    2015-12-12

    Patient safety is a national and international priority with medication safety earmarked as both a prevalent and high-risk area of concern. To date, medication safety research has focused overwhelmingly on institutional based care provided by paid healthcare professionals, which often has little applicability to the home care setting. This critical gap in our current understanding of medication safety in the home care sector is particularly evident with the elderly who often manage more than one chronic illness and a complex palette of medications, along with other care needs. This study addresses the medication management issues faced by seniors with chronic illnesses, their family, caregivers, and paid providers within Canadian publicly funded home care programs in Alberta (AB), Ontario (ON), Quebec (QC) and Nova Scotia (NS). Informed by a socio-ecological perspective, this study utilized Interpretive Description (ID) methodology and participatory photographic methods to capture and analyze a range of visual and textual data. Three successive phases of data collection and analysis were conducted in a concurrent, iterative fashion in eight urban and/or rural households in each province. A total of 94 participants (i.e., seniors receiving home care services, their family/caregivers, and paid providers) were interviewed individually. In addition, 69 providers took part in focus groups. Analysis was iterative and concurrent with data collection in that each interview was compared with subsequent interviews for converging as well as diverging patterns. Six patterns were identified that provide a rich portrayal of the complexity of medication management safety in home care: vulnerabilities that impact the safe management and storage of medication, sustaining adequate supports, degrees of shared accountability for care, systems of variable effectiveness, poly-literacy required to navigate the system, and systemic challenges to maintaining medication safety in the home

  13. Barriers to Care for Depressed Older People: Perceptions of Aged Care among Medical Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Marita P.; Davison, Tanya; Mellor, David; George, Kuruvilla

    2009-01-01

    The current study evaluated barriers to detection of depression among older people. Focus groups were conducted with 21 professional carers, 4 nurses, 10 general practitioners, and 7 aged care managers. The results demonstrated that care for older people is primarily focused on physical care. Further, staff resources, a lack of continuity of care,…

  14. Palliative care education for medical students: Differences in course evolution, organisation, evaluation and funding: A survey of all UK medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Steven; Gibbins, Jane; Paes, Paul; Adams, Astrid; Chandratilake, Madawa; Gishen, Faye; Lodge, Philip; Wee, Bee; Barclay, Stephen

    2017-06-01

    A proportion of newly qualified doctors report feeling unprepared to manage patients with palliative care and end-of-life needs. This may be related to barriers within their institution during undergraduate training. Information is limited regarding the current organisation of palliative care teaching across UK medical schools. To investigate the evolution and structure of palliative care teaching at UK medical schools. Anonymised, web-based questionnaire. Settings/participants: Results were obtained from palliative care course organisers at all 30 UK medical schools. The palliative care course was established through active planning (13/30, 43%), ad hoc development (10, 33%) or combination of approaches (7, 23%). The place of palliative care teaching within the curriculum varied. A student-selected palliative care component was offered by 29/30 (97%). All medical schools sought student feedback. The course was reviewed in 26/30 (87%) but not in 4. Similarly, a course organiser was responsible for the palliative care programme in 26/30 but not in 4. A total of 22 respondents spent a mean of 3.9 h (median 2.5)/week in supporting/delivering palliative care education (medical schools. Funding was not universally transparent. Palliative care teaching was associated with some form of funding in 20/30 (66%). Development, organisation, course evaluation and funding for palliative care teaching at UK medical schools are variable. This may have implications for delivery of effective palliative care education for medical students.

  15. Strategies for safe medication use in ambulatory care settings in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Asta V; Bernard, Shulamit L

    2009-09-01

    This study aims to identify strategies for safe medication use practices in ambulatory care settings, with a special focus on clinical pharmacy services. We conducted case studies on 34 organizations, more than half of which were safety net providers. Data included discussions with 186 key informants, 3 interim debriefings, and a technical expert panel. We analyzed qualitative data using inductive analysis techniques and grounded theory approach. Ambulatory care organizations practice a broad range of safe medication use strategies. The inclusion of clinical pharmacy services is a culture change that supports efforts to improve patient safety and patient-centered care. Organizations integrated clinical pharmacy services when they introduced such services in a purposefully paced and gradual manner. Organizations sustained such services when they collected and reported data demonstrating improvements in patient outcomes and cost savings. Clinical pharmacy services were generally accompanied by strategies that helped organizations to provide patient-centered care; collect and measure process, safety, and clinical outcomes; promote leadership commitment; and integrate care delivery processes. These strategies interacted within organizations in synergistic rather than hierarchical or linear way. Organizational ability to provide safe, patient-centered, and efficient care that is supported by measurable data largely depends on leadership commitment and ability to integrate care processes. Ambulatory care organizations use multiple strategies for safe medication use systems. Understanding processes that promote such strategies will provide a helpful road map for other organizations in implementation and sustainability of safe medication use systems.

  16. 77 FR 38838 - Lists of Designated Primary Medical Care, Mental Health, and Dental Health Professional Shortage...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ..., Mental Health, and Dental Health Professional Shortage Areas AGENCY: Health Resources and Services... primary medical care, mental health, and dental health professional shortage areas (HPSAs) as of April 1... National Health Service Corps (NHSC) personnel to provide primary care, dental, or mental health...

  17. Workplace Violence and Safety Issues in Long-Term Medical Care Facilities: Nurses' Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bankole K. Fasanya

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion: WPV is an epidemic problem that affects all health-care professionals. The findings of this study could help long-term medical care facilities' management identify the areas to focus on mitigating, controlling, and/or eliminating incidents of WPV.

  18. The Allied Health Care Professional's Role in Assisting Medical Decision Making at the End of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Heather

    2012-01-01

    As a patient approaches the end of life, he or she faces a number of very difficult medical decisions. Allied health care professionals, including speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and occupational therapists (OTs), can be instrumental in assisting their patients to make advance care plans, although their traditional job descriptions do not…

  19. Health Care Professionals' Perceptions of the Use of Electronic Medical Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeyeye, Adebisi

    2015-01-01

    Electronic medical record (EMR) use has improved significantly in health care organizations. However, many barriers and factors influence the success of EMR implementation and adoption. The purpose of the descriptive qualitative single-case study was to explore health care professionals' perceptions of the use of EMRs at a hospital division of a…

  20. Evidence-Based Quality Improvement: A recipe for improving medication safety and handover of care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeulers, M.

    2016-01-01

    In healthcare we strive to provide the highest possible quality of care. Even though healthcare professionals work together with the intention to provide safe care, medical errors still threaten patient safety. Patient safety has received considerable attention since the beginning of this century,

  1. Outcomes of Emergency Medical Patients Admitted to an Intermediate Care Unit With Detailed Admission Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Catherine E; Sahetya, Sarina K; Bradsher, Robert W; Scholten, Eric L; Bain, William; Siddique, Shazia M; Hager, David N

    2017-01-01

    An important, but not well characterized, population receiving intermediate care is that of medical patients admitted directly from the emergency department. To characterize emergency medical patients and their outcomes when admitted to an intermediate care unit with clearly defined admission guidelines. Demographic data, admitting diagnoses, illness severity, comorbid conditions, lengths of stay, and hospital mortality were characterized for all emergency medical patients admitted directly to an intermediate care unit from July through December 2012. A total of 317 unique patients were admitted (mean age, 54 [SD, 16] years). Most patients were admitted with respiratory (26.5%) or cardiac (17.0%) syndromes. The mean (SD) Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation score version II, Simplified Acute Physiology Score version II, and Charlson Comorbidity Index were 15.6 (6.5), 20.7 (11.8), and 2.7 (2.3), respectively. Severity of illness and length of stay were significantly different for patients who required intensive care within 24 hours of admission (n = 16) or later (n = 25), patients who continued with inter mediate care for more than 24 hours (n = 247), and patients who were downgraded or discharged in less than 24 hours (n = 29). Overall hospital mortality was 4.4% (14 deaths). Emergency medical patients with moderate severity of illness and comorbidity can be admitted to an intermediate level of care with relatively infrequent transfer to intensive care and relatively low mortality. ©2016 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  2. Medical Service Utilization among Youth with School-Identified Disabilities in Residential Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Matthew C.; Trout, Alexandra L.; Nelson, Timothy D.; Epstein, Michael H.; W. Thompson, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Background: Behavioral, social, emotional, and educational risks among children and youth with school identified disabilities served in residential care have been well documented. However, the health care needs and medical service utilization of this high-risk population are less well known. Given the risks associated with children with…

  3. Assessing the skills of home care workers in helping older people take their prescribed medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Elizabeth E J

    2015-08-01

    The Southern Health and Social Care Trust in Northern Ireland applied a modified version of the Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) to assess the skills of home care workers in assisting older people taking prescribed medications. In Northern Ireland, home care workers are care workers employed by health and social care trusts or private agencies. The application of the model has developed the skills of this staff group, improved the relationship between the commissioner and provider, significantly reduced the time spent by community nurses in individual training and assessment, and enhanced the patient experience for those taking medication. Overall, the application of this model has provided assurances to the Trust board, the executive director of nursing, and operational directors that home care workers are competent in assisting older people in this high-risk activity.

  4. The relationships among self-care, dispositional mindfulness, and psychological distress in medical students

    OpenAIRE

    Slonim, Jessica; Kienhuis, Mandy; Di Benedetto, Mirella; REECE, JOHN

    2015-01-01

    Background: Past research suggests that medical students experience high levels of psychological distress.Objective: The aim of the current study was to investigate the relationships among engagement in self-care behaviours, dispositional mindfulness, and psychological distress.Methods: The sample consisted of 139 female and 68 male Australian medical students (N=207) aged 17–41 years (M=21.82, SD=3.62) across the 5 years of the Monash University medical course. Participants completed an onli...

  5. Inner City Community Oriented Primary Care to Improve Medical Student Skills and Combat Obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez, José E.; Fornari, Alice B.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Efforts to increase medical student knowledge regarding obesity are needed in medi­cal school curriculum. This article examines a third year medical student intervention utilizing obesity group visits. Description: In our third-year family medicine clerkship, we implemented the Health not Cosmet­ics pilot intervention as part of a Community Oriented Primary Care experience. The intervention consisted of weekly group visits run by third and fourth year medical students to teach lif...

  6. [Medical practice and clinical research: keys to generate knowledge and improve care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Castuera-Gómez, Carla; Talavera, Juan O

    2013-01-01

    The increased quality in medical care may be immediately accomplished if clinical research is integrated into daily clinical practice. In the generation of medical knowledge are four steps: an unanswered question awakened from clinical practice, the critical analysis of specialized literature, the development of a research protocol, and, finally, the publication of outcomes. Decision making and continuous training are becoming part of an effective strategy of medical attention improvement.

  7. A Joint Force Medical Command is Required to Fix Combat Casualty Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-05

    all-volunteer military and similar programs evolved to train the majority of medical specialists the military required ranging from medics to nurse ...surgery, nursing , pharmacy, radiology and laboratory services, and also have a basic understanding of what a hospital does when it is established...A Joint Force Medical Command is Required to Fix Combat Casualty Care by Colonel Shawn C. Nessen United States Army Pr og ra

  8. Medication safety in acute care in Australia: where are we now? Part 1: a review of the extent and causes of medication problems 2002–2008

    OpenAIRE

    Roughead, Elizabeth E.; Semple, Susan J

    2009-01-01

    Background This paper presents Part 1 of a two-part literature review examining medication safety in the Australian acute care setting. This review was undertaken for the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care to update a previous national report on medication safety conducted in 2002. This first part of the review examines the extent and causes of medication incidents and adverse drug events in acute care. Methods A literature search was conducted to identify Australian s...

  9. A cost-benefit analysis of electronic medical records in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Samuel J; Middleton, Blackford; Prosser, Lisa A; Bardon, Christiana G; Spurr, Cynthia D; Carchidi, Patricia J; Kittler, Anne F; Goldszer, Robert C; Fairchild, David G; Sussman, Andrew J; Kuperman, Gilad J; Bates, David W

    2003-04-01

    Electronic medical record systems improve the quality of patient care and decrease medical errors, but their financial effects have not been as well documented. The purpose of this study was to estimate the net financial benefit or cost of implementing electronic medical record systems in primary care. We performed a cost-benefit study to analyze the financial effects of electronic medical record systems in ambulatory primary care settings from the perspective of the health care organization. Data were obtained from studies at our institution and from the published literature. The reference strategy for comparisons was the traditional paper-based medical record. The primary outcome measure was the net financial benefit or cost per primary care physician for a 5-year period. The estimated net benefit from using an electronic medical record for a 5-year period was 86,400 US dollars per provider. Benefits accrue primarily from savings in drug expenditures, improved utilization of radiology tests, better capture of charges, and decreased billing errors. In one-way sensitivity analyses, the model was most sensitive to the proportion of patients whose care was capitated; the net benefit varied from a low of 8400 US dollars to a high of 140,100 US dollars . A five-way sensitivity analysis with the most pessimistic and optimistic assumptions showed results ranging from a 2300 US dollars net cost to a 330,900 US dollars net benefit. Implementation of an electronic medical record system in primary care can result in a positive financial return on investment to the health care organization. The magnitude of the return is sensitive to several key factors. Copyright 2003 by Excerpta Medica Inc.

  10. Quality in health care and globalization of health services: accreditation and regulatory oversight of medical tourism companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Leigh G

    2011-02-01

    Patients are crossing national borders in search of affordable and timely health care. Many medical tourism companies are now involved in organizing cross-border health services. Despite the rapid expansion of the medical tourism industry, few standards exist to ensure that these businesses organize high-quality, competent international health care. Addressing the regulatory vacuum, 10 standards are proposed as a framework for regulating the medical tourism industry. Medical tourism companies should have to undergo accreditation review. Care should be arranged only at accredited international health-care facilities. Standards should be established to ensure that clients of medical tourism companies make informed choices. Continuity of care needs to become an integral feature of cross-border care. Restrictions should be placed on the use of waiver of liability forms by medical tourism companies. Medical tourism companies must ensure that they conform to relevant legislation governing privacy and confidentiality of patient information. Restrictions must be placed on the types of health services marketed by medical tourism companies. Representatives of medical tourism agencies should have to undergo training and certification. Medical travel insurance and medical complications insurance should be included in the health-care plans of patients traveling for care. To protect clients from financial losses, medical tourism companies should be mandated to contribute to compensation funds. Establishing high standards for the operation of medical tourism companies should reduce risks facing patients when they travel abroad for health care.

  11. The cost-effectiveness of managed care regarding chronic medicine prescriptions in a selected medical scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Day

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to examine the cost-effectiveness of managed care interventions with respect to prescriptions for chronic illness sufferers enrolled with a specific medical scheme. The illnesses included, were epilepsy, hypertension, diabetes and asthma. The managed care interventions applied were a primary discount; the use of preferred provider pharmacies, and drug utilization review. It was concluded that the managed care interventions resulted in some real cost savings.

  12. Houston's medical disaster response to Hurricane Katrina: part 2: transitioning from emergency evacuee care to community health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Douglas R; Gavagan, Thomas; Smart, Kieran; Weller, Nancy; Upton, Lori A; Havron, Douglas A; Fishkind, Avrim; Persse, David; Shank, Paul; Shah, Umair A; Mattox, Kenneth

    2009-04-01

    After Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf Coast on August 29, 2005, thousands of ill and injured evacuees were transported to Houston, TX. Houston's regional disaster plan was quickly implemented, leading to the activation of the Regional Hospital Preparedness Council's Catastrophic Medical Operations Center and the rapid construction of a 65-examination-room medical facility within the Reliant Center. A plan for triage of arriving evacuees was quickly developed and the Astrodome/Reliant Center Complex mega-shelter was created. Herein, we discuss major elements of the regional disaster response, including regional coordination, triage and emergency medical service transfers into the region's medical centers, medical care in population shelters, and community health challenges.

  13. [work motivation -- assessment instruments and their relevance for medical care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, Rolf G; Ranft, Andreas; Greitemann, Bernhard; Heuft, Gereon

    2005-11-01

    The relevance of work motivation for medical research and healthcare, in particular rehabilitation, is described. Four diagnostic instruments in the German language are introduced which can assess work motivation using a scale system: AVEM, JDS, LMI and FBTM. Their possible application and potential usage for the clinical area are discussed. Apart from the FBTM, none of these instruments can be directly used as a general instrument in a normal medical clinical setting. Finally, a current model for work motivation (compensatory model of work motivation and volition) is presented that contains basis concepts, which are judged as important for future research questions concerning the development of motivation diagnostic instruments.

  14. Tips for medical practice success in the upcoming accountable care era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobbitt, Julian D

    2012-01-01

    Due to the unsustainable cost of healthcare, the movement to accountable care will be inevitable. This author predicts that recent Medicare Accountable Care Organization (ACO) regulations will energize ACO development. There are specific practical strategies every medical practice leader should know in order to navigate this new healthcare environment successfully. There is a window of opportunity, which will not stay open long, to control a medical practice's destiny in molding a fair, sustainable, and successful ACO. Not being prepared and defaulting to the status quo through passivity is also a choice that promises more work for less compensation for medical practices. The choice is clear, and the blueprint for success is available.

  15. Care provider perspectives on medical travel: A three-country study of destination hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garman, Andrew N; Johnson, Tricia J; Lynch, Elizabeth B; Satjapot, Siriporn

    2016-01-01

    Despite growing interest in the current and potential role of medical travel in U.S. patient care, very little research has been conducted on clinician and other provider organizations' perspectives on providing international patient care. The present study sought to gain formative insights about medical travel from the providers' perspectives, by conducting structured interviews and focus groups in six hospitals from three countries catering to patients traveling from the United States. Findings highlighted the surprising role of international events and policies in the evolution of medical travel, as well as both the desire and need for more transparent quality standards.

  16. Clinical Pharmacist Team-Based Care in a Safety Net Medical Home: Facilitators and Barriers to Chronic Care Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price-Haywood, Eboni G; Amering, Sarah; Luo, Qingyang; Lefante, John J

    2017-04-01

    Collaborative care models incorporating pharmacists have been shown to improve quality of care for patients with hypertension and/or diabetes. Little is known about how to integrate such services outside of clinical trials. The authors implemented a 22-month observational study to evaluate pharmacy collaborative care for hypertension and diabetes in a safety net medical home that incorporated population risk stratification, clinical decision support, and medication dose adjustment protocols. Patients in the pharmacy group saw their primary care provider (PCP) more often and had higher baseline systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and A1c levels compared to patients who only received care from their PCPs. There were no significant differences in the proportion of patients achieving treatment goals (SBP patients who underwent collaborative care versus those who did not. Age, race, and number of PCP encounters were associated with BP and A1c trends. The median time to achieve disease control was longer in the pharmacy group. Although 70% of all patients with poorly controlled hypertension achieved treatment goals within 7 months, less than 50% of patients with poorly controlled diabetes achieved A1c culture, health information technology and related workflows, and pharmacy caseload optimization. Future studies should further examine implementation strategies that work best in specific settings to optimize the benefits of team-based care with clinical pharmacists.

  17. The definition of healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP) is insufficient for the medical environment in Japan: a comparison of HCAP and nursing and healthcare-associated pneumonia (NHCAP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaku, Norihito; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Morinaga, Yoshitomo; Izumikawa, Koichi; Nagashima, Seiji; Kakeya, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro; Fukuda, Minoru; Takatani, Hiroshi; Fukuda, Masaaki; Hashiguchi, Kohji; Kohno, Shigeru

    2013-02-01

    Healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP) is a new concept of pneumonia, which was proposed in the ATS/IDSA guidelines. The guidelines explain that HCAP patients should be treated with broad-spectrum antimicrobial drugs directed at multidrug-resistant pathogens. However, in Japan, there are many elderly people who received in-home care service. These patients seemed to be consistent with the concept of HCAP, but they did not meet the definition of HCAP. Therefore, the Japanese Respiratory Society modified the definition of HCAP according to the medical environmental in Japan. We retrospectively observed HCAP patients and nursing home and healthcare-associated pneumonia (NHCAP) patients who were hospitalized during 24 months at the Japanese Red Cross Nagasaki Genbaku Hospital (Nagasaki, Japan). Patient background, disease severity, identified pathogens, initial antibiotic regimens, and outcomes were compared. A total of 108 patients (77 HCAP and 31 NHCAP except HCAP patients) were evaluated. Of NHCAP except HCAP patients, 27 (87.1 %) were above 3 in the ECOG PS score. There were almost no significant differences between the two groups in characteristics, pneumonia severity, identified bacteria, initial antibiotic regimens, and response rate of initial antibiotic therapy. Although the in-hospital mortality of HCAP patients and NHCAP except HCAP patients was 9.1 % and 19.4 %, respectively, this difference did not reach statistical significance (P > 0.05). Our study suggested that, in the criteria of HCAP, some Japanese patients, who were consistent with the concept of HCAP, were classified as community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Therefore, there is a need to change the definition of HCAP according to the medical environment in Japan.

  18. [Physician and medical psychologist: complementary approaches in providing psychological care to cancer patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chulkova, V A; Pesterëva, E V

    2014-01-01

    In providing psychological care to an oncological patient a physician and a medical psychologist come from a variety of professional positions that require different approaches and methods. It is proposed a three-phase model of the dynamics of the psychological state of the person in the situation of cancer reflecting the process of psychological adaptation of a particular patient. Focusing on this model, the authors conclude that psychological care to cancer patient, performed by a doctor and a medical psychologist, are different kinds of psychological care that does not replace but complement each other.

  19. Public policy and medical tourism: ethical implications for the Egyptian health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, Bob

    2011-01-01

    Egypt's medical tourism industry has been experiencing tremendous growth. However, Egypt continues to lack the necessary investment in its public health system to effectively care for its population. Current policy and the emergence of medical tourism have led to unequal health care access, resulting in high a prevalence of infectious diseases and lack of resources for its most vulnerable populations. As a new Egyptian government emerges, it is important for policymakers to understand the critical issues and ethical concerns of existing health policy. This understanding may be used to propose new policy that more effectively allocates to care for Egypt's population.

  20. Medical informatics: an essential tool for health sciences research in acute care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Man; Pickering, Brian W; Smith, Vernon D; Hadzikadic, Mirsad; Gajic, Ognjen; Herasevich, Vitaly

    2009-10-01

    Medical Informatics has become an important tool in modern health care practice and research. In the present article we outline the challenges and opportunities associated with the implementation of electronic medical records (EMR) in complex environments such as intensive care units (ICU). We share our initial experience in the design, maintenance and application of a customized critical care, Microsoft SQL based, research warehouse, ICU DataMart. ICU DataMart integrates clinical and administrative data from heterogeneous sources within the EMR to support research and practice improvement in the ICUs. Examples of intelligent alarms -- "sniffers", administrative reports, decision support and clinical research applications are presented.

  1. [Attitude survey of medical staff on the participation of community pharmacists in palliative home care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akai, Namika; Fujita-Hamabe, Wakako; Tokuyama, Shogo

    2009-11-01

    The treatment of cancer pain requires an individually-targeted multidimensional team approach. Further, the basic act for the Anti-Cancer Measures describes that medical staff including pharmacists should participate in the palliative care. Thus it is obvious that community pharmacists should also participate in palliative home care. In addition, a misunderstanding about opioids remains strong in Japan, which could be one of the barriers to palliative home care. In our previous report, we clarified for local residents the importance of educational activity using opioids as a new role for community pharmacists, and it was recognized of great significance by these pharmacists. In this study, we conducted a questionnaire survey among medical doctors, nurses, care managers and home helpers about the need and meaning of the educational activity performed by pharmacists in palliative home care. 86.4% of respondents felt pharmacists' participation in home care was required. Furthermore, most respondents thought that misunderstanding remained about opioids in palliative home care, and believed that pharmacists could play an important role in educational activity about opioids as experts in medicine. This study clarified that other medical team members need the participation of community pharmacists in palliative home care. Therefore, it seems important for these pharmacists to be proactive in participating in such care in the future.

  2. Medical Abortion in Primary Care : Pitfalls and Benefits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boersma, A. A.; Meyboom-de Jong, B.

    2009-01-01

    We describe jive pitfalls of medical abortion: ectopic pregnancy not terminated after misoprostol, but without negative side-effects; long-term vaginal blood loss with suspicious retained products which disappeared spontaneously; a patient with uterus myomatatosus with severe pain and retained

  3. Caring for migrant farm workers on medical-surgical units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Maureen J

    2011-01-01

    Over 3 million migrant farm workers are employed in the United States. Many factors place them at risk for work-related disease and injury. Knowledge of workers' health issues can prepare medical-surgical nurses to anticipate and meet the needs of this underserved population.

  4. Early-life medical care and human capital accumulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daysal, N. Meltem

    2015-01-01

    that both types of interventions may benefit not only child health but also long-term educational outcomes. In addition, early-life medical interventions may improve the educational outcomes of siblings. These findings can be used to design policies that improve long-term outcomes and reduce economic...

  5. Medical Abortion in Primary Care : Pitfalls and Benefits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boersma, A. A.; Meyboom-de Jong, B.

    2009-01-01

    We describe jive pitfalls of medical abortion: ectopic pregnancy not terminated after misoprostol, but without negative side-effects; long-term vaginal blood loss with suspicious retained products which disappeared spontaneously; a patient with uterus myomatatosus with severe pain and retained produ

  6. Point-of-Care Ultrasonography for Undersea Medical Officers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    management in austere and operational environments. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Ultrasound , EFAST, FAST , Undersea Medical Officers, SOLCUS 16. SECURITY...Introduction to Basic Ultrasound Extended FAST with Inferior Vena Cava interrogation Procedures (IVs & blocks) (need supplies: needles, syringes, wipes...Guideline for the Performance of the Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma ( FAST ) Examination. The American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine

  7. Primary health eye care: evaluation of the competence of medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-10-17

    Oct 17, 2009 ... Conclusion: Medical students at the University of Cape Town need more than the current one week of practical ophthalmology .... a diameter of 6 mm, and a slide of a photographic image of ... Can you see the fundus (yes/no).

  8. Elder Specialists: Psychosocial Aspects of Medical Education in Geriatric Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann-Stone, Nancy; Robinson, Sherry B.; Rull, Gary; Rosher, Richard B.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes an Elder Specialist Program developed by one school of medicine to sensitize medical students to geriatric psychosocial issues. Elder Specialists participate in panel discussions as part of each geriatric session. As an alternative to traditional senior mentoring programs, the Elder Specialist Program provides all students a…

  9. Medical Abortion in Primary Care : Pitfalls and Benefits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boersma, A. A.; Meyboom-de Jong, B.

    2009-01-01

    We describe jive pitfalls of medical abortion: ectopic pregnancy not terminated after misoprostol, but without negative side-effects; long-term vaginal blood loss with suspicious retained products which disappeared spontaneously; a patient with uterus myomatatosus with severe pain and retained produ

  10. The Medical Literature as a Resource for Health Care Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKibbon, K. Ann; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Discussion of evidence-based medicine (EBM) focuses on information tools to facilitate the practice of EBM that were developed, evaluated, and made more accessible by the McMaster University (Canada) Faculty of Health Sciences. Highlights include users' guides to medical literature, strategies for improving MEDLINE searches, new journals, and…

  11. Visiting nurses' posthospital medication management in home health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kollerup, Mette Geil; Curtis, Tine; Schantz Laursen, Birgitte

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Medication management is the most challenging component of a successful transition from hospital to home, a challenge of growing complexity as the number of older persons living with chronic conditions grows, along with increasingly specialised and accelerated hospital treatment plans...

  12. Disparate patterns of prenatal care utilization stratified by medical and psychosocial risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krans, Elizabeth E; Davis, Matthew M; Palladino, Christie L

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate patterns of prenatal care utilization stratified by medical and psychosocial risk. A retrospective cohort of 786 pregnant women who subsequently delivered live births from 1999 to 2003 at the University of Michigan were classified into high medical, high psychosocial, high medical and high psychosocial (dual high risk) and low-risk pregnancies. Chi-square and logistic regression analyses assessed the association between risk and prenatal care utilization using the Kotelchuck Index. Of 786 pregnancies, 202 (25.7%) were high medical risk, 178 (22.7%) were high psychosocial risk, 227 (28.9%) were dual high risk and 179 (22.8%) were low-risk. Over 31% of dual high risk and 25% of high medical risk pregnancies received "adequate plus" prenatal care versus 10% of high psychosocial risk pregnancies. In multivariate analyses, adjusted for risk, race and insurance, high psychosocial risk pregnancies (OR = 1.69; 95% CI 1.06-2.72) were significantly more likely to receive inadequate prenatal care than care of greater intensity. Many high psychosocial risk pregnancies do not receive adequate prenatal care.

  13. Evolving paradigm of illnesses presented to medical Intensive Care Unit in body builders: Cases from tertiary care center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar Garg

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bodybuilding is the use of progressive resistance exercise to control and develop one′s musculature. With the rise in number of persons adopting this activity, there is evolving paradigm of illnesses presented to intensive care in this population subset. Strict adherence to details of bodybuilding and avoidance of unsupervised medications are essential to prevent untoward effects.

  14. Towards improving medical care for people with intellectual disability living in the community : Possibilities of integrated care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, DEMC; Krol, B; Groothoff, JW; Post, D

    2006-01-01

    Background Ongoing deinstitutionalization has resulted in several problems in medical care delivery to people with intellectual disability, such as an increased workload for general practitioners (GPs) and a lack of active co-ordination and co-operation between healthcare professionals. A major cons

  15. Evolving paradigm of illnesses presented to medical Intensive Care Unit in body builders: Cases from tertiary care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Sunil Kumar

    2015-04-01

    Bodybuilding is the use of progressive resistance exercise to control and develop one's musculature. With the rise in number of persons adopting this activity, there is evolving paradigm of illnesses presented to intensive care in this population subset. Strict adherence to details of bodybuilding and avoidance of unsupervised medications are essential to prevent untoward effects.

  16. The effect of medical treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) on foster care caseloads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fallesen, Peter; Wildeman, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Since the early 2000s, foster care caseloads have decreased in many wealthy democracies, yet the causes of these declines remain, for the most part, a mystery. This article uses administrative data on all Danish municipalities (N = 277) and a 10% randomly drawn sample of all Danish children (N...... = 157,938) in the period from 1998 to 2010 to show that increasing medical treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) accounts for a substantial share of the decrease in foster care caseloads. According to our estimates, the decline in foster care caseloads during this period would...... have been 45% smaller absent increases in medical treatment of ADHD. These findings are especially provocative in light of recent research showing ambiguous effects of medical treatment of ADHD. Future research should be attentive to how medical treatment aimed at addressing children’s acute behavioral...

  17. Queues and care: how medical residents organize their work in a busy clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlay, W; Mutran, E J; Zeitler, R R; Randall, C S

    1990-09-01

    How do medical residents organize their work in settings where queue demands are heavy and resources are limited? Under such conditions, a queue theory would predict the delivery of care that is indifferent to clients' needs or that gets rid of clients as quickly as possible. In an exploratory case study of medical residents in a Veterans Administration outpatient clinic, we found instead that the medical residents' work was characterized by a high level of professional commitment: they provided thorough medical examinations and attempted to expedite patient care in other ways. We attribute the residents' professional ethos to opportunities provided in the VA hospital to learn the craft of routine medicine and to be directly responsible for patient care; such opportunities were not available in other settings.

  18. The impact of medical technology on sense of security in the palliative home care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munck, Berit; Sandgren, Anna

    2017-03-02

    The increase in the use of medical devices in palliative home care requires that patients and next-of-kin feel secure. Therefore, the aim was to describe medical technology's impact on the sense of security for patients, next-of-kin and district nurses. Deductive content analysis was conducted on data from three previous studies, using the theoretical framework 'palliative home care as a secure base'. The use of medical technology was shown to have an impact on the sense of security for all involved. A sense of control was promoted by trust in staff and their competence in managing the technology, which was linked to continuity. Inner peace and being in comfort implied effective symptom relief facilitated by pain pumps and being relieved of responsibility. Health care professionals need to have practical knowledge about medical technology, but at the same time have an awareness of how to create and maintain a sense of security.

  19. Focused Acute Medicine Ultrasound (FAMUS) - point of care ultrasound for the Acute Medical Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallwood, Nicholas; Dachsel, Martin; Matsa, Ramprasad; Tabiowo, Eugene; Walden, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Point of care ultrasound (POCU) is becoming increasingly popular as an extension to clinical examination techniques. Specific POCU training pathways have been developed in specialties such as Emergency and Intensive Care Medicine (CORE Emergency Ultrasound and Core UltraSound Intensive Care, for example), but until this time there has not been a curriculum for the acutely unwell medical patient outside of Critical Care. We describe the development of Focused Acute Medicine Ultrasound (FAMUS), a curriculum designed specifically for the Acute Physician to learn ultrasound techniques to aid in the management of the unwell adult patient. We detail both the outline of the curriculum and the process involved for a candidate to achieve FAMUS accreditation. It is anticipated this will appeal to both Acute Medical Unit (AMU) clinicians and general physicians who deal with the unwell or deteriorating medical or surgical patient. In time, the aspiration is for FAMUS to become a core part of the AIM curriculum.

  20. Care of the breastfeeding mother in medical-surgical areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenner, Lori

    2007-04-01

    Benefits and myths of breastfeeding may interfere with the breastfeeding relationship during maternal hospitalization. Guidelines for maintaining the breastfeeding relationship and/or protecting the milk supply during contact with the health care system outside of the maternal child area are presented.

  1. 76 FR 59167 - Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc., Oncology Care Systems Division, Concord, CA; Siemens Medical...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-23

    ..., Concord, CA; Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc., Global Services/Supply Chain Management Including.../Supply Chain Management. These employees provided support for the supply of information technology...,158) and Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc., Global Services/Supply Chain Management,...

  2. Medical Conditions Differentially Affect the Development of IADL Disability: Implications for Medical Care and Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furner, Sylvia E.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Determined independent effects of nine self-reported medical conditions on the likelihood of developing specific instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs) disabilities at three points in time. Various medical conditions differentially affect each specific IADL disability, and each IADL disability has its own set of predictors, which, in…

  3. Documentation of clinical care in hospital patients' medical records: A qualitative study of medical students' perspectives on clinical documentation education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowlands, Stella; Coverdale, Steven; Callen, Joanne

    2016-12-01

    Clinical documentation is essential for communication between health professionals and the provision of quality care to patients. To examine medical students' perspectives of their education in documentation of clinical care in hospital patients' medical records. A qualitative design using semi-structured interviews with fourth-year medical students was undertaken at a hospital-based clinical school in an Australian university. Several themes reflecting medical students' clinical documentation education emerged from the data: formal clinical documentation education using lectures and tutorials was minimal; most education occurred on the job by junior doctors and student's expressed concerns regarding variation in education between teams and receiving limited feedback on performance. Respondents reported on the importance of feedback for their learning of disease processes and treatments. They suggested that improvements could be made in the timing of clinical documentation education and they stressed the importance of training on the job. On-the-job education with feedback in clinical documentation provides a learning opportunity for medical students and is essential in order to ensure accurate, safe, succinct and timely clinical notes. © The Author(s) 2016.

  4. Patient centered primary care is associated with patient hypertension medication adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roumie, Christianne L; Greevy, Robert; Wallston, Kenneth A; Elasy, Tom A; Kaltenbach, Lisa; Kotter, Kristen; Dittus, Robert S; Speroff, Theodore

    2011-08-01

    There is increasing evidence that patient centered care, including communication skills, is an essential component to chronic illness care. Our aim was to evaluate patient centered primary care as a determinant of medication adherence. We mailed 1,341 veterans with hypertension the Short Form Primary Care Assessment Survey (PCAS) which measures elements of patient centered primary care. We prospectively collected each patient's antihypertensive medication adherence for 6 months. Patients were characterized as adherent if they had medication for >80%. 654 surveys were returned (50.7%); and 499 patients with complete data were analyzed. Antihypertensive adherence increased as scores in patient centered care increased [RR 3.18 (95% CI 1.44, 16.23) bootstrap 5000 resamples] for PCAS score of 4.5 (highest quartile) versus 1.5 (lowest quartile). Future research is needed to determine if improving patient centered care, particularly communication skills, could lead to improvements in health related behaviors such as medication adherence and health outcomes.

  5. Safety in home care: A research protocol for studying medication management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Easty Anthony

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patient safety is an ongoing global priority, with medication safety considered a prevalent, high-risk area of concern. Yet, we have little understanding of the supports and barriers to safe medication management in the Canadian home care environment. There is a clear need to engage the providers and recipients of care in studying and improving medication safety with collaborative approaches to exploring the nature and safety of medication management in home care. Methods A socio-ecological perspective on health and health systems drives our iterative qualitative study on medication safety with elderly home care clients, family members and other informal caregivers, and home care providers. As we purposively sample across four Canadian provinces: Alberta (AB, Ontario (ON, Quebec (QC and Nova Scotia (NS, we will collect textual and visual data through home-based interviews, participant-led photo walkabouts of the home, and photo elicitation sessions at clients' kitchen tables. Using successive rounds of interpretive description and human factors engineering analyses, we will generate robust descriptions of managing medication at home within each provincial sample and across the four-province group. We will validate our initial interpretations through photo elicitation focus groups with home care providers in each province to develop a refined description of the phenomenon that can inform future decision-making, quality improvement efforts, and research. Discussion The application of interpretive and human factors lenses to the visual and textual data is expected to yield findings that advance our understanding of the issues, challenges, and risk-mitigating strategies related to medication safety in home care. The images are powerful knowledge translation tools for sharing what we learn with participants, decision makers, other healthcare audiences, and the public. In addition, participants engage in knowledge exchange

  6. Nosocomial infections in a Dutch neonatal intensive care unit: surveillance study with definitions for infection specifically adapted for neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zwet, W C; Kaiser, A M; van Elburg, R M; Berkhof, J; Fetter, W P F; Parlevliet, G A; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, C M J E

    2005-12-01

    The incidence of nosocomial infection in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) is high compared with other wards. However, no definitions for hospital-acquired infection are available for NICUs. The aim of this study was to measure the incidence of such infections and to identify risk factors in the NICU of the VU University Medical Center, which serves as a level III regional NICU. For this purpose, a prospective surveillance was performed in 1998-2000. We designed definitions by adjusting the current definitions of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for children risk factors were dichotomized. Analysis of risk factors was performed by Cox regression with time-dependent variables. The relationship between the Clinical Risk Index for Babies (CRIB) and nosocomial infection was investigated. Furthermore, for a random sample of cases, we determined whether bloodstream infection and pneumonia would also have been identified with the CDC definitions. Seven hundred and forty-two neonates were included in the study. One hundred and ninety-one neonates developed 264 infections. Bloodstream infection (N=138, 14.9/1000 patient-days) and pneumonia (N=69, 7.5/1000 patient-days) were the most common infections. Of bloodstream infections, 59% were caused by coagulase-negative staphylococci; in 21% of neonates, blood cultures remained negative. In 25% of pneumonias, Enterobacteriaceae were the causative micro-organisms; 26% of cultures remained negative. Compared with the Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System (NNIS) of the CDC, our device utilization ratios and device-associated nosocomial infection rates were high. The main risk factors for bloodstream infection were birth weight [hazard ratio (HR) 1.79, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.45-2.17] and parenteral feeding with hospital-pharmacy-produced, all-in-one mixture 'Minimix' (HR 3.69, 95%CI 2.03-6.69); administration of intravenous antibiotics (HR 0.39, 95%CI 0.26-0.56) was a protective risk factor. The

  7. Medical students writing on death, dying and palliative care: a qualitative analysis of reflective essays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Jason W; Dikomitis, Lisa; Gadoud, Amy

    2016-12-01

    Medical students and doctors are becoming better prepared to care for patients with palliative care needs and support patients at the end of life. This preparation needs to start at medical school. To assess how medical students learn about death, dying and palliative care during a clinical placement using reflective essays and to provide insights to improve medical education about end-of-life care and/or palliative care. Qualitative study in which all reflective essays written by third-year medical students in 1 year from a UK medical school were searched electronically for those that included 'death', 'dying' and 'palliative care'. The anonymised data were managed using QSR NVivo 10 software, and a systematic analysis was conducted in three distinct phases: (1) open coding; (2) axial coding and (3) selective coding. Ethical approval was received. 54 essays met the inclusion criteria from 241 essays screened for the terms 'death', 'dying' or 'palliative'; 22 students gave consent for participation and their 24 essays were included. Saturation of themes was reached. Three overarching themes were identified: emotions, empathy and experiential and reflective learning. Students emphasised trying to develop a balance between showing empathy and their emotional state. Students learnt a lot from clinical encounters and watching doctors manage difficult situations, as well as from their refection during and after the experience. Reflective essays give insights into the way students learn about death, dying and palliative care and how it affects them personally as well as the preparation that is needed to be better equipped to deal with these kinds of experiences. Analysis of the essays enabled the proposal of new strategies to help make them more effective learning tools and to optimise students' learning from a palliative care attachment. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  8. The Impact of Medical Student Participation in Emergency Medicine Patient Care on Departmental Press Ganey Scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron W. Bernard

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Press Ganey (PG scores are used by public entities to gauge the quality of patient care from medical facilities in the United States. Academic health centers (AHCs are charged with educating the new generation of doctors, but rely heavily on PG scores for their business operation. AHCs need to know what impact medical student involvement has on patient care and their PG scores. Purpose: We sought to identify the impact students have on emergency department (ED PG scores related to overall visit and the treating physician’s performance. Methods: This was a retrospective, observational cohort study of discharged ED patients who completed PG satisfaction surveys at one academic, and one community-based ED. Outcomes were responses to questions about the overall visit assessment and doctor’s care, measured on a five-point scale. We compared the distribution of responses for each question through proportions with 95% confidence intervals (CIs stratified by medical student participation. For each question, we constructed a multivariable ordinal logistic regression model including medical student involvement and other independent variables known to affect PG scores. Results: We analyzed 2,753 encounters, of which 259 (9.4% had medical student involvement. For all questions, there were no appreciable differences in patient responses when stratifying by medical student involvement. In regression models, medical student involvement was not associated with PG score for any outcome, including overall rating of care (odds ratio [OR] 1.10, 95% CI [0.90-1.34] or likelihood of recommending our EDs (OR 1.07, 95% CI [0.86-1.32]. Findings were similar when each ED was analyzed individually. Conclusion: We found that medical student involvement in patient care did not adversely impact ED PG scores in discharged patients. Neither overall scores nor physician-specific scores were impacted. Results were similar at both the academic medical center and

  9. The Impact of Medical Student Participation in Emergency Medicine Patient Care on Departmental Press Ganey Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Aaron W.; Martin, Daniel R.; Moseley, Mark G.; Kman, Nicholas E.; Khandelwal, Sorabh; Carpenter, Daniel; Way, David P.; Caterino, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Press Ganey (PG) scores are used by public entities to gauge the quality of patient care from medical facilities in the United States. Academic health centers (AHCs) are charged with educating the new generation of doctors, but rely heavily on PG scores for their business operation. AHCs need to know what impact medical student involvement has on patient care and their PG scores. Purpose We sought to identify the impact students have on emergency department (ED) PG scores related to overall visit and the treating physician’s performance. Methods This was a retrospective, observational cohort study of discharged ED patients who completed PG satisfaction surveys at one academic, and one community-based ED. Outcomes were responses to questions about the overall visit assessment and doctor’s care, measured on a five-point scale. We compared the distribution of responses for each question through proportions with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) stratified by medical student participation. For each question, we constructed a multivariable ordinal logistic regression model including medical student involvement and other independent variables known to affect PG scores. Results We analyzed 2,753 encounters, of which 259 (9.4%) had medical student involvement. For all questions, there were no appreciable differences in patient responses when stratifying by medical student involvement. In regression models, medical student involvement was not associated with PG score for any outcome, including overall rating of care (odds ratio [OR] 1.10, 95% CI [0.90–1.34]) or likelihood of recommending our EDs (OR 1.07, 95% CI [0.86–1.32]). Findings were similar when each ED was analyzed individually. Conclusion We found that medical student involvement in patient care did not adversely impact ED PG scores in discharged patients. Neither overall scores nor physician-specific scores were impacted. Results were similar at both the academic medical center and the community

  10. Medical care of asylum seekers: a descriptive study of the appropriateness of nurse practitioners' care compared to traditional physician-based care in a gatekeeping system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pécoud Alain

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medical care for asylum seekers is a complex and critical issue worldwide. It is influenced by social, political, and economic pressures, as well as premigration conditions, the process of migration, and postmigration conditions in the host country. Increasing needs and healthcare costs have led public health authorities to put nurse practitioners in charge of the management of a gatekeeping system for asylum seekers. The quality of this system has never been evaluated. We assessed the competencies of nurses and physicians in identifying the medical needs of asylum seekers and providing them with appropriate treatment that reflects good clinical practice. Methods This cross-sectional descriptive study evaluated the appropriateness of care provided to asylum seekers by trained nurse practitioners in nursing healthcare centers and by physicians in private practices, an academic medical outpatient clinic, and the emergency unit of the university hospital in Lausanne, Switzerland. From 1687 asylum seeking patients who had consulted each setting between June and December 2003, 450 were randomly selected to participate. A panel of experts reviewed their medical records and assessed the appropriateness of medical care received according to three parameters: 1 use of appropriate procedures to identify medical needs (medical history, clinical examination, complementary investigations, and referral, 2 provision of access to treatment meeting medical needs, and 3 absence of unnecessary medical procedures. Results In the nurse practitioner group, the procedures used to identify medical needs were less often appropriate (79% of reports vs. 92.4% of reports; p Conclusion Although the nursing gatekeeping system provides appropriate treatment to asylum seekers, it might be improved with further training in recording medical history and performing targeted clinical examination.

  11. Bodies or organisms? Medical encounter as a control apparatus at a primary care centre in Barcelona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Zaballos Samper

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Medical practice is driven by technology, discourses, and knowledge about health and illness. This has resulted in its gaining a dominating position in power relations achieved by means of diagnosis, medicalization, and habit and conduct creation and maintenance. Interaction at primary care centres is built on mainstream biomedical views of both the medical discourse and the social practices related to health, illness and the human body. Moreover, it is also rooted on the ideologies conveyed by those social concepts, which in turn, permeate interaction all through with power relations. The present paper takes ethnographic data and in-depth interviews as a departing point to analyse how diagnosis, medicalization, and biopolicies for health prevention and improvement carried out in primary care centres in Barcelona make up a control apparatus. Furthermore, this essay also explores how the apparatus is developed in the medical encounter and turns the body into an organism.

  12. Corruption in the health care sector: A barrier to access of orthopaedic care and medical devices in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Maryse; Kohler, Jillian C; Orbinski, James; Howard, Andrew

    2012-05-03

    Globally, injuries cause approximately as many deaths per year as HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria combined, and 90% of injury deaths occur in low- and middle- income countries. Given not all injuries kill, the disability burden, particularly from orthopaedic injuries, is much higher but is poorly measured at present. The orthopaedic services and orthopaedic medical devices needed to manage the injury burden are frequently unavailable in these countries. Corruption is known to be a major barrier to access of health care, but its effects on access to orthopaedic services is still unknown. A qualitative case study of 45 open-ended interviews was conducted to investigate the access to orthopaedic health services and orthopaedic medical devices in Uganda. Participants included orthopaedic surgeons, related healthcare professionals, industry and government representatives, and patients. Participants' experiences in accessing orthopaedic medical devices were explored. Thematic analysis was used to analyze and code the transcripts. Analysis of the interview data identified poor leadership in government and corruption as major barriers to access of orthopaedic care and orthopaedic medical devices. Corruption was perceived to occur at the worker, hospital and government levels in the forms of misappropriation of funds, theft of equipment, resale of drugs and medical devices, fraud and absenteeism. Other barriers elicited included insufficient health infrastructure and human resources, and high costs of orthopaedic equipment and poverty. This study identified perceived corruption as a significant barrier to access of orthopaedic care and orthopaedic medical devices in Uganda. As the burden of injury continues to grow, the need to combat corruption and ensure access to orthopaedic services is imperative. Anti-corruption strategies such as transparency and accountability measures, codes of conduct, whistleblower protection, and higher wages and benefits for workers could be

  13. Corruption in the health care sector: A barrier to access of orthopaedic care and medical devices in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouchard Maryse

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Globally, injuries cause approximately as many deaths per year as HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria combined, and 90% of injury deaths occur in low- and middle- income countries. Given not all injuries kill, the disability burden, particularly from orthopaedic injuries, is much higher but is poorly measured at present. The orthopaedic services and orthopaedic medical devices needed to manage the injury burden are frequently unavailable in these countries. Corruption is known to be a major barrier to access of health care, but its effects on access to orthopaedic services is still unknown. Methods A qualitative case study of 45 open-ended interviews was conducted to investigate the access to orthopaedic health services and orthopaedic medical devices in Uganda. Participants included orthopaedic surgeons, related healthcare professionals, industry and government representatives, and patients. Participants’ experiences in accessing orthopaedic medical devices were explored. Thematic analysis was used to analyze and code the transcripts. Results Analysis of the interview data identified poor leadership in government and corruption as major barriers to access of orthopaedic care and orthopaedic medical devices. Corruption was perceived to occur at the worker, hospital and government levels in the forms of misappropriation of funds, theft of equipment, resale of drugs and medical devices, fraud and absenteeism. Other barriers elicited included insufficient health infrastructure and human resources, and high costs of orthopaedic equipment and poverty. Conclusions This study identified perceived corruption as a significant barrier to access of orthopaedic care and orthopaedic medical devices in Uganda. As the burden of injury continues to grow, the need to combat corruption and ensure access to orthopaedic services is imperative. Anti-corruption strategies such as transparency and accountability measures, codes of conduct

  14. Corruption in the health care sector: A barrier to access of orthopaedic care and medical devices in Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Globally, injuries cause approximately as many deaths per year as HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria combined, and 90% of injury deaths occur in low- and middle- income countries. Given not all injuries kill, the disability burden, particularly from orthopaedic injuries, is much higher but is poorly measured at present. The orthopaedic services and orthopaedic medical devices needed to manage the injury burden are frequently unavailable in these countries. Corruption is known to be a major barrier to access of health care, but its effects on access to orthopaedic services is still unknown. Methods A qualitative case study of 45 open-ended interviews was conducted to investigate the access to orthopaedic health services and orthopaedic medical devices in Uganda. Participants included orthopaedic surgeons, related healthcare professionals, industry and government representatives, and patients. Participants’ experiences in accessing orthopaedic medical devices were explored. Thematic analysis was used to analyze and code the transcripts. Results Analysis of the interview data identified poor leadership in government and corruption as major barriers to access of orthopaedic care and orthopaedic medical devices. Corruption was perceived to occur at the worker, hospital and government levels in the forms of misappropriation of funds, theft of equipment, resale of drugs and medical devices, fraud and absenteeism. Other barriers elicited included insufficient health infrastructure and human resources, and high costs of orthopaedic equipment and poverty. Conclusions This study identified perceived corruption as a significant barrier to access of orthopaedic care and orthopaedic medical devices in Uganda. As the burden of injury continues to grow, the need to combat corruption and ensure access to orthopaedic services is imperative. Anti-corruption strategies such as transparency and accountability measures, codes of conduct, whistleblower protection, and higher

  15. 38 CFR 17.108 - Copayments for inpatient hospital care and outpatient medical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... specialty care provided at a specialty care clinic are radiology services requiring the immediate presence... ordered as part of the special registry examination) offered by VA to evaluate possible health risks... dental care provided under 38 U.S.C. 1712; (8) Readjustment counseling and related mental health services...

  16. Effects of a multimodule curriculum of palliative care on medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Stanley S L; Hu, Wen-Yu; Chang, Hao-Hsiang; Chang, Shan-Chwen; Chen, Chin-Yu; Chiu, Tai-Yuan

    2008-04-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of educational intervention using a multimodule curriculum of palliative care on medical students, and to explore significant factors that influence improvement in beliefs of ethical decision-making. A total of 259 medical students enrolled in the "Family, Society and Medicine" course, and accepted a multimodule palliative care curriculum that included a 1-hour lecture, 1 hour of patient contact, 1 hour of literature reading, and 1 hour of discussion. A questionnaire was administered before and after the course to evaluate improvements in medical students' knowledge (principles and clinical management) of palliative care and their beliefs concerning ethical decision-making in palliative care. The students showed significant improvements after the course in their knowledge of the principles of palliative care (pretest 58.4% vs. posttest 73.1%; p less than 0.01) and clinical management of palliative care (pretest 58.8% vs. posttest 67.9%; p less than 0.01). Although their beliefs about ethical decision-making were also improved after the course, the medical students did not have a positive belief of "artificial nutrition and hydration is not always beneficial for terminal cancer patients", with a mean score of only 3.15 and 3.51 (pretest and posttest, respectively; range, 1-5). The logistic regression model showed that improvement in knowledge of either principles or clinical management did not significantly improve beliefs about ethical decision-making. A multimodule curriculum of palliative care for medical students can significantly improve their knowledge on principles of clinical management and beliefs about ethical decision-making in palliative care. As for changes in beliefs about ethical decision-making in palliative care, continued ethical and clinical training is required.

  17. Problems Associated with Coordination and Role Definitions in Health Care Teams: A Hospice Program Evaluation and Intervention Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berteotti, Carol R.; And Others

    Using an evaluation of a hospital-based hospice as a case study, this paper analyzes problematic issues surrounding health care teams (HCTs) in light of findings revealed in the literature concerning HCT structures and processes. The factors of coordination and role definitions in HCTs and their manifestations in a particular hospice HCT in terms…

  18. Self-medication: Awareness and Attitude among undergraduate medical students in a tertiary care medical college, Dhule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandip Bharat Patil

    2015-01-01

    Results: Of the 464 respondents, 151 (32.6% were female and 313 (67.4% were male. Overall, 389 (84% participants consumed OTC medications. The commonly consumed OTC drugs were supplements and vitamins followed by painkillers, flu/ cough remedies and sore throat products. The OTC medications were most frequently bought from pharmacies. Easy access, convenience and time saving were the most frequent reasons for self-medication. Eighty two percent of the respondents stated that their level of knowledge regarding OTC medications was moderate to low. Of the study participants, 74 were on regular prescription medications and half of them were unsure or disagreed that OTC drugs could interfere with the regular prescription drugs. Conclusion: Lack of awareness regarding drug interaction is an issue that warrants further intervention by increasing the knowledge so as to prevent adverse events from the drugs."

  19. Experiences of parenting a child with medical complexity in need of acute hospital care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagvall, Monica; Ehnfors, Margareta; Anderzén-Carlsson, Agneta

    2016-03-01

    Parents of children with medical complexity have described being responsible for providing advanced care for the child. When the child is acutely ill, they must rely on the health-care services during short or long periods of hospitalization. The purpose of this study was to describe parental experiences of caring for their child with medical complexity during hospitalization for acute deterioration, specifically focussing on parental needs and their experiences of the attitudes of staff. Data were gathered through individual interviews and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. The care period can be interpreted as a balancing act between acting as a caregiver and being in need of care. The parents needed skilled staff who could relieve them of medical responsibility, but they wanted to be involved in the care and in the decisions taken. They needed support, including relief, in order to meet their own needs and to be able to take care of their children. It was important that the child was treated with respect in order for the parent to trust the staff. An approach where staff view parents and children as a single unit, as recipients of care, would probably make the situation easier for these parents and children.

  20. The Integration of Medical Toxicology and Addiction Medicine: a New Era in Patient Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laes, JoAn R

    2016-03-01

    Medical toxicologists are frequently called upon to treat patients who are addicted to alcohol, tobacco, or other substances across many care settings. Medical toxicologists provide service to their patients through the identification, treatment, and prevention of addiction and its co-morbidities, and practice opportunities are quite varied. Training in addiction medicine can be obtained during or after medical toxicology fellowship through resources offered by the American Society of Addiction Medicine. Additionally, the American Board of Addiction Medicine offers certification in the specialty of addiction medicine to candidates across a wide range of medical specialties.