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Sample records for definite knee oa

  1. Prevalence of knee pain and knee OA in southern Sweden and the proportion that seeks medical care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turkiewicz, Aleksandra; Gerhardsson de Verdier, Maria; Engström, Gunnar;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of frequent knee pain in radiographic, symptomatic and clinically defined knee OA in middle-aged and elderly patients and the proportion that seeks medical care. METHODS: In 2007 a random sample of 10 000 56- to 84-year-old residents...... of Malmö, Sweden, were questioned about knee pain. We classified subjects reporting knee pain with a duration of at least 4 weeks as having frequent knee pain. A random sample of 1300 individuals with frequent knee pain and 650 without were invited for assessment by the ACR clinical knee OA criteria...... and for bilateral weight-bearing knee radiography. We considered a Kellgren-Lawrence grade ≥2 as radiographic knee OA and that in combination with frequent knee pain as symptomatic knee OA. By linkage with the Skåne Healthcare Register, we determined the proportion of subjects that had consulted for knee OA or pain...

  2. Intra-articular analgesia and steroid reduce pain sensitivity in knee OA patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Tanja Schjødt; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Ellegaard, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To assess the effects of intra-articular therapy on pain sensitivity in the knee and surrounding tissues in knee OA patients. Methods. Twenty-five knee OA patients with symptomatic knee OA were included in this interventional cohort study. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) were recorded...... before, immediately after, and two weeks after ultrasound guided intra-articular injection of lidocaine combined with glucocorticosteroid. Computer-controlled and manual pressure algometers were used to assess PPT on the knee, vastus lateralis, tibialis anterior, and the extensor carpi radialis longus...... muscles (control site). Results. Significantly increased PPTs were found following intra-articular injection, at both the knee (P 

  3. Focal knee lesions in knee pairs of asymptomatic and symptomatic subjects with OA risk factors—Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chundru, Renu, E-mail: renu.chundru@ucsf.edu [Musculoskeletal and Quantitative Imaging Research Group, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California San Francisco, 185 Berry Street, Suite 350, San Francisco, CA 94107 (United States); Baum, Thomas, E-mail: thbaum@gmx.de [Musculoskeletal and Quantitative Imaging Research Group, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California San Francisco, 185 Berry Street, Suite 350, San Francisco, CA 94107 (United States); Nardo, Lorenzo, E-mail: lorenzo.nardo@ucsf.edu [Musculoskeletal and Quantitative Imaging Research Group, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California San Francisco, 185 Berry Street, Suite 350, San Francisco, CA 94107 (United States); Nevitt, Michael C., E-mail: MNevitt@psg.ucsf.edu [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, 185 Berry Street, Suite 5700, San Francisco, CA 94107 (United States); Lynch, John, E-mail: JLynch@psg.ucsf.edu [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, 185 Berry Street, Suite 5700, San Francisco, CA 94107 (United States); McCulloch, Charles E., E-mail: CMcCulloch@epi.ucsf.edu [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, 185 Berry Street, Suite 5700, San Francisco, CA 94107 (United States); Link, Thomas M., E-mail: tmlink@radiology.ucsf.edu [Musculoskeletal and Quantitative Imaging Research Group, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California San Francisco, 185 Berry Street, Suite 350, San Francisco, CA 94107 (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Objective: To better understand the relationship between knee pain and bilateral knee lesions, we compared focal knee lesions in knee pairs of subjects with no, unilateral, and bilateral knee pain, and risk factors for knee osteoarthritis (OA), but no radiographic knee OA. Materials and methods: We examined both knees of 120 subjects from the Osteoarthritis Initiative database. We randomly selected 60 subjects aged 45–55 years with OA risk factors, no knee pain (WOMAC pain score = 0) and no radiographic OA (KL-score ≤1) in both knees. We also selected two comparison groups with OA risk factors and no radiographic OA in both knees, but with knee pain (WOMAC pain score ≥5): 30 subjects with right only knee pain and 30 subjects with bilateral knee pain. All subjects underwent 3T MRI of both knees and focal knee lesions were assessed. Results: Statistically significant associations between prevalence of focal lesions in the right and left knee with odds ratios up to 13.5 were found in all three subject groups. Focal knee lesions were generally not associated with pain in analyses comparing knee pairs of subjects with unilateral knee pain (p > 0.05). The prevalence and severity of focal knee lesions were not significantly different in knee pairs of subjects with no knee pain and those with bilateral knee pain (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Focal knee lesions in the right and left knee of subjects with OA risk factors were positively associated with each other independent of knee pain status, and were not statistically significant different between knees in subjects with unilateral knee pain.

  4. Association of knee pain and different definitions of knee osteoarthritis with health-related quality of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiadaliri, A. A.; Lamm, C.J.; Gerhardsson de Verdier, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background: While the impact of knee pain and knee osteoarthritis (OA) on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) has been investigated in the literature, there is a lack of knowledge on the impact of different definitions of OA on HRQoL. The main aim of this study was to measure and compare...... the impact of knee OA and its different definitions on HRQoL in the general population. Methods: A random sample of 1300 participants from Malmö, Sweden with pain in one or both knees in the past 12 months with duration ≥4 weeks and 650 participants without were invited to clinical and radiographic knee...... examination. A total of 1527 individuals with a mean (SD) age 69.4 (7.2) participated and responded to both generic (EQ-5D-3L) and disease-specific (the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score) questionnaires. Knee pain was defined as pain during the last month during most of the days. Knee OA...

  5. The effect of either topical menthol or a placebo on functioning and knee pain among patients with knee OA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topp, Robert; Brosky, Joseph A; Pieschel, David

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common health problem with symptoms including reduced functioning and joint pain. Protracted pharmacological management of knee OA is associated with side effects including gastrointestinal, renal, and neurological dysfunction. Menthol gels have been used with limited empirical support to relieve pain and improve functioning among individual with OA. The purpose of this study was to compare the ability to complete functional tasks and knee pain while completing functional tasks among patients with knee OA after topical application of either 3.5% menthol gel or an inert placebo gel. Twenty individuals with knee OA volunteered to complete 2 data collection visits 1 week apart. Subjects underwent the same data collection at each visit including the performance of functional tasks and self-reporting knee pain while performing each task. The functional tasks included a 6-Minute Walk (6-MW), the Timed Get Up and Go (TUG), 30-second timed chair stand (TCS), and time to ascend (Up stairs) and descend (Down stairs) a flight of stairs. Subjects reported their knee pain immediately following each functional task using a 100-mm visual analog scale. These assessments of pain and functioning were measured twice at each subject visit: upon arrival at the facility without any intervention and again during the same visit after random application to the OA knee of 5 mL of 3.5% menthol gel or 5 mL of an inert gel. There were no significant between-group differences or time by treatment interaction in performance of any of the functional tasks, or measures of pain, at any of the data collection time points. However, there were significant within-group differences. Scores on the 6-MW, TCS, and Down stairs functional tasks improved significantly following the application of menthol gel. Scores on the Down stairs functional task improved significantly following application of the placebo gel. The menthol intervention resulted in significant reductions in pain

  6. Feasibility of neuromuscular training in patients with severe hip or knee OA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ageberg, Eva; Link, Anne; Roos, Ewa M

    2010-01-01

    with knee injuries, to older patients with severe hip or knee OA. We hypothesized that the training program was feasible, determined as: 1) at most acceptable self-reported pain following training; 2) decreased or unchanged pain during the training period; 3) few joint specific adverse events related...... to training, and 4) achieved progression of training level during the training period. METHODS: Seventy-six patients, between 60 and 77 years, with severe hip (n = 38, 55% women) or knee OA (n = 38, 61% women) underwent an individualized, goal-based neuromuscular training program (NEMEX-TJR) in groups...... for a median of 11 weeks (quartiles 7 to 15) prior to total joint replacement (TJR). Pain was self-reported immediately after each training session on a 0 to 10 cm, no pain to pain as bad as it could be, scale, where 0-2 indicates safe, > 2 to 5 acceptable and > 5 high risk pain. Joint specific adverse events...

  7. Semi-Quantitative Imaging Biomarkers of Knee Osteoarthritis Progression: Data from the FNIH OA Biomarkers Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Jamie E.; Losina, Elena; Nevitt, Michael C.; Roemer, Frank W.; Guermazi, Ali; Lynch, John A.; Katz, Jeffrey N.; Kwoh, C. Kent; Kraus, Virginia B.; Hunter, David J.

    2017-01-01

    Objective To determine the association between changes in semi-quantitative knee MRI biomarkers over 24 months and radiographic and pain progression over 48 months in knees with mild to moderate osteoarthritis. Methods We undertook a nested case-control study as part of the Osteoarthritis Biomarkers Consortium Project. We built multivariable logistic regression models to examine the association between change over 24 months in semi-quantitative MR imaging markers and knee OA radiographic and pain progression. MRIs were read according to the MRI Osteoarthritis Knee Score (MOAKS) scoring system. We focused on changes in cartilage, osteophytes, meniscus, bone marrow lesions, Hoffa-synovitis, and synovitis-effusion. Results The most parsimonious model included changes in cartilage thickness and surface area, synovitis-effusion, Hoffa-synovitis, and meniscal morphology (C-statistic =0.740). Subjects with worsening cartilage thickness in 3+ subregions vs. no worsening had 2.8-fold (95% CI: 1.3 – 5.9) greater odds of being a case while subjects with worsening in cartilage surface area in 3+ subregions vs. no worsening had 2.4-fold (95% CI: 1.3 – 4.4) greater odds of being a case. Having worsening in any region in meniscal morphology was associated with a 2.2-fold (95%CI: 1.3 – 3.8) greater odds of being a case. Worsening synovitis-effusion (OR=2.7) and Hoffa-synovitis (OR=2.0) were also associated with greater odds of being a case. Conclusion Twenty-four-month change in cartilage thickness, cartilage surface area, synovitis-effusion, Hoffa-synovitis, and meniscal morphology were independently associated with OA progression, suggesting that they may serve as efficacy biomarkers in clinical trials of disease modifying interventions for knee OA. PMID:27111771

  8. Postgraduate education to increase adherence to a Dutch physiotherapy practice guideline for hip and knee OA: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peter, W.F.; Wees, P.J. van der; Verhoef, J.; Jong, Z. de; Bodegom-Vos, L. van; Hilberdink, W.K.H.A.; Fiocco, M.; Vliet Vlieland, T.P.M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the effectiveness of two educational courses aiming to improve adherence to recommendations in a Dutch physiotherapy practice guideline for hip and knee OA. METHODS: Physiotherapists (PTs) from three regions in The Netherlands were invited to participate in a study comparing an

  9. Baseline Vitamin D Status is Predictive of Longitudinal Change in Tibial BMD in Knee Osteoarthritis (OA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    With its lack of effective treatment and high prevalence, the public health impact of OA is substantial. Peri-articular bone in OA can be evaluated with the medial:lateral tibial BMD ratio (M:L BMD) obtained from dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Higher M:L BMD is associated with medial OA features...

  10. Unsupervised definition of the tibia-femoral joint regions of the human knee and its applications to cartilage analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamez-Peña, José G.; Barbu-McInnis, Monica; Totterman, Saara

    2006-03-01

    Abnormal MR findings including cartilage defects, cartilage denuded areas, osteophytes, and bone marrow edema (BME) are used in staging and evaluating the degree of osteoarthritis (OA) in the knee. The locations of the abnormal findings have been correlated to the degree of pain and stiffness of the joint in the same location. The definition of the anatomic region in MR images is not always an objective task, due to the lack of clear anatomical features. This uncertainty causes variance in the location of the abnormality between readers and time points. Therefore, it is important to have a reproducible system to define the anatomic regions. This works present a computerized approach to define the different anatomic knee regions. The approach is based on an algorithm that uses unique features of the femur and its spatial relation in the extended knee. The femur features are found from three dimensional segmentation maps of the knee. From the segmentation maps, the algorithm automatically divides the femur cartilage into five anatomic regions: trochlea, medial weight bearing area, lateral weight bearing area, posterior medial femoral condyle, and posterior lateral femoral condyle. Furthermore, the algorithm automatically labels the medial and lateral tibia cartilage. The unsupervised definition of the knee regions allows a reproducible way to evaluate regional OA changes. This works will present the application of this automated algorithm for the regional analysis of the cartilage tissue.

  11. Can multivariate models based on MOAKS predict OA knee pain? Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna-Gómez, Carlos D.; Zanella-Calzada, Laura A.; Galván-Tejada, Jorge I.; Galván-Tejada, Carlos E.; Celaya-Padilla, José M.

    2017-03-01

    Osteoarthritis is the most common rheumatic disease in the world. Knee pain is the most disabling symptom in the disease, the prediction of pain is one of the targets in preventive medicine, this can be applied to new therapies or treatments. Using the magnetic resonance imaging and the grading scales, a multivariate model based on genetic algorithms is presented. Using a predictive model can be useful to associate minor structure changes in the joint with the future knee pain. Results suggest that multivariate models can be predictive with future knee chronic pain. All models; T0, T1 and T2, were statistically significant, all p values were 0.60.

  12. Urinary pentosidine does not predict cartilage loss among subjects with symptomatic knee OA : the BOKS Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hunter, D.J.; LaValley, M.; Li, J.; Zhang, Y.; Bauer, D.; Nevitt, M.; Guermazi, A.; Groot, J. de; Sakkee, N.; Gale, D.; Felson, D.T.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Age-related changes in articular cartilage are likely to play a role in the etiology of osteoarthritis (OA). One of the major changes in the extracellular matrix of cartilage is the age-related accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Pentosidine, an AGE crosslink, is one o

  13. Case definitions of knee osteoarthritis in 4,151 unselected subjects: relevance for epidemiological studies : The Copenhagen Osteoarthritis Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laxafoss, Erling; Jacobsen, Steffen; Gosvig, Kasper K;

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aims of the present study were threefold: to examine the distribution of knee joint osteoarthritis in a large, standardized radiological study; to examine the relationships between self reported knee pain and radiological OA; and to examine the natural history of radio-morphological...... for subsequent standardized radiography of the pelvis, the knees, the hands, the wrists, and the lumbar spine. Images were analyzed and knee joint osteoarthritis (OA) was classified according to the radiographic atlas of Kellgren and Lawrence. Joint space width (JSW) was measured at three sites within both...... the medial and the lateral compartment. RESULTS: For the entire cohort the prevalence of radiological knee joint OA of all grades was 38.7% for men and 44.2% for women. Age stratification documented increasing knee joint OA both in regard to prevalence and morphological severity. Knee pain was universally...

  14. Recommendations for standardization and phenotype definitions in genetic studies of osteoarthritis: The TREAT-OA consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Kerkhof (Hanneke); I. Meulenbelt (Ingrid); T. Akune (Toru); N.K. Arden (Nigel); A. Aromaa (Arpo); S.M. Bierma-Zeinstra (Sita); C. Cooper (Charles); J. Dai; M. Doherty (Michael); S. Doherty (Sally); D. Felson; A. Gonzalez (Antonio); A. Gordon; A. Harilainen (Arsi); D.J. Hart; V.B. Hauksson (Valdimar); M. Heliovaara (Markku); A. Hofman (Albert); S. Ikegawa; T. Ingvarsson (Torvaldur); Q. Jiang; H. Jonsson; I. Jonsdottir (Ingileif); H. Kawaguchi; M. Kloppenburg (Margreet); U.M. Kujala (Urho); N.E. Lane; P. Leino-Arjas (Päivi I.); L.S. Lohmander (Stefan); F.P. Luyten (Frank); K.N. Malizos (Konstantinos); M. Nakajima; M.C. Nevitt (Michael); H.A.P. Pols (Huib); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); D. Shi; E. Slagboom (Eline); T.D. Spector (Timothy); K. Stefansson (Kari); A. Sudo (Akihiro); A. Tamm; A.E. Tamm (Aile); A. Tsezou (Aspasia); A. Uchida; A.G. Uitterlinden (André); J.M. Wilkinson (Mark); N. Yoshimura; A.M. Valdes (Ana Maria); J.B.J. van Meurs (Joyce); A.J. Carr (Andrew Jonathan)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To address the need for standardization of osteoarthritis (OA) phenotypes by examining the effect of heterogeneity among symptomatic (SOA) and radiographic osteoarthritis (ROA) phenotypes. Methods: Descriptions of OA phenotypes of the 28 studies involved in the TREAT-OA consor

  15. Case definitions of knee osteoarthritis in 4,151 unselected subjects: relevance for epidemiological studies. The Copenhagen osteoarthritis study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laxafoss, Erling; Jacobsen, Steffen; Gosvig, Kasper K.; Sonne-Holm, Stig [Copenhagen University Hospital of Hvidovre (Denmark). Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

    2010-09-15

    The aims of the present study were threefold: to examine the distribution of knee joint osteoarthritis in a large, standardized radiological study; to examine the relationships between self reported knee pain and radiological OA; and to examine the natural history of radio-morphological change over age in individuals without radiological features of OA. The Copenhagen Osteoarthritis Study - COS is a substudy of the Copenhagen City Heart Study, a longitudinal regional health survey. From the third inclusion of the CCHS (1992-1994) 4,151 subjects were selected for subsequent standardized radiography of the pelvis, the knees, the hands, the wrists, and the lumbar spine. Images were analyzed and knee joint osteoarthritis (OA) was classified according to the radiographic atlas of Kellgren and Lawrence. Joint space width (JSW) was measured at three sites within both the medial and the lateral compartment. For the entire cohort the prevalence of radiological knee joint OA of all grades was 38.7% for men and 44.2% for women. Age stratification documented increasing knee joint OA both in regard to prevalence and morphological severity. Knee pain was universally correlated to the Kellgren and Lawrence severity of OA. In a subgroup with no features of radiological OA, a significant and linear decline in JSW with increasing age was found. We found a clear relationship between self-reported knee pain and radiological osteoarthritis. Pain was proportionally related to the severity of change. We also demonstrated a significant diminishing of joint space width with increasing age in individuals without apparent radiological degeneration. (orig.)

  16. Signs of knee osteoarthritis common in 620 patients undergoing arthroscopic surgery for meniscal tear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihl, Kenneth; Englund, Martin; Lohmander, L Stefan; Jørgensen, Uffe; Nissen, Nis; Schjerning, Jeppe; Thorlund, Jonas B

    2017-02-01

    Background and purpose - Recent evidence has questioned the effect of arthroscopic knee surgery for middle-aged and older patients with degenerative meniscal tears with or without concomitant radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA). We investigated the prevalence of early or more established knee OA and patients' characteristics in a cohort of patients undergoing arthroscopic surgery for a meniscal tear. Patients and methods - 641 patients assigned for arthroscopy on suspicion of meniscus tear were consecutively recruited from February 2013 through January 2015. Of these, 620 patients (mean age 49 (18-77) years, 57% men) with full datasets available were included in the present study. Prior to surgery, patients completed questionnaires regarding onset of symptoms, duration of symptoms, and mechanical symptoms along with the knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS). At arthroscopy, the operating surgeon recorded information about meniscal pathology and cartilage damage. Early or more established knee OA was defined as the combination of self-reported frequent knee pain, cartilage damage, and the presence of degenerative meniscal tissue. Results - 43% of patients (269 of 620) had early or more established knee OA. Of these, a large proportion had severe cartilage lesions with almost half having a severe cartilage lesion in at least 1 knee compartment. Interpretation - Based on a definition including frequent knee pain, cartilage damage, and degenerative meniscal tissue, early or more established knee OA was present in 43% of patients undergoing knee arthroscopy for meniscal tear.

  17. Texture analysis of cartilage T2 maps: individuals with risk factors for OA have higher and more heterogeneous knee cartilage MR T2 compared to normal controls--data from the osteoarthritis initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Gabby B; Baum, Thomas; Carballido-Gamio, Julio; Nardo, Lorenzo; Virayavanich, Warapat; Alizai, Hamza; Lynch, John A; McCulloch, Charles E; Majumdar, Sharmila; Link, Thomas M

    2011-01-01

    The goals of this study were (i) to compare the prevalence of focal knee abnormalities, the mean cartilage T2 relaxation time, and the spatial distribution of cartilage magnetic resonance (MR) T2 relaxation times between subjects with and without risk factors for Osteoarthritis (OA), (ii) to determine the relationship between MR cartilage T2 parameters, age and cartilage morphology as determined with whole-organ magnetic resonance imaging scores (WORMS) and (iii) to assess the reproducibility of WORMS scoring and T2 relaxation time measurements including the mean and grey level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) texture parameters. Subjects with risk factors for OA (n = 92) and healthy controls (n = 53) were randomly selected from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI) incidence and control cohorts, respectively. The specific inclusion criteria for this study were (1) age range 45-55 years, (2) body mass index (BMI) of 19-27 kg/m2, (3) Western Ontario and McMaster University (WOMAC) pain score of zero and (4) Kellgren Lawrence (KL) score of zero at baseline. 3.0 Tesla MR images of the right knee were analyzed using morphological gradings of cartilage, bone marrow and menisci (WORMS) as well as compartment specific cartilage T2 mean and heterogeneity. Regression models adjusted for age, gender, and BMI were used to determine the difference in cartilage parameters between groups. While there was no significant difference in the prevalence of knee abnormalities (cartilage lesions, bone marrow lesions, meniscus lesions) between controls and subjects at risk for OA, T2 parameters (mean T2, GLCM contrast, and GLCM variance) were significantly elevated in those at risk for OA. Additionally, a positive significant association between cartilage WORMS score and cartilage T2 parameters was evident. Overall, this study demonstrated that subjects at risk for OA have both higher and more heterogeneous cartilage T2 values than controls, and that T2 parameters are associated with

  18. Toward a Clinical Definition of Early Osteoarthritis: Onset of Patient-Reported Knee Pain Begins on Stairs. Data From the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    OpenAIRE

    Hensor, EM; Dube, B.; Kingsbury, SR; Tennant, A; Conaghan, PG

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Early detection of osteoarthritis (OA) would increase the chances of effective intervention. We aimed to investigate which patient-reported activity is first associated with knee pain. We hypothesized that pain would occur first during activities requiring weight bearing and knee bending. METHODS: Data were obtained from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI), a multicenter, longitudinal prospective observational cohort of people who have or are at high risk of OA. Participants comple...

  19. Best performing definition of accelerated knee osteoarthritis: data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driban, Jeffrey B; Stout, Alina C; Lo, Grace H; Eaton, Charles B; Price, Lori Lyn; Lu, Bing; Barbe, Mary F; McAlindon, Timothy E

    2016-10-01

    We evaluated agreement among several definitions of accelerated knee osteoarthritis (AKOA) and construct validity by comparing their individual associations with injury, age, obesity, and knee pain. We selected knees from the Osteoarthritis Initiative that had no radiographic knee osteoarthritis [Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) 0 or 1] at baseline and had high-quality quantitative medial joint space width (JSW) measures on two or more consecutive visits (n = 1655 knees, 1143 participants). Quantitative medial JSW was based on a semi-automated method and was location specific (x = 0.25). We compared six definitions of AKOA: stringent JSW (averaged): average JSW loss greater than 1.05 mm/year over 4 years; stringent JSW (consistent): JSW loss greater than 1.05 mm/year for at least 2 years; lenient JSW (averaged): average JSW loss greater than 0.25 mm/year over 4 years; lenient JSW (consistent): JSW loss greater than 0.25 mm/year for at least 2 years; comprehensive KL based: progression from no radiographic osteoarthritis to advance-stage osteoarthritis (KL 3 or 4; development of definite osteophyte and joint space narrowing) within 4 years; and lenient KL based: an increase of at least two KL grades within 4 years. Over 4 years the incidence rate of AKOA was 0.4%, 0.8%, 15.5%, 22.1%, 12.4%, and 7.2% based on the stringent JSW (averaged and consistent), lenient JSW (averaged and consistent), lenient KL-based definition, and comprehensive KL-based definition. All but one knee that met the stringent JSW definition also met the comprehensive KL-based definition. There was fair substantial agreement between the lenient JSW (averaged), lenient KL-based, and comprehensive KL-based definitions. A comprehensive KL-based definition led to larger effect sizes for injury, age, body mass index, and average pain over 4 years. A comprehensive KL-based definition of AKOA may be ideal because it represents a broader definition of joint deterioration compared with those focused on just joint

  20. Varus thrust and knee frontal plane dynamic motion in persons with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, A H; Chmiel, J S; Moisio, K C; Almagor, O; Zhang, Y; Cahue, S; Sharma, L

    2013-11-01

    Varus thrust visualized during walking is associated with a greater medial knee load and an increased risk of medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) progression. Little is known about how varus thrust presence determined by visual observation relates to quantitative gait kinematic data. We hypothesized that varus thrust presence is associated with greater knee frontal plane dynamic movement during the stance phase of gait. Participants had knee OA in at least one knee. Trained examiners assessed participants for varus thrust presence during ambulation. Frontal plane knee motion during ambulation was captured using external passive reflective markers and an 8-camera motion analysis system. To examine the cross-sectional relationship between varus thrust and frontal plane knee motion, we used multivariable regression models with the quantitative motion measures as dependent variables and varus thrust (present/absent) as predictor; models were adjusted for age, gender, body mass index (BMI), gait speed, and knee static alignment. 236 persons [mean BMI: 28.5 kg/m(2) (standard deviation (SD) 5.5), mean age: 64.9 years (SD 10.4), 75.8% women] contributing 440 knees comprised the study sample. 82 knees (18.6%) had definite varus thrust. Knees with varus thrust had greater peak varus angle and greater peak varus angular velocity during stance than knees without varus thrust (mean differences 0.90° and 6.65°/s, respectively). These patterns remained significant after adjusting for age, gender, BMI, gait speed, and knee static alignment. Visualized varus thrust during walking was associated with a greater peak knee varus angular velocity and a greater peak knee varus angle during stance phase of gait. Copyright © 2013 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Gait changes in patients with knee osteoarthritis are replicated by experimental knee pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Aaboe, Jens;

    2010-01-01

    Medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by pain and associated with abnormal knee moments during walking. The relationship between knee OA pain and gait changes remains to be clarified, and a better understanding of this link could advance the treatment and prevention of disease...... progression. This study investigated changes in knee moments during walking following experimental knee pain in healthy volunteers, and whether these changes replicated the joint moments observed in medial knee OA patients....

  2. Knee Confidence as it Relates to Self-Reported and Objective Correlates of Knee Osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Søren T; Rasmussen, Sten; Simonsen, Ole

    2015-01-01

    osteoarthritis (OA). Background Lack of knee confidence is a frequent symptom in patients with knee OA, but little is known of associations between knee confidence and other common correlates of knee OA. Methods Baseline data from 220 patients with knee OA were applied in ordinal regression analyses, with knee...... confidence, assessed using item Q3 of the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, as the dependent variable and self-reported (pain on walking, general health, fear of movement, self-efficacy, function, and previous serious injury) and objective measures (muscle strength, 20-m walk time...

  3. What Are the Prognostic Factors for Radiographic Progression of Knee Osteoarthritis? A Meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.N. Bastick (Alex); J.N. Belo (Janneke); J. Runhaar (Jos); S.M. Bierma-Zeinstra (Sita)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: A previous systematic review on prognostic factors for knee osteoarthritis (OA) progression showed associations for generalized OA and hyaluronic acid levels. Knee pain, radiographic severity, sex, quadriceps strength, knee injury, and regular sport activities were not associ

  4. Functional Fitness and Self-Reported Quality of Life of Older Women Diagnosed with Knee Osteoarthrosis: A Cross-Sectional Case Control Study

    OpenAIRE

    Paula Andréa Malveira Cavalcante; Márcio Roberto Doro; Frank Shiguemitsu Suzuki; Roberta Luksevicius Rica; Andrey Jorge Serra; Francisco Luciano Pontes Junior; Alexandre Lopes Evangelista; Aylton José Figueira Junior; Julien Steven Baker; Danilo Sales Bocalini

    2015-01-01

    Aim. Utilizing a cross-sectional case control design, the aim of this study was to evaluate the functional fitness and self-reported quality of life differences in older people diagnosed with knee osteoarthrosis (O) who participated in health promotion groups. Methods. Ninety older women were distributed into two groups: control without O of the knee (C, n = 40) and a group diagnosed with primary and secondary knee O with grade II or higher, with definite osteophytes (OA, n = 50). Functional ...

  5. Radiographic knee osteoarthritis in ex-elite table tennis players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajabi Reza

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Table tennis involves adoption of the semi-flexed knee and asymmetrical torsional trunk movements creating rotational torques on the knee joint which may predispose players to osteoarthritis (OA of the knee. This study aims to compare radiographic signs of knee OA and associated functional levels in ex-elite male table tennis players and control subjects. Methods Study participants were 22 ex-elite male table tennis players (mean age 56.64 ± 5.17 years with 10 years of involvement at the professional level and 22 non-athletic males (mean age 55.63 ± 4.08 years recruited from the general population. A set of three radiographs taken from each knee were evaluated by an experienced radiologist using the Kellgren and Lawrence (KL scale (0-4 to determine radiographic levels of OA severity. The intercondylar distance was taken as a measure of lower limb angulation. Participants also completed the pain, stiffness, and physical function categories of the Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC 3.1 questionnaire. Results The results showed 78.3% of the ex-elite table tennis players and 36.3% of controls had varying signs of radiographic knee OA with a significant difference in the prevalence levels of definite radiographic OA (KL scale > 2 found between the two groups (P ≤ 0.001. Based on the WOMAC scores, 68.2% of the ex-elite table tennis players reported symptoms of knee pain compared with 27.3% of the controls (p = 0.02 though no significant differences were identified in the mean physical function or stiffness scores between the two groups. In terms of knee alignment, 73.7% of the ex-elite athletes and 32% of the control group had signs of altered lower limb alignment (genu varum (p = 0.01. Statistical differences were found in subjects categorized as having radiographic signs of OA and altered lower limb alignment (p = 0.03. Conclusions Ex-elite table tennis players were found to have increased

  6. Does loading influence the severity of cartilage degeneration in the canine groove-model of OA?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, P.; Intema, F.; El, B. van; Groot, J. de; Bijlsma, J.W.J.; Lafeber, F.; Mastbergen, S.

    2009-01-01

    Many animal models are used to study osteoarthritis (OA). In these models the role of joint loading in the development of OA is not fully understood. We studied the effect of loading on the development of OA in the canine Groove-model. In ten female beagle dogs OA was induced in one knee according t

  7. Relationship between foot function and medial knee joint loading in people with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Levinger, Pazit; Menz, Hylton B; Morrow, Adam D; Bartlett, John R; Feller, Julian A; Bergman, Neil R

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic joint loading, particularly the external knee adduction moment (KAM), is an important surrogate measure for the medio-lateral distribution of force across the knee joint in people with knee osteoarthritis (OA...

  8. The role of muscle strengthening in exercise therapy for knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartholdy, Cecilie; Juhl, Carsten; Christensen, Robin

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To analyze if exercise interventions for patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) following the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) definition of muscle strength training differs from other types of exercise, and to analyze associations between changes in muscle strength, pain, a...

  9. Obesity and disability in the symptomatic Irish knee osteoarthritis population.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ambrose, N L

    2010-06-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee is a common disorder with significant social and financial implications. Obesity is the strongest modifiable risk factor of knee OA. There is little data on obesity in Irish knee OA populations and its relationship to other measures of disease severity.

  10. Association between knee alignment and knee pain in patients surgically treated for medial knee osteoarthritis by high tibial osteotomy. A one year follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    W-Dahl, Annette; Toksvig-Larsen, Sören; Roos, Ewa

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The association between knee alignment and knee pain in knee osteoarthritis (OA) is unclear. High tibial osteotomy, a treatment option in knee OA, alters load from the affected to the unaffected compartment of the knee by correcting malalignment. This surgical procedure thus offers...... the possibility to study the cross-sectional and longitudinal association of alignment to pain. The aims were to study 1) the preoperative association of knee alignment to preoperative knee pain and 2) the association of change in knee alignment with surgery to change in knee pain over time in patients operated...... on for knee OA by high tibial osteotomy. METHODS: 182 patients (68% men) mean age 53 years (34 - 69) with varus alignment having tibial osteotomy by the hemicallotasis technique for medial knee OA were consecutively included. Knee alignment was assessed by the Hip-Knee-Ankle (HKA) angle from radiographs...

  11. Appendicular bone mass and knee and hand osteoarthritis in Japanese women: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moji Kazuhiko

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been reported that there is an inverse association between osteoarthritis (OA and osteoporosis. However, the relationship of bone mass to OA in a Japanese population whose rates of OA are different from Caucasians remains uncertain. Methods We studied the association of appendicular bone mineral density (second metacarpal; mBMD and quantitative bone ultrasound (calcaneus; stiffness index with knee and hand OA among 567 Japanese community-dwelling women. Knee and hand radiographs were scored for OA using Kellgren-Lawrence (K/L scales. In addition, we evaluated the presence of osteophytes and of joint space narrowing. The hand joints were examined at the distal and proximal interphalangeal (DIP, PIP and first metacarpophalangeal/carpometacarpal (MCP/CMC joints. Results After adjusting for age and body mass index (BMI, stiffness index was significantly higher in women with K/L scale, grade 3 at CMC/MCP joint compared with those with no OA. Adjusted means of stiffness index and mBMD were significantly higher in women with definite osteophytes at the CMC/MCP joint compared to those without osteophytes, whereas there were no significant differences for knee, DIP and PIP joints. Stiffness index, but not mBMD, was higher in women with definite joint space narrowing at the CMC/MCP joint compared with those with no joint space narrowing. Conclusions Appendicular bone mass was increased with OA at the CMC/MCP joint, especially among women with osteophytes. Our findings suggest that the association of peripheral bone mass with OA for knee, DIP or PIP may be less clearcut in Japanese women than in other populations.

  12. An ultrasound score for knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riecke, B F; Christensen, R.; Torp-Pedersen, S

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop standardized musculoskeletal ultrasound (MUS) procedures and scoring for detecting knee osteoarthritis (OA) and test the MUS score's ability to discern various degrees of knee OA, in comparison with plain radiography and the 'Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score' (KO...

  13. Alterations in walking knee joint stiffness in individuals with knee osteoarthritis and self-reported knee instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, Jonathan A.; Gorman, Shannon; Fitzgerald, G. Kelley; Farrokhi, Shawn

    2017-01-01

    Increased walking knee joint stiffness has been reported in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) as a compensatory strategy to improve knee joint stability. However, presence of episodic self-reported knee instability in a large subgroup of patients with knee OA may be a sign of inadequate walking knee joint stiffness. The objective of this work was to evaluate the differences in walking knee joint stiffness in patients with knee OA with and without self-reported instability and examine the relationship between walking knee joint stiffness with quadriceps strength, knee joint laxity, and varus knee malalignment. Overground biomechanical data at a self-selected gait velocity was collected for 35 individuals with knee OA without self-reported instability (stable group) and 17 individuals with knee OA and episodic self-reported instability (unstable group). Knee joint stiffness was calculated during the weight-acceptance phase of gait as the change in the external knee joint moment divided by the change in the knee flexion angle. The unstable group walked with lower knee joint stiffness (p=0.01), mainly due to smaller heel-contact knee flexion angles (pknee flexion excursions (pknee stable counterparts. No significant relationships were observed between walking knee joint stiffness and quadriceps strength, knee joint laxity or varus knee malalignment. Reduced walking knee joint stiffness appears to be associated with episodic knee instability and independent of quadriceps muscle weakness, knee joint laxity or varus malalignment. Further investigations of the temporal relationship between self-reported knee joint instability and walking knee joint stiffness are warranted. PMID:26481256

  14. Alterations in walking knee joint stiffness in individuals with knee osteoarthritis and self-reported knee instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, Jonathan A; Gorman, Shannon; Fitzgerald, G Kelley; Farrokhi, Shawn

    2016-01-01

    Increased walking knee joint stiffness has been reported in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) as a compensatory strategy to improve knee joint stability. However, presence of episodic self-reported knee instability in a large subgroup of patients with knee OA may be a sign of inadequate walking knee joint stiffness. The objective of this work was to evaluate the differences in walking knee joint stiffness in patients with knee OA with and without self-reported instability and examine the relationship between walking knee joint stiffness with quadriceps strength, knee joint laxity, and varus knee malalignment. Overground biomechanical data at a self-selected gait velocity was collected for 35 individuals with knee OA without self-reported instability (stable group) and 17 individuals with knee OA and episodic self-reported instability (unstable group). Knee joint stiffness was calculated during the weight-acceptance phase of gait as the change in the external knee joint moment divided by the change in the knee flexion angle. The unstable group walked with lower knee joint stiffness (p=0.01), mainly due to smaller heel-contact knee flexion angles (pknee flexion excursions (pknee stable counterparts. No significant relationships were observed between walking knee joint stiffness and quadriceps strength, knee joint laxity or varus knee malalignment. Reduced walking knee joint stiffness appears to be associated with episodic knee instability and independent of quadriceps muscle weakness, knee joint laxity or varus malalignment. Further investigations of the temporal relationship between self-reported knee joint instability and walking knee joint stiffness are warranted.

  15. Decreased Knee Joint Loading Associated With Early Knee Osteoarthritis After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellsandt, Elizabeth; Gardinier, Emily S; Manal, Kurt; Axe, Michael J; Buchanan, Thomas S; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury predisposes individuals to early-onset knee joint osteoarthritis (OA). Abnormal joint loading is apparent after ACL injury and reconstruction. The relationship between altered joint biomechanics and the development of knee OA is unknown. Altered knee joint kinetics and medial compartment contact forces initially after injury and reconstruction are associated with radiographic knee OA 5 years after reconstruction. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Individuals with acute, unilateral ACL injury completed gait analysis before (baseline) and after (posttraining) preoperative rehabilitation and at 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years after reconstruction. Surface electromyographic and knee biomechanical data served as inputs to an electromyographically driven musculoskeletal model to estimate knee joint contact forces. Patients completed radiographic testing 5 years after reconstruction. Differences in knee joint kinetics and contact forces were compared between patients with and those without radiographic knee OA. Patients with OA walked with greater frontal plane interlimb differences than those without OA (nonOA) at baseline (peak knee adduction moment difference: 0.00 ± 0.08 N·m/kg·m [nonOA] vs -0.15 ± 0.09 N·m/kg·m [OA], P = .014; peak knee adduction moment impulse difference: -0.001 ± 0.032 N·m·s/kg·m [nonOA] vs -0.048 ± 0.031 N·m·s/kg·m [OA], P = .042). The involved limb knee adduction moment impulse of the group with osteoarthritis was also lower than that of the group without osteoarthritis at baseline (0.087 ± 0.023 N·m·s/kg·m [nonOA] vs 0.049 ± 0.018 N·m·s/kg·m [OA], P = .023). Significant group differences were absent at posttraining but reemerged 6 months after reconstruction (peak knee adduction moment difference: 0.02 ± 0.04 N·m/kg·m [nonOA] vs -0.06 ± 0.11 N·m/kg·m [OA], P = .043). In addition, the OA group walked with lower peak medial compartment contact forces of the involved limb

  16. Effects of an intensive weight loss program on knee joint loading in obese adults with knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkjaer, T; Henriksen, Marius; Aaboe, J

    2011-01-01

    To determine the effect of an intensive weight loss program on knee joint loads during walking in obese patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA).......To determine the effect of an intensive weight loss program on knee joint loads during walking in obese patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA)....

  17. Definition and evaluation of testing scenarios for knee wear simulation under conditions of highly demanding daily activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwiesau, Jens; Schilling, Carolin; Kaddick, Christian; Utzschneider, Sandra; Jansson, Volkmar; Fritz, Bernhard; Blömer, Wilhelm; Grupp, Thomas M

    2013-05-01

    The objective of our study was the definition of testing scenarios for knee wear simulation under various highly demanding daily activities of patients after total knee arthroplasty. This was mainly based on a review of published data on knee kinematics and kinetics followed by the evaluation of the accuracy and precision of a new experimental setup. We combined tibio-femoral load and kinematic data reported in the literature to develop deep squatting loading profiles for simulator input. A servo-hydraulic knee wear simulator was customised with a capability of a maximum flexion of 120°, a tibio-femoral load of 5000N, an anterior-posterior (AP) shear force of ±1000N and an internal-external (IE) rotational torque of ±50Nm to simulate highly demanding patient activities. During the evaluation of the newly configurated simulator the ability of the test machine to apply the required load and torque profiles and the flexion kinematics in a precise manner was examined by nominal-actual profile comparisons monitored periodically during subsequent knee wear simulation. For the flexion kinematics under displacement control a delayed actuator response of approximately 0.05s was inevitable due to the inertia of masses in movement of the coupled knee wear stations 1-3 during all applied activities. The axial load and IE torque is applied in an effective manner without substantial deviations between nominal and actual load and torque profiles. During the first third of the motion cycle a marked deviation between nominal and actual AP shear load profiles has to be noticed but without any expected measurable effect on the latter wear simulation due to the fact that the load values are well within the peak magnitude of the nominal load amplitude. In conclusion the described testing method will be an important tool to have more realistic knee wear simulations based on load conditions of the knee joint during activities of daily living.

  18. Muscle weakness, afferent sensory dysfunction and exercise in knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roos, Ewa M.; Herzog, Walter; Block, Joel A

    2011-01-01

    Lower-extremity muscle strength and afferent sensory dysfunction, such as reduced proprioceptive acuity, are potentially modifiable putative risk factors for knee osteoarthritis (OA). Findings from current studies suggest that muscle weakness is a predictor of knee OA onset, while there is confli...... with previous knee injuries) are easily identified, and may benefit from exercise interventions to prevent or delay OA onset....... a possibility for achieving preventive structure or load modifications. In contrast, large randomized controlled trials of patients with established OA have failed to demonstrate beneficial effects of strengthening exercises. Subgroups of individuals who are at increased risk of knee OA (such as those...

  19. The association between radiographic severity and pre-operative function in patients undergoing primary knee replacement for osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dowsey, Michelle M; Dieppe, Paul; Lohmander, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    To determine the association between radiographic osteoarthritis (OA) and pre-operative function in patients undergoing primary knee replacement.......To determine the association between radiographic osteoarthritis (OA) and pre-operative function in patients undergoing primary knee replacement....

  20. High Prevalence of Neuropathic Pain Features in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oteo-Álvaro, Ángel; Ruiz-Ibán, Miguel A; Miguens, Xoan; Stern, Andrés; Villoria, Jesús; Sánchez-Magro, Isabel

    2015-09-01

    The present epidemiological research evaluated the prevalence of neuropathic pain characteristics in patients with painful knee osteoarthritis (OA) and the plausibility that such neuropathic features were specific of OA. Outpatients with chronic pain associated with knee OA who attended orthopedic surgery or rehabilitation clinics were systematically screened for neuropathic pain with the Douleur Neuropathique in 4 questions (DN4) questionnaire. Data from medical files and those obtained during a single structured clinical interview were correlated with the DN4 scores. Information on potential confounders of neuropathic-like qualities of knee pain was collected to evaluate as much as possible only the symptoms attributable to OA. Of 2,776 patients recruited, 2,167 patients provided valid data from 2,992 knees. The DN4 was scored positively (≥ 4) in 1,125 patients (51.9%) and 1,459 knees (48.8%). When patients with potential confounders were excluded, the respective prevalences were 33.3% and 29.4%. Patients who scored positively in the DN4 had more severe pain, greater structural damage, and more potential confounders of neuropathic pain. Three potential confounders conveyed much of the variability explained by regression analyses. However, latent class analyses revealed that the concourse of other factors is required to explain the neuropathic pain qualities. A relevant proportion of patients with chronic pain associated with knee OA featured neuropathic pain qualities that were not explained by other conditions. The present research has provided reasonable epidemiological grounds to attempt their definite diagnosis and classification. © 2014 World Institute of Pain.

  1. Knee Osteoarthritis Treatment with the KineSpring Knee Implant System: A Report of Two Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Hayes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is a leading cause of disability in middle-aged and older adults with the prevalence expected to increase by 40% by 2025. This dramatic projected increase in OA reflects, in large part, the alarming obesity epidemic. Indeed, it is now well understood that abnormal loading across the knee joint due to malalignment and/or excessive weight gain is responsible for accelerating OA progression. Consequently, there is a therapeutic need for alternative knee OA treatments that directly address joint overload to fill the gap between ineffective conservative care and invasive joint-modifying surgical procedures. We describe two cases that presented with bilateral knee OA resistant to conservative treatments, each with one knee previously and unsuccessfully treated with high tibial osteotomy to improve alignment and the contralateral knee successfully treated with a joint-preserving, load-absorbing implant (KineSpring Knee Implant System.

  2. Does increasing step width alter knee biomechanics in medial compartment knee osteoarthritis patients during stair descent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquette, Max R; Zhang, Songning; Milner, Clare E; Klipple, Gary

    2014-06-01

    Research shows that one of the first complaints from knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients is difficulty in stair ambulation due to knee pain. Increased step width (SW) has been shown to reduce first and second peak internal knee abduction moments, a surrogate variable for medial compartment knee joint loading, during stair descent in healthy older adults. This study investigates the effects of increased step width (SW) on knee biomechanics and knee pain in medial compartment knee OA patients during stair descent. Thirteen medial compartment knee OA patients were recruited for the study. A motion analysis system was used to obtain three-dimensional joint kinematics. An instrumented staircase was used to collect ground reaction forces (GRF). Participants performed stair descent trials at their self-selected speed using preferred, wide, and wider SW. Participants rated their knee pain levels after each SW condition. Increased SW had no effect on peak knee abduction moments and knee pain. Patients reported low levels of knee pain during all stair descent trials. The 2nd peak knee adduction angle and frontal plane GRF at time of 2nd peak abduction moment were reduced with increasing SW. The findings suggest that increases in SW may not influence knee loads in medial compartment knee OA patients afflicted with low levels of knee pain during stair descent. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Ambulatory measurement of the knee adduction moment in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Noort, J.C.; van der Esch, M.; Steultjens, M.P.M.; Dekker, J.; Schepers, H. Martin; Veltink, Petrus H.

    2013-01-01

    High knee joint-loading increases the risk and progression of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Mechanical loading on the knee is reflected in the external knee adduction moment (KAdM) that can be measured during gait with laboratory-based measurement systems. However, clinical application of these systems

  4. Ambulatory measurement of the knee adduction moment in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, van den J.C.; Esch, van der M.; Steultjens, M.P.M.; Dekker, J.; Schepers, H.M.; Veltink, P.H.

    2013-01-01

    High knee joint-loading increases the risk and progression of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Mechanical loading on the knee is reflected in the external knee adduction moment (KAdM) that can be measured during gait with laboratory-based measurement systems. However, clinical application of these systems

  5. An evaluation of anatomical and functional knee axis definition in the context of side-cutting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Mark A; Vanrenterghem, Jos

    2012-07-26

    Side-cutting is commonly used to evaluate knee joint kinematics and kinetics in the context of anterior cruciate ligament injury risk. Many existing side-cutting studies fail to clearly define the orientation of the femoral frame and the knee axis, making comparisons between studies difficult. A femoral frame constructed using the ISB or existing functional methods does not necessarily have a medial-lateral axis that is aligned with the axis of the knee. A functional frame that directly aligns with the medial-lateral knee axis was compared to the ISB anatomical frame and the Besier functional frame (Besier et al., 2003) to determine whether the chosen frame would affect the interpretation of side-cutting data. Kinematic and kinetic variables were calculated during three side-cutting manoeuvres of 28 subjects. Differences in mean frame orientation were correlated with the differences in mean knee angle during side-cutting. The differences between the ISB anatomical frame and the functional frames were significantly correlated with the differences in superior-inferior and medial-lateral axis orientations. Coefficients of multiple correlation showed a good to high (CMCs≥0.74) similarity between frames for knee angles and moments. Using a femoral anatomical frame rather than a functional frame most significantly affected offset rather than cross talk in knee angles and moments measured during side-cutting. There were no significant differences in offset or cross talk between the two functional methods. Maximum differences of <4° for frontal plane knee angle requires cautious interpretation but differences <8Nm for knee joint moment were not thought to affect the interpretation of side-cutting data when comparing between studies.

  6. Current surgical treatment of knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rönn, Karolin; Reischl, Nikolaus; Gautier, Emanuel; Jacobi, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Osteoathritis (OA) of the knee is common, and the chances of suffering from OA increase with age. Its treatment should be initially nonoperative-and requires both pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment modalities. If conservative therapy fails, surgery should be considered. Surgical treatments for knee OA include arthroscopy, cartilage repair, osteotomy, and knee arthroplasty. Determining which of these procedures is most appropriate depends on several factors, including the location, stage of OA, comorbidities on the one side and patients suffering on the other side. Arthroscopic lavage and débridement is often carried out, but does not alter disease progression. If OA is limited to one compartment, unicompartmental knee arthroplasty or unloading osteotomy can be considered. They are recommended in young and active patients in regard to the risks and limited durability of total knee replacement. Total arthroplasty of the knee is a common and safe method in the elderly patients with advanced knee OA. This paper summarizes current surgical treatment strategies for knee OA, with a focus on the latest developments, indications and level of evidence.

  7. Current Surgical Treatment of Knee Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolin Rönn

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoathritis (OA of the knee is common, and the chances of suffering from OA increase with age. Its treatment should be initially nonoperative—and requires both pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment modalities. If conservative therapy fails, surgery should be considered. Surgical treatments for knee OA include arthroscopy, cartilage repair, osteotomy, and knee arthroplasty. Determining which of these procedures is most appropriate depends on several factors, including the location, stage of OA, comorbidities on the one side and patients suffering on the other side. Arthroscopic lavage and débridement is often carried out, but does not alter disease progression. If OA is limited to one compartment, unicompartmental knee arthroplasty or unloading osteotomy can be considered. They are recommended in young and active patients in regard to the risks and limited durability of total knee replacement. Total arthroplasty of the knee is a common and safe method in the elderly patients with advanced knee OA. This paper summarizes current surgical treatment strategies for knee OA, with a focus on the latest developments, indications and level of evidence.

  8. Toward a clinical definition of early osteoarthritis: onset of patient-reported knee pain begins on stairs. Data from the osteoarthritis initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensor, Elizabeth M A; Dube, Bright; Kingsbury, Sarah R; Tennant, Alan; Conaghan, Philip G

    2015-01-01

    Early detection of osteoarthritis (OA) would increase the chances of effective intervention. We aimed to investigate which patient-reported activity is first associated with knee pain. We hypothesized that pain would occur first during activities requiring weight bearing and knee bending. Data were obtained from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI), a multicenter, longitudinal prospective observational cohort of people who have or are at high risk of OA. Participants completed the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC; Likert scale) annually for up to 7 years. Rasch analysis was used to rank the WOMAC pain questions (activities) in order of affirmation as the pain score increased from 0. For each total WOMAC score category (0-20) we selected 25 individuals at random based on their maximum score across all visits. Fit to the Rasch model was assessed in this subset; stability of question ranking over successive visits was confirmed in the full OAI. WOMAC data on 4,673 people were included, with 491 selected for subset analysis. The subset data showed good fit to the Rasch model (χ(2) = 43.31, P = 0.332). In the full OAI, the "using stairs" question was the first to score points as the total pain score increased from 0 (baseline logit score ± 95% confidence interval -4.74 ± 0.07), then "walking" (-2.94 ± 0.07), "standing" (-2.65 ± 0.07), "lying/sitting" (-2.00 ± 0.08), and finally "in bed" (-1.32 ± 0.09). This ordering was consistent over successive visits. Knee pain is most likely to first appear during weight-bearing activities involving bending of the knee, such as using stairs. First appearance of this symptom may identify a group suitable for early intervention strategies. © 2015 The Authors. Arthritis Care & Research is published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Rheumatology.

  9. Ultrasonographic assessment of pes anserinus tendon and pes anserinus tendinitis bursitis syndrome in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toktas, Hasan; Dundar, Umit; Adar, Sevda; Solak, Ozlem; Ulasli, Alper Murat

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the ultrasonographic (US) findings of pes anserinus tendon and bursa in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) with or without clinical pes anserinus tendinitis bursitis syndrome (PATBS). A total of 157 female patients with the diagnosis of knee OA on both knees (314 knees), and 30 age, and body mass index- matched healthy female controls without knee pain (60 knees), were included in the study. PATBS was clinically diagnosed. US evaluation parameters were the measurement of the thickness of pes anserinus tendon insertion region (PA) and examination of the morphologic intratendinous PA tissue characteristics and pes anserinus bursitis (PAB). Radiographic knee osteoarthritis graded I-IV according to Kellgren and Lawrence (KL) for each knee was recorded. Pain and functional status were assessed by the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC). There were 183 PATBS (58.3%) clinical diagnoses among the 314 knees with OA. The mean thickness of PA in the patients with knee OA graded 1,2,3,4 with/without PATBS was significantly greater than the controls (p = 0.001). The mean thickness of PA in knees with OA KL graded 3 and 4 with/without PATBS, was greater than knees with OA KL graded 1 and 2 with/without PATBS (p < 0,05) (except knee OA KL graded 2 with PATBS versus knee OA KL graded 4 without PATBS).The knee OA KL graded 1,2,3,4 with PATBS had significantly more PAB and less loss of normal fibrillar echotexture of PA compared to controls and knees with OA KL graded 1,2,3,4 without PATBS (p < 0.05). The VAS scores of knees with OA KL graded 3, 4 with PATBS were significantly greater than those of knees with OA KL graded 3,4 without PATBS (p < 0.05). PA thickness was significantly associated with the KL grade (r: 0.336, p:0.001) and PATBS (r: 0.371, p < 0.001). It is concluded that the mean thickness of PA in knees with OA with/without PATBS was significantly greater than the

  10. Myofascial Pain in Patients Waitlisted for Total Knee Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Henry

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Knee pain is one of the major sources of pain and disability in developed countries, particularly in aging populations, and is the primary indication for total knee arthroplasty (TKA in patients with osteoarthritis (OA.

  11. Proprioception in knee osteoarthritis: a narrative review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoop, J.; Leeden, M. van der; Lems, W.F.; Esch, M. van der

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To give an overview of the literature on knee proprioception in knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients. Method: A literature search was performed and reviewed using the narrative approach. Results: (1) Three presumed functions of knee proprioception have been described in the literature: prote

  12. Osteoarthritis of the hip or knee: which coexisting disorders are disabling?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reeuwijk, K.G.; Rooij, M. de; Dijk, G.M. van; Veenhof, C.; Steultjens, M.P.; Dekker, J.

    2010-01-01

    Exercise therapy is generally recommended in osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip or knee. However, coexisting disorders may bring additional impairments, which may necessitate adaptations to exercise for OA of the hip or knee. For the purpose of developing an adapted protocol for exercise therapy in OA

  13. Osteoarthritis of the hip or knee: which coexisting disorders are disabling?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reeuwijk, K.G.; Rooij, M. de; Dijk, G.M. van; Veenhof, C.; Steultjens, M.P.; Dekker, J.

    2010-01-01

    Exercise therapy is generally recommended in osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip or knee. However, coexisting disorders may bring additional impairments, which may necessitate adaptations to exercise for OA of the hip or knee. For the purpose of developing an adapted protocol for exercise therapy in OA p

  14. The role of pain and functional impairment in the decision to recommend total joint replacement in hip and knee osteoarthritis: an international cross-sectional study of 1909 patients. Report of the OARSI-OMERACT Task Force on total joint replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gossec, L; Paternotte, S; Maillefert, J F;

    2011-01-01

    Score Physical function Short-form, 0-100). Analyses: Comparison of patients with vs without surgeons' indication for TJR. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve analyses and logistic regression were applied to determine cut points of pain and disability defining recommendation for TJR. RESULTS......OBJECTIVE: To assess the pain and functional disability levels corresponding to an indication for total joint replacement (TJR) in hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: Design: International cross-sectional study in 10 countries. Patients: Consecutive outpatients with definite hip or knee OA...

  15. Mechanical contributors to sex differences in idiopathic knee osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolella Daniel P

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The occurrence of knee osteoarthritis (OA increases with age and is more common in women compared with men, especially after the age of 50 years. Recent work suggests that contact stress in the knee cartilage is a significant predictor of the risk for developing knee OA. Significant gaps in knowledge remain, however, as to how changes in musculoskeletal traits disturb the normal mechanical environment of the knee and contribute to sex differences in the initiation and progression of idiopathic knee OA. To illustrate this knowledge deficit, we summarize what is known about the influence of limb alignment, muscle function, and obesity on sex differences in knee OA. Observational data suggest that limb alignment can predict the development of radiographic signs of knee OA, potentially due to increased stresses and strains within the joint. However, these data do not indicate how limb alignment could contribute to sex differences in either the development or worsening of knee OA. Similarly, the strength of the knee extensor muscles is compromised in women who develop radiographic and symptomatic signs of knee OA, but the extent to which the decline in muscle function precedes the development of the disease is uncertain. Even less is known about how changes in muscle function might contribute to the worsening of knee OA. Conversely, obesity is a stronger predictor of developing knee OA symptoms in women than in men. The influence of obesity on developing knee OA symptoms is not associated with deviation in limb alignment, but BMI predicts the worsening of the symptoms only in individuals with neutral and valgus (knock-kneed knees. It is more likely, however, that obesity modulates OA through a combination of systemic effects, particularly an increase in inflammatory cytokines, and mechanical factors within the joint. The absence of strong associations of these surrogate measures of the mechanical environment in the knee joint with sex

  16. Physiotherapy management of knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Carolyn J; Hinman, Rana S; Bennell, Kim L

    2011-05-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a prevalent chronic joint disease causing pain and disability. Physiotherapy, which encompasses a number of modalities, is a non-invasive treatment option in the management of OA. This review summarizes the evidence for commonly used physiotherapy interventions. There is strong evidence to show short-term beneficial effects of exercise on pain and function, although the type of exercise does not seem to influence treatment outcome. Delivery modes, including individual, group or home exercise are all effective, although therapist contact may improve benefits. Attention to improving adherence to exercise is needed to maximize outcomes in the longer-term. Knee taping applied with the aim of realigning the patella and unloading soft tissues can reduce pain. There is also evidence to support the use of knee braces in people with knee OA. Biomechanical studies show that lateral wedge shoe insoles reduce knee load but clinical trials do not support symptomatic benefits. Recent studies suggest individual shoe characteristics also affect knee load and there is current interest in the effect of modified shoe designs. Manual therapy, while not to be used as a stand-alone treatment, may be beneficial. In summary, although the research is not equivocal, there is sufficient evidence to indicate that physiotherapy interventions can reduce pain and improve function in those with knee OA.

  17. Does Loading Influence the Severity of Cartilage Degeneration in the Canine Groove-Model of OA?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Petra; Intema, Femke; van El, Benno; DeGroot, Jeroen; Bijlsma, J. W. J.; Lafeber, Floris; Mastbergen, Simon

    2009-01-01

    Many animal models are used to study osteoarthritis (OA). In these models the role of joint loading in the development of CA is not fully understood. We studied the effect of loading on the development of CIA in the canine Groove-model. In ten female beagle dogs OA was induced in one knee according

  18. The association of osteoarthritis risk factors with localized, regional and diffuse knee pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, L R; Boudreau, R; Newman, A B; Hannon, M J; Chu, C R; Nevitt, M C; Kent Kwoh, C

    2010-10-01

    To identify determinants of different patterns of knee pain with a focus on risk factors for knee osteoarthritis (OA). The Knee Pain Map is an interviewer-administered assessment that asks subjects to characterize their knee pain as localized, regional, or diffuse. A total of 2677 participants from the Osteoarthritis Initiative were studied. We used multinomial logistic regression to examine the relationship between risk factors for OA and knee pain patterns. We examined the bivariate and multivariate relationships of knee pain pattern with age, body mass index (BMI), sex, race, family history of total joint replacement, knee injury, knee surgery, and hand OA. We compared 2462 knees with pain to 1805 knees without pain. In the bivariate analysis, age, sex, BMI, injury, surgery, and hand OA were associated with at least one pain pattern. In the multivariate model, all of these variables remained significantly associated with at least one pattern. When compared to knees without pain, higher BMI, injury, and surgery were associated with all patterns. BMI had its strongest association with diffuse pain. Older age was less likely to be associated with localized pain while female sex was associated with regional pain. We have shown that specific OA risk factors are associated with different knee pain patterns. Better understanding of the relationship between OA risk factors and knee pain patterns may help to characterize the heterogeneous subsets of knee OA. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Identification of Early Degenerative Changes in the Knee after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Rupture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.L. van Meer (Belle)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractOsteoarthritis (OA) is a common disease of the musculoskeletal system. In the Netherlands approximately 1.2 million people suffer from OA. OA can arise in all synovial joints, but knee, hand and hip are most often affected. The incidence rate of OA is growing after the age of 50 year

  20. Identification of Early Degenerative Changes in the Knee after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Rupture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.L. van Meer (Belle)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractOsteoarthritis (OA) is a common disease of the musculoskeletal system. In the Netherlands approximately 1.2 million people suffer from OA. OA can arise in all synovial joints, but knee, hand and hip are most often affected. The incidence rate of OA is growing after the age of 50

  1. The pain-relieving qualities of exercise in knee osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susko AM

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Allyn M Susko, G Kelley Fitzgerald Department of Physical Therapy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA Abstract: The purpose of this review article is to explore the role of therapeutic exercise in managing the pain associated with knee osteoarthritis (OA. Therapeutic exercise is often recommended as a first-line conservative treatment for knee OA, and current evidence supports exercise as an effective pain-relieving intervention. We explore the current state of evidence for exercise as a pain-relieving intervention for knee OA. Next, the mechanisms by which knee OA pain occurs and the potential ways in which exercise may act on those mechanisms are discussed. Clinical applicability and future research directions are suggested. Although evidence demonstrates that exercise reduces knee OA pain, optimal exercise mode and dosage have not been determined. In addition, it is not clearly understood whether exercise provides pain relief via peripheral or central mechanisms or a combination of both. Published clinical trials have explored a variety of interventions, but these interventions have not been specifically designed to target pain pathways. Current evidence strongly supports exercise as a pain-relieving option for those with knee OA. Future research needs to illuminate the mechanisms by which exercise reduces the pain associated with knee OA and the development of therapeutic exercise interventions to specifically target these mechanisms. Keywords: knee, OA, exercise, pain

  2. Treatment modalities for patients with varus medial knee osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Duivenvoorden (Tijs)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most common joint disorders in the Western population, which causes pain, stiffness, loss of function and disability. In patients with OA the cartilage, located at the ends of long bones, is damaged. OA is most prevalent in the knee joint.

  3. Distinct subtypes of knee osteoarthritis: Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H. Waarsing (Jan); S.M. Bierma-Zeinstra (Sita); H.H. Weinans (Harrie)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjective. OA is suspected to be a collection of distinct subtypes, each with different aetiology and clinical characteristics. We aimed to explore the existence of different subtypes of knee OA, using cluster analysis of the data of the OA Initiative. Methods. We used latent class

  4. Distinct subtypes of knee osteoarthritis : data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waarsing, Jan H; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M A; Weinans, Harrie

    OBJECTIVE: OA is suspected to be a collection of distinct subtypes, each with different aetiology and clinical characteristics. We aimed to explore the existence of different subtypes of knee OA, using cluster analysis of the data of the OA Initiative. METHODS: We used latent class cluster analysis

  5. Distinct subtypes of knee osteoarthritis : data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waarsing, Jan H; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M A; Weinans, Harrie

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: OA is suspected to be a collection of distinct subtypes, each with different aetiology and clinical characteristics. We aimed to explore the existence of different subtypes of knee OA, using cluster analysis of the data of the OA Initiative. METHODS: We used latent class cluster analysis

  6. Effects of kinesiotherapy, ultrasound and electrotherapy in management of bilateral knee osteoarthritis: prospective clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Although recent advances in knee osteoarthritis (OA) treatment and evaluation were achieved, to the best of our knowledge, few studies have evaluated the longitudinal effect of therapeutic modalities on the functional exercise capacity of patients with knee OA. The purpose was to investigate the effects of kinesiotherapy and electrotherapy on functional exercise capacity, evaluated using the six-minute walk test (6-MWT) in patients with bilateral knee OA. Secondary measure...

  7. Functional Fitness and Self-Reported Quality of Life of Older Women Diagnosed with Knee Osteoarthrosis: A Cross-Sectional Case Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Andréa Malveira Cavalcante

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Utilizing a cross-sectional case control design, the aim of this study was to evaluate the functional fitness and self-reported quality of life differences in older people diagnosed with knee osteoarthrosis (O who participated in health promotion groups. Methods. Ninety older women were distributed into two groups: control without O of the knee (C, n=40 and a group diagnosed with primary and secondary knee O with grade II or higher, with definite osteophytes (OA, n=50. Functional fitness was evaluated by specific tests, and the time spent in physical activity and quality of life was evaluated by the IPAQ and WHOQOL (distributed in four domains: physical: P, psychological: PS, social: S, and environmental: E domain questionnaires. Results. No differences were found between ages of groups (C: 66±7; OA: 67±9; years. The values of the chair stand test (rep in the OA (13±5 group were different when compared to C group (22±5. For the 6-minute walk test (meters, the values obtained for the C (635±142 were higher (P<0.01 than the OA (297±143 group. The time spent in physical activity (min was greater (P<0.001 in the control (220±12 group compared to OA (100±10 group. Higher values (P<0.001 in all domains were found in the C (P: 69±16, PS: 72±17, S: 67±15, E: 70±15 group compared to OA (P: 48±7, PS: 43±8, S: 53±13, E: 47±14 group. Conclusion. Our data suggests that knee O, in older women, can promote a decline in time spent performing physical activity and functional fitness with decline in quality of life with an increase in sitting time.

  8. Associations of varus thrust and alignment with pain in knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Grace H; Harvey, William F; McAlindon, Timothy E

    2012-07-01

    To investigate associations of varus thrust and varus static alignment with pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). This was a cross-sectional study of participants from a randomized controlled trial of vitamin D treatment for knee OA. Participants were video recorded while walking and scored for presence of varus thrust. Static alignment was measured on standard posteroanterior knee radiographs. Pain questions from the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) questionnaire were used to assess symptoms. We calculated means for total WOMAC pain in relation to varus thrust and static varus alignment (i.e., corrected anatomic alignmentthrust and varus alignment as the predictors. There were 82 participants, 60% of whom were female. The mean±SD age was 65.1±8.5 years, and the mean±SD body mass index was 30.2±5.4 kg/m2. The mean total WOMAC pain score was 6.3 versus 3.9, respectively, in those with versus without definite varus thrust (P=0.007) and 5.0 versus 4.2 in those with versus without varus alignment (P=0.36). Odds ratios for pain with walking and standing were 4.7 (95% confidence interval 1.8-11.9) and 5.5 (95% confidence interval 2.2-14.2), respectively, in those with and those without definite varus thrust. There were no significant associations between varus alignment and responses to individual WOMAC pain questions. Sensitivity analyses suggested that varus classified using a more stringent definition might have been associated with pain on walking and standing. In patients with knee OA, varus thrust, and possibly varus static alignment, were associated with pain, specifically during weight-bearing activities. Treatment of varus thrust (e.g., via bracing or gait modification) may lead to improvement of symptoms. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  9. Douglas OA-4A Dolphin

    Science.gov (United States)

    1938-01-01

    Douglas OA-4A Dolphin: This twin-engine Douglas OA-4A Dolphin was unusual in comparison with other OA-4s in that it employed a nose wheel instead of a tail wheel during its NACA testing at Langley. Here is is seen in the NACA hangar in September 1938.

  10. Effect of center of pressure modulation on knee adduction moment in medial compartment knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haim, Amir; Wolf, Alon; Rubin, Guy; Genis, Yulya; Khoury, Mona; Rozen, Nimrod

    2011-11-01

    The knee adduction moment (KAM) provides a major contribution to the elevated load in the medial compartment of the knee. An abnormally high KAM has been linked with the progression of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Footwear-generated biomechanical manipulations reduce the magnitude of this moment by conveying a more laterally shifted trajectory of the foot's center of pressure (COP), reducing the distance between the ground reaction force and the center of the knee joint, thus lowering the magnitude of the torque. We sought to examine the outcome of a COP shift in a cohort of female patients suffering from medial knee OA. Twenty-two female patients suffering from medial compartment knee OA underwent successive gait analysis testing and direct pedobarographic examination of the COP trajectory with a foot-worn biomechanical device allowing controlled manipulation of the COP. Modulation of the COP coronal trajectory from medial to lateral offset resulted in a significant reduction of the KAM. This trend was demonstrated in subjects with mild-to-moderate OA and in patients suffering from severe stages of the disease. Our results indicate that controlled manipulation of knee coronal kinetics in individuals suffering from medial knee OA can be facilitated by customized COP modification.

  11. Progressive Resistance Exercise with Eccentric Loading for the Management of Knee Osteoarthritis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hernandez, Haniel J; McIntosh, Valerie; Leland, Azadeh; Harris-Love, Michael O

    2015-01-01

    .... The use of an eccentric training paradigm may prove to be beneficial for older adults with knee OA since eccentric muscle actions are involved in the energy absorption at the knee joint during gait...

  12. Construct validity of the DynaPort(R)KneeTest: a comparison with observations of physical therapists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mokkink, L.B.; Terwee, C.B.; Lummel, van R.C.; Witte, de S.J.; Wetzels, L.; Bouter, L.M.; Vet, de H.C.W.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the construct validity of the DynaPort((R))KneeTest (KneeTest), which is a performance-based test to assess functioning of patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Scores on the KneeTest (KneeScore) were compared with observations of physical therapists of the patients' functiona

  13. Gait variability and motor control in people with knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkjaer, Tine; Raffalt, Peter C; Dalsgaard, Helle

    2015-01-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a common disease that impairs walking ability and function. We compared the temporal gait variability and motor control in people with knee OA with healthy controls. The purpose was to test the hypothesis that the temporal gait variability would reflect a more...... fluctuation analysis. The motor control was assessed by the soleus (SO) Hoffmann (H)-reflex modulation and muscle co-activation during walking. The results showed no statistically significant mean group differences in any of the gait variability measures or muscle co-activation levels. The SO H......-reflex amplitude was significantly higher in the knee OA group around heel strike when compared with the controls. The mean group difference in the H-reflex in the initial part of the stance phase (control-knee OA) was -6.6% Mmax (95% CI: -10.4 to -2.7, p=0.041). The present OA group reported relatively small...

  14. Gait adaptations with aging in healthy participants and people with knee-joint osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffell, Lynsey D; Jordan, Stevan J; Cobb, Justin P; McGregor, Alison H

    2017-09-01

    The relationship between age and gait characteristics in people with and without medial compartment osteoarthritis (OA) remains unclear. We aimed to characterize this relationship and to relate biomechanical and structural parameters in a subset of OA patients. Twenty five participants with diagnosed unilateral medial knee OA and 84 healthy participants, with no known knee pathology were recruited. 3D motion capture was used to analyse sagittal and coronal plane gait parameters while participants walked at a comfortable speed. Participants were categorized according to age (18-30, 31-59 and 60+ years), and those with and without OA were compared between and within age groups. In a subset of OA patients, clinically available Computed Tomography images were used to assess joint structure. Differences in coronal plane kinematics at the hip and knee were noted in participants with OA particularly those who were older compared with our healthy controls, as well as increased knee moments. Knee adduction moment correlated with structural parameters in the subset of OA patients. Increased knee moments and altered kinematics were observed in older participants presenting with OA only, which seem to be related to morphological changes in the joint due to OA, as opposed to being related to the initial cause of medial knee OA. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Signs of knee osteoarthritis common in 620 patients undergoing arthroscopic surgery for meniscal tear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Kenneth; Englund, Martin; Lohmander, L. Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose - Recent evidence has questioned the effect of arthroscopic knee surgery for middle-aged and older patients with degenerative meniscal tears with or without concomitant radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA). We investigated the prevalence of early or more established knee OA...... and patients' characteristics in a cohort of patients undergoing arthroscopic surgery for a meniscal tear. Patients and methods - 641 patients assigned for arthroscopy on suspicion of meniscus tear were consecutively recruited from February 2013 through January 2015. Of these, 620 patients (mean age 49 (18...... established knee OA was present in 43% of patients undergoing knee arthroscopy for meniscal tear....

  16. Osteoarthritis of the knee after meniscal resection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paradowski, P T; Lohmander, L S; Englund, M

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine prevalence, incidence and progression of radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA) in a cohort of subjects with previous meniscectomy. METHODS: We assessed 221 subjects (177 men and 44 women) with weight bearing knee radiography twice (assessment A and B) with a follow-up time...

  17. The Effect of Hip Bracing on Gait in Patients with Medial Knee Osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    David Wallace; Christa Barr

    2012-01-01

    Objective. Impaired hip motion has been associated with heightened medial knee joint loading in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). A hip external rotation strap designed to pull the femur into external rotation and abduction may serve as one protective mechanism. The primary aim of our study is to determine if the strap decreases medial knee joint loading during level walking in people with knee OA. Design. This study is a single-day repeated measures design. Methods. 15 volunteers with ...

  18. Risk factors for knee osteoarthritis in Morocco. A case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounach, Aziza; Nouijai, Abderrazak; Ghozlani, Imad; Ghazi, Mirieme; Achemlal, Lahsen; Bezza, Ahmed; El Maghraoui, Abdellah

    2008-03-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee is the most common form of arthritis. A positive association between obesity and several occupational factors and knee OA has been observed in previous studies in populations of different ethnicity. The aim of this study was to examine the relation between knee OA and body weight and occupational factors in a Moroccan sample of patients with knee OA. Our cases were consecutive patients diagnosed in our department with knee OA utilizing radiography in a 1-year period. No cases displayed established causes of secondary OA. Controls were selected randomly from the general population and were individually matched to each case for age and sex. Interviews were obtained from 95 cases and controls. Detailed information on general health status, height, weight, smoking habits, specific physical loads from occupation and housework, and sports activities was collected. The risk of knee OA increased with higher body mass index, odds ratio (OR) = 3.12 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.67-5.81; p climbing stairs more than 50 steps/day were associated with decreased risk of knee OA, OR = 0.29 (95% CI = 0.15-0.56; p = 0.02) and 0.48 (95% CI = 0.26-0.91; p climbing stairs are inversely associated with knee OA.

  19. Knee Osteoarthritis Is Associated With Previous Meniscus and Anterior Cruciate Ligament Surgery Among Elite College American Football Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew V; Nepple, Jeffrey J; Wright, Rick W; Matava, Matthew J; Brophy, Robert H

    Football puts athletes at risk for knee injuries such meniscus and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears, which are associated with the development of osteoarthritis (OA). Previous knee surgery, player position, and body mass index (BMI) may be associated with knee OA. In elite football players undergoing knee magnetic resonance imaging at the National Football League's Invitational Combine, the prevalence of knee OA is associated with previous knee surgery and BMI. Retrospective cohort. Level 4. A retrospective review was performed of all participants of the National Football League Combine from 2005 to 2009 who underwent magnetic resonance imaging of the knee because of prior knee injury, surgery, or knee-related symptoms or concerning examination findings. Imaging studies were reviewed for evidence of OA. History of previous knee surgery-including ACL reconstruction, meniscal procedures, and articular cartilage surgery-and position were recorded for each athlete. BMI was calculated based on height and weight. There was a higher prevalence of OA in knees with a history of previous knee surgery (23% vs 4.0%, P 30 kg/m(2) was also associated with a higher risk of OA ( P = 0.007) but player position was not associated with knee OA. Previous knee surgery, particularly ACL reconstruction and partial meniscectomy, and elevated BMI are associated with knee OA in elite football players. Future research should investigate ways to minimize the risk of OA after knee surgery in these athletes. Treatment of knee injuries in football athletes should consider chondroprotection, including meniscal preservation and cartilage repair, when possible.

  20. Effect of Knee Extensor Strength on Incident Radiographic and Symptomatic Knee Osteoarthritis in Individuals with Meniscal Pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlund, Jonas B; Felson, David T; Segal, Neil A

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: High knee extensor strength may be important to protect against development of knee osteoarthritis (OA) in populations at elevated risk, such as individuals with meniscal pathology. We investigated the extent to which high knee extensor muscle strength was associated with a decreased r...

  1. Effect of Weekly Alendronate on Knee Symptoms in Patients with Osteoporosis and Knee Osteoarthritis Coexistence - Original Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levent Ediz

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to examine the effect of alendronate 70 mg weekly on knee symptoms in elderly women with osteoporosis and knee OA coexistence. Material and Methods: Elderly women who diagnosed as osteoporosis between 60-75 years old, underwent radiography of the knee if they reported symptoms of knee OA. Radiographs were read for Kellgren and Lawrence grade and individual features of OA. Osteoporotic patients with Knee OA treated with 70 mg alendronate once weekly for one year. Knee symptoms were assessed by interview before the treatment and 6 and 12 months after the treatment, and knee pain severity was evaluated using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC, Lequense index, VAS at rest and at movement. Results: Alendronate 70 mg once weekly use was associated with less severity of knee pain as assessed by WOMAC scores, Lequense index, VAS at rest and at movement at 6th and 12th month assessments. Conclusion: This current study has shown that Alendronate 70 mg once weekly use was associated with less severity of knee symptoms in elderly women with osteoporosis and knee OA coexistence. Additional long-term randomised, placebo controlled clinical trials are needed to confirm this effect of weekly Alendronate. (From the World of Osteoporosis 2010;16:17-21

  2. Histological characteristics of knee menisci in patients with osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Dalton; Tilton, Emily; Dominick, Kathryn; Flory, Kale; Ernest, Taylor; Johnson, Jane C; Main, Donet C; Kondrashov, Peter

    2017-09-01

    Existing data indicate knee menisci in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) show tearing, maceration, and fragmentation, but little is known about the change in histological structure. The aim of this study was to evaluate the change in the menisci histological structure in patients with clinically diagnosed knee OA. Fourteen patients undergoing surgical treatment of knee OA (OA group) and 14 cadaveric knees (control group) were assessed. Demographic data, medical history, synovial fluid, OA severity, medial meniscus (MM) tissue, and lateral meniscus (LM) tissue were collected from the OA group. Three nonconsecutive 10 μm cross-sectional tissue slices of menisci were analyzed for percentage of tissue calcification. Exact Mann-Whitney tests and Spearman correlation coefficients tested for relationships between variables. The major change in the histological structure of the menisci in patients with OA was calcification of the matrix, which was significantly greater in the OA group compared with the control group for MM (OA: 11.9%, cadaver: 5.17%; P < 0.001) and LM tissues (OA: 11.1%, cadaver: 4.2%; P < 0.001). A correlation between percent calcification of the MM and LM tissues existed in the OA group (ρ = 0.56, P = 0.04) but not the control group (P = 0.20). The most pronounced pathological change in the histology of menisci was calcification of the cartilage matrix, significantly greater in the OA group than the control group. A strong correlation between percent calcification of MM and LM tissues in patients with OA indicates changes in fibrocartilage matrix of menisci progress similarly in the medial and lateral compartments of the knee. Clin. Anat. 30:805-810, 2017. © 2017Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Do early life factors affect the development of knee osteoarthritis in later life: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony, Benny; Jones, Graeme; Jin, Xingzhong; Ding, Changhai

    2016-09-13

    Osteoarthritis (OA) mainly affects older populations; however, it is possible that early life factors contribute to the development of OA in later life. The aim of this review is to describe the association between childhood or early adulthood risk factors and knee pain, structural imaging markers and development of knee OA in later life. A narrative overview of the literature synthesising the findings of literature retrieved from searches of computerised databases and manual searches was conducted. We found that only a few studies have explored the long-term effect of childhood or early adulthood risk factors on the markers of joint health that predispose people to OA or joint symptoms. High body mass index (BMI) and/or overweight status from childhood to adulthood were independently related to knee pain and OA in later life. The findings regarding the association between strenuous physical activity and knee structures in young adults are still conflicting. However, a favourable effect of moderate physical activity and fitness on knee structures is reported. Childhood physical activity and performance measures had independent beneficial effects on knee structures including knee cartilage in children and young adults. Anterior knee pain syndrome in adolescence could lead to the development of patellofemoral knee OA in the late 40s. Furthermore, weak evidence suggests that childhood malalignment, socioeconomic status and physical abuse are associated with OA in later life. The available evidence suggests that early life intervention may prevent OA in later life.

  4. Kinematic alterations of the lower limbs and pelvis during an ascending stairs task are associated with the degree of knee osteoarthritis severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Glaucia Helena; Selistre, Luiz Fernando Approbato; Petrella, Marina; Mattiello, Stela Márcia

    2017-03-01

    Individuals with knee osteoarthritis (OA) generally demonstrate great difficulty in ascending stairs. The strategies and compensations used by these individuals in stair activities have not been fully established. The purpose of this study was to investigate the joint kinematics of the pelvis, hip, knee and ankle throughout the gait cycle, in the sagittal and frontal planes, in individuals with mild and moderate knee OA, during an ascending stairs task. Thirty-one individuals with knee OA and 19 controls were subjected to clinical and radiographic analysis, divided into three groups: control, mild knee OA, and moderate knee OA. Participants answered a self-reported questionnaire, carried out performance-based tests, and their kinematic data were recorded during an ascending stairs task using an eight-camera Qualisys 3D-Motion analysis system. The individuals with moderate degrees of knee OA demonstrated kinematic alterations in the pelvis, hip, knee, and ankle in the sagittal plane. The individuals with mild degrees of knee OA demonstrated kinematic alterations of the hip in the frontal plane, and kinematic alterations of the ankle in the sagittal plane. The ascending stairs task allowed verification of meaningful information regarding gait strategies used by individuals with mild and moderate knee OA. The strategies of these two groups of individuals are different for this task, although more pronounced in individuals with moderate knee OA. The findings should be taken into account in the development of rehabilitation programs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparison of urinary excretion of Deoxypiridinoline and value of serum Osteocalcin within the Knee Osteoarthritis grading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry Isbagio

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The identification of molecular markers, which reflects differences in disease progression rates in Osteoarthritis (OA, would greatly facilitate clinical studies. Urinary Deoxypyridinoline (UDPD and serum osteocalcin (OC had been widely used for marker of bone metabolism, but the use for molecular marker in OA was lack of data. Recent studies show that there were conflicted results between urinary excretion of DPD and serum OC value within knee OA grading. The aim of this study is to compare of urinary excretion of DPD and the level of serum OC as destructive parameter of cartilage within the knee OA grading. This cross sectional study comprise of 69 patients with OA of knee joints. Kellgren and Lawrence scale was use for grading of OA. Group of patients with knee OA grade 2 call as group of early OA and group of patients with knee OA grade 3 and 4 calls as group of late OA. DPD in urine was measured using Immuno-chemilunescence, serum osteocalcin was measured using Elisa method. The mean value of urinary concentrations of DPD in OA patients was higher than normal value (9.79 ± 7.28 nM DPD/mM Creatinin, and the mean value of serum OC within normal value (8.49 ± 4.68 ng/mL. There were no significant differences of age, body mass index (BMI, duration of illness, urinary excretion of UDPD and serum OC level between early and late OA. In conclusion, there is no significant difference of urinary excretion of DPD and serum OC level within knee OA grading. The use of urinary DPD and serum OC as molecular markers of progression of OA needed to be explored by other longitudinal study. (Med J Indones 2004; 13: 96-101 Keywords: Knee osteoarthritis, deoxypiridinoline, osteocalcin

  6. A Novel Method of Evaluating Knee Joint Stability of Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis: Multiscale Entropy Analysis with A Knee-Aiming Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Diange; Zhang, Shijie; Zhang, Hui; Jiang, Long; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2017-03-23

    Deteriorating knee stability is a local risk factor that reflects the occurrence and aggregative of osteoarthritis (OA). Despite the many biomechanics-based methods for assessing the structural stability of knee joints in clinics, these methods have many limitations. The stability of the knee joint relies on not only biomechanical factors, but also proprioception and the central nervous system. In this study, we attempt to depict the stability of knee joint from a holistic viewpoint, and a novel index of knee joint stability (IKJS) was thus extracted. We compared the differences of IKJS in 57 healthy volunteers and 55 patients with OA before and after total knee replacement (TKR). Analysis of Variance results demonstrated that there existed significant differences in IKJS among the three participating groups (knee OA increased remarkably after TKR (p knee-aiming task is feasible for quantitatively determining knee stability. It can provide a potentially valuable and convenient tool to evaluate the effect of postoperative rehabilitation for patients with knee OA.

  7. Impaction 0f Hemorrheology and Intraosseous Hypertension of the Rabbits with Knee OA Treated with Gutong Herb Paste%骨痛膏局部外敷对膝关节炎家兔的骨内压及血液流变学的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾俊华; 张方建; 白书臣; 李浩; 戴燚

    2011-01-01

    目的:观察中药制荆骨痛膏局部外敷对膝关节炎家兔的骨内压及血液流变学的影响及作用,为中药临床治疗骨性关节炎(OA)提供实验依据.方法:日本大耳白兔,32只,体重2~2.5kg左右,随机分为正常组、造模组、骨痛膏组(用药组)、天和骨通膏组(对照组).每组8只,除正常组外,均在无菌条件下,行右侧股静脉结扎,建立免骨性关节炎模型.正常组与造模组不予处理.8周后,骨痛膏组用骨痛膏行右膝关节外敷,3天1次,共3周.天和骨通膏组用天和骨通膏行右膝关节外敷,3天1次.共3周.后用BL-410生物机能系统测量兔双膝关节骨内压,然后取骨髓血测量血液流变学,骨内压测量结果采用配对资料均数的t检验进行分析,骨髓血血液流变学检测结果采用q检验进行分析.结果:造模组兔右膝关节发生了类似于临床早期OA的病理改变:骨内压较正常组明显升高(P0.05),而对照组的骨内压和血液流变学等各项指标与正常组相比差异有统计学意义(P<0.01).结论:骨痛膏外敷能有效降低膝关节家免骨内高压,明显改善骨髓血血液流变学状态,并可使其恢复至正常水平,从而起到延缓关节软骨的退变,有利于软骨修复的作用.%Objective:To observe the impaction of hemorrheology and intraosseous hypertension of the rabbits with knee OA treated with Gutong Herb Paste, provide experimental bases for the clinical application of Gutong Herb Paste.Methods:Japanese big-eared rabbits which were from 2 kg to 2.5 kg,were randomly divided into 4 groups:the normal group, the model group, the Gutong Herb Paste group (abbreviated give drug group the following),and the Tianhegutong Herb Paste group (abbreviated contrast group the following),8 rabbits each group.The models of knee OA were made by ligating the right femoral vein of rabbits,except all the rabbits in the normal group, under the condition of sterility.All the rabbits in the Gutong Herb

  8. Case definitions of knee osteoarthritis in 4,151 unselected subjects: relevance for epidemiological studies : The Copenhagen Osteoarthritis Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laxafoss, Erling; Jacobsen, Steffen; Gosvig, Kasper K

    2010-01-01

    -morphological change over age in individuals without radiological features of OA. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The Copenhagen Osteoarthritis Study - COS is a substudy of the Copenhagen City Heart Study, a longitudinal regional health survey. From the third inclusion of the CCHS (1992-1994) 4,151 subjects were selected...

  9. Vastus medialis motor unit properties in knee osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chess David G

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maximal isometric quadriceps strength deficits have been widely reported in studies of knee osteoarthritis (OA, however little is known about the effect of osteoarthritis knee pain on submaximal quadriceps neuromuscular function. The purpose of this study was to measure vastus medialis motor unit (MU properties in participants with knee OA, during submaximal isometric contractions. Methods Vastus medialis motor unit potential (MUP parameters were assessed in 8 patients with knee OA and 8 healthy, sex and age-matched controls during submaximal isometric contractions (20% of maximum isometric torque. Unpaired t-tests were used to compare groups for demographic and muscle parameters. Results Maximum knee extension torque was ~22% lower in the OA group, a difference that was not statistically significantly (p = 0.11. During submaximal contractions, size related parameters of the needle MUPs (e.g. negative peak duration and amplitude-to-area ratio were greater in the OA group (p Conclusions Changes in MU recruitment and rate coding strategies in OA may reflect a chronic reinnervation process or a compensatory strategy in the presence of chronic knee pain associated with OA.

  10. Gait variability and motor control in people with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkjaer, Tine; Raffalt, Peter C; Dalsgaard, Helle; Simonsen, Erik B; Petersen, Nicolas C; Bliddal, Henning; Henriksen, Marius

    2015-10-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a common disease that impairs walking ability and function. We compared the temporal gait variability and motor control in people with knee OA with healthy controls. The purpose was to test the hypothesis that the temporal gait variability would reflect a more stereotypic pattern in people with knee OA compared with healthy age-matched subjects. To assess the gait variability the temporal structure of the ankle and knee joint kinematics was quantified by the largest Lyapunov exponent and the stride time fluctuations were quantified by sample entropy and detrended fluctuation analysis. The motor control was assessed by the soleus (SO) Hoffmann (H)-reflex modulation and muscle co-activation during walking. The results showed no statistically significant mean group differences in any of the gait variability measures or muscle co-activation levels. The SO H-reflex amplitude was significantly higher in the knee OA group around heel strike when compared with the controls. The mean group difference in the H-reflex in the initial part of the stance phase (control-knee OA) was -6.6% Mmax (95% CI: -10.4 to -2.7, p=0.041). The present OA group reported relatively small impact of their disease. These results suggest that the OA group in general sustained a normal gait pattern with natural variability but with suggestions of facilitated SO H-reflex in the swing to stance phase transition. We speculate that the difference in SO H-reflex modulation reflects that the OA group increased the excitability of the soleus stretch reflex as a preparatory mechanism to avoid sudden collapse of the knee joint which is not uncommon in knee OA.

  11. The knee adduction moment measured with an instrumented force shoe in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, van den Josien C.; Esch, van der Martin; Steultjens, Martijn P.M.; Dekker, Joost; Schepers, H. Martin; Veltink, Peter H.; Harlaar, Jaap

    2012-01-01

    The external knee adduction moment (KAdM) during gait is an important parameter in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). KAdM measurement is currently restricted to instruments only available in gait laboratories. However, ambulatory movement analysis technology, including instrumented force shoes

  12. Prediction of progression of radiographic knee osteoarthritis using tibial trabecular bone texture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woloszynski, T; Podsiadlo, P; Stachowiak, G W

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE.: To develop a system for prediction of progression of radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA) using tibial trabecular bone (TB) texture. METHODS.: We studied 203 knees with (n=68) or without (n=135) radiographic tibiofemoral OA in 105 subjects (90 men, 15 women, mean age 54 years) who had...

  13. High plasma levels of vitamin C and E are associated with incident radiographic knee osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous studies suggest that the antioxidants vitamins C and E may protect against development of knee osteoarthritis (OA). We examined the association of circulating levels of vitamin C and E with incident whole knee radiographic OA (WKROA). We performed a nested case-control study of incident WKR...

  14. Dietary intake of fiber and risk of knee osteoarthritis in two U.S. prospective cohorts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objectives: Dietary fiber reduces body weight and inflammation both of which are linked with knee osteoarthritis (OA). We examined the association between fiber intake and risk of knee OA. Methods: We used data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI) of 4796 participants and Framingham Offspring Os...

  15. Muscle power is an independent determinant of pain and quality of life in knee osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    OBJECTIVE: This study examined the relationships between leg muscle strength, power, and perceived disease severity in subjects with knee osteoarthritis (OA) in order to determine whether dynamic leg extensor muscle power would be associated with pain and quality of life in knee OA. METHODS: Baseli...

  16. Proprioceptive accuracy in women with early and established knee osteoarthritis and its relation to functional ability, postural control, and muscle strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baert, Isabel A C; Mahmoudian, Armaghan; Nieuwenhuys, Angela; Jonkers, Ilse; Staes, Filip; Luyten, Frank P; Truijen, Steven; Verschueren, Sabine M P

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify differences in knee proprioceptive accuracy between subjects with early knee osteoarthritis (OA), established knee OA, and healthy controls. Furthermore, the relation between proprioceptive accuracy on the one hand and functional ability, postural balance, and muscle strength on the other hand was also explored. New MRI-based classification criteria showing evidence of beginning joint degeneration have been used to identify subjects with early knee OA. A total of 45 women with knee OA (early OA, n = 21; established OA, n = 24) and 20 healthy female control subjects participated in the study. Proprioceptive accuracy was evaluated using the repositioning error of a knee joint position sense test using a three-dimensional motion analysis system. Subjective and objective functional ability was assessed by the knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score, the timed "Up & Go" test, and the stair climbing test. The sensory organization test measured postural control. Muscle strength was measured by isokinetic dynamometry. Early OA subjects showed no significant differences in proprioceptive accuracy compared to healthy controls. In contrast, established OA subjects showed a higher repositioning error compared to early OA subjects (+29 %, P = 0.033) and healthy controls (+25 %, P = 0.068). Proprioceptive accuracy was not significantly associated with functional ability, postural balance, and muscle strength. Knee joint proprioceptive deficits were observed in established OA but not in early OA, suggesting that impaired proprioception is most likely a consequence of structural degeneration, rather than a risk factor in the pathogenesis of knee OA. Impaired proprioceptive accuracy was not associated with disease-related functionality in knee OA patients. Treatment strategies designed to address proprioceptive deficits may be not effective in prevention of knee OA progression and may have no impact on patients

  17. Forecasting the Burden of Advanced Knee Osteoarthritis over a 10-Year Period in a Cohort of 60–64 year-old US Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Holly L.; Katz, Jeffrey N.; Reichmann, William M.; Gerlovin, Hanna; Wright, Elizabeth A.; Hunter, David J.; Jordan, Joanne M.; Kessler, Courtenay L.; Losina, Elena

    2010-01-01

    Objective To forecast the burden of symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA) in the elderly US population over a 10-year horizon. Design Using a computer simulation model of the natural history and management of knee OA combined with population-based data from the 2008 US Census we projected the 10-year burden of knee OA among persons 60–64 years of age. Knee OA incidence and progression rates were derived from national cohorts and calibrated to published literature. Results Using national data we estimated that 13% of 14,338,292 adults 60–64 years old have prevalent symptomatic, radiographic knee OA. Among persons surviving the next decade, 20% will have symptomatic advanced (Kellgren-Lawrence [K-L] grade 3) or end-stage (K-L 4) knee OA. Prevalence of advanced knee OA will range from 10% among non-obese to 35% among obese persons. Our estimates show that a more sensitive imaging tool, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), may increase the number OA cases diagnosed by up to 94% assuming that 50% of all ‘pre-radiographic knee OA’ (K-L 1) has some evidence of cartilage degeneration seen on MRI. Conclusions Projecting new and advanced cases of knee OA among persons aged 60–64 years over the next decade creates a benchmark that can be used to evaluate population-based benefits of future disease-modifying OA drugs that are currently undergoing testing at various stages. PMID:20955807

  18. Factors associated with stair climbing ability in patients with knee osteoarthritis and knee arthroplasty: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitchelo, Tara; McClelland, Jodie A; Webster, Kate E

    2014-01-01

    People with knee osteoarthritis (OA) report ongoing limitations in climbing stairs, even after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The aim of this systematic review was to synthesise the available evidence of factors affecting stair climbing ability in patients with knee OA before and after TKA. A systematic search was conducted of common electronic databases. All English language abstracts where stair-climbing was assessed in patients with either knee OA or at least 6 months after TKA, and a relationship to any physical, psychological or demographic factors was reported. Thirteen studies were included in the final review, nine investigated a knee OA population, and four investigated a TKA population. For patients with knee OA there was consistent and convincing evidence that greater stair-climbing ability was related to stronger lower limb muscles and less knee pain. For patients with TKA there was much less research, and no conclusions could be reached. For people with knee OA there is evidence that some physical, demographic and psychosocial factors are related to stair-climbing ability. However, the evidence for similar relationships in the TKA population is scarce and needs more extensive research. Implications for Rehabilitation People with knee osteoarthritis experience difficulty when climbing stairs, and this remains challenging even after knee replacement. For people with knee osteoarthritis, a range of physical, demographic and psychosocial factors contribute to stair-climbing ability, however, evidence for similar relationships in the TKA population is scarce. Rehabilitation that is multi-faceted may be the best approach to improve stair-climbing in people with knee osteoarthritis.

  19. Proprioceptive impairments associated with knee osteoarthritis are not generalized to the ankle and elbow joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanahan, Camille J; Wrigley, Tim V; Farrell, Michael J; Bennell, Kim L; Hodges, Paul W

    2015-06-01

    The mechanisms for proprioceptive changes associated with knee osteoarthritis (OA) remain elusive. Observations of proprioceptive changes in both affected knees and other joints imply more generalized mechanisms for proprioceptive impairment. However, evidence for a generalized effect remains controversial. This study examined whether joint repositioning proprioceptive deficits are localized to the diseased joint (knee) or generalized across other joints (elbow and ankle) in people with knee OA. Thirty individuals with right knee OA (17 female, 66±7 [mean±SD] years) of moderate/severe radiographic disease severity and 30 healthy asymptomatic controls of comparable age (17 female, 65±8years) performed active joint repositioning tests of the knee, ankle and elbow in randomised order in supine. Participants with knee OA had a larger relative error for joint repositioning of the knee than the controls (OA: 2.7±2.1°, control: 1.6±1.7°, p=.03). Relative error did not differ between groups for the ankle (OA: 2.2±2.5°, control: 1.9±1.3°, p=.50) or elbow (OA: 2.5±3.3°, control: 2.9±2.8°, p=.58). These results are consistent with a mechanism for proprioceptive change that is localized to the knee joint. This could be mediated by problems with mechanoreceptors, processing/relay of somatosensory input to higher centers, or joint-specific interference with cognitive processes by pain.

  20. Effects of neuromuscular training (NEMEX-TJR) on patient-reported outcomes and physical function in severe primary hip or knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ageberg, Eva; Nilsdotter, Anna; Kosek, Eva

    2013-01-01

    The benefits of exercise in mild and moderate knee or hip osteoarthritis (OA) are apparent, but the evidence in severe OA is less clear. We recently reported that neuromuscular training was well tolerated and feasible in patients with severe primary hip or knee OA. The aims of this controlled bef...... before-and-after study were to compare baseline status to an age-matched population-based reference group and to examine the effects of neuromuscular training on patient-reported outcomes and physical function in patients with severe primary OA of the hip or knee.......The benefits of exercise in mild and moderate knee or hip osteoarthritis (OA) are apparent, but the evidence in severe OA is less clear. We recently reported that neuromuscular training was well tolerated and feasible in patients with severe primary hip or knee OA. The aims of this controlled...

  1. Varus Thrust and Incident and Progressive Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Leena; Chang, Alison H; Jackson, Rebecca D; Nevitt, Michael; Moisio, Kirsten C; Hochberg, Marc; Eaton, Charles; Kwoh, C Kent; Almagor, Orit; Cauley, Jane; Chmiel, Joan S

    2017-08-03

    To determine if varus thrust, bowing-out of the knee during gait, i.e., the first appearance or worsening of varus alignment during stance, is associated with incident and progressive knee osteoarthritis (OA), we undertook an Osteoarthritis Initiative ancillary study. We further considered hypothesized associations adjusted for static alignment, anticipating some attenuation. 2-3 trained examiners/site at 4 sites observed gait. In eligible knees, incident OA was analyzed as subsequent incident KL≥2, whole and partial-grade medial joint space narrowing (JSN), and annualized loss of joint space width (JSW), and progression as medial JSN and JSW loss. Outcomes were assessed over up to 7 years of follow-up. Analyses were knee-level, using multivariable logistic and linear regression with GEE to account for between-limb correlation. The incident OA sample included 4187 knees/2610 persons; the progression sample included 3421 knees/2284 persons. In knees with OA, thrust was associated with progression by each outcome adjusting for age, gender, BMI, and pain. In knees without OA, varus thrust was not associated with incident OA or other outcomes. After adjustment for alignment, the thrust/progression association was attenuated but an independent association persisted for partial grade JSN and JSW loss outcome models. WOMAC Pain and alignment were consistently associated with all outcomes. Within the stratum of varus knees, thrust was associated with an increased risk of progression. Varus thrust visualized during gait is associated with knee OA progression and should be a target of intervention development. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Knee Bursitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knee bursitis Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Knee bursitis is inflammation of a small fluid-filled sac (bursa) situated ... in your knee can become inflamed, but knee bursitis most commonly occurs over the kneecap or on ...

  3. Knee Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knee replacement is surgery for people with severe knee damage. Knee replacement can relieve pain and allow you to ... Your doctor may recommend it if you have knee pain and medicine and other treatments are not ...

  4. [A cross-sectional population survey of knee osteoarthritis in Taiyuan region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Chang-hai; Zeng, Qing-yu; Li, Xiao-feng; Dong, Hai-yuan; Zhang, Ai-lian; Zhao, Qi

    2006-07-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee is found to be one of the commonest rheumatic disorders. For prevention of knee OA, the risk factors for this condition should first be identified. A population sample of 2188 adults aged 35 - 64 years, living in 6-story buildings without elevators, was surveyed from April to August 2005 in the urban of Taiyuan region, north China. Protocol of APLAR-COPCORD Core Questionnaire for identification of risk factors for knee OA was implemented. The positive respondents were examined simultaneously by rheumatologists. Lateral and anterior-posterior non-weight-bearing knee radiographs were arranged. Variables such as sex, age, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, education level, and smoking et al, were included in binary logistic regression model for further analysis. Prevalence rate of knee pain and knee OA was 13.6% and 10.9% respectively, significantly higher than that in Shantou--in south of China and similar with Beijing--in north of China. Both of these prevalence was significantly higher in women than that in men (18.3% vs. 8.7% and 15.1% vs. 6.3%), and with a tendency of being increased with age. The prevalence rate of knee OA was increased more obviously in people after 40 years old in women and after 45 years old in men. BMI in knee OA group was significantly higher than that in non-knee OA group. Binary logistic regression revealed that age, sex, and BMI were significantly associated with knee OA. Whereas there were no significant association between the other factors such as climbing stairs, waist circumference, time length of occupation service, education level, smoking, as well as religious belief and knee OA. Geography, aging (aged > 40 years in woman and > 45 years in man, respectively), female, and overweight (BMI > or = 24 kg/m(2)) might be the associated risk factors of knee OA. No association between climbing stairs and knee OA was found. Prevention of knee OA should be initiated before the middle-aged, especially

  5. Changes in lower extremity muscle mass and muscle strength after weight loss in obese patients with knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Christensen, Robin; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the effects of low-energy diet-induced weight loss on lower-extremity muscle mass and knee muscle strength in obese patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA), and the associations of these effects.......To investigate the effects of low-energy diet-induced weight loss on lower-extremity muscle mass and knee muscle strength in obese patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA), and the associations of these effects....

  6. Hip and Knee Osteoarthritis Affects Younger People, Too.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Ilana N; Kemp, Joanne L; Crossley, Kay M; Culvenor, Adam G; Hinman, Rana S

    2017-02-01

    Synopsis Although osteoarthritis (OA) has traditionally been considered a disease of older age, hip and knee OA can and does affect younger adults, with a profound impact on psychosocial well-being and work capacity. Obesity and a history of traumatic knee injury (eg, anterior cruciate ligament rupture and/or meniscal tear) are key risk factors for the accelerated development of knee OA, while structural hip deformities (including those contributing to femoroacetabular impingement syndrome) are strong predictors of early-onset hip OA. In view of these associations, rising rates of obesity and sports injuries are concerning, and may signal a future surge in OA incidence among younger people. Assessment of hip and knee OA in younger people should focus on a patient-centered history, comprehensive physical examination, performance-based measures, and patient-reported outcome measures to enable monitoring of symptoms and function over time. Referral for imaging should be reserved for people presenting with atypical signs or symptoms that may indicate diagnoses other than OA. Nonpharmacological approaches are core strategies for the management of hip and knee OA in younger people, and these include appropriate disease-related education, activity modification (including for work-related tasks), physical therapist- prescribed exercise programs to address identified physical impairments, and weight control or weight loss. High-quality evidence has shown no benefit of arthroscopy for knee OA, and there are no published clinical trials to support the use of hip arthroscopy for OA. Referral for joint-conserving or joint replacement surgery should be considered when nonpharmacological and pharmacological management strategies are no longer effective. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017;47(2):67-79. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.7286.

  7. Associations of educational attainment, occupation and community poverty with knee osteoarthritis in the Johnston County (North Carolina) osteoarthritis project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Leigh F; Cleveland, Rebecca J; Shreffler, Jack; Schwartz, Todd A; Schoster, Britta; Randolph, Randy; Renner, Jordan B; Jordan, Joanne M

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine data from the Johnston County Osteoarthritis (OA) Project for independent associations of educational attainment, occupation and community poverty with tibiofemoral knee OA. A cross-sectional analysis was conducted on 3,591 individuals (66% Caucasian and 34% African American). Educational attainment (poverty rate ( 25%) were examined separately and together in logistic models adjusting for covariates of age, gender, race, body mass index (BMI), smoking, knee injury and occupational activity score. Outcomes were presence of radiographic knee OA (rOA), symptomatic knee OA (sxOA), bilateral rOA and bilateral sxOA. When all three socioeconomic status (SES) variables were analyzed simultaneously, low educational attainment was significantly associated with rOA (odds ratio (OR) = 1.44, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.20, 1.73), bilateral rOA (OR = 1.43, 95% CI 1.13, 1.81), and sxOA (OR = 1.66, 95% CI 1.34, 2.06), after adjusting for covariates. Independently, living in a community of high household poverty rate was associated with rOA (OR = 1.83, 95% CI 1.43, 2.36), bilateral rOA (OR = 1.56, 95% CI 1.12, 2.16), and sxOA (OR = 1.36, 95% CI 1.00, 1.83). Occupation had no significant independent association beyond educational attainment and community poverty. Both educational attainment and community SES were independently associated with knee OA after adjusting for primary risk factors for knee OA.

  8. KNEE-JOINT LOADING IN KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS: INFLUENCE OF ABDOMINAL AND THIGH FAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messier, Stephen P.; Beavers, Daniel P.; Loeser, Richard F.; Carr, J. Jeffery; Khajanchi, Shubham; Legault, Claudine; Nicklas, Barbara J.; Hunter, David J.; DeVita, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Using three separate models that included total body mass, total lean and total fat mass, and abdominal and thigh fat as independent measures, we determined their association with knee-joint loads in older overweight and obese adults with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods Fat depots were quantified using computed tomography and total lean and fat mass determined with dual energy x-ray absorptiometry in 176 adults (age = 66.3 yr., BMI = 33.5 kg·m−2) with radiographic knee OA. Knee moments and joint bone-on-bone forces were calculated using gait analysis and musculoskeletal modeling. Results Higher total body mass was significantly associated (p ≤ 0.0001) with greater knee compressive and shear forces, compressive and shear impulses (p < 0.0001), patellofemoral forces (p< 0.006), and knee extensor moments (p = 0.003). Regression analysis with total lean and total fat mass as independent variables revealed significant positive associations of total fat mass with knee compressive (p = 0.0001), shear (p < 0.001), and patellofemoral forces (p = 0.01) and knee extension moment (p = 0.008). Gastrocnemius and quadriceps forces were positively associated with total fat mass. Total lean mass was associated with knee compressive force (p = 0.002). A regression model that included total thigh and total abdominal fat found both were significantly associated with knee compressive and shear forces (p ≤ 0.04). Thigh fat was associated with the knee abduction (p = 0.03) and knee extension moment (p = 0.02). Conclusions Thigh fat, consisting predominately of subcutaneous fat, had similar significant associations with knee joint forces as abdominal fat despite its much smaller volume and could be an important therapeutic target for people with knee OA. PMID:25133996

  9. Topical diclofenac in the treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee

    OpenAIRE

    Niklas Schuelert; Russell, Fiona A.; McDougall, Jason J

    2011-01-01

    Niklas Schuelert, Fiona A Russell, Jason J McDougallDepartment of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, CanadaAbstract: Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common disease that affects millions of people worldwide. As there is no cure for OA, drug treatment to relieve symptoms is the main form of management. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as diclofenac are the most commonly used drugs to treat knee OA pain. Unfortunately, these agents are associated with gas...

  10. Self-reported quality care for knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerås, N; Jordan, K P; Clausen, B

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess and compare patient perceived quality of osteoarthritis (OA) management in primary healthcare in Denmark, Norway, Portugal and the UK. METHODS: Participants consulting with clinical signs and symptoms of knee OA were identified in 30 general practices and invited to complete...

  11. The GSB total knee arthroplasty. A medium- and long-term follow-up and survival analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, C. van; Pluk, C.; Waal Malefijt, M.C. de; Kock, M. de; Veth, R.P.H.

    2001-01-01

    From 1981 to 1987, 77 GSB-II total knee arthroplasties were implanted in 65 patients. There were 23 men and 42 women aged on average 60 years old (range 30-85 years). The diagnosis was osteoarthritis (OA) in 21 knees, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in 44 knees, and other in 12 knees. A clinical and radio

  12. Six-week high-intensity exercise program for middle-aged patients with knee osteoarthritis: a randomized controlled trial [ISRCTN20244858

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roos Ewa M

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies on exercise in knee osteoarthritis (OA have focused on elderly subjects. Subjects in this study were middle-aged with symptomatic and definite radiographic knee osteoarthritis. The aim was to test the effects of a short-term, high-intensity exercise program on self-reported pain, function and quality of life. Methods Patients aged 36–65, with OA grade III (Kellgren & Lawrence were recruited. They had been referred for radiographic examination due to knee pain and had no history of major knee injury. They were randomized to a twice weekly supervised one hour exercise intervention for six weeks, or to a non-intervention control group. Exercise was performed at ≥ 60% of maximum heart rate (HR max. The primary outcome measure was the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS. Follow-up occurred at 6 weeks and 6 months. Results Sixty-one subjects (mean age 56 (SD 6, 51 % women, mean BMI 29.5 (SD 4.8 were randomly assigned to intervention (n = 30 or control group (n = 31. No significant differences in the KOOS subscales assessing pain, other symptoms, or function in daily life or in sport and recreation were seen at any time point between exercisers and controls. In the exercise group, an improvement was seen at 6 weeks in the KOOS subscale quality of life compared to the control group (mean change 4.0 vs. -0.7, p = 0.05. The difference between groups was still persistent at 6 months (p = 0.02. Conclusion A six-week high-intensive exercise program had no effect on pain or function in middle-aged patients with moderate to severe radiographic knee OA. Some effect was seen on quality of life in the exercise group compared to the control group.

  13. Biomechanical and neuromuscular adaptations during the landing phase of a stepping-down task in patients with early or established knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Ramirez, Diana C; Malfait, Bart; Baert, Isabel; van der Leeden, Marike; van Dieën, Jaap; Lems, Willem F; Dekker, Joost; Luyten, Frank P; Verschueren, Sabine

    2016-06-01

    To compare the knee joint kinematics, kinetics and EMG activity patterns during a stepping-down task in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) with control subjects. 33 women with knee OA (early OA, n=14; established OA n=19) and 14 female control subjects performed a stepping-down task from a 20cm step. Knee joint kinematics, kinetics and EMG activity were recorded on the stepping-down leg during the loading phase. During the stepping-down task patients with established knee OA showed greater normalized medial hamstrings activity (p=0.034) and greater vastus lateralis-medial hamstrings co-contraction (p=0.012) than controls. Greater vastus medialis-medial hamstrings co-contraction was found in patients with established OA compared to control subjects (p=0.040) and to patients with early OA (p=0.023). Self-reported knee instability was reported in 7% and 32% of the patients with early and established OA, respectively. The greater EMG co-activity found in established OA might suggest a less efficient use of knee muscles or an attempt to compensate for greater knee laxity usually present in patients with established OA. In the early stage of the disease, the biomechanical and neuromuscular control of stepping-down is not altered compared to healthy controls. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Acute effects of lateral shoe wedges on joint biomechanics of patients with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis during stationary cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Jacob K; Klipple, Gary; Stewart, Candice; Asif, Irfan; Zhang, Songning

    2016-09-06

    Cycling is commonly prescribed for individuals with knee osteoarthritis (OA) but very little biomechanical research exists on the topic. Individuals with OA may be at greater risk of OA progression or other knee injuries because of their altered knee kinematics. This study investigated the effects of lateral wedges on knee joint biomechanics and pain in patients with medial compartment knee OA during stationary cycling. Thirteen participants with OA and 11 paired healthy participants volunteered for this study. A motion analysis system and a customized instrumented pedal were used to collect 5 pedal cycles of kinematics and kinetics, respectively, during 2 minutes of cycling in 1 neutral and 2 lateral wedge (5° and 10°) conditions. Participants pedaled at 60 RPM and an 80W workrate and rated their knee pain on a visual analog scale during each minute of each condition. There was a 22% decrease in the internal knee abduction moment with the 10° wedge. However, this finding was not accompanied by a decrease in knee adduction angle or subjective pain. Additionally, there was an increase in vertical and horizontal pedal reaction force which may negate the advantages of the decreased internal knee abduction moment. For people with medial knee OA, cycling with 10° lateral wedges may not be sufficient to slow the progression of OA beyond the neutral riding condition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The association between submaximal quadriceps force steadiness and the knee adduction moment during walking in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Tina Juul; Langberg, Henning; Aaboe, Jens

    2011-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the relationship between quadriceps force steadiness and knee adduction moment during walking in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). BACKGROUND: Studies have shown that quadriceps force steadiness is impaired in patients with knee......, and knee pain was assessed using the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) pain subscale and a visual analog scale. RESULTS: Regression analyses showed that quadriceps force steadiness did not predict the peak knee adduction moment (adjusted R2 = 0.05, P = .41). Inclusion of covariates did...

  16. Isokinetic assessment of the hip muscles in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Alqualo Costa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the difference in isokinetic strength of hip muscles between patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA and matched healthy controls, and to establish the correlation between this isokinetic strength and pain and function in patients with knee OA. METHODS: 25 patients with a diagnosis of unilateral knee OA, 25 patients with bilateral knee OA, and 50 matched controls were evaluated using the visual analog scale for pain, knee Lequesne index, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities questionnaire and an isokinetic test. RESULTS: The groups were matched for age, gender and body mass index. The results of the isokinetic test revealed lower peak torque of the hip in patients with OA of the knee than in the control group for all movements studied. Strong correlations were found between the peak torque, visual analog scale and function. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with OA of the knee exhibit lower isokinetic strength in the hip muscles than healthy control subjects. Strengthening the muscles surrounding the hip joint may help to decrease pain in people with knee OA. Some correlations between pain/function and peak torque were found.

  17. Examining the Minimal Important Difference of Patient-reported Outcome Measures for Individuals with Knee Osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mills, Kathryn A G; Naylor, Justine M; Eyles, Jillian P

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the influence of different analytical methods, baseline covariates, followup periods, and anchor questions when establishing a minimal important difference (MID) for individuals with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Second, to propose MID for improving and worsening on the Knee...... injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS). METHODS: Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data from 272 patients with knee OA undergoing a multidisciplinary nonsurgical management strategy. The magnitude and rate of change as well as the influence of baseline covariates were examined...

  18. Signs of knee osteoarthritis common in 620 patients undergoing arthroscopic surgery for meniscal tear

    OpenAIRE

    Pihl, Kenneth; Englund, Martin; Lohmander, L Stefan; Jørgensen, Uffe; Nissen, Nis; Schjerning, Jeppe; Thorlund, Jonas Bloch

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose - Recent evidence has questioned the effect of arthroscopic knee surgery for middle-aged and older patients with degenerative meniscal tears with or without concomitant radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA). We investigated the prevalence of early or more established knee OA and patients' characteristics in a cohort of patients undergoing arthroscopic surgery for a meniscal tear. Patients and methods - 641 patients assigned for arthroscopy on suspicion of meniscus tear ...

  19. The Association of Obesity with Walking Independent of Knee Pain: The Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study

    OpenAIRE

    White, Daniel K.; Tuhina Neogi; Yuqing Zhang; David Felson; Michael LaValley; Jingbo Niu; Michael Nevitt; Cora E Lewis; James Torner; K. Douglas Gross

    2012-01-01

    Practice guidelines recommend addressing obesity for people with knee OA, however, the association of obesity with walking independent of pain is not known. We investigated this association within the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study, a cohort of older adults who have or are at high risk of knee OA. Subjects wore a StepWatch to record steps taken over 7 days. We measured knee pain from a visual analogue scale and obesity by BMI. We examined the association of obesity with walking using lin...

  20. Exercise Alters Gait Pattern but Not Knee Load in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Jia; Chang, Chao-Chin; Chou, You-Cai

    2016-01-01

    Six female patients with bilateral medial knee OA and 6 healthy controls were recruited. Patients with knee OA received a 6-week physiotherapist-supervised and home-based exercise program. Outcome measures, including the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index and Short Form-36 Health Survey as well as objective biomechanical indices were obtained at baseline and follow-up. After treatment, no significant difference was observed in the knee abductor moment (KAM), lever arm, and ground reaction force. We, however, observed significantly improved pain and physical function as well as altered gait patterns, including a higher hip flexor moment and hip extension angle with a faster walking speed. Although KAM was unchanged, patients with bilateral knee OA showed an improved walking speed and altered the gait pattern after 6 weeks of supervised exercise. This finding suggests that the exercise intervention improves proximal joint mechanics during walking and can be considered for patients with bilateral knee OA. Non-weight-bearing strengthening without external resistance combined with stretching exercise may be an option to improve pain and function in individuals with OA who cannot perform high resistance exercises owing to pain or other reasons. PMID:27725941

  1. Exercise Alters Gait Pattern but Not Knee Load in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ssu-Yu Chang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Six female patients with bilateral medial knee OA and 6 healthy controls were recruited. Patients with knee OA received a 6-week physiotherapist-supervised and home-based exercise program. Outcome measures, including the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index and Short Form-36 Health Survey as well as objective biomechanical indices were obtained at baseline and follow-up. After treatment, no significant difference was observed in the knee abductor moment (KAM, lever arm, and ground reaction force. We, however, observed significantly improved pain and physical function as well as altered gait patterns, including a higher hip flexor moment and hip extension angle with a faster walking speed. Although KAM was unchanged, patients with bilateral knee OA showed an improved walking speed and altered the gait pattern after 6 weeks of supervised exercise. This finding suggests that the exercise intervention improves proximal joint mechanics during walking and can be considered for patients with bilateral knee OA. Non-weight-bearing strengthening without external resistance combined with stretching exercise may be an option to improve pain and function in individuals with OA who cannot perform high resistance exercises owing to pain or other reasons.

  2. Do Psychosocial Factors Predict Muscle Strength, Pain, or Physical Performance in Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baert, Isabel A C; Meeus, Mira; Mahmoudian, Armaghan; Luyten, Frank P; Nijs, Jo; Verschueren, Sabine M P

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship of psychosocial factors, namely, pain catastrophizing, kinesiophobia, and maladaptive coping strategies, with muscle strength, pain, and physical performance in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA)-related symptoms. A total of 109 women (64 with knee OA-related symptoms) with a mean age of 65.4 years (49-81 years) were recruited for this study. Psychosocial factors were quantified by the Pain Catastrophizing Scale, Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia, and Pain Coping Inventory. Clinical features were assessed using isometric and isokinetic knee muscle strength measurements, visual analog scale, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, and functional tests. Associations were examined using correlation and regression analysis. In knee OA patients, pain catastrophizing, kinesiophobia, and coping strategy explained a significant proportion of the variability in isometric knee extension and flexion strength (6.3%-9.2%), accounting for more overall variability than some demographic and medical status variables combined. Psychosocial factors were not significant independent predictors of isokinetic strength, knee pain, or physical performance. In understanding clinical features related to knee OA, such as muscle weakness, pain catastrophizing, kinesiophobia, and coping strategy might offer something additional beyond what might be explained by traditional factors, underscoring the importance of a biopsychosocial approach in knee OA management. Further research on individual patient characteristics that mediate the effects of psychosocial factors is, however, required in order to create opportunities for more targeted, personalized treatment for knee OA.

  3. OARSI recommended performance-based tests to assess physical function in people diagnosed with hip or knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dobson, F; Hinman, R S; Roos, Ewa M.

    2013-01-01

    To recommend a consensus-derived set of performance-based tests of physical function for use in people diagnosed with hip or knee osteoarthritis (OA) or following joint replacement.......To recommend a consensus-derived set of performance-based tests of physical function for use in people diagnosed with hip or knee osteoarthritis (OA) or following joint replacement....

  4. The effect of patient characteristics on variability in pain and function over two years in early knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paradowski, Przemyslaw T; Englund, Martin; Lohmander, L Stefan

    2005-01-01

    Large variations in pain and function are seen over time in subjects at risk for and with radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA). We hypothesized that this variation may be related not only to knee OA but also to patient characteristics. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence...

  5. Effects of Tai Ji Quan training on gait kinematics in older Chinese women with knee osteoarthritis: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingguang Zhu

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: Among older Chinese women with knee OA, a tailored Tai Ji Quan intervention improved gait outcomes. The intervention also improved overall function as indexed by the WOMAC and SPPB. These results support the use of Tai Ji Quan for older Chinese adults with knee OA to both improve their functional mobility and reduce pain symptomatology.

  6. An OMERACT reliability exercise of inflammatory and structural abnormalities in patients with knee osteoarthritis using ultrasound assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruyn, George Aw; Naredo, Esperanza; Damjanov, Nemanja;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess whether ultrasonography (US) is reliable for the evaluation of inflammatory and structural abnormalities in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: Thirteen patients with early knee OA were examined by 11 experienced sonographers during 2 days. Dichotomous and semiqu...

  7. Relationship between years in the trade and the development of radiographic knee osteoarthritis and MRI-detected meniscal tears and bursitis in floor layers. A cross-sectional study of a historical cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lilli Kirkeskov; Rytter, Søren; Marott, Jacob Louis

    2012-01-01

    An increased risk of developing knee disorders including radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA) have been shown among workers with kneeling working demands. There may also be a dose-related association between duration of employment in occupations with kneeling work and development of radiographic...... knee OA and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-detected meniscal tears and bursitis....

  8. [Update on current care guidelines: knee and hip osteoarthriti].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The goal of OA (osteoarthritis) treatment is to relieve pain and maintain/improve patient's functional capacity. First line medication is paracetamol and topical NSAIDs, and oral NSAIDs when needed. Tramadol and codeine may be considered in most severe cases. Glucosamine and chondroitin do not differ from placebo, but intra-articular glucocorticoids and hyaluronate may be useful. Supervised exercise is recommended especially for knee osteoarthritis. Cold, TENS and ultrasound therapies may offer short-term benefits in knee OA. Arthroscopic debridement does not alleviate OA symptoms. Arthroplasty is indicated if pain is not otherwise manageable.

  9. Knee osteoarthritis in a chestnut farmer – Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Mattioli

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Several studies have dealt with the issue of professional risk factors and onset of knee osteoarthritis (OA. In particular, occupational epidemiological studies have provided evidence that activities resulting in biomechanical overload may be linked with an increased risk of knee OA – also among farmers. To our knowledge, no cases of knee OA among chestnut farmers have been reported in the literature. Case report. We report the case of a 70-year-old Caucasian male who has worked for more than 50 years on a chestnut farm. In 2007, an X-ray and a MRI, performed after a workplace accident to his left knee, showed the presence of knee OA. His job required a range of repetitive tasks, such as squatting, kneeling, climbing, walking on sloping terrain, assuming uncomfortable postures, and lifting and carrying heavy loads for the great majority of the working day. All the aforementioned tasks are known occupational risk factors for knee OA. Regarding individual risk factors, at the time of the first diagnosis of knee OA, the worker was 64-years-old with a body mass index of 26.5 kg/m2. He reported no cases of arthritis among his relatives and no sports playing on his part. In addition, his medical history revealed the presence of two minor lumbar disc herniations and tendinitis of the long head of the biceps. Conclusion. Considering the lack of major individual risk factors for knee OA, it is reasonable to suppose that five decades of exposure to biomechanical overload as a chestnut farmer was a relevant risk factor for the onset of the disease.

  10. Longitudinal association between foot and ankle symptoms and worsening of symptomatic radiographic knee osteoarthritis: data from the osteoarthritis initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, K L; Kasza, J; Hunter, D J; Hinman, R S; Menz, H B; Peat, G; Bennell, K L

    2017-09-01

    To assess whether foot and/or ankle symptoms are associated with an increased risk of worsening of knee pain and radiographic change in people with knee osteoarthritis (OA). The presence and laterality of foot/ankle symptoms were recorded at baseline in 1368 participants from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI) with symptomatic radiographic knee OA. Knee pain severity (measured using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index pain subscale) and minimum medial tibiofemoral joint space (minJSW) width measured on X-ray were assessed yearly over the subsequent 4 years. Associations between foot/ankle symptoms and worsening of (1) knee pain, and (2) both knee pain and minJSW (i.e., symptomatic radiographic knee OA) were assessed using logistic regression. Foot/ankle symptoms in either foot/ankle significantly increased the odds of knee pain worsening (adjusted OR 1.54, 95% CI 1.25 to 1.91). Laterality analysis showed ipsilateral (adjusted OR 1.50, 95% CI 1.07 to 2.10), contralateral (adjusted OR 1.44, 95% CI 1.02 to 2.06) and bilateral foot/ankle symptoms (adjusted OR 1.61, 95% CI 1.22 to 2.13) were all associated with knee pain worsening in the follow up period. There was no association between foot/ankle symptoms and worsening of symptomatic radiographic knee OA. The presence of foot/ankle symptoms in people with symptomatic radiographic knee OA was associated with increased risk of knee pain worsening, but not worsening of symptomatic radiographic knee OA, over the subsequent 4 years. Future studies should investigate whether treatment of foot/ankle symptoms reduces the risk of knee pain worsening in people with knee OA. Copyright © 2017 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Criteria used when deciding on eligibility for total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Søren Thorgaard; Ross, Ewa M.; Laursen, Mogens Berg;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clinical decision-making in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a complex process needing further clarification. The aim of this study was to compare TKA eligibility criteria considered most important by orthopedic surgeons (OSs) to characteristics of patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA...

  12. Relationship of bone mineral density to progression of knee osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objective. To evaluate the longitudinal relationship between bone mineral density (BMD) and BMD changes and the progression of knee osteoarthritis (OA), as measured by cartilage outcomes. Methods. We used observational cohort data from the Vitamin D for Knee Osteoarthritis trial. Bilateral femoral ...

  13. Biomechanical analysis of stair descent in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igawa, Tatsuya; Katsuhira, Junji

    2014-05-01

    [Purpose] The purposes of this study were to investigate the lower extremity joint kinematics and kinetics of patients with the knee osteoarthritis (knee OA) during stair descent and clarify the biomechanical factors related to their difficulty in stair descent. [Subjects and Methods] Eight healthy elderly persons and four knee OA patients participated in this study. A 3-D motion analysis system and force plates were employed to measure lower extremity joint angles, ranges of motion, joint moments, joint powers, and ratios of contribution for the joint powers while descending stairs. [Results] Knee joint flexion angle, extension moment, and negative power during the early stance phase in the knee OA group were smaller than those in the healthy subjects group. However, no significant changes in these parameters in the ankle joint were observed between the two subject groups. [Conclusion] Knee OA patients could not use the knee joint to absorb impact during the early stance phase of stair descent. Hence, they might compensate for the roles played by the intact knee joint by mainly using ipsilateral ankle kinematics and kinetics.

  14. Dynamic weight-bearing assessment of pain in knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klokker, Louise; Christensen, Robin; Wæhrens, Eva Elisabet Ejlersen

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) has suggested to asses pain after specific activities consistently in clinical trials on knee OA. The Dynamic weight-bearing Assessment of Pain (DAP) assesses pain during activity (30 s of performing repeated deep knee-bends from...

  15. Positive association between increased popliteal artery vessel wall thickness and generalized osteoarthritis: is OA also part of the metabolic syndrome?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kornaat, Peter R.; Sharma, Ruby; Geest, Rob J. van der; Lamb, Hildo J.; Bloem, Johan L.; Watt, Iain [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); Kloppenburg, Margreet [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Rheumatology, Leiden (Netherlands); Hellio le Graverand, Marie-Pierre [Pfizer Global Research and Development, New London, CT (United States)

    2009-12-15

    The purpose of the study was to determine if a positive association exists between arterial vessel wall thickness and generalized osteoarthritis (OA). Our hypothesis is that generalized OA is another facet of the metabolic syndrome. The medical ethical review board of our institution approved the study. Written informed consent was obtained from each patient prior to the study. Magnetic resonance (MR) images of the knee were obtained in 42 patients who had been diagnosed with generalized OA at multiple joint sites. Another 27 MR images of the knee were obtained from a matched normal (non-OA) reference population. Vessel wall thickness of the popliteal artery was quantitatively measured by dedicated software. Linear regression models were used to investigate the association between vessel wall thickness and generalized OA. Adjustments were made for age, sex, and body mass index (BMI). Confidence intervals (CI) were computed at the 95% level and a significance level of {alpha} = 0.05 was used. Patients in the generalized OA population had a significant higher average vessel wall thickness than persons from the normal reference population (p {<=} {alpha}), even when correction was made for sex, age, and BMI. The average vessel wall thickness of the popliteal artery was 1.09 mm in patients with generalized OA, and 0.96 mm in the matched normal reference population. The association found between increased popliteal artery vessel wall thickness and generalized osteoarthritis suggests that generalized OA might be another facet of the metabolic syndrome. (orig.)

  16. Medial knee osteoarthritis treated by insoles or braces: a randomized trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.M. van Raaij (Tom); M. Reijman (Max); R.W. Brouwer (Reinoud); S.M. Bierma-Zeinstra (Sita); J.A.N. Verhaar (Jan)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: There is controversial evidence regarding whether foot orthoses or knee braces improve pain and function or correct malalignment in selected patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the medial knee compartment. However, insoles are safe and less costly than knee bracing if they r

  17. Knee extensor strength and body weight in adolescent men and the risk of knee osteoarthritis by middle age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turkiewicz, Aleksandra; Timpka, Simon; Thorlund, Jonas Bloch

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the extent to which knee extensor strength and weight in adolescence are associated with knee osteoarthritis (OA) by middle age. METHODS: We studied a cohort of 40 121 men who at age 18 years in 1969/1970 underwent mandatory conscription in Sweden. We retrieved data on isome...

  18. Knee Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... BMI Calculator myhealthfinder Immunization Schedules Nutrient Shortfall Questionnaire Knee ProblemsPain, swelling, stiffness and "water" on the knee are common symptoms. Follow this chart for more ...

  19. Conservative management of symptomatic knee osteoarthritis: a flawed strategy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis C. Crawford

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Conservative management of medial compartment knee osteoarthritis (OA is a misleading term used to describe the application of medical, orthotic, and/or rehabilitative therapies exclusive of surgical interventions. The implication of this nomenclature is that these therapies offer satisfactory symptom relief, alter disease progression, and have limited side effects. Unfortunately, conservative therapeutic options possesses few, if any, characteristics of an ideal treatment, namely one that significantly alleviates pain, improves knee function, and reduces medial compartmental loading without adverse side effects. As uncompensated mechanical loading is a primary culprit in the development and progression of knee OA, we propose that the therapeutic perspective of conservative treatment should shift from pharmacological treatments, which have no influence on joint loading, minimal potential to alter joint function, substantial associated risks, and significant financial costs, towards minimally invasive load absorbing therapeutic interventions. A safe and effective minimally invasive medical device specifically engineered for symptomatic relief of medial knee OA by limiting joint contact forces has the potential to reduce the clinical and economic knee OA burden. This review characterizes the current standard of care recommendations for conservative management of medial compartment knee OA with respect to treatment efficacy, risk profile, and economic burden.

  20. Quality of Life in Knee Osteoarthritis; Correlation with Clinical Measures and the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Atıf Erol Aksekili

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Osteoarthritis (OA, the most common degenerative joint disorder, affects the quality of lives (QoL of the sufferers as other chronic disorders. Therefore assessment of QOL is of particular importance. In this study we aimed to evaluate the quality of life (QoL in patients with knee osteoarthritis by using the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP and to determine its relationships with disability and pain indices. METHODS: Patients with knee OA (n=105, with a mean age of 59.79±10.10 yrs and 50 sex and age-matched healthy controls were included in the study. Age, sex, symptom durations, body mass index (BMI and Kellgren-Lawrence scores were recorded. NHP was used in assessment of QoL in all patients and controls. Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS was used in assessment of disability and pain was assessed by using Visual Analog Scale (VAS in patients. RESULTS: Patients with knee OA had higher scores in all subgroups of NHP than controls. In patients the NHP total score significantly correlated to presence of effusion, VAS pain and the KOOS subgroups scores. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: The patients with knee OA had a significantly poorer quality of life compared to the healthy persons. Besides, NHP was found to be associated with clinical examination findings and disability. We assume that NHP can effectively be used in evaluation of health status in patients with knee OA.

  1. A Standardized "Rescue" Exercise Program for Symptomatic Flare-up of Knee Osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartholdy, Cecilie; Klokker, Louise; Bandak, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Secondary analysis of clinical trial data. Background Knee osteoarthritis (OA) management has changed significantly over recent decades toward nonpharmacological treatments, particularly exercise. However, the optimal exercise program remains to be established. Objective To describe...... not result in further worsening of exacerbated knee OA symptoms. The intervention may be particularly relevant for patients with knee OA who have more severe symptoms. Level of Evidence Therapy, level 2b. Registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01545258 and NCT01945749). J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016...

  2. Knee effusion: ultrasound as a useful tool for the detection of calcium pyrophosphate crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruta, Santiago; Catay, Erika; Marin, Josefina; Rosa, Javier; García-Monaco, Ricardo; Soriano, Enrique R

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of ultrasound (US) and conventional radiography (CR) for the detection of calcium pyrophosphate (CPP) crystals in patients with knee effusion. Consecutive patients ≥50 years old with knee effusion were included. All patients underwent arthrocentesis with aspiration of synovial fluid (SF) and subsequent analysis of CPP crystals using plain light and polarizing light microscopy. US and CR of the involved knee were performed immediately after arthrocentesis. CR results were read by an experienced rheumatologist, searching for chondrocalcinosis. US examinations were carried out by an experienced rheumatologist blinded to all clinical and imaging data. The following US abnormal findings were considered indicative of CPP crystals deposition (CPPD): (1) hyperechoic bands within the femoral hyaline cartilage layer, and (2) hyperechoic sparkling spots in meniscal fibrocartilage. A total of 75 knees were evaluated in the same number of patients. Analysis of SF revealed CPP crystals in 15 out of 75 (20 %) knees: all (10) patients with previous diagnosis of CPPD, 3 patients with previous diagnosis of primary knee osteoarthritis (OA) and 2 patients without previous definitive diagnosis of a rheumatic condition. Using SF analysis as reference method, sensitivity and specificity for US findings was 60 and 96.7 %, respectively, while CR showed a sensitivity of 40 % and a specificity of 83.3 %. US results showed high specificity with acceptable sensitivity to detect CPP crystals in patients with knee effusion. Compared with CR, US results had better specificity and sensitivity. US may be used in daily rheumatologic practice when CPPD is suspected.

  3. Reduced rate of knee extensor torque development in older adults with knee osteoarthritis is associated with intrinsic muscle contractile deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Damien M; Tourville, Timothy W; Slauterbeck, James R; Ades, Philip A; Stevens-Lapsley, Jennifer; Beynnon, Bruce D; Toth, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    We examined the effect of knee osteoarthritis on the rate of torque development (RTD) of the knee extensors in older adults with advanced-stage knee osteoarthritis (OA; n=15) and recreationally-active controls (n=15) of similar age, sex and health status, as well as the relationship between RTD and the size and contractility of single muscle fibers. OA participants had lower RTD when expressed in absolute terms (Nm/ms). There were sex differences in peak RTD (Ptorque (PT). In knee OA volunteers, we found strong correlations between the RTD expressed relative to PT and the velocity of contraction of single myosin heavy chain (MHC) I and IIA/X muscle fibers (r=0.652 and 0.862; both Pknee osteoarthritis and healthy older adults is related, in part, to the size and function of single muscle fibers.

  4. Transcriptomic Signatures of Meniscal Tears and Articular Cartilage from Knees Undergoing Arthroscopic Partial Meniscectomy Show Evidence for Early Osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Brophy, Robert H.; Sandell, Linda; Wright, Rick W.; Rai, Muhammad Farooq

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Despite clinical evidence demonstrating that meniscus tears are early events in the initiation and propagation of knee osteoarthritis (OA), the biology of how meniscus injury leads to changes in the articular cartilage is not well studied. Therefore, we compared the molecular biology of articular and meniscal cartilage within the same knees undergoing partial meniscectomy to advance our understanding of early molecular events in the knee that contribute to the development of OA fo...

  5. Knee Bursitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... make a diagnosis of knee bursitis during a physical exam. Your doctor will inspect your knee by: Comparing the condition of both knees, particularly if only one is painful Gently pressing on different areas of your knee to detect warmth, swelling and the source of pain Carefully moving ...

  6. Anterior Knee Pain (Chondromalacia Patellae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrick, James G.

    1989-01-01

    This article presents a pragmatic approach to the definition, diagnosis, and management of anterior knee pain. Symptoms and treatment are described. Emphasis is on active involvement of the patient in the rehabilitation exercise program. (IAH)

  7. Randomised controlled trial of extraarticular gold bead implantation for treatment of knee osteoarthritis: a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nejrup, Kirsten; Olivarius, Niels de Fine; Jacobsen, Judith L.

    2008-01-01

    The primary objective of this double-blind, randomised, controlled trial was to determine if implanting gold beads at five acupuncture points around the knee joint improves 1-year outcomes for patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. Participants were 43 adults aged 18-80 years with pain...... and stiffness from non-specific OA of the knee for over a year. The intervention was blinded implantation of gold beads at five acupuncture points around the affected knee through a hypodermic needle, or needle insertion alone. Primary outcome measures were knee pain, stiffness and function assessed...... acupuncture had greater relative improvements in self-assessed outcomes. The treatment was well tolerated. This 1-year pilot study indicates that extraarticular gold bead implantation is a promising treatment modality for patients with OA of the knee. The new treatment should be tested in a larger trial...

  8. Knee extensor and flexor muscle power explains stair ascension time in patients with unilateral late-stage knee osteoarthritis: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valtonen, Anu M; Pöyhönen, Tapani; Manninen, Mikko; Heinonen, Ari; Sipilä, Sarianna

    2015-02-01

    To determine the extent of asymmetrical deficits in knee extensor and flexor muscles, and to examine whether asymmetrical muscle deficits are associated with mobility limitations in persons with late-stage knee osteoarthritis (OA). Cross-sectional. Research laboratory. A clinical sample (N=56; age range, 50-75y) of eligible persons with late-stage knee OA awaiting knee replacement. Not applicable. Knee extensor and flexor power and torque assessed isokinetically; thigh muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) assessed by computed tomography; mobility limitation assessed by walking speed and stair ascension time; and pain assessed with the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index questionnaire. The asymmetrical deficits in knee extensor and flexor power and torque were between 18% and 29% (Pmuscle CSA, the asymmetrical deficit was 4% (Ppower deficits and weaker knee extensor and flexor power on the contralateral side were associated with slower stair ascension times. Moreover, weaker knee extensor and flexor power on the ipsilateral side were associated with slower stair ascension times. Greater knee pain in the OA joint was independently associated with slower stair ascending time in both models. The knee extensor and flexor muscle power of both the ipsilateral and contralateral sides and the pain in the OA knee were independently associated with stair ascension times. These results highlight the importance of assessing muscle power on both sides and knee pain in the prevention of mobility limitations in patients with knee OA. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Increased pain sensitivity but normal function of exercise induced analgesia in hip and knee osteoarthritis - treatment effects of neuromuscular exercise and total joint replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kosek, E; Roos, Ewa M.; Ageberg, E

    2013-01-01

    To assess exercise induced analgesia (EIA) and pain sensitivity in hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) and to study the effects of neuromuscular exercise and surgery on these parameters.......To assess exercise induced analgesia (EIA) and pain sensitivity in hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) and to study the effects of neuromuscular exercise and surgery on these parameters....

  10. It’s not just a knee, but a whole life: A qualitative descriptive study on patients’ experiences of living with knee osteoarthritis and their expectations for knee arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyvang, Josefina; Hedström, Margareta; Gleissman, Sissel Andreassen

    2016-01-01

    Aim Knee arthroplasties are an increasingly common treatment for osteoarthritis (OA) and the main indication is pain. Previous research states, however, that 15–20% of the operated patients are dissatisfied and 20–30% have persistent pain after surgery. This study is aimed at describing patients’ experiences of living with knee OA when scheduled for surgery and further their expectations for future life after surgery. Methods We interviewed 12 patients with knee OA scheduled for arthroplasty, using semi-structured qualitative interviews. The interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim and analyzed using qualitative thematic analysis. Findings Three categories were formulated with an overriding theme: “It's not just a knee, but a whole life.” The three categories were “Change from their earlier lives,” “Coping with knee problems,” and “Ultimate decision to undergo surgery.” The main finding was that knee OA affects the whole body and self, ultimately affecting the patients’ lives on many levels. Further findings were that knee OA was considered to be the central focus in the participants’ lives, which limited their level of activity, their ability to function as desired, their quality of life, and their mental well-being. Although surgery was considered to be the only solution, the expectations regarding the outcome differed. Conclusions The participants were forced to change how they previously had lived their lives resulting in a feeling of loss. Thus, the experienced loss and expectations for future life must be put into the context of the individual's own personality and be taken into account when treating individuals with knee OA. The experience of living with knee OA largely varies between individuals. This mandates that patients’ assessment should be considered on individual basis with regard to each patient. PMID:27036130

  11. Assessment of quality oflife in patients with early knee osteoarthritis using SF-36

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M S Svetlova

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study quality of life (QL measures in pts with early knee osteoarthritis (OA with SF-36. Material and methods. 102 outpatient pts with early knee OA were included. Mean age was 48,3± 12,7 years, mean OA duration - 10,5±7,9 months. 33,3% of pts had 0, 42,6% - I, 20,5% - II stage of knee OA. According to sonographic examination of knee joints the patients were divided into two groups: group I without synovitis and group II — with synovitis of the knee joints. 50 healthy volunteers were included in control group. QL was assessed with SF-36. Results. All QL measures in early knee OA pts were lower than in control. There was significant difference of physical functioning, role physical functioning (RPF, social functioning (SF and role emotional functioning (REF (p<0,05. Pts of group II had significantly lower RPF and REF than group I pts (p<0,05. Conclusion. QL of pts with knee OA decrease at early stage of the disease what requires administration of proper therapy as soon as possible after verification of the diagnosis.

  12. Individual patient data meta-analysis of trials investigating the effectiveness of intra-articular glucocorticoid injections in patients with knee or hip osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Middelkoop, Marienke; Dziedzic, Krysia S; Doherty, Michael

    2013-01-01

    -analysis to quantify the effect modified by the predictors using individual patient data (IPD) is suggested. The initiative to collect and analyze IPD in OA research is commenced by the OA Trial Bank. The study aims are therefore: to evaluate the efficacy of intra-articular glucocorticoids for knee or hip OA...

  13. Spa therapy and knee osteoarthritis: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forestier, Romain; Erol Forestier, Fatma Begüm; Francon, Alain

    2016-06-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a public health problem that will probably increase in the future with the aging of the population. Crenobalneotherapy is commonly used to treat OA, but evidence from previous reviews was not sufficient. This systematic review aimed to identify the best evidence for the clinical effect of crenobalneotherapy for knee OA. We systematically searched MEDLINE via PubMed, PEDRO and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials for articles published up to September 2015. Articles were included if trials were comparative, if one or more of the subgroups had knee OA with separate data, and if spa therapy or any hydrotherapy techniques involving mineral water or mineral mud was compared to any other intervention or no treatment. Statistical validity, external validity and quality of side effects assessment were evaluated by personal checklists. Risk of bias was assessed by the CLEAR NTP. Treatments (hot mineral water baths, mud therapy, hot showers, and sometimes massage and supervised water exercises) delivered in spa centers across Europe and the Middle East seem to improve symptoms in knee OA. They may be effective for pain and function. There are conflicting results about the effect on quality of life and drug consumption. Improvements with spa therapy for knee OA appear to be clinically relevant until 3 to 6 months and sometimes 9 months. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. The effect on knee-joint load of instruction in analgesic use compared with neuromuscular exercise in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Brian; Holsgaard-Larsen, Anders; Søndergaard, Jens

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a mechanically driven disease, and it is suggested that medial tibiofemoral knee-joint load increases with pharmacologic pain relief, indicating that pharmacologic pain relief may be positively associated with disease progression. Treatment modalities......, compared with optimized analgesics and antiinflammatory drug use, on the measures of knee-joint load in people with mild to moderate medial tibiofemoral knee osteoarthritis. METHOD/DESIGN: One hundred men and women with mild to moderate medial knee osteoarthritis will be recruited from general medical...... and physical function in people with mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01638962 (July 3, 2012)....

  15. Knee osteoarthritis prevalence and influence on postmenopausal women TOC \\o "1-5" \\h \\z quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A A Popov

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study prevalence of knee joints osteoarthritis (OA in menopausal women and its influence on menopausal syndrome severity and quality of life of pts. Material and methods. A random sample (673 pts from the general population of pts (6734 women consulted by specialists due to menopausal problems was examined. History evaluation, physical examination by a rheumatologist, calculation of body mass index (BMI and waist/hips circumference ratio (WHR were performed. Pain (VAS, Lequesne index, modified menopausal index (MMI, depression presence and severity and quality of life (QL with SF-36 questionnaire were assessed. OA was diagnosed according to common clinical and radiological criteria. Results. 73% of examined persons complained of joint pain. 45,1% of cases fulfilled OA criteria. 932 women with knee OA were analyzed (mean age 51,6±5,5 years. Control group included 372 women without OA (mean age 50,1+5,7 years. Frequency of manifest knee OA in women visited a specialized center due to menopausal problems was higher than in general population. Obesity doubled risk of knee OA development in menopause. Pts with knee OA had decreased QL according to physical functioning and pain scales. QL restriction on social and emotional functioning scales, general and mental health in OA pts was associated with presence of comorbid depression.

  16. Predicting dynamic knee joint load with clinical measures in people with medial knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Michael A; Bennell, Kim L

    2011-08-01

    Knee joint loading, as measured by the knee adduction moment (KAM), has been implicated in the pathogenesis of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Given that the KAM can only currently be accurately measured in the laboratory setting with sophisticated and expensive equipment, its utility in the clinical setting is limited. This study aimed to determine the ability of a combination of four clinical measures to predict KAM values. Three-dimensional motion analysis was used to calculate the peak KAM at a self-selected walking speed in 47 consecutive individuals with medial compartment knee OA and varus malalignment. Clinical predictors included: body mass; tibial angle measured using an inclinometer; walking speed; and visually observed trunk lean toward the affected limb during the stance phase of walking. Multiple linear regression was performed to predict KAM magnitudes using the four clinical measures. A regression model including body mass (41% explained variance), tibial angle (17% explained variance), and walking speed (9% explained variance) explained a total of 67% of variance in the peak KAM. Our study demonstrates that a set of measures easily obtained in the clinical setting (body mass, tibial alignment, and walking speed) can help predict the KAM in people with medial knee OA. Identifying those patients who are more likely to experience high medial knee loads could assist clinicians in deciding whether load-modifying interventions may be appropriate for patients, whilst repeated assessment of joint load could provide a mechanism to monitor disease progression or success of treatment.

  17. Knee injuries in football

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    estimated 240 million (in 2000)1 to 265 million (in 2006)2 players ... injuries during a season, but due to variations in the definition of ... a risk for a major knee injury, with 20% of illegal activity-related ... Rob Collins is a lecturer in the Section Sports Medicine at the University of .... full return to football is between 6 and 9.

  18. Signs of knee osteoarthritis common in 620 patients undergoing arthroscopic surgery for meniscal tear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Kenneth; Englund, Martin; Lohmander, L Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose - Recent evidence has questioned the effect of arthroscopic knee surgery for middle-aged and older patients with degenerative meniscal tears with or without concomitant radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA). We investigated the prevalence of early or more established knee OA......-77) years, 57% men) with full datasets available were included in the present study. Prior to surgery, patients completed questionnaires regarding onset of symptoms, duration of symptoms, and mechanical symptoms along with the knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS). At arthroscopy...

  19. Loaded versus unloaded magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knee: Effect on meniscus extrusion in healthy volunteers and patients with osteoarthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Rina Patel; Matthew Eltgroth; Souza, Richard B.; Zhang, Chiyuan A.; Sharmila Majumdar; Link, Thomas M.; Daria Motamedi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Assess the impact of knee joint loading on meniscal extrusion in normal individuals and those with varying degrees of osteoarthritis (OA). Methods: 143 healthy volunteers and patients with OA underwent 3 T MRI of the knee under unloaded and loaded conditions. OA was graded with the Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) system. Menisci were evaluated for presence of tear. Descriptive statistics were expressed as mean ± standard deviation. Loaded and unloaded groups were compared using Student’s...

  20. EULAR recommendations for the non-pharmacological core management of hip and knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandes, Linda; Hagen, Kare B.; Bijlsma, Johannes W.J.

    2013-01-01

    The objective was to develop evidence -based recommendations and a research and educational agenda for the non-pharmacological management of hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA). The multidisciplinary task force comprised 21 experts: nurses, occupational therapists, physiotherapists, rheumatologists,...

  1. Massage Therapy for Osteoarthritis of the Knee: A Randomized Dose-Finding Trial: e30248

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adam I Perlman; Ather Ali; Valentine Yanchou Njike; David Hom; Anna Davidi; Susan Gould-Fogerite; Carl Milak; David L Katz

    2012-01-01

      Background In a previous trial of massage for osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee, we demonstrated feasibility, safety and possible efficacy, with benefits that persisted at least 8 weeks beyond treatment termination...

  2. Exercise increases interleukin-10 levels both intraarticularly and peri-synovially in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helmark, Ida C; Mikkelsen, Ulla R; Børglum, Jens

    2010-01-01

    The microdialysis method was applied to the human knee joint with osteoarthritis (OA) in order to reveal changes in biochemical markers of cartilage and inflammation, intraarticularly and in the synovium, in response to a single bout of mechanical joint loading....

  3. Green OA Self-Archiving Needs a Lobbying Organisation

    OpenAIRE

    Harnad, Stevan

    2007-01-01

    Some university libraries and administrations think OA is all about journal affordability, digital preservation, digital curation (IRs) and interoperability (OAI). Some OA publishers think OA is all about conversion to Gold OA and the funding of Gold OA fees (CERN, etc.). Some copyright reformers think OA is all about reforming copyright law. And some traditional publishers lobby against Green OA mandates (and sometimes also against Gold OA) as a threat to their industry. There exists no reco...

  4. Do knee osteoarthritis and fat-free mass interact in their impact on health-related quality of life in men? Results from a population-based cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, A Willemien; de Mutsert, Renée; Bloem, Johannes L; Reijnierse, Monique; Kazato, Hanako; le Cessie, Saskia; den Heijer, Martin; Rosendaal, Frits R; Kloppenburg, Margreet

    2015-07-01

    To investigate whether obesity and other risk factors interact with knee osteoarthritis (OA) in its adverse impact on health-related quality of life (HRQOL). In 1,262 participants of the Netherlands Epidemiology of Obesity Study, a population-based cohort (age 45-65 years, 53% women, and median body mass index [BMI] 27 kg/m(2) ), knee OA was defined following modified American College of Rheumatology criteria. BMI and fat-free mass (as proxy for muscle mass) were assessed by bioelectrical impedance analysis, and comorbidities by self-report. HRQOL was assessed using the Short Form 36 physical component summary (PCS) score. Linear regression analyses were performed to examine associations between knee OA and PCS score, adjusting for age and sex and stratified for BMI, fat-free mass, and comorbidities. Knee OA (prevalence 16%) was associated with a 7.2-points lower PCS score (95% confidence interval -9.5, -4.8). PCS score was also negatively associated with obesity and comorbidities; however, no interaction with knee OA was seen. Low fat-free mass was associated with a lower PCS score and interacted with knee OA in men. Interaction between concurring OA and low fat-free mass attributed to 64% of the decrease in PCS score, as compared with men without OA and with high fat-free mass. Knee OA was associated with a lower HRQOL, as were its risk factors, obesity, comorbidities, and low fat-free mass. In men, fat-free mass interacted with knee OA, leading to an additional decrease of HRQOL in the case of concurrence. Especially in the former, improvement of fat-free mass may improve HRQOL in knee OA patients. © 2015, American College of Rheumatology.

  5. Web-Based Study of Risk Factors for Pain Exacerbation in Osteoarthritis of the Knee (SPARK-Web): Design and Rationale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makovey, Joanna; Metcalf, Ben; Zhang, Yuqing; Chen, Jian Sheng; Bennell, Kim; March, Lyn; Hunter, David J

    2015-07-08

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is the most frequent cause of limited mobility and diminished quality of life. Pain is the main symptom that drives individuals with knee OA to seek medical care and a recognized antecedent to disability and eventually joint replacement. Many persons with symptomatic knee OA experience recurrent pain exacerbations. Knowledge and clarification of risk factors for pain exacerbation may allow those affected to minimize reoccurrence of these episodes. The aim of this study is to use a Web-based case-crossover design to identify risk factors for knee pain exacerbations in persons with symptomatic knee OA. Web-based case-crossover design is used to study persons with symptomatic knee OA. Participants with knee pain and radiographic knee OA will be recruited and followed for 90 days. Participants will complete an online questionnaire at the baseline and every 10 days thereafter (totaling up to 10 control-period questionnaires); participants will also be asked to report online when they experience an episode of increased knee pain. Pain exacerbation will be defined as an increase in knee pain severity of two points from baseline on a numeric rating scale (NRS 0-10). Physical activity, footwear, knee injury, medication use, climate, psychological factors, and their possible interactions will be assessed as potential triggers for pain exacerbation using conditional logistic regression models. This project has been funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC). The enrollment for the study has started. So far, 343 participants have been enrolled. The study is expected to be finished in October 2015. This study will identify risk factors for pain exacerbations in knee OA. The identification and possible modification/elimination of such risk factors will help to prevent the reoccurrence of pain exacerbation episodes and therefore improve knee OA management.

  6. A systematic review to evaluate exercise for anterior cruciate ligament injuries: does this approach reduce the incidence of knee osteoarthritis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncan KJ

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Koji J Duncan, Jaclyn N Chopp-Hurley, Monica R Maly School of Rehabilitation Science, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada Purpose: Among a variety of conservative and surgical options to treat anterior cruciate ligament (ACL injuries, we do not understand which options could potentially prevent knee osteoarthritis (OA. The aim of this systematic review was to examine the evidence pertaining to exercise treatment of ACL injuries in the context of knee OA. Methods: Medline, Embase, CINAHL, PubMed, and PEDro (Physiotherapy Evidence Database databases were systematically searched using keywords encompassed within four primary key terms: knee, osteoarthritis, anterior cruciate ligament, and exercise. Clinical studies evaluating the effect of an exercise treatment for ACL injuries on the development of knee OA in adult humans were included. The PEDro scale was used to critically assess the studies included in the review. Results: Eighteen studies were included in this review, with a median PEDro score of 6/11 (range, 2/11–9/11. Three studies provided statistical evidence that exercise following ACL injury lowered the risk for knee OA development. Nine studies demonstrated no benefit of exercise in preventing knee OA incidence relative to either operative treatment or the contralateral, unaffected knee. However, exercise resulted in higher knee instability. Nonetheless, there were no significant differences in subjective or objective knee outcomes for early versus late ACL reconstruction. Limitations: This review was not registered through PROSPERO. Conclusion: The relationship between a rehabilitative exercise for ACL injuries and long-term knee OA prevalence is inconclusive. However, research suggests initial conservative treatment with optional late ACL reconstruction because this treatment strategy may reduce the risk of knee OA. More research, ideally randomized controlled trials or comparable designs, is required prior to establishing

  7. Knee joint biomechanics and neuromuscular control during gait before and after total knee arthroplasty are sex-specific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astephen Wilson, Janie L; Dunbar, Michael J; Hubley-Kozey, Cheryl L

    2015-01-01

    The future of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) surgery will involve planning that incorporates more patient-specific characteristics. Despite known biological, morphological, and functional differences between men and women, there has been little investigation into knee joint biomechanical and neuromuscular differences between men and women with osteoarthritis, and none that have examined sex-specific biomechanical and neuromuscular responses to TKA surgery. The objective of this study was to examine sex-associated differences in knee kinematics, kinetics and neuromuscular patterns during gait before and after TKA. Fifty-two patients with end-stage knee OA (28 women, 24 men) underwent gait and neuromuscular analysis within the week prior to and one year after surgery. A number of sex-specific differences were identified which suggest a different manifestation of end-stage knee OA between the sexes.

  8. Association of interleukin-6 promoter polymorphism with knee osteoarthritis: a meta-analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ai Zhipeng; Ning Xianming; Shou Tao; Tang Wenru; Luo Ying; Zhang Jihong

    2014-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of human polyarthritis.Many genetic factors have been implicated in OA.It was reported that a polymorphism in the gene of interleukin-6 (IL-6) was associated with OA of knee.The aim of this study was to determine whether functional IL-6 promoter-174G/C (rs1800795) polymorphisms confer susceptibility to knee OA.Methods A meta-analysis was conducted on the association between the IL-6 polymorphism and knee OA.Electronic search at PubMed,EMBASE,Weipu database,and Wanfang database was conducted to select studies.Case-control studies containing available genotype frequencies of IL-6-174G/C were chosen,and odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (C/) was used to assess the strength of this association.Results A total of seven studies involving 6 464 subjects (knee OA 3 331 and controls 3 133) were considered in this study.The results suggested that the variant genotypes were not associated with knee OA risk in all genetic models (additive model:OR=1.144,95% CI 0.934-1.402,P=0.194; recessive model:OR=1.113,95% CI 0.799-1.550,P=0.526;dominant model:OR=1.186,95% CI 0.918-1.531,P=0.191).A symmetric funnel plot,the Begg's test (P >0.05),suggested that the data lacked publication bias.Conclusions This meta-analysis does not support the idea that rs1800795 genotype is associated with increased risk of knee OA.However,to draw comprehensive and more reliable conclusions,further prospective studies with larger numbers of participants worldwide are needed to examine the association between rs1800795 polymorphism and knee OA.

  9. Significance of arthrosonography for knee joint damage diagnosis in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L V Sizova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess significance of arthrosonography in diagnosis of in knee joint changes in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Material and methods. 44 patients with early RA aged 19 to 73 years were examined. 29,5% of pts had early RA without primary osteoarthritis (OA, 70,5% had early RA with primary OA. Ultrasonography of knee joints was performed with Diasonics (USA, 1997 by the linear sensor with frequency of 7 MHz. The protocol of ultrasonic examination of knee joints was filled for each pt. Results. Clinical signs of of knee joint synovitis have been revealed in 61,5% of pts with early RA without primary OA, and in 80,6% of pts with early RA with primary OA, ultrasonic - in 100% of pts. Intraarticular knee joint effusion resulted in increase of suprapatellar bursa and lateral recesses size. Extraarticular inflammation was frequently shown by thickening of semymemranous muscles tendons, especially in pts with the early RA with primary OA (p<0,005. Degenerative changes in the group of pts with primary OA were more expressed in early RA and usually accompanied by non-uniform decrease of cartilage thickness and occurrence of osteophytes while cartilage in pts with early RA without primary OA had normal thickness or thickening because of swelling, and osteophytes were absent. Conclusion. Prevalence of knee joint intraarticular and extraarticular inflammatory changes over degenerate changes (symmetric thickening of the synovium, primary increase of the sizes of suprapatellar bursa and lateral recesses because of effusion, thickening of tendons of knee joints at the normal or increased thickness of cartilage because of inflammation can be considered sonographic sign of early RA. In pts with early RA coincided with primary OA these changes were usually found in combination with non-uniform decrease of cartilage thickness. In case of cartilage inflammatory edema, detection of osteophytes allows to confirm presence of OA in pts with

  10. Measuring physiotherapy performance in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee: A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holm Inger

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with knee osteoarthritis [OA] are commonly treated by physiotherapists in primary care. Measuring physiotherapy performance is important before developing strategies to improve quality. The purpose of this study was to measure physiotherapy performance in patients with knee OA by comparing clinical practice to evidence from systematic reviews. Methods We developed a data-collection form and invited all private practitioners in Norway [n = 2798] to prospectively collect data on the management of one patient with knee OA through 12 treatment session. Actual practice was compared to findings from an overview of systematic reviews summarising the effect of physiotherapy interventions for knee OA. Results A total of 297 physiotherapists reported their management for patients with knee OA. Exercise was the most common treatment used, provided by 98% of the physiotherapists. There is evidence of high quality that exercise reduces pain and improves function in patients with knee OA. Thirty-five percent of physiotherapists used acupuncture, low-level laser therapy or transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. There is evidence of moderate quality that these treatments reduce pain in knee OA. Patient education, supported by moderate quality evidence for improving psychological outcomes, was provided by 68%. Physiotherapists used a median of four different treatment modalities for each patient. They offered many treatment modalities based on evidence of low quality or without evidence from systematic reviews, e.g. traction and mobilisation, massage and stretching. Conclusion Exercise was used in almost all treatment sessions in the management of knee OA. This practice is desirable since it is supported by high quality evidence. Physiotherapists also provide several other treatment modalities based on evidence of moderate or low quality, or no evidence from systematic reviews. Ways to promote high quality evidence into

  11. A 5 year prospective study of patient-relevant outcomes after total knee replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsdotter, A-K; Toksvig-Larsen, S; Roos, E M

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To prospectively describe self-reported outcomes up to 5 years after total knee replacement (TKR) in Osteoarthritis (OA) and to study which patient-relevant factors may predict outcomes for pain and physical function (PF). METHODS: 102 consecutive patients with knee OA, 63 women and 39...... postoperatively. RESULTS: Response rate at 5 years was 86%. At 6 months significant improvement was seen in all KOOS and SF-36 scores (P

  12. Strategies used during a challenging weighted walking task in healthy adults and individuals with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubinski, Andrew J; Higginson, Jill S

    2012-01-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a disease that affects millions of people. While numerous gait differences have been identified between healthy adults and adults with knee OA under normal and challenging conditions, adults with knee OA have not been studied during a challenging weighted walking task. Investigation of the effect of weighted walking on the initial contact and loading response phases of gait was undertaken in 20 healthy and 20 knee OA subjects ages 40-85 years old walking at 1.0m/s while unweighted and weighted with 1/6th of their body weight in a weight vest. Subjects were grouped according to their Kellgren and Lawrence radiographic score and healthy subjects were age-matched to those with knee OA. ANOVA revealed significant effects for hip flexion angle at initial contact, step length, initial double support percent, and load rate. Post hoc t-tests revealed that subjects with knee OA had a larger initial double support percent and hip flexion angle at initial contact and a decreased load rate compared to unweighted, healthy adults. Also, both groups increased their initial double support percent in response to the challenging weighted walking task, but only the healthy adults increased their hip flexion angle at initial contact and decreased their load rate. During the weighted condition, the knee OA group had a shorter step length compared to the healthy group. Because the knee OA group only made minor compensations to their gait strategy, it appears that they may be unable or prefer not to adjust their gait mechanics due to underlying issues.

  13. Knee Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bursitis . Symptoms of bursitis in the knee include warmth, tenderness, swelling, and pain on the front of ... injury without the aid of a television screen. Physical Therapy Depending on the type of knee injury ...

  14. Osteoarthritis of the hip and/or knee in Dutch general practice and physiotherapy practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barten, D.J.; Swinkels, I.C.; Dorsman, S.A.; Veenhof, C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To describe demographic characteristics and the treatment process of patients with hip osteoarthritis (OA) or knee OA treated in Dutch general practice (GP) and/or physiotherapy practice. Additionally, to investigate whether there are differences in characteristics between referred and non-

  15. Which patients with osteoarthritis of hip and/or knee benefit most from behavorial graded activity?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenhof, C.; Ende, C.H.M. van den; Dekker, J.; Köke, A.J.A.; Oostendorp, R.A.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.

    2007-01-01

    Our objective was to investigate whether behavioral graded activity (BGA) has particular benefit in specific subgroups of osteoarthritis (OA) patients. Two hundred participants with OA of hip or knee, or both (clinical American College of Rheumatology, ACR, criteria) participated in a randomized cli

  16. Movement detection impaired in patients with knee osteoarthritis compared to healthy controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, H; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit; Hansen, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify whether osteoarthritis (OA) patients have a localized or a generalized reduction in proprioception. Twenty one women with knee OA (mean age [SD]: 57.1 [12.0] years) and 29 healthy women (mean age [SD]: 55.3 [10.1] years) had their joint position sense (JPS...

  17. CHECKing biochemical markers in early-stage knee and hip osteoarthritis, a critical appraisal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Spil, W.E.

    2012-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease and poses a large social and financial burden for societies worldwide. OA is characterized by symptoms of pain, stiffness, and incidental soft tissue swelling of synovial joints. Synovial joints, such as knees and hips, unite bone ends covered by

  18. Which patients with osteoarthritis of hip and/or knee benefit most from behavioral graded activity?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenhof, C.; Ende, C.H.M. van den; Dekker, J.; Kiike, A.J.; Oostendorp, R.A.B.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.

    2007-01-01

    Our objective was to investigate whether behavioral graded activity (BGA) has particular benefit in specific subgroups of osteoarthritis (OA) patients. Two hundred participants with OA of hip or knee, or both (clinical American College of Rheumatology, ACR, criteria) participated in a randomized cli

  19. Knee joint contact mechanics during downhill gait and its relationship with varus/valgus motion and muscle strength in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrokhi, Shawn; Voycheck, Carrie A; Gustafson, Jonathan A; Fitzgerald, G Kelley; Tashman, Scott

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this exploratory study was to evaluate tibiofemoral joint contact point excursions and velocities during downhill gait and assess the relationship between tibiofemoral joint contact mechanics with frontal-plane knee joint motion and lower extremity muscle weakness in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Dynamic stereo X-ray was used to quantify tibiofemoral joint contact mechanics and frontal-plane motion during the loading response phase of downhill gait in 11 patients with knee OA and 11 control volunteers. Quantitative testing of the quadriceps and the hip abductor muscles was also performed. Patients with knee OA demonstrated larger medial/lateral joint contact point excursions (p < 0.02) and greater heel-strike joint contact point velocities (p < 0.05) for the medial and lateral compartments compared to the control group. The peak medial/lateral joint contact point velocity of the medial compartment was also greater for patients with knee OA compared to their control counterparts (p = 0.02). Additionally, patients with knee OA demonstrated significantly increased frontal-plane varus motion excursions (p < 0.01) and greater quadriceps and hip abductor muscle weakness (p = 0.03). In general, increased joint contact point excursions and velocities in patients with knee OA were linearly associated with greater frontal-plane varus motion excursions (p < 0.04) but not with quadriceps or hip abductor strength. Altered contact mechanics in patients with knee OA may be related to compromised frontal-plane joint stability but not with deficits in muscle strength.

  20. The KineSpring® Knee Implant System: an implantable joint-unloading prosthesis for treatment of medial knee osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clifford AG

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Anton G Clifford,1 Stefan M Gabriel,1 Mary O’Connell,1 David Lowe,1 Larry E Miller,2,3 Jon E Block31Moximed, Inc, Hayward, CA, USA; 2Miller Scientific Consulting, Inc, Arden, NC, USA; 3The Jon Block Group, San Francisco, CA, USAAbstract: Symptomatic medial compartment knee osteoarthritis (OA is the leading cause of musculoskeletal pain and disability in adults. Therapies intended to unload the medial knee compartment have yielded unsatisfactory results due to low patient compliance with conservative treatments and high complication rates with surgical options. There is no widely available joint-unloading treatment for medial knee OA that offers clinically important symptom alleviation, low complication risk, and high patient acceptance. The KineSpring® Knee Implant System (Moximed, Inc, Hayward, CA, USA is a first-of-its-kind, implantable, extra-articular, extra-capsular prosthesis intended to alleviate knee OA-related symptoms by reducing medial knee compartment loading while overcoming the limitations of traditional joint-unloading therapies. Preclinical and clinical studies have demonstrated excellent prosthesis durability, substantial reductions in medial compartment and total joint loads, and clinically important improvements in OA-related pain and function. The purpose of this report is to describe the KineSpring System, including implant characteristics, principles of operation, indications for use, patient selection criteria, surgical technique, postoperative care, preclinical testing, and clinical experience. The KineSpring System has potential to bridge the gap between ineffective conservative treatments and irreversible surgical interventions for medial compartment knee OA.Keywords: KineSpring, knee, medial, osteoarthritis, prosthesis

  1. The effect of different types of insoles or shoe modifications on medial loading of the knee in persons with medial knee osteoarthritis: a randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Richard K; Chapman, Graham J; Parkes, Matthew J; Forsythe, Laura; Felson, David T

    2015-11-01

    Many conservative treatments exist for medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) which aims to reduce the external knee adduction moment (EKAM). The objective of this study was to determine the difference between different shoes and lateral wedge insoles on EKAM, knee adduction angular impulse (KAAI), external knee flexion moment, pain, and comfort when walking in individuals with medial knee OA. Seventy individuals with medial knee OA underwent three-dimensional walking gait analysis in five conditions (barefoot, control shoe, typical wedge, supported wedge, and mobility shoe) with pain and comfort recorded concurrently. The change in EKAM, KAAI, external knee flexion moment, pain, and comfort were assessed using multiple linear regressions and pairwise comparisons. Compared with the control shoe, lateral wedge insoles and barefoot walking significantly reduced early stance EKAM and KAAI. The mobility shoe showed no effect. A significant reduction in latter stance EKAM was seen in the lateral wedge insoles compared to the other conditions, with only the barefoot condition reducing the external knee flexion moment. However, the mobility shoe showed significant immediate knee pain reduction and improved comfort scores. Different lateral wedge insoles show comparable reductions in medial knee loading and in our study, the mobility shoe did not affect medial loading.

  2. Does meniscal pathology alter gait knee biomechanics and strength post-ACL reconstruction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Michelle; Bryant, Adam L; Wrigley, Tim V; Pratt, Clare; Crossley, Kay M; Whitehead, Tim S; Morris, Hayden G; Clark, Ross A; Perraton, Luke G

    2016-05-01

    Individuals following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) with concomitant meniscal pathology have a higher risk of developing knee osteoarthritis (OA) compared to those with isolated ACLR. Knee extensor weakness and altered dynamic knee joint biomechanics have been suggested to play a role in the development of knee OA following ACLR. This study investigated whether these factors differ in people following ACLR who have concomitant meniscal pathology compared to patients with isolated ACLR. Thirty-three patients with isolated ACLR and 34 patients with ACLR and meniscal pathology underwent strength and gait assessment 12-24 months post-operatively. Primary measures were peak isometric knee extensor torque and knee adduction moment (peak and impulse). Secondary measures included peak knee flexion moment and knee kinematics (sagittal and transverse). There were no between-group differences in knee extensor strength [mean difference (95 % CI) 0.09 (-0.23 to 0.42) Nm/kg, n.s.], peak knee adduction moment [-0.02 (-0.54 to 0.49) Nm/(BW × HT) %, n.s.] or knee adduction moment impulse [0.01 (-0.15 to 0.17) Nm/(BW × HT) %, p = n.s.]. No between-group differences were found for any secondary measures. No evidence was found to suggest that the higher prevalence of OA in patients with ACLR and meniscal pathology compared to patients with isolated ACLR is attributed to reduced knee muscle strength or altered knee joint biomechanics assessed 1-2 years post-surgery. Given that there is a higher incidence of knee OA in patients with concomitant meniscal pathology and ACLR, further investigation is needed so that population-specific rehabilitation protocols can be developed. III.

  3. Effects of Meditation on Symptoms of Knee Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selfe, Terry Kit; Innes, Kim E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate changes in knee pain, function, and related indices in older adults with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee, following an 8-week meditation program. Methods Eleven community-dwelling adults with physician- confirmed knee OA were enrolled in the study. Core outcomes included recommended measures of knee pain (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index [WOMAC] and 11-point numeric rating scale [NRS]), function (WOMAC), and perceived global status (patient global assessment). Additional outcomes included: perceived stress; stress hardiness; mood; sleep; and sympathetic activation. Following baseline assessment, participants were trained briefly in mantra meditation and instructed to meditate for 15–20 minutes twice daily for 8 weeks, and to record each practice session on a daily log. Changes over time were analyzed using paired t-tests. Results Nine participants (82%) completed the study. Participants had statistically significant improvements in all core outcomes: knee pain (WOMAC: 47.7% ± 25.1% reduction, P = 0.001; NRS: 42.6% ± 34.6% reduction, P mantra meditation program may help reduce knee pain and dysfunction, as well as improving mood and related outcomes in adults with knee OA. PMID:26549967

  4. Level and Determinants of Knowledge of Symptomatic Knee Osteoarthritis among Railway Workers in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurubaran Ganasegeran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Symptomatic knee osteoarthritis, an ancient malady greatly impairing modern population quality of life, has stimulated global attention to find effective modes of prevention and intervention. Purpose. This study aimed to assess factors affecting knowledge of symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (knee OA among Malaysian railway workers. Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 513 railway workers involving eight major states within Peninsular Malaysia using population-based sampling. The assessment instrument was a face-validated, prepiloted, self-administered instrument with sociodemographics and knowledge items on knee OA. Results. Mean (±SD age of the respondents was 41.4 (±10.7, with the majority aged 50 years or older (34.9%. Of the total respondents, 53.6% had low levels of knowledge of knee OA disease. Multivariate analysis found that four demographic predictors, age ≥50 years, family history of knee OA, self-awareness, and clinical diagnosis of the disease entity, were significantly associated with knowledge scores. Conclusion. The finding of a low level knee OA knowledge among Malaysian railway workers points to an urgent need for massive information to be disseminated among the workers at risk to foster primary prevention and self-care.

  5. Real-time knee adduction moment feedback training using an elliptical trainer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sang Hoon; Lee, Song Joo; Ren, Yupeng; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2014-03-01

    The external knee adduction moment (EKAM) is associated with knee osteoarthritis (OA) in many aspects including presence, progression, and severity of knee OA. Despite of its importance, there is a lack of EKAM estimation methods that can provide patients with knee OA real-time EKAM biofeedback for training and clinical evaluations without using a motion analysis laboratory. A practical real-time EKAM estimation method, which utilizes kinematics measured by a simple six degree-of-freedom goniometer and kinetics measured by a multi-axis force sensor underneath the foot, was developed to provide real-time feedback of the EKAM to the patients during stepping on an elliptical trainer, which can potentially be used to control and alter the EKAM. High reliability (ICC(2,1): 0.9580) of the real-time EKAM estimation method was verified through stepping trials of seven subjects without musculoskeletal disorders. Combined with advantages of elliptical trainers including functional weight-bearing stepping and mitigation of impulsive forces, the real-time EKAM estimation method is expected to help patients with knee OA better control frontal plane knee loading and reduce knee OA development and progression.

  6. On O(a^2) effects in gradient flow observables

    CERN Document Server

    Ramos, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    In lattice gauge theories, the gradient flow has been used extensively both, for scale setting and for defining finite volume renormalization schemes for the gauge coupling. Unfortunately, rather large cutoff effects have been observed in some cases. We here investigate these effects to leading order in perturbation theory, considering various definitions of the lattice observable, the lattice flow equation and the Yang Mills lattice action. These considerations suggest an improved set- up for which we perform a scaling test in the pure SU(3) gauge theory, demonstrating strongly reduced cutoff effects. We then attempt to obtain a more complete understanding of the structure of O(a^2) effects by applying Symanzik's effective theory approach to the 4+1 dimensional local field theory with flow time as the fifth dimension. From these considerations we are led to a fully O(a^2) improved set-up the study of which is left to future work.

  7. Muscle Activation Profiles and Co-Activation of Quadriceps and Hamstring Muscles around Knee Joint in Indian Primary Osteoarthritis Knee Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sanjeev Kumar; Yadav, Shiv Lal; Singh, U; Wadhwa, Sanjay

    2017-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of knee is a common joint disease. It is associated with reduced knee joint stability due to impaired quadriceps strength, pain, and an altered joint structure. There is altered muscle activation in knee OA patients, which interferes with normal load distribution around the knee and facilitates disease progression. Our primary aim was to determine activation patterns of the muscles i.e., quadriceps and hamstrings in knee OA patients during walking. We also studied co-activation of muscles around knee joint in primary OA knee patients including directed medial and lateral co-contractions. This observational study was done at Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India. Fourty-four patients with medial compartment primary knee OA were included in study after satisfying inclusion and exclusion criteria. All the patients were assessed for mean, peak and integrated Root Mean Square (RMS), EMG values, muscle activation patterns and co-activation of muscles around knee joint by surface Electromyography (EMG) analysis of Vastus Medialis Obliques (VMO), Vastus Lateralis (VL), Semitendinosus (SMT) and Biceps Femoris (BF) muscles during gait cycle. The EMG waveform for each muscle was amplitude normalized and time normalized to 100% of gait cycle and plotted on graph. Quantitative variables were assessed for normal distribution and accordingly mean±SD or median (range), as appropriate, was computed. For primary OA knee, mean age 61±5 years, mean weight 63.7±10.1 kg, mean height 153.9±7.2 cm, and mean Body Mass Index (BMI) 26.8±3.0 kg/m(2) was found. The muscle activity of hamstrings (SMT muscle and BF) was increased during midstance, late stance and early swing phase of gait cycle as compared to quadriceps (VMO and VL) muscle activity respectively, suggesting co-contraction of opposing muscles around knee joint. Patients with knee OA walk with increased hamstring muscle activity (during

  8. The Relationship Between Knee Osteoarthritis and Osteoporosis in Postmenopausal Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Karakaşlı

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study the bone density of the upper femur and radius were compared accoding to the severity of knee osteoarthritis (OA, bone mineral index (BMI and age. Eighty two postmenopausal women with knee osteoarthritis were recruited in this study. Bone mineral density of the femur and radius was measured using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry(DEXA. Radiological grading of knee OA was done by using Kellgren-Lawrence and individual feature scales. In our study, there were 15 subjects with Kellgren and Lawrence grade 0, 13 with grade 1, 21 with grade 2, 25 with grade 3, and 8 with grade 4 OA. There were no differences in hip and radius bone mineral density (BMD by presence of any radiographic features of OA in patients (p>0.05. BMD of the femoral neck and trochanter was significantly associated with BMI (p<0.01. Negative correlation was found between age and BMD (p<0.05. BMD was not associated with knee OA. With aging, we found a strong correlation between the femur BMD and BMI, although BMD decreased with age.

  9. Spa therapy: can be a valid option for treating knee osteoarthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenti, Sara; Cheleschi, Sara; Galeazzi, Mauro; Fioravanti, Antonella

    2015-08-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) continues to be one of the leading causes of `years lived with disability' worldwide. Symptomatic knee OA is highly prevalent among people aged 50 years and over and is destined to become an ever more important healthcare problem. Current management of knee OA includes non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatments. Spa therapy is one of the most commonly used non-pharmacological approaches for OA in many European countries, as well as in Japan and Israel. Despite its long history and popularity, spa treatment is still the subject of debate and its role in modern medicine continues to be unclear. The objective of this review is to summarize the currently available information on clinical effects and mechanisms of action of spa therapy in knee OA. Various randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) were conducted to assess the efficacy and tolerability of balneotherapy and mud-pack therapy in patients with knee OA. Data from these clinical trials support a beneficial effect of spa therapy on pain, function and quality of life in knee OA that lasts over time, until 6-9 months after the treatment. The mechanisms by which immersion in mineral or thermal water or the application of mud alleviate suffering in OA are not fully understood. The net benefit is probably the result of a combination of factors, among which the mechanical, thermal and chemical effects are most prominent. In conclusion, spa therapy seems to have a role in the treatment of knee OA. Additional RCTs and further studies of mechanisms of action with high methodological quality are necessary to prove the effects of spa therapy.

  10. Development of comorbidity-adapted exercise protocols for patients with knee osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rooij, Mariëtte; van der Leeden, Marike; Avezaat, Ellis; Häkkinen, Arja; Klaver, Rob; Maas, Tjieu; Peter, Wilfred F; Roorda, Leo D; Lems, Willem F; Dekker, Joost

    2014-01-01

    Background Exercise therapy is generally recommended for patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. Comorbidity, which is highly prevalent in OA, may interfere with exercise therapy. To date, there is no evidence-based protocol for the treatment of patients with knee OA and comorbidity. Special protocols adapted to the comorbidity may facilitate the application of exercise therapy in patients with knee OA and one or more comorbidities. Purpose The purpose of this study was to develop comorbidity-adapted exercise protocols for patients with knee OA and comorbidity. Method Several steps were undertaken to develop comorbidity-adapted protocols: selection of highly prevalent comorbidities in OA, a literature search to identify restrictions and contraindications for exercise therapy for the various comorbid diseases, consultation of experts on each comorbid disease, and field testing of the protocol in eleven patients with knee OA and comorbidity. Results Based on literature and expert opinion, comorbidity-adapted protocols were developed for highly prevalent comorbidities in OA. Field testing showed that the protocols provided guidance in clinical decision making in both the diagnostic and the treatment phase. Because of overlap, the number of exercise protocols could be reduced to three: one for physiological adaptations (coronary disease, heart failure, hypertension, diabetes type 2, chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, obesity), one for behavioral adaptations (chronic a-specific pain, nonspecific low back pain, depression), and one for environmental adaptations (visual or hearing impairments). Evaluation of patient outcome after treatment showed significant (P<0.05) and clinically relevant improvements in activity limitations and pain. Conclusion Comorbidity-adapted exercise protocols for patients with knee OA were developed, providing guidance in clinical reasoning with regard to diagnostics and treatment. To evaluate the effectiveness of treatment in line

  11. Spa therapy: can be a valid option for treating knee osteoarthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenti, Sara; Cheleschi, Sara; Galeazzi, Mauro; Fioravanti, Antonella

    2015-08-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) continues to be one of the leading causes of 'years lived with disability' worldwide. Symptomatic knee OA is highly prevalent among people aged 50 years and over and is destined to become an ever more important healthcare problem. Current management of knee OA includes non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatments. Spa therapy is one of the most commonly used non-pharmacological approaches for OA in many European countries, as well as in Japan and Israel. Despite its long history and popularity, spa treatment is still the subject of debate and its role in modern medicine continues to be unclear. The objective of this review is to summarize the currently available information on clinical effects and mechanisms of action of spa therapy in knee OA. Various randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) were conducted to assess the efficacy and tolerability of balneotherapy and mud-pack therapy in patients with knee OA. Data from these clinical trials support a beneficial effect of spa therapy on pain, function and quality of life in knee OA that lasts over time, until 6-9 months after the treatment. The mechanisms by which immersion in mineral or thermal water or the application of mud alleviate suffering in OA are not fully understood. The net benefit is probably the result of a combination of factors, among which the mechanical, thermal and chemical effects are most prominent. In conclusion, spa therapy seems to have a role in the treatment of knee OA. Additional RCTs and further studies of mechanisms of action with high methodological quality are necessary to prove the effects of spa therapy.

  12. Obesity and increased burden of hip and knee joint disease in Australia: Results from a national survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ackerman Ilana N

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research involving more representative samples is needed to extend our understanding of the broader impact of obesity in hip or knee joint disease (arthritis and OA beyond clinical settings. Although population-based research has been conducted in the United States, how these findings translate to other countries is unclear. Using a national approach, this study explored associations between obesity and the burden of hip and knee joint disease in Australia (in terms of prevalence, pain, stiffness, function, Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL and disease severity. Methods A random sample of 5000 Australians (≥39 years from the federal electoral roll was invited to complete a mailed questionnaire to identify doctor-diagnosed hip arthritis, hip OA, knee arthritis and knee OA and evaluate the burden of these conditions. Validated questionnaires included the WOMAC Index, Assessment of Quality of Life instrument and Multi-Attribute Prioritisation Tool. Body Mass Index (BMI was classified into underweight/normal weight (≤24.99 kg/m2, overweight (25–29.99 or obese (≥30. Multiple logistic regression was used to estimate odds of arthritis and OA, with demographic and socioeconomic variables included in the models. Associations between BMI and other variables were investigated using analysis of covariance, with adjustment for age and sex. Results Data were available from 1,157 participants (23%. Overweight participants had increased odds of knee arthritis (adjusted OR (AOR 1.87, 95%CI 1.14-3.07 and knee OA (AOR 2.11, 95%CI 1.07-4.15. Obesity was associated with higher prevalence of hip arthritis (AOR 2.18, 95%CI 1.17-4.06, knee arthritis (AOR 5.47, 95%CI 3.35-8.95 and knee OA (AOR 7.35, 95%CI 3.85-14.02. Of those with arthritis or OA, obese individuals reported more pain (for hip arthritis, hip OA and knee OA, greater stiffness (for hip arthritis, knee arthritis and knee OA, worse function (all diagnoses, lower HRQoL (for hip

  13. The association between knee joint biomechanics and neuromuscular control and moderate knee osteoarthritis radiographic and pain severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astephen Wilson, J L; Deluzio, K J; Dunbar, M J; Caldwell, G E; Hubley-Kozey, C L

    2011-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the association between biomechanical and neuromuscular factors of clinically diagnosed mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis (OA) with radiographic severity and pain severity separately. Three-dimensional gait analysis and electromyography were performed on a group of 40 participants with clinically diagnosed mild to moderate medial knee OA. Associations between radiographic severity, defined using a visual analog radiographic score, and pain severity, defined with the pain subscale of the WOMAC osteoarthritis index, with knee joint kinematics and kinetics, electromyography patterns of periarticular knee muscles, BMI and gait speed were determined with correlation analyses. Multiple linear regression analyses of radiographic and pain severity were also explored. Statistically significant correlations between radiographic severity and the overall magnitude of the knee adduction moment during stance (r²=21.4%, P=0.003) and the magnitude of the knee flexion angle during the gait cycle (r²=11.4%, P=0.03) were found. Significant correlations between pain and gait speed (r²=28.2%, Pknee adduction moment during stance and BMI explained a significant portion of the variability in radiographic severity (R(2)=27.1%, Pknee joint biomechanical variables are associated with structural knee OA severity measured from radiographs in clinically diagnosed mild to moderate levels of disease, but that pain severity is only reflected in gait speed and neuromuscular activation patterns. A combination of the knee adduction moment and BMI better explained structural knee OA severity than any individual factor alone. Copyright © 2010 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Overuse Knee Injuries in Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Kezunović

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available According to many statistics over 55% of all sports-related injuries are incurred in the knee joint (active sportsmen and recreationists. The statistics definitely differ, depending on type of sport and specific movements habitually performed in a particular sport. Therefore, in addition to acute knee injuries overuse syndromes are common in the knee area also due to specificities of patellofemoral joint just because specific diseases like „jumper's knee“ and „runner's knee“ are related to certain sport activities. Generally speaking, these syndromes occur due to poor orientation of the knee extensor mechanism, i.e. friction of iliotibial band and patellofemoral chondromalacia. It is believed that about 45% of all overuse syndromes in the knee area occur as a result of running.

  15. Unraveling the confusion behind hyaluronic acid efficacy in the treatment of symptomatic knee osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller LE

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Larry E Miller,1 Roy D Altman,2 Louis F McIntyre3 1Miller Scientific Consulting, Inc., Asheville, NC, 2Department of Rheumatology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, 3Northwell Physician Partners, Sleepy Hollow, NY, USA Abstract: Hyaluronic acid (HA is a commonly prescribed treatment for knee pain resulting from osteoarthritis (OA. Although numerous HA products have been approved for use by the US Food and Drug Administration, the efficacy of HA injections for knee OA remains disputed with meta-analyses and societal clinical guidelines drawing disparate conclusions. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS recently published a best-evidence systematic review and concluded that available data did not support the routine use of HA for knee OA. The purpose of the current article is to highlight issues that confound interpretation of meta-analyses on HA for knee OA, to provide realistic estimates of the true efficacy of HA injections in knee OA, and to provide commentary on the methods and conclusions from the AAOS systematic review. In general, the clinical benefit of HA is underestimated using conventional meta-analytic techniques. When accounting for differential control group effects in HA studies, it can be reasonably concluded that HA injections may be beneficial to an appreciable number of patients with knee OA. In addition, the systematic review methodology used by AAOS was questionable due to exclusion of numerous relevant studies and inclusion of studies that used HAs not approved for use in the US, both of which underestimated the true efficacy of HA injections. Overall, the efficacy of HA injections for knee OA is likely better than previously reported. Future clinical trials and meta-analyses should account for differential control group effects in order to avoid the continued confusion surrounding HA injection efficacy. Keywords: effect size, hyaluronic acid, injection, knee, minimal important difference

  16. Is there a causal link between knee loading and knee osteoarthritis progression? A systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies and randomised trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Marius; Creaby, Mark W; Lund, Hans; Juhl, Carsten; Christensen, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Objective We performed a systematic review, meta-analysis and assessed the evidence supporting a causal link between knee joint loading during walking and structural knee osteoarthritis (OA) progression. Design Systematic review, meta-analysis and application of Bradford Hill's considerations on causation. Data sources We searched MEDLINE, Scopus, AMED, CINAHL and SportsDiscus for prospective cohort studies and randomised controlled trials (RCTs) from 1950 through October 2013. Study eligibility criteria We selected cohort studies and RCTs in which estimates of knee joint loading during walking were used to predict structural knee OA progression assessed by X-ray or MRI. Data analyses Meta-analysis was performed to estimate the combined OR for structural disease progression with higher baseline loading. The likelihood of a causal link between knee joint loading and OA progression was assessed from cohort studies using the Bradford Hill guidelines to derive a 0–4 causation score based on four criteria and examined for confirmation in RCTs. Results Of the 1078 potentially eligible articles, 5 prospective cohort studies were included. The studies included a total of 452 patients relating joint loading to disease progression over 12–72 months. There were very serious limitations associated with the methodological quality of the included studies. The combined OR for disease progression was 1.90 (95% CI 0.85 to 4.25; I2=77%) for each one-unit increment in baseline knee loading. The combined causation score was 0, indicating no causal association between knee loading and knee OA progression. No RCTs were found to confirm or refute the findings from the cohort studies. Conclusions There is very limited and low-quality evidence to support for a causal link between knee joint loading during walking and structural progression of knee OA. Trial registration number CRD42012003253 PMID:25031196

  17. Is there a causal link between knee loading and knee osteoarthritis progression? A systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies and randomised trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Marius; Creaby, Mark W; Lund, Hans; Juhl, Carsten; Christensen, Robin

    2014-07-15

    We performed a systematic review, meta-analysis and assessed the evidence supporting a causal link between knee joint loading during walking and structural knee osteoarthritis (OA) progression. Systematic review, meta-analysis and application of Bradford Hill's considerations on causation. We searched MEDLINE, Scopus, AMED, CINAHL and SportsDiscus for prospective cohort studies and randomised controlled trials (RCTs) from 1950 through October 2013. We selected cohort studies and RCTs in which estimates of knee joint loading during walking were used to predict structural knee OA progression assessed by X-ray or MRI. Meta-analysis was performed to estimate the combined OR for structural disease progression with higher baseline loading. The likelihood of a causal link between knee joint loading and OA progression was assessed from cohort studies using the Bradford Hill guidelines to derive a 0-4 causation score based on four criteria and examined for confirmation in RCTs. Of the 1078 potentially eligible articles, 5 prospective cohort studies were included. The studies included a total of 452 patients relating joint loading to disease progression over 12-72 months. There were very serious limitations associated with the methodological quality of the included studies. The combined OR for disease progression was 1.90 (95% CI 0.85 to 4.25; I(2)=77%) for each one-unit increment in baseline knee loading. The combined causation score was 0, indicating no causal association between knee loading and knee OA progression. No RCTs were found to confirm or refute the findings from the cohort studies. There is very limited and low-quality evidence to support for a causal link between knee joint loading during walking and structural progression of knee OA. CRD42012003253. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  18. Age and Comorbidities Affect Quality of Life in Patients With Osteoarthrtitis and Knee Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandez-Cuadros

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Osteoarthritis (OA is a multifactorial, disabling and degenerative disease that worsens with age and affects patient’s health-related quality of life (HRQOL. Objectives The current study aimed to assess if age and comorbidities have an influence on knee OA and knee replacement outcome before and after the surgery. Methods A quasi-experimental intervention study was conducted on a sample of 125 patients with knee osteoarthritis and designed to assess total knee arthroplasty (TKA outcomes before and after the surgery. One orthopedic surgeon performed all surgeries with the same type of joint prosthesis from 2008 to 2012. The HRQOL was assessed by the short form (36 health survey (SF-36 questionnaire. Results It was observed that knee osteoarthritis significantly affects all the dimensions of HRQOL before the surgery included in the SF-36 questionnaire and a clinical improvement observed after the intervention with total knee arthroplasty. Age influenced bodily pain (P = 0.012 and vitality (P = 0.002 in knee osteoarthritis (before the intervention, and on physical (P = 0.040 and mental health components (P = 0.002, after total knee arthroplasty. Previous arthroplasties and comorbidities had no effect on knee OA. However, previous total knee/hip arthroplasty were associated with the improvement in physical functioning (P = 0.021 after the TKA; comorbidities influenced the dimension of mental health (MH (P = 0.036 after the surgery. Conclusions Total knee arthroplasty is justified according to the perception of clinical improvement and the improvement in the dimensions of HRQOL reported by the patients. Age affects knee osteoarthritis and TKA outcomes. Comorbidities have no influence on knee OA, but affect mental health after the intervention.

  19. The association between metacarpal ratio, radiographic hand and knee osteoarthritis and its progression after meniscectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paradowski, P T; Lohmander, Stefan; Englund, Martin Kristian

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine whether the ratio of the second and fourth metacarpal bone length (MC2:MC4) in subjects with prior meniscectomy of the knee is associated with radiographic hand and knee osteoarthritis (OA) and its progression. DESIGN: We assessed 219 subjects (175 men and 44 women) twice...

  20. Effect of pre-operative neuromuscular training on functional outcome after total knee replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huber, Erika O; de Bie, Rob A; Roos, Ewa M.

    2013-01-01

    Total Knee Replacement (TKR) is the standard treatment for patients with severe knee osteoarthritis (OA). Significant improvement in pain and function are seen after TKR and approximately 80% of patients are very satisfied with the outcome. Functional status prior to TKR is a major predictor of o...

  1. The effect of weight maintenance on symptoms of knee osteoarthritis in obese patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Robin; Henriksen, Marius; Leeds, Anthony R;

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare results of obese patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) who, after an intensive weight loss regimen, received 1 year of either Dietary support (D), knee-Exercise program (E), or Control (C) "no attention". Methods Randomized, two-phase, parallel-group trial. 192 obese partici...

  2. EFFICACY OF KINESIO-TAPING VERSUS PHONOPHORESIS ON KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS: AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Gaid Sedhom

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Osteoarthritis (OA is the most common type of joint disease. Pain is the most common symptom of knee osteoarthritis. Also it characterized by sign, symptoms of inflammation, pain, stiffness and loss of mobility. This study was conducted to explore the efficacy of kinesio taping (KT versus Aescin, Diethylamine Salicylate gel phonophoresis (PH on pain level, range of motion (ROM, and proprioceptive accuracy on mild to moderate knee OA patients. Methods: Forty females with knee OA from Outpatient Clinic of Physical Therapy Faculty participated in the study with mean age (49±5.82 years. They were randomly assigned into 2 equal groups. Group I: received Aescin, Diethylamine Salicylate gel PH with pulsed ultrasound therapy and group II received KT. All patients received hot packs and selected exercise program for four weeks; three sessions per week. Visual analogue scale was used in assessment of pain level. Electronic digital goniometer was used in assessment of knee flexion ROM. Iso-kinetic daynamometer was used in assessment of knee proprioceptive accuracy. Results: There was a significant relieving of pain perception, increasing of knee flexion ROM and improving proprioceptive accuracy in knee joint post-study in both groups. But application of Aescin, Diethylamine Salicylate gel PH had significant relieve of knee pain than KT. Conclusion: Using of Aescin, Diethylamine Salicylate gel PH is more effective than KT application in reliving knee pain in knee osteoarthritic patients.

  3. Dietary and Supplemental Vitamin C and D on Symptom Severity and Physical Function in Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Man; Bounsanga, Jerry; Voss, Maren W; Gu, Yushan; Crum, Anthony B; Tang, Philip

    2017-05-30

    Vitamins C and D have been associated with decreasing pain and increasing function but these associations are not definitive. This cross-sectional study explores what relationships supplemental and dietary intake of vitamins C and D have on pain severity and physical function in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Using data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative, we performed regression analyses to examine relationships between vitamins C and D, pain, and function. Dietary vitamin D and dietary vitamin C were divided into >90th, 50th-90th, and D was divided into >85th percentile, whereas the high percentile group for supplemental vitamin C was divided into >90th percentile. We found the 90th/85th percentile levels of dietary and supplemental vitamin D to be positively associated with pain (β = 0.180; p = 0.028) and inversely related to physical function (β = -0.150, p = 0.028), respectively. Daily intake of vitamin C showed no statistical significance. We found that supplementary vitamin D was strongly associated with lessened disability for knee OA patients. The unexpected finding that associated dietary vitamin D with greater knee pain merits further study.

  4. Do Laterally Wedged Insoles or Valgus Braces Unload the Medial Compartment of the Knee in Patients With Osteoarthritis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Duivenvoorden (Tijs); T.M. van Raaij (Tom); H.L.D. Horemans (Herwin); R.W. Brouwer (Reinoud); P.K. Bos (Koen); S.M. Bierma-Zeinstra (Sita); J.A.N. Verhaar (Jan); M. Reijman (Max)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The results of conservative treatment of knee osteoarthritis (OA) are generally evaluated in epidemiological studies with clinical outcome measures as primary outcomes. Biomechanical evaluation of orthoses shows that there are potentially beneficial biomechanical changes to j

  5. Secondary Knee Osteoarthritis due to Neurofibromatosis Type 1 Treated with above the Knee Amputation: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay Patel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF-1 has a variety of associated orthopaedic manifestations that have been previously reported. We report a case of severe, grade 4 knee osteoarthritis (OA with recurrent subluxation and joint laxity due to multiple extra-articular neurofibromas ultimately treated with Above the Knee Amputation (AKA. Case Description. A 39-year-old man presented with multiple neurofibromas and lymphedema leading to degenerative changes of the knee. Conservative treatment failed due to the severity of the knee degeneration and patient discomfort. Likewise, arthroplasty was not possible due to poor bone quality and joint instability. Therefore, AKA was selected to relieve symptoms and provide functional improvement. six months after the procedure the patient has increased functional capacity for ambulation and activities of daily living, as well as significant decrease in pain and discomfort. Clinical Relevance. Extra-articular neurofibromas causing severe secondary OA in relatively young patients can be functionally improved with AKA and prosthetic device use.

  6. Secondary Knee Osteoarthritis due to Neurofibromatosis Type 1 Treated with above the Knee Amputation: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jay; Whiting, Jeffrey; Jones, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Background. Neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF-1) has a variety of associated orthopaedic manifestations that have been previously reported. We report a case of severe, grade 4 knee osteoarthritis (OA) with recurrent subluxation and joint laxity due to multiple extra-articular neurofibromas ultimately treated with Above the Knee Amputation (AKA). Case Description. A 39-year-old man presented with multiple neurofibromas and lymphedema leading to degenerative changes of the knee. Conservative treatment failed due to the severity of the knee degeneration and patient discomfort. Likewise, arthroplasty was not possible due to poor bone quality and joint instability. Therefore, AKA was selected to relieve symptoms and provide functional improvement. six months after the procedure the patient has increased functional capacity for ambulation and activities of daily living, as well as significant decrease in pain and discomfort. Clinical Relevance. Extra-articular neurofibromas causing severe secondary OA in relatively young patients can be functionally improved with AKA and prosthetic device use.

  7. Role of integrated approach of yoga therapy in a failed post-total knee replacement of bilateral knees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Ebnezar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OA Knee is the most common arthritis. Knee replacement Surgeries are being done increasingly in the present times. This has led to the violation of the standard indications and when knees are replaced ignoring other co - musculoskeletal conditions it results in the surgery failing early. This is about a patient who encountered a failed TKR due to improper selection as patient had bilateral OA Hip that was ignored in the initial stages. To overcome the problem she was advised bilateral hip replacement which would leave her with four replacements in the lower limb. She refused surgery and was told there are no alternative treatment options. This patient underwent a 3 week integrated course of IAYT at our center and she made a remarkable recovery. IAYT is a good non-surgical treatment that can be affective both before and after knee replacement and it should be considered as the first choice of treatment before surgery.

  8. Individuals with medial knee osteoarthritis show neuromuscular adaptation when perturbed during walking despite functional and structural impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Deepak; Swanik, Charles Buz; Reisman, Darcy S; Rudolph, Katherine S

    2014-01-01

    Neuromuscular control relies on sensory feedback that influences responses to changing external demands, and the normal response is for movement and muscle activation patterns to adapt to repeated perturbations. People with knee osteoarthritis (OA) are known to have pain, quadriceps weakness, and neuromotor deficits that could affect adaption to external perturbations. The aim of this study was to analyze neuromotor adaptation during walking in people with knee OA (n = 38) and controls (n = 23). Disability, quadriceps strength, joint space width, malalignment, and proprioception were assessed. Kinematic and EMG data were collected during undisturbed walking and during perturbations that caused lateral translation of the foot at initial contact. Knee excursions and EMG magnitudes were analyzed. Subjects with OA walked with less knee motion and higher muscle activation and had greater pain, limitations in function, quadriceps weakness, and malalignment, but no difference was observed in proprioception. Both groups showed increased EMG and decreased knee motion in response to the first perturbation, followed by progressively decreased EMG activity and increased knee motion during midstance over the first five perturbations, but no group differences were observed. Over 30 trials, EMG levels returned to those of normal walking. The results illustrate that people with knee OA respond similarly to healthy individuals when exposed to challenging perturbations during functional weight-bearing activities despite structural, functional, and neuromotor impairments. Mechanisms underlying the adaptive response in people with knee OA need further study.

  9. Dynamic weight-bearing assessment of pain in knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klokker, Louise; Christensen, Robin; Wæhrens, Eva E;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) has suggested to asses pain after specific activities consistently in clinical trials on knee OA. The Dynamic weight-bearing Assessment of Pain (DAP) assesses pain during activity (30 s of performing repeated deep knee-bends fr....... A change of 2.4 or more can be interpreted as clinically relevant. The DAP is a promising alternative to using 'pain on walking' as a clinical trial inclusion criterion/outcome....

  10. Prevalence of knee abnormalities in patients with osteoarthritis and anterior cruciate ligament injury identified with peripheral magnetic resonance imaging: a pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, H. [McMaster Univ., Dept. of Medical Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: wuh5@mcmaster.ca; Webber, C. [Hamilton Health Sciences, Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); McMaster Univ., Dept. of Radiology, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Fuentes, C.O. [Hamilton Health Sciences, Dept. of Radiology, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Benson, R.; Beattie, K. [McMaster Univ., Dept. of Medical Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Adachi, J.D.; Xie, X. [McMaster Univ., Dept. of Medical Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Jabbari, F. [Hamilton Health Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Levy, D.R. [McMaster Univ., Sports Medicine, Dept. of Family Medicine and Dept. of Medicine, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2007-06-15

    To assess, with a peripheral magnetic resonance imaging system (pMRI), the prevalence of bony and soft tissue abnormalities in the knee joints of normal subjects, osteoarthritis (OA) patients, and individuals who have suffered an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture; and 2) to compare the prevalence among groups. Magnetic resonance (MR) images of 28 healthy, 32 OA, and 26 ACL damaged knees were acquired with a 1.0-T pMRI system. Two radiologists grade the presence and severity of 9 MR image features: cartilage degeneration, osteophytes, subchondral cyst, bone marrow edema, meniscal abnormality, ligament integrity, loose bodies, popliteal cysts, and joint effusion. Ten of 28 healthy (35.7%), 24 of 26 ACL (92.3%), and all OA knees (100%) showed prevalent cartilage defects; 5 healthy (17.9%), 20 ACL (76.9%), and all OA knees (100%) had osteophytes; and 9 normal (32.1%), 21 ACL (80.8%), and 29 OA knees (90.6%) had meniscal abnormalities. One-half of the knees in the OA group (16 of 32, 50%) had subchondral cysts, and almost one-half had bone marrow edema (15 of 32, 46.9%). These features were not common in the ACL group (7.7%, and 11.5%, respectively) and were not observed in healthy knees. The OA group had the most severe cartilage defects, osteophytes, bone marrow edema, subchondral cysts, and meniscal abnormalities; the ACL group showed more severe cartilage defects, osteophytes, and meniscal abnormalities than did normal subjects. The results suggest that knees that have sustained ACL damage have OA-like features, most subjects (19 of 26, 73.1%) could be identified as in the early stage of OA. The prominent abnormalities present in ACL-damaged knees are cartilage defects, osteophytes, and meniscal abnormalities. (author)

  11. Associations between serum ghrelin and knee symptoms, joint structures and cartilage or bone biomarkers in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J; Wang, K; Xu, J; Ruan, G; Zhu, Q; Cai, J; Ren, J; Zheng, S; Zhu, Z; Otahal, P; Ding, C

    2017-09-01

    The roles of ghrelin in knee osteoarthritis (OA) are unclear. This study aimed to examine cross-sectional associations of ghrelin with knee symptoms, joint structures and cartilage or bone biomarkers in patients with knee OA. This study included 146 patients with symptomatic knee OA. Serum levels of ghrelin and cartilage or bone biomarkers including cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), cross linked C-telopeptide of type I collagen (CTXI), cross linked N-telopeptide of type I collagen (NTXI), N-terminal procollagen III propeptide (PIIINP), and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-3, 10, 13 were measured using Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Knee symptoms were assessed using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC). Infrapatellar fat pad (IPFP) volume, IPFP signal intensity alternation, cartilage defects, bone marrow lesions (BMLs) and effusion-synovitis were assessed using the (MRI). Osteophytes and joint space narrowing (JSN) were assessed using the Osteoarthritis Research Society International atlas. After adjustment for potential confounders, ghrelin quartiles were positively associated with knee symptoms including pain, stiffness, dysfunction and total score (quartile 4 vs 1: β 24.19, 95% CI 8.13-40.25). Ghrelin quartiles were also significantly associated with increased IPFP signal intensity alteration (quartile 4 vs 1: OR 3.57, 95% CI 1.55-8.25) and NTXI, PIIINP, MMP3 and MMP13. Ghrelin was not significantly associated with other joint structures and biomarkers. Serum levels of ghrelin were significantly associated with increased knee symptoms, IPFP signal intensity alteration and serum levels of MMP3, MMP13, NTXI and PIIINP, suggesting that ghrelin may have a role to play in knee OA. Copyright © 2017 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Individuals with medial knee osteoarthritis show neuromuscular adaptation when perturbed during walking despite functional and structural impairments

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Deepak; Swanik, Charles (Buz); Reisman, Darcy S.; Rudolph, Katherine S.

    2013-01-01

    Neuromuscular control relies on sensory feedback that influences responses to changing external demands, and the normal response is for movement and muscle activation patterns to adapt to repeated perturbations. People with knee osteoarthritis (OA) are known to have pain, quadriceps weakness, and neuromotor deficits that could affect adaption to external perturbations. The aim of this study was to analyze neuromotor adaptation during walking in people with knee OA (n = 38) and controls (n = 2...

  13. A systematic review to evaluate exercise for anterior cruciate ligament injuries: does this approach reduce the incidence of knee osteoarthritis?

    OpenAIRE

    Duncan KJ; Chopp-Hurley JN; Maly MR

    2016-01-01

    Koji J Duncan, Jaclyn N Chopp-Hurley, Monica R Maly School of Rehabilitation Science, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada Purpose: Among a variety of conservative and surgical options to treat anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries, we do not understand which options could potentially prevent knee osteoarthritis (OA). The aim of this systematic review was to examine the evidence pertaining to exercise treatment of ACL injuries in the context of knee OA. Methods: Medline, Embase, CIN...

  14. Epidemiology of knee osteoarthritis in India and related factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Chandra Prakash; Singh, Pulkesh; Chaturvedi, Sanjay; Pruthi, Kaushal Kumar; Vij, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Background: Among the chronic rheumatic diseases, hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) is the most prevalent and is a leading cause of pain and disability in most countries worldwide. Its prevalence increases with age and generally affects women more frequently than men. OA is strongly associated with aging and heavy physical occupational activity, a required livelihood for many people living in rural communities in developing countries. Determining region-specific OA prevalence and risk factor profiles will provide important information for planning future cost effective preventive strategies and health care services. Materials and Methods: The study was a community based cross sectional study to find out the prevalence of primary knee OA in India which has a population of 1.252 billion. The study was done across five sites in India. Each site was further divided into big city, small city, town, and village. The total sample size was 5000 subjects. Tools consisted of a structured questionnaire and plain skiagrams for confirmation of OA. Diagnosis was done using Kellgren and Lawrence scale for osteoarthritis. Results: Overall prevalence of knee OA was found to be 28.7%. The associated factors were found to be female gender (prevalence of 31.6%) (P = 0.007), obesity (P = 0.04), age (P = 0.001) and sedentary work (P = 0.001). Conclusions: There is scarcity of studies done in India which has varied socio geographical background and communities. We conducted this study for analyzing the current prevalence of OA in different locations. This study has evidenced a large percentage of population as borderline OA; therefore, it depends mainly on the prevention of modifiable risk factors to preserve at ease movement in elderly population through awareness programs.

  15. Effect of Comorbid Knee and Hip Osteoarthritis on Longitudinal Clinical and Health Care Use Outcomes in Older Adults With New Visits for Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rundell, Sean D; Goode, Adam P; Suri, Pradeep; Heagerty, Patrick J; Comstock, Bryan A; Friedly, Janna L; Gold, Laura S; Bauer, Zoya; Avins, Andrew L; Nedeljkovic, Srdjan S; Nerenz, David R; Kessler, Larry; Jarvik, Jeffrey G

    2017-01-01

    To examine if a comorbid diagnosis of knee or hip osteoarthritis (OA) in older adults with new back pain visits is associated with long-term patient-reported outcomes and back-related health care use. Prospective cohort study. Three integrated health systems forming the Back pain Outcomes using Longitudinal Data cohort. Participants (N=5155) were older adults (≥65y) with a new visit for back pain and a complete electronic health record data. Not applicable; we obtained OA diagnoses using diagnostic codes in the electronic health record 12 months prior to the new back pain visit. The Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RDQ) and the EuroQol-5D (EQ-5D) were key patient-reported outcomes. Health care use, measured by relative-value units (RVUs), was summed for the 12 months after the initial visit. We used linear mixed-effects models to model patient-reported outcomes. We also used generalized linear models to test the association between comorbid knee or hip OA and total back-related RVUs. Of the 5155 participants, 368 (7.1%) had a comorbid knee OA diagnosis, and 94 (1.8%) had a hip OA diagnosis. Of the participants, 4711 (91.4%) had neither knee nor hip OA. In adjusted models, the 12-month RDQ score was 1.23 points higher (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.72-1.74) for patients with knee OA and 1.26 points higher (95% CI, 0.24-2.27) for those with hip OA than those without knee or hip OA, respectively. A lower EQ-5D score was found among participants with knee OA (.02 lower; 95% CI, -.04 to -.01) and hip OA diagnoses (.03 lower; 95% CI, -.05 to -.01) compared with those without knee or hip OA, respectively. Comorbid knee or hip OA was not significantly associated with total 12-month back-related resource use. Comorbid knee or hip OA in older adults with a new back pain visit was associated with modestly worse long-term disability and health-related quality of life. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  16. OCCUPATIONAL RISK FACTORS IN KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muralidhara

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Osteoarthritis (OA, also often called “osteoarthrosis” or “degenerative joint disease” is the most common form of arthritis. MATERIALS AND METHODS Present retrospective statistical study was conducted at the Department of orthopaedics in a tertiary care hospital (Catering to a largely agricultural population over a period of 2 years from January 2012 to December 2014. RESULTS Prevalence of osteoarthritis common in farmers accounting to 70%. Other occupations at risk of OA of knee were, Teachers 12%, Housewives 08%, Athletes 04%, Policemen 04% and Drivers 02%. It is in conformity with most previous studies reviewed. CONCLUSION Osteoarthritis of Knee is a major health issue and important cause of disability in elderly population. Occupational risk factors are important in development of osteoarthritis.

  17. Incorporating Novel Mobile Health Technologies Into Management of Knee Osteoarthritis in Patients Treated With Intra-Articular Hyaluronic Acid: Rationale and Protocol of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Donald; Skrepnik, Nebojsa; Toselli, Richard M; Leroy, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee is one of the leading causes of disability in the United States. One relatively new strategy that could be helpful in the management of OA is the use of mHealth technologies, as they can be used to increase physical activity and promote exercise, which are key components of knee OA management. Objective Currently, no published data on the use of a mHealth approach to comprehensively monitor physical activity in patients with OA are available, and sim...

  18. Vibratory perception threshold in young and middle-aged patients at high risk of knee osteoarthritis compared to controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlund, Jonas Bloch; Shakoor, Najia; Ageberg, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Vibratory perception threshold (VPT) is impaired in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). It is, however, not known if sensory deficits precede or follow as a consequence of OA. The aim of this study was to investigate VPT in 2 independent groups of patients with high risk of future OA (young a...... anterior cruciate ligament [ACL]-injured patients and middle-aged meniscectomized patients) and compare them to age-matched controls....

  19. Effects of Progressive Resistance Strength Training on Knee Biomechanics During Single Leg Step-up in Persons with Mild Knee Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuade, Kevin James; de Oliveira, Anamaria Siriani

    2011-01-01

    Background The goal of this study was to determine if increasing strength in primary knee extensors and flexors would directly affect net knee joint moments during a common functional task in persons with knee osteoarthritis. Methods An exploratory single sample clinical trial with pre-post treatment measures was used to study volunteers with clinical diagnosis of mild knee OA in one knee. Subjects participated in an individually supervised training program 3 times a week for eight weeks consisting of progressive resistive exercises for knee extensors and knee flexors. Pre and post training outcome assessments included: 1. Net internal knee joint moments, 2. Electromyography of primary knee extensors and flexors, and 3. Self-report measures of knee pain and function. The distribution of lower extremity joint moments as a percent of the total support moment was also investigated. Findings Pain, symptoms, activities of daily life, quality of life, stiffness, and function scores showed significant improvement following strength training. Knee internal valgus and hip internal rotation moments showed increasing but non-statistically significant changes post-training. There were no significant differences in muscle co-contraction activation of the Quadriceps and Hamstrings. Interpretations While exercise continues to be an important element of OA management, the results of this study suggest improvements in function, pain, and other symptoms, as a result of strength training may not be causally related to specific biomechanical changes in net joint moments. PMID:21514018

  20. Treatment of hip/knee osteoarthritis in Dutch general practice and physical therapy practice : an observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barten, Di-Janne J A; Swinkels, Llse C S; Dorsman, Sara A; Dekker, Joost; Veenhof, Cindy; de Bakker, Dinny H

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A multidisciplinary, guideline-based Stepped-Care-Strategy (SCS), has recently been developed to improve the management of hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA). To date, it is unknown to what extent current Dutch OA care is consistent with the SCS, both with respect to the content of care as

  1. Treatment of hip/knee osteoarthritis in Dutch general practice and physical therapy practice: an observational study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barten, D.J.A.; Swinkels, I.C.S.; Dorsman, S.A.; Dekker, J.; Veenhof, C.; Bakker, D.H. de

    2015-01-01

    Background: A multidisciplinary, guideline-based Stepped-Care-Strategy (SCS), has recently been developed to improve the management of hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA). To date, it is unknown to what extent current Dutch OA care is consistent with the SCS, both with respect to the content of care as

  2. Treatment of hip/knee osteoarthritis in Dutch general practice and physical therapy practice : an observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barten, Di-Janne J A; Swinkels, Llse C S; Dorsman, Sara A; Dekker, Joost; Veenhof, Cindy; de Bakker, Dinny H

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A multidisciplinary, guideline-based Stepped-Care-Strategy (SCS), has recently been developed to improve the management of hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA). To date, it is unknown to what extent current Dutch OA care is consistent with the SCS, both with respect to the content of care as

  3. Treatment of hip/knee osteoarthritis in Dutch general practice and physical therapy practice: an observational study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barten, D.J.A.; Swinkels, I.C.S.; Dorsman, S.A.; Dekker, J.; Veenhof, C.; Bakker, D.H. de

    2015-01-01

    Background: A multidisciplinary, guideline-based Stepped-Care-Strategy (SCS), has recently been developed to improve the management of hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA). To date, it is unknown to what extent current Dutch OA care is consistent with the SCS, both with respect to the content of care as

  4. Pain and disability in patients with osteoarthritis of hip or knee: the relationship with articular, kinesiological, and psychological characteristics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baar, M.E. van; Dekkers, J.; Lemmens, J.A.M.; Oostendorp, R.A.B.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To determine to what extent articular, kinesiological, and psychological factors each contribute to pain and disability in patients with osteoarthritis (OA), after controlling for other factors. Methods: Cross sectional study among 200 patients with OA of the hip or knee. Dependent variab

  5. Factors associated with physical activity in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip or knee: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenhof, C.; Huisman, P.A.; Barten, J.A.; Takken, T.; Pisters, M.F.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To give an overview of factors related to the level of physical activity in patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: An extensive systematic literature search was conducted in PubMed, CINAHL and Embase. Inclusion criteria were: studies on patients with a diagnosis of OA of

  6. Factors associated with physical activity in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip or knee: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenhof, C.; Huisman, P.A.; Barten, J.A.; Takken, T.; Pisters, M.F.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To give an overview of factors related to the level of physical activity in patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: An extensive systematic literature search was conducted in PubMed, CINAHL and Embase. Inclusion criteria were: studies on patients with a diagnosis of OA of

  7. In vivo three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging of rat knee osteoarthritis model induced using meniscal transection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Xiang J. Wang

    2015-07-01

    Conclusion: MRI offers in vivo information on the pathogenesis change of rat knee OA induced with menisectomy. It can serve as a supplement technique to histology, as it is particularly useful for longitudinal follow-up of OA model development.

  8. The role of neuromuscular changes in aging and knee osteoarthritis on dynamic postural control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takacs, Judit; Carpenter, Mark G; Garland, S Jayne; Hunt, Michael A

    2013-04-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic joint condition, with 30% of those over the age of 75 exhibiting severe radiographic disease. Nearly 50% of those with knee OA have experienced a fall in the past year. Falls are a considerable public health concern, with a high risk of serious injury and a significant socioeconomic impact. The ability to defend against a fall relies on adequate dynamic postural control, and alterations in dynamic postural control are seen with normal aging. Neuromuscular changes associated with aging may be responsible for some of these alterations in dynamic postural control. Even greater neuromuscular deficits, which may impact dynamic postural control and the ability to defend against a fall, are seen in people with knee OA. There is little evidence to date on how knee OA affects the ability to respond to and defend against falls and the neuromuscular changes that contribute to balance deficits. As a result, this review will: summarize the key characteristics of postural responses to an external perturbation, highlight the changes in dynamic postural control seen with normal aging, review the neuromuscular changes associated with aging that have known and possible effects on dynamic postural control, and summarize the neuromuscular changes and balance problems in knee OA. Future research to better understand the role of neuromuscular changes in knee OA and their effect on dynamic postural control will be suggested. Such an understanding is critical to the successful creation and implementation of fall prevention and treatment programs, in order to reduce the excessive risk of falling in knee OA.

  9. Impulse-forces during walking are not increased in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Simonsen, Erik B; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    in knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients and compared them to those in healthy subjects. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: We studied 9 OA patients and 10 healthy subjects using three-dimensional gait analyses concentrated on the heel strike. Impulse GRF (iGRF) was measured together with peak accelerations (PA......BACKGROUND: Impulsive forces in the knee joint have been suspected to be a co-factor in the development and progression of knee osteoarthritis. We thus evaluated the impulsive sagittal ground reaction forces (iGRF), shock waves and lower extremity joint kinematics at heel strike during walking...... showed similar iGRF, similar tibial and sacral PA, and similar joint angles at heel strike. Following pain relief, the OA patients struck the ground with more extended hip and knee joints and lower tibial PA compared to the painful condition. Although such changes occurred after pain relief, all...

  10. Knee joint laxity and passive stiffness in meniscectomized patients compared with healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorlund, Jonas B; Creaby, Mark W; Wrigley, Tim V; Metcalf, Ben R; Bennell, Kim L

    2014-10-01

    Passive mechanical behavior of the knee in the frontal plane, measured as angular laxity and mechanical stiffness, may play an important role in the pathogenesis of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Little is known about knee laxity and stiffness prior to knee OA onset. We investigated knee joint angular laxity and passive stiffness in meniscectomized patients at high risk of knee OA compared with healthy controls. Sixty patients meniscectomized for a medial meniscal tear (52 men, 41.4 ± 5.5 years, 175.3 ± 7.9 cm, 83.6 ± 12.8 kg, mean ± SD) and 21 healthy controls (18 men, 42.0 ± 6.7 years, 176.8 ± 5.7 cm, 77.8 ± 13.4 kg) had their knee joint angular laxity and passive stiffness assessed twice ~2.3 years apart. Linear regression models including age, sex, height and body mass as covariates in the adjusted model were used to assess differences between groups. Greater knee joint varus (-10.1 vs. -7.3°, pknee joint angular laxity and reduced passive stiffness ~3 months post surgery compared with controls. In addition, the results indicated that knee joint laxity may increase over time in meniscectomized patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of end-stage hip, knee, and ankle osteoarthritis on walking mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Daniel; Vap, Alexander; Queen, Robin M

    2015-09-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that the presence of isolated ankle (A-OA; N=30), knee (K-OA; N=20), or hip (H-OA; N=30) osteoarthritis (OA) compared to asymptomatic controls (N=15) would lead to mechanical changes in the affected joint but also in all other lower limb joints and gait overall. Stride length, stance and swing times, as well as joint angles and moments at the hip, knee, and ankle were derived from 3-D kinematic and kinetic data collected from seven self-selected speed walking trial. Values were compared across groups using a 1×4 ANCOVA, covarying for walking speed. With walking speed controlled, the results indicated a reduction in hip and knee extension and ankle plantar flexion in accordance with the joint affected. In addition, OA in one joint had strong effects on other joints. In both H-OA and K-OA groups the hip never passed into extension, and A-OA subjects significantly changed hip kinematics to compensate for lack of plantar flexion. Finally, OA in any joint led to lower peak vertical forces as well as extension and plantar flexion moments compared to controls. The presence of end-stage OA at various lower extremity joints results in compensatory gait mechanics that cause movement alterations throughout the lower extremity. This work reinforces our understanding of the complex interaction of joints of the lower limb and the importance of focusing on the mechanics of the entire lower limb when considering gait disability and potential interventions in patients with isolated OA.

  12. Exercise in knee osteoarthritis: do treatment outcomes relate to bone marrow lesions? A randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckwée, David; Vaes, Peter; Raeymaeckers, Steven; Shahabpour, Maryam; Scheerlinck, Thierry; Bautmans, Ivan

    2017-09-01

    Exercise is effective for reducing knee osteoarthritis (OA) pain but effect sizes vary widely. Moreover, not all knee OA patients perceive beneficial effects. Tailoring specific exercises to subgroups of knee OA patients may increase effectivity. Bone marrow lesions (BMLs) have been suggested as a criterion to define such subgroups. This study aimed to investigate whether BMLs' presence/absence is related to treatment outcomes in a group of knee OA patients who exercised for 18 weeks. Subjects with symptomatic knee OA started a strength or walking exercise program. BMLs' presence at baseline was assessed. Pain was assessed before and after the intervention with the intermittent and constant osteoarthritis pain (ICOAP) questionnaire. Also the global perceived effect (GPE) on the patient's complaints was rated. Thirty-five patients (strength (N = 17) and walking (N = 18)) were analyzed for BMLs. BMLs were present in 25 (71%) knees. Five (14%) patients dropped out and 19 (54%) improved (GPE ≥5). All dropouts had BMLs, but no difference was seen between dropouts and retainers (p > 0.05). Pain scores did not differ between intervention groups (p > 0.05) or between patients with BMLs and without BMLs (p > 0.05). Pain scores and GPE was not different between knee OA patients with and without baseline BMLs in this sample. Implications for Rehabilitation Both walking and strengthening exercises are effective means of improving pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis. In a relatively small sample, this study shows that the presence or absence of subchondral bone marrow lesions, as seen on magnetic resonance images, is not related to treatment outcomes.

  13. The relationship between pain and dynamic knee joint loading in knee osteoarthritis varies with radiographic disease severity. A cross sectional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Aaboe, Jens; Bliddal, Henning

    2012-01-01

    between pain intensity and dynamic knee joint loading indicate a natural reaction to pain, which will limit the stress on the joint. In contrast, either absent or positive relationships between pain and dynamic loading in severe OA may lead to overuse and accelerated disease progression. These findings......OBJECTIVE: In a cross sectional study, we investigated the relationships between knee pain and mechanical loading across the knee, as indicated by the external knee adduction moment (KAM) during walking in patients with symptomatic knee OA who were distinguished by different radiographic disease...... and KAM impulses were obtained from gait analyses. Mixed linear regression analyses were performed with KAM variables as the outcome, and pain and disease severity as independent variables, adjusting for age, gender, and walking speed. RESULTS: In adjusted analyses, less severe patients demonstrated...

  14. Synovectomy of the knee with /sup 90/Y

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spooren, P.F.M.J.; Rasker, J.J.; Arens, R.P.J.H.

    1985-05-01

    In 33 patients with chronic arthritis of the knee, 48 knees were treated with an intra-articular injection of 5 mCi yttrium silicate /sup 90/Y. There were 27 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 6 with osteoarthrosis (OA); the mean follow-up period was 33 months. At clinical investigation after 1 year, no signs of pain or swelling were found in 15 knees. In most cases, pain and swelling improved subjectively, with a mean duration of 11 months; in 20 knees, the improvement lasted more than 22 months. When radiographs showed severe destruction, /sup 90/Y treatment was unsuccessful, but an important new finding was that most patients with mild or moderate radiological abormalities appeared to have a long-lasting improvement. The result did not correlate with erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), haemoglobin or Rose titre at the time of injection or at follow up, suggesting that the result of the treatment is more dependent on local factors than on the disease activity. The results of /sup 90/Y treatment in 6 OA knees with persistent swelling were promising regarding swelling, even in patients with moderate radiological abnormalities. The main side-effect was a sometimes painful swelling of the knee, which was always successfully treated with an intra-articular corticosteroid injection. In /sup 90/Y-treated knees, the incidence of unstable joints was not significantly higher than in non-treated knees. In conclusion, /sup 90/Y synovectomy may be a succesful treatment for patients older than 50 years with chronic arthritis of the knee due to RA and probably also OA, even when moderate radiological abnormalities are present.

  15. Physiotherapy in hip and knee osteoarthritis : evidence and daily practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peter, Willem Frederik Hendrik (Wilfred)

    2015-01-01

    In the first part an update of a guideline for the physiotherapy treatment of patients with hip and knee OA is described. Then a set of quality indicators for the physiotherapy management is developed to be used as an instrument to measure guideline adherence. Subsequently the effect of educational

  16. Automatic analysis of trabecular bone structure from knee MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marques, Joselene; Granlund, Rabia; Lillholm, Martin

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the feasibility of quantifying osteoarthritis (OA) by analysis of the trabecular bone structure in low-field knee MRI. Generic texture features were extracted from the images and subsequently selected by sequential floating forward selection (SFFS), following a fully automatic, un...

  17. The concept of physical limitations in knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klokker, Louise; Osborne, H. Richard; Waehrens, Eva E

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To comprehensively identify components of the physical limitation concept in knee osteoarthritis (OA) and to rate the clinical importance of these using perspectives of both patients and health professionals. DESIGN: Concept mapping, a structured group process, was used to identify...

  18. Unicompartmental Osteoarthritis of the Knee: Diagnosis and Treatment of Malalignment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.W. Brouwer (Reinoud)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractOsteoarthritis (OA) of the knee is a common medical condition that is often seen in general practice and causes considerable pain and immobility. In the United States, approximately 6% of the population aged 30 years and older and 12% of the population aged 65 years and older suffer f

  19. Characterization of knee osteoarthritis in Latin America. A comparative analysis of clinical and health care utilization in Argentina, Brazil, and Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos-Vargas, Rubén; Cardiel, Mario H; Loyola-Sánchez, Adalberto; De Abreu, Mirhelen Mendes; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A; Rossignol, Michel; Avouac, Bernard; Ferraz, Marcos Bosi; Halhol, Hafid

    2014-01-01

    The burden of knee osteoarthritis (OA) in Latin America is unknown. To determine the demographic, clinical, and therapeutic characteristics of patients with OA in Argentina, Brazil, and Mexico. This is an observational, cross-sectional study of patients with symptomatic knee OA referred from first care medical centers to Rheumatology departments. We included 1210 patients (Argentina 398, Brazil 402, Mexico 410; mean age 61.8 [12] years; 80.8% females). Knee OA pain lasted for 69 months; the duration and severity of the last episode were 190 days and (SD 5.2 [3.3]; 74% had functional limitations, but very few patients lost their job because of knee OA. Around 71% had taken medications, but 63% relied on their own pocket to afford knee OA cost. Most demographic and clinical variables differed across countries, particularly the level of pain, disability, treatment, and access to care. The variable country of origin influenced the level of pain, disability, and NSAIDs use in logistic regression models; age, pain, treatment, and health care access influenced at least 2 of the models. The burden of knee OA in Latin American depends on demographic, clinical, and therapeutic variables. The role of such variables differs across countries. The level of certain variables is significantly influenced by country of origin and health care system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  20. UK-based physical therapists' attitudes and beliefs regarding exercise and knee osteoarthritis: findings from a mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Melanie A; Nicholls, Elaine E; Young, Julie; Hay, Elaine M; Foster, Nadine E

    2009-11-15

    Within the UK, differences exist between physical therapists' use of exercise for patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) and recent exercise recommendations. This may be explained by their underlying attitudes and beliefs. We aimed to describe UK physical therapists' attitudes and beliefs regarding exercise and knee OA, and understand and explain them. A survey was mailed to 2,000 UK-based chartered physical therapists that included 23 attitude statements derived from recently published recommendations. Semistructured telephone interviews were conducted with a purposeful sample of questionnaire respondents (n = 24), and were recorded and analyzed thematically. The questionnaire response rate was 58% (n = 1,152); 538 respondents reported treating a patient with knee OA in the last 6 months. The survey highlighted uncertainty about potential benefits of exercise for knee OA: only 56% largely/totally agreed that knee problems are improved by local exercise. Although exercise adherence was deemed important, it was seen as the patient's, not the therapist's, responsibility. Interviews revealed an underlying biomedical model of care of knee pain, with knee OA viewed as a progressive degenerative condition. A paternalistic treatment approach was evident. Health care systems presented a number of barriers to best practice, including limited opportunity to provide followup. Although the attitudes and beliefs of physical therapists may help to explain differences between current practice and recent exercise recommendations, the wider health care system also plays a part. Further research is needed to support meaningful shifts in physical therapy care in line with the best practice recommendations.

  1. Endocannabinoids and acute pain after total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azim, Syed; Nicholson, James; Rebecchi, Mario J; Galbavy, William; Feng, Tian; Reinsel, Ruth; Volkow, Nora D; Benveniste, Helene; Kaczocha, Martin

    2015-02-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee is a progressive disease that is associated with inflammation of the joints and lower extremity pain. Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a surgical procedure that aims to reduce pain and restore motor function in patients suffering from OA. The immediate postoperative period can be intensely painful leading to extended recovery times including persistent pain. The endocannabinoid system regulates nociception, and the activation of cannabinoid receptors produces antinociceptive effects in preclinical models of OA. To date, the influence of the endocannabinoid tone on pain and disability in OA patients and on acute postoperative pain in humans has not been explored. In this study, we provide the first comprehensive profile of endocannabinoids in serum, cerebrospinal fluid, and synovial fluid of patients with painful end-stage OA undergoing TKA and examine correlations between endocannabinoid levels, interleukin 6, functional disability, acute postoperative pain, and postoperative opioid use. Our results reveal that central (cerebrospinal fluid) and peripheral (synovial fluid) levels of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoyl glycerol were significantly elevated in patients who developed higher postoperative pain after TKA. In addition, synovial fluid 2-arachidonoyl glycerol levels were positively correlated with postoperative opioid use. Similarly, synovial fluid levels of the anti-inflammatory lipid palmitoylethanolamide correlated with functional disability in OA. Taken together, our results are the first to reveal associations between central and peripheral endocannabinoid levels and postoperative pain. This suggests that endocannabinoid metabolism may serve as a target for the development of novel analgesics both for systemic or local delivery into the joint.

  2. Effect of Kaempferia parviflora extract on knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Hiroko; Suzuki, Ryo; Sato, Kei; Ogami, Takatoshi; Tomozawa, Hiroshi; Tsubata, Masahito; Ichinose, Koji; Aburada, Masaki; Ochiai, Wataru; Sugiyama, Kiyoshi; Shimada, Tsutomu

    2017-08-19

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is becoming more prevalent worldwide due to increases in the numbers of elderly and obese patients. Currently, pharmaceutical medicines used for the treatment of OA are for symptomatic therapy and therefore new therapeutic agents are needed. Kaempferia parviflora (KP) is a plant growing naturally in Southeast Asia and has various pharmacological effects including an anti-inflammatory effect, but no effect on OA has yet been reported. We therefore conducted a search for the effects KP and the active components of KP extract (KPE) exert on OA as well as its mechanism of action. Results from a study of KPE using the monoiodoacetic acid rat OA model revealed that KPE reduced the pain threshold and severity of osteoarthritic cartilage lesions. The mechanism of action and active components were then investigated using IL-1β-treated human knee-derived chondrocytes. KPE, as well as 5,7-dimethoxyflavone and 5,7,4'-trimethoxyflavone, which are key constituents of KPE and highly absorbable into the body, reduced the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), which are the main extracellular matrix enzymes that degrade collagen within cartilage. As mentioned above, KPE acted to suppress OA and 5,7-dimethoxyflavone and 5,7,4'-trimethoxyflavone were shown to be involved as part of KPE's mechanism that inhibits MMPs.

  3. Work and power of the knee flexor and extensor muscles in patients with osteoarthritis and after total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastiani, Denise; Ritzel, Cintia Helena; Bortoluzzi, Silvia Manfrin; Vaz, Marco Aurelio

    2012-01-01

    The inflammatory manifestations of knee osteoarthritis (OA) lead to muscle inhibition and hypotrophy, resulting in a reduction in total muscle work and muscle power. Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is the most adequate surgery for the treatment of advanced OA. However, its effects on muscle functional behavior have not been well understood. To compare the total work and power of the knee flexor and extensor muscles in patients with OA (20) and in patients post-TKA (12) at two angular velocities (60º/sec and 240º/sec). An isokinetic Biodex dynamometer was used to assess muscle power and total work during isokinetic contractions. Two-way ANOVA for repeated measures was used to compare total muscle work and muscle power between the groups (SPSS software, version 13.0; significance level, P 0.05). In addition, no difference was observed in the muscle power of the knee extensors and flexors (P > 0.05). Total work and power were similar in the OA and TKA groups, suggesting that TKA did not improve functional capacity, which was similar in both groups.

  4. Physical Activity and Spatial Differences in Medial Knee T1rho and T2 Relaxation Times in Knee Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    KUMAR, DEEPAK; SOUZA, RICHARD B.; SINGH, JUSTIN; CALIXTO, NATHANIEL E.; NARDO, LORENZO; LINK, THOMAS M.; LI, XIAOJUAN; MAJUMDAR, SHARMILA

    2015-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN Cross-sectional. OBJECTIVES To investigate the association between knee loading–related osteoarthritis (OA) risk factors (obesity, malalignment, and physical activity) and medial knee laminar (superficial and deep) T1rho and T2 relaxation times. BACKGROUND The interaction of various modifiable loading-related knee risk factors and cartilage health in knee OA is currently not well known. METHODS Participants with and without knee OA (n = 151) underwent magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T for superficial and deep cartilage T1rho and T2 magnetic resonance relaxation times in the medial femur (MF) and medial tibia (MT). Other variables included radiographic Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) grade, alignment, pain and symptoms using the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, and physical activity using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ). Individuals with a KL grade of 4 were excluded. Group differences were calculated using 1-way analysis of variance, adjusting for age and body mass index. Linear regression models were created with age, sex, body mass index, alignment, KL grade, and the IPAQ scores to predict the laminar T1rho and T2 times. RESULTS Total IPAQ scores were the only significant predictors among the loading-related variables for superficial MF T1rho (P = .005), deep MT T1rho (P = .026), and superficial MF T2 (P = .049). Additionally, the KL grade predicted the superficial MF T1rho (P = .023) and deep MT T1rho (P = .022). CONCLUSION Higher physical activity levels and worse radiographic severity of knee OA, but not obesity or alignment, were associated with worse cartilage composition. PMID:25353261

  5. Predominance of synovial sensory nerve fibers in arthrofibrosis following total knee arthroplasty compared to osteoarthritis of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeck, Franz Xaver; Schmitt, Miriam; Baier, Clemens; Stangl, Hubert; Beckmann, Johannes; Grifka, Joachim; Straub, Rainer H

    2016-02-17

    So far, there exists no golden standard for the treatment of arthrofibrosis (AF) following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Although pain is a hallmark of AF, nociceptive nerve fibers have never been investigated in affected joint tissue. A total of 24 patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee (n = 12) and post-TKA AF of the knee (n = 12) were included. Along evaluation of typical clinical signs and symptoms by using the Knee Society Clinical Rating System (KSS), the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC index), the innervation of joint tissue was studied by semiquantitative immunofluorescence of nerve fibers. Patients with AF compared to OA had a lower KSS and lower KOOS. In all compartments (anterior, medial, and lateral recesses), the density of synovial sympathetic nerve fibers was significantly higher in OA compared to AF, which was also true for the density of sensory nerve fibers in the medial and lateral recesses. In synovial tissue of the anterior recess of patients with AF compared to OA, the density of nociceptive sensory nerve fibers was significantly higher relative to sympathetic nerve fibers. This was similarly observed in the neighboring infrapatellar fat pad of the knee. Similar as in many painful musculoskeletal diseases, this study indicates that patients with arthrofibrosis of the knee after TKA demonstrate a preponderance of profibrotic sensory nerve fibers over antifibrotic sympathetic nerve fibers. This could serve as a starting point for AF therapy with specific antifibrotic pain medication or regional anesthetic techniques.

  6. Lower body positive pressure: an emerging technology in the battle against knee osteoarthritis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takacs J

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Judit Takacs,1 Judy E Anderson,1,3 Jeff RS Leiter,1,2,4 Peter B MacDonald,2,4 Jason D Peeler1,4 1Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Science, 2Department of Surgery, 3Department of Biological Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada; 4Pan Am Clinic, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada Background: Knee osteoarthritis (OA is the most prevalent medical condition in individuals over the age of 65 years, and is a progressive joint degenerative condition with no known cure. Research suggests that there is a strong relationship between knee pain and loss of physical function. The resulting lifestyle modifications negatively impact not only disease onset and progression but also overall health, work productivity, and quality of life of the affected individual. Purpose: The goal of this investigation was to examine the feasibility of using an emerging technology called lower body positive pressure (LBPP to simulate weight loss and reduce acute knee pain during treadmill walking exercise in overweight individuals with radiographically confirmed symptomatic knee OA. Design: Prospective case series. Methods: Twenty-two overweight individuals with knee OA completed two 20-minute treadmill walking sessions (one full weight bearing and one LBPP supported at a speed of 3.1 mph, 0% incline. Acute knee pain was assessed using a visual analog scale, and the percentage of LBPP support required to minimize knee pain was evaluated every 5 minutes. Knee Osteoarthritis Outcome Scores were used to quantify knee pain and functional status between walking sessions. The order of testing was randomized, with sessions occurring a minimum of 1 week apart. Results: A mean LBPP of 12.4% of body weight provided participants with significant pain relief during walking, and prevented exacerbation of acute knee pain over the duration of the 20-minute exercise session. Patients felt safe and confident walking with LBPP support on the treadmill, and demonstrated no change

  7. Knee osteoarthritis: influence of work involving heavy lifting, kneeling, climbing stairs or ladders, or kneeling/squatting combined with heavy lifting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, L K

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the evidence for an association between knee osteoarthritis (kneeOA) and physical work demands. Systematic searches were made, and epidemiological studies on kneeOA and heavy lifting, kneeling and climbing stairs published in 1966 to 2007 inclusive were reviewed. The quality of the studies was assessed and an overall evaluation of the degree of evidence of a causal relationship between kneeOA and physically demanding work was made, using specific criteria of the different degrees of evidence of causality. Limitations of the studies include few participants, use of different diagnostic criteria and a poor description of the exposure. It is concluded that moderate evidence was found for a relationship between kneeling, heavy lifting and kneeOA. For the combination of kneeling/squatting and heavy lifting the association seemed stronger than for kneeling/squatting or heavy lifting alone, but only a few studies were found concerning this relationship. Therefore the degree of evidence for a causal relationship was considered to be moderate. In the studies on the association between kneeOA and climbing stairs or ladders, there was an increased risk for kneeOA, but only a few studies were found and no dose-response relationship has been investigated. The evidence of a causal relationship is therefore considered to be limited.

  8. The effects of hip muscle strengthening on knee load, pain, and function in people with knee osteoarthritis: a protocol for a randomised, single-blind controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hunter David J

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lower limb strengthening exercises are an important component of the treatment for knee osteoarthritis (OA. Strengthening the hip abductor and adductor muscles may influence joint loading and/or OA-related symptoms, but no study has evaluated these hypotheses directly. The aim of this randomised, single-blind controlled trial is to determine whether hip abductor and adductor muscle strengthening can reduce knee load and improve pain and physical function in people with medial compartment knee OA. Methods/Design 88 participants with painful, radiographically confirmed medial compartment knee OA and varus alignment will be recruited from the community and randomly allocated to a hip strengthening or control group using concealed allocation stratified by disease severity. The hip strengthening group will perform 6 exercises to strengthen the hip abductor and adductor muscles at home 5 times per week for 12 weeks. They will consult with a physiotherapist on 7 occasions to be taught the exercises and progress exercise resistance. The control group will be requested to continue with their usual care. Blinded follow up assessment will be conducted at 12 weeks after randomisation. The primary outcome measure is the change in the peak external knee adduction moment measured during walking. Questionnaires will assess changes in pain and physical function as well as overall perceived rating of change. An intention-to-treat analysis will be performed using linear regression modelling and adjusting for baseline outcome values and other demographic characteristics. Discussion Results from this trial will contribute to the evidence regarding the effect of hip strengthening on knee loads and symptoms in people with medial compartment knee OA. If shown to reduce the knee adduction moment, hip strengthening has the potential to slow disease progression. Trial Registration Australia New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTR12607000001493

  9. Knee Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... need knee replacement surgery usually have problems walking, climbing stairs, and getting in and out of chairs. Some ... a total living space on one floor since climbing stairs can be difficult. Install safety bars or a ...

  10. Knee Arthroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... experience any of the following: • Fever • Chills • Persistent warmth or redness around the knee • Persistent or increased ... you should be able to return to most physical activities a er 6 to 8 weeks, or ...

  11. Runner's Knee

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Over the summer he bought a pair of running shoes and took up jogging. He started with ... bending the knee — when walking, kneeling, squatting, or running, for example. Walking or running downhill or even ...

  12. Is a long leg a risk for hip or knee osteoarthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallroth, Kaj; Ristolainen, Leena; Manninen, Mikko

    2017-10-01

    Background and purpose - 7% of the asymptomatic population has leg-length inequality (LLI) greater than 12 mm. It has been proposed that LLI of >5 mm can be associated with an increased risk of osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee and hip. We studied a possible association between LLI and OA of the knee and hip joint. Patients and methods - We followed 193 individuals (97 women, 96 men) for 29 years. The initial mean age of the participants was 43 (34-54) years, and they had no clinical histories or signs of leg symptoms. The initial standing radiographs of their hips were re-examined and measured for LLI and signs of OA. None had any signs of OA. At the follow-up, data on performed hip or knee arthroplasties were obtained. Results - 24 (12%) of the subjects had no discernible leg-length difference, 62 (32%), had LLIs of 1-4 mm, 74 (38%) of 5-8 mm, 21 (11%) of 9-12 mm, and 12 (6%) of over 12 mm. 16 (8%) of the subjects had undergone arthroplasty for primary OA during follow-up, and of those, 8 for both hip and knee OA. 10 individuals had undergone an arthroplasty of the longer leg and only 3 of the shorter leg. In the group of equal leg length, 3 had had an arthroplasty of hip or knee. Interpretation - We noted that hip or knee arthroplasty due to primary OA had been done 3 times more often to the longer leg than to the shorter.

  13. Proteomic analysis of synovial fluid as an analytical tool to detect candidate biomarkers for knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Weixiong; Li, Zhongli; Zhang, Hao; Li, Ji; Wang, Ketao; Yang, Yimeng

    2015-01-01

    We conducted research to detect the proteomic profiles in synovial fluid (SF) from knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients to better understand the pathogenesis and aetiology of OA. Our long-term goal is to identify reliable candidate biomarkers for OA in SF. The SF proteins obtained from 10 knee OA patients and 10 non-OA patients (9 of whom were patients with a meniscus injury in the knee; 1 had a discoid meniscus in the knee, and all exhibited intact articular cartilage) were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE). The repeatability of the obtained protein spots regarding their intensity was tested via triplicate 2-DE of selected samples. The observed protein expression patterns were subjected to statistical analysis, and differentially expressed protein spots were identified via matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation-time of flight/time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS). Our analyses showed low intrasample variability and clear intersample variation. Among the protein spots observed on the gels, there were 29 significant differences, of which 22 corresponded to upregulation and 7 to downregulation in the OA group. One of the upregulated protein spots was confirmed to be haptoglobin by mass spectrometry, and the levels of haptoglobin in SF are positively correlated with the severity of OA (r = 0.89, P < 0.001). This study showed that 2-DE could be used under standard conditions to screen SF samples and identify a small subset of proteins in SF that are potential markers associated with OA. Spots of interest identified by mass spectrometry, such as haptoglobin, may be associated with OA severity.

  14. Manual physical therapy and perturbation exercises in knee osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhon, Daniel; Deyle, Gail; Gill, Norman; Rendeiro, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Knee osteoarthritis (OA) causes disability among the elderly and is often associated with impaired balance and proprioception. Perturbation exercises may help improve these impairments. Although manual physical therapy is generally a well-tolerated treatment for knee OA, perturbation exercises have not been evaluated when used with a manual physical therapy approach. The purpose of this study was to observe tolerance to perturbation exercises and the effect of a manual physical therapy approach with perturbation exercises on patients with knee OA. Methods: This was a prospective observational cohort study of 15 patients with knee OA. The Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC), global rating of change (GROC), and 72-hour post-treatment tolerance were primary outcome measures. Patients received perturbation balance exercises along with a manual physical therapy approach, twice weekly for 4 weeks. Follow-up evaluation was done at 1, 3, and 6 months after beginning the program. Results: Mean total WOMAC score significantly improved (P = 0.001) after the 4-week program (total WOMAC: initial, 105; 4 weeks, 56; 3 months, 54; 6 months, 57). Mean improvements were similar to previously published trials of manual physical therapy without perturbation exercises. The GROC score showed a minimal clinically important difference (MCID)≥+3 in 13 patients (87%) at 4 weeks, 12 patients (80%) at 3 months, and 9 patients (60%) at 6 months. No patients reported exacerbation of symptoms within 72 hours following each treatment session. Discussion: A manual physical therapy approach that also included perturbation exercises was well tolerated and resulted in improved outcome scores in patients with knee OA. PMID:24421635

  15. Knee Injuries and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your knee joint is made up of bone, cartilage, ligaments and fluid. Muscles and tendons help the knee joint move. When any of these structures is hurt or diseased, you have knee problems. Knee problems can cause pain and difficulty ...

  16. Associations between joint effusion in the knee and gene expression levels in the circulation: A meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y.F.M. Ramos (Yolande); M.J. Peters (Marjolein); W. den Hollander (Wouter); D. Schiphof (Dieuwke); A. Hofman (Albert); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); E.H.G. Oei (Edwin); P.E. Slagboom (Eline); M. Kloppenburg (Margreet); J.L. Bloem (Johan); S.M. Bierma-Zeinstra (Sita); I. Meulenbelt (Ingrid); J.B.J. van Meurs (Joyce)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To identify molecular biomarkers for early knee osteoarthritis (OA), we examined whether joint effusion in the knee associated with different gene expression levels in the circulation. Materials and Methods: Joint effusion grades measured with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging a

  17. The Effects of Bariatric Surgery Weight Loss on Knee Pain in Patients with Osteoarthritis of the Knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Edwards

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies have shown that osteoarthritis (OA is highly associated with obesity, and individuals clinically defined as obese (BMI > 30.0 kg/m2 are four times more likely to have knee OA over the general population. The purpose of this research was to examine if isolated weight loss improved knee symptoms in patients with osteoarthritis. Adult patients (n=24; age 18–70; BMI > 35 kg/m2 with clinical and radiographic evidence of knee OA participated in a one-year trial in which WOMAC and KOOS surveys were administered at a presurgery baseline and six and twelve months postsurgery. Statistical analysis was performed using Student's t and Wilcoxon Signed Rank tests. Weight loss six and twelve months following bariatric surgery was statistically significant (P<0.05 compared to presurgery measurements. All variables from both KOOS and WOMAC assessments were significantly improved (P<0.05 when compared to baseline. Isolated weight loss occurring via bariatric surgery resulted in statistically significant improvement in patient’s knee arthritis symptoms at both six and twelve months. Further research will need to be done to determine if symptom relief continues over time, and if the benefits are also applicable to individuals with symptomatic knee arthritis that are overweight but not obese.

  18. Exercise and dietary weight loss in overweight and obese older adults with knee osteoarthritis: the Arthritis, Diet, and Activity Promotion Trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Messier, Stephen P; Loeser, Richard F; Miller, Gary D; Morgan, Timothy M; Rejeski, W Jack; Sevick, Mary Ann; Ettinger, Jr, Walter H; Pahor, Marco; Williamson, Jeff D

    2004-01-01

    ... long-term exercise and dietary weight loss are more effective, either separately or in combination, than usual care in improving physical function, pain, and mobility in older overweight and obese adults with knee osteoarthritis (OA...

  19. Shea Nut Oil Triterpene Concentrate Attenuates Knee Osteoarthritis Development in Rats: Evidence from Knee Joint Histology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Sheng-Hsiung; Lai, Chun-Fu; Lin, Yu-Chieh; Kong, Zwe-Ling; Wong, Chih-Shung

    2016-01-01

    Background Shea nut oil triterpene concentrate is considered to have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Traditionally, it has been used to treat arthritic conditions in humans. This study aimed to investigate the effect of attenuating osteoarthritis (OA)-induced pain and joint destruction in rats by administering shea nut oil triterpene concentrate (SheaFlex75, which is more than 50% triterpenes). Methods An anterior cruciate ligament transaction (ACLT) with medial meniscectomy (MMx) was used to induce OA in male Wistar rats. Different doses of SheaFlex75 (111.6 mg/kg, 223.2 mg/kg, and 446.4 mg/kg) were then intragastrically administered daily for 12 weeks after surgery. Body weight and the width of the knee joint were measured weekly. Additionally, incapacitance tests were performed at weeks 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 to measure the weight bearing of the hind limbs, and the morphology and histopathology of the medial femoral condyles were examined and were evaluated using the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) scoring system. Results This study showed that SheaFlex75 reduced the swelling of the knee joint with OA and rectified its weight bearing after ACLT plus MMx surgery in rats. Treatment with SheaFlex75 also decreased ACLT plus MMx surgery-induced knee joint matrix loss and cartilage degeneration. Conclusion SheaFlex75 relieves the symptoms of OA and protects cartilage from degeneration. SheaFlex75 thus has the potential to be an ideal nutraceutical supplement for joint protection, particularly for injured knee joints. PMID:27583436

  20. The Effect of Hip Bracing on Gait in Patients with Medial Knee Osteoarthritis

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    David Wallace

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Impaired hip motion has been associated with heightened medial knee joint loading in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA. A hip external rotation strap designed to pull the femur into external rotation and abduction may serve as one protective mechanism. The primary aim of our study is to determine if the strap decreases medial knee joint loading during level walking in people with knee OA. Design. This study is a single-day repeated measures design. Methods. 15 volunteers with medial knee OA underwent motion analysis data collection during two randomly assigned walking conditions: (1 wearing the strap and (2 control (no strap. Primary outcome measures were peak pelvis, hip and knee joint motions, and torques. These outcomes were averaged across five trials for each condition. Results. Hip abduction (<0.01, trunk lean towards the stance limb (=0.04 and pelvic tilt (=0.02 significantly increased with the strap versus control trials. Knee adduction loading did not significantly change with the strap (=0.33. Conclusion. The use of the hip external rotation strap resulted in angular changes at the hip and pelvis which may be beneficial for patients with medial knee osteoarthritis.

  1. Radiographic Measurement of Joint Space Width Using the Fixed Flexion View in 1,102 Knees of Japanese Patients with Osteoarthritis in Comparison with the Standing Extended View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Hiroyuki; Arai, Yuji; Kobayashi, Masashi; Nakagawa, Shuji; Inoue, Hiroaki; Hino, Manabu; Komaki, Shintaro; Ikoma, Kazuya; Ueshima, Keiichiro; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The fixed flexion view (FFV) of the knee is considered useful for evaluating the joint space when assessing the severity of osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. To clarify the usefulness of FFV for evaluation of the joint space and severity of knee OA, this study evaluated changes in the joint space on the FFV and standing extended view (SEV) in patients with knee OA. Materials and Methods The SEV and FFV images were acquired in 567 patients (1,102 knees) who visited the hospital with a chief complaint of knee joint pain. Medial joint space width (MJSW) and Kellgren-Lawrence (K-L) classification assessed using the SEV and FFV images were compared. Results Mean MJSW was significantly smaller when assessed on the FFV than on the SEV (3.02±1.55 mm vs. 4.31±1.30 mm; p<0.001). The K-L grade was the same or higher on the FFV than on the SEV. Conclusions The FFV is more useful than the SEV for evaluating the joint space in OA knees. Treatment strategies in patients with knee OA should be determined based on routinely acquired FFV images. PMID:28231651

  2. Pathophysiology of obesity on knee joint homeostasis: contributions of the infrapatellar fat pad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santangelo, Kelly S; Radakovich, Lauren B; Fouts, Josie; Foster, Michelle T

    2016-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a debilitating condition characterized by inflammation, breakdown, and consequent loss of cartilage of the joints. Epidemiological studies indicate obesity is an important risk factor involved in OA initiation and progression. Traditional views propose OA to be a biomechanical consequence of excess weight on weight-bearing joints; however, emerging data demonstrates that systemic and local factors released from white adipose depots play a role. Hence, current views characterize OA as a condition exacerbated by a metabolic link related to adipose tissue, and not solely related to redistributed/altered weight load. Factors demonstrated to influence cartilage and bone homeostasis include adipocyte-derived hormones ("adipokines") and adipose depot released cytokines. Epidemiological studies demonstrate a positive relation between systemic circulating cytokines, leptin, and resistin with OA types, while the association with adiponectin is controversial. Local factors in joints have also been shown to play a role in OA. In particular, this includes the knee, a weight-bearing joint that encloses a relatively large adipose depot, the infrapatellar fat pad (IFP), which serves as a source of local inflammatory factors. This review summarizes the relation of obesity and OA as it specifically relates to the IFP and other integral supporting structures. Overall, studies support the concept that metabolic effects associated with systemic obesity also extend to the IFP, which promotes inflammation, pain, and cartilage destruction within the local knee joint environment, thus contributing to development and progression of OA.

  3. “…Keep mobile, I think that’s half the battle.” A qualitative study of prevention of knee pain in symptomless older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Fizzah

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The emphasis on prevention in English health policy continues to centre predominantly on major diseases such as coronary heart disease and diabetes. A number of key documents detailing self-management techniques and prevention of osteoarthritis (OA are currently available, including the NICE guidelines and the Arthritis Foundation’s National Public Health Agenda for Osteoarthritis. However, few investigations have explored preventative knowledge of knee OA amongst the population. In particular, asymptomatic members of the population may use further information in considering how to prevent knee pain. This study considers perceptions around the prevention of knee pain amongst an asymptomatic population; this target population may provide alternative insights by which to stimulate preventative behaviours. Methods A sample of thirteen patients with no current knee pain was selected from responders to a population survey. Each interview was tape recorded and fully transcribed. Qualitative computer software package NVivo8 was used to manage the data. Thematic analysis was conducted using the constant comparative method. Results The definition and causes of knee pain were interpreted in a multitude of ways. The importance of prevention was recognised by a sub-set, while a small proportion of participants negated the role of prevention. A range of social factors, including early adoption of actions, influenced the implementation and continuation of preventative behaviours. Individual responsibility for prevention was a key theme, although the role of society was also considered. Exercise was cited as a principal preventative strategy, although some participants viewed exercise as a destructive activity. A number of participants deemed pharmacotherapy to be harmful and at odds with normal physiology, instead preferring to adopt preventative behaviour over medication usage. Conclusions This asymptomatic population exhibit

  4. Influence of Periostin on Synoviocytes in Knee Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    TAJIKA, YUTARO; MOUE, TATSUYA; ISHIKAWA, SHINTARO; ASANO, KAZUHITO; OKUMO, TAKAYUKI; TAKAGI, HIROSHI; HISAMITSU, TADASHI

    2017-01-01

    Background: Periostin (POSTN) is a protein that binds to integrins to support adhesion and migration of epithelial cells. Mice lacking this gene exhibit cardiac valve disease as well as skeletal and dental defects. Recent studies indicated that periostin is involved in the pathogenesis and progression of knee osteoarthritis (OA). We investigated the influence of periostin and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) on OA synoviocytes. Materials and Methods: OA patients were classified according to the Kellgren-Lawrence system and the levels of periostin, interleukin (IL)-4, IL-13 and transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) in the synovial fluid were measured. MMPs or tissue inhibitor of MMPs (TIMPs) with periostin in cultured cells were measured when periostin was added to OA-associated synovial cells. Dexamethasone, a steroid medication which shows immunosuppressive effects, was used to investigate the influence of the downstream cascade. Results: Periostin and IL-13 levels were up-regulated during the progression of OA. MMP-2 and MMP-3 levels increased in a periostin concentration-dependent manner. Increase in MMP-2 and MMP-3 levels was inhibited by dexamethasone treatment. Conclusion: In vivo results herein indicate that IL-13 may induce periostin production in OA. Furthermore, periostin may facilitate MMP production in OA-associated synovial cells. PMID:28064223

  5. New variables for measuring joint space width to evaluate knee osteoarthritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AN Bing-chen; FANG Kai; WANG You; ZENG Yi-ming; DAI Ke-rong

    2011-01-01

    Background Assessing the radiographic features of knee osteoarthritis (OA),especially joint space narrowing,is important for evaluating disease progression.The purpose of this study was to quantitatively analyze joint space narrowing by measuring 2 new variables:the average joint space width (aJSW) and the articulate angle (AA) on X-ray films,and to evaluate the relationship between the 2 variables,knee function and OA symptoms.Methods Using the web-based radiology viewer (Cedara I-ReachTM 4.1.1),we measured the 2 variables in 50 knees of 41 patients with knee OA participating in the Shanghai OA Study.We also evaluated the Kellgren-Lawrence (K-L) grade,the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities OA Index (WOMAC),and additional questionnaire in OA knees.The study was approved by the ethics committee of Shanghai Ninth People's Hospital (No.2009-28).Results The aJSW correlated with the K-L grade (r=-0.57,P <0.001),kneeling (r=0.29,P=0.04),sitting cross-legged on the floor (r=-0.31,P=0.03),WOMAC pain (r=-0.31,P=0.03),WOMAC disability (r=-0.35,P=0.01),pain while squatting (r=-0.37,P=0.01),and defecating in a squatting position (r=-0.39,P=0.01).The AA correlated with defecating in a squatting position (r=0.29,P=0.05),WOMAC disability (r=0.30,P=0.04) and K-L grade (r=0.44,P=0.003).The K-L grade also correlated with pain while squatting (r=-0.40,P=0.005) and defecating in a squatting position (r=-0.34,P=0.02),WOMAC pain (r=0.30,P=0.04),and WOMAC disability (r=0.30,P=0.04).Conclusions The aJSW closely correlated with knee OA symptoms and function scores,and was more sensitive to knee OA related disabilities than K-L grade and the AA.The aJSW could be used as a new variable for knee OA evaluation.

  6. Frequency of varus and valgus thrust and factors associated with thrust presence in persons with or at higher risk of developing knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Alison; Hochberg, Marc; Song, Jing; Dunlop, Dorothy; Chmiel, Joan S; Nevitt, Michael; Hayes, Karen; Eaton, Charles; Bathon, Joan; Jackson, Rebecca; Kwoh, C Kent; Sharma, Leena

    2010-05-01

    Varus thrust observed during gait has been shown to be associated with a 4-fold increase in the risk of medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) progression. Valgus thrust is believed to be less common than varus thrust; the prevalence of each is uncertain. Racial differences in risk factors may help explain variations in the natural history of knee OA. We undertook this study to determine the frequency of varus and valgus thrust in African Americans and Caucasians and to identify factors associated with thrust presence. The Osteoarthritis Initiative cohort includes men and women who have knee OA or are at increased risk of developing it. Trained examiners assessed thrust presence by gait observation. Logistic regression with generalized estimating equations was used to identify factors associated with thrust presence, and odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated. Compared with Caucasians, African Americans had lower odds of varus thrust, controlling for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), injury, surgery, disease severity, strength, pain, and alignment in persons without knee OA (adjusted OR 0.50 [95% CI 0.36, 0.72]) and in those with knee OA (adjusted OR 0.46 [95% CI 0.34, 0.61]). Also independently associated with varus thrust were age, sex, BMI, disease severity, strength, and alignment. The odds of valgus thrust were greater for African Americans than for Caucasians in persons without knee OA (adjusted OR 1.69 [95% CI 1.02, 2.80]) and in those with knee OA (adjusted OR 1.98 [95% CI 1.35, 2.91]). Also independently associated with valgus thrust were disease severity and malalignment. Compared with Caucasians, African Americans had lower odds of varus thrust and greater odds of valgus thrust. These findings may help explain the difference between these groups in the pattern of OA involvement at the knee.

  7. Lower limb kinematics during the swing phase in patients with knee osteoarthritis measured using an inertial sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimoto, Kenji; Takahashi, Makoto; Tokuda, Kazuki; Sawada, Tomonori; Anan, Masaya; Shinkoda, Koichi

    2017-09-01

    During gait, the swing limb requires flexible control to adapt to ever changing environmental circumstances. However, few studies have focused on the mechanics of swing limb control in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Investigating the variability of swing limb kinematics, which can be represented by variables such as the peak shank angular velocity during the swing phase obtained from an inertial sensor, provides insights into the adaptability of swing limb control. The purpose of this study was to investigate how patients with knee OA control the swing limb and whether the degree of impairment and disability due to knee OA affects swing limb control. Twelve subjects diagnosed with knee OA and 11 healthy control subjects participated in this study. Subjects walked on a treadmill for 10min. The mean, coefficient of variation, and fractal scaling exponent α of the peak shank angular velocity during the swing phase were calculated. There were no significant differences between the groups for any of the kinematic parameters. The Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) activities of daily living (ADL) subsection correlated with the coefficient of variation (r=-0.677, p=0.016) and the scaling exponent α (r=0.604, p=0.037) of the peak shank angular velocity. Control of the swing limb was associated with the degree of impairment and disability. Larger and more random variability of peak shank angular velocity may indicate decreased ADL ability in patients with knee OA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Pain sensation in human osteoarthritic knee joints is strongly enhanced by diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eitner, Annett; Pester, Julia; Vogel, Franziska; Marintschev, Ivan; Lehmann, Thomas; Hofmann, Gunther O; Schaible, Hans-Georg

    2017-09-01

    The major burden of knee joint osteoarthritis (OA) is pain. Since in elder patients diabetes mellitus is an important comorbidity of OA, we explored whether the presence of diabetes mellitus has a significant influence on pain intensity at the end stage of knee OA, and we aimed to identify factors possibly related to changes of pain intensity in diabetic patients. In 23 diabetic and 47 nondiabetic patients with OA undergoing total knee arthroplasty, we assessed the pain intensity before the operation using the "Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score". Furthermore, synovial tissue, synovial fluid (SF), cartilage, and blood were obtained. We determined the synovitis score, the concentrations of prostaglandin E2 and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in the SF and serum, and of C-reactive protein and HbA1c and other metabolic parameters in the serum. We performed multivariate regression analyses to study the association of pain with several parameters. Diabetic patients had on average a higher Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score pain score than nondiabetic patients (P < 0.001). Knee joints from diabetic patients exhibited on average higher synovitis scores (P = 0.024) and higher concentrations of IL-6 in the SF (P = 0.003) than knee joints from nondiabetic patients. Multivariate regression analysis showed that patients with higher synovitis scores had more intense pain independent of all investigated confounders, and that the positive association between pain intensities and IL-6 levels was dependent on diabetes mellitus and/or synovitis. These data suggest that diabetes mellitus significantly increases pain intensity of knee OA, and that in diabetic patients higher pain intensities were determined by stronger synovitis.

  9. A genetic association study between growth differentiation factor 5 (GDF 5 polymorphism and knee osteoarthritis in Thai population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sura Thanyachai

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Osteoarthritis (OA is a multi-factorial disease and genetic factor is one of the important etiologic risk factors. Various genetic polymorphisms have been elucidated that they might be associated with OA. Recently, several studies have shown an association between Growth Differentiation Factor 5(GDF5 polymorphism and knee OA. However, the role of genetic predisposing factor in each ethnic group cannot be replicated to all, with conflicting data in the literatures. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the association between GDF5 polymorphism and knee OA in Thai population. Materials and Methods One hundred and ninety three patients aged 54-88 years who attended Ramathibodi Hospital were enrolled. Ninety cases with knee OA according to American College of Rheumatology criteria and one hundred and three cases in control group gave informed consent. Blood sample (5 ml were collected for identification of GDF5 (rs143383 single nucleotide polymorphism by PCR/RFLP according to a standard protocol. This study protocol was approved by the Ethics Committee on human experimentation of Ramathibodi Hospital Faculty of Medicine, Mahidol University. Odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals were calculated for the risk of knee OA by genotype (TT, TC and CC and allele (T/C analyses. Results The baseline characteristics between two groups including job, smoking and activity were not different, except age and BMI. The entire cases and controls were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (p > 0.05. The OA knee group (n = 90 had genotypic figure which has shown by TT 42.2% (n = 38, TC 45.6% (n = 41 and CC 12% (n = 11, whereas the control group (n = 103 revealed TT 32% (n = 33, TC 45.6% (n = 47, and CC 22.3% (n = 23, respectively. Genotypic TT increased risk of knee OA as compared to CC [OR = 2.41 (P = 0.04, 95%CI = 1.02-5.67]. In the allele analysis, the T allele was found to be significantly associated with knee OA [OR = 1.53 (P = 0

  10. Design and Evaluation of a New Type of Knee Orthosis to Align the Mediolateral Angle of the Knee Joint with Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Esrafilian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Osteoarthritis (OA is a disease which influences the performance of the knee joint. Moreover, the force and moments applied on the joint increase in contrast to normal subjects. Various types of knee orthoses have been designed to solve the mentioned problems. However, there are other problems in terms of distal migration during walking and the alignment of the orthosis which cannot be changed following the use of brace. Therefore, the main aim of the research was to design an orthosis to solve the aforementioned problems. Method. A new type of knee orthosis was designed with a modular structure. Two patients with knee OA participated in this research project. The force applied on the foot, moment transmitted through the knee joint, and spatiotemporal gait parameters were measured by use of a motion analysis system. Results. The results of the research showed that the adduction moment applied on the knee joint decreased while subjects walked with the new knee orthosis (P-value < 0.05. Conclusion. The new design of the knee brace can be used as an effective treatment to decrease the loads applied on the knee joint and to improve the alignment whilst walking.

  11. Design and evaluation of a new type of knee orthosis to align the mediolateral angle of the knee joint with osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esrafilian, Amir; Karimi, Mohammad Taghi; Eshraghi, Arezoo

    2012-01-01

    Background. Osteoarthritis (OA) is a disease which influences the performance of the knee joint. Moreover, the force and moments applied on the joint increase in contrast to normal subjects. Various types of knee orthoses have been designed to solve the mentioned problems. However, there are other problems in terms of distal migration during walking and the alignment of the orthosis which cannot be changed following the use of brace. Therefore, the main aim of the research was to design an orthosis to solve the aforementioned problems. Method. A new type of knee orthosis was designed with a modular structure. Two patients with knee OA participated in this research project. The force applied on the foot, moment transmitted through the knee joint, and spatiotemporal gait parameters were measured by use of a motion analysis system. Results. The results of the research showed that the adduction moment applied on the knee joint decreased while subjects walked with the new knee orthosis (P-value knee brace can be used as an effective treatment to decrease the loads applied on the knee joint and to improve the alignment whilst walking.

  12. Associations Between Knee Effusion-synovitis and Joint Structural Changes in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xia; Jin, Xingzhong; Blizzard, Leigh; Antony, Benny; Han, Weiyu; Zhu, Zhaohua; Cicuttini, Flavia; Wluka, Anita E; Winzenberg, Tania; Jones, Graeme; Ding, Changhai

    2017-09-01

    To describe the associations between effusion-synovitis and joint structural abnormalities in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) over 24 months. A posthoc analysis using data from a randomized controlled trial in 413 patients with symptomatic OA (aged 63 ± 7 yrs, 208 women). Knee effusion-synovitis volume and score, cartilage defects, cartilage volume, and bone marrow lesions (BML) were assessed using magnetic resonance imaging. Joint space narrowing (JSN) and osteophytes were assessed using radiograph. Least significant change criterion was used to define change in effusion-synovitis volume. Knee symptoms were assessed by Western Ontario and McMaster University OA Index. Multivariable linear/logistic regression and multilevel generalized mixed-effects models were used in longitudinal analyses. Total effusion-synovitis volume increased modestly from baseline (8.0 ± 8.5 ml) to followup (9.0 ± 10.5 ml). Baseline BML, cartilage defect, JSN, and osteophyte scores were positively associated with change in effusion-synovitis volume (p < 0.05). Baseline cartilage defects and JSN were also associated with change in effusion-synovitis score (p < 0.05). However, neither baseline effusion-synovitis score nor volume consistently predicted change in the above structures except cartilage volume. In the mixed-effects models, knee effusion-synovitis was positively associated with BML (volume: β = 1.19 ml/grade; score: OR = 1.75/grade) and cartilage defects (volume: β = 1.87 ml/grade; score: OR = 2.22/grade), while negatively associated with cartilage volume loss. Change in effusion-synovitis volume was positively correlated with changes in knee pain and stiffness scores (p < 0.05). Knee cartilage and subchondral bone abnormalities predicted change in effusion-synovitis, but effusion-synovitis did not predict knee structural changes. These findings suggest that synovial inflammation is likely the result of joint structural abnormalities in established OA. Clinical

  13. Different thresholds for detecting osteophytes and joint space narrowing exist between the site investigators and the centralized reader in a multicenter knee osteoarthritis study - data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guermazi, Ali; Hayashi, Daichi [Boston University School of Medicine, Quantitative Imaging Center, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Hunter, David J. [New England Baptist Hospital, Division of Research, Boston, MA (United States); University of Sydney, Northern Clinical School, Sydney (Australia); Li, Ling [New England Baptist Hospital, Division of Research, Boston, MA (United States); Benichou, Olivier [Eli Lilly and Co, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Eckstein, Felix [Paracelsus Medical University, Salzburg (Austria); Chondrometrics GmbH, Ainring (Germany); Kwoh, C.K. [University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Nevitt, Michael [University of California, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2012-02-15

    To evaluate how the reading of knee radiographs by site investigators differs from that by an expert musculoskeletal radiologist who trained and validated them in a multicenter knee osteoarthritis (OA) study. A subset of participants from the Osteoarthritis Initiative progression cohort was studied. Osteophytes and joint space narrowing (JSN) were evaluated using Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) and Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) grading. Radiographs were read by site investigators, who received training and validation of their competence by an expert musculoskeletal radiologist. Radiographs were re-read by this radiologist, who acted as a central reader. For KL and OARSI grading of osteophytes, discrepancies between two readings were adjudicated by another expert reader. Radiographs from 96 subjects (49 women) and 192 knees (138 KL grade {>=} 2) were included. The site reading showed moderate agreement for KL grading overall (kappa=0.52) and for KL {>=} 2 (i.e., radiographic diagnosis of ''definite OA''; kappa=0.41). For OARSI grading, the site reading showed substantial agreement for lateral and medial JSN (kappa=0.65 and 0.71), but only fair agreement for osteophytes (kappa=0.37). For KL grading, the adjudicator's reading showed substantial agreement with the centralized reading (kappa=0.62), but only slight agreement with the site reading (kappa = 0.10). Site investigators over-graded osteophytes compared to the central reader and the adjudicator. Different thresholds for scoring of JSN exist even between experts. Our results suggest that research studies using radiographic grading of OA should use a centralized reader for all grading. (orig.)

  14. Symptomatic knee disorders in floor layers and graphic designers. A cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Previous studies have described an increased risk of developing tibio-femoral osteoarthritis (TF OA), meniscal tears and bursitis among those with a trade as floor layers. The purpose of this study was to analyse symptomatic knee disorders among floor layers that were highly exposed to kneeling work tasks compared to graphic designers without knee-demanding work tasks. Methods Data on the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) were collected by questionnaires. In total 134 floor layers and 120 graphic designers had a bilateral radiographic knee examination to detect TF OA and patella-femoral (PF) OA. A random sample of 92 floor layers and 49 graphic designers had Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of both knees to examine meniscal tears. Means of the subscales of KOOS were compared by analysis of variance. The risk ratio of symptomatic knee disorders defined as a combination of radiological detected knee OA or MRI-detected meniscal tears combined with a low KOOS score was estimated by logistic regression in floor layers with 95% confidence interval (CI) and adjusted for age, body mass index, traumas, and knee-straining sports activities. Symptomatic knee OA or meniscal tears were defined as a combination of low KOOS-scores and radiographic or MRI pathology. Results Symptomatic TF and medial meniscal tears were found in floor layers compared to graphic designers with odds ratios 2.6 (95%CI 0.99-6.9) and 2.04 (95% CI 0.77-5.5), respectively. There were no differences in PF OA. Floor layers scored significantly lower on all KOOS subscales compared to graphic designers. Significantly lower scores on the KOOS subscales were also found for radiographic TF and PF OA regardless of trade but not for meniscal tears. Conclusions The study showed an overall increased risk of developing symptomatic TF OA in a group of floor layers with a substantial amount of kneeling work positions. Prevention would be appropriate to reduce the proportion of kneeling

  15. Symptomatic knee disorders in floor layers and graphic designers. A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen Lilli

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have described an increased risk of developing tibio-femoral osteoarthritis (TF OA, meniscal tears and bursitis among those with a trade as floor layers. The purpose of this study was to analyse symptomatic knee disorders among floor layers that were highly exposed to kneeling work tasks compared to graphic designers without knee-demanding work tasks. Methods Data on the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS were collected by questionnaires. In total 134 floor layers and 120 graphic designers had a bilateral radiographic knee examination to detect TF OA and patella-femoral (PF OA. A random sample of 92 floor layers and 49 graphic designers had Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI of both knees to examine meniscal tears. Means of the subscales of KOOS were compared by analysis of variance. The risk ratio of symptomatic knee disorders defined as a combination of radiological detected knee OA or MRI-detected meniscal tears combined with a low KOOS score was estimated by logistic regression in floor layers with 95% confidence interval (CI and adjusted for age, body mass index, traumas, and knee-straining sports activities. Symptomatic knee OA or meniscal tears were defined as a combination of low KOOS-scores and radiographic or MRI pathology. Results Symptomatic TF and medial meniscal tears were found in floor layers compared to graphic designers with odds ratios 2.6 (95%CI 0.99-6.9 and 2.04 (95% CI 0.77-5.5, respectively. There were no differences in PF OA. Floor layers scored significantly lower on all KOOS subscales compared to graphic designers. Significantly lower scores on the KOOS subscales were also found for radiographic TF and PF OA regardless of trade but not for meniscal tears. Conclusions The study showed an overall increased risk of developing symptomatic TF OA in a group of floor layers with a substantial amount of kneeling work positions. Prevention would be appropriate to reduce the

  16. The influence of foot progression angle on the knee adduction moment during walking and stair climbing in pain free individuals with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Mengtao; Axe, Michael J; Manal, Kurt

    2007-09-01

    The external knee adduction moment during walking and stair climbing has a characteristic double hump pattern. The magnitude of the adduction moment is associated with the development and progression of medial compartment knee osteoarthritis (OA). There is an inverse relationship between the magnitude of the second peak adduction moment and foot progression angle (FPA). Increasing FPA beyond a self-selected degree of toe-out may further reduce the magnitude of this moment for persons with knee OA. In this study, subjects with medial compartment knee OA walked and climbed stairs using their natural (i.e. self-selected) and an increased FPA (i.e. self-selected+15 degrees of additional toe-out). Increasing FPA did not change the magnitude of the first peak adduction moment but it did significantly decrease the second peak during walking. The first peak moment during stair ascent was significantly greater for the increased FPA condition, and a significant reduction was noted for the second peak. No significant differences were noted during stair descent. These results suggest that walking with a toe-out strategy may benefit persons with early stages of medial knee OA.

  17. Influence of biomechanical characteristics on pain and function outcomes from exercise in medial knee osteoarthritis and varus malalignment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennell, Kim L.; Dobson, Fiona; Roos, Ewa M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether selected biomechanical characteristics influence changes in pain and physical function with exercise in people with medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) and varus malalignment. Methods: Post-hoc exploratory analyses from a randomised controlled trial involving 100...... the pain-relieving effects of two different types of exercise. Further research is needed to confirm whether exercise that is prescribed according to specific biomechanical characteristics optimises knee OA outcomes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....... people with medial knee OA and varus malalignment who were randomly allocated to one of two 12-week exercise programs; quadriceps strengthening or neuromuscular exercise. Outcome measures were change in overall average knee pain (visual analogue scale) and self-reported physical function (Western Ontario...

  18. Hybrid OA – a way to go?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nol (Arnold Verhagen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available After publication of the report of the ‘Finch’ committee, publishers suddenly seem to recognize the potential of open access (OA as a viable business model for scholarly publishing and wish to promote ‘hybrid OA’ as a means to get from A to B. This article explores the potentially disruptive financial effects of hybrid OA, especially for research-intensive universities. Starting from the assumption that OA will lead to higher costs of dissemination for higher education (HE anyway, the author indicates two possible ways to get round the financials cliffs between toll access and open access. In both cases, it is necessary to construct a financial communication channel between costs of subscriptions and costs of article processing charges (APCs on the level of the individual university and/or the consortium.

  19. The Effects of a Moderate Exercise Program on Knee Osteoarthritis in Male Wistar Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Fallah Mohammadi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available   Objective(s: Osteoarthritis (OA or degenerative joint disease is the commonest form of arthritis and can lead to joint pain, decrease in joint’s range of motion, loss of function, and ultimately disability. Exercise is considered as one of the non-pharmacological treatments of OA. But the effects of exercise on knee joint cartilage remain ambiguous. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of a four-week moderate treadmill exercise on rats’ knee osteoarthritis.   Materials and Methods: Eighteen male Wistar rats (173 ± 1 g, 8 weeks old were randomly divided into three groups (n = 6: Intact control, monosodium iodoacetate (MIA only (OA, and training. The osteoarthritis model was induced by intra-articular injection of monosodium iodoacetate (MIA. Subjects followed a moderate-intensity exercise program for 28 days. Rats were killed after 28 days and histological assessment was done on their knee joints. One-way ANOVA (P

  20. Neuromuscular versus quadriceps strengthening exercise in patients with medial knee osteoarthritis and varus malalignment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennell, Kim L; Kyriakides, Mary; Metcalf, Ben

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the effects of neuromuscular exercise (NEXA) and quadriceps strengthening (QS) on the knee adduction moment (an indicator of mediolateral distribution of knee load), pain, and physical function in patients with medial knee joint osteoarthritis (OA) and varus malalignment...... component. Primary outcomes were peak external knee adduction moment (3-dimensional gait analysis), pain (visual analog scale), and self-reported physical function (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index). RESULTS: Eighty-two patients (38 [76%] of 50 in the NEXA group and 44 [88...

  1. Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the French version of the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) in knee osteoarthritis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ornetti, P; Parratte, S; Gossec, L

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To adapt the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) into French and to evaluate the psychometric properties of this new version. METHODS: The French version of the KOOS was developed according to cross-cultural guidelines by using the "translation-back translation" method...... to ensure content validity. KOOS data were then obtained in patients with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA). The translated questionnaire was evaluated in two knee OA population groups, one with no indication for joint replacement (medicine), and the other waiting for joint replacement (surgery......). The psychometric properties evaluated were feasibility: percentage of responses, floor and ceiling effects; construct validity: internal consistency using Cronbach's alpha, correlations with osteoarthritis knee and hip quality of life domains using Spearman's rank test, and known group comparison between medicine...

  2. Automatic O(a) improvement for twisted mass QCD in the presence of spontaneous symmetry breaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Sinya; Bär, Oliver

    2006-08-01

    In this paper we present a proof for automatic O(a) improvement in twisted mass lattice QCD at maximal twist, which uses only the symmetries of the leading part in the Symanzik effective action. In the process of the proof we clarify that the twist angle is dynamically determined by vacuum expectation values in the Symanzik theory. For maximal twist according to this definition, we show that scaling violations of all quantities which have nonzero values in the continuum limit are even in a. In addition, using Wilson chiral perturbation theory, we investigate this definition for maximal twist and compare it to other definitions which were already employed in actual simulations.

  3. Is latero-medial patellar mobility related to the range of motion of the knee joint after total knee arthroplasty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Susumu; Nakashima, Takeshi; Morisaka, Ayako; Omachi, Takaaki; Ida, Kunio; Kawamura, Morio

    2010-12-01

    Diminished range of motion (ROM) of the knee joint after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is thought to be related to reduced patellar mobility. This has not been confirmed clinically due to a lack of quantitative methods adequate for measuring patellar mobility. We investigated the relationship between patellar mobility by a reported quantitative method and knee joint ROM after TKA. Forty-nine patients [osteoarthritis--OA: 29 knees; rheumatoid arthritis--RA: 20 knees] were examined after TKA. Respective medial and lateral patellar mobility was measured 1 and 6 months postoperatively using a patellofemoral arthrometer (PFA). Knee joint ROM was also measured in each of those 2 sessions. Although the flexion and extension of the knee joints improved significantly from 1 to 6 months after TKA, the medial and lateral patellar displacements (LPDs) failed to improve during that same period. Moreover, only the changes in knee flexion and medial patellar displacement (MPD) between the two sessions were positively correlated (r = 0.31, p knee ROM after TKA.

  4. Reference intervals of serum hyaluronic acid corresponding to the radiographic severity of knee osteoarthritis in women

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    Kaneko Haruka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Backgroud While serum levels of hyarulonic acid (sHA is known to be useful for a burden of disease biomarker in knee OA, it is far from practical. The reference intervals must be established for biomarkers to be useful for clinical interpretation. The aim of this study was to establish the reference intervals of sHA corresponding to the radiographic severity of knee OA for elucidating whether sHA can be useful as a burden of disease marker for individual patient with knee OA. Methods 372 women with Kellgren & Lawrence grade (K/L 1 through 4 painful knee OA were enrolled in this study. The patients included 54 with K/L 1, 96 with K/L 2, 97 with K/L 3, and 118 with K/L 4. Serum samples were obtained from all subjects on the day that radiographs taken. A HA binding protein based latex agglutination assay that employed an ELISA format was used to measure sHA. Age and BMI adjusted one way ANOVA was used to set the reference intervals of sHA. Results The reference intervals for sHA corresponding to the patients with K/L 4 (49.6 – 66.5 ng/ml was established without any overlap against to those with K/L 1, 2 and 3, while those with K/L 1, 2 and 3 showed considerable overlap. Conclusions These results indicate that sHA can be available as a burden of disease marker for the individuals with severe knee OA (K/L 4, while it is not for those with primary to moderate knee OA (K/L 1–3.

  5. Effect of sensorimotor training on balance in elderly patients with knee osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal F. Ahmed

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is a chronic disabling disease that generates many impairments of functional health status. Impairments of balance are recognized in patients with knee OA. This study investigated the short term effect of sensorimotor training on balance in elderly patients with knee OA, and whether these changes were associated with impairment of functional performance. In addition the possible independent predictors of impaired balance were determined. Forty female patients with knee OA were divided into two equal groups. The control group received a traditional exercise programme and the study group received sensorimotor training in addition to traditional exercises. Blind assessment was conducted at the beginning of the study and after 6 weeks of training to measure balance [in the form of overall stability index (OSI, medial/lateral stability index (MLSI, anterior/posterior stability index (APSI], perceived pain, proprioception acuity, knee extensor muscle torque, and functional disability. For the sensorimotor group, statistically significant improvements were recorded in all measured parameters, while the traditional exercise group recorded significant improvement only on measures of perceived pain, proprioception acuity, muscle torque, and functional disability, and non-significant changes on all balance measurements. Furthermore, the sensorimotor group produced significantly better improvement than the traditional group. The main predictor of balance was proprioception. The classic traditional exercise programme used in the management of knee OA is not enough for improving balance. Addition of sensorimotor training to the rehabilitation programme of these patients could produce more positive effects on balance and functional activity levels. The association between balance, proprioception and functional activity should be considered when treating knee OA.

  6. Weight satisfaction, management strategies and health beliefs in knee osteoarthritis patients attending an outpatient clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekram, A R M S; Cicuttini, F M; Teichtahl, A J; Crammond, B R; Lombard, C B; Liew, S M; Urquhart, D M; Wluka, A E

    2016-04-01

    Although weight control is important in managing knee osteoarthritis (OA), it is difficult to achieve. Understanding beliefs regarding weight management in people with knee OA may improve weight control. To examine differences in bodyweight satisfaction, weight management strategies and weight-related health-beliefs in obese, overweight and normal weight people with knee OA. The beliefs and attitudes to weight in 102 people with symptomatic knee OA were ascertained. Participants were classified as being obese, overweight or of normal weight. Although obese and overweight participants were less satisfied with their bodyweight, they were more likely to want to lose weight and to report dieting compared with normal weight participants(P weight gain in the past 6 months (P weight participants (P = 0.04). When asked about their own weight gain, obese participants more frequently believed genetic and metabolic factors to be important than normal and overweight participants (P = 0.01). While 51 (53%) believed that increasing activity was more important than dietary change to avoid weight gain, this was more commonly believed by obese and overweight participants (P weight, obese people with symptomatic knee OA more commonly reported weight gain. Overweight and obese participants attributed weight gain to non-modifiable factors but believed physical activity is more important than dietary change in weight management. Thus, education regarding the importance of diet as compared with non-modifiable factors and physical activity may improve weight management in obese people with knee OA. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  7. Knee pain during activities of daily living and its relationship with physical activity in patients with early and severe knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukutani, Naoto; Iijima, Hirotaka; Aoyama, Tomoki; Yamamoto, Yuko; Hiraoka, Masakazu; Miyanobu, Kazuyuki; Jinnouchi, Masashi; Kaneda, Eishi; Tsuboyama, Tadao; Matsuda, Shuichi

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether knee pain during various activities of daily living (ADLs) is associated with physical activity in patients with early and severe knee osteoarthritis (OA). We hypothesized that the painful ADLs associated with decreased physical activity differ according to disease severity. This cross-sectional study enrolled 270 patients with medial knee OA, assigned to either the early (Kellgren Lawrence [K/L] grade 1-2) or the severe group (K/L grade 3-4). Physical activity was assessed using a pedometer. Knee pain during six ADLs (waking up in the morning, walking on a flat surface, ascending stairs, etc.) was evaluated using a questionnaire. We performed multiple regression and quantile regression analysis to investigate whether knee pain during each ADL was associated with physical activity. In the early group, the more knee pain they experienced while ascending stairs, the lower their physical activity was (75th regression coefficient = -1033.70, P = 0.018). In the severe group, the more knee pain they experienced while walking on a flat surface or bending to the floor or standing up, the lower their physical activity was (unstandardized coefficients = -1850.87, P = 0.026; unstandardized coefficients = -2640.35, P = 0.010). Knee pain while ascending stairs and while walking on a flat surface or bending to the floor or standing up was a probable limiting factor for physical activity in early and severe knee OA, respectively. These findings suggested that a reduction in task-specific knee pain according to disease severity could improve physical activity levels.

  8. UTILIZATION OF PULSED ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELD AND TRADITIONAL PHYSIOTHERAPY IN KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadrya H. Battecha

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF has been suggested as a treatment method for musculoskeletal system disorders. The present study was conducted to determine whether the addition of PEMF to traditional physiotherapy produces better clinical outcomes than traditional physiotherapy alone in the management of moderate knee osteoarthritis (OA. Design: A single-blinded, randomized controlled study Methods: Twenty subjects (5 men and 15 women with unilateral moderate knee OA (Kellgren-Lawrence criteria grade 2. They were randomly allocated in 2 groups to receive: group (A PEMF plus ultrasound plus exercises; or (B ultrasound plus exercises. Both groups received the respective treatments 3 times per week for 4 weeks and underwent the same pretreatment and post treatment evaluation that included active knee range of motion (ROM by universal goniometer, knee pain score by visual analogue scale (VAS and knee functional performance by Western Ontario and McMaster Universities osteoarthritis index (WOMAC. Result: There was an improvement in both groups in active knee flexion ROM, reduced VAS score and improved WOMAC index , however, all outcomes were significantly better in group (A (p <0.05. Moreover, the percentages of outcomes improvement were in favor of group (A. Conclusion: The addition of PEMF to traditional physiotherapy in managing Knee OA produced a greater improvement in pain relief, range of motion and resulted in better functional performance than did traditional physiotherapy alone. The improvement in current study should be limited to short term outcomes of PEMF.

  9. Knee arthrodesis – ultima ratio for the treatment of the infected knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiemann, Andreas H. H.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The irretrievable destruction of the knee due to trauma, tumor or infection is the indication for knee arthrodesis. The main reason for knee arthrodesis in terms of infection ist the infected total knee arthroplasty. Central problem is the definition of the term “irretrievable”. It is based on the subjective opinion of the attending physician and depends on his expert knowledge of this specific entity. The preservation of a functioning extremity is the main goal.This article shows the typical indications and contraindications for knee arthrodesis following septic knee diseases. In addition it gives insight into the biomechanical and technical considerations to be kept in mind. Finally the postoperative care and outcome of different techniques are analysed.

  10. Hybrid OA: a way to go?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, N.

    2013-01-01

    After publication of the report of the ‘Finch’ committee, publishers suddenly seem to recognize the potential of open access (OA) as a viable business model for scholarly publishing and wish to promote ‘hybrid OA’ as a means to get from A to B. This article explores the potentially disruptive

  11. Immediate Efficacy of Neuromuscular Exercise in Patients with Severe Osteoarthritis of the Hip or Knee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Allan; Overgaard, Søren; Holsgaard-Larsen, Anders

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Knowledge about the effects of exercise in severe and endstage osteoarthritis (OA) is limited. The aim was to evaluate the efficacy of a neuromuscular exercise program in patients with clinically severe hip or knee OA. METHODS: This was a randomized controlled assessor-blinded trial...... and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS) and the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) questionnaire. The secondary outcomes were the HOOS/KOOS subscales Pain, Symptoms, Sport and Recreation, and Joint-related Quality of Life. Exploratory outcomes were functional performance measures and lower limb...

  12. Foot posture in people with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feller Julian A

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Foot posture has long been considered to contribute to the development of lower limb musculoskeletal conditions as it may alter the mechanical alignment and dynamic function of the lower limb. This study compared foot posture in people with and without medial compartment knee osteoarthritis (OA using a range of clinical foot measures. The reliability of the foot measures was also assessed. Methods The foot posture of 32 patients with clinically and radiographically-confirmed OA predominantly in the medial compartment of the knee and 28 asymptomatic age-matched healthy controls was investigated using the foot posture index (FPI, vertical navicular height and drop, and the arch index. Independent t tests and effect size (Cohen's d were used to investigate the differences between the groups in the foot posture measurements. Results Significant differences were found between the control and the knee OA groups in relation to the FPI (1.35 ± 1.43 vs. 2.46 ± 2.18, p = 0.02; d = 0.61, medium effect size, navicular drop (0.02 ± 0.01 vs. 0.03 ± 0.01, p = 0.01; d = 1.02, large effect size and the arch index (0.22 ± 0.04 vs. 0.26 ± 0.04, p = 0.04; d = 1.02, large effect size. No significant difference was found for vertical navicular height (0.24 ± 0.03 vs. 0.23 ± 0.03, p = 0.54; d = 0.04, negligible effect size. Conclusion People with medial compartment knee OA exhibit a more pronated foot type compared to controls. It is therefore recommended that the assessment of patients with knee OA in clinical practice should include simple foot measures, and that the potential influence of foot structure and function on the efficacy of foot orthoses in the management of medial compartment knee OA be further investigated.

  13. The effect of age and knee osteoarthritis on muscle activation patterns and knee joint biomechanics during dual belt treadmill gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Derek; Baker, Matthew; Wong, Ivan; Stanish, William

    2017-06-01

    To compare a group of individuals with moderate medial compartment knee osteoarthritis (OA) to both an age-matched asymptomatic group of older adults and younger adults to determine whether differences in knee joint muscle activation patterns and joint biomechanics exist during gait between these three groups. 20 young adults, 20 older adults, and 40 individuals with moderate knee OA were recruited. Using standardized procedures, surface electromyograms were recorded from the vastus lateralis and medialis, rectus femoris and the medial and lateral hamstrings. All individuals walked on a dual belt instrumented treadmill while segment motions and ground reaction forces were recorded. Sagittal plane motion and net external sagittal and frontal plane moments were calculated. Discrete measures and principal component analyses extracted amplitude and temporal waveform features. Analysis of Variance models using Bonferroni corrections determined between and within group differences in these gait features (α=0.05). Individuals with knee OA have distinct biomechanics and muscle activation patterns when compared to age-matched asymptomatic adults and younger adults whereas differences between the young and older adults were few and included only measures of muscle activation amplitude. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Long-Term Effects of AposTherapy in Patients with Osteoarthritis of the Knee: A Two-Year Followup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaron Bar-Ziv

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Several biomechanics treatments for knee osteoarthritis (OA have emerged with the goal of reducing pain and improving function. Through this, researchers have hoped to achieve a transition from the pathological gait patterns to coordinated motor responses. The purpose of the study was to determine the long-term effects of a therapy using a biomechanical device in patients with knee OA. Patients with knee OA were enrolled to active and control groups. The biomechanical device used in therapy (AposTherapy was individually calibrated to each patient in the active group. Patients in the control group received standard treatment. Outcomes were the Western Ontario and McMaster Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC, Aggregated Locomotor Function (ALF, Short Form 36 (SF-36, and Knee Society Score assessments. The active and control groups were similar at the baseline (group difference in all scores . The active group showed a larger improvement over time between groups in all three WOMAC categories (, 21.7, and 18.1 for pain, stiffness, and function; all , SF-36 Physical Scale (; , Knee Society Knee Score (; , and Knee Society Function Score (; . At the two-year endpoint, the active group showed significantly better results (all . The groups showed a difference of 4.9, 5.6, and 4.7 for the WOMAC pain, stiffness, and function scores, respectively, 10.8 s in ALF score, 30.5 in SF-36 Physical Scale, 16.9 in SF-36 Mental Scale, 17.8 in Knee Society Knee Score, and 25.2 in Knee Society Function Score. The biomechanical therapy examined was shown to significantly reduce pain and improve function and quality of life of patients with knee OA over the long term.

  15. The knee pain map: reliability of a method to identify knee pain location and pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Laura R; Boudreau, Robert; Hannon, Michael J; Newman, Anne B; Chu, Constance R; Jansen, Mary; Nevitt, Michael C; Kwoh, C Kent

    2009-06-15

    To describe the location and pattern of knee pain in patients with chronic, frequent knee pain using the Knee Pain Map, and to evaluate the inter- and intrarater reliability of the map. A cohort of 799 participants from the University of Pittsburgh Osteoarthritis Initiative Clinical Center who had knee pain in the last 12 months were studied. Trained interviewers assessed and recorded participant-reported knee pain patterns into 8 local areas, 4 regional areas, or as diffuse. Inter- and intrarater reliability were assessed using Fleiss' kappa. Participants most often reported localized (69%) followed by regional (14%) or diffuse (10%) knee pain. In those with localized pain, the most commonly reported locations were the medial (56%) and lateral (43%) joint lines. In those with regional pain, the most commonly reported regions were the patella (44%) and medial region (38%). There was excellent interrater reliability for the identification of localized and regional pain patterns (kappa = 0.7-0.9 and 0.7-0.8, respectively). The interrater reliability for specific locations was also excellent (kappa = 0.7-1.0) when the number of participants with pain in a location was >4. For regional pain, the kappa for specific regions varied from 0.7-1.0. The majority of participants could identify the location of their knee pain, and trained interviewers could reliably record those locations. The variation in locations suggests that there are multiple sources of pain in knee OA. Additional studies are needed to determine whether specific knee pain patterns correlate with discrete pathologic findings on radiographs or magnetic resonance images.

  16. Dynamic loading of the knee and hip joint and compensatory strategies in children and adolescents with varus malalignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stief, Felix; Böhm, Harald; Schwirtz, Ansgar; Dussa, Chakravarthy Ugandhar; Döderlein, Leonhard

    2011-03-01

    Three-dimensional gait analysis is a diagnostic tool that can be used to gain a better understanding of the relationship between joint loading and the onset or progression of articular cartilage degeneration in subjects with varus malalignment. The purpose of the present study was to investigate knee and hip joint angles and moments in children and adolescents with pathological varus alignment of the knee without signs of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Moreover, we wanted to know if compensatory mechanisms are present in this young patient group. Fourteen, otherwise healthy patients with varus malalignment of the knee and 15 healthy control subjects were analysed. Patients showed a reduced knee extension and a significantly lower maximum knee extension moment in terminal stance compared to controls. The maximum knee adduction moment in mid and terminal stance and the maximum hip abduction moment in loading response were significantly higher in the patient group. In the transverse plane, abnormally increased knee internal rotation and hip external rotation moments were present in patients with varus malalignment. These findings imply that varus malalignment is not an isolated problem in the frontal plane. In contrast to adult patients with established medial knee OA, the young patients assessed in the present study did not show typical compensatory mechanisms such as increased foot progression angle or reduced walking speed. This suggests that children and adolescents with varus malalignment of the knee probably do not need to alter their spatio-temporal gait parameters in order to decrease knee joint loading.

  17. The Knee Clinical Assessment Study – CAS(K). A prospective study of knee pain and knee osteoarthritis in the general population

    OpenAIRE

    Hay Elaine; Duncan Rachel; Wilkie Ross; Myers Helen; Dziedzic Krysia; Wood Laurence; Handy June; Thomas Elaine; Peat George; Hill Jonathan; Croft Peter

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background Knee pain affects an estimated 25% of the adult population aged 50 years and over. Osteoarthritis is the most common diagnosis made in older adults consulting with knee pain in primary care. However, the relationship between this diagnosis and both the current disease-based definition of osteoarthritis and the regional pain syndrome of knee pain and disability is unclear. Expert consensus, based on current evidence, views the disease and the syndrome as distinct entities b...

  18. Adiponectin and Leptin Synovial Fluid Concentration as a Marker for the Severity of Knee Osteoarthritis in Obese Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eddy Mart Salim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Osteoarthritis (OA is a chronic degenerative joint disorder of the synovial joint characterized by loss of articular cartilage, osteophyte formation, and alterations of subchondral bone. An increase of weight bearing affect on knee joint biomechanically and alter concentration of adipokines, such as adiponectin and leptin. Herein we reported a correlation between adiponectin and leptin synovial fluid concentration with the severity of knee OA in obese patients. Material and Methods: Totally 45 patients were included in this research. ELISA was used to determine adiponectin and leptin concentrations of synovial fluid. The severity of knee OA was classified by Kellgren-Lawrence grading scale. Data analysis was conducted using SPSS for windows. Results: Based on the leptin measurement, it was shown that leptin concentrations were correlated positively with the severity of knee OA. Vice versa, adiponectin concentrations were correlated negative. Conclusion: Our study was support the biomarker function of adiponectin and leptin concentration on synovial fluids, in which those concentrations were related with the severity of OA. Those results also suggested the function of leptin and adiponectin on OA. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(4.000: 746-756

  19. The association of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the calcitonin gene with primary osteoarthritis of the knee in Mexican mestizo population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magaña, J J; Muñoz, B; Borgonio-Cuadra, V M; Razo-Estrada, C; González-Huerta, C; Cortés-González, S; Albores, A; Miranda-Duarte, A

    2013-10-01

    Primary osteoarthritis (OA) is a multifactorial disorder with several genetics factors involved. Calcitonin (CT) has been suggested to possess chondroprotective effects and could play an important role in the pathogenesis of OA. The aim of this study was to investigate whether genetic variations in or adjacent to the CT gene may be associated with primary OA of the knee in Mexican mestizo population. We conducted a case-control study to investigate the association between six single nucleotide polymorphisms at the CT locus and OA of the knee in 107 cases and 106 controls. Cases were patients >40 years of age, with a body mass index (BMI) ≤ 27 and a radiologic score for OA of the knee ≥ 2. Controls were subjects >40 years of age with a radiologic score <2. Non-conditional logistic regression was developed to evaluate risk magnitude. The G allele and GT genotype frequencies of the G-706T polymorphism and the C allele and CC genotype of the C-778T polymorphism were significantly higher in patients with OA than in control subjects. The GG genotype of the G-706T was associated with lower risk of the development of OA of the knee. According to the results, the G-706T and the C-778T polymorphisms were related to the Cdx1 and Mzf1 transcription factor binding sites, respectively. Therefore, these could be related to regulation sequences in the CT gene promoter. In conclusion, G-706T and C-778T polymorphisms in the CT gene are significantly associated with the development of primary OA of the knee.

  20. Simultaneous bilateral total knee and ankle arthroplasty as a single surgical procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Simultaneous osteoarthritis (OA) of the ankle joint complicates primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA). In such cases, rehabilitation of TKA is limited by debilitating ankle pain, but varus or valgus ankle arthritis may even compromise placement of knee prosthetic components. Case presentation We present a patient with simultaneous bilateral valgus and patellofemoral OA of the knees and bilateral varus OA of the ankle joints that equally contributed to overall disability. This 63 years old, motivated and otherwise healthy patient was treated by simultaneous bilateral total knee and ankle arthroplasty (quadruple total joint arthroplasty, TJA) during the same anesthesia. Two years outcome showed excellent alignment and function of all four replaced joints. Postoperative time for rehabilitation, back to work (6th week) and hospital stay (12 days) of this special patient was markedly reduced compared to the usual course of separate TJA. Conclusions Simultaneous quadruple TJA in equally disabling OA of bilateral deformed knees and ankles resulted in a better functional outcome and faster recovery compared to the average reported results after TKA and TAA in literature. However, careful preoperative planning, extensive patient education, and two complete surgical teams were considered essential for successful performance. To the best of our knowledge this is the first case report in literature about quadruple major total joint arthroplasty implanted during the same anesthesia in the same patient. PMID:21995682

  1. Simultaneous bilateral total knee and ankle arthroplasty as a single surgical procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hintermann Beat

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Simultaneous osteoarthritis (OA of the ankle joint complicates primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA. In such cases, rehabilitation of TKA is limited by debilitating ankle pain, but varus or valgus ankle arthritis may even compromise placement of knee prosthetic components. Case presentation We present a patient with simultaneous bilateral valgus and patellofemoral OA of the knees and bilateral varus OA of the ankle joints that equally contributed to overall disability. This 63 years old, motivated and otherwise healthy patient was treated by simultaneous bilateral total knee and ankle arthroplasty (quadruple total joint arthroplasty, TJA during the same anesthesia. Two years outcome showed excellent alignment and function of all four replaced joints. Postoperative time for rehabilitation, back to work (6th week and hospital stay (12 days of this special patient was markedly reduced compared to the usual course of separate TJA. Conclusions Simultaneous quadruple TJA in equally disabling OA of bilateral deformed knees and ankles resulted in a better functional outcome and faster recovery compared to the average reported results after TKA and TAA in literature. However, careful preoperative planning, extensive patient education, and two complete surgical teams were considered essential for successful performance. To the best of our knowledge this is the first case report in literature about quadruple major total joint arthroplasty implanted during the same anesthesia in the same patient.

  2. Postural response to vibration of triceps surae, but not quadriceps muscles, differs between people with and without knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanahan, Camille J; Wrigley, Tim V; Farrell, Michael J; Bennell, Kim L; Hodges, Paul W

    2014-08-01

    Although proprioceptive impairments are reported in knee osteoarthritis (OA), there has been little investigation of the underlying causes. Muscle spindles make an important contribution to proprioception. This study investigated whether function of quadriceps, triceps surae, and tibialis anterior muscle spindles is altered in individuals with knee OA. Thirty individuals with knee OA (17 females, 66 ± 7 [mean ± SD] years) and 30 healthy asymptomatic controls (17 females, 65 ± 8 years) stood comfortably and blindfolded on a force plate. Mechanical vibration (60 Hz) was applied bilaterally over the quadriceps, triceps surae, or tibialis anterior muscles for the middle 15 s (Vibration) of a 45 s trial (preceded and followed by 15 s Baseline and Recovery periods). Two trials were recorded for each muscle site. Mean anterior-posterior displacement of centre of pressure was analysed. Although there were no differences between groups for trials with vibration applied to the quandriceps or tibialis anterior, participants with knee OA were initially perturbed more by triceps surae vibration and accommodated less to repeated exposure than controls. This indicates that people with knee OA have less potential to detect or compensate for disturbed input to triceps surae, possibly due to an inability to compensate using muscles spindles in the quadriceps muscle.

  3. Neuromuscular exercise as treatment for knee osteoarthritis in middle aged patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Brian

    Summary Background Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a mechanically-driven disease. It is suggested that medial tibiofemoral knee-joint load increases with pharmacological pain relief, indicating that pharmacological pain relief may be positively associated with disease progression. Treatment modalities......). For the cross-sectional study (paper I), we calculated the Knee Index using 3-dimensional gait analysis in a sample of the first 44 subjects, aged 40-70 years with mild to moderate knee OA, recruited for the randomized controlled trial. Subjects were instructed to walk at a self-selected speed and the average...... gait showed a statistically significant increase immediately after the 8-week intervention for the NEMEX-group, corresponding to a statistically non-significant between-group difference. Despite within-group improvements in most KOOS subscale scores and functional performance in both treatment groups...

  4. Physical therapy vs. internet-based exercise training (PATH-IN) for patients with knee osteoarthritis: study protocol of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Quinn I; Gunn, Alexander H; Beaulieu, John E; Benas, Bernadette C; Buley, Bruce; Callahan, Leigh F; Cantrell, John; Genova, Andrew P; Golightly, Yvonne M; Goode, Adam P; Gridley, Christopher I; Gross, Michael T; Heiderscheit, Bryan C; Hill, Carla H; Huffman, Kim M; Kline, Aaron; Schwartz, Todd A; Allen, Kelli D

    2015-09-28

    Physical activity improves pain and function among individuals with knee osteoarthritis (OA), but most people with this condition are inactive. Physical therapists play a key role in helping people with knee OA to increase appropriate physical activity. However, health care access issues, financial constraints, and other factors impede some patients from receiving physical therapy (PT) for knee OA. A need exists to develop and evaluate other methods to provide physical activity instruction and support to people with knee OA. This study is examining the effectiveness of an internet-based exercise training (IBET) program designed for knee OA, designed by physical therapists and other clinicians. This is a randomized controlled trial of 350 participants with symptomatic knee OA, allocated to three groups: IBET, standard PT, and a wait list (WL) control group (in a 2:2:1 ratio, respectively). The study was funded by the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute, which conducted a peer review of the proposal. The IBET program provides patients with a tailored exercise program (based on functional level, symptoms, and current activity), video demonstrations of exercises, and guidance for appropriate exercise progression. The PT group receives up to 8 individual visits with a physical therapist, mirroring standard practice for knee OA and with an emphasis on a home exercise program. Outcomes are assessed at baseline, 4 months (primary time point) and 12 months (to assess maintenance of treatment effects). The primary outcome is the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, and secondary outcomes include objective physical function, satisfaction with physical function, physical activity, depressive symptoms and global assessment of change. Linear mixed models will be used to compare both the IBET and standard PT groups to the WL control group, examine whether IBET is non-inferior to PT (a treatment that has an established evidence base for knee

  5. Water on the Knee

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your knee joint. Some people call this condition "water on the knee." A swollen knee may be ... Choose low-impact exercise. Certain activities, such as water aerobics and swimming, don't place continuous weight- ...

  6. Knee pain (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... front of the knee can be due to bursitis, arthritis, or softening of the patella cartilage as ... knee. Overall knee pain can be due to bursitis, arthritis, tears in the ligaments, osteoarthritis of the ...

  7. Knee microfracture surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartilage regeneration - knee ... Three types of anesthesia may be used for knee arthroscopy surgery: Medicine to relax you, and shots of painkillers to numb the knee Spinal (regional) anesthesia General anesthesia (you will be ...

  8. Preventing Knee Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Our Newsletter Donate Blog Skip breadcrumb navigation Preventing Knee Injuries Knee injuries in children and adolescent athletes ... this PDF Share this page: WHAT ARE COMMON KNEE INJURIES? Pain Syndromes One of the most common ...

  9. WOMAC Osteoarthritis Index--additional dimensions for use in subjects with post-traumatic osteoarthritis of the knee. Western Ontario and MacMaster Universities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roos, Ewa M.; Roos, H P; Lohmander, L S

    1999-01-01

    To compare the sensitivity of WOMAC and the two added dimensions Sport and Recreation Function and Knee Related Quality of Life in subjects with radiographic knee OA to that in controls. To study the influence of age on the reported outcomes....

  10. Self-Reported Functional Status as Predictor of Observed Functional Capacity in Subjects with Early Osteoarthritis of the Hip and Knee : A Diagnostic Study in the CHECK Cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bieleman, H. J.; Reneman, M. F.; van Ittersum, M. W.; van der Schans, C. P.; Groothoff, J. W.; Oosterveld, F. G. J.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis (OA) may experience functional limitations in work settings. In the Cohort Hip and Cohort Knee study (CHECK) physical function was both self-reported and measured performance-based, using Functional Capacity Evaluation (FCE). Relations between self

  11. Quantitative in vivo CT arthrography of the human osteoarthritic knee to estimate cartilage sulphated glycosaminoglycan content : correlation with ex-vivo reference standards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tiel, J; Siebelt, M; Reijman, M; Bos, P.K.; Waarsing, J H; Zuurmond, A-M; Nasserinejad, K; van Osch, G J V M; Verhaar, J A N; Krestin, G P; Weinans, H; Oei, E H G

    OBJECTIVE: Recently, computed tomography arthrography (CTa) was introduced as quantitative imaging biomarker to estimate cartilage sulphated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) content in human cadaveric knees. Our aim was to assess the correlation between in vivo CTa in human osteoarthritis (OA) knees and ex

  12. Quantitative in vivo CT arthrography of the human osteoarthritic knee to estimate cartilage sulphated glycosaminoglycan content: correlation with ex-vivo reference standards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiel, J. van; Siebelt, M.; Reijman, M.; Bos, P.K.; Waarsing, J.H.; Zuurmond, A.M.; Nasserinejad, K.; Osch, G.J.V.M. van; Verhaar, J.A.N.; Krestin, G.P.; Weinans, H.; Oei, E.H.G.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Recently, computed tomography arthrography (CTa) was introduced as quantitative imaging biomarker to estimate cartilage sulphated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) content in human cadaveric knees. Our aim was to assess the correlation between in vivo CTa in human osteoarthritis (OA) knees and ex

  13. MRI in definition of bleeding source, lesion pattern and therapy in haemarthros of the knee; Die MRT beim Haemarthros des Kniegelenks: Bestimmung von Blutungsursachen, Verletzungsmustern und Therapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachmann, G. [Abt. Diagnostische Radiologie, Klinikum der Justus-Liebig-Universitaet, Giessen (Germany); Juergensen, I. [Orthopaedische Klinik, Klinikum der Justus-Liebig-Universitaet, Giessen (Germany); Leier, S. [Orthopaedische Klinik, Klinikum der Justus-Liebig-Universitaet, Giessen (Germany); Rauber, K. [Abt. Diagnostische Radiologie, Klinikum der Justus-Liebig-Universitaet, Giessen (Germany)

    1996-09-01

    Patients with haemarthros of the knee were examined by MRI and arthroscopy to identify the bleeding source and to determine surgical or conservative therapy. A prospective study was performed on 120 patients who underwent MRI and arthroscopy, point lesions and bleeding sources were documented separately on a standardised form. Arthroscopy demonstrated a ruptured anterior cruciate ligament in 86%, meniscal tears in 55%, disruption of collateral ligaments in 17%, osteochondral lesions in 5% and tears of capsule or plicae in 13%. Disruption of cruciate ligaments caused haemorrhage in all but three cases. In contrast, only meniscal tears located very adjacent to the meniscal basement had bled. Those types of osteochondral lesions caused haemorrhage characterised on MRI by destruction of the subchondral plate and overlying cartilage. Severe lesions of the knee were diagnosed by MRI in 71% to 100%, slight lesions in 13% to 40% of the cases. Single, combined and bland lesions were accurately diagnosed in MRI which permitted a correct prediction of surgical and conservative therapy in 96% and 80%. Morphological criteria in MRI permit identification of bleeding sources in haemarthros of the knee. Different lesion patterns can be separated for the planning of therapy. (orig.) [Deutsch] Bei gesichertem Haemarthros des Knies wurde geprueft, ob mit der MRT Angaben zur Blutungsursache moeglich sind und die relevanten Verletzungsmuster fuer die folgende konservative oder operative Therapie exakt beschrieben werden koennen. In einer prospektiven Studie wurden 120 Patienten mit akutem Haemarthros des Knies nacheinander mit der MRT und der Arthroskopie untersucht. Alle Laesionen und Blutungsquellen wurden getrennt fuer beide Methoden auf standardisierten Erhebungsboegen fuer die Arthroskopie registriert. Arthroskopisch wurden Rupturen der vorderen Kreuzbaender in 86%, Meniskusrisse in 55%, Rupturen der Kollateralbaender in 17%, subchondrale Laesionen in 5% und Kapsel- bzw

  14. Evaluation of the benefit of corticosteroid injection before exercise therapy in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Christensen, Robin; Klokker, Louise

    2015-01-01

    placebo injection given before exercise therapy at an OA outpatient clinic from October 1, 2012, through April 2, 2014. The participants had radiographic confirmation of clinical OA of the knee, clinical signs of localized inflammation in the knee, and knee pain during walking (score >4 on a scale of 0...... to 10). INTERVENTIONS: Participants were randomly allocated (1:1) to an intra-articular 1-mL injection of the knee with methylprednisolone acetate (Depo-Medrol), 40 mg/mL, dissolved in 4 mL of lidocaine hydrochloride (10 mg/mL) (corticosteroid group) or a 1-mL isotonic saline injection mixed with 4 m......L of lidocaine hydrochloride (10 mg/mL) (placebo group). Two weeks after the injections, all participants started a 12-week supervised exercise program. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: The primary outcome was change in the Pain subscale of the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) questionnaire (range...

  15. Determinants of Self-Reported Health Status in a Population-Based Sample of Persons with Radiographic Knee Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichmann, William M.; Katz, Jeffrey N.; Kessler, Courtenay L.; Jordan, Joanne M.; Losina, Elena

    2009-01-01

    Objective Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is highly prevalent and disabling. Patients with radiographic knee OA may experience pain and functional impairment, which can diminish their health status. Our objective was to determine factors associated with self-reported health status in a national population-based sample with radiographic knee OA. Methods Our sample included all NHANES III participants who underwent a knee radiograph and were found to have radiographic OA (defined as Kellgren-Lawrence (K-L) grade two or higher). Self-reported health status was determined by asking the participant to rate their overall health as excellent, very good, good, fair, or poor. Self-reported health status was analyzed as an ordinal variable using cumulative logit regression, a dichotomous variable (excellent/very good/good vs. fair/poor) using logistic regression, and as a continuous variable after transformation using linear regression. Results Forty-two percent (N=1,021) of NHANES III participants with a knee radiograph were included in this analysis. The multivariable analyses were performed on 1,009 (99%) of the eligible participants with complete data. We found that non-white race, lower income, more comorbidities, and greater functional limitation were associated with worse self-reported health status in all three multivariable analyses. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that quantifies the role of clinical, radiographic and socio-economic factors associated with self-reported health status in a population-based sample of patients with knee OA. Self-reported health status in patients with knee OA is associated with functional status and comorbidity. PMID:19644892

  16. Application of computational lower extremity model to investigate different muscle activities and joint force patterns in knee osteoarthritis patients during walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nha, Kyung Wook; Dorj, Ariunzaya; Feng, Jun; Shin, Jun Ho; Kim, Jong In; Kwon, Jae Ho; Kim, Kyungsoo; Kim, Yoon Hyuk

    2013-01-01

    Many experimental and computational studies have reported that osteoarthritis in the knee joint affects knee biomechanics, including joint kinematics, joint contact forces, and muscle activities, due to functional restriction and disability. In this study, differences in muscle activities and joint force patterns between knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients and normal subjects during walking were investigated using the inverse dynamic analysis with a lower extremity musculoskeletal model. Extensor/flexor muscle activations and torque ratios and the joint contact forces were compared between the OA and normal groups. The OA patients had higher extensor muscle forces and lateral component of the knee joint force than normal subjects as well as force and torque ratios of extensor and flexor muscles, while the other parameters had little differences. The results explained that OA patients increased the level of antagonistic cocontraction and the adduction moment on the knee joint. The presented findings and technologies provide insight into biomechanical changes in OA patients and can also be used to evaluate the postoperative functional outcomes of the OA treatments.

  17. Application of Computational Lower Extremity Model to Investigate Different Muscle Activities and Joint Force Patterns in Knee Osteoarthritis Patients during Walking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung Wook Nha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Many experimental and computational studies have reported that osteoarthritis in the knee joint affects knee biomechanics, including joint kinematics, joint contact forces, and muscle activities, due to functional restriction and disability. In this study, differences in muscle activities and joint force patterns between knee osteoarthritis (OA patients and normal subjects during walking were investigated using the inverse dynamic analysis with a lower extremity musculoskeletal model. Extensor/flexor muscle activations and torque ratios and the joint contact forces were compared between the OA and normal groups. The OA patients had higher extensor muscle forces and lateral component of the knee joint force than normal subjects as well as force and torque ratios of extensor and flexor muscles, while the other parameters had little differences. The results explained that OA patients increased the level of antagonistic cocontraction and the adduction moment on the knee joint. The presented findings and technologies provide insight into biomechanical changes in OA patients and can also be used to evaluate the postoperative functional outcomes of the OA treatments.

  18. Measuring postural control during mini-squat posture in men with early knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrella, M; Gramani-Say, K; Serrão, P R M S; Lessi, G C; Barela, J A; Carvalho, R P; Mattiello, S M

    2017-02-06

    Studies have suggested a compromised postural control in individuals with knee osteoarthritis (OA) evidenced by larger and faster displacement of center of pressure (COP). However, quantification of postural control in the mini-squat posture performed by patients with early knee OA and its relation to muscle strength and self-reported symptoms have not been investigated. The main aim of this cross-sectional, observational, controlled study was to determine whether postural control in the mini-squat posture differs between individuals with early knee OA and a control group (CG) and verify the relation among knee extensor torque (KET) and self-reported physical function, stiffness and pain. Twenty four individuals with knee OA grades I and II (OAG) (mean age: 52.35±5.00) and twenty subjects without knee injuries (CG) (mean age: 51.40±8.07) participated in this study. Participants were assessed in postural control through a force plate (Bertec Mod. USA), which provided information about the anterior-posterior (AP) and medial-lateral (ML) COP displacement during the mini-squat, in isometric, concentric and eccentric knee extensor torque (KET) (90°/s) through an isokinetic dynamometer (BiodexMulti-Joint System3, Biodex Medical Incorporation, New York, NY, USA), and in self-reported symptoms through the WOMAC questionnaire. The main outcomes measured were the AP and ML COP amplitude and velocity of displacement; isometric, concentric, and eccentric KET and self-reported physical function, stiffness and pain. No significant differences were found between groups for postural control (p>0.05). Significant lower eccentric KET (p=0.01) and higher scores for the WOMAC subscales of pain (p=postural instability and the need to include quadriceps muscle strengthening, especially by eccentric contractions. The relationship between the self-reported symptoms and a lower and slower COP displacement suggest that the postural control strategy during tasks with a semi-flexed knee

  19. Changes Within Clinical Practice After a Randomized Controlled Trial of Knee Arthroscopy for Osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Amin, Nirav H; Hussain, Waqas; Ryan, John; Morrison, Shannon; Miniaci, Anthony; Jones, Morgan H.

    2017-01-01

    Background: In 2002, Moseley et al published a randomized controlled trial (RCT) that showed no difference between knee arthroscopy and placebo for patients with osteoarthritis (OA). We wanted to assess the impact of the trial on clinical practice in the United States. Purpose/Hypothesis: To evaluate changes in knee arthroscopy practice before and after publication of the article by Moseley et al and to assess the effect of this landmark RCT on the behavior of practicing orthopaedic surgeons....

  20. Degree of synovitis on MRI by comprehensive whole knee semi-quantitative scoring method correlates with histologic and macroscopic features of synovial tissue inflammation in knee osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lange-Brokaar, B.J.E. de; Ioan-Facsinay, A.; Yusuf, E.; Visser, A.W.; Kroon, H.M.; Andersen, S.N.; Herb-van Toorn, L.; Osch, G.J.V.M. van; Zuurmond, A.M.; Stojanovic-Susulic, V.; Bloem, J.L.; Nelissen, R.G.H.H.; Huizinga, T.W.J.; Kloppenburg, M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the association between synovitis on contrast enhanced (CE) MRI with microscopic and macroscopic features of synovial tissue inflammation. Method: Forty-one patients (mean age 60 years, 61% women) with symptomatic radiographic knee OA were studied: twenty underwent arthroscopy

  1. Degree of synovitis on MRI by comprehensive whole knee semi-quantitative scoring method correlates with histologic and macroscopic features of synovial tissue inflammation in knee osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lange-Brokaar, B.J.E. de; Ioan-Facsinay, A.; Yusuf, E.; Visser, A.W.; Kroon, H.M.; Andersen, S.N.; Herb-van Toorn, L.; Osch, G.J.V.M. van; Zuurmond, A.M.; Stojanovic-Susulic, V.; Bloem, J.L.; Nelissen, R.G.H.H.; Huizinga, T.W.J.; Kloppenburg, M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the association between synovitis on contrast enhanced (CE) MRI with microscopic and macroscopic features of synovial tissue inflammation. Method: Forty-one patients (mean age 60 years, 61% women) with symptomatic radiographic knee OA were studied: twenty underwent arthroscopy

  2. Variable compensation during the sit-to-stand task among individuals with severe knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagawa, Yoshimasa; Bonnefoy-Mazure, Alice; Armand, Stéphane; Lubbeke, Anne; Hoffmeyer, Pierre; Suva, Domizio; Turcot, Katia

    2017-09-01

    Individuals with knee osteoarthritis (OA) show variability during the sit-to-stand (STS) task, so they may not perform the STS in the same way. This study aimed to determine whether individuals with knee OA have different strategies in performing the STS. Participants with knee OA and able-bodied individuals underwent STS evaluation at a self-selected pace with use of a motion measurement system consisting of 12 cameras and 2 force plates. In total, 101 participants (57 women) with knee OA showed 3 main STS strategies. As compared with the 27 controls (14 women), 24 OA participants, compensated STS, showed greater trunk flexion (47.1° vs. 38.3°; P<0.01) and trunk obliquity (4.6° vs. -0.8°; P<0.001) when completing the STS task in the same amount of time as controls (2.4 vs. 2.7s; P=0.999). The second group (n=59), inadequately compensated STS, also compensated with trunk flexion (47.7° vs. 38.3°; P<0.01) and trunk obliquity (1.6° vs. -0.8°; P<0.001) but took longer than controls (3.4 vs. 2.7s; P=0.001). The third group (n=18), severe impaired STS, took an extended amount of time to execute the STS (6s), with marked trunk flexion (59.2°) and obliquity (4.1°), so participants in this group were perhaps severely impaired in completing the STS. This study identified 3 groups STS trunk strategies among participants with STS. Moreover, the data reveal a concise representation of the relations among strategy variables. The findings could be used to simplify the characterization of the STS among patients with knee OA and aid with follow-up. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Body mass index, pain and function in individuals with knee osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adewale L Oyeyemi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Obesity is a risk factor for progression of knee osteoarthritis (OA, and high body mass index (BMI may interfere with treatment effectiveness on pain and function in individuals with knee OA. This study investigated the effects of BMI on pain and function during a four-week exercise programme in patients with knee OA. Materials and Methods: Forty-six (31 women and 15 men participants with knee OA of different BMI categories (15 normal weight participants, 13 over weight participants and 18 obese participants, received standardised exercise therapy programme twice a week for 4 weeks. Outcome included a 10-point pain rating scale for pain-intensity and the western Ontario and McMaster university osteoarthritis index (WOMAC for physical function. Results: Two-way repeated measure analysis of variance (ANOVA on pain assessment score revealed a significant effect of time (F = 1049.401, P < 0.001 and group (F = 9.393, P < 0.001 on pain. Similar significant effect of time (F = 595.744, P < 0.001 and group (F = 5.431, P = 0.008 was obtained for WOMAC score on function. Post hoc analysis revealed significant difference between the normal weight and overweight group (t = 2.472, P = 0.016 and between normal weight and obese group (t = 3.893, P = 0.005 on pain outcome at the 4 th week post treatment. No significant difference was found at 4 th week post treatment on WOMAC scores (F = 2.010, P = 0.146. Conclusion: Exercise improved pain and function scores in OA patients across the BMI groups. Overweight independent of obesity may interfere with effectiveness of pain control during the symptomatic treatment of knee OA patients.

  4. Computer-aided diagnosis of early knee osteoarthritis based on MRI T2 mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yixiao; Yang, Ran; Jia, Sen; Li, Zhanjun; Zhou, Zhiyang; Lou, Ting

    2014-01-01

    This work was aimed at studying the method of computer-aided diagnosis of early knee OA (OA: osteoarthritis). Based on the technique of MRI (MRI: Magnetic Resonance Imaging) T2 Mapping, through computer image processing, feature extraction, calculation and analysis via constructing a classifier, an effective computer-aided diagnosis method for knee OA was created to assist doctors in their accurate, timely and convenient detection of potential risk of OA. In order to evaluate this method, a total of 1380 data from the MRI images of 46 samples of knee joints were collected. These data were then modeled through linear regression on an offline general platform by the use of the ImageJ software, and a map of the physical parameter T2 was reconstructed. After the image processing, the T2 values of ten regions in the WORMS (WORMS: Whole-organ Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score) areas of the articular cartilage were extracted to be used as the eigenvalues in data mining. Then,a RBF (RBF: Radical Basis Function) network classifier was built to classify and identify the collected data. The classifier exhibited a final identification accuracy of 75%, indicating a good result of assisting diagnosis. Since the knee OA classifier constituted by a weights-directly-determined RBF neural network didn't require any iteration, our results demonstrated that the optimal weights, appropriate center and variance could be yielded through simple procedures. Furthermore, the accuracy for both the training samples and the testing samples from the normal group could reach 100%. Finally, the classifier was superior both in time efficiency and classification performance to the frequently used classifiers based on iterative learning. Thus it was suitable to be used as an aid to computer-aided diagnosis of early knee OA.

  5. 41 CFR 102-85.70 - Are the standard OA terms appropriate for non-cancelable space?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... PROPERTY 85-PRICING POLICY FOR OCCUPANCY IN GSA SPACE Occupancy Agreement § 102-85.70 Are the standard OA... cancel upon a 4-month (120 day) notice is not available. See § 102-85.35 for the definition of...

  6. Relationship between obesity and early failure of total knee prostheses

    OpenAIRE

    Bordini, B.; Stea, S.; Cremonini, S.; Viceconti, M.; Palma, R.; Toni, A.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Obesity is a risk factor for knee arthritis. Total knee arthroplasty is the definitive surgical treatment of this disease. Therefore, a high percentage of subjects treated are overweight. Since 2000 in the Emilia-Romagna Region the Register of Orthopedic Prosthetic Implantology, RIPO, has recorded data of all the primary and revision operations performed on the knee; height and weight of patients at the time of surgery have also been recorded. Methods To understand how ove...

  7. O(a) improved lattice QCD

    OpenAIRE

    Sommer, Rainer

    1997-01-01

    We review the O(a) improvement of lattice QCD with special emphasis on the motivation for performing the improvement programme non-perturbatively and the general concepts of on-shell improvement. The present status of the calculations of various improvement coefficients (perturbative and non-perturbative) is reviewed, as well as the computation of the isospin current normalization constants $Z_A$ and $Z_V$. We comment on recent results for hadronic observables obtained in the improved theory.

  8. Measurement properties of performance-based outcome measures to assess physical function in young and middle-aged people known to be at high risk of hip and/or knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kroman, S L; Roos, Ewa M.; Bennell, K L;

    2014-01-01

    To systematically appraise the evidence on measurement properties of performance-based outcome measures to assess physical function in young and middle-aged people known to be at high risk of hip and/or knee osteoarthritis (OA).......To systematically appraise the evidence on measurement properties of performance-based outcome measures to assess physical function in young and middle-aged people known to be at high risk of hip and/or knee osteoarthritis (OA)....

  9. A MULTICENTER, BLIND, RANDOMIZED, PLACEBO-CONTROLLED STUDY OF THE SYMPTOM- AND STRUCTURE-MODIFYING EFFET OF ALFLUTOP IN PATIENTS WITH KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS. REPORT 2: THE ASSESSMENT OF THE STRUCTURE-MODIFYING EFFECT OF THE DRUG

    OpenAIRE

    L. I. Alekseeva; E P Sharapova; E. A. Taskina; N. V. Chichasova; G R Imametdinova; N A Shostak; N. G. Pravdyuk; L N Denisov

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the symptom- and structure-modifying effect of Alflutop compared to placebo (PL) in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Material and methods. The study included 90 patients with knee OA (according to the criteria of the Russian Association of Rheumatologists) at the stage 2–3 (according to the Kellgren-Lawrence scale); pain score when walk- ing ≥ 40 mm (assessed using the visual analog scale). All the patients provided an informed consent. The patients were randomly...

  10. The effect of Ai Chi aquatic therapy on individuals with knee osteoarthritis: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Billy C L; Kong, Iris S Y; Lee, Roy K L; Man, Ryan W F; Tse, William H K; Fong, Adalade K W; Tsang, William W N

    2017-05-01

    [Purpose] To examine the efficacy of Ai Chi in relieving the pain and stiffness of knee osteoarthritis and improving, physical functioning, proprioception and quality of life. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-five persons with knee osteoarthritis completed 5 weeks Ai Chi practice (60 minutes per session, twice per week, 10 sessions in total). Knee pain and stiffness were measured before and after the intervention program. [Results] Significant improvements in pain, self-perceived physical functioning and self-perceived stiffness were observed after the Ai-Chi intervention. On average, no significant change in knee range of motion, 6-minute walk test distances or proprioception was observed. [Conclusion] A five-week Ai Chi intervention can improve the pain and stiffness of knee osteoarthritis and self-perceived physical functions and quality of life improvement. Ai Chi may be another treatment choice for people with knee OA to practice in the community.

  11. A COMPARATIVE STUDY BETWEEN JOINT MOBILIZATION AND CONVENTIONAL PHYSIOTHERAPY IN KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aftab Ahmad

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Osteoarthritis (O.A. is an active disease process involving articular cartilage destruction, subchondral bone thickening and new bone formation. Worldwide osteoarthritis is estimated to be the fourth leading cause of disability, in which 10% are males and 13% are females. Studies from china, Bangladesh and Pakistan have shown high prevalence of knee osteoarthritis. Pharmacological interventions, surgical procedures and Physiotherapy management play important role in knee Osteoarthritis. In Physiotherapy management of osteoarthritis, manual therapy along with thermotherapy and/or electrotherapy is used. Current study was to evaluate the effectiveness of joint mobilization in knee osteo-arthritis. Methods: Comparative study was undertaken on 50 patients with osteoarthritis of the knee who were randomly assigned to one of two groups that received Joint mobilization alone (n = 25; mean age, 53 years or Conventional Physiotherapy (n = 25; mean age, 50 years.Both groups were received their programs for 8 weeks; two sessions per week. Analysis of data within group and between groups of the pre and post treatment values of the function and pain was done using pair t test and independent t test. Results: Both groups showed significant improvement in ISOA score and VAS. There was statistical significant difference between the two groups (Group A and B i.e. p < 0.005. Conclusion: Manual joint mobilization improves the effectiveness of the treatment program in treating symptoms of knee OA and improves function in elderly people with knee OA.

  12. Gait analysis of patients with knee osteoarthritis before and after Chinese massage treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qingguang, Zhu; Min, Fang; Li, Gong; Shuyun, Jiang; Wuquan, Sun; Jianhua, Li; Yong, Li

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Chinese massage therapy in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) by measuring lower-limb gait parameters. We recruited 20 women with knee OA, who then underwent Chinese massage therapy three times per week for 2 weeks. The patients underwent gait evaluation using a six-camera infrared motion analysis system. They completed Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index questionnaires before and after treatment. We calculated the forward speed, step width, step length, total support time percentage, initial double support time percentage, and single support time percentage. We also measured the angles at the knee, hip, and ankle during the stance phase of walking. The results showed statistically significant mean differences in knee pain relief, alleviation of stiffness, and physical function enhancement after therapy (P < 0.05). The patients gained significantly faster gait speed, greater step width, and increased total support time percentage after the Chinese massage therapy (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences in the range of motion or initial contact angles of the knee, hip, or ankle during the stance phase of walking. We concluded that Chinese massage is a beneficial complementary treatment and an alternative therapy choice for patients with knee OA for short-term pain relief. Chinese massage may improve walking ability for these patients.

  13. Matrix metalloproteases and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases in medial plica and pannus-like tissue contribute to knee osteoarthritis progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chih-Chang; Lin, Cheng-Yu; Wang, Hwai-Shi; Lyu, Shaw-Ruey

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by degradation of the cartilage matrix, leading to pathologic changes in the joints. However, the pathogenic effects of synovial tissue inflammation on OA knees are not clear. To investigate whether the inflammation caused by the medial plica is involved in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis, we examined the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs), interleukin (IL)-1β, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in the medial plica and pannus-like tissue in the knees of patients with medial compartment OA who underwent either arthroscopic medial release (stage II; 15 knee joints from 15 patients) or total knee replacement (stage IV; 18 knee joints from 18 patients). MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-9, IL-1β, and TNF-α mRNA and protein levels measured, respectively, by quantitative real-time PCR and Quantibody human MMP arrays, were highly expressed in extracts of medial plica and pannus-like tissue from stage IV knee joints. Immunohistochemical staining also demonstrated high expression of MMP-2, MMP-3, and MMP-9 in plica and pannus-like tissue of stage IV OA knees and not in normal cartilage. Some TIMP/MMP ratios decreased significantly in both medial plica and pannus-like tissue as disease progressed from stage II to stage IV. Furthermore, the migration of cells from the pannus-like tissue was enhanced by IL-1β, while plica cell migration was enhanced by TNF-α. The results suggest that medial plica and pannus-like tissue may be involved in the process of cartilage degradation in medial compartment OA of the knee.

  14. Coefficients of Friction, Lubricin, and Cartilage Damage in the Anterior Cruciate Ligament-Deficient Guinea Pig Knee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teeple, Erin; Elsaid, Khaled A.; Fleming, Braden C.; Jay, Gregory D.; Aslani, Koosha; Crisco, Joseph J.; Mechrefe, Anthony P.

    2009-01-01

    The coefficient of friction (COF) of articular cartilage is thought to increase with osteoarthritis (OA) progression, and this increase may occur due to a decrease in lubricin concentration. The objectives of this study were to measure the COF of guinea pig tibiofemoral joints with different stages of OA, and to establish relationships between COF, lubricin concentrations in synovial fluid, and degradation status using the Hartley guinea pig model. Both hind limbs from 24 animals were harvested: seven 3-month-old (no OA), seven 12-month-old (mild OA), and ten that were euthanized at 12-months of age after undergoing unilateral anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) transection at 3-months of age (moderate OA). Contralateral knees served as age matched controls. COFs of the tibiofemoral joints were measured using a pendulum apparatus. Synovial fluid lavages were analyzed to determine the concentration and integrity of lubricin using ELISA and western blot, and the overall articular cartilage status was evaluated by histology. The results showed that the mean COF in the ACL-deficient knees was significantly greater than that of the 3-month knees (p<0.01) and the 12-month knees (p<0.01). Lubricin concentrations in the ACL-deficient knees were significantly lower than that of the 3-month knees (p<0.01) and 12-month knees (p<0.01). No significant differences in COF or lubricin concentration were found between the 3-month and the 12-month knees. Histology verified the extent of cartilage damage in each group. Conclusion COF values increased and lubricin levels decreased with cartilage damage following ACL transection. PMID:17868097

  15. Muscle Power Is an Independent Determinant of Pain and Quality of Life in Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Kieran F; Price, Lori Lyn; Harvey, William F; Driban, Jeffrey B; Hau, Cynthia; Fielding, Roger A; Wang, Chenchen

    2015-12-01

    This study examined the relationships between leg muscle strength, power, and perceived disease severity in subjects with knee osteoarthritis (OA) in order to determine whether dynamic leg extensor muscle power would be associated with pain and quality of life in knee OA. Baseline data on 190 subjects with knee OA (mean ± SD age 60.2 ± 10.4 years, body mass index 32.7 ± 7.2 kg/m(2) ) were obtained from a randomized controlled trial. Knee pain was measured using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, and health-related quality of life was assessed using the Short Form 36 (SF-36). One-repetition maximum (1RM) strength was assessed using the bilateral leg press, and peak muscle power was measured during 5 maximum voluntary velocity repetitions at 40% and 70% of 1RM. In univariate analysis, greater muscle power was significantly associated with pain (r = -0.17, P muscle power was a significant independent predictor of pain (P ≤ 0.05) and PCS scores (P ≤ 0.04). However, muscle strength was not an independent determinant of pain or quality of life (P ≥ 0.06). Muscle power is an independent determinant of pain and quality of life in knee OA. Compared to strength, muscle power may be a more clinically important measure of muscle function within this population. New trials to systematically examine the impact of muscle power training interventions on disease severity in knee OA are particularly warranted. © 2015, American College of Rheumatology.

  16. Physiotherapy in hip and knee osteoarthritis: evidence and daily practice

    OpenAIRE

    Peter, Willem Frederik Hendrik (Wilfred)

    2015-01-01

    In the first part an update of a guideline for the physiotherapy treatment of patients with hip and knee OA is described. Then a set of quality indicators for the physiotherapy management is developed to be used as an instrument to measure guideline adherence. Subsequently the effect of educational strategies to enhance their uptake by physiotherapists in daily clinical practice is investigated. An interactive approach with patient colaboration and following a proces of clinical reasoning has...

  17. Application and Efficacy Evaluation of High Flexion Knee Prosthesis System in Total Knee Replacement%高屈曲后稳定型假体在全膝关节置换术中的应用及疗效评估

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张磊; 况丽; 曹洪; 邹海兵

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical effects of high-flexion prosthesis in total knee replacement.Methods Total 70 knees in 56 patients with knee joint injury were given total knee replacement.The high-flexion prosthesis was replacd through center incision and patellar medial approach.The fixed situation of prosthesis was observed with X-ray,and the scores of knee and knee function were evaluated with KSS scoring system.Results At final follow-up examination,the range of knee motion was improved from (64.71± 24.27) ° preoperatively to (126.79 ± 8.60)° postoperatively.The maximum flexion was (132.07 ± 9.03)°.The average Knee Society knee scores improved from (36.36 ± 10.36) preoperatively to (90.91 ± 4.46),and the average Knee Society function scores improved from (32.50 ± 10.14) scores preoperatively to (78.61 ± 11.61) scores.The X-ray examination of two of knees in patients with OA and three of knees in patients with RA showed lucencies around the tibial prosthesis,but the radiolucencies were lower than 2 mm and were nonprogressive.Conclusion Total knee replacement with high-flexion prosthesis can provide satisfactory improvement in knee function for patients with knee joint disease.The short-term effect is definite,but the long-term effect needs further studies.%目的:评估高屈曲型膝关节假体置换术后的临床疗效.方珐:对56例70膝膝关节病残患者进行高屈曲型全膝关节假体置换术.采用正中切口,髌旁内侧入路,行全膝关节置换.通过X线观察假体固定情况,采用美国膝关节学会评分(KSS评分)评定膝评分及膝功能评分.结果:末次随访时,关节活动度(ROM)明显增加,由术前(64.71 ±24.27)°增加至术后(126.79 ±8.60)°(110°~135°).术后最大屈曲角度为(132.07 ±9.03)°.术前KSS膝评分为(36.36±10.36)分,膝功能评分为(32.50 ±10.14)分,术后分别为(90.91±4.46)、(78.61±11.61)分.2例骨性关节炎及3例类风湿关节炎患者术后X线提示胫骨

  18. Internet Versus DVD Decision Aids for Hip and Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Kelli D; Sanders, Linda L; Olsen, Maren K; Bowlby, Lynn; Katz, Jeffrey N; Mather, Richard C; Williams, John W

    2016-06-01

    Decision aids (DAs) can improve multiple decision-making outcomes, but it is not known whether different formats of delivery differ in their effectiveness or acceptability. The present study compared the effectiveness and acceptability of internet and DVD formats of DAs for osteoarthritis (OA). Patients with hip or knee OA were randomized to view an internet or DVD format DA, which provided information on OA treatments. Measures were collected at baseline, immediately after viewing the DA and then 30 days later. Outcomes included: Hip/Knee OA Decision Quality Instrument - Knowledge Subscale (HK-DQI Knowledge), Decisional Conflict Scale (DCS), Preparation for Decision Making Scale (PDMS), Stage of Decision Making, and Acceptability of DAs. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) were used to examine changes in HK-DQI Knowledge and DCS scores over time, between decision aid groups and within the sample overall. Group differences in the PDMS scale (assessed once, immediately after DA viewing) were estimated using a Wilcoxon rank sums test. Among 155 participants in the study, the mean age was 61.8 years, 60.6% were women and 58.1% were Caucasian. HK-DQI Knowledge scores improved over time (p John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. A review of the clinical evidence for exercise in osteoarthritis of the hip and knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennell, Kim L; Hinman, Rana S

    2011-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic joint disease with the hip and knee being commonly affected lower limb sites. Osteoarthritis causes pain, stiffness, swelling, joint instability and muscle weakness, all of which can lead to impaired physical function and reduced quality of life. This review of evidence provides recommendations for exercise prescription in those with hip or knee OA. A narrative review was performed. Conservative non-pharmacological strategies, particularly exercise, are recommended by all clinical guidelines for the management of OA and meta-analyses support these exercise recommendations. Aerobic, strengthening, aquatic and Tai chi exercise are beneficial for improving pain and function in people with OA with benefits seen across the range of disease severities. The optimal exercise dosage is yet to be determined and an individualized approach to exercise prescription is required based on an assessment of impairments, patient preference, co-morbidities and accessibility. Maximising adherence is a key element dictating success of exercise therapy. This can be enhanced by the use of supervised exercise sessions (possibly in class format) in the initial exercise period followed by home exercises. Bringing patients back for intermittent consultations with the exercise practitioner, or attendance at "refresher" group exercise classes may also assist long-term adherence and improved patient outcomes. Few studies have evaluated the effects of exercise on structural disease progression and there is currently no evidence to show that exercise can be disease modifying. Exercise plays an important role in managing symptoms in those with hip and knee OA.

  20. The Healing Effect of Bone Marrow-Derived Stem Cells in Knee Osteoarthritis: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrabani, Davood; Mojtahed Jaberi, Fereidoon; Zakerinia, Maryam; Hadianfard, Mohammad Javad; Jalli, Reza; Tanideh, Nader; Zare, Shahrokh

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a prevalent chronic disease impacting on quality of life and has societal and economical burden increasing with age. Yet, no confirmed pharmacological, biological or surgical therapy could prevent the progressive destruction of OA joint. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) with immunosuppressive activities emerged a potential therapy. We describe a magnetic resonance images (MRI) approved 47 years old nomad female suffering from a severe right knee OA. After intra-articular injection of 36×106 passage 2 of bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMSCs), the patient’s functional status of the knee, the number of stairs she could climb, the pain on visual analog scale (VAS) and walking distance improved after two months post-transplantation. MRI revealed an extension of the repaired tissue over subchondral bone. So as MSC transplantation is a simple technique, resulted into pain relief, minimized donor-site morbidity, provided a better quality of life, significantly improved cartilage quality with no need to hospitalization or surgery, cell transplantation can be considered as a reliable alternative treatment for chronic knee OA. Therefore these findings can be added to the literature on using BMSCs for treatment of OA. PMID:27579273

  1. Relationship between knee alignment and T1ρ values of articular cartilage and menisci in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ligong, E-mail: ligong.wang@hotmail.com [Quantitative Multinuclear Musculoskeletal Imaging Group (QMMIG), Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY 10016 (United States); School of Radiation Medicine and Protection, Medical College of Soochow University, School for Radiological and interdisciplinary Sciences (RAD-X), Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China); Vieira, Renata La Rocca, E-mail: relarocca@gmail.com [Quantitative Multinuclear Musculoskeletal Imaging Group (QMMIG), Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Rybak, Leon D., E-mail: Leon.Rybak@nyumc.org [Quantitative Multinuclear Musculoskeletal Imaging Group (QMMIG), Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Babb, James S., E-mail: James.Babb@nyumc.org [Quantitative Multinuclear Musculoskeletal Imaging Group (QMMIG), Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Chang, Gregory, E-mail: gregory.chang@nyumc.org [Quantitative Multinuclear Musculoskeletal Imaging Group (QMMIG), Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Krasnokutsky, Svetlana, E-mail: Svetlana.Krasnokutsky@nyumc.org [Department of Rheumatology, New York University Hospital for Joint Diseases, 301 East 17th Street, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Abramson, Steven, E-mail: StevenB.Abramson@nyumc.org [Department of Rheumatology, New York University Hospital for Joint Diseases, 301 East 17th Street, New York, NY 10003 (United States); and others

    2013-11-01

    Objective: To assess the relationship between knee alignment and subregional T1ρ values of the femorotibial cartilage and menisci in patients with mild (Kellgren–Lawrence grade 1) to moderate (KL3) osteoarthritis (OA) at 3 T. Materials and methods: 26 subjects with a clinical diagnosis of KL1-3 OA were included and subdivided into three subgroups: varus, valgus, and neutral. All subjects were evaluated on a 3 T MR scanner. Mann–Whitney and Wilcoxon signed rank tests were performed to determine any statistically significant differences in subregional T1ρ values of femorotibial cartilage and menisci among the three subgroups of KL1-3 OA patients. Results: Medial femoral anterior cartilage subregion in varus group had significantly higher (p < 0.05) T1ρ values than all cartilage subregions in valgus group. Medial tibial central cartilage subregion had significantly higher T1ρ values (p < 0.05) than lateral tibial central cartilage subregion in varus group. The posterior horn of the medial meniscus in neutral group had significantly higher T1ρ values (p < 0.0029) than all meniscus subregions in valgus group. Conclusion: There exists some degree of association between knee alignment and subregional T1ρ values of femorotibial cartilage and menisci in patients with clinical OA.

  2. Knee osteoarthritis image registration: data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galván-Tejada, Jorge I.; Celaya-Padilla, José M.; Treviño, Victor; Tamez-Peña, José G.

    2015-03-01

    Knee osteoarthritis is a very common disease, in early stages, changes in joint structures are shown, some of the most common symptoms are; formation of osteophytes, cartilage degradation and joint space reduction, among others. Based on a joint space reduction measurement, Kellgren-Lawrence grading scale, is a very extensive used tool to asses radiological OA knee x-ray images, based on information obtained from these assessments, the objective of this work is to correlate the Kellgren-Lawrence score to the bilateral asymmetry between knees. Using public data from the Osteoarthritis initiative (OAI), a set of images with different Kellgren-Lawrencescores were used to determine a relationship of Kellgren-Lawrence score and the bilateral asymmetry, in order to measure the asymmetry between the knees, the right knee was registered to match the left knee, then a series of similarity metrics, mutual information, correlation, and mean squared error where computed to correlate the deformation (mismatch) of the knees to the Kellgren-Lawrence score. Radiological information was evaluated and scored by OAI radiologist groups. The results of the study suggest an association between Radiological Kellgren-Lawrence score and image registration metrics, mutual information and correlation is higher in the early stages, and mean squared error is higher in advanced stages. This association can be helpful to develop a computer aided grading tool.

  3. IN VIVO KINEMATICS OF THE ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT DEFICIENT KNEE DURING WIDE-BASED SQUAT USING A 2D/3D REGISTRATION TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Miyaji

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL deficiency increases the risk of early osteoarthritis (OA. Studies of ACL deficient knee kinematics would be important to reveal the disease process and therefore to find mechanisms which would potentially slow OA progression. The purpose of this study was to determine if in vivo kinematics of the anterior cruciate ligament deficient (ACLD knee during a wide-based squat activity differ from kinematics of the contralateral intact knee. Thirty-three patients with a unilateral ACLD knee consented to participate in this institutional review board approved study with the contralateral intact knee serving as the control. In vivo knee kinematics during the wide-based squat were analyzed using a 2D/3D registration technique utilizing CT-based bone models and lateral fluoroscopy. Comparisons were performed using values between 0 and 100° flexion both in flexion and extension phases of the squat activity. Both the ACLD and intact knees demonstrated increasing tibial internal rotation with knee flexion, and no difference was observed in tibial rotation between the groups. The tibia in the ACLD knee was more anterior than that of the contralateral knees at 0 and 5° flexion in both phases (p < 0.05. Tibiofemoral medial contact points of the ACLD knees were more posterior than that of the contralateral knees at 5, 10 and 15° of knee flexion in the extension phase of the squat activity (p < 0.05. Tibiofemoral lateral contact points of the ACLD knees were more posterior than that of the contralateral knees at 0° flexion in the both phases (p < 0.05. The kinematics of the ACLD and contralateral intact knees were similar during the wide-based squat except at the low flexion angles. Therefore, we conclude the wide-based squat may be recommended for the ACLD knee by avoiding terminal extension

  4. Measurement properties of performance-based measures to assess physical function in hip and knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dobson, F; Hinman, R S; Hall, M

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To systematically review the measurement properties of performance-based measures to assess physical function in people with hip and/or knee osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: Electronic searches were performed in MEDLINE, CINAHL, Embase, and PsycINFO up to the end of June 2012. Two...

  5. Quality indicators for physiotherapy care in hip and knee osteoarthritis: development and clinimetric properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peter, W.F.; Wees, P.J. van der; Hendriks, E.J.; Bie, R.A. de; Verhoef, J.; Jong, Z. de; Bodegom-Vos, L. van; Hilberdink, W.K.H.A.; Vlieland, T.P.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to develop process quality indicators for physiotherapy care based on key recommendations of the Dutch physiotherapy guideline on hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: Guideline recommendations were rated for their relevance by an expert panel, transf

  6. Impact of exercise type and dose on pain and disability in knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Carsten Bogh; Christensen, Robin Daniel Kjersgaard; Roos, Ewa M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify the optimal exercise program, characterized by type and intensity of exercise, length of program, duration of individual supervised sessions, and number of sessions per week, for reducing pain and patient-reported disability in knee osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: A systematic...

  7. No effects of functional exercise therapy on walking biomechanics in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Klokker, Louise; Bartholdy, Cecilie

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To assess the effects of a functional and individualised exercise programme on gait biomechanics during walking in people with knee OA. METHODS: Sixty participants were randomised to 12 weeks of facility-based functional and individualised neuromuscular exercise therapy (ET), 3 sessions per...

  8. Reasons for Treatment Choices in Knee and Hip Osteoarthritis: A Qualitative Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Selten, E.M.H.; Vriezekolk, J.E.; Geenen, R.; Laan, W.H. van der; Meulen-Dilling, R.G. van der; Nijhof, M.W.; Schers, H.J.; Ende, C.H.M. van den

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Conservative treatment modalities in osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip or knee are underused, whereas the demand for surgery is rising substantially. To improve the use of conservative treatment modalities, a more in-depth understanding of the reasons for patients' treatment choices is requi

  9. Reasons for treatment choices in knee and hip osteoarthritis: a qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Selten, E.M.H.; Vriezekolk, J.E.; Geenen, R.; Van der Laan, W.H.; Van der Meulen-Dilling, R.G.; Nijhof, M.W.; Schers, H.J.; van den Ende, C.H.M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Conservative treatment modalities in osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip or knee are underused, whereas the demand for surgery is rising substantially. To improve the use of conservative treatment modalities, a more in-depth understanding of the reasons for patients’ treatment choices is requir

  10. Prognostic factors of progression of osteoarthritis of the knee : A systematic review of observational studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belo, J. N.; Berger, M. Y.; Reijman, M.; Koes, B. W.; Bierma-Zeinstra, S. M. A.

    2007-01-01

    objective. To provide an overview of prognostic factors of knee osteoarthritis (OA) progression. Methods. We searched Medline and Embase up to December 2003 according to a specified search strategy (keywords for disease, location, and study design). Studies that fulfilled predefined criteria were as

  11. Development of a Decision Support System to Predict Physicians' Rehabilitation Protocols for Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawamdeh, Ziad M.; Alshraideh, Mohammad A.; Al-Ajlouni, Jihad M.; Salah, Imad K.; Holm, Margo B.; Otom, Ali H.

    2012-01-01

    To design a medical decision support system (MDSS) that would accurately predict the rehabilitation protocols prescribed by the physicians for patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) using only their demographic and clinical characteristics. The demographic and clinical variables for 170 patients receiving one of three treatment protocols for knee…

  12. Prognostic factors of progression of osteoarthritis of the knee : A systematic review of observational studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belo, J. N.; Berger, M. Y.; Reijman, M.; Koes, B. W.; Bierma-Zeinstra, S. M. A.

    2007-01-01

    objective. To provide an overview of prognostic factors of knee osteoarthritis (OA) progression. Methods. We searched Medline and Embase up to December 2003 according to a specified search strategy (keywords for disease, location, and study design). Studies that fulfilled predefined criteria were

  13. Group education and exercise is feasible in knee and hip osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Søren Thorgaard; Odgaard, Anders; Rasmussen, Jens Ole

    2012-01-01

    Clinical practice does not reflect current clinical guidelines recommending an early multimodal non-surgical treatment for knee and hip osteoarthritis (OA). The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility of such an initiative (Good Life with osteoArthritis in Denmark (GLA:D) in persons ...

  14. Structural joint changes, malalignment, and laxity in osteoarthritis of the knee

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esch, van der M.; Steultjens, M.P.; Wieringa, H.; Dinant, H.; Dekker, J.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the relationship between (i) structural joint changes (i.e. joint space narrowing and osteophyte formation) and laxity and (ii) joint malalignment and laxity in osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was carried out on 35 outpatients with osteoarthriti

  15. Range of joint motion and disability in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee or hip.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steultjens, M.P.M.; Dekker, J.; Baar, M.E. van; Oostendorp, R.A.B.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To establish the relationships between the range of joint motion (ROM) and disability in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee or hip. Two related issues were addressed: (1) the inter-relationships between ROMs of joint actions, and (2) the relationship between ROM and disability.

  16. Weight loss as treatment for knee osteoarthritis symptoms in obese patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bliddal, Henning; Leeds, Anthony; Stigsgaard, Lise

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate 1-year symptomatic improvement in obese patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) on an intensive low-energy diet (LED) maintained by frequent consultations with a dietician compared to minimal attention. METHODS: The LED programme consisted of group therapy with dietary consu...

  17. Symptomatic knee disorders in floor layers and graphic designers. A cross-sectional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lilli Kirkeskov; Rytter, Søren; Bonde, Jens Peter

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have described an increased risk of developing tibio-femoral osteoarthritis (TF OA), meniscal tears and bursitis among those with a trade as floor layers. The purpose of this study was to analyse symptomatic knee disorders among floor layers that were highly exposed to kneeling...

  18. A hierarchy of patient-reported outcomes for meta-analysis of knee osteoarthritis trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Carsten; Lund, Hans; Roos, Ewa M

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To develop a prioritised list based on responsiveness for extracting patient-reported outcomes (PROs) measuring pain and disability for performing meta-analyses in knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods. A systematic search was conducted in 20 highest impact factor general and rheumatology...

  19. Changes in knee joint load indices from before to 12 months after arthroscopic partial meniscectomy: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorlund, J B; Holsgaard-Larsen, A; Creaby, M W; Jørgensen, G M; Nissen, N; Englund, M; Lohmander, L S

    2016-07-01

    Patients undergoing arthroscopic partial meniscectomy (APM) are at increased risk of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Meniscal damage and/or surgery may alter knee joint loading to increase OA risk. We investigated changes in knee joint loading following medial APM surgery, compared with the contra-lateral leg. We estimated indices of knee joint loading (external peak knee adduction moment (KAM), KAM impulse and peak knee flexion moment (KFM)) normalized to body size (i.e., body mass (BM) and height (HT)) using 3D gait analysis in 23 patients (17 men, mean (SD) 46.2 (6.4) years, BMI 25.8 (3.4) kg/m(2)) without radiographic knee OA before and 12 months after medial APM. Static alignment was assessed by radiography and self-reported outcomes by Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS). Peak KAM and KAM impulse increased in the APM leg compared to the contra-lateral leg from before to 12 months after surgery (change difference: 0.38 Nm/BM*HT% 95% CI 0.01 to 0.76 (P = 0.049) and 0.20 Nm*s/BM*HT% 95% CI 0.10 to 0.30 (P knee OA in these patients. Randomized trials including a non-surgical control group are needed to determine if changes in joint loading following APM are caused by surgery or by changes in symptoms. Copyright © 2016 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of potentially modifiable physical factors as predictors of health status in knee osteoarthritis patients referred for physical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Rui Soles; Pinheiro, João Páscoa; Cabri, Jan

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this cross sectional study was to estimate the contributions of potentially modifiable physical factors to variations in perceived health status in knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients referred for physical therapy. Health status was measured by three questionnaires: Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS); Knee Outcome Survey - Activities of Daily Living Scale (KOS-ADLS); and Medical Outcomes Study - 36 item Short Form (SF-36). Physical factors were measured by a battery of tests: body mass index (BMI); visual analog scale (VAS) of pain intensity; isometric dynamometry; universal goniometry; step test (ST); timed "up and go" test (TUGT); 20-meter walk test (20MWT); and 6-minute walk test (6MWT). All tests were administered to 136 subjects with symptomatic knee OA (94 females, 42 males; age: 67.2 ± 7.1 years). Multiple stepwise regression analyses revealed that knee muscle strength, VAS of pain intensity, 6MWT, degree of knee flexion and BMI were moderate predictors of health status. In the final models, selected combinations of these potentially modifiable physical factors explained 22% to 37% of the variance in KOOS subscale scores, 40% of the variance in the KOS-ADLS scale score, and 21% to 34% of the variance in physical health SF-36 subscale scores. More research is required in order to evaluate whether therapeutic interventions targeting these potentially modifiable physical factors would improve health status in knee OA patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. ESWT and alendronate sodium demonstrate equal protective effects in osteoarthritis of the knee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ching-Jen; Chou, Wen-Yi; Hsu, Shan-Ling; Huang, Chien-Yiu; Cheng, Jai-Hong

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the effects of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) and alendronate sodium (alendronate) in osteoarthritis (OA) of rat knees. The control group was subjected to a sham surgery and did not receive either ESWT or alendronate treatment. The OA group underwent anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) and medial meniscectomy (MM) surgery and did not receive either ESWT or alendronate. The ESWT group underwent ACLT and MM surgery and received ESWT after the surgery. The alendronate group received alendronate after ACLT and MM surgery. The evaluations included radiograph, bone mineral density (BMD), serum C-telopeptide collagen II (CTX-II), cartilage oligomeric protein (COMP), alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin, histopathological examination and immunohistochemical analysis. Radiographs at 12 weeks showed pronounced OA changes in the OA group. The BMD values, CTX-II, COMP, alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin showed no significant difference between ESWT and alendronate groups. In histopathology, the Mankin and Safranin O scores significantly increased in the OA, ESWT and alendronate groups, but without any significant difference between the ESWT and alendronate groups. In immunohistochemical analysis, the von Willebrand factor (vWF), vascular endothelial factor (VEGF), soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule (sVCAM), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2), and osteocalcin expressions in articular cartilage and subchondral bone showed a significant decrease in the OA group, but no difference was noted between the ESWT and alendronate groups. In conclusion, ESWT and alendronate sodium demonstrate equal protective effects from developing osteoarthritis of the knee in rats.

  2. India-Based Knee Osteoarthritis Evaluation (iKare): A Multi-Centre Cross-Sectional Study on the Management of Knee Pain and Early Osteoarthritis in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancheti, Parag; Shetty, Vijay D; Dhillon, Mandeep S; Sprague, Sheila A; Bhandari, Mohit

    2017-09-01

    Access to early knee osteoarthritis treatment in low and middle income nations is often believed to be limited. We conducted a cross-sectional study in India to assess prior access to treatment among patients presenting with knee pain to specialist orthopaedic clinics. The multi-centre, cross-sectional study included patients presenting with knee pain at 3 hospitals in India. Patients who met the inclusion criteria and provided informed consent completed a questionnaire designed to assess patient demographics, socioeconomic status, knee pain, treatment method, and patient's knowledge on osteoarthritis (OA). Their orthopaedic surgeons also completed a questionnaire on the severity of patient's OA and their recommended treatments. The impact of demographic characteristics on the prescription of treatment options was analyzed using logistic regression. A total of 714 patients met the eligibility criteria and participated in this study. The majority of patients had been experiencing pain for less than 1 year (64.8%) and had previously been prescribed medications (91.6%), supplements (68.6%), and nonpharmacological (81.9%) treatments to manage their knee OA. Current treatment recommendations included oral medications (83.3%), intra-articular injections (29.8%), and surgical intervention (12.7%). Prescription of oral medications was related to younger age, lack of deformities, and lower Kellgren-Lawrence grades (p < 0.01). Patients treated in private hospital settings were more likely to have been previously treated with medications (range, 84.3% to 92.6%; p < 0.01) and physical treatments (range, 61.8% to 84.8%; p < 0.01) than patients treated at government hospitals. Contrary to the perception, our findings suggest a similar proportion of early knee OA treatment between India and North America.

  3. The expression of SIRT1 in articular cartilage of patients with knee osteoarthritis and its correlation with disease severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yusheng; Xiao, Wenfeng; Wu, Ping; Deng, Zhenhan; Zeng, Chao; Li, Hui; Yang, Tuo; Lei, Guanghua

    2016-11-18

    The study aims to investigate the expression of SIRT1 in articular cartilage of patients with primary knee osteoarthritis (OA) and its relationship with disease severity. Cartilage tissue samples were collected from 38 knee OA patients and 9 normal healthy controls and then ascribed to normal, mild, moderate, and severe groups on the basis of the improved Mankin grading system. The expression of SIRT1 in articular cartilage was detected by immunohistochemistry and western blots. The expression of p53 and acetylated p53 (Ac-p53) was also measured by western blots. The mutual comparisons of the SIRT1 expression levels in all groups have statistical significance except the one between the mild and moderate groups. Moreover, western blot results showed that the SIRT1 was decreased and p53/Ac-p53 were increased in the OA group. The average gray level of SIRT1 increases with the improving grade of the improved Mankin grading system scorers. The expression of SIRT1 in articular cartilage is negatively associated with severity of knee OA, indicating that SIRT1 may act as a monitoring indicator for determining development and progression of knee OA.

  4. ANALYSIS OF THE PATHOGENETIC MECHANISMS OF CHRONIC JOINT PAIN IN PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS AND KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS

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    E. S. Filatova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to reveal neurogenic mechanisms in the pathogenesis of chronic pain syndrome in rheumatoid arthritis (RA and knee osteoarthritis (OA in order to develop individualized pharmacotherapy.Subjects and methods. One hundred and eighty-three patients with RA and 80 with knee OA were examined. By using the neuropathic pain diagnostic questionnaire (DN4, all the patients were divided into 2 groups with and without a neuropathic pain component (NPC.Results. NPC was found in 43% of the patients with RA and it was connected with involvement of the peripheral somatosensory system. In RA, NPC was common in older patients with longer disease duration, higher X-ray stage, and severe functional insufficiency. 30% of patients with knee OA also had NPC, however the signs of nervous system involvement were absent. In OA, NPC was associated with hyperalgesia, higher pain intensity, more marked joint dysfunction on the WOMAC, and anxiety.Discussion. This investigation revealed a mixed pattern of chronic pain syndrome in patients with RA and knee OA; some patients were found to have a NPC in the presence of predominantly a nociceptive component

  5. Imaging osteoarthritis in the knee joints using x-ray guided diffuse optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qizhi; Yuan, Zhen; Sobel, Eric S.; Jiang, Huabei

    2010-02-01

    In our previous studies, near-infrared (NIR) diffuse optical tomography (DOT) had been successfully applied to imaging osteoarthritis (OA) in the finger joints where significant difference in optical properties of the joint tissues was evident between healthy and OA finger joints. Here we report for the first time that large joints such as the knee can also be optically imaged especially when DOT is combined with x-ray tomosynthesis where the 3D image of the bones from x-ray is incorporated into the DOT reconstruction as spatial a priori structural information. This study demonstrates that NIR light can image large joints such as the knee in addition to finger joints, which will drastically broaden the clinical utility of our x-ray guided DOT technique for OA diagnosis.

  6. Effect of whole body vibration exercise on muscle strength and proprioception in females with knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trans, T; Aaboe, J; Henriksen, M

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of whole body vibration (WBV) exercise on muscle strength and proprioception in female patients with osteoarthritis in the knee (knee-OA). A single blinded, randomised, controlled trial was performed in an outpatient clinic on 52 female patients...... groups trained twice a week for 8 weeks, with a progressively increasing intensity. The WBV groups performed unloaded static WBV exercise. The following were measured: knee muscle strength (extension/flexion) and proprioception (threshold for detection of passive movement (TDPM)). Self-reported disease...

  7. Knee Dislocation: A Case Report, Diagnostic Vascular Work-Up, and Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burg, Michael D.; Dijkstra, Björn L.

    2017-01-01

    Knee dislocation is an uncommon, potentially limb-threatening, knee injury. Most often caused by high-velocity trauma, it can also result from low- or even ultra-low-velocity trauma. Rapid identification of the injury, reduction, and definitive management are necessary to minimize neurovascular damage. We present a case of rotatory anterolateral knee dislocation sustained during a twisting sports-related event. Special emphasis is placed on diagnosing vascular injuries associated with knee dislocations. PMID:28321343

  8. Pain management in the elderly: transdermal fentanyl for the treatment of pain caused by osteoarthritis of the knee and hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordarski, Sylwester

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the utility of transdermal fentanyl (transdermal fentanyl, TDF) for the treatment of pain due to osteoarthritis (osteoarthritis, OA) of the knee and hip, which was not adequately controlled by nonopioid analgesics or weak opioids. WOMAC is a reliable, valid, and responsive multidimensional, self-administrated outcome measure designed specifically to evaluate patients with OA of the knee or hip. TDF significantly increased pain control and improved functioning and quality of life. Metoclopramide appeared to be of limited value in preventing nausea and vomiting.

  9. High mid-term revision rate after treatment of large, full-thickness cartilage lesions and OA in the patellofemoral joint using a large inlay resurfacing prosthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Jens Ole

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: The HemiCAP-Wave® implant for the patellofemoral resurfacing treatment of large cartilage lesions and osteoarthritis (OA) was introduced in 2009. The outcome of a prospective cohort study of 18 patients with large trochlea lesions or isolated OA treated with the HemiCAP-Wave® implant...... than 4 cm(2). Patients were followed for 2 years with American Knee Society Subjective outcome Scores (AKSS), pain scores and radiographic evaluations and for up to 6 years with complications and reoperations. RESULTS: At the 1- and 2-year follow-up mean AKSS clinical score, the mean AKSS function...... pain but high mid-term revision rate after patellofemoral inlay resurfacing using the HemiCAP-Wave® implant. Patellofemoral resurfacing implantation treatment with a large inlay prosthesis can offer temporary treatment for large isolated patellofemoral cartilage lesions or OA in younger patients...

  10. Physical Management of Patient with Osteoarthritis of Knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Moniruzzaman Khan

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA, is by far the most common form of arthritis. It shows a strong association with ageing and is a major cause of pain and disability in the elderly. Pathologically, it may be defined as a condition of synovial joints characterized by focal loss of articular hyaline cartilage with proliferation of new bone and remodelling of joint contour. Inflammation is not a prominent feature, OA preferentially targets the weight bearing joint mainly knee & hip. There is no single cause of OA; it results from a disparity between the stress applied to the articular cartilage and the ability of the cartilage to withstand that stress. The initial or early OA treatment aimed at relieve of pain, restoration of joint movement and rest of the joint with the support of analgesic and NSAIDS. Shortwave diathermy (SWD and ultrasound therapy is also helpful in relieving pain and joint stiffness. For long term management full explanation of the nature of OA and advice and instruction on appropriate exercise program is essential. Reduction of any adverse mechanical factors - these includes weight loss if obese, shock -absorbing footwear, use of walking stick or walker. DOI: 10.3329/bsmmuj.v2i2.4770 BSMMU J 2009; 2(2: 95-98

  11. Improving care for people with osteoarthritis of the hip and knee: how has national policy for osteoarthritis been translated into service models in Australia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Caroline; Hunter, David; Hinman, Rana; March, Lyn; Osborne, Richard; Bennell, Kim

    2011-05-01

    There is strong rationale for improving care for people with chronic conditions, including osteoarthritis (OA). Successful implementation of healthcare reform requires new concepts and directions that are strongly supported by policy, new models of care (service redesign) and changes in day-to-day practice (healthcare provider and patient practice). In this paper we discuss the extent to which policy about management of OA of the hip and knee has been translated into new service models in Australia. A structured search of government and other key health websites in Australia was performed to identify policy, funding initiatives and new services models for managing OA of the hip and knee. This search was supported by a literature review. Musculoskeletal conditions were designated a National Health Priority in Australia in 2002. Under the Better Arthritis and Osteoporosis Care initiative, Australia has developed a national policy for OA care and national evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for management of OA of the hip and knee. Only two well-described examples of new chronic disease management service models, the Osteoarthritis Clinical Pathway (OACP) model and the Osteoarthritis Hip and Knee Service (OAHKS) were identified. Primarily focused within acute care public hospital settings, these have been shown to be feasible and acceptable but have limited data on clinical impact and cost-effectiveness. While policy is extant, implementation has not been systematic and comprehensive. Clinicians have evidence-based recommendations for OA management but are poorly supported by service models to deliver these effectively and efficiently.

  12. Airflow Simulations around OA Intake Louver with Electronic Velocity Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Hwataik

    2011-01-01

    It is important to control outdoor airflow rates into HVAC systems in terms of energy conservation and healthy indoor environment. Technologies are being developed to measure outdoor air (OA) flow rates through OA intake louvers on a real time basis. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the airflow characteristics through an OA intake louver numerically in order to provide suggestions for sensor installations. Airflow patterns are simulated with and without electronic air velocity sens...

  13. Comparison of cartilage thickness with radiologic grade of knee osteoarthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnesi, Filippo [Mayo Clinic, Motion Analysis Laboratory, Division of Orthopedic Research, Rochester, MN (United States); Polytechnic of Milan, Department of Bioengineering, Milan (Italy); Amrami, Kimberly K. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Frigo, Carlo A. [Polytechnic of Milan, Department of Bioengineering, Milan (Italy); Kaufman, Kenton R. [Mayo Clinic, Motion Analysis Laboratory, Division of Orthopedic Research, Rochester, MN (United States); Mayo Clinic/Foundation, Motion Analysis Laboratory, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2008-07-15

    To compare joint space width (JSW) measurements obtained from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with a semi-automated computer algorithm to the Kellgren and Lawrence grading of osteoarthritis (OA). Three hundred and six patients (234 female, 72 male) with a mean age of 56.7 years (range 31-81 years) underwent MRI of their knees with a fast oblique spiral spoiled gradient (SPGR) sequence. A board-certified musculoskeletal radiologist graded the OA of all the patients in accordance with the Kellgren and Lawrence OA scale. A previously validated computer algorithm was used to determine the minimum JSW for both the tibiofemoral joint and the patellofemoral joint. An analysis of variance (ANOVA) with the Student-Newman-Kuels post-hoc test was used to determine if there were differences in JSW as a function of OA grade. The radiologic grade of OA was inversely associated with the JSW. In the medial compartment the JSW did not change significantly between grade 1 and grade 2, but there was a significant decrease in JSW between grade 0 (normal) and grade 1 and for each OA grade above grade 2. In the lateral compartment no statistical differences were found till grade 2, while grade 3 was found to be statistically different from the previous one. The number of patients with a grade 4 patellofemoral OA was too low for the statistical significance to be assessed. In the patellofemoral joint the JSW did not change significantly until grade 2, while a statistically significant reduction was found for both grade 3 and grade 4. This study showed that an inverse non-linear relationship exists between radiologic grade and JSW. The relationship differs for the tibiofemoral and the patellofemoral joint. (orig.)

  14. Body mass index and risk of knee osteoarthritis: systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Huaqing; Chen, Changhong

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Obesity is suggested to be a risk factor for knee osteoarthritis (OA). This meta-analysis aimed to examine the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and the risk of knee OA in published prospective studies. Design Meta-analysis. Studies reviewed An extensive literature review was performed, and relevant studies published in English were retrieved from the computerised databases MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane. Methods The effect estimate (RR or HR) and its 95% CI are investigated on the basis of the evaluation of differences of knee OR risk in overweight or obesity versus those with normal weight. Category-specific risk estimates were further transformed into estimates of the RR in terms of per increase of 5 in BMI by using the generalised least-squares method for trend estimation. Studies were independently reviewed by two investigators. Subgroup analysis was performed. Heterogeneity and publication bias were assessed. Data from eligible studies were extracted, and the meta-analysis was performed by using the STATA software V.12.0. Results 14 studies were finally included in the analysis. The results showed that overweight and obesity were significantly associated with higher knee OA risks of 2.45 (95% CI 1.88 to 3.20, p<0.001) and 4.55 (95% CI 2.90 to 7.13, p<0.001), respectively. The risk of knee OA increases by 35% (95% CI 1.18 to 1.53, p<0.001) with a 5 kg/m2 increase in BMI. Subgroup analysis showed that obesity was an independent predictor of knee OA risk regardless of the study country, sample size, gender proportion of participants, duration of follow-up, presence of adjusted knee injury and assessed study quality above or below an NOS score of 8. No publication bias was detected. Conclusions Obesity was a robust risk factor for knee OA. Professionals should take a possible weight reduction into account for the treatment of knee OA whenever a patient is significantly overweight. PMID:26656979

  15. Application of Infrared Thermography as a Diagnostic Tool of Knee Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arfaoui, Ahlem; Bouzid, Mohamed Amine; Pron, Hervé; Taiar, Redha; Polidori, Guillaume

    This paper aimed to study the feasibility of application of infrared thermography to detect osteoarthritis of the knee and to compare the distribution of skin temperature between participants with osteoarthritis and those without pathology. All tests were conducted at LACM (Laboratory of Mechanical Stresses Analysis) and the gymnasium of the University of Reims Champagne Ardennes. IR thermography was performed using an IR camera. Ten participants with knee osteoarthritis and 12 reference healthy participants without OA participated in this study. Questionnaires were also used. The participants with osteoarthritis of the knee were selected on clinical examination and a series of radiographs. The level of pain was recorded by using a simple verbal scale (0-4). Infrared thermography reveals relevant disease by highlighting asymmetrical behavior in thermal color maps of both knees. Moreover, a linear evolution of skin temperature in the knee area versus time has been found whatever the participant group is in the first stage following a given effort. Results clearly show that the temperature can be regarded as a key parameter for evaluating pain. Thermal images of the knee were taken with an infrared camera. The study shows that with the advantage of being noninvasive and easily repeatable, IRT appears to be a useful tool to detect quantifiable patterns of surface temperatures and predict the singular thermal behavior of this pathology. It also seems that this non-intrusive technique enables to detect the early clinical manifestations of knee OA.

  16. The Effects of Action Potential Stimulation on Pain, Swelling and Function of Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

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    Razieh Sepehri

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Knee osteoarthritis (OA is one of the most prevalent joint diseases. Electrical muscle stimulation is effective to improve its symptoms. Today, action potential stimulation (APS with various currents and periods is used to treat OA. This study aims at analyzing the effect of action potential stimulation in improving knee OA symptoms. Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial, patients with mild to moderate knee OA divided randomly in two groups each had 15 people. Along with the conventional exercises of physiotherapy, one group received 16 minutes action potential stimulation with the lowest intensity (sensible; but the other group besides receiving the conventional exercises of physiotherapy was connected into a plugged off machine for 16 minutes. Certain variables were measured and recorded four times. Results: Comparing the variables before and after intervention did not show any meaningful difference between the two groups. But within group, pain with p=0.0001 showed a meaningful decrease. Decreasing of swelling (inflammation in group 1 and 2 was meaningful with p<0.001 and p<0.001, respectively. For group 1, knee flexion range was improved meaningfully between first and fourth times as p<0.031, but it was not meaningful for group 2. Duration of 50 meters walking and step up and down from three steps significantly decreased in both groups. Conclusion: Although there was no significant difference in variables between two groups, but within both groups’ pain and swelling decreased and functional ability increased, thus, it can be concluded that type of APS does not play a key role in treating knee OA.

  17. Effects of Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy in Chronic Stroke Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effects of extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) on pain, function, and ultrasonographic features of chronic stroke patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods A total of 18 chronic stroke patients (33 knee joints) with unilateral or bilateral knee OA (Kellgren-Lawrence grade ≥1) were enrolled in this study. The patients were randomly allocated to an experimental group receiving ESWT (n=9) or a control group receiving sham ESWT (n=9). For the ESWT group, patients received 1,000 pulses weekly for 3 weeks, totaling to an energy dose of 0.05 mJ/mm2 on the proximal medial tibia of the affected knee. The assessments were performed before the treatment, immediately after the first treatment, and 1 week after the last treatment using the following: the visual analog scale (VAS) for pain; patient perception of the clinical severity of OA; the Korean version of Modified Barthel Index (ambulation and chair/bed transfer); the Functional Independence Measure scale (FIM; bed/chair/wheelchair transfer, toilet transfer, walking, and stairs); and ultrasonographic features (articular cartilage thickness, Doppler activity, and joint effusion height). Results The experimental group showed a significant improvement in VAS score (4.50±1.87 to 2.71±1.38) and patient perception of the clinical severity of OA (1.87±0.83 to 2.75±0.46). The bed/chair/wheelchair transfer components of the FIM score also improved significantly (4.12±1.55 to 4.62±1.30). In terms of the ultrasonographic features, increased Doppler activity was observed in the medial knee in the experimental group immediately following ESWT. Conclusion It is suggested that ESWT may reduce pain and improve function in chronic stroke patients with OA, and may increase vascular activity at the target site. PMID:27847716

  18. The study of subchondral lesions in osteoarthritis of the knee using magnetic resonance imaging

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    Takagishi, Hiroshi [Fukuoka Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2001-03-01

    In order to examine the significance of the signal abnormalities of subchondral bone in osteoarthritic knee with 0.5 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), especially in T2-low signal lesions which show a low signal intensity on both the T1- and T2-weighted images and T2-high signal lesions which show a low signal intensity on the T1-weighted image and a high signal intensity on the T2-weighted image, we examined 54 patients (representing 58 knees) with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee on MRI as compared with the arthroscopic findings or operative findings and histologically evaluated them. In addition, in order to elucidate what becomes of those signal abnormalities in the subchondral bone after biomechanical treatment utilizing a high tibial osteotomy (HTO) which reduces the maldistributed load, we examined 30 patients (representing 34 knees) under HTO on MRI and compared these findings with the arthroscopic findings. The incidence of the presence of those signal abnormalities of subchondral bone on MRI tended to correlate with the severity of the articular cartilage damage, and also reflected the degree of damage to the articular cartilage well. In a histologically investigation, T2-high signal lesions showed granulation tissue with high vascularity, which seemed to be an active phase in OA. T2-low signal lesions of OA in a late stage showed subchondral sclerosis histologically. In addition, the signal changes of the subchondral bone on MRI seemed correlate with the changes in the load distribution in the knee joint because T2-high signal lesions before HTO were observed to either diminish or disappear after undergoing a successful osteotomy. The signal abnormalities of the subchondral bone on MRI on OA thus helped in determining the appropriate phase, therapeutic effects and prognosis of OA. (author)

  19. Pain as one of the risk factors for progression of knee osteoarthrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Gavriilovna Kashevarova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the impact of pain intensity on the progression of knee osteoarthrosis (OA. Subjects and methods. One hundred and ten patients with knee OA were examined at a 5-year interval. All the patients underwent a questionnaire survey and knee joint pain assessment using a visual analog scale (VAS and standard radiography. Results. After 5-year follow-up, radiographic OA progression was seen in 40 patients (Group 2; its stage remained the same in 70 patients (Group 1. In both groups, the patients were matched for age (59.2+9.5 and 59.0+8.1 years and disease duration (11.1+10.6 and 13.7+9.9 years. During the first examination, pain on walking was more severe in Group 1 than in Group 2: 57.8+16.6 and 48.7+13.3 mm by VAS (р=0.002, as well as severe joint pain was predominant in these patients: 22.5 and 11.4%, respectively. Over the 5-year period, there was an increase in pain intensity. At the end of the follow-up, the patients with progressive OA rated their knee joint pain as severe in 35% of cases whereas in this index the non-progression group was only 12.9 (p = 0.012. Conclusion. In the OA progression group, pain intensity was initially statistically higher than that in the non-progression group. During 5-year follow-up, Group 1 showed an increase in knee joint pain intensity on walking, which can be considered as one of the predictors of gonarthrosis progression.

  20. In Vivo Quantitative Ultrasound Image Analysis of Femoral Subchondral Bone in Knee Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Podlipská

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A potential of quantitative noninvasive knee ultrasonography (US for detecting changes in femoral subchondral bone related to knee osteoarthritis (OA was investigated. Thirty-nine patients referred to a knee arthroscopy underwent dynamic noninvasive US examination of the knee joint. The subchondral bone was semiautomatically segmented from representative US images of femoral medial and lateral condyles and intercondylar notch area. Subsequently, the normalized mean gray-level intensity profile, starting from the cartilage-bone interface and extending to the subchondral bone depth of ~1.7 mm, was calculated. The obtained profile was divided into 5 depth levels and the mean of each level, as well as the slope of the profile within the first two levels, was calculated. The US quantitative data were compared with the arthroscopic Noyes’ grading and radiographic Kellgren-Lawrence (K-L grading. Qualitatively, an increase in relative subchondral bone US gray-level values was observed as OA progressed. Statistically significant correlations were observed between normalized US mean intensity or intensity slope especially in subchondral bone depth level 2 and K-L grading (r=0.600, P<0.001; r=0.486, P=0.006, resp. or femoral arthroscopic scoring (r=0.332, P=0.039; r=0.335, P=0.037, resp.. This novel quantitative noninvasive US analysis technique is promising for detection of femoral subchondral bone changes in knee OA.

  1. Preserving knee function following osteoarthritis diagnosis: a sustainability theory and social ecology clinical commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyland, J; Wera, J; Henzman, C; Miller, T; Jakob, R; Caborn, D N M

    2015-02-01

    To sustain natural systems, there must be an ongoing balance between environmental, social, and economic considerations. A key element of sustainability theory is to identify the most vulnerable surroundings. The most vulnerable knee tissue is the articular cartilage as it is the last line of osteoarthritis (OA) defense. This tissue has a poor capacity for healing. Based on sustainability theory and social ecology concepts we propose that several key factors contribute to knee function preservation. Factors include health history, genetic predisposition, personal behaviors, and socio-environmental factors in addition to local-regional-global physiological system function. Addressing only some of these factors or any one factor in isolation may lead to less than optimal treatment effectiveness. The purpose of this commentary is to introduce a medical, surgical and rehabilitation management approach for patients with knee OA that considers more than physical function improvement. This approach also considers social, emotional, and environmental factors to better ensure patient satisfaction, fulfilled expectations and successful outcomes. A clinical care pathway is presented for a 57-year-old patient with medial compartment knee OA who is contemplating early arthroplasty versus a knee function preservation treatment approach. Early arthroplasty refers to high revision likelihood based on a minimum 15 year prosthesis life-expectancy.

  2. THE HISTOLOGICAL AND BIOCHEMICAL CHANGES ON EXPERIMENTAL OSTEOARTHRITIS IN RABBIT KNEE

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    S. HLUCHÝ

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthrosis (OA is a common joint disease, characterized by degenerative changes in articular cartilage and reactive proliferation of bone and cartilage around the joint. The evaluation of the histological and biochemical changes were investigated on the articular cartilage of knee joint during development of osteoarthritis in rabbits following anterior cruciate ligament transsection (ACLT. A total of 12 New Zealand White (NZW male rabbits with closed epiphyses underwent ACLT of knees and healthy control knees arthrotomy. The animals were killed at 9 weeks after surgery. The parameters tested were gross morphology, histology as well as urinary pyridinoline (Pyr and creatinine. Morphological changes in osteoarthritic femoral condyles were seen on both, medial and lateral region, but markedly on medial condyle of the ACLT knee. The articular cartilage was characterised by a rough and hypertrophic appearance with severe erosions. The gross morphological examination of healthy control revealed no changes. Histological evidence for cartilage degeneration was observed in the ACLT knees. In OA femoral condyles the articular cartilage showed degenerative changes, including: rough surface, loss of superficial layer, erosion, fissures, irregular arrangement and form of chondrocytes. Biochemical determinations showed significantly higher concentrations of urinary Pyr in the OA rabbits compared to healthy rabbits during the whole period of the study (9 weeks, indicating a higher collagen degradation of cartilage and subchondral bone in the osteoarthritic animals.

  3. Reliability of surface electromyographic recordings during walking in individuals with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubley-Kozey, Cheryl L; Robbins, Shawn M; Rutherford, Derek J; Stanish, William D

    2013-04-01

    To determine test-retest reliability of a surface electromyographic protocol designed to measure knee joint muscle activation during walking in individuals with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Twenty-one individuals with moderate medial compartment knee OA completed two gait data collections separated by approximately 1month. Using a standardized protocol, surface electromyograms from rectus femoris plus lateral and medial sites for the gastrocnemii, vastii and hamstring muscles were recorded during walking. After full-wave rectification and low pass filtering, time and amplitude normalized (percent of maximum) waveforms were calculated. Principal component analysis (PP-scores) and co-contraction indices (CCI) were calculated from the waveforms. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC2,k) were calculated for PP-scores and CCI's. No differences in walking speed, knee muscle strength and symptoms were found between visits (p>0.05). The majority of PP-scores (17 of 21) and two of four CCIs demonstrated ICC2,k values greater than 0.81. Remaining PP-scores and CCIs had ICC2,k values between 0.61 and 0.80. The results support that reliable EMG characteristics can be captured from a moderate knee OA patient population using a standardized protocol.

  4. Vitality and the course of limitations in activities in osteoarthritis of the hip or knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Dijk Gabriella M

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of the study was to determine whether psychological and social factors predict the course of limitations in activities in elderly patients with osteoarthritis of the hip or knee, in addition to established somatic and cognitive risk factors. Methods A longitudinal cohort study with a follow-up period of three years was conducted. Patients (N = 237 with hip or knee osteoarthritis were recruited from rehabilitation centers and hospitals. Body functions, comorbidity, cognitive functioning, limitations in activities and psychological and social factors (mental health, vitality, pain coping and perceived social support were assessed. Statistical analyses included univariate and multivariate regression analyses. Psychological and social factors were added to a previously developed model with body functions, comorbidity and cognitive functioning. Results In knee OA, low vitality has a negative impact on the course of self-reported and performance-based limitations in activities, after controlling for somatic and cognitive factors. In hip OA, psychological and social factors had no additional contribution to the model. Conclusion Low vitality predicts deterioration of limitations in activities in elderly patients with osteoarthritis of the knee, in addition to established somatic and cognitive risk factors. However, the contribution of vitality is relatively small. Results of this study are relevant for the group of patients with knee or hip OA, attending hospitals and rehabilitation centers.

  5. Structural changes in the knee during weight loss maintenance after a significant weight loss in obese patients with osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, M; Christensen, R; Hunter, D J

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare structural knee joint changes in obese patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) that after an intensive weight loss therapy were randomized to continuous dietetic support, a specialized knee exercise program, or 'no attention' for 1 year. METHODS: 192 obese individuals with knee...... OA underwent an intensive 16-week weight loss program with subsequent randomization to one of the three treatment groups. Changes in cartilage loss, bone marrow lesions (BMLs), synovitis, and effusion were assessed using semi quantitative assessments of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) obtained...... at weeks 0 and 68 applying the BLOKS score. RESULTS: During the 52 weeks maintenance period the continuous dietary maintenance group support on average gained 1.1 kg (95% CI: -0.3:2.5) body mass, the exercise group gained 6.6 kg (95% CI 5.4:7.8) and the no-attention group gained 4.8 kg (95% CI: 2...

  6. Rheumatoid Arthritis vs Osteoarthritis in Patients Receiving Total Knee Arthroplasty: Perioperative Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stundner, Ottokar; Danninger, Thomas; Chiu, Ya-Lin; Sun, Xuming; Goodman, Susan M; Russell, Linda A; Figgie, Mark; Mazumdar, Madhu; Memtsoudis, Stavros G

    2013-01-01

    There is a paucity of data available on perioperative outcomes of patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We determined differences in demographics and risk for perioperative adverse events between patients suffering from osteoarthritis (OA) versus RA using a population-based approach. Of 351,103 entries for patients who underwent TKA, 3.4% had a diagnosis of RA. RA patients were on average younger [RA: 64.3 years vs OA: 66.6 years; p<0.001] and more likely female [RA: 79.2% vs OA: 63.2%; P<0. 001]. The unadjusted rates of mortality and most major perioperative adverse events were similar in both groups, with the exception of infection [RA: 4.5% vs. OA: 3.8%; P<0.001]. RA was not associated with increased adjusted odds for combined adverse events. PMID:23764034

  7. Clinical, Radiological and Ultrasonographic Findings Related to Knee Pain in Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Keith K. W.; Sit, Regina W. S.; Wu, Ricky W. K.; Ngai, Allen H. Y.

    2014-01-01

    Background Pain is the predominant symptom of knee osteoarthritis (OA) and the main reason of disability. Ultrasound is now one of the new imaging modality in Musculoskeletal medicine and its role in assessing the pain severity in the knee osteoarthritis is evaluated in this study. Objectives (1) To study the correlation between ultrasonographic (US) findings and pain score and (2) whether ultrasonographic findings show a better association of pain level than conventional X-rays in patients suffering from primary knee osteoarthritis. Methods In this multi-center study, 193 patients with primary knee OA were asked to score their average knee pain using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis (WOMAC) questionnaire;patients would then go for a radiological and an US evaluation of their painful knee. Findings from both imaging modalities will be studied with the associated pain score. Results Ultrasound showed that knee effusion has positive correlation with pain score upon walking (r = 0.217) and stair climbing (r = 0.194). Presence of suprapatellar synovitis had higher pain score on sitting (Spearman's Rank correlation  = 0.355). The medial(r = 0.170) and lateral meniscus protrusion (r = 0.201) were associated with pain score upon stair climbing. Conclusions Our study found that both imaging modalities shown some significant association with the aspect of pain; neither one is clearly better but rather complementary to each other. A trend is found in both modalities: walking pain is related to pathologies of the either the lateral or medial tibiofemoral joint(TFJ)while stair climbing pain is related to both tibiofemoral joint pathologies and also to the patellofemoral joint (PFJ) pathology. This suggested that biomechanical derangement is an important aspect in OA knee pain. PMID:24675807

  8. Clinical, radiological and ultrasonographic findings related to knee pain in osteoarthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith K W Chan

    Full Text Available Pain is the predominant symptom of knee osteoarthritis (OA and the main reason of disability. Ultrasound is now one of the new imaging modality in Musculoskeletal medicine and its role in assessing the pain severity in the knee osteoarthritis is evaluated in this study.(1 To study the correlation between ultrasonographic (US findings and pain score and (2 whether ultrasonographic findings show a better association of pain level than conventional X-rays in patients suffering from primary knee osteoarthritis.In this multi-center study, 193 patients with primary knee OA were asked to score their average knee pain using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis (WOMAC questionnaire;patients would then go for a radiological and an US evaluation of their painful knee. Findings from both imaging modalities will be studied with the associated pain score.Ultrasound showed that knee effusion has positive correlation with pain score upon walking (r = 0.217 and stair climbing (r = 0.194. Presence of suprapatellar synovitis had higher pain score on sitting (Spearman's Rank correlation  = 0.355. The medial(r = 0.170 and lateral meniscus protrusion (r = 0.201 were associated with pain score upon stair climbing.Our study found that both imaging modalities shown some significant association with the aspect of pain; neither one is clearly better but rather complementary to each other. A trend is found in both modalities: walking pain is related to pathologies of the either the lateral or medial tibiofemoral joint(TFJwhile stair climbing pain is related to both tibiofemoral joint pathologies and also to the patellofemoral joint (PFJ pathology. This suggested that biomechanical derangement is an important aspect in OA knee pain.

  9. CURRENT PHARMACOTHERAPY FOR KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS: SPECIFIC FEATURES OF SYMPTOMATIC AND DISEASE MODIFYING EFFECTS. COMMUNICATION 1. SPECIFIC FEATURES OF THE SYMPTOMATIC EFFECTS OF CURRENT DRUGS TO TREAT KNEE OSTHEOARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. S. Tsvetkova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the specific features of the symptomatic effect and tolerability of acetaminophen, glucosamine sulfate (GS, chondroitin sulfate (CS, and meloxicam in patents with knee osteoarthritis (OA. Subjects and methods. An 18-month open-label randomized prospective parallel-group trial enrolled 80 patients with knee OA who fulfilled the American College of Rheumatology criteria and signed the informed consent. They had Kellgren and Lawrence grades O-III OA with visual analogue scale pain intensity of ≥ 40 mm in the target knee, a body mass index of ≤ 35 kg/m2, and no clinical dysfunctions of vital organs and systems. The patients were randomized into 4 groups: 1 acetaminophen 2 g daily; 2 a standard GS regimen; 3 a standard CS regimen; 4 meloxicam 15 mg daily. The patients were followed up for 18 months. The effectiveness was evaluated by the WOMAC questionnaire, Leguesne index, and OMERACT-OARSI (D scenario during 8 visits. Laboratory and clinical examination as well as electrocardiography were performed. Adverse events were recorded during each visit.Results. After 4 weeks of treatment, symptomatic improvement was noted in all groups; however, the best effect was achieved by the use of meloxicam that ensured an obvious improvement in all patients. According to the OMERACT-OARSI criteria and changes in the WOMAC and Leguesne indices, the total efficacy of meloxicam was also highest. 20, 10, and 15% of the patients failed to respond to treatment in the acetaminophen, GS, and CS groups, respectively. Conclusion. The results of this trial suggest that it is expedient to use GS, CS, and meloxicam long, support the recent guidelines of the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and OA (ESCEO, and can give proofs of the efficiency and safety of GS, CS, and meloxicam used in the treatment of knee OA.

  10. Effect of joint traction on functional improvement and quality of life in patients with severe knee osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Sedigheh Sadat Naeimee; Abbas Rahimi; Mehdi Rezaee; Alireza Akbarzadeh Baghban; Khosro Khademi Kalantari; ُSomayeh Mahmoudi Aghdam

    2012-01-01

    Background and aim: Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most prevalent joint disease in adults around the world and its incidence rises with age. Patients with severe knee osteoarthritis often complain of pain and severe functional disability. Most of conservative treatments used in this group of patients induce poor improvements. This study evaluated the effect of joint traction on quality of life of patients with severe knee osteoarthritis.Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial study, forty f...

  11. Effect of Grade 1 Mobilization on Osteoarthritic Knee Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tavakkoli Mehdi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Knee osteoarthritis (OA is one of the common disabling conditions in human. Joint mobilization is a passive rhythmic accessory movement therapy that is used in the treatment of OA. In this study, the effect of grade one mobilization, on pain reduction of knee OA has been investigated.Materials and Methods: This study was an unidirectional blind clinical trial with random sampling from patients admitted to Sarcheshme physiotherapy clinic in 2007. Thirty participants were divided into 3 groups randomly: group 1: Mobilization + Exercise therapy, group 2: Exercise therapy and group 3: Mobilization. Ultrasound with the intensity below 0.2 W/Cm2 was used for all groups as placebo. The treatment was done in 10 sessions during 3 weeks. Outcome was measured using was WOMAC questionnaire form (Likert Type. Measurements were done before and after treatment and one week after final treatment session. Friedman, Wilcoxon and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used for data analysis included.Results: Comparison of pain between before and after treatment showed significant differences in group 1 (P=0.01 and group 3 (P=0.04 but was not significant in group 2 (P=0.135. The difference of pain at follow up visit was significant only in group 1 in comparison to before treatment (P=0.007. Pain reduction between before and after treatment (P=0.504 and before treatment and follow up session (P=0.18, showed no significant differences, between 3 groups.Conclusion: This study showed that grade 1 mobilization can decrease the pain of knee OA. If exercise therapy is used combined with mobilization, the effect of treatment will continue at least for about one week.

  12. Influence of Isometric Exercise Training on Quadriceps Muscle Architecture and Strength in Obese Subjects with Knee Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waleed S Mahmoud

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Obese individuals have reduced quadriceps muscle strength relative to body mass that may increase the rate of progression of knee osteoarthritis (OA. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of isometric exercise training on quadriceps muscle architecture and strength in obese subjects with knee osteoarthritis. Methods: Fortyfour obese male subjects aged 40–65 years diagnosed with knee osteoarthritis were randomly assigned into group A (n=32 and group B (n=12. Group A subjects performed a 12-week isometric exercise program. Group B subjects did not participate in any exercise program and maintained their ordinary activities for the same period. Both groups received the same conventional physical therapy program including hot packs and therapeutic ultrasonic. Muscle thickness, pennation angles and fascicle length of the vastus lateralis (VL muscle of the affected knee were measured at rest by B-mode ultrasonography. Maximal voluntary isometric knee extension torque (MVIC of the affected knee was measured using an isokinetic dynamometer. Knee pain and function were evaluated using visual analogue pain scale (VAS and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC. All variables were evaluated before and the end of the intervention period for both groups. Results: at the end of the program, group A subjects showed significant improvements compared with group B subjects regarding MVIC and muscle architecture parameters (p<0.05. Also, there was significant improvement in post-test VAS and WOMAC scores in group A subjects compared to group B subjects (p<0.05. Conclusion: A 12-week quadriceps isometric training program improves knee pain and quadriceps muscle strength and architecture in obese subjects with knee OA. These results indicate that isometric training should be regarded as a proper exercise intervention for obese patients with knee OA.

  13. Community-Based Progressive Aquatic Exercise for the Management of Knee Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayle Maryanna Masslon

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background We examined the feasibility and effectiveness of a community-based progressive aquatic exercise program for community dwelling older adults, with moderate to severe knee osteoarthritis (OA. Objectives The purposes of this study were to 1, assess the effects of a progressive aquatic exercise program on the walking ability, stair climbing ability, quadriceps muscle strength, as well as self-reported symptoms, function, and quality of life in community dwelling adults with moderate to severe knee OA and; 2, assess the feasibility of a community-based aquatic program for community dwelling adults with knee OA. Methods Seventeen volunteers (12 women (x = 61.1 years and 5 men (x = 69.0 years participated in a progressive 8 - 10 week aquatic exercise program, consisting of 20 - 24, 1-hour sessions. Outcome measures, acquired twice before beginning the exercise protocol as well as after 4 and 8 weeks of exercise, included the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS instrument, a 2 minute walk test (2MWT, a 10 step stair climb for time, and an isometric knee extension strength assessment. Results Significant improvements were detected in 2 MWT, 10 step stair climb, right quadriceps isometric force development, and the KOOS symptoms and stiffness subscale. Significant improvement was found on KOOS function subscales between baseline testing sessions and maintained at follow-up. Non-significant improvements were identified in left quadriceps isometric force development, KOOS pain, and KOOS quality of life. Conclusions These data suggest that a community-based, progressive aquatic exercise program is feasible and results in measurable improvements in function without worsening symptoms. Further study is warranted to investigate the impact of a longer program and the role of aquatic exercise in the long-term management of patients with knee OA.

  14. Association of Cross Linked C-Telopeptide II Collagen and Hyaluronic Acid with Knee Osteoarthritis Severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Butar Butar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This study was carried out to investigate the association of Cross Linked C-Telopeptide Type I & II Collagen (CTX-I and II and hyaluronic acid (HA with knee osteoarthritis (OA severity. METHODS: Sixty menopause women with primary knee OA were enrolled in this study during their visits to the Outpatient Department. Patients with knee pain during weight bearing, active or passive range of motion, or tenderness with Kellgren-Lawrence (KL grade of more than I were included. Patients with injury, inflammatory and metabolic diseases were excluded. Patients were put in a 10-hour fasting prior to withdrawal of morning blood samples for examinations of HA, CTX-I, interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β, and high sensitivity C reactive protein (hs-CRP level. Second void morning urine specimens were taken for CTXII assessment. HA, CTX-I and II levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS: Sixty menopausal female patients were included in this study, 35 with KL grade II, 17 grade III, and 8 grade IV. Means of CTX-II were significantly different between subjects KL grade IV and III (p=0.021. Correlation of KL grade was significant with CTX-II (p=0.001, r=0.412 and HA (p=0.0411, r=0.269. KL grades were not significantly associated with CTX-I (p=0.8364, r=-0.0272; IL-1β (p=0.5773, r=0.0853 and hs-CRP (p=0.2625, r=0.1470. CONCLUSIONS: CTX-II and HA were associated with severity of knee OA, suggesting that CTX-II and HA can be used as marker for knee OA severity. KEYWORDS: CTX-II, hyaluronic acid, otestoarthritis, knee.

  15. Some Adipose Derived Hormones in Association with the Risk of Knee Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Moghtadae

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Knee osteoarthritis (OA is the most common form of arthritis and is the major cause of pain and disability in the elderly. The relationship between obesity and increased risk of knee osteoarthritis was known for many years. Since then, many studies have shown the relationship between knee osteoarthritis and obesity. Objectives In this study, we tried to evaluate whether compared to weight, the adipose tissue has a stronger correlation with the occurrence of knee osteoarthritis. Methods In a cross-sectional study that was a part of the Fasa knee osteoarthritis registry (FOAS, 131 patients with OA were sex matched with 262 patients in the control group. Serum samples of the patients, the Western Ontario and McMaster universities arthritis index (WOMAC questionnaire and demographic data were collected. Leptin and adiponectin as hormones secreted by the adipose tissue were measured. Results Weight, body mass index (BMI, and waist circumference (WC were significantly different between the two groups (P < 0.001. The Kellgren and Lawrence (K&L score was significantly higher among the patients (P < 0.001. Pain levels in patients with OA were also significantly higher compared to those in the control group (P < 0.001. Both leptin and adiponectin concentrations were higher in the OA patients. Adiponectin had a negative relationship with BMI in the OA group (r = 0.570, P < 0.001, but leptin had a positive relationship with BMI (r = 0.781, P < 0.001. In the OA group, both adipokines had higher levels in female patients compared to male patients. Conclusions The results of the current study showed that levels of hormones secreted from the adipose tissue, in people with knee OA, were higher compared to the control group, indicating the possible effect of these hormones on the process of osteoarthritis. Finally, we showed that after adjusting for age, sex, and BMI, leptin and adiponectin are significantly correlated with the amount of pain

  16. The Dutch version of the knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score: A validation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verhaar Jan AN

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS was constructed in Sweden. This questionnaire has proved to be valid for several orthopedic interventions of the knee. It has been formally translated and validated in several languages, but not yet in Dutch. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the clinimetric properties of the Dutch version of the KOOS questionnaire in knee patients with various stages of osteoarthritis (OA. Methods The Swedish version of the KOOS questionnaire was first translated into Dutch according to a standardized procedure and second tested for clinimetric quality. The study population consisted of patients with different stages of OA (mild, moderate and severe and of patients after primary TKA, and after a revision of the TKA. All patients filled in the Dutch KOOS questionnaire, as well as the SF-36 and a Visual Analogue Scale for pain. The following analyses were performed to evaluate the clinimetric quality of the KOOS: Cronbach's alpha (internal consistency, principal component analyses (factor analysis, intraclass correlation coefficients (reliability, spearman's correlation coefficient (construct validity, and floor and ceiling effects. Results For all patients groups Cronbach's alpha was for all subscales above 0.70. The ICCs, assessed for the patient groups with mild and moderate OA and after revision of the TKA patients, were above 0.70 for all subscales. Of the predefined hypotheses 60% or more could be confirmed for the patients with mild and moderate OA and for the TKA patients. For the other patient groups less than 45% could be confirmed. Ceiling effects were present in the mild OA group for the subscales Pain, Symptoms and ADL and for the subscale Sport/Recreation in the severe OA group. Floor effects were found for the subscales Sport/Recreation and Qol in the severe OA and revision TKA groups. Conclusion Based on these different clinimetric properties within the

  17. ASSESSMENT OF IN VIVO MECHANICAL MUSCLE FUNCTION IN PATIENTS WITH OSTEOARTHRITIS (OA) OF THE HIP; RELIABILITY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Carsten; Overgaard, Søren; Aagaard, Per

    2009-01-01

    -joint strength and power a novel setup. MATERIAL AND METHODS Isokinetic contractions for both knee and hip muscles were performed. Reliability for isometric muscle contractions in vivo was recorded and evaluated by use of within subject variability (CVW-S), Spearman correlation and Limits of Agreement (Lo......INTRODUCTION Muscle function in patients with hip OA is not well-studied. We established a new setup of tests in order to monitor patients before and after surgery with total hip arthroplasty (THA). A test-retest protocol was designed to evaluate the reproducibility of single- and multi......A). Both explosive muscle force characteristics (Rate of force development) and maximal isometric force (MVC) were obtained for the affected (aff) and non-affected (n-aff) leg (only data MVC for affected side in this abstract). 20 patients, (age 55.9 ± 4.8; height 174 ± 8; BMI 27.1 ± 4.5) with unilateral...

  18. Longitudinal impact of joint pain comorbidity on quality of life and activity levels in knee osteoarthritis: data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogeboom, Thomas J; den Broeder, Alfons A; de Bie, Rob A; van den Ende, Cornelia H M

    2013-03-01

    Joint pain comorbidity (JPC) is common in individuals with knee OA. This study investigates the longitudinal association between JPC and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and physical activity levels in individuals with knee OA. Data from the progression cohort of the Osteoarthritis Initiative (n = 1233; age 61 years and 58% females) were analysed. JPC was considered present if individuals reported pain in three or more joint groups, including the knee joints. HRQoL was assessed using the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) Quality of Life subscale, and self-reported physical activity was determined using the Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly (PASE). Generalized estimating equation (GEE) analyses were performed, adjusted for age, sex, duration of complaints, medical comorbidity, and physical and mental functioning. Over the 4-year period, 32% of participants never reported JPC, whereas 12% always reported JPC. GEE modelling demonstrated that having JPC was negatively associated with HRQoL [regression coefficient β (95% CI) -3.57 (-4.69, -2.44)] and not associated with physical activity [-1.32 (-6.61, 3.98)]. Considering the impact of JPC on the HRQoL of individuals with knee OA, the assessment of JPC in individuals with knee OA might be a daily routine.

  19. Microprocessor prosthetic knees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Dale

    2006-02-01

    This article traces the development of microprocessor prosthetic knees from early research in the 1970s to the present. Read about how microprocessor knees work, functional options, patient selection, and the future of this prosthetic.

  20. Prosthetic Knee Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Google Bookmarks Technorati Yahoo MyWeb Prosthetic Knee Systems Translated into plain language by Helen Osborne of ... Consulting Original article by Bill Dupes Prosthetic knee systems are among the most complex of all components. ...

  1. Partial knee replacement - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100225.htm Partial knee replacement - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Knee Replacement A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited ...

  2. Knee braces - unloading

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... most people talk about the arthritis in their knees, they are referring to a type of arthritis ... is caused by wear and tear inside your knee joints. Cartilage, the firm, rubbery tissue that cushions ...

  3. Knee arthroscopy - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100117.htm Knee arthroscopy - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... to slide 5 out of 5 Overview The knee is a complex joint made up of the ...

  4. Knee joint replacement - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100088.htm Knee joint replacement - series—Normal anatomy To use the ... to slide 4 out of 4 Overview The knee is a complex joint. It contains the distal ...

  5. Loss of knee-extension strength is related to knee swelling after total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Bente; Kristensen, Morten T; Bencke, Jesper;

    2010-01-01

    To examine whether changes in knee-extension strength and functional performance are related to knee swelling after total knee arthroplasty (TKA).......To examine whether changes in knee-extension strength and functional performance are related to knee swelling after total knee arthroplasty (TKA)....

  6. Bone marrow edema in the knee in osteoarthrosis and association with total knee arthroplasty within a three-year follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scher, Courtney [Michigan State University Osteopathic Radiology Residency, Henry Ford Macomb Hospital, Warren, MI (United States); Craig, Joseph [Department of Radiology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI (United States); Nelson, Fred [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2008-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a correlation exists between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of bone marrow edema (BME) in osteoarthrosis (OA) of the knee joint and need for total knee arthroplasty (TKA) within a follow-up period of 3 years. The entire database of knee MR studies over a 3-year period was used to select individuals with knee OA. A chart review was conducted to identify and include only those who had a 3-year follow-up appointment from the time of the initial MR study. There were 25 patients in the OA-only group (four men and 21 women; age range, 28-75; average age, 49.3 years). The OA and BME group had 48 patients (23 men and 25 women; average age, 55.5 years). The MRs were reviewed and interpreted by a musculoskeletal radiologist and were classified into one of four patterns of BME: none, focal, global, or cystic pattern. Meniscal tear and degree of cartilage loss were also assessed. Subjects who had BME of any pattern type were 8.95 times as likely to progress rapidly to a TKA when compared to subjects with no BME (p=0.016). Subjects with a global pattern of BME were 5.45 times as likely to have a TKA compared to subjects with focal, cyst, or no BME (p<0.05). Subjects with a global edema pattern were 13.04 times as likely to have a TKA than subjects with no marrow edema in the knee (p<0.01). There was no correlation of TKA with meniscal tear or cartilage loss. The group of subjects who had a TKA were 12.6 years older than those who did not have a TKA (p<0.001). However, the BME results were still significant after accounting for the age difference. Our classification of patterns into global, focal, cystic, and absence of BME is an attempt to further define edema in osteoarthrosis and how it relates to clinical progression. Patients with BME and OA have an increased risk of TKA as opposed to OA and no marrow edema. The BME pattern with the worst prognosis for the knee is the global pattern. (orig.)

  7. Gait and muscle activation changes in men with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liikavainio, Tuomas; Bragge, Timo; Hakkarainen, Marko; Karjalainen, Pasi A; Arokoski, Jari P

    2010-01-01

    The aim was to examine the biomechanics of level- and stair-walking in men with knee osteoarthritis (OA) at different pre-determined gait speeds and to compare the results with those obtained from healthy control subjects. Special emphasis was placed on the estimation of joint loading. Fifty-four men with knee OA (50-69 years) and 53 healthy age- and sex-matched controls were enrolled in the study. The participants walked barefoot in the laboratory (1.2 m/s+/-5%), corridor (1.2; 1.5 and 1.7 m/s+/-5%), and climbing and coming down stairs (0.5 and 0.8 m/s+/-5%) separately. Joint loading was assessed with skin mounted accelerometers (SMAs) attached just above and below the more affected knee joint. The 3-D ground reaction forces (GRFs) and muscle activation with surface-electromyography (EMG) from vastus medialis (VM) and biceps femoris (BF) were also measured simultaneously. There were no differences in SMA variables between groups during level-walking, but maximal loading rate (LR(max)) was higher bilaterally in the controls (Pstair descent at faster speed. The distinctions in muscle activation both at level- and stair ambulation in VM and BF muscles revealed that the patients used different strategies to execute the same walking tasks. It is concluded that the differences in measured SMA and GRF parameters between the knee OA patients and the controls were only minor at constant gait speeds. It is speculated that the faster speeds in the stair descent subjected the compensatory mechanisms to the maximum highlighting the differences between groups.

  8. Effect of joint traction on functional improvement and quality of life in patients with severe knee osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedigheh Sadat Naeimee

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and aim: Osteoarthritis (OA is the most prevalent joint disease in adults around the world and its incidence rises with age. Patients with severe knee osteoarthritis often complain of pain and severe functional disability. Most of conservative treatments used in this group of patients induce poor improvements. This study evaluated the effect of joint traction on quality of life of patients with severe knee osteoarthritis.Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial study, forty female patients with severe knee OA were randomly assigned to two following groups; common physiotherapy treatment and common physiotherapy treatment accompanied by knee distraction. Quality of life was evaluated pre- and post-treatment and also one month follow-up using the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS questionnaire.Results: Common physiotherapy treatment accompanied by knee distraction resulted in significantly better quality of life post-treatment and at 1month follow-up, compared to common physiotherapy treatment alone (P<0.01.Conclusion: Common physiotherapy treatment accompanied by knee distraction induces significant improvement in quality of life in patients with severe knee osteoarthritis compared to common physiotherapy treatment alone.

  9. Total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Henrik M.; Petersen, Michael M.

    2016-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a successful treatment of the osteoarthritic knee, which has increased dramatically over the last 30 years. The indication is a painful osteoarthritic knee with relevant radiographic findings and failure of conservative measures like painkillers and exercise. Trea...

  10. Total knee replacement plus physical and medical therapy or treatment with physical and medical therapy alone: a randomised controlled trial in patients with knee osteoarthritis (the MEDIC-study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skou Soren T

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a lack of high quality evidence concerning the efficacy of total knee arthroplasty (TKA. According to international evidence-based guidelines, treatment of knee osteoarthritis (KOA should include patient education, exercise and weight loss. Insoles and pharmacological treatment can be included as supplementary treatments. If the combination of these non-surgical treatment modalities is ineffective, TKA may be indicated. The purpose of this randomised controlled trial is to examine whether TKA provides further improvement in pain, function and quality of life in addition to optimised non-surgical treatment in patients with KOA defined as definite radiographic OA and up to moderate pain. Methods/Design The study will be conducted in The North Denmark Region. 100 participants with radiographic KOA (K-L grade ≥2 and mean pain during the previous week of ≤ 60 mm (0–100, best to worst scale who are considered eligible for TKA by an orthopaedic surgeon will be included. The treatment will consist of 12 weeks of optimised non-surgical treatment consisting of patient education, exercise, diet, insoles, analgesics and/or NSAIDs. Patients will be randomised to either receiving or not receiving a TKA in addition to the optimised non-surgical treatment. The primary outcome will be the change from baseline to 12 months on the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS4 defined as the average score for the subscale scores for pain, symptoms, activities of daily living, and quality of life. Secondary outcomes include the five individual KOOS subscale scores, EQ-5D, pain on a 100 mm Visual Analogue Scale, self-efficacy, pain pressure thresholds, and isometric knee flexion and knee extension strength. Discussion This is the first randomised controlled trial to investigate the efficacy of TKA as an adjunct treatment to optimised non-surgical treatment in patients with KOA. The results will significantly contribute to

  11. L-DOPA is an endogenous ligand for OA1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa M Lopez

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Albinism is a genetic defect characterized by a loss of pigmentation. The neurosensory retina, which is not pigmented, exhibits pathologic changes secondary to the loss of pigmentation in the retina pigment epithelium (RPE. How the loss of pigmentation in the RPE causes developmental defects in the adjacent neurosensory retina has not been determined, but offers a unique opportunity to investigate the interactions between these two important tissues. One of the genes that causes albinism encodes for an orphan GPCR (OA1 expressed only in pigmented cells, including the RPE. We investigated the function and signaling of OA1 in RPE and transfected cell lines. Our results indicate that OA1 is a selective L-DOPA receptor, with no measurable second messenger activity from two closely related compounds, tyrosine and dopamine. Radiolabeled ligand binding confirmed that OA1 exhibited a single, saturable binding site for L-DOPA. Dopamine competed with L-DOPA for the single OA1 binding site, suggesting it could function as an OA1 antagonist. OA1 response to L-DOPA was defined by several common measures of G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR activation, including influx of intracellular calcium and recruitment of beta-arrestin. Further, inhibition of tyrosinase, the enzyme that makes L-DOPA, resulted in decreased PEDF secretion by RPE. Further, stimulation of OA1 in RPE with L-DOPA resulted in increased PEDF secretion. Taken together, our results illustrate an autocrine loop between OA1 and tyrosinase linked through L-DOPA, and this loop includes the secretion of at least one very potent retinal neurotrophic factor. OA1 is a selective L-DOPA receptor whose downstream effects govern spatial patterning of the developing retina. Our results suggest that the retinal consequences of albinism caused by changes in melanin synthetic machinery may be treated by L-DOPA supplementation.

  12. Six-year course and prognosis of nontraumatic knee symptoms in adults in general practice: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastelein, Marlous; Luijsterburg, Pim A J; Belo, Janneke N; Verhaar, Jan A N; Koes, Bart W; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M A

    2011-09-01

    To examine the 6-year course of nontraumatic knee symptoms in adults in general practice, to identify prognostic factors for unfavorable outcome, and to develop a clinical prediction rule. Adults (ages >35 years) with incident nontraumatic knee symptoms (n = 549) were followed for 6 years. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to identify prognostic factors associated with an unfavorable outcome, the area under the receiver operating curve (AUC) was calculated to determine discriminative ability, and a clinical prediction rule was developed. Unfavorable outcome is defined as persistent knee symptoms at 6-year followup or having undergone knee replacement surgery during followup. At 6-year followup, 42.1% of patients had an unfavorable outcome. Having persistent knee symptoms (odds ratio [OR] 5.31, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 3.27-8.61) and fulfilling the clinical American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria for osteoarthritis (OA; OR 2.65, 95% CI 1.48-4.73) at 1-year followup were significantly associated with unfavorable outcome, while fulfilling the clinical ACR criteria for OA at baseline was not. Baseline factors independently associated with an unfavorable outcome were low/middle education level, comorbidity of the skeletal system, duration of knee symptoms of >3 months, bilateral knee symptoms, self-reported warm knee, history of nontraumatic knee symptoms, valgus alignment, pain at passive knee flexion/extension, and bony enlargement of the knee joint (AUC 0.80). Nontraumatic knee symptoms in adults in general practice appear to become a chronic disorder in nearly half of the patients. The developed clinical prediction rule with 10 baseline prognostic factors can be used to select high-risk patients for an unfavorable outcome at long-term followup. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  13. The Training Effect of Early Intervention with a Hybrid Assistive Limb after Total Knee Arthroplasty

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    Takashi Fukaya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available After total knee arthroplasty (TKA, it is important for patients to show early improvements in knee joint function and walking to regain independence in performing the activities of daily life. We conducted for 4 weeks an intervention one week after TKA using a hybrid assistive limb (HAL: unilateral leg type as an exoskeleton robotic device to facilitate knee joint function and walking. The intervention improved the range of knee extension movement safely and without pain compared to preoperation. In addition, we found that training with the HAL improved walking ability, speed, and rate, as well as the time taken to perform the timed up and go (TUG test compared to preoperation. The strength of the quadriceps muscle did not improve with training; however, the patient was able to induce a knee extensor moment during the initial stance phase, as measured by kinetics and kinematics, and these actions could be performed without pain. HAL training soon after TKA improved knee joint function in a 76-year-old patient who presented with OA of the knee. The improvements in knee extension lag and knee extensor moment allowed the patient to walk without pain and regain ADL in comparison with preoperation.

  14. Traumatic knee extension deficit (the locked knee)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helmark, I C; Neergaard, K; Krogsgaard, M R

    2007-01-01

    In the present study we investigated the validity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and arthroscopy in knees with acute, traumatic extension deficit (the "locked knee"), and evaluated whether arthroscopy of knees with no mechanical pathology could be avoided by MRI evaluation. The study consisted...... of 50 patients who had an acute, traumatic extension deficit of the knee. All patients were submitted to MRI prior to arthroscopy. Following MRI and surgery, standardized forms were filled out, attempting to objectify the findings. The orthopaedic surgeon was not aware of the MRI result prior to surgery......, the following results were calculated for the overall appearance of a lesion able to cause locking: Positive predictive value = 0.85, negative predictive value = 0.77, sensitivity = 0.95, specificity = 0.53. Two knees were erroneously evaluated with no mechanical locking at MRI (one bucket-handle lesion and one...

  15. Knee Arthrodesis after failure of Knee Arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottfriedsen, Tinne B; Morville Schrøder, Henrik; Odgaard, Anders

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Arthrodesis is considered a salvage procedure after failure of a knee arthroplasty. Data on the use of this procedure are limited. The purpose of this study was to identify the incidence, causes, surgical techniques, and outcomes of arthrodesis after failed knee arthroplasty...... in a nationwide population. METHODS: Data were extracted from the Danish Civil Registration System, the Danish National Patient Register, and the Danish Knee Arthroplasty Register. A total of 92,785 primary knee arthroplasties performed in Denmark from 1997 to 2013 were identified by linking the data using....... Differences in cumulative incidence were compared with the Gray test. RESULTS: A total of 164 of the 165 arthrodeses were performed for causes related to failed knee arthroplasty. The 15-year cumulative incidence of arthrodesis was 0.26% (95% confidence interval, 0.21% to 0.31%). The 5-year cumulative...

  16. Does joint alignment affect the T2 values of cartilage in patients with knee osteoarthritis?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrich, Klaus M. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Shepard, Timothy; Chang, Gregory; Wang, Ligong; Babb, James S.; Regatte, Ravinder [New York University Langone Medical Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Schweitzer, Mark [Ottawa Hospital, Diagnostic Imaging, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2010-06-15

    To assess the relationship between T2 values of femorotibial cartilage and knee alignment in patients with clinical symptoms of medial osteoarthritis (OA). Twenty-four patients (mean age {+-} standard deviation, 62.5 {+-} 9.9 years) with clinical symptoms of medial knee OA, 12 with varus and 12 with valgus alignment of the femorotibial joint, were investigated on 3T MR using a 2D multi-echo spin echo (MESE) sequence for T2 mapping. Analysis of covariance, Spearman correlation coefficients, exact Mann-Whitney tests, and Fisher's exact tests were used for statistical analysis. Overall the T2 values of cartilage in the medial compartment (median {+-} interquartile-range, 49.44 {+-} 6.58) were significantly higher (P = 0.0043) than those in the lateral compartment (47.15 {+-} 6.87). Patients with varus alignment (50.83 {+-} 6.30 ms) had significantly higher T2 values of cartilage (P < 0.0001) than patients with valgus alignment (46.20 {+-} 6.00 ms). No statistically significant association between the T2 values of cartilage (in either location) and the Kellgren Lawrence score was found in the varus or in the valgus group. T2 measurements were increased in medial knee OA patients with varus alignment, adding support to the theory of an association of OA and joint alignment. (orig.)

  17. Fatigue in knee and hip osteoarthritis: the role of pain and physical function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snijders, Gijs F; van den Ende, Cornelia H M; Fransen, Jaap; van Riel, Piet L C M; Stukstette, Mirelle J P M; Defoort, Koen C; Arts-Sanders, Marianne A; van den Hoogen, Frank H J; den Broeder, Alfons A

    2011-10-01

    It is suggested that serious levels of fatigue are present in nearly half of patients with OA. However, it is unclear which dimensions of fatigue are involved, if fatigue is related to pain and physical function, and if fatigue is influenced by therapy. The aims of this study were to measure levels of different dimensions of fatigue before and after evidenced-based conservative treatment and to investigate the association between fatigue and pain and physical function in patients with knee or hip OA. In this observational cohort study, levels of different dimensions of fatigue were measured in knee and/or hip OA patients before and after 12 weeks of conservative treatment. Cross-sectional and longitudinal relations between (change in) fatigue dimensions and (change in) pain or physical function were studied using association models, controlling for predefined possible confounders. A total of 231 patients was included, with 47% experiencing severe fatigue. A small decrease in levels of fatigue was seen after standardized treatment. The level of fatigue severity was cross-sectionally and longitudinally associated with physical function, whereas the level of physical fatigue was cross-sectionally and longitudinally associated with pain and physical function. No confounders were identified. Important levels of fatigue are common in knee and hip OA patients. After evidence-based tailored conservative treatment targeted to improve pain and physical function, a small decrease in fatigue levels was found. Reduction in levels of different fatigue dimensions were related to the change in physical function and pain.

  18. Patterns of Traditional Chinese Medicine Diagnosis in Thermal Laser Acupuncture Treatment of Knee Osteoarthritis

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    Lizhen Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Knee osteoarthritis (OA manifests with pain, joint stiffness, and limited function. In traditional Chinese medicine, knee OA is differentiated into three patterns: yang deficiency and cold coagulation, kidney deficiency, and blood stasis. The objective of this study was to determine whether yang deficiency cold coagulation patients respond better to thermal laser acupuncture treatment than do non-yang deficient patients. Fifty-two patients with OA were allocated to group A (yang deficient, n=26 or B (non-yang deficient, n=26. All patients received a 20-min thermal laser acupuncture treatment at acupoint Dubi (ST 35 three times a week for two weeks and twice a week for another four weeks. Outcome assessments were performed immediately after the first treatment, and at weeks 2, 6, and 10. Group A function scores were significantly better than those of Group B at weeks 2 (P=0.049, 6 (P=0.046, and 10 (P=0.042, but no significant differences were found between the two groups in pain and stiffness scores at any time point. No significant adverse effect was observed. The combined 10.6 μm–650 nm laser treatment might be most beneficial to yang deficiency cold coagulation knee OA patients, particularly in improving function.

  19. Far infrared emitting plaster in knee osteoarthritis: a single blinded, randomised clinical trial

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    N. Marino

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Therapeutic approach of osteoarthritis (OA still represents a challenge in clinical practice. The aim of the study is to assess the efficacy of far infrared (FIR emitting plaster in the treatment of knee OA. Design. This is a randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group with equal randomization (1:1, clinical trial. Patients affected by knee OA were randomly allocated to 1 of 2 treatment groups, either placebo plaster or far infrared emitting plaster. Primary endpoint was to assess pain improvement from baseline to 1 months posttreatment in the visual analogue score (VAS. Secondary end point was to evaluate pain score after 1 week of treatment and to compare ultrasonographic findings after 1 month of treatment. Results. Each group comprised 30 (in the FIR group and 30 (in the placebo group completers. VAS scores of the placebo and the FIR group were significantly lower at 1 week post-treatment (95% confidence interval CI = -1.14 to 0.31; PConclusions. Far infrared emitting plaster could be considered an effective non-pharmacological choice for the therapeutic management of knee OA.

  20. What is the current status of chondroitin sulfate and glucosamine for the treatment of knee osteoarthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrotin, Yves; Marty, Marc; Mobasheri, Ali

    2014-07-01

    Chondroitin sulfate and glucosamine sulfate exert beneficial effects on the metabolism of in vitro models of cells derived from synovial joints: chondrocytes, synoviocytes and cells from subchondral bone, all of which are involved in osteoarthritis (OA). They increase type II collagen and proteoglycan synthesis in human articular chondrocytes and are able to reduce the production of some pro-inflammatory mediators and proteases, to reduce the cellular death process, and improve the anabolic/catabolic balance of the extracellular cartilage matrix (ECM). Clinical trials have reported a beneficial effect of chondroitin sulfate and glucosamine sulfate on pain and function. The structure-modifying effects of these compounds have been reported and analyzed in recent meta-analyses. The results for knee OA demonstrate a small but significant reduction in the rate of joint space narrowing. Chondroitin sulfate and glucosamine sulphate are recommended by several guidelines from international societies for the management of knee and hip OA, while others do not recommend these products or recommend only under condition. This comprehensive review clarifies the role of these compounds in the therapeutic arsenal for patients with knee OA.

  1. Anterior knee pain in younger adults as a precursor to subsequent patellofemoral osteoarthritis: a systematic review

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    Thomas Martin J

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patellofemoral osteoarthritis (PFOA is a common form of knee OA in middle and older age, but its relation to PF disorders and symptoms earlier in life is unclear. Our aim was to conduct a systematic review to investigate the strength of evidence for an association between anterior knee pain (AKP in younger adults and subsequent PFOA. Methods The search strategy included electronic databases (Pubmed, EMBASE, AMED, CINAHL, Cochrane, PEDro, SportDiscus: inception to December 2009, reference lists of potentially eligible studies and selected reviews. Full text articles in any language, - identified via English titles and abstracts, were included if they were retrospective or prospective in design and contained quantitative data regarding structural changes indicative of PFOA, incident to original idiopathic AKP. Eligibility criteria were applied to titles, abstracts and full-texts by two independent reviewers. Data extraction included study location, design, date, sampling procedure, sample characteristics, AKP/PFOA definitions, follow-up duration and rate, and main findings. Foreign language articles were translated into English prior to examination. Results Seven articles satisfied eligibility (5 English, 2 German. Only one case-control study directly investigated a link between PFOA and prior AKP, providing level 3b evidence in favour of an association (OR 4.4; 95%CI 1.8, 10.6. Rough estimates of the annual risk of PFOA from the remaining six small, uncontrolled, observational studies (mean follow-up range: 5.7 to 23 years ranged from 0% to 3.4%. This was not the primary aim of these studies, and limitations in design and methodology mean this data should be interpreted with caution. Conclusions There is a paucity of high-quality evidence reporting a link between AKP and PFOA. Further, well-designed cohort studies may be able to fill this evidence gap.

  2. Effects of sesame seed supplementation on inflammatory factors and oxidative stress biomarkers in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

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    Mahdieh Khadem Haghighian

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Considering the high prevalence of osteoarthritis (OA and since until now there has not been any human studies to evaluate the effect of sesame in OA patients, this study was designed to assess the effect of administration of sesame on inflammation and oxidative stress in patients with knee OA. Fifty patients with knee OA were allocated into two groups namely control and sesame group. 25 patients in the control group received 40 g placebo powder per day while 25 patients in the sesame group received 40 g of sesame seed daily during two months of study along with standard medical therapy. Serum total antioxidant capacity, malondialdehyde (MDA, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP and interleukin-6 (IL-6 were measured. In the sesame group, a significant decrease in serum MDA and hs-CRP were seen after two months of study (P0.05. Serum IL-6 decreased significantly in both groups compared with baseline during the two-month study (P<0.05. There was a significant difference in mean serum IL-6 between two groups after treatment (P=0.001. Sesame seed is a natural and safe substance that may have beneficial effects in patients with knee OA, and it may provide new complementary and adjunctive treatment in these patients.

  3. Effect of Sri Lankan traditional medicine and Ayurveda on Sandhigata Vata (osteoarthritis of knee joint).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Pathirage Kamal; Perera, Manaram; Kumarasinghe, Nishantha

    2014-01-01

    Reported case was a 63-year-old female with end-stage osteoarthritis (OA) (Sandhigata Vata) of the left knee joint accompanied by exostoses. Radiology (X-ray) report confirmed it as a Kellgren-Lawrence grade III or less with exostoses. At the beginning, the Knee Society Rating System scores of pain, movement and stability were poor, and function score was fair. Srilankan traditional and Ayurveda medicine treatment was given in three regimens for 70 days. After 70 days, external treatment of oleation and 2 capsules of Shallaki (Boswellia serrata Triana and Planch) and two tablets of Jeewya (comprised of Emblica officinalis Gaertn., Tinospora cordifolia [Willd.] Millers. and Terminalia chebula Retz.), twice daily were continued over 5 months. Visual analogue scale for pain, knee scores in the Knee Society online rating system and a Ayurveda clinical assessment criteria was used to evaluate the effects of treatments in weekly basis. After treatment for 70 days, the Knee Society Rating System scores of pain, movement and stability were also improved up to good level and function score was improved up to excellent level. During the follow-up period, joint symptoms and signs and the knee scores were unchanged. In conclusion, this OA patient's quality of life was improved by the combined treatment of Sri Lankan traditional medicine and Ayurveda.

  4. The Association of Obesity with Walking Independent of Knee Pain: The Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study

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    Daniel K. White

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Practice guidelines recommend addressing obesity for people with knee OA, however, the association of obesity with walking independent of pain is not known. We investigated this association within the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study, a cohort of older adults who have or are at high risk of knee OA. Subjects wore a StepWatch to record steps taken over 7 days. We measured knee pain from a visual analogue scale and obesity by BMI. We examined the association of obesity with walking using linear regression adjusting for pain and covariates. Of 1788 subjects, the mean steps/day taken was 8872.9±3543.4. Subjects with a BMI ≥35 took 3355 fewer steps per day independent of knee pain compared with those with a BMI ≤25 (95% CI −3899, −2811. BMI accounted for 9.7% of the variability of walking while knee pain accounted for 2.9%. BMI was associated with walking independent of knee pain.

  5. Ten-year results of physical activity after high tibial osteotomy in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    W-Dahl, Annette; Toksvig-Larsen, Sören; Lindstrand, Anders

    2017-03-01

    The purpose was to describe physical activity with respect to leisure and working activity in patients operated on by high tibial osteotomy using the hemicallotasis technique for knee osteoarthritis (OA), preoperatively and 10 years postoperatively. Seventy-nine patients, median age 55 (range 35-66), operated on by high tibial osteotomy using the hemicallotasis technique for knee OA 2001-2003 were included. Questionnaires for evaluation of physical and working activity, satisfaction as well as the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) were filled in preoperatively and 2 and 10 years postoperatively. Conversion to knee arthroplasty was obtained through the Swedish Knee Arthroplasty Register. Changes between two postoperative measurements were assessed by Wilcoxon's rank test. Twenty-five patients were converted to a total knee arthroplasty, and nine patients were lost to follow-up during the 10 years, resulted in 45 patients available for follow-up. Preoperatively, 33/45 patients were physically active mainly in heavy yard/household work, and 43/45 patients were working active. Ten years after the HCO, 23/45 patients were still active with golf, dancing, hiking, etc., and 23/45 were retired. At 10 years postoperatively compared to 2 years postoperatively, the patients experienced more problems with pain (89 compared to 69, p = <0.0001). Of 45 patients, 36 were satisfied with the high tibial osteotomy surgery in general 10 years postoperatively, while 13/45 were satisfied with their sport and recreational function. The 10-year results indicate that high tibial osteotomy using the hemicallotasis technique for knee OA is an option for selected patients that improves the level of physical activity, with mild deterioration over time, and gives the majority of the patients the possibility to be working active until retirement. Level IV.

  6. Knee and hip radiographic osteoarthritis features: differences on pain, function and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Duarte; Severo, Milton; Santos, Rui A; Barros, Henrique; Branco, Jaime; Lucas, Raquel; Costa, Lúcia; Ramos, Elisabete

    2016-06-01

    The association between radiographic osteoarthritis (OA) and symptoms is inconsistent and variable according to each joint. The purpose of this study is to understand the relation between radiographic OA features, pain, function and quality of life, in knee and hip joints. A cross-sectional study was performed using information from EPIPorto cohort. Data was obtained by interview using a structured questionnaire on social, demographic, behavioural and clinical data. Pain was assessed using a pain frequency score (regarding ever having knee pain, pain in the last year, in the last 6 months and in the last month). Quality of life was evaluated with Short Form 36 (SF-36) and function disability with the Lequesne knee and hip indexes. Radiographic knees and hips were classified using the Kellgren-Lawrence score (KL 0-4). Linear regression and proportional odds ratios estimated the association between radiographic features, pain, function and quality of life. In our study, symptomatic OA (KL ≥ 2 plus joint pain) was 26.0 % in knee and 7.0 % hip joints. In knee, the increase on radiographic score increased the odds to have a higher pain frequency score [1.58 (95 % CI = 1.27, 1.97)] and was associated [adjusted β (95 % CI)] with worst general health [-3.05 (-5.00, -1.09)], physical function [-4.92 (-7.03, -2.80)], role-physical [-4.10 (-8.08, -0.11)], bodily pain [-2.96 (-5.45, -0.48)] and limitations in activities of daily living [0.48 (0.08, 0.89)]. Regarding hip, no significant associations were found between the severity of radiographic lesions and these measures. Radiographic lesions in knee were associated with higher complaints, as far as pain and functional limitations are concerned, compared with hip.

  7. Correlates of knee bone marrow lesions in younger adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony, Benny; Venn, Alison; Cicuttini, Flavia; March, Lyn; Blizzard, Leigh; Dwyer, Terence; Halliday, Andrew; Cross, Marita; Jones, Graeme; Ding, Changhai

    2016-01-26

    Subchondral bone marrow lesions (BMLs) play a key role in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA) and are associated with pain and structural progression in knee OA. However, little is known about clinical significance and determinants of BMLs of the knee joint in younger adults. We aimed to describe the prevalence and environmental (physical activity), structural (cartilage defects, meniscal lesions) and clinical (pain, stiffness, physical dysfunction) correlates of BMLs in younger adults and to determine whether cholesterol levels measured 5 years prior were associated with current BMLs in young adults. Subjects broadly representative of the Australian young adult population (n = 328, aged 31-41 years, female 48.7 %) underwent T1- and proton density-weighted fat-suppressed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in their dominant knee. BMLs, cartilage defects, meniscal lesions and cartilage volume were measured. Knee pain was assessed by Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and physical activity was measured by the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ). Cholesterol levels including high-density lipoprotein (HDL) were assessed 5 years prior to MRI. The overall prevalence of BML was 17 % (grade 1: 10.7 %, grade 2: 4.3 %, grade 3: 1.8 %). BML was positively associated with increasing age and previous knee injury but not body mass index. Moderate physical activity (prevalence ratio (PR):0.93, 95 % CI: 0.87, 0.99) and HDL cholesterol (PR:0.36, 95 % CI: 0.15, 0.87) were negatively associated with BML, while vigorous activity (PR:1.02, 95 % CI: 1.01, 1.03) was positively associated with medial tibiofemoral BMLs. BMLs were associated with more severe total WOMAC knee pain (>5 vs ≤5, PR:1.05, 95 % CI: 1.02, 1.09) and WOMAC dysfunction (PR:1.75, 95 % CI: 1.07, 2.89), total knee cartilage defects (PR:2.65, 95 % CI: 1.47, 4.80) and total meniscal lesion score (PR:1.92, 95 % CI: 1.13, 3.28). BMLs in young adults are

  8. Cannabinoid CB2 receptors regulate central sensitization and pain responses associated with osteoarthritis of the knee joint.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J Burston

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA of the joint is a prevalent disease accompanied by chronic, debilitating pain. Recent clinical evidence has demonstrated that central sensitization contributes to OA pain. An improved understanding of how OA joint pathology impacts upon the central processing of pain is crucial for the identification of novel analgesic targets/new therapeutic strategies. Inhibitory cannabinoid 2 (CB2 receptors attenuate peripheral immune cell function and modulate central neuro-immune responses in models of neurodegeneration. Systemic administration of the CB2 receptor agonist JWH133 attenuated OA-induced pain behaviour, and the changes in circulating pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines exhibited in this model. Electrophysiological studies revealed that spinal administration of JWH133 inhibited noxious-evoked responses of spinal neurones in the model of OA pain, but not in control rats, indicating a novel spinal role of this target. We further demonstrate dynamic changes in spinal CB2 receptor mRNA and protein expression in an OA pain model. The expression of CB2 receptor protein by both neurones and microglia in the spinal cord was significantly increased in the model of OA. Hallmarks of central sensitization, significant spinal astrogliosis and increases in activity of metalloproteases MMP-2 and MMP-9 in the spinal cord were evident in the model of OA pain. Systemic administration of JWH133 attenuated these markers of central sensitization, providing a neurobiological basis for analgesic effects of the CB2 receptor in this model of OA pain. Analysis of human spinal cord revealed a negative correlation between spinal cord CB2 receptor mRNA and macroscopic knee chondropathy. These data provide new clinically relevant evidence that joint damage and spinal CB2 receptor expression are correlated combined with converging pre-clinical evidence that activation of CB2 receptors inhibits central sensitization and its contribution to the manifestation

  9. Cannabinoid CB2 receptors regulate central sensitization and pain responses associated with osteoarthritis of the knee joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burston, James J; Sagar, Devi Rani; Shao, Pin; Bai, Mingfeng; King, Emma; Brailsford, Louis; Turner, Jenna M; Hathway, Gareth J; Bennett, Andrew J; Walsh, David A; Kendall, David A; Lichtman, Aron; Chapman, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the joint is a prevalent disease accompanied by chronic, debilitating pain. Recent clinical evidence has demonstrated that central sensitization contributes to OA pain. An improved understanding of how OA joint pathology impacts upon the central processing of pain is crucial for the identification of novel analgesic targets/new therapeutic strategies. Inhibitory cannabinoid 2 (CB2) receptors attenuate peripheral immune cell function and modulate central neuro-immune responses in models of neurodegeneration. Systemic administration of the CB2 receptor agonist JWH133 attenuated OA-induced pain behaviour, and the changes in circulating pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines exhibited in this model. Electrophysiological studies revealed that spinal administration of JWH133 inhibited noxious-evoked responses of spinal neurones in the model of OA pain, but not in control rats, indicating a novel spinal role of this target. We further demonstrate dynamic changes in spinal CB2 receptor mRNA and protein expression in an OA pain model. The expression of CB2 receptor protein by both neurones and microglia in the spinal cord was significantly increased in the model of OA. Hallmarks of central sensitization, significant spinal astrogliosis and increases in activity of metalloproteases MMP-2 and MMP-9 in the spinal cord were evident in the model of OA pain. Systemic administration of JWH133 attenuated these markers of central sensitization, providing a neurobiological basis for analgesic effects of the CB2 receptor in this model of OA pain. Analysis of human spinal cord revealed a negative correlation between spinal cord CB2 receptor mRNA and macroscopic knee chondropathy. These data provide new clinically relevant evidence that joint damage and spinal CB2 receptor expression are correlated combined with converging pre-clinical evidence that activation of CB2 receptors inhibits central sensitization and its contribution to the manifestation of chronic OA

  10. Sport and early osteoarthritis: the role of sport in aetiology, progression and treatment of knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannini, F; Spalding, T; Andriolo, L; Berruto, M; Denti, M; Espregueira-Mendes, J; Menetrey, J; Peretti, G M; Seil, R; Filardo, G

    2016-06-01

    Sports activities are considered favourable for general health; nevertheless, a possible influence of sports practice on the development of early osteoarthritis (OA) is a cause for concern. A higher incidence of OA in knees and ankles of former high-impact sports players than in those of the normal population has been shown and it is still debatable whether the cause is either to be recognized generically in the higher number of injuries or in a joint overload. The possibility to address knee OA in its early phases may be strictly connected to the modification of specific extrinsic or intrinsic factors, related to the patient in order to save the joint from further disease progression; these include sport practice, equipment and load. Non-surgical therapies such as continuative muscles reinforce and training play a strong role in the care of athletes with early OA, particularly if professional. There is an overall agreement on the need of an early restoring of a proper meniscal, ligament and cartilage integrity in order to protect the knee and resume sports safely, whereas alignment is a point still strongly debatable especially for professional athletes. Remaining questions still to be answered are the risks of different sports in relation to one another, although an actual protective effect of low-impact sports, such as walking, swimming or cycling, has been recognized on the appearance or worsening of OA, the effect of continuing or ceasing to practice a sport on the natural history of early OA, and even following appropriate treatment is still unknown.

  11. Long-term effectiveness of exercise therapy in patients with Osteoarthritis of the hip or knee : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pisters, Martijn F.; Veenhof, Cindy; Van Meeteren, Nico L. U.; Ostelo, Raymond W.; De Bakker, Dinny H.; Schellevis, Franicois G.; Dekkers, Joost

    2007-01-01

    Objective. To determine the long-term effectiveness (>= 6 months after treatment) of exercise therapy on pain, physical function, and patient global assessment of effectiveness in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip and/or knee. Methods. We conducted an extensive literature search in PubMed

  12. Effectiveness of behavioral graded activity in patients with osteoarthritis of hip and/or knee: a randomized clinical trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenhof, C.; Köke, A.J.A.; Dekker, J.; Oostendorp, R.A.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.; Tulder, M.W. van; Ende, C.H.M. van den

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effectiveness of a behavioral graded activity program (BGA) compared with usual care (UC; exercise therapy and advice) according to the Dutch guidelines for physiotherapy in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip and/or knee. The BGA intervention is intended to incr

  13. Treatment of knee osteoarthritis with pulsed electromagnetic fields: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thamsborg, G; Florescu, A; Oturai, P

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The investigation aimed at determining the effectiveness of pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) in the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee by conducting a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. DESIGN: The trial consisted of 2h daily treatment 5 days per...

  14. The relationship between the MRI features of mild osteoarthritis in the patellofemoral and tibiofemoral compartments of the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kornaat, Peter R.; Watt, Iain; Bloem, Johan L. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); Riyazi, Naghmeh; Kloppenburg, Margreet [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Rheumatology, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2005-08-01

    The aim of this work was to demonstrate the relationship between osteoarthritic changes seen on magnetic resonance (MR) images of the patellofemoral (PF) or tibiofemoral (TF) compartments in patients with mild osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. MR images of the knee were obtained in 105 sib pairs (210 patients) who had been diagnosed with OA at multiple joints. Entry criteria included that the degree of OA in the knee examined should be between a Kellgren and Lawrence score of 2 or 3. MR images were analyzed for the presence of cartilaginous lesions, bone marrow edema (BME) and meniscal tears. The relationship between findings in the medial and lateral aspects of the PF and TF compartments was examined. The number of cartilaginous defects on either side of the PF compartment correlated positively with number of cartilaginous defects in the ipsilateral TF compartment (odds ratio, OR, 55, confidence interval, CI, 7.8-382). The number of cartilaginous defects in the PF compartment correlated positively with ipsilateral meniscal tears (OR 3.7, CI 1.0-14) and ipsilateral PF BME (OR 17, CI 3.8-72). Cartilaginous defects in the TF compartment correlated positively with ipsilateral meniscal tears (OR 9.8, CI 2.5-38) and ipsilateral TF BME (OR 120, CI 6.5-2,221). Osteoarthritic defects lateralize or medialize in the PF and TF compartments of the knee in patients with mild OA. (orig.)

  15. Physical activity and exercise adherence in physical therapy exercise treatment in patients with osteoarthritis of hip or knee.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pisters, M.F.; Veenhof, C.; Bakker, D. de; Schellevis, F.G.; Dekker, J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: a lack of regular physical activity in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip and/or knee is an important risk factor for functional decline. The ultimate goal of exercise therapy is to improve the overall physical function and to help individuals meet the demands of daily living. Ear

  16. Long-term effectiveness of exercise therapy in patients with Osteoarthritis of the hip or knee : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pisters, Martijn F.; Veenhof, Cindy; Van Meeteren, Nico L. U.; Ostelo, Raymond W.; De Bakker, Dinny H.; Schellevis, Franicois G.; Dekkers, Joost

    2007-01-01

    Objective. To determine the long-term effectiveness (>= 6 months after treatment) of exercise therapy on pain, physical function, and patient global assessment of effectiveness in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip and/or knee. Methods. We conducted an extensive literature search in PubMed

  17. Long-term effectiveness of exercise therapy in patients with osteoarthritis of hip or knee: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pisters, M.F.; Veenhof, C.; Meeteren, N.L.U. van; Ostelo, R.W.; Bakker, D. de; Schellevis, F.G.; Dekker, J.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the long-term effectiveness (= 6 months after treatment) of exercise therapy on pain, physical function and patient global assessment of effectiveness in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip and/or knee. METHODS: An extensive literature search in PubMed, Embase, CINAHL,

  18. Efficacy of Tailored Exercise Therapy on Physical Functioning in Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis and Comorbidity: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rooij, Mariëtte; van der Leeden, Marike; Cheung, John; van der Esch, Martin; Häkkinen, Arja; Haverkamp, Daniël; Roorda, Leo D; Twisk, Jos; Vollebregt, Joke; Lems, Willem F; Dekker, Joost

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the efficacy on physical functioning and safety of tailored exercise therapy in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) and comorbidities. In a randomized controlled trial, 126 participants were included with a clinical diagnosis of knee OA and at least 1 of the following target comorbidities: coronary disease, heart failure, type 2 diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or obesity (body mass index ≥30 kg/m(2) ), with severity score ≥2 on the Cumulative Illness Rating Scale. The intervention group received a 20-week, individualized, comorbidity-adapted exercise program consisting of aerobic and strength training and training of daily activities. The control group received their current medical care for knee OA and were placed on a waiting list for exercise therapy. Primary outcome measures were the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, subscale physical functioning (WOMAC-pf), and the 6-minute walk test (6MWT). Measurements were performed at baseline, after 20 weeks (directly posttreatment), and at 3 months posttreatment. Statistically significant physical functioning differences over time were found between the intervention and control group (WOMAC: B = -7.43 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) -9.99, -4.87], P therapy is efficacious in improving physical functioning and safe in patients with knee OA and severe comorbidities. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  19. Intra-articular Hyaluronic Acid in Treating Knee Osteoarthritis: a PRISMA-Compliant Systematic Review of Overlapping Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Dan; Wang, Bin; Liu, Qiang; Ke, Yan; Xu, Yuankun; Li, Zhichang; Lin, Jianhao

    2016-09-12

    Numerous meta-analyses have been conducted aiming to compare hyaluronic acid (HA) and placebo in treating knee osteoarthritis (OA). Nevertheless, the conclusions of these meta-analyses are not in consistency. The purpose of the present study was to perform a systematic review of overlapping meta-analyses investigating the efficacy and safety of HA for Knee OA and to provide treatment recommendations through the best evidence. A systematic review was conducted based on the PRISMA guidelines. The meta-analyses and/or systematic reviews that compared HA and placebo for knee OA were identified. AMSTAR instrument was used to evaluate the methodological quality of individual study. The information of heterogeneity within each variable was fetched for the individual studies. Which meta-analyses can provide best evidence was determined according to Jadad algorithm. Twelve meta-analyses met the eligibility requirements. The Jadad decision making tool suggests that the highest quality review should be selected. As a result, a high-quality Cochrane review was included. The present systematic review of overlapping meta-analyses demonstrates that HA is an effective intervention in treating knee OA without increased risk of adverse events. Therefore, the present conclusions may help decision makers interpret and choose among discordant meta-analyses.

  20. Validity of Cyriax's concept capsular pattern for the diagnosis of osteoarthritis of hip and/or knee.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijl, D.; Dekker, J.; Baar, M.E. van; Oostendorp, R.A.B.; Lemmens, A.M.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.; Voorn, TH.B.

    1998-01-01

    To analyse the validity of Cyriax's concept of the 'capsular pattern' in the diagnosis of osteoarthritis (OA) of hip and knee, data on 200 patients were analysed. The capsular pattern with limitations of medial rotation, flexion, and abduction, was not present in a distinct pattern in patients with

  1. Design and testing a web-based physical activity intervention for patients with osteoarthritis in hip and/or knee.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bossen, D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Due to elevated fear of pain, catastrophizing thoughts and joint stiffness, a large group of patients with hip and/or knee osteoarthritis (OA) remain sedentary. Although inactivity may enhance in short-term pain reduction, prolonged inactivity may augment functional decline. Therefore, we d

  2. Long-term effectiveness of exercise therapy in patients with osteoarthritis of hip or knee: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pisters, M.F.; Veenhof, C.; Meeteren, N.L.U. van; Ostelo, R.W.; Bakker, D. de; Schellevis, F.G.; Dekker, J.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the long-term effectiveness (= 6 months after treatment) of exercise therapy on pain, physical function and patient global assessment of effectiveness in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip and/or knee. METHODS: An extensive literature search in PubMed, Embase, CINAHL,

  3. Effects of preoperative neuromuscular electrical stimulation on quadriceps strength and functional recovery in total knee arthroplasty. A pilot study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walls, Raymond J

    2010-01-01

    Supervised preoperative muscle strengthening programmes (prehabilitation) can improve recovery after total joint arthroplasty but are considered resource intensive. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) has been shown to improve quadriceps femoris muscle (QFM) strength and clinical function in subjects with knee osteoarthritis (OA) however it has not been previously investigated as a prehabilitation modality.

  4. The efficacy of 12 weeks non-surgical treatment for patients not eligible for total knee replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Søren Thorgaard; Rasmussen, Sten; Laursen, Mogens Berg

    2015-01-01

    secondary care with knee OA, confirmed by radiography (Kellgren-Lawrence grade ≥1), but not eligible for a TKR. The 12-week non-surgical treatment program consisted of individualized progressed neuromuscular exercise, patient education, insoles, dietary advice and prescription of pain medication...

  5. Exercise adherence improves long-term patient outcome in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip and/or knee.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pisters, M.; Veenhof, C.; Schellevis, F.; Twisk, J.; Dekker, J.; Bakker, D. de

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of patient exercise adherence, within the prescribed physiotherapy treatment period and after discharge, on patients’ outcome on pain, physical function and patient self-perceived effect in individuals with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip and/or knee. Relevance: The p

  6. Effectiveness of behavioral graded activity in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip and/or knee: A randomized clinical trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenhof, C.; Koke, A.J.; Dekker, J.; Oostendorp, R.A.B.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.; Tulder, M.W. van; Ende, C.H.M. van den

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effectiveness of a behavioral graded activity program (BGA) compared with usual care (UC; exercise therapy and advice) according to the Dutch guidelines for physiotherapy in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip and/or knee. The BGA intervention is intended to incr

  7. Low Vitamin D levels are associated with greater pain and slow walking speed in patients with knee osteoarthritis (KOA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The clinical status of patients with knee OA is primarily predicated by their level of pain and their muscle function. Recent studies have shown that vitamin D influences both musculoskeletal health and neuromuscular function. Vitamin D deficiency is common among elders and those with comorbidities....

  8. The effects of various kinds of lateral wedge insoles on performance of individuals with knee joint osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Rafiaee

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Using lateral wedge insole is a simple, inexpensive therapy for decreasing pain and improving quality of life; however, most research must be carried out to find the effects of lateral wedge on severity of knee joint OA and aligning TFA.

  9. Design and testing a web-based physical activity intervention for patients with osteoarthritis in hip and/or knee.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bossen, D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Due to elevated fear of pain, catastrophizing thoughts and joint stiffness, a large group of patients with hip and/or knee osteoarthritis (OA) remain sedentary. Although inactivity may enhance in short-term pain reduction, prolonged inactivity may augment functional decline. Therefore, we

  10. Effects of home-based resistance training and neuromuscular electrical stimulation in knee osteoarthritis: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce-Brand Robert A

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quadriceps femoris muscle (QFM weakness is a feature of knee osteoarthritis (OA and exercise programs that strengthen this muscle group can improve function, disability and pain. Traditional supervised resistance exercise is however resource intensive and dependent on good adherence which can be challenging to achieve in patients with significant knee OA. Because of the limitations of traditional exercise programs, interest has been shown in the use of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES to strengthen the QFM. We conducted a single-blind, prospective randomized controlled study to compare the effects of home-based resistance training (RT and NMES on patients with moderate to severe knee OA. Methods 41 patients aged 55 to 75 years were randomised to 6 week programs of RT, NMES or a control group receiving standard care. The primary outcome was functional capacity measured using a walk test, stair climb test and chair rise test. Additional outcomes were self-reported disability, quadriceps strength and cross-sectional area. Outcomes were assessed pre- and post-intervention and at 6 weeks post-intervention (weeks 1, 8 and 14 respectively. Results There were similar, significant improvements in functional capacity for the RT and NMES groups at week 8 compared to week 1 (p≤0.001 and compared to the control group (p  Conclusions Home-based NMES is an acceptable alternative to exercise therapy in the management of knee OA, producing similar improvements in functional capacity. Trial registration: Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN85231954

  11. Physical activity and exercise adherence in physical therapy exercise treatment in patients with osteoarthritis of hip or knee.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pisters, M.F.; Veenhof, C.; Bakker, D. de; Schellevis, F.G.; Dekker, J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: a lack of regular physical activity in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip and/or knee is an important risk factor for functional decline. The ultimate goal of exercise therapy is to improve the overall physical function and to help individuals meet the demands of daily living. Ear

  12. Validity of summing painful joint sites to assess joint-pain comorbidity in hip or knee osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siemons, Liseth; Klooster, ten Peter M.; Laar, van de Mart A.F.J.; Ende, van den Cornelia H.M.; Hoogeboom, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies in patients with hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) have advocated the relevance of assessing the number of painful joint sites, other than the primary affected joint, in both research and clinical practice. However, it is unclear whether joint-pain comorbidities can simpl

  13. Exercise adherence improves long-term patient outcome in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip and/or knee.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pisters, M.; Veenhof, C.; Schellevis, F.; Twisk, J.; Dekker, J.; Bakker, D. de

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of patient exercise adherence, within the prescribed physiotherapy treatment period and after discharge, on patients’ outcome on pain, physical function and patient self-perceived effect in individuals with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip and/or knee. Relevance: The

  14. Local and Systemic Cardiovascular Effects from Monochromatic Infrared Therapy in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis: A Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ru-Lan Hsieh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Infrared (IR therapy is used for pain relief in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA. However, IR’s effects on the cardiovascular system remain uncertain. Therefore, we investigated the local and systemic cardiovascular effects of monochromatic IR therapy on patients with knee OA in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study. Seventy-one subjects with knee OA received one session of 40 min of active or placebo monochromatic IR treatment (with power output of 6.24 W, wavelength of 890 nm, power density of 34.7 mW/cm2 for 40 min, total energy of 41.6 J/cm2 per knee per session over the knee joints. Heart rate, blood pressure, and knee arterial blood flow velocity were periodically assessed at the baseline, during, and after treatment. Data were analyzed by repeated-measure analysis of covariance. Compared to baseline, there were no statistically significant group x time interaction effects between the 2 groups for heart rate (P=0.160, blood pressure (systolic blood pressure: P=0.861; diastolic blood pressure: P=0.757, or mean arterial blood flow velocity (P=0.769 in follow-up assessments. The present study revealed that although there was no increase of knee arterial blood flow velocity, monochromatic IR therapy produced no detrimental systemic cardiovascular effects.

  15. A smart cane with vibrotactile biofeedback improves cane loading for people with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routson, Rebecca L; Bailey, Marcus; Pumford, Isabelle; Czerniecki, Joseph M; Aubin, Patrick M

    2016-08-01

    Nine million adults have symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA) in the U.S. and almost half of those people have a walking aid such as a cane. Proper cane loading (e.g. 15% body weight [BW]) can reduce knee loading and may slow OA progression. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of a novel smart cane with vibrotactile biofeedback that aims to facilitate increased cane loading. Ten subjects with knee OA performed a 50 m hallway walk test under four conditions: 1) naïve, 2) conventional cane with verbal instruction, 3) smart cane, and 4) conventional cane post smart cane. The cane load (% BW; mean ± 1 standard deviation) for the four conditions was 9.0 ± 1.9 (naïve), 12.7 ± 2.6 (conventional cane), 17.6 ± 2.4 (smart cane), and 15.6 ±3.1 (conventional cane post smart cane). These results indicate that the smart cane's vibrotactile biofeedback helped the users achieve the target cane loading of 15% BW or more as compared to naïve or verbal instruction alone. After using the smart cane, conventional cane loading was higher than the naïve and verbal instruction conditions demonstrating a potential smart cane training effect. Long term increased cane loading may reduce knee pain and improve joint function.

  16. The Relationship between Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury and Osteoarthritis of the Knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Simon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL tears are a common injury, particularly in the athletic and youth populations. The known association between ACL injury and subsequent osteoarthritis (OA of the knee merits a more in-depth understanding of the relationship between the ACL-injured knee and osteoarthritis. ACL injury, especially with concomitant meniscal or other ligamentous pathology, predisposes the knee to an increased risk of osteoarthritis. ACL insufficiency results in deterioration of the normal physiologic knee bending culminating in increased anterior tibial translation and increased internal tibial rotation. This leads to increased mean contact stresses in the posterior medial and lateral compartments under anterior and rotational loading. However, surgical reconstruction of the ACL has not been shown to reduce the risk of future OA development back to baseline and has variability based on operative factors of graft choice, timing of surgery, presence of meniscal and chondral abnormalities, and surgical technique. Known strategies to prevent OA development are applicable to patients with ACL deficiency or after ACL reconstruction and include weight management, avoidance of excessive musculoskeletal loading, and strength training. Reconstruction of the ACL does not necessarily prevent osteoarthritis in many of these patients and may depend on several external variables.

  17. Structure-symptom relationship with wide-area ultrasound scanning of knee osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podlipská, Jana; Koski, Juhani M.; Kaukinen, Päivi; Haapea, Marianne; Tervonen, Osmo; Arokoski, Jari P.; Saarakkala, Simo

    2017-01-01

    The aetiology of knee pain in osteoarthritis (OA) is heterogeneous and its relationship with structural changes and function is unclear. Our goal was to determine the prevalence of wide-area scanned ultrasound-defined knee OA structural features and their association with pain and functional impairment in 79 symptomatic and 63 asymptomatic subjects. All subjects underwent ultrasound knee wide-area scanning and the severity of articular cartilage degeneration, the presence and size of osteophytes, and meniscal extrusion were evaluated. Subjects filled in a self-administrated questionnaire on present knee pain, and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) on clinical symptoms and function over the past week. Cartilage changes were the most prevalent followed by lateral meniscal extrusion, osteophytes and medial meniscal extrusion. The global femoral cartilage grade associated strongly with pain and the WOMAC index. Site-specifically, early medial cartilage changes and thinning in sulcus and lateral site were associated with symptoms. The presence of femoral lateral osteophytes was also associated with both outcomes. Using the novel wide-area ultrasound scanning technique, we were able to confirm the negative impact of femoral cartilage OA changes on clinical symptoms. Presence, not necessarily size, of lateral femoral osteophytes was also associated with increased pain and disability. PMID:28295049

  18. Total Knee Arthroplasty: Does the Tibial Medial Side Defect Affect Outcome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Vahedian-Ardakani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Primary knee osteoarthritis (OA is one of the degenerative diseases that destroy auricularcartilage within knee joint and cause pain, varies deformity, decrease knee function. Total kneearthroplasty (TKA is an effective intervention in order to relieve pain, improve function and QOL (qualityof life in patients with severe osteoarthritis of the knees that have different degrees of varus deformity.However, we are not aware of any study to shows if medial side defect in tibia has any association withoutcome. We conceive this study of finding out if medial side defect of tibia affects the outcome. 124patients (143 knees with primary knee OA with different stages of defects participated in this study.Patients classified into two groups based on Rand classification of knee defects (patients with Rand I andII in group 1 and patients with Rand III and IV in group 2. Pain and knee alignment have been measuredby Visual analog scale (VAS and 3-joint X-ray and quality of life, knee function and radiographic havebeen measured by questionnaires of SF 36, WOMAC and KSS score. The mean follow-up was 18. 2mounts (range 12 to 23 months. The results showed that all of the parameters improved significantlywithin groups (P≤0.001. Comparison TKA between two groups in the postoperative analysis shows thatthere was a significant difference between groups in pain, radiographic and functional KSS and WOMACscore (P≤0.05. So group 1 had better results in these parameters than group 2 after surgery. TKA is aneffective intervention for all patients with severe osteoarthritis and varus deformity. However, the severityof medial tibial defects is an important determinant of outcome. Patients with a more severe deformityhave less favorable outcome.

  19. Clinical value of SPECT/CT for evaluation of patients with painful knees after total knee arthroplasty- a new dimension of diagnostics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasch Helmut

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of our study was to evaluate the clinical value of hybrid SPECT/CT for the assessment of patients with painful total knee arthroplasty (TKA. Methods Twenty-three painful knees in patients following primary TKA were assessed using Tc-99m-HDP-SPECT/CT. Rotational, sagittal and coronal position of the TKA was assessed on 3D-CT reconstructions. The level of the SPECT-tracer uptake (0-10 and its anatomical distribution was mapped using a validated localization scheme. Univariate analysis (Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney, Spearmean`s-rho test, p Results SPECT/CT imaging changed the suspected diagnosis and the proposed treatment in 19/23 (83% knees. Progression of patellofemoral OA (n = 11, loosening of the tibial (n = 3 and loosening of the femoral component (n = 2 were identified as the leading causes of pain after TKA. Patients with externally rotated tibial trays showed higher tracer uptake in the medial patellar facet (p = 0.049 and in the femur (p = 0.051. Patients with knee pain due to patellofemoral OA showed significantly higher tracer uptake in the patella than others (p Conclusions SPECT/CT was very helpful in establishing the diagnosis and guiding subsequent management in patients with painful knees after TKA, particularly in patients with patellofemoral problems and malpositioned or loose TKA.

  20. Relationship between knee kinetic outcome measures in vertical counter movement jumps and self-reported function in ACL reconstructed subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brekke, Anders Falk

    2014-01-01

    and Traumatology, Odense University Hospital, Institute of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark Introduction: Altered loading pattern of the medial aspect of the knee has been associated with the development of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are associated......Relationship between knee kinetic outcome measures in counter movement jumps and self-reported function in ACL reconstructed subjects Brekke AF1,2, Nielsen DB2, Holsgaard-Larsen A2 1School of physiotherapy, University College Zealand, Denmark 2Orthopaedic Research Unit, Department of Orthopaedics...

  1. EFFICACY OF HOME-BASED KINESTHESIA, BALANCE & AGILITY EXERCISE TRAINING AMONG PERSONS WITH SYMPTOMATIC KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew W. Rogers

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of a home-based kinesthesia, balance and agility (KBA exercise program to improve symptoms among persons age > 50 years with knee osteoarthritis (OA. Forty-four persons were randomly assigned to 8-weeks, 3 times per week KBA, resistance training (RT, KBA + RT, or Control. KBA utilized walking agility exercises and single-leg static and dynamic balancing. RT used elastic resistance bands for open chain lower extremity exercises. KBA + RT performed selected exercises from each technique. Control applied inert lotion daily. Outcomes included the OA specific WOMAC Index of Pain, Stiffness, and Physical Function (PF, community activity level, exercise self-efficacy, self-report knee stability, and 15m get up & go walk (GUG. Thirty-three participants [70.7 (SD 8.5 years] completed the trial. Analysis of variance comparing baseline, mid-point, and follow-up measures revealed significant (p < 0.05 improvements in WOMAC scores among KBA, RT, KBA + RT, and Control, with no differences between groups. However, Control WOMAC improvements peaked at mid- point, whereas improvement in the exercise conditions continued at 8-weeks. There were no significant changes in community activity level. Only Control improved exercise self-efficacy. Knee stability was improved in RT and Control. GUG improved in RT and KBA+RT. These results indicate that KBA, RT, or a combination of the two administered as home exercise programs are effective in improving symptoms and quality of life among persons with knee OA. Control results indicate a strong placebo effect in the short term. A combination of KBA and RT should be considered as part of the rehabilitation program, but KBA or RT alone may be appropriate for some patients. Studies with more statistical power are needed to confirm or refute these results. Patient presentation, preferences, costs, and convenience should be considered when choosing an exercise

  2. Effects of kinesiotherapy, ultrasound and electrotherapy in management of bilateral knee osteoarthritis: prospective clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mascarin Naryana

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although recent advances in knee osteoarthritis (OA treatment and evaluation were achieved, to the best of our knowledge, few studies have evaluated the longitudinal effect of therapeutic modalities on the functional exercise capacity of patients with knee OA. The purpose was to investigate the effects of kinesiotherapy and electrotherapy on functional exercise capacity, evaluated using the six-minute walk test (6-MWT in patients with bilateral knee OA. Secondary measurements included range of motion (ROM, severity of knee pain (VAS, and a measure of perceived health and physical function, evaluated using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC Osteoarthritis Index. Methods A total of 40 women with bilateral knee OA were assigned to three groups: kinesiotherapy (KIN, n = 16, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS, n = 12, or ultrasound (US, n = 10. The groups underwent 12 weeks of intervention twice per week. The participants were subjected to the 6-MWT, ROM, VAS and WOMAC index. These tests were performed before and after the intervention. The study was focused on outpatients and was carried out at Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Brazil. Results At follow-up, the KIN and US groups had significantly higher 6-MWT distances (19.8 ± 21.7 and 14.1 ± 22.5%, respectively compared with their respective pre-intervention values. All treatments were effective for reducing pain and improving the WOMAC index. Conclusions We demonstrated that the 6-MWT is a tool that can be used to evaluate improvements in the functional exercise capacity of patients submitted to a clinical intervention.

  3. Efficacy of home-based kinesthesia, balance & agility exercise training among persons with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Matthew W; Tamulevicius, Nauris; Semple, Stuart J; Krkeljas, Zarko

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of a home-based kinesthesia, balance and agility (KBA) exercise program to improve symptoms among persons age ≥ 50 years with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Forty-four persons were randomly assigned to 8-weeks, 3 times per week KBA, resistance training (RT), KBA + RT, or Control. KBA utilized walking agility exercises and single-leg static and dynamic balancing. RT used elastic resistance bands for open chain lower extremity exercises. KBA + RT performed selected exercises from each technique. Control applied inert lotion daily. Outcomes included the OA specific WOMAC Index of Pain, Stiffness, and Physical Function (PF), community activity level, exercise self-efficacy, self-report knee stability, and 15m get up & go walk (GUG). Thirty-three participants [70.7 (SD 8.5) years] completed the trial. Analysis of variance comparing baseline, mid-point, and follow-up measures revealed significant (p point, whereas improvement in the exercise conditions continued at 8-weeks. There were no significant changes in community activity level. Only Control improved exercise self-efficacy. Knee stability was improved in RT and Control. GUG improved in RT and KBA+RT. These results indicate that KBA, RT, or a combination of the two administered as home exercise programs are effective in improving symptoms and quality of life among persons with knee OA. Control results indicate a strong placebo effect in the short term. A combination of KBA and RT should be considered as part of the rehabilitation program, but KBA or RT alone may be appropriate for some patients. Studies with more statistical power are needed to confirm or refute these results. Patient presentation, preferences, costs, and convenience should be considered when choosing an exercise rehabilitation approach for persons with knee OA.

  4. Molecular changes after shockwave therapy in osteoarthritic knee in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C.-J.; Sun, Y.-C.; Wu, C.-T.; Weng, L.-H.; Wang, F.-S.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the molecular changes of DKK-1, MMP13, Wnt-5a and \\upbeta -catenin after extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) in anterior cruciate ligament transected (ACLT) osteoarthritic (OA) knee in rats. 27 male Spraque-Dawley rats were divided into three groups. Group I was the control one and received sham knee arthrotomy but no ACLT or ESWT. Group II underwent ACLT, but no ESWT. Group III underwent ACLT and received ESWT. The animals were killed at 12 weeks, and the harvested knee specimens were subjected to histopathological examination and immunohistochemical analysis. Radiographs of the knees were obtained at 0 and 12 weeks. At 12 weeks, radiographs of group II showed more arthritic changes with formation of osteochondral fragments, whereas very subtle arthritis was noted in groups I and III. In histopathological examination, group II showed a significant increase of Mankin score and a decrease of subchondral bone as compared to groups I and III. Group III showed a significant decrease of Mankin score and an increase of subchondral bone, with the data comparable to group I. In immunohistochemical analysis, group II showed significant increases of DKK-1 and MMP13 and decreases of Wnt-5a and \\upbeta -catenin in articular cartilage and subchondral bone as compared to groups I and III. Group III showed significant decreases of DKK-1 and MMP13 and increases of Wnt-5a and \\upbeta -catenin, with the data comparable to group I. In conclusion, the application of ESWT causes molecular changes that are consistent with the improvement in subchondral bone remodeling and chondroprotective effect in ACLT OA knees in rats.

  5. Critical appraisal of the role of glucosamine and chondroitin in the management of osteoarthritis of the knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven J Narvy

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Steven J Narvy1, C Thomas Vangsness Jr21Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USAAbstract: Osteoarthritis (OA is the most common musculoskeletal disease in the United States, with rising prevalence. Medical management of OA involves acetaminophen, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and other analgesics, all of which are of variable efficacy and are associated with significant side effects and toxicities. The purpose of this review is to critically evaluate the efficacy of glucosamine and chondroitin, both as single agents and in combination, for the treatment of knee OA. Also evaluated were the level of evidence and funding support of the included articles. Almost every included trial of glucosamine sulfate, glucosamine hydrochloride, and chondroitin sulfate has found the safety of these compounds to be equal to that of placebo, though their therapeutic efficacy in decreasing knee OA pain and improving joint function is variable. Additionally, there are data to support a role of these agents in reducing radiographic progression of knee OA. Industry involvement, however, remains prominent. Further, more comprehensive study by independent researchers free of industry ties is necessary to identify a subset of patients in whom the use of glucosamine and/or chondroitin would be most beneficial. These agents may be safely tried as an initial therapy in select OA patients prior to initiating therapy with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, acetaminophen, and other traditional medications.Keywords: glucosamine sulfate, glucosamine hydrochloride, chondroitin sulfate, knee osteoarthritis, nutritional supplement, nutraceutical

  6. Interpolation function for approximating knee joint behavior in human gait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth-Taşcǎu, Mirela; Pater, Flavius; Stoia, Dan Ioan

    2013-10-01

    Starting from the importance of analyzing the kinematic data of the lower limb in gait movement, especially the angular variation of the knee joint, the paper propose an approximation function that can be used for processing the correlation among a multitude of knee cycles. The approximation of the raw knee data was done by Lagrange polynomial interpolation on a signal acquired using Zebris Gait Analysis System. The signal used in approximation belongs to a typical subject extracted from a lot of ten investigated subjects, but the function domain of definition belongs to the entire group. The study of the knee joint kinematics plays an important role in understanding the kinematics of the gait, this articulation having the largest range of motion in whole joints, in gait. The study does not propose to find an approximation function for the adduction-abduction movement of the knee, this being considered a residual movement comparing to the flexion-extension.

  7. Biomechanics of medial unicondylar in combination with patellofemoral knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyse, Thomas J; El-Zayat, Bilal F; De Corte, Ronny; Scheys, Lennart; Chevalier, Yan; Fuchs-Winkelmann, Susanne; Labey, Luc

    2014-01-01

    Modular bicompartmental knee arthroplasty (BKA) for treatment of medio-patellofemoral osteoarthritis (OA) should allow for close to normal kinematics in comparison with unicondylar knee arthroplasty (UKA) and the native knee. There is so far no data to support this. Six fresh frozen full leg cadaver specimens were prepared and mounted in a kinematic rig with six degrees of freedom for the knee joint. Three motion patterns were applied with the native knee and after sequential implantation of medial UKA and patellofemoral joint replacement (PFJ): passive flexion-extension, open chain extension, and squatting. During the loaded motions, quadriceps and hamstrings muscle forces were applied. Infrared cameras continuously recorded the trajectories of marker frames rigidly attached to femur, tibia and patella. Prior computer tomography allowed identification of coordinate frames of the bones. Strains in the collateral ligaments were calculated from insertion site distances. UKA led to a less adducted and internally rotated tibia and a more strained medial collateral ligament (MCL). Addition of a patellofemoral replacement led to a more posterior position of both femoral condyles, a more dorsally located tibiofemoral contact point and higher MCL strain with squatting. In comparison to UKA modular BKA leads to a more dorsal tibial contact point, a medial femoral condyle being located more posteriorly, and more MCL strain. Mainly the changes to the trochlear anatomy as introduced by PFJ may account for these differences. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of the Japanese herbal medicine, Boiogito, on the osteoarthritis of the knee with joint effusion

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    Majima Tokifumi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Boiogito (Japanese herbal medicine, Tsumura Co. Tokyo, Japan contains sinomenin which inhibits inflammatory reactions. Since sinomenine is a principle component of the Boiogito, there is a possibility of it being effective on osteoarthritis (OA of the knee with joint effusion. However, there is no report concerning the effectiveness of Boiogito on knee OA. The objective of the present study is to investigate the therapeutic effect of Boiogito on OA of the knee associated with joint effusion in a comparative study among randomly assigned groups. Methods Study was performed using 50 patients who were diagnosed with primary osteoarthritis of the knee with joint effusion. The patients were randomly assigned to two groups: one group (25 patients using both loxoprofen (2-{4-[(2-oxocyclopentyl methyl]} propanoic acid and Boiogito and the other group (25 patients using loxoprofen, and were evaluated during a 12 week observation period. The assessment parameters including knee scores in the Knee Society Rating System including Knee score and Functional scores, amount of joint effusion by joint puncture in clinically detected cases, the 36-items short form of the Medical Outcome Study Questionnaire (SF-36 as a measurement of health related quality of life were used. Results The knee scores based on the Knee Society Rating System were improved in both groups. The staircase climbing up and down ability in the Knee society rating system functional score was significantly improved in the group using Boiogito and loxoprofen compared to the loxoprofen group. In the evaluation using SF-36, significant improvements were found in the scores in both groups in physical functioning after 12 weeks. The amount of joint fluid was significantly decreased at 4, 8 and 12 weeks compared to pre-administration baseline in the group using Boiogito and loxoprofen. A side effect of Boiogito, dry mouth, was found in one case. The symptom was mild and improved

  9. Prevalence of the Pro12Ala missense mutation in the PPARG2 gene in Kuwaiti patients with primary knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jarallah, Khaled F; Shehab, Diaa K; Haider, Mohammad Z

    2011-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) play an important role in a number of cellular and metabolic functions. This study was carried out to determine the prevalence of a missense mutation (Pro12Ala) in the PPARG2 gene in Kuwaiti Arab patients with primary knee osteoarthritis (OA) and healthy controls with the aim of identifying a possible association. A prospective cross-sectional study carried out at three major teaching hospitals (referral centers) in the country over a one-year period. The prevalence of PPARG2 gene Pro12Ala missense mutation was determined in 104 Kuwaiti Arab patients with primary knee OA and 111 ethnically matched healthy controls. The prevalence of this Pro12Ala missense mutation was also determined in clinical subgroups of OA patients divided on the basis of age at onset, function and radiologic grading. The Pro-Pro genotype of the PPARG2 gene Pro12Ala missense mutation was detected in 95/104 (91.3%) cases compared to 111/111 (100%) in the control subjects. The heterozygous Pro-Ala genotype was detected in 9/104 (8.7%) of the OA patients, while it was not detected in any of the controls. The Ala-Ala genotype was not detected in any of the OA patients or the controls. No significant differences were detected in the PPARG2 gene Pro12Ala genotypes in the subgroups of patients classified on the basis of age at onset, functional assessment using Lequesne's functional index, and radiological grading using Kellgren-Lawrence (K-L) grading. This study found no significant association between the PPARG2 gene Pro12Ala missense mutation and knee OA. However, the presence of the Pro-Pro genotype of the PPARG2 gene mutation has a protective effect against development of OA.

  10. Serum levels of vitamin D, sunlight exposure, and knee cartilage loss in older adults: the Tasmanian older adult cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Changhai; Cicuttini, Flavia; Parameswaran, Venkat; Burgess, John; Quinn, Steve; Jones, Graeme

    2009-05-01

    To determine the associations between serum levels of vitamin D, sunlight exposure, and knee cartilage loss cross-sectionally and longitudinally in older adults. A total of 880 randomly selected subjects (mean age 61 years [range 51-79 years], 50% women) were studied at baseline, and 353 of these subjects were studied 2.9 years later. Serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) were assessed by radioimmunoassay, and sunlight exposure was assessed by questionnaire. T1-weighted fat-suppressed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the right knee was performed to determine knee cartilage volume and defects. Knee radiographic osteoarthritis (OA) and knee pain were also assessed. The mean 25(OH)D serum level was 52.8 nmoles/liter at baseline (range 13-119 nmoles/liter). Winter sunlight exposure and serum 25(OH)D level were both positively associated with medial and lateral tibial cartilage volume, and a serum 25(OH)D levelSunlight exposure and serum 25(OH)D levels are both associated with decreased knee cartilage loss (assessed by radiograph or MRI). This is best observed using the whole range of 25(OH)D levels rather than predefined cut points and implies that achieving vitamin D sufficiency may prevent and/or retard cartilage loss in knee OA.

  11. Differences in injury pattern and prevalence of cartilage lesions in knee and ankle joints: a retrospective cohort study

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    Matthias Aurich

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is more common in the knee compared to the ankle joint. This can not be explained exclusively by anatomical and biomechanical differences. The aim of this study is to analyze and compare the injury pattern (clinically and the cartilage lesions (arthroscopically of knee and ankle joints in a cohort of patients from the same catchment area. A retrospective study of the clinical data of 3122 patients (2139 outpatients and 983 inpatients was performed, who were treated due to an injury of the knee and ankle joint. Statistical analysis was performed using SigmaStat 3.0 (SPSS Inc, Chicago, USA. There is a higher prevalence of injuries in the ankle as compared to the knee joint in this population from the same catchment area. In contrast, high-grade cartilage lesions are more prevalent in the knee, whereas low grade cartilage lesions are equally distributed between knee and ankle. From this data it can be concluded that the frequency of injuries and the injury pattern of knee versus ankle joints do not correlate with the severity of cartilage lesions and may therefore have no direct influence on the differential incidence of OA in those two joints.

  12. Differences in gait patterns, pain, function and quality of life between males and females with knee osteoarthritis: a clinical trial

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    Agar Gabriel

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to gain a deeper understanding of the gender differences in knee osteoarthritis (OA by evaluating the differences in gait spatio-temporal parameters and the differences in pain, quality of life and function between males and females suffering from knee OA. Methods 49 males and 85 females suffering from bilateral medial compartment knee OA participated in this study. Each patient underwent a computerized gait test and completed the WOMAC questionnaire and the SF-36 health survey. Independent t-tests were performed to examine the differences between males and females in age, BMI, spatio-temporal parameters, the WOMAC questionnaire and the SF-36 health survey. Results Males and females had different gait patterns. Although males and females walked at the same walking speed, cadence and step length, they presented significant differences in the gait cycle phases. Males walked with a smaller stance and double limb support, and with a larger swing and single limb support compared to females. In addition, males walked with a greater toe out angle compared to females. While significant differences were not found in the WOMAC subscales, females consistently reported higher levels of pain and disability. Conclusion The spatio-temporal differences between genders may suggest underlying differences in the gait strategies adopted by males and females in order to reduce pain and cope with the loads acting on their affected joints, two key aspects of knee OA. These gender effects should therefore be taken into consideration when evaluating patients with knee OA. Trial Registration The study is registered in the NIH clinical trial registration, protocol No. NCT00599729.

  13. Association of knee osteoarthritis with onset and resolution of pain and physical functional disability: the ROAD study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraki, Shigeyuki; Akune, Toru; Nagata, Keiji; Ishimoto, Yuyu; Yoshida, Munehito; Tokimura, Fumiaki; Tanaka, Sakae; Oka, Hiroyuki; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Kozo; Yoshimura, Noriko

    2014-11-01

    To examine the onset and resolution of pain and physical functional disability using Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and their association with knee osteoarthritis (OA) in the longitudinal large-scale population of the nationwide cohort study, Research on Osteoarthritis/osteoporosis Against Disability (ROAD). Subjects from the ROAD study who had been recruited during 2005-2007 were followed up 3 years later. A total of 1,578 subjects completed the WOMAC questionnaire at baseline and follow up, and the onset and resolution rate of pain and physical functional disability were examined. We also examined the association of onset of pain and physical functional disability and their resolution with severity of knee OA as well as age, body-mass index and grip strength. After a 3.3-year follow-up, the onset rate of pain was 35.0% and 35.3% in men and women, respectively, and the onset rate of physical functional disability was 38% and 40%, respectively. Resolution rate of pain was 20.3% and 26.2% in men and women, respectively, and resolution rate of physical functional disability was 16% and 14% in men and women, respectively. Knee OA was significantly associated with onset and resolution of pain and physical functional disability in women, but there was no significant association of knee OA with onset of pain and resolution of physical functional disability in men. The present longitudinal study revealed the onset rate of pain and physical functional disability as well as their resolution, and their association with knee OA.

  14. Is hyaluronate sodium effective in the management of knee osteoarthritis? A placebo-controlled double-blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kul-Panza, E; Berker, N

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of intra-articular hyaluronic acid (HA) injection on pain and function in knee osteoarthritis (OA). Fourty-eight patients with knee OA were included in this study. The patients were randomized into two groups: one group received HA injections (average molecular weight [MW] 1.5 million Da), and the other group received placebo containing 0.9% saline. Three injections of HA or placebo were given at weeks 1, 2 and 3. The evaluation instruments were: Visual Analog Scale (VAS); Likert Scale; Lequesne climbing stairs, at night, on sitting and lying down, on standing); the number of analgesics taken; changes in knee flexion angle; and patient satisfaction. Assessment was performed at weeks 1, 3, 5, and 14 after the first injection. Significant improvement for almost all parameters was noted in both groups (P 0.05), except for WOMAC pain subscore on walking at final assessment (week 14) which showed greater improvement in the HA-treated group (35.2% versus 9.1%; P=0.01). HA treatment was effective in the management of knee OA and improved knee pain and functional outcome, but there was no statistically significant difference in functional and symptom improvement with respect to saline (placebo) injection.

  15. Does patella position influence ligament balancing in total knee arthroplasty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jung-Ro; Oh, Kwang-Jun; Wang, Joon Ho; Yang, Jae-Hyuk

    2015-07-01

    In vivo comparative gap measurements were performed in three different patella positions (reduced, subluxated and everted) using offset-type-force-controlled-spreader-system. Prospectively, 50 knees were operated by total knee arthroplasty using a navigation-assisted gap-balancing technique. The offset-type-force-controlled-spreader-system was used for gap measurements. This commercially available instrument allows controllable tension in patella-reduced position. The mediolateral gaps of knee extension (0°) and flexion (90°) angle were recorded in three different patella positions; reduced, subluxated and everted. Any gap differences of more than 3 mm were considered as a meaningful difference. Correlation between the difference with the demographic data, preoperative radiologic alignment and intraoperative data was analysed. For statistical analysis, ANOVA and Pearson's correlation test were used. The gaps in patella eversion demonstrated smaller gaps both in knee extension and flexion position compared to the gaps of patella reduction position. The amount of decreased gaps was more definite in knee flexion position. Statistically significant difference was observed for the lateral gap of patella eversion compared to gap of patella reduction in knee flexion position (p patella subluxation and 33 (66 %) knees of patella evertion demonstrated either increased or decreased gaps in knee flexion position compared to the gaps of patella reduction position. The gaps in patella eversion demonstrated smaller gaps both in knee extension and flexion position compared to the gaps of patella reduction position. The amount of decreased gaps was more definite in knee flexion position. Therefore, the intraoperative patellar positioning has influence on the measurement of the joint gap. Keeping the patella in reduced position is important during gap balancing. I.

  16. OSTEOARTHRITIS OF KNEE JOINT AND ITS RISK FACTOR IN POPULATION OF BIHAR

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    Mahesh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND In study of Orthopaedic diseases, Osteoarthritis (OA is one of the most prevalent condition resulting to disability particularly in population of old age people and is a leading cause of chronic disability. The knee is the commonest of the large joints in the body to be affected by Osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis is a very chronic joint disorder in which there is progressive softening and disintegration of articular cartilage accompanied by new growth of cartilage and bone at the joint margins (Osteophytes and the capsular fibrosis. METHODS A total of 100 cases and 100 controls were taken in the Bihari Population. For each case, an age matched control of same sex was taken, who had no complaints pertaining to knee. RESULTS In this study, old age, female sex, obesity, hypertension, family history of knee pain, Indian toilet habits, history of knee trauma/disease, sitting cross-legged for longer period, sitting before Computer for long hours, using cell phone with improper body posture and increased frequency of knee bending were found to be predisposing factors for knee Osteoarthritis. CONCLUSION Keeping weight under control, modifying daily habits such as sitting cross-legged and squatting along with using western toilet can significantly reduce the toll of knee osteoarthritis. Any trauma to knee should be dealt with utmost care, so as to maintain joint congruity and to prevent its progression to osteoarthritis in future is also strongly recommended.

  17. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction using Bone Patellar Tendon Bone autograft in ACL deficient Knee

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    Navin Kumar Karn

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Injury to Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL reconstruction has increased because of increased interest in sports. There are various grafts used for reconstruction of ACL, for example, Bone Patellar Tendon Bone, Hamstring etc. The study was conducted to evaluate the results of Bone Patellar Tendon Bone graft used for reconstruction of Anterior Cruciate Ligament.Materials & Methods: 40 patients with chronic ACL deficient knee presenting to Neuro Hospital from July 2011 to June 2013 were included in the study. The patients with intraarticular fracture of knee, severe OA knee, local active or suspected infection and systemic disease that might influence the study results were excluded from the study. Bone patellar tendon bone graft was harvested from ipsilateral knee in all the cases. The patient was followed till 2 year with specified programme of rehabilitation. The pain was assessed using VAS and the function of the knee was assessed using Modified WOMAC knee index.Results: The long term satisfactory results in terms of functional stability, symptom relief and return to preinjury level of activity was seen in 32 cases (80%. Two knees got infected out of which one required arthroscopic debridement. Mean visual analogue scale was 8 and modified WOMAC knee score was 3 at 2 year follow up.Conclusion: Bone patellar tendon bone graft is useful in high demand patients and cost effective option with high patient satisfaction rate for reconstruction of ACL.JCMS Nepal. 2015;11(3:12-15.

  18. MECHANISMS OF CHRONIC PAIN AT OSTEOARTHROSIS OF THE KNEE

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    E. F. Turovskaya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The main symptom of osteoarthritis (OA is pain. Mechanisms of chronic pain in OA have not been fully investigated yet.Objective: to study key mechanisms of chronic pain in patients with knee OA.Subjects and methods. Authors examined 80 women aged 45–65 years, with chronic pain due to OA of the knee. Clinical rheumatologic and neurologic examinations, screening for neuropathic pain (PainDETECT and DN4 questionnaires, estimation of duration and intensity of pain, WOMAC assessment and evaluation of affective disorders (HADS questionnaire were performed. X-ray and ultrasonography were used to assess destructive changes of theknee.Results. According to DN4 questionnaire, 25 (30% patients scored 4 and more, i. e. had signs of neuropathic pain, whereas 55 (70% did not (scored less than 4. Although neurologic examination did not reveal lesions of somatosensory system in neither of groups, assessment of the pain sensitivity showed hyperalgesia in 60% of cases. Patients with signs of neuropathic pain typically have secondary hyperalgesia propagating far from the damaged joint.Conclusion. 30% of patients with osteoarthritis have pain of different intensity determined by nociceptive and neuropathic mechanisms. At the same time the absence of lesions of somatosensory system does not let us to consider the pain neuropathic and indicates that it has dysfunctional nature. Signs of neuropathic pain associated with secondary hyperalgesia may be a clinical symptom of central sensitization. Due to this fact, reasonable therapy of osteoarthritis-associated chronic pain should include, besides NSAIDs, central acting drugs for neuropathic pain treatment.

  19. Clinical benefit of intra-articular saline as a comparator in clinical trials of knee osteoarthritis treatments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altman, Roy D; Devji, Tahira; Bhandari, Mohit;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Hyaluronic acid and corticosteroids are common intra-articular (IA) therapies widely used for the management of mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis (OA). Many trials evaluating the efficacy of IA administered therapies commonly use IA saline injections as a placebo comparator arm....... Using a systematic review and meta-analysis, our objective was to assess the clinical benefit associated with use of IA saline in trials of IA therapies in the treatment of patients with painful knee OA. METHODS: MEDLINE and Embase databases were searched for articles published up to and including...... in the meta-analysis. Based on data with moderate inconsistency IA saline was found to significantly improve short-term knee pain in 32 studies involving 1705 patients (SMD = -0.68; 95% CI: -0.78 to -0.57; P IA injection...

  20. Functional Outcomes of Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty Following Failed Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty

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    Chris Ironside

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA can be used to treat medial compartment osteoarthritis of the knee. Some of these knees will eventually fail, and need to be revised. There is controversy about using UKA in younger patients as a definitive procedure or as a means to delay total knee arthroplasty (TKA because the outcomes of subsequent revision surgery may be inferior to a primary TKA. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed a series of 46 revision TKA patients following failed UKA (UKA revisions using functional outcomes questionnaires and compared the results with a cohort of age and gender matched primary TKA patients. Our hypothesis was that UKA revision surgery would be inferior to primary TKA surgery. Results: Data was collected on 33 knees after a mean follow-up period of five years. There was no significant difference in the Oxford Knee Score (33.7 vs 37.1, p = 0.09 or the Western Ontario and MacMasters Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC (24.8 vs. 19.1, p = 0.22. A subgroup analysis demonstrated that UKAs, which fail early, are more likely to produce an inferior outcome following revision surgery than those that survive more than five years. Discussion: We conclude that UKA can be used effectively in appropriately selected patients, as the functional outcome of their subsequent revision to TKA is not significantly inferior to a primary TKA.

  1. Imaging of knee arthroplasty

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    Miller, Theodore T. [Department of Radiology, North Shore University Hospital, 825 Northern Blvd., Great Neck, NY 11021 (United States)]. E-mail: TMiller@NSHS.edu

    2005-05-01

    Knee replacement surgery, either with unicompartmental or total systems, is common. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the appearance of normal knee arthroplasty and the appearances of complications such as infection, polyethylene wear, aseptic loosening and particle-induced osteolysis, patellofemoral abnormalities, axial instability, and periprosthetic and component fracture. Knowledge of the potential complications and their imaging appearances will help the radiologist in the diagnostic evaluation of the patient with a painful knee arthroplasty.

  2. Semi-automatic knee cartilage segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dam, Erik B.; Folkesson, Jenny; Pettersen, Paola C.; Christiansen, Claus

    2006-03-01

    Osteo-Arthritis (OA) is a very common age-related cause of pain and reduced range of motion. A central effect of OA is wear-down of the articular cartilage that otherwise ensures smooth joint motion. Quantification of the cartilage breakdown is central in monitoring disease progression and therefore cartilage segmentation is required. Recent advances allow automatic cartilage segmentation with high accuracy in most cases. However, the automatic methods still fail in some problematic cases. For clinical studies, even if a few failing cases will be averaged out in the overall results, this reduces the mean accuracy and precision and thereby necessitates larger/longer studies. Since the severe OA cases are often most problematic for the automatic methods, there is even a risk that the quantification will introduce a bias in the results. Therefore, interactive inspection and correction of these problematic cases is desirable. For diagnosis on individuals, this is even more crucial since the diagnosis will otherwise simply fail. We introduce and evaluate a semi-automatic cartilage segmentation method combining an automatic pre-segmentation with an interactive step that allows inspection and correction. The automatic step consists of voxel classification based on supervised learning. The interactive step combines a watershed transformation of the original scan with the posterior probability map from the classification step at sub-voxel precision. We evaluate the method for the task of segmenting the tibial cartilage sheet from low-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of knees. The evaluation shows that the combined method allows accurate and highly reproducible correction of the segmentation of even the worst cases in approximately ten minutes of interaction.

  3. Biomechanical factors and physical examination findings in osteoarthritis of the knee: associations with tissue abnormalities assessed by conventional radiography and high-resolution 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Introduction We aimed to explore the associations between knee osteoarthritis (OA)-related tissue abnormalities assessed by conventional radiography (CR) and by high-resolution 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as well as biomechanical factors and findings from physical examination in patients with knee OA. Methods This was an explorative cross-sectional study of 105 patients with knee OA. Index knees were imaged using CR and MRI. Multiple features from CR and MRI (cartilage, osteophytes, bone marrow lesions, effusion and synovitis) were related to biomechanical factors (quadriceps and hamstrings muscle strength, proprioceptive accuracy and varus-valgus laxity) and physical examination findings (bony tenderness, crepitus, bony enlargement and palpable warmth), using multivariable regression analyses. Results Quadriceps weakness was associated with cartilage integrity, effusion, synovitis (all detected by MRI) and CR-detected joint space narrowing. Knee joint laxity was associated with MRI-detected cartilage integrity, CR-detected joint space narrowing and osteophyte formation. Multiple tissue abnormalities including cartilage integrity, osteophytes and effusion, but only those detected by MRI, were found to be associated with physical examination findings such as crepitus. Conclusion We observed clinically relevant findings, including a significant association between quadriceps weakness and both effusion and synovitis, detected by MRI. Inflammation was detected in over one-third of the participants, emphasizing the inflammatory component of OA and a possible important role for anti-inflammatory therapies in knee OA. In general, OA-related tissue abnormalities of the knee, even those detected by MRI, were found to be discordant with biomechanical and physical examination features. PMID:23039323

  4. Middle-aged patients with an MRI-verified medial meniscal tear report symptoms commonly associated with knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hare, Kristoffer B.; Stefan Lohmander, L.; Kise, Nina Jullum

    2017-01-01

    with a degenerative medial meniscus tear reported symptoms commonly associated with knee osteoarthritis. Frequent knee pain, presence of lack of confidence in the knee, and clicking did not distinguish those with a meniscal tear alone from those with early radiographic knee OA. Our findings support the notion...... when to perform surgery. We determined the prevalence and severity of self-reported knee symptoms in patients eligible for arthroscopic partial meniscectomy due to a degenerative meniscal tear. We investigated whether symptoms commonly considered to be related to meniscus injury were associated......Background and purpose — No consensus exists on when to perform arthroscopic partial meniscectomy in patients with a degenerative meniscal tear. Since MRI and clinical tests are not accurate in detecting a symptomatic meniscal lesion, the patient’s symptoms often play a large role when deciding...

  5. Individual and occupational risk factors for knee osteoarthritis: results of a case-control study in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klussmann, André; Gebhardt, Hansjürgen; Nübling, Matthias; Liebers, Falk; Quirós Perea, Emilio; Cordier, Wolfgang; von Engelhardt, Lars V; Schubert, Markus; Dávid, Andreas; Bouillon, Bertil; Rieger, Monika A

    2010-01-01

    A number of occupational risk factors are discussed in relation to the development and progress of knee joint diseases (for example, working in a kneeling or squatting posture, lifting and carrying heavy weights). Besides the occupational factors, a number of individual risk factors are important. The distinction between work-related and other factors is crucial in assessing the risk and in deriving preventive measures in occupational health. In a case-control study, patients with and without symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA) were questioned by means of a standardised questionnaire complemented by a semi-standardised interview. Controls were matched and assigned to the cases by gender and age. Conditional logistic regression was used in analysing data. In total, 739 cases and 571 controls were included in the study. In women and men, several individual and occupational predictors for knee OA could be described: obesity (odds ratio (OR) up to 17.65 in women and up to 12.56 in men); kneeling/squatting (women, OR 2.52 (>8,934 hours/life); men, 2.16 (574 to 12,244 hours/life), 2.47 (>12,244 hours/life)); genetic predisposition (women, OR 2.17; men, OR 2.37); and sports with a risk of unapparent trauma (women, OR 2.47 (>or=1,440 hours/life); men, 2.58 (>or=3,232 hours/life)). In women, malalignment of the knee (OR 11.54), pain in the knee already in childhood (OR 2.08), and the daily lifting and carrying of loads (>or=1,088 tons/life, OR 2.13) were related to an increased OR; sitting and smoking led to a reduced OR. The results support a dose-response relationship between kneeling/squatting and symptomatic knee OA in men and, for the first time, in women. The results concerning general and occupational predictors for knee OA reflect the findings from the literature quite well. Yet occupational risks such as jumping or climbing stairs/ladders, as discussed in the literature, did not correlate with symptomatic knee OA in the present study. With regards to occupational

  6. Mitochondrial localization of the OAS1 p46 isoform associated with a common single nucleotide polymorphism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Karina Hansen; Pahus, Jytte; Hansen, Mariann Fagernæs

    2014-01-01

    vacuoles/lysosomes. By using recombinantly expressed OAS1 mutant proteins, we found that the OAS1 SNP rs1131454 (former rs3741981) did not affect the enzymatic OAS1 activity. Conclusions: The SNP rs10774671 determines differential expression of the OAS1 isoforms. In Daudi and HT1080 cells the p46 isoform...

  7. Movardol® (N-acetylglucosamine, Boswellia serrata, ginger) supplementation in the management of knee osteoarthritis: preliminary results from a 6-month registry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolognesi, G; Belcaro, G; Feragalli, B; Cornelli, U; Cotellese, R; Hu, S; Dugall, M

    2016-12-01

    Knee Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic disease caused by the deterioration of cartilage in joints, which results in activation of the inflammatory response, pain, and impaired movement. Complementary therapies, particularly supplementation, in the management of moderate/severe knee OA have been gaining attention. This registry study aimed at evaluating the synergistic effect of Movardol®, a supplementation containing active ingredients with recognized anti-inflammatory activities on symptoms and levels of circulating biomarkers of knee OA. 54 subjects with symptomatic, moderate knee OA freely decided to follow either a standard management (SM) (n = 26) or SM plus oral supplementation with Movardol® (n = 28). Movardol® supplementation containing N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, ginger, and Boswellia Serrata extract was taken at the following dosage: 3 tablets/day for one week and then 2 tablets/day. Several parameters were assessed at inclusion and after 1, 3 and 6 months: functional impairment by the Karnofsky Performance Scale Index; pain, stiffness, physical, social and emotional functions by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC); total and pain-free walking distance; circulating biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress. Significant improvements in the functional outcomes and pain-free walking distance were observed after 1, 3 and 6 months in OA patients supplemented with Movardol®. Moreover, all the signs/symptoms of disease assessed by the WOMAC tended to regress over a 6-month period in patients following SM+supplementation. Inflammatory markers and plasmatic content of reactive oxygen species decreased over 6 months, in supplemented patients. Movardol® supplementation resulted to be safe and well tolerated, also showing the beneficial effect in term of a decrease in pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments and, consequently, reduction in management costs. These preliminary results indicate the efficacy and

  8. Exercise therapy, manual therapy, or both, for osteoarthritis of the hip or knee: a factorial randomised controlled trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baxter G David

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-pharmacological, non-surgical interventions are recommended as the first line of treatment for osteoarthritis (OA of the hip and knee. There is evidence that exercise therapy is effective for reducing pain and improving function in patients with knee OA, some evidence that exercise therapy is effective for hip OA, and early indications that manual therapy may be efficacious for hip and knee OA. There is little evidence as to which approach is more effective, if benefits endure, or if providing these therapies is cost-effective for the management of this disorder. The MOA Trial (Management of OsteoArthritis aims to test the effectiveness of two physiotherapy interventions for improving disability and pain in adults with hip or knee OA in New Zealand. Specifically, our primary objectives are to investigate whether: 1. Exercise therapy versus no exercise therapy improves disability at 12 months; 2. Manual physiotherapy versus no manual therapy improves disability at 12 months; 3. Providing physiotherapy programmes in addition to usual care is more cost-effective than usual care alone in the management of osteoarthritis at 24 months. Methods This is a 2 × 2 factorial randomised controlled trial. We plan to recruit 224 participants with hip or knee OA. Eligible participants will be randomly allocated to receive either: (a a supervised multi-modal exercise therapy programme; (b an individualised manual therapy programme; (c both exercise therapy and manual therapy; or, (d no trial physiotherapy. All participants will continue to receive usual medical care. The outcome assessors, orthopaedic surgeons, general medical practitioners, and statistician will be blind to group allocation until the statistical analysis is completed. The trial is funded by Health Research Council of New Zealand Project Grants (Project numbers 07/199, 07/200. Discussion The MOA Trial will be the first to investigate the effectiveness and cost

  9. Potential plasma biomarkers for progression of knee osteoarthritis using glycoproteomic analysis coupled with a 2D-LC-MALDI system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fukuda Isao

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although osteoarthritis (OA is a highly prevalent joint disease, to date, no reliable biomarkers have been found for the disease. In this study, we attempted to identify factors the amounts of which significantly change in association with the progression of knee OA. Methods A total of 68 subjects with primary knee OA were enrolled in the study. These subjects were followed up over an 18-month period, and plasma and serum samples were obtained together with knee radiographs every 6 months, i.e., 0, 6, 12 and 18 months after the enrollment. Progressors and non-progressors were determined from the changes on radiographs, and plasma samples from those subjects were subjected to N-glycoproteomic 2D-LC-MALDI analysis. MS peaks were identified, and intensities for respective peaks were compared between the progressors and non-progressors to find the peak intensities of which differed significantly between the two groups of subjects. Proteins represented by the chosen peaks were identified by MS/MS analysis. Expression of the identified proteins was evaluated in synovial tissues from 10 OA knee joints by in situ hybridization, western blotting analysis and ELISA. Results Among the subjects involved in the study, 3 subjects were determined to be progressors, and 6 plasma and serum samples from these subjects were subjected to the analysis together with another 6 samples from the non-progressors. More than 3000 MS peaks were identified by N-glycoproteomic 2D-LC-MALDI analysis. Among them, 4 peaks were found to have significantly different peak intensities between the progressors and non-progressors. MS/MS analysis revealed that these peaks represented clusterin, hemopexin, alpha-1 acid glycoprotein-2, and macrophage stimulating protein, respectively. The expression of these genes in OA synovium was confirmed by in situ hybridization, and for clusterin and hemopexin, by western blotting analysis and ELISA as well. Conclusions In this

  10. The impact of OA journals on the work of university library%OA期刊对高校图书馆期刊工作的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘晓芳

    2012-01-01

    论述了OA期刊的涵义,分析了OA期刊对高校图书馆期刊工作的影响,提出了如何充分利用OA期刊资源提升馆藏资源的质量与服务的相关措施。%This paper discusses the definition of OA journal and analyses its impact on university library work.It points out how to make full use of OA journals resources to enhance the quality of library resources and services relevant measures.

  11. Development and initial validation of the ibadan knee/hip osteoarthritis outcome measure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. O. Akinpelu

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Development of outcome measures remains a focus of health research in the 21st century. Outcome measures originally developed for the Nigerian environment are very rare. The aims of this study were to develop an outcome measure for management of hip and knee arthritic conditions, and to investigate the validity and responsiveness of it. Methods: The Ibadan Knee/Hip Osteoarthritis Measure (IKHOAMwas developed from other measures found in literature, as well as complaints of attending patients. Forty nine patients with pain from knee and/or hip osteoarthritis, the OA group (OAG and 49 individuals without knee or hip pain, the pain-free group (PFG were assessed, using the IKHOAM. The OAG was assessed on IKHOAM and the Visual Analogu