WorldWideScience

Sample records for defining anatomoclinical syndromes

  1. Chapter 15: Jean-Martin Charcot and the anatomo-clinical method of neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Christopher G

    2010-01-01

    Jean-Martin Charcot (1825-1893) was the premier clinical neurologist of the 19th century. Charcot's research was anchored in the anatomo-clinical method, a two-part methodology that linked clinical signs with anatomical lesions. The first step of this method involved the careful documentation of clinical signs with longitudinal observation. At the time of death, the second step involved autopsy examination of the brain and spinal cord. With combined clinical and anatomical data, Charcot was able to suggest concrete clinical-anatomical correlations. This method helped to define the tracts and nuclei responsible for normal and abnormal neurological signs and was pivotal to a new classification of neurological diseases based on anatomy. The best-developed example of this method was Charcot's work with motor system degenerative disorders, specifically amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. These studies led to the international designation of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis as Charcot's disease. Other examples of the fruits of the anatomo-clinical method included several stroke syndromes and the linkage of specific signs to specific lesions in multiple sclerosis. The discipline fostered cortical localization theory, which moved neurologists away from the concept of the brain as a homogenous organ in preference to the concept that brain regions controlled specific motor, sensory and language functions. Charcot's attempts to apply his anatomo-clinical method to the knotty neurological diagnosis of hysteria led him to experiments and conclusions that drew criticism and even scorn from colleagues. These events tarnished Charcot's reputation at the close of his career. In the context of Charcot's extensive discoveries and lasting contributions, the anatomo-clinical method remains the anchor of modern neurological diagnosis and is Charcot's most important contribution to clinical neurology.

  2. Síndrome de la niña y el niño sacudidos: hallazgos anatomoclínicos Shaken baby syndrome: anatomoclinic features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl A Bonilla Montero

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available El síndrome del niño sacudido es una de las formas más severas de maltrato infantil que ocurre principalmente en niños menores de un año. Por la vulnerabilidad de las víctimas y por las secuelas que puede producir, incluyendo la muerte, es necesario, en el abordaje clínico, tener presente la sospecha diagnóstica ante lesiones de explicación insatisfactoria por parte de los encargados del menor. Asimismo si se trata de un abordaje médico legal deben tenerse las consideraciones necesarias para documentar las lesiones, tanto en el paciente vivo, como en los casos de homicidio, para colaborar con la administración de justicia. Para ello se debe tratar de implementar una metodología homogénea para la realización de dichas pericias, tanto en la parte clínica como patológico forense. En este artículo se describe la forma habitual de presentación clínica del síndrome del niño sacudido y se expone una guía básica para la realización de autopsias medicolegales en casos de muertes por esta causa.The shaken baby syndrome is one of the most severe presentations of child abuse that is seen in children especially under the first year of age. The great vulnerability of this group of patients and the serious consequences that they may encounter in the future, including death, are enough reason to inquire, during the clinical approach, about the possibility that the patient being attended may be a victim of physical abuse. From a medico-legal evaluation, it is pertinent to document and describe thoroughly the physical lesions in the living patient and in cases of homicide, in order to contribute scientifically in the administration of justice. For that reason it is essential to follow a uniform methodology in the management of both the clinical and the forensic assessment. This article reviews the usual clinical presentation of the shaken baby syndrome and proposes a basic guide to evaluate the autopsies in cases of deaths originated by

  3. Defining nephrotic syndrome from an integrative genomics perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Matthew G; Hodgin, Jeffrey B; Kretzler, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Nephrotic syndrome (NS) is a clinical condition with a high degree of morbidity and mortality, caused by failure of the glomerular filtration barrier, resulting in massive proteinuria. Our current diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic decisions in NS are largely based upon clinical or histological patterns such as "focal segmental glomerulosclerosis" or "steroid sensitive". Yet these descriptive classifications lack the precision to explain the physiologic origins and clinical heterogeneity observed in this syndrome. A more precise definition of NS is required to identify mechanisms of disease and capture various clinical trajectories. An integrative genomics approach to NS applies bioinformatics and computational methods to comprehensive experimental, molecular and clinical data for holistic disease definition. A unique aspect is analysis of data together to discover NS-associated molecules, pathways, and networks. Integrating multidimensional datasets from the outset highlights how molecular lesions impact the entire individual. Data sets integrated range from genetic variation to gene expression, to histologic changes, to progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). This review will introduce the tenets of integrative genomics and suggest how it can increase our understanding of NS from molecular and pathophysiological perspectives. A diverse group of genome-scale experiments are presented that have sought to define molecular signatures of NS. Finally, the Nephrotic Syndrome Study Network (NEPTUNE) will be introduced as an international, prospective cohort study of patients with NS that utilizes an integrated systems genomics approach from the outset. A major NEPTUNE goal is to achieve comprehensive disease definition from a genomics perspective and identify shared molecular drivers of disease.

  4. Ichthyosis prematurity syndrome: a well-defined congenital ichthyosis subtype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygum, Anette; Westermark, Per; Brandrup, Flemming

    2008-01-01

    . The parents recalled that his elder sister had similar but milder skin changes and respiratory distress syndrome at birth. Ichthyosis prematurity syndrome was suggested and the diagnosis supported by electron microscopy of a skin biopsy specimen showing pathognomonic trilamellar membrane aggregations...... birth he developed respiratory distress and needed intubation. Remarkable skin changes were noticed with universal red, edematous and desquamating, spongy skin giving an impression of excessive vernix caseosa. Marked regression of the edema and ichthyotic scaling was observed within a few weeks......Ichthyosis prematurity syndrome is a rare syndrome characterized by the clinical triad of premature birth, thick caseous desquamating epidermis, and neonatal asphyxia. We describe two siblings with ichthyosis prematurity syndrome. The index patient was born at gestational week 34. Immediately after...

  5. Relationship between current level of immunodeficiency and non-acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-defining malignancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reekie, Joanne; Kosa, Csaba; Engsig, Frederik;

    2010-01-01

    In the combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) era, non-acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-defining malignancies account for more morbidity and mortality in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients than AIDS-defining malignancies. However, conflicting data have been reported on the re......In the combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) era, non-acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-defining malignancies account for more morbidity and mortality in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients than AIDS-defining malignancies. However, conflicting data have been reported...... on the relationship between immunodeficiency and the development of some non-AIDS-defining malignancies....

  6. Behavioral Features of Williams Beuren Syndrome Compared to Fragile X Syndrome and Subjects with Intellectual Disability without Defined Etiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Garcia, D.; Granero, R.; Gallastegui, F.; Perez-Jurado, L. A.; Brun-Gasca, C.

    2011-01-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) is a genetically determined neurodevelopmental disorder caused by a heterozygous deletion of 26-28 genes on chromosome band 7q11.23. During the past few years, researchers and clinicians have significantly contributed to define the phenotype of the syndrome, including its cognitive and behavioral aspects. However, it…

  7. The defining DNA methylation signature of Floating-Harbor Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Rebecca L; Schenkel, Laila C; Nikkel, Sarah M; Ainsworth, Peter J; Pare, Guillaume; Boycott, Kym M; Bulman, Dennis E; Sadikovic, Bekim

    2016-12-09

    Floating-Harbor syndrome (FHS) is an autosomal dominant genetic condition characterized by short stature, delayed osseous maturation, expressive language impairment, and unique facial dysmorphology. We previously identified mutations in the chromatin remodeling protein SRCAP (SNF2-related CBP Activator Protein) as the cause of FHS. SRCAP has multiple roles in chromatin and transcriptional regulation; however, specific epigenetic consequences of SRCAP mutations remain to be described. Using high resolution genome-wide DNA methylation analysis, we identified a unique and highly specific DNA methylation "epi-signature" in the peripheral blood of individuals with FHS. Both hyper and hypomethylated loci are distributed across the genome, preferentially occurring in CpG islands. Clonal bisulfite sequencing of two hypermethylated (FIGN and STPG2) and two hypomethylated (MYO1F and RASIP1) genes confirmed these findings. The identification of a unique methylation signature in FHS provides further insight into the biological function of SRCAP and provides a unique biomarker for this disorder.

  8. The SAPHO syndrome: defining the radiologic spectrum of diseases comprising the syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, H.; Tamura, K. [Department of Radiology, Jichi Medical School, 3311 Minamikawachi-machi, Kawachi-gun, Tochigi-ken, 329-04 (Japan); Fujii, T. [Department of Pathology, Jichi Medical School, 3311 Minamikawachi-machi, Kawachi-gun, Tochigi-ken, 329-04 (Japan)

    1998-06-02

    The objective of our study was to clarify the radiologic spectrum of disease entities belonging to the SAPHO syndrome (SAPHO being an acronym for synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis). A retrospective analysis of radiologic data was undertaken to determine the relationship of the osteoarthritic changes seen in palmoplantar pustulosis (PPP, n = 179), acne (n = 3), psoriasis vulgaris (PsV, n = 355), generalized pustular psoriasis (GPP, n = 25), and chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO, n = 4). Osseous changes of PPP, acne, and CRMO overlap each other; 7 PPP, 2 acne, and 3 CRMO patients manifested stenocostoclavicular hyperostosis as well as hyperostosis of the spine, pelvis, and/or femur. These findings were not seen in either PsV or GPP patients. Thirteen PsV and 4 GPP patients had peripheral arthritis and/or symmetrical sacroiliitis, which were not observed in the PPP, acne, and CRMO patients. The PPP, acne, and CRMO patients may be grouped as belonging to the single disease entity, namely SAPHO syndrome. Our findings do not support the inclusion of PsV and GPP in the spectrum of this syndrome. (orig.) With 7 figs., 2 tabs., 30 refs.

  9. Human papillomavirus-associated cancers as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome defining illnesses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shohreh Shahabi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The Centers for Disease Control currently report cervical, vulvar, vaginal, anal and some head and neck cancers as human papillomavirus (HPV-associated cancers. Only cervical cancer is listed amongst acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS defining illnesses. All of these cancers may represent progression of the immunocompromised state with the inability to eradicate viral infection. This study reports the case of a 27-year old HIV positive female presenting with a persistent right vulvar exophytic lesion. High-risk HPV analysis and immunostaining for P16 were both positive. A biopsy of the lesion revealed invasive squamous cell carcinoma. The patient underwent neoadjuvant radiation and chemotherapy followed by a radical vulvectomy. During treatment, her CD4 T-lymphocyte count decreased to 120 advancing her condition from HIV to AIDS. This case suggests that all HPV-associated cancers should be included as AIDS defining illnesses.

  10. Irritable bowel syndrome subtypes defined by Rome II and Rome III criteria are similar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, Spencer D; Morris, Carolyn B; Hu, Yuming; Toner, Brenda B; Diamant, Nicholas; Whitehead, William E; Bangdiwala, Shrikant I; Drossman, Douglas A

    2009-03-01

    The implications of the Rome III recommendations to change the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) subtype criteria for stool pattern are unknown. (1) Determine the level of agreement between Rome II and Rome III subtypes and (2) compare the behaviors of Rome II and Rome III subtypes over time. Female patients (n=148) with Rome II defined IBS were prospectively tracked over 5 consecutive 3-month periods. At baseline, bowel habit reports on questionnaires were used to subclassify patients into Rome II and Rome III subtypes. Over the subsequent 15 months, bowel habit reports on diary cards were used to subclassify patients based on previously derived surrogate criteria into Rome II and Rome III IBS subtypes. The level of agreement between Rome II and Rome III subtype assignments was quite high (86.5%; kappa 0.79). The behavior of Rome II and Rome III subtypes over time was also similar in terms of subtype prevalence, subtype stability, and the proportion of subjects who met criteria for alternating irritable bowel syndrome. Rome II and Rome III IBS subtypes are in high agreement and behave similarly over time. Therefore, studies that used Rome II subtype criteria and studies that will use Rome III criteria will define comparable populations.

  11. Optimal waist circumference cutoff value for defining the metabolic syndrome in postmenopausal Latin American women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blümel, Juan E; Legorreta, Deborah; Chedraui, Peter; Ayala, Felix; Bencosme, Ascanio; Danckers, Luis; Lange, Diego; Espinoza, Maria T; Gomez, Gustavo; Grandia, Elena; Izaguirre, Humberto; Manriquez, Valentin; Martino, Mabel; Navarro, Daysi; Ojeda, Eliana; Onatra, William; Pozzo, Estela; Prada, Mariela; Royer, Monique; Saavedra, Javier M; Sayegh, Fabiana; Tserotas, Konstantinos; Vallejo, Maria S; Zuñiga, Cristina

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine an optimal waist circumference (WC) cutoff value for defining the metabolic syndrome (METS) in postmenopausal Latin American women. A total of 3,965 postmenopausal women (age, 45-64 y), with self-reported good health, attending routine consultation at 12 gynecological centers in major Latin American cities were included in this cross-sectional study. Modified guidelines of the US National Cholesterol Education Program, Adult Treatment Panel III were used to assess METS risk factors. Receiver operator characteristic curve analysis was used to obtain an optimal WC cutoff value best predicting at least two other METS components. Optimal cutoff values were calculated by plotting the true-positive rate (sensitivity) against the false-positive rate (1 - specificity). In addition, total accuracy, distance to receiver operator characteristic curve, and the Youden Index were calculated. Of the participants, 51.6% (n = 2,047) were identified as having two or more nonadipose METS risk components (excluding a positive WC component). These women were older, had more years since menopause onset, used hormone therapy less frequently, and had higher body mass indices than women with fewer metabolic risk factors. The optimal WC cutoff value best predicting at least two other METS components was determined to be 88 cm, equal to that defined by the Adult Treatment Panel III. A WC cutoff value of 88 cm is optimal for defining METS in this postmenopausal Latin American series.

  12. Correlated genetic effects on reproduction define a domestication syndrome in a forest tree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Del-Blanco, Luis; Alía, Ricardo; González-Martínez, Santiago C; Sampedro, Luis; Lario, Francisco; Climent, José

    2015-04-01

    Compared to natural selection, domestication implies a dramatic change in traits linked to fitness. A number of traits conferring fitness in the wild might be detrimental under domestication, and domesticated species typically differ from their ancestors in a set of traits known as the domestication syndrome. Specifically, trade-offs between growth and reproduction are well established across the tree of life. According to allocation theory, selection for growth rate is expected to indirectly alter life-history reproductive traits, diverting resources from reproduction to growth. Here we tested this hypothesis by examining the genetic change and correlated responses of reproductive traits as a result of selection for timber yield in the tree Pinus pinaster. Phenotypic selection was carried out in a natural population, and progenies from selected trees were compared with those of control trees in a common garden experiment. According to expectations, we detected a genetic change in important life-history traits due to selection. Specifically, threshold sizes for reproduction were much higher and reproductive investment relative to size significantly lower in the selected progenies just after a single artificial selection event. Our study helps to define the domestication syndrome in exploited forest trees and shows that changes affecting developmental pathways are relevant in domestication processes of long-lived plants.

  13. [Fahr syndrome secondary to primary hypoparathyroidism: about a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Boukhrissi, Fatima; Zoulati, Ghizlane; En-Nafaa, Issam; Ouleghzal, Hassan; Derrou, Sara; Safi, Soumaya; Bamou, Youssef; Balouch, Lhoussine

    2017-01-01

    Fahr syndrome is a rare anatomo-clinic disease whose most common cause is primary or postoperative hypoparathyroidism. It is characterized by bilateral and symmetrical intracerebral calcifications located in the central gray nuclei, most often associated with phosphocalcium metabolism disorders. We here report the case of a 54-year old patient who had been treated for primary hypoparathyroidism for 20 years, presenting with amnesic disorders revealing Fahr syndrome secondary to hypoparathyroidism.

  14. Complex karyotype newly defined: The strongest prognostic factor in advanced childhood myelodysplastic syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Göhring (Gudrun); K. Michalova (Kyra); H.B. Beverloo (Berna); D. Betts (David); J. Harbott (Jochen); O.A. Haas (Oskar); G. Kerndrup (Gitte); L. Sainati (Laura); E. Bergstraesser (Eva); H. Hasle (Henrik); J. Stary (Jan); M. Trebo (Monica); M.M. van den Heuvel-Eibrink (Marry); M. Zecca (Marco); E.R. van Wering (Elisabeth); A. Fischer (Alexandra); P. Noellke (Peter); B. Strahm (Brigitte); F. Locatelli (Franco); C.M. Niemeyer (Charlotte); B. Schlegelberger (Brigitte)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractTo identify cytogenetic risk factors predicting outcome in children with advanced myelodysplastic syndrome, overall survival of 192 children prospectively enrolled in European Working Group of Myelodysplastic Syndrome in Childhood studies was evaluated with regard to karyotypic complexit

  15. The asthma–COPD overlap syndrome: how is it defined and what are its clinical implications?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van den Berge M

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Maarten van den Berge,1,2 René Aalbers,31Department of Pulmonary Diseases, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, 2GRIAC Research Institute, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, 3Department of Pulmonary Diseases, Martini Hospital, Groningen, the Netherlands Abstract: It is increasingly recognized that both asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD are heterogeneous diseases with a large inter-individual variability with respect to their clinical expression, disease progression, and responsiveness to the available treatments. The introduction of asthma–COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS may lead to a better clinical characterization and improved treatment of patients with obstructive airways disease. However, it is still in its early phase and several improvements will have to be made. First, a clear definition of ACOS and preferably also its sub-phenotypes, eg, asthma–ACOS and COPD–ACOS, is urgently needed. That would also allow researchers to design clinical studies in well-defined patients. The latter is important since the interpretation of clinical studies performed so far is hampered by the use of many different definitions of ACOS. Second, future studies are needed to investigate the role of state-of-the-art techniques such as computed tomography, genetics, and genomics in the phenotyping of patients with obstructive airways disease, ie, asthma, COPD, and ACOS. Third, longitudinal studies are now needed to better define the clinical implications of ACOS with respect to the long-term outcome and treatment of ACOS and its sub-phenotypes compared to only asthma or COPD. Keywords: ACOS, asthma, COPD, inflammation, remodeling, overlap phenotype

  16. Temporal organization of rest defined by actigraphy data in healthy and childhood chronic fatigue syndrome children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, Minako; Ueno, Taro; Tomita, Jun; Kawatani, Junko; Tomoda, Akemi; Kume, Shoen; Kume, Kazuhiko

    2013-11-04

    Accumulating evidence has shown a universality in the temporal organization of activity and rest among animals ranging from mammals to insects. Previous reports in both humans and mice showed that rest bout durations followed long-tailed (i.e., power-law) distributions, whereas activity bouts followed exponential distributions. We confirmed similar results in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Conversely, another report showed that the awakening bout durations, which were defined by polysomnography in bed, followed power-law distributions, while sleeping periods, which may correspond to rest, followed exponential distributions. This apparent discrepancy has been left to be resolved. Actigraphy data from healthy and disordered children were analyzed separately for two periods: time out of bed (UP period) and time in bed (DOWN period). When data over a period of 24 h were analyzed as a whole, rest bouts showed a power law distribution as previously reported. However, when UP and DOWN period data were analyzed separately, neither showed power law properties. Using a newly developed strict method, only 30% of individuals satisfied the power law criteria, even when the 24 h data were analyzed. The human results were in contrast to the Drosophila results, which revealed clear power-law distributions for both day time and night time rest through the use of a strict method. In addition, we analyzed the actigraphy data from patients with childhood type chronic fatigue syndrome (CCFS), and found that they showed differences from healthy controls when their UP and DOWN data were analyzed separately. These results suggested that the DOWN sleep, the bout distribution of which showed exponential properties, contributes to the production of long-tail distributions in human rest periods. We propose that separate analysis of UP and DOWN period data is important for understanding the temporal organization of activity.

  17. Defining the molecular interface that connects the Fanconi anemia protein FANCM to the Bloom syndrome dissolvasome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoadley, Kelly A; Xue, Yutong; Ling, Chen; Takata, Minoru; Wang, Weidong; Keck, James L

    2012-03-20

    The RMI subcomplex (RMI1/RMI2) functions with the BLM helicase and topoisomerase IIIα in a complex called the "dissolvasome," which separates double-Holliday junction DNA structures that can arise during DNA repair. This activity suppresses potentially harmful sister chromatid exchange (SCE) events in wild-type cells but not in cells derived from Bloom syndrome patients with inactivating BLM mutations. The RMI subcomplex also associates with FANCM, a component of the Fanconi anemia (FA) core complex that is important for repair of stalled DNA replication forks. The RMI/FANCM interface appears to help coordinate dissolvasome and FA core complex activities, but its precise role remains poorly understood. Here, we define the structure of the RMI/FANCM interface and investigate its roles in coordinating cellular DNA-repair activities. The X-ray crystal structure of the RMI core complex bound to a well-conserved peptide from FANCM shows that FANCM binds to both RMI proteins through a hydrophobic "knobs-into-holes" packing arrangement. The RMI/FANCM interface is shown to be critical for interaction between the components of the dissolvasome and the FA core complex. FANCM variants that substitute alanine for key interface residues strongly destabilize the complex in solution and lead to increased SCE levels in cells that are similar to those observed in blm- or fancm-deficient cells. This study provides a molecular view of the RMI/FANCM complex and highlights a key interface utilized in coordinating the activities of two critical eukaryotic DNA-damage repair machines.

  18. A unique point mutation in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 gene (FGFR3) defines a new craniosynostosis syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muenke, M.; Gripp, K.W.; McDonald-McGinn, D.M. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1997-03-01

    The underlying basis of many forms of syndromic craniosynostosis has been defined on a molecular level. However, many patients with familial or sporadic craniosynostosis do not have the classical findings of those craniosynostosis syndromes. Here we present 61 individuals from 20 unrelated families where coronal synostosis is due to an amino acid substitution (Pro250Arg) that results from a single point mutation in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 gene on chromosome 4p. In this instance, a new clinical syndrome is being defined on the basis of the molecular finding. In addition to the skull findings, some patients had abnormalities on radiographs of hands and feet, including thimble-like middle phalanges, coned epiphyses, and carpal and tarsal fusions. Brachydactyly was seen in some cases; none had clinically significant syndactyly or deviation of the great toe. Sensorineural hearing loss was present in some, and developmental delay was seen in a minority. While the radiological findings of hands and feet can be very helpful in diagnosing this syndrome, it is not in all cases clearly distinguishable on a clinical basis from other craniosynostosis syndromes. Therefore, this mutation should be tested for in patients with coronal synostosis. 54 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Mathematical Learning Disability in Girls with Turner Syndrome: A Challenge to Defining MLD and Its Subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzocco, Michele M. M.

    2009-01-01

    Turner syndrome is a common disorder with a prevalence of 1:2,500 live female births. Although not associated with mental retardation, there is an increased risk of learning difficulties in this population. In particular, mathematical learning difficulties among girls with Turner syndrome are prevalent, significant, and persistent. As such, the…

  20. Functional limitations in functional somatic syndromes and well-defined medical diseases : Results from the general population cohort LifeLines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joustra, Monica L.; Janssens, Karin A.M.; Bültmann, Ute; Rosmalen, Judith G.M.

    Objective: Functional somatic syndromes (FSS), defined as physical syndromes without known underlying organic pathology, are sometimes regarded as less serious conditions than well-defined medical diseases (MD). The aims of this study were to evaluate functional limitations in FSS, and to compare

  1. Sarcoidosis or Sjögren syndrome? Clues to defining mimicry or coexistence in 59 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Casals, Manuel; Brito-Zerón, Pilar; García-Carrasco, Mario; Font, Josep

    2004-03-01

    We present 5 new cases of coexisting sarcoidosis and Sjögren syndrome (SS) and review the literature for additional cases in order to analyze the clinical, immunologic, and histologic characteristics that may help physicians differentiate the mimicry of SS by sarcoidosis from a true coexistence of both autoimmune diseases. We considered the coexistence of sarcoidosis with SS to be when patients presented specific histologic patterns of both diseases, simultaneously or at different times.Fifty-nine patients were included in the analysis (54 identified in the literature search plus our 5 unpublished cases): 49 (83%) patients were female and 10 (17%) were male, with a mean age at diagnosis of 50 years. According to the histopathologic examination of the exocrine glands performed in 53 cases, we defined coexistence of sarcoidosis and SS in 28 cases, while in the remaining 25 patients, sarcoidosis mimicked SS. Clues to identifying when sarcoidosis coexists with SS were a higher prevalence of systemic manifestations (arthritis and uveitis) and positive immunologic parameters (antinuclear antibodies, rheumatoid factor, and anti-Ro/SS-A), as well as the existence of a focal sialadenitis (Chisholm-Mason score grades III-IV, with a CD4+ lymphocytic infiltration) in the salivary gland biopsy. In patients first diagnosed with primary SS, the appearance of some clinical features such as hilar adenopathies, uveitis, or hypercalcemia leads to the diagnosis of coexisting sarcoidosis. A careful application of the new American-European consensus criteria had a sensitivity of 93% and a specificity of 92% in identifying when SS coexists with sarcoidosis.In conclusion, the association of sarcoidosis with SS leads to a true coexistence of both diseases in more than half the patients described in the literature, while in the remaining patients, sarcoidosis mimics SS. In light of these results, sarcoidosis should not be considered as an exclusion criterion for the diagnosis of SS, and in

  2. Metabolic syndrome: no internationally defined standard cut-off value for waist circumference

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Olabode Oladeinde

    2007-01-01

    @@ The metabolic syndrome (MS) is a cluster of interrelated risk factors of metabolic origin - metabolic risk factors that appear to directly promote the development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and increase the risk of development of type 2 diabetes.

  3. Carbohydrate restriction improves the features of Metabolic Syndrome. Metabolic Syndrome may be defined by the response to carbohydrate restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volek, Jeff S; Feinman, Richard D

    2005-11-16

    Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) represents a constellation of markers that indicates a predisposition to diabetes, cardiovascular disease and other pathologic states. The definition and treatment are a matter of current debate and there is not general agreement on a precise definition or, to some extent, whether the designation provides more information than the individual components. We consider here five indicators that are central to most definitions and we provide evidence from the literature that these are precisely the symptoms that respond to reduction in dietary carbohydrate (CHO). Carbohydrate restriction is one of several strategies for reducing body mass but even in the absence of weight loss or in comparison with low fat alternatives, CHO restriction is effective at ameliorating high fasting glucose and insulin, high plasma triglycerides (TAG), low HDL and high blood pressure. In addition, low fat, high CHO diets have long been known to raise TAG, lower HDL and, in the absence of weight loss, may worsen glycemic control. Thus, whereas there are numerous strategies for weight loss, a patient with high BMI and high TAG is likely to benefit most from a regimen that reduces CHO intake. Reviewing the literature, benefits of CHO restriction are seen in normal or overweight individuals, in normal patients who meet the criteria for MetS or in patients with frank diabetes. Moreover, in low fat studies that ameliorate LDL and total cholesterol, controls may do better on the symptoms of MetS. On this basis, we feel that MetS is a meaningful, useful phenomenon and may, in fact, be operationally defined as the set of markers that responds to CHO restriction. Insofar as this is an accurate characterization it is likely the result of the effect of dietary CHO on insulin metabolism. Glucose is the major insulin secretagogue and insulin resistance has been tied to the hyperinsulinemic state or the effect of such a state on lipid metabolism. The conclusion is probably not

  4. Carbohydrate restriction improves the features of Metabolic Syndrome. Metabolic Syndrome may be defined by the response to carbohydrate restriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feinman Richard D

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Metabolic Syndrome (MetS represents a constellation of markers that indicates a predisposition to diabetes, cardiovascular disease and other pathologic states. The definition and treatment are a matter of current debate and there is not general agreement on a precise definition or, to some extent, whether the designation provides more information than the individual components. We consider here five indicators that are central to most definitions and we provide evidence from the literature that these are precisely the symptoms that respond to reduction in dietary carbohydrate (CHO. Carbohydrate restriction is one of several strategies for reducing body mass but even in the absence of weight loss or in comparison with low fat alternatives, CHO restriction is effective at ameliorating high fasting glucose and insulin, high plasma triglycerides (TAG, low HDL and high blood pressure. In addition, low fat, high CHO diets have long been known to raise TAG, lower HDL and, in the absence of weight loss, may worsen glycemic control. Thus, whereas there are numerous strategies for weight loss, a patient with high BMI and high TAG is likely to benefit most from a regimen that reduces CHO intake. Reviewing the literature, benefits of CHO restriction are seen in normal or overweight individuals, in normal patients who meet the criteria for MetS or in patients with frank diabetes. Moreover, in low fat studies that ameliorate LDL and total cholesterol, controls may do better on the symptoms of MetS. On this basis, we feel that MetS is a meaningful, useful phenomenon and may, in fact, be operationally defined as the set of markers that responds to CHO restriction. Insofar as this is an accurate characterization it is likely the result of the effect of dietary CHO on insulin metabolism. Glucose is the major insulin secretagogue and insulin resistance has been tied to the hyperinsulinemic state or the effect of such a state on lipid metabolism. The

  5. CAGE-defined promoter regions of the genes implicated in Rett Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitezic, Morana; Bertin, Nicolas; Andersson, Robin;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mutations in three functionally diverse genes cause Rett Syndrome. Although the functions of Forkhead box G1 (FOXG1), Methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) and Cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) have been studied individually, not much is known about their relation to each other...... for each gene and the common transcription factors likely to regulate the three genes. Our data imply Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) mediated silencing of Foxg1 in cerebellum CONCLUSIONS: Our analyses provide a comprehensive picture of the regulatory regions of the three genes involved in Rett...... Syndrome....

  6. CAGE-defined promoter regions of the genes implicated in Rett Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitezic, Morana; Bertin, Nicolas; Andersson, Robin;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mutations in three functionally diverse genes cause Rett Syndrome. Although the functions of Forkhead box G1 (FOXG1), Methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) and Cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) have been studied individually, not much is known about their relation to each other...

  7. Defining the phenotype associated with microduplication reciprocal to Sotos syndrome microdeletion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novara, Francesca; Stanzial, Franco; Rossi, Elena

    2014-01-01

    NSD1 point mutations, submicroscopic deletions and intragenic deletions are the major cause of Sotos syndrome, characterized by pre-postnatal generalized overgrowth with advanced bone age, learning disability, seizures, distinctive facial phenotype. Reverse clinical phenotype due to 5q35...

  8. A candidate region for Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome defined by genetic and physical mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wainwright, B.; Negus, K.; Berkman, J. [Univ. of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCCS, or Gorlin`s syndrome) is a cancer predisposition syndrome charcterized by multiple basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) and diverse developmental defects. The gene responsible for NBCCS, which is most likely to be a tumor suppressor gene, has previously been mapped to 9q22.3-q31 in a 12 cM interval between the microsatellite marker loci D9S12 and D9S109. Combined multipoint and haplotype analyses of Australian pedigrees has further refined the localization to a 2 cM interval between markers D9S196 and D9S180. Our loss of heterozygosity (LOH) studies from sporadic (n= 58) and familial (n=41) BCCs indicate that 50% have deletions within the NBCCS candidate region. All LOH is consistent with the genetic mapping of the NBCCS locus. Additionally, one sporadic tumor indicates that the smallest region of overlap in the deletions is within the interval D9S287 (proximal) and D9S180 (distal). A series of YAC clones from within this region has been mapped by FISH to examine chimerism. These clones, which have been mapped with respect to one another, form a contig which encompasses the candidate region from D9S196 to D9S180.

  9. Complex karyotype newly defined: the strongest prognostic factor in advanced childhood myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göhring, Gudrun; Michalova, Kyra; Beverloo, H Berna; Betts, David; Harbott, Jochen; Haas, Oskar A; Kerndrup, Gitte; Sainati, Laura; Bergstraesser, Eva; Hasle, Henrik; Stary, Jan; Trebo, Monika; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M; Zecca, Marco; van Wering, Elisabeth R; Fischer, Alexandra; Noellke, Peter; Strahm, Brigitte; Locatelli, Franco; Niemeyer, Charlotte M; Schlegelberger, Brigitte

    2010-11-11

    To identify cytogenetic risk factors predicting outcome in children with advanced myelodysplastic syndrome, overall survival of 192 children prospectively enrolled in European Working Group of Myelodysplastic Syndrome in Childhood studies was evaluated with regard to karyotypic complexity. Structurally complex constitutes a new definition of complex karyotype characterized by more than or equal to 3 chromosomal aberrations, including at least one structural aberration. Five-year overall survival in patients with more than or equal to 3 clonal aberrations, which were not structurally complex, did not differ from that observed in patients with normal karyotype. Cox regression analysis revealed the presence of a monosomal and structurally complex karyotype to be strongly associated with poor prognosis (hazard ratio = 4.6, P < .01). Notably, a structurally complex karyotype without a monosomy was associated with a very short 2-year overall survival probability of only 14% (hazard ratio = 14.5; P < .01). The presence of a structurally complex karyotype was the strongest independent prognostic marker predicting poor outcome in children with advanced myelodysplastic syndrome.

  10. Optimizing the molecular diagnosis of GALNS: novel methods to define and characterize Morquio-A syndrome-associated mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caciotti, Anna; Tonin, Rodolfo; Rigoldi, Miriam; Ferri, Lorenzo; Catarzi, Serena; Cavicchi, Catia; Procopio, Elena; Donati, Maria Alice; Ficcadenti, Anna; Fiumara, Agata; Barone, Rita; Garavelli, Livia; Rocco, Maja Di; Filocamo, Mirella; Antuzzi, Daniela; Scarpa, Maurizio; Mooney, Sean D; Li, Biao; Skouma, Anastasia; Bianca, Sebastiano; Concolino, Daniela; Casalone, Rosario; Monti, Elena; Pantaleo, Marilena; Giglio, Sabrina; Guerrini, Renzo; Parini, Rossella; Morrone, Amelia

    2015-03-01

    Morquio A syndrome (MPS IVA) is a systemic lysosomal storage disorder caused by the deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfatase (GALNS), encoded by the GALNS gene. We studied 37 MPS IV A patients and defined genotype-phenotype correlations based on clinical data, biochemical assays, molecular analyses, and in silico structural analyses of associated mutations. We found that standard sequencing procedures, albeit identifying 14 novel small GALNS genetic lesions, failed to characterize the second disease-causing mutation in the 16% of the patients' cohort. To address this drawback and uncover potential gross GALNS rearrangements, we developed molecular procedures (CNV [copy-number variation] assays, QF-PCRs [quantitative fluorescent-PCRs]), endorsed by CGH-arrays. Using this approach, we characterized two new large deletions and their corresponding breakpoints. Both deletions were heterozygous and included the first exon of the PIEZO1 gene, which is associated with dehydrated hereditary stomatocitosis, an autosomal-dominant syndrome. In addition, we characterized the new GALNS intronic lesion c.245-11C>G causing m-RNA defects, although identified outside the GT/AG splice pair. We estimated the occurrence of the disease in the Italian population to be approximately 1:300,000 live births and defined a molecular testing algorithm designed to help diagnosing MPS IVA and foreseeing disease progression.

  11. Abdominal compartment syndrome – Intra-abdominal hypertension: Defining, diagnosing, and managing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papavramidis, Theodossis S; Marinis, Athanasios D; Pliakos, Ioannis; Kesisoglou, Isaak; Papavramidou, Nicki

    2011-01-01

    Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) and intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) are increasingly recognized as potential complications in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. ACS and IAH affect all body systems, most notably the cardiac, respiratory, renal, and neurologic systems. ACS/IAH affects blood flow to various organs and plays a significant role in the prognosis of the patients. Recognition of ACS/IAH, its risk factors and clinical signs can reduce the morbidity and mortality associated. Moreover, knowledge of the pathophysiology may help rationalize the therapeutic approach. We start this article with a brief historic review on ACS/IAH. Then, we present the definitions concerning parameters necessary in understanding ACS/IAH. Finally, pathophysiology aspects of both phenomena are presented, prior to exploring the various facets of ACS/IAH management. PMID:21769216

  12. A TCTN2 mutation defines a novel Meckel Gruber syndrome locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaheen, Ranad; Faqeih, Eissa; Seidahmed, Mohammed Z; Sunker, Asma; Alali, Faten Ezzat; AlQahtani, Khadijah; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2011-06-01

    Meckel Gruber syndrome (MKS) is an autosomal recessive multisystem disorder that represents a severe form of ciliopathy in humans and is characterized by significant genetic heterogeneity. In this article, we describe the identification of a novel MKS locus MKS8 that we map to TCTN2, in a multiplex consanguineous family. TCTN2 is a paralog of the recently identified Tectonic 1, which has been shown to modulate sonic hedgehog signaling. Expression analysis at different developmental stages of the murine ortholog revealed a spatial and temporal pattern consistent with the MKS phenotype observed in our patient. The exclusion of this and the other seven MKS genes in our collection of consanguineous Arab MKS families confirms the existence of two additional MKS loci. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Waist circumference cutoff points for Chinese adults with metabolic syndrome defined by the International Diabetes Federation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanhui LU; Yuqing ZHANG; Changyu PAN; Juming LU; Shuyu WANG; Chunlin LI; Lisheng LIU; Runping ZHENG; Hui TIAN; Xianling WANG; Lijuan YANG

    2007-01-01

    Objective To investigate the appropriate waist circumference (WC) cutoff points for central obesity in the middle-aged and elderly Beijing residents by the metabolic syndrome definition of the International Diabetes Federation (IDF). Methods A total of 2,344Beijing residents aged ≥40 years were investigated. They answered questionnaires, received physical examinations, and underwent plasma glucose and lipid profile measurement. Those non-diabetic subjects underwent a 75g oral glucose tolerance test. All data were analyzed to calculate the appropriate WC cutoff points for central obesity reaching the diagonsis of MS. Results 1) Both in males and females, the triglyceride (TG), systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) increased linearly with WC, and the high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) decreased linearly with WC (P<0.05). 2)The prevalence of elevated TG,reduced HDL-C, elevated blood pressure, elevated FBG, or ≥ 2 of these factors increased with WC (P<0.05). 3) Based on the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis and Youden index, the WC values for central obesity and for detecting BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2were about 90 cm for men and 80 cm for women. 4) The odds ratio for the presence of two or more metabolic risk factors increased abruptly in men with WC ≥ 90 cm and in women with WC ≥ 80 cm. Conclusions The appropriate WC cutoff point for central obesity was determined to be 90 cm for men and 80 cm for women in the middle-aged and elderly Beijing residents by the metabolic syndrome definition of IDF.

  14. An examination of the prevalence of IDF- and ATPIII-defined metabolic syndrome in an Irish screening population.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Waterhouse, D F

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the prevalence of ATPIII- and IDF-defined metabolic syndrome (MetS) in an Irish screening population and to determine the calculated cardiovascular risk for each group. DESIGN: A total of 1,716 subjects were enrolled over a 12-month period. MAIN OUTCOMES: The ATPIII-defined prevalence of MetS in this population was 13.2%. Using IDF criteria, 21.4% of subjects were identified as having the MetS. Correlation between the two definitions was high; however, IDF criteria identified an additional 9.5% (n = 164) of the population as having MetS, which ATPIII criteria failed to recognise. CONCLUSION: We noted a higher prevalence of MetS in the studied population when defined by IDF criteria. However, those identified by IDF and not by ATPIII definition did not have a higher cardiovascular risk score by either Framingham or European Score than those without MetS. Thus, application of the ATPIII definition of MetS, may be the more practical.

  15. Referral bias in defining the phenotype and prevalence of obesity in polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezeh, Uche; Yildiz, Bulent O; Azziz, Ricardo

    2013-06-01

    The described phenotype of the polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) has been primarily based on findings in a referred (self or otherwise) population. It is possible that the phenotype of PCOS would be different if the disorder were to be detected and studied in its natural (unbiased) state. Our objective was to compare the phenotype of PCOS detected in an unselected population with that identified in a referral population. Participants included 292 PCOS patients identified at a tertiary care outpatient facility (referral PCOS) and 64 PCOS women (unselected PCOS) identified through the screening of a population of 668 seeking a pre-employment physical. Among the women undergoing a pre-employment physical, 563 did not demonstrate features of the disorder (unselected controls). All PCOS subjects met the National Institutes of Health 1990 criteria for the disorder. We estimated prevalence of obesity and severity of disease burden. Referral PCOS subjects had greater mean body mass index and hirsutism score and higher degrees of hyperandrogenemia, were more likely to be non-Hispanic White (83.90%), and demonstrated a more severe PCOS subphenotype than unselected PCOS or unselected controls. The prevalence of obesity and severe obesity in referral PCOS was 2.3 and 2.5 times greater than estimates of the same in unselected PCOS and 2.2 and 3.8 times greater than estimates in unselected controls, respectively. Alternatively, unselected PCOS subjects had a prevalence of obesity and severe obesity and a mean body mass index similar to those of the general population from which they were derived. The phenotype of PCOS, including the racial/ethnic mix, severity of presentation, and rate of obesity, is affected significantly by whether the PCOS subject arises from a referral population or through unselected screening, likely reflecting the degree of patient concern and awareness and access to healthcare.

  16. Distress syndromes, illness behavior, access to care and medical utilization in a defined population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechanic, D; Cleary, P D; Greenley, J R

    1982-04-01

    This article examines the use of general medical services in a representative sample from a defined geographic area and in a sample of persons seeking psychiatric care from the same area. Psychiatric patients made 100 per cent more general medical care visits in the retrospective period and 83 per cent more in the prospective period than persons who did not seek mental health care. The analysis focuses on the determinants in general medical care use between those who sought mental health care and those who did not. The first hypothesis is that physical symptoms and dysfunction concomitant with psychologic disorder explain the difference. The second argues that the association is a product of help-seeking orientations and illness behavior. The third focuses on variations due to differences in access. The first two types of factors are the most important. Using sex, physical symptoms and illness behavior measures, we explain 50 per cent of the differences in retrospective utilization and 40 per cent of the differences in prospective data.

  17. Duplication 12p and Pallister-Killian syndrome: a case report and review of the literature toward defining a Pallister-Killian syndrome minimal critical region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Kosuke; Conlin, Laura K; Berrodin, Donna; Fincher, Christopher; Wilkens, Alisha; Haldeman-Englert, Chad; Saitta, Sulagna C; Zackai, Elaine H; Spinner, Nancy B; Krantz, Ian D

    2012-12-01

    Pallister-Killian syndrome (PKS) is a multisystem sporadic genetic condition characterized by facial anomalies, variable developmental delay and intellectual impairment, hypotonia, hearing loss, seizures, pigmentary skin differences, temporal alopecia, diaphragmatic hernia, congenital heart defects, and other systemic abnormalities. PKS is typically caused by the presence of a supernumerary isochromosome composed of the short arms of chromosome 12 resulting in tetrasomy 12p, which is often present in a tissue limited mosaic state. The PKS phenotype has also often been observed in individuals with complete or partial duplications of 12p (trisomy 12p rather than tetrasomy 12p) as the result of an interstitial duplication or unbalanced translocation. We have identified a proposita with PKS who has two small de novo interstitial duplications of 12p which, along with a review of previously reported cases, has allowed us to define a minimum critical region for PKS.

  18. Multiple genetic loci within 11p15 defined by Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome rearrangement breakpoints and subchromosomal transferable fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoovers, J M; Kalikin, L M; Johnson, L A; Alders, M; Redeker, B; Law, D J; Bliek, J; Steenman, M; Benedict, M; Wiegant, J

    1995-01-01

    Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) involves fetal overgrowth and predisposition to a wide variety of embryonal tumors of childhood. We have previously found that BWS is genetically linked to 11p15 and that this same band shows loss of heterozygosity in the types of tumors to which children with BWS are susceptible. However, 11p15 contains > 20 megabases, and therefore, the BWS and tumor suppressor genes could be distinct. To determine the precise physical relationship between these loci, we isolated yeast artificial chromosomes, and cosmid libraries from them, within the region of loss of heterozygosity in embryonal tumors. Five germ-line balanced chromosomal rearrangement breakpoint sites from BWS patients, as well as a balanced chromosomal translocation breakpoint from a rhabdoid tumor, were isolated within a 295- to 320-kb cluster defined by a complete cosmid contig crossing these breakpoints. This breakpoint cluster terminated approximately 100 kb centromeric to the imprinted gene IGF2 and 100 kb telomeric to p57KIP2, an inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases, and was located within subchromosomal transferable fragments that suppressed the growth of embryonal tumor cells in genetic complementation experiments. We have identified 11 transcribed sequences in this BWS/tumor suppressor coincident region, one of which corresponded to p57KIP2. However, three additional BWS breakpoints were > 4 megabases centromeric to the other five breakpoints and were excluded from the tumor suppressor region defined by subchromosomal transferable fragments. Thus, multiple genetic loci define BWS and tumor suppression on 11p15. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:8618920

  19. The co-occurrence of Hashimoto thyroiditis in primary Sjogren's syndrome defines a subset of patients with milder clinical phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caramaschi, Paola; Biasi, Domenico; Caimmi, Cristian; Scambi, Cinzia; Pieropan, Sara; Barausse, Giovanni; Adami, Silvano

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate in a cohort of 100 consecutive patients affected by primary Sjogren's syndrome (pSS) the incidence of Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) and to compare the clinical features and the laboratory parameters of patients affected by pSS with and without concomitant HT. In 100 consecutive patients affected by pSS, the occurrence of other autoimmune diseases was recorded and a full examination of thyroid function obtained. HT was associated with pSS in 27 cases. The comparison between pSS cases with and without HT showed that only patients with isolated pSS had low C4 level [p = 0.032, OR (IC 95 %) 230 (13.13-4,046)]. In addition, only patients affected by pSS without HT had evidence of cryoglobulins, cutaneous vasculitis with palpable purpura, peripheral neuropathy, and development of lymphoma, although all these manifestations were observed in a 4.1-8.2 % of the cases, without reaching statistical significance. The association of HT in patients suffering from pSS defines a subset of patients with milder disease and normal C4 levels.

  20. Transcriptome Analysis of the Interferon-Signature Defining the Autoimmune Process of Sjögren’s Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, A. B.; Nguyen, C. Q.

    2015-01-01

    Sjögren’s syndrome (SS) of humans and SS-like (SjS-like) diseases in mouse models are characterized by chronic immune attacks against the salivary and lacrimal glands leading to exocrine dysfunction. One characteristic of SS and SjS-like diseases repeatedly observed is a strong upregulated expression of both the type I (α/β) and type II (γ) interferons (IFNs). In addition, recent global transcriptome studies have identified a variety of IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) transcripts differentially expressed in tissues of SS patients and mouse models exhibiting SjS-like disease. Analyses of these transcriptome databases indicate that the sets of differentially expressed genes are highly restricted, suggesting that there is a unique specificity in ISGs activated (or suppressed) during development and onset of disease. As a result, these observations have led to both SS and SjS-like diseases being designated as ‘interferon-signature’ diseases. While SS and SjS-like diseases may be designated as such, very little effort has been made to determine what an interferon-signature might signify relative to autoinflammation and whether it might point directly to an underlying etiopathological mechanism. Here, we review these limited data and provide a model of how the products of these genes interact molecularly and biologically to define critical details of SS pathology. PMID:22703193

  1. Spatially defined modulation of skin temperature and hand ownership of both hands in patients with unilateral complex regional pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseley, G Lorimer; Gallace, Alberto; Iannetti, Gian Domenico

    2012-12-01

    Numerous clinical conditions, including complex regional pain syndrome, are characterized by autonomic dysfunctions (e.g. altered thermoregulation, sometimes confined to a single limb), and disrupted cortical representation of the body and the surrounding space. The presence, in patients with complex regional pain syndrome, of a disruption in spatial perception, bodily ownership and thermoregulation led us to hypothesize that impaired spatial perception might result in a spatial-dependent modulation of thermoregulation and bodily ownership over the affected limb. In five experiments involving a total of 23 patients with complex regional pain syndrome of one arm and 10 healthy control subjects, we measured skin temperature of the hand with infrared thermal imaging, before and after experimental periods of either 9 or 10 min each, during which the hand was held on one or the other side of the body midline. Tactile processing was assessed by temporal order judgements of pairs of vibrotactile stimuli, delivered one to each hand. Pain and sense of ownership over the hand were assessed by self-report scales. Across experiments, when kept on its usual side of the body midline, the affected hand was 0.5 ± 0.3°C cooler than the healthy hand (P hand were prioritized over those delivered to the affected hand. Simply crossing both hands over the midline resulted in (i) warming of the affected hand (the affected hand became 0.4 ± 0.3°C warmer than when it was in the uncrossed position; P = 0.01); (ii) cooling of the healthy hand (by 0.3 ± 0.3°C; P = 0.02); and (iii) reversal of the prioritization of tactile processing. When only the affected hand was crossed over the midline, it became warmer (by 0.5 ± 0.3°C; P = 0.01). When only the healthy hand was crossed over the midline, it became cooler (by 0.3 ± 0.3°C; P = 0.01). The temperature change of either hand was positively related to its distance from the body midline (pooled data: r = 0.76, P hand over the body

  2. Defining Sudden Infant Death and Sudden Intrauterine Unexpected Death Syndromes with Regard to Anatomo-Pathological Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottaviani, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    Crib death, or sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), is the most frequent form of death in the first year of life, striking one baby in every 1,700–2,000. Yet, despite advances in maternal–infant care, sudden intrauterine unexplained/unexpected death syndrome (SIUDS) has a sixfold to eightfold greater incidence than that of SIDS. Frequent congenital abnormalities, likely morphological substrates for SIDS–SIUDS, were detected, mainly represented by alterations of the cardiac conduction system, such as accessory pathways and abnormal resorptive degeneration, and hypoplasia/agenesis of the vital brainstem structures. On the basis of these considerations, the new common definition of the SIDS–SIUDS complex is “The sudden death of a fetus after the 25th gestational week or infant under one year of age which is unexpected by history and remains unexplained after a thorough case investigation, including examination of the death scene, performance of a general autopsy and examination of the fetal adnexa”. Therefore, given that the general autopsy does not disclose any cause of death, a more in-depth histopathological analysis of the cardiac conduction system and autonomic nervous system by specialized pathologists is necessary. PMID:27709109

  3. Isometric and isokinetic muscle strength in patients with fibrositis syndrome. New characteristics for a difficult definable category of patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Søren; Danneskiold-Samsøe, B

    1987-01-01

    A common complaint among patients with fibrositis syndrome is exhaustion and fatique. It was therefore felt desirable to evaluate the muscle strength of these patients compared with normal subjects. Maximum isometric and isokinetic strength of knee extension was measured in 15 patients and 15...... healthy matched subjects, using an isokinetic dynamometer (Cybex II). Maximum isometric strength at various knee extension angles (90 degrees, 60 degrees and 30 degrees degrees) was significantly (p less than 0.001) lower in the fibrositis group than in controls, a reduction of approximately 58......-66%. Maximum isokinetic strength at various knee extension velocities (30-240 degrees per second) was also significantly (p less than 0.01) lower in the fibrositis group than in controls, the reduction being approximately 41-51%. In conclusion, isometric and isokinetic muscle strength is found to be lower...

  4. Comprehensive clinical studies in 34 patients with molecularly defined UPD(14)pat and related conditions (Kagami–Ogata syndrome)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagami, Masayo; Kurosawa, Kenji; Miyazaki, Osamu; Ishino, Fumitoshi; Matsuoka, Kentaro; Ogata, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    Paternal uniparental disomy 14 (UPD(14)pat) and epimutations and microdeletions affecting the maternally derived 14q32.2 imprinted region lead to a unique constellation of clinical features such as facial abnormalities, small bell-shaped thorax with a coat-hanger appearance of the ribs, abdominal wall defects, placentomegaly, and polyhydramnios. In this study, we performed comprehensive clinical studies in patients with UPD(14)pat (n=23), epimutations (n=5), and microdeletions (n=6), and revealed several notable findings. First, a unique facial appearance with full cheeks and a protruding philtrum and distinctive chest roentgenograms with increased coat-hanger angles to the ribs constituted the pathognomonic features from infancy through childhood. Second, birth size was well preserved, with a median birth length of ±0 SD (range, −1.7 to +3.0 SD) and a median birth weight of +2.3 SD (range, +0.1 to +8.8 SD). Third, developmental delay and/or intellectual disability was invariably present, with a median developmental/intellectual quotient of 55 (range, 29–70). Fourth, hepatoblastoma was identified in three infantile patients (8.8%), and histological examination in two patients showed a poorly differentiated embryonal hepatoblastoma with focal macrotrabecular lesions and well-differentiated hepatoblastoma, respectively. These findings suggest the necessity of an adequate support for developmental delay and periodical screening for hepatoblastoma in the affected patients, and some phenotypic overlap between UPD(14)pat and related conditions and Beckwith–Wiedemann syndrome. On the basis of our previous and present studies that have made a significant contribution to the clarification of underlying (epi)genetic factors and the definition of clinical findings, we propose the name ‘Kagami–Ogata syndrome' for UPD(14)pat and related conditions. PMID:25689926

  5. Comprehensive clinical studies in 34 patients with molecularly defined UPD(14)pat and related conditions (Kagami-Ogata syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagami, Masayo; Kurosawa, Kenji; Miyazaki, Osamu; Ishino, Fumitoshi; Matsuoka, Kentaro; Ogata, Tsutomu

    2015-11-01

    Paternal uniparental disomy 14 (UPD(14)pat) and epimutations and microdeletions affecting the maternally derived 14q32.2 imprinted region lead to a unique constellation of clinical features such as facial abnormalities, small bell-shaped thorax with a coat-hanger appearance of the ribs, abdominal wall defects, placentomegaly, and polyhydramnios. In this study, we performed comprehensive clinical studies in patients with UPD(14)pat (n=23), epimutations (n=5), and microdeletions (n=6), and revealed several notable findings. First, a unique facial appearance with full cheeks and a protruding philtrum and distinctive chest roentgenograms with increased coat-hanger angles to the ribs constituted the pathognomonic features from infancy through childhood. Second, birth size was well preserved, with a median birth length of ±0 SD (range, -1.7 to +3.0 SD) and a median birth weight of +2.3 SD (range, +0.1 to +8.8 SD). Third, developmental delay and/or intellectual disability was invariably present, with a median developmental/intellectual quotient of 55 (range, 29-70). Fourth, hepatoblastoma was identified in three infantile patients (8.8%), and histological examination in two patients showed a poorly differentiated embryonal hepatoblastoma with focal macrotrabecular lesions and well-differentiated hepatoblastoma, respectively. These findings suggest the necessity of an adequate support for developmental delay and periodical screening for hepatoblastoma in the affected patients, and some phenotypic overlap between UPD(14)pat and related conditions and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome. On the basis of our previous and present studies that have made a significant contribution to the clarification of underlying (epi)genetic factors and the definition of clinical findings, we propose the name 'Kagami-Ogata syndrome' for UPD(14)pat and related conditions.

  6. Adipose tissue lipolysis as a metabolic pathway to define pharmacological strategies against obesity and the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langin, Dominique

    2006-06-01

    lipid droplet coating by perilipins facilitates the access of the enzyme. The role of other lipid-interacting proteins in lipolysis is still unclear. The proteins involved in the lipolytic process constitute drug targets for the treatment of obesity and the metabolic syndrome. The oldest example is nicotinic acid (niacin) used as a hypolipidaemic drug. A first approach consists in molecules stimulating lipolysis and oxidation of the released fatty acids to decrease fat stores. A second approach is a chronic inhibition of lipolysis to diminish plasma fatty acid level which is a central feature of the metabolic syndrome.

  7. Acute chest syndrome is associated with single nucleotide polymorphism-defined beta globin cluster haplotype in children with sickle cell anaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, Christopher J; Boulet, Sheree L; Yang, Genyan; Payne, Amanda B; Ghaji, Nafisa; Pyle, Meredith E; Hooper, W Craig; Bhatnagar, Pallav; Keefer, Jeffrey; Barron-Casella, Emily A; Casella, James F; Debaun, Michael R

    2013-10-01

    Genetic diversity at the human β-globin locus has been implicated as a modifier of sickle cell anaemia (SCA) severity. However, haplotypes defined by restriction fragment length polymorphism sites across the β-globin locus have not been consistently associated with clinical phenotypes. To define the genetic structure at the β-globin locus more thoroughly, we performed high-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) mapping in 820 children who were homozygous for the sickle cell mutation (HbSS). Genotyping results revealed very high linkage disequilibrium across a large region spanning the locus control region and the HBB (β-globin gene) cluster. We identified three predominant haplotypes accounting for 96% of the β(S) -carrying chromosomes in this population that could be distinguished using a minimal set of common SNPs. Consistent with previous studies, fetal haemoglobin level was significantly associated with β(S) -haplotypes. After controlling for covariates, an association was detected between haplotype and rate of hospitalization for acute chest syndrome (ACS) (incidence rate ratio 0·51, 95% confidence interval 0·29-0·89) but not incidence rate of vaso-occlusive pain or presence of silent cerebral infarct (SCI). Our results suggest that these SNP-defined β(S) -haplotypes may be associated with ACS, but not pain or SCI in a study population of children with SCA.

  8. Defining the phenotype of restless legs syndrome/Willis-Ekbom disease (RLS/WED): a clinical and polysomnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, Fabrizio; Galbiati, Andrea; Marelli, Sara; Cusmai, Maria; Gasperi, Alessandro; Oldani, Alessandro; Zucconi, Marco; Padovani, Alessandro; Ferini Strambi, Luigi

    2016-02-01

    Clinical features variability between familial and sporadic restless legs syndrome/Willis-Ekbom disease (RLS/WED) has been previously reported. With this retrospective cohort study, we aimed to determine the clinical and polysomnographic characteristics of 400 RLS/WED patients. Patients with familial RLS/WED were significantly younger than sporadic RLS/WED, while clinical and polysomnographic characteristics were similar in both groups. No difference was found for the age-at-onset between idiopathic and secondary RLS/WED. Periodic limb movements (PLM) index and REM sleep time were higher in idiopathic RLS/WED. Time of onset of symptoms was in the evening or at bedtime in 28.04 and 37.80% of patients, respectively, while in 21.34% of patients onset was more than 1 h after sleep onset. Impulse control and compulsive behaviours (ICBs) were found in 13.29% patients on dopamine agonist therapy. Our analyses support the hypothesis that patients with a familial history of RLS/WED may have a genetic component. Nevertheless, the dichotomy between early and late onset disease seems to be less sharp than previously reported. A large proportion of RLS/WED patients can have atypical features, therefore making the diagnosis challenging. Some cases can be missed even when the patient refers to a sleep specialist, as revealed by the partial absence of daytime symptoms, the high comorbidity with insomnia and other sleep complaints and the high percentage of symptoms beginning after sleep onset. This draws attention on the importance of a careful evaluation of the patient, to recognize potentially treatable secondary forms of RLS/WED.

  9. Utility of the modified ATP III defined metabolic syndrome and severe obesity as predictors of insulin resistance in overweight children and adolescents: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agarwalla Vipin

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rising prevalence of obesity and metabolic syndrome (MetS has received increased attention since both place individuals at risk for Type II diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Insulin resistance (IR has been implicated in the pathogenesis of obesity and MetS in both children and adults and is a known independent cardiovascular risk factor. However measures of IR are not routinely performed in children while MetS or severe obesity when present, are considered as clinical markers for IR. Objective The study was undertaken to assess the utility of ATPIII defined metabolic syndrome (MetS and severe obesity as predictors of insulin resistance (IR in a group of 576 overweight children and adolescents attending a pediatric obesity clinic in Brooklyn. Methods Inclusion criteria were children ages 3–19, and body mass index > 95th percentile for age. MetS was defined using ATP III criteria, modified for age. IR was defined as upper tertile of homeostasis model assessment (HOMA within 3 age groups (3–8, n = 122; 9–11, n = 164; 12–19, n = 290. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive values and odds ratios (OR with 95% confidence intervals (CI were calculated within age groups for predicting IR using MetS and severe obesity respectively. Results MetS was present in 45%, 48% and 42% of the respective age groups and significantly predicted IR only in the oldest group (OR = 2.0, 95% CI 1.2, 3.4; p = .006. Sensitivities were Conclusion The expression of IR in overweight children and adolescents is heterogeneous and MetS or severe obesity may not be sufficiently sensitive and specific indicators of insulin resistance. In addition to screening for MetS in overweight children markers for IR should be routinely performed. Further research is needed to establish threshold values of insulin measures in overweight children who may be at greater associated risk of adverse outcomes whether or not MetS is present.

  10. Defining disease activity states and clinically meaningful improvement in primary Sjögren's syndrome with EULAR primary Sjögren's syndrome disease activity (ESSDAI) and patient-reported indexes (ESSPRI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seror, Raphaèle; Bootsma, Hendrika; Saraux, Alain; Bowman, Simon J; Theander, Elke; Brun, Johan G; Baron, Gabriel; Le Guern, Véronique; Devauchelle-Pensec, Valérie; Ramos-Casals, Manel; Valim, Valeria; Dörner, Thomas; Tzioufas, Athanasios; Gottenberg, Jacques-Eric; Solans Laqué, Roser; Mandl, Thomas; Hachulla, Eric; Sivils, Kathy L; Ng, Wan-Fai; Fauchais, Anne-Laure; Bombardieri, Stefano; Priori, Roberta; Bartoloni, Elena; Goeb, Vincent; Praprotnik, Sonja; Sumida, Takayuki; Nishiyama, Sumusu; Caporali, Roberto; Kruize, Aike A; Vollenweider, Cristina; Ravaud, Philippe; Meiners, Petra; Brito-Zerón, Pilar; Vitali, Claudio; Mariette, Xavier

    2016-02-01

    To define disease activity levels, minimal clinically important improvement (MCII) and patient-acceptable symptom state (PASS) with the primary Sjögren's syndrome (SS) disease activity indexes: European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) SS disease activity index (ESSDAI) and EULAR SS patient-reported index (ESSPRI). For 790 patients from two large prospective cohorts, ESSDAI, physician evaluation of disease activity, ESSPRI and patients' satisfaction with their current health status were recorded. Receiver operating characteristic curve analyses and anchoring methods were used to estimate disease activity levels of ESSDAI and the PASS of ESSPRI. At follow-up visit, patients and physicians assessed, respectively, whether symptoms and disease activity have improved or not. An anchoring method based on this evaluation was used to estimate MCII of ESSDAI and ESSPRI. Low-activity (ESSDAI<5), moderate-activity (5≤ESSDAI≤13) and high-activity (ESSDAI≥14) levels were defined. MCII of ESSDAI was defined as an improvement of at least three points. The PASS estimate was defined as an ESSPRI<5 points and MCII as a decrease of at least one point or 15%. This study determined disease activity levels, PASS and MCII of ESSDAI and ESSPRI. These results will help designing future clinical trials in SS. For evaluating systemic complications, the proposal is to include patients with moderate activity (ESSDAI≥5) and define response to treatment as an improvement of ESSDAI at least three points. For addressing patient-reported outcomes, inclusion of patients with unsatisfactory symptom state (ESSPRI≥5) and defining response as an improvement of ESSPRI at least one point or 15% seems reasonable. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  11. Síndrome de la niña y el niño sacudidos: hallazgos anatomoclínicos Shaken baby syndrome: anatomoclinic features

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    El síndrome del niño sacudido es una de las formas más severas de maltrato infantil que ocurre principalmente en niños menores de un año. Por la vulnerabilidad de las víctimas y por las secuelas que puede producir, incluyendo la muerte, es necesario, en el abordaje clínico, tener presente la sospecha diagnóstica ante lesiones de explicación insatisfactoria por parte de los encargados del menor. Asimismo si se trata de un abordaje médico legal deben tenerse las consideraciones necesarias para ...

  12. IL-4-dependent effector phase in autoimmune exocrinopathy as defined by the NOD.IL-4-gene knockout mouse model of Sjögren's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brayer, J B; Cha, S; Nagashima, H; Yasunari, U; Lindberg, A; Diggs, S; Martinez, J; Goa, J; Humphreys-Beher, M G; Peck, A B

    2001-01-01

    NOD mice manifest many features of autoimmune exocrinopathy (Sjögren's syndrome), a disease generally characterized by a chronic, progressive immunological attack against the exocrine tissues of the salivary and lacrimal glands. Previous studies using the NOD congenic partner strain, NOD.Igmu(null), defined an important role for B lymphocytes in the development of xerostomia, implicating autoantibodies reactive with the acetylcholine muscarinic receptor (M3R) as the possible effector mechanism. In the present study, we have examined the impact of the cytokine, interleukin (IL)-4, on autoimmune exocrinopathy by using the IL-4 gene knockout (KO) NOD mouse strain, NOD.IL-4-/-. Despite manifesting the physiological aberrations and marked leukocytic infiltration of the salivary glands characteristic of autoimmune xerostomia in NOD mice, the NOD.IL-4-/- mice do not develop xerostomia. However, NOD.IL-4-/- mice that received adoptively transferred T lymphocytes derived from NOD.Igmu-/- mice progress to xerostomia, thereby reversing the defect. While progression or lack of progression to xerostomia correlated with the ability of the NOD.IL-4-/- mice to express detectable anti-M3R autoantibodies, the precise mechanism of how IL-4 influences the development of autoimmune xerostomia remains speculative.

  13. [An analysis of the prevalence of isolated dental anomalies and of those associated with hereditary syndromes: a model for evaluating the genetic control of the dentition characteristics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccetti, T

    1993-06-01

    Tooth ontogenesis, morphogenesis, and eruption are under a multifactorial (genetic, epigenetic, environmental) control. The aim of this study has been a genetic appraisal of tooth developmental characteristics by means of the prevalence and patterns of association of tooth anomalies in a large sample of hereditary syndromes. MATERIALS AND METHODS. A sample of 169 hereditary syndromes exhibiting tooth abnormalities was collected from the literature: original articles were controlled in order to achieve uniformity of judgement about the definition of the dental defects. Tooth anomalies were classified according to anatomoclinical criteria: number (hypodontia/hyperdontia), shape, position, structure (enamel/dentin/cementum), size (micro-/macrodontism), eruption (precocious/delayed including unerupted teeth). Prevalence data were calculated for: 1) modes of syndrome inheritance; 2) syndromes exhibiting a single dental anomaly vs. syndromes exhibiting associated tooth abnormalities; 3) different types of tooth abnormalities; 4) isolated and associated tooth abnormalities.

  14. Depressive Symptoms, Age at Diagnosis and A Clinically Defined Metabolic Syndrome as Independent Correlates of Glycemic Control in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias Andreoulakis

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The findings concerning the association of metabolic syndrome (MetS and depression with glycemic control are controversial. Recently, age at type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM diagnosis has attracted particular attention but the relevant findings are limited. This study aimed to further assess the association between age at T2DM diagnosis, depressive symptoms and MetS with glycemic control in T2DM patients. Methods: In 116 T2DM patients we assessed disease-related and MetS-related variables as well as depressive symptom severity (Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression scale - CES-D. Glycemic control, as assessed by glycated hemoglobin (HBA1c levels, was the dependent variable. Results: Suboptimal HBA1c levels, i.e. 7% (53 mmol/mol or higher, were found in 35.3% of the patients. Elevated CES-D scores indicative of clinically relevant depressive symptoms (CES-D?16 or possible major depression (CES-D>23 where found in 31.9% and 11.2% of the patients, respectively. Younger age at T2DM diagnosis (p=0.004, greater treatment intensity (p=0.009, higher levels of depressive symptoms (p=0.011 and the presence of a clinically defined MetS (p=0.012 were the variables independently associated with glycemic control in multiple regression analysis after adjusting for sex, education, marital status, family history of diabetes and disease duration. Conclusion: In T2DM patients, the linear association found between depressive symptom severity and glycemic control points to the need of depressive symptoms being timely addressed. Younger age at T2DM onset may also be an important correlate of suboptimal glycemic control, independent of disease duration. Finally, classification of MetS in T2DM by clinical severity might help delineate its impact on glycemic control.

  15. An Xq22.3 duplication detected by comparative genomic hybridization microarray (Array-CGH) defines a new locus (FGS5) for FG syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehee, Fernanda Sarquis; Rosenberg, Carla; Krepischi-Santos, Ana Cristina; Kok, Fernando; Knijnenburg, Jeroen; Froyen, Guy; Vianna-Morgante, Angela M; Opitz, John M; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita

    2005-12-15

    FG syndrome is an X-linked multiple congenital anomalies (MCA) syndrome. It has been mapped to four distinct loci FGS1-4, through linkage analysis (Xq13, Xp22.3, and Xp11.4-p11.3) and based on the breakpoints of an X chromosome inversion (Xq11:Xq28), but so far no gene has been identified. We describe a boy with FG syndrome who has an inherited duplication at band Xq22.3 detected by comparative genomic hybridization microarray (Array-CGH). These duplication maps outside all four loci described so far for FG syndrome, representing therefore a new locus, which we propose to be called FGS5. MID2, a gene closely related to MID1, which is known to be mutated in Opitz G/BBB syndrome, maps within the duplicated segment of our patient. Since FG and Opitz G/BBB syndromes share many manifestations we considered MID2 a candidate gene for FG syndrome. We also discuss the involvement of other potential genes within the duplicated segment and its relationship with clinical symptoms of our patient, as well as the laboratory abnormalities found in his mother, a carrier of the duplication.

  16. Define Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk-Madsen, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    "Project" is a key concept in IS management. The word is frequently used in textbooks and standards. Yet we seldom find a precise definition of the concept. This paper discusses how to define the concept of a project. The proposed definition covers both heavily formalized projects and informally...... organized, agile projects. Based on the proposed definition popular existing definitions are discussed....

  17. Pediatric nasopharyngeal carcinoma: Anatomo-clinic aspects, therapeutic results and progressive particularities;Le cancer du cavum de l'enfant et l'adulte jeune: aspects anatomocliniques, therapeutiques et particularites evolutives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frikha, M.; Toumi, N. [Service de carcinologie medicale, CHU Habib-Bourguiba, Sfax (Tunisia); Ghorbel, L.; Ben Salah, H.; Daoud, J. [Service de carcinologie radiotherapie, CHU Habib-Bourguiba, Sfax, (Tunisia); Khabir, A.; Boudawara, T. [Service d' anatomopathologie, CHU Habib-Bourguiba, Sfax (Tunisia); Karray, H. [Service de virologie, CHU Habib-Bourguiba, Sfax (Tunisia); Gargouri, R. [Centre de biotechnologie, Sfax (Tunisia); Ghorbel, A. [Service d' ORL, CHU Habib-Bourguiba, Sfax (Tunisia)

    2010-06-15

    Purpose We retrospectively analyzed anatomo-clinic, therapeutic and progressive particularities of 74 young patients (= 20 years) with nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated between 1993 and 2005. Patients and methods Initial work-up included a fiberoptic naso-fiberscopy with biopsy, computed tomography and/or MRI of nasopharynx and neck, chest X-ray, abdominal ultrasonography and bone scan. Patients were treated with either primary chemotherapy (epirubicin and cisplatin) followed by radiotherapy or concomitant radio chemotherapy (five fluorouracil and cisplatin). Radiotherapy was delivered to a total dose of 70 to 75 Gy to nasopharynx and involved cervical lymph nodes and 50 Gy to the remainder cervical areas. Results The median age was 16 years. Sixty-three percent of patients had undifferentiated tumors. Sixty-six percent had locally advanced tumor. With a median follow-up of 107 months, one patient presented a local relapse, 24 patients developed distant metastases with a median delay of 7 months. The 5 years overall survival and disease-free survival were 66 and 65 %. Late complications were dominated by dry mouth and endocrine disorders. Comments Pediatric nasopharyngeal carcinoma is characterized by an early metastatic diffusion. Local control is excellent but with severe late toxicities. New techniques of radiotherapy and new molecules of chemotherapy could improve these results. (authors)

  18. A novel unstable duplication upstream of HAS2 predisposes to a breed-defining skin phenotype and a periodic fever syndrome in Chinese Shar-Pei dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia Olsson

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary periodic fever syndromes are characterized by recurrent episodes of fever and inflammation with no known pathogenic or autoimmune cause. In humans, several genes have been implicated in this group of diseases, but the majority of cases remain unexplained. A similar periodic fever syndrome is relatively frequent in the Chinese Shar-Pei breed of dogs. In the western world, Shar-Pei have been strongly selected for a distinctive thick and heavily folded skin. In this study, a mutation affecting both these traits was identified. Using genome-wide SNP analysis of Shar-Pei and other breeds, the strongest signal of a breed-specific selective sweep was located on chromosome 13. The same region also harbored the strongest genome-wide association (GWA signal for susceptibility to the periodic fever syndrome (p(raw = 2.3 × 10⁻⁶, p(genome = 0.01. Dense targeted resequencing revealed two partially overlapping duplications, 14.3 Kb and 16.1 Kb in size, unique to Shar-Pei and upstream of the Hyaluronic Acid Synthase 2 (HAS2 gene. HAS2 encodes the rate-limiting enzyme synthesizing hyaluronan (HA, a major component of the skin. HA is up-regulated and accumulates in the thickened skin of Shar-Pei. A high copy number of the 16.1 Kb duplication was associated with an increased expression of HAS2 as well as the periodic fever syndrome (p < 0.0001. When fragmented, HA can act as a trigger of the innate immune system and stimulate sterile fever and inflammation. The strong selection for the skin phenotype therefore appears to enrich for a pleiotropic mutation predisposing these dogs to a periodic fever syndrome. The identification of HA as a major risk factor for this canine disease raises the potential of this glycosaminoglycan as a risk factor for human periodic fevers and as an important driver of chronic inflammation.

  19. A nonsense mutation in CEP55 defines a new locus for a Meckel-like syndrome, an autosomal recessive lethal fetal ciliopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondeson, M-L; Ericson, K; Gudmundsson, S; Ameur, A; Pontén, F; Wesström, J; Frykholm, C; Wilbe, M

    2017-11-01

    Mutations in genes involved in the cilium-centrosome complex are called ciliopathies. Meckel-Gruber syndrome (MKS) is a ciliopathic lethal autosomal recessive syndrome characterized by genetically and clinically heterogeneous manifestations, including renal cystic dysplasia, occipital encephalocele and polydactyly. Several genes have previously been associated with MKS and MKS-like phenotypes, but there are still genes remaining to be discovered. We have used whole-exome sequencing (WES) to uncover the genetics of a suspected autosomal recessive Meckel syndrome phenotype in a family with 2 affected fetuses. RNA studies and histopathological analysis was performed for further delineation. WES lead to identification of a homozygous nonsense mutation c.256C>T (p.Arg86*) in CEP55 (centrosomal protein of 55 kDa) in the affected fetus. The variant has previously been identified in carriers in low frequencies, and segregated in the family. CEP55 is an important centrosomal protein required for the mid-body formation at cytokinesis. Our results expand the list of centrosomal proteins implicated in human ciliopathies and provide evidence for an essential role of CEP55 during embryogenesis and development of disease. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Defining excellence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehl, B

    1993-05-01

    Excellence in the pharmacy profession, particularly pharmacy management, is defined. Several factors have a significant effect on the ability to reach a given level of excellence. The first is the economic and political climate in which pharmacists practice. Stricter controls, reduced resources, and the velocity of change all necessitate nurturing of values and a work ethic to maintain excellence. Excellence must be measured by the services provided with regard to the resources available; thus, the ability to achieve excellence is a true test of leadership and innovation. Excellence is also time dependent, and today's innovation becomes tomorrow's standard. Programs that raise the level of patient care, not those that aggrandize the profession, are the most important. In addition, basic services must be practiced at a level of excellence. Quality assessment is a way to improve care and bring medical treatment to a higher plane of excellence. For such assessment to be effective and not punitive, the philosophy of the program must be known, and the goal must be clear. Excellence in practice is dependent on factors such as political and social norms, standards of practice, available resources; perceptions, time, the motivation to progress to a higher level, and the continuous innovation required to reshape the profession to meet the needs of society.

  1. Antiphospholipid syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cervera, Ricard; Piette, Jean-Charles; Font, Josep

    2002-01-01

    To analyze the clinical and immunologic manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in a large cohort of patients and to define patterns of disease expression.......To analyze the clinical and immunologic manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in a large cohort of patients and to define patterns of disease expression....

  2. A Chromosome 7 Pericentric Inversion Defined at Single-Nucleotide Resolution Using Diagnostic Whole Genome Sequencing in a Patient with Hand-Foot-Genital Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M Watson

    Full Text Available Next generation sequencing methodologies are facilitating the rapid characterisation of novel structural variants at nucleotide resolution. These approaches are particularly applicable to variants initially identified using alternative molecular methods. We report a child born with bilateral postaxial syndactyly of the feet and bilateral fifth finger clinodactyly. This was presumed to be an autosomal recessive syndrome, due to the family history of consanguinity. Karyotype analysis revealed a homozygous pericentric inversion of chromosome 7 (46,XX,inv(7(p15q21x2 which was confirmed to be heterozygous in both unaffected parents. Since the resolution of the karyotype was insufficient to identify any putatively causative gene, we undertook medium-coverage whole genome sequencing using paired-end reads, in order to elucidate the molecular breakpoints. In a two-step analysis, we first narrowed down the region by identifying discordant read-pairs, and then determined the precise molecular breakpoint by analysing the mapping locations of "soft-clipped" breakpoint-spanning reads. PCR and Sanger sequencing confirmed the identified breakpoints, both of which were located in intergenic regions. Significantly, the 7p15 breakpoint was located 523 kb upstream of HOXA13, the locus for hand-foot-genital syndrome. By inference from studies of HOXA locus control in the mouse, we suggest that the inversion has delocalised a HOXA13 enhancer to produce the phenotype observed in our patient. This study demonstrates how modern genetic diagnostic approach can characterise structural variants at nucleotide resolution and provide potential insights into functional regulation.

  3. Longitudinal measures of cognition in the Ts65Dn mouse: Refining windows and defining modalities for therapeutic intervention in Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmos-Serrano, J Luis; Tyler, William A; Cabral, Howard J; Haydar, Tarik F

    2016-05-01

    Mouse models have provided insights into adult changes in learning and memory in Down syndrome, but an in-depth assessment of how these abnormalities develop over time has never been conducted. To address this shortcoming, we conducted a longitudinal behavioral study from birth until late adulthood in the Ts65Dn mouse model to measure the emergence and continuity of learning and memory deficits in individuals with a broad array of tests. Our results demonstrate for the first time that the pace at which neonatal and perinatal milestones are acquired is correlated with later cognitive performance as an adult. In addition, we find that life-long behavioral indexing stratifies mice within each genotype. Our expanded assessment reveals that diminished cognitive flexibility, as measured by reversal learning, is the most robust learning and memory impairment in both young and old Ts65Dn mice. Moreover, we find that reversal learning degrades with age and is therefore a useful biomarker for studying age-related decline in cognitive ability. Altogether, our results indicate that preclinical studies aiming to restore cognitive function in Ts65Dn should target both neonatal milestones and reversal learning in adulthood. Here we provide the quantitative framework for this type of approach.

  4. Management of primary ciliary dyskinesia/Kartagener's syndrome in infertile male patients and current progress in defining the underlying genetic mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Wei Sha

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Kartagener's syndrome (KS is an autosomal recessive genetic disease accounting for approximately 50% of the cases of primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD. As it is accompanied by many complications, PCD/KS severely affects the patient's quality of life. Therapeutic approaches for PCD/KS aim to enhance prevention, facilitate rapid definitive diagnosis, avoid misdiagnosis, maintain active treatment, control infection and postpone the development of lesions. In male patients, sperm flagella may show impairment in or complete absence of the ability to swing, which ultimately results in male infertility. Assisted reproductive technology will certainly benefit such patients. For PCD/KS patients with completely immotile sperm, intracytoplasmic sperm injection may be very important and even indispensable. Considering the number of PCD/KS susceptibility genes and mutations that are being identified, more extensive genetic screening is indispensable in patients with these diseases. Moreover, further studies into the potential molecular mechanisms of these diseases are required. In this review, we summarize the available information on various aspects of this disease in order to delineate the therapeutic objectives more clearly, and clarify the efficacy of assisted reproductive technology as a means of treatment for patients with PCD/KS-associated infertility.

  5. Staphylococcus aureus toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1) production and Lactobacillus species growth in a defined medium simulating vaginal secretions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stingley, Robin L; Liu, Huanli; Mullis, Lisa B; Elkins, Christopher A; Hart, Mark E

    2014-11-01

    Lactobacillus species are commensal with the healthy vaginal environment and inhibit the growth of many pathogenic bacteria in the vaginal tract by a variety of mechanisms, such as the production of hydrogen peroxide, organic acids, and antimicrobial substances. Simulation of the vaginal environment is crucial for proper investigation of the effects of Lactobacillus species on pathogenic bacteria. In this study, we modified a medium used to simulate vaginal secretions to improve the growth of toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1)-producing Staphylococcus aureus clinical strains and Lactobacillus species so that interactions between these bacteria may be examined. A medium consisting of basal salts, vitamins, albumin, glycogen, mucin, urea, sodium bicarbonate, polyoxyethylene sorbitan monolaurate, and amino acids supported the growth of S. aureus and the production of TSST-1 as determined by Western analysis. Improved growth of the Lactobacillus species was seen when this same medium was supplemented with manganese chloride, sodium acetate, and an increase in glucose concentration. However, growth of S. aureus in the supplemented medium resulted in reduced levels of TSST-1. Production of TSST-1 was not detected in a medium routinely used for the growth of Lactobacillus species although S. aureus growth was not inhibited. The development of an improved genital tract secretion medium provides a more authentic environment in which to study the interactions of Lactobacillus species and vaginal pathogens, such as S. aureus.

  6. Defining incidence, risk factors, and impact on survival of central line-associated blood stream infections following hematopoietic cell transplantation in acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukenbill, Joshua; Rybicki, Lisa; Sekeres, Mikkael A; Zaman, Muhammad Omer; Copelan, Alexander; Haddad, Housam; Fraser, Thomas; DiGiorgio, Megan J; Hanna, Rabi; Duong, Hien; Hill, Brian; Kalaycio, Matt; Sobecks, Ronald; Bolwell, Brian; Copelan, Edward

    2013-05-01

    Central line-associated blood stream infections (CLABSI) commonly complicate the care of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (HCT). We developed a modified CLABSI (MCLABSI) definition that attempts to exclude pathogens usually acquired because of disruption of mucosal barriers during the vulnerable neutropenic period following HCT that are generally included under the original definition (OCLABSI). We conducted a retrospective study of all AML and MDS patients undergoing HCT between August 2009 and December 2011 at the Cleveland Clinic (N = 73), identifying both OCLABSI and MCLABSI incidence. The median age at transplantation was 52 years (range, 16 to 70); 34 had a high (≥3) HCT comorbidity index (HCT-CI); 34 received bone marrow (BM), 24 received peripheral stem cells (PSC), and 15 received umbilical cord blood cells (UCB). Among these 73 patients, 23 (31.5%) developed OCLABSI, of whom 16 (69.6%) died, and 8 (11%) developed MCLABSI, of whom 7 (87.5%) died. OCLABSI was diagnosed a median of 9 days from HCT: 5 days (range, 2 to 12) for UCB and 78 days (range, 7 to 211) for BM/PSC (P < .001). MCLABSI occurred a median of 12 days from HCT, with similar earlier UCB and later BM/PSC diagnosis (P = .030). Risk factors for OCLABSI in univariate analysis included CBC (P < .001), human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-mismatch (P = .005), low CD34(+) count (P = .007), low total nucleated cell dose (P = .016), and non-Caucasian race (P = .017). Risk factors for OCLABSI in multivariable analysis were UCB (P < .001) and high HCT-CI (P = .002). There was a significant increase in mortality for both OCLABSI (hazard ratio, 7.14; CI, 3.31 to 15.37; P < .001) and MCLABSI (hazard ratio, 6.44; CI, 2.28 to 18.18; P < .001). CLABSI is common and associated with high mortality in AML and MDS patients undergoing HCT, especially in UCB recipients and those with high HCT-CI. We propose

  7. Pyrin binds the PSTPIP1/CD2BP1 protein, defining familial Mediterranean fever and PAPA syndrome as disorders in the same pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoham, Nitza G; Centola, Michael; Mansfield, Elizabeth; Hull, Keith M; Wood, Geryl; Wise, Carol A; Kastner, Daniel L

    2003-11-11

    Pyrin, the familial Mediterranean fever protein, is found in association with the cytoskeleton in myeloid/monocytic cells and modulates IL-1beta processing, NF-kappaB activation, and apoptosis. These effects are mediated in part through cognate interactions with the adaptor protein ASC, which shares an N-terminal motif with pyrin. We sought additional upstream regulators of inflammation by using pyrin as the bait in yeast two-hybrid assays. We now show that proline serine threonine phosphatase-interacting protein [PSTPIP1, or CD2-binding protein 1 (CD2BP1)], a tyrosine-phosphorylated protein involved in cytoskeletal organization, also interacts with pyrin. Recently, PSTPIP1/CD2BP1 mutations were shown to cause the syndrome of pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne (PAPA), a dominantly inherited autoinflammatory disorder mediated predominantly by granulocytes. Endogenous PSTPIP1/CD2BP1 and pyrin are coexpressed in monocytes and granulocytes and can be coimmunoprecipitated from THP-1 cells. The B box segment of pyrin was necessary and the B box/coiled-coil segment sufficient for this interaction, whereas the SH3 and coiled-coil domains of PSTPIP1/CD2BP1 were both necessary, but neither was sufficient, for pyrin binding. The Y344F PSTPIP1/CD2BP1 mutation, which blocks tyrosine phosphorylation, was associated with a marked reduction in pyrin binding in pervanadate-treated cells. PAPA-associated A230T and E250Q PSTPIP1/CD2BP1 mutations markedly increased pyrin binding as assayed by immunoprecipitation and, relative to WT, these mutants were hyperphosphorylated when coexpressed with c-Abl kinase. Consistent with the hypothesis that these mutations exert a dominant-negative effect on the previously reported activity of pyrin, we found increased IL-1beta production by peripheral blood leukocytes from a clinically active PAPA patient with the A230T PSTPIP1/CD2BP1 mutation and in cell lines transfected with both PAPA-associated mutants.

  8. AIDS defining disease: Disseminated cryptococcosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshan Anupama

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Disseminated cryptococcosis is one of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome defining criteria and the most common cause of life threatening meningitis. Disseminated lesions in the skin manifest as papules or nodules that mimic molluscum contagiosum (MC. We report here a human immunodeficiency virus positive patient who presented with MC like lesions. Disseminated cryptococcosis was confirmed by India ink preparation and histopathology. The condition of the patient improved with amphotercin B.

  9. Defining and Quantifying the Social Phenotype in Autism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Klin, Ami; Jones, Warren; Schultz, Robert; Volkmar, Fred; Cohen, Donald

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Genetic and neurofunctional research in autism has highlighted the need for improved characterization of the core social disorder defining the broad spectrum of syndrome manifestations. METHOD...

  10. Burnout Syndrome of Teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Semrádová, Michaela

    2013-01-01

    The bachelor's thesis covers burnout syndrome of teachers. Defines burnout syndrome, describes its causes and symptoms. Describes teaching as helping profession and focousing on stressful situations at school. In the last chapter described different prevention strategies burnout syndrome. Key words: burnout syndrome, teaching, teacher, helping professions, beginning teacher, stress

  11. Defining the Urological Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    From an international symposium by the National Institutes of Health, June 16–17, 2008, the mechanisms around urogenital pain (UGP) are now much more clearly understood, with a move away from considering the ‘end-organ’ as being responsible towards a central neuroplasticity theory and as a consequence both a multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary approach to management. PMID:26526548

  12. An infertile case of 47,XYY syndrome without autistic spectrum: Cost effective well-define of extra Y chromosome by GTG, C bandings, QF-PCR and FISH analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özturk Özdemir

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD was frequently reported in autosomal and sex chromosome abnormalities and limited findings pointed out the Y chromosome. In the current case, it was aimed to identify the genetic cause for a man without autism profiles using combined cytogenetic and molecular genetic techniques. Automated karyotype analysis was made after combined methods with GTG, C bandings, QF-PCR and FISH techniquesfor the current case. Additional Y chromosome was identified after conventional GTG and C-banded karyotype analysis. The current case of 47,XYY syndrome was reported due to without autistic profiles such as language and social impairment. The proband’s karyotype was determined as 47,XYY. No other numerical and/or structural chromosomal abnormalities were detected in the karyotype analysis. Cytogenetic methods combined with cost-effective techniques such as C, GTG banding and FISH provide well-define of extra Y chromosome in the presented case of without autistic spectrum. Both Y chromosomes were in the same size and C-banded profiles in the current proband pointed out that both are originated from one chromosome by endoreduplication Y chromosome after zigot formation

  13. [Anatomo-clinical study of arterioventricular disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attié, F; Bassotti, R; Arteaga, M; Kuri, J; Zamora, C

    1976-01-01

    The relationship of the great arteries with their respective ventricles in the three toncoconal morphologies depends on the orientation and rotation of the septum of the trunk and cone. In this work we study a case of crossed great arteries and another of partial distortion of the great arteries and one of transposition of the great arteries, all with arterioventricular concordance. In the anatomic and angiocardiographic examples an analysis is made of the arterioventricular relation in each type of arterial pedicle. We say that arterioventricular concordance exists with crossed great arteries when the pulmonary originated from the anterior infundibulum and its direction of right to left or from left to right in the frontal plane shows the spacial position of the anatomically right ventricle. In the transposition of the great arteries or in the partial distortion of the great arteries with arterioventricular concordance the aorta in the frontal plane shows the spacial position of the anatomically right ventricle. In the first group the aorta originates from the anterior infundibulum while in the second, from the posterior infundibulum. We review the examples of arterioventricular discordance diagnosed by necropsy or by laboratory studies. We study 5 cases; 1 with crossed great arteries, 3 with transposition of great arteries and the last with partial distortion of the great arteries. In the arterioventricular discordances with crossed great arteries in the lateral position, we observe that the pulmonary artery originates from the anterior infudnibulum whereas in the transposition, the aorta emerges from the anterior infundibulum. In the partial distortion of the great arteries the vessels are side by side or the aorta a little bit anterior to the pulmonary which is connected with the anterior infundibulum. In the posteroanterior incidence when there exists an arterioventricular discordance with crossed great arteries, the direction of the pulmonary does not indicate the spacial position of the anatomically right ventricle. In the same way, in the transposition and in the partial distortion of the great arteries the aorta does not indicate the spacial position of the anatomically right ventricle. On the basis of the evidence obtained by experimental and descriptive embriology, the morphogenetic processes responsible for the arterioventricular relations are presented. The anatomic specimens of each example is analyzed and the adequate parameter for the diagnosis of the distinct varieties of arterioventricular relations are presented. Finally a review is made of the few cases found in the literature and the differential diagsis between the concordant and discordant troncoconal malformation is established.

  14. [Rheumatic carditis in the adult. Anatomoclinical correlation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guadalajara, J F; Gual, J J; Valvuena, N; Vera, A; Laplaza, I; Salinas, L

    1990-01-01

    The histologic findings of 325 necropsies of rheumatic patients at the National Institute of Cardiology in Mexico, between 1980-1985 were studied forty five of them had Aschoff nodules plus valvular inflammation-Out of these 45 cases two groups were formed: children-adolescent group (24 cases) and an adult group (21 cases). The clinical, histologic and laboratory findings were compared. Clinical records were reviewed searching for history of rheumatic fever. Active rheumatic fever was suspected in 16 patients in the younger group (67%) and only in 3 adults (14.2%). As far as Jones' criteria is concerned, the most common finding was carditis, principally in the younger group (83%). In the adult group, it appeared in 50% of the patients. All other criteria were only occasionally seen or could not be identified during the patients lifetime. The most common laboratory finding which could suggest active rheumatic fever were: a high levels of anti-streptolysin in younger patients (95%) and elevation of erythro-sedimentation in adults (83%). We conclude that in active rheumatic fever of the adult; Jones criteria are not met, so the illness is difficult to recognize, and there is clinical-histologic discrepancy. In this context the disease has a "silent" evolution.

  15. Definable deduction relation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张玉平

    1999-01-01

    The nonmonotonic deduction relation in default reasoning is defined with fixed point style, which has the many-extension property that classical logic is not possessed of. These two kinds of deductions both have boolean definability property, that is, their extensions or deductive closures can be defined by boolean formulas. A generalized form of fixed point method is employed to define a class of deduction relations, which all have the above property. Theorems on definability and atomless boolean algebras in model theory are essential in dealing with this assertion.

  16. CHARGE syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad Chitra

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract CHARGE syndrome was initially defined as a non-random association of anomalies (Coloboma, Heart defect, Atresia choanae, Retarded growth and development, Genital hypoplasia, Ear anomalies/deafness. In 1998, an expert group defined the major (the classical 4C's: Choanal atresia, Coloboma, Characteristic ears and Cranial nerve anomalies and minor criteria of CHARGE syndrome. Individuals with all four major characteristics or three major and three minor characteristics are highly likely to have CHARGE syndrome. However, there have been individuals genetically identified with CHARGE syndrome without the classical choanal atresia and coloboma. The reported incidence of CHARGE syndrome ranges from 0.1–1.2/10,000 and depends on professional recognition. Coloboma mainly affects the retina. Major and minor congenital heart defects (the commonest cyanotic heart defect is tetralogy of Fallot occur in 75–80% of patients. Choanal atresia may be membranous or bony; bilateral or unilateral. Mental retardation is variable with intelligence quotients (IQ ranging from normal to profound retardation. Under-development of the external genitalia is a common finding in males but it is less apparent in females. Ear abnormalities include a classical finding of unusually shaped ears and hearing loss (conductive and/or nerve deafness that ranges from mild to severe deafness. Multiple cranial nerve dysfunctions are common. A behavioral phenotype for CHARGE syndrome is emerging. Mutations in the CHD7 gene (member of the chromodomain helicase DNA protein family are detected in over 75% of patients with CHARGE syndrome. Children with CHARGE syndrome require intensive medical management as well as numerous surgical interventions. They also need multidisciplinary follow up. Some of the hidden issues of CHARGE syndrome are often forgotten, one being the feeding adaptation of these children, which needs an early aggressive approach from a feeding team. As the child

  17. Insulino resistencia y síndrome metabólico en pacientes con enfermedad coronaria definida por angiografía Insulin-resistance and metabolic syndrome in patients with coronary heart disease defined by angiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Benozzi

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Se examinó la frecuencia de insulino-resistencia (IR y síndrome metabólico (SM en pacientes coronarios empleando diferentes criterios de definición y se analizó cuáles mostraban mejor asociación con la presencia y gravedad de la afección. Fue un estudio casos-controles en 100 pacientes con edades entre 40 y 70 años que concurrieron a un centro hospitalario para realizarse una angiografía. IR fue definido por insulina >15 mU/l, el modelo hemostático de insulino-resistencia (HOMA-IR >3.1 y la combinación del índice de masa corporal (IMC >27.5 kg/m² con HOMA-IR >3.6. SM fue definido según International Diabetes Federation y American Heart Association / National Heart, Lung, and Blood. Insulina >15 mU/l y HOMA-IR >3.1 tuvieron la misma sensibilidad, (60.3%, y se asociaron significativamente con la extensión de la enfermedad coronaria, p = 0.001 y p = 0.009 respectivamente. En cambio, IMC >27.5 kg/m² con HOMA-IR >3.6 mostró menor sensibilidad, (43.1%, y menor asociación con la gravedad, (p = 0.028. Los odds ratio (OR para enfermedad coronaria fueron respectivamente: 3.16 (IC 95% 1.28-7.79, p = 0.012; 2.93 (IC 95% 1.20-7.19 p = 0.019; 2.86 (IC 95% 1.10-7.41, P = 0.031. La frecuencia de SM definida según American Heart Association / National Heart, Lung, and Blood fue mayor en coronarios versus controles (62.1% versus 33.3%, p = 0.003, se asoció con la enfermedad en uno o en múltiples vasos (p = 0.011 y fue su predictor, OR = 4.22 (IC 95% 1.65-10.83 p = 0.003. Sin embargo, SM definido según International Diabetes Federation no se asoció con la presencia ni con la gravedad de la enfermedad.The frequency of insulin-resistance (IR and metabolic syndrome (MS were examined in coronary patients using different criteria of definition. It was also analyzed which of them indicated a strong association with the presence and severity of the disease. This was a case-control study on 100 patients between 40 and 70 years old, assisted in a

  18. Historically defined autobiographical periods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, Norman R.; Hansen, Tia G. B.; Lee, Peter J.;

    2012-01-01

    The chapter reviews a research programme that has demonstrated the existence of historically defined autobiographical periods and identified the conditions that bring them about. Data from four samples of World War II-generation adults show that historically defined autobiographical periods endure...... over time and theoretical implications are discussed, notably by introducing a new approach to autobiographical memory, Transition Theory, which assumes that autobiographical memory is organized by transitional events that can be selfinitiated or externally imposed - historically defined...

  19. Defining Legal Moralism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thaysen, Jens Damgaard

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses how legal moralism should be defined. It is argued that legal moralism should be defined as the position that “For any X, it is always a pro tanto reason for justifiably imposing legal regulation on X that X is morally wrong (where “morally wrong” is not conceptually equivalent...

  20. Scheie syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hurler syndrome) MPS II (Hunter syndrome) MPS IV (Morquio syndrome) MPS III (Sanfilippo syndrome) Causes Scheie syndrome ... Autosomal recessive Cloudy cornea Hearing loss Hurler syndrome Morquio syndrome Review Date 4/20/2015 Updated by: ...

  1. Tuberculose como doença definidora de síndrome da imunodeficiência adquirida: dez anos de evolução na Cidade do Rio de Janeiro Tuberculosis as a disease defining acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: ten years of surveillance in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Cristina Coelho Soares

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar a freqüência da tuberculose e das outras principais doenças oportunistas definidoras de síndrome da imunodeficiência adquirida, no momento em que estes casos são notificados, no Município do Rio de Janeiro. MÉTODOS: Análise do banco de dados do Sistema de Vigilância Epidemiológica do Programa de Doenças Sexualmente Transmissíveis e Síndrome da Imunodeficiência Adquirida da Cidade do Rio de Janeiro, no período de 1993 a 2002. RESULTADOS: A expansão da definição de casos de síndrome da imunodeficiência adquirida ocorrida em 1998 criou um aumento substancial no número de casos notificados de síndrome da imunodeficiência adquirida, principalmente por aqueles que passaram a ser definidos pelo critério imunológico. Dentre os casos de síndrome da imunodeficiência adquirida que foram definidos apenas por doença, a candidíase em suas diversas formas manteve-se como a doença oportunista de maior freqüência no momento da notificação. Embora a pneumonia por Pneumocystis carinii se apresentasse como a segunda doença mais freqüente na maioria dos anos observados, a partir de 2001, a tuberculose ultrapassou-a em freqüência, tornando-se a segunda doença mais freqüente no momento da notificação dos casos de síndrome da imunodeficiência adquirida. CONCLUSÃO: Apesar da diminuição do número de casos de síndrome da imunodeficiência adquirida definidos por doença, a tuberculose manteve-se como um importante evento definidor dessa síndrome, sendo atualmente de ocorrência mais freqüente do que a pneumonia por Pneumocystis carinii e a toxoplasmose, provavelmente por sua alta taxa de prevalência na cidade.OBJECTIVE: To analyze the frequency of tuberculosis and of the other principal opportunistic infections defining acquired immunodeficiency syndrome at the time such cases were reported in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. METHODS: Analysis of the data compiled in the Rio de Janeiro Municipal

  2. Defining Documentary Film

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    A discussion of various attemts at defining documentary film regarding form, content, truth, stile, genre or reception - and a propoposal of a positive list of essential, but non-exclusive characteristica of documentary film......A discussion of various attemts at defining documentary film regarding form, content, truth, stile, genre or reception - and a propoposal of a positive list of essential, but non-exclusive characteristica of documentary film...

  3. Definably amenable NIP groups

    OpenAIRE

    Chernikov, Artem; Simon, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    We study definably amenable NIP groups. We develop a theory of generics, showing that various definitions considered previously coincide, and study invariant measures. Applications include: characterization of regular ergodic measures, a proof of the conjecture of Petrykowski connecting existence of bounded orbits with definable amenability in the NIP case, and the Ellis group conjecture of Newelski and Pillay connecting the model-theoretic connected component of an NIP group with the ideal s...

  4. Eagle syndrome. A narrative review

    OpenAIRE

    Heber Arbildo; Luis Gamarra; Sandra Rojas; Edward Infantes; Hernán Vásquez

    2016-01-01

    Painful disorders in the maxillofacial region are common in dental practice. Most of these conditions are not properly diagnosed because of inadequate knowledge of craniofacial and cervico-pharyngeal syndromes such as Eagle Syndrome. The aim of this review is to describe the general aspects, diagnosis and treatment of Eagle syndrome. Eagle syndrome or stylohyoid syndrome was first described by Watt W. Eagle in 1937. It was defined as orofacial pain related to the elongation of the styloid pro...

  5. Eisenmengers syndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Annette Schophuus; Iversen, Kasper; Vejlstrup, Niels G;

    2009-01-01

    Congenital heart disease with left-to-right shunt can induce proliferation, vasoconstriction and thrombosis in the pulmonary vascular bed. Eventually, the patient may develop Eisenmenger syndrome defined as pulmonary arterial hypertension caused by high pulmonary vascular resistance with right......-to-left shunt and cyanosis. Patients with Eisenmenger syndrome suffer a high risk of complications in connection with acute medical conditions, extra-cardiac surgery and pregnancy. This article describes the precautions that should be taken to reduce morbidity and mortality in these patients. Udgivelsesdato...

  6. Neuroacanthocytosis Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker Ruth H

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Neuroacanthocytosis (NA syndromes are a group of genetically defined diseases characterized by the association of red blood cell acanthocytosis and progressive degeneration of the basal ganglia. NA syndromes are exceptionally rare with an estimated prevalence of less than 1 to 5 per 1'000'000 inhabitants for each disorder. The core NA syndromes include autosomal recessive chorea-acanthocytosis and X-linked McLeod syndrome which have a Huntington´s disease-like phenotype consisting of a choreatic movement disorder, psychiatric manifestations and cognitive decline, and additional multi-system features including myopathy and axonal neuropathy. In addition, cardiomyopathy may occur in McLeod syndrome. Acanthocytes are also found in a proportion of patients with autosomal dominant Huntington's disease-like 2, autosomal recessive pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration and several inherited disorders of lipoprotein metabolism, namely abetalipoproteinemia (Bassen-Kornzweig syndrome and hypobetalipoproteinemia leading to vitamin E malabsorption. The latter disorders are characterized by a peripheral neuropathy and sensory ataxia due to dorsal column degeneration, but movement disorders and cognitive impairment are not present. NA syndromes are caused by disease-specific genetic mutations. The mechanism by which these mutations cause neurodegeneration is not known. The association of the acanthocytic membrane abnormality with selective degeneration of the basal ganglia, however, suggests a common pathogenetic pathway. Laboratory tests include blood smears to detect acanthocytosis and determination of serum creatine kinase. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging may demonstrate striatal atrophy. Kell and Kx blood group antigens are reduced or absent in McLeod syndrome. Western blot for chorein demonstrates absence of this protein in red blood cells of chorea-acanthocytosis patients. Specific genetic testing is possible in all NA syndromes

  7. Can play be defined?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eichberg, Henning

    2015-01-01

    Can play be defined? There is reason to raise critical questions about the established academic demand that at phenomenon – also in humanist studies – should first of all be defined, i.e. de-lineated and by neat lines limited to a “little box” that can be handled. The following chapter develops t....... Human beings can very well understand play – or whatever phenomenon in human life – without defining it........ The academic imperative of definition seems to be linked to the positivistic attempts – and produces sometimes monstrous definitions. Have they any philosophical value for our knowledge of what play is? Definition is not a universal instrument of knowledge-building, but a culturally specific construction...

  8. Nouns to Define Homophobia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adalberto Campo Arias

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. The term ‘homophobia’ was introduced in the academic context more than 40 years ago. However, its meaning has changed over time. Objective. To review the nouns used in the last twelve years to define homophobia. Methodology. The authors conducted a systematic search in Medline through Pubmed that included editorials, letters to editors, comments and narrative reviews, in English and Spanish. A qualitative analysis (Grounded theory was applied to analyze nouns used to define homophobia since 2001 through 2012. Results. Authors reviewed three papers including ten nouns to define homophobia, the most common noun was fear. The terms were grouped into two domains: negative attitude and discomfort with homosexuality. Conclusion. Fear is the most used word to describe homophobia. The terms were grouped into two domains: negative attitude and discomfort toward homosexuality.

  9. Defining "intermittent UVR exposure"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodekær, Mette; Philipsen, Peter Alshede; Petersen, Bibi Øager;

    2016-01-01

    to define and quantify “intermittent UVR exposure” by an objective measure. Methods: A broad study population of adults and children had data collected during a summer period. Data were personal UVR dosimetry measurements, from which the number of “intermittent days” was derived, sun behaviour diaries.......001). The corresponding numbers for prediction of nevi and lentigo density by retrospective questionnaire data was lower (R2 = 0.11, R2 = 0.26, p defined objective measure of intermittent UVR exposure. This measure may provide a better prediction of solar skin damage and CMM...

  10. Polyclonal, newly derived T cells with low expression of inhibitory molecule PD-1 in tonsils define the phenotype of lymphocytes in children with Periodic Fever, Aphtous Stomatitis, Pharyngitis and Adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dytrych, Petra; Krol, Petra; Petra, Dytrych; Petra, Krol; Kotrova, Michaela; Kuzilkova, Daniela; Michaela, Kotrova; Daniela, Kuzilkova; Hubacek, Petr; Krol, Ladislav; Petr, Hubacek; Ladislav, Krol; Katra, Rami; Hrusak, Ondrej; Rami, Katra; Ondrej, Hrusak; Kabelka, Zdenek; Dolezalova, Pavla; Zdenek, Kabelka; Pavla, Dolezalova; Kalina, Tomas; Fronkova, Eva; Tomas, Kalina; Eva, Fronkova

    2015-05-01

    PFAPA syndrome is a benign, recurrent inflammatory disease of childhood. Tonsillectomy is one of the therapeutic options with a yet unexplained biological mechanism. We tested whether specific lymphocyte subsets recruited from blood to human tonsils participate in PFAPA pathogenesis. Paired tonsils/peripheral blood (PB) samples were investigated (a) from children with PFAPA that successfully resolved after tonsillectomy (n=10) (b) from children with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome as controls (n=10). The lymphocyte profiles were analysed using 8-colour flow cytometry, immunoglobulin (IGH) and T-cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangements via PCR and next generation sequencing; a TREC/KREC analysis was performed using qPCR. The PFAPA tonsils in the asymptomatic phase had a lower percentage of B-lymphocytes than controls; T-lymphocyte counts were significantly higher in PB. The percentages of cytotoxic CD8pos T-lymphocytes were approximately 2-fold higher in PFAPA tonsils; the transitional B cells and naïve stages of both the CD4pos and CD8pos T-lymphocytes with a low expression of PD-1 molecule and high numbers of TREC were also increased. With the exception of elevated plasmablasts, no other differences were significant in PB. The expression levels of CXCL10, CXCL9 and CCL19 genes were significantly higher in PFAPA tonsils. The IGH/TCR pattern showed no clonal/oligoclonal expansion. DNA from the Epstein-Barr virus, Human Herpervirus-6 or adenovirus was detected in 7 of 10 PFAPA tonsils but also in 7 of 9 controls. Our findings suggest that the uninhibited, polyclonal response of newly derived lymphocytes participate in the pathogenesis of PFAPA. Because most of the observed changes were restricted to tonsils and were not present in PB, they partly explain the therapeutic success of tonsillectomy in PFAPA syndrome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Defining the Role of Bariatric Surgery in Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome Patients%减重手术在多囊卵巢综合征治疗中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shaveta M. Malik; Michael L. Traub; 王恺京; 徐安安

    2013-01-01

    Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine disorder in women. To meet PCOS criteria, women must have a combination of hyperandrogenism, anovulation and ultrasound findings. Almost 10% of all reproductive age women worldwide show signs of PCOS. Although women often seek care for gynecological or body image concerns, many PCOS women are at risk for metabolic syndrome (MS). Many of the metabolic consequences are overlooked and undertreated by physicians because these patients tend to be young, reproductive age women. MS and obesity coexist commonly with PCOS. These young women are predisposed to glucose abnormalities and ultimately diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia and eventually cardiovascular disease. Bariatric surgery can be an effective means of weight loss in PCOS women. Surgical techniques have become safer and less invasive over time and have been found to be effective in achieving significant weight loss. Surgical options have also increased, giving patients more choices. Bariatric surgery may prevent or reverse metabolic syndrome. Bariatric surgery may also have reproductive benefits in PCOS patients. Although bariatric surgery has historically been performed in older, reproductive aged women, it has recently gained favor in adolescents as well. This is of particular importance due to the prevalence of both PCOS and MS in adolescents. Treatment of PCOS and MS certainly requires a combination of medical therapy, psychological support and lifestyle modifications. These treatments are difficult and often frustrating for patients and physicians. Bariatric surgery can be effective in achieving significant weight loss, restoration of the hypothalamic pituitary axis, reduction of cardiovascular risk and even in improving pregnancy outcomes. Ultimately, bariatric surgery should be considered part of the treatment in PCOS women, especially in those with MS.

  12. Compartment syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubarak, S. J.; Pedowitz, R. A.; Hargens, A. R.

    1989-01-01

    The compartment syndrome is defined as a condition in which high pressure within a closed fascial space (muscle compartment) reduces capillary blood perfusion below the level necessary for tissue viability'. This condition occurs in acute and chronic (exertional) forms, and may be secondary to a variety of causes. The end-result of an extended period of elevated intramuscular pressure may be the development of irreversible tissue injury and Volkmann's contracture. The goal of treatment of the compartment syndrome is the reduction of intracompartmental pressure thus facilitating reperfusion of ischaemic tissue and this goal may be achieved by decompressive fasciotomy. Controversy exists regarding the critical pressure-time thresholds for surgical decompression and the optimal diagnostic methods of measuring intracompartmental pressures. This paper will update and review some current knowledge regarding the pathophysiology, aetiology, diagnosis, and treatment of the acute compartment syndrome.

  13. Compartment syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubarak, S. J.; Pedowitz, R. A.; Hargens, A. R.

    1989-01-01

    The compartment syndrome is defined as a condition in which high pressure within a closed fascial space (muscle compartment) reduces capillary blood perfusion below the level necessary for tissue viability'. This condition occurs in acute and chronic (exertional) forms, and may be secondary to a variety of causes. The end-result of an extended period of elevated intramuscular pressure may be the development of irreversible tissue injury and Volkmann's contracture. The goal of treatment of the compartment syndrome is the reduction of intracompartmental pressure thus facilitating reperfusion of ischaemic tissue and this goal may be achieved by decompressive fasciotomy. Controversy exists regarding the critical pressure-time thresholds for surgical decompression and the optimal diagnostic methods of measuring intracompartmental pressures. This paper will update and review some current knowledge regarding the pathophysiology, aetiology, diagnosis, and treatment of the acute compartment syndrome.

  14. On Defining Mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    Though central to any pedagogical development of physics, the concept of mass is still not well understood. Properly defining mass has proven to be far more daunting than contemporary textbooks would have us believe. And yet today the origin of mass is one of the most aggressively pursued areas of research in all of physics. Much of the excitement…

  15. Defining Data Science

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Yangyong; Xiong, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Data science is gaining more and more and widespread attention, but no consensus viewpoint on what data science is has emerged. As a new science, its objects of study and scientific issues should not be covered by established sciences. Data in cyberspace have formed what we call datanature. In the present paper, data science is defined as the science of exploring datanature.

  16. Defining Mathematical Giftedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parish, Linda

    2014-01-01

    This theoretical paper outlines the process of defining "mathematical giftedness" for a present study on how primary school teaching shapes the mindsets of children who are mathematically gifted. Mathematical giftedness is not a badge of honour or some special value attributed to a child who has achieved something exceptional.…

  17. Software Defined Networking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caba, Cosmin Marius

    resources are limited. Hence, to counteract this trend, current QoS mechanisms must become simpler to deploy and operate, in order to motivate NSPs to employ QoS techniques instead of overprovisioning. Software Defined Networking (SDN) represents a paradigm shift in the way telecommunication and data...

  18. Defining Effective Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layne, L.

    2012-01-01

    The author looks at the meaning of specific terminology commonly used in student surveys: "effective teaching." The research seeks to determine if there is a difference in how "effective teaching" is defined by those taking student surveys and those interpreting the results. To investigate this difference, a sample group of professors and students…

  19. Defining Game Mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sicart (Vila), Miguel Angel

    2008-01-01

    This article defins game mechanics in relation to rules and challenges. Game mechanics are methods invoked by agents for interacting with the game world. I apply this definition to a comparative analysis of the games Rez, Every Extend Extra and Shadow of the Colossus that will show the relevance...... of a formal definition of game mechanics. Udgivelsesdato: Dec 2008...

  20. Software Defined Cyberinfrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, Ian; Blaiszik, Ben; Chard, Kyle; Chard, Ryan

    2017-07-17

    Within and across thousands of science labs, researchers and students struggle to manage data produced in experiments, simulations, and analyses. Largely manual research data lifecycle management processes mean that much time is wasted, research results are often irreproducible, and data sharing and reuse remain rare. In response, we propose a new approach to data lifecycle management in which researchers are empowered to define the actions to be performed at individual storage systems when data are created or modified: actions such as analysis, transformation, copying, and publication. We term this approach software-defined cyberinfrastructure because users can implement powerful data management policies by deploying rules to local storage systems, much as software-defined networking allows users to configure networks by deploying rules to switches.We argue that this approach can enable a new class of responsive distributed storage infrastructure that will accelerate research innovation by allowing any researcher to associate data workflows with data sources, whether local or remote, for such purposes as data ingest, characterization, indexing, and sharing. We report on early experiments with this approach in the context of experimental science, in which a simple if-trigger-then-action (IFTA) notation is used to define rules.

  1. Defining in Classroom Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariotti, Maria Alessandra; Fischbein, Efraim

    1997-01-01

    Discusses some aspects of the defining process in geometrical context in the reference frame of the theory of "figural concepts." Presents analysis of some examples taken from a teaching experiment at the sixth-grade level. Contains 30 references. (Author/ASK)

  2. Defining Game Mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sicart (Vila), Miguel Angel

    2008-01-01

    This article defins game mechanics in relation to rules and challenges. Game mechanics are methods invoked by agents for interacting with the game world. I apply this definition to a comparative analysis of the games Rez, Every Extend Extra and Shadow of the Colossus that will show the relevance...... of a formal definition of game mechanics. Udgivelsesdato: Dec 2008...

  3. De la escuela anatomoclínica a la fisiología moderna en la Facultad de Medicina de la Universidad de Antioquia From the anatomoclinical school to the physiopathological one at the medical faculty, University of Antioquia, in Medellin, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-04-01

    ´s formulations, whose model of the universe dominated scientific thought between the middle of the XVII century and the end of the XIX century; then with Einstein´s modern physics and the relativity and quantic theories. Einstein broke up with the mechanistic Newtonian vision of the XIX century physics, but biomedical science, through education, remains anchored to the fragmentary vision of reality offered by symptoms and organs. The change from the anatomoclinical school to the physiopathological one at the Medical Faculty, University of Antioquia, is described. This Faculty dates back to 1871 and started under the influence of the anatomoclinical French model. It did not change until 1940; then there was a significant change to scientific medicine with the pathology laboratory (1943 and the clinicopathological conference (1944, both founded by doctor Alfredo Correa Henao. Also, with the development of modern physiology with doctor Alberto Saldarriaga, a surgeon from the school of Bernard and Leriche, and doctor Antonio Ramírez González, a physiologist from Louisville University (USA and a chest surgeon from the United Kingdom. Some work carried out at the physiology and experimental surgery laboratories are described, in which both German and American methodologies were employed.

  4. Defining the fascial system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adstrum, Sue; Hedley, Gil; Schleip, Robert; Stecco, Carla; Yucesoy, Can A

    2017-01-01

    Fascia is a widely used yet indistinctly defined anatomical term that is concurrently applied to the description of soft collagenous connective tissue, distinct sections of membranous tissue, and a body pervading soft connective tissue system. Inconsistent use of this term is causing concern due to its potential to confuse technical communication about fascia in global, multiple discipline- and multiple profession-spanning discourse environments. The Fascia Research Society acted to address this issue by establishing a Fascia Nomenclature Committee (FNC) whose purpose was to clarify the terminology relating to fascia. This committee has since developed and defined the terms a fascia, and, more recently, the fascial system. This article reports on the FNC's proposed definition of the fascial system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Defining Legal Moralism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thaysen, Jens Damgaard

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses how legal moralism should be defined. It is argued that legal moralism should be defined as the position that “For any X, it is always a pro tanto reason for justifiably imposing legal regulation on X that X is morally wrong (where “morally wrong” is not conceptually equivalent...... to “harmful”)”. Furthermore, a distinction between six types of legal moralism is made. The six types are grouped according to whether they are concerned with the enforcement of positive or critical morality, and whether they are concerned with criminalising, legally restricting, or refraining from legally...... protecting morally wrong behaviour. This is interesting because not all types of legal moralism are equally vulnerable to the different critiques of legal moralism that have been put forth. Indeed, I show that some interesting types of legal moralism have not been criticised at all....

  6. Define Digital Vernacular

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘佳; 李海英; James Stevens; Rough Nelson

    2014-01-01

    As science and technology developed, the tools of humans developed from humans’hands, to mechanical and digital technologies. The tools influ-ence almost everything in the humans’world, so does vernacular. The digital vernacular could be understood as using digital technology to vernacular; the digital means technologies. It also could be understood as doing vernacular in a digital way;the digital means data and information, in other words it can be seeking truth from facts. Define digital vernacular is not only what is digital vernacular, but also about how to do the digital vernacular and what kind of attitude we should hold to-ward the digital vernacular. Define digital vernacular as both thinking and doing.

  7. Defining local food

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Safania Normann

    2013-01-01

    Despite evolving local food research, there is no consistent definition of “local food.” Various understandings are utilized, which have resulted in a diverse landscape of meaning. The main purpose of this paper is to examine how researchers within the local food systems literature define local...... food, and how these definitions can be used as a starting point to identify a new taxonomy of local food based on three domains of proximity....

  8. [To define internet addiction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonioni, Federico

    2013-01-01

    Internet addiction is a new behavioral disorder difficult to define, especially when referring to young teenagers who make great use of web-mediated relationships. It's necessary to separate the cases of overt dependency on those in which the abuse of internet seems to have a different value, offering the only way to achieve the possible relationship. Internet is mediating a new way of communicating and thinking, this may favor the onset of clinical phenomena intended to surprise.

  9. Decidability of definability

    CERN Document Server

    Tsankov, Manuel Bodirsky; Michael Pinsker; Todor

    2010-01-01

    For a fixed infinite structure $\\Gamma$ with finite signature $\\tau$, we study the following computational problem: Input are quantifier-free first-order $\\tau$-formulas $\\phi_0,\\phi_1,\\dots,\\phi_n$ that define relations $R_0,R_1,\\dots,R_n$ over $\\Gamma$. The question is whether the relation $R_0$ is primitive positive definable from $R_1,\\ldots,R_n$, i.e., definable by a first-order formula that uses only relation symbols for $R_1, \\dots, R_n$, equality, conjunctions, and existential quantification (disjunction, negation, and universal quantification are forbidden). We show decidability of this problem for all structures $\\Gamma$ that have a first-order definition in an ordered homogeneous structure $\\Delta$ with a finite language whose age is a Ramsey class and determined by finitely many forbidden substructures. Examples for structures $\\Gamma$ with this property are the order of the rationals, the random graph, the homogeneous universal poset, the random tournament, all homogeneous universal $C$-relations...

  10. [Antisynthetase syndrome without muscle involvement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Júdez Navarro, Enrique; Martínez Carretero, Myriam; Martínez Jiménez, Gonzalo Fidel

    2007-11-01

    Antisynthetase syndrome is a well defined syndrome characterized by the presence of interstitial lung disease in association with arthritis, miositis, mechanic's hands and Ruynaud's phenomenon in the presence of antisynthetase antibodies, especially Ac anti-Jo1. We described the case of a 68-year-old man with this syndrome in the absence of inflammatory muscle disease.

  11. Defining Z in Q

    CERN Document Server

    Koenigsmann, Jochen

    2010-01-01

    We show that ${\\mathbb Z}$ is definable in ${\\mathbb Q}$ by a universal first-order formula in the language of rings. We also present an $\\forall\\exists$-formula for ${\\mathbb Z}$ in ${\\mathbb Q}$ with just one universal quantifier. We exhibit new diophantine subsets of ${\\mathbb Q}$ like the set of non-squares or the complement of the image of the norm map under a quadratic extension. Finally, we show that there is no existential formula for ${\\mathbb Z}$ in ${\\mathbb Q}$, provided one assumes a strong variant of the Bombieri-Lang Conjecture for varieties over ${\\mathbb Q}$ with many ${\\mathbb Q}$-rational points.

  12. Software-Defined Cluster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    聂华; 杨晓君; 刘淘英

    2015-01-01

    The cluster architecture has played an important role in high-end computing for the past 20 years. With the advent of Internet services, big data, and cloud computing, traditional clusters face three challenges: 1) providing flexible system balance among computing, memory, and I/O capabilities;2) reducing resource pooling overheads;and 3) addressing low performance-power efficiency. This position paper proposes a software-defined cluster (SDC) architecture to deal with these challenges. The SDC architecture inherits two features of traditional cluster: its architecture is multicomputer and it has loosely-coupled interconnect. SDC provides two new mechanisms: global I/O space (GIO) and hardware-supported native access (HNA) to remote devices. Application software can define a virtual cluster best suited to its needs from resources pools provided by a physical cluster, and traditional cluster ecosystems need no modification. We also discuss a prototype design and implementation of a 32-processor cloud server utilizing the SDC architecture.

  13. Dumping Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... System & How it Works Digestive Diseases A-Z Dumping Syndrome What is dumping syndrome? Dumping syndrome occurs when food, especially sugar, ... the colon and rectum—and anus. What causes dumping syndrome? Dumping syndrome is caused by problems with ...

  14. Implementing Software Defined Radio

    CERN Document Server

    Grayver, Eugene

    2013-01-01

    Software Defined Radio makes wireless communications easier, more efficient, and more reliable. This book bridges the gap between academic research and practical implementation. When beginning a project, practicing engineers, technical managers, and graduate students can save countless hours by considering the concepts presented in these pages. The author covers the myriad options and trade-offs available when selecting an appropriate hardware architecture. As demonstrated here, the choice between hardware- and software-centric architecture can mean the difference between meeting an aggressive schedule and bogging down in endless design iterations. Because of the author’s experience overseeing dozens of failed and successful developments, he is able to present many real-life examples. Some of the key concepts covered are: Choosing the right architecture for the market – laboratory, military, or commercial Hardware platforms – FPGAs, GPPs, specialized and hybrid devices Standardization efforts to ens...

  15. Defining cyber warfare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan D. Mladenović

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Cyber conflicts represent a new kind of warfare that is technologically developing very rapidly. Such development results in more frequent and more intensive cyber attacks undertaken by states against adversary targets, with a wide range of diverse operations, from information operations to physical destruction of targets. Nevertheless, cyber warfare is waged through the application of the same means, techniques and methods as those used in cyber criminal, terrorism and intelligence activities. Moreover, it has a very specific nature that enables states to covertly initiate attacks against their adversaries. The starting point in defining doctrines, procedures and standards in the area of cyber warfare is determining its true nature. In this paper, a contribution to this effort was made through the analysis of the existing state doctrines and international practice in the area of cyber warfare towards the determination of its nationally acceptable definition.

  16. Defining the Anthropocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Simon; Maslin, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Time is divided by geologists according to marked shifts in Earth's state. Recent global environmental changes suggest that Earth may have entered a new human-dominated geological epoch, the Anthropocene. Should the Anthropocene - the idea that human activity is a force acting upon the Earth system in ways that mean that Earth will be altered for millions of years - be defined as a geological time-unit at the level of an Epoch? Here we appraise the data to assess such claims, first in terms of changes to the Earth system, with particular focus on very long-lived impacts, as Epochs typically last millions of years. Can Earth really be said to be in transition from one state to another? Secondly, we then consider the formal criteria used to define geological time-units and move forward through time examining whether currently available evidence passes typical geological time-unit evidence thresholds. We suggest two time periods likely fit the criteria (1) the aftermath of the interlinking of the Old and New Worlds, which moved species across continents and ocean basins worldwide, a geologically unprecedented and permanent change, which is also the globally synchronous coolest part of the Little Ice Age (in Earth system terms), and the beginning of global trade and a new socio-economic "world system" (in historical terms), marked as a golden spike by a temporary drop in atmospheric CO2, centred on 1610 CE; and (2) the aftermath of the Second World War, when many global environmental changes accelerated and novel long-lived materials were increasingly manufactured, known as the Great Acceleration (in Earth system terms) and the beginning of the Cold War (in historical terms), marked as a golden spike by the peak in radionuclide fallout in 1964. We finish by noting that the Anthropocene debate is politically loaded, thus transparency in the presentation of evidence is essential if a formal definition of the Anthropocene is to avoid becoming a debate about bias. The

  17. On defining dietary fibre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVries, Jonathan W

    2003-02-01

    Establishing a definition for dietary fibre has historically been a balance between nutrition knowledge and analytical method capabilities. While the most widely accepted physiologically-based definitions have generally been accurate in defining the dietary fibre in foods, scientists and regulators have tended, in practice, to rely on analytical procedures as the definitional basis in fact. As a result, incongruities between theory and practice have resulted in confusion regarding the components that make up dietary fibre. In November 1998 the president of the American Association of Cereal Chemists (AACC) appointed an expert scientific review committee and charged it with the task of reviewing and, if necessary, updating the definition of dietary fibre. The committee was further charged with assessing the state of analytical methodology and making recommendations relevant to the updated definition. After due deliberation, an updated definition of dietary fibre was delivered to the AACC Board of Directors for consideration and adoption (Anon, 2000; Jones 2000b). The updated definition includes the same food components as the historical working definition used for approximately 30 years (a very important point, considering that the majority of the research of the past 30 years delineating the positive health effects of dietary fibre is based on that working definition). However, the updated definition more clearly delineates the make-up of dietary fibre and its physiological functionality. As a result, relatively few changes will be necessary in analytical methodology. Current methodologies, in particular AACC-approved method of analysis 32-05 (Grami, 2000), Association of Official Analytical Chemists' official method of analysis 985.29 (Horwitz, 2000a) or AACC 32-07 (Grami, 2000) Association of Official Analytical Chemists 991.43 (Horwitz, 2000a) will continue to be sufficient and used for most foods. A small number of additional methods will be necessary to

  18. Antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervera, Ricard

    2017-03-01

    The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is defined by the development of venous and/or arterial thromboses, often multiple, and pregnancy morbidity (mainly, recurrent fetal losses), in the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL). Some estimates indicate that the incidence of the APS is around 5 new cases per 100,000 persons per year and the prevalence around 40-50 cases per 100,000 persons. The aPL are positive in approximately 13% of patients with stroke, 11% with myocardial infarction, 9.5% of patients with deep vein thrombosis and 6% of patients with pregnancy morbidity. Currently, there is consensus in treating APS patients with thrombosis with long-term oral anticoagulation and to prevent obstetric manifestations with the use of aspirin and heparin. This review summarizes the main knowledge on the clinical and therapeutic aspects of this syndrome. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Cushing syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hypercortisolism; Cortisol excess; Glucocorticoid excess - Cushing syndrome ... The most common cause of Cushing syndrome is taking too much ... exogenous Cushing syndrome . Prednisone, dexamethasone, and ...

  20. Serotonin syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyperserotonemia; Serotonergic syndrome; Serotonin toxicity; SSRI - serotonin syndrome; MAO - serotonin syndrome ... two medicines that affect the body's level of serotonin are taken together at the same time. The ...

  1. Gardner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Types of Cancer > Gardner Syndrome Request Permissions Gardner Syndrome Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 06/2014 What is Gardner syndrome? Gardner syndrome is a subtype of familial ...

  2. [The refeeding syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambers, Wietske M; Kraaijenbrink, Bastiaan; Siegert, Carl E H

    2015-01-01

    The refeeding syndrome may occur during reintroduction of carbohydrates in malnourished patients. This syndrome is characterized by reduced plasma electrolyte levels, hypophosphataemia being most prevalent. The symptoms can vary from minor symptoms to severe neurological or cardiac symptoms. The pathophysiological mechanism comprises an increase in insulin levels, resulting in shifts of phosphate, potassium and magnesium into the intracellular environment, as well as fluid retention and relative deficiency of vitamin B1. There is growing interest in the screening and treatment of patients with malnutrition, due to which the incidence of refeeding syndrome is probably increasing. Currently, there is no single definition of this syndrome and therefore there is no solid scientific basis for screening and treatment. In this article we describe the rationale for screening and additional laboratory investigations. A prospective, controlled trial is important to define the clinical relevance of the refeeding syndrome and optimize its treatment.

  3. Atraumatic painless compartment syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Scott; Griffin, Gregory D; Simon, Erin L

    2013-12-01

    Acute compartment syndrome is a time-sensitive diagnosis and surgical emergency because it poses a threat to life and the limbs. It is defined by Matsen et al (Surg Gynecol Obstet. 1978;147(6):943–949) as "a condition in which increased pressure within a limited space compromises the circulation and function of the tissues within that space." The most common cause of compartment syndrome is traumatic injury. A variety of other conditions such as vascular injuries, bleeding disorders, thrombosis, fasciitis, gas gangrene, rhabdomyolysis, prolonged limb compression, cellulitis, and nephrotic syndrome may also cause compartment syndrome. Patients who are elderly, have preexisting nerve damage, or have psychopathology may have an atypical presentation. This case highlights the first report of a 75-year-old woman who developed painless bilateral compartment syndrome in the absence of traumatic injury.

  4. [Refeeding syndrome: practical issues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzi, M; Limonta, A; Pichard, C; Stirnemann, J

    2015-10-14

    The refeeding syndrome is frequent and potentially deadly, still it is underdiagnosed. It is defined by clinical and biological manifestations that are seen upon refeeding of malnourished patients. It is the consequence of the transition from catabolism to anabolism. Ions intracellular shift caused by insulin and B1 vitamin deficiency are fundamental in the development of this syndrome. Riskconditions are well summarized by the NICE criteria. To avoid refeeding syndrome, it is fundamental to find and correct any electrolytic deficiency and to give thiamine before starting a slow and progressive oral, enteral or parenteral refeeding.

  5. [Pharmacologic treatment of Asperger syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Satoru

    2007-03-01

    Asperger syndrome is associated with various dysfunctional and problematic behaviors, in addition to the core features of communication and social skills dysfunction that define these conditions. Although there is currently no pharmacologic cure for the core features of Asperger syndrome. This article discusses the various medications for the behavioral symptoms of Asperger syndrome, which include hyperactivity, aggression, tantrums, self-injury, depression, obsession and so on. Methylphenidate, SSRIs, atypical antipsychotics and mood stabilizer were introduced.

  6. Defining pyromes and global syndromes of fire regimes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Archibald, S

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available , and grassfueled fires, and the relationship of these to biomes and climate are not deterministic. Pyromes were partially discriminated on the basis of available moisture and rainfall seasonality. Human impacts also affected pyromes and are globally apparent...

  7. West syndrome in a patient with Schinzel-Giedion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Fuyu; Kuroda, Yukiko; Naruto, Takuya; Ohashi, Ikuko; Takano, Kyoko; Kurosawa, Kenji

    2015-06-01

    Schinzel-Giedion syndrome is a rare recognizable malformation syndrome defined by characteristic facial features, profound developmental delay, severe growth failure, and multiple congenital anomalies. The causative gene of Schinzel-Giedion syndrome, SETBP1, has been identified, but limited cases have been confirmed by molecular analysis. We present a 9-month-old girl affected by West syndrome with Schinzel-Giedion syndrome. Congenital severe hydronephrosis, typical facial features, and multiple anomalies suggested a clinical diagnosis of Schinzel-Giedion syndrome. Hypsarrhythmia occurred at 7 months of age and was temporarily controlled by adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) therapy during 5 weeks. SETBP1 mutational analysis showed the presence of a recurrent mutation, p.Ile871Thr. The implications in management of Schinzel-Giedion syndrome are discussed.

  8. Redefining syndromic surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Rebecca; May, Larissa; Baker, Julia; Test, Elisa

    2011-12-01

    With growing concerns about international spread of disease and expanding use of early disease detection surveillance methods, the field of syndromic surveillance has received increased attention over the last decade. The purpose of this article is to clarify the various meanings that have been assigned to the term syndromic surveillance and to propose a refined categorization of the characteristics of these systems. Existing literature and conference proceedings were examined on syndromic surveillance from 1998 to 2010, focusing on low- and middle-income settings. Based on the 36 unique definitions of syndromic surveillance found in the literature, five commonly accepted principles of syndromic surveillance systems were identified, as well as two fundamental categories: specific and non-specific disease detection. Ultimately, the proposed categorization of syndromic surveillance distinguishes between systems that focus on detecting defined syndromes or outcomes of interest and those that aim to uncover non-specific trends that suggest an outbreak may be occurring. By providing an accurate and comprehensive picture of this field's capabilities, and differentiating among system types, a unified understanding of the syndromic surveillance field can be developed, encouraging the adoption, investment in, and implementation of these systems in settings that need bolstered surveillance capacity, particularly low- and middle-income countries. Copyright © 2011 Ministry of Health, Saudi Arabia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Cross Syndrome Comparison of Sleep Problems in Children with Down Syndrome and Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashworth, Anna; Hill, Catherine M.; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette; Dimitriou, Dagmara

    2013-01-01

    Based on previous findings of frequent sleep problems in children with Down syndrome (DS) and Williams syndrome (WS), the present study aimed to expand our knowledge by using parent report and actigraphy to define sleep problems more precisely in these groups. Twenty-two school-aged children with DS, 24 with WS and 52 typically developing (TD)…

  10. Defining asthma in genetic studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppelman, GH; Postma, DS; Meijer, G.

    1999-01-01

    Genetic studies have been hampered by the lack of a gold standard to diagnose asthma. The complex nature of asthma makes it more difficult to identify asthma genes. Therefore, approaches to define phenotypes, which have been successful in other genetically complex diseases, may be applied to define

  11. Defining asthma in genetic studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppelman, GH; Postma, DS; Meijer, G.

    1999-01-01

    Genetic studies have been hampered by the lack of a gold standard to diagnose asthma. The complex nature of asthma makes it more difficult to identify asthma genes. Therefore, approaches to define phenotypes, which have been successful in other genetically complex diseases, may be applied to define

  12. Genetic Syndromes Associated with Craniosynostosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jung Min

    2016-05-01

    Craniosynostosis is defined as the premature fusion of one or more of the cranial sutures. It leads not only to secondary distortion of skull shape but to various complications including neurologic, ophthalmic and respiratory dysfunction. Craniosynostosis is very heterogeneous in terms of its causes, presentation, and management. Both environmental factors and genetic factors are associated with development of craniosynostosis. Nonsyndromic craniosynostosis accounts for more than 70% of all cases. Syndromic craniosynostosis with a certain genetic cause is more likely to involve multiple sutures or bilateral coronal sutures. FGFR2, FGFR3, FGFR1, TWIST1 and EFNB1 genes are major causative genes of genetic syndromes associated with craniosynostosis. Although most of syndromic craniosynostosis show autosomal dominant inheritance, approximately half of patients are de novo cases. Apert syndrome, Pfeiffer syndrome, Crouzon syndrome, and Antley-Bixler syndrome are related to mutations in FGFR family (especially in FGFR2), and mutations in FGFRs can be overlapped between different syndromes. Saethre-Chotzen syndrome, Muenke syndrome, and craniofrontonasal syndrome are representative disorders showing isolated coronal suture involvement. Compared to the other types of craniosynostosis, single gene mutations can be more frequently detected, in one-third of coronal synostosis patients. Molecular diagnosis can be helpful to provide adequate genetic counseling and guidance for patients with syndromic craniosynostosis.

  13. Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia, insulin resistance syndrome, low HDL cholesterol, Metabolic Syndrome, overweight, syndrome x, type 2 diabetes Family Health, Kids and Teens, Men, Women January 2005 Copyright © American Academy of Family PhysiciansThis ...

  14. Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marfan syndrome is a disorder that affects connective tissue. Connective tissues are proteins that support skin, bones, ... fibrillin. A problem with the fibrillin gene causes Marfan syndrome. Marfan syndrome can be mild to severe, ...

  15. Williams syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams-Beuren syndrome ... Williams syndrome is caused by not having a copy of several genes. Parents may not have any family history of the condition. However, people with Williams syndrome have a 50% chance of passing the ...

  16. Fahr's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Page You are here Home » Disorders » All Disorders Fahr's Syndrome Information Page Fahr's Syndrome Information Page What research is being done? ... and conducts research on neurogenetic disorders such as Fahr's Syndrome. The goals of this research are to ...

  17. [Descartes' influence on the development of the anatomoclinical method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Hernández, A; Domínguez Rodríguez, M V; Fabre Pi, O; Cubero González, A

    2010-01-01

    The development of the anatomical-clinical method was a huge advance for modern medicine since it revealed a new approach to understanding diagnostic procedures. This change in medical thinking towards a more scientific basis has gradually evolved over several centuries, reaching its brilliant zenith with the contributions of the French school. There are certain similarities between the guidelines of the anatomical-clinical method and René Descartes' philosophical principles, so it is fair to consider him as one of the major precursors in this new line of thinking that definitely influenced the historical course of medicine.

  18. Defining and Classifying Interest Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baroni, Laura; Carroll, Brendan; Chalmers, Adam;

    2014-01-01

    The interest group concept is defined in many different ways in the existing literature and a range of different classification schemes are employed. This complicates comparisons between different studies and their findings. One of the important tasks faced by interest group scholars engaged...... in large-N studies is therefore to define the concept of an interest group and to determine which classification scheme to use for different group types. After reviewing the existing literature, this article sets out to compare different approaches to defining and classifying interest groups with a sample...

  19. Hepatorenal syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jan Lata

    2012-01-01

    Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) is defined as a functional renal failure in patients with liver disease with portal hypertension and it constitutes the climax of systemic circulatory changes associated with portal hypertension.This term refers to a precisely specified syndrome featuring in particular morphologically intact kidneys,where regulatory mechanisms have minimised glomerular filtration and maximised tubular resorption and urine concentration,which ultimately results in uraemia.The syndrome occurs almost exclusively in patients with ascites.Type 1 HRS develops as a consequence of a severe reduction of effective circulating volume due to both an extreme splanchnic arterial vasodilatation and a reduction of cardiac output.Type 2 HRS is characterised by a stable or slowly progressive renal failure so that its main clinical consequence is not acute renal failure,but refractory ascites,and its impact on prognosis is less negative.Liver transplantation is the most appropriate therapeutic method,nevertheless,only a few patients can receive it.The most suitable "bridge treatments" or treatment for patients ineligible for a liver transplant include terlipressin plus albumin.Terlipressin is at an initial dose of 0.5-1 mg every 4 h by intravenous bolus to 3 mg every 4 h in cases when there is no response.Renal function recovery can be achieved in less than 50% of patients and a considerable decrease in renal function may reoccur even in patients who have been responding to therapy over the short term.Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt plays only a marginal role in the treatment of HRS.

  20. Duane Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Corneal Abrasions Dilating Eye Drops Lazy eye (defined) Pink eye (defined) Retinopathy of Prematurity Strabismus Stye (defined) Vision ... Corneal Abrasions Dilating Eye Drops Lazy eye (defined) Pink eye (defined) Retinopathy of Prematurity Strabismus Stye (defined) Vision ...

  1. Brown Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Corneal Abrasions Dilating Eye Drops Lazy eye (defined) Pink eye (defined) Retinopathy of Prematurity Strabismus Stye (defined) Vision ... Corneal Abrasions Dilating Eye Drops Lazy eye (defined) Pink eye (defined) Retinopathy of Prematurity Strabismus Stye (defined) Vision ...

  2. Theoretical approaches to elections defining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalya V. Lebedeva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical approaches to elections defining develop the nature, essence and content of elections, help to determine their place and a role as one of the major national law institutions in democratic system.

  3. Defining Modules, Modularity and Modularization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Thomas Dedenroth; Pedersen, Per Erik Elgård

    The paper describes the evolution of the concept of modularity in a historical perspective. The main reasons for modularity are: create variety, utilize similarities, and reduce complexity. The paper defines the terms: Module, modularity, and modularization.......The paper describes the evolution of the concept of modularity in a historical perspective. The main reasons for modularity are: create variety, utilize similarities, and reduce complexity. The paper defines the terms: Module, modularity, and modularization....

  4. [Prevention of the refeeding syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Núñez, Maria E; Hernández Muniesa, B

    2010-01-01

    The refeeding syndrome can be defined as the metabolic alterations developed by the rapid nutrition repletion (oral, enteral as well as parenteral feeding) of severaly malnourished patients. Refeeding syndrome is a potentially fatal clinical condition and it is often underdiagnosed on non-specialized nutrition units. The most important key for its prevention is to identify patients at high risk for developing refeeding syndrome, before nutrition repletion. The present case describes the steps to prevent the refeeding syndrome as well as the clinical recommendations to restart nutrition support.

  5. Hereditary periodic fever syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McDermott, MF; Frenkel, J

    Hereditary periodic fever syndromes are defined by recurrent attacks of generalised inflammation for which no infectious or auto-immune cause can be identified. For most of these disorders, the molecular basis has recently been elucidated. This has opened the prospect of novel therapeutic

  6. The Forgotten Syndrome?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Vita Fooken; Hansen, Michael Stormly; Møller, Martin Nue

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gradenigo's Syndrome (GS) is defined as the clinical triad of acute otitis media, ipsilateral sixth nerve palsy, and pain in the distribution of the first and the second branches of the fifth nerve. The purpose of this study is to review the literature and report 4 cases of GS. METHODS...

  7. Cardiorenal Syndromes and Sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Chelazzi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The cardiorenal syndrome is a clinical and pathophysiological entity defined as the concomitant presence of renal and cardiovascular dysfunction. In patients with severe sepsis and septic shock, acute cardiovascular, and renal derangements are common, that is, the septic cardiorenal syndrome. The aim of this paper is to describe the pathophysiology and clinical features of septic cardiorenal syndrome in light of the actual clinical and experimental evidence. In particular, the importance of systemic and intrarenal endothelial dysfunction, alterations of kidney perfusion, and myocardial function, organ “crosstalk” and ubiquitous inflammatory injury have been extensively reviewed in light of their role in cardiorenal syndrome etiology. Treatment includes early and targeted optimization of hemodynamics to reverse systemic hypotension and restore urinary output. In case of persistent renal impairment, renal replacement therapy may be used to remove cytokines and restore renal function.

  8. DOWN SYNDROME WITH MOYAMOYA SYNDROME

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mohan Makwana; R. K. Vishnoi; Jai Prakash Soni; Kapil Jetha; Suresh Kumar Verma; Pradeep Singh Rathore; Monika Choudhary

    2017-01-01

    ...,” in which the arterial changes are seen among patients with various syndromes or other disease processes- Down syndrome, sickle cell anaemia, neurofibromatosis type-1, congenital heart disease...

  9. Kindler syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaviarasan P

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Kindler syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder associated with skin fragility. It is characterized by blistering in infancy, photosensitivity and progressive poikiloderma. The syndrome involves the skin and mucous membrane with radiological changes. The genetic defect has been identified on the short arm of chromosome 20. This report describes an 18-year-old patient with classical features like blistering and photosensitivity in childhood and the subsequent development of poikiloderma. The differential diagnosis of Kindler syndrome includes diseases like Bloom syndrome, Cockayne syndrome, dyskeratosis congenita, epidermolysis bullosa, Rothmund-Thomson syndrome and xeroderma pigmentosum. Our patient had classical cutaneous features of Kindler syndrome with phimosis as a complication.

  10. Defining the states of consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassi, P; Muzet, A

    2001-03-01

    Consciousness remains an elusive concept due to the difficulty to define what has been regarded for many years as a subjective experience, therefore irrelevant for scientific study. Recent development in this field of research has allowed to provide some new insight to a possible way to define consciousness. Going through the extensive literature in this domain, several perspectives are proposed to define this concept. (1) Consciousness and Attention may not reflect the same process. (2) Consciousness during wake and sleep may not involve the same mechanisms. (3) Besides physiological states of consciousness, human beings can experience modified states of consciousness either by self-training (transcendental meditation, hypnosis, etc.) or by drug intake (hallucinogens, anaesthetics, etc.). Altogether, we address the question of a more precise terminology, given the theoretical weight words can convey. To this respect, we propose different definitions for concepts like consciousness, vigilance, arousal and alertness as candidates to separate functional entities.

  11. Modular Software-Defined Radio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhiemeier Arnd-Ragnar

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In view of the technical and commercial boundary conditions for software-defined radio (SDR, it is suggestive to reconsider the concept anew from an unconventional point of view. The organizational principles of signal processing (rather than the signal processing algorithms themselves are the main focus of this work on modular software-defined radio. Modularity and flexibility are just two key characteristics of the SDR environment which extend smoothly into the modeling of hardware and software. In particular, the proposed model of signal processing software includes irregular, connected, directed, acyclic graphs with random node weights and random edges. Several approaches for mapping such software to a given hardware are discussed. Taking into account previous findings as well as new results from system simulations presented here, the paper finally concludes with the utility of pipelining as a general design guideline for modular software-defined radio.

  12. Defining the Internet of Things

    OpenAIRE

    Benghozi, Pierre-Jean; Bureau, Sylvain; Massit-Folléa, Françoise

    2012-01-01

    How can a definition be given to what does not yet exist ? The Internet of Things, as it is conceptualized by researchers or imagined by science-fiction writers such as Bruce Sterling, is not yet reality and if we try to define it accurately we risk rash predictions. In order to better comprehend this notion, let us first define the main principles of the IoT as given in research papers and reports on the subject. Definitions gradually established Almost all agree that the Internet of Things...

  13. Defining the Internet of Things

    OpenAIRE

    Benghozi, Pierre-Jean; Bureau, Sylvain; Massit-Folléa, Françoise

    2012-01-01

    How can a definition be given to what does not yet exist ? The Internet of Things, as it is conceptualized by researchers or imagined by science-fiction writers such as Bruce Sterling, is not yet reality and if we try to define it accurately we risk rash predictions. In order to better comprehend this notion, let us first define the main principles of the IoT as given in research papers and reports on the subject. Definitions gradually established Almost all agree that the Internet of Things...

  14. Polycystic ovary syndrome and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Aus Tariq

    2015-08-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a heterogeneous disorder, where the main clinical features include menstrual irregularities, sub-fertility, hyperandrogenism, and hirsutism. The prevalence of PCOS depends on ethnicity, environmental and genetic factors, as well as the criteria used to define it. On the other hand, metabolic syndrome is a constellation of metabolic disorders which include mainly abdominal obesity, insulin resistance, impaired glucose metabolism, hypertension and dyslipidaemia. These associated disorders directly increase the risk of Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DMT2), coronary heart disease (CHD), cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and endometrial cancer. Many patients with PCOS have features of metabolic syndrome such as visceral obesity, hyperinsulinaemia and insulin resistance. These place patients with PCOS under high risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD), Type 2 diabetes (DMT2) and gynecological cancer, in particular, endometrial cancer. Metabolic syndrome is also increased in infertile women with PCOS. The aim of this review is to provide clear and up to date information about PCOS and its relationship with metabolic syndrome, and the possible interaction between different metabolic disorders.

  15. Defined medium for Moraxella bovis.

    OpenAIRE

    Juni, E; Heym, G A

    1986-01-01

    A defined medium (medium MB) for Moraxella bovis was formulated. Nineteen strains grew well on medium MB. One strain was auxotrophic for asparagine, and another was auxotrophic for methionine. Strains of M. equi and M. lacunata also grew on medium MB. All strains had an absolute requirement for thiamine and were stimulated by or actually required the other growth factors in the medium.

  16. Indico CONFERENCE: Define the Programme

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Ferreira, Pedro

    2017-01-01

    In this tutorial you are going to learn how to define the programme of a conference in Indico. The program of your conference is divided in different “tracks”. Tracks represent the subject matter of the conference, such as “Online Computing”, “Offline Computing”, and so on.

  17. Defining and Measuring User Experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stage, Jan

    2006-01-01

    on the intrinsic relation between definition and measurement. In the area of usability, this relation has been developed over several years. It is described how usability is defined and measured in contemporary approaches. Based on that, it is discussed to what extent we can employ experience from the conceptual...

  18. Defining sphincter of oddi dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funch-Jensen, P

    1996-01-01

    Sphincter of Oddi (SO) dysmotility may give rise to pain. The golden standard for the demonstration of SO dysfunction is endoscopic manometry. A number of abnormalities are observed in patients with postcholecystectomy pain and in patients with idiopathic recurrent pancreatitis. Criteria for defi...... for defining SO dysfunction and the possible mechanisms for the precipitation of pain are discussed....

  19. Defined medium for Moraxella bovis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juni, E; Heym, G A

    1986-10-01

    A defined medium (medium MB) for Moraxella bovis was formulated. Nineteen strains grew well on medium MB. One strain was auxotrophic for asparagine, and another was auxotrophic for methionine. Strains of M. equi and M. lacunata also grew on medium MB. All strains had an absolute requirement for thiamine and were stimulated by or actually required the other growth factors in the medium.

  20. Defined medium for Moraxella bovis.

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    A defined medium (medium MB) for Moraxella bovis was formulated. Nineteen strains grew well on medium MB. One strain was auxotrophic for asparagine, and another was auxotrophic for methionine. Strains of M. equi and M. lacunata also grew on medium MB. All strains had an absolute requirement for thiamine and were stimulated by or actually required the other growth factors in the medium.

  1. Network Coded Software Defined Networking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krigslund, Jeppe; Hansen, Jonas; Roetter, Daniel Enrique Lucani

    2015-01-01

    Software Defined Networking (SDN) and Network Coding (NC) are two key concepts in networking that have garnered a large attention in recent years. On the one hand, SDN's potential to virtualize services in the Internet allows a large flexibility not only for routing data, but also to manage buffe...

  2. Defining and Differentiating the Makerspace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dousay, Tonia A.

    2017-01-01

    Many resources now punctuate the maker movement landscape. However, some schools and communities still struggle to understand this burgeoning movement. How do we define these spaces and differentiate them from previous labs and shops? Through a multidimensional framework, stakeholders should consider how the structure, access, staffing, and tools…

  3. Posterior Fossa Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serhan Kupeli

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Posterior fossa syndrome is defined as the temporary and complete loss of speech after posterior fossa surgery which is not related to cerebellar hemorrhage, infection of the cerebellum, degenerative or neoplastic diseases of the cerebellum. In this review, we aimed to outline the incidence of posterior fossa syndrome, to define the risk factors for posterior fossa syndrome, to describe accompanying neurobehavioural and psychologic problems and to speculate about the etiologic mechanisms. The diagnosis of medulloblastoma and midline location of the tumor are important risk factors for the development of posterior fossa syndrome. These findings support the hypothesis that temporary ischemia and edema due to retracted and largely manipulated dentate nuclei and superior cerebellar pedincles may be the cause of mutism. Informing the family and the patient about the posterior fossa syndromemust be a component of the preoperative interview and patients who developed posterior fossa syndrome should be followed for accompanying neurobehavioural and psychologic problems even after mutism improved. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2014; 23(4.000: 636-657

  4. Clinical presentation and functional prognosis in syndrome X.

    OpenAIRE

    Chauhan, A; Mullins, P A; Thuraisingham, S I; Petch, M C; Schofield, P. M.

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To assess the effect of clinical presentation on functional prognosis in patients with syndrome X. DESIGN--A prospective study. Patients with syndrome X presenting with unstable angina and stable angina were followed up with a questionnaire to examine their functional state. PATIENTS--41 patients with syndrome X and unstable angina and 41 patients with syndrome X and stable angina. Syndrome X was defined as typical anginal chest pain, a positive exercise test, and normal coronary ...

  5. Ulnar tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachoura, Abdo; Jacoby, Sidney M

    2012-10-01

    Ulnar tunnel syndrome could be broadly defined as a compressive neuropathy of the ulnar nerve at the level of the wrist. The ulnar tunnel, or Guyon's canal, has a complex and variable anatomy. Various factors may precipitate the onset of ulnar tunnel syndrome. Patient presentation depends on the anatomic zone of ulnar nerve compression: zone I compression, motor and sensory signs and symptoms; zone II compression, isolated motor deficits; and zone III compression; purely sensory deficits. Conservative treatment such as activity modification may be helpful, but often, surgical exploration of the ulnar tunnel with subsequent ulnar nerve decompression is indicated.

  6. [Pulmonary-renal syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risso, Jorge A; Mazzocchi, Octavio; De All, Jorge; Gnocchi, César A

    2009-01-01

    The pulmonary-renal syndrome is defined as a combination of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage and glomerulonephritis. The coexistence of these two clinical conditions is due to diseases with different pathogenic mechanisms. Primary systemic vasculitis and Goodpasture syndrome are the most frequent etiologies. Systemic lupus erythematosus, connective tissue diseases, negative anti neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody vasculitis and those secondary to drugs are far less common causes. An early diagnosis based on clinical, radiologic, laboratory and histologic criteria enables early treatment, thus diminishing its high morbidity-mortality rate. Therapy is based on high doses of corticosteroids, immunosuppressants, tumor necrosis factor inhibitors and plasmapheresis.

  7. Epidermal nevus syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asch, Sarah; Sugarman, Jeffrey L

    2015-01-01

    The term epidermal nevus syndrome (ENS) has been used to describe the association of epidermal hamartomas and extracutaneous abnormalities. Although many continue to use the term "ENS," it is now understood that this is not one disease, but rather a heterogeneous group with distinct genetic profiles defined by a common cutaneous phenotype: the presence of epidermal and adnexal hamartomas that are associated with other organ system involvement. One commonality is that epidermal nevi often follow the lines of Blaschko and it appears the more widespread the cutaneous manifestations, the greater the risk for extracutaneous manifestations. The majority of the extracutaneous manifestations involve the brain, eye, and skeletal systems. The CNS involvement is wide ranging and involves both clinical manifestations such as intellectual disability and seizures, as well as structural anomalies. Several subsets of ENS with characteristic features have been delineated including the nevus sebaceus syndrome, Proteus syndrome, CHILD syndrome, Becker's nevus syndrome, nevus comedonicus syndrome, and phakomatosis pigmentokeratotica. Advances in molecular biology have revealed that the manifestations of ENS are due to genomic mosaicism. It is likely that the varied clinical manifestations of ENS are due in great part to the functional effects of specific genetic defects. Optimal management of the patient with ENS involves an interdisciplinary approach given the potential for multisystem involvement. Of note, epidermal nevi have been associated with both benign and malignant neoplasms, and thus ongoing clinical follow-up is required.

  8. Sleep overlap syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Rezaeetalab

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Overlap syndrome, which is known as the coexistence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, was first defined by Flenley. Although it can refer to concomitant occurrence of any of the pulmonary diseases and OSA, overlap syndrome is commonly considered as the coexistence of OSA and COPD. This disease has unique adverse health consequences distinct from either condition alone. Given the high prevalence of each solitary disease, overlap syndrome is also likely to be common and clinically relevant. Despite the fact that overlap syndrome has been described in the literature for nearly 30 years, paucity of evaluations and studies limited the discussion on diagnosis, prevalence, pathophysiology, treatment, and outcomes of this disease. This review article addresses these issues by reviewing several recent studies conducted in Iran or other countries. This review suggests that overlap syndrome has worse outcomes than either disease alone. Our findings accentuated the urgent need for further studies on overlap syndrome and all overlaps between OSA and chronic pulmonary disease to provide a deeper insight into diagnosis and non-invasive treatments of this disease.

  9. Unusual headache syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, Luiz P

    2013-01-01

    Some headache syndromes have few cases reported in the literature. Their clinical characteristics, pathogenesis, and treatment may have not been completely defined. They may not actually be uncommon but rather under-recognized and/or underreported. A literature review of unusual headache syndromes, searching PubMed and ISI Web of Knowledge, was performed. After deciding which disorders to study, relevant publications in scientific journals, including original articles, reviews, meeting abstracts, and letters or correspondences to the editors were searched. This paper reviewed the clinical characteristics, the pathogenesis, the diagnosis, and the treatment of five interesting and unusual headache syndromes: exploding head syndrome, red ear syndrome, neck-tongue syndrome, nummular headache, and cardiac cephalgia. Recognizing some unusual headaches, either primary or secondary, may be a challenge for many non-headache specialist physicians. It is important to study them because the correct diagnosis may result in specific treatments that may improve the quality of life of these patients, and this can even be life saving. © 2013 American Headache Society.

  10. Software defined radio architectures evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Palomo, Alvaro; Villing, Rudi; Farrell, Ronan

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an performance evaluation of GNU Radio and OSSIE, two open source Software Defined Radio (SDR) architectures. The two architectures were compared by running implementations of a BPSK waveform utilising a software loopback channel on each. The upper bound full duplex throughput was found to be around 700kbps in both cases, though OSSIE was slightly faster than GNU Radio. CPU and memory loads did not differ significantly.

  11. How to define green adjuvants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Bert; Steurbaut, Walter; Spanoghe, Pieter

    2012-08-01

    The concept 'green adjuvants' is difficult to define. This paper formulates an answer based on two approaches. Starting from the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) definition for green chemistry, production-based and environmental-impact-based definitions for green adjuvants are proposed. According to the production-based approach, adjuvants are defined as green if they are manufactured using renewable raw materials as much as possible while making efficient use of energy, preferably renewable energy. According to the environmental impact approach, adjuvants are defined as green (1) if they have a low human and environmental impact, (2) if they do not increase active ingredient environmental mobility and/or toxicity to humans and non-target organisms, (3) if they do not increase the exposure to these active substances and (4) if they lower the impact of formulated pesticides by enhancing the performance of active ingredients, thus potentially lowering the required dosage of active ingredients. Based on both approaches, a tentative definition for 'green adjuvants' is given, and future research and legislation directions are set out.

  12. Syndromic autism: II. Genetic syndromes associated with autism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Artigas-Pallarés, J; Gabau-Vila, E; Guitart-Feliubadaló, M

    2005-01-01

    ..., tuberous sclerosis, Duchenne's disease, Timothy syndrome, 10p terminal deletion, Cowden syndrome, 45,X/46,XY mosaicism, Myhre syndrome, Sotos syndrome, Cohen syndrome, Goldenhar syndrome, Joubert...

  13. Edwards' syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Doreen; Dearmun, Annette

    2016-12-08

    Edwards' syndrome is a serious genetic condition that affects fetal cellular functions, tissue development and organogenesis. Most infants with the syndrome are female, but there is no race predominance.

  14. Dravet Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Craniosynostosis Information Page Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Information Page Cushing's Syndrome Information Page Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Dementia Information ...

  15. Paraneoplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dementia, seizures, sensory loss in the limbs, and vertigo or dizziness. Paraneoplastic syndromes include Lambert-Eaton myasthenic ... dementia, seizures, sensory loss in the limbs, and vertigo or dizziness. Paraneoplastic syndromes include Lambert-Eaton myasthenic ...

  16. Turner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects a girl's development. The cause is a missing or incomplete ... t work properly. Other physical features typical of Turner syndrome are Short, "webbed" neck with folds of skin ...

  17. Cushing's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushing's syndrome is a hormonal disorder. The cause is long-term exposure to too much cortisol, a hormone ... cause your body to make too much cortisol. Cushing's syndrome is rare. Some symptoms are Upper body obesity ...

  18. Lynch Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... colon cancer may include surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Cancer screening for people with Lynch syndrome If you ... et al. Milestones of Lynch syndrome: 1895-2015. Nature Reviews Cancer. http://www.nature.com/nrc/journal/vaop/ncurrent/ ...

  19. Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metabolic syndrome is a group of conditions that put you at risk for heart disease and diabetes. These ... doctors agree on the definition or cause of metabolic syndrome. The cause might be insulin resistance. Insulin is ...

  20. Meckel syndrome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Salonen, R; Paavola, P

    1998-01-01

    Meckel syndrome (MKS) is a lethal syndrome with a central nervous system malformation, usually occipital meningoencephalocele, bilaterally large multicystic kidneys with fibrotic changes of the liver, and polydactyly in most cases...

  1. Angelman Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this syndrome often display hyperactivity, small head size, sleep disorders, and movement and balance disorders that can cause ... this syndrome often display hyperactivity, small head size, sleep disorders, and movement and balance disorders that can cause ...

  2. Apert Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Saikat; Saha, Sandip; Kar, Arnab; Mondal, Souvonik; Basu, Syamantak

    2014-09-01

    Apert syndrome is one of the craniosynostosis syndromes which, due to its association with other skeletal anomalies, is also known as acrocephalosyndactyly. It is a rare congenital anomaly which stands out from other craniosynostosis due to its characteristic skeletal presentations.

  3. Learning about Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... genetic terms used on this page Learning About Down Syndrome What is Down syndrome? What are the symptoms ... syndrome Additional Resources for Down Syndrome What is Down syndrome? Down syndrome is a chromosomal condition related to ...

  4. UNIQLO, Define Your Own Fashion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Ting

    2009-01-01

    @@ Yes,women like and enjoy shopping.Always,they want to buy some well-designed clothes with the most 'in'factors; and what's of the great importance,they would like to hear the words:"wow! You fit the wear well!"However,the most satisfied right things could not be always waiting for you there or you would not help complaining the so-fast changing trends day by day.At that time,why not to seek some delights from the basic classic collections?UNIQLO maybe is a choice for you to define your own fashion.

  5. Defining and Measuring User Experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stage, Jan

    2006-01-01

    User experience is being used to denote what a user goes through while using a computerized system. The concept has gained momentum as a means to distinguish new types of applications such as games and entertainment software from more traditional work-related applications. This paper focuses...... on the intrinsic relation between definition and measurement. In the area of usability, this relation has been developed over several years. It is described how usability is defined and measured in contemporary approaches. Based on that, it is discussed to what extent we can employ experience from the conceptual...... definition of usability to develop the notion of user experience....

  6. Velocardiofacial Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gothelf, Doron; Frisch, Amos; Michaelovsky, Elena; Weizman, Abraham; Shprintzen, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS), also known as DiGeorge, conotruncal anomaly face, and Cayler syndromes, is caused by a microdeletion in the long arm of Chromosome 22. We review the history of the syndrome from the first clinical reports almost half a century ago to the current intriguing molecular findings associating genes from the…

  7. Fraser syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana Kumari M

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Fraser syndrome or cryptophthalmos is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by major features such as cryptophthalmos, syndactyly and abnormal genitalia. The diagnosis of this syndrome can be made on clinical examination and perinatal autopsy. We present the autopsy findings of a rare case of Fraser syndrome in a male infant.

  8. Rowell syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Y Bhat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rowell syndrome is a rare disease consisting of erythema multiforme-like lesions associated with lupus erythematosus. The syndrome occurs mostly in middle-aged women. The authors describe the syndrome in a 15-year-old boy who responded well to systemic steroids and hydroxychloroquine.

  9. Wallenberg's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information Page You are here Home » Disorders » All Disorders Wallenberg's Syndrome Information Page Wallenberg's Syndrome Information Page What ... better ways to prevent, treat, and ultimately cure disorders such as Wallenberg’s syndrome. Information from the National Library of Medicine’s ...

  10. Eagle's syndrome: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Moon, Chang-Sig; Lee, Baek-Soo; Kwon, Yong-Dae; Choi, Byung-Jun; Lee, Jung-Woo; Lee, Hyun-Woo; Yun, Sun-Ung; Ohe, Joo-Young

    2014-01-01

    Eagle's syndrome is a disease caused by an elongated styloid process or calcified stylohyoid ligament. Eagle defined the disorder in 1937 by describing clinical findings related to an elongated styloid process, which is one of the numerous causes of pain in the craniofacial and cervical region. The prevalence of individuals with this anatomic abnormality in the adult population is estimated to be 4% with 0.16% of these individuals reported to be symptomatic. Eagle's syndrome is usually charac...

  11. Monogenic diabetes syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astuti, Dewi; Sabir, Ataf; Fulton, Piers

    2017-01-01

    We developed a variant database for diabetes syndrome genes, using the Leiden Open Variation Database platform, containing observed phenotypes matched to the genetic variations. We populated it with 628 published disease-associated variants (December 2016) for: WFS1 (n = 309), CISD2 (n = 3), ALMS1...... for the WFS1 gene. The presence of biallelic loss-of-function variants predicted Wolfram syndrome defined by insulin-dependent diabetes and optic atrophy, with a sensitivity of 79% (95% CI 75%-83%) and specificity of 92% (83%-97%). The presence of minor loss-of-function variants in WFS1 predicted isolated...... diabetes, isolated deafness, or isolated congenital cataracts without development of the full syndrome (sensitivity 100% [93%-100%]; specificity 78% [73%-82%]). The ability to provide a prognostic prediction based on genotype will lead to improvements in patient care and counseling. The development...

  12. Defining Life: The Virus Viewpoint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forterre, Patrick

    2010-04-01

    Are viruses alive? Until very recently, answering this question was often negative and viruses were not considered in discussions on the origin and definition of life. This situation is rapidly changing, following several discoveries that have modified our vision of viruses. It has been recognized that viruses have played (and still play) a major innovative role in the evolution of cellular organisms. New definitions of viruses have been proposed and their position in the universal tree of life is actively discussed. Viruses are no more confused with their virions, but can be viewed as complex living entities that transform the infected cell into a novel organism—the virus—producing virions. I suggest here to define life (an historical process) as the mode of existence of ribosome encoding organisms (cells) and capsid encoding organisms (viruses) and their ancestors. I propose to define an organism as an ensemble of integrated organs (molecular or cellular) producing individuals evolving through natural selection. The origin of life on our planet would correspond to the establishment of the first organism corresponding to this definition.

  13. Defining life: the virus viewpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forterre, Patrick

    2010-04-01

    Are viruses alive? Until very recently, answering this question was often negative and viruses were not considered in discussions on the origin and definition of life. This situation is rapidly changing, following several discoveries that have modified our vision of viruses. It has been recognized that viruses have played (and still play) a major innovative role in the evolution of cellular organisms. New definitions of viruses have been proposed and their position in the universal tree of life is actively discussed. Viruses are no more confused with their virions, but can be viewed as complex living entities that transform the infected cell into a novel organism-the virus-producing virions. I suggest here to define life (an historical process) as the mode of existence of ribosome encoding organisms (cells) and capsid encoding organisms (viruses) and their ancestors. I propose to define an organism as an ensemble of integrated organs (molecular or cellular) producing individuals evolving through natural selection. The origin of life on our planet would correspond to the establishment of the first organism corresponding to this definition.

  14. [Mild traumatic brain injury and postconcussive syndrome: a re-emergent questioning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auxéméry, Y

    2012-09-01

    also be altered by a scissoring mechanism of the perforating arteries. A cortical contusion through impression of the cortex on the contours of the cranium is frequent. The most common type of injury is traumatic axonal injury. Cerebral lesions that are secondary to TBI associate cell deaths through the mechanisms of apoptosis and necrosis concerning the nerve and glial cells. The scientific objective is to discover an anatomoclinical correlation between the symptoms of post-concussion syndrome and objectifiable brain damage. The predictive value of serum concentrations of the specific serum markers S-100B and neurone specific enolase has been established. Cerebral imaging will allow the mechanisms concerned in cranial trauma to be better understood and thus may allow these mechanisms to be linked with co-morbid post-traumatic psychiatric disorders such as depression. The pyschopathological approach provides supplementary enlightenment where neuroimaging studies struggle to establish precise anatomoclinical correlations between neurotraumatic lesions, state of post-traumatic stress, and PCS. Moving away from a purely scientific view to focus on subjectivity, PCS can establish itself in subjects with no history of head trauma thus showing purely psychic suffering. Is the former name of "subjective post-head injury syndrome" no longer pertinent since the neurobiological affections can be objectified? Yet, the latter does not necessarily explain the somatic symptoms. Beyond any opposition of a psychic or somatic causality, it shows the complexity of this interaction. Admittedly, looking for a neuropathological affection is particularly cardinal to propose an aetiological model and objectify the lesions, which should be documented using a forensic approach. However, within the context of treatment, this theoretical division of the brain and the mind becomes less operative: the psychotherapeutic support will on the contrary back the indivisibility of the subject, he

  15. Defining Life: Synthesis and Conclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayon, Jean

    2010-04-01

    The first part of the paper offers philosophical landmarks on the general issue of defining life. §1 defends that the recognition of “life” has always been and remains primarily an intuitive process, for the scientist as for the layperson. However we should not expect, then, to be able to draw a definition from this original experience, because our cognitive apparatus has not been primarily designed for this. §2 is about definitions in general. Two kinds of definition should be carefully distinguished: lexical definitions (based upon current uses of a word), and stipulative or legislative definitions, which deliberately assign a meaning to a word, for the purpose of clarifying scientific or philosophical arguments. The present volume provides examples of these two kinds of definitions. §3 examines three traditional philosophical definitions of life, all of which have been elaborated prior to the emergence of biology as a specific scientific discipline: life as animation (Aristotle), life as mechanism, and life as organization (Kant). All three concepts constitute a common heritage that structures in depth a good deal of our cultural intuitions and vocabulary any time we try to think about “life”. The present volume offers examples of these three concepts in contemporary scientific discourse. The second part of the paper proposes a synthesis of the major debates developed in this volume. Three major questions have been discussed. A first issue (§4) is whether we should define life or not, and why. Most authors are skeptical about the possibility of defining life in a strong way, although all admit that criteria are useful in contexts such as exobiology, artificial life and the origins of life. §5 examines the possible kinds of definitions of life presented in the volume. Those authors who have explicitly defended that a definition of life is needed, can be classified into two categories. The first category (or standard view) refers to two conditions

  16. Defining life: synthesis and conclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayon, Jean

    2010-04-01

    The first part of the paper offers philosophical landmarks on the general issue of defining life. Section 1 defends that the recognition of "life" has always been and remains primarily an intuitive process, for the scientist as for the layperson. However we should not expect, then, to be able to draw a definition from this original experience, because our cognitive apparatus has not been primarily designed for this. Section 2 is about definitions in general. Two kinds of definition should be carefully distinguished: lexical definitions (based upon current uses of a word), and stipulative or legislative definitions, which deliberately assign a meaning to a word, for the purpose of clarifying scientific or philosophical arguments. The present volume provides examples of these two kinds of definitions. Section 3 examines three traditional philosophical definitions of life, all of which have been elaborated prior to the emergence of biology as a specific scientific discipline: life as animation (Aristotle), life as mechanism, and life as organization (Kant). All three concepts constitute a common heritage that structures in depth a good deal of our cultural intuitions and vocabulary any time we try to think about "life". The present volume offers examples of these three concepts in contemporary scientific discourse. The second part of the paper proposes a synthesis of the major debates developed in this volume. Three major questions have been discussed. A first issue (Section 4) is whether we should define life or not, and why. Most authors are skeptical about the possibility of defining life in a strong way, although all admit that criteria are useful in contexts such as exobiology, artificial life and the origins of life. Section 5 examines the possible kinds of definitions of life presented in the volume. Those authors who have explicitly defended that a definition of life is needed, can be classified into two categories. The first category (or standard view) refers

  17. Refeeding syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández López, M T; López Otero, M J; Alvarez Vázquez, P; Arias Delgado, J; Varela Correa, J J

    2009-01-01

    Refeeding syndrome is a complex syndrome that occurs as a result of reintroducing nutrition (oral, enteral or parenteral) to patients who are starved or malnourished. Patients can develop fluid-balance abnormalities, electrolyte disorders (hypophosphataemia, hypokalaemia and hypomagnesaemia), abnormal glucose metabolism and certain vitamin deficiencies. Refeeding syndrome encompasses abnormalities affecting multiple organ systems, including neurological, pulmonary, cardiac, neuromuscular and haematological functions. Pathogenic mechanisms involved in the refeeding syndrome and clinical manifestations have been reviewed. We provide suggestions for the prevention and treatment of refeeding syndrome. The most important steps are to identify patients at risk, reintroduce nutrition cautiously and correct electrolyte and vitamin deficiencies properly.

  18. [Metabolic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuishi, Masanori; Miyashita, Kazutoshi; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2009-02-01

    Metabolic syndrome, which is consisted of hypertension, dyslipidemia and impaired glucose tolerance, is one of the most significant lifestyle-related disorders that lead to cardiovascular diseases. Among many upstream factors that are related to metabolic syndrome, obesity, especially visceral obesity, plays an essential role in its pathogenesis. In recent studies, possible mechanisms which connect obesity to metabolic syndrome have been elucidated, such as inflammation, abnormal secretion of adipokines and mitochondrial dysfunction. In this review, we focus on the relationship between obesity and metabolic syndrome; and illustrate how visceral obesity contributes to, and how the treatments for obesity act on metabolic syndrome.

  19. Network Coded Software Defined Networking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jonas; Roetter, Daniel Enrique Lucani; Krigslund, Jeppe

    2015-01-01

    Software defined networking has garnered large attention due to its potential to virtualize services in the Internet, introducing flexibility in the buffering, scheduling, processing, and routing of data in network routers. SDN breaks the deadlock that has kept Internet network protocols stagnant...... for decades, while applications and physical links have evolved. This article advocates for the use of SDN to bring about 5G network services by incorporating network coding (NC) functionalities. The latter constitutes a major leap forward compared to the state-of-the- art store and forward Internet paradigm....... The inherent flexibility of both SDN and NC provides fertile ground to envision more efficient, robust, and secure networking designs, which may also incorporate content caching and storage, all of which are key challenges of the upcoming 5G networks. This article not only proposes the fundamentals...

  20. Network Coded Software Defined Networking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krigslund, Jeppe; Hansen, Jonas; Roetter, Daniel Enrique Lucani;

    2015-01-01

    Software Defined Networking (SDN) and Network Coding (NC) are two key concepts in networking that have garnered a large attention in recent years. On the one hand, SDN's potential to virtualize services in the Internet allows a large flexibility not only for routing data, but also to manage...... buffering, scheduling, and processing over the network. On the other hand, NC has shown great potential for increasing robustness and performance when deployed on intermediate nodes in the network. This new paradigm changes the dynamics of network protocols, requiring new designs that exploit its potential....... This paper advocates for the use of SDN to bring about future Internet and 5G network services by incorporating network coding (NC) functionalities. The inherent flexibility of both SDN and NC provides a fertile ground to envision more efficient, robust, and secure networking designs, that may also...

  1. Defining biocultural approaches to conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavin, Michael C; McCarter, Joe; Mead, Aroha; Berkes, Fikret; Stepp, John Richard; Peterson, Debora; Tang, Ruifei

    2015-03-01

    We contend that biocultural approaches to conservation can achieve effective and just conservation outcomes while addressing erosion of both cultural and biological diversity. Here, we propose a set of guidelines for the adoption of biocultural approaches to conservation. First, we draw lessons from work on biocultural diversity and heritage, social-ecological systems theory, integrated conservation and development, co-management, and community-based conservation to define biocultural approaches to conservation. Second, we describe eight principles that characterize such approaches. Third, we discuss reasons for adopting biocultural approaches and challenges. If used well, biocultural approaches to conservation can be a powerful tool for reducing the global loss of both biological and cultural diversity.

  2. Miniature EVA Software Defined Radio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozhidaev, Aleksey

    2012-01-01

    As NASA embarks upon developing the Next-Generation Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) Radio for deep space exploration, the demands on EVA battery life will substantially increase. The number of modes and frequency bands required will continue to grow in order to enable efficient and complex multi-mode operations including communications, navigation, and tracking applications. Whether conducting astronaut excursions, communicating to soldiers, or first responders responding to emergency hazards, NASA has developed an innovative, affordable, miniaturized, power-efficient software defined radio that offers unprecedented power-efficient flexibility. This lightweight, programmable, S-band, multi-service, frequency- agile EVA software defined radio (SDR) supports data, telemetry, voice, and both standard and high-definition video. Features include a modular design, an easily scalable architecture, and the EVA SDR allows for both stationary and mobile battery powered handheld operations. Currently, the radio is equipped with an S-band RF section. However, its scalable architecture can accommodate multiple RF sections simultaneously to cover multiple frequency bands. The EVA SDR also supports multiple network protocols. It currently implements a Hybrid Mesh Network based on the 802.11s open standard protocol. The radio targets RF channel data rates up to 20 Mbps and can be equipped with a real-time operating system (RTOS) that can be switched off for power-aware applications. The EVA SDR's modular design permits implementation of the same hardware at all Network Nodes concept. This approach assures the portability of the same software into any radio in the system. It also brings several benefits to the entire system including reducing system maintenance, system complexity, and development cost.

  3. Asymptomatic Alzheimer disease: Defining resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohman, Timothy J; McLaren, Donald G; Mormino, Elizabeth C; Gifford, Katherine A; Libon, David J; Jefferson, Angela L

    2016-12-06

    To define robust resilience metrics by leveraging CSF biomarkers of Alzheimer disease (AD) pathology within a latent variable framework and to demonstrate the ability of such metrics to predict slower rates of cognitive decline and protection against diagnostic conversion. Participants with normal cognition (n = 297) and mild cognitive impairment (n = 432) were drawn from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. Resilience metrics were defined at baseline by examining the residuals when regressing brain aging outcomes (hippocampal volume and cognition) on CSF biomarkers. A positive residual reflected better outcomes than expected for a given level of pathology (high resilience). Residuals were integrated into a latent variable model of resilience and validated by testing their ability to independently predict diagnostic conversion, cognitive decline, and the rate of ventricular dilation. Latent variables of resilience predicted a decreased risk of conversion (hazard ratio 0.02, p < 0.001), and slower rates of ventricular dilation (β < -4.7, p < 2 × 10(-15)). These results were significant even when analyses were restricted to clinically normal individuals. Furthermore, resilience metrics interacted with biomarker status such that biomarker-positive individuals with low resilience showed the greatest risk of subsequent decline. Robust phenotypes of resilience calculated by leveraging AD biomarkers and baseline brain aging outcomes provide insight into which individuals are at greatest risk of short-term decline. Such comprehensive definitions of resilience are needed to further our understanding of the mechanisms that protect individuals from the clinical manifestation of AD dementia, especially among biomarker-positive individuals. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  4. [Autoinflammatory syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ida, Hiroaki; Eguchi, Katsumi

    2009-03-01

    The autoinflammatory syndromes include a group of inherited diseases that are characterized by 1) seemingly unprovoked episodes of systemic inflammations, 2) absence of high titer of autoantibody or auto-reactive T cell, and 3) inborn error of innate immunity. In this article, we will focus on the clinical features, the pathogenesis related the genetic defects, and the therapeutic strategies in the representative disorders including familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), TNF receptor associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS), cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS), hyper-IgD with periodic fever syndrome (HIDS), syndrome of pyogenic arthritis with pyoderma gangrenosum and acne (PAPA), and Blau syndrome. Recent advances in genetics and molecular biology have proceeded our understanding of the pathogenesis of autoinflammatory syndromes.

  5. Asperger's syndrome – elementary school challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Zorman, Alja

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to introduce primary school challenges and reactions that occur when a student with Asperger's syndrome enters school. In the theoretical part, I define Asperger's syndrome and autism, introduce the law applying to students with Asperger's syndrome, describe the challenges in the school environment and focus on teachers and their process of accepting assistance. I also focus on where the student integrates, if he is unsuccessful in primary school. In the empirica...

  6. Myofascial Pain Syndrome: A Treatment Review

    OpenAIRE

    Desai, Mehul J.; Saini, Vikramjeet; Saini, Shawnjeet

    2013-01-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is defined as pain that originates from myofascial trigger points in skeletal muscle. It is prevalent in regional musculoskeletal pain syndromes, either alone or in combination with other pain generators. The appropriate evaluation and management of myofascial pain is an important part of musculoskeletal rehabilitation, and regional axial and limb pain syndromes. This article reviews the current hypotheses regarding the treatment modalities for myofascial trigge...

  7. Acrosomo-nuclear syndrome in canine sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrudka, F

    1983-01-01

    An acrosomo-nuclear syndrome in sperm of an infertile semicryptorchid dog is described. Based on an EM study of developing and mature sperm the syndrome is defined by simultaneous occurrence of these symptoms: 1) intranuclear inclusions of acrosomal origin, 2) maldifferentiated apical segment of acrosome, 3) intraacrosomal inclusions of Sertoli cell origin, 4) characteristic change of nuclear shape and 5) retained cytoplasmic droplet. The cause of the syndrome and possibility of a transfer of somatic factors are discussed.

  8. Juvenile polyposis syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lodewijk AA Brosens; Danielle Langeveld; W Arnout van Hattem; Francis M Giardiello; G Johan A Offerhaus

    2011-01-01

    Juvenile polyposis syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by multiple distinct juvenile polyps in the gastrointestinal tract and an increased risk of colorectal cancer.The cumulative life-time risk of colorectal cancer is 39% and the relative risk is 34.Juvenile polyps have a distinctive histology characterized by an abundance of edematous lamina propria with inflammatory cells and cystically dilated glands lined by cuboidal to columnar epithelium with reactive changes.Clinically, juvenile polyposis syndrome is defined by the presence of 5 or more juvenile polyps in the colorectum,juvenile polyps throughout the gastrointestinal tract or any number of juvenile polyps and a positive family history of juvenile polyposis.In about 50%-60% of patients diagnosed with juvenile polyposis syndrome a germline mutation in the SMAD4 or BMPR1A gene is found.Both genes play a role in the BMP/TGF-beta signalling pathway.It has been suggested that cancer in juvenile polyposis may develop through the so-alled "landscaper mechanism" where an abnormal stromal environment leads to neoplastic transformation of the adjacent epithelium and in the end invasive carcinoma.Recognition of this rare disorder is important for patients and their families with regard to treatment,follow-up and screening of at risk individuals.Each clinician confronted with the diagnosis of a juvenile polyp should therefore consider the possibility of juvenile polyposis syndrome.In addition, juvenile polyposis syndrome provides a unique model to study colorectal cancer pathogenesis in general and gives insight in the molecular genetic basis of cancer. This review discusses clinical manifestations, genetics, pathogenesis and management of juvenile polyposis syndrome.

  9. Software Defined Common Processing System (SDCPS) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Coherent Logix, Incorporated proposes the Software Defined Common Processing System (SDCPS) program to facilitate the development of a Software Defined Radio...

  10. Eagle syndrome. A narrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heber Arbildo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Painful disorders in the maxillofacial region are common in dental practice. Most of these conditions are not properly diagnosed because of inadequate knowledge of craniofacial and cervico-pharyngeal syndromes such as Eagle Syndrome. The aim of this review is to describe the general aspects, diagnosis and treatment of Eagle syndrome. Eagle syndrome or stylohyoid syndrome was first described by Watt W. Eagle in 1937. It was defined as orofacial pain related to the elongation of the styloid process and ligament stylohyoid calcification. The condition is accompanied by symptoms such as dysphonia, dysphagia, sore throat, glossitis, earache, tonsillitis, facial pain, headache, pain in the temporomandibular joint and inability to perform lateral movements of the neck. Diagnosis and treatment of Eagle syndrome based on symptoms and radiographic examination of the patient will determine the need for surgical or nonsurgical treatment. Eagle syndrome is a complex disorder demanding a thorough knowledge of its signs and symptoms to make a correct diagnosis and provide an appropriate subsequent treatment. Disseminating information about this syndrome among medical-dental professionals is essential to provide adequate dental care to patients.

  11. Variable impact on mortality of AIDS-defining events diagnosed during combination antiretroviral therapy : not all AIDS-defining conditions are created equal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mocroft, Amanda; Sterne, Jonathan A C; Egger, Matthias; May, Margaret; Grabar, Sophie; Furrer, Hansjakob; Sabin, Caroline; Fatkenheuer, Gerd; Justice, Amy; Reiss, Peter; d'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Gill, John; Hogg, Robert; Bonnet, Fabrice; Kitahata, Mari; Staszewski, Schlomo; Casabona, Jordi; Harris, Ross; Saag, Michael; Niesters, Bert

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The extent to which mortality differs following individual acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-defining events (ADEs) has not been assessed among patients initiating combination antiretroviral therapy. METHODS: We analyzed data from 31,620 patients with no prior ADEs who started co

  12. Defining Tobacco Regulatory Science Competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wipfli, Heather L; Berman, Micah; Hanson, Kacey; Kelder, Steven; Solis, Amy; Villanti, Andrea C; Ribeiro, Carla M P; Meissner, Helen I; Anderson, Roger

    2017-02-01

    In 2013, the National Institutes of Health and the Food and Drug Administration funded a network of 14 Tobacco Centers of Regulatory Science (TCORS) with a mission that included research and training. A cross-TCORS Panel was established to define tobacco regulatory science (TRS) competencies to help harmonize and guide their emerging educational programs. The purpose of this paper is to describe the Panel's work to develop core TRS domains and competencies. The Panel developed the list of domains and competencies using a semistructured Delphi method divided into four phases occurring between November 2013 and August 2015. The final proposed list included a total of 51 competencies across six core domains and 28 competencies across five specialized domains. There is a need for continued discussion to establish the utility of the proposed set of competencies for emerging TRS curricula and to identify the best strategies for incorporating these competencies into TRS training programs. Given the field's broad multidisciplinary nature, further experience is needed to refine the core domains that should be covered in TRS training programs versus knowledge obtained in more specialized programs. Regulatory science to inform the regulation of tobacco products is an emerging field. The paper provides an initial list of core and specialized domains and competencies to be used in developing curricula for new and emerging training programs aimed at preparing a new cohort of scientists to conduct critical TRS research. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Wellens' syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Lai

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of quite rare cause of thoracic pain suspected by emergency physician as Wellens’ syndrome. Wellens’ syndrome is a pattern of electrocardiographic T-wave changes associated with critical, proximal left anterior descending artery (LAD. This syndrome is about 10-15% of all unstable angina in emergency department (ED. The cardiologic consult was obtained in ED and it was not conclusive for a Wellens’ syndrome, so that the diagnostistic planning was wrong. The authors point out the importance of this syndrome in ED and the necessity of an urgent angiographic study as every acute coronary syndrome presented in ED. We remark the importance in ED to recognize these changes associated with critical LAD obstruction and the high risk for anterior wall myocardial infarction.

  14. [Autoinflammatory syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamprecht, P; Gross, W L

    2009-06-01

    In its strict sense, the term "autoinflammatory syndromes" comprises the hereditary periodic fever syndromes (HPF), which are caused by mutations of pattern-recognition receptors (PRR) and perturbations of the cytokine balance. These include the crypyrinopathies, familial Mediterranean fever, TNF-receptor associated periodic fever syndrome (TRAPS), hyper-IgD and periodic syndrome (HIDS), pyogenic sterile arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum and acne (PAPA) syndrome, NALP12-HPF, and the Blau syndrome. The diseases are characterized by spontaneous activation of cells of the innate immunity in the absence of ligands. Autoantibodies are usually not found. HPF clinically present with recurrent fever episodes and inflammation, especially of serosal and synovial interfaces and the skin. Intriguingly, PRR-mediated autoinflammtory mechanisms also play a role in a number of chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

  15. Defining functional dyspepsia Definiendo la dispepsia funcional

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fermín Mearin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Dyspepsia and functional dyspepsia represent a highly significant public health issue. A good definition of dyspepsia is key for helping us to better approach symptoms, decision making, and therapy indications. During the last few years many attempts were made at establishing a definition of dyspepsia. Results were little successful on most occasions, and clear discrepancies arose on whether symptoms should be associated with digestion, which types of symptoms were to be included, which anatomic location should symptoms have, etc. The Rome III Committee defined dyspepsia as "a symptom or set of symptoms that most physicians consider to originate from the gastroduodenal area", including the following: postprandial heaviness, early satiety, and epigastric pain or burning. Two new entities were defined: a food-induced dyspeptic symptoms (postprandial distress syndrome; and b epigastric pain (epigastric pain syndrome. These and other definitions have shown both strengths and weaknesses. At times they have been much too complex, at times much too simple; furthermore, they have commonly erred on the side of being inaccurate and impractical. On the other hand, some (the most recent ones are difficult to translate into the Spanish language. In a meeting of gastroenterologists with a special interest in digestive functional disorders, the various aspects of dyspepsia definition were discussed and put to the vote, and the following conclusions were arrived at: dyspepsia is defined as a set of symptoms, either related or unrelated to food ingestion, localized on the upper half of the abdomen. They include: a epigastric discomfort (as a category of severity or pain; b postprandial heaviness; and c early satiety. Associated complaints include: nausea, belching, bloating, and epigastric burn (heartburn. All these must be scored according to severity and frequency. Furthermore, psychological factors may be involved in the origin of functional dyspepsia. On the

  16. Urofacial syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal F Akl

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The urofacial syndrome is characterized by functional obstructive uropathy asso-ciated with an inverted smile. The importance of the subject is that it sheds light, not only on the muscles of facial expression, but also on the inheritance of voiding disorders and lower urinary tract malformations. We report a 10-year-old-male patient who had the urofacial syndrome. Early diagnosis of the urofacial syndrome is important to avoid upper urinary tract damage and renal failure.

  17. Gorlin syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basanti Devi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gorlin Syndrome, a rare genodermatosis, otherwise known as Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS is a multisystem disease affecting skin, nervous system, eyes, endocrine glands, and bones. It is characterized by multiple basal cell carcinomas, palmoplantar pits, jaw cysts, and bony deformities like kyphoscoliosis and frontal bossing. We would like to report a case of Gorlin syndrome with classical features, as this is a rare genodermatosis.

  18. Gorlin syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Basanti; Behera, Binodini; Patro, Sibasish; Pattnaik, Subhransu S; Puhan, Manas R

    2013-05-01

    Gorlin Syndrome, a rare genodermatosis, otherwise known as Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) is a multisystem disease affecting skin, nervous system, eyes, endocrine glands, and bones. It is characterized by multiple basal cell carcinomas, palmoplantar pits, jaw cysts, and bony deformities like kyphoscoliosis and frontal bossing. We would like to report a case of Gorlin syndrome with classical features, as this is a rare genodermatosis.

  19. Metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gogia Atul

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The Metabolic syndrome is a widely prevalent and multi-factorial disorder. The syndrome has been given several names, including- the metabolic syndrome, the insulin resistance syndrome, the plurimetabolic syndrome, and the deadly quartet. With the formulation of NCEP/ATP III guidelines, some uniformity and standardization has occurred in the definition of metabolic syndrome and has been very useful for epidemiological purposes. The mechanisms underlying the metabolic syndrome are not fully known; however resistance to insulin stimulated glucose uptake seems to modify biochemical responses in a way that predisposes to metabolic risk factors. The clinical relevance of the metabolic syndrome is related to its role in the development of cardiovascular disease. Management of the metabolic syndrome involves patient-education and intervention at various levels. Weight reduction is one of the main stays of treatment. In this article we comprehensively discuss this syndrome- the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical relevance and management. The need to do a comprehensive review of this particular syndrome has arisen in view of the ever increasing incidence of this entitiy. Soon, metabolic syndrome will overtake cigarette smoking as the number one risk factor for heart disease among the US population. Hardly any issue of any primary care medical journal can be opened without encountering an article on type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia or hypertension. It is rare to see type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia, obesity or hypertension in isolation. Insulin resistance and resulting hyperinsulinemia have been implicated in the development of glucose intolerance (and progression to type 2 diabetes, hypertriglyceridemia, hypertension, polycystic ovary yndrome, hypercoagulability and vascular inflammation, as well as the eventual development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease manifested as myocardial infarction, stroke and myriad end organ diseases. Conversely

  20. Revesz syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayane Cristine Issaho

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Revesz syndrome is a rare variant of dyskeratosis congenita and is characterized by bilateral exudative retinopathy, alterations in the anterior ocular segment, intrauterine growth retardation, fine sparse hair, reticulate skin pigmentation, bone marrow failure, cerebral calcification, cerebellar hypoplasia and psychomotor retardation. Few patients with this syndrome have been reported, and significant clinical variations exist among patients. This report describes the first Brazilian case of Revesz syndrome and its ocular and clinical features.

  1. [Pseudohypoparathyroidism revealed by Fahr syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahloul, N; Chaari, W; Boughamoura, L; Charfeddine, L; Khammeri, S; Amri, F

    2009-05-01

    Fahr syndrome is defined by the presence of striopallidal notched bilateral and symmetric calcifications at the base of the skull. We report an observation of a 12-year-old girl who presented gait impairment, seizures, somnolence and aphasia. Brain computed tomodensitometry identified intracranial calcifications. The tests demonstrated pseudohypoparathyroidism.

  2. Lemierre's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesen, Katrine; Bødtger, Uffe; Heltberg, Ole

    2014-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is an often un-diagnosed disease seen in previously healthy young subjects, presenting with symptoms of pharyngitis, fever and elevated markers of inflammation. The syndrome is characterised by infectious thrombosis of the jugular vein due to infection with Fusobacteria, causi...

  3. Turner Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravinder K. Gupta, Ritu Gupta, Sunil Dutt Sharma

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Turner Syndrome is one of the important chromosomal disorders characterised by loss (total or part ofsex chromosome. The manifestations being peripheral edema, short stature, extra skin fold, webbing ofneck, renal and cardiovascular anomalies, sexual infantilism, learning disability etc. We present here aone month female baby who had classical features of Turner Syndrome. The karyotape analysis wasconsistent with the diagnosis.

  4. Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your body, the white blood cells that fight infections, and the platelets that help with blood clotting. If you have a myelodysplastic syndrome, the stem cells do not mature into healthy blood cells. ... anemia, or easy bleeding. Myelodysplastic syndromes often do ...

  5. Proteus syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Renu

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of proteus syndrome in a 20 year old male is repoted. Hemihypertrophy, asymmetric megalodactyly, linear epidermal naevus, naevus flammeus, angiokeratoma, lymphangioma circumscriptum, thickening of the palms and soles, scoliosis and varicose veins were present. There are only few reports of these cases in adults. The syndrome has not been reported from India.

  6. Franceschetti syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikrant Kasat

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Franceschetti syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development with variable expressivity. It is commonly known as Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS. It is named after E. Treacher Collins who described the essential components of the condition. It affects both genders equally. This article reports a case of TCS in an 18-year-old female.

  7. LEOPARD syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... L, Strano S, Carbone A, Calvieri C, Giustini S. LEOPARD syndrome. Dermatol Online J . 2008;14(3):7. PMID: 18627709 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18627709 . Sarkozy A, Digilio MC, Dallapiccola B. LEOPARD syndrome. Orphanet J Rare Dis . 2008;3:13. PMID: ...

  8. Turner Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akcan AB.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Turner syndrome is an important cause of short stature in girls and primer amenorrhea in young women that is usually caused by loss of part or all of an X chromosome. This topic will review the clinical manifestations, diagnosis and management of Turner syndrome.

  9. Poland syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Chandra Madhur Sharma; Shrawan Kumar; Meghwani, Manoj K.; Agrawal, Ravi P.

    2014-01-01

    Poland′s syndrome is a rare congenital condition, characterized by the absence of the sternal or breastbone portion of the pectoralis major muscle, which may be associated with the absence of nearby musculoskeletal structures. We hereby report an 8-year-old boy with typical features of Poland syndrome, the first documented case from Uttar Pradesh, India.

  10. Poland syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Madhur Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Poland′s syndrome is a rare congenital condition, characterized by the absence of the sternal or breastbone portion of the pectoralis major muscle, which may be associated with the absence of nearby musculoskeletal structures. We hereby report an 8-year-old boy with typical features of Poland syndrome, the first documented case from Uttar Pradesh, India.

  11. Sneddon's syndrome: case report and review of its relationship with antiphospholipid syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The Sneddon's syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by the occurrence of cerebrovascular disease associated with livedo reticularis. The antiphospholipid syndrome is the most frequent type of acquired thrombophilia, defined by the occurrence of thrombosis or pregnancy morbidity in the presence of persistently positive antiphospholipid antibodies. Approximately 80% of Sneddon's syndrome patients have an antiphospholipid antibody marker. These antibodies may play a pathogenetic role in some...

  12. A Case with Repeated Recurrent Acute Coronary Syndrome due to Pseudoephedrine Use: Kounis Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metin Çeliker

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Allergic reaction-associated acute coronary syndrome picture is defined as Kounis syndrome. Although drug use is the most common cause of allergic reaction, foods and environmental factors may also play a role in the etiology. Herein, a case with acute coronary syndrome that developed two times at 8-month interval due to pseudoephedrine use for upper respiratory tract infection is presented.

  13. Vitreomacular Traction Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Bottós

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The advent of new technologies such as high definition optical coherence tomography (OCT has not only provided unprecedented imaging capabilities, but also raised the need to define concepts not yet settled and often confusing such as the vitreomacular traction (VMT syndrome. While technological advances drive us into the future by clarifying the pathophysiology of many diseases and enabling novel therapeutic options, it is at the same time necessary to review basic disease concepts in addition to definitions and classifications. VMT syndrome is implicated in the pathophysiology of a number of macular disorders, translating into a variety of anatomical and functional consequences underscoring the complexity of the condition. These macular changes are closely related to the VMT configuration and have led to proposing classification of this syndrome based on OCT findings. The size and severity of the remaining vitreomacular attachment may define the specific maculopathy. Focal VMT usually leads to macular hole formation, tractional cystoid macular edema and foveal retinal detachment, while broad VMT is associated with epiretinal membranes, diffuse retinal thickening and impaired foveal depression recovery. Despite similar postoperative visual acuity (VA in focal and broad VMT subgroups, visual improvement is greater with focal VMT because preoperative VA is frequently lower. Surgical procedures are effective to relieve VMT and improve VA in most eyes; outcomes vary with VMT morphology and the duration of symptoms.

  14. Metabolic syndrome, inflammation and atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Paoletti

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Rodolfo Paoletti1,2, Chiara Bolego1, Andrea Poli2, Andrea Cignarella1,31Department of Pharmacological Sciences, University of Milan, Italy; 2Nutrition Foundation of Italy (NFI, Milan; 3Department of Pharmacology and Anesthesiology, University of Padova, ItalyAbstract: The inflammatory component of atherogenesis has been increasingly recognized over the last decade. Inflammation participates in all stages of atherosclerosis, not only during initiation and during evolution of lesions, but also with precipitation of acute thrombotic complications. The metabolic syndrome is associated with increased risk for development of both cardiovascular disease and type-2 diabetes in humans. Central obesity and insulin resistance are thought to represent common underlying factors of the syndrome, which features a chronic low-grade inflammatory state. Diagnosis of the metabolic syndrome occurs using defined threshold values for waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting glucose and dyslipidemia. The metabolic syndrome appears to affect a significant proportion of the population. Therapeutic approaches that reduce the levels of proinflammatory biomarkers and address traditional risk factors are particularly important in preventing cardiovascular disease and, potentially, diabetes. The primary management of metabolic syndrome involves healthy lifestyle promotion through moderate calorie restriction, moderate increase in physical activity and change in dietary composition. Treatment of individual components aims to control atherogenic dyslipidemia using fibrates and statins, elevated blood pressure, and hyperglycemia. While no single treatment for the metabolic syndrome as a whole yet exists, emerging therapies offer potential as future therapeutic approaches.Keywords: metabolic syndrome, systemic inflammation, coronary artery disease

  15. Gut microbiome and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazidi, Mohsen; Rezaie, Peyman; Kengne, Andre Pascal; Mobarhan, Majid Ghayour; Ferns, Gordon A

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiome contributes approximately 2kg of the whole body weight, and recent studies suggest that gut microbiota has a profound effect on human metabolism, potentially contributing to several features of the metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is defined by a clustering of metabolic disorders that include central adiposity with visceral fat accumulation, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, dysglycemia and non-optimal blood pressure levels. Metabolic syndrome is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes. It is estimated that around 20-25 percent of the world's adult population has metabolic syndrome. In this manuscript, we have reviewed the existing data linking gut microbiome with metabolic syndrome. Existing evidence from studies both in animals and humans support a link between gut microbiome and various components of metabolic syndrome. Possible pathways include involvement with energy homeostasis and metabolic processes, modulation of inflammatory signaling pathways, interferences with the immune system, and interference with the renin-angiotensin system. Modification of gut microbiota via prebiotics, probiotics or other dietary interventions has provided evidence to support a possible beneficial effect of interventions targeting gut microbiota modulation to treat components or complications of metabolic syndrome.

  16. "SAPHO syndrome and infections".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govoni, Marcello; Colina, Matteo; Massara, Alfonso; Trotta, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    The syndrome of synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, osteitis (SAPHO) encompasses a broad spectrum of cutaneous manifestations associated with osteitic and hyperostotic lesions, which typically may involve the anterior chest wall (ACW). The aetiopathogenetic mechanisms as well as the nosographic framing of the disease are still not fully defined although an important role has been suggested for Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes). This germ might be able to stimulate both the innate and the T-cell-mediated immune system. The elicited immunological response could be an attempt to eliminate the germ thus inducing the perpetuation of the inflammation. Whether the osteo-articular changes seen in SAPHO could be attributable directly to the infection or to an inflammatory reaction induced by pathogenic material remains a debated issue. The current concept of SAPHO syndrome as a reactive infectious osteitis in genetic predisposed subjects seems appealing, but it has not been yet demonstrated.

  17. On defining semantics of extended attribute grammars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ole Lehrmann

    1980-01-01

    Knuth has introduced attribute grammars (AGs) as a tool to define the semanitcs of context-free languages. The use of AGs in connection with programming language definitions has mostly been to define the context-sensitive syntax of the language and to define a translation in code for a hypothetical...

  18. Defining moments in leadership character development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleich, Michael R

    2015-06-01

    Critical moments in life define one's character and clarify true values. Reflective leadership is espoused as an important practice for transformational leaders. Professional development educators can help surface and explore defining moments, strengthen leadership behavior with defining moments as a catalyst for change, and create safe spaces for leaders to expand their leadership capacity.

  19. [Pregnancy and antiphospholipid syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costedoat-Chalumeau, N; Guettrot-Imbert, G; Leguern, V; Leroux, G; Le Thi Huong, D; Wechsler, B; Morel, N; Vauthier-Brouzes, D; Dommergues, M; Cornet, A; Aumaître, O; Pourrat, O; Piette, J-C; Nizard, J

    2012-04-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is associated with a risk of obstetrical complications, affecting both the mother and the fetus. Obstetrical APS is defined by a history of three consecutive spontaneous miscarriages before 10 weeks of gestation (WG), an intra-uterine fetal death after 10 WG, or a premature birth before 34 WG because of severe pre-eclampsia, eclampsia or placental adverse outcomes (intrauterine growth retardation, oligohydramnios). Pregnancy in women with a diagnosis of obstetric APS is at increased risk for placental abruption, HELLP (Hemolysis, Elevated Liver enzymes, Low Platelet count) syndrome and thrombosis that may be part of a catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS). A previous thrombosis and the presence of a lupus anticoagulant are risk factors for pregnancy failure. A multidisciplinary approach, associating the internist, the anesthesiologist and the obstetrician, is recommended for these high-risk pregnancies. Preconception counseling is proposed to identify pregnancy contraindications, and to define and adapt the treatment prior and during the upcoming pregnancy. Heparin and low-dose aspirin are the main treatments. The choice between therapeutic or prophylactic doses of heparin will depend on the patient's medical history. The anticoagulant therapeutic window for delivery should be as narrow as possible and adapted to maternal thrombotic risk. There is a persistent maternal risk in the postpartum period (thrombosis, HELLP syndrome, CAPS) justifying an antithrombotic coverage during this period. We suggest a monthly clinical and biological monitoring which can be more frequent towards the end of pregnancy. The persistence of notches at the Doppler-ultrasound evaluation seems to be the best predictor for a higher risk of placental vascular complications. Treatment optimization and multidisciplinary antenatal care improve the prognosis of pregnancies in women with obstetric APS, leading to a favorable outcome most of the time.

  20. CLOVES syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Jacob; Upton, Joseph

    2013-12-01

    A cohort of patients with overgrowth syndromes has been identified with congenital lipomatous overgrowth, dysregulated fat deposits, and mixed vascular malformations. The acronym CLOVES was given on a heuristic basis to stand for congenital lipomatous overgrowth (CLO), vascular malformation (V), epidermal nevi (E), and scoliosis and spinal deformities (S). These patients have upper limb anomalies with variable phenotypes. Although hand anomalies alone cannot make the diagnosis, the foot, truncal, cutaneous and spinal anomalies are particularly diagnostic. CLOVES syndrome has emerged as a distinct clinical entity diagnosed by clinical and radiographic examinations. The overgrowth pattern is now easily distinguished from other overgrowth syndromes.

  1. Hubris syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, David

    2008-08-01

    Hubris syndrome is associated with power, more likely to manifest itself the longer the person exercises power and the greater the power they exercise. A syndrome not to be applied to anyone with existing mental illness or brain damage. Usually symptoms abate when the person no longer exercises power. It is less likely to develop in people who retain a personal modesty, remain open to criticism, have a degree of cynicism or well developed sense of humour. Four heads of government in the last 100 years are singled out as having developed hubris syndrome: David Lloyd George, Margaret Thatcher, George W Bush and Tony Blair.

  2. HYDROLETHALUS SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aradhana

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Hydrolethalus Syndrome (HLS is a rare lethal genetic syndrome, recognized as a consequence of a study on Meckle syndrome in Finland .1 HLS is characterized by multiple developmental defects of fetus which include fetal hydrocephalus, agenesis of corpus callosum, absent midline structures of brain, Cleft lip and cleft palate, defective lobulation of lungs, micrognathia and very characteristic abnormality of polydactyly. About 80% of patients have polydactyly, in hands it is postaxial and preaxial in feet with duplicated big toe. A highly characteristic hallux duplex is seen in almost no other situation .2 Club feet is also common.

  3. Jerusalem syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-el, Y; Durst, R; Katz, G; Zislin, J; Strauss, Z; Knobler, H Y

    2000-01-01

    Jerusalem's psychiatrists expect to encounter, as the millennium approaches, an ever-increasing number of tourists who, upon arriving in Jerusalem, may suffer psychotic decompensation. To describe the Jerusalem syndrome as a unique acute psychotic state. This analysis is based on accumulated clinical experience and phenomenological data consisting of cultural and religious perspectives. Three main categories of the syndrome are identified and described, with special focus on the category pertaining to spontaneous manifestations, unconfounded by previous psychotic history or psychopathology. The discrete form of the Jerusalem syndrome is related to religious excitement induced by proximity to the holy places of Jerusalem, and is indicated by seven characteristic sequential stages.

  4. Variable impact on mortality of AIDS-defining events diagnosed during combination antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mocroft, Amanda; Sterne, Jonathan A C; Egger, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The extent to which mortality differs following individual acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-defining events (ADEs) has not been assessed among patients initiating combination antiretroviral therapy. METHODS: We analyzed data from 31,620 patients with no prior ADEs who started...

  5. [Autoinflammatory syndromes/fever syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schedel, J; Bach, B; Kümmerle-Deschner, J B; Kötter, I

    2011-05-01

    Hereditary periodic (fever) syndromes, also called autoinflammatory syndromes, are characterized by relapsing fever and additional manifestations such as skin rashes, mucosal manifestations, or joint symptoms. Some of these disorders present with organ involvement and serological signs of inflammation without fever. There is a strong serological inflammatory response with an elevation of serum amyloid A (SAA), resulting in an increased risk of secondary amyloidosis. There are monogenic disorders (familial mediterranean fever (FMF), hyper-IgD-syndrome (HIDS), cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS), "pyogenic arthritis, acne, pyoderma gangrenosum" (PAPA), and "pediatric granulomatous arthritis (PGA) where mutations in genes have been described, which in part by influencing the function of the inflammasome, in part by other means, lead to the induction of the production of IL-1β. In "early-onset of enterocolitis (IBD)", a functional IL-10 receptor is lacking. Therapeutically, above all, the IL-1 receptor antagonist anakinra is used. In case of TRAPS and PGA, TNF-antagonists (etanercept) may also be used; in FMF colchicine is first choice. As additional possible autoinflammatory syndromes, PFAPA syndrome (periodic fever with aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and adenitis), Schnitzler syndrome, Still's disease of adult and pediatric onset, Behçet disease, gout, chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) and Crohn's disease also are mentioned.

  6. Marfan syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... at least once every year. Alternative Names Aortic aneurysm - ... syndrome. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 702. ...

  7. Reye Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A Life After Diagnosis Support for Chronic Illness Corporate Partnerships Interview with Kristen Hanks Liver Lowdown July ... poor blood clotting and bleeding caused by liver failure. What are the symptoms of Reye syndrome? Reye ...

  8. [Refeeding syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ševela, Stanislav; Novák, František; Kazda, Antonín; Brodská, Helena

    2016-01-01

    Despite being known more than 60 years, refeeding syndrome (RS) still bears many uncertainties. For example, its definition is not clear and definite, and the attitude to it varies from the complete neglect to over-prevention.The term "refeeding syndrome" refers to electrolyte and metabolic changes occurring in malnourished patients after the readministration of nutrition. These changes concern especially to phosphates and ions. Potassium, magnesium, naturism and fluids balance are involved. The changes lead to cell energetic metabolism and electric potential disturbances, with related clinical symptoms.Fully developed refeeding syndrome is quite rare; nevertheless it can be fatal for the patient. However, even its development can lead to many complications increasing the patient's morbidity and the length of stay in the hospital. Yet the refeeding syndrome is more or less predictable and if kept in mind also preventable.The aim of this article is to get the reader to know more about this metabolic phenomenon and possible attitudes towards it.

  9. Premenstrual syndrome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kwan, Irene; Onwude, Joseph Loze

    2015-01-01

    A woman has premenstrual syndrome (PMS) if she complains of recurrent psychological and/or physical symptoms occurring during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle, and often resolving by the end of menstruation...

  10. Zellweger Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... done? The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), and other institutes of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), conduct research exploring the molecular and genetic basis of Zellweger syndrome and the other PBDs, ...

  11. Autoinflammatory syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeazzi, M; Gasbarrini, G; Ghirardello, A; Grandemange, S; Hoffman, H M; Manna, R; Podswiadek, M; Punzi, L; Sebastiani, G D; Touitou, I; Doria, A

    2006-01-01

    The autoinflammatory disorders are a new and expanding classification of inflammatory diseases characterized by recurrent episodes of systemic inflammation in the absence of pathogens, autoantibodies or antigen specific T cells. These disorders are caused by primary dysfunction of the innate immune system, without evidence of adaptive immune dysregulation. Innate immune abnormalities include aberrant responses to pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) like lipopolysaccharide and peptidoglycan, prominent neutrophilia in blood and tissues, and dysregulation of inflammatory cytokines (IL-1beta, TNF-alpha) or their receptors. The autoinflammatory diseases comprise both hereditary (Familial Mediterranean Fever, FMF; Mevalonate Kinase Deficiency, MKD; TNF Receptor Associated Periodic Syndrome, TRAPS; Cryopyrin Associated Periodic Syndrome, CAPS; Blau syndrome; Pyogenic sterile Arthritis, Pyoderma gangrenosum and Acne syndrome, PAPA; Chronic Recurrent Multifocal Osteomyelitis, CRMO) and multifactorial (Crohn's and Behçet's diseases) disorders. Mutations responsible for FMF, TRAPS, CAPS, PAPA are in proteins involved in modulation of inflammation and apoptosis.

  12. Piriformis Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of sitting for a long period of time, climbing stairs, walking, or running. × Definition Piriformis syndrome is a ... of sitting for a long period of time, climbing stairs, walking, or running. View Full Definition Treatment Generally, ...

  13. Barth Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saric, Ana; Andreau, Karine; Armand, Anne-Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding the enzyme tafazzin, TAZ, cause Barth syndrome (BTHS). Individuals with this X-linked multisystem disorder present cardiomyopathy (CM) (often dilated), skeletal muscle weakness, neutropenia, growth retardation, and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria. Biopsies of the heart,...

  14. Bart syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaikwad Anil

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available An infant presenting with extensive aplasia cutis on lower extremities later developed blisters on skin and mucous membrane. Clinical features and histopathological examination of skin favoured the diagnosis of Bart syndrome.

  15. Neurocutaneous Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... affect kids include: neurofibromatosis, types 1 and 2 (NF1 and NF2) Sturge-Weber syndrome tuberous sclerosis (TS) ... forms of this disorder are neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2), and Schwannomatosis. NF1 is ...

  16. Usher Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... optic nerve (arrow) looks very pale, the vessels (stars) are very thin and there is characteristic pigment, ... syndrome gene have a child together, with each birth there is a: 1-in-4 chance of ...

  17. Cockayne syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karikkineth, Ajoy C; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Fivenson, Elayne;

    2017-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a disorder characterized by a variety of clinical features including cachectic dwarfism, severe neurological manifestations including microcephaly and cognitive deficits, pigmentary retinopathy, cataracts, sensorineural deafness, and ambulatory and feeding difficulties...

  18. Beals Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... arachnoldactyly (CCA), which refers to the joint contractures (shortening) that are key features of the syndrome. How ... remain contracted for long periods of time, the muscles can become tight and short, restricting movement. When ...

  19. Isaac's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Page NINDS Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome Information Page NINDS Whiplash Information Page NINDS Infantile Spasms Information Page NINDS ... Support Library Clinical Research Next Steps Pre-Funding: After Review Terms of Award Pre-Award Start-up ...

  20. Noonan syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chest shape (most often a sunken chest called pectus excavatum) Webbed and short-appearing neck Exams and Tests ... to consider genetic counseling before having children. Images Pectus excavatum References Ali O, Donohoue PA. Noonan syndrome. In: ...

  1. Dressler's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... syndrome can cause more-serious complications, including: Cardiac tamponade. Inflammation of the pericardium can cause fluids to ... including: Draining excess fluids. If you develop cardiac tamponade, your doctor will likely recommend a procedure (pericardiocentesis) ...

  2. [Mobius syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladuţiu, Cristina; Duma, Ionela

    2012-01-01

    Mobius syndrom, an anomaly in cranial nerve developement, presents with a remarkable clinical polymorphism. The rare occurence of this pathology and the questions raised by the diagnosis and treatment determined us to make this presentation.

  3. Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diagnostic tests that can identify Down syndrome include: Amniocentesis. A sample of the amniotic fluid surrounding the ... somewhat higher risk of miscarriage than second trimester amniocentesis. Cordocentesis. In this test, also known as percutaneous ...

  4. Metabolic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... obesity ). This body type may be described as "apple-shaped." Insulin resistance. Insulin is a hormone produced ... Syndrome Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by URAC, also known as the ...

  5. Eagle's Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Pinheiro, Thaís Gonçalves; Soares,Vítor Yamashiro Rocha; Ferreira,Denise Bastos Lage; Raymundo,Igor Teixeira; Nascimento, Luiz Augusto; Oliveira, Carlos Augusto Costa Pires de

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Eagle's syndrome is characterized by cervicopharyngeal signs and symptoms associated with elongation of the styloid apophysis. This elongation may occur through ossification of the stylohyoid ligament, or through growth of the apophysis due to osteogenesis triggered by a factor such as trauma. Elongation of the styloid apophysis may give rise to intense facial pain, headache, dysphagia, otalgia, buzzing sensations, and trismus. Precise diagnosis of the syndrome is diffic...

  6. SAPHO syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Sueli; Sampaio-Barros, Percival D

    2013-05-01

    SAPHO syndrome is a disorder characterized by Synovitis, Acne, Pustulosis, Hyperostosis, and Osteitis. As the osteoarticular and skin manifestations often do not occur simultaneously and there are no validated diagnostic criteria, the diagnosis can be difficult. Clinical and imaging investigation is necessary to establish the many differential diagnoses of SAPHO syndrome. The etiopathogenesis involves infectious (probably Propionibacterium acnes), immunologic, and genetic factors. Treatment is based on information gathered from case reports and small series, and is related to specific skin or articular symptoms.

  7. Floppy eyelid syndrome: review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Miyamoto

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Floppy eyelid syndrome is characterized by the easy evertion of the upper eyelid which occurs spontaneously during the sleep, causing the exposure of the eye surface and chronic papillary conjunctivitis. Its pathogenesis is not totally defined yet: it is usually more frequent in middle-aged, male obese patients and it is associated with systemic disorders such as obstructive sleep apnea, high blood pressure and diabetes. On the occasions which conservative treatment fails, surgical procedures present good results, including surgical techniques which are constantly evolving.

  8. Carpenter syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidestrand, Pip; Vasconez, Henry; Cottrill, Carol

    2009-01-01

    Carpenter syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that belongs to a group of rare craniosynostosis syndromes (Bull Soc Med Paris 1906;23:1310). Carpenter syndrome is the rarest, with only occasional patients seen. There are 3 common features in all of these syndromes: craniosynostosis (skull base abnormalities, with early fusion in different sutures), midface hypoplasia, and musculoskeletal abnormalities. Clinical features of Carpenter syndrome include peculiar facies, asymmetry of the skull, polydactyly, brachymesophalangy, mild soft tissue syndactyly, obesity, hypogenitalism, congenital heart disease, and mental retardation (J Pediatr 1966;69:1; Am J Roentgenol 1969;106). The brachycephaly is caused by early fusion in the coronal, sagittal, and lambdoidal sutures (Proc R Soc Med Sect Study Dis Child 1909). Most of the affected patients have a surgical procedure between 3 to 9 months of age to open the cranial vault to make space for the brain to grow (Plast Reconstr Surg 1978;62:335). We present a patient with Carpenter syndrome who is unusual in that she is an adult who has never had surgical intervention.

  9. Stylocarotid syndrome: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Branko

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION The American otolaryngologist Eagle was the first to describe styloid syndrome in 1937 and the syndrome was named after him (Eagle's syndrome. The original description of two separate syndromes is connected with his name: classical syndrome, which almost constantly occurs after tonsillectomy and carotid artery syndrome, which occurs without tonsillectomy and also in cases when stylohyoid complex compresses the carotid segments and perivascular sympathetic fibers. In the following years, two more syndromes were defined: stylohyoid and pseudostylohyoid, which according to their manifestations, correspond to the genuine classical form. CASE OUTLINE A 40-year old male is presented, with a history of 3-year duration of pains in the upper part of the left side of the neck, in the left eye and its surroundings. Pain occurrences were not regular. Throbbing pains were most often provoked by sudden head movements and neck compression. He was healthy until the onset of these problems. The findings of all examinations were normal. The applied prophylactic therapy, typical for cluster headache, was without any effect. On 64-MSCT (multislice computed tomography, the neck arteries did not show any intraluminal pathology. The styloid processes were of normal length. On the left side, the styloid process tip pressed the internal carotid artery disturbing its longitudinal axis. CONCLUSION In our presentation, the defined lengths of the styloid processes were normal. The medial angulation of the left styloid process was more expressed reaching 63.5 degrees (the right side angulation was normal. Persistent and throbbing pain in the region of the left eye with backward projection suggested compression on the internal carotid artery. Pains were most frequently provoked by head turning and neck compression. 64-MSCT diagnostics enabled us to determine the characteristics of styloid processes and their relation to the internal carotid artery. Improvement

  10. Etiopathogenetic mechanisms of fibromyalgia syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.H. Gracely

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS is a common chronic condition of widespread pain with causal mechanisms that are largely unknown. It is characterized by moderate to severe musculoskel - etal pain and allodynia, but its pathogenesis appears confined to the nociceptive structures of the central nervous system. From a pathogenetic point of view, indeed, no clear muscle pathology has been demonstrated in FMS (1, 2, while increasing evidence suggests a disturbance in pain perception that is genetically conditioned. In our review we will consider five “keypoints” that we think determine the origin and maintenance of the pain syndrome that we define as fibromyalgia...

  11. Cerebral salt wasting syndrome: review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerdà-Esteve, M; Cuadrado-Godia, E; Chillaron, J J; Pont-Sunyer, C; Cucurella, G; Fernández, M; Goday, A; Cano-Pérez, J F; Rodríguez-Campello, A; Roquer, J

    2008-06-01

    Hyponatremia is the most frequent electrolyte disorder in critically neurological patients. Cerebral salt wasting syndrome (CSW) is defined as a renal loss of sodium during intracranial disease leading to hyponatremia and a decrease in extracellular fluid volume. The pathogenesis of this disorder is still not completely understood. Sympathetic responses as well as some natriuretic factors play a role in this syndrome. Distinction between SIADH and CSW might be difficult. The essential point is the volemic state. It is necessary to rule out other intermediate causes. Treatment requires volume replacement and maintenance of a positive salt balance. Mineral corticoids may be useful in complicated cases.

  12. Metabolic Syndrome (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Metabolic Syndrome KidsHealth > For Parents > Metabolic Syndrome A A A ... this is a condition called metabolic syndrome . About Metabolic Syndrome Not to be confused with metabolic disease (which ...

  13. Down Syndrome (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CPR: A Real Lifesaver Kids Talk About: Coaches Down Syndrome KidsHealth > For Kids > Down Syndrome Print A A ... skills. continue Do a Lot of People Have Down Syndrome? Down syndrome is not contagious , so you can' ...

  14. Juvenile Polyposis Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Types of Cancer > Juvenile Polyposis Syndrome Request Permissions Juvenile Polyposis Syndrome Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 12/2015 What is juvenile polyposis syndrome? Juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS) is a ...

  15. Cardiac Syndrome X

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kawasaki Disease Long Q-T Syndrome Marfan Syndrome Metabolic Syndrome Mitral Valve Prolapse Myocardial Bridge Myocarditis Obstructive Sleep Apnea Pericarditis Peripheral Vascular Disease Rheumatic Fever Sick Sinus Syndrome Silent Ischemia Stroke Sudden ...

  16. Exogenous Cushing syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushing syndrome - corticosteroid induced; Corticosteroid-induced Cushing syndrome; Iatrogenic Cushing syndrome ... Cushing syndrome is a disorder that occurs when your body has a higher than normal level of the ...

  17. What is Metabolic Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Metabolic Syndrome? Metabolic syndrome is the name for a group of ... that may play a role in causing metabolic syndrome. Outlook Metabolic syndrome is becoming more common due to a ...

  18. Learning about WAGR Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... used are: WAGR Complex Wilms' Tumor-Aniridia-Genitourinary Anomalies-Mental Retardation Syndrome Wilms' Tumor-Aniridia-Gonadoblastoma-Mental Retardation Syndrome Chromosome 11p deletion syndrome 11p deletion syndrome The cause ...

  19. Escobar syndrome mimicing congenital patellar syndrome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ezirmik, Naci; Yildiz, Kadri; Can, Cahit Emre

    2012-01-01

    ...) syndrome is a rare syndrome. Intrauterin growth reterdation, abnormal face, wide-spead pterygiums that resulted in joint contractures, ptosis, chryptoorchidism, patellar dysplasia and foot deformities are seen on this syndrome...

  20. Autoinflammatory syndromes behind the scenes of recurrent fevers in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigante, Donato

    2009-08-01

    Many children experience recurrent fevers with no easily identifiable source and only a careful follow-up helps in the early identification of other presenting symptoms of other defined conditions which require medical intervention. Autoinflammatory syndromes are rare childhood-onset disorders of the innate immunity in which recurrent flares of fever and inflammation affecting skin, joints, the gastrointestinal tube, or serous membranes are the most striking signs, without any evidence of autoantibody production or underlying infections. Among the pediatric conditions belonging to this group we can consider hereditary recurrent fevers (familial Mediterranean fever, mevalonate kinase deficiency syndrome, tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome, cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes), pyogenic disorders (PAPA syndrome, CRMO syndrome, Majeed syndrome), immune-mediated granulomatous diseases (Blau syndrome, Crohn's disease), and idiopathic febrile syndromes (systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis, PFAPA syndrome, Behçet syndrome). Their genetic background has only been partially elucidated and advances in their molecular pathogenesis are shedding new light on the innate immune system, whilst more and more diseases are being reconsidered at a pathogenetic level and included in this new chapter of postgenomic medicine. The diagnosis of most autoinflammatory syndromes relies on clinical history, demonstration of an increased acute-phase response during inflammatory attacks, and, possibly, genetic confirmation, which is still elusive especially for idiopathic febrile syndromes. This astonishing progress in the awareness and knowledge of autoinflammatory syndromes has anticipated the actual possibilities of medical intervention and rationalized treatment with targeted biologic agents.

  1. The LOLITA User-Definable Template Interface

    OpenAIRE

    Košmelj, Katarina

    2001-01-01

    The development of user-definable templates interfaces which allow the user to design new templates definitions in a user-friendly way is a new issue in the field of information extraction. The LOLITA user-definable templates interface allows the user to define new templates using sentences in natural language text with a few restrictions and formal elements. This approach is rather different from previous approaches to information extraction which require developers to code the template defi...

  2. Software Defined Common Processing System (SDCPS) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Coherent Logix, Incorporated (CLX) proposes the development of a Software Defined Common Processing System (SDCPS) that leverages the inherent advantages of an...

  3. Externally definable sets and dependent pairs II

    CERN Document Server

    Chernikov, Artem

    2012-01-01

    We continue investigating the structure of externally definable sets in NIP theories and preservation of NIP after expanding by new predicates. Most importantly: types over finite sets are uniformly definable; over a model, a family of non-forking instances of a formula (with parameters ranging over a type-definable set) can be covered with finitely many invariant types; we give some criteria for the boundedness of an expansion by a new predicate in a distal theory; naming an arbitrary small indiscernible sequence preserves NIP, while naming a large one doesn't; there are models of NIP theories over which all 1-types are definable, but not all n-types.

  4. Perseveration in the Connected Speech of Boys with Fragile X Syndrome with and without Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Gary E.; Roberts, Joanne E.; Helm-Estabrooks, Nancy; Sideris, John; Vanderbilt, Jacqueline; Moskowitz, Lauren

    2012-01-01

    Verbal perseveration is a frequently reported language characteristic of males with Fragile X syndrome and may be a defining feature or hallmark of the syndrome. We compared the verbal perseveration of boys with Fragile X syndrome with (n = 29) and without (n = 30) autism spectrum disorder, boys with Down syndrome (n = 27), and typically…

  5. Perseveration in the Connected Speech of Boys with Fragile X Syndrome with and without Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Gary E.; Roberts, Joanne E.; Helm-Estabrooks, Nancy; Sideris, John; Vanderbilt, Jacqueline; Moskowitz, Lauren

    2012-01-01

    Verbal perseveration is a frequently reported language characteristic of males with Fragile X syndrome and may be a defining feature or hallmark of the syndrome. We compared the verbal perseveration of boys with Fragile X syndrome with (n = 29) and without (n = 30) autism spectrum disorder, boys with Down syndrome (n = 27), and typically…

  6. Syndromic albinism: a review of genetics and phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheinfeld, Noah S

    2003-12-01

    There are several syndromes of albinism associated with systemic pathology. These include Chediak-Higashi Syndrome (CHS), Hermansky-Pudlack Syndrome (HPS), Griscelli Syndrome (GS), Elejalde Syndrome (ES) and Cross-McKusick-Breen Syndrome (CMBS). In the last several years the genetic defects underlying some of these syndromes have been described. HPS is related to 7 genes in humans. GS is related to 3 genes: MYOVA, Rab-27A, and melanophilin (Mlph). CHS is related to one gene: LYST. The genetic defects in ES and CMBS are yet to be defined. Syndromic forms of albinism are associated with defects in the packaging of melanin and other cellular proteins. As such they are distinct from oculocutaneous albinism, which is associated with defects in the production of melanin (e.g., TRP1, P gene, and tyrosinase).

  7. Towards defining heart failure in adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolger, Aidan P; Gatzoulis, Michael A

    2004-12-01

    Injury to the myocardium disrupts geometric integrity and results in changes to intracardiac pressure, wall stress and tension, and the pattern of blood flow through the heart. Significant disruption to pump function results in heart failure which is defined in terms of symptoms: breathlessness and fatigue, signs of salt and water retention, and neurohormonal activation. This syndrome most commonly occurs in the context of injury due to ischaemic heart disease and dilated cardiomyopathy but because patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) are born with sometimes gross distortions of cardiac anatomy they too are subject to the forces that drive heart failure. This paper explores the available data relating to the clinical and neurohormonal manifestations of heart failure in patients with congenital heart disease and describes how, by additionally exploring events at a cellular level, we may be able to arrive at a definition of heart failure relevant to this population.

  8. Drug hypersensitivity syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Kumari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug hypersensitivity syndrome (DHS is an adverse drug reaction commonly associated with the aromatic antiepileptic drugs (AEDs, viz., phenytoin (PHT, carbamazepine (CBZ, phenobarbital (PB, lamotrigine, primidone, etc. It can also be caused by other drugs, such as sulfonamides, dapsone, minocycline, gold derivatives, cyclosporine, captopril, diltiazem, terbinafine, azathioprine and allopurinol. Diagnosis of DHS may be difficult because of the variety of clinical and laboratory abnormalities and manifestations and because the syndrome may mimic infectious, neoplastic or collagen vascular disorders. The risk for developing hypersensitivity within 60 days of the first or second prescription in new users of PHT or CBZ was estimated to be 2.3-4.5 per 10,000 and 1-4.1 per 10,000, respectively. The syndrome is defined by the fever, skin rash, lymphadenopathy and internal organ involvement within the first 2-8 weeks after initiation of therapy. Internal manifestations include, among others, agranulocytosis, hepatitis, nephritis and myositis. Insufficient detoxification may lead to cell death or contribute to the formation of antigen that triggers an immune reaction. Cross-reactivity among PHT, CBZ and PB is as high as 70%-80%. Management mainly includes immediate withdrawal of the culprit drug, symptomatic treatment and systemic steroids or immunoglobulins.

  9. Oral Allergy Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuto Kondo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral allergy syndrome (OAS is defined as the symptoms of IgE-mediated immediate allergy localized in the oral mucosa, and the characteristics depend on the lability of the antigen. Another term used for this syndrome is pollen-food allergy (PFS; the patient is sensitized with pollen via the airways and exhibits an allergic reaction to food antigen with a structural similarity to the pollen (class 2 food allergy. In addition to PFS, latex-fruit syndrome is also well-known as the disease exhibiting OAS. In treating the condition, it must be noted that most but not all symptoms of PFS are those of OAS. In many cases, antigens become edible by heating, but some are resistant to heating. Also, since the exacerbation of atopic dermatitis is occasionally observed after the intake of cooked antigens in asymptomatic individuals, careful inquiry of the history is important in designing the treatment. Immunotherapy against the cross-reacting pollen has also been attempted in PFS.

  10. Sweet′s syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piyush G Limdiwala

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis or Sweet′s syndrome (SS is characterized by painful, erythematous plaques of rapid onset accompanied by fever. The etiology of SS is unknown and it may be associated with antecedent infections, malignancies, autoimmune diseases, drugs and vaccines, upper respiratory or gastrointestinal infection, pregnancy, inflammatory bowel disease as well as chemotherapy or idiopathic. The standard therapy for SS is systemic corticosteroids. We report a rare case of 19-year-old young male patient with complaint of severe ill-defined type of pain in both jaws associated with plaques and papules on extensor surfaces of upper and lower extremities with bodyache and myalgia. Histopathological examination suggested perivascular neutrophilic infiltration with scattered eosinophils. Sweet syndrome has rare oral manifestations secondary to hematological changes. It can also present as a paraneoplastic syndrome (malignancy-associated form of condition, which is most commonly related to acute myelogenous leukemia, which leads to poor prognosis and thus it requires careful examination, early diagnosis and long-term follow-up.

  11. Pfeiffer syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fryns Jean-Pierre

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pfeiffer syndrome is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that associates craniosynostosis, broad and deviated thumbs and big toes, and partial syndactyly on hands and feet. Hydrocephaly may be found occasionally, along with severe ocular proptosis, ankylosed elbows, abnormal viscera, and slow development. Based on the severity of the phenotype, Pfeiffer syndrome is divided into three clinical subtypes. Type 1 "classic" Pfeiffer syndrome involves individuals with mild manifestations including brachycephaly, midface hypoplasia and finger and toe abnormalities; it is associated with normal intelligence and generally good outcome. Type 2 consists of cloverleaf skull, extreme proptosis, finger and toe abnormalities, elbow ankylosis or synostosis, developmental delay and neurological complications. Type 3 is similar to type 2 but without a cloverleaf skull. Clinical overlap between the three types may occur. Pfeiffer syndrome affects about 1 in 100,000 individuals. The disorder can be caused by mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor genes FGFR-1 or FGFR-2. Pfeiffer syndrome can be diagnosed prenatally by sonography showing craniosynostosis, hypertelorism with proptosis, and broad thumb, or molecularly if it concerns a recurrence and the causative mutation was found. Molecular genetic testing is important to confirm the diagnosis. Management includes multiple-staged surgery of craniosynostosis. Midfacial surgery is performed to reduce the exophthalmos and the midfacial hypoplasia.

  12. A definability theorem for first order logic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Butz, C.; Moerdijk, I.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we will present a definability theorem for first order logic This theorem is very easy to state and its proof only uses elementary tools To explain the theorem let us first observe that if M is a model of a theory T in a language L then clearly any definable subset S M ie a subset S

  13. Defining Dynamic Graphics by a Graphical Language

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛其昌; 戴汝为

    1991-01-01

    A graphical language which can be used for defining dynamic picture and applying control actions to it is defined with an expanded attributed grammar.Based on this a system is built for developing the presentation of application data of user interface.This system provides user interface designers with a friendly and high efficient programming environment.

  14. 7 CFR 29.12 - Terms defined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Terms defined. 29.12 Section 29.12 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Regulations Definitions § 29.12 Terms defined. As used in this subpart and in all...

  15. Clinical management of hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasen, Hans F A; Tomlinson, Ian; Castells, Antoni

    2015-02-01

    Hereditary factors are involved in the development of a substantial proportion of all cases of colorectal cancer. Inherited forms of colorectal cancer are usually subdivided into polyposis syndromes characterized by the development of multiple colorectal polyps and nonpolyposis syndromes characterized by the development of few or no polyps. Timely identification of hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes is vital because patient participation in early detection programmes prevents premature death due to cancer. Polyposis syndromes are fairly easy to recognize, but some patients might have characteristics that overlap with other clinically defined syndromes. Comprehensive analysis of the genes known to be associated with polyposis syndromes helps to establish the final diagnosis in these patients. Recognizing Lynch syndrome is more difficult than other polyposis syndromes owing to the absence of pathognomonic features. Most investigators therefore recommend performing systematic molecular analysis of all newly diagnosed colorectal cancer using immunohistochemical methods. The implementation in clinical practice of new high-throughput methods for molecular analysis might further increase the identification of individuals at risk of hereditary colorectal cancer. This Review describes the clinical management of the various hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes and demonstrates the advantage of using a classification based on the underlying gene defects.

  16. Refeeding syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripathy Swagata

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a fifty-year-old male who was admitted with a three month history of increasing weakness, prostration, decreasing appetite and inability to swallow. The patient was a chronic alcoholic, unemployed, and of very poor socioeconomic background. The patient was initially investigated for upper GI malignancy, Addisons disease, bulbar palsy and other endocrinopathies. Concurrent management was started for severe electrolyte abnormalities and enteral nutritional supplementation was begun. By the fourth day of feeding patient developed severe hypophosphatemia and other life-threatening features suggesting refeeding syndrome. The patient was managed for the manifestations of refeeding syndrome. A final diagnosis of chronic alcoholic malnutrition with refeeding syndrome was made. Refeeding of previously starving patients may lead to a variety of complications including sudden death.

  17. Microcephaly syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuelo, Dianne

    2007-09-01

    The objective of this article is to review microcephaly from a genetics point of view, especially with regard to the process of identification of syndromes in which small head circumference occurs. Microcephaly can be due to either genetic or environmental causes. It can be the only positive finding or may be part of a syndrome of congenital anomalies. The genetic etiology can be caused by autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, or X-linked genes or various types of chromosome anomalies. Some of the gene mutations have been identified recently. Syndromic microcephaly is associated with a large number of conditions. Some can be diagnosed, or at least suspected, based on their characteristic facial dysmorphism, and others can be searched for using databases of genetic disorders.

  18. Postconcussional Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Necla Keskin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Postconcussional syndrome is characterized by somatic, cognitive and psychiatric (emotional, behavioral symptoms that occurs after mild traumatic brain injury. It has been known that these symptoms recover fully within 3-6 months almost in 90% of patients. Although its etiology is still controversial, biological, psychological and social factors may account for the development and continuation of the symptoms. Diagnosis is based on the subjective complaints. To find out an objective method for definite diagnosis, trials searching for both neuroimaging and specific serum biomarkers stil continue. The treatment of the syndrome is mainly of palliative nature. Information, education, reassurance and multifaceted rehabilitation programmes can be beneficial. There are promising trials reporting the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy in the treatment of postconcussional syndrome. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(1.000: 96-109

  19. Fraser syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barisic, Ingeborg; Odak, Ljubica; Loane, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Fraser syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by cryptophthalmos, cutaneous syndactyly, laryngeal, and urogenital malformations. We present a population-based epidemiological study using data provided by the European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies (EUROCAT) network...... of birth defect registries. Between January 1990 and December 2008, we identified 26 cases of Fraser syndrome in the monitored population of 12,886,464 births (minimal estimated prevalence of 0.20 per 100,000 or 1:495,633 births). Most cases (18/26; 69%) were registered in the western part of Europe, where...... was particularly high (42%). Most cases of Fraser syndrome (85%) are suspected prenatally, often due to the presence of the association of renal agenesis and cryptophthalmos. In the European population, a high proportion (82%) of pregnancies is terminated, thus reducing the live birth prevalence to a third...

  20. [Serotonin syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lheureux, P; Penaloza, A; De Cottenier, V; Ullmann, U; Gris, M

    2002-10-01

    The serotonin syndrome is a hyperserotoninergic state resulting from an excess of intrasynaptic 5-hydroxytryptamine, induced by multiple psychotropic agents, but also non psychiatric drugs. It is a potentially dangerous and sometimes lethal condition. The clinical manifestations usually include cognitive, neuromuscular and autonomic features and are mediated by the action of serotonin on various subtypes of receptors. The main differential diagnosis is the neuroleptic malignant syndrome. Treatment is mainly supportive. No pharmacological agent has been definitely demonstrated really effective. However, reports of cases treated with the 5-HT2 blockers, including cyproheptadine or chlorpromazine have suggested that these agents could have some efficacy. Serotonin syndrome is a toxic condition which requires heightened clinical awareness among physicians in order to prevent, recognize, and treat the condition promptly.

  1. [Autoinflammatory syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, José Melo; Gomes, Sónia Melo; Conde, Marta

    2010-01-01

    Autoinflammatory syndromes (AIS) are a heterogeneous group of congenital diseases characterized by the presence of recurrent episodes of fever and local or generalized inflammation, in the absence of infectious agents, detectable auto-antibodies or antigen-specific autoreactive T-cells. These diseases have been much better understood during the past 15 years, mainly due to the marked advances of the Human Genoma Project and its implications in the identification and characterization of genetic mutations. In this paper we make a revision of the classification of AIS and focus our attention specially on the cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS), in particular the CINCA syndrome that shares many clinical characteristics with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

  2. Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevil Ikinci

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic Syndrome is a combination of risk factors including common etiopathogenesis. These risk factors play different roles in occurence of atherosclerotic diseases, type 2 diabetes, and cancers. Although a compromise can not be achieved on differential diagnosis for MS, the existence of any three criterias enable to diagnose MS. These are abdominal obesity, dislipidemia (hypertrigliceridemia, hypercholesterolemia, and reduced high density lipoprotein hypertension, and elevated fasting blood glucose. According to the results of Metabolic Syndrome Research (METSAR, the overall prevalence of MS in Turkey is 34%; in females 40%, and in males it is 28%. As a result of “Western” diet, and increased frequency of obesity, MS is observed in children and in adolescents both in the world and in Turkey. Resulting in chronic diseases, it is thought that the syndrome can be prevented by healthy lifestyle behaviours. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2010; 9(5.000: 535-540

  3. Ramsay hunt syndrome (herpes zoster oticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Karthiga Kannan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ramsay Hunt syndrome (RHS is defined as an acute peripheral facial neuropathy caused by the reactivated latent varicella zoster virus (VZV in the geniculate ganglion; characterized with erythematous vesicular rash of the skin of the ear canal, auricle, facial skin, oral mucosa and facial palsy (also known as herpes zoster oticus. This article reports a case of Ramsay Hunt Syndrome (RHS in a 37-year-old male patient depicting the classical signs.

  4. Savant Syndrome: Clinical and Neuropsychological Features

    OpenAIRE

    Durukan, İbrahim; Türkbay, Tümer

    2010-01-01

    Savant syndrome defines the people who have severe developmental and mental disabilities but also have extraordinary mental skills which are missing in many people. Although general mental capacity is under average mental level, savant has excessive knowledge about one or more domains. It is accepted that as many as one in 10 persons with autistic disorder have such remarkable abilities in varying degrees, although savant syndrome occurs in other developmental disabilities or in other types o...

  5. Developmental Dynamics of Rett Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Danielle; Banerjee, Abhishek; Sur, Mriganka

    2016-01-01

    Rett Syndrome was long considered to be simply a disorder of postnatal development, with phenotypes that manifest only late in development and into adulthood. A variety of recent evidence demonstrates that the phenotypes of Rett Syndrome are present at the earliest stages of brain development, including developmental stages that define neurogenesis, migration, and patterning in addition to stages of synaptic and circuit development and plasticity. These phenotypes arise from the pleotropic effects of MeCP2, which is expressed very early in neuronal progenitors and continues to be expressed into adulthood. The effects of MeCP2 are mediated by diverse signaling, transcriptional, and epigenetic mechanisms. Attempts to reverse the effects of Rett Syndrome need to take into account the developmental dynamics and temporal impact of MeCP2 loss.

  6. Eagle's Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinheiro, Thaís Gonçalves

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Eagle's syndrome is characterized by cervicopharyngeal signs and symptoms associated with elongation of the styloid apophysis. This elongation may occur through ossification of the stylohyoid ligament, or through growth of the apophysis due to osteogenesis triggered by a factor such as trauma. Elongation of the styloid apophysis may give rise to intense facial pain, headache, dysphagia, otalgia, buzzing sensations, and trismus. Precise diagnosis of the syndrome is difficult, and it is generally confounded by other manifestations of cervicopharyngeal pain. Objective: To describe a case of Eagle's syndrome. Case Report: A 53-year-old man reported lateral pain in his neck that had been present for 30 years. Computed tomography (CT of the neck showed elongation and ossification of the styloid processes of the temporal bone, which was compatible with Eagle's syndrome. Surgery was performed for bilateral resection of the stylohyoid ligament by using a transoral and endoscopic access route. The patient continued to present pain laterally in the neck, predominantly on his left side. CT was performed again, which showed elongation of the styloid processes. The patient then underwent lateral cervicotomy with resection of the stylohyoid process, which partially resolved his painful condition. Final Comments: Patients with Eagle's syndrome generally have a history of chronic pain. Appropriate knowledge of this disease is necessary for adequate treatment to be provided. The importance of diagnosing this uncommon and often unsuspected disease should be emphasized, given that correct clinical-surgical treatment is frequently delayed. The diagnosis of Eagle's syndrome is clinical and radiographic, and the definitive treatment in cases of difficult-to-control pain is surgical.

  7. Turner Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandran Sudarshan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects mostly females. Affected females have characteristic features such as short stature, premature ovarian failure, and several other features. Oral manifestations of this condition are not much discussed in the literature. But reported literature includes teeth, palate, periodontal and salivary changes. So the aim of this review is to illustrate the general manifestations, and especially the oral manifestations of Turner syndrome and evaluate their possible management. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2012; 21(4.000: 246-252

  8. [PFAPA syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Suzete Costa Anjos; Vales, Fernando; Cardoso, Eduardo; Santos, Margarida

    2009-01-01

    PFAPA syndrome is characterized by periodic fever, pharyngitis, cervical adenitis and aphthous stomatitis. The bouts of fever can last for days or even weeks. Between crises, patients remain asymptomatic for variable periods. It appears before the age of five and has limited duration (4-8 years). Its aetiopathogeny is unknown. Corticoids are the treatment of choice. Tonsillectomy has been proposed as a solution but remains controversial. We present the case of a 4-year-old girl with PFAPA syndrome who underwent tonsillectomy in January, 2008, and we review the literature.

  9. Waardenburg syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tagra Sunita

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Waardenburg syndrome is a rare inherited and genetically heterogenous disorder of neural crest cell development. Four distinct subtypes showing marked interfamilial and intrafamilial variability have been described. We report a girl showing constellation of congenital hearing impairment with 110 dB and 105 dB loss in right and left ear respectively, hypoplastic blue iridis, white forelock, dystopia canthorum and broad nasal root. Other affected relatives of the family, with variable features of the syndrome, have been depicted in the pedigree.

  10. Lemierre's syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Dwyer, D N

    2012-02-01

    Lemierre\\'s syndrome is a rare disease that results in an oropharyngeal infection, which precipitates an internal jugular vein thrombosis and metastatic infection. Fusobacterium necrophorum is an anaerobic Gram-negative bacillus and has been identified as the causative agent. We describe the case of a young girl whose presentation and diagnosis were confounded by a history of valvular heart disease. Infection of heart valves can produce many of the signs and symptoms associated with Lemierre\\'s syndrome. We describe the diagnosis, investigation and optimal management of this rare disorder.

  11. Olmsted syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Pramod

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Olmsted syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by the combination of periorificial, keratotic plaques and bilateral palmoplantar keratoderma. New associated features are being reported. Olmsted syndrome is particularly rare in a female patient, and we report such a case in a six year-old Indian girl, who presented with keratoderma of her soles since birth and on her palms since the age of two years along with perioral and perinasal hyperkeratosis. She had sparse, light brown, thin hair. Although the psychomotor development of the child was normal until 18 months of age, the keratoderma plaques had restricted the child′s mobility after that stage.

  12. Gorlin Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siroos Risbaf

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gorlin syndrome is a dominant autosomal familial disorder. The manifestations begin at an early age and a combination of phenotypic abnormalities such special facial appearance, jaw cysts and skeletal anomalies are seen in this disease. A 22-year-old woman referred to Zahedan Dental School complaining of pain on the left cheek. During the examination, several cutaneous lesions in the neck, pits in palm and sole and multiple jaw cysts were observed. According to the clinical symptoms, lesion biopsy and reports of Gorlin syndrome radiography were presented.

  13. [Wilkie's syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bognár, Gábor; Ledniczky, György; Palik, Eva; Zubek, László; Sugár, István; Ondrejka, Pál

    2008-10-01

    Loss of retroperitoneal fatty tissue as a result of a variety of debilitating conditions and noxa is believed to be the etiologic factor of superior mesenteric artery syndrome. A case of a 35 years old female patient with severe malnutrition and weight loss is presented, who developed superior mesenteric artery syndrome. Various theories of etiology, clinical course and treatment options of this uncommon disease are discussed. In our case, conservative management was inefficient, while surgical treatment aiming to bypass the obstruction by an anastomosis between the jejunum and the proximal duodenum (duodenojejunostomy) was successful. An interdisciplinary teamwork provides the most beneficial diagnostic and therapeutic result in this often underestimated disease.

  14. Morbihan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veraldi, Stefano; Persico, Maria Chiara; Francia, Claudia

    2013-04-01

    We report a case of severe Morbihan syndrome (chronic erythematous edema of the upper portion of the face) in a 60-year-old man. The syndrome was characterized clinically by erythematous edema involving the forehead, glabella, and both eyelids, because of which the patient was not able to open completely his eyes. Furthermore, erythema and telangiectasiae were visible on the nose and cheeks. Laboratory and instrumental examinations were within normal ranges or negative. Histopathological examination showed dermal edema, perivascular and periadnexal lympho-histiocytic infiltrate, and sebaceous gland hyperplasia. Oral isotretinoin was ineffective despite the relatively long duration of the therapy (26 weeks).

  15. Morbihan syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Veraldi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of severe Morbihan syndrome (chronic erythematous edema of the upper portion of the face in a 60-year-old man. The syndrome was characterized clinically by erythematous edema involving the forehead, glabella, and both eyelids, because of which the patient was not able to open completely his eyes. Furthermore, erythema and telangiectasiae were visible on the nose and cheeks. Laboratory and instrumental examinations were within normal ranges or negative. Histopathological examination showed dermal edema, perivascular and periadnexal lympho-histiocytic infiltrate, and sebaceous gland hyperplasia. Oral isotretinoin was ineffective despite the relatively long duration of the therapy (26 weeks.

  16. Chemically defined medium and Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szewczyk, Nathaniel J.; Kozak, Elena; Conley, Catharine A.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: C. elegans has been established as a powerful genetic system. Use of a chemically defined medium (C. elegans Maintenance Medium (CeMM)) now allows standardization and systematic manipulation of the nutrients that animals receive. Liquid cultivation allows automated culturing and experimentation and should be of use in large-scale growth and screening of animals. RESULTS: We find that CeMM is versatile and culturing is simple. CeMM can be used in a solid or liquid state, it can be stored unused for at least a year, unattended actively growing cultures may be maintained longer than with standard techniques, and standard C. elegans protocols work well with animals grown in defined medium. We also find that there are caveats to using defined medium. Animals in defined medium grow more slowly than on standard medium, appear to display adaptation to the defined medium, and display altered growth rates as they change the composition of the defined medium. CONCLUSIONS: As was suggested with the introduction of C. elegans as a potential genetic system, use of defined medium with C. elegans should prove a powerful tool.

  17. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Antiphospholipid Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Plavsic

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Antiphospholipid syndrome is an autoimmune disorder defined as association of vascular thrombosis and/or pregnancy complications with presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (lupus anticoagulant, anticardiolipin and anti-β2 glycoprotein I. It is the most common cause of acquired thrombophilia, and can occur as an independent entity or in relation with other diseases, especially systemic lupus erythematosus. Presence of antiphospholipid syndrome in systemic lupus erythematosus is additional vaso occlusive factor in already present inflammation, bringing further risk for thrombotic events. Clinical and serological manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosus are very similar, so possible connection for these two autoimmune disorders is assumed.

  18. Myofascial pain syndrome: a treatment review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Mehul J; Saini, Vikramjeet; Saini, Shawnjeet

    2013-06-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is defined as pain that originates from myofascial trigger points in skeletal muscle. It is prevalent in regional musculoskeletal pain syndromes, either alone or in combination with other pain generators. The appropriate evaluation and management of myofascial pain is an important part of musculoskeletal rehabilitation, and regional axial and limb pain syndromes. This article reviews the current hypotheses regarding the treatment modalities for myofascial trigger points and muscle pain. Through a critical evidence-based review of the pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatments, the authors aim to provide clinicians with a more comprehensive knowledge of the interventions for myofascial pain.

  19. Bilayer graphene quantum dot defined by topgates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Müller, André; Kaestner, Bernd; Hohls, Frank; Weimann, Thomas; Pierz, Klaus; Schumacher, Hans W., E-mail: hans.w.schumacher@ptb.de [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Bundesallee 100, 38116 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2014-06-21

    We investigate the application of nanoscale topgates on exfoliated bilayer graphene to define quantum dot devices. At temperatures below 500 mK, the conductance underneath the grounded gates is suppressed, which we attribute to nearest neighbour hopping and strain-induced piezoelectric fields. The gate-layout can thus be used to define resistive regions by tuning into the corresponding temperature range. We use this method to define a quantum dot structure in bilayer graphene showing Coulomb blockade oscillations consistent with the gate layout.

  20. Marfan syndrome masked by Down syndrome?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vis, J.C.; Engelen, K. van; Timmermans, J.; Hamel, B.C.J.; Mulder, B.J.

    2009-01-01

    Down syndrome is the most common chromosomal abnormality. A simultaneous occurrence with Marfan syndrome is extremely rare. We present a case of a 28-year-old female with Down syndrome and a mutation in the fibrillin-1 gene. The patient showed strikingly few manifestations of Marfan syndrome.

  1. Marfan syndrome masked by Down syndrome?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vis, J.C.; Engelen, K. van; Timmermans, J.; Hamel, B.C.J.; Mulder, B.J.

    2009-01-01

    Down syndrome is the most common chromosomal abnormality. A simultaneous occurrence with Marfan syndrome is extremely rare. We present a case of a 28-year-old female with Down syndrome and a mutation in the fibrillin-1 gene. The patient showed strikingly few manifestations of Marfan syndrome. Althou

  2. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jan; Bures; Jiri; Cyrany; Darina; Kohoutova; Miroslav; Frstl; Stanislav; Rejchrt; Jaroslav; Kvetina; Viktor; Vorisek; Marcela; Kopacova

    2010-01-01

    Human intestinal microbiota create a complex polymi-crobial ecology. This is characterised by its high population density, wide diversity and complexity of interaction. Any dysbalance of this complex intestinal microbiome, both qualitative and quantitative, might have serious health consequence for a macro-organism, including small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome (SIBO).SIBO is defined as an increase in the number and/or alteration in the type of bacteria in the upper gastro-intestinal tract. There...

  3. Klinefelter Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hande Peynirci

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Klinefelter syndrome is the most common sex chromosome disorder in males. Variation in clinical presentation and insufficient awareness of this syndrome among clinicians lead to fifty percent of patients remain undetected. Typical clinical features of Klinefelter syndrome are various degrees of hypogonadal symptoms, atrophic testes and gynaecomastia. However, these typical clinical symptoms may not be present in all patients. Even if serum testosterone levels are not markedly low, elevated serum follicle-stimulating hormone is a considerable laboratory finding. Definitive diagnosis is made by karyotype analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes. It must be kept in mind that this analysis may be normal in rare conditions. Early recognition of patients during puberty and handling them as soon as possible is important. Testosterone replacement therapy results in increased muscle mass, bone mineral density and libido. The patient’s mood and self-esteem improve significantly. In general, patients with Klinefelter syndrome are accepted as infertile, however, assisted reproductive techniques may provide fertilization. Turk Jem 2013; 17: 63-7

  4. Lemierre's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesen, Katrine M; Bodtger, Uffe

    2016-01-01

    /or swelling in the throat or neck, as well as respiratory symptoms. Laboratory findings show elevated infectious parameters and radiological findings show thrombosis of the internal jugular vein and emboli in the lungs or other organs. The syndrome is often associated with an infection with Fusobacterium...

  5. Dumping Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stomach move to your small intestine in an uncontrolled, abnormally fast manner. This is most often related to changes in your stomach associated with surgery. Dumping syndrome can occur after any stomach operation or removal of the esophagus (esophagectomy). Gastric bypass surgery for ...

  6. Brugada Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to look at your heart's electrical activity (electrophysiology study), you'll need to fast for eight to 12 hours before your test. Write down any symptoms you're experiencing, including any that may seem unrelated to Brugada syndrome. Write down key personal information, especially any family ...

  7. Bloom syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Harleen; Chacon, Anna H; Choudhary, Sonal; McLeod, Michael P; Meshkov, Lauren; Nouri, Keyvan; Izakovic, Jan

    2014-07-01

    Bloom Syndrome (BS, MIM #210900) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder caused by a mutation in the BLM gene, which codes for the DNA repair enzyme RecQL3 helicase. Without proper DNA repair mechanisms, abnormal DNA exchange takes place between sister chromatids and results in genetic instability that may lead to cancer, especially lymphoma and acute myelogenous leukemia, lower and upper gastrointestinal tract neoplasias, cutaneous tumors, and neoplasias in the genitalia and urinary tract. BS patients are usually of Ashkenazi Jewish descent and exhibit narrow facial features, elongated limbs, and several dermatologic complications including photosensitivity, poikiloderma, and telangiectatic erythema. The most concerning manifestation of BS is multiple malignancies, which require frequent screenings and strict vigilance by the physician. Therefore, distinguishing between BS and other dermatologic syndromes of similar presentation such as Rothmund-Thomson Syndrome, Erythropoietic Protoporphyria, and Cockayne Syndrome is paramount to disease management and to prolonging life. BS can be diagnosed through a variety of DNA sequencing methods, and genetic testing is available for high-risk populations. This review consolidates several sources on BS sequelae and aims to suggest the importance of differentiating BS from other dermatologic conditions. This paper also elucidates the recently discovered BRAFT and FANCM protein complexes that link BS and Fanconi anemia.

  8. Gitelman syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoers, N.V.A.M.; Levtchenko, E.N.

    2008-01-01

    Gitelman syndrome (GS), also referred to as familial hypokalemia-hypomagnesemia, is characterized by hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis in combination with significant hypomagnesemia and low urinary calcium excretion. The prevalence is estimated at approximately 1:40,000 and accordingly, the prevalence

  9. Chylomicronemia syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the blood. The disorder is passed down through families. Causes Chylomicronemia syndrome can occur due to a rare genetic disorder in which a protein (enzyme) called lipoprotein lipase (LpL) is broken or missing. LpL is normally found in fat and muscle. ...

  10. Gitelman syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoers, N.V.A.M.; Levtchenko, E.N.

    2008-01-01

    Gitelman syndrome (GS), also referred to as familial hypokalemia-hypomagnesemia, is characterized by hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis in combination with significant hypomagnesemia and low urinary calcium excretion. The prevalence is estimated at approximately 1:40,000 and accordingly, the prevalence

  11. Proteus syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debi Basanti

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteus syndrome is a variable and complex disorder characterized by multifocal overgrowths affecting any tissue or structure of the body. We present a girl aged 3 years and 8 months with an epidermal nevus, port-wine stain, macrodactyly with gigantism of the feet, lymphohemagiomas and multiple lipomas.

  12. [Waardenburg's syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimñenez, F; Carbonell, R; Pérez, F; Lozano, I

    1994-01-01

    Reporting one case of this condition type-2 with heterochromia iridis and cochlear deafness. The AA. review the syndrome's components and it nomenclature as well. They discuss about the convenience of including this deviation in the chapter of "diseases of the embryonic neural crest". The specific place of the gene responsibly in the chromosome-2 and the possibilities of genetic counselling are considered.

  13. Waardenburg's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesudian, D P; Jayaraman, M; Janaki, V R; Yesudian, P

    1995-01-01

    Three children in a family of five presented with heterochromia iridis, lateral displacement of inner canthi and varying degrees of sensorineural deafness. All the 3 showed iris atrophy. The father of the children had only heterochromia iridis. A diagnosis of Waardenburg's syndrome Type I was made in the children with the father probably representing a forme fruste of the condition.

  14. Caplan syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CT scan of the chest Joint x-rays Pulmonary function tests Rheumatoid factor test and other blood tests Treatment There is no specific treatment for Caplan syndrome, other than treating any lung and joint disease. ... MD, MHS, Associate Professor of Medicine, Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care, Perelman School of Medicine, ...

  15. Metabolic syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Charles Shaeffer

    2004-01-01

    @@ The emergence of cardiac disease as the number one world-wide cause of death justifies efforts to identify individuals at higher risk for preventive therapy. The metabolic syndrome, originally described by Reaven, 1 has been associated with higher cardiovascular disease risk. 2 Type Ⅱ diabetes is also a frequent sequela. 3

  16. Sotos Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 663-4637) Sotos Syndrome Support Association P.O. Box 4626 Wheaton IL Wheaton, IL 60189 info@sotossyndrome.org http://www.sotossyndrome.org/ Tel: 888-246-7772 The Arc of the United States 1825 K Street, NW ...

  17. Rett Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culbert, Linda A.

    This pamphlet reviews the historical process involved in initially recognizing Rett Syndrome as a specific disorder in girls. Its etiology is unknown, but studies have considered factors as hyperammonemia, a two-step mutation, a fragile X chromosome, metabolic disorder, environmental causation, dopamine deficiency, and an inactive X chromosome.…

  18. Reifenstein syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Androgens are most important during early development in the womb. People with Reifenstein syndrome can have a normal lifespan and be totally healthy, but they may have difficulty conceiving a child. In the most severe cases, boys with outer female genitals ...

  19. Nodding Syndrome

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-12-19

    Dr. Scott Dowell, a CDC director, discusses the rare illness, nodding syndrome, in children in Africa.  Created: 12/19/2013 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 1/27/2014.

  20. [SAPHO syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heldmann, F; Kiltz, U; Baraliakos, X; Braun, J

    2014-10-01

    The SAPHO syndrome, an acronym for synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis and osteitis, is a rare disease which affects bones, joints and the skin. The main osteoarticular features are hyperostosis and osteitis. Osteoarticular symptoms predominantly occur on the anterior chest wall but the spine and the peripheral skeleton can also be involved. The most important skin affections are palmoplantar pustulosis and severe acne. The etiology of this syndrome remains unclear but infectious, immunological and genetic factors are involved. The diagnostic features of SAPHO syndrome are clinical and radiological. The most important diagnostic procedure is Tc-99 m bone scintigraphy but conventional x-rays as well as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can also contribute to the final diagnosis. Bone histology and positron emission tomography CT (PET-CT) may help to differentiate SAPHO syndrome from malignancies and infectious osteomyelitis. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the cornerstone of treatment. The results obtained using antibiotics and disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), such as sulfasalazine and methotrexate are inconsistent. Bisphosphonates and anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) drugs have shown promising results in small studies but further research is still necessary.

  1. Use of vaccines as probes to define disease burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feikin, Daniel R; Scott, J Anthony G; Gessner, Bradford D

    2014-05-17

    Vaccine probe studies have emerged in the past 15 years as a useful way to characterise disease. By contrast, traditional studies of vaccines focus on defining the vaccine effectiveness or efficacy. The underlying basis for the vaccine probe approach is that the difference in disease burden between vaccinated and unvaccinated individuals can be ascribed to the vaccine-specific pathogen. Vaccine probe studies can increase understanding of a vaccine's public health value. For instance, even when a vaccine has a seemingly low efficacy, a high baseline disease incidence can lead to a large vaccine-preventable disease burden and thus that population-based vaccine introduction would be justified. So far, vaccines have been used as probes to characterise disease syndromes caused by Haemophilus influenzae type b, pneumococcus, rotavirus, and early infant influenza. However, vaccine probe studies have enormous potential and could be used more widely in epidemiology, for example, to define the vaccine-preventable burden of malaria, typhoid, paediatric influenza, and dengue, and to identify causal interactions between different pathogens.

  2. Reconfigurable, Cognitive Software Defined Radio Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Intelligent Automation Inc, (IAI) is currently developing a software defined radio (SDR) platform that can adaptively switch between different modes of operation for...

  3. Reconfigurable, Cognitive Software Defined Radio Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — IAI is actively developing Software Defined Radio platforms that can adaptively switch between different modes of operation by modifying both transmit waveforms and...

  4. Convolutional Goppa codes defined on fibrations

    CERN Document Server

    Curto, J I Iglesias; Martín, F J Plaza; Sotelo, G Serrano

    2010-01-01

    We define a new class of Convolutional Codes in terms of fibrations of algebraic varieties generalizaing our previous constructions of Convolutional Goppa Codes. Using this general construction we can give several examples of Maximum Distance Separable (MDS) Convolutional Codes.

  5. Radiation Tolerant Software Defined Video Processor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MaXentric's is proposing a radiation tolerant Software Define Video Processor, codenamed SDVP, for the problem of advanced motion imaging in the space environment....

  6. Towards a Southern African English Defining Vocabulary

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    In my experience, defining vocabularies compiled for English dictionaries for a British or .... Oxford 3000, which contains 3 540 entries, and is available on the Internet. ... One thing that became apparent was a lack of consistency within lexical.

  7. Software Defined Multiband EVA Radio Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this research is to propose a reliable, lightweight, programmable, multi-band, multi-mode, miniaturized frequency-agile EVA software defined radio...

  8. Software Defined Multiband EVA Radio Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of Phase 2 is to build a reliable, lightweight, programmable, multi-mode, miniaturized EVA Software Defined Radio (SDR) that supports data telemetry,...

  9. Cardiac valve degeneration in a patient with Sneddon syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diosteanu, Raluca; Schuler, Gerhard; Müller, Ulrike

    2015-06-01

    Sneddon syndrome--a rare cause of aortic and mitral valve stenosis. Sneddon syndrome is a rare disorder that leads to repeated occurrence of cerebrovascular disease and skin manifestation, defined as livedo racemosa generalisata. The authors report the occurrence of multiple valve degenerations in a 49-year-old patient with Sneddon syndrome, which seemed to have been asymptomatic through a long period of time and was diagnosed as it needed a complex surgical intervention.

  10. Optimum Criteria for Developing Defined Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion IVAN

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Basic aspects concerning distributed applications are presented: definition, particularities and importance. For distributed applications linear, arborescent, graph structures are defined with different versions and aggregation methods. Distributed applications have associated structures which through their characteristics influence the costs of the stages in the development cycle and the exploitation costs transferred to each user. The complexity of the defined structures is analyzed. The minimum and maximum criteria are enumerated for optimizing distributed application structures.

  11. Compartment syndromes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aly Saber

    2014-01-01

    Body compartments bound by fascia and limited by bony backgrounds are found in the extremities, buttocks, abdomen and thoracic cavity; conditions that cause intracompartmental swelling and hypertension can lead to ischemia and limb loss.Although compartment syndromes are described in all body regions from head to toe, the etiology, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention are best characterized for three key body regions: the first is extremity, the second is abdominal, and the third is thoracic compartment syndromes.Thoracic compartment syndrome usually occurs as a result of pathological accumulation of air, fluid or blood in the mediastinum and has traditionally been described in trauma.As the intracranial contents are confined within a rigid bony cage, any increase in volume within thiscompartment as a result of brain oedema or an expanding traumatic intracranial haematoma, leads to a reciprocal decrease in the volume of cerebrospinal fluid and intracranial venous blood volume.Limb compartment syndromes may present either in acute or chronic clinical forms.Intra-abdominal pressure can be measured by direct or indirect methods.While the direct methods are quite accurate, theyare impractical and not feasible for routine practice.Indirect measurement is done through inferior vena cava, gastric, rectal and urinary bladder.Indirect measurement through urinary bladder is the simplest and is considered the method of choice for intra-abdominal pressure measurement.The management of patients with intra-abdominal hypertension is based on four important principles: the first is related to the specific procedures aiming at lowering intra-abdominal pressure and the consequences of intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome; the second is for general support and medical management of the critically ill patient; while the third is surgical decompression and the fourth is optimization after surgical decompression.

  12. Biochemical abnormalities in Pearson syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crippa, Beatrice Letizia; Leon, Eyby; Calhoun, Amy; Lowichik, Amy; Pasquali, Marzia; Longo, Nicola

    2015-03-01

    Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome is a multisystem mitochondrial disorder characterized by bone marrow failure and pancreatic insufficiency. Children who survive the severe bone marrow dysfunction in childhood develop Kearns-Sayre syndrome later in life. Here we report on four new cases with this condition and define their biochemical abnormalities. Three out of four patients presented with failure to thrive, with most of them having normal development and head size. All patients had evidence of bone marrow involvement that spontaneously improved in three out of four patients. Unique findings in our patients were acute pancreatitis (one out of four), renal Fanconi syndrome (present in all patients, but symptomatic only in one), and an unusual organic aciduria with 3-hydroxyisobutyric aciduria in one patient. Biochemical analysis indicated low levels of plasma citrulline and arginine, despite low-normal ammonia levels. Regression analysis indicated a significant correlation between each intermediate of the urea cycle and the next, except between ornithine and citrulline. This suggested that the reaction catalyzed by ornithine transcarbamylase (that converts ornithine to citrulline) might not be very efficient in patients with Pearson syndrome. In view of low-normal ammonia levels, we hypothesize that ammonia and carbamylphosphate could be diverted from the urea cycle to the synthesis of nucleotides in patients with Pearson syndrome and possibly other mitochondrial disorders.

  13. Ultrastructure of platelets in Bernard-Soulier syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, J E; Gilchrist, G S; Brigden, L P; Bowie, E J

    1975-07-01

    The platelets of a patient with the Bernard-Soulier syndrome were studied by electron microscopy. The main abnormalities were the presence of giant and often round platelets, hypertrophic and frequently widely dilated open canalicular system, disorganized microtubules, and platelets with sparse or absent granulation. Although well defined, these ultrastructural morphologic aberrations are not considered diagnostic or pathognomonic of the syndrome.

  14. A case of seronegative catastrophic antiphospholipid antibody syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shreders, Amanda; Bar, Michael

    2013-02-01

    Catastrophic antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (CAPS) is a rare syndrome associated with multiorgan failure that carries a high mortality rate. It has been defined previously by the presence of autoantibodies in a patient with acute multiorgan failure as a result of small vessel occlusion by multiple thrombi. We report a patient who meets all criteria of CAPS except for persistent seronegativity.

  15. Down Syndrome: Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... leading human rights organization for all individuals with Down syndrome. National Down Syndrome Society 8 E 41st Street, 8th Floor New ... New York 10017 800-221-4602 [email protected] Down Syndrome What Is Down Syndrome? Down Syndrome Facts Myths & ...

  16. Down Syndrome: Eye Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... En Español Read in Chinese What causes Down syndrome? Down syndrome is caused by a duplication of all ... Where can I find more information regarding Down Syndrome? National Down Syndrome Society VISIT SITE » Downs Syndrome Association VISIT ...

  17. Sexuality and Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 4602 [email protected] Down Syndrome What Is Down Syndrome? Down Syndrome Facts Myths & Truths Preferred Language Guide Q& ... Shop NDSS Home » Resources » Wellness » Sexuality » Sexuality & Down Syndrome Sexuality & Down Syndrome Human sexuality encompasses an individual's self-esteem, ...

  18. Hepatic infarction in HELLP syndrome; a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Mi Jeong; Kim, Hong [Keimyung Univ. School of Medicine, Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-11-01

    Hepatic infarction is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication of pregnancy-associated preeclampsia or HELLP (hemolysis, elevated liver function tests, low platelets) syndrome. We present a case of hepatic infarction subsequent to HELLP syndrome and occurring during the immediate postpartum, and the associated radiologic findings. Sonography revealed poorly defined hypoechoic zones of infarction. Computed tomography(CT) demonstrated the characteristic features of nonenhancing, low attenuation, relatively well-defined, wedge shaped or geographic hepatic lesions, without mass effect.

  19. Are syndromes in environmental medicine variants of somatoform disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesmüller, G A; Ebel, H; Hornberg, C; Kwan, O; Friel, J

    2003-10-01

    To date, relatively little is known about the etiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, therapy, prevention and prognosis of environment-related syndromes like multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS), idiopathic environmental intolerance (IEI), sick building syndrome (SBS), chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), candida syndrome (CS) and burnout syndrome (BS). Part of the reason is that these syndromes have not been clearly defined and classified in scientific categories distinct from each other, and that they show clinical similarities to classified somatoform disorders. Furthermore, there are at least three possible explanations for the existence of these syndromes: (1) The syndromes may result from the interaction of environmental factors, individual susceptibility and psychological factors (i.e., how they are perceived and seen by the patient); (2) they may reflect socially and culturally accepted methods of expressing distress; and/or (3) they may be iatrogenic. Despite all the uncertainties in evaluation of environmental syndromes, physicians have the duty to take the affected person's problems seriously. A comprehensive systematic classification which better accounts for these complex clinical manifestations is long overdue. Until these syndromes are well defined, the terms used for them should definitely not be applied to connote a specific disease process.

  20. Otodental syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bloch-Zupan Agnès

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The otodental syndrome also named otodental dysplasia, is characterised by a striking dental phenotype known as globodontia, associated with sensorineural high frequency hearing loss and eye coloboma. Globodontia occurs in both primary and permanent dentition, affecting canine and molar teeth (i.e. enlarged bulbous malformed posterior teeth with almost no discernable cusps or grooves. The condition appears to be inherited in an autosomal dominant mode, although sporadic cases have been reported. It is a rare disease, a few families have been described in the literature. In the British family, the locus for oculo-oto-dental syndrome was mapped to 20q13.1 within a 12-cM critical chromosomal region. Dental management is complex, interdisciplinary and will include regular follow up, scheduled teeth extraction and orthodontic treatment. Hearing checks and, if necessary, hearing aids are mandatory, as well as eye examination and ad hoc treatment if necessary.

  1. Lemierre's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesen, Katrine M; Bodtger, Uffe

    2016-01-01

    This is a systematic review of cases with Lemierre's syndrome (LS) in the past 5 years. LS is characterized by sepsis often evolving after a sore throat or tonsillitis and then complicated by various septic emboli and thrombosis of the internal jugular vein. Symptoms include sepsis, pain, and...... necrophorum. We found a total of 137 cases of LS, of which 47 were infected with F. necrophorum and others with Staphylococcus and Streptococcus. Complications of this rare but severe disease included osteomyelitis, meningitis, and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Mortality was extremely high in the pre......-antibiotic era but has diminished with the advent of antibiotics. This review showed a mortality rate of only 2% of which none of the cases involved fusobacteria. Duration of treatment varied; a 4-6-week course of carbapenem or piperacillin/tazobactam in combination with metronidazole was optimum. Other...

  2. Dravet syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Incorpora Gemma

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract "Dravet syndrome" (DS previously named severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (SMEI, or epilepsy with polymorphic seizures, is a rare disorder characterized by an early, severe, generalized, epileptic encephalopathy. DS is characterized by febrile and afebrile seizures beginning in the 1st year of life followed by different types of seizures (either focal or generalized, which are typically resistant to antiepileptic drugs. A developmental delay from the 2nd to 3rd year of life becomes evident, together with motor disturbances and personality disorders. Beside the classic syndrome, there are milder cases which have been called severe myoclonic epilepsy borderline (SMEB. DS is caused by a mutation in the neuronal sodium channel gene, SCN1A , that is also mutated in generalized epilepsy with FS+ (GEFS+.

  3. Parinaud's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffie, D; Ongerboer de Visser, B W; Stefanko, S Z

    1983-02-01

    Five cases of a tumour in the quadrigeminal area have been described, 4 of which could be verified by autopsy. In 2 cases with a metastasis in the tegmentum of the mesencephalon, a Parinaud syndrome was present. In 2 other cases, however, with extensive destruction of the quadrigeminal plate and of the posterior commissure this syndrome was not present. In the 5th case, with a big vascular tumour of the pineal area, disturbances of eye movements and pupils were also lacking. From these observations we may conclude that (1) destruction of the quadrigeminal plate has no influence upon vertical eye movements. (2) destruction of the posterior commissure, in combination with the quadrigeminal plate, is not always followed by disturbances of vertical eye movements. In man it is still not clear which structures are responsible for the performance of vertical eye movements.

  4. Apert syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premalatha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Apert syndrome (acrocephalosyndactyly is a rare developmental malformation characterized by craniosynostosis, mid-face hypoplasia, symmetrical syndactyly of hands and feet. The prodromal characteristics for the typical cranio-facial appearance are early craniosynostosis of the coronal suture, cranial base and agenesis of the sagittal suture. The purpose of this paper is to report a case of Apert syndrome with emphasis on craniofacial and oral features in an eighteen-month-old male child. The patient presented with several craniofacial deformities, including brachycephaly, midface hypoplasia, flat face, hypertelorism, ocular proptosis, downslanting palpebral fissures. Syndactylies with osseous fusion of the hands and feet were also observed. Intraoral findings included delayed eruption of teeth, high arched palate with pseudo cleft in the posterior one third.

  5. Paraneoplastic syndromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS) comprise a diverse group of disorders that are associated with cancer but unrelated to the size, location, metastases, or physiologic activities of the mature tissue of origin. They are remote effects of tumors that may appear as signs, symptoms, or syndromes which can mimic other disease conditions encountered in veterinary medicine. Recognition of PNS is valuable for several reasons: the observed abnormalities may represent tumor cell markers and facilitate early diagnosis of the tumor; they may allow assessment of premalignant states; they may aid in the search metastases; they may help quantify and monitor response to therapy; and, they may provide insight into the study of malignant transformation and oncogene expression. This review will concentrate on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of some of the common PNS encountered in veterinary medicine.

  6. Fluency Disorders in Genetic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Borsel, John; Tetnowski, John A.

    2007-01-01

    The characteristics of various genetic syndromes have included "stuttering" as a primary symptom associated with that syndrome. Specifically, Down syndrome, fragile X syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, Tourette syndrome, Neurofibromatosis type I, and Turner syndrome all list "stuttering" as a characteristic of that syndrome. An extensive review of…

  7. Griscelli syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar T

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Partial albinism with immunodeficiency is a rare and fatal immunologic disorder characterized by pigmentary dilution and variable cellular immunodeficiency. It was initially described in 1978. Primary abnormalities included silvery grayish sheen to the hair, large pigment agglomerations in hair shafts and an abundance of mature melanosomes in melanocytes, with reduced pigmentation of adjacent keratinocytes. We describe a child with Griscelli syndrome who presented with hepatitis, pancytopenia and silvery hair. The diagnosis was confirmed by microscopic skin and hair examination.

  8. Hepatorenal syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sharon Turban; Paul J Thuluvath; Mohamed G Atta

    2007-01-01

    Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) is a "functional" and reversible form of renal failure that occurs in patients with advanced chronic liver disease. The distinctive hallmark feature of HRS is the intense renal vasoconstriction caused by interactions between systemic and portal hemodynamics. This results in activation of vasoconstrictors and suppression of vasodilators in the renal circulation. Epidemiology, pathophysiology, as well as current and emerging therapies of HRS are discussed in this review.

  9. Postconcussional Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Necla Keskin; Lut Tamam

    2013-01-01

    Postconcussional syndrome is characterized by somatic, cognitive and psychiatric (emotional, behavioral) symptoms that occurs after mild traumatic brain injury. It has been known that these symptoms recover fully within 3-6 months almost in 90% of patients. Although its etiology is still controversial, biological, psychological and social factors may account for the development and continuation of the symptoms. Diagnosis is based on the subjective complaints. To find out an objective method f...

  10. Fraser syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chattopadhyay A

    1993-10-01

    Full Text Available Fraser Syndrome is a rare disorder with only a few cases having been described in Indian literature. We report here a case of a patient aged 16 yr present with primary amenorrhea which is a very unusual mode of presentation. Multiple associated anomalies were present including those of eyelids, eyebrow, face, fingers and genitalia. Chromosome analysis revealed a normal female karyotype. Pituitary gonadotropins were within normal range.

  11. [Fibromyalgia syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo Hernández, A; Rodríguez Lozano, C; Ojeda Bruno, S

    1992-02-01

    The Fibromialgia Syndrome (FS) is a common clinical entity which may produce symtoms and signs related to multiple fields of Medicine. Typical clinical characteristics of FS include extensive pain, presence of sensitive points during exploration, morning stiffness, asthenia and non-refresing sleep. Frequently, associated rheumatologic diseases are observed, as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthrosis and vertebral disorders. In FS, complementary tests are usually normal. The most widely accepted hypothesis suggests that this is a disorder affecting modulation of pain sensitivity.

  12. Gerstmann's syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Sukumar, S.; Ferguson, G C

    1996-01-01

    Although Gerstmann's syndrome has been well documented since it was characterised in the latter half of last century, there has not been much literature on it in the last few years. We present a classical case in a patient who was admitted into hospital for an unrelated problem. We conclude that clinical examination still has a valuable role in neurology, despite the availability of excellent imaging techniques.

  13. Software-Defined Cellular Mobile Network Solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiandong Li; Peng Liu; Hongyan Li

    2014-01-01

    The emergency relating to software-defined networking (SDN), especially in terms of the prototype associated with OpenFlow, pro-vides new possibilities for innovating on network design. Researchers have started to extend SDN to cellular networks. Such new programmable architecture is beneficial to the evolution of mobile networks and allows operators to provide better services. The typical cellular network comprises radio access network (RAN) and core network (CN); hence, the technique roadmap diverges in two ways. In this paper, we investigate SoftRAN, the latest SDN solution for RAN, and SoftCell and MobileFlow, the latest solu-tions for CN. We also define a series of control functions for CROWD. Unlike in the other literature, we emphasize only software-defined cellular network solutions and specifications in order to provide possible research directions.

  14. Comparison of target volume defined by CT scanning and {sup 18}F-F.D.G. PET for the radiotherapy of head and neck cancers; Comparaison des volumes cibles definis par scanographie et TEP- au [18F]-FDG pour la radiotherapie des cancers de la tete et du cou

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henriques de Figueiredo, B.; Barret, O.; Allard, M.; Fernandez, P. [Hopital Pellegrin, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Galland, S.; Demeaux, H. [Hopital Saint-Andre, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Lagarde, P.; Dejean, C.; Buj, S.; Richaud, P. [Institut Bergonie, 33 - Bordeaux (France)

    2009-10-15

    In spite of lack of correlation with anatomo-pathological pieces for these inoperable cancers, it seems that the PET allows to better adjust the anatomo-clinical target volume (C.T.V.70 Gy) by orienting, especially on the supplementary extension risks. Then, the reduction of the macroscopic tumor volume noticed in PET could be interesting in the case of a dose escalation. (N.C.)

  15. Antiphospholipid syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlović Dragan M.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS is an autoimmune disease with recurrent thromboses and pregnancy complications (90% are female patients that can be primary and secondary (with concomitant autoimmune disease. Antiphospholipid antibodies are prothrombotic but also act directly with brain tissue. One clinical and one laboratory criterion is necessary for the diagnosis of APS. Positive serological tests have to be confirmed after at least 12 weeks. Clinical picture consists of thromboses in many organs and spontaneous miscarriages, sometimes thrombocytopaenia and haemolytic anaemia, but neurological cases are the most frequent: headaches, stroke, encephalopathy, seizures, visual disturbances, Sneddon syndrome, dementia, vertigo, chorea, balism, transitory global amnesia, psychosis, transversal myelopathy and Guillain-Barre syndrome. About 50% of strokes below 50 years of age are caused by APS. The first line of therapy in stroke is anticoagulation: intravenous heparin or low-weight heparins. In chronic treatment, oral anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy are used, warfarin and aspirin, mostly for life. In resistant cases, corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulins and plasmapheresis are necessary. Prognosis is good in most patients but some are treatment-resistant with recurrent thrombotic events and eventually death.

  16. Kartagener syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedaa Skeik

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nedaa Skeik1–3, Fadi I Jabr41Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 2Dartmouth Medical School, Hannover, NH, USA; 3New York Medical College, New York, NY, USA; 4Horizon Medical Center, Hospital Medicine, Dickson, TN, USAAbstract: Kartagener syndrome is a rare, ciliopathic, autosomal recessive genetic disorder that causes a defect in the action of the cilia lining the respiratory tract and fallopian tube. Patients usually present with chronic recurrent rhinosinusitis, otitis media, pneumonia, and bronchiectasis caused by pseudomonal infection. Situs inversus can be seen in about 50% of cases. Diagnosis can be made by tests to prove impaired cilia function, biopsy, and genetic studies. Treatment is supportive. In severe cases, the prognosis can be fatal if bilateral lung transplantation is delayed. We present a case of a 66-year-old woman with chronic recurrent upper respiratory infections, pseudomonal pneumonia, and chronic bronchiectasis who presented with acute respiratory failure. She was diagnosed with Kartagener syndrome based on her clinical presentation and genetic studies. She expired on ventilator with refractory respiratory and multiorgan failure.Keywords: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, bronchiectasis, immotile cilia syndrome, situs inversus

  17. Crush syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Lovallo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The first detailed cases of crush syndrome were described in 1941 in London after victims trapped beneath bombed buildings presented with swollen limbs, hypovolemic shock, dark urine, renal failure, and ultimately perished. The majority of the data and studies on this topic still draw from large databases of earthquake victims. However, in Africa, a continent with little seismic activity, the majority of crush syndrome cases are instead victims of severe beatings rather than earthquake casualties, and clinical suspicion by emergency personnel must be high in this patient group presenting with oliguria or pigmenturia. Damaged skeletal muscle fibres and cell membranes lead to an inflammatory cascade resulting in fluid sequestration in the injured extremity, hypotension, hyperkalemia and hypocalcemia and their complications, and renal injury from multiple sources. Elevations in the serum creatinine, creatine kinase (CK, and potassium levels are frequent findings in these patients, and can help guide critical steps in management. Fluid resuscitation should begin prior to extrication of trapped victims or as early as possible, as this basic intervention has been shown to in large part prevent progression of renal injury to requiring haemodialysis. Alkalinization of the urine and use of mannitol for forced diuresis are recommended therapies under specific circumstances and are supported by studies done in animal models, but have not been shown to change clinical outcomes in human crush victims. In the past 70 years the crush syndrome and its management have been studied more thoroughly, however clinical practice guidelines continue to evolve.

  18. Asperger Syndrome (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teaching Kids to Be Smart About Social Media Asperger Syndrome KidsHealth > For Parents > Asperger Syndrome Print A ... the medical community still use the term. About Asperger Syndrome The disorder is named after Hans Asperger, ...

  19. Genetic obesity syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstone, Anthony P; Beales, Philip L

    2008-01-01

    There are numerous reports of multi-system genetic disorders with obesity. Many have a characteristic presentation and several, an overlapping phenotype indicating the likelihood of a shared common underlying mechanism or pathway. By understanding the genetic causes and functional perturbations of such syndromes we stand to gain tremendous insight into obesogenic pathways. In this review we focus particularly on Bardet-Biedl syndrome, whose molecular genetics and cell biology has been elucidated recently, and Prader-Willi syndrome, the commonest obesity syndrome due to loss of imprinted genes on 15q11-13. We also discuss highlights of other genetic obesity syndromes including Alstrom syndrome, Cohen syndrome, Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy (pseudohypoparathyroidism), Carpenter syndrome, MOMO syndrome, Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome, cases with deletions of 6q16, 1p36, 2q37 and 9q34, maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 14, fragile X syndrome and Börjeson-Forssman-Lehman syndrome.

  20. Anesthesia & Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Care » Associated Conditions » Anesthesia & Down Syndrome Anesthesia & Down Syndrome Complications of anesthesia (sedation during surgery) occur in ... histories are complicated. Why Would an Individual With Down Syndrome Need A nesthesia? 40-60% of infants born ...

  1. Dental Issues & Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Associated Conditions » Dental Issues & Down Syndrome Dental Issues & Down Syndrome Dental care is important for everybody, but people ... is Different About the Teeth of People With Down Syndrome? Delayed Eruption The teeth of people with Down ...

  2. Heart and Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Associated Conditions » The Heart & Down Syndrome The Heart & Down Syndrome Abnormalities of the cardiovascular system are common in ... the Most Common Heart Defects in Children With Down Syndrome? The most common defects are Atrioventricular Septal Defect ( ...

  3. ADHD & Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Care » Associated Conditions » ADHD & Down Syndrome ADHD & Down Syndrome Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD, is a ... age. How Common Is ADD in Children With Down Syndrome? The frequency of ADHD in children with Down ...

  4. What Causes Down Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications What causes Down syndrome? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: ... Down Syndrome Registry​ . Chromosomal Changes That Can Cause Down Syndrome Research shows that three types of chromosomal changes ...

  5. Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyaline membrane disease (HMD); Infant respiratory distress syndrome; Respiratory distress syndrome in infants; RDS - infants ... improves slowly after that. Some infants with severe respiratory distress syndrome will die. This most often occurs between days ...

  6. BIOMARKERS TO DEFINE OPTIMAL PROTEIN REQUIREMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Di Girolamo, Filippo Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Dietary proteins are the source of the amino acids required by the body for tissue growth and maintenance. The Population Reference Intake (PRI) for proteins, as defined by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) for healthy adults, including the elderly, is 0.83 g/kg body weight/day. This amount is defined on the net balance of body protein (or “nitrogen balance”, given by the difference between dietary nitrogen intake and losses) equivalent to 0.66 g/kg/day plus a safety factor for interp...

  7. GNU Based Security in Software Defined Radio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. B. Bhadka

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Various new technologies are explored for radio communication toward the 21st century. Among them the technology of "software defined radio" attracts large attention. Software Defined Radio (SDR technology implements some of the functional modules of a radio system in software enabling highly flexible handsets. SDR devices may be reconfigured dynamically via the download of new software modules. Malicious or malfunctioning downloaded software present serious security risks to SDR devices and networks in which they operate. Together with the use of software downloading, future terminals will become a platform to support the deployment of yet unspecified services and applications.

  8. Medical abortion. defining success and categorizing failures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rørbye, Christina; Nørgaard, Mogens; Vestermark, Vibeke;

    2003-01-01

    Medical abortion was performed in 461 consecutive women with gestational age LT /= 63 days using a regimen of mifepristone 600 mg followed 2 days later by gemeprost 1 mg vaginally. Success, defined as no surgical intervention, declined from 98.7% after 2 weeks to 94.6% after 15 weeks. The differe......Medical abortion was performed in 461 consecutive women with gestational age LT /= 63 days using a regimen of mifepristone 600 mg followed 2 days later by gemeprost 1 mg vaginally. Success, defined as no surgical intervention, declined from 98.7% after 2 weeks to 94.6% after 15 weeks...

  9. What Defines a Separate Hydrothermal System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawless, J.V.; Bogie, I.; Bignall, G.

    1995-01-01

    Separate hydrothermal systems can be defined in a variety of ways. Criteria which have been applied include separation of heat source, upflow, economic resource and geophysical anomaly. Alternatively, connections have been defined by the effects of withdrawal of economically useful fluid and subsidence, effects of reinjection, changes in thermal features, or by a hydrological connection of groundwaters. It is proposed here that: ''A separate hydrothermal system is one that is fed by a separate convective upflow of fluid, at a depth above the brittle-ductile transition for the host rocks, while acknowledging that separate hydrothermal systems can be hydrologically interconnected at shallower levels''.

  10. Fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, and myofascial pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buskila, D

    2000-03-01

    Fibromyalgia and widespread pain were common in Gulf War veterans with unexplained illness referred to a rheumatology clinic. Increased tenderness was demonstrated in the postmenstrual phase of the cycle compared with the intermenstrual phase in normally cycling women but not in users of oral contraceptives. Patients with fibromyalgia had high levels of symptoms that have been used to define silicone implant-associated syndrome. Tender points were found to be a common transient finding associated with acute infectious mononucleosis, but fibromyalgia was an unusual long-term outcome. The common association of fibromyalgia with other rheumatic and systemic illnesses was further explored. A preliminary study revealed a possible linkage of fibromyalgia to the HLA region. Patients with fibromyalgia were found to have an impaired ability to activate the hypothalamic pituitary portion of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis as well as the sympathoadrenal system, leading to reduced corticotropin and epinephrine response to hypoglycemia. Much interest has been expressed in the literature on the possible role of autonomic dysfunction in the development or exacerbation of fatigue and other symptoms in chronic fatigue syndrome. Mycoplasma genus and mycoplasma fermentans were detected by polymerase chain reaction in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome. It was reported that myofascial temporomandibular disorder does not run in families. No major therapeutic trials in fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, or myofascial pain syndrome were reported over the past year. The effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy and behavior therapy for chronic pain in adults was emphasized. A favorable outcome of fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome in children and adolescents was reported.

  11. Inherited ichthyosis: Syndromic forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Kozo

    2016-03-01

    Among diseases that cause ichthyosis as one of the symptoms, there are some diseases that induce abnormalities in organs other than the skin. Of these, diseases with characteristic signs are regarded as syndromes. Although these syndromes are very rare, Netherton syndrome, Sjögren-Larsson syndrome, Conradi-Hünermann-Happle syndrome, Dorfman-Chanarin syndrome, ichthyosis follicularis, atrichia and photophobia (IFAP) syndrome, and Refsum syndrome have been described in texts as representative ones. It is important to know the molecular genetics and pathomechanisms in order to establish an effective therapy and beneficial genetic counseling including a prenatal diagnosis.

  12. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pharyngitis, Adenitis Syndrome (Juvenile) Polymyalgia Rheumatica Psoriatic Arthritis Raynaud's Phenomenon Reactive Arthritis Rheumatoid Arthritis Scleroderma Sjogren's Syndrome Spinal Stenosis Spondyloarthritis Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (Juvenile) Takayasu's ...

  13. Bruxism defined and graded: an international consensus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lobbezoo, F.; Ahlberg, J.; Glaros, A.G.; Kato, T.; Koyano, K.; Lavigne, G.J.; de Leeuw, R.; Manfredini, D.; Svensson, P.; Winocur, E.

    2013-01-01

    To date, there is no consensus about the definition and diagnostic grading of bruxism. A written consensus discussion was held among an international group of bruxism experts as to formulate a definition of bruxism and to suggest a grading system for its operationalisation. The expert group defined

  14. Defining, constructing and assessing learning outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, R M

    2009-08-01

    Learning outcomes define the veterinary curriculum and inform students about what they must be able to demonstrate to succeed. Stakeholder consultation during their development ensures that programme learning outcomes equip graduates to contribute to the veterinary profession. Effective learning outcomes form a hierarchy linking the programme, its courses and tasks. Clear outcomes direct students towards higher quality learning by indicating the achievements intended, but leave scope for emergent learning outcomes. Defined technical competencies fit within this overarching framework, complementing higher order learning. Mapping is used to align learning outcomes horizontally and vertically so students are systematically guided towards entry-level competence and professional independence. Constructively aligned learning and assessment tasks ensure learners spend the focused time required to sequentially develop programme outcomes. Assessment by staff, peers and other stakeholders certifies achievement of intended outcomes. Effective assessment also empowers students to define and achieve their own learning outcomes, so they develop the habits of autonomous life-long learning. Evaluation of the quality and consistency of achieved outcomes informs ongoing programme improvement. If we are going to achieve the objectives of this set of papers, i.e. to improve public health education globally (Rev. sci. tech. Off. int. Epiz. 28 [2] 2009), then it is essential that they be well defined in the learning outcomes statement of all veterinary schools.

  15. Restandardisation defined as democratising language planning1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    aims to define restandardisation as democratising language planning, i.e. a .... disintegration of the Soviet Union of Yugoslavia, the opening of borders in Europe, and the ..... descriptive framework for standardisation as a language planning process. .... belonging to the same language group in order to form one common ...

  16. 7 CFR 51.2 - Terms defined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Definitions § 51.2 Terms defined. Words in the regulations in this part in the singular form shall be deemed.... “Federal-State Inspection Agency” means any State agency, business association or trade organization... plant. “Packing plant” means the premises, buildings, structures, and equipment including but...

  17. Defining benzodiazepine dependence: The confusion persists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linsen, S.M.; Zitman, F.G.; Breteler, M.H.M.

    1995-01-01

    Little consensus exists on the risk of benzodiazepine (BZD) dependence. We investigated how often BZD dependence and related concepts have been defined in the literature on BZD effects in humans. In addition, the definitions of BZD dependence were compared in order to assess the similarity of conten

  18. 47 CFR 54.401 - Lifeline defined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Universal Service Support for Low-Income Consumers § 54.401 Lifeline defined. (a) As used in this... assistance. Eligible telecommunications carriers not subject to state commission jurisdiction also shall...

  19. THEORETICAL APPROACHES DEFINE SENSE OF INVESTMENT PROJECT

    OpenAIRE

    Yu. A. Burduzha

    2010-01-01

    The essence of terms “project”, “investment project” is defined in the article, as well as the difference between definitions of terms “project”, “plan” and “program” is determined. The main approaches to the treatment of definition of term “investment project” are considered.

  20. Precise Interval Timer for Software Defined Radio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozhidaev, Aleksey (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A precise digital fractional interval timer for software defined radios which vary their waveform on a packet-by-packet basis. The timer allows for variable length in the preamble of the RF packet and allows to adjust boundaries of the TDMA (Time Division Multiple Access) Slots of the receiver of an SDR based on the reception of the RF packet of interest.

  1. Externally definable sets and dependent pairs

    CERN Document Server

    Chernikov, Artem

    2010-01-01

    We prove that externally definable sets in first order NIP theories have honest definitions, giving a new proof of Shelah's expansion theorem. Also we discuss a weak notion of stable embeddedness true in this context. Those results are then used to prove a general theorem on dependent pairs, which in particular answers a question of Baldwin and Benedikt on naming an indiscernible sequence.

  2. Defining Parental Involvement: Perception of School Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Clara Y.; Austin, Sheila M.; Growe, Roslin

    2013-01-01

    There remains a plaguing question of how to get parents involved with their child's education. Many parents and educators have different perceptions of what parental involvement means. Miscommunication between the two groups often exists because of how parental involvement is conceptualized. While educators define parental involvement as…

  3. Defining enthesitis in spondyloarthritis by ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terslev, Lene; Naredo, E; Iagnocco, A

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To standardize ultrasound (US) in enthesitis. Methods: An Initial Delphi exercise was undertaken to define US detected enthesitis and its core components. These definitions were subsequently tested on static images taken from Spondyloarthritis (SpA) patients in order to evaluate...

  4. 16 CFR 303.1 - Terms defined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... that solicit ultimate consumers to purchase such textile products by mail, telephone, electronic mail... REGULATIONS UNDER THE TEXTILE FIBER PRODUCTS IDENTIFICATION ACT § 303.1 Terms defined. As used in this part, unless the context otherwise specifically requires: (a) The term Act means the Textile Fiber...

  5. Acquisition Cycle Time: Defining the Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    prescribe appetite suppression and fiscal discipline . Still others diagnose inept management and excessive bureaucracy, and prescribe streamlined...complex the system, the higher this bound. • Software development consists of completing known work and discovering new work. There are fundamental ... taxonomy of acquisition risk categories, with corresponding development timelines. In that report, a low-risk acquisition is defined to be one that

  6. Defining Grammatical Difficulty: A Student Teacher Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graus, Johan; Coppen, Peter-Arno

    2015-01-01

    Numerous second language acquisition (SLA) researchers have tried to define grammatical difficulty in second and foreign language acquisition--often as part of an attempt to relate the efficacy of different types of instruction to the degree of difficulty of grammatical structures. The resulting proliferation of definitions and the lack of a…

  7. 16 CFR 502.2 - Terms defined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... and customary and regular when used with the term price means the price at which a consumer commodity..., package, label, person, commerce, principal display panel, and random package have the same meaning as those terms are defined under part 500 of this chapter. (b) The term packager and labeler means any...

  8. Software-defined anything challenges status quo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Wayne; Borders, Tammie

    2015-01-01

    INL successfully developed a proof of concept for "Software Defined Anything" by emulating the laboratory's business applications that run on Virtual Machines. The work INL conducted demonstrates to industry on how this methodology can be used to improve security, automate and repeat processes, and improve consistency.

  9. Defining collaborative business rules management solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    dr. Martijn Zoet; Johan Versendaal

    2014-01-01

    From the publishers' website: The goal of this research is to define a method for configuring a collaborative business rules management solution from a value proposition perspective. In an earlier published study (Business rules management solutions: added value by means of business

  10. Defining and Operationalising L2 Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulte, Bram; Housen, Alex

    2012-01-01

    This chapter takes a critical look at complexity in L2 research. We demonstrate several problems in the L2 literature in terms of how complexity has been defined and operationalised as a construct. In the first part of the chapter we try to unravel its highly complex, multidimensional nature by presenting a taxonomic model that identifies major…

  11. THEORETICAL APPROACHES DEFINE SENSE OF INVESTMENT PROJECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. A. Burduzha

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The essence of terms “project”, “investment project” is defined in the article, as well as the difference between definitions of terms “project”, “plan” and “program” is determined. The main approaches to the treatment of definition of term “investment project” are considered.

  12. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Corneal Abrasions Dilating Eye Drops Lazy eye (defined) Pink eye (defined) Retinopathy of Prematurity Strabismus Stye (defined) Vision ... Corneal Abrasions Dilating Eye Drops Lazy eye (defined) Pink eye (defined) Retinopathy of Prematurity Strabismus Stye (defined) Vision ...

  13. SYNDROME X IN ACUTE CORONARY SYNDROME PATIENTS- A TERTIARY CARE CENTER STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogendra

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic Syndrome (MS or insulin resistance syndrome is commonly defined as a group of risk factors or abnormalities associated with insulin resistance that markedly increased risk for both coronary heart disease and diabetes. Cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality, even in the absence of baseline CVD and diabetes. Early identification, treatment and prevention of the metabolic syndrome present a major challenge for health care professionals facing an epidemic of overweight and sedentary lifestyle. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES To study the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in pts. with Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS and its effect on hospital outcomes. MATERIALS AND METHODS Observational study in 55 cases (28 cases and 27 controls was conducted in Dr. BRAMH, Raipur and each patient was assessed with detailed clinical history and was also assessed for parameters of MS. The cases and controls were also followed up during their hospital stay for the presence of or development of heart failure, arrhythmias, shock and death. Chi square and ‘t’ test were used to analyse obtained data. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS In the present study sex ratio amongst the cases was (M:F 1.15:1 and 2.6:1 in controls. Maximum patients were between the ages of 50-60. Non-ST elevation MI was more common in patients with metabolic syndrome and they presented late to the hospital for treatment. Hypertension and fasting hyperglycemia are the most prevalent components of metabolic syndrome in patients of acute coronary syndrome. Our Study also suggests that hypertriglyceridemia is the most common lipid abnormality in patients of acute coronary syndrome. An increase in the incidence of heart failure was observed in patients with metabolic syndrome Cardiogenic shock is seen with increased frequency in patients with metabolic syndrome. Case fatalities were seen with equal frequency in both the groups, hence metabolic syndrome is not associated with increased case fatality while

  14. Macrocephaly, obesity, mental (intellectual) disability, and ocular abnormalities: alternative definition and further delineation of MOMO syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Donato, N; Riess, A; Hackmann, K; Rump, A; Huebner, A; von der Hagen, M; Hahn, G; Schrock, E; Tinschert, S

    2012-11-01

    MOMO syndrome, previously defined as Macrosomia, Obesity, Macrocephaly, and Ocular abnormalities (OMIM 157980) is a rare intellectual disability syndrome of unknown cause. We describe two further patients with MOMO syndrome. Reported data of patients with MOMO syndrome and our own findings indicate that overgrowth does not appear to be a specific feature. We propose to form the acronym "MOMO" from Macrocephaly, Obesity, Mental (intellectual) disability, and Ocular abnormalities, excluding macrosomia from the syndrome name. The combination of obesity, macrocephaly, and colobomas is unique, therefore these features can be used as major diagnostic criteria of MOMO syndrome. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Cardiac complications in a metamizole-induced type I Kounis syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose F. Martínez Juste

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Kounis syndrome is defined as the coincidental occurrence of allergic reaction and acute coronary syndrome secondary to vasospasm. Anti-inflammatory drugs are included as one of the multiple causes. Current data available about this syndrome come from case reports. We present the case of a patient who suffered Kounis syndrome with cardiogenic shock and asystole after intravenous infusion of Metamizole, and in which no lesions were observed in coronariography.

  16. Early Repolarization Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederic Sacher

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The electrocardiographic pattern of early repolarization (ER is common, with a particularly high prevalence reported amongst athletes and adolescents. It has long been associated with benign outcome [1-3]. Recently, an association between inferolateral ER pattern and sudden cardiac death (SCD has been established by different groups [4-7]. Population-based studies have also reported an increased mortality rate among patients with inferolateral ER pattern compared to controls [7-9]. To bring back together these differences, it is important to focus on the definition of ER pattern used in these different studies as well as the population included. The definition of ER pattern associated with sudden cardiac death was the presence of J point elevation more than or equal to 0.1mV in at least 2 contiguous inferior and/or lateral leads of a standard 12-lead ECG and not ST elevation as it was often the case in the studies with benign outcome. Any study dealing with ER should clearly indicate the definition used. Otherwise it cannot be interpreted. Talking about definition, ER syndrome is an ER pattern (as defined above associated with symptoms (syncope or aborted SCD and/or familial history of SCD as mentioned in the last HRS/EHRA/APHRS Expert Consensus Statement on the Diagnosis and Management of Patients with Inherited Primary Arrhythmia Syndromes [10]. It is important to recognise that having only an ER pattern is not a disease.

  17. Preeclampsia: Syndrome or Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myatt, Leslie; Roberts, James M

    2015-11-01

    The focus on disease mechanisms underlying the hypertension and proteinuria defining preeclampsia has increased knowledge of the pathophysiology yet we lack both therapy and predictors. We propose this is in part due to the fact that diagnostic findings identify a "preeclampsia syndrome" but do not necessarily indicate the most important pathophysiology nor if organs are involved as cause or consequence. The increased risk for later life cardiovascular disease in women who develop preeclampsia suggests the stress test of pregnancy exposes pre-existing subclinical vascular disease. The dogma that inadequate trophoblast invasion and ischemia/reperfusion injury to the placenta is "the" cause of preeclampsia is more relevant to early onset preeclampsia (preeclampsia where maternal constitutive factors or susceptibility to vascular damage is more relevant. The contribution of differing disease phenotypes to the syndrome may explain the inability of biomarker studies to identify all preeclampsia. Identification of phenotypes will require large amounts of prospective clinical data and biospecimens, collected in a harmonized manner with analysis in an unbiased discovery approach.

  18. Cerebral salt wasting syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harshal Dholke

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is on the rise, especially in today′s fast-paced world. TBI requires not only neurosurgical expertise but also neurointensivist involvement for a better outcome. Disturbances of sodium balance are common in patients with brain injury, as the central nervous system plays a major role in sodium regulation. Hyponatraemia, defined as serum sodium <135 meq/L is commonly seen and is especially deleterious as it can contribute to cerebral oedema in these patients. Syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH, is the most well-known cause of hyponatraemia in this subset of patients. Cerebral Salt Wasting Syndrome (CSWS, leading to renal sodium loss is an important cause of hyponatraemia in patients with TBI. Although incompletely studied, decreased renal sympathetic responses and cerebral natriuretic factors play a role in the pathogenesis of CSWS. Maintaining a positive sodium balance and adequate hydration can help in the treatment. It is important to differentiate between SIADH and CSWS when trying to ascertain a case for patients with acute brain injury, as the treatment of the two are diametrically opposite.

  19. [Acute coronary syndrome -- 2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Dávid; Merkely, Béla

    2012-12-23

    The acute coronary syndrome is the most severe form of coronary artery disease. It is an immediate threat of life and the mortality rate can be high without proper therapy and patient management. Based on the first ECG, two different forms can be distinguished: acute coronary syndrome with and without ST elevation. Besides adequate medication, management of these patients is an essential part of treatment. In case of ST elevation, coronarography and percutaneous coronary intervention is needed in general, within 24 hours from the onset of symptoms. When ST elevation is not detected on the ECG, individual ischemic risk factors and predictable mortality of the patient may define the necessity and the date of the invasive examination. The Hungarian hemodynamic laboratory network covers almost the whole country and, therefore, practically each patient may receive a state-of-the-art therapy. Although indicators of cardiovascular diseases are still prominent, the mortality rate of myocardial Infarction is decreasing in Hungary due to the well-organized invasive care.

  20. Heart failure accompanied by sick euthyroid syndrome and exercise training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psirropoulos, D; Lefkos, N; Boudonas, G; Efthimiadis, A; Vogas, V; Keskilidis, C; Tsapas, G

    2002-05-01

    Sick euthyroid syndrome is defined as the decrease of serum free triiodothyronine with normal free L-thyroxin and thyrotropin. Its appearance in patients with chronic heart failure is an indicator of severity. Exercise training through a wide variety of mechanisms reverses sick euthyroid syndrome (normalization of free triiodothyronine levels) and improves the ability to exercise. There is a connection during exercise among dyspnea, hyperventilation, fatigue, catecholamines, a decrease in the number and function of beta-blocker receptors, and elevation of serum free triiodothyronine. It is not known whether sick euthyroid syndrome contributes to the development of heart failure or is only an attendant syndrome.

  1. Acute coronary syndromes in the community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M. Manemann (Sheila M.); Y. Gerber (Yariv); A.M. Chamberlain (Alanna); S.M. Dunlay (Shannon); M.R. Bell (Malcolm); A.S. Jaffe (Allan); S.A. Weston (Susan); J.M. Killian (Jill); J.A. Kors (Jan); V.L. Roger (Véronique Lee)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjectives To measure the incidence of acute coronary syndrome (ACS), defined as first-ever myocardial infarction (MI) or unstable angina (UA); evaluate recent temporal trends; and determine whether survival after ACS has changed over time and differs by type. Patients and Methods This w

  2. Non ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Sarkees, Michael L; Bavry, Anthony A.

    2010-01-01

    Non ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS, here defined as unstable angina and non ST-elevation MI) is characterised by episodes of chest pain at rest or with minimal exertion, which increase in frequency or severity, often with dynamic ECG changes.

  3. Stressful life events and incident metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rutters, Femke; Pilz, Stefan; Koopman, Anitra D M

    2015-01-01

    . Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the Adult Treatment Panel III, including fasting plasma glucose levels, HDL-C levels, triglyceride levels, waist circumference and hypertension. We included 1099 participants (47% male; age 60 ± 7 years). During 6.5 years of follow-up, 238 participants (22...

  4. J Wave Syndromes: A Decade of Progress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-Liang Li; Lin Yang; Chang-Cong Cui; Chao-Feng Sun; Gan-Xin Yan

    2015-01-01

    Objective:The objective was to provide a brief history of J wave syndromes and to summarize our current understanding of their molecular,ionic,cellular mechanisms,and clinical features.We will also discuss the existing debates and further direction in basic and clinical research for J wave syndromes.Data Sources:The publications on key words of"J wave syndromes","early repolarization syndrome (ERS)","Brugada syndrome (BrS)" and "ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI)" were comprehensively reviewed through search of the PubMed literatures without restriction on the publication date.Study Selection:Original articles,reviews and other literatures concerning J wave syndromes,ERS,BrS and STEMI were selected.Results:J wave syndromes were firstly defined by Yan et al.in a Chinese journal a decade ago,which represent a spectrum of variable phenotypes characterized by appearance of prominent electrocardiographic J wave including ERS,BrS and ventricular fibrillation (VF) associated with hypothermia and acute STEMI.J wave syndromes can be inherited or acquired and are mechanistically linked to amplification of the transient outward current (Ito)-mediated J waves that can lead to phase 2 reentry capable of initiating VF.Conclusions:J wave syndromes are a group of newly highlighted clinical entities that share similar molecular,ionic and cellular mechanism and marked by amplified J wave on the electrocardiogram and a risk of VF.The clinical challenge ahead is to identify the patients with J wave syndromes who are at risk for sudden cardiac death and determine the alternative therapeutic strategies to reduce mortality.

  5. Raynaud's syndrome and carpal tunnel syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Waller, D G; Dathan, J R

    1985-01-01

    We report three cases of Raynaud's syndrome with digital ischaemic ulceration, in association with carpal tunnel syndrome. In all cases, the aetiology of the Raynaud's syndrome was probably unrelated to the nerve compression. However, symptoms were worse on the side of the median nerve lesion in two patients and worse on the side with the most severe nerve dysfunction in the third; symptoms were relieved by carpal tunnel decompression in two patients. We suggest that carpal tunnel syndrome ma...

  6. A Bad Case of Good's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachdjian, Raffi; Keller, Janet J; Pfeffer, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Good's syndrome is a relatively rare immunodeficiency condition that presents in the fourth or fifth decade of life and is defined by hypogammaglobulinemia in the setting of a thymoma. The humoral defect may be severe enough to cause an absence in B cells, with a consequent recurrence of sinopulmonary disease, chronic non-infectious diarrhea and opportunistic infections. The prognosis in patients with Good's syndrome appears to be worse than in those with X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) and common variable immune deficiency (CVID). There have only been three cases of Good's syndrome associated with mycobacterium, and only one case with a cavitary lesion in the lungs. We present here a unique case of Good's syndrome with a non-mycobacterial cavitary lesion.

  7. The "adult" form of the scimitar syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuis, C; Charaf, L A; Brevière, G M; Abou, P; Rémy-Jardin, M; Helmius, G

    1992-08-15

    One hundred twenty-two cases of the adult form of the scimitar syndrome were collected from different cardiologic centers. The clinical, radiographic and hemodynamic findings are described. The scimitar syndrome is defined as an anomalous right pulmonary venous drainage, partial or complete, to the inferior vena cava. Additional characteristics of this syndrome such as hypoplasia and abnormalities of the vascular supply to the right lung, dextrocardia and abnormalities of the bronchial segmentation are common; bronchiectases are rare. The left to right shunt was less than 50% in 100 of the 122 patients. The pulmonary arterial pressures were normal in 94 patients and slightly elevated in 28. A follow-up study of these patients showed that, without surgical correction, they lead a normal life. An awareness of this syndrome may avoid unnecessary invasive diagnostic procedures and surgical treatment for most patients.

  8. Morvan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maskery, Mark; Chhetri, Suresh K.; Dayanandan, Rejith; Gall, Claire

    2016-01-01

    A 74-year-old gentleman was admitted to the regional neurosciences center with encephalopathy, myokymia, and dysautonomia. Chest imaging had previously identified an incidental mass in the anterior mediastinum, consistent with a primary thymic tumor. Antivoltage-gated potassium channel (anti-VGKC) antibodies were positive (titer 1273 pmol/L) and he was hypokalemic. Electromyogram and nerve conduction studies were in keeping with peripheral nerve hyperexcitability syndrome, and an electroencephalogram was consistent with encephalopathy. A diagnosis of Morvan syndrome was made, for which he was initially treated with high-dose steroids, followed by a 5-day course of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy. He also underwent thymectomy, followed by a postexcision flare of his symptoms requiring intensive care management. Further steroids, plasmapheresis, and IVIG achieved stabilization of his clinical condition, enabling transfer for inpatient neurorehabilitation. He was commenced on azathioprine and a prolonged oral steroid taper. A subsequent presumed incipient relapse responded well to further IVIG treatment. This case report documents a thymoma-associated presentation of anti-VGKC-positive Morvan syndrome supplemented by patient and carer narrative and video, both of which provide valuable further insights into this rare disorder. There are a limited number of publications surrounding this rare condition available in the English literature. This, combined with the heterogenous presentation, association with underlying malignancy, response to treatment, and prognosis, provides a diagnostic challenge. However, the association with anti-VGKC antibody-associated complexes and 2 recent case series have provided some scope for both accurate diagnosis and management. PMID:26740856

  9. Prevalence study of genetically defined skeletal muscle channelopathies in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horga, Alejandro; Raja Rayan, Dipa L; Matthews, Emma; Sud, Richa; Fialho, Doreen; Durran, Siobhan C M; Burge, James A; Portaro, Simona; Davis, Mary B; Haworth, Andrea; Hanna, Michael G

    2013-04-16

    To obtain minimum point prevalence rates for the skeletal muscle channelopathies and to evaluate the frequency distribution of mutations associated with these disorders. Analysis of demographic, clinical, electrophysiologic, and genetic data of all patients assessed at our national specialist channelopathy service. Only patients living in the United Kingdom with a genetically defined diagnosis of nondystrophic myotonia or periodic paralysis were eligible for the study. Prevalence rates were estimated for England, December 2011. A total of 665 patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria, of which 593 were living in England, giving a minimum point prevalence of 1.12/100,000 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.03-1.21). Disease-specific prevalence figures were as follows: myotonia congenita 0.52/100,000 (95% CI 0.46-0.59), paramyotonia congenita 0.17/100,000 (95% CI 0.13-0.20), sodium channel myotonias 0.06/100,000 (95% CI 0.04-0.08), hyperkalemic periodic paralysis 0.17/100,000 (95% CI 0.13-0.20), hypokalemic periodic paralysis 0.13/100,000 (95% CI 0.10-0.17), and Andersen-Tawil syndrome (ATS) 0.08/100,000 (95% CI 0.05-0.10). In the whole sample (665 patients), 15 out of 104 different CLCN1 mutations accounted for 60% of all patients with myotonia congenita, 11 out of 22 SCN4A mutations for 86% of paramyotonia congenita/sodium channel myotonia pedigrees, and 3 out of 17 KCNJ2 mutations for 42% of ATS pedigrees. We describe for the first time the overall prevalence of genetically defined skeletal muscle channelopathies in England. Despite the large variety of mutations observed in patients with nondystrophic myotonia and ATS, a limited number accounted for a large proportion of cases.

  10. Trichorhinophalangeal syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuzovic, S.; Fiebach, B.J.O.; Magnus, L.; Sauerbrei, H.U.

    1982-11-01

    This article reports on 14 cases of a trichorhinophalangeal syndrome in five successive generations. Besides the well-known characteristics of the TRPS the following symptoms observed in this family are new: Teething was considerably delayed, intelligence was reduced, and there were skin manifestations resembling eczema. Besides, struma colli and colitis ulcerosa were also observed. Subsequent observations have to clarify whether these symptoms are a facultative part of the TRPS pattern. The constant appearance of carriers of these characteristics during five generation points to dominant heredity.

  11. Eagle Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beytholahi JM

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available Eagle's syndrome is characterized by an elongated styloid process and (or calcification of"nstylohyoid ligament besides clinical symptoms. The symptoms are those related to pain when"nswallowing or rotating the neck, headacke, earache, dizziness, intermittent glossitis, sensation of"nforeign body in pharynx and transient syncope. The case which is presented can be considered a very"nrare form of the disease in which complete calcification of the ligament and it's thickening has"noccured. Also there is little relationship between the severity of calcification and severity of symptoms."nA careful and thorough evaluation of each panoramic radiography is emphasized.

  12. HELLP syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilek Acar

    2014-08-01

    Suggested treatment modality consists, stabilization of blood pressure and magnesium sulfate infusion. Then evaluation of fetal status and planning delivery method and time if maternal status remains unstable. If prognosis seems favorable without urgent delivery and fetus can benefit from it, a course of betamethasone can be given to fetuses between 24 and 34 weeks of gestational age. The only and definite treatment of HELLP syndrome is delivering the baby. Suggested benefits of steroid therapy and other experimental treatments are still to be proven effective by large randomized controlled trials. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2014; 23(4.000: 735-760

  13. Jacobsen syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattina, Teresa; Perrotta, Concetta Simona; Grossfeld, Paul

    2009-03-07

    Jacobsen syndrome is a MCA/MR contiguous gene syndrome caused by partial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11. To date, over 200 cases have been reported. The prevalence has been estimated at 1/100,000 births, with a female/male ratio 2:1. The most common clinical features include pre- and postnatal physical growth retardation, psychomotor retardation, and characteristic facial dysmorphism (skull deformities, hypertelorism, ptosis, coloboma, downslanting palpebral fissures, epicanthal folds, broad nasal bridge, short nose, v-shaped mouth, small ears, low set posteriorly rotated ears). Abnormal platelet function, thrombocytopenia or pancytopenia are usually present at birth. Patients commonly have malformations of the heart, kidney, gastrointestinal tract, genitalia, central nervous system and skeleton. Ocular, hearing, immunological and hormonal problems may be also present. The deletion size ranges from approximately 7 to 20 Mb, with the proximal breakpoint within or telomeric to subband 11q23.3 and the deletion extending usually to the telomere. The deletion is de novo in 85% of reported cases, and in 15% of cases it results from an unbalanced segregation of a familial balanced translocation or from other chromosome rearrangements. In a minority of cases the breakpoint is at the FRA11B fragile site. Diagnosis is based on clinical findings (intellectual deficit, facial dysmorphic features and thrombocytopenia) and confirmed by cytogenetics analysis. Differential diagnoses include Turner and Noonan syndromes, and acquired thrombocytopenia due to sepsis. Prenatal diagnosis of 11q deletion is possible by amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling and cytogenetic analysis. Management is multi-disciplinary and requires evaluation by general pediatrician, pediatric cardiologist, neurologist, ophthalmologist. Auditory tests, blood tests, endocrine and immunological assessment and follow-up should be offered to all patients. Cardiac malformations can be very severe

  14. Chilaiditi syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, S D; Cruikshank, J G

    1977-02-01

    The features of the Chilaiditi Syndrome are described, together with the historial background, and a brief review of the literature on the condition is given. The prevalence in our geriatric population was found to be 1% and the 13 cases seen over 22 months are reported briefly. The prevalence increases with age and may be related to the consumption of drugs by the elderly; although in the majority it is asymptomatic, it may, particularly when associated with gastrointestinal symptoms, lead to unnecessary laparotomy. In the geriatric patient, interposition of the bowel should be considered in the differential diagnosis of air under the right hemidiaphragm.

  15. Myofascial syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarlo Carli

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Myofascial pain syndrome is common cause one of musculoskeletal pain and it is characterized by trigger points (TP, limited range of motion in joints and local twitch response (LTR during mechanical stimulation of the TP. Trigger point is a hyperirritable spot in skeletal muscle that is associated with a hypersensitive palpable nodule in a taut band. The spot is tender when pressed and can give rise to characteristic referred pain, motor dysfunction and autonomic phenomena. Palpation is reliable diagnostic criterion for locating TP in patients. Treatment is based on anesthetise TP, stretch and spray, local pression and physical activity.

  16. Jacobsen syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grossfeld Paul

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Jacobsen syndrome is a MCA/MR contiguous gene syndrome caused by partial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11. To date, over 200 cases have been reported. The prevalence has been estimated at 1/100,000 births, with a female/male ratio 2:1. The most common clinical features include pre- and postnatal physical growth retardation, psychomotor retardation, and characteristic facial dysmorphism (skull deformities, hypertelorism, ptosis, coloboma, downslanting palpebral fissures, epicanthal folds, broad nasal bridge, short nose, v-shaped mouth, small ears, low set posteriorly rotated ears. Abnormal platelet function, thrombocytopenia or pancytopenia are usually present at birth. Patients commonly have malformations of the heart, kidney, gastrointestinal tract, genitalia, central nervous system and skeleton. Ocular, hearing, immunological and hormonal problems may be also present. The deletion size ranges from ~7 to 20 Mb, with the proximal breakpoint within or telomeric to subband 11q23.3 and the deletion extending usually to the telomere. The deletion is de novo in 85% of reported cases, and in 15% of cases it results from an unbalanced segregation of a familial balanced translocation or from other chromosome rearrangements. In a minority of cases the breakpoint is at the FRA11B fragile site. Diagnosis is based on clinical findings (intellectual deficit, facial dysmorphic features and thrombocytopenia and confirmed by cytogenetics analysis. Differential diagnoses include Turner and Noonan syndromes, and acquired thrombocytopenia due to sepsis. Prenatal diagnosis of 11q deletion is possible by amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling and cytogenetic analysis. Management is multi-disciplinary and requires evaluation by general pediatrician, pediatric cardiologist, neurologist, ophthalmologist. Auditory tests, blood tests, endocrine and immunological assessment and follow-up should be offered to all patients. Cardiac malformations can be

  17. Olmsted Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirka C

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A 20-year-old Sikh man had palmoplantar keratoderma, flexion deformity of digits, universal alopecia, keratotic plaques at the angles of mouth, gluteal cleft, knees and dorsal aspects of the metacarpophalangeal joints of the hand; features of Olmsted syndrome. He had normal nails, teeth, oral mucosa and normal joint movements. Treatment with acitretin, 25mg/day for three and a half months, followed by 25mg once daily alternating with 50mg once daily for 3 months resulted in significant improvement.

  18. Refeeding syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentebella, Judy; Kerner, John A

    2009-10-01

    Refeeding syndrome (RFS) is the result of aggressive enteral or parenteral feeding in a malnourished patient, with hypophosphatemia being the hallmark of this phenomenon. Other metabolic abnormalities, such as hypokalemia and hypomagnesemia, may also occur, along with sodium and fluid retention. The metabolic changes that occur in RFS can be severe enough to cause cardiorespiratory failure and death. This article reviews the pathophysiology, the clinical manifestations, and the management of RFS. The key to prevention is identifying patients at risk and being aware of the potential complications involved in rapidly reintroducing feeds to a malnourished patient.

  19. OCULO-CEREBRO-RENAL SYNDROME (LOWE'S SYNDROME)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1991-01-01

    Oculo-cerebro-renal syndrome (Lowe's syndrome) is characterized by mental and motor retardation, cataract, glaucoma and renal abnormalities. It is an X-linked recessive metabolic disease. Two brothers suffering from Lowe's syndrome are reported. Their mother with lenticular opacities and peculiar facial appearance is in concordance with the obligate carrier. The ocular changes and heridity are discussed.

  20. Computer vision syndrome: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blehm, Clayton; Vishnu, Seema; Khattak, Ashbala; Mitra, Shrabanee; Yee, Richard W

    2005-01-01

    As computers become part of our everyday life, more and more people are experiencing a variety of ocular symptoms related to computer use. These include eyestrain, tired eyes, irritation, redness, blurred vision, and double vision, collectively referred to as computer vision syndrome. This article describes both the characteristics and treatment modalities that are available at this time. Computer vision syndrome symptoms may be the cause of ocular (ocular-surface abnormalities or accommodative spasms) and/or extraocular (ergonomic) etiologies. However, the major contributor to computer vision syndrome symptoms by far appears to be dry eye. The visual effects of various display characteristics such as lighting, glare, display quality, refresh rates, and radiation are also discussed. Treatment requires a multidirectional approach combining ocular therapy with adjustment of the workstation. Proper lighting, anti-glare filters, ergonomic positioning of computer monitor and regular work breaks may help improve visual comfort. Lubricating eye drops and special computer glasses help relieve ocular surface-related symptoms. More work needs to be done to specifically define the processes that cause computer vision syndrome and to develop and improve effective treatments that successfully address these causes.

  1. FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING QUALITY AND ITS DEFINING CHARACTERISTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andra M. ACHIM

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The importance ofhigh-quality financial statements is highlighted by the main standard-setting institutions activating in the field of accounting and reporting. These have issued Conceptual Frameworks which state and describe the qualitative characteristics of accounting information. In this qualitative study, the research methodology consists of reviewing the literature related to the definition of accounting quality and striving for understanding how it can be explained. The main objective of the study is to identify the characteristics information should possess in order to be of high quality. These characteristics also contribute to the way of defining financial accounting quality. The main conclusions that arise from this research are represented by the facts that indeed financial accounting quality cannot be uniquely defined and that financial information is of good quality when it enhances the characteristics incorporated in the conceptual frameworks issued by both International Accounting Standards Board and Financial Accounting Standards Board.

  2. Defining Tiger Parenting in Chinese Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su Yeong

    2013-09-01

    "Tiger" parenting, as described by Amy Chua [2011], has instigated scholarly discourse on this phenomenon and its possible effects on families. Our eight-year longitudinal study, published in the Asian American Journal of Psychology [Kim, Wang, Orozco-Lapray, Shen, & Murtuza, 2013b], demonstrates that tiger parenting is not a common parenting profile in a sample of 444 Chinese American families. Tiger parenting also does not relate to superior academic performance in children. In fact, the best developmental outcomes were found among children of supportive parents. We examine the complexities around defining tiger parenting by reviewing classical literature on parenting styles and scholarship on Asian American parenting, along with Amy Chua's own description of her parenting method, to develop, define, and categorize variability in parenting in a sample of Chinese American families. We also provide evidence that supportive parenting is important for the optimal development of Chinese American adolescents.

  3. Defining life or bringing biology to life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Mirazo, Kepa; Peretó, Juli; Moreno, Alvaro

    2010-04-01

    In the present, post-genomic times, systemic or holistic approaches to living phenomena are compulsory to overcome the limits of traditional strategies, such as the methodological reductionism of molecular biology. In this paper, we propose that theoretical and philosophical efforts to define life also contribute to those integrative approaches, providing a global theoretical framework that may help to deal with or interpret the huge amount of data being collected by current high-throughput technologies, in this so-called 'omics' revolution. We claim that two fundamental notions can capture the core of the living, (basic) autonomy and open-ended evolution, and that only the complementary combination of these two theoretical constructs offers an adequate solution to the problem of defining the nature of life in specific enough-but also encompassing enough-terms. This tentative solution should also illuminate, in its most elementary version, the leading steps towards living beings on Earth.

  4. Control of System with Defined Risk Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavol Tomasov

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In the following paper the basic requirements for system control with defined risk level is presented. The paper should be an introduction to describe of theoretical apparatus, which was created during some years of research work in the Department of information and safety systems in this area. It a modification or creation of new parts of Information theory, System theory, and Control theory means. This parts are necessary for the analysis and synthesis tasks in the systems where dominant attribute of control is defined risk level. The basic problem is the creation of protect mechanism again the threats from inside and from controlled system environs. For each risk reduction mechanism is needed some redundancy which should be into control algorithm to put by exactly determined way.

  5. Defining professional nursing accountability: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krautscheid, Lorretta C

    2014-01-01

    Professional nursing accountability is described by both professional nursing organizations and nursing education credentialing agencies as a core aspect that underpins professional nursing practice. Although accountability is foundational to professional practice, a review of the literature revealed no consistent language or definition regarding professional nursing accountability. Instead, the literature itself reveals that professional nursing accountability is challenging to both describe and define. The ambiguity surrounding how to define professional nursing accountability contributes to challenges associated with both teaching and evaluating student nurse accountability within nursing education curricula. This article provides a reliable and comprehensive definition of professional nursing accountability derived from a synthesis of the literature. Recommendations for nursing education practice and recommendations for nursing education research are proposed.

  6. Fingerprinting Software Defined Networks and Controllers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Graduate School of Engineering and Management Air Force Institute of Technology Air University Air...Networking Defined Within a computer network, switching devices contain three abstractly organized services known as planes [9]. As shown in Figure 2.1, these...stations that exist within an exploitable network. The final threat vector is the lack of trusted resources for forensics and remediation for when an

  7. Research misconduct oversight: defining case costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammon, Elizabeth; Franzini, Luisa

    2013-01-01

    This study uses a sequential mixed method study design to define cost elements of research misconduct among faculty at academic medical centers. Using time driven activity based costing, the model estimates a per case cost for 17 cases of research misconduct reported by the Office of Research Integrity for the period of 2000-2005. Per case cost of research misconduct was found to range from $116,160 to $2,192,620. Research misconduct cost drivers are identified.

  8. Quantum Thought Experiments Can Define Nature

    CERN Document Server

    McCartor, D

    2004-01-01

    One would not think that thought experiments could matter to nature, for they are a humble human device. Yet quantum mechanics very naturally frames thought experiments (as distinct from precisely defining what exists). They exemplify the informing powers of radiation. Though based on wave functions that have time symmetry, these tableaux inevitably tell of irreversible behavior by nature. The paper sketches how John von Neumann's measurement theory fits into this and retells N. David Mermin's baseball story.

  9. Defining benzodiazepine dependence: The confusion persists

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    Little consensus exists on the risk of benzodiazepine (BZD) dependence. We investigated how often BZD dependence and related concepts have been defined in the literature on BZD effects in humans. In addition, the definitions of BZD dependence were compared in order to assess the similarity of contents. From a total of 250 papers (published between 1988 and 1991) 51 provided 126 dependence-related definitions. Six studies referred to the DSM definitions and one to the WHO definition. The obsol...

  10. Defining viability in mammalian cell cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Browne, Susan M.; Al-Rubeai, Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    Abstract A large number of assays are available to monitor viability in mammalian cell cultures with most defining loss of viability as a loss of plasma membrane integrity, a characteristic of necrotic cell death. However, the majority of cultured cells die by apoptosis and early apoptotic cells, although non-viable, maintain an intact plasma membrane and are thus ignored. Here we measure the viability of cultures of a number of common mammalian cell lines by assays that measure me...

  11. Thermodynamics. Using Affinities to define reversible processes

    CERN Document Server

    Ritacco, Hernán A

    2016-01-01

    In this article a definition of reversible processes in terms of differences in intensive Thermodynamics properties (Affinities) is proposed. This definition makes it possible to both define reversible processes before introducing the concept of entropy and avoid the circularity problem that follows from the Clausius definition of entropy changes. The convenience of this new definition compared to those commonly found in textbooks is demonstrated with examples.

  12. How Should Energy Be Defined Throughout Schooling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bächtold, Manuel

    2017-02-01

    The question of how to teach energy has been renewed by recent studies focusing on the learning and teaching progressions for this concept. In this context, one question has been, for the most part, overlooked: how should energy be defined throughout schooling? This paper addresses this question in three steps. We first identify and discuss two main approaches in physics concerning the definition of energy, one claiming there is no satisfactory definition and taking conservation as a fundamental property, and the other based on Rankine's definition of energy as the capacity of a system to produce changes. We then present a study concerning how energy is actually defined throughout schooling in the case of France by analyzing national programs, physics textbooks, and the answers of teachers to a questionnaire. This study brings to light a consistency problem in the way energy is defined across school years: in primary school, an adapted version of Rankine's definition is introduced and conservation is ignored; in high school, conservation is introduced and Rankine's definition is ignored. Finally, we address this consistency problem by discussing possible teaching progressions. We argue in favor of the use of Rankine's definition throughout schooling: at primary school, it is a possible substitute to students' erroneous conceptions; at secondary school, it might help students become aware of the unifying role of energy and thereby overcome the compartmentalization problem.

  13. Speciation without Pre-Defined Fitness Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gras, Robin; Golestani, Abbas; Hendry, Andrew P; Cristescu, Melania E

    2015-01-01

    The forces promoting and constraining speciation are often studied in theoretical models because the process is hard to observe, replicate, and manipulate in real organisms. Most models analyzed to date include pre-defined functions influencing fitness, leaving open the question of how speciation might proceed without these built-in determinants. To consider the process of speciation without pre-defined functions, we employ the individual-based ecosystem simulation platform EcoSim. The environment is initially uniform across space, and an evolving behavioural model then determines how prey consume resources and how predators consume prey. Simulations including natural selection (i.e., an evolving behavioural model that influences survival and reproduction) frequently led to strong and distinct phenotypic/genotypic clusters between which hybridization was low. This speciation was the result of divergence between spatially-localized clusters in the behavioural model, an emergent property of evolving ecological interactions. By contrast, simulations without natural selection (i.e., behavioural model turned off) but with spatial isolation (i.e., limited dispersal) produced weaker and overlapping clusters. Simulations without natural selection or spatial isolation (i.e., behaviour model turned off and high dispersal) did not generate clusters. These results confirm the role of natural selection in speciation by showing its importance even in the absence of pre-defined fitness functions.

  14. HIV-induced immunodeficiency and mortality from AIDS-defining and non-AIDS-defining malignancies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monforte, Antonella d'Arminio; Abrams, Donald; Pradier, Christian; Weber, Rainer; Reiss, Peter; Bonnet, Fabrice; Kirk, Ole; Law, Matthew; De Wit, Stephane; Friis-Møller, Nina; Phillips, Andrew N; Sabin, Caroline A; Lundgren, Jens D; Schölvinck, Elisabeth H.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate deaths from AIDS-defining malignancies (ADM) and non-AIDS-defining malignancies (nADM) in the D:A:D Study and to investigate the relationship between these deaths and immunodeficiency. DESIGN: Observational cohort study. METHODS: Patients (23 437) were followed prospectively f

  15. Lowe syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loi Mario

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Lowe syndrome (the oculocerebrorenal syndrome of Lowe, OCRL is a multisystem disorder characterised by anomalies affecting the eye, the nervous system and the kidney. It is a uncommon, panethnic, X-linked disease, with estimated prevalence in the general population of approximately 1 in 500,000. Bilateral cataract and severe hypotonia are present at birth. In the subsequent weeks or months, a proximal renal tubulopathy (Fanconi-type becomes evident and the ocular picture may be complicated by glaucoma and cheloids. Psychomotor retardation is evident in childhood, while behavioural problems prevail and renal complications arise in adolescence. The mutation of the gene OCRL1 localized at Xq26.1, coding for the enzyme phosphatidylinositol (4,5 bisphosphate 5 phosphatase, PtdIns (4,5P2, in the trans-Golgi network is responsible for the disease. Both enzymatic and molecular testing are available for confirmation of the diagnosis and for prenatal detection of the disease. The treatment includes: cataract extraction, glaucoma control, physical and speech therapy, use of drugs to address behavioural problems, and correction of the tubular acidosis and the bone disease with the use of bicarbonate, phosphate, potassium and water. Life span rarely exceeds 40 years.

  16. Cardiorenal syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabry Omar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in patients with chronic kidney disease.  Heart failure may lead to acute kidney injury and vice versa. Chronic kidney disease may affect the clinical outcomes in patients with cardiovascular disorders. Renal impairment with any degree of albuminuria has been increasingly recognized as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular events and heart failure hospitalizations, while chronic heart failure may cause chronic kidney disease. The bidirectional nature of these disorders contributes to the complexity and the composite definitions of cardiorenal syndromes. However, the most important clinical trials in heart failure tend to exclude patients with significant renal dysfunction. The mechanisms whereby renal insufficiency worsens the outcome in heart failure are not known, and several pathways could contribute to the ‘‘vicious heart/kidney circle.’’ Traditionally, renal impairment has been attributed to the renal hypoperfusion due to reduced cardiac output and decreased systemic pressure. The hypovolemia leads to sympathetic activity, increased renin-angiotensin aldosterone pathway, and arginine-vasopressin release. These mechanisms cause fluid and sodium retention, peripheral vasoconstriction, and volume overload. Therapy to improve renal dysfunction, reduce neurohormonal activation and ameliorate renal blood flow could lead to a reduction in mortality and hospitalization in patients with cardiorenal syndrome.

  17. KBG syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brancati Francesco

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract KBG syndrome is a rare condition characterised by a typical facial dysmorphism, macrodontia of the upper central incisors, skeletal (mainly costovertebral anomalies and developmental delay. To date, KBG syndrome has been reported in 45 patients. Clinical features observed in more than half of patients that may support the diagnosis are short stature, electroencephalogram (EEG anomalies (with or without seizures and abnormal hair implantation. Cutaneous syndactyly, webbed short neck, cryptorchidism, hearing loss, palatal defects, strabismus and congenital heart defects are less common findings. Autosomal dominant transmission has been observed in some families, and it is predominantly the mother, often showing a milder clinical picture, that transmits the disease. The diagnosis is currently based solely on clinical findings as the aetiology is unknown. The final diagnosis is generally achieved after the eruption of upper permanent central incisors at 7–8 years of age when the management of possible congenital anomalies should have been already planned. A full developmental assessment should be done at diagnosis and, if delays are noted, an infant stimulation program should be initiated. Subsequent management and follow-up should include an EEG, complete orthodontic evaluation, skeletal investigation with particular regard to spine curvatures and limb asymmetry, hearing testing and ophthalmologic assessment.

  18. Sotos syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cormier-Daire Valérie

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sotos syndrome is an overgrowth condition characterized by cardinal features including excessive growth during childhood, macrocephaly, distinctive facial gestalt and various degrees of learning difficulty, and associated with variable minor features. The exact prevalence remains unknown but hundreds of cases have been reported. The diagnosis is usually suspected after birth because of excessive height and occipitofrontal circumference (OFC, advanced bone age, neonatal complications including hypotonia and feeding difficulties, and facial gestalt. Other inconstant clinical abnormalities include scoliosis, cardiac and genitourinary anomalies, seizures and brisk deep tendon reflexes. Variable delays in cognitive and motor development are also observed. The syndrome may also be associated with an increased risk of tumors. Mutations and deletions of the NSD1 gene (located at chromosome 5q35 and coding for a histone methyltransferase implicated in transcriptional regulation are responsible for more than 75% of cases. FISH analysis, MLPA or multiplex quantitative PCR allow the detection of total/partial NSD1 deletions, and direct sequencing allows detection of NSD1 mutations. The large majority of NSD1 abnormalities occur de novo and there are very few familial cases. Although most cases are sporadic, several reports of autosomal dominant inheritance have been described. Germline mosaicism has never been reported and the recurrence risk for normal parents is very low (

  19. Sheehan's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilicli, Fatih; Dokmetas, Hatice Sebila; Acibucu, Fettah

    2013-04-01

    Sheehan's syndrome (SS) is characterized by various degrees of hypopituitarism, and develops as a result of ischemic pituitary necrosis due to severe postpartum hemorrhage. Increased pituitary volume, small sella size, disseminated intravascular coagulation and autoimmunity are the proposed factors in the pathogenesis of SS. Hormonal insufficiencies, ranging from single pituitary hormone insufficiency to total hypopituitarism, are observed in patients. The first most important issue in the diagnosis is being aware of the syndrome. Lack of lactation and failure of menstrual resumption after delivery that complicated with severe hemorrhage are the most important clues in diagnosing SS. The most frequent endocrine disorders are the deficiencies of growth hormone and prolactin. In patients with typical obstetric history, prolactin response to TRH seems to be the most sensitive screening test in diagnosing SS. Other than typical pituitary deficiency, symptoms such as anemia, pancytopenia, osteoporosis, impairment in cognitive functions and impairment in the quality of life are also present in these patients. Treatment of SS is based on the appropriate replacement of deficient hormones. Growth hormone replacement has been found to have positive effects; however, risk to benefit ratio, side effects and cost of the treatment should be taken into account.

  20. Klinefelter syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, C M; Bremner, W J

    1998-06-22

    Klinefelter syndrome is the most common sex chromosome disorder. Affected males carry an additional X chromosome, which results in male hypogonadism, androgen deficiency, and impaired spermatogenesis. Some patients may exhibit all of the classic signs of this disorder, including gynecomastia, small testes, sparse body hair, tallness, and infertility, whereas others, because of the wide variability in clinical expression, lack many of these features. Treatment consists of testosterone replacement therapy to correct the androgen deficiency and to provide patients with appropriate virilization. This therapy also has positive effects on mood and self-esteem and has been shown to protect against osteoporosis, although it will not reverse infertility. Although the diagnosis of Klinefelter syndrome is now made definitively using chromosomal karyotyping, revealing in most instances a 47,XXY genotype, the diagnosis also can be made using a careful history and results of a physical examination, with the hallmark being small, firm testes. As it affects 1 in 500 male patients and presents with a variety of clinical features, primary care physicians should be familiar with this condition.

  1. A new diagnostic approach to popliteal artery entrapment syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Charles; Kennedy, Dominic; Bastian-Jordan, Matthew; Hislop, Matthew; Cramp, Brendan; Dhupelia, Sanjay [Queensland X-Ray, Sunnybank, Queensland, 4109 (Australia)

    2015-09-15

    A new method of diagnosing and defining functional popliteal artery entrapment syndrome is described. By combining ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging techniques with dynamic plantarflexion of the ankle against resistance, functional entrapment can be demonstrated and the location of the arterial occlusion identified. This combination of imaging modalities will also define muscular anatomy for guiding intervention such as surgery or Botox injection.

  2. Down Syndrome (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet Down Syndrome KidsHealth > For Parents > Down Syndrome Print A A ... Help en español El síndrome de Down About Down Syndrome Down syndrome (DS), also called Trisomy 21, is ...

  3. Facts about Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... label> Information For… Media Policy Makers Facts about Down Syndrome Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on ... children with Down syndrome. View charts » What is Down Syndrome? Down syndrome is a condition in which a ...

  4. [Semiotics of the Currarino syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankevych, T L; Lóniushkin, O I; Sitkovskyĭ, M B; Kaplan, V M; Iurchenko, M I; Cherniienko, Iu L

    1993-01-01

    The main criteria for diagnosis of the Currarino syndrome have been defined. Roentgenologic investigation of the lumbar-sacral spine in direct projection is indicated to all the patients with anorectal developmental defects, in particular with congenital anorectal stenosis. In detection of a specific defect of the terminal vertebrae, the performance of computed tomography of the pelvic bottom and nuclear magnetic resonance tomography of the lumbar-sacral spine is necessary. This permits to assess the nature of a presacral tumour and degree of dysplasia of the external and sphincter. Timely diagnosis of the Currarino syndrome in children with the anorectal developmental defects permits to avoid severe septic and functional complications in surgical intervention.

  5. Exercise in the Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Golbidi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The metabolic syndrome is a clustering of obesity, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension that is occurring in increasing frequency across the global population. Although there is some controversy about its diagnostic criteria, oxidative stress, which is defined as imbalance between the production and inactivation of reactive oxygen species, has a major pathophysiological role in all the components of this disease. Oxidative stress and consequent inflammation induce insulin resistance, which likely links the various components of this disease. We briefly review the role of oxidative stress as a major component of the metabolic syndrome and then discuss the impact of exercise on these pathophysiological pathways. Included in this paper is the effect of exercise in reducing fat-induced inflammation, blood pressure, and improving muscular metabolism.

  6. Immunoprophylaxis of bovine respiratory syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogan Dragan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Bovine Respiratory Syndrome (BRS is a multifactorial disease caused by the interaction of infective agents, the environment and the individual immunological response of animals in the herd. Despite five decades of research on BRS, no clear understanding of how environmental factors influence pathogenic outcomes of the disease has been defined. As such, the development of immunoprophylaxis and vaccine programmes to prevent outbreaks of BRS in cattle has not been successful. The current paper discusses vaccination programmes for all categories of cattle and presents a review of existing vaccines being used for immunoprophylaxis of respiratory syndrome in cattle and discusses the advantages and disadvantages of the currently used vaccines and vaccination programmes. Lastly, a discussion detailing the design of future perfect vaccines is presented.

  7. Rothmund-Thomson syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roversi Gaia

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rothmund-Thomson syndrome (RTS is a genodermatosis presenting with a characteristic facial rash (poikiloderma associated with short stature, sparse scalp hair, sparse or absent eyelashes and/or eyebrows, juvenile cataracts, skeletal abnormalities, radial ray defects, premature aging and a predisposition to cancer. The prevalence is unknown but around 300 cases have been reported in the literature so far. The diagnostic hallmark is facial erythema, which spreads to the extremities but spares the trunk, and which manifests itself within the first year and then develops into poikiloderma. Two clinical subforms of RTS have been defined: RTSI characterised by poikiloderma, ectodermal dysplasia and juvenile cataracts, and RTSII characterised by poikiloderma, congenital bone defects and an increased risk of osteosarcoma in childhood and skin cancer later in life. The skeletal abnormalities may be overt (frontal bossing, saddle nose and congenital radial ray defects, and/or subtle (visible only by radiographic analysis. Gastrointestinal, respiratory and haematological signs have been reported in a few patients. RTS is transmitted in an autosomal recessive manner and is genetically heterogeneous: RTSII is caused by homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in the RECQL4 helicase gene (detected in 60-65% of RTS patients, whereas the aetiology in RTSI remains unknown. Diagnosis is based on clinical findings (primarily on the age of onset, spreading and appearance of the poikiloderma and molecular analysis for RECQL4 mutations. Missense mutations are rare, while frameshift, nonsense mutations and splice-site mutations prevail. A fully informative test requires transcript analysis not to overlook intronic deletions causing missplicing. The diagnosis of RTS should be considered in all patients with osteosarcoma, particularly if associated with skin changes. The differential diagnosis should include other causes of childhood poikiloderma

  8. Neuroimaging of Central Sensitivity Syndromes: Key Insights from the Scientific Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walitt, Brian; Ceko, Marta; Gracely, John L; Gracely, Richard H

    2016-01-01

    Central sensitivity syndromes are characterized by distressing symptoms, such as pain and fatigue, in the absence of clinically obvious pathology. The scientific underpinnings of these disorders are not currently known. Modern neuroimaging techniques promise new insights into mechanisms mediating these postulated syndromes. We review the results of neuroimaging applied to five central sensitivity syndromes: fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome, temporomandibular joint disorder, and vulvodynia syndrome. Neuroimaging studies of basal metabolism, anatomic constitution, molecular constituents, evoked neural activity, and treatment effect are compared across all of these syndromes. Evoked sensory paradigms reveal sensory augmentation to both painful and nonpainful stimulation. This is a transformative observation for these syndromes, which were historically considered to be completely of hysterical or feigned in origin. However, whether sensory augmentation represents the cause of these syndromes, a predisposing factor, an endophenotype, or an epiphenomenon cannot be discerned from the current literature. Further, the result from cross-sectional neuroimaging studies of basal activity, anatomy, and molecular constituency are extremely heterogeneous within and between the syndromes. A defining neuroimaging "signature" cannot be discerned for any of the particular syndromes or for an over-arching central sensitization mechanism common to all of the syndromes. Several issues confound initial attempts to meaningfully measure treatment effects in these syndromes. At this time, the existence of "central sensitivity syndromes" is based more soundly on clinical and epidemiological evidence. A coherent picture of a "central sensitization" mechanism that bridges across all of these syndromes does not emerge from the existing scientific evidence.

  9. Metabolic syndrome: definitions and controversies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaltsas Gregory

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Metabolic syndrome (MetS is a complex disorder defined by a cluster of interconnected factors that increase the risk of cardiovascular atherosclerotic diseases and diabetes mellitus type 2. Currently, several different definitions of MetS exist, causing substantial confusion as to whether they identify the same individuals or represent a surrogate of risk factors. Recently, a number of other factors besides those traditionally used to define MetS that are also linked to the syndrome have been identified. In this review, we critically consider existing definitions and evolving information, and conclude that there is still a need to develop uniform criteria to define MetS, so as to enable comparisons between different studies and to better identify patients at risk. As the application of the MetS model has not been fully validated in children and adolescents as yet, and because of its alarmingly increasing prevalence in this population, we suggest that diagnosis, prevention and treatment in this age group should better focus on established risk factors rather than the diagnosis of MetS.

  10. Leopard syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dallapiccola Bruno

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract LEOPARD syndrome (LS, OMIM 151100 is a rare multiple congenital anomalies condition, mainly characterized by skin, facial and cardiac anomalies. LEOPARD is an acronym for the major features of this disorder, including multiple Lentigines, ECG conduction abnormalities, Ocular hypertelorism, Pulmonic stenosis, Abnormal genitalia, Retardation of growth, and sensorineural Deafness. About 200 patients have been reported worldwide but the real incidence of LS has not been assessed. Facial dysmorphism includes ocular hypertelorism, palpebral ptosis and low-set ears. Stature is usually below the 25th centile. Cardiac defects, in particular hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mostly involving the left ventricle, and ECG anomalies are common. The lentigines may be congenital, although more frequently manifest by the age of 4–5 years and increase throughout puberty. Additional common features are café-au-lait spots (CLS, chest anomalies, cryptorchidism, delayed puberty, hypotonia, mild developmental delay, sensorineural deafness and learning difficulties. In about 85% of the cases, a heterozygous missense mutation is detected in exons 7, 12 or 13 of the PTPN11 gene. Recently, missense mutations in the RAF1 gene have been found in two out of six PTPN11-negative LS patients. Mutation analysis can be carried out on blood, chorionic villi and amniotic fluid samples. LS is largely overlapping Noonan syndrome and, during childhood, Neurofibromatosis type 1-Noonan syndrome. Diagnostic clues of LS are multiple lentigines and CLS, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and deafness. Mutation-based differential diagnosis in patients with borderline clinical manifestations is warranted. LS is an autosomal dominant condition, with full penetrance and variable expressivity. If one parent is affected, a 50% recurrence risk is appropriate. LS should be suspected in foetuses with severe cardiac hypertrophy and prenatal DNA test may be performed. Clinical management should

  11. Software Defined Radio: Basic Principles and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Raúl Machado-Fernández

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The author makes a review of the SDR (Software Defined Radio technology, including hardware schemes and application fields. A low performance device is presented and several tests are executed with it using free software. With the acquired experience, SDR employment opportunities are identified for low-cost solutions that can solve significant problems. In addition, a list of the most important frameworks related to the technology developed in the last years is offered, recommending the use of three of them.

  12. Software defined networks a comprehensive approach

    CERN Document Server

    Goransson, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Software Defined Networks discusses the historical networking environment that gave rise to SDN, as well as the latest advances in SDN technology. The book gives you the state of the art knowledge needed for successful deployment of an SDN, including: How to explain to the non-technical business decision makers in your organization the potential benefits, as well as the risks, in shifting parts of a network to the SDN modelHow to make intelligent decisions about when to integrate SDN technologies in a networkHow to decide if your organization should be developing its own SDN applications or

  13. Rates of Convergence of Recursively Defined Sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambov, Branimir Zdravkov

    2005-01-01

    This paper gives a generalization of a result by Matiyasevich which gives explicit rates of convergence for monotone recursively defined sequences. The generalization is motivated by recent developments in fixed point theory and the search for applications of proof mining to the field. It relaxes...... the requirement for monotonicity to the form xn+1 ≤ (1+an)xn+bn where the parameter sequences have to be bounded in sum, and also provides means to treat computational errors. The paper also gives an example result, an application of proof mining to fixed point theory, that can be achieved by the means discussed...

  14. Healthcare Engineering Defined: A White Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chyu, Ming-Chien; Austin, Tony; Calisir, Fethi; Chanjaplammootil, Samuel; Davis, Mark J; Favela, Jesus; Gan, Heng; Gefen, Amit; Haddas, Ram; Hahn-Goldberg, Shoshana; Hornero, Roberto; Huang, Yu-Li; Jensen, Øystein; Jiang, Zhongwei; Katsanis, J S; Lee, Jeong-A; Lewis, Gladius; Lovell, Nigel H; Luebbers, Heinz-Theo; Morales, George G; Matis, Timothy; Matthews, Judith T; Mazur, Lukasz; Ng, Eddie Yin-Kwee; Oommen, K J; Ormand, Kevin; Rohde, Tarald; Sánchez-Morillo, Daniel; Sanz-Calcedo, Justo García; Sawan, Mohamad; Shen, Chwan-Li; Shieh, Jiann-Shing; Su, Chao-Ton; Sun, Lilly; Sun, Mingui; Sun, Yi; Tewolde, Senay N; Williams, Eric A; Yan, Chongjun; Zhang, Jiajie; Zhang, Yuan-Ting

    2015-01-01

    Engineering has been playing an important role in serving and advancing healthcare. The term "Healthcare Engineering" has been used by professional societies, universities, scientific authors, and the healthcare industry for decades. However, the definition of "Healthcare Engineering" remains ambiguous. The purpose of this position paper is to present a definition of Healthcare Engineering as an academic discipline, an area of research, a field of specialty, and a profession. Healthcare Engineering is defined in terms of what it is, who performs it, where it is performed, and how it is performed, including its purpose, scope, topics, synergy, education/training, contributions, and prospects.

  15. Defining Cyberbullying: A Multiple Perspectives Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alipan, Alexandra; Skues, Jason; Theiler, Stephen; Wise, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    To date, there has been a lack of consensus among researchers, practitioners, and laypersons about the definition of cyberbullying. Researchers have typically applied the key characteristics of intent to harm, power imbalance, and repetition from the definition of traditional bullying to cyberbullying, but how these characteristics transfer from the real world to a technology-mediated environment remains ambiguous. Moreover, very few studies have specifically investigated how cyberbullying is defined from the perspective of bullies, victims and bystanders. To this end, this article will propose a three-part definition of cyberbullying, which incorporates the perspective of bullies, victims and bystanders.

  16. UNIQLO,Define Your Own Fashion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Yes,women like and enjoy shopping.Always,they want to buy some well-designed clothes with the most ‘in’ factors;and what’s of the great importance,they would like to hear the words:"wow! You fit the wear well!" However,the most satisfied right things could not be always waiting for you thereory ou would not help complaining the so-fast changing trends day by day.At that time,why not to seek some delights from the basic classic collections? UNIQLO maybe is a choice for you to define youro wn fashion.

  17. Defining Starch Binding by Glucan Phosphatases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Auger, Kyle; Raththagala, Madushi; Wilkens, Casper

    2015-01-01

    phosphatases. The main objective of this study was to quantify the binding affinity of different enzymes that are involved in this cyclic process. We established a protocol to quickly, reproducibly, and quantitatively measure the binding of the enzymes to glucans utilizing Affinity Gel Electrophoresis (AGE...... glucan phosphatases showed similar affinities for the short oligosaccharide β-cyclodextrin. We performed structure-guided mutagenesis to define the mechanism of these differences. We found that the carbohydrate binding module (CBM) domain provided a stronger binding affinity compared to surface binding...

  18. Defining Requirements for Improved Photovoltaic System Reliability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maish, A.B.

    1998-12-21

    Reliable systems are an essential ingredient of any technology progressing toward commercial maturity and large-scale deployment. This paper defines reliability as meeting system fictional requirements, and then develops a framework to understand and quantify photovoltaic system reliability based on initial and ongoing costs and system value. The core elements necessary to achieve reliable PV systems are reviewed. These include appropriate system design, satisfactory component reliability, and proper installation and servicing. Reliability status, key issues, and present needs in system reliability are summarized for four application sectors.

  19. Languages for Software-Defined Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    1 Languages for Software-Defined Networks Nate Foster∗, Michael J. Freedman†, Arjun Guha∗, Rob Harrison‡, Naga Praveen Katta†, Christopher Monsanto ...2012. [12] “The Frenetic project.” http://www.frenetic-lang.org/, Sept. 2012. [13] N. Foster, R. Harrison, M. J. Freedman, C. Monsanto , J. Rexford...performance networks,” in ACM SIGCOMM, pp. 254–265, Aug. 2011. [15] C. Monsanto , N. Foster, R. Harrison, and D. Walker, “A compiler and run-time system for

  20. Healthcare Engineering Defined: A White Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Chien Chyu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Engineering has been playing an important role in serving and advancing healthcare. The term “Healthcare Engineering” has been used by professional societies, universities, scientific authors, and the healthcare industry for decades. However, the definition of “Healthcare Engineering” remains ambiguous. The purpose of this position paper is to present a definition of Healthcare Engineering as an academic discipline, an area of research, a field of specialty, and a profession. Healthcare Engineering is defined in terms of what it is, who performs it, where it is performed, and how it is performed, including its purpose, scope, topics, synergy, education/training, contributions, and prospects.

  1. Delta Semantics Defined By Petri Nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kurt; Kyng, Morten; Madsen, Ole Lehrmann

    This report is identical to an earlier version of May 1978 except that Chapter 5 has been revised. A new paper: "A Petri Net Definition of a System Description Language", DAIMI, April 1979, 20 pages, extends the Petri net model to include a data state representing the program variables. Delta...... and the possibility of using predicates to specify state changes. In this paper a formal semantics for Delta is defined and analysed using Petri nets. Petri nets was chosen because the ideas behind Petri nets and Delta concide on several points. A number of proposals for changes in Delta, which resulted from...

  2. Defining recovery in adult bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jessica; Agras, W Stewart; Bryson, Susan

    2013-01-01

    To examine how different definitions of recovery lead to varying rates of recovery, maintenance of recovery, and relapse in bulimia nervosa (BN), end-of-treatment (EOT) and follow-up data were obtained from 96 adults with BN. Combining behavioral, physical, and psychological criteria led to recovery rates between 15.5% and 34.4% at EOT, though relapse was approximately 50%. Combining these criteria and requiring abstinence from binge eating and purging when defining recovery may lead to lower recovery rates than those found in previous studies; however, a strength of this definition is that individuals who meet this criteria have no remaining disordered behaviors or symptoms.

  3. Metabolic Syndrome: Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortada, Rami; Williams, Tracy

    2015-08-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a heterogeneous condition characterized by androgen excess, ovulatory dysfunction, and polycystic ovaries. It is the most common endocrinopathy among women of reproductive age, affecting between 6.5% and 8% of women, and is the most common cause of infertility. Insulin resistance is almost always present in women with PCOS, regardless of weight, and they often develop diabetes and metabolic syndrome. The Rotterdam criteria are widely used for diagnosis. These criteria require that patients have at least two of the following conditions: hyperandrogenism, ovulatory dysfunction, and polycystic ovaries. The diagnosis of PCOS also requires exclusion of other potential etiologies of hyperandrogenism and ovulatory dysfunction. The approach to PCOS management differs according to the presenting symptoms and treatment goals, particularly the patient's desire for pregnancy. Weight loss through dietary modifications and exercise is recommended for patients with PCOS who are overweight. Oral contraceptives are the first-line treatment for regulating menstrual cycles and reducing manifestations of hyperandrogenism, such as acne and hirsutism. Clomiphene is the first-line drug for management of anovulatory infertility. Metformin is recommended for metabolic abnormalities such as prediabetes, and a statin should be prescribed for cardioprotection if the patient meets standard criteria for statin therapy.

  4. Cardiorenal metabolic syndrome in the African diaspora: rationale for including chronic kidney disease in the metabolic syndrome definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lea, Janice P; Greene, Eddie L; Nicholas, Susanne B; Agodoa, Lawrence; Norris, Keith C

    2009-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is more likely to progress to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in African Americans while the reasons for this are unclear. The metabolic syndrome is a risk factor for the development of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and has been recently linked to incident CKD. Historically, fewer African Americans meet criteria for the definition of metabolic syndrome, despite having higher rates of cardiovascular mortality than Caucasians. The presence of microalbuminuria portends increased cardiovascular risks and has been shown to cluster with the metabolic syndrome. We recently reported that proteinuria is a predictor of CKD progression in African American hypertensives with metabolic syndrome. In this review we explore the potential value of including CKD markers--microalbuminuria/proteinuria or low glomerular filtration rate (GFR)-in refining the cluster of factors defined as metabolic syndrome, ie, "cardiorenal metabolic syndrome."

  5. Defining the genetics of thrombotic microangiopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira-Martins, Paula; El Sissy, Carine; Bordereau, Pauline; Gruber, Aurelia; Rosain, Jeremie; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique

    2016-04-01

    The spectrum of the thrombotic microangiopathies (TMA) encompasses a heterogeneous group of disorders with hereditary and acquired forms. Endothelial cell injury in the microvasculature is common to all TMAs, whatever the pathophysiological process. In this review we describe genetic mutations characteristic of certain TMAs and review their contributions to disease. Recent identification of novel pathologic mutations has been enabled by exome studies. The monogenic forms of TMA are more frequently caused by recessive alterations in von Willebrand factor cleaving protease ADAMST13, leading to congenital thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, or cobalamine C and DGKE genes, leading to an atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome (aHUS)-like TMA. aHUS, whether idiopathic or linked to a known complement amplifying condition, is a TMA that primarily affects kidney function. It often results from a combination of an underlying genetic susceptibility with environmental factors activating the alternative complement pathway. Pathogenic variants in at least five complement genes coding for complement factor H (CFH) complement factor I (CFI), MCP (CD46), C3 and complement factor B (CFB) have been demonstrated to increase the risk of developing aHUS, but several more genes have been implicated. A new challenge is to separate disease-associated genetic variants from the broader background of variants or polymorphisms present in all human genomes that are rare, potentially functional, but may or may not be pathogenic.

  6. Trichorhinophalangeal syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Vaccaro

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Trichorhinophalangeal syndrome (TRPS is the collective name of three rare congenital conditions characterised by craniofacial and skeletal abnormalities. The three known types of TRPS have different modalities of genetic transmission: namely, TRPS I and III are inherited as an autosomal dominant disease, while the cases of TRPS II are essentially sporadic.The diagnosis of the different types of TRPS is based on clinical and radiological findings, eventually integrated by genetic analysis, particularly useful in some cases with the non-classical clinical presentation. Alopecia and structural abnormalities of the nose and the hands should be considered as clinical hallmarks, whereas endocrine disorders, renal alterations, ureteral reflux, heart pathology and bone dysplasia have been documented, in the setting of a multisystem involvement.

  7. Hypereosinophilic syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Civardi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The last few years have seen a complete change in the etiopathogenetic features, classification and therapeutic approach of the hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES, a multiorgan targeted blood disease. The discovery of a genetic mutation and the occurrence of a new fusion gene, named FIP1L1-PDGFRA (FIP gene, in some patients allowed the identification of a new myeloproliferative disorder, M-HES: thereafter, the pivotal therapeutic role of the tyrosine kinase inhibitors, particularly, imatinib mesylate, was clearly detected. In the same period a new pathogenetic mechanism has been detected: some authors described the presence of a CD3-CD4 +Tcell clone correlating with the overproduction of IL5, a potent eosinophilic cell line stimulating cytokine. As a consequence an international consensus committee proposed a new classification for these syndromes, in accordance with these new pathogenetic features. The disease is characterized by an extensive tissue and organ damage due to an eosinophilic cell infiltration and leading to the release of toxic cytokines and subsequent organ dysfunction. The heart, lungs, gastrointestinal apparatus, skin and central nervous system are affected. Moreover the released cytokines can induce a thrombophilic status and thromboembolic events can occur throughout the body. Aim of the study: We describe the diagnostic procedures that are necessary in order to obtain a correct diagnosis and classification of the disease and to evaluate the presence of an organ and tissue damage. In particular, bone marrow biopsy and cytogenetic examination of blood and marrow are necessary for detecting M-HES cases that are positive for the FIP gene. In these patients, imatinib mesylate has a leading role for obtaining complete remission of the disease in a high percentage of cases. We also examine the therapeutic options for the other forms of the disease: prednisone, interferon, hydroxiurea are effective therapeutic tools in

  8. The Defining Characteristics of Urban Living Labs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kris Steen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The organization of supported and sustainable urban interventions is challenging, with multiple actors involved, fragmented decision-making powers, and multiple values at stake. Globally, urban living labs have become a fashionable phenomenon to tackle this challenge, fostering the development and implementation of innovation, experimentation, and knowledge in urban, real-life settings while emphasizing the important role of participation and co-creation. However, although urban living labs could in this way help cities to speed up the sustainable transition, urban living lab experts agree that, in order to truly succeed in these ambitious tasks, the way urban living labs are being shaped and steered needs further research. Yet, they also confirm the existing variation and opaqueness in the definition of the concept. This article contributes to conceptual clarity by developing an operationalized definition of urban living labs, which has been used to assess 90 sustainable urban innovation projects in the city of Amsterdam. The assessment shows that the majority of the projects that are labelled as living labs do not include one or more of the defining elements of a living lab. In particular, the defining co-creation and development activities were found to be absent in many of the projects. This article makes it possible to categorize alleged living lab projects and distill the “true” living labs from the many improperly labelled or unlabelled living labs, allowing more specific analyses and, ultimately, better targeted methodological recommendations for urban living labs.

  9. COMMENSURABLE ENCRYPTION USING USER- DEFINE KEY TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ripal dilipbhai ranpara

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Cryptography is the gold standard for security. It is used to protect the transmission and storage of data between two parties by encrypting it into an unreadable format. Cryptography has enabled the first wave of secure transmissions, which has helped fuel the growth of transactions like shopping, banking, and finance over the world’s biggest public network, the Internet. Many Internet applications such as e-mail, databases, and browsers store a tremendous amount of personal and financial information, but frequently the data is left unprotected. Traditional network security is frequently less effective at preventing hackers from accessing this data. For instance, once-private databases are now completely exposed on the Internet. It turns out that getting to the database that holds millions of credit card numbers—the transmission—is secure through the use of cryptography, but the database itself isn’t, fueling the rise of credit card information theft. A paradigm shift is now under way for cryptography. The only way to make data secure in any application that runs over the Internet is to use secret (also known as private key cryptography. The current security methods focus on securing Internet applications using public keys techniques that are no longer effective.so according to my knowledge no one has addressed on COMMENSURABLE USER-DEFINE KEY TECHNIQUE that is used to encrypt the data as per the user-define key

  10. Cancer nursing in Ontario: defining nursing roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitch, Margaret I; Mings, Deborah

    2003-01-01

    The delivery of cancer care in Ontario is facing unprecedented challenges. Shortages in nursing, as in all professional disciplines, are having an impact on the delivery of cancer care. Oncology nurses have a major role to play in the delivery of optimum cancer care. Oncology nursing, when adequately defined and supported, can benefit the cancer delivery system, patients, and families. A primary nursing model is seen as being key to the delivery of optimum cancer care. Primary nursing as a philosophy facilitates continuity of care, coordination of a patient's care plan, and a meaningful ongoing relationship with the patient and his/her family. Primary nursing, when delivered in the collaboration of a nurse-physician team, allows for medical resources to be used appropriately. Defined roles enable nurses to manage patients within their scope of practice in collaboration with physicians. Enacting other nursing roles, such as nurse practitioners and advanced practice nurses, can also enable the health care system to manage a broader number of patients with more complex needs. This article presents a position paper originally written as the basis for an advocacy and education initiative in Ontario. It is shared in anticipation that the work may be useful to oncology nurses in other jurisdictions in their efforts to advance oncology nursing and improvement of patient care.

  11. Using experimental design to define boundary manikins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertilsson, Erik; Högberg, Dan; Hanson, Lars

    2012-01-01

    When evaluating human-machine interaction it is central to consider anthropometric diversity to ensure intended accommodation levels. A well-known method is the use of boundary cases where manikins with extreme but likely measurement combinations are derived by mathematical treatment of anthropometric data. The supposition by that method is that the use of these manikins will facilitate accommodation of the expected part of the total, less extreme, population. In literature sources there are differences in how many and in what way these manikins should be defined. A similar field to the boundary case method is the use of experimental design in where relationships between affecting factors of a process is studied by a systematic approach. This paper examines the possibilities to adopt methodology used in experimental design to define a group of manikins. Different experimental designs were adopted to be used together with a confidence region and its axes. The result from the study shows that it is possible to adapt the methodology of experimental design when creating groups of manikins. The size of these groups of manikins depends heavily on the number of key measurements but also on the type of chosen experimental design.

  12. Defining professional pharmacy services in community pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moullin, Joanna C; Sabater-Hernández, Daniel; Fernandez-Llimos, Fernando; Benrimoj, Shalom I

    2013-01-01

    Multiple terms and definitions exist to describe specific aspects of pharmacy practice and service provision, yet none encompass the full range of professional services delivered by community pharmacy. The majority of current pharmacy service definitions and nomenclature refer to either the professional philosophy of pharmaceutical care or to specific professional pharmacy services; particularly pharmaceutical services provided by pharmacists with a focus on drug safety, effectiveness and health outcomes. The objective of this paper is therefore to define a professional pharmacy service within the context of the community pharmacy model of service provision. A professional pharmacy service is defined as "an action or set of actions undertaken in or organised by a pharmacy, delivered by a pharmacist or other health practitioner, who applies their specialised health knowledge personally or via an intermediary, with a patient/client, population or other health professional, to optimise the process of care, with the aim to improve health outcomes and the value of healthcare." Based on Donabedian's framework, the professional pharmacy service definition incorporates the concepts of organizational structure, process indicators and outcome measures. The definition will assist in many areas including recognition of the full range of services provided by community pharmacy and facilitating the identification of indicators of professional pharmacy service implementation and sustainable provision. A simple conceptual model for incorporating all services provided by community pharmacy is proposed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Medical abortion. defining success and categorizing failures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rørbye, Christina; Nørgaard, Mogens; Vestermark, Vibeke

    2003-01-01

    Medical abortion was performed in 461 consecutive women with gestational age LT /= 63 days using a regimen of mifepristone 600 mg followed 2 days later by gemeprost 1 mg vaginally. Success, defined as no surgical intervention, declined from 98.7% after 2 weeks to 94.6% after 15 weeks. The differe......Medical abortion was performed in 461 consecutive women with gestational age LT /= 63 days using a regimen of mifepristone 600 mg followed 2 days later by gemeprost 1 mg vaginally. Success, defined as no surgical intervention, declined from 98.7% after 2 weeks to 94.6% after 15 weeks....... The difference in short- and long-term success rates increased with increasing gestational age. The majority of failures (76%) were diagnosed more than 2 weeks after initiation of the abortion. At a 2-week follow-up visit, the women who turned out to be failures had a larger endometrial width, higher beta......-hCG values and smaller reductions of beta-hCG than those treated successfully. To optimize comparison of success rates after different medical abortion regimens, we suggest that the criteria for success are stated clearly, that the success rates are stratified according to gestational age...

  14. Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome in COPD Patients and Its Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breyer, Marie-Kathrin; Spruit, Martijn A.; Hanson, Corrine K.; Franssen, Frits M. E.; Vanfleteren, Lowie E. G. W.; Groenen, Miriam T. J.; Bruijnzeel, Piet L. B.; Wouters, Emiel F. M.; Rutten, Erica P. A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in COPD patients and its impact on patient related outcomes has been little studied. We evaluated the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and clinical and functional characteristics in patients with COPD and healthy subjects. Methods 228 COPD patients and 156 healthy subjects were included. Metabolic syndrome was defined using criteria of the IDF. In all patients spirometry, body composition, functional exercise performance, and mood and health status were assessed. Groups were stratified for BMI and gender. Results Metabolic syndrome was present in 57% of the COPD patients and 40% of the healthy subjects. After stratification for BMI, presence of metabolic syndrome in patients with a BMI ≥25 kg/m2 was higher than in healthy peers. Patients with metabolic syndrome and a BMI metabolic syndrome. Spirometry, maximal ergometry, mood and health status, and blood gases were not different between those groups. In COPD patients with metabolic syndrome self-reported co-morbidities and medication use were higher than in those without. Conclusion Metabolic syndrome is more prevalent in overweight or obese COPD patients than in BMI matched healthy subjects. Metabolic syndrome did not additionally impact patients' functional outcomes, but did impact the prevalence of co-morbidities. PMID:24950070

  15. [Type 1 diabetes and autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, Márcia S

    2008-03-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is associated with autoimmune thyroid disease (AIT), celiac disease (CD), Addison's disease (AD), and other autoimmune diseases. These diseases can occur simultaneously in defined syndromes with distinct pathophysiology and characteristics: autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes (APSs) and the immunodysregulation polyendocrinopathy enteropathy X-linked syndrome (IPEX). APSs were initially defined as a multiple endocrine gland insufficiency associated to an autoimmune disease in a patient. APS-1 is characterized by the evidence of chronic candidiasis, chronic hypoparathyroidism, AD and T1D could be present as part of this syndrome. The combination of autoimmune adrenal insufficiency with AIT and/or type 1 autoimmune diabetes mellitus defines APS-2. AIT associated to other autoimmune diseases (excluding AD and/or hypoparathyroidism) are the main characteristics of APS-3. Different clinical combinations of autoimmune diseases which were not included in the previous groups are the characteristics of APS-4. IPEX is a recessive disorder characterized by the neonatal onset of T1D, infections, enteropathy, thrombocytopenia and anemia, as well as endocrinopathy, eczema and cachexia. These disorders are not common, but their consequences can be life threatening when the diagnosis is overlooked, and the treatment is the same prescribed for isolated disease presentation.

  16. Neuroimaging in Restless Legs Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provini, Federica; Chiaro, Giacomo

    2015-09-01

    Neuroimaging studies are of crucial relevance in defining the pathophysiology of restless legs syndrome (RLS). MRI studies showed no structural brain lesions and confirmed a central iron deficiency. Structural and functional studies showed an involvement of the thalamus, sensorimotor cortical areas, and cerebellum in RLS and assessed neurotransmission abnormalities in the dopaminergic and opiate systems. Finally, glutamatergic hyperactivity has been proposed as a cause of disrupted and shortened sleep in RLS. Differences among the results of the studies make it difficult to draw any definitive conclusions, thus, suggesting the need for future research.

  17. ADHD and genetic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo-Castro, Adriana; D'Agati, Elisa; Curatolo, Paolo

    2011-06-01

    A high rate of Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)-like characteristics has been reported in a wide variety of disorders including syndromes with known genetic causes. In this article, we review the genetic and the neurobiological links between ADHD symptoms and some genetic syndromes such as: Fragile X Syndrome, Neurofibromatosis 1, DiGeorge Syndrome, Tuberous Sclerosis Complex, Turner Syndrome, Williams Syndrome and Klinefelter Syndrome. Although each syndrome may arise from different genetic abnormalities with multiple molecular functions, the effects of these abnormalities may give rise to common effects downstream in the biological pathways or neural circuits, resulting in the presentation of ADHD symptoms. Early diagnosis of ADHD allows for earlier treatment, and has the potential for a better outcome in children with genetic syndromes.

  18. Savant Syndrome: Clinical and Neuropsychological Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Durukan

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Savant syndrome defines the people who have severe developmental and mental disabilities but also have extraordinary mental skills which are missing in many people. Although general mental capacity is under average mental level, savant has excessive knowledge about one or more domains. It is accepted that as many as one in 10 persons with autistic disorder have such remarkable abilities in varying degrees, although savant syndrome occurs in other developmental disabilities or in other types of central nervous system injury or disease as well. Males outnumber females by an approximate 6 : 1 ratio in savant syndrome. Savant skills are limited to five general categories. These are music, art, calender calculating, mathematics and mechanical or spatial skills. Savant skills can also be divided into three as savants who have splinter skills, talented savants and prodigious savants. A remarkable memory welds to the special abilities determined in savant syndrome. Savant syndrome can be congenital or it can be acquired. Most often savant skills emerge in childhood, superimposed on some underlying developmental disability present at birth. However, acquired savant skills can also appear, when none were previously present, in neurotypical individuals following brain injury or disease later in infancy, childhood or adult life. Savant skills don’t depend on only rote memory. It is approved that an enhanced or spared ability to represent and manipulate highly organised domain-specific information. Various theoretic models were defined to explain the neuropsychological profile in savant syndrome. Interest in savants has a long history, stretching back to the early 18th century; nevertheless, the savant syndrome remains as much a mystery now as it did when it was first described. Given that many questions about the existence and nature of savant talent remain unanswered, it seems likely that research efforts will continue unabated.

  19. "Defining Computer 'Speed': An Unsolved Challenge"

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: The reason we use computers is their speed, and the reason we use parallel computers is that they're faster than single-processor computers. Yet, after 70 years of electronic digital computing, we still do not have a solid definition of what computer 'speed' means, or even what it means to be 'faster'. Unlike measures in physics, where the definition of speed is rigorous and unequivocal, in computing there is no definition of speed that is universally accepted. As a result, computer customers have made purchases misguided by dubious information, computer designers have optimized their designs for the wrong goals, and computer programmers have chosen methods that optimize the wrong things. This talk describes why some of the obvious and historical ways of defining 'speed' haven't served us well, and the things we've learned in the struggle to find a definition that works. Biography: Dr. John Gustafson is a Director ...

  20. Software Defined Networking Demands on Software Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galinac Grbac, T.; Caba, Cosmin Marius; Soler, José

    2015-01-01

    Software Defined Networking (SDN) is a networking approach based on a centralized control plane architecture with standardised interfaces between control and data planes. SDN enables fast configuration and reconfiguration of the network to enhance resource utilization and service performances....... This new approach enables a more dynamic and flexible network, which may adapt to user needs and application requirements. To this end, systemized solutions must be implemented in network software, aiming to provide secure network services that meet the required service performance levels. In this paper......, we review this new approach to networking from an architectural point of view, and identify and discuss some critical quality issues that require new developments in software technologies. These issues we discuss along with use case scenarios. Here in this paper we aim to identify challenges...