WorldWideScience

Sample records for defined globular assemblies

  1. The Assembly History of Globular Cluster Star Streams

    CERN Document Server

    Carlberg, Raymond G

    2016-01-01

    The early accretion onto the Milky Way of satellite galaxies containing dense star clusters is a likely source of the halo globular clusters and the beginning of their associated stellar streams. The process of infall of a satellite with dynamical friction and subsequent merging is simulated with a simple evolving potential model. King model clusters are initiated within the satellite galaxy on circular orbits in a disk. Merging places the clusters on new orbits that substantially underfill their tidal radii, requiring that some internal relaxation of the clusters must be included to cause them to expand to their new tidal surface and start or continue to produce star streams. A toy model with a simplified Monte Carlo relaxation procedure gives the clusters star particles random velocity kicks at approximately the rate expected from collisional dynamics. The clusters expand and lose stars to evaporation leading to tidal streams that have local properties, including sub-halo gaps, as expected in a static halo....

  2. Initial conditions for globular clusters and assembly of the old globular cluster population of the Milky Way

    CERN Document Server

    Marks, Michael

    2010-01-01

    By comparing N-body calculations that include primordial residual-gas expulsion with the observed properties of 20 Galactic globular clusters (GCs) for which the stellar mass function (MF) has been measured, we constrain the time-scale over which the gas of their embedded cluster counterparts must have been removed, the star formation efficiency the progenitor cloud must have had and the strength of the tidal-field the clusters must have formed in. The three parameters determine the expansion and mass-loss during residual-gas expulsion. After applying corrections for stellar and dynamical evolution we find birth cluster masses, sizes and densities for the GC sample and the same quantities for the progenitor gas clouds. The pre-cluster cloud core masses were between 10^5-10^7 M_sun and half-mass radii were typically below 1 pc and reach down to 0.2 pc. We show that the low-mass present day (PD) MF slope, initial half-mass radius and initial density of clusters correlates with cluster metallicity, unmasking met...

  3. Mechanisms of the self-assembly of EAK16-family peptides into fibrillar and globular structures: molecular dynamics simulations from nano- to micro-seconds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emamyari, Soheila; Kargar, Faezeh; Sheikh-Hasani, Vahid; Emadi, Saeed; Fazli, Hossein

    2015-05-01

    The self-assembly of EAK16-family peptides in a bulk solution was studied using a combination of all-atom and coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. In addition, specified concentrations of EAK16 peptides were induced to form fibrillary or globular assemblies in vitro. The results show that the combination of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations on the single- and double-chain levels and coarse-grained simulations on the many-chain level predicts the experimental observations reasonably well. At neutral pH conditions, EAK16-I and EAK16-II assemble into fibrillary structures, whereas EAK16-IV aggregates into globular assemblies. Mechanisms of the formation of fibrillar and globular assemblies are described using the simulation results.

  4. The puzzling assembly of the Milky Way halo – contributions from dwarf Spheroidals and globular clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lépine S.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available While recent sky surveys have uncovered large numbers of ever fainter Milky Way satellites, their classification as star clusters, low-luminosity galaxies, or tidal overdensities remains often unclear. Likewise, their contributions to the build-up of the halo is yet debated. In this contribution we will discuss the current knowledge of the stellar populations and chemo-dynamics in these puzzling satellites, with a particular focus on dwarf spheroidal galaxies and the globular clusters in the outer Galactic halo. Also the question of whether some of the outermost halo objects are dynamically associated with the (Milky Way halo at all is addressed in terms of proper measurements in the remote Leo I and II dwarf galaxies.

  5. Effect of Small Molecule Osmolytes on the Self-Assembly and Functionality of Globular Protein-Polymer Diblock Copolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Carla S.; Xu, Liza; Olsen, Bradley D. [MIT

    2013-12-05

    Blending the small molecule osmolytes glycerol and trehalose with the model globular protein–polymer block copolymer mCherry-b-poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) (mCherry-b-PNIPAM) is demonstrated to improve protein functionality in self-assembled nanostructures. The incorporation of either additive into block copolymers results in functionality retention in the solid state of 80 and 100% for PNIPAM volume fractions of 40 and 55%, respectively. This represents a large improvement over the 50–60% functionality observed in the absence of any additive. Furthermore, glycerol decreases the thermal stability of block copolymer films by 15–20 °C, while trehalose results in an improvement in the thermal stability by 15–20 °C. These results suggest that hydrogen bond replacement is responsible for the retention of protein function but suppression or enhancement of thermal motion based on the glass transition of the osmolyte primarily determines thermal stability. While both osmolytes are observed to have a disordering effect on the nanostructure morphology with increasing concentration, this effect is less pronounced in materials with a larger polymer volume fraction. Glycerol preferentially localizes in the protein domains and swells the nanostructures, inducing disordering or a change in morphology depending on the PNIPAM coil fraction. In contrast, trehalose is observed to macrophase separate from the block copolymer, which results in nanodomains becoming more disordered without changing significantly in size.

  6. On the Assembly of Dwarf Galaxies in Clusters and their Efficient Formation of Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Mistani, Pouria A; Pillepich, Annalisa; Sanchez-Janssen, Ruben; Vogelsberger, Mark; Nelson, Dylan; Rodriguez-Gomez, Vicente; Torrey, Paul; Hernquist, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Galaxy clusters contain a large population of low mass dwarf elliptical galaxies whose exact origin is unclear: their colors, structural properties and kinematics differ substantially from those of dwarf irregulars in the field. We use the Illustris cosmological simulation to study differences in the assembly paths of dwarf galaxies (3e8 < M_*/M_sun < 1e10) according to their environment. We find that cluster dwarfs achieve their maximum total and stellar mass on average ~ 8 and ~ 4.5 Gyr ago, respectively, around the time of infall into the clusters. In contrast, field dwarfs not subjected to environmental stripping, reach their maximum mass at redshift z = 0. This different assembly history naturally produces a color bimodality, with blue isolated dwarfs and redder cluster dwarfs exhibiting negligible star-formation today. The cessation of star formation happens over median times 3.5-5 Gyr depending on stellar mass, and shows a large scatter (~ 1-8 Gyr), with the lower values associated with starburst...

  7. The dynamics of filament assembly define cytoskeletal network morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foffano, Giulia; Levernier, Nicolas; Lenz, Martin

    2016-12-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is a key component in the machinery of eukaryotic cells, and it self-assembles out of equilibrium into a wide variety of biologically crucial structures. Although the molecular mechanisms involved are well characterized, the physical principles governing the spatial arrangement of actin filaments are not understood. Here we propose that the dynamics of actin network assembly from growing filaments results from a competition between diffusion, bundling and steric hindrance, and is responsible for the range of observed morphologies. Our model and simulations thus predict an abrupt dynamical transition between homogeneous and strongly bundled networks as a function of the actin polymerization rate. This suggests that cells may effect dramatic changes to their internal architecture through minute modifications of their nonequilibrium dynamics. Our results are consistent with available experimental data.

  8. Self-assembly dynamics for the transition of a globular aggregate to a fibril network of lysozyme proteins via a coarse-grained Monte Carlo simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, R. B.; Farmer, B. L.; Gerstman, Bernard S.

    2015-09-01

    The self-organizing dynamics of lysozymes (an amyloid protein with 148 residues) with different numbers of protein chains, Nc = 1,5,10, and 15 (concentration 0.004 - 0.063) is studied by a coarse-grained Monte Carlo simulation with knowledge-based residue-residue interactions. The dynamics of an isolated lysozyme (Nc = 1) is ultra-slow (quasi-static) at low temperatures and becomes diffusive asymptotically on raising the temperature. In contrast, the presence of interacting proteins leads to concentration induced protein diffusion at low temperatures and concentration-tempering sub-diffusion at high temperatures. Variation of the radius of gyration of the protein with temperature shows a systematic transition from a globular structure (at low T) to a random coil (high T) conformation when the proteins are isolated. The crossover from globular to random coil becomes sharper upon increasing the protein concentration (i.e. with Nc = 5,10), with larger Rg at higher temperatures and concentration; Rg becomes smaller on adding more protein chains (e.g. Nc = 15) a non-monotonic response to protein concentration. Analysis of the structure factor (S(q)) provides an estimate of the effective dimension (D ≥ 3, globular conformation at low temperature, and D ˜ 1.7, random coil, at high temperatures) of the isolated protein. With many interacting proteins, the morphology of the self-assembly varies with scale, i.e. at the low temperature (T = 0.015), D ˜ 2.9 on the scale comparable to the radius of gyration of the protein, and D ˜ 2.3 at the large scale over the entire sample. The global network of fibrils appears at high temperature (T = 0.021) with D ˜ 1.7 (i.e. a random coil morphology at large scale) involving tenuous distribution of micro-globules (at small scales).

  9. Self-assembly dynamics for the transition of a globular aggregate to a fibril network of lysozyme proteins via a coarse-grained Monte Carlo simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. B. Pandey

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The self-organizing dynamics of lysozymes (an amyloid protein with 148 residues with different numbers of protein chains, Nc = 1,5,10, and 15 (concentration 0.004 – 0.063 is studied by a coarse-grained Monte Carlo simulation with knowledge-based residue-residue interactions. The dynamics of an isolated lysozyme (Nc = 1 is ultra-slow (quasi-static at low temperatures and becomes diffusive asymptotically on raising the temperature. In contrast, the presence of interacting proteins leads to concentration induced protein diffusion at low temperatures and concentration-tempering sub-diffusion at high temperatures. Variation of the radius of gyration of the protein with temperature shows a systematic transition from a globular structure (at low T to a random coil (high T conformation when the proteins are isolated. The crossover from globular to random coil becomes sharper upon increasing the protein concentration (i.e. with Nc = 5,10, with larger Rg at higher temperatures and concentration; Rg becomes smaller on adding more protein chains (e.g. Nc = 15 a non-monotonic response to protein concentration. Analysis of the structure factor (S(q provides an estimate of the effective dimension (D ≥ 3, globular conformation at low temperature, and D ∼ 1.7, random coil, at high temperatures of the isolated protein. With many interacting proteins, the morphology of the self-assembly varies with scale, i.e. at the low temperature (T = 0.015, D ∼ 2.9 on the scale comparable to the radius of gyration of the protein, and D ∼ 2.3 at the large scale over the entire sample. The global network of fibrils appears at high temperature (T = 0.021 with D ∼ 1.7 (i.e. a random coil morphology at large scale involving tenuous distribution of micro-globules (at small scales.

  10. Crystalline oligo(ethylene sulfide) domains define highly stable supramolecular block copolymer assemblies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brubaker, Carrie E.; Velluto, Diana; Demurtas, Davide; Phelps, Edward A.; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.

    2015-07-01

    With proper control over copolymer design and solvation conditions, self-assembled materials display impressive morphological variety that encompasses nanoscale colloids as well as bulk three-dimensional architectures. Here we take advantage of both hydrophobicity and crystallinity to mediate supra-molecular self-assembly of spherical micellar, linear fibrillar, or hydrogel structures by a family of highly asymmetric poly(ethylene glycol)-b-oligo(ethylene sulfide) (PEG-OES) copolymers. Assembly structural polymorphism was achieved with modification of PEG-OES topology (linear versus multiarm) and with precise, monomer-by-monomer control of OES length. Notably, all three morphologies were accessed utilizing OES oligomers with degrees of polymerization as short as three. These exceptionally small assembly forming blocks represent the first application of ethylene sulfide oligomers in supramolecular materials. While the assemblies demonstrated robust aqueous stability over time, oxidation by hydrogen peroxide progressively converted ethylene sulfide residues to increasingly hydrophilic and amorphous sulfoxides and sulfones, causing morphological changes and permanent disassembly. We utilized complementary microscopic and spectroscopic techniques to confirm this chemical stimulus-responsive behavior in self-assembled PEG-OES colloidal dispersions and physical gels. In addition to inherent stimulus-responsive behavior, fibrillar assemblies demonstrated biologically relevant molecular delivery, as confirmed by the dose-dependent activation of murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells following fibril-mediated delivery of the immunological adjuvant monophosphoryl lipid A. In physical gels composed of either linear or multiarm PEG-OES precursors, rheologic analysis also identified mechanical stimulus-responsive shear thinning behavior. Thanks to the facile preparation, user-defined morphology, aqueous stability, carrier functionality, and stimuli-responsive behaviors of

  11. Distribution of star formation rates during the rapid assembly of NGC 1399 as deduced from its globular cluster system

    CERN Document Server

    Schulz, C; Kroupa, P; Pflamm-Altenburg, J

    2016-01-01

    Ultra-compact dwarf galaxies (UCDs) share many properties with globular clusters (GCs) and are found in similar environments. A large sample of UCDs and GCs around NGC 1399, the central giant elliptical of the Fornax galaxy cluster, is used to infer their formation history and also that of NGC 1399. We assumed that all GCs and UCDs in our sample are star clusters (SCs) and used them as tracers of past star formation activities. After correcting our GC/UCD sample for mass loss, we interpreted their overall mass function to be a superposition of SC populations that formed coevally during different times. The SC masses of each population were distributed according to the embedded cluster mass function (ECMF), a pure power law with the slope $-\\beta$ and a stellar upper mass limit, $M_{\\mathrm{max}}$, which depended on the star formation rate (SFR). We decomposed the observed GC/UCD mass function into individual SC populations and converted $M_{\\mathrm{max}}$ of each SC population to an SFR. The overall distribut...

  12. Distribution of star formation rates during the rapid assembly of NGC 1399 as deduced from its globular cluster system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, C.; Hilker, M.; Kroupa, P.; Pflamm-Altenburg, J.

    2016-10-01

    Ultra-compact dwarf galaxies (UCDs) share many properties with globular clusters (GCs) and are found in similar environments. Here, a large sample of UCDs and GCs around NGC 1399, the central giant elliptical of the Fornax galaxy cluster, is used to infer their formation history and also to shed light on the formation of NGC 1399 itself. We assumed that all GCs and UCDs in our sample are the result of star cluster (SC) formation processes and used them as tracers of past star formation activities. After correcting our GC/UCD sample for mass loss, we interpreted their overall mass function to be a superposition of SC populations that formed coevally during different formation epochs. The SC masses of each population were distributed according to the embedded cluster mass function (ECMF), a pure power law with the slope - β. Each ECMF was characterized by a stellar upper mass limit, Mmax, which depended on the star formation rate (SFR). We decomposed the observed GC/UCD mass function into individual SC populations and converted Mmax of each SC population to an SFR. The overall distribution of SFRs reveals under which conditions the GC/UCD sample around NGC 1399 formed. Considering the constraints set by the age of the GCs/UCDs and the present stellar mass of NGC 1399, we found that the formation of the GCs/UCDs can be well explained within our framework with values for β below 2.3. This finding agrees very well with the observation of young SCs where β ≈ 2.0 is usually found. Even though we took into account that some of the most massive objects might not be genuine SCs and applied different corrections for the mass loss, we found that these considerations do not influence much the outcome. We derived the peak SFRs to be between approximately 300 and 3000 M⊙ yr-1, which matches the SFRs observed in massive high-redshift sub-millimeter galaxies and an SFR estimate inferred from NGC 1399 based on the so-called downsizing picture, meaning that more massive

  13. The assembly of the plasmodial PLP synthase complex follows a defined course.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid B Müller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plants, fungi, bacteria and the apicomplexan parasite Plasmodium falciparum are able to synthesize vitamin B6 de novo, whereas mammals depend upon the uptake of this essential nutrient from their diet. The active form of vitamin B6 is pyridoxal 5-phosphate (PLP. For its synthesis two enzymes, Pdx1 and Pdx2, act together, forming a multimeric complex consisting of 12 Pdx1 and 12 Pdx2 protomers. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report amino acid residues responsible for stabilization of the structural and enzymatic integrity of the plasmodial PLP synthase, identified by using distinct mutational analysis and biochemical approaches. Residues R85, H88 and E91 (RHE are located at the Pdx1:Pdx1 interface and play an important role in Pdx1 complex assembly. Mutation of these residues to alanine impedes both Pdx1 activity and Pdx2 binding. Furthermore, changing D26, K83 and K151 (DKK, amino acids from the active site of Pdx1, to alanine obstructs not only enzyme activity but also formation of the complex. In contrast to the monomeric appearance of the RHE mutant, alteration of the DKK residues results in a hexameric assembly, and does not affect Pdx2 binding or its activity. While the modelled position of K151 is distal to the Pdx1:Pdx1 interface, it affects the assembly of hexameric Pdx1 into a functional dodecamer, which is crucial for PLP synthesis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, our data suggest that the assembly of a functional Pdx1:Pdx2 complex follows a defined pathway and that inhibition of this assembly results in an inactive holoenzyme.

  14. Synthesis, characterization and self-assembly of well-defined linear heptablock quaterpolymers

    KAUST Repository

    Ntaras, Christos

    2016-05-17

    Two well-defined heptablock quaterpolymers of the ABCDCBA type [Α: polystyrene (PS), B: poly(butadiene) with ∼90% 1,4-microstructure (PB1,4), C: poly(isoprene) with ∼55% 3,4-microstructure (PI3,4) and D: poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)] were synthesized by combining anionic polymerization high vacuum techniques and hydrosilylation/chlorosilane chemistry. All intermediates and final products were characterized by size exclusion chromatography, membrane osmometry, and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to further verify the chemical modification reaction of the difunctional PDMS. The self-assembly in bulk of these novel heptablock quarterpolymers, studied by transmission electron microscopy and small angle X-ray scattering, revealed 3-phase 4-layer alternating lamellae morphology of PS, PB1,4, and mixed PI3,4/PDMS domains. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to further confirm the miscibility of PI3,4 and PDMS blocks. It is the first time that PDMS is the central segment in such multiblock polymers (≥3 chemically different blocks). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Polym. Sci., Part B: Polym. Phys. 2016, 54, 1443–1449. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Self-assembly of a chiral carbonate- and cytidine-containing dodecanuclear copper(II) complex: a multiarm-supplied globular capsule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armentano, Donatella; Marino, Nadia; Mastropietro, Teresa F; Martínez-Lillo, José; Cano, Joan; Julve, Miguel; Lloret, Francesc; De Munno, Giovanni

    2008-11-17

    A dodecanuclear copper(II) globular-shaped structure has been obtained with the cytidine nucleoside and the templating carbonate anion. It shows receptor properties through anion-cation and multiple anion-pi interactions toward ClO 4 (-) as well as an overall antiferromagnetic coupling.

  16. Surface-Directed Assembly of Sequence-Defined Synthetic Polymers into Networks of Hexagonally Patterned Nanoribbons with Controlled Functionalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chun-Long; Zuckermann, Ronald N.; DeYoreo, James J.

    2016-05-24

    The exquisite self-assembly of proteins and peptides in nature into highly ordered functional materials has inspired innovative approaches to biomimetic materials design and synthesis. Here we report the assembly of peptoids—a class of highly stable sequence-defined synthetic polymers—into biomimetic materials on mica surfaces. The assembling 12-mer peptoid contains alternating acidic and aromatic residues, and the presence of Ca2+ cations creates peptoid-peptoid and peptoid-mica interactions that drive assembly. In situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) shows that peptoids first assemble into discrete nanoparticles, these particles then transform into hexagonally-patterned nanoribbons on mica surfaces. AFM-based dynamic force spectroscopy (DFS) studies show that peptoid-mica interactions are much stronger than peptoidpeptoid interactions in the presence of Ca2+, illuminating the physical parameters that drive peptoid assembly. We further demonstrate the display of functional groups at the N-terminus of assembling peptoid sequence to produce biomimetic materials with similar hierarchical structures. This research demonstrates that surface-directed peptoid assembly can be used as a robust platform to develop biomimetic coating materials for applications.

  17. Self-assembly of precisely defined DNA nanotube superstructures using DNA origami seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, A M; Velazquez, L; Chisenhall, A; Schiffels, D; Fygenson, D K; Schulman, R

    2017-01-05

    We demonstrate a versatile process for assembling micron-scale filament architectures by controlling where DNA tile nanotubes nucleate on DNA origami assemblies. "Nunchucks," potential mechanical magnifiers of nanoscale dynamics consisting of two nanotubes connected by a dsDNA linker, form at yields sufficient for application and consistent with models.

  18. Tissue engineering by self-assembly of cells printed into topologically defined structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakab, Karoly; Norotte, Cyrille; Damon, Brook; Marga, Francoise; Neagu, Adrian; Besch-Williford, Cynthia L; Kachurin, Anatoly; Church, Kenneth H; Park, Hyoungshin; Mironov, Vladimir; Markwald, Roger; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Forgacs, Gabor

    2008-03-01

    Understanding the principles of biological self-assembly is indispensable for developing efficient strategies to build living tissues and organs. We exploit the self-organizing capacity of cells and tissues to construct functional living structures of prescribed shape. In our technology, multicellular spheroids (bio-ink particles) are placed into biocompatible environment (bio-paper) by the use of a three-dimensional delivery device (bio-printer). Our approach mimics early morphogenesis and is based on the realization that the genetic control of developmental patterning through self-assembly involves physical mechanisms. Three-dimensional tissue structures are formed through the postprinting fusion of the bio-ink particles, in analogy with early structure-forming processes in the embryo that utilize the apparent liquid-like behavior of tissues composed of motile and adhesive cells. We modeled the process of self-assembly by fusion of bio-ink particles, and employed this novel technology to print extended cellular structures of various shapes. Functionality was tested on cardiac constructs built from embryonic cardiac and endothelial cells. The postprinting self-assembly of bio-ink particles resulted in synchronously beating solid tissue blocks, showing signs of early vascularization, with the endothelial cells organized into vessel-like conduits.

  19. Defining Determinants and Dynamics and Cellulose Microfibril Biosynthesis, Assembly and Degredation OSP Number: 63079/A001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2013-12-01

    The central paradigm for converting plant biomass into soluble sugars for subsequent conversion to transportation fuels involves the enzymatic depolymerization of lignocellulosic plant cell walls by microbial enzymes. Despite decades of intensive research, this is still a relatively inefficient process, due largely to the recalcitrance and enormous complexity of the substrate. A major obstacle is still insufficient understanding of the detailed structure and biosynthesis of major wall components, including cellulose. For example, although cellulose is generally depicted as rigid, insoluble, uniformly crystalline microfibrils that are resistant to enzymatic degradation, the in vivo structures of plant cellulose microfibrils are surprisingly complex. Crystallinity is frequently disrupted, for example by dislocations and areas containing chain ends, resulting in “amorphous” disordered regions. Importantly, microfibril structure and the relative proportions of crystalline and non-crystalline disordered surface regions vary substantially and yet the molecular mechanisms by which plants regulate microfibril crystallinity, and other aspects of microfibril architecture, are still entirely unknown. This obviously has a profound effect on susceptibility to enzymatic hydrolysis and so this is a critical area of research in order to characterize and optimize cellulosic biomass degradation. The entire field of cell wall assembly, as distinct from polysaccharide biosynthesis, and the degree to which they are coupled, are relatively unexplored, despite the great potential for major advances in addressing the hurdle of biomass recalcitrance. Our overarching hypothesis was that identification of the molecular machinery that determine microfibril polymerization, deposition and structure will allow the design of more effective degradative systems, and the generation of cellulosic materials with enhanced and predictable bioconversion characteristics. Our experimental framework had

  20. Modeling Formation of Globular Clusters: Beacons of Galactic Star Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Gnedin, Oleg Y

    2010-01-01

    Modern hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy formation are able to predict accurately the rates and locations of the assembly of giant molecular clouds in early galaxies. These clouds could host star clusters with the masses and sizes of real globular clusters. I describe current state-of-the-art simulations aimed at understanding the origin of the cluster mass function and metallicity distribution. Metallicity bimodality of globular cluster systems appears to be a natural outcome of hierarchical formation and gradually declining fraction of cold gas in galaxies. Globular cluster formation was most prominent at redshifts z>3, when massive star clusters may have contributed as much as 20% of all galactic star formation.

  1. Self-assembly behavior of well-defined polymethylene-block-poly(ethylene glycol) copolymers in aqueous solution

    KAUST Repository

    Alkayal, Nazeeha

    2016-09-22

    A series of well-defined amphiphilic polymethylene-b-poly(ethylene glycol) (PM-b-PEG) diblock copolymers, with different hydrophobic chain length, were synthesized by combining Diels-Alder reaction with polyhomologation. The successful synthetic procedure was confirmed by size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) and 1H NMR spectroscopy. These block copolymers self-assembled into spherical micelles in aqueous solutions and exhibit low critical micelle concentration (CMC) of 2–4 mg/mL, as determined by fluorescence spectroscopy using pyrene as a probe. Measurements of the micelle hydrodynamic diameters, performed by dynamic light scattering (DLS), cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), revealed a direct dependence of the micelle size from the polymethylene block length.

  2. Dissolution of Globular Clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Baumgardt, Holger

    2006-01-01

    Globular clusters are among the oldest objects in galaxies, and understanding the details of their formation and evolution can bring valuable insight into the early history of galaxies. This review summarises the current knowledge about the dissolution of star clusters and discusses the implications of star cluster dissolution for the evolution of the mass function of star cluster systems in galaxies.

  3. Adsorption of biopolymers human serum albumin and human gamma globulin to well-defined surfaces of self-assembled monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cregger, Tricia Ann

    The tenacity with which the blood proteins Human Serum Albumin (HSA) and Human Gamma Globulin (HGG) adsorb to a surface modified with a monomolecular coating varies with the packing of the alkyl chains in the coating. The adsorption of proteins onto well-defined surfaces of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) was studied with X-ray reflectometry (XR), neutron reflectometry (NR), optical reflectometry, and total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF). NR and XR was used to study adsorption in the absence of flow, while optical reflectometry and TIRF were used to probe the adsorption under flow conditions. In particular, competitive adsorption measurements of binary solutions of HSA, HGG and Fibrinogen (FIB) were performed with TIRE The properties of the surface were varied by altering the alkyl chains' packing density and the chain end functionality of the SAMs. The depth profiles of protein concentration near the adsorbing surface measured by NR were dependent upon the chain packing density in the case of HSA. The concentration depth profile of HGG was unaltered by varying chain packing density. Measurements performed under flow using optical reflectometry showed a different behavior: the surface excess of adsorbed HSA was relatively independent of the surface packing, while the surface excess of HGG depended on the packing density of the SAM. The tenacity with which the proteins adsorbed to different functionalized surfaces was determined by attempting to remove the protein using a strong surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Ex situ XR measurements suggested that both HSA and HGG adsorb more tenaciously to a less densely-packed monolayer, almost independent of surface functionality. Two exceptions were a less densely-packed vinyl-terminated monolayer and a less densely-packed bromine-terminated monolayer, from which HSA could not be removed at all.

  4. White Dwarfs in Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Möhler, S

    2008-01-01

    We review empirical and theoretical findings concerning white dwarfs in Galactic globular clusters. Since their detection is a critical issue we describe in detail the various efforts to find white dwarfs in globular clusters. We then outline the advantages of using cluster white dwarfs to investigate the formation and evolution of white dwarfs and concentrate on evolutionary channels that appear to be unique to globular clusters. We also discuss the usefulness of globular cluster white dwarfs to provide independent information on the distances and ages of globular clusters, information that is very important far beyond the immediate field of white dwarf research. Finally, we mention possible future avenues concerning globular cluster white dwarfs, like the study of strange quark matter or plasma neutrinos.

  5. Morphological Studies on Sn-O Coordination Driving Self-assembly of Well-defined Organotin-containing Block Copolymers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Jiang; Wei Yan; Ling-yan Liu; Wei-xing Chang; Jing Li

    2014-01-01

    A tin-oxygen coordination driving self-assembly was developed in the block copolymers containing organotin,which were prepared by the radical addition-fraction transfer (RAFT) method and characterized by the gel-permeation chromatography (GPC) and 1H-NMR.And the self-assemblies of these block copolymers with various chain length ratios in the different concenaations in CHCl3 were stable according to the results of DLS and TEM.Additionally,it was also given an insight investigation on the regulation of self-assembly of the block copolymers by adding dibutyltin dichloride and a possible mechanism was proposed.

  6. Two views of globular cluster stars in the Galactic halo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martell S.L.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In [1] we reported the discovery in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II/SEGUE spectroscopic database of a small subset of halo red giants, 2.5%, with CN and CH band strengths indicative of globular-cluster-like carbon and nitrogen abundances. Because the formation of stars with unusual light-element abundances is thought to be restricted to high-density environments like globular clusters, this result has strong implications for both cluster formation processes and the assembly history of the Galactic halo. Here we discuss two efforts to expand upon that work.

  7. Membranes with well-defined ions transport channels fabricated via solvent-responsive layer-by-layer assembly method for vanadium flow battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wanxing; Li, Xianfeng; Cao, Jingyu; Zhang, Hongzhang; Zhang, Huamin

    2014-02-06

    In this work we presented a general strategy for the fabrication of membranes with well-defined ions transport channels through solvent-responsive layer-by-layer assembly (SR-LBL). Multilayered poly (diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) and poly (acrylic acid) (PAA) complexes were first introduced on the inner pore wall and the surface of sulfonated poly (ether ether ketone)/poly (ether sulfone) (PES/SPEEK) nanofiltration membranes to form ions transport channels with tuned radius. This type of membranes are highly efficient for the separators of batteries especially vanadium flow batteries (VFBs): the VFBs assembled with prepared membranes exhibit an outstanding performance in a wide current density range, which is much higher than that assembled with commercial Nafion 115 membranes. This idea could inspire the development of membranes for other flow battery systems, as well as create further progress in similar areas such as fuel cells, electro-dialysis, chlor-alkali cells, water electrolysis and so on.

  8. Counterions control whether self-assembly leads to formation of stable and well-defined unilamellar nanotubes or nanoribbons and nanorods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Dong; Schwall, Christian; Sfintes, George

    2014-01-01

    Self-assembly of the amphiphilic π-conjugated carbenium ion ATOTA-1(+) in aqueous solution selectively leads to discrete and highly stable nanotubes or nanoribbons and nanorods, depending on the nature of the counterion (Cl(-) vs. PF6(-), respectively). The nanotubes formed by the Cl(-) salt...... illustrate an exceptional example of a structural well-defined (29±2 nm in outer diameter) unilamellar tubular morphology featuring π-conjugated functionality and high stability and flexibility, in aqueous solution....

  9. Relativistic Binaries in Globular Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benacquista Matthew J.

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The galactic population of globular clusters are old, dense star systems, with a typical cluster containing 10^4 - 10^7 stars. As an old population of stars, globular clusters contain many collapsed and degenerate objects. As a dense population of stars, globular clusters are the scene of many interesting close dynamical interactions between stars. These dynamical interactions can alter the evolution of individual stars and can produce tight binary systems containing one or two compact objects. In this review, we discuss the theoretical models of globular cluster evolution and binary evolution, techniques for simulating this evolution which lead to relativistic binaries, and current and possible future observational evidence for this population. Globular cluster evolution will focus on the properties that boost the production of hard binary systems and on the tidal interactions of the galaxy with the cluster, which tend to alter the structure of the globular cluster with time. The interaction of the components of hard binary systems alters the evolution of both bodies and can lead to exotic objects. Direct N-body integrations and Fokker-Planck simulations of the evolution of globular clusters that incorporate tidal interactions and lead to predictions of relativistic binary populations are also discussed. We discuss the current observational evidence for cataclysmic variables, millisecond pulsars, and low-mass X-ray binaries as well as possible future detection of relativistic binaries with gravitational radiation.

  10. Relativistic Binaries in Globular Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benacquista Matthew

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The galactic population of globular clusters are old, dense star systems, with a typical cluster containing $10^4 - 10^6$ stars. As an old population of stars, globular clusters contain many collapsed and degenerate objects. As a dense population of stars, globular clusters are the scene of many interesting close dynamical interactions between stars. These dynamical interactions can alter the evolution of individual stars and can produce tight binary systems containing one or two compact objects. In this review, we discuss the theoretical models of globular cluster evolution and binary evolution, techniques for simulating this evolution which lead to relativistic binaries, and current and possible future observational evidence for this population. Globular cluster evolution will focus on the properties that boost the production of hard binary systems and on the tidal interactions of the galaxy with the cluster, which tend to alter the structure of the globular cluster with time. The interaction of the components of hard binary systems alters the evolution of both bodies and can lead to exotic objects. Direct $N$-body integrations and Fokker--Planck simulations of the evolution of globular clusters that incorporate tidal interactions and lead to predictions of relativistic binary populations are also discussed. We discuss the current observational evidence for cataclysmic variables, millisecond pulsars, and low-mass X-ray binaries as well as possible future detection of relativistic binaries with gravitational radiation.

  11. Occurrence of potentially hazardous GRBs launched in globular clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Domainko, Wilfried F

    2011-01-01

    Nearby, Galactic gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) may affect the terrestrial biota if their radiation is beamed towards the Earth. Compact stellar binary mergers are possible central engines of short GRBs and their rate could be boosted in globular clusters. Globular cluster typically follow well defined orbits around the galactic center. Therefore their position relative to the solar system can be calculated back in time. This fact is used to demonstrate that globular cluster - solar system encounters define possible points in time when a nearby GRB could have exploded. Additionally, potential terrestrial signatures in the geological record connected to such an event are discussed. Assuming rates of GRBs launched in globular cluster found from the redshift distribution of short burst and adopting the current globular cluster space-density around the solar system it is found that the expected minimal distance d_min for such a GRB in the last Gyr is in the range d_min ~ 1 - 3.5 kpc. From the average gamma-ray luminosit...

  12. Globular clusters with Gaia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancino, E.; Bellazzini, M.; Giuffrida, G.; Marinoni, S.

    2017-01-01

    The treatment of crowded fields in Gaia data will only be a reality in a few years from now. In particular, for globular clusters, only the end-of-mission data (public in 2022-2023) will have the necessary full crowding treatment and will reach sufficient quality for the faintest stars. As a consequence, the work on the deblending and decontamination pipelines is still ongoing. We describe the present status of the pipelines for different Gaia instruments, and we model the end-of-mission crowding errors on the basis of available information. We then apply the nominal post-launch Gaia performances, appropriately worsened by the estimated crowding errors, to a set of 18 simulated globular clusters with different concentration, distance, and field contamination. We conclude that there will be 103-104 stars with astrometric performances virtually untouched by crowding (contaminated by <1 mmag) in the majoritiy of clusters. The most limiting factor will be field crowding, not cluster crowding: the most contaminated clusters will only contain 10-100 clean stars. We also conclude that: (i) the systemic proper motions and parallaxes will be determined to 1% or better up to ≃15 kpc, and the nearby clusters will have radial velocities to a few km s-1 ; (ii) internal kinematics will be of unprecendented quality, cluster masses will be determined to ≃10% up to 15 kpc and beyond, and it will be possible to identify differences of a few km s-1 or less in the kinematics (if any) of cluster sub-populations up to 10 kpc and beyond; (iii) the brightest stars (V≃17 mag) will have space-quality, wide-field photometry (mmag errors), and all Gaia photometry will have 1-3% errors on the absolute photometric calibration.

  13. The inner Galactic globular clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateo M.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Galactic globular clusters located towards the inner regions of the Milky Way have been historically neglected, mainly due to the difficulties caused by the presence of an elevated extinction by foreground dust, and high field star densities along the lines of sight where most of them lie. To overcome these difficulties we have developed a new method to map the differential extinction suffered by these clusters, which was successfully applied to a sample of moderately-extincted, luminous, extended, inner Galactic globular clusters observed in the optical, for which we have been able to determine more accurate physical parameters. For the most extincted inner Galactic globular clusters, near-infrared wavelengths provide a more suitable window for their study. The VVV survey, which is currently observing the central regions of the Milky Way at these wavelengths, will provide a comprehensive view, from the inner regions out to their tidal radii and beyond, of most of these globular clusters.

  14. Dynamic DNA-controlled "stop-and-go" assembly of well-defined protein domains on RNA-scaffolded TMV-like nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Angela; Eber, Fabian J; Wenz, Nana L; Altintoprak, Klara; Jeske, Holger; Eiben, Sabine; Wege, Christina

    2016-12-01

    A DNA-based approach allows external control over the self-assembly process of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)-like ribonucleoprotein nanotubes: their growth from viral coat protein (CP) subunits on five distinct RNA scaffolds containing the TMV origin of assembly (OAs) could be temporarily blocked by a stopper DNA oligomer hybridized downstream (3') of the OAs. At two upstream (5') sites tested, simple hybridization was not sufficient for stable stalling, which correlates with previous findings on a non-symmetric assembly of TMV. The growth of DNA-arrested particles could be restarted efficiently by displacement of the stopper via its toehold by using a release DNA oligomer, even after storage for twelve days. This novel strategy for growing proteinaceous tubes under tight kinetic and spatial control combines RNA guidance and its site-specific but reversible interruption by DNA blocking elements. As three of the RNA scaffolds contained long heterologous non-TMV sequence portions that included the stopping sites, this method is applicable to all RNAs amenable to TMV CP encapsidation, albeit with variable efficiency most likely depending on the scaffolds' secondary structures. The use of two distinct, selectively addressable CP variants during the serial assembly stages finally enabled an externally configured fabrication of nanotubes with highly defined subdomains. The "stop-and-go" strategy thus might pave the way towards production routines of TMV-like particles with variable aspect ratios from a single RNA scaffold, and of nanotubes with two or even more adjacent protein domains of tightly pre-defined lengths.

  15. Relativistic Binaries in Globular Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J. Benacquista

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Galactic globular clusters are old, dense star systems typically containing 10^4 – 10^6 stars. As an old population of stars, globular clusters contain many collapsed and degenerate objects. As a dense population of stars, globular clusters are the scene of many interesting close dynamical interactions between stars. These dynamical interactions can alter the evolution of individual stars and can produce tight binary systems containing one or two compact objects. In this review, we discuss theoretical models of globular cluster evolution and binary evolution, techniques for simulating this evolution that leads to relativistic binaries, and current and possible future observational evidence for this population. Our discussion of globular cluster evolution will focus on the processes that boost the production of tight binary systems and the subsequent interaction of these binaries that can alter the properties of both bodies and can lead to exotic objects. Direct N-body integrations and Fokker–Planck simulations of the evolution of globular clusters that incorporate tidal interactions and lead to predictions of relativistic binary populations are also discussed. We discuss the current observational evidence for cataclysmic variables, millisecond pulsars, and low-mass X-ray binaries as well as possible future detection of relativistic binaries with gravitational radiation.

  16. The Youngest Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, Sara

    2014-01-01

    It is likely that all stars are born in clusters, but most clusters are not bound and disperse. None of the many protoclusters in our Galaxy are likely to develop into long-lived bound clusters. The Super Star Clusters (SSCs) seen in starburst galaxies are more massive and compact and have better chances of survival. The birth and early development of SSCs takes place deep in molecular clouds, and during this crucial stage the embedded clusters are invisible to optical or UV observations but are studied via the radio-infared supernebulae (RISN) they excite. We review observations of embedded clusters and identify RISN within 10 Mpc whose exciting clusters have a million solar masses or more in volumes of a few cubic parsecs and which are likely to not only survive as bound clusters, but to evolve into objects as massive and compact as Galactic globulars. These clusters are distinguished by very high star formation efficiency eta, at least a factor of 10 higher than the few percent seen in the Galaxy, probably...

  17. Controllable assembly of well-defined monodisperse Au nanoparticles on hierarchical ZnO microspheres for enhanced visible-light-driven photocatalytic and antibacterial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan; Fang, Hua-Bin; Zheng, Yan-Zhen; Ye, Rongqin; Tao, Xia; Chen, Jian-Feng

    2015-11-01

    A high-efficiency visible-light-driven photocatalyst composed of homogeneously distributed Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) well-defined on hierarchical ZnO microspheres (ZMS) via a controllable layer-by-layer self-assembly technique is demonstrated. The gradual growth of the characteristic absorption bands of Au loaded on ZnO in the visible light region with an increasing number of assemblies indicates the enhancement of the light harvesting ability of the ZMS/Au composites as well as the reproducibility and controllability of the entire assembly process. Results on the photoelectrochemical performance characterized by EIS and transient photocurrent response spectra indicate that the ZMS/Au composites possess increased photoinduced charge separation and transfer efficiency compared to the pure ZMS film. As a result, the hybrid composites exhibited enhanced decomposition activity for methylene blue and salicylic acid as well as antibacterial activity in killing S. aureus and E. coli under visible light irradiation. It can be noted that well-distributed Au components even at a rather low Au/ZnO weight ratio of ~1.2% also exhibited extraordinary photocatalysis. Such a facile and controllable self-assembly approach may be viable for preparing high-performance visible-light-driven ZMS/Au photocatalysts in a simple and controllable way, and consequently, the technology may extend to other plasmon-enhanced heterostructures made of nanostructured semiconductors and noble metals for great potential application in environmental protection.A high-efficiency visible-light-driven photocatalyst composed of homogeneously distributed Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) well-defined on hierarchical ZnO microspheres (ZMS) via a controllable layer-by-layer self-assembly technique is demonstrated. The gradual growth of the characteristic absorption bands of Au loaded on ZnO in the visible light region with an increasing number of assemblies indicates the enhancement of the light harvesting ability of

  18. Temporally defined neocortical translation and polysome assembly are determined by the RNA-binding protein Hu antigen R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraushar, Matthew L; Thompson, Kevin; Wijeratne, H R Sagara; Viljetic, Barbara; Sakers, Kristina; Marson, Justin W; Kontoyiannis, Dimitris L; Buyske, Steven; Hart, Ronald P; Rasin, Mladen-Roko

    2014-09-09

    Precise spatiotemporal control of mRNA translation machinery is essential to the development of highly complex systems like the neocortex. However, spatiotemporal regulation of translation machinery in the developing neocortex remains poorly understood. Here, we show that an RNA-binding protein, Hu antigen R (HuR), regulates both neocorticogenesis and specificity of neocortical translation machinery in a developmental stage-dependent manner in mice. Neocortical absence of HuR alters the phosphorylation states of initiation and elongation factors in the core translation machinery. In addition, HuR regulates the temporally specific positioning of functionally related mRNAs into the active translation sites, the polysomes. HuR also determines the specificity of neocortical polysomes by defining their combinatorial composition of ribosomal proteins and initiation and elongation factors. For some HuR-dependent proteins, the association with polysomes likewise depends on the eukaryotic initiation factor 2 alpha kinase 4, which associates with HuR in prenatal developing neocortices. Finally, we found that deletion of HuR before embryonic day 10 disrupts both neocortical lamination and formation of the main neocortical commissure, the corpus callosum. Our study identifies a crucial role for HuR in neocortical development as a translational gatekeeper for functionally related mRNA subgroups and polysomal protein specificity.

  19. Dynamical Processes in Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    McMillan, Stephen L W

    2014-01-01

    Globular clusters are among the most congested stellar systems in the Universe. Internal dynamical evolution drives them toward states of high central density, while simultaneously concentrating the most massive stars and binary systems in their cores. As a result, these clusters are expected to be sites of frequent close encounters and physical collisions between stars and binaries, making them efficient factories for the production of interesting and observable astrophysical exotica. I describe some elements of the competition among stellar dynamics, stellar evolution, and other processes that control globular cluster dynamics, with particular emphasis on pathways that may lead to the formation of blue stragglers.

  20. Laminins in basement membrane assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohenester, Erhard; Yurchenco, Peter D

    2013-01-01

    The heterotrimeric laminins are a defining component of all basement membranes and self-assemble into a cell-associated network. The three short arms of the cross-shaped laminin molecule form the network nodes, with a strict requirement for one α, one β and one γ arm. The globular domain at the end of the long arm binds to cellular receptors, including integrins, α-dystroglycan, heparan sulfates and sulfated glycolipids. Collateral anchorage of the laminin network is provided by the proteoglycans perlecan and agrin. A second network is then formed by type IV collagen, which interacts with the laminin network through the heparan sulfate chains of perlecan and agrin and additional linkage by nidogen. This maturation of basement membranes becomes essential at later stages of embryo development.

  1. Cold gelation of globular proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alting, A.C.

    2003-01-01

    Keywords : globular proteins, whey protein, ovalbumin, cold gelation, disulfide bonds, texture, gel hardnessProtein gelation in food products is important to obtain desirable sensory and textural properties. Cold gelation is a novel method to produce protein-based gels. It is a two step process in w

  2. Cold gelation of globular proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alting, A.C.

    2003-01-01

    Keywords : globular proteins, whey protein, ovalbumin, cold gelation, disulfide bonds, texture, gel hardnessProtein gelation in food products is important to obtain desirable sensory and textural properties. Cold gelation is a novel method to produce protein-based gels. It is a two step process in w

  3. Radio Emission from Globular Clusters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Radio emission of globular clusters is studied by analyzing the VLA radio survey data of the NVSS and FIRST. We find that 13 clusters have radio sources within their half-mass radii of clusters. Sources detected previously in NGC 7078and NGC 6440 are identified. Pulsars in NGC 6121, NGC 6440 and NGC 7078cannot be detected because of the insufficient survey sensitivity and resolution.There may be a pulsar in the core of Terzan 1. The nature of the extended radio source near the core of NGC 6440 remains unclear. In the core of a globular cluster,there may be many neutron stars or an intermediate mass black hole, but this cannot be clarified with the current radio observations.

  4. Globular Clusters for Faint Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-07-01

    The origin of ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs) has posed a long-standing mystery for astronomers. New observations of several of these faint giants with the Hubble Space Telescope are now lending support to one theory.Faint-Galaxy MysteryHubble images of Dragonfly 44 (top) and DFX1 (bottom). The right panels show the data with greater contrast and extended objects masked. [van Dokkum et al. 2017]UDGs large, extremely faint spheroidal objects were first discovered in the Virgo galaxy cluster roughly three decades ago. Modern telescope capabilities have resulted in many more discoveries of similar faint galaxies in recent years, suggesting that they are a much more common phenomenon than we originally thought.Despite the many observations, UDGs still pose a number of unanswered questions. Chief among them: what are UDGs? Why are these objects the size of normal galaxies, yet so dim? There are two primary models that explain UDGs:UDGs were originally small galaxies, hence their low luminosity. Tidal interactions then puffed them up to the large size we observe today.UDGs are effectively failed galaxies. They formed the same way as normal galaxies of their large size, but something truncated their star formation early, preventing them from gaining the brightness that we would expect for galaxies of their size.Now a team of scientists led by Pieter van Dokkum (Yale University) has made some intriguing observations with Hubble that lend weight to one of these models.Globulars observed in 16 Coma-cluster UDGs by Hubble. The top right panel shows the galaxy identifications. The top left panel shows the derived number of globular clusters in each galaxy. [van Dokkum et al. 2017]Globulars GaloreVan Dokkum and collaborators imaged two UDGs with Hubble: Dragonfly 44 and DFX1, both located in the Coma galaxy cluster. These faint galaxies are both smooth and elongated, with no obvious irregular features, spiral arms, star-forming regions, or other indications of tidal interactions

  5. Featured Image: Globular Cluster Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-04-01

    This figure (click for the full view) shows the meridional galactic orbits of 12 globular clusters that orbit the Milky Way. The recent release of stellar parallax data from Gaia allowed a team of scientists at Dartmouth College to improve measurements of a number of galactic globular clusters very old clusters of stars that can either orbit within the galactic disk and bulge or more distantly in the galactic halo. In a recent publication led by Erin OMalley, the team presents their findings and combines their new measurements for the clusters with proper motions from past studies to calculate the orbits that these globulars take. These calculations show us whether the clusters reside in the galactic disk and bulge (as only NGC 104 does in the sample shown here, since its orbit is confined to 8 kpc radially and 4 kpc vertically of the galactic center), or if they are halo clusters. To learn more about the authors work, you can check out the paper below!CitationErin M. OMalley et al 2017 ApJ 838 162. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/aa6574

  6. Rotation and flattening of globular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall, S. M.; Frenk, C. S.

    1985-01-01

    Methods for measuring globular cluster ellipticities and the results of such measurements are reviewed, and the processes that determine the shapes of globular clusters and the ways in which they change with time are discussed. The use of the virial tensor theorem to study the connection between the global rotation, velocity anisotropy, and the shape of a self-gravitating system is addressed, and the employment of N-body models to simulate the evolution of globular clusters with initially anisotropic velocity distributions is examined. The application of a simple evaporation model and Fokker-Planck integrations to study the two-body diffusion in globular clusters is reviewed.

  7. Globular Clusters as Tracers of Stellar Bimodality in Elliptical Galaxies: The Case of NGC 1399

    CERN Document Server

    Forte, J C; Geisler, D; Forte, Juan C.; Faifer, Favio; Geisler, Doug

    2004-01-01

    Globular cluster systems (GCS) frequently show a bi-modal distribution of the cluster integrated colours. This work explores the arguments to support the idea that the same feature is shared by the diffuse stellar population of the galaxy they are associated with. In the particular case of NGC 1399 the results show that the galaxy brightness profile and colour gradient as well as the behaviour of the cumulative globular cluster specific frequency, are compatible with the presence of two dominant stellar populations, associated with the so called "blue" and "red" globular cluster families. These globular families are characterized by different intrinsic specific frequencies (defined in terms of each stellar population): Sn=3.3 +/- 0.3 in the case of the red globulars and Sn=14.3 +/- 2.5 for the blue ones. We stress that this result is not necessarily conflicting with recent works that point out a clear difference between the metallicity distribution of (resolved) halo stars and globulars when comparing their n...

  8. The morphological details of globular keratohyalin granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerhof, W; Dingemans, K P

    1986-10-01

    In quickly dividing epithelia such as that of the tongue, keratohyalin formation takes place in globular keratohyalin granules (KHG). This is in contrast with the irregular KHG as seen in normal, slowly dividing epidermis. The morphogenesis of the globular KHG is explained in this study. In small KHG, dense aggregates of ribosomes can be seen at the site of blebs. It is suggested that these blebs framed with ribosomes are internalized giving rise to "dense homogeneous deposits" or "single granules". Lipid droplets occur in the upper spinous and horny layer. Globular KHG also contain variable amounts of lipids, and the lipid content seems to be inversely related to the protein content, dependent on the degree of cell differentiation or on the rate of cell turnover. It is suggested that in epithelia with a high cell turnover few rigid keratohyalin components are dispersed in lipids, which maintain a globular shape due to the surface tension.

  9. Globular Cluster X-ray Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Verbunt, F

    2004-01-01

    After a brief historical overview we discuss the luminous X-ray sources in globular clusters of our Galaxy. This is followed by an overview of the very luminous X-ray sources studied in globular clusters of 14 other galaxies, and a discussion of their formation and the relation to X-ray sources outside globular clusters. We describe the discovery and classification of low-luminosity X-ray sources, and end the review with some remarks on the formation and evolution of X-ray sources in globular clusters. Observational results are summarized in three tables. Comments are very welcome. Please send them to F.W.M.Verbunt@astro.uu.nl and lewin@mit.edu.

  10. Some Remarks on Extragalactic Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Richtler, T

    2005-01-01

    I comment (in a review fashion) on a few selected topics in the field of extragalactic globular clusters with strong emphasis on recent work. The topics are: bimodality in the colour distribution of cluster systems, young massive clusters, and the brightest old clusters. Globular cluster research, perhaps more than ever, has lead to important (at least to astronomers) progress and problems in galaxy structure and formation.

  11. Mesoporous Bragg reflectors: block-copolymer self-assembly leads to building blocks with well defined continuous pores and high control over optical properties

    KAUST Repository

    Guldin, S.

    2011-08-19

    Mesoporous distributed Bragg re ectors (MDBRs) exhibit porosity on the sub-optical length scale. This makes them ideally suited as sensing platforms in biology and chemistry as well as for light management in optoelectronic devices. Here we present a new fast forward route for the fabrication of MDBRs which relies on the self-assembling properties of the block copolymer poly(isoprene-block -ethylene oxide) (PI-b -PEO) in combination with sol-gel chemistry. The interplay between structure directing organic host and co-assembled inorganic guest allows the ne tuning of refractive index in the outcome material. The refractive index dierence between the high and low porosity layer can be as high as 0.4, with the optical interfaces being well dened. Following a 30 min annealing protocol after each layer deposition enables the fast and reliable stacking of MDBRs which exhibit a continuous TiO2 network with large accessible pores and high optical quality.

  12. Engineering of supramolecular photoactive protein architectures: the defined co-assembly of photosystem I and cytochrome c using a nanoscaled DNA-matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieger, Kai R.; Ciornii, Dmitri; Kölsch, Adrian; Hejazi, Mahdi; Lokstein, Heiko; Feifel, Sven C.; Zouni, Athina; Lisdat, Fred

    2016-05-01

    The engineering of renewable and sustainable protein-based light-to-energy converting systems is an emerging field of research. Here, we report on the development of supramolecular light-harvesting electrodes, consisting of the redox protein cytochrome c working as a molecular scaffold as well as a conductive wiring network and photosystem I as a photo-functional matrix element. Both proteins form complexes in solution, which in turn can be adsorbed on thiol-modified gold electrodes through a self-assembly mechanism. To overcome the limited stability of self-grown assemblies, DNA, a natural polyelectrolyte, is used as a further building block for the construction of a photo-active 3D architecture. DNA acts as a structural matrix element holding larger protein amounts and thus remarkably improving the maximum photocurrent and electrode stability. On investigating the photophysical properties, this system demonstrates that effective electron pathways have been created.The engineering of renewable and sustainable protein-based light-to-energy converting systems is an emerging field of research. Here, we report on the development of supramolecular light-harvesting electrodes, consisting of the redox protein cytochrome c working as a molecular scaffold as well as a conductive wiring network and photosystem I as a photo-functional matrix element. Both proteins form complexes in solution, which in turn can be adsorbed on thiol-modified gold electrodes through a self-assembly mechanism. To overcome the limited stability of self-grown assemblies, DNA, a natural polyelectrolyte, is used as a further building block for the construction of a photo-active 3D architecture. DNA acts as a structural matrix element holding larger protein amounts and thus remarkably improving the maximum photocurrent and electrode stability. On investigating the photophysical properties, this system demonstrates that effective electron pathways have been created. Electronic supplementary information

  13. "Galaxy," Defined

    CERN Document Server

    Willman, Beth

    2012-01-01

    A growing number of low luminosity and low surface brightness astronomical objects challenge traditional notions of both galaxies and star clusters. To address this challenge, we propose a definition of galaxy that does not depend on a cold dark matter model of the universe: A galaxy is a gravitationally bound collection of stars whose properties cannot be explained by a combination of baryons and Newton's laws of gravity. We use this definition to critically examine the classification of ultra-faint dwarfs, globular clusters, ultra-compact dwarfs, and tidal dwarfs. While kinematic studies provide an effective diagnostic of the definition in many regimes, they can be less useful for compact or very faint systems. To explore the utility of using the [Fe/H] spread as a diagnostic, we use published spectroscopic [Fe/H] measurements of 16 Milky Way dwarfs and 24 globular clusters to uniformly calculate their [Fe/H] spreads and associated uncertainties. Our principal results are: (i) no known, old star cluster wit...

  14. All quiet in Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Dobrotka, A; Menou, K; Dobrotka, Andrej; Lasota, Jean-Pierre; Menou, Kristen

    2006-01-01

    Cataclysmic Variables (CVs) should be present in large numbers in Globular Clusters (GCs). Numerous low-luminosity X-ray sources identified over the past few years as candidate CVs in GCs support this notion. Yet, very few "cataclysms," the characteristic feature of this class of objects in the field, have been observed in GCs. We address this discrepancy here, within the framework of the standard Disk Instability Model for CV outbursts. We argue that the paucity of outbursts in GCs is probably not a direct consequence of the donors' low metallicities. We present diagnostics based on outburst properties allowing tests of the hypothesis that rare cataclysms are entirely due to lower mass transfer rates in GCs relative to the field, and we argue against this explanation. Instead, we propose that a combination of low mass transfer rates (>~ 10^14-15 g/s) and moderately strong white dwarf magnetic moments (>~ 10^30 G cm^3) stabilize CV disks in GCs and thus prevent most of them from experiencing frequent outburst...

  15. Globular cluster system erosion and nucleus formation in elliptical galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Capuzzo-Dolcetta, R

    1998-01-01

    The radial distribution of globular clusters in galaxies is always less peaked to the centre than the halo stars'. Extending previous work to a sample of HST globular cluster systems in ellipticals, we evaluate the number of clusters lost to the galactic centre as the integrals of the difference between the observed globular cluster system distribution and the underlying halo light profile. It results that the initial populations of globular clusters were from 25% to 50% richer than now. This significant number of missing globular clusters supports the hypothesis that a large quantity of globular cluster mass in form of globular clusters decayed and destroyed has been lost to the galactic centres, where plausibly contributed to formation and feeding of a mas sive object therein. It is relevant noting that the observed correlation between the core radius of the globular cluster system and the parent galaxy luminosity can be interpreted as a result of evolution.

  16. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Cytokines and Fibroblast Growth factor-2 Stimulate Human Endothelial Cell-Pericyte Tube Co-Assembly in 3D Fibrin Matrices under Serum-Free Defined Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Annie O.; Bowers, Stephanie L. K.; Stratman, Amber N.; Davis, George E.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a novel 3D fibrin matrix model using recombinant hematopoietic stem cell cytokines under serum-free defined conditions which promotes the assembly of human endothelial cell (EC) tubes with co-associated pericytes. Individual ECs and pericytes are randomly mixed together and EC tubes form that is accompanied by pericyte recruitment to the EC tube abluminal surface over a 3-5 day period. These morphogenic processes are stimulated by a combination of the hematopoietic stem cell cytokines, stem cell factor, interleukin-3, stromal derived factor-1α, and Flt-3 ligand which are added in conjunction with fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 into the fibrin matrix. In contrast, this tube morphogenic response does not occur under serum-free defined conditions when VEGF and FGF-2 are added together in the fibrin matrices. We recently demonstrated that VEGF and FGF-2 are able to prime EC tube morphogenic responses (i.e. added overnight prior to the morphogenic assay) to hematopoietic stem cell cytokines in collagen matrices and, interestingly, they also prime EC tube morphogenesis in 3D fibrin matrices. EC-pericyte interactions in 3D fibrin matrices leads to marked vascular basement membrane assembly as demonstrated using immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. Furthermore, we show that hematopoietic stem cell cytokines and pericytes stimulate EC sprouting in fibrin matrices in a manner dependent on the α5β1 integrin. This novel co-culture system, under serum-free defined conditions, allows for a molecular analysis of EC tube assembly, pericyte recruitment and maturation events in a critical ECM environment (i.e. fibrin matrices) that regulates angiogenic events in postnatal life. PMID:24391990

  17. Globular Cluster System erosion in elliptical galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Capuzzo-Dolcetta, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we analyze data of 8 elliptical galaxies in order to study the difference between their globular cluster systems (GCSs) radial distributions and those of the galactic stellar component. In all the galaxies studied here the globular cluster system density profile is significantly flatter toward the galactic centre than that of stars. If this difference is interpreted as a depauperation of the initial GC population, the estimated number of missing globular clusters is significant, ranging from 21% to 71% of their initial population abundance in the eight galaxies examined. The corresponding mass lost to the central galactic region is 7x10^7-1.85x10^9 solar masses. All this mass carried toward central galactic regions have likely had an important feedback on the innermost galactic region, including its violent transient activity (AGN) and local massive black hole formation and growth.

  18. Reconstructing Galaxy Histories from Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    West, M J; Marzke, R O; Jordan, A; West, Michael J.; Cote, Patrick; Marzke, Ronald O.; Jordan, Andres

    2004-01-01

    Nearly a century after the true nature of galaxies as distant "island universes" was established, their origin and evolution remain great unsolved problems of modern astrophysics. One of the most promising ways to investigate galaxy formation is to study the ubiquitous globular star clusters that surround most galaxies. Recent advances in our understanding of the globular cluster systems of the Milky Way and other galaxies point to a complex picture of galaxy genesis driven by cannibalism, collisions, bursts of star formation and other tumultuous events.

  19. Synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopy-defined structure of the C-terminal domain of NaChBac and its role in channel assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powl, Andrew M.; O’Reilly, Andrias O.; Miles, Andrew J.; Wallace, B. A.

    2010-01-01

    Extramembranous domains play important roles in the structure and function of membrane proteins, contributing to protein stability, forming association domains, and binding ancillary subunits and ligands. However, these domains are generally flexible, making them difficult or unsuitable targets for obtaining high-resolution X-ray and NMR structural information. In this study we show that the highly sensitive method of synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SRCD) spectroscopy can be used as a powerful tool to investigate the structure of the extramembranous C-terminal domain (CTD) of the prokaryotic voltage-gated sodium channel (NaV) from Bacillus halodurans, NaChBac. Sequence analyses predict its CTD will consist of an unordered region followed by an α-helix, which has a propensity to form a multimeric coiled-coil motif, and which could form an association domain in the homotetrameric NaChBac channel. By creating a number of shortened constructs we have shown experimentally that the CTD does indeed contain a stretch of ∼20 α-helical residues preceded by a nonhelical region adjacent to the final transmembrane segment and that the efficiency of assembly of channels in the membrane progressively decreases as the CTD residues are removed. Analyses of the CTDs of 32 putative prokaryotic NaV sequences suggest that a CTD helical bundle is a structural feature conserved throughout the bacterial sodium channel family. PMID:20663949

  20. The IMF of Globular Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marchi, G.; Paresce, F.

    1999-12-01

    Accurate luminosity functions (LF) for a dozen globular clusters have now been measured at or just beyond their half-light radius using HST. They span almost the entire cluster main sequence below 0.75 MO. All these clusters exhibit LF that rise continuously from an absolute I magnitude MI 6 to a peak at MI 8.5-9 and then drop with increasing MI. Transformation of the LF into mass functions (MF) by means of the most recent mass luminosity relations that are consistent with all presently available data on the physical properties of low mass, low metallicity stars shows that all the LF observed so far can be obtained from MF having the shape of a log-normal distribution with characteristic mass mc=0.33 +/- 0.03 MO and standard deviation sigma =1.81 +/- 0.19. In particular, the LF of the four clusters in the sample that extend well beyond the peak luminosity down to close to the Hydrogen burning limit (NGC6341, NGC6397, NGC6752, and NGC6809) can only be reproduced by such distributions and not by a single power-law in the 0.1 - 0.6 MO range. After correction for the effects of mass segregation, the variation of the ratio of the number of higher to lower mass stars with cluster mass or any simple orbital parameter or the expected time to disruption recently computed for these clusters shows no statistically significant trend over a range of this last parameter of more than a factor of 100. We conclude that the global MF of these clusters have not been measurably modified by evaporation and tidal interactions with the Galaxy and, thus, should reflect the initial distribution of stellar masses. Since the log-normal function that we find is also very similar to the one obtained independently for much younger clusters and to the form expected theoretically, the implication seems to be unavoidable that it represents the true stellar IMF for this type of stars in this mass range.

  1. The formation of S0 galaxies: evidence from globular clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Barr, J M; Bamford, S P; Bedregal, A G; Merrifield, M R

    2007-01-01

    We test the theory that lenticular (S0) galaxies form from spirals whose star formation has been shut down. We use the globular cluster specific frequency S_N, defined as the number of globular clusters normalised by the galaxy luminosity as a diagnostic. NTT/EMMI long-slit spectroscopic observations of 11 S0 galaxies at z < 0.006 are used to measure the absorption-line indices, Hdelta, Hgamma, Mgb, Fe5270 and Fe5335 within the central r_e/8. By inverting single-stellar population models, luminosity-weighted mean ages, metallicities and alpha-element abundance ratios are derived. We estimate the amount of fading a galaxy has undergone by comparing each galaxy's S_N with its deviation from the mean spiral S_N. Galaxies with higher S_N have older stellar populations. Moreover, we find that the zero-point and amount of fading is consistent with a scenario where lenticulars are formed by the quenching of star formation in spiral galaxies. Our data also rule out any formation method for S0s which creates a larg...

  2. Multiple populations in globular clusters. Lessons learned from the Milky Way globular clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Gratton, Raffaele; Bragaglia, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Recent progress in studies of globular clusters has shown that they are not simple stellar populations, being rather made of multiple generations. Evidence stems both from photometry and spectroscopy. A new paradigm is then arising for the formation of massive star clusters, which includes several episodes of star formation. While this provides an explanation for several features of globular clusters, including the second parameter problem, it also opens new perspectives about the relation between globular clusters and the halo of our Galaxy, and by extension of all populations with a high specific frequency of globular clusters, such as, e.g., giant elliptical galaxies. We review progress in this area, focusing on the most recent studies. Several points remain to be properly understood, in particular those concerning the nature of the polluters producing the abundance pattern in the clusters and the typical timescale, the range of cluster masses where this phenomenon is active, and the relation between globu...

  3. Two cell circuits of oriented adult hippocampal neurons on self-assembled monolayers for use in the study of neuronal communication in a defined system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Darin; Stancescu, Maria; Molnar, Peter; Hickman, James J

    2013-08-21

    In this study, we demonstrate the directed formation of small circuits of electrically active, synaptically connected neurons derived from the hippocampus of adult rats through the use of engineered chemically modified culture surfaces that orient the polarity of the neuronal processes. Although synaptogenesis, synaptic communication, synaptic plasticity, and brain disease pathophysiology can be studied using brain slice or dissociated embryonic neuronal culture systems, the complex elements found in neuronal synapses makes specific studies difficult in these random cultures. The study of synaptic transmission in mature adult neurons and factors affecting synaptic transmission are generally studied in organotypic cultures, in brain slices, or in vivo. However, engineered neuronal networks would allow these studies to be performed instead on simple functional neuronal circuits derived from adult brain tissue. Photolithographic patterned self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) were used to create the two-cell "bidirectional polarity" circuit patterns. This pattern consisted of a cell permissive SAM, N-1[3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl] diethylenetriamine (DETA), and was composed of two 25 μm somal adhesion sites connected with 5 μm lines acting as surface cues for guided axonal and dendritic regeneration. Surrounding the DETA pattern was a background of a non-cell-permissive poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) SAM. Adult hippocampal neurons were first cultured on coverslips coated with DETA monolayers and were later passaged onto the PEG-DETA bidirectional polarity patterns in serum-free medium. These neurons followed surface cues, attaching and regenerating only along the DETA substrate to form small engineered neuronal circuits. These circuits were stable for more than 21 days in vitro (DIV), during which synaptic connectivity was evaluated using basic electrophysiological methods.

  4. Non-Recycled Pulsars in Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Lynch, Ryan S; Lorimer, Duncan R; Mnatsakanov, Robert; Turk, Philip J; Ransom, Scott M

    2011-01-01

    We place limits on the population of non-recycled pulsars originating in globular clusters through Monte Carlo simulations and frequentist statistical techniques. We set upper limits on the birth rates of non-recycled cluster pulsars and predict how many may remain in the clusters, and how many may escape the cluster potentials and enter the field of the Galaxy.

  5. Gravitational interactions between globular and open clusters: an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Marcos, R de la Fuente; Reilly, D

    2014-01-01

    Historically, it has been assumed that globular and open clusters never interact. However, recent evidence suggests that: globular clusters passing through the disk may be able to perturb giant molecular clouds (GMCs) triggering formation of open clusters and some old open clusters may be linked to accreted globulars. Here, we further explore the existence of possible dynamical connections between globular and open clusters, and realize that the most obvious link must be in the form of gravitational interactions. If open clusters are born out of GMCs, they have to move in similar orbits. If we accept that globulars can interact with GMCs, triggering star formation, it follows that globular and open clusters must also interact. Consistently, theoretical arguments as well as observational evidence, show that globular and open clusters certainly are interacting populations and their interactions are far more common than usually thought, especially for objects part of the bulge/disk. Monte Carlo calculations conf...

  6. Globular cluster x-ray sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pooley, David

    2010-04-20

    Globular clusters and x-ray astronomy have a long and fruitful history. Uhuru and OSO-7 revealed highly luminous (> 10(36) ergs(-1)) x-ray sources in globular clusters, and Einstein and ROSAT revealed a larger population of low-luminosity (luminosity sources were low-mass x-ray binaries in outburst and that they were orders of magnitude more abundant per unit mass in globular clusters than in the rest of the galaxy. However, the low-luminosity sources proved difficult to classify. Many ideas were put forth--low-mass x-ray binaries in quiescence (qLMXBs), cataclysmic variables (CVs), active main-sequence binaries (ABs), and millisecond pulsars (MSPs)--but secure identifications were scarce. In ROSAT observations of 55 clusters, about 25 low-luminosity sources were found. Chandra has now observed over 80 Galactic globular clusters, and these observations have revealed over 1,500 x-ray sources. The superb angular resolution has allowed for many counterpart identifications, providing clues to the nature of this population. It is a heterogeneous mix of qLMXBs, CVs, ABs, and MSPs, and it has been shown that the qLMXBs and CVs are both, in part, overabundant like the luminous LMXBs. The number of x-ray sources in a cluster correlates very well with its encounter frequency. This points to dynamical formation scenarios for the x-ray sources and shows them to be excellent tracers of the complicated internal dynamics. The relation between the encounter frequency and the number of x-ray sources has been used to suggest that we have misunderstood the dynamical states of globular clusters.

  7. Globular cluster x-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pooley, David

    2010-01-01

    Globular clusters and x-ray astronomy have a long and fruitful history. Uhuru and OSO-7 revealed highly luminous (> 1036 ergs-1) x-ray sources in globular clusters, and Einstein and ROSAT revealed a larger population of low-luminosity (luminosity sources were low-mass x-ray binaries in outburst and that they were orders of magnitude more abundant per unit mass in globular clusters than in the rest of the galaxy. However, the low-luminosity sources proved difficult to classify. Many ideas were put forth—low-mass x-ray binaries in quiescence (qLMXBs), cataclysmic variables (CVs), active main-sequence binaries (ABs), and millisecond pulsars (MSPs)—but secure identifications were scarce. In ROSAT observations of 55 clusters, about 25 low-luminosity sources were found. Chandra has now observed over 80 Galactic globular clusters, and these observations have revealed over 1,500 x-ray sources. The superb angular resolution has allowed for many counterpart identifications, providing clues to the nature of this population. It is a heterogeneous mix of qLMXBs, CVs, ABs, and MSPs, and it has been shown that the qLMXBs and CVs are both, in part, overabundant like the luminous LMXBs. The number of x-ray sources in a cluster correlates very well with its encounter frequency. This points to dynamical formation scenarios for the x-ray sources and shows them to be excellent tracers of the complicated internal dynamics. The relation between the encounter frequency and the number of x-ray sources has been used to suggest that we have misunderstood the dynamical states of globular clusters. PMID:20404204

  8. Nanostructured self-assembling peptides as a defined extracellular matrix for long-term functional maintenance of primary hepatocytes in a bioartificial liver modular device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giri S

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Shibashish Giri,1 Ulf-Dietrich Braumann,2,3 Priya Giri,1,3 Ali Acikgöz,1,4 Patrick Scheibe,3,5 Karen Nieber,6 Augustinus Bader1 1Department of Cell Techniques and Applied Stem Cell Biology, Center for Biotechnology and Biomedicine (BBZ, 2Institute for Medical Informatics, Statistics, and Epidemiology (IMISE, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany; 3Interdisciplinary Center for Bioinformatics (IZBI, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany; 4Klinikum St Georg, Leipzig, Germany; 5Translational Center for Regenerative Medicine (TRM Leipzig, 6Department of Pharmacology for Natural Sciences, Institute of Pharmacy, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany Abstract: Much effort has been directed towards the optimization of the capture of in vivo hepatocytes from their microenvironment. Some methods of capture include an ex vivo cellular model in a bioreactor based liver module, a micropatterned module, a microfluidic 3D chip, coated plates, and other innovative approaches for the functional maintenance of primary hepatocytes. However, none of the above methods meet US Food and Drug Administration (FDA guidelines, which recommend and encourage that the duration of a toxicity assay of a drug should be a minimum of 14 days, to a maximum of 90 days for a general toxicity assay. Existing innovative reports have used undefined extracellular matrices like matrigel, rigid collagen, or serum supplementations, which are often problematic, unacceptable in preclinical and clinical applications, and can even interfere with experimental outcomes. We have overcome these challenges by using integrated nanostructured self-assembling peptides and a special combination of growth factors and cytokines to establish a proof of concept to mimic the in vivo hepatocyte microenvironment pattern in vitro for predicting the in vivo drug hepatotoxicity in a scalable bioartificial liver module. Hepatocyte functionality (albumin, urea was measured at days 10, 30, 60, and 90 and we

  9. A comparative study of the relationship between protein structure and beta-aggregation in globular and intrinsically disordered proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linding, Rune; Schymkowitz, Joost; Rousseau, Frederic

    2004-01-01

    A growing number of proteins are being identified that are biologically active though intrinsically disordered, in sharp contrast with the classic notion that proteins require a well-defined globular structure in order to be functional. At the same time recent work showed that aggregation and amy...

  10. Young Radio Pulsars in Galactic Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Boyles, Jason; Turk, Phil J; Mnatsakanov, Robert; Lynch, Ryan S; Ransom, Scott M; Freire, Paulo C; Belczynski, Khris

    2011-01-01

    Currently three isolated radio pulsars and one binary radio pulsar with no evidence of any previous recycling are known in 97 surveyed Galactic globular clusters. As pointed out by Lyne et al., the presence of these pulsars cannot be explained by core-collapse supernovae, as is commonly assumed for their counterparts in the Galactic disk. We apply a Bayesian analysis to the results from surveys for radio pulsars in globular clusters and find the number of potentially observable non-recycled radio pulsars present in all clusters to be -0.6. In this case, the potentially observable population of such young pulsars is 447^{+1420}_{-399} (the error bars give the 95% confidence interval) and their birth rate is 0.012^{+0.037}_{-0.010} pulsars per century. The mostly likely creation scenario to explain these pulsars is the electron capture supernova of a OMgNe white dwarf.

  11. Chemical Abundances of Giants in Globular Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratton, Raffaele G.; Bragaglia, Angela; Carretta, Eugenio; D'Orazi, Valentina; Lucatello, Sara

    A large fraction of stars form in clusters. According to a widespread paradigma, stellar clusters are prototypes of single stellar populations. According to this concept, they formed on a very short time scale, and all their stars share the same chemical composition. Recently it has been understood that massive stellar clusters (the globular clusters) rather host various stellar populations, characterized by different chemical composition: these stellar populations have also slightly different ages, stars of the second generations being formed from the ejecta of part of those of an earlier one. Furthermore, it is becoming clear that the efficiency of the process is quite low: many more stars formed within this process than currently present in the clusters. This implies that a significant, perhaps even dominant fraction of the ancient population of galaxies formed within the episodes that lead to formation the globular clusters.

  12. VARIABLES IN GLOBULAR CLUSTER NGC 5024

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safonova, M.; Stalin, C. S., E-mail: rita@iiap.res.in, E-mail: stalin@iiap.res.in [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Koramangala, Bangalore 560 034 (India)

    2011-12-15

    We present the results of a commissioning campaign to observe Galactic globular clusters for the search of microlensing events. The central 10' Multiplication-Sign 10' region of the globular cluster NGC 5024 was monitored using the 2 m Himalayan Chandra Telescope in R-band for a period of about 8 hr on 2010 March 24. Light curves were obtained for nearly 10,000 stars using a modified Differential Image Analysis technique. We identified all known variables within our field of view and revised the periods and status of some previously reported short-period variables. We report about 70 new variable sources and present their equatorial coordinates, periods, light curves, and possible types. Out of these, 15 are SX Phe stars, 10 are W UMa-type stars, and 14 are probable RR Lyrae stars. Nine of the newly discovered SX Phe stars and one eclipsing binary belong to the blue straggler star population.

  13. Destruction of the galactic globular cluster system

    CERN Document Server

    Gnedin, O Y; Gnedin, Oleg Y; Ostriker, Jeremiah P

    1996-01-01

    We investigate the dynamical evolution of the Galactic Globular Cluster System in considerably greater detail than has been done hitherto, finding that destruction rates are significantly larger than given by previous estimates. More than half of the present clusters (52%-58% for the OC galactic model, and 75%-86% for the BSS model) will be destroyed in the next Hubble time. For the evolution of individual clusters we use a Fokker-Planck code including two-body relaxation, tidal truncation of clusters, compressive gravitational shocks while clusters pass through the Galactic disk, and tidal shocks due to passage close to the bulge. Gravitational shocks are treated comprehensively, using a recent result by Kundic & Ostriker (1995) that the shock-induced relaxation term, driving an additional dispersion of energies, is generally more important than the usual energy shift term. We discuss some implications for a past history of the Globular Cluster System, and the initial distribution of the destruction time...

  14. Formation Mechanisms of IMBH in Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Giersz, Mirek; Hypki, Arkadiusz; Askar, Abbas; Lützgendorf, Nora

    2016-01-01

    We very briefly discuss proposed in the literature possible scenarios for intermediate mass black holes (IMBH) formation in globular clusters. We also discuss the results of the MOCCA simulations of about 2000 models (BigSurvey) regarding the distribution of events connected with electromagnetic and gravitational radiations, namely: mass transfer on IMBH, collisions and mergers with IMBH and mergers with IMBH due to gravitational radiation. The rates of these events are very small, so their observation is very improbable.

  15. High Energy Gamma-rays from Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Sitarek, W B J

    2007-01-01

    It is expected that specific globular clusters can contain up to a hundred of millisecond pulsars. These pulsars can accelerate leptons at the shock waves originated in collisions of the pulsar winds and/or inside the pulsar magnetospheres. Energetic leptons diffuse gradually through the globular cluster comptonizing stellar and microwave background radiation. We calculate the GeV-TeV $\\gamma$-ray spectra for different models of injection of leptons and parameters of the globular clusters assuming reasonable, of the order of 1%, efficiency of energy conversion from the pulsar winds into the relativistic leptons. It is concluded that leptons accelerated in the globular cluster cores should produce well localized $\\gamma$-ray sources which are concentric with these globular clusters. The results are shown for four specific globular clusters (47 Tuc, Ter 5, M13, and M15), in which significant population of millisecond pulsars have been already discovered. We argue that the best candidates, which might be potenti...

  16. X-ray sources in globular clusters of other galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Lewin, W H G; Lewin, Walter H.G.; Verbunt, Frank

    2005-01-01

    A large number of X-ray sources in globular clusters of galaxies other than the Milky Way has been found with Chandra. We discuss three issues relating to these sources. The X-ray luminosity function (XLF) of the sources in globular clusters of M31 is marginally compatible with the XLF of globular clusters of the Milky Way. The individual XLFs of a dozen elliptical galaxies, after correction for incompleteness, are compatible with one another and show no break; however, the XLF found by adding the individual XLFs of elliptical galaxies has a break at L_x about 5x10(38) ergs/s. For the moment there is no evidence for a difference between the XLFs of sources inside and outside globular clusters of elliptical galaxies. It is not (yet?) possible to decide which fraction of low-mass X-ray binaries in elliptical galaxies outside globular clusters have formed inside globular clusters.

  17. Modelling the Milky Way's globular cluster system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binney, James; Wong, Leong Khim

    2017-05-01

    We construct a model for the Galactic globular cluster system based on a realistic gravitational potential and a distribution function (DF) analytic in the action integrals. The DF comprises disc and halo components whose functional forms resemble those recently used to describe the stellar discs and stellar halo. We determine the posterior distribution of our model parameters using a Bayesian approach. This gives us an understanding of how well the globular cluster data constrain our model. The favoured parameter values of the disc and halo DFs are similar to values previously obtained from fits to the stellar disc and halo, although the cluster halo system shows clearer rotation than does the stellar halo. Our model reproduces the generic features of the globular cluster system, namely the density profile, the mean rotation velocity and the fraction of metal-rich clusters. However, the data indicate either incompatibility between catalogued cluster distances and current estimates of distance to the Galactic Centre, or failure to identify clusters behind the bulge. As the data for our Galaxy's components increase in volume and precision over the next few years, it will be rewarding to revisit the present analysis.

  18. Primordial black holes in globular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurdsson, Steinn; Hernquist, Lars

    1993-01-01

    It has recently been recognized that significant numbers of medium-mass back holes (of order 10 solar masses) should form in globular clusters during the early stages of their evolution. Here we explore the dynamical and observational consequences of the presence of such a primordial black-hole population in a globular cluster. The holes initially segregate to the cluster cores, where they form binary and multiple black-hole systems. The subsequent dynamical evolution of the black-hole population ejects most of the holes on a relatively short timescale: a typical cluster will retain between zero and four black holes in its core, and possibly a few black holes in its halo. The presence of binary, triple, and quadruple black-hole systems in cluster cores will disrupt main-sequence and giant stellar binaries; this may account for the observed anomalies in the distribution of binaries in globular clusters. Furthermore, tidal interactions between a multiple black-hole system and a red giant star can remove much of the red giant's stellar envelope, which may explain the puzzling absence of larger red giants in the cores of some very dense clusters.

  19. Globular Cluster Systems along the Hubble Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huizinga, Edwin

    1996-07-01

    Globular Cluster Systems {GCSs} provide a powerful tool to differentiate between competing galaxy formation- and evolution scenarios. However, our current knowledge of GCS in spiral galaxies is based mainly on studies of the Galaxy and M31. Even though GCSs have been detected in other spiral galaxies, ground-based observations barely reach the peak of the Globular-Cluster luminosity function, and do not provide accurate colors. We propose a systematic study of the GCSs in 6 edge-on L* spiral galaxies beyond the Local Group, using WFPC2. These galaxies were carefully selected to meet several stringent criteria. With the new dithering techniques, it will be possible to resolve any faint background galaxies and obtain a clean sample of globular clusters for all galaxies in our sample. This will allow us to study the complete luminosity functions, {V-I} color distributions, and GCS richness for L* galaxies as a function of Hubble type {Sa, Sb, Sc}. These data will be used to study the relations between the galaxies' bulge and {thin/thick} disk properties and their GCSs. If, for example, GCS properties correlate with bulge properties, this will rule out any strong evolution along the Hubble Sequence towards earlier type spirals, from Sc to Sa, as has recently been proposed by Pfenniger et al. {1994}.

  20. VLT spectroscopy of NGC3115 globular clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Kuntschner, H; Sharples, R M; Worthey, G; Fricke, K J; Kuntschner, Harald; Ziegler, Bodo L.; Worthey, Guy; Fricke, Klaus J.

    2002-01-01

    We present results derived from VLT-FORS2 spectra of 24 different globular clusters associated with the lenticular galaxy NGC3115. A subsample of 17 globular clusters have sufficiently high signal-to-noise to allow precision measurements of absorption line-strengths. Comparing these indices to new stellar population models by Thomas et al. we determine ages, metallicities and element abundance ratios. Our data are also compared with the Lick/IDS observations of Milky Way and M31 globular clusters. Unpublished higher order Balmer lines (HgammaA,F and HdeltaA,F) from the Lick/IDS observations are given in the Appendix. Our best age estimates show that the observed clusters which sample the bimodal colour distribution of NGC3115 are coeval within our observational errors (2-3 Gyr). Our best calibrated age/metallicity diagnostic diagram (Hbeta vs [MgFe]) indicates an absolute age of 11-12 Gyr. We confirm with our accurate line-strength measurements that the (V-I) colour is a good metallicity indicator within the ...

  1. Globular Clusters around Galaxies in Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Rocha, C D; Bolte, M; Ziegler, B L; Puzia, T

    2001-01-01

    We have obtained deep photometry of NGC 1199 (in the compact group HCG 22) and NGC 6868 (in the Telescopium loose group) with the Keck II and the VLT-I telescopes. Both galaxies are the optically brightest galaxy of their groups. NGC 1199 has two companion galaxies at a median projected distance of only 33 kpc and, based in its peculiar internal structure and large X-ray halo, NGC 6868 has been proposed to be a merger remnant. Our analysis of $B$ and $R$ images uncovered a population of globular clusters around both galaxies, with total (and local) specific frequency S_N = 3.6\\pm1.8 (3.4\\pm1.5) for NGC 1199 and S_N = 1.8\\pm1.1 (0.8\\pm0.4) for NGC 6868. The radial profile of the globulars of NGC 1199 follows the light distribution of the galaxy and can be fitted by a power--law and a ``core model'' with a very steep slope (\\alpha = 2.5\\pm0.3). In the case of NGC 6868, the profile of the globulars is well fitted by a power--law and a ``core model'' profile of slope 1.4\\pm0.3 and is shallower than the galaxy lig...

  2. The Faint Globular Cluster in the Dwarf Galaxy Andromeda I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Nelson; Strader, Jay; Sand, David J.; Willman, Beth; Seth, Anil C.

    2017-09-01

    Observations of globular clusters in dwarf galaxies can be used to study a variety of topics, including the structure of dark matter halos and the history of vigorous star formation in low-mass galaxies. We report on the properties of the faint globular cluster (M V -3.4) in the M31 dwarf galaxy Andromeda I. This object adds to the growing population of low-luminosity Local Group galaxies that host single globular clusters.

  3. Globular cluster star classification: Application to M13

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caimmi R.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Starting from recent determination of Fe, O, Na abundances on a restricted sample (N = 67 of halo and thick disk stars, a natural and well motivated selection criterion is defined for the classification globular cluster stars. An application is performed to M13 using a sample (N = 113 for which Fe, O, Na abundances have been recently inferred from observations. A comparison is made between the current and earlier M13 star classifications. Both O and Na empirical differential abundance distributions are determined for each class and for the whole sample (with the addition of Fe in the last case and compared with their theoretical counterparts due to cosmic scatter obeying a Gaussian distribution whose parameters are inferred from related subsamples. The occurrence of an agreement between the empirical and theoretical distributions is interpreted as absence of significant chemical evolution and vice versa. The procedure is repeated with regard to four additional classes depending on whether oxygen and sodium abundance is above (stage CE or below (stage AF a selected threshold. Both O and Na empirical differential abundance distributions, related to the whole sample, exhibit a linear fit for the AF and CE stage. Within the errors, the oxygen slope for the CE stage is equal and of opposite sign with respect to the sodium slope for AF stage, while the contrary holds when dealing with the oxygen slope for the AF stage with respect to the sodium slope for the CE stage. In the light of simple models of chemical evolution applied to M13, oxygen depletion appears to be mainly turned into sodium enrichment for [O/H]≥ -1.35 and [Na/H]≤ -1.45, while one or more largely preferred channels occur for [O/H] -1.45. In addition, the primordial to the current M13 mass ratio can be inferred from the true sodium yield in units of the sodium solar abundance. Though the above results are mainly qualitative due to large (-+1.5 dex uncertainties in abundance

  4. RR Lyrae in Sagittarius Dwarf Globular Clusters (Poster abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritzl, B. J.; Gehrman, T. J.; Bell, E.; Salinas, R.; Smith, H. A.; Catelan, M.

    2016-12-01

    (Abstract only) The Milky Way Galaxy was built up in part by the cannibalization of smaller dwarf galaxies. Some of them likely contained globular clusters. The Sagittarius dwarf galaxy provides a unique opportunity to study a system of globular clusters that originated outside the Milky Way. We have investigated the RR Lyrae populations in two Sagittarius globular clusters, Arp 2 and Terzan 8. The RR Lyrae are used to study the properties of the clusters and to compare this system to Milky Way globular clusters. We will discuss whether or not dwarf galaxies similar to the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy could have played a role in the formation of the Milky Way Galaxy.

  5. Cosmic Strings and the Origin of Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Barton, Alistair; Lin, Ling

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesize that cosmic string loops are the seeds about which globular clusters accrete. Fixing the cosmic string tension by demanding that the peak in the distribution of masses of objects accreting onto string loops agrees with the peak in the observed mass distribution of globular clusters in our Milky Way galaxy, we then compute the expected number density and mass function of globular clusters, and compare with observations. Our hypothesis naturally explains why globular clusters are the oldest and most dense objects in a galaxy, and why they are found in the halo of the galaxy.

  6. Fluorine variations in the globular cluster NGC 6656 (M22): implications for internal enrichment timescales

    CERN Document Server

    D'Orazi, Valentina; Lugaro, Maria; Gratton, Raffaele G; Angelou, George; Bragaglia, Angela; Carretta, Eugenio; Alves-Brito, Alan; Ivans, Inese I; Masseron, Thomas; Mucciarelli, Alessio

    2012-01-01

    Observed chemical (anti)correlations in proton-capture elements among globular cluster stars are presently recognised as the signature of self-enrichment from now extinct, previous generations of stars. This defines the multiple population scenario. Since fluorine is also affected by proton captures, determining its abundance in globular clusters provides new and complementary clues regarding the nature of these previous generations, and supplies strong observational constraints to the chemical enrichment timescales. In this paper we present our results on near-infrared CRIRES spectroscopic observations of six cool giant stars in NGC 6656 (M22): the main objective is to derive the F content and its internal variation in this peculiar cluster, which exhibits significant changes in both light and heavy element abundances. We detected F variations across our sample beyond the measurement uncertainties and found that the F abundances are positively correlated with O and anticorrelated with Na, as expected accordi...

  7. FORS2/VLT survey of Milky Way globular clusters. II. Fe and Mg abundances of 51 Milky Way globular clusters on a homogeneous scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, B.; Barbuy, B.; Saviane, I.; Held, E. V.; Da Costa, G. S.; Ortolani, S.; Gullieuszik, M.; Vásquez, S.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Globular clusters trace the formation and evolution of the Milky Way and surrounding galaxies, and outline their chemical enrichment history. To accomplish these tasks it is important to have large samples of clusters with homogeneous data and analysis to derive kinematics, chemical abundances, ages and locations. Aims: We obtain homogeneous metallicities and α-element enhancement for 51 Galactic bulge, disc, and halo globular clusters that are among the most distant and/or highly reddened in the Galaxy's globular cluster system. We also provide membership selection based on stellar radial velocities and atmospheric parameters. The implications of our results are discussed. Methods: We observed R ~ 2000 spectra in the wavelength interval 456-586 nm for over 800 red giant stars in 51 Galactic globular clusters. We applied full spectrum fitting with the code ETOILE together with libraries of observed and synthetic spectra. We compared the mean abundances of all clusters with previous work and with field stars. We used the relation between mean metallicity and horizontal branch morphology defined by all clusters to select outliers for discussion. Results: [Fe/H], [Mg/Fe], and [α/Fe] were derived in a consistent way for almost one-third of all Galactic globular clusters. We find our metallicities are comparable to those derived from high-resolution data to within σ = 0.08 dex over the interval -2.5< [Fe/H] < 0.0. Furthermore, a comparison of previous metallicity scales with our values yields σ< 0.16 dex. We also find that the distribution of [Mg/Fe] and [α/Fe] with [Fe/H] for the 51 clusters follows the general trend exhibited by field stars. It is the first time that the following clusters have been included in a large sample of homogeneous stellar spectroscopic observations and metallicity derivation: BH 176, Djorg 2, Pal 10, NGC 6426, Lynga 7, and Terzan 8. In particular, only photometric metallicities were available previously for the first three

  8. Define Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk-Madsen, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    "Project" is a key concept in IS management. The word is frequently used in textbooks and standards. Yet we seldom find a precise definition of the concept. This paper discusses how to define the concept of a project. The proposed definition covers both heavily formalized projects and informally...... organized, agile projects. Based on the proposed definition popular existing definitions are discussed....

  9. Selective Uptake and Refolding of Globular Proteins in Coacervate Microdroplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Nicolas; Li, Mei; Mann, Stephen

    2016-06-14

    Intrinsic differences in the molecular sequestration of folded and unfolded proteins within poly(diallyldimethylammonium) (PDDA)/poly(acrylate) (PAA) coacervate microdroplets are exploited to establish membrane-free microcompartments that support protein refolding, facilitate the recovery of secondary structure and enzyme activity, and enable the selective uptake and exclusion of folded and unfolded biomolecules, respectively. Native bovine serum albumin, carbonic anhydrase, and α-chymotrypsin are preferentially sequestered within positively charged coacervate microdroplets, and the unfolding of these proteins in the presence of increasing amounts of urea results in an exponential decrease in the equilibrium partition constants as well as the kinetic release of unfolded molecules from the droplets into the surrounding continuous phase. Slow refolding in the presence of positively charged microdroplets leads to the resequestration of functional proteins and the restoration of enzymatic activity; however, fast refolding results in protein aggregation at the droplet surface. In contrast, slow and fast refolding in the presence of negatively charged PDDA/PAA droplets gives rise to reduced protein aggregation and misfolding by interactions at the droplet surface to give increased levels of protein renaturation. Together, our observations provide new insights into the bottom-up design and construction of self-assembling microcompartments capable of supporting the selective uptake and refolding of globular proteins.

  10. No energy equipartition in globular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenti, Michele; van der Marel, Roeland

    2013-11-01

    It is widely believed that globular clusters evolve over many two-body relaxation times towards a state of energy equipartition, so that velocity dispersion scales with stellar mass as σ ∝ m-η with η = 0.5. We show here that this is incorrect, using a suite of direct N-body simulations with a variety of realistic initial mass functions and initial conditions. No simulated system ever reaches a state close to equipartition. Near the centre, the luminous main-sequence stars reach a maximum ηmax ≈ 0.15 ± 0.03. At large times, all radial bins convergence on an asymptotic value η∞ ≈ 0.08 ± 0.02. The development of this `partial equipartition' is strikingly similar across our simulations, despite the range of different initial conditions employed. Compact remnants tend to have higher η than main-sequence stars (but still η hole (IMBH) decreases η, consistent with our previous findings of a quenching of mass segregation under these conditions. All these results can be understood as a consequence of the Spitzer instability for two-component systems, extended by Vishniac to a continuous mass spectrum. Mass segregation (the tendency of heavier stars to sink towards the core) has often been studied observationally, but energy equipartition has not. Due to the advent of high-quality proper motion data sets from the Hubble Space Telescope, it is now possible to measure η for real clusters. Detailed data-model comparisons open up a new observational window on globular cluster dynamics and evolution. A first comparison of our simulations to observations of Omega Cen yields good agreement, supporting the view that globular clusters are not generally in energy equipartition. Modelling techniques that assume equipartition by construction (e.g. multi-mass Michie-King models) are approximate at best.

  11. Lack of Energy Equipartition in Globular Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenti, Michele

    2013-05-01

    Abstract (2,250 Maximum Characters): It is widely believed that globular clusters evolve over many two-body relaxation times toward a state of energy equipartition, so that velocity dispersion scales with stellar mass as σ∝m^{-η} with η=0.5. I will show instead that this is incorrect, using a suite of direct N-body simulations with a variety of realistic initial mass functions and initial conditions. No simulated system ever reaches a state close to equipartition. Near the center, the luminous main-sequence stars reach a maximum η_{max 0.15±0.03. At large times, all radial bins convergence on an asymptotic value η_{∞ 0.08±0.02. The development of this ``partial equipartition'' is strikingly similar across simulations, despite the range of different initial conditions employed. Compact remnants tend to have higher η than main-sequence stars (but still ηhole (IMBH) decreases η, consistent with our previous findings of a quenching of mass segregation under these conditions. All these results can be understood as a consequence of the Spitzer instability for two-component systems, extended by Vishniac to a continuous mass spectrum. Mass segregation (the tendency of heavier stars to sink toward the core) has often been studied observationally, but energy equipartition has not. Due to the advent of high-quality proper motion datasets from the Hubble Space Telescope, it is now possible to measure η for real clusters. Detailed data-model comparisons open up a new observational window on globular cluster dynamics, structure, evolution, initial conditions, and possible IMBHs. A first comparison of my simulations to observations of Omega Cen yields good agreement, supporting the view that globular clusters are not generally in energy equipartition. Modeling techniques that assume equipartition by construction (e.g., multi-mass Michie-King models) are thus approximate at best.

  12. Pulsating White Dwarfs in Globular Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaan, A.; Zabot, A.; Fraga, L.

    2012-09-01

    We present our current efforts to detect pulsating white dwarfs in globular clusters and analyze the future of this area when the Extremely Large Telescope (ELT), the Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT) and the Thirty-Meter Telescope (TMT) all become operational. Today we are able to detect pulsating white dwarfs in M 4, NGC 6397 and NGC 6752. When ELT comes on line we should be able to improve the quality of data for the nearby clusters and push the limit to at least 3 magnitudes further, up to NGC 6626, increasing the number of observable clusters from 3 to 20.

  13. UV Spectroscopic Indices of Galactic Globular Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Hernández, J.; Chávez, M.; Bertone, E.; Buzzoni, A.; Bressan, A.

    2009-03-01

    We present the calculation of a set of 12 mid-ultraviolet (1900-3200 Å) spectroscopic indices for a sample of 15 galactic globular clusters (GGC) observed with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE). We explore the dependence of the indices on age and metal abundance. We found that five indices (BL 2538, Fe II 2609, Mg II 2800, Mg I 2852 and Mg Wide) display a remarkably good correlation with [Fe/H]. With respect to age, only one index (BL 2740) shows a good correlation. Results from theoretical simple stellar populations well reproduce the global trends of indices vs. [Fe/H].

  14. The Globular cluster system of M31.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galleti, S.; Buzzoni, A.; Federici, L.; Fusi Pecci, F.

    I present here some results of the extensive revision work of M31 confirmed and candidate globular clusters. The Revised Bologna Catalog, RBC, www.bo.astro.it/M31 is currently the largest and most complete database available online. Two spectroscopic surveys are in progress to confirm RBC cluster candidates as well as newly identified candidates at large distances from the center of M31. I have also studied a subsample of bright and young (age < 2 Gyr) clusters in M31 that doesn't appear to have any counterpart in the Milky Way.

  15. Exotic populations in Galactic Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Ferraro, F R

    2006-01-01

    Recent high-resolution observations of the central region of Galactic globular clusters have shown the presence of a large variety of exotic stellar objects whose formation and evolution may be strongly affected by dynamical interactions. In this paper I review the main properties of two classes of exotic objects: the so-called Blue Stragglers stars and the recently identified optical companions to Millisecond pulsar. Both these class of objects are invaluable tools to investigate the binary evolution in very dense environments and are powerful tracers of the dynamical history of the parent cluster.

  16. Globular Clusters as Cradles of Life and Advanced Civilizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Stefano, Rosanne; Ray, Alak

    2016-01-01

    Globular clusters are bound groups of about a million stars and stellar remnants. They are old, largely isolated, and very dense. We consider what each of these special features can mean for the development of life, the evolution of intelligent life, and the long-term survival of technological civilizations. We find that, if they house planets, globular clusters provide ideal environments for advanced civilizations that can survive over long times. We therefore propose methods to search for planets in globular clusters. If planets are found and if our arguments are correct, searches for intelligent life are most likely to succeed when directed toward globular clusters. Globular clusters may be the first places in which distant life is identified in our own or in external galaxies.

  17. Globular Clusters as Cradles of Life and Advanced Civilizations

    CERN Document Server

    Di Stefano, R

    2016-01-01

    Globular clusters are ancient stellar populations with no star formation or core-collapse supernovae. Several lines of evidence suggest that globular clusters are rich in planets. If so, and if advanced civilizations can develop there, then the distances between these civilizations and other stars would be far smaller than typical distances between stars in the Galactic disk. The relative proximity would facilitate interstellar communication and travel. However, the very proximity that promotes interstellar travel also brings danger, since stellar interactions can destroy planetary systems. However, by modeling globular clusters and their stellar populations, we find that large regions of many globular clusters can be thought of as "sweet spots" where habitable-zone planetary orbits can be stable for long times. We also compute the ambient densities and fluxes in the regions within which habitable-zone planets can survive. Globular clusters are among the best targets for searches for extraterrestrial intellig...

  18. Lithium-Rich Giants in Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Kirby, Evan N; Zhang, Andrew J; Hong, Jerry; Guo, Michelle; Guo, Rachel; Cohen, Judith G; Cunha, Katia

    2016-01-01

    Although red giants deplete lithium on their surfaces, some giants are Li-rich. Intermediate-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars can generate Li through the Cameron-Fowler conveyor, but the existence of Li-rich, low-mass red giant branch (RGB) stars is puzzling. Globular clusters are the best sites to examine this phenomenon because it is straightforward to determine membership in the cluster and to identify the evolutionary state of each star. In 72 hours of Keck/DEIMOS exposures in 25 clusters, we found four Li-rich RGB and two Li-rich AGB stars. There were 1696 RGB and 125 AGB stars with measurements or upper limits consistent with normal abundances of Li. Hence, the frequency of Li-richness in globular clusters is (0.2 +/- 0.1)% for the RGB, (1.6 +/- 1.1)% for the AGB, and (0.3 +/- 0.1)% for all giants. Because the Li-rich RGB stars are on the lower RGB, Li self-generation mechanisms proposed to occur at the luminosity function bump or He core flash cannot explain these four lower RGB stars. We propo...

  19. Hot Populations in M87 Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Sohn, S T; Kundu, A; Landsman, W B; Burstein, D; Bohlin, R C; Frogel, J A; Rose, J A

    2005-01-01

    We have obtained HST/STIS far- and near-UV photometry of globular clusters in four fields in the gE galaxy M87. To a limit of m(FUV) = 25 we detect a total of 66 globular clusters (GCs) in common with the deep HST optical-band study of Kundu et al. (1999). Despite strong overlap in V- and I-band properties, the M87 GCs have UV/optical properties that are distinct from clusters in the Milky Way and in M31. M87 clusters, especially metal-poor ones, produce larger hot HB populations than do Milky Way analogues. Cluster mass is probably not a factor in these distinctions. The most metal-rich M87 GCs in our sample are near Z_sun and overlap the local E galaxy sample in estimated Mg_2 line indices. Nonetheless, the clusters produce much more UV light at a given Mg_2, being up to 1 mag bluer than any gE galaxy in (FUV-V) color. The M87 GCs do not appear to represent a transition between Milky Way-type clusters and E galaxies. The differences are in the correct sense if the clusters are significantly older than the E...

  20. Spectroscopy of Globular Clusters in M81

    CERN Document Server

    Schroder, L L; Kissler-Patig, M; Phillips, A C; Huchra, J P; Schroder, Linda L.; Brodie, Jean P.; Kissler-Patig, Markus; Phillips, John P. Huchra & Andrew C.

    2002-01-01

    We present moderate-resolution spectroscopy of globular clusters (GCs) around the Sa/Sb spiral galaxy M81 (NGC 3031). Sixteen candidate clusters were observed with the Low Resolution Imaging Spectrograph on the Keck I telescope. All are confirmed as bona fide GCs, although one of the clusters appears to have been undergoing a transient event during our observations. In general, the M81 globular cluster system (GCS) is found to be very similar to the Milky Way (MW) and M31 systems, both chemically and kinematically. A kinematic analysis of the velocities of 44 M81 GCS, (the 16 presented here and 28 from previous work) strongly suggests that the red, metal-rich clusters are rotating in the same sense as the gas in the disk of M81. The blue, metal-poor clusters have halo-like kinematics, showing no evidence for rotation. The kinematics of clusters whose projected galactocentric radii lie between 4 and 8 kpc suggest that they are rotating much more than those which lie outside these bounds. We suggest that these ...

  1. Globular cluster systems of six shell galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Sikkema, G; Carter, D; Valentijn, E A; Balcells, M

    2006-01-01

    Shells in Elliptical Galaxies are faint, sharp-edged features, believed to provide evidence of a recent ($\\sim 0.5 - 2 \\times 10^9$ years ago) merger event. We analyse the Globular Cluster (GC) systems of six shell elliptical galaxies, to examine the effects of mergers upon the GC formation history. We examine the colour distributions, and investigate differences between red and blue globular cluster populations. We present luminosity functions, spatial distributions and specific frequencies ($S_N$) at 50 kpc radius for our sample. We present V and I magnitudes for cluster candidates measured with the HST Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). Galaxy background light is modelled and removed, and magnitudes are measured in 8 pixel (0.4 arcsec) diameter apertures. Background contamination is removed using counts from HDFS. We find that the colour distributions for NGC 3923 and NGC 5982 have a bimodal form typical of bright ellipticals, with peaks near $V-I=0.92 \\pm 0.04$ and $V-I=1.18 \\pm 0.06$. In NGC 7626, we fin...

  2. Pulsars in Globular Clusters with the SKA

    CERN Document Server

    Hessels, J W T; Bailes, M; Bassa, C G; Freire, P C C; Lorimer, D R; Lynch, R; Ransom, S M; Stairs, I H

    2015-01-01

    Globular clusters are highly efficient radio pulsar factories. These pulsars can be used as precision probes of the clusters' structure, gas content, magnetic field, and formation history; some of them are also highly interesting in their own right because they probe exotic stellar evolution scenarios as well as the physics of dense matter, accretion, and gravity. Deep searches with SKA1-MID and SKA1-LOW will plausibly double to triple the known population. Such searches will only require one to a few tied-array beams, and can be done during early commissioning of the telescope - before an all-sky pulsar survey using hundreds to thousands of tied-array beams is feasible. With SKA2 it will be possible to observe most of the active radio pulsars within a large fraction of the Galactic globular clusters, an estimated population of 600 - 3700 observable pulsars (those beamed towards us). This rivals the total population of millisecond pulsars that can be found in the Galactic field; fully characterizing it will p...

  3. Edades relativas de cúmulos globulares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller Bertolami, M.; Forte, J. C.

    El trabajo de Rossemberg et al (1999), estudia las edades relativas de cúmulos globulares galácticos mediante el análisis de ciertos parámetros morfológicos de los diagramas color-magnitud de dichos cúmulos. Este trabajo se centra en tres puntos: analizar la consistencia de los resultados obtenidos por Rossemberg et al (1999) al emplear observaciones en el sistema fotométrico de Washington, más precisamente, las magnitudes C y T1 en lugar de las magnitudes V e I utilizadas por dichos autores. De la existencia de colores integrados, metalicidad y edad (relativa) para 21 de los cúmulos utilizados en dicho trabajo, se analiza la consistencia de estos resultados con las dependencias de color integrado como función de la edad y la metalicidad que se desprenden de los modelos teóricos de luz integrada por Worthey (1994), Schulz (2002) y Lee et al (2002). Por último se lleva a cabo una breve comparación de la morfología de los diagramas color-magnitud de los cúmulos globulares y de las isocronas utilizadas, a fin de intentar identificar algunas de las posibles causas de las diferencias observadas en los incisos anteriores.

  4. Binaries in Globular Clusters Multiple Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucatello, Sara; Sollima, Antonio; Gratton, Raffaele; D'Orazi, Valentina; Vesperini, Enrico; Carretta, Eugenio; Bragaglia, Angela

    2015-08-01

    In spite of considerable theoretical and obsservational effort, the series of events that leads to the formation of Globular Clusters and their multiple populations is still unclear.One of the key matters is where the so-called second generation of stars form and its distribution at the time of its birth with respect to the first generation. Some of the latest modeling has suggested that second generation should form in a compact subsystem concentrated in the inner regions of the primordial, first generation cluster. In this scenario, loss of a large fraction of the cluster mass is expected, mostly comprised of first generation stars. This would account for the mass budget issue (one of the main problems in the self-enrichment scenario) and would imply a considerable contribution of the clusters to the formation of the Galactic Halo.Testing this prediction is hence of great importance, but not so immediate. Long-term, dynamical evolution of multiple-population clusters could blur considerably the signature of the initial different concentrations, leaving at present time some memory in the very central part (Vesperini et al. 2013), which, because of its high density, is generally not accessible to the multi-object high resolution spectrographs that yield the spectra that allow the chemical composition measurements necessary to tag the different populations.An alternative approach to test the prediction of the initial segregation of the second generations is that of determining their binary fractions. In fact, until the two populations are completely mixed, second generation stars will evolve in a denser environment where disruption will occur more rapidly, leading to a smaller binary incidence in such population (Vesperini et al 2011).I will present the results of our long-term radial velocity monitoring of 10 Galactic Globular clusters, discuss the derived binary fractions in the two populations and address the implications of our findings on our understanding of

  5. Globular Cluster Streams as Galactic High-Precision Scales

    CERN Document Server

    Küpper, A H W; Bonaca, A; Johnston, K V; Hogg, D W; Kroupa, P; Santiago, B X

    2015-01-01

    Tidal streams of globular clusters are ideal tracers of the Galactic gravitational potential. Compared to the few known, complex and diffuse dwarf-galaxy streams, they are kinematically cold, have thin morphologies and are abundant in the halo of the Milky Way. Their coldness and thinness in combination with potential epicyclic substructure in the vicinity of the stream progenitor turns them into high-precision scales. With the example of Palomar 5, we demonstrate how modeling of a globular cluster stream allows us to simultaneously measure the properties of the disrupting globular cluster, its orbital motion, and the gravitational potential of the Milky Way.

  6. Detailed Chemical Abundances of Extragalactic Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Bernstein, R A

    2005-01-01

    We outline a method to measure the detailed chemical composition of extragalactic (unresolved) globular clusters (GCs) from echelle spectra of their integrated light. Our goal is to use this method to measure abundance patterns of GCs in distant spiral and elliptical galaxies to constrain their formation histories. To develop this technique we have obtained a ``training set'' of integrated-light spectra of resolved GCs in the Milky Way and LMC by scanning across the clusters during exposures. Our training set also include spectra of individual stars in those GCs from which abundances can be obtained in the normal way to provide a check on our integrated-light results. We present here the preliminary integrated-light analysis of one GC in our training set, NGC 104 (47 Tuc), and outline some of the techniques utilized and problems encountered in that analysis.

  7. Defining excellence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehl, B

    1993-05-01

    Excellence in the pharmacy profession, particularly pharmacy management, is defined. Several factors have a significant effect on the ability to reach a given level of excellence. The first is the economic and political climate in which pharmacists practice. Stricter controls, reduced resources, and the velocity of change all necessitate nurturing of values and a work ethic to maintain excellence. Excellence must be measured by the services provided with regard to the resources available; thus, the ability to achieve excellence is a true test of leadership and innovation. Excellence is also time dependent, and today's innovation becomes tomorrow's standard. Programs that raise the level of patient care, not those that aggrandize the profession, are the most important. In addition, basic services must be practiced at a level of excellence. Quality assessment is a way to improve care and bring medical treatment to a higher plane of excellence. For such assessment to be effective and not punitive, the philosophy of the program must be known, and the goal must be clear. Excellence in practice is dependent on factors such as political and social norms, standards of practice, available resources; perceptions, time, the motivation to progress to a higher level, and the continuous innovation required to reshape the profession to meet the needs of society.

  8. Lithium-rich Giants in Globular Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Evan N.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Zhang, Andrew J.; Hong, Jerry; Guo, Michelle; Guo, Rachel; Cohen, Judith G.; Cunha, Katia

    2016-03-01

    Although red giants deplete lithium on their surfaces, some giants are Li-rich. Intermediate-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars can generate Li through the Cameron-Fowler conveyor, but the existence of Li-rich, low-mass red giant branch (RGB) stars is puzzling. Globular clusters are the best sites to examine this phenomenon because it is straightforward to determine membership in the cluster and to identify the evolutionary state of each star. In 72 hours of Keck/DEIMOS exposures in 25 clusters, we found four Li-rich RGB and two Li-rich AGB stars. There were 1696 RGB and 125 AGB stars with measurements or upper limits consistent with normal abundances of Li. Hence, the frequency of Li-richness in globular clusters is (0.2 ± 0.1)% for the RGB, (1.6 ± 1.1)% for the AGB, and (0.3 ± 0.1)% for all giants. Because the Li-rich RGB stars are on the lower RGB, Li self-generation mechanisms proposed to occur at the luminosity function bump or He core flash cannot explain these four lower RGB stars. We propose the following origin for Li enrichment: (1) All luminous giants experience a brief phase of Li enrichment at the He core flash. (2) All post-RGB stars with binary companions on the lower RGB will engage in mass transfer. This scenario predicts that 0.1% of lower RGB stars will appear Li-rich due to mass transfer from a recently Li-enhanced companion. This frequency is at the lower end of our confidence interval. The data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  9. LITHIUM-RICH GIANTS IN GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirby, Evan N.; Cohen, Judith G. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Boulevard, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Guhathakurta, Puragra [UCO/Lick Observatory and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Zhang, Andrew J. [The Harker School, 500 Saratoga Avenue, San Jose, CA 95129 (United States); Hong, Jerry [Palo Alto High School, 50 Embarcadero Road, Palo Alto, CA, 94301 (United States); Guo, Michelle [Stanford University, 450 Serra Mall, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Guo, Rachel [Irvington High School, 41800 Blacow Road, Fremont, CA 94538 (United States); Cunha, Katia [Observatório Nacional, São Cristóvão Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2016-03-10

    Although red giants deplete lithium on their surfaces, some giants are Li-rich. Intermediate-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars can generate Li through the Cameron–Fowler conveyor, but the existence of Li-rich, low-mass red giant branch (RGB) stars is puzzling. Globular clusters are the best sites to examine this phenomenon because it is straightforward to determine membership in the cluster and to identify the evolutionary state of each star. In 72 hours of Keck/DEIMOS exposures in 25 clusters, we found four Li-rich RGB and two Li-rich AGB stars. There were 1696 RGB and 125 AGB stars with measurements or upper limits consistent with normal abundances of Li. Hence, the frequency of Li-richness in globular clusters is (0.2 ± 0.1)% for the RGB, (1.6 ± 1.1)% for the AGB, and (0.3 ± 0.1)% for all giants. Because the Li-rich RGB stars are on the lower RGB, Li self-generation mechanisms proposed to occur at the luminosity function bump or He core flash cannot explain these four lower RGB stars. We propose the following origin for Li enrichment: (1) All luminous giants experience a brief phase of Li enrichment at the He core flash. (2) All post-RGB stars with binary companions on the lower RGB will engage in mass transfer. This scenario predicts that 0.1% of lower RGB stars will appear Li-rich due to mass transfer from a recently Li-enhanced companion. This frequency is at the lower end of our confidence interval.

  10. The X-ray globular cluster NGC 1851

    CERN Document Server

    Alcaino, G

    1976-01-01

    A BV photometric investigation of the Southern Globular Cluster NGC 1851, was carried out using the 1 m telescope of Cerro La Silla (ESO) for the photoelectric work and the 1 m telescope of Cerro Las Campanas (CARSO) for the photographic work. Nineteen stars were observed photoelectrically, the limiting magnitude being V=16.18. Using this sequence, 156 stars were measured photographically. The derived apparent distance modulus is (m-M)/sub app/=15/sup m/.50. The reddening is E(B-V)=0/sup m/.10. The true distance modulus is (m-M) /sub 0/=15/sup m/.20. The distance is 11 kpc from the sun, 6 kpc from the galactic plane and 17 kpc from the galactic centre. The main features of the colour-magnitude diagram are: a well defined horizontal branch abundant in red stars and deficient in blue stars, a rich subgiant and asymptotic branch and a moderately populated red giant branch of medium steepness rising to Delta V=2/sup m/.5 at (B-V) /sub 0/=1.4. At the distance of 11 kpc the maximum observed luminosity of the X-ray ...

  11. New SX Phe variables in the globular cluster NGC288

    CERN Document Server

    Martinazzi, E; Costa, J E S; Pieres, A; Bonatto, C; Bica, E; Fraga, L

    2014-01-01

    We report the discovery of two new variable stars in the metal-poor globular cluster NGC 288, found by means of time-series CCD photometry. We classified the new variables as SX Phoenicis due to their characteristic fundamental mode periods (1.02 +- 0.01 and 0.69 +- 0.01 hours), and refine the period estimates for other six known variables. SX Phe stars are known to follow a well-defined Period-Luminosity (P-L) relation and, thus, can be used for determining distances; they are more numerous than RR Lyraes in NGC~288. We obtain the P-L relation for the fundamental mode M_V = (-2.59 +- 0.18) log P_0(d) + (-0.34 +- 0.24) and for the first-overtone mode M_V = (-2.59 +- 0.18) log P_1(d) + (0.50 +- 0.25). Multi-chromatic isochrone fits to our UBV color-magnitude diagrams, based on the Dartmouth Stellar Evolution Database, provide = -1.3 +- 0.1, E(B-V) = 0.02 +- 0.01 and absolute distance modulus (m-M)0 = 14.72 +- 0.01 for NGC 288.

  12. New SX Phe variables in the globular cluster NGC 288

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinazzi, E.; Kepler, S. O.; Costa, J. E. S.; Pieres, A.; Bonatto, C.; Bica, E.; Fraga, L.

    2015-03-01

    We report the discovery of two new variable stars in the metal-poor globular cluster NGC 288, found by means of time series CCD photometry. We classified the new variables as SX Phoenicis (SX Phe) due to their characteristic fundamental mode periods (1.02 ± 0.01 and 0.69 ± 0.01 h), and refine the period estimates for other six known variables. SX Phe stars are known to follow a well-defined period-luminosity (P-L) relation and, thus, can be used for determining distances; they are more numerous than RR Lyraes in NGC 288. We obtain the P-L relation for the fundamental mode MV = (-2.59 ± 0.18) log P0(d) + (-0.34 ± 0.24) and for the first-overtone mode MV = (-2.59 ± 0.18) log P1(d) + (0.50 ± 0.25). Multichromatic isochrone fits to our UBV colour-magnitude diagrams, based on the Dartmouth Stellar Evolution Database, provide = -1.3 ± 0.1, E(B - V) = 0.02 ± 0.01 and absolute distance modulus (m - M)0 = 14.72 ± 0.01 for NGC 288.

  13. A DYING STAR IN GLOBULAR CLUSTER

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    A DYING STAR IN GLOBULAR CLUSTER M15 The globular cluster Messier 15 is shown in this color image obtained with the NASA Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2). Lying some 40,000 light-years from Earth in the direction of the constellation Pegasus, M15 is one of nearly 150 known globular clusters that form a vast halo surrounding our Milky Way galaxy. Each of these clusters is a spherical association of hundreds of thousands of ancient stars. The image, prepared by the Hubble Heritage team, attempts to show the stars in M15 in their true colors. The brightest cluster stars are red giants, with an orange color due to surface temperatures lower than our Sun's. Most of the fainter stars are hotter, giving them a bluish-white color. If we lived in the core of M15, our sky would blaze with tens of thousands of brilliant stars both day and night! Nestled among the myriads of stars visible in the Hubble image is an astronomical oddity. The pinkish object to the upper left of the cluster's core is a gas cloud surrounding a dying star. Known as Kuestner 648, this was the first planetary nebula to be identified in a globular cluster. In 1928, F. G. Pease, working at the 100-inch telescope of California's Mount Wilson Observatory, photographed the spectrum of K 648 and discovered the telltale bright emission of a nebular gas cloud rather than a normal star. In the ensuing 70 years, only three more planetary nebulae have been discovered in globular clusters. The stars in M15 and other globular clusters are estimated to be about 12 billion years old. They were among the first generations of stars to form in the Milky Way. Our Sun, by comparison, is a youthful 4.6 billion years old. As a star like the Sun ages, it exhausts the hydrogen that fuels its nuclear fusion, and increases in size to become a red giant. Then it ejects its outer layers into space, producing a planetary nebula. The remnant star at the center of the nebula gradually dies away as a

  14. Ages of Globular Clusters from HIPPARCOS Parallaxes of Local Subdwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratton, Raffaele G.; Fusi Pecci, Flavio; Carretta, Eugenio; Clementini, Gisella; Corsi, Carlo E.; Lattanzi, Mario

    1997-12-01

    We report here initial but strongly conclusive results for absolute ages of Galactic globular clusters (GGCs). This study is based on high-precision trigonometric parallaxes from the HIPPARCOS satellite coupled with accurate metal abundances ([Fe/H], [O/Fe], and [α/Fe]) from high-resolution spectroscopy for a sample of about thirty subdwarfs. Systematic effects due to star selection (Lutz-Kelker corrections to parallaxes) and the possible presence of undetected binaries in the sample of bona fide single stars are examined, and appropriate corrections are estimated. They are found to be small for our sample. The new data allow us to reliably define the absolute location of the main sequence (MS) as a function of metallicity. These results are then used to derive distances and ages for a carefully selected sample of nine globular clusters having metallicities determined from high-dispersion spectra of individual giants according to a procedure totally consistent with that used for the field subdwarfs. Very precise and homogeneous reddening values have also been independently determined for these clusters. Random errors for our distance moduli are +/-0.08 mag, and systematic errors are likely of the same order of magnitude. These very accurate distances allow us to derive ages with internal errors of ~12% (+/-1.5 Gyr). The main results are: 1. HIPPARCOS parallaxes are smaller than corresponding ground-based measurements, leading, in turn, to longer distance moduli (~0.2 mag) and younger ages (~2.8 Gyr). 2. The distance to NGC 6752 derived from our MS fitting is consistent with that determined using the white dwarf cooling sequence. 3. The relation between the zero-age HB (ZAHB) absolute magnitude and metallicity for the nine program clusters is MV(ZAHB)=(0.22+/-0.09)([Fe/H]+1.5)+(0.49+/-0.04) . This relation is fairly consistent with some of the most recent theoretical models. Within quoted errors, the slope is in agreement with that given by the Baade-Wesselink (BW

  15. Modeling the Tenuous Intracluster Medium in Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Naiman, J; Ramirez-Ruiz, E

    2013-01-01

    We employ hydrodynamical simulations to investigate the underlying mechanism responsible for the low levels of gas and dust in globular clusters. Our models examine the competing effects of mass supply from the evolved stellar population and energy injection from the main sequence stellar members for globular clusters 47 Tucanae, M15, NGC 6440, and NGC 6752. Disregarding all other gas evacuation processes, we find that the energy output from the main sequence stellar population alone is capable of effectively clearing the evolved stellar ejecta and producing intracluster gas densities consistent with current observational constraints. This result distinguishes a viable ubiquitous gas and dust evacuation mechanism for globular clusters. In addition, we extend our analysis to probe the efficiency of pulsar wind feedback in globular clusters. The detection of intracluster ionized gas in cluster 47 Tucanae allows us to place particularly strict limits on pulsar wind thermalization efficiency, which must be extrem...

  16. Analytical Solution for Stellar Density in Globular Clusters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. A. Sharaf; A. M. Sendi

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, four parameters analytical solution will be established for the stellar density function in globular clusters. The solution could be used for any arbitrary order of outward decrease of the cluster’s density.

  17. ACS photometry of the globular cluster B514

    CERN Document Server

    Galleti, S; Bellazzini, M; Buzzoni, A; Pecci, F F

    2006-01-01

    We present deep F606W, F814W ACS photometry of the recently discovered globular cluster B514, the outermost known globular in the M31 galaxy. The cluster appears quite extended and member stars are unequivocally identified out to ~200 pc from the center. The Color Magnitude Diagram reveals a steep Red Giant Branch (RGB), and a Horizontal Branch (HB) extending blue ward of the instability strip, indicating that B514 is a classical old metal-poor globular cluster. The RGB locus and the position of the RGB Bump are both consistent with a metallicity [Fe/H] ~ -1.8, in excellent agreement with spectroscopic estimates. A preliminary estimate of the integrated absolute V magnitude (M_V< -9.1) suggests that B514 is among the brightest globulars of M31.

  18. Most Massive Globular Cluster in Our Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-05-01

    Far down in the southern sky, in the constellation of Centaurus, a diffuse spot of light can be perceived with the unaided eye. It may be unimpressive, but when seen through a telescope, it turns out to be a beautiful, dense cluster of innumerable stars [1]. Omega Centauri, as this object is called, is the brightest of its type in the sky. We refer to it as a "globular cluster", due to its symmetric form. It belongs to our Milky Way galaxy and astrophysical investigations have shown that it is located at a distance of about 16,500 light-years (1 light-year = 9,460,000,000,000 km). Nobody knows for sure how many individual stars it contains, but recent estimates run into the millions. Most of these stars are more than 10,000 million years old and it is generally agreed that Omega Centauri has a similar age. Measurements of its motion indicate that Omega Centauri plows through the Milky Way in an elongated orbit. It is not easy to understand how it has managed to keep its stars together during such an extended period. MEASURING STELLAR VELOCITIES IN OMEGA CENTAURI A group of astronomers [2] have recently carried through a major investigation of Omega Centauri. After many nights of observations at the ESO La Silla observatory, they now conclude that not only is this globular cluster the brightest, it is indeed by far the most massive known in the Milky Way. The very time-consuming observations were made during numerous observing sessions over a period of no less than 13 years (1981-1993), with the photoelectric spectrometer CORAVEL mounted on the 1.5-m Danish telescope at La Silla. The CORAVEL instrument (COrelation RAdial VELocities) was built in a joint effort between the Geneva (Switzerland) and Marseilles (France) observatories. It functions according to the cross-correlation technique, by means of which the spectrum of the observed star is compared with a "standard stellar spectrum" [3]. HOW HEAVY IS OMEGA CENTAURI? In the present study, a total of 1701

  19. Globular Clusters as Cradles of Life and Advanced Civilizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Stefano, R.; Ray, A.

    2016-08-01

    Globular clusters are ancient stellar populations in compact dense ellipsoids. There is no star formation and there are no core-collapse supernovae, but several lines of evidence suggest that globular clusters are rich in planets. If so, and if advanced civilizations can develop there, then the distances between these civilizations and other stars would be far smaller than typical distances between stars in the Galactic disk, facilitating interstellar communication and travel. The potent combination of long-term stability and high stellar densities provides a globular cluster opportunity. Yet the very proximity that promotes interstellar travel also brings danger, as stellar interactions can destroy planetary systems. We find, however, that large portions of many globular clusters are “sweet spots,” where habitable-zone planetary orbits are stable for long times. Globular clusters in our own and other galaxies are, therefore, among the best targets for searches for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI). We use the Drake equation to compare the likelihood of advanced civilizations in globular clusters to that in the Galactic disk. We also consider free-floating planets, since wide-orbit planets can be ejected to travel through the cluster. Civilizations spawned in globular clusters may be able to establish self-sustaining outposts, reducing the probability that a single catastrophic event will destroy the civilization. Although individual civilizations may follow different evolutionary paths, or even be destroyed, the cluster may continue to host advanced civilizations once a small number have jumped across interstellar space. Civilizations residing in globular clusters could therefore, in a sense, be immortal.

  20. Normal Globular Cluster Systems in Massive Low Surface Brightness Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Villegas, Daniela; Jordán, Andrés; Goudfrooij, Paul; Zwaan, Martin

    2007-01-01

    We present the results of a study of the globular cluster systems of 6 massive spiral galaxies, originally cataloged as low surface brightness galaxies but here shown to span a wide range of central surface brightness values, including two intermediate to low surface brightness galaxies. We used the Advanced Camera for Surveys on board HST to obtain photometry in the F475W and F775W bands and select sources with photometric and morphological properties consistent with those of globular clusters. A total of 206 candidates were identified in our target galaxies. From a direct comparison with the Galactic globular cluster system we derive specific frequency values for each galaxy that are in the expected range for late-type galaxies. We show that the globular cluster candidates in all galaxies have properties consistent with globular cluster systems of previously studied galaxies in terms of luminosity, sizes and color. We establish the presence of globular clusters in the two intermediate to low surface brightn...

  1. Deep VLT search for globular clusters in NGC 5128 color-magnitude diagrams and globular cluster luminosity function

    CERN Document Server

    Rejkuba, M

    2001-01-01

    At the distance of NGC 5128 (3.6 \\pm 0.2 Mpc) it is possible to resolve globular clusters with high resolution imaging from the ground, thus allowing the globular cluster candidate selection primarily through their morphological properties. I report the discovery of 71 globular clusters in NGC 5128 on VLT UT1+FORS1 images, including the faintest members (Mv ~ -5) known to date in this galaxy as well as 5 previously known clusters. U- and V-band photometry has been measured for all the candidates and the luminosity function, spanning -10.1globular cluster luminosity functions in an elliptical galaxy determined so far. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistics show that the difference between the globular cluster luminosity functions of NGC 5128 and the MW is not larger than the difference between the ones of M31 and the MW. The (U-V)o color histogram shows a bimodal distribution. For 23 globular clusters I obtained K-band images with SOFI at the...

  2. Coil fraction-dependent phase behaviour of a model globular protein–polymer diblock copolymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Carla S. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Olsen, Bradley D. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The self-assembly of the model globular protein–polymer block copolymer mCherry-b-poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) is explored across a range of polymer coil fractions from 0.21 to 0.82 to produce a phase diagram for these materials as a function of molecular composition. Overall, four types of morphologies were observed: hexagonally packed cylinders, perforated lamellae, lamellae, and disordered nanostructures. Across all coil fractions and morphologies, a lyotropic re-entrant order–disorder transition in water was observed, with disordered structures below 30 wt% and above 70 wt% and well-ordered morphologies at intermediate concentrations. Solid state samples prepared by solvent evaporation show moderately ordered structures similar to those observed in 60 wt% solutions, suggesting that bulk structures result from kinetic trapping of morphologies which appear at lower concentrations. While highly ordered cylindrical nanostructures are observed around a bioconjugate polymer volume fraction of 0.3 and well-ordered lamellae are seen near a volume fraction of 0.6, materials at lower or higher coil fractions become increasingly disordered. Notable differences between the phase behaviour of globular protein–polymer block copolymers and coil–coil diblock copolymers include the lack of spherical nanostructures at either high or low polymer coil fractions as well as shifted phase boundaries between morphologies which result in an asymmetric phase diagram.

  3. GeMS MCAO observations of the Galactic globular cluster NGC 2808: the absolute age

    CERN Document Server

    Massari, Davide; McConnachie, A; Bono, G; Dall'Ora, M; Ferraro, I; Iannicola, G; Stetson, P B; Turri, P; Tolstoy, E

    2016-01-01

    Globular clusters are the oldest stellar systems in the Milky Way and probe the early epoch of the Galaxy formation. However, the uncertainties on their absolute age are still too large to soundly constrain how the Galactic structures have assembled. The aim of this work is to obtain an accurate estimate of the absolute age of the globular cluster NGC 2808 using deep IR data obtained with the multi conjugate adaptive optics system operating at the Gemini South telescope (GeMS). This exquisite photometry, combined with that obtained in V and I bands with HST, allowed us the detection of the faint Main Sequence Knee feature in NGC 2808 colour magnitude diagram. The difference between this point and the main sequence turn off is a good age estimator and provides ages with unprecedented accuracy. We found that NGC 2808 has an age of t=10.9\\pm0.7 (intrinsic) \\pm0.45 (metallicity term) Gyr. A possible contamination by He-enhanced population could make the cluster up to 0.25 Gyr older. Although this age estimate agr...

  4. No Energy Equipartition in Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Trenti, M

    2013-01-01

    It is widely believed that globular clusters evolve over many two-body relaxation times toward a state of energy equipartition, so that velocity dispersion scales with stellar mass as \\sigma m^{-\\eta} with \\eta = 0.5. We show that this is incorrect, using direct N-body simulations with a variety of realistic IMFs and initial conditions. No simulated system ever reaches a state close to equipartition. Near the center, the luminous main-sequence stars reach a maximum \\eta_{max} ~ 0.15 \\pm 0.03. At large times, all radial bins convergence on an asymptotic value \\eta_{\\infty} ~ 0.08 \\pm 0.02. The development of this "partial equipartition" is strikingly similar across our simulations, despite the range of initial conditions employed. Compact remnants tend to have higher \\eta than main-sequence stars (but still \\eta < 0.5), due to their steeper (evolved) mass function. The presence of an intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH) decreases \\eta, consistent with our previous findings of a quenching of mass segregation ...

  5. The Timing of Nine Globular Cluster Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Lynch, Ryan S; Ransom, Scott M; Jacoby, Bryan A

    2011-01-01

    We have used the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope to time nine previously known pulsars without published timing solutions in the globular clusters M62, NGC 6544, and NGC 6624. We have full timing solutions that measure the spin, astrometric, and (where applicable) binary parameters for six of these pulsars. The remaining three pulsars (reported here for the first time) were not detected enough to establish solutions. We also report our timing solutions for five pulsars with previously published solutions, and find good agreement with past authors, except for PSR J1701-3006B in M62. Gas in this system is probably responsible for the discrepancy in orbital parameters, and we have been able to measure a change in the orbital period over the course of our observations. Among the pulsars with new solutions we find several binary pulsars with very low mass companions (members of the so-called "black widow" class) and we are able to place constraints on the mass-to-light ratio in two clusters. We confirm that on...

  6. The Globular Cluster System of NGC 6822

    CERN Document Server

    Veljanoski, J; Mackey, A D; Huxor, A P; Hurley, J R; Bernard, E J; Cote, P; Irwin, M J; Martin, N F; Burgett, W S; Chambers, K C; Flewelling, H; Kudritzki, R; Waters, C

    2015-01-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of the globular cluster (GC) system of the Local Group dwarf irregular galaxy NGC 6822. Our study is based on homogeneous optical and near-IR photometry, as well as long-slit spectroscopic observations which are used to determine new radial velocities for 6 GCs, two of which had no previous spectroscopic information. We construct optical-near IR colour-colour diagrams and through comparison to simple stellar population models infer that the GCs have old ages consistent with being 9 Gyr or older, while their metallicities are in the range between -1.6 < [Fe/H] < -0.4. We conduct a kinematic analysis of the GC population and find tentative evidence for weak net rotation of the GC system, in the same sense as that exhibited by the underlying spheroid. The most likely amplitude of rotation is ~10 km/s, approximately half the magnitude of the observed velocity dispersion. Finally, we use the GCs to estimate the dynamical mass of NGC 6822 within 11 kpc and we formally find ...

  7. Universality of Vibrational Spectra of Globular Proteins

    CERN Document Server

    Na, Hyuntae; ben-Avraham, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    It is shown that the density of modes of the vibrational spectrum of globular proteins is universal, i.e., regardless of the protein in question it closely follows one universal curve. The present study, including 135 proteins analyzed with a full atomic empirical potential (CHARMM22) and using the full complement of all atoms Cartesian degrees of freedom, goes far beyond confirming previous claims of universality, finding that universality holds even in the high-frequency range (300- 4000 1/cm), where peaks and turns in the density of states are faithfully reproduced from one protein to the next. We also characterize fluctuations of the spectral density from the average, paving the way to a meaningful discussion of rare, unusual spectra and the structural reasons for the deviations in such "outlier" proteins. Since the method used for the derivation of the vibrational modes (potential energy formulation, set of degrees of freedom employed, etc.) has a dramatic effect on the spectral density, another signific...

  8. Modeling the Blue Stragglers in Globular Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Sourav

    2012-10-01

    Blue stragglers {BS} have been extensively observed in Galactic globular clusters {GGC}. primarily with HST. Many theoretical studies have identified BS formation channels and it is understood that dynamics in GCs modifies formation and distribution of the BSs. Despite the wealth of observational data, comprehensive theoretical models including all relevant physical processes in dynamically evolving GCs do not exist. Our dynamical cluster modeling code, developed over the past decade, includes all relevant physical processes in a GC including two-body relaxation, strong scattering, physical collisions, and stellar-evolution {single and binary}. We can model GCs with realistic N and provide star-by-star models for GCs directly comparable with the observed data. This proposed study will create realistic GC models with initial conditions from a grid spanning a large range in the multidimensional parameter space including cluster mass, binary fraction, concentration, and Galactic position. Our numerical models combined with observational constraints from existing HST data will for the first time provide explanations for the observed trends in the BS populations in GGCs, the dominant formation channel for these BSs, typical dynamical ages of the BSs, and find detailed dynamical histories of the BSs in GGCs. These models will yield valuable insight on the correlations between the BS properties and a number of cluster dynamical properties {central density, binary fraction, and binary orbital properties} which will potentially help constrain a GC's past evolutionary history. As a bonus a large set of realistic theoretical GC models will be constructed.

  9. The realm of the Galactic globular clusters and the mass of their primordial clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo; Cassisi, Santi; Silich, Sergiy

    2016-01-01

    By adopting the empirical constraints related to the estimates of Helium enhancement ($\\Delta Y$), present mass ratio between first and second stellar generations ($M_{1G}/M_{2G}$) and the actual mass of Galactic globular clusters ($M_{GC}$), we envisage a possible scenario for the formation of these stellar systems. Our approach allows for the possible loss of stars through evaporation or tidal interactions and different star formation efficiencies. In our approach the star formation efficiency of the first generation ($\\epsilon_{1G}$) is the central factor that links the stellar generations as it not only defines both the mass in stars of the first generation and the remaining mass available for further star formation, but it also fixes the amount of matter required to contaminate the second stellar generation. In this way, $\\epsilon_{1G}$ is fully defined by the He enhancement between successive generations in a GC. We also show that globular clusters fit well within a $\\Delta Y$ {\\it vs} $M_{1G}/M_{2G}$ d...

  10. A search for RCB stars in globular clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Boiardi, Scarlett-Rose; Davoust, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    There are only about 65 R Coronae Borealis stars known in our Galaxy, and none in globular clusters. As these stars are thought to result from the merger of two white dwarfs, one would expect the higher stellar density of globular clusters to favor their formation. We have searched for such stars in Galactic globular clusters, as their presence in a specific category of clusters might provide more clues as to their formation. We selected from the WISE all-Sky source catalog all the stars within the tidal radius of the 150 globular clusters within 50 kpc, which is the distance to which RCB stars are detectable by WISE. The total number of stars selected in this way was 635989. We then successively applied the eight selection criteria of Tisserand (2012) satisfied by RCB stars to the dereddened photometric WISE and 2MASS data. Only three stars satisfying the conditions were found in the field of three globular clusters. The star in the field of Liller 1 is most probably a protostar. For the two other candidates...

  11. THE TIMING OF NINE GLOBULAR CLUSTER PULSARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynch, Ryan S. [Physics Department, McGill University, 3600 Rue University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Freire, Paulo C. C. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Ransom, Scott M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903-4325 (United States); Jacoby, Bryan A., E-mail: rlynch@physics.mcgill.ca, E-mail: pfreire@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de, E-mail: sransom@nrao.edu, E-mail: bryan.jacoby@gmail.com [Aerospace Corporation, 15049 Conference Center Drive, Chantilly, VA 20151-3824 (United States)

    2012-02-01

    We have used the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope to time nine previously known pulsars without published timing solutions in the globular clusters (GCs) M62, NGC 6544, and NGC 6624. We have full timing solutions that measure the spin, astrometric, and (where applicable) binary parameters for six of these pulsars. The remaining three pulsars (reported here for the first time) were not detected enough to establish solutions. We also report our timing solutions for five pulsars with previously published solutions, and find good agreement with other authors, except for PSR J1701-3006B in M62. Gas in this system is probably responsible for the discrepancy in orbital parameters, and we have been able to measure a change in the orbital period over the course of our observations. Among the pulsars with new solutions we find several binary pulsars with very low mass companions (members of the so-called 'black widow' class) and we are able to place constraints on the mass-to-light ratio in two clusters. We confirm that one of the pulsars in NGC 6624 is indeed a member of the rare class of non-recycled pulsars found in GCs. We have also measured the orbital precession and Shapiro delay for a relativistic binary in NGC 6544. If we assume that the orbital precession can be described entirely by general relativity, which is likely, we are able to measure the total system mass (2.57190(73) M{sub Sun }) and companion mass (1.2064(20) M{sub Sun }), from which we derive the orbital inclination (sin i = 0.9956(14)) and the pulsar mass (1.3655(21) M{sub Sun }), the most precise such measurement ever obtained for a millisecond pulsar. The companion is the most massive known around a fully recycled pulsar.

  12. Are Globular Clusters the Remnant Nuclei of Progenitor Disk Galaxies?

    CERN Document Server

    Boeker, Torsten

    2007-01-01

    The globular cluster system of a typical spheroidal galaxy makes up about 0.25% of the total galaxy mass (McLaughlin 1999). This is roughly the same mass fraction as contained in the nuclear star clus- ter (or stellar nucleus) present in most nearby low-mass galaxies. Motivated by this "coincidence", this Letter discusses a scenario in which globular clusters of present-day galaxies are the surviving nuclei of the dwarf galaxies that - according to the hierarchical merging paradigm of galaxy forma- tion - constitute the "building blocks" of present-day massive galaxies. This scenario, which was first suggested by Freeman (1993), has become more attractive recently in the light of studies that demonstrate a complex star formation history in a number of massive globular clusters.

  13. Shedding Light on Lithium Evolution: The Globular Cluster Perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Korn, A J

    2012-01-01

    I shall review what has been learnt during 20 years of lithium observations in stars belonging to metal-poor globular clusters. The focus will be on little evolved main-sequence, turnoff-point (TOP) and subgiant-branch (SGB) stars expected to display Spite-plateau lithium abundances like those found in the majority of field stars of similar metallicities. But is the Spite plateau of globular clusters the same as those of field stars? What effect does, e.g., cluster-internal pollution have on lithium abundances in the now dominant second generation of stars? It will be shown that it is primarily our incomplete knowledge of the temperature scale of Population II stars which currently limits the diagnostic power of globular clusters as regards the stellar-surface evolution of lithium.

  14. Astronomers Ponder Lack of Planets in Globular Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    This videotape has seven segments, discussing and showing the evidence for the proposition that the galactic clusters do not have many planets. Specifically the segments show: (1) Dr. Ron Gilliland discussing the process of looking for "Hot Jupiters" (i.e., planets about the size of Jupiter, which are hotter than Jupiter) in the globular clusters, (2) a zoom into 47 Tucanae globular cluster, (3) an animation of a planet passing between the host star and the earth with a brightness graph, (4) the same animation as before without the graph, (5) Ron Gilliland of the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) discussing possible interpretations of his findings in the 47 Tucanae globular cluster, (6) Ron Gilliland examining the images of 47 Tucanae, and (7) images of 47 Tucanae watching for variations in brightness.

  15. Notes on counter-orbiting globular clusters in the Milky Way

    OpenAIRE

    Yankelevich, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    It is argued that Galactic globular clusters rotating retrograde may originate from prograde globular clusters that change their angular momenturm due to gravitational perturbations from the Magellanic Cloud galaxies. It is shown that those galactic globular clusters with orbits near the Lagrangiane point of the system "Milky Way - Maggellanic Clouds" can change the sign of their angular momentum in few Gyr time scale.

  16. Spectroscopic evidence of Multiple Stellar Populations in Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Carretta, Eugenio

    2016-01-01

    Galactic globular clusters are not simple stellar populations. And nothing is simple in their study, basically because we try to reconstruct chains of events that occurred at redshift z > 2-3 by observing these objects at z=0, after a Hubble time. Fortunately, spectroscopy offers a magnifying lens: differences of tens or hundreds of Myrs between stellar generations are translated into differences in abundances up to a full dex. I will review the complex pattern emerging by the combined efforts of different groups, focusing on the chemical signatures of multiple populations in globular clusters.

  17. Sistemas de cúmulos globulares extragalácticos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, J. C.

    Se describen las características de los sistemas de cúmulos globulares asociados a galaxias elípticas en una variedad de medios y, en particular, aquellas vinculadas con la distribución espacial, frecuencia específica y composición química. Esta discusión se hace dentro de un conjunto de esquemas orientados a explicar las primeras fases de la formación de las galaxias dominantes en cúmulos y del rol de los sistemas de cúmulos globulares en esos procesos.

  18. Globular cluster-massive black hole interactions in galactic centers

    CERN Document Server

    Capuzzo-Dolcetta, R

    2016-01-01

    Many, if not all, galaxies host massive compact objects at their centers. They are present as singularities (super massive black holes) or high density star clusters (nuclear tar clusters). In some cases they coexist, and interact more or less strongly. In this short paper I will talk of the 'merger' globular cluster scenario, which has been shown in the past to be an explanation of the substantial mass accumulation in galactic centers. In particular, I will present the many astrophysical implications of such scenario pointing the attention on the mutual feedback of orbitally decaying globular clusters with massive and super massive black holes.

  19. A model for globular cluster extreme anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Antona, F.; Ventura, P.

    2007-08-01

    In spite of the efforts made in recent years, there is still no comprehensive explanation for the chemical anomalies of globular cluster (GC) stars. Among these anomalies, the most striking is oxygen depletion, which reaches values down to [O/Fe] ~ -0.4 in most clusters, but in M13 it goes down to less than [O/Fe] ~ -1. In this work we suggest that the anomalies are due to the superposition of two different events, as follows. (i) Primordial self-enrichment; this is required to explain the oxygen depletion down to a minimum value [O/Fe] ~ -0.4. (ii) Extra mixing in a fraction of the stars already born with anomalous composition; these objects, starting with already low [O/Fe], will reduce the oxygen abundance down to the most extreme values. Contrary to other models that invoke extra mixing to explain the chemical anomalies, we suggest that this mixing is active only if there is a fraction of the stars in which the primordial composition is not only oxygen-depleted, but also extremely helium-rich (Y ~ 0.4), as found in a few GCs from their main-sequence multiplicity. We propose that the rotational evolution (and an associated extra mixing) of extremely helium-rich stars may be affected by the fact that they develop a very small or non-existent molecular weight barrier during the evolution. We show that extra mixing in these stars, having initial chemistry that has already been CNO processed, affects mainly the oxygen abundance, as well as (to a much smaller extent) the sodium abundance. The model also predicts a large fluorine depletion concomitant with the oxygen depletion, and a further enhancement of the surface helium abundance, which reaches values close to Y = 0.5 in the computed models. We stress that, in this tentative explanation, those stars that are primordially oxygen-depleted, but are not extremely helium-rich, do not suffer deep extra mixing.

  20. Tidal tails around globular clusters: are they good tracers of cluster orbits?

    CERN Document Server

    Matteo, P D; Miocchi, P; Montuori, M

    2006-01-01

    In the last decade, observational studies have shown the existence of tidal streams in the outer part of many galactic globular clusters. The most striking examples of clusters with well defined tidal tails are represented by Palomar 5 and NGC 5466 (both observed in the framework of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey), which show structures elongated for 4 kpc and 1 kpc in length, respectively. Unfortunately, most of the observational studies about globular clusters (GCs) do not cover such a large field of the sky as the SDSS does. In this framework, by mean of a parallel, adaptive tree-code, we performed detailed N-body simulations of GCs moving in a realistic three-components (bulge, disk and halo) Milky Way potential, in order to clarify whether and to what extent tails in the clusters outer regions (few tidal radii) are tracers of the local orbits and, also, if some kind of correlation exists among the cluster orbital phase and the orientation of such streams.

  1. Tidal stripping of globular clusters in a simulated galaxy cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Ramos, Felipe; Muriel, Hernán; Abadi, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Using a cosmological N-body numerical simulation of the formation of a galaxy cluster- sized halo, we analyze the temporal evolution of its globular cluster population. We follow the dynamical evolution of 38 galactic dark matter halos orbiting in a galaxy cluster that at redshift z=0 has a virial mass of 1.71 * 10 ^14 Msol h^-1. In order to mimic both "blue" and "red" populations of globular clusters, for each galactic halo we select two different sets of particles at high redshift (z ~ 1), constrained by the condition that, at redshift z=0, their average radial density profiles are similar to the observed profiles. As expected, the general galaxy cluster tidal field removes a significant fraction of the globular cluster populations to feed the intracluster population. On average, halos lost approximately 16% and 29% of their initial red and blue globular cluster populations, respectively. Our results suggest that these fractions strongly depend on the orbital trajectory of the galactic halo, specifically on...

  2. Catalogue of variable stars in Milky Way globular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Christine

    2017-09-01

    Globular cluster variable stars have been studied for more than a century. In the early investigations, more than 90% of the known variables were of the RR Lyrae type. However, in the interim, technological advances have facilitated the discovery of other types of variables. As a result, although RR Lyrae stars still dominate, they now constitute less than 70% of the known variables.

  3. Trazando la materia oscura con cúmulos globulares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, J. C.

    Se describe la estrategia adoptada para mapear la distribución de materia oscura y bariónica en galaxias elípticas cuyos cúmulos globulares están siendo observados con los telescopios VLT y Gemini. Se ejemplifican los resultados con los datos obtenidos en el cúmulo de Fornax.

  4. Possible systematic decreases in the age of globular clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, X. [Univ. of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Schramm, D. N. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Univ. of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Dearborn, D. S.P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Truran, J. W. [Univ. of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1994-03-01

    The ages of globular clusters inferred from observations depends sensitively on assumptions like the initial helium abundance and the mass loss rate. A high helium abundance (e.g., Y\\approx0.28) or a mass loss rate of \\sim10^{-11}M_\\odot yr^{-1} near the main sequence turn-off region lowers the current age estimate from 14 Gyr to about 10--12 Gyr, significantly relaxing the constraints on the Hubble constant, allowing values as high as 60km/sec/Mpc for a universe with the critical density and 90km/sec/Mpc for a baryon-only universe. Possible mechanisms for the helium enhancement in globular clusters are discussed, as are arguments for an instability strip induced mass loss near the turn-off. Ages lower than 10 Gyr are not possible even with the operation of both of these mechanisms unless the initial helium abundance in globular clusters is >0.30, which would conflict with indirect measurements of helium abundances in globular clusters.

  5. Integrated spectral study of reddened globular clusters and candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bica, E.; Claria, J. J.; Piatti, A. E.; Bonatto, C.

    1998-09-01

    This paper presents integrated spectra in the range 6700 - 9500 Angstroms for 20 Galactic globular clusters (and candidates) in the bulge and 5 others projected on the Galactic disk (|l|>30mbox {^{\\circ}}\\ and |b|Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito (CASLEO), Argentina, and European Southern Observatory (ESO), Chile.

  6. Black hole binaries dynamically formed in globular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dawoo; Kim, Chunglee; Lee, Hyung Mok; Bae, Yeong-Bok; Belczynski, Krzysztof

    2017-08-01

    We investigate properties of black hole (BH) binaries formed in globular clusters via dynamical processes, using directN-body simulations. We pay attention to effects of BH mass function on the total mass and mass ratio distributions of BH binaries ejected from clusters. First, we consider BH populations with two different masses in order to learn basic differences from models with single-mass BHs only. Secondly, we consider continuous BH mass functions adapted from recent studies on massive star evolution in a low metallicity environment, where globular clusters are formed. In this work, we consider only binaries that are formed by three-body processes and ignore stellar evolution and primordial binaries for simplicity. Our results imply that most BH binary mergers take place after they get ejected from the cluster. Also, mass ratios of dynamically formed binaries should be close to 1 or likely to be less than 2:1. Since the binary formation efficiency is larger for higher-mass BHs, it is likely that a BH mass function sampled by gravitational-wave observations would be weighed towards higher masses than the mass function of single BHs for a dynamically formed population. Applying conservative assumptions regarding globular cluster populations such as small BH mass fraction and no primordial binaries, the merger rate of BH binaries originated from globular clusters is estimated to be at least 6.5 yr-1 Gpc-3. Actual rate can be up to more than several times of our conservative estimate.

  7. A Dwarf Nova in the Globular Cluster M13

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Servillat, M.; Webb, N.A.; Lewis, F.; Knigge, C.; van den Berg, M.C.; Dieball, A.; Grindlay, J.E.

    2011-01-01

    Dwarf novae (DNe) in globular clusters (GCs) seem to be rare with only 13 detections in the 157 known Galactic GCs. We report the identification of a new DN in M13, the 14th DN identified in a GC to date. Using the 2 m Faulkes Telescope North, we conducted a search for stars in M13 that show variabi

  8. Supra-galactic colour patterns in globular cluster systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, Juan C.

    2017-07-01

    An analysis of globular cluster systems associated with galaxies included in the Virgo and Fornax Hubble Space Telescope-Advanced Camera Surveys reveals distinct (g - z) colour modulation patterns. These features appear on composite samples of globular clusters and, most evidently, in galaxies with absolute magnitudes Mg in the range from -20.2 to -19.2. These colour modulations are also detectable on some samples of globular clusters in the central galaxies NGC 1399 and NGC 4486 (and confirmed on data sets obtained with different instruments and photometric systems), as well as in other bright galaxies in these clusters. After discarding field contamination, photometric errors and statistical effects, we conclude that these supra-galactic colour patterns are real and reflect some previously unknown characteristic. These features suggest that the globular cluster formation process was not entirely stochastic but included a fraction of clusters that formed in a rather synchronized fashion over large spatial scales, and in a tentative time lapse of about 1.5 Gy at redshifts z between 2 and 4. We speculate that the putative mechanism leading to that synchronism may be associated with large scale feedback effects connected with violent star-forming events and/or with supermassive black holes.

  9. Globular cluster content and evolutionary history of NGC147

    CERN Document Server

    Sharina, Margarita

    2009-01-01

    We present the results of spectroscopic observations of eight globular cluster candidates in NGC147, a satellite dwarf elliptical galaxy of M31. Our goal is to make a complete inventory of the globular cluster system of this galaxy, determine the properties of their stellar populations, and compare these properties with those of systems of globular clusters in other dwarf galaxies. The candidates were identified on Canada-France-Hawaii telescope photographic plates. Medium resolution spectra were obtained with the SCORPIO spectrograph at the prime focus of the 6m telescope of the Russian Academy of Sciences. We were able to confirm the nature of all eight candidates, three of which (GC5, GC7, and GC10) are indeed globular clusters, and to estimate evolutionary parameters for the two brightest ones and for Hodge II. The bright clusters GC5 and GC7 appear to have metallicities ([Z/H]~ -1.5- -1.8) that are lower than the oldest stars in the galaxy. The fainter GC Hodge II has a metallicity [Z/H]=-1.1 dex, simila...

  10. About the globular homology of higher dimensional automata

    OpenAIRE

    Gaucher, Philippe

    2000-01-01

    We introduce a new simplicial nerve of higher dimensional automata whose homology groups yield a new definition of the globular homology. With this new definition, the drawbacks noticed with the construction of math.CT/9902151 disappear. Moreover the important morphisms which associate to every globe its corresponding branching area and merging area of execution paths become morphisms of simplicial sets.

  11. The SAGES Legacy Unifying Globulars and Galaxies survey (SLUGGS): sample definition, methods, and initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodie, Jean P.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Jennings, Zachary G.; Pota, Vincenzo; Kader, Justin; Roediger, Joel C.; Villaume, Alexa; Arnold, Jacob A.; Woodley, Kristin A. [University of California Observatories, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Strader, Jay [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Forbes, Duncan A.; Pastorello, Nicola; Usher, Christopher; Blom, Christina; Kartha, Sreeja S. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia); Foster, Caroline; Spitler, Lee R., E-mail: jbrodie@ucsc.edu [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 915, North Ryde, NSW 1670 (Australia)

    2014-11-20

    We introduce and provide the scientific motivation for a wide-field photometric and spectroscopic chemodynamical survey of nearby early-type galaxies (ETGs) and their globular cluster (GC) systems. The SAGES Legacy Unifying Globulars and GalaxieS (SLUGGS) survey is being carried out primarily with Subaru/Suprime-Cam and Keck/DEIMOS. The former provides deep gri imaging over a 900 arcmin{sup 2} field-of-view to characterize GC and host galaxy colors and spatial distributions, and to identify spectroscopic targets. The NIR Ca II triplet provides GC line-of-sight velocities and metallicities out to typically ∼8 R {sub e}, and to ∼15 R {sub e} in some cases. New techniques to extract integrated stellar kinematics and metallicities to large radii (∼2-3 R {sub e}) are used in concert with GC data to create two-dimensional (2D) velocity and metallicity maps for comparison with simulations of galaxy formation. The advantages of SLUGGS compared with other, complementary, 2D-chemodynamical surveys are its superior velocity resolution, radial extent, and multiple halo tracers. We describe the sample of 25 nearby ETGs, the selection criteria for galaxies and GCs, the observing strategies, the data reduction techniques, and modeling methods. The survey observations are nearly complete and more than 30 papers have so far been published using SLUGGS data. Here we summarize some initial results, including signatures of two-phase galaxy assembly, evidence for GC metallicity bimodality, and a novel framework for the formation of extended star clusters and ultracompact dwarfs. An integrated overview of current chemodynamical constraints on GC systems points to separate, in situ formation modes at high redshifts for metal-poor and metal-rich GCs.

  12. UV Properties of Galactic Globular Clusters with GALEX II. Integrated colors

    CERN Document Server

    Dalessandro, Emanuele; Rood, Robert T; Ferraro, Francesco R; Sohn, Sangmo T; Lanzoni, Barbara; O'Connell, Robert W

    2012-01-01

    We present ultraviolet (UV) integrated colors of 44 Galactic globular clusters (GGCs) observed with the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) in both FUV and NUV bands. This data-base is the largest homogeneous catalog of UV colors ever published for stellar systems in our Galaxy. The proximity of GGCs makes it possible to resolve many individual stars even with the somewhat low spatial resolution of GALEX. This allows us to determine how the integrated UV colors are driven by hot stellar populations, primarily horizontal branch stars and their progeny. The UV colors are found to be correlated with various parameters commonly used to define the horizontal branch morphology. We also investigate how the UV colors vary with parameters like metallicity, age, helium abundance and concentration. We find for the first time that GCs associated with the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy have (FUV-V) colors systematically redder than GGCs with the same metallicity. Finally, we speculate about the presence of an interesting trend, s...

  13. Top-down assembly design using assembly features

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石万凯; DENEUX; Dominique; 等

    2002-01-01

    The primary task of top-down assembly desig is to define a product's detailed physical description satisfying its functional requirements identified during the functional design phase.The implementation of this design process requires two things,that is ,product functional representation and a general assembly model.Product functions are not only the formulation of a customer's needs,but also the input data of assembly design.A general assembly model is to support the evolving process of the elaboration of a product structure.The assembly feature of extended concept is taken as a functional carrier,which is a generic relation among assembly-modeled entities.The model of assembly features describes the link between product functions and form features of parts.On the basis of this link,the propagation of design modifications is discussed so as to preserve the functionality and the coherence of the assembly model.The formal model of assembly design process describes the top-down process of creating an assembly model.This formal model is represented by the combination of assembly feature operations,the assembly model and the evaluation process.A design case study is conducted to verify the applicability of the presented approaches.

  14. Assembling Sustainable Territories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandergeest, Peter; Ponte, Stefano; Bush, Simon

    2015-01-01

    The authors show how certification assembles ‘sustainable’ territories through a complex layering of regulatory authority in which both government and nongovernment entities claim rule-making authority, sometimes working together, sometimes in parallel, sometimes competitively. It is argued...... that territorialisation is accomplished not just through (re)defining bounded space, but more broadly through the assembling of four elements: space, subjects, objects, and expertise. Four case studies of sustainability certification in seafood are analyzed to show that ‘green gabbing’ is not necessarily the central...... dynamic in assembling sustainable territories, and that certification always involves state agencies in determining how the key elements that comprise it are defined. Whereas some state agencies have been suspicious of sustainability certification, others have embraced it or even used it to extend...

  15. Assembling Sustainable Territories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandergeest, Peter; Ponte, Stefano; Bush, Simon

    2015-01-01

    that territorialisation is accomplished not just through (re)defining bounded space, but more broadly through the assembling of four elements: space, subjects, objects, and expertise. Four case studies of sustainability certification in seafood are analyzed to show that ‘green gabbing’ is not necessarily the central...

  16. Dump valve assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, T.J.

    1984-01-01

    A dump valve assembly comprising a body having a bore defined by a tapered wall and a truncated spherical valve member adapted to seat along a spherical surface portion thereof against said tapered wall. Means are provided for pivoting said valve member between a closed position engagable with said tapered wall and an open position disengaged therefrom.

  17. Universal convergence of the specific volume changes of globular proteins upon unfolding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweiker, Katrina L; Fitz, Victoria W; Makhatadze, George I

    2009-11-24

    Both pressure and temperature are important environmental variables, and to obtain a complete understanding of the mechanisms of protein folding, it is necessary to determine how protein stability is dependent on these fundamental thermodynamic parameters. Although the temperature dependence of protein stability has been widely explored, the dependence of protein stability on pressure is not as well studied. In this paper, we report the results of the direct thermodynamic determination of the change in specific volume (DeltaV/V) upon protein unfolding, which defines the pressure dependence of protein stability, for five model proteins (ubiquitin, eglin c, ribonuclease A, lysozyme, and cytochrome c). We have shown that the specific volumetric changes upon unfolding for four of the proteins (ubiquitin, eglin c, ribonuclease A, and lysozyme) appear to converge to a common value at high temperatures. Analysis of various contributions to the change in volume upon protein unfolding allowed us to put forth the hypothesis that the change in volume due to hydration is very close to zero at this temperature, such that DeltaV/V is defined largely by the total volume of cavities and voids within a protein, and that this is a universal property of all small globular proteins without prosthetic groups. To test this hypothesis, additional experiments were performed with variants of eglin c that had site-directed substitutions at two buried positions, to create an additional cavity in the protein core. The results of these experiments, coupled with the structural analysis of cytochrome c showing a lower packing density compared to those of the other four proteins, provided further support for the hypothesis. Finally, we have shown that the deviation of the high-temperature DeltaV value of a given protein from the convergence value can be used to determine the size of the excess cavities in globular proteins.

  18. Massive binary stars and self-enrichment of globular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzard, R. G.; de Mink, S. E.; Pols, O. R.; Langer, N.; Sana, H.; de Koter, A.

    ~Globular clusters contain many stars with surface abundance patterns indicating contributions from hydrogen burning products, as seen in the anti-correlated elemental abundances of e.g. sodium and oxygen, and magnesium and aluminium. Multiple generations of stars can explain this phenomenon, with the second generation forming from a mixture of pristine gas and ejecta from the first generation. We show that massive binary stars may be a source of much of the material that makes this second generation of stars. Mass transfer in binaries is often non-conservative and the ejected matter moves slowly enough that it can remain inside a globular cluster and remain available for subsequent star formation. Recent studies show that there are more short-period massive binaries than previously thought, hence also more stars that interact and eject nuclear-processed material.

  19. The Relation Between the Globular Cluster Mass and Luminosity Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Kruijssen, J M Diederik

    2009-01-01

    The relation between the globular cluster luminosity function (GCLF, dN/dlogL) and globular cluster mass function (GCMF, dN/dlogM) is considered. Due to low-mass star depletion, dissolving GCs have mass-to-light (M/L) ratios that are lower than expected from their metallicities. This has been shown to lead to an M/L ratio that increases with GC mass and luminosity. We model the GCLF and GCMF and show that the power law slopes inherently differ (1.0 versus 0.7, respectively) when accounting for the variability of M/L. The observed GCLF is found to be consistent with a Schechter-type initial cluster mass function and a mass-dependent mass-loss rate.

  20. The Detailed Chemical Abundance Patterns of M31 Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Colucci, J E; Cohen, J

    2012-01-01

    We present detailed chemical abundances for $>$20 elements in $\\sim$30 globular clusters in M31. These results have been obtained using high resolution ($\\lambda/\\Delta\\lambda\\sim$24,000) spectra of their integrated light and analyzed using our original method. The globular clusters have galactocentric radii between 2.5 kpc and 117 kpc, and therefore provide abundance patterns for different phases of galaxy formation recorded in the inner and outer halo of M31. We find that the clusters in our survey have a range in metallicity of $-2.2$20 kpc have a small range in abundance of [Fe/H]$=-1.6 \\pm 0.10$. We also measure abundances of alpha, r- and s-process elements. These results constitute the first abundance pattern constraints for old populations in M31 that are comparable to those known for the Milky Way halo.

  1. Blue Stragglers in Globular Clusters: Observations, Statistics and Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Knigge, Christian

    2014-01-01

    This chapter explores how we might use the observed {\\em statistics} of blue stragglers in globular clusters to shed light on their formation. This means we will touch on topics also discussed elsewhere in this book, such as the discovery and implications of bimodal radial distributions and the "double sequences" of blue stragglers that have recently been found in some clusters. However, we will focus particularly on the search for a "smoking gun" correlation between the number of blue stragglers in a given globular cluster and a physical cluster parameter that would point towards a particular formation channel. As we shall see, there is little evidence for an intrinsic correlation between blue straggler numbers and stellar collision rates, even in dense cluster cores. On the other hand, there is a clear correlation between blue straggler numbers and the total (core) mass of the cluster. This would seem to point towards a formation channel involving binaries, rather than dynamical encounters. However, the cor...

  2. Massive Binary Stars and Self-Enrichment of Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Izzard, Robert G; Pols, Onno R; Langer, Norbert; Sana, Hugues; de Koter, Alex

    2013-01-01

    Globular clusters contain many stars with surface abundance patterns indicating contributions from hydrogen burning products, as seen in the anti-correlated elemental abundances of e.g. sodium and oxygen, and magnesium and aluminium. Multiple generations of stars can explain this phenomenon, with the second generation forming from a mixture of pristine gas and ejecta from the first generation. We show that massive binary stars may be a source of much of the material that makes this second generation of stars. Mass transfer in binaries is often non-conservative and the ejected matter moves slowly enough that it can remain inside a globular cluster and remain available for subsequent star formation. Recent studies show that there are more short-period massive binaries than previously thought, hence also more stars that interact and eject nuclear-processed material.

  3. Chemical abundances of blue straggler stars in Galactic Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Lovisi, L

    2014-01-01

    By using the high resolution spectrograph FLAMES@VLT we performed the first systematic campaign devoted to measure chemical abundances of blue straggler stars (BSSs). These stars, whose existence is not predicted by the canonical stellar evolutionary theory, are likely the product of the interactions between stars in the dense environment of Globular Clusters. Two main scenarios for BSS formation (mass transfer in binary systems and stellar collisions) have been proposed and hydrodynamical simulations predict different chemical patterns in the two cases, in particular C and O depletion for mass transfer BSSs. In this contribution, the main results for BSS samples in 6 Globular Clusters and their interpretation in terms of BSS formation processes are discussed. For the first time, evidence of radiative levitation in the shallow envelopes of BSSs hotter than $\\sim$8000 K has been found. C and O depletion for some BSSs has been detected in 47 Tucanae, M30 and $\\omega$ Centauri thus suggesting a mass transfer ori...

  4. Fast rotating Blue Stragglers in the globular cluster M4

    CERN Document Server

    Lovisi, L; Ferraro, F R; Lucatello, S; Lanzoni, B; Dalessandro, E; Beccari, G; Rood, R T; Sills, A; Pecci, F Fusi; Gratton, R; Piotto, G

    2010-01-01

    We have used high resolution spectra obtained with the spectrograph FLAMES at the ESO Very Large Telescope to determine the kinematical properties and the abundance patterns of 20 blue straggler stars (BSSs) in the globular cluster M4. We found that ~ 40% of the measured BSSs are fast rotators (with rotational velocities > 50 km/s). This is the largest frequency of rapidly rotating BSSs ever detected in a globular cluster. In addition, at odds with what has been found in 47 Tucanae, no evidence of carbon and/or oxygen depletion has been revealed in the sample of 11 BSSs for which we were able to measure the abundances. This could be due either to low statistics, or to a different BSS formation process acting in M4.

  5. The Blue Straggler Population of the Globular Cluster M5

    CERN Document Server

    Lanzoni, B; Ferraro, F R; Mancini, C; Beccari, G; Rood, R T; Mapelli, M; Sigurdsson, S

    2007-01-01

    By combining high-resolution HST and wide-field ground based observations, in ultraviolet and optical bands, we study the Blue Stragglers Star (BSS) population of the galactic globular cluster M5 (NGC 5904) from its very central regions up to its periphery. The BSS distribution is highly peaked in the cluster center, decreases at intermediate radii and rises again outward. Such a bimodal distribution is similar to those previously observed in other globular clusters (M3, 47Tucanae, NGC6752). As for these clusters, dynamical simulations suggest that, while the majority of BSS in M5 could be originated by stellar collisions, a significant fraction (20-40%) of BSS generated by mass transfer processes in primordial binaries is required to reproduce the observed radial distribution. A candidate BSS has been detected beyond the cluster tidal radius. If confirmed, this could represent an interesting case of an "evaporating" BSS.

  6. Core-hydrogen-burning RSGs in the early globular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szécsi, Dorottya; Mackey, Jonathan; Langer, Norbert

    The first stellar generation in galactic globular clusters contained massive low-metallicity stars (Charbonnel et al. 2014). We modelled the evolution of this massive stellar population and found that such stars with masses 100-600 M⊙ evolve into cool RSGs (Szécsi et al. 2015). These RSGs spend not only the core-He-burning phase but even the last few 105 years of the core-H-burning phase on the SG branch. Due to the presence of hot massive stars in the cluster at the same time, we show that the RSG wind is trapped into photoionization confined shells (Mackey et al. 2014). We simulated the shell formation around such RSGs and find them to become gravitationally unstable (Szécsi et al. 2016). We propose a scenario in which these shells are responsible for the formation of the second generation low-mass stars in globular clusters with anomalous surface abundances.

  7. Core Hydrogen Burning Red Supergiants in the Young Globular Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szecsi, Dorottya; Mackey, Jonathan; Langer, Norbert

    2015-08-01

    The first stellar generation in galactic globular clusters contained massive low metallicity stars. We modelled the evolution of this massive stellar population and found that such stars with masses 100-600 Msun evolve into red supergiants. These red supergiants are particularly interesting because they spend not only the helium burning phase but even the last few hundres tousands of years of the core hydrogen burning phase on the RSG branch. Due to the presence of hot massive stars at the same time, we show that the RSG wind is trapped into photoionization confined shells. We simulate the shell formation around such red supergiants and find them to become gravitationally unstable. We propose a scenario in which these shells are responsible for the formation of the second generation low mass stars in globular clusters with anomalous surface abundances.

  8. Eccentric double white dwarfs as LISA sources in globular clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Willems, B; Vecchio, A; Ivanova, N; Rasio, F A; Fregeau, J M; Belczynski, K

    2007-01-01

    We consider the formation of double white dwarfs (DWDs) through dynamical interactions in globular clusters. Such interactions can readily give rise to eccentric DWDs, in contrast to the exclusively circular population that is expected to form in the Galactic disk. We show that for a 5-year Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission and distances as far as the Large Magellanic Cloud, multiple harmonics from eccentric DWDs can be detected at a signal-to-noise ratio higher than 8 for at least a handful of eccentric DWDs, given their formation rate and typical merger lifetimes estimated from current cluster simulations. Consequently the association of eccentricity with stellar-mass LISA sources does not uniquely involve neutron stars, as is usually assumed. Due to the difficulty of detecting these systems with present and planned electromagnetic observatories, LISA could provide unique dynamical identifications of eccentric DWDs in globular clusters.

  9. Globular Clusters and the Mira Period-Luminosity Relation

    CERN Document Server

    Feast, M W; Menzies, J; Feast, Michael; Whitelock, Patricia; Menzies, John

    2002-01-01

    A globular cluster distance scale based on Hipparcos parallaxes of subdwarfs has been used to derive estimates of M_K for cluster Miras, including one in the SMC globular cluster NGC121. These lead to a zero-point of the Mira infrared period-luminosity relation, PL(K), in good agreement with that derived from Hipparcos parallaxes of nearby field Miras. The mean of these two estimates together with data on LMC Miras yields an LMC distance modulus of 18.60 +/- 0.10 in evident agreement with a metallicity corrected Cepheid modulus (18.59 +/- 0.10). The use of luminous AGB stars as extragalactic population indicators is also discussed.

  10. Mock Observations of Blue Stragglers in Globular Cluster Models

    CERN Document Server

    Sills, Alison; Chatterjee, Sourav; Rasio, Frederic A

    2013-01-01

    We created artificial color-magnitude diagrams of Monte Carlo dynamical models of globular clusters, and then used observational methods to determine the number of blue stragglers in those clusters. We compared these blue stragglers to various cluster properties, mimicking work that has been done for blue stragglers in Milky Way globular clusters to determine the dominant formation mechanism(s) of this unusual stellar population. We find that a mass-based prescription for selecting blue stragglers will choose approximately twice as many blue stragglers than a selection criterion that was developed for observations of real clusters. However, the two numbers of blue stragglers are well-correlated, so either selection criterion can be used to characterize the blue straggler population of a cluster. We confirm previous results that the simplified prescription for the evolution of a collision or merger product in the BSE code overestimates the lifetime of collision products. Because our observationally-motivated s...

  11. A 500 Parsec Halo Surrounding the Galactic Globular NGC 1851

    CERN Document Server

    Olszewski, Edward W; Knezek, Patricia; Subramaniam, Annapurni; de Boer, Thomas; Seitzer, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Using imaging that shows four magnitudes of main sequence stars, we have discovered that the Galactic globular cluster NGC 1851 is surrounded by a halo that is visible from the tidal radius of 700 arcsec (41 pc) to more than 4500 arcsec (>250 pc). This halo is symmetric and falls in density as a power law of $r^{-1.24}$. It contains approximately 0.1% of the dynamical mass of NGC 1851. There is no evidence for tidal tails. Current models of globular cluster evolution do not explain this feature, although simulations of tidal influences on dwarf spheroidal galaxies qualitatively mimic these results. Given the state of published models it is not possible to decide between creation of this halo from isolated cluster evaporation, or from tidal or disk shocking, or from destruction of a dwarf galaxy in which this object may have once been embedded.

  12. Catalogue of variable stars in Milky Way globular clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clement Christine

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Globular cluster variable stars have been studied for more than a century. In the early investigations, more than 90% of the known variables were of the RR Lyrae type. However, in the interim, technological advances have facilitated the discovery of other types of variables. As a result, although RR Lyrae stars still dominate, they now constitute less than 70% of the known variables.

  13. Evolution of redback radio pulsars in globular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benvenuto, O. G.; De Vito, M. A.; Horvath, J. E.

    2017-01-01

    Context. We study the evolution of close binary systems composed of a normal, intermediate mass star and a neutron star considering a chemical composition typical of that present in globular clusters (Z = 0.001). Aims: We look for similarities and differences with respect to solar composition donor stars, which we have extensively studied in the past. As a definite example, we perform an application on one of the redbacks located in a globular cluster. Methods: We performed a detailed grid of models in order to find systems that represent the so-called redback binary radio pulsar systems with donor star masses between 0.6 and 2.0 solar masses and orbital periods in the range 0.2-0.9 d. Results: We find that the evolution of these binary systems is rather similar to those corresponding to solar composition objects, allowing us to account for the occurrence of redbacks in globular clusters, as the main physical ingredient is the irradiation feedback. Redback systems are in the quasi-RLOF state, that is, almost filling their corresponding Roche lobe. During the irradiation cycle the system alternates between semi-detached and detached states. While detached the system appears as a binary millisecond pulsar, called a redback. Circumstellar material, as seen in redbacks, is left behind after the previous semi-detached phase. Conclusions: The evolution of binary radio pulsar systems considering irradiation successfully accounts for, and provides a way for, the occurrence of redback pulsars in low-metallicity environments such as globular clusters. This is the case despite possible effects of the low metal content of the donor star that could drive systems away from redback configuration.

  14. Forming Globular Cluster Systems in a Semi-analytic Scheme

    OpenAIRE

    Beasley, Michael A.; Baugh, Carlton M.; Forbes, Duncan A.; Sharples, Ray M.; Frenk, Carlos S.

    2002-01-01

    We apply the semi-analytical galaxy formation code of Cole et al. to investigate the formation of globular cluster (GC) systems in hierarchical clustering scenarios. The nature of the model allows us to investigate the properties of GC systems and their parent galaxies within a cosmological framework, over a wide dynamic range of mass and time resolution. Assuming GCs form during mergers of gaseous systems, the metal-rich peak of the classical 'bimodal' metallicity distribution of GCs natural...

  15. Thermodynamics of the temperature-induced unfolding of globular proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Khechinashvili, N. N.; Janin, J.; Rodier, F.

    1995-01-01

    The heat capacity, enthalpy, entropy, and Gibbs energy changes for the temperature-induced unfolding of 11 globular proteins of known three-dimensional structure have been obtained by microcalorimetric measurements. Their experimental values are compared to those we calculate from the change in solvent-accessible surface area between the native proteins and the extended polypeptide chain. We use proportionality coefficients for the transfer (hydration) of aliphatic, aromatic, and polar groups...

  16. The first Δa observations of three globular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paunzen, E.; Iliev, I. Kh.; Pintado, O. I.; Baum, H.; Maitzen, H. M.; Netopil, M.; Önehag, A.; Zejda, M.; Fraga, L.

    2014-09-01

    Globular clusters are main astrophysical laboratories to test and modify evolutionary models. Thought to be rather homogeneous in their local elemental distribution of members, results suggest a wide variety of chemical peculiarities. Besides different main sequences, believed to be caused by different helium abundances, peculiarities of blue horizontal-branch stars and on the red giant branch were found. This whole zoo of peculiar objects has to be explained in the context of stellar formation and evolution. The tool of Δa photometry is employed in order to detect peculiar stars in the whole spectral range. This three filter narrow-band system measures the flux distribution in the region from 4900 to 5600 Å in order to find any peculiarities around 5200 Å. It is highly efficient to detect classical chemically peculiar stars of the upper main sequence, Be/Ae, shell and metal-weak objects in the Milky Way and Magellanic Clouds. We present Δa photometry of 2266 stars from 109 individual frames for three globular clusters (NGC 104, NGC 6205, and NGC 7099). A comparison with published abundances, for three horizontal-branch stars, only, yields an excellent agreement. According to the 3σ detection limit of each globular cluster, about 3 per cent of the stars lie in abnormal regions in the diagnostic diagrams. The first observations of three widely different aggregates give very promising results, which will serve as a solid basis for follow-up observations including photometric as well as spectroscopic studies.

  17. A Genuine Intermediate-Age Globular Cluster in M33

    CERN Document Server

    Chandar, R; Sarajedini, A; Goudfrooij, P; Chandar, Rupali; Puzia, Thomas H.; Sarajedini, Ata

    2006-01-01

    We present deep integrated-light spectroscopy of nine M33 globular clusters taken with the Hectospec instrument at the MMT Observatory. Based on our spectroscopy and previous deep color-magnitude diagrams obtained with HST/WFPC2, we present evidence for the presence of a genuine intermediate-age globular cluster in M33. The analysis of Lick line indices indicates that all globular clusters are metal-poor ([Z/H] <~ -1.0) and that cluster M33-C38 is about 5-8 Gyr younger than the rest of the sample M33 star clusters. We find no evidence for a population of blue horizontal branch stars in the CMD of M33-C38, which rules out the possibility of an artificially young spectroscopic age due to the presence of hot stars. We infer a total mass of 5-9 x 10^4 M_sol for M33-C38, which implies that M33-C38 has survived ~2-3 times longer than some dynamical evolution model predictions for star clusters in M33, although it is not yet clear to which dynamical component of M33 - thin disk, thick disk, halo - the cluster is ...

  18. Interdependence of the Rad50 hook and globular domain functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohl, Marcel; Kochańczyk, Tomasz; Tous, Cristina; Aguilera, Andrés; Krężel, Artur; Petrini, John H J

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Rad50 contains a conserved Zn2+ coordination domain (the Rad50 hook) that functions as a homodimerization interface. Hook ablation phenocopies Rad50 deficiency in all respects. Here we focused on rad50 mutations flanking the Zn2+-coordinating hook cysteines. These mutants impaired hook-mediated dimerization, but recombination between sister chromatids was largely unaffected. This may reflect that cohesin-mediated sister chromatid interactions are sufficient for double strand break repair. However, Mre11 complex functions specified by the globular domain, including Tel1 (ATM) activation, nonhomologous end-joining, and DNA double strand break end resection were affected, suggesting that dimerization exerts a broad influence on Mre11 complex function. These phenotypes were suppressed by mutations within the coiled coil and globular ATPase domain, suggesting a model in which conformational changes in the hook and globular domains are transmitted via the extended coils of Rad50. We propose that transmission of spatial information in this manner underlies the regulation of Mre11 complex functions. PMID:25601756

  19. Kinematics of the Globular Cluster System of the Sombrero Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windschitl, Jessica L.; Rhode, K. L.; Bridges, T. J.; Zepf, S. E.; Gebhardt, K.; Freeman, K. C.

    2013-06-01

    Using spectra from the Hydra spectrograph on the 3.5m WIYN telescope and from the AAOmega spectrograph on the 3.9m Anglo-Australian Telescope, we have measured heliocentric radial velocities for >50 globular clusters in the Sombrero Galaxy (M104). We combine these new measurements with those from previous studies to construct and analyze a total sample of >360 globular cluster velocities in M104. We use the line-of-sight velocity dispersion to determine the mass and mass-to-light ratio profiles for the galaxy using a spherical, isotropic Jeans mass model. In addition to the increased sample size, our data provide a significant expansion in radial coverage compared to previous spectroscopic studies. This allows us to reliably compute the mass profile of M104 out to ~43 kpc, nearly 14 kpc farther into the halo than previous work. We find that the mass-to-light ratio profile increases from the center to a value of ~20 at 43 kpc. We also look for the presence of rotation in the globular cluster system as a whole and within the red and blue subpopulations. Despite the large number of clusters and better radial sampling, we do not find strong evidence of rotation.

  20. Multivariate analysis of the globular clusters in M87

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Sukanta; Davoust, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    An objective classification of 147 globular clusters in the inner region of the giant elliptical galaxy M87 is carried out with the help of two methods of multivariate analysis. First independent component analysis is used to determine a set of independent variables that are linear combinations of various observed parameters (mostly Lick indices) of the globular clusters. Next K-means cluster analysis is applied on the independent components, to find the optimum number of homogeneous groups having an underlying structure. The properties of the four groups of globular clusters thus uncovered are used to explain the formation mechanism of the host galaxy. It is suggested that M87 formed in two successive phases. First a monolithic collapse, which gave rise to an inner group of metal-rich clusters with little systematic rotation and an outer group of metal-poor clusters in eccentric orbits. In a second phase, the galaxy accreted low-mass satellites in a dissipationless fashion, from the gas of which the two othe...

  1. CNO enrichment by rotating AGB stars in globular clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Decressin, T; Siess, L; Palacios, A; Meynet, G; Georgy, C

    2009-01-01

    AGB stars have long been held responsible for the important star-to-star variations in light elements observed in Galactic globular clusters. We analyse the main impacts of a first generation of rotating intermediate-mass stars on the chemical properties of second-generation globular cluster stars. The rotating models were computed without magnetic fields and without the effects of internal gravity waves. They account for the transports by meridional currents and turbulence. We computed the evolution of both standard and rotating stellar models with initial masses between 2.5 and 8 Msun within the metallicity range covered by Galactic globular clusters. During central He-burning, rotational mixing transports fresh CO-rich material from the core towards the hydrogen-burning shell, leading to the production of primary 14N. In stars more massive than M > 4 Msun, the convective envelope reaches this reservoir during the second dredge-up episode, resulting in a large increase in the total C+N+O content at the stel...

  2. A Survey for Planetary Nebulae in M31 Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Jacoby, George H; De Marco, Orsola; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Herrmann, Kimberly A; Hwang, Ho Seong; Kaplan, Evan; Davies, James E

    2013-01-01

    We report the results of an [O III] 5007 spectroscopic survey for planetary nebulae (PNe) located within the star clusters of M31. By examining R ~ 5000 spectra taken with the WIYN+Hydra spectrograph, we identify 3 PN candidates in a sample of 274 likely globular clusters, 2 candidates in objects which may be globular clusters, and 5 candidates in a set of 85 younger systems. The possible PNe are all faint, between ~2.5 and ~6.8 mag down the PN luminosity function, and, partly as a consequence of our selection criteria, have high excitation, with [O III] 5007 to H-beta ratios ranging from 2 to ~12. We discuss the individual candidates, their likelihood of cluster membership, and the possibility that they were formed via binary interactions within the clusters. Our data are consistent with the suggestion that PN formation within globular clusters correlates with binary encounter frequency, though, due to the small numbers and large uncertainties in the candidate list, this study does not provide sufficient evi...

  3. Globular cluster ages and the formation of the galactic halo

    CERN Document Server

    Chaboyer, B; Sarajedini, A; Chaboyer, Brian; Sarajedini, Ata

    1995-01-01

    Main sequence turnoff magnitudes from the recent set of Yale isochrones (Chaboyer \\ea 1995) have been combined with a variety of relations for the absolute magnitude of RR Lyr stars (\\mvrr) to calibrate age as a function of the difference in magnitude between the main sequence turn-off and the horizontal branch (\\dv). A best estimate for the calibration of \\mvrr is derived from a survey of the current literature: \\mvrr = 0.20 \\feh + 0.98. This estimate, together with other calibrations (with slopes ranging from 0.15 to 0.30) has been used to derive \\dv ages for 43 Galactic globular clusters. Independent of the choice of \\mvrr, there is no strong evidence for an age-Galacto\\-centric distance relationship among the 43 globular clusters. However, an age-metallicity relation exists, with the metal-poor clusters being the oldest. A study of the age distribution reveals that an age range of 5 Gyr exists among the bulk of the globular clusters. In addition, about 10\\% of the sample are substantially younger, and inc...

  4. Primordial Globular Clusters, X-Ray Binaries & Cosmological Reionisation

    CERN Document Server

    Power, C; Combet, C; Wilkinson, M I

    2009-01-01

    Globular clusters are dense stellar systems that have typical ages of ~13 billion years, implying that they formed at redshifts of z>~6. Massive stars in newly formed or primordial globular clusters could have played an important role during the epoch of cosmological reionisation (z>~6) as sources of energetic, neutral hydrogen ionising UV photons. We investigate whether or not these stars could have been as important in death as sources of energetic X-ray photons as they were during their main sequence lives. Most massive stars are expected to form in binaries, and an appreciable fraction of these (as much as ~30%) will evolve into X-ray luminous (L_X~10^38 erg/s) high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs). These sources would have made a contribution to the X-ray background at z>~6. Using Monte Carlo models of a globular cluster, we estimate the total X-ray luminosity of a population of HMXBs. We compare and contrast this with the total UV luminosity of the massive stars during their main sequence lives. For reasonab...

  5. Heavy elements and chemical enrichment in globular clusters

    CERN Document Server

    James, G; Bonifacio, P; Carretta, E; Gratton, R G; Spite, F

    2004-01-01

    High resolution (R > 40 000) and high S/N spectra have been acquired with UVES on the VLT-Kueyen (Paranal Observatory, ESO Chile) for several main sequence turnoff stars (V ~ 17 mag) and subgiants at the base of the Red Giant Branch (V ~ 16 mag) in three globular clusters (NGC 6397, NGC 6752 and 47 Tuc/NGC 104) at different metallicities (respectively [Fe/H] = -2.0; -1.5; -0.7$). Spectra for a sample of 25 field halo subdwarves have also been taken with equal resolution, but higher S/N. These data have been used to determine the abundances of several neutron-capture elements in these three clusters: strontium, yttrium, barium and europium. This is the first abundance determination of these heavy elements for such unevolved stars in these three globular clusters. These values, together with the [Ba/Eu] and [Sr/Ba] abundance ratios, have been used to test the self-enrichment scenario. A comparison is done with field halo stars and other well known Galactic globular clusters in which heavy elements have already ...

  6. Globular Clusters: DNA of Early-Type galaxies?

    CERN Document Server

    Forte, J C; Faifer, F R; Castelli, A V Smith; Escudero, Carlos; González, N M; Sesto, L A

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores if the mean properties of Early-Type Galaxies (ETG) can be reconstructed from "genetic" information stored in their GCs (i.e., in their chemical abundances, spatial distributions and ages). This approach implies that the formation of each globular occurs in very massive stellar environments, as suggested by some models that aim at explaining the presence of multi-populations in these systems. The assumption that the relative number of globular clusters to diffuse stellar mass depends exponentially on chemical abundance, [Z/H], and the presence of two dominant GC sub-populations blue and red, allows the mapping of low metallicity halos and of higher metallicity (and more heterogeneous) bulges. In particular, the masses of the low-metallicity halos seem to scale up with dark matter mass through a constant. We also find a dependence of the globular cluster formation efficiency with the mean projected stellar mass density of the galaxies within their effective radii. The analysis is based on a...

  7. Multi-position photovoltaic assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinwoodie, Thomas L.

    2003-03-18

    The invention is directed to a PV assembly, for use on a support surface, comprising a base, a PV module, a multi-position module support assembly, securing the module to the base at shipping and inclined-use angles, a deflector, a multi-position deflector support securing the deflector to the base at deflector shipping and deflector inclined-use angles, the module and deflector having opposed edges defining a gap therebetween. The invention permits transport of the PV assemblies in a relatively compact form, thus lowering shipping costs, while facilitating installation of the PV assemblies with the PV module at the proper inclination.

  8. Drive piston assembly for a valve actuator assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Zongxuan (Troy, MI)

    2010-02-23

    A drive piston assembly is provided that is operable to selectively open a poppet valve. The drive piston assembly includes a cartridge defining a generally stepped bore. A drive piston is movable within the generally stepped bore and a boost sleeve is coaxially disposed with respect to the drive piston. A main fluid chamber is at least partially defined by the generally stepped bore, drive piston, and boost sleeve. First and second feedback chambers are at least partially defined by the drive piston and each are disposed at opposite ends of the drive piston. At least one of the drive piston and the boost sleeve is sufficiently configured to move within the generally stepped bore in response to fluid pressure within the main fluid chamber to selectively open the poppet valve. A valve actuator assembly and engine are also provided incorporating the disclosed drive piston assembly.

  9. Isolated ellipticals and their globular cluster systems III. NGC 2271, NGC 2865, NGC 3962, NGC 4240 and IC 4889

    CERN Document Server

    Salinas, R; Richtler, T; Lane, R R

    2015-01-01

    As tracers of star formation, galaxy assembly and mass distribution, globular clusters have provided important clues to our understanding of early-type galaxies. But their study has been mostly constrained to galaxy groups and clusters where early-type galaxies dominate, leaving the properties of the globular cluster systems (GCSs) of isolated ellipticals as a mostly uncharted territory. We present Gemini-South/GMOS $g'i'$ observations of five isolated elliptical galaxies: NGC 3962, NGC 2865, IC 4889, NGC 2271 and NGC 4240. Photometry of their GCSs reveals clear color bimodality in three of them, remaining inconclusive for the other two. All the studied GCSs are rather poor with a mean specific frequency $S_N\\sim 1.5$, independently of the parent galaxy luminosity. Considering also previous work, it is clear that bimodality and especially the presence of a significant, even dominant, population of blue clusters occurs at even the most isolated systems, casting doubts on a possible accreted origin of metal-poo...

  10. Globular clusters in the far-ultraviolet: evidence for He-enriched second populations in extragalactic globular clusters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, Mark B.; Zepf, Stephen E.; Kundu, Arunav; Chael, Julia

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the integrated far-ultraviolet (FUV) emission from globular clusters. We present new FUV photometry of M87's clusters based on archival Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 F170W observations. We use these data to test the reliability of published photometry based on HST space telescope imaging spectrograph FUV-MAMA observations, which are now known to suffer from significant red-leak. We generally confirm these previous FUV detections, but suggest they may be somewhat fainter. We compare the FUV emission from bright (MV populations models. Metal-rich globular clusters show a large spread in FUV - V, with some clusters in M31, M81 and M87 being much bluer than standard predictions. This requires that some metal-rich clusters host a significant population of blue/extreme horizontal branch (HB) stars. These hot HB stars are not traditionally expected in metal-rich environments, but are a natural consequence of multiple populations in clusters - since the enriched population is observed to be He enhanced and will therefore produce bluer HB stars, even at high metallicity. We conclude that the observed FUV emission from metal-rich clusters in M31, M81 and M87 provides evidence that He-enhanced second populations, similar to those observed directly in the Milky Way, may be a ubiquitous feature of globular clusters in the local Universe. Future HST FUV photometry is required to both confirm our interpretation of these archival data and provide constraints on He-enriched second populations of stars in extragalactic globular clusters.

  11. STATISTICAL PROPERTIES OF LONG-RANGE CONTACTS IN GLOBULAR PROTEINS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang-hong Wang; Jian-hong Ke; Mang-xiao Hu

    2004-01-01

    The analysis of residue-residue contacts in protein structures can shed some light on our understanding of the folding and stability of proteins. In this paper, we study the statistical properties of long-range and short-range residueresidue contacts of 91 globular proteins using CSU software and analyze the importance of long-range contacts in globular protein structure. There are many short-range and long-range contacts in globular proteins, and it is found that the average number of long-range contacts per residue is 5.63 and the percentage of residue-residue contacts which are involved in longrange ones is 59.4%. In more detail, the distribution of long-range contacts in different residue intervals is investigated and it is found that the residues occurring in the interval range of 4-10 residues apart in the sequence contribute more long-range contacts to the stability of globular protein. The number of long-range contacts per residue, which is a measure of ability to form residue-residue contacts, is also calculated for 20 different amino acid residues. It is shown that hydrophobic residues (including Leu, Val, Ile, Met, Phc, Tyr, Cys and Trp) having a large number of long-range contacts easily form long-range contacts, while the hydrophilic amino acids (including Ala, Gly, Thr, His, Glu, Gin, Asp, Asn, Lys, Ser, Arg, and Pro) form long-range contacts with more difficulty. The relationship between the Fauchere-Pliska hydrophobicity scale (FPH) and the number of short-range and long-range contacts per residue for 20 amino acid residues is also studied. An approximately linear relationship between the Fauchere-Pliska hydrophobicity scale (FPH) and the number of long-range contacts per residue CL is found and can be expressed as CiL= a + b x FPHwhere a = 5.04 and b = 1.23. These results can help us to understand the role of residue-residue contacts in globular protein structure.

  12. Dynamical evolution of globular-cluster systems in clusters of galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muzzio, J.C.

    1987-04-01

    The dynamical processes that affect globular-cluster systems in clusters of galaxies are analyzed. Two-body and impulsive approximations are utilized to study dynamical friction, drag force, tidal stripping, tidal radii, globular-cluster swapping, tidal accretion, and galactic cannibalism. The evolution of galaxies and the collision of galaxies are simulated numerically; the steps involved in the simulation are described. The simulated data are compared with observations. Consideration is given to the number of galaxies, halo extension, location of the galaxies, distribution of the missing mass, nonequilibrium initial conditions, mass dependence, massive central galaxies, globular-cluster distribution, and lost globular clusters. 116 references.

  13. The Colors of Dwarf Elliptical Galaxy Globular Cluster Systems, Nuclei and Stellar Halos

    OpenAIRE

    Lotz, Jennifer M.; Miller, Bryan W.; Ferguson, Henry C.

    2004-01-01

    We present the results of a Hubble Space Telescope WFPC2 F555W and F814W survey of 69 dwarf elliptical galaxies (dEs) in the Virgo and Fornax Clusters and Leo Group. The $V-I$ colors of the dE globular clusters, nuclei, and underlying field star populations are used to trace the dE star-formation histories. We find that the dE globular cluster candidates are as blue as the metal-poor globular clusters of the Milky Way. The observed correlation of the dE globular cluster systems' $V-I$ color w...

  14. The Evolution of the Globular Cluster System in a Triaxial Galaxy Can a Galactic Nucleus Form by Globular Cluster Capture?

    CERN Document Server

    Capuzzo-Dolcetta, R

    1993-01-01

    Dynamical friction due to field stars and tidal disruption caused by a central nucleus are crucial in determining the evolution of the globular cluster system in an elliptical galaxy. In this paper I examine the possibility that some of galactic nuclei have been formed by frictionally decayied globular clusters moving in a triaxial potential. The initial rapid growth of the nucleus, due mainly to massive clusters on box orbits falling in a short time scale into the galactic centre, is found to be later slowed by tidal disruption induced by the nucleus itself on less massive clusters in the way described by Ostriker, Binney & Saha. The efficiency of dynamical friction is such to carry to the centre of the galaxy enough globular cluster mass available to form a compact nucleus, but the actual modes of its collisionless formation remains to be investigated. The mass of the resulting nucleus is determined by the mutual feedback of the two mentioned processes, together with the knowlegde of the initial spatial...

  15. Effects of the dissolution of low-concentration globular clusters on the evolution of globular cluster systems

    CERN Document Server

    Vesperini, E

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the role of dissolution of low-concentration clusters due to mass loss through stellar evolution on the evolution of the properties of globular cluster systems (GCSs) in elliptical galaxies. Our simulations show that, for an initial mass-concentration relationship based on that inferred from Galactic globular clusters, dissolution of low-concentration clusters leads to the disruption of a large number of clusters. A power-law initial globular cluster system mass function (GCMF) similar to that observed in young cluster systems in merging galaxies is transformed by this dissolution into a bell-shaped GCMF with a mean mass similar to that of old GCSs for all the galaxies investigated. Two-body relaxation and dynamical friction, which are also included in our simulations, subsequently lead to an additional significant evolution and disruption of the population of clusters. As shown previously, when these processes act on a bell-shaped GCMF with a mean mass similar to that of old GCS, they do not s...

  16. Sequence assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheibye-Alsing, Karsten; Hoffmann, S.; Frankel, Annett Maria

    2009-01-01

    Despite the rapidly increasing number of sequenced and re-sequenced genomes, many issues regarding the computational assembly of large-scale sequencing data have remain unresolved. Computational assembly is crucial in large genome projects as well for the evolving high-throughput technologies...

  17. In vitro kinetochore assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miell, Matthew D D; Straight, Aaron F

    2016-01-01

    The kinetochore is the primary site of interaction between chromosomes and microtubules of the mitotic spindle during chromosome segregation. The kinetochore is a complex of more than 100 proteins that transiently assemble during mitosis at a single defined region on each chromosome, known as the centromere. Kinetochore assembly and activity must be tightly regulated to ensure proper microtubule interaction and faithful chromosome segregation because perturbation of kinetochores often results in aneuploidy and cell lethality. As such, cell free and reconstituted systems to analyze kinetochore formation and function are invaluable in probing the biochemical activities of kinetochores. In vitro approaches to studying kinetochores have enabled the manipulation of kinetochore protein structure, function, interactions and regulation that are not possible in cells. Here we outline a cell-free approach for the assembly of centromeres and recruitment of functional kinetochores that enables their manipulation and analysis. PMID:27193846

  18. The kinematics of globular clusters systems in the outer halos of the Aquarius simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Veljanoski, Jovan

    2016-01-01

    Stellar halos and globular cluster (GC) systems contain valuable information regarding the assembly history of their host galaxies. Motivated by the detection of a significant rotation signal in the outer halo GC system of M31, in this contribution we investigate the likelihood of detecting such a rotation signal in projection, using cosmological simulations. To this end we select subsets of tagged particles in the halos of the Aquarius simulations to represent mock GC systems, and analyse their kinematics. We find that GC systems can exhibit a non-negligible rotation signal provided the associated stellar halo also has a net angular momentum. The ability to detect this rotation signal is highly dependent on the viewing perspective, and the probability to see a signal larger than that measured in M31 ranges from 10% to 90% for the different halos in the Aquarius suite. High values are found from a perspective such that the projected angular momentum of the GC system is within 40 deg from the rotation axis det...

  19. The paucity of globular clusters around the field elliptical NGC 7507

    CERN Document Server

    Caso, J P; Bassino, L P; Salinas, R; Lane, R R; Romanowsky, A

    2013-01-01

    Context: There is strong evidence that globular cluster systems (GCSs) of massive galaxies are largely assembled by infall/accretion processes. Therefore, we expect the GCSs of isolated elliptical galaxies to be poor. Alhough not completely isolated, NGC 7507 is a massive field elliptical galaxy with an apparently very low dark matter content. Aims: We determine the richness, the colour distribution, and the structural properties of the GCS of NGC 7507. Methods: We perform wide-field Washington photometry with data obtained with the MOSAIC II camera at the 4m-Blanco telescope, CTIO. Results: The GCS is very poor with S_N ~ 0.6. We identify three subpopulations with peaks at (C-T1) colours of 1.21, 1.42, and 1.72. The bluest population may represent the old, metal-poor component. This interpretation is supported by its shallow density profile. The red population is more concentrated, resembling the galaxy light. The intermediate-colour population is strongly peaked in colour and we interpret this population as...

  20. An AO-assisted Variability Study of Four Globular Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, R.; Contreras Ramos, R.; Strader, J.; Hakala, P.; Catelan, M.; Peacock, M. B.; Simunovic, M.

    2016-09-01

    The image-subtraction technique applied to study variable stars in globular clusters represented a leap in the number of new detections, with the drawback that many of these new light curves could not be transformed to magnitudes due to severe crowding. In this paper, we present observations of four Galactic globular clusters, M 2 (NGC 7089), M 10 (NGC 6254), M 80 (NGC 6093), and NGC 1261, taken with the ground-layer adaptive optics module at the SOAR Telescope, SAM. We show that the higher image quality provided by SAM allows for the calibration of the light curves of the great majority of the variables near the cores of these clusters as well as the detection of new variables, even in clusters where image-subtraction searches were already conducted. We report the discovery of 15 new variables in M 2 (12 RR Lyrae stars and 3 SX Phe stars), 12 new variables in M 10 (11 SX Phe and 1 long-period variable), and 1 new W UMa-type variable in NGC 1261. No new detections are found in M 80, but previous uncertain detections are confirmed and the corresponding light curves are calibrated into magnitudes. Additionally, based on the number of detected variables and new Hubble Space Telescope/UVIS photometry, we revisit a previous suggestion that M 80 may be the globular cluster with the richest population of blue stragglers in our Galaxy. Based on observations obtained at the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope, which is a joint project of the Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia, e Inovação (MCTI) da República Federativa do Brasil, the U.S. National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), and Michigan State University (MSU).

  1. Functionalized self-assembly of gold nanoparticles functionalized with amino acids and aleurone globular protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomoaia-Cotisel, Maria; Mocanu, Aurora; Horovitz, Ossi; Indrea, Emil; Tomoaia, Gheorghe; Bratu, Ioan

    2009-01-01

    Gold colloidal aqueous solutions were synthesized and characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy and TEM. Gold films were prepared on silanized glass slides at room temperature and with thermal treatment. The interaction of gold nanoparticles with biomolecules (amino acids, protein) was studied using UV-Vis spectroscopy, AFM, TEM and X-ray diffraction.

  2. Multiple populations in Galactic globular clusters: a survey in the Strömgren system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alonso-García, J.; Catelan, M.; Amigo, P.;

    2013-01-01

    We are coming to believe that stellar populations in globular clusters are not as simple as they were once thought to be. A growing amount of photometric and spectroscopic evidence shows that globular clusters host at least two different stellar populations. In our contribution to these proceedin...

  3. Further definition of the mass-metallicity relation in globular cluster systems around brightest cluster galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cockcroft, R.; Harris, W.E.; Wehner, E.M.; Whitmore, B.C.; Rothberg, B.

    2009-01-01

    We combine the globular cluster (GC) data for 15 brightest cluster galaxies and use this material to trace the mass–metallicity relations (MMRs) in their globular cluster systems (GCSs). This work extends previous studies which correlate the properties of the MMR with those of the host galaxy. Our c

  4. New Breakthroughs in the Battle of the Bulge Using Globular Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisler, D.; Mauro, F.; Bidin, C. M.; Cohen, R.; Chené, A.; Villanova, S.; Cummings, J.; Gormaz, A.; Minniti, D.; Alonso-García, J.; Hempel, M.; VVV Team

    2015-05-01

    We present some recent work undertaken mostly at the Universidad de Concepción using bulge globular clusters to better understand this important but poorly studied Galactic component, especially based on data from the VVV Survey. This includes discovering new bulge globulars, investigating dual HBs, and obtaining Ca triplet metallicities and velocities.

  5. The WAGGS project - I. The WiFeS Atlas of Galactic Globular cluster Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usher, Christopher; Pastorello, Nicola; Bellstedt, Sabine; Alabi, Adebusola; Cerulo, Pierluigi; Chevalier, Leonie; Fraser-McKelvie, Amelia; Penny, Samantha; Foster, Caroline; McDermid, Richard M.; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Villaume, Alexa

    2017-07-01

    We present the WiFeS Atlas of Galactic Globular cluster Spectra, a library of integrated spectra of Milky Way and Local Group globular clusters. We used the WiFeS integral field spectrograph on the Australian National University 2.3 m telescope to observe the central regions of 64 Milky Way globular clusters and 22 globular clusters hosted by the Milky Way's low-mass satellite galaxies. The spectra have wider wavelength coverage (3300-9050 Å) and higher spectral resolution (R = 6800) than existing spectral libraries of Milky Way globular clusters. By including Large and Small Magellanic Cloud star clusters, we extend the coverage of parameter space of existing libraries towards young and intermediate ages. While testing stellar population synthesis models and analysis techniques is the main aim of this library, the observations may also further our understanding of the stellar populations of Local Group globular clusters and make possible the direct comparison of extragalactic globular cluster integrated light observations with well-understood globular clusters in the Milky Way. The integrated spectra are publicly available via the project website.

  6. X-ray Binaries in Early Type Galaxies and the Globular Cluster Connection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maccarone, T.J.; Kundu, A.; Zepf, S.E.; Puzia, T.H.; Tovmassian, G.; Sion, E.

    2004-01-01

    We summarize the key observations made in recent observations of X-ray sources in early-type galaxies. Typically about half of the X-ray binaries in early-type galaxies are in globular clusters, they are preferentially found in metal rich globular clusters, and there is no indication that cluster

  7. A common colour-magnitude relation from giant elliptical galaxies to globular clusters?

    CERN Document Server

    Castelli, A V Smith; Richtler, T; Faifer, F; Forte, J C; Cellone, S A

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the existence of a common colour-magnitude relation (CMR) of metal-poor globular clusters and early-type galaxies, i.e. giant ellipticals, normal ellipticals and lenticulars, dwarf ellipticals and lenticulars, and dwarf spheroidals. Such CMR would cover a range of ~ 14 mag, extending from the brightest galaxies, down to the globular clusters on the fainter side.

  8. The gravitational waveforms of white dwarf collisions in globular clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loren-Aguilar, P; Garcia-Berro, E [Departament de Fisica Aplicada, Escola Politecnica Superior de Castelldefels, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Av. del Canal OlImpic, s/n, 08860 Castelldefels (Spain); Lobo, J A; Isern, J, E-mail: loren@fa.upc.ed [Institut de Ciencies de l' Espai, CSIC, Campus UAB, Facultat de Ciencies, Torre C-5, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain)

    2009-06-01

    In the dense central regions of globular clusters close encounters of two white dwarfs are relatively frequent. The estimated frequency is one or more strong encounters per star in the lifetime of the cluster. Such encounters should be then potential sources of gravitational wave radiation. Thus, it is foreseeable that these collisions could be either individually detected by LISA or they could contribute significantly to the background noise of the detector. We compute the pattern of gravitational wave emission from these encounters for a sufficiently broad range of system parameters, namely the masses, the relative velocities and the distances of the two white dwarfs involved in the encounter.

  9. The Mass-to-Light Ratios of Galactic Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Kruijssen, J M Diederik

    2009-01-01

    The observed mass-to-light (M/L) ratios of globular clusters (GCs) are on average ~20% lower than expected from Simple Stellar Population (SSP) models, which only account for the effects of stellar evolution. We study the M/L ratio evolution of a sample of 24 Galactic GCs using parameterised cluster models. The dynamical evolution of GCs is included by accounting for their dissolution and by using a detailed description of the evolution of the stellar mass function. The ejection of low-mass stars leads to a decrease of M/L, which is found to explain the discrepancy between the observations and SSP models.

  10. Radio sources near the core of globular cluster 47 Tucanae

    CERN Document Server

    McConnell, D

    1999-01-01

    We present ATCA radio images of the globular cluster 47 Tucanae made at 1.4and 1.7 GHz and provide an analysis of the radio sources detected within 5arcmin of the cluster centre. 11 sources are detected, most of which areclustered about the core of 47 Tuc. Both of the pulsars in 47 Tuc whosepositions are known can be identified with sources in the 1.4 GHz image. Thesource distribution has a characteristic radius of ~100 arcsec, larger than the23 arcsec radius of the cluster core. We compare source positions with thepositions of nine X-ray sources and find no correspondence.

  11. Dynamics of the Globular Cluster NGC 665 with WFPC2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ding; CHEN Li; WANG Jia-Ji

    2004-01-01

    @@ We have used the Hubble Space Telescope observations to measure proper motion of the globular cluster NGC6656 (M22) with respect to the background bulge stars and its internal velocity dispersion profile. Based on the proper motion of the cluster, its space velocity (II, (-) , W) = (184 ± 3, 209 ±14, 132 ± 15) km s- 1 and galactic orbit are also obtained. The central velocity dispersion in radial and tangential components of the internal motion of cluster stars is 16.99 km s-1. We derive the mass-to-light ratio M/ LV ~ 3.3 ± 0.2, which is relatively higher than the previous results.

  12. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE Photometry of the Globular Cluster M4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Richer, Harvey B.; Fahlman, Gregory G.; Bolte, Michael; Bond, Howard E.; Hesser, James E.; Pryor, Carlton; Stetson, Peter B.

    1999-02-01

    This paper presents a detailed description of the acquisition and processing of a large body of imaging data for three fields in the globular cluster M4 taken with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. Analysis with the ALLFRAME package yielded the deepest photometry yet obtained for this cluster. The resulting data set for 4708 stars (positions and calibrated photometry in V, I, and, in two fields, U) spanning approximately six cluster core radii is presented. The scientific analysis is deferred to three companion papers, which investigate the significant white dwarf population discovered and the main-sequence population.

  13. Fatigue behaviour of cast iron with globular graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huebner, P.; Pusch, G.; Krodel, L. [Institut fuer Werkstofftechnik, TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Gustav-Zeuner-Strasse 5, 09599 Freiberg (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Cast iron with bainitic matrix and globular graphite, so called austempered ductile iron (ADI), allows the substitution of heat-treatable steels. The use of ADI in safety-relevant components requires knowledge of the fracture and fatigue behaviour. Cyclic stress strain behaviour and fatigue life at total strain control and random loading have been investigated at ADI (EN-GJS-1000-5) and pearlitic cast iron (EN-GJS-600-3). In addition fracture mechanic tests at cyclic loading at various stress ratios were carried out. (Abstract Copyright [2004], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  14. Microwave-enhanced folding and denaturation of globular proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Henrik; Bohr, Jakob

    2000-01-01

    It is shown that microwave irradiation can affect the kinetics of the folding process of some globular proteins, especially beta-lactoglobulin. At low temperature the folding from the cold denatured phase of the protein is enhanced, while at a higher temperature the denaturation of the protein from...... its folded state is enhanced. In the latter case, a negative temperature gradient is needed for the denaturation process, suggesting that the effects of the microwaves are nonthermal. This supports the notion that coherent topological excitations can exist in proteins. The application of microwaves...

  15. Variable Stars in the Globular Cluster NGC 4590 (M68

    CERN Document Server

    Sariya, Devesh Path; Yadav, R K S

    2013-01-01

    We present results of time series photometry to search for variable stars in the field of metal-poor globular cluster NGC 4590 (M68). Periods have been revised for 40 known variables and no significant changes were found. A considerable change in Blazhko effect for V25 has been detected. Among nine newly discovered variable candidates, 5 stars are of RRc Bailey type variables while 4 stars are unclassified. The variable stars V10, V21, V50 and V51 are found to be cluster members based on the radial velocity data taken from literature.

  16. Variable stars in the globular cluster NGC 4590 (M68)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sariya, Devesh P.; Lata, Sneh; Yadav, R. K. S.

    2014-02-01

    We present results of time series photometry to search for variable stars in the field of metal-poor globular cluster NGC 4590 (M68). Periods have been revised for 40 known variables and no significant changes were found. A considerable change in Blazhko effect for V25 has been detected. Among nine newly discovered variable candidates, 5 stars are of RRc Bailey type variables while 4 stars are unclassified. The variable stars V10, V21, V50 and V51 are found to be cluster members based on the radial velocity data taken from literature.

  17. Star Formation and Chemical Enrichment for Globular Clusters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林清; 束成钢; 常瑞香; 赵君亮

    2001-01-01

    A model considering gas outflows due to supernova explosions is developed for the star formation and chemical enrichment for the globular clusters (GCs) in the Milky Way galaxy. Through Monte Carlo simulations, the observed global properties of GCs can be well reproduced, including the metallicity distribution, no-correlation between cluster masses and galactocentric distances, etc. The predicted mass function of the parent clouds for the observed GCs at present day can be well described as a power law with the index of-1.8, which is consistent with the current observations for the molecular clouds.

  18. Definable deduction relation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张玉平

    1999-01-01

    The nonmonotonic deduction relation in default reasoning is defined with fixed point style, which has the many-extension property that classical logic is not possessed of. These two kinds of deductions both have boolean definability property, that is, their extensions or deductive closures can be defined by boolean formulas. A generalized form of fixed point method is employed to define a class of deduction relations, which all have the above property. Theorems on definability and atomless boolean algebras in model theory are essential in dealing with this assertion.

  19. Spatially confined assembly of nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lin; Chen, Xiaodong; Lu, Nan; Chi, Lifeng

    2014-10-21

    an increasingly important role in the controllable assembly of NPs. In this Account, we summarize our approaches and progress in fabricating spatially confined assemblies of NPs that allow for the positioning of NPs with high resolution and considerable throughput. The spatially selective assembly of NPs at the desired location can be achieved by various mechanisms, such as, a controlled dewetting process, electrostatically mediated assembly of particles, and confined deposition and growth of NPs. Three nanofabrication techniques used to produce prepatterns on a substrate are summarized: the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) patterning technique, e-beam lithography (EBL), and nanoimprint lithography (NPL). The particle density, particle size, or interparticle distance in NP assemblies strongly depends on the geometric parameters of the template structure due to spatial confinement. In addition, with smart design template structures, multiplexed NPs can be assembled into a defined structure, thus demonstrating the structural and functional complexity required for highly integrated and multifunction applications.

  20. An updated survey of globular clusters in M 31. III. A spectroscopic metallicity scale for the Revised Bologna Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galleti, S.; Bellazzini, M.; Buzzoni, A.; Federici, L.; Fusi Pecci, F.

    2009-12-01

    Aims. We present a new homogeneous set of metallicity estimates based on Lick indices for the old globular clusters of the M 31 galaxy. The final aim is to add homogeneous spectroscopic metallicities to as many entries as possible of the Revised Bologna Catalog of M 31 clusters, by reporting Lick index measurements from any source (literature, new observations, etc.) on the same scale. Methods: New empirical relations of [Fe/H] as a function of [MgFe] and Mg2 indices are based on the well-studied galactic globular clusters, complemented with theoretical model predictions for -0.2≤ [Fe/H]≤ +0.5. Lick indices for M 31 clusters from various literature sources (225 clusters) and from new observations by our team (71 clusters) have been transformed into the Trager et al. system, yielding new metallicity estimates for 245 globular clusters of M 31. Results: Our values are in good agreement with recent estimates based on detailed spectral fitting and with those obtained from color magnitude diagrams of clusters imaged with the Hubble Space Telescope. The typical uncertainty on individual estimates is ≃±0.25 dex, as resulted from the comparison with metallicities derived from color magnitude diagrams of individual clusters. Conclusions: The metallicity distribution of M 31 globular cluster is briefly discussed and compared with that of the Milky Way. Simple parametric statistical tests suggest that the distribution is probably not unimodal. The strong correlation between metallicity and kinematics found in previous studies is confirmed. The most metal-rich GCs tend to be packed into the center of the system and to cluster tightly around the galactic rotation curve defined by the HI disk, while the velocity dispersion about the curve increases with decreasing metallicity. However, also the clusters with [Fe/H]<-1.0 display a clear rotation pattern, at odds with their Milky Way counterparts. Based on observations made at La Palma, at the Spanish Observatorio del Roque

  1. An AO-assisted variability study of four globular clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Salinas, R; Strader, J; Hakala, P; Catelan, M; Peacock, M; Simunovic, M

    2016-01-01

    The image subtraction technique applied to study variable stars in globular clusters represented a leap in the number of new detections, with the drawback that many of these new light curves could not be transformed to magnitudes due to the severe crowding. In this paper we present observations of four Galactic globular clusters, M 2 (NGC 7089), M 10 (NGC 6254), M 80 (NGC 6093) and NGC 1261, taken with the ground-layer adaptive optics module at the SOAR Telescope, SAM. We show that the higher image quality provided by SAM allows the calibration of the light curves of the great majority of the variables near the cores of these clusters as well as the detection of new variables even in clusters where image-subtraction searches were already conducted. We report the discovery of 15 new variables in M 2 (12 RR Lyrae stars and 3 SX Phe stars), 12 new variables in M 10 (11 SX Phe and one long-period variable) and one new W UMa-type variable in NGC 1261. No new detections are found in M 80, but previous uncertain det...

  2. Heavy elements in Globular Clusters: the role of AGB stars

    CERN Document Server

    Straniero, Oscar; Piersanti, Luciano

    2014-01-01

    Recent observations of heavy elements in Globular Clusters reveal intriguing deviations from the standard paradigm of the early galactic nucleosynthesis. If the r-process contamination is a common feature of halo stars, s-process enhancements are found in a few Globular Clusters only. We show that the combined pollution of AGB stars with mass ranging between 3 to 6 M$_\\odot$ may account for most of the features of the s-process overabundance in M4 and M22. In these stars, the s process is a mixture of two different neutron-capture nucleosynthesis episodes. The first is due to the 13C(a,n)16O reaction and takes place during the interpulse periods. The second is due to the 22Ne(a,n)25Mg reaction and takes place in the convective zones generated by thermal pulses. The production of the heaviest s elements (from Ba to Pb) requires the first neutron burst, while the second produces large overabundances of light s (Sr, Y, Zr). The first mainly operates in the less-massive AGB stars, while the second dominates in th...

  3. Bimodal Galaxies and Bimodality in Globular Cluster Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Forbes, D A

    2005-01-01

    Various galaxy properties are not continuous over a large range in mass, but rather reveal a remarkable transition or `bimodality' at a stellar mass of 3 x 10^{10} Mo. These properties include colors, stellar populations, Xray emission and mass-to-light ratios. This behavior has been interpreted as the transition from hot to cold flows by Dekel & Birnboim (2005). Here we explore whether globular cluster (GC) systems also reveal a bimodal nature with regard to this critical mass scale. Globular clusters probe star formation at early epochs in the Universe and survive subsequent galaxy mergers and accretions. We use new data from the ACS Virgo Cluster Survey (Peng etal 2005), which provides a homogeneous sample of the GC systems around one hundred Virgo early-type galaxies covering a range of five hundred in galaxy mass. Their classification of the GC color distributions is taken to examine a key quantity -- the number of GCs per unit galaxy luminosity. Below the critical mass, this quantity (called the GC ...

  4. The incidence of binaries in Globular Cluster stellar populations

    CERN Document Server

    Lucatello, S; Gratton, R; Vesperini, E; D'Orazi, V; Carretta, E; Bragaglia, A

    2015-01-01

    Binary fraction and orbital characteristics provide indications on the conditions of star formation, as they shed light on the environment they were born in. Multiple systems are more common in low density environments rather than in higher density ones. In the current debate about the formation of Globular Clusters and their multiple populations, studying the binary incidence in the populations they host offers a crucial piece of information on the environment of their birth and their subsequent dynamical evolution. Through a multi-year observational campaign using FLAMES at VLT, we monitored the radial velocity of 968 Red-Giant Branch stars located around the half-light radii in a sample of 10 Galactic Globular Clusters. We found a total of 21 radial velocity variables identified as {\\it bona fide} binary stars, for a binary fraction of 2.2%$\\pm$0.5%. When separating the sample into first generation and second generation stars, we find a binary fraction of 4.9%$\\pm$1.3% and 1.2%$\\pm$0.4% respectively. Throu...

  5. Are Some Milky Way Globular Clusters Hosted by Undiscovered Galaxies?

    CERN Document Server

    Zaritsky, Dennis; Sand, David J

    2016-01-01

    The confirmation of a globular cluster (GC) in the recently discovered ultrafaint galaxy Eridanus II (Eri II) motivated us to examine the question posed in the title. After estimating the halo mass of Eri II using a published stellar mass - halo mass relation, the one GC in this galaxy supports extending the relationship between the number of GCs hosted by a galaxy and the galaxy's total mass about two orders of magnitude in stellar mass below the previous limit. For this empirically determined specific frequency of between 0.06 and 0.39 globular clusters per 10$^9$ $M_\\odot$ of total mass, the surviving Milky Way (MW) subhalos with masses smaller than $10^{10} M_\\odot$ could host as many as 5 to 31 GCs, broadly consistent with the actual population of outer halo MW GCs, although matching the radial distribution in detail remains a challenge. Using a subhalo mass function from published high resolution numerical simulations and a Poissonian model for populating those halos with the aforementioned empirically ...

  6. X-ray Counterparts of Millisecond Pulsars in Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, W; Prinz, T

    2010-01-01

    We have systematically studied the X-ray emission properties of globular cluster millisecond pulsars in order to evaluate their spectral properties and luminosities in a uniform way. Cross-correlating the radio timing positions of the cluster pulsars with the high resolution Chandra images revealed 31 X-ray counterparts identified in nine different globular cluster systems, including those in 47 Tuc. Timing analysis has been performed for all sources corresponding to the temporal resolution available in the archival Chandra data. Making use of unpublished data on M28, M4 and NGC 6752 allowed us to obtain further constraints for the millisecond pulsar counterparts located in these clusters. Counting rate and energy flux upper limits were computed for those 36 pulsars for which no X-ray counterparts could be detected. Comparing the X-ray and radio pulse profiles of PSR J1821-2452 in M28 and the 47 Tuc pulsars PSR J0024-7204D,O,R indicated some correspondence between both wavebands. The X-ray efficiency of the g...

  7. The formation of globular clusters through minihalo-minihalo mergers

    CERN Document Server

    Trenti, Michele; Jimenez, Raul

    2015-01-01

    We propose a novel scenario for the formation of Globular Clusters (GCs) based on the merger of two or more atomic cooling halos at high-redshift (z>6). The model naturally fulfills several key observational constraints on GCs that have emerged in the last decade. Specifically, absolute and relative ages, widespread presence of multiple stellar populations, spatial distribution around host galaxies, and correlations between galactocentric radius and metallicity. In our framework, the oldest globular clusters form the first generation stars as an intense burst in the center of a minihalo that grows above the threshold for hydrogen cooling (halo mass M_h~1e8 Msun) and undergoes a major merger within the cooling timescale (~150 Myr). Subsequent minor mergers and sustained gas infall bring new supply of pristine gas at the halo center, diluting AGB ejecta, and triggering additional bursts of star formation which form multiple generation of stars in the majority of the clusters. The DM halo around the GC is then s...

  8. In search of massive single-population Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Caloi, V

    2011-01-01

    Most Globular Clusters so far examined host (at least) two stellar populations. This feature requires a two--step process, in which the nuclearly processed matter from a first generation (FG) of stars gives birth to a second generation (SG) bearing the fingerprint of a fully CNO-cycled matter. Since the present population of most globular clusters is made up largely of SG stars, a substantial fraction of the FG (>~90%) must be lost. Nevertheless, two types of clusters dominated by a simple stellar population (FG clusters) should exist: either clusters initially too small to be able to retain a cooling flow and form a SG (FG-only clusters), or massive clusters that could retain the CNO processed ejecta and form a SG, but were unable to lose a significant fraction of their FG (mainly-FG clusters). We attempt a classification of FG clusters, based on the morphology of their horizontal branches (HBs), as displayed in photomectric catalogues for 106 clusters. FG candidates are the clusters in which the HB can be r...

  9. Brain asymmetry in the white matter making and globularity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantina eTheofanopoulou

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies from the field of language genetics and evolutionary anthropology have put forward the hypothesis that the emergence of our species-specific brain is to be understood not in terms of size, but in light of developmental changes that gave rise to a more globular braincase configuration after the split from Neanderthals-Denisovans. On the grounds that (i white matter myelination is delayed relative to other brain structures and in humans is protracted compared with other primates and (ii neural connectivity is linked genetically to our brain/skull morphology and language-ready brain, I take it that one significant evolutionary change in Homo sapiens’ lineage is the interhemispheric connectivity mediated by the Corpus Callosum. The size, myelination and fiber caliber of the Corpus Callosum presents an anterior-to-posterior increase, in a way that inter-hemispheric connectivity is more prominent in the sensory motor areas, whereas high- order areas are more intra-hemispherically connected. Building on evidence from language-processing studies that account for this asymmetry (‘lateralization’ in terms of brain rhythms, I present an evo-devo hypothesis according to which the myelination of the Corpus Callosum, Brain Asymmetry and Globularity are conjectured to make up the angles of a co-evolutionary triangle that gave rise to our language-ready brain.

  10. Brain asymmetry in the white matter making and globularity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theofanopoulou, Constantina

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies from the field of language genetics and evolutionary anthropology have put forward the hypothesis that the emergence of our species-specific brain is to be understood not in terms of size, but in light of developmental changes that gave rise to a more globular braincase configuration after the split from Neanderthals-Denisovans. On the grounds that (i) white matter myelination is delayed relative to other brain structures and, in humans, is protracted compared with other primates and that (ii) neural connectivity is linked genetically to our brain/skull morphology and language-ready brain, I argue that one significant evolutionary change in Homo sapiens' lineage is the interhemispheric connectivity mediated by the Corpus Callosum. The size, myelination and fiber caliber of the Corpus Callosum present an anterior-to-posterior increase, in a way that inter-hemispheric connectivity is more prominent in the sensory motor areas, whereas "high- order" areas are more intra-hemispherically connected. Building on evidence from language-processing studies that account for this asymmetry ('lateralization') in terms of brain rhythms, I present an evo-devo hypothesis according to which the myelination of the Corpus Callosum, Brain Asymmetry, and Globularity are conjectured to make up the angles of a co-evolutionary triangle that gave rise to our language-ready brain.

  11. A spectroscopic study of the Globular Cluster NGC 4147

    CERN Document Server

    Villanova, Sandro; Bidin, Cristian Moni; Assmann, Paulina

    2016-01-01

    We present the abundance analysis for a sample of 18 red giant branch stars in the metal-poor globular cluster NGC 4147 based on medium and high resolution spectra. This is the first extensive spectroscopic study of this cluster. We derive abundances of C, N, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni, Y, Ba, and Eu. We find a metallicity of [Fe/H]=-1.84+-0.02 and an alpha-enhancement of +0.38+-0.05 (errors on the mean), typical of halo globular clusters in this metallicity regime. A significant spread is observed in the abundances of light elements C, N, O, Na, and Al. In particular we found a Na-O anti-correlation and Na-Al correlation. The cluster contains only 15% of stars that belong to the first generation (Na-poor and O-rich). This implies that it suffered a severe mass loss during its lifetime. Its [Ca/Fe] and [Ti/Fe] mean values agree better with the Galactic Halo trend than with the trend of extragalactic environments at the cluster metallicity. This possibly suggests that NGC 4147 is a genuine Galactic ...

  12. White Dwarfs in Globular Clusters HST Observations of M4

    CERN Document Server

    Richer, H B; Ibata, R A; Pryor, C E; Bell, R A; Bolte, M; Bond, H E; Harris, W E; Hesser, J E; Holland, S; Ivanans, N; Mandushev, G I; Stetson, P B; Wood, M A; Richer, Harvey B.; Fahlman, Gregory G.; Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Pryor, Carlton; Bell, Roger A.; Bolte, Michael; Bond, Howard E.; Harris, William E.; Hesser, James E.; Holland, Steve; Ivanans, Nicholas; Mandushev, Georgi; Stetson, Peter B.; Wood, Matt A.

    1997-01-01

    Using WFPC2 on the Hubble Space Telescope, we have isolated a sample of 258 white dwarfs (WDs) in the Galactic globular cluster M4. Fields at three radial distances from the cluster center were observed and sizeable WD populations were found in all three. The location of these WDs in the color-magnitude diagram, their mean mass of 0.51($ \\pm 0.03$)M$_{\\odot}$, and their luminosity function confirm basic tenets of stellar evolution theory and support the results from current WD cooling theory. The WDs are used to extend the cluster main-sequence mass function upward to stars that have already completed their nuclear evolution. The WD/red dwarf binary frequency in M4 is investigated and found to be at most a few percent of all the main-sequence stars. The most ancient WDs found are about 9 Gyr old, a level which is set solely by the photometric limits of our data. Even though this is less than the age of M4, we discuss how these cooling WDs can eventually be used to check the turnoff ages of globular clusters a...

  13. Dynamical Formation of Close Binary Systems in Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Pooley, D; Anderson, S F; Baumgardt, H; Filippenko, A V; Gaensler, B M; Homer, L; Hut, P; Kaspi, V M; Margon, B; McMillan, S; Zwart, S P; Van der Klis, M; Verbunt, F

    2003-01-01

    We know from observations that globular clusters are very efficient catalysts in forming unusual short-period binary systems or their offspring, such as low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs; neutron stars accreting matter from low-mass stellar companions), cataclysmic variables (CVs; white dwarfs accreting matter from stellar companions), and millisecond pulsars (MSPs; rotating neutron stars with spin periods of a few ms). Although there has been little direct evidence, the overabundance of these objects in globular clusters has been attributed by numerous authors to the high densities in the cores, which leads to an increase in the formation rate of exotic binary systems through close stellar encounters. Many such close binary systems emit X-radiation at low luminosities (L_x < 10^{34} erg/s) and are being found in large numbers through observations with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Here we present conclusive observational evidence for a link between the number of close binaries observed in X-rays in a globul...

  14. A new abundance scale for the globular cluster 47 Tuc

    CERN Document Server

    Koch, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    We present chemical abundances for O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti and Fe in eight red giants and one turnoff star in the metal rich globular cluster 47 Tuc, based on spectroscopy with the MIKE high resolution spectrograph on the Magellan 6.5-m Clay telescope. A robust line by line differential abundance analysis technique, relative to the K-giant Arcturus, was used to reduce systematic errors from atmospheric and atomic parameters. Our derived mean LTE [Fe/H] of -0.76 +- 0.01 +- 0.04 dex (random and systematic error, respectively) is more metal poor by about 0.1 dex than recent literature results. The chemical element ratios in this nearby globular cluster most closely resemble those of the Galactic bulge, although there is a non-negligible overlap with the composition of thick-disk stars. We find that the [Al/Fe] and [Na/Fe] ratios coincide with the upper boundary of the trends seen in the bulge and thick disk. There is only a small intrinsic scatter in the majority of the abundance ratios, indicating that 47 Tuc...

  15. Chromatin assembly using Drosophila systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyodorov, Dmitry V; Levenstein, Mark E

    2002-05-01

    To successfully study chromatin structure and activity in vitro, it is essential to have a chromatin assembly system that will prepare extended nucleosome arrays with highly defined protein content that resemble bulk chromatin isolated from living cell nuclei in terms of periodicity and nucleosome positioning. The Drosophila ATP-dependent chromatin assembly system described in this unit meets these requirements. The end product of the reaction described here has highly periodic extended arrays with physiologic spacing and positioning of the nucleosomes.

  16. The red giant branches of Galactic globular clusters in the [(V-I)o,Mv] plane metallicity indices and morphology

    CERN Document Server

    Saviane, I; Piotto, G; Aparicio, A; Saviane, Ivo; Rosenberg, Alfred; Piotto, Giampaolo; Aparicio, Antonio

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to carry out a thorough investigation of the changes in morphology of the red giant branch (RGB) of Galactic globular clusters (GGC) as a function of metallicity, in the V,I bands. To this aim, two key points are developed in the course of the analysis. (a) Using our photometric V,I database for Galactic globular clusters (the largest homogeneous data sample to date; Rosenberg et al. 1999) we measure a complete set of metallicity indices, based on the morphology and position of the red-giant branch. In particular, we provide here the first calibration of the S, DV_(1.1) and DV_(1.4) indices in the (V-I,V) plane. We show that our indices are internally consistent, and we calibrate each index in terms of metallicity, both on the Zinn & West (1984) and the Carretta & Gratton (1997) scales. Our new calibrations of the (V-I)o,g, DV_(1.2), (V-I)_(-3.0) and (V-I)_(-3.5) indices are consistent with existing relations. (b) Using a grid of selected RGB fiducial points, we define a f...

  17. ARO STIR: Defining Peptide Nanostructures By Engineering Assembly Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-16

    transferred to the Peltier plate of the ARG2 rheometer equilibrated at 5°C, and the upper plate was lowered to a gap height of 500 µm. The upper plate...and the Peltier plate were equilibrated to 30°C prior to carrying out the rheological experiments. Oscillatory time sweep measurement steps were

  18. Sabot assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bzorgi, Fariborz

    2016-11-08

    A sabot assembly includes a projectile and a housing dimensioned and configured for receiving the projectile. An air pressure cavity having a cavity diameter is disposed between a front end and a rear end of the housing. Air intake nozzles are in fluid communication with the air pressure cavity and each has a nozzle diameter less than the cavity diameter. In operation, air flows through the plurality of air intake nozzles and into the air pressure cavity upon firing of the projectile from a gun barrel to pressurize the air pressure cavity for assisting in separation of the housing from the projectile upon the sabot assembly exiting the gun barrel.

  19. Historically defined autobiographical periods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, Norman R.; Hansen, Tia G. B.; Lee, Peter J.;

    2012-01-01

    The chapter reviews a research programme that has demonstrated the existence of historically defined autobiographical periods and identified the conditions that bring them about. Data from four samples of World War II-generation adults show that historically defined autobiographical periods endure...... over time and theoretical implications are discussed, notably by introducing a new approach to autobiographical memory, Transition Theory, which assumes that autobiographical memory is organized by transitional events that can be selfinitiated or externally imposed - historically defined...

  20. Globular clusters in the far-ultraviolet: evidence for He-enriched second populations in extra-galactic globular clusters?

    CERN Document Server

    Peacock, Mark B; Kundu, Arunav; Chael, Julia

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the integrated far-ultraviolet (FUV) emission from globular clusters. We present new FUV photometry of M~87's clusters based on archival HST WFPC2 F170W observations. We use these data to test the reliability of published photometry based on HST STIS FUV-MAMA observations, which are now known to suffer from significant red-leak. We generally confirm these previous FUV detections, but suggest they may be somewhat fainter. We compare the FUV emission from bright ($M_{V} < -9.0$) clusters in the Milky Way, M~31, M~81 and M~87 to each other and to the predictions from stellar populations models. Metal-rich globular clusters show a large spread in FUV-V, with some clusters in M~31, M~81 and M~87 being much bluer than standard predictions. This requires that some metal-rich clusters host a significant population of blue/extreme horizontal branch (HB) stars. These hot HB stars are not traditionally expected in metal-rich environments, but are a natural consequence of multiple populations in cluster...

  1. The SLUGGS Survey: Wide Field Imaging of the Globular Cluster System of NGC 4278

    CERN Document Server

    Usher, Christopher; Spitler, Lee R; Brodie, Jean P; Romanowsky, Aaron J; Strader, Jay; Woodley, Kristin A

    2013-01-01

    We use multi-pointing HST ACS and wide field Subaru Suprime-Cam imaging to study the globular cluster system of the L* elliptical galaxy NGC 4278. We have also obtained a handful of new globular cluster spectra with Keck/DEIMOS. We determine the globular cluster surface density profile and use it to calculate the total number of globular clusters, finding the system to be slightly more populous than average for galaxies of its luminosity. We find clear evidence for bimodality in the globular cluster colour distribution and for a colour-magnitude relation in the blue subpopulation (a 'blue tilt'). We also find negative radial colour gradients in both colour subpopulations of equal strength which are similar in strength to those reported in other galaxies. The sizes of NGC 4278's globular clusters decrease with redder colours and increase with galactocentric radius. The ratio of the sizes of blue to red globular clusters is independent of galactocentric radius demonstrating that internal effects are responsible...

  2. Facile cation electro-insertion into layer-by-layer assembled iron phytate films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cummings, Charles Y.; Roweth, Alistair H.; Ching, Andrew K.Z.; Jenkins, A. Toby A.; Mitchels, John M.; Shariki, Sara; Marken, Frank [Department of Chemistry, University of Bath (United Kingdom); Liew, Soon Yee; Thielemans, Wim [Faculty of Engineering, Process and Environmental Research Division, University of Nottingham (United Kingdom); Walsh, Darren A. [School of Chemistry, University of Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2010-12-15

    Molecular layer-by-layer assembly from pre-saturated aqueous solutions of Fe{sup 3+} and phytate is employed to build up iron phytate deposits on tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) electrodes. Globular films with approximately 1 nm growth per layer are observed by AFM imaging and sectioning. In electrochemical experiments the iron phytate films show well-defined voltammetric responses consistent with an immobilised Fe(III/II) redox system in aqueous (LiClO{sub 4}, NaClO{sub 4}, KClO{sub 4}, phosphate buffer) and in ethanolic (LiClO{sub 4}, NaClO{sub 4}, NBu{sub 4}ClO{sub 4}) electrolyte solutions. The Fe(III/II) redox system is reversible and cation insertion/expulsion occurs fast on the timescale of voltammetric experiments even for more bulky NBu{sub 4}{sup +} cations and in ethanolic solution. Peak shape analysis and scan rate dependent midpoint potentials suggest structural changes accompanying the redox process and limiting propagation. Iron phytate is proposed as a versatile and essentially colourless cation electro-insertion material and as a potential energy storage material. (author)

  3. Assembling consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assembling Consumption marks a definitive step in the institutionalisation of qualitative business research. By gathering leading scholars and educators who study markets, marketing and consumption through the lenses of philosophy, sociology and anthropology, this book clarifies and applies...... societies. This is an essential reading for both seasoned scholars and advanced students of markets, economies and social forms of consumption....

  4. Defining Legal Moralism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thaysen, Jens Damgaard

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses how legal moralism should be defined. It is argued that legal moralism should be defined as the position that “For any X, it is always a pro tanto reason for justifiably imposing legal regulation on X that X is morally wrong (where “morally wrong” is not conceptually equivalent...

  5. In search of massive single-population globular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caloi, Vittoria; D'Antona, Francesca

    2011-10-01

    The vast majority of globular clusters so far examined shows the chemical signatures of hosting (at least) two stellar populations. According to recent ideas, this feature requires a two-step process, in which the nuclearly processed matter from a 'first generation' (FG) of stars gives birth to a 'second generation' (SG), bearing the fingerprint of a fully carbon-nitrogen-oxygen (CNO) cycled matter. Since, as observed, the present population of most globular clusters is made up largely of SG stars, a substantial fraction of the FG (≳90 per cent) must be lost. Nevertheless, two types of clusters dominated by a simple stellar population (FG clusters) should exist: clusters initially too small to be able to retain a cooling flow and form a second generation (FG-only clusters) and massive clusters that could retain the CNO-processed ejecta and form an SG, but were unable to lose a significant fraction of their FG (mainly-FG clusters). Identification of mainly-FG clusters may provide an estimate of the fraction of the initial mass involved in the formation of the SG. We attempt a first classification of FG clusters, based on the morphology of their horizontal branches (HBs), as displayed in the published catalogues of photometric data for 106 clusters. We select, as FG candidates, the clusters in which the HB can be reproduced by the evolution of an almost unique mass. We find that less than 20 per cent of clusters with [Fe/H] base the spectroscopic result that the SG is a dominant constituent of today's clusters, suggesting that its formation is an ingredient necessary for the survival of globular clusters during their dynamical evolution in the Galactic tidal field. In more detail we show that Pal 3 turns out to be a good example of FG-only cluster. Instead, HB simulations and space distribution of its components indicate that M53 is a 'mainly-FG' cluster that evolved in dynamic isolation and developed a small SG in its core thanks to its large mass. Mainly

  6. Multiple populations in Galactic globular clusters: a survey in the Strömgren system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alonso-García, J.; Catelan, M.; Amigo, P.

    2013-01-01

    We are coming to believe that stellar populations in globular clusters are not as simple as they were once thought to be. A growing amount of photometric and spectroscopic evidence shows that globular clusters host at least two different stellar populations. In our contribution to these proceedings...... we present the first results of a survey we are conducting to look for the presence of multiple populations in a significant number of Galactic globular clusters, using the Strömgren system. We intend to photometrically separate these populations and characterize their radial distributions...

  7. Globular clusters in the outer Galactic halo: new HST/ACS imaging of 6 globular clusters and the Galactic globular cluster age-metallicity relation

    CERN Document Server

    Dotter, Aaron; Anderson, Jay

    2011-01-01

    Color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) derived from Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys F606W,F814W photometry of 6 globular clusters (GCs) are presented. The six GCs form two loose groupings in Galactocentric distance (Rgc): IC 4499, NGC 6426, and Ruprecht 106 at ~15-20 kpc and NGC 7006, Palomar 15, and Pyxis at ~40 kpc. The CMDs allow the ages to be estimated from the main sequence turnoff in every case. In addition, the age of Palomar 5 (Rgc ~ 18 kpc) is estimated using archival HST Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 V,I photometry. The age analysis reveals the following: IC 4499, Ruprecht 106, and Pyxis are 1-2 Gyr younger than inner halo GCs with similar metallicities; NGC 7006 and Palomar 5 are marginally younger than their inner halo counterparts; NGC 6426 and Palomar 15, the two most metal-poor GCs in the sample, are coeval with all the other metal-poor GCs within the uncertainties. Combined with our previous efforts, the current sample provides strong evidence that the Galactic GC age-metall...

  8. SOAR Adaptive Optics Observations of the Globular Cluster NGC6496

    CERN Document Server

    Fraga, Luciano; Tokovinin, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    We present high-quality BVRI photometric data in the field of globular cluster NGC 6496 obtained with the SOAR Telescope Adaptive Module (SAM). Our observations were collected as part of the ongoing SAM commissioning. The distance modulus and cluster color excess as found from the red clump is $\\mMv = 15.71 \\pm 0.02$\\,mag and $\\EVI = 0.28 \\pm 0.02$\\,mag. An age of $10.5 \\pm 0.5$\\,Gyr is determined from the difference in magnitude between the red clump and the subgiant branch. These parameters are in excellent agreement with the values derived from isochrone fitting. From the color-magnitude diagram we find a metallicity of $\\feh = -0.65$\\,dex and hence support a disk classification for NGC 6496. The complete $BVRI$ data set for NGC 6469 is made available in the electronic edition of the Journal.

  9. Soar adaptive optics observations of the globular cluster NGC 6496

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraga, Luciano [Southern Observatory for Astrophysical Research, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Kunder, Andrea; Tokovinin, Andrei, E-mail: lfraga@ctio.noao.edu, E-mail: lfraga@lna.br [Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile)

    2013-06-01

    We present high-quality BVRI photometric data in the field of globular cluster NGC 6496 obtained with the SOAR Telescope Adaptive Module (SAM). Our observations were collected as part of the ongoing SAM commissioning. The distance modulus and cluster color excess as found from the red clump are (m – M) {sub V} = 15.71 ± 0.02 mag and E(V – I) = 0.28 ± 0.02 mag. An age of 10.5 ± 0.5 Gyr is determined from the difference in magnitude between the red clump and the subgiant branch. These parameters are in excellent agreement with the values derived from isochrone fitting. From the color-magnitude diagram we find a metallicity of [Fe/H] = –0.65 dex and hence support a disk classification for NGC 6496. The complete BVRI data set for NGC 6469 is made available in the electronic edition of the Journal.

  10. Variable stars in the bulge globular cluster NGC 6401

    CERN Document Server

    Tsapras, Y; Bramich, D M; Jaimes, R Figuera; Kains, N; Street, R; Hundertmark, M; Horne, K; Dominik, M; Snodgrass, C

    2016-01-01

    We present a study of variable stars in globular cluster NGC 6401. The cluster is only $5.3\\degr$ away from the Galactic centre and suffers from strong differential reddening. The photometric precision afforded us by difference image analysis resulted in improved sensitivity to variability in formerly inaccessible interior regions of the cluster. We find 23 RRab and 11 RRc stars within one cluster radius (2.4$\\arcmin$), for which we provide coordinates, finder-charts and time-series photometry. Through Fourier decomposition of the RR Lyrae star light curves we derive a mean metallicity of [Fe/H]$_{\\mathrm{UVES}} = -1.13 \\pm 0.06$ (${\\rm [Fe/H]}_{\\mathrm{ZW}} = -1.25 \\pm 0.06$), and a distance of $d\\approx 6.35 \\pm 0.81$ kpc. Using the RR Lyrae population, we also determine that NGC 6401 is an Oosterhoff type I cluster.

  11. Analysis of Globular Cluster Photometry from 2MASS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarajedini, Ata; Milliman, K.; Kirkpatrick, A.

    2007-12-01

    Using near-infrared color magnitude diagrams of over 30 Galactic globular clusters, we have measured the magnitude of the red giant branch (RGB) 'bump,' the level of the core-helium burning red clump, and the slope of the RGB. Our aim is to compare our values with those measured by other investigators for the same clusters as we all as to derive new relations between these quantities and cluster properties such as age and metallicity. We find a good correlation between our values and those in the literature albeit with significant scatter. This work will explore the reasons for this scatter and techniques to minimize its effects. This research was supported by an REU supplement to NSF CAREER grant AST00-94048.

  12. A DOUBLE MAIN SEQUENCE IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER NGC 6397

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milone, A. P.; Aparicio, A. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife, Canary Islands (Spain); Marino, A. F. [Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics, Postfach 1317, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Piotto, G. [Dipartimento di Astronomia, Universita di Padova, Vicolo dell' Osservatorio 3, Padova I-35122 (Italy); Bedin, L. R.; Anderson, J. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3800 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Cassisi, S. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Collurania, via Mentore Maggini, I-64100 Teramo (Italy); Rich, R. M., E-mail: milone@iac.es, E-mail: aparicio@iac.es, E-mail: amarino@MPA-Garching.MPG.DE, E-mail: giampaolo.piotto@unipd.it, E-mail: jayander@stsci.edu, E-mail: bedin@stsci.edu, E-mail: cassisi@oa-teramo.inaf.it, E-mail: rmr@astro.ucla.edu [Division of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Los Angeles, 430 Portola Plaza, Box 951547, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States)

    2012-01-20

    High-precision multi-band Hubble Space Telescope (HST) photometry reveals that the main sequence of the globular cluster NGC 6397 splits into two components, containing {approx}30% and {approx}70% of the stars. This double sequence is consistent with the idea that the cluster hosts two stellar populations: (1) a primordial population that has a composition similar to field stars, containing {approx}30% of the stars, and (2) a second generation with enhanced sodium and nitrogen, depleted carbon and oxygen, and a slightly enhanced helium abundance ({Delta}Y {approx} 0.01). We examine the color difference between the two sequences across a variety of color baselines and find that the second sequence is anomalously faint in m{sub F336W}. Theoretical isochrones indicate that this could be due to NH depletion.

  13. Spectroscopic Study of the Globular Clusters in M31

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. C. Kim

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemos realizado un nuevo reconocimiento sistem tico de c mulos globulares (CG en un area de 3 3 centrada en M31. Usando datos fotom tricos obtenidos con las observaciones del telescopio 0.9-m de KPNO con los filtros CMT1 Washington, y datos espectrosc picos obtenidos de las observaciones del telescopio 3.5-m de KPNO/WIYN con el espetr grafo de multifibras Hydra, hemos confirmado 544 CGs previamente conocidos y encontrado m s de 600 CGs nuevos y candidatos. M s de cien candidatos se creen que son CGs genuinos. Presentamos la distribuci n de metalicidad de los conocidos previamente y de los CGs nuevos en M31, lo cual muestra un mejor ajuste a tres componentes comparados con los ajustes a dos componentes

  14. Flowering Buds of Globular Proteins: Transpiring Simplicity of Protein Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezovsky, Igor N.

    2002-01-01

    Structural and functional complexity of proteins is dramatically reduced to a simple linear picture when the laws of polymer physics are considered. A basic unit of the protein structure is a nearly standard closed loop of 25–35 amino acid residues, and every globular protein is built of consecutively connected closed loops. The physical necessity of the closed loops had been apparently imposed on the early stages of protein evolution. Indeed, the most frequent prototype sequence motifs in prokaryotic proteins have the same sequence size, and their high match representatives are found as closed loops in crystallized proteins. Thus, the linear organization of the closed loop elements is a quintessence of protein evolution, structure and folding. PMID:18629251

  15. Forming Globular Cluster Systems in a Semi-analytic Scheme

    CERN Document Server

    Beasley, M A; Forbes, D A; Sharples, R M; Frenk, C S; Beasley, Michael A.; Baugh, Carlton M.; Forbes, Duncan A.; Sharples, Ray M.; Frenk, Carlos S.

    2002-01-01

    We apply the semi-analytical galaxy formation code of Cole et al. to investigate the formation of globular cluster (GC) systems in hierarchical clustering scenarios. The nature of the model allows us to investigate the properties of GC systems and their parent galaxies within a cosmological framework, over a wide dynamic range of mass and time resolution. Assuming GCs form during mergers of gaseous systems, the metal-rich peak of the classical 'bimodal' metallicity distribution of GCs naturally falls out of our model, where such merging occurs over a wide range of redshifts. The physical origin of old, metal-poor GCs (the metal-poor peak) is harder to understand, since their formation must be decoupled from the ongoing star formation in these systems at high redshift (z~5). Within the context of semi-analytic models in general, a possible solution lies in a cut-off in the GC formation efficiency at a characteristic local star formation rate.

  16. Anisotropic Models for Globular Clusters, Galactic Bulges and Dark Halos

    CERN Document Server

    Nguyen, P H

    2013-01-01

    Spherical systems with a polytropic equation of state are of great interest in astrophysics. They are widely used to describe neutron stars, red giants, white dwarfs, brown dwarfs, main sequence stars, galactic halos and globular clusters of diverse sizes. In this paper we construct analytically a family of self-gravitating spherical models in the post-Newtonian approximation of general relativity. These models present interesting cusps in their density profiles which are appropriate for the modeling of galaxies and dark matter halos. The systems described here are anisotropic in the sense that their equiprobability surfaces in velocity space are non-spherical, leading to an overabundance of radial or circular orbits, depending on the parameters of the model in consideration. Among the family, we find the post-Newtonian generalization of the Plummer and Hernquist models. A close inspection of their equation of state reveals that these solutions interpolate smoothly between a polytropic sphere in the asymptoti...

  17. Evolution of Binary Stars in Multiple-Population Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, Jongsuk; Sollima, Antonio; McMillan, Stephen L W; D'Antona, Franca; D'Ercole, Annibale

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of multiple stellar populations in globular clusters has implications for all the aspects of the study of these stellar systems. In this paper, by means of N-body simulations, we study the evolution of binary stars in multiple-population clusters and explore the implications of the initial differences in the spatial distribution of different stellar populations for the evolution and survival of their binary stars. Our simulations show that initial differences between the spatial distribution of first-generation (FG) and second-generation (SG) stars can leave a fingerprint in the current properties of the binary population. SG binaries are disrupted more efficiently than those of the FG population resulting in a global SG binary fraction smaller than that of the FG. As for surviving binaries, dynamical evolution produces a difference between the SG and the FG binary binding energy distribution with the SG population characterized by a larger fraction of high binding energy (more bound) binaries. ...

  18. Constraints on mass loss of globular clusters in dwarf galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Larsen, S S; Brodie, J P

    2013-01-01

    The Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy is well known for its very high globular cluster specific frequency, SN=26. Furthermore, while the field star metallicity distribution peaks at [Fe/H]=-1, four of the five GCs have [Fe/H]<-2. Only about 5 percent of the field stars have such low metallicities. Hence, a very large fraction of about 1/5-1/4 of the most metal-poor stars belong to the four most metal-poor GCs. This implies that these clusters could, at most, have been a factor of 4-5 more massive initially. A second, even more extreme case may be the IKN dwarf galaxy where SN=124. Although metallicities are not accurately known, the GCs account for about 13 percent of the total V-band luminosity of IKN.

  19. Intermediate-age globular clusters in four galaxy merger remnants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trancho, Gelys [Giant Magellan Telescope Organization, 251 South Lake Avenue, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Miller, Bryan W. [Gemini Observatory, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Schweizer, François [Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Burdett, Daniel P. [The University of Adelaide, South Australia 5005 (Australia); Palamara, David, E-mail: gtrancho@gmto.org [Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia)

    2014-08-01

    We present the results of combining Hubble Space Telescope optical photometry with ground-based K{sub s} -band photometry from the Gemini imagers NIRI and FLAMINGOS-I to study the globular cluster (GC) populations in four early-type galaxies that are candidate remnants of recent mergers (NGC 1700, NGC 2865, NGC 4382, and NGC 7727). These galaxies were chosen based on their blue colors and fine structure, such as shells and ripples that are indicative of past interactions. We fit the combined VIK{sub s} GC data with simple toy models of mixed cluster populations that contain three subpopulations of different age and metallicity. The fits, done via chi-squared mapping of the parameter space, yield clear evidence for the presence of intermediate-age clusters in each galaxy. We find that the ages of ∼1-2 Gyr for these GC subpopulations are consistent with the previously estimated merger ages for the host galaxies.

  20. A one-dimensional toy model of globular clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Fanelli, D; Ruffo, S; Fanelli, Duccio; Merafina, Marco; Ruffo, Stefano

    2001-01-01

    We introduce a one-dimensional toy model of globular clusters. The model is a version of the well-known gravitational sheets system, where we take additionally into account mass and energy loss by evaporation of stars at the boundaries. Numerical integration by the "exact" event-driven dynamics is performed, for initial uniform density and Gaussian random velocities. Two distinct quasi-stationary asymptotic regimes are attained, depending on the initial energy of the system. We guess the forms of the density and velocity profiles which fit numerical data extremely well and allow to perform an independent calculation of the self-consistent gravitational potential. Some power-laws for the asymptotic number of stars and for the collision times are suggested.

  1. The Composition of the Bulge Globular Cluster NGC 6273

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilachowski, C. A.; Johnson, C. I.; Rich, R. M.; Caldwell, N.; Mateo, M.; Bailey, J. I.; Crane, J. D.

    2017-03-01

    Observations of red giants in the Bulge globular cluster NGC 6273 with the Michigan/Magellan Fiber System (M2FS) mounted on the Nasmuth-East port of the Magellan-Clay 6.5-m telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory reveal a spread in metallicity. Members have been confirmed with radial velocity. NGC 6273 has at least two populations separated by 0.2-0.3 dex in [Fe/H]. The sodium and aluminum abundances are correlated while the magnesium and aluminum abundances are anti-correlated. The cluster also shows a rise in the abundance of the s-process element lanthanum with [Fe/H] similar to other massive clusters. The cluster contains a possible third population depleted in most elements by 0.3 dex.

  2. Isolated ellipticals and their globular cluster systems. III. NGC 2271, NGC 2865, NGC 3962, NGC 4240, and IC 4889

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, R.; Alabi, A.; Richtler, T.; Lane, R. R.

    2015-05-01

    As tracers of star formation, galaxy assembly, and mass distribution, globular clusters have provided important clues to our understanding of early-type galaxies. But their study has been mostly constrained to galaxy groups and clusters where early-type galaxies dominate, leaving the properties of the globular cluster systems (GCSs) of isolated ellipticals as a mostly uncharted territory. We present Gemini-South/GMOS g'i' observations of five isolated elliptical galaxies: NGC 3962, NGC 2865, IC 4889, NGC 2271, and NGC 4240. Photometry of their GCSs reveals clear color bimodality in three of them, but remains inconclusive for the other two. All the studied GCSs are rather poor with a mean specific frequency SN ~ 1.5, independently of the parent galaxy luminosity. Considering information from previous work as well, it is clear that bimodality and especially the presence of a significant, even dominant, population of blue clusters occurs at even the most isolated systems, which casts doubts on a possible accreted origin of metal-poor clusters, as suggested by some models. Additionally, we discuss the possible existence of ultra-compact dwarfs around the isolated elliptical NGC 3962. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (United Kingdom), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia e Inovação (Brazil) and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina).Globular cluster photometry is available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/577/A59Appendices are available in

  3. The Frequency of Lithium-Rich Giants in Globular Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Evan N.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Zhang, Andrew J.; Hong, Jerry; Guo, Michelle; Guo, Rachel; Cohen, Judith G.; Cunha, Katia M. L.

    2016-01-01

    Although red giants destroy lithium, some giants are Li-rich. Intermediate-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars can generate Li through the Cameron-Fowler conveyor, but the existence of Li-rich, low-mass red giant branch (RGB) stars is puzzling. Globular clusters are the best sites to examine this phenomenon because it is straightforward to determine membership in the cluster and to identify the evolutionary state of each star. In 72 hours of Keck/DEIMOS exposures in 25 clusters, we found four Li-rich RGB and two Li-rich AGB stars. There were 1696 RGB and 125 AGB stars with measurements or upper limits consistent with normal abundances of Li. Hence, the frequency of Li-richness in globular clusters is (0.2 ± 0.1)% for the RGB, (1.6 ± 1.1)% for the AGB, and (0.3 ± 0.1)% for all giants. Because the Li-rich RGB stars are on the lower RGB, Li self-generation mechanisms proposed to occur at the luminosity function bump or He core flash cannot explain these four lower RGB stars. We propose the following origin for Li enrichment: (1) All luminous giants experience a brief phase of Li enrichment at the He core flash. (2) All post-RGB stars with binary companions on the lower RGB will engage in mass transfer. This scenario predicts that 0.1% of lower RGB stars will appear Li-rich due to mass transfer from a recently Li-enhanced companion. This frequency is at the lower end of our confidence interval.

  4. Bayesian Analysis of Multiple Populations in Galactic Globular Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner-Kaiser, Rachel A.; Sarajedini, Ata; von Hippel, Ted; Stenning, David; Piotto, Giampaolo; Milone, Antonino; van Dyk, David A.; Robinson, Elliot; Stein, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    We use GO 13297 Cycle 21 Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations and archival GO 10775 Cycle 14 HST ACS Treasury observations of Galactic Globular Clusters to find and characterize multiple stellar populations. Determining how globular clusters are able to create and retain enriched material to produce several generations of stars is key to understanding how these objects formed and how they have affected the structural, kinematic, and chemical evolution of the Milky Way. We employ a sophisticated Bayesian technique with an adaptive MCMC algorithm to simultaneously fit the age, distance, absorption, and metallicity for each cluster. At the same time, we also fit unique helium values to two distinct populations of the cluster and determine the relative proportions of those populations. Our unique numerical approach allows objective and precise analysis of these complicated clusters, providing posterior distribution functions for each parameter of interest. We use these results to gain a better understanding of multiple populations in these clusters and their role in the history of the Milky Way.Support for this work was provided by NASA through grant numbers HST-GO-10775 and HST-GO-13297 from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. This material is based upon work supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under Grant NNX11AF34G issued through the Office of Space Science. This project was supported by the National Aeronautics & Space Administration through the University of Central Florida's NASA Florida Space Grant Consortium.

  5. A Proper Motions Study of the Globular Cluster NGC 3201

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sariya, Devesh P.; Jiang, Ing-Guey; Yadav, R. K. S.

    2017-03-01

    With a high value of heliocentric radial velocity, a retrograde orbit, and suspected to have an extragalactic origin, NGC 3201 is an interesting globular cluster for kinematical studies. Our purpose is to calculate the relative proper motions (PMs) and membership probability for the stars in the wide region of globular cluster NGC 3201. PM based membership probabilities are used to isolate the cluster sample from the field stars. The membership catalog will help address the question of chemical inhomogeneity in the cluster. Archive CCD data taken with a wide-field imager (WFI) mounted on the ESO 2.2 m telescope are reduced using the high-precision astrometric software developed by Anderson et al. for the WFI images. The epoch gap between the two observational runs is ∼14.3 years. To standardize the BVI photometry, Stetson’s secondary standard stars are used. The CCD data with an epoch gap of ∼14.3 years enables us to decontaminate the cluster stars from field stars efficiently. The median precision of PMs is better than ∼0.8 mas yr‑1 for stars having V< 18 mag that increases up to ∼1.5 mas yr‑1 for stars with 18< V< 20 mag. Kinematic membership probabilities are calculated using PMs for stars brighter than V∼ 20 mag. An electronic catalog of positions, relative PMs, BVI magnitudes, and membership probabilities in the ∼19.7 × 17 arcmin2 region of NGC 3201 is presented. We use our membership catalog to identify probable cluster members among the known variables and X-ray sources in the direction of NGC 3201. Based on observations with the MPG/ESO 2.2 m and ESO/VLT telescopes, located at La Silla and Paranal Observatory, Chile, under DDT programs 164.O-0561(F), 093.A-9028(A), and the archive material.

  6. Uncovering Multiple Populations in Globular Clusters with Washington Photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisler, Douglas; Cummings, Jeff; Villanova, Sandro; Carraro, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Globular Clusters (GCs), long considered as ideal Simple Stellar Populations, are now known to harbor a wide variety of chemical inhomogeneities. Multiple populations (MP) are being found in a growing number of Galactic globular clusters (GCs) via both photometric and spectroscopic techniques. Indeed, it has been suggested that a GC is an object that possesses MP. A definitive investigation of MP in GCs will undoubtedly provide a profound improvement in our understanding of their formation and evolution.However, most studies employ either high resolution VLT spectroscopy, HST photometry or inefficient filters from the ground. A ground-based photometric system which is both efficient and effective would be especially excellent for uncovering MP. We demonstrate that the Washington system meets these goals. The Washington C filter, in addition to being specifically designed for the purpose of detecting MPs, is both much broader and redder than competing UV filters, making it far more efficient at detecting MPs and much less sensitive to reddening and extinction.Our analysis of the well-studied GC NGC 1851 shows indeed that the C filter is both very efficient and effective at detecting its previously discovered MPs in the RGB and SGB, using relatively little telescope time on only a 1-meter telescope. Remarkably, we have also detected an intrinsically broad MS best characterized by two distinct but heavily overlapping populations that cannot be explained by binaries, field stars, or photometric errors. Detailed analysis shows that the MS distribution is in very good agreement with that seen on the RGB. This is the first time MPs in a MS have been discovered from the ground, and just as strikingly, using only a 1-meter telescope. The Washington system thus proves to be a very powerful tool for investigating MPs, and holds particular promise for extragalactic objects where photons are limited.

  7. The SLUGGS Survey: Globular cluster kinematics in a "double sigma" galaxy - NGC 4473

    CERN Document Server

    Alabi, Adebusola B; Forbes, Duncan A; Romanowsky, Aaron J; Pastorello, Nicola; Brodie, Jean P; Spitler, Lee R; Strader, Jay; Usher, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    NGC 4473 is a so--called double sigma (2$\\sigma$) galaxy, i.e. a galaxy with rare, double peaks in its 2D stellar velocity dispersion. Here, we present the globular cluster (GC) kinematics in NGC 4473 out to $\\sim10\\,R_e$ (effective radii) using data from combined HST/ACS and Subaru/Suprime--Cam imaging and Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopy. We find that the 2$\\sigma$ nature of NGC 4473 persists up to 3 $R_e$, though it becomes misaligned to the photometric major axis. We also observe a significant offset between the stellar and GC rotation amplitudes. This offset can be understood as a co--addition of counter--rotating stars producing little net stellar rotation. We identify a sharp radial transition in the GC kinematics at $\\sim4\\,R_e$ suggesting a well defined kinematically distinct halo. In the inner region ($4\\,R_e$), the red GCs rotate in an opposite direction compared to the inner region red GCs, along the photometric major axis, while the blue GCs rotate along an axis intermediate between the major and minor p...

  8. Lithium and oxygen in globular cluster dwarfs and the early disc accretion scenario

    CERN Document Server

    Salaris, M

    2014-01-01

    A new scenario --early disc accretion-- has been recently proposed to explain the discovery of multiple stellar populations in Galactic globular clusters. According to this model, the existence of well defined (anti)-correlations amongst light element abundances (i.e. C, N, O, Na) in the photospheres of stars belonging to the same cluster (and the associated helium enrichment), is caused by accretion of the ejecta of short lived interacting massive binary systems (and single fast rotating massive stars) on fully convective pre-main sequence low- and very low-mass stars, during the early stages of the cluster evolution. We investigated the constraints provided by considering simultaneously the observed spread of lithium and oxygen (and when possible also sodium) abundances for samples of turn-off stars in NGC6752, NGC6121 (M4), and NGC104 (47Tuc), and the helium abundance of their multiple main sequences. These observations provide a very powerful test for the accretion scenario, because the observed O, Li and...

  9. Study the cooperative motion of long-chain polyelectrolyte in presence of small globular protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trabelsi, Saber; Bassalah, Mohamed Arbi; Aschi, Adel; Othman, Tahar; Gharbi, Abdelhafidh

    2016-12-01

    We study in this paper the effect of small globular protein on the dynamic properties of long-chain NaPSS in semidilute regime using Dynamic Light Scattering and viscometry in three phases respecting the pH of the medium. The scaling concept of the heterogeneous system is compared with the De Gennes argument for homogeneous polymer solutions. The results showed a positive and negative deviations to the De Gennes approach of the correlation length scale of mixture defined by (c/c*)δ. The macroscopic viscosity of protein and the potential electrostatic interaction are taken as principal factors affecting the cooperative motion of blobs. δ was discussed as the parameter responsible for the conformational change of polyelectrolyte chain subunit within blob. The theoretical analysis of the electrostatic interaction between protein and subunit gave one possible solution relating the deviation δ to the dimensionless coupling constant u as δ uu+1 and δ - 1/3 u/u+1 for a swollen and shrunk subunit, respectively. A good accordance of experimental values of δ to theoretical approach was found.

  10. The horizontal branch luminosity vs metallicity in M31 globular clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Federici, Luciana; Bellazzini, Michele; Pecci, Flavio Fusi; Galleti, Silvia; Perina, Sibilla

    2012-01-01

    Thanks to the outstanding capabilites of the HST, our current knowledge about the M31 globular clusters (GCs) is similar to our knowledge of the Milky Way GCs in the 1960s-1970s, which set the basis for studying the halo and galaxy formation using these objects as tracers, and established their importance in defining the cosmic distance scale. We intend to derive a new calibration of the M_V(HB)-[Fe/H] relation by exploiting the large photometric database of old GCs in M31 in the HST archive. We collected the BVI data for 48 old GCs in M31 and analysed them by applying the same methods and procedures to all objects. We obtained a set of homogeneous colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) that were best-fitted with the fiducial CMD ridge lines of selected Milky Way template GCs. Reddening, metallicity, Horizontal Branch (HB) luminosity and distance were determined self-consistently for each cluster. There are three main results of this study: i) the relation M_V(HB)=(0.25+/-0.02)[Fe/H]+(0.89+/-0.03), which is obtaine...

  11. Blue straggler star populations in globular clusters - II. Proper-motion cleaned HST catalogues of BSSs in 38 Galactic GCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simunovic, Mirko; Puzia, Thomas H.

    2016-11-01

    We present new blue straggler star (BSS) catalogues in 38 Milky Way globular clusters (GCs) based on multipassband and multi-epoch treasury survey data from the Hubble Space Telescope. We measure precise astrometry and relative proper motions of stars in all target clusters and performed a subsequent cluster membership selection. We study the accuracy of our proper-motion measurements using estimates of central velocity dispersions and find very good agreement with previous studies in the literature. Finally, we present a homogeneous BSS selection method, that expands the classic BSS selection parameter space to more evolved BSS evolutionary stages. We apply this method to the proper-motion cleaned GC star catalogues in order to define proper-motion cleaned BSS catalogues in all 38 GCs, which we make publicly available to enable further study and follow-up observations.

  12. Blue Straggler Star Populations in Globular Clusters: II. Proper-Motion Cleaned HST Catalogs of BSSs in 38 Galactic GCs

    CERN Document Server

    Simunovic, Mirko

    2016-01-01

    We present new Blue Straggler Star (BSS) catalogs in 38 Milky Way globular clusters (GCs) based on multi-passband and multi-epoch treasury survey data from the Hubble Space Telescope. We measure precise astrometry and relative proper motions of stars in all target clusters and performed a subsequent cluster membership selection. We study the accuracy of our proper motion measurements using estimates of central velocity dispersions and find very good agreement with previous studies in the literature. Finally, we present a homogeneous BSS selection method, that expands the classic BSS selection parameter space to more evolved BSS evolutionary stages. We apply this method to the proper-motion cleaned GC star catalogs in order to define proper-motion cleaned BSS catalogs in all 38 GCs, which we make publicly available to enable further study and follow-up observations.

  13. Dump assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldmann, Louis H.

    1986-01-01

    A dump assembly having a fixed conduit and a rotatable conduit provided with overlapping plates, respectively, at their adjacent ends. The plates are formed with openings, respectively, normally offset from each other to block flow. The other end of the rotatable conduit is provided with means for securing the open end of a filled container thereto. Rotation of the rotatable conduit raises and inverts the container to empty the contents while concurrently aligning the conduit openings to permit flow of material therethrough.

  14. Defining Documentary Film

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    A discussion of various attemts at defining documentary film regarding form, content, truth, stile, genre or reception - and a propoposal of a positive list of essential, but non-exclusive characteristica of documentary film......A discussion of various attemts at defining documentary film regarding form, content, truth, stile, genre or reception - and a propoposal of a positive list of essential, but non-exclusive characteristica of documentary film...

  15. Definably amenable NIP groups

    OpenAIRE

    Chernikov, Artem; Simon, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    We study definably amenable NIP groups. We develop a theory of generics, showing that various definitions considered previously coincide, and study invariant measures. Applications include: characterization of regular ergodic measures, a proof of the conjecture of Petrykowski connecting existence of bounded orbits with definable amenability in the NIP case, and the Ellis group conjecture of Newelski and Pillay connecting the model-theoretic connected component of an NIP group with the ideal s...

  16. General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    5th April, 2016 – Ordinary General Assembly of the Staff Association! In the first semester of each year, the Staff Association (SA) invites its members to attend and participate in the Ordinary General Assembly (OGA). This year the OGA will be held on Tuesday, April 5th 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00 in BE Auditorium, Meyrin (6-2-024). During the Ordinary General Assembly, the activity and financial reports of the SA are presented and submitted for approval to the members. This is the occasion to get a global view on the activities of the SA, its financial management, and an opportunity to express one’s opinion, including taking part in the votes. Other points are listed on the agenda, as proposed by the Staff Council. Who can vote? Only “ordinary” members (MPE) of the SA can vote. Associated members (MPA) of the SA and/or affiliated pensioners have a right to vote on those topics that are of direct interest to them. Who can give his/her opinion? The Ordinary General Asse...

  17. Rotor blade assembly having internal loading features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soloway, Daniel David

    2017-05-16

    Rotor blade assemblies and wind turbines are provided. A rotor blade assembly includes a rotor blade having exterior surfaces defining a pressure side, a suction side, a leading edge and a trailing edge each extending between a tip and a root, the rotor blade defining a span and a chord, the exterior surfaces defining an interior of the rotor blade. The rotor blade assembly further includes a loading assembly, the loading assembly including a weight disposed within the interior and movable generally along the span of the rotor blade, the weight connected to a rotor blade component such that movement of the weight towards the tip causes application of a force to the rotor blade component by the weight. Centrifugal force due to rotation of the rotor blade biases the weight towards the tip.

  18. Crystal Structure of the VapBC Toxin–Antitoxin Complex from Shigella flexneri Reveals a Hetero-Octameric DNA-Binding Assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dienemann, Christian; Bøggild, Andreas; Winther, Kristoffer S.

    2011-01-01

    the crystal structure of the intact Shigella flexneri VapBC TA complex, determined to 2.7 Å resolution. Both in solution and in the crystal structure, four molecules of each protein combine to form a large and globular hetero-octameric assembly with SpoVT/AbrB-type DNA-binding domains at each end and a total...

  19. Discovery of VHE gamma-ray emission from the direction of the globular cluster Terzan 5

    CERN Document Server

    Domainko, W; Brun, F; Eger, P; Jamrozy, M; Dyrda, M; Komin, N; Schwanke, U

    2011-01-01

    Globular clusters are old stellar systems which exhibit very-high stellar densities in their cores. The globular cluster Terzan 5 is characterized by a high stellar encounter rate and hosts the largest detected population of millisecond pulsars. It also features bright GeV gamma-ray emission and extended X-ray radiation. However, no globular clusters have been detected in very-high-energy gamma rays (VHE, E> 100 GeV) so far. In order to investigate this possibility Terzan 5 has been observed with the H.E.S.S. telescope array in this energy band. The discovery of a source of VHE gamma rays from the direction of this globular cluster will be reported. The results of the VHE analysis and a multi-wavelength view of Terzan 5 will be presented in this contribution. No counterpart or model can fully explain the observed morphology of the detected VHE gamma-ray source.

  20. APOGEE Chemical Abundances of Globular Cluster Giants in the Inner Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Schiavon, Ricardo P; Frinchaboy, Peter M; Zasowski, Gail; Meszaros, Szabolcs; Garcia-Hernandez, D A; Cohen, Roger E; Tang, Baitian; Villanova, Sandro; Geisler, Douglas; Beers, Timothy C; Fernandez-Trincado, J G; Perez, Ana E Garcia; Lucatello, Sara; Majewski, Steven R; Martell, Sarah L; O'Connell, Robert W; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Carrera, Ricardo; Lane, Richard R; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Munoz, Ricardo R; Nitschelm, Christian; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; Roman-Lopes, Alexandre; Schultheis, Matthias; Simmons, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    We report chemical abundances obtained by SDSS-III/APOGEE for giant stars in five globular clusters located within 2.2 kpc of the Galactic centre. We detect the presence of multiple stellar populations in four of those clusters (NGC 6553, NGC 6528, Terzan 5, and Palomar 6) and find strong evidence for their presence in NGC 6522. All clusters present a significant spread in the abundances of N, C, Na, and Al, with the usual correlations and anti-correlations between various abundances seen in other globular clusters. Our results provide important quantitative constraints on theoretical models for self-enrichment of globular clusters, by testing their predictions for the dependence of yields of elements such as Na, N, C, and Al on metallicity. They also confirm that, under the assumption that field N-rich stars originate from globular cluster destruction, they can be used as tracers of their parental systems in the high- metallicity regime.

  1. Multiple Stellar Populations and Their Evolution in Globular Clusters: A Nucleosynthesis Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbonnel, C.

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a review of the characteristics of the multiple stellar populations observed in globular clusters, and of their possible origin. The current theoretical issues and the many open questions are discussed.

  2. PROBING THE LINK BETWEEN DYNAMICS AND STELLAR EVOLUTION: BLUE STRAGGLER STARS IN GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. R. Ferraro

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution we review the main observational properties of Blue Straggler Stars (BSS in Galactic Globular Clusters. A flower of results on the BSS frequency, radial distribution, and chemical composition are presented and discussed.

  3. Multiple stellar populations and their evolution in globular clusters: A nucleosynthesis perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Charbonnel, C

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the characteristics of the multiple stellar populations observed in globular clusters, and of their possible origin. The current theoretical issues and the many open questions are discussed.

  4. Interactions of phenolic compounds with globular proteins and their effects on food-related functional properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prigent, S.V.E.

    2005-01-01

    In order to modulate the functional properties of food proteins, the interactions between globular proteins and the monomeric phenolic, caffeoylquinic acid (CQA, chlorogenic acid), and the oligomeric phenolics, procyanidins, were characterized and investigated for their effect on protein functional

  5. The Relative and Absolute Ages of Old Globular Clusters in the LCDM Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenti, Michele; Padoan, Paolo; Jimenez, Raul

    2015-08-01

    Old globular clusters (GCs) in the Milky Way have ages of about 13 Gyr, placing their formation time in the reionization epoch. We propose a novel scenario for the formation of these systems based on the merger of two or more atomic cooling halos at high redshift (z\\gt 6). First-generation stars are formed as an intense burst in the center of a minihalo that grows above the threshold for hydrogen cooling (halo mass {M}{{h}}˜ {10}8 {M}⊙ ) by undergoing a major merger within its cooling timescale (˜150 Myr). Subsequent minor mergers and sustained gas infall bring a new supply of pristine gas to the halo center, creating conditions that can trigger new episodes of star formation. The dark-matter halo around the GC is then stripped during assembly of the host-galaxy halo. Minihalo merging is efficient only in a short redshift window, set by the {{Λ }}{CDM} parameters, allowing us to make a strong prediction on the age distribution for old GCs. From cosmological simulations, we derive an average merging redshift z> =9 and a narrow distribution {{Δ }}z=2, implying average GC age =13.0+/- 0.2 {Gyr} including ˜0.2 Gyr of star formation delay. Qualitatively, our scenario reproduces other general old GC properties (characteristic masses and number of objects, metallicity versus galactocentric radius anticorrelation, radial distribution), but unlike age, these generally depend on details of baryonic physics. In addition to improved age measurements, direct validation of the model at z˜ 10 may be within reach with ultradeep gravitationally lensed observations with the James Webb Space Telescope.

  6. The kinematics of globular clusters systems in the outer halos of the Aquarius simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veljanoski, J.; Helmi, A.

    2016-07-01

    Stellar halos and globular cluster (GC) systems contain valuable information regarding the assembly history of their host galaxies. Motivated by the detection of a significant rotation signal in the outer halo GC system of M 31, we investigate the likelihood of detecting such a rotation signal in projection, using cosmological simulations. To this end we select subsets of tagged particles in the halos of the Aquarius simulations to represent mock GC systems, and analyse their kinematics. We find that GC systems can exhibit a non-negligible rotation signal provided the associated stellar halo also has a net angular momentum. The ability to detect this rotation signal is highly dependent on the viewing perspective, and the probability of seeing a signal larger than that measured in M 31 ranges from 10% to 90% for the different halos in the Aquarius suite. High values are found from a perspective such that the projected angular momentum of the GC system is within ≲40 deg of the rotation axis determined via the projected positions and line-of-sight velocities of the GCs. Furthermore, the true 3D angular momentum of the outer stellar halo is relatively well aligned, within 35 deg, with that of the mock GC systems. We argue that the net angular momentum in the mock GC systems arises naturally when the majority of the material is accreted from a preferred direction, namely along the dominant dark matter filament of the large-scale structure that the halos are embedded in. This, together with the favourable edge-on view of M 31's disk suggests that it is not a coincidence that a large rotation signal has been measured for its outer halo GC system.

  7. Disentangling multiple stellar populations in globular clusters using the Str\\"omgren system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alonso-García, J.; Catelan, M.; Amigo, P.

    2012-01-01

    clusters, both in our Galaxy and in others. We have started a series of observations of Galactic globular clusters using the Str\\"omgren photometric system in order to find the signatures of these multiple populations and establish their presence in a more complete sample of globular clusters in the Milky...... Way, and to study their radial distributions and extensions. We present here the first results of our survey....

  8. Deep WIYN Imaging of the Globular Cluster System of the Lenticular Galaxy NGC 3607

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Derrick; Rhode, Katherine L.; Jorgenson, Regina

    2017-01-01

    Globular clusters serve as relics of a galaxy’s past history, because they are thought to be among the first objects to form in a galaxy. Measuring the properties of the globular cluster population of a galaxy — in particular the total number, spatial distribution, and color distribution of the clusters — can provide important clues about the formation and evolution of that galaxy. Here we present results from the analysis of the globular cluster population of NGC 3607, an S0 galaxy with M_V = -21.9 that is ~23 Mpc away and is the brightest member of the Leo II group. We used images from the Minimosaic camera on the WIYN 3.5-m telescope with total exposure times of 6300, 6000, and 5400 seconds in the B, V, and R filters, respectively, to image the globular cluster system of NGC 3607 well past its apparent radial extent of 6.3’ (41 kpc). Point-source globular clusters are selected with three-filter photometry to help eliminate foreground stars and background galaxies. The excellent seeing in our WIYN images (0.6” to 0.9”) also helped reduce contamination in the globular cluster candidate sample. Artificial star tests yielded 50% completeness levels of B = 25.4, V=25.2, and R=24.1 and we observed approximately 41% of the galaxy’s Globular Cluster Luminosity Function. We estimate the total number of globular clusters in NGC 3607 is 1000+/-50, which translates to specific frequency values of S_N = 1.7+/-0.3 and T = 2.6+/-0.3 for this galaxy’s luminosity and stellar mass. This research was supported in part by NSF REU grant AST-1358980 and the Nantucket Maria Mitchell Association.

  9. DNA-guided nanoparticle assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gang, Oleg; Nykypanchuk, Dmytro; Maye, Mathew; van der Lelie, Daniel

    2013-07-16

    In some embodiments, DNA-capped nanoparticles are used to define a degree of crystalline order in assemblies thereof. In some embodiments, thermodynamically reversible and stable body-centered cubic (bcc) structures, with particles occupying nanoparticles linked by nucleic acid sequences and forming an open crystal structure with catalytically active agents attached to the crystal on its surface or in interstices.

  10. Globular Cluster Population of Hickson Compact Group 22a and 90c

    CERN Document Server

    Barkhouse, W A; Bothun, G D; Barkhouse, Wayne A.; West, Michael J.; Bothun, Gregory D.

    2001-01-01

    We present the first measurement of the globular cluster populations of galaxies in Hickson compact groups, in order to investigate the effect of these high density environments on the formation and evolution of globular cluster systems. Based on V and R band images that we obtained of HCG 22a and HCG 90c with the ESO New Technology Telescope (NTT), we find a total globular cluster population of $1590\\pm 854$ for HCG 22a and $2136\\pm 718$ for 90c. The specific frequency for HCG 22a was found to be $S_{N}=1.9\\pm 1.0$ and $S_{N}= 3.4\\pm 1.1$ for HCG 90c. A power-law fit to the globular cluster radial profile of HCG 22a yields $\\sigma\\sim R^{-2.01\\pm 0.30}$ and for HCG 90c we found $\\sigma \\sim R^{-1.20\\pm0.16}$. A comparison of the globular cluster radial profiles with the surface brightness of the parent galaxy shows that the globular cluster systems are at least as extended as the halo light. The measured values for the specific frequency are consistent with a scenario in which the host galaxies were in a low...

  11. Can play be defined?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eichberg, Henning

    2015-01-01

    Can play be defined? There is reason to raise critical questions about the established academic demand that at phenomenon – also in humanist studies – should first of all be defined, i.e. de-lineated and by neat lines limited to a “little box” that can be handled. The following chapter develops t....... Human beings can very well understand play – or whatever phenomenon in human life – without defining it........ The academic imperative of definition seems to be linked to the positivistic attempts – and produces sometimes monstrous definitions. Have they any philosophical value for our knowledge of what play is? Definition is not a universal instrument of knowledge-building, but a culturally specific construction...

  12. Nouns to Define Homophobia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adalberto Campo Arias

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. The term ‘homophobia’ was introduced in the academic context more than 40 years ago. However, its meaning has changed over time. Objective. To review the nouns used in the last twelve years to define homophobia. Methodology. The authors conducted a systematic search in Medline through Pubmed that included editorials, letters to editors, comments and narrative reviews, in English and Spanish. A qualitative analysis (Grounded theory was applied to analyze nouns used to define homophobia since 2001 through 2012. Results. Authors reviewed three papers including ten nouns to define homophobia, the most common noun was fear. The terms were grouped into two domains: negative attitude and discomfort with homosexuality. Conclusion. Fear is the most used word to describe homophobia. The terms were grouped into two domains: negative attitude and discomfort toward homosexuality.

  13. Defining "intermittent UVR exposure"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodekær, Mette; Philipsen, Peter Alshede; Petersen, Bibi Øager;

    2016-01-01

    to define and quantify “intermittent UVR exposure” by an objective measure. Methods: A broad study population of adults and children had data collected during a summer period. Data were personal UVR dosimetry measurements, from which the number of “intermittent days” was derived, sun behaviour diaries.......001). The corresponding numbers for prediction of nevi and lentigo density by retrospective questionnaire data was lower (R2 = 0.11, R2 = 0.26, p defined objective measure of intermittent UVR exposure. This measure may provide a better prediction of solar skin damage and CMM...

  14. Fluid cooled electrical assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinehart, Lawrence E.; Romero, Guillermo L.

    2007-02-06

    A heat producing, fluid cooled assembly that includes a housing made of liquid-impermeable material, which defines a fluid inlet and a fluid outlet and an opening. Also included is an electrical package having a set of semiconductor electrical devices supported on a substrate and the second major surface is a heat sink adapted to express heat generated from the electrical apparatus and wherein the second major surface defines a rim that is fit to the opening. Further, the housing is constructed so that as fluid travels from the fluid inlet to the fluid outlet it is constrained to flow past the opening thereby placing the fluid in contact with the heat sink.

  15. The Stellar Populations of Nuclei, Globular Clusters, and Stars in dE Galaxies in Virgo and Fornax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitfield Miller, Bryan; Hyazinth Puzia, Thomas; Hilker, Michael; Sanchez-Janssen, Ruben; Kissler-Patig, Markus

    2015-08-01

    We present ages and metallicities for globular clusters, nuclei, and underlying stars in nucleated dwarf elliptical galaxies (dE,N) in the Virgo and Fornax Cluster based on Lick/IDS index measurements and SSP models. Gemini/GMOS spectroscopy shows that the globular clusters are mostly old and metal-poor, very similar to the globular clusters in the Milky Way halo. The nuclei and underlying stars tend to be more metal-rich than the globular clusters and have a wide range of ages. The [α/Fe] ratios for both the globular clusters and nuclei range between 0.0 and 0.3. Formation scenarios for globular clusters and nuclei will be discussed.

  16. On Defining Mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    Though central to any pedagogical development of physics, the concept of mass is still not well understood. Properly defining mass has proven to be far more daunting than contemporary textbooks would have us believe. And yet today the origin of mass is one of the most aggressively pursued areas of research in all of physics. Much of the excitement…

  17. Defining Data Science

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Yangyong; Xiong, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Data science is gaining more and more and widespread attention, but no consensus viewpoint on what data science is has emerged. As a new science, its objects of study and scientific issues should not be covered by established sciences. Data in cyberspace have formed what we call datanature. In the present paper, data science is defined as the science of exploring datanature.

  18. Defining Mathematical Giftedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parish, Linda

    2014-01-01

    This theoretical paper outlines the process of defining "mathematical giftedness" for a present study on how primary school teaching shapes the mindsets of children who are mathematically gifted. Mathematical giftedness is not a badge of honour or some special value attributed to a child who has achieved something exceptional.…

  19. Software Defined Networking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caba, Cosmin Marius

    resources are limited. Hence, to counteract this trend, current QoS mechanisms must become simpler to deploy and operate, in order to motivate NSPs to employ QoS techniques instead of overprovisioning. Software Defined Networking (SDN) represents a paradigm shift in the way telecommunication and data...

  20. Defining Effective Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layne, L.

    2012-01-01

    The author looks at the meaning of specific terminology commonly used in student surveys: "effective teaching." The research seeks to determine if there is a difference in how "effective teaching" is defined by those taking student surveys and those interpreting the results. To investigate this difference, a sample group of professors and students…

  1. Defining Game Mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sicart (Vila), Miguel Angel

    2008-01-01

    This article defins game mechanics in relation to rules and challenges. Game mechanics are methods invoked by agents for interacting with the game world. I apply this definition to a comparative analysis of the games Rez, Every Extend Extra and Shadow of the Colossus that will show the relevance...... of a formal definition of game mechanics. Udgivelsesdato: Dec 2008...

  2. Software Defined Cyberinfrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, Ian; Blaiszik, Ben; Chard, Kyle; Chard, Ryan

    2017-07-17

    Within and across thousands of science labs, researchers and students struggle to manage data produced in experiments, simulations, and analyses. Largely manual research data lifecycle management processes mean that much time is wasted, research results are often irreproducible, and data sharing and reuse remain rare. In response, we propose a new approach to data lifecycle management in which researchers are empowered to define the actions to be performed at individual storage systems when data are created or modified: actions such as analysis, transformation, copying, and publication. We term this approach software-defined cyberinfrastructure because users can implement powerful data management policies by deploying rules to local storage systems, much as software-defined networking allows users to configure networks by deploying rules to switches.We argue that this approach can enable a new class of responsive distributed storage infrastructure that will accelerate research innovation by allowing any researcher to associate data workflows with data sources, whether local or remote, for such purposes as data ingest, characterization, indexing, and sharing. We report on early experiments with this approach in the context of experimental science, in which a simple if-trigger-then-action (IFTA) notation is used to define rules.

  3. Defining in Classroom Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariotti, Maria Alessandra; Fischbein, Efraim

    1997-01-01

    Discusses some aspects of the defining process in geometrical context in the reference frame of the theory of "figural concepts." Presents analysis of some examples taken from a teaching experiment at the sixth-grade level. Contains 30 references. (Author/ASK)

  4. Defining Game Mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sicart (Vila), Miguel Angel

    2008-01-01

    This article defins game mechanics in relation to rules and challenges. Game mechanics are methods invoked by agents for interacting with the game world. I apply this definition to a comparative analysis of the games Rez, Every Extend Extra and Shadow of the Colossus that will show the relevance...... of a formal definition of game mechanics. Udgivelsesdato: Dec 2008...

  5. General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Mardi 5 mai à 11 h 00 Salle 13-2-005 Conformément aux statuts de l’Association du personnel, une Assemblée générale ordinaire est organisée une fois par année (article IV.2.1). Projet d’ordre du jour : 1- Adoption de l’ordre du jour. 2- Approbation du procès-verbal de l’Assemblée générale ordinaire du 22 mai 2014. 3- Présentation et approbation du rapport d’activités 2014. 4- Présentation et approbation du rapport financier 2014. 5- Présentation et approbation du rapport des vérificateurs aux comptes pour 2014. 6- Programme 2015. 7- Présentation et approbation du projet de budget 2015 et taux de cotisation pour 2015. 8- Pas de modifications aux Statuts de l'Association du personnel proposée. 9- Élections des membres de la Commission é...

  6. General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    Mardi 5 avril à 11 h 00 BE Auditorium Meyrin (6-2-024) Conformément aux statuts de l’Association du personnel, une Assemblée générale ordinaire est organisée une fois par année (article IV.2.1). Projet d’ordre du jour : Adoption de l’ordre du jour. Approbation du procès-verbal de l’Assemblée générale ordinaire du 5 mai 2015. Présentation et approbation du rapport d’activités 2015. Présentation et approbation du rapport financier 2015. Présentation et approbation du rapport des vérificateurs aux comptes pour 2015. Programme de travail 2016. Présentation et approbation du projet de budget 2016 Approbation du taux de cotisation pour 2017. Modifications aux Statuts de l'Association du personnel proposée. Élections des membres de la Commissio...

  7. General assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Mardi 5 mai à 11 h 00 Salle 13-2-005 Conformément aux statuts de l’Association du personnel, une Assemblée générale ordinaire est organisée une fois par année (article IV.2.1). Projet d’ordre du jour : Adoption de l’ordre du jour. Approbation du procès-verbal de l’Assemblée générale ordinaire du 22 mai 2014. Présentation et approbation du rapport d’activités 2014. Présentation et approbation du rapport financier 2014. Présentation et approbation du rapport des vérificateurs aux comptes pour 2014. Programme 2015. Présentation et approbation du projet de budget 2015 et taux de cotisation pour 2015. Pas de modifications aux Statuts de l'Association du personnel proposée. Élections des membres de la Commission électorale. &am...

  8. General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Conformément aux statuts de l’Association du personnel, une Assemblée générale ordinaire est organisée une fois par année (article IV.2.1). Projet d’ordre du jour : Adoption de l’ordre du jour. Approbation du procès-verbal de l’Assemblée générale ordinaire du 5 avril 2016. Présentation et approbation du rapport d’activités 2016. Présentation et approbation du rapport financier 2016. Présentation et approbation du rapport des vérificateurs aux comptes pour 2016. Programme de travail 2017. Présentation et approbation du projet de budget 2017 Approbation du taux de cotisation pour 2018. Modifications aux Statuts de l'Association du personnel proposées. Élections des membres de la Commission électorale. Élections des vérifica...

  9. ULTRASONIC ASSEMBLY [REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PORAV Viorica

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper exposes the possibility of machine producesers to optimize the costs of clothes assembling. Ultrasonic systems being frequently utilized have many advantages on semi products of synthetic textile and technical textile. First of all, sewing – cutting process can be accomplished under high speeds and rate of losses can be minimized. Cutting seal applications are frequently used for underwear and sportswear. Slicing and unit cutting machines, as well as portable sealing machines are available for labeling sector. Products such as bag, pocket and cover can be sewed in a seamless manner for promotion purposes. All objects in terms of accessories are obtained in same standard. Our quilting machines are preferred in worldwide due to its threadless, high quality sealing. An alternative to the classic sewing assembly, with thread and needles is ultrasonic seaming. In ultrasonic welding, there are no connective bolts, nails, soldering materials, or adhesives necessary to bind the materials together. Ultrasonic is defined as acoustic frequencies above the range audible to the human ear. Ultrasonic frequencies are administered to the fabric from the sonotrode of bonding machine. The high frequency and powerful energy produced, when is release in one special environment, the ultrasound heating this environment. The ability to ultrasonic weld textiles and films depend on their thermoplastic contents and the desired end results. The paper defines the weld ability of more common textiles and films. The welding refers to all types of bonding and sealing, as in point bonding of fabric, or continuous sealing of film.

  10. Defining the fascial system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adstrum, Sue; Hedley, Gil; Schleip, Robert; Stecco, Carla; Yucesoy, Can A

    2017-01-01

    Fascia is a widely used yet indistinctly defined anatomical term that is concurrently applied to the description of soft collagenous connective tissue, distinct sections of membranous tissue, and a body pervading soft connective tissue system. Inconsistent use of this term is causing concern due to its potential to confuse technical communication about fascia in global, multiple discipline- and multiple profession-spanning discourse environments. The Fascia Research Society acted to address this issue by establishing a Fascia Nomenclature Committee (FNC) whose purpose was to clarify the terminology relating to fascia. This committee has since developed and defined the terms a fascia, and, more recently, the fascial system. This article reports on the FNC's proposed definition of the fascial system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Defining Legal Moralism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thaysen, Jens Damgaard

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses how legal moralism should be defined. It is argued that legal moralism should be defined as the position that “For any X, it is always a pro tanto reason for justifiably imposing legal regulation on X that X is morally wrong (where “morally wrong” is not conceptually equivalent...... to “harmful”)”. Furthermore, a distinction between six types of legal moralism is made. The six types are grouped according to whether they are concerned with the enforcement of positive or critical morality, and whether they are concerned with criminalising, legally restricting, or refraining from legally...... protecting morally wrong behaviour. This is interesting because not all types of legal moralism are equally vulnerable to the different critiques of legal moralism that have been put forth. Indeed, I show that some interesting types of legal moralism have not been criticised at all....

  12. Define Digital Vernacular

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘佳; 李海英; James Stevens; Rough Nelson

    2014-01-01

    As science and technology developed, the tools of humans developed from humans’hands, to mechanical and digital technologies. The tools influ-ence almost everything in the humans’world, so does vernacular. The digital vernacular could be understood as using digital technology to vernacular; the digital means technologies. It also could be understood as doing vernacular in a digital way;the digital means data and information, in other words it can be seeking truth from facts. Define digital vernacular is not only what is digital vernacular, but also about how to do the digital vernacular and what kind of attitude we should hold to-ward the digital vernacular. Define digital vernacular as both thinking and doing.

  13. Globular cluster interstellar media: ionized and ejected by white dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, I.; Zijlstra, A. A.

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation from white dwarfs can efficiently clear Galactic globular clusters (GCs) of their intracluster medium (ICM). This solves the problem of the missing ICM in clusters, which is otherwise expected to build up to easily observable quantities. To show this, we recreate the ionizing flux in 47 Tuc, following randomly generated stars through their asymptotic giant branch (AGB), post-AGB and white dwarf evolution. Each white dwarf can ionize all the material injected into the cluster by stellar winds for ˜3 Myr of its evolution: ˜40 such white dwarfs exist at any point. Every GC's ICM should be ionized. The neutral cloud in M15 should be caused by a temporary overdensity. A pressure-supported ICM will expand over the cluster's tidal radius, where it will be truncated, allowing Jeans escape. The modelled Jeans mass-loss rate approximates the total stellar mass-loss rate, allowing efficient clearing of ICM. Any cluster's ICM mass should equal the mass injected by its stars over the sound travel time between the cluster core and tidal radius. We predict ˜11.3 M⊙ of ICM within 47 Tuc, cleared over ˜4 Myr, compared to a dynamical time-scale of 4.3 Myr. We present a new mass hierarchy, discussing the transition between GCs dwarf galaxies.

  14. An AKARI Search for Intracluster Dust of Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Matsunaga, N; Nakada, Y; Fukushi, H; Tanabé, T; Ita, Y; Izumiura, H; Matsuura, M; Ueta, T; Yamamura, I

    2008-01-01

    We report the observations of 12 globular clusters with the AKARI/FIS. Our goal is to search for emission from the cold dust within clusters. We detect diffuse emissions toward NGC 6402 and 2808, but the IRAS 100-micron maps show the presence of strong background radiation. They are likely emitted from the galactic cirrus, while we cannot rule out the possible association of a bump of emission with the cluster in the case of NGC 6402. We also detect 28 point-like sources mainly in the WIDE-S images (90 micron). At least several of them are not associated with the clusters but background galaxies based on some external catalogs. We present the SEDs by combining the near-and-mid infrared data obtained with the IRC if possible. The SEDs suggest that most of the point sources are background galaxies. We find one candidate of the intracluster dust which has no mid-infrared counterpart unlike the other point-like sources, although some features such as its point-like appearance should be explained before we conclud...

  15. The first Delta a observations of three globular clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Paunzen, E; Pintado, O I; Baum, H; Maitzen, H M; Netopil, M; Oenehag, A; Zejda, M; Fraga, L

    2014-01-01

    Globular clusters are main astrophysical laboratories to test and modify evolutionary models. Thought to be rather homogeneous in their local elemental Distribution of members, results suggest a wide variety of chemical peculiarities. Besides different main sequences, believed to be caused by different helium abundances, peculiarities of blue horizontal-branch stars and on the red giant branch were found. This whole zoo of peculiar objects has to be explained in the context of stellar formation and evolution. The tool of Delta a photometry is employed in order to detect peculiar stars in the whole spectral range. This three filter narrow band system measures the flux distribution in the region from 4900 to 5600A in order to find any peculiarities around 5200A. It is highly efficient to detect classical chemically peculiar stars of the upper main sequence, Be/Ae, shell and metal-weak objects in the Milky Way and Magellanic Clouds. We present Delta a photometry of 2266 stars from 109 individual frames for three...

  16. SOAR Adaptive Optics Observations of the Globular Cluster NGC 6496

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraga, Luciano; Kunder, Andrea; Tokovinin, Andrei

    2013-06-01

    We present high-quality BVRI photometric data in the field of globular cluster NGC 6496 obtained with the SOAR Telescope Adaptive Module (SAM). Our observations were collected as part of the ongoing SAM commissioning. The distance modulus and cluster color excess as found from the red clump are (m - M) V = 15.71 ± 0.02 mag and E(V - I) = 0.28 ± 0.02 mag. An age of 10.5 ± 0.5 Gyr is determined from the difference in magnitude between the red clump and the subgiant branch. These parameters are in excellent agreement with the values derived from isochrone fitting. From the color-magnitude diagram we find a metallicity of [Fe/H] = -0.65 dex and hence support a disk classification for NGC 6496. The complete BVRI data set for NGC 6469 is made available in the electronic edition of the Journal. Based on observations obtained at the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope, which is a joint project of the Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia, e Inovação (MCTI) da República Federativa do Brasil, the U.S. National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), and Michigan State University (MSU).

  17. Fluorine abundances and the puzzle of globular cluster chemical history

    CERN Document Server

    de Laverny, P

    2013-01-01

    The abundance of fluorine in a few Galactic globular clusters is known to strongly vary from star-to-star. These unexpected chemical properties are an additional confirmation of the chemical inhomogeneities already found in several GC, and probably caused by the first generations of stars formed in these systems. The aim of this article is to complement our understanding of the F-behaviour in GC stars and to look for new constraints on the formation histories of their multiple stellar populations. We have collected near-IR spectra of 15 RGB stars belonging to GC spanning a wide range of metallicity: 47 Tuc, M4, NGC6397 and M30. F, Na and Fe abundances have been estimated by spectral synthesis. No anticorrelation between F and Na abundances are found for the most metal-rich cluster of the sample (47 Tuc). In this GC, RGB stars indeed exhibit rather small differences in [F/Fe] unlike the larger ones found for the [Na/Fe] ratios. This reveals a rather inhomogeneous stellar system and a complex chemical evolution...

  18. A Massive Neutron Star in the Globular Cluster M5

    CERN Document Server

    Freire, Paulo C C; Berg, Maureen van den; Hessels, Jason W T

    2007-01-01

    We report the results of 18 years of Arecibo timing of two pulsars in the globular cluster NGC 5904 (M5), PSR B1516+02A and PSR B1516+02B. This has allowed the measurement of the proper motions of these pulsars and of the cluster. PSR B1516+02B is a 7.95-ms pulsar in a binary system with a ~0.2 solar-mass companion and an orbital period of 6.86 days. In deep HST images, no optical counterpart is detected at the position of the pulsar, implying the companion is either a white dwarf or a low-mass MS star. The eccentricity of the orbit (e = 0.14) has allowed a measurement of the rate of advance of periastron: 0.0136 +/ 0.0007 degrees per year. It is very likely that the periastron advance is due to the effects of general relativity; the total mass of the binary system is then 2.14 +/- 0.16 solar masses. The small measured mass function implies, in a statistical sense, that a very large fraction of this total mass is contained in the pulsar: 1.94 +0.17/-0.19 solar masses (1 sigma$); there is a 5 % probability tha...

  19. Dynamical Evolution of Globular Clusters in the Galaxy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武振宇; 束成钢; 陈文屏

    2003-01-01

    Given the initial conditions of spatial density distribution, velocity distribution and mass function, the dynamical evolution of globular clusters in the Milky Way is investigated in details by means of Monte Carlo simulations.Four dynamic mechanisms are considered: stellar evaporation, stellar evolution, tidal shocks due to both the disc and bulge, and dynamical friction. It is found that stellar evaporation dominates the evolution of low-mass clusters and all four are important for massive ones. For both the power-law and lognormal initial clusters mass functions, we can find the best-fitting models which can match the present-day observations with their main features of the mass function almost unchanged after evolution of several Gyr. This implies that it is not possible to determine the initial mass function only based on the observed mass function today. The dispersion of the modelled mass functions mainly depends on the potential wells of host galaxies with the almost constant peaks,which is consistent with current observations

  20. Mergers and ejections of black holes in globular clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Aarseth, Sverre

    2012-01-01

    We report on results of fully consistent N-body simulations of globular cluster models with N = 100 000 members containing neutron stars and black holes. Using the improved `algorithmic regularization' method of Hellstrom and Mikkola for compact subsystems, the new code NBODY7 enables for the first time general relativistic coalescence to be achieved for post-Newtonian terms and realistic parameters. Following an early stage of mass segregation, a few black holes form a small dense core which usually leads to the formation of one dominant binary. The subsequent evolution by dynamical shrinkage involves the competing processes of ejection and mergers by radiation energy loss. Unless the binary is ejected, long-lived triple systems often exhibit Kozai cycles with extremely high inner eccentricity (e > 0.999) which may terminate in coalescence at a few Schwarzschild radii. A characteristic feature is that ordinary stars as well as black holes and even BH binaries are ejected with high velocities. On the basis of...

  1. A novel look at energy equipartition in globular clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Bianchini, P; Norris, M A; Schinnerer, E; Varri, A L

    2016-01-01

    Two-body interactions play a major role in shaping the structural and dynamical properties of globular clusters (GCs) over their long-term evolution. In particular, GCs evolve toward a state of partial energy equipartition that induces a mass-dependence in their kinematics. By using a set of Monte Carlo cluster simulations evolved in quasi-isolation, we show that the stellar mass dependence of the velocity dispersion $\\sigma(m)$ can be described by an exponential function $\\sigma^2\\propto \\exp(-m/m_\\mathrm{eq})$, with the parameter $m_\\mathrm{eq}$ quantifying the degree of partial energy equipartition of the systems. This simple parametrization successfully captures the behaviour of the velocity dispersion at lower as well as higher stellar masses, that is, the regime where the system is expected to approach full equipartition. We find a tight correlation between the degree of equipartition reached by a GC and its dynamical state, indicating that clusters that are more than about 20 core relaxation times old,...

  2. Measuring consistent masses for 25 Milky Way globular clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimmig, Brian; Seth, Anil; Ivans, Inese I.; Anderton, Tim; Gregersen, Dylan [Physics and Astronomy Department, University of Utah, SLC, UT 84112 (United States); Strader, Jay [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Caldwell, Nelson [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    We present central velocity dispersions, masses, mass-to-light ratios (M/Ls ), and rotation strengths for 25 Galactic globular clusters (GCs). We derive radial velocities of 1951 stars in 12 GCs from single order spectra taken with Hectochelle on the MMT telescope. To this sample we add an analysis of available archival data of individual stars. For the full set of data we fit King models to derive consistent dynamical parameters for the clusters. We find good agreement between single-mass King models and the observed radial dispersion profiles. The large, uniform sample of dynamical masses we derive enables us to examine trends of M/L with cluster mass and metallicity. The overall values of M/L and the trends with mass and metallicity are consistent with existing measurements from a large sample of M31 clusters. This includes a clear trend of increasing M/L with cluster mass and lower than expected M/Ls for the metal-rich clusters. We find no clear trend of increasing rotation with increasing cluster metallicity suggested in previous work.

  3. Mining SDSS in search of Multiple Populations in Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Lardo, C; Pancino, E; Carretta, E; Bragaglia, A; Dalessandro, E

    2010-01-01

    Several recent studies have reported the detection of an anomalous color spread along the red giant branch (RGB) of some globular clusters (GC) that appears only when color indices including a near ultraviolet band (such as Johnson U or Stromgren u) are considered. This anomalous spread in color indexes such as U-B or c_{y} has been shown to correlate with variations in the abundances of light elements such as C, N, O, Na, etc., which, in turn, are generally believed to be associated with subsequent star formation episodes that occurred in the earliest few 10^{8} yr of the cluster's life. Here we use publicly available u, g, r Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometry to search for anomalous u-g spreads in the RGBs of nine Galactic GCs. In seven of them (M 2, M 3, M 5, M 13, M 15, M 92 and M 53), we find evidence of a statistically significant spread in the u-g color, not seen in g-r and not accounted for by observational effects. In the case of M 5, we demonstrate that the observed u-g color spread correlates with...

  4. The globular cluster system of NGC1316. III. Kinematic complexity

    CERN Document Server

    Richtler, Tom; Kumar, Brijesh; Bassino, Lilia P; Gomez, Matias; Dirsch, Boris

    2014-01-01

    The merger remnant NGC 1316 (Fornax A) is one of the most important objects regarding the investigation of merger-related processes. We use kinematical data of globular clusters (GCs) and the diffuse stellar light to investigate the global structure of NGC 1316 and to constrain the dark matter content. We perform multi-object-spectroscopy with VLT/FORS2 and MXU. Out of 562 slits, we extract radial velocities for 177 GCs. Moreover, we measure radial velocities of the integrated galaxy light, using slits with a sufficiently bright "sky". To these data, we add 20 cluster velocities from Goudfrooij et al. (2001). In an appendix, we identify new morphological features of NGC 1316 and its companion galaxy NGC 1317. The GC sample based on radial velocities confirms the colour peaks already found in our photometric study. The bright clusters, which probably have their origin in a 2 Gyr-old starburst and younger star formation events, avoid the systemic velocity. A Gaussian velocity distribution is found only for clus...

  5. Blue Straggler Stars in the Unusual Globular Cluster NGC 6388

    CERN Document Server

    Dalessandro, E; Ferraro, F R; Rood, R T; Milone, A; Piotto, G; Valenti, E

    2007-01-01

    We have used multi-band high resolution HST WFPC2 and ACS observations combined with wide field ground-based observations to study the blue straggler star (BSS) population in the galactic globular cluster NGC 6388. As in several other clusters we have studied, the BSS distribution is found to be bimodal: highly peaked in the cluster center, rapidly decreasing at intermediate radii, and rising again at larger radii. In other clusters the sparsely populated intermediate-radius region (or ``zone of avoidance'') corresponds well to that part of the cluster where dynamical friction would have caused the more massive BSS or their binary progenitors to settle to the cluster center. Instead, in NGC 6388, BSS still populate a region that should have been cleaned out by dynamical friction effects, thus suggesting that dynamical friction is somehow less efficient than expected. As by-product of these observations, the peculiar morphology of the horizontal branch (HB) is also confirmed. In particular, within the (very ex...

  6. Ultraviolet Imaging of the Globular Cluster 47 Tucanae

    CERN Document Server

    O'Connell, R W; Shah, R Y; Rood, R T; Landsman, W B; Bohlin, R C; Neff, S G; Roberts, M S; Smith, A M; Stecher, T P; Connell, Robert W. O'; Dorman, Ben; Shah, Ronak Y.; Rood, Robert T.; Landsman, Wayne B.; Bohlin, Ralph C.; Neff, Susan G.; Roberts, Morton S.; Smith, Andrew M.; Stecher, Theodore P.

    1997-01-01

    We have used the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope to obtain deep far-UV (1620 Angstrom), 40' diameter images of the prototypical metal-rich globular cluster 47 Tucanae. We find a population of about 20 hot (Teff > 9000 K) objects near or above the predicted UV luminosity of the hot horizontal branch (HB) and lying within two half-light radii of the cluster center. We believe these are normal hot HB or post-HB objects rather than interacting binaries or blue stragglers. IUE spectra of two are consistent with post-HB phases. These observations, and recent HST photometry of two other metal-rich clusters, demonstrate that populations with rich, cool HB's can nonetheless produce hot HB and post-HB stars. The cluster center also contains an unusual diffuse far-UV source which is more extended than its V-band light. It is possible that this is associated with an intracluster medium, for which there was earlier infrared and X-ray evidence, and is produced by C IV emission or scattered light from grains.

  7. Multiwavelength photometry in the Globular Cluster M2

    CERN Document Server

    Dalessandro, E; Lanzoni, B; Ferraro, F R; Schiavon, R; Rood, R T

    2009-01-01

    We present a multiwavelength photometric analysis of the globular cluster M2. The data-set has been obtained by combining high-resolution (HST/WFPC2 and ACS) and wide-field (GALEX) space observations and ground based (MEGACAM-CFHT, EMMI-NTT) images. The photometric sample covers the entire cluster extension from the very central regions up to the tidal radius and beyond. It allows an accurate determination of the cluster center of gravity and other structural parameters derived from the star count density profile. Moreover we study the BSS population and its radial distribution. A total of 123 BSS has been selected, and their radial distribution has been found to be bimodal (highly peaked in the center, decreasing at intermediate radii and rising outward), as already found in a number of other clusters. The radial position of the minimum of the BSS distribution is consistent with the radius of avoidance caused by the dynamical friction of massive objects over the cluster age. We also searched for gradients in...

  8. Discovery of Remote Globular Cluster Satellites of M87

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparkman, Lea; Guo, Rachel; Toloba, Elisa; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Peng, Eric W.; Ferrarese, Laura; Cote, Patrick; NGVS Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    We present the discovery of several tens of globular clusters (GCs) in the outer regions of the giant elliptical M87, the brightest galaxy in the Virgo Cluster. These M87 GC satellites were discovered in the course of Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopic follow up of GC candidates that were identified in the Next Generation Virgo cluster Survey (NGVS). Specifically, the primary targets of this Keck spectroscopic campaign were GC satellites of early-type dwarf (dE) galaxies. However, we found that our sample contained a subset of GCs for which M87 is the most likely host. This subset is consistent with having an r^-1 power-law surface density distribution and a radial velocity distribution both centered on M87. The remote M87 GC satellites span the radial range 140 to 900 kpc, out to about a third of the Virgo Cluster's virial radius (for comparison, M87's effective radius is only 8 kpc). These M87 GC satellites are probably former satellites of other Virgo Cluster galaxies that have subsequently been cannibalized by M87.This research was supported by the National Science Foundation and the UC Santa Cruz Science Internship Program.

  9. Globular clusters indicate ultra diffuse galaxies are dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Beasley, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    We present an analysis of archival {\\it HST/ACS} imaging in the F475W ($g_{475}$), F606W ($V_{606}$) and F814W ($I_{814}$) bands of the globular cluster (GC) system of a large (3.4 kpc effective radius) ultra-diffuse galaxy (DF17) believed located in the Coma Cluster of galaxies. We detect 11 GCs down to the 5$\\sigma$ completeness limit of the imaging ($I_{814}=$27 mag). Correcting for background and our detection limits yields a total population of GCs in this galaxy of $32\\pm6$ and a $V$-band specific frequency, $S_N=33\\pm6$. Based on comparisons to the GC systems of Local galaxies, we show that both the absolute number and the colors of the GC system of DF17 are consistent with the GC system of a dark-matter dominated dwarf galaxy with virial mass $\\sim1.0\\times10^{11}$~\\msun and a dark-to-stellar mass ratio, $M_{vir} / M_{ star}\\sim 1300$. Based on the stellar mass-growth of the Milky Way, we show that DF17 cannot be understood as a failed Milky Way-like system, but is more similar to quenched Large Magel...

  10. Globular adiponectin induces differentiation and fusion of skeletal muscle cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tania Fiaschi; Domenico Cirelli; Giuseppina Comito; Stefania Gelmini; Giampietro Ramponi; Maria Serio; Paola Chiarugi

    2009-01-01

    The growing interest in skeletal muscle regeneration is associated with the opening of new therapeutic strategies for muscle injury after trauma, as well as several muscular degenerative pathologies, including dystrophies, muscu-lar atrophy, and cachexia. Studies focused on the ability of extracellular factors to promote myogenesis are therefore highly promising. We now report that an adipocyte-derived factor, globular adiponectin (gAd), is able to induce mus-cle gene expression and cell differentiation, gAd, besides its well-known ability to regulate several metabolic func-tions in muscle, including glucose uptake and consumption and fatty acid catabolism, is able to block cell cycle entry of myoblasts, to induce the expression of specific skeletal muscle markers such as myosin heavy chain or eaveolin-3, as well as to provoke cell fusion into multinucleated syneytia and, finally, muscle fibre formation, gAd exerts its pro-differentiative activity through redox-dependent activation of p38, Akt and 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase path-ways. Interestingly, differentiating myoblasts are autocrine for adiponectiu, and the mimicking of pro-inflammatory settings or exposure to oxidative stress strongly increases the production of the hormone from differentiating cells. These data suggest a novel function of adiponectin, directly coordinating the myogenic differentiation program and serving an autocrine function during skeletal myogenesis.

  11. Multiwavelength Modelling of the Globular Cluster Terzan 5

    CERN Document Server

    Buesching, I; Kopp, A; de Jager, O C; Clapson, A C

    2012-01-01

    Diffuse X-ray emission has recently been detected from the globular cluster (GC) Terzan 5, extending out to ~2.5' from the cluster centre. This emission may arise from synchrotron radiation (SR) by energetic leptons being injected into the cluster by the resident millisecond pulsar (MSP) population that interact with the cluster field. These leptons may also be reaccelerated in shocks created by collisions of pulsar winds, and may interact with bright starlight and cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons, yielding gamma rays at very high energies (VHE) through the inverse Compton (IC) process. In the GeV range, Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has detected a population of GCs, very plausibly including Terzan 5, their spectral properties and energetics being consistent with cumulative magnetospheric emission from a population of MSPs. H.E.S.S. has furthermore detected a VHE excess in the direction of Terzan 5. One may derive constraints on the number of MSPs, N_tot, and the radial profiles of the GC B-field,...

  12. Intra Cluster Globular Clusters around NGC 1399 in Fornax?

    CERN Document Server

    Schuberth, Y; Bassino, L; Hilker, M

    2007-01-01

    We investigate whether the globular clusters (GCs) in the recently published sample of GCs in the Fornax cluster by Bergond and coworkers are indeed intra-cluster objects. We combine the catalogue of radial velocity measurements by Bergond et al. with our CTIO MOSAIC photometry in the Washington system and analyse the relation of metal-poor and metal-rich GCs with their host galaxies. The metal-rich GCs appear to be kinematically associated with their respective host galaxies. The vast majority of the metal-poor GCs found in between the galaxies of the Fornax cluster have velocities which are consistent with them being members of the very extended NGC 1399 GC system. We find that when the sample is restricted to the most accurate velocity measurements, the GC velocity dispersion profile can be described with a mass model derived for the NGC 1399 GC system within 80 kpc. We identify one ``vagrant'' GC whose radial velocity suggests that it is not bound to any galaxy unless its orbit has a very large apogalacti...

  13. A Chandra Study of the Galactic Globular Cluster Omega Centauri

    CERN Document Server

    Haggard, Daryl; Davies, Melvyn B

    2009-01-01

    We analyze a ~70 ksec Chandra ACIS-I exposure of the globular cluster Omega Centauri (NGC 5139). The ~17 amin x 17 amin field of view fully encompasses three core radii and almost twice the half-mass radius. We detect 180 sources to a limiting flux of ~4.3x10^-16 erg/cm^2/s (Lx = 1.2x10^30 erg/s at 4.9 kpc). After accounting for the number of active galactic nuclei and possible foreground stars, we estimate that 45-70 of the sources are cluster members. Four of the X-ray sources have previously been identified as compact accreting binaries in the cluster--three cataclysmic variables (CVs) and one quiescent neutron star. Correlating the Chandra positions with known variable stars yields eight matches, of which five are probable cluster members that are likely to be binary stars with active coronae. Extrapolating these optical identifications to the remaining unidentified X-ray source population, we estimate that 20-35 of the sources are CVs and a similar number are active binaries. This likely represents most ...

  14. Lipases at interfaces: unique interfacial properties as globular proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, P; Miller, R; Krägel, J; Leser, M; Fainerman, V B; Watzke, H; Holmberg, K

    2008-06-01

    The adsorption behavior of two globular proteins, lipase from Rhizomucor miehei and beta-lactoglobulin, at inert oil/water and air/water interfaces was studied by the pendant drop technique. The kinetics and adsorption isotherms were interpreted for both proteins in different environments. It was found that the adopted mathematical models well describe the adsorption behavior of the proteins at the studied interfaces. One of the main findings is that unique interfacial properties were observed for lipase as compared to the reference beta-lactoglobulin. A folded drop with a "skinlike" film was formed for the two proteins after aging followed by compression. This behavior is normally associated with protein unfolding and covalent cross-linking at the interface. Despite this, the lipase activity was not suppressed. By highlighting the unique interfacial properties of lipases, we believe that the presented work contributes to a better understanding of lipase interfacial activation and the mechanisms regulating lipolysis. The results indicate that the understanding of the physical properties of lipases can lead to novel approaches to regulate their activity.

  15. The state of globular clusters at birth II: primordial binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Leigh, Nathan W C; Marks, Michael; Webb, Jeremy J; Hypki, Arkadiusz; Heinke, Craig O; Kroupa, Pavel; Sills, Alison

    2014-01-01

    (abridged) In this paper, we constrain the properties of primordial binary populations in Galactic globular clusters using the MOCCA Monte Carlo code for cluster evolution. Our results are compared to the observations of Milone et al. (2012) using the photometric binary populations as proxies for the true underlying distributions, in order to test the hypothesis that the data are consistent with an universal initial binary fraction near unity and the binary orbital parameter distributions of Kroupa (1995). With the exception of a few possible outliers, we find that the data are to first-order consistent with the universality hypothesis. Specifically, the present-day binary fractions inside the half-mass radius r$_{\\rm h}$ can be reproduced assuming either high initial binary fractions near unity with a dominant soft binary component as in the Kroupa distribution combined with high initial densities (10$^4$-10$^6$ M$_{\\odot}$ pc$^{-3}$), or low initial binary fractions ($\\sim$ 5-10%) with a dominant hard binar...

  16. The Ancient Globular Clusters Were Much More Massive At Birth

    CERN Document Server

    Conroy, Charlie

    2011-01-01

    All globular clusters (GCs) studied to date show evidence for internal variation in their light element abundances. These variations have been interpreted as evidence for multiple star formation episodes within GCs, with secondary episodes fueled, at least in part, by the ejecta of AGB stars from a first generation of stars. A major puzzle emerging from this otherwise plausible scenario is that the fraction of stars associated with the second episode of star formation is observed to be much larger than expected for a standard IMF. The present work investigates this tension by modeling the observed anti-correlation between [Na/Fe] and [O/Fe] for 20 Galactic GCs. A strong correlation is found between the fraction of current GC stellar mass comprised of pure AGB ejecta, f_p, and GC mass. This fraction varies from 0.20 at low masses (10^4.5 Msun) to 0.45 at high masses (10^6.5 Msun). The fraction of mass associated with pure AGB ejecta is directly related to the total mass of the cluster at birth; the ratio betwe...

  17. Structural Parameters for 10 Halo Globular Clusters in M33

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jun

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we present the properties of 10 halo globular clusters (GCs) with luminosities L ≃ 5-7 × 105 L⊙ in the Local Group galaxy M33 using images from the Hubble Space Telescope WFPC2 in the F555W and F814W bands. We obtained the ellipticities, position angles, and surface brightness profiles for each GC. In general, the ellipticities of the M33 sample clusters are similar to those of the M31 clusters. The structural and dynamical parameters are derived by fitting the profiles to three different models combined with mass-to-light ratios (M/L values) from population-synthesis models. The structural parameters include core radii, concentration, half-light radii, and central surface brightness. The dynamical parameters include the integrated cluster mass, integrated binding energy, central surface mass density, and predicted line of sight velocity dispersion at the cluster center. The velocity dispersions of the four clusters predicted here agree well with the observed dispersions by Larsen et al. The results here showed that the majority of the sample halo GCs are better fitted by both the King model and the Wilson model than the Sérsic model. In general, the properties of the clusters in M33, M31, and the Milky Way fall in the same regions of parameter spaces. The tight correlations of cluster properties indicate a “fundamental plane” for clusters, which reflects some universal physical conditions and processes operating at the epoch of cluster formation.

  18. The Globular Cluster Systems around NGC 3311 and NGC 3309

    CERN Document Server

    Wehner, Elizabeth; Whitmore, Brad; Rothberg, Barry; Woodley, Kristin

    2008-01-01

    We present extensive new photometry in (g',i') of the large globular cluster (GC) system around NGC 3311, the central cD galaxy in the Hydra cluster. Our GMOS data cover a 5.5' field of view and reach a limiting magnitude i' = 26, about 0.5 magnitude fainter than the turnover point of the GC luminosity function. We find that NGC 3311 has a huge population of ~16, 000 GCs, closely similar to the prototypical high specific frequency Virgo giant M87. The color-magnitude distribution shows that the metal-poor blue GC sequence and the metal-richer red sequence are both present, with nearly equal numbers of clusters. Bimodal fits to the color distributions confirm that the blue sequence shows the same trend of progressively increasing metallicity with GC mass that has previously been found in many other large galaxies; the correlation we find corresponds to a scaling of GC metallicity with mass of Z ~ M^0.6 . By contrast, the red sequence shows no change of mean metallicity with mass, but it shows an upward extensi...

  19. A model for the Globular Cluster extreme anomalies

    CERN Document Server

    D'Antona, F

    2007-01-01

    In spite of the efforts made in the latest years, still there is no comprehensive explanation for the chemical anomalies of globular cluster stars. Among these, the most striking is oxygen depletion, which reaches values down to [O/Fe]~-0.4 in most clusters, but in M13 it goes down to less than [O/Fe]~ - 1. In this work we suggest that the anomalies are due to the super position of two different events: 1) PRIMORDIAL SELF-ENRICHMENT: this is asked to explain the oxygen depletion down to a minimum value [O/Fe]~ -0.4; 2) EXTRA MIXING IN A FRACTION OF THE STARS ALREADY BORN WITH ANOMALOUS COMPOSITION: these objects, starting with already low [O/Fe], will reduce the oxygen abundance down to the most extreme values. Contrary to other models that invoke extra mixing to explain the chemical anomalies, we suggest that it is active only if there is a fraction of the stars in which the primordial composition is not only oxygen depleted, but also extremely helium rich (Y~ 0.4), as found in a few GCs from their main sequ...

  20. KINEMATICS OF OUTER HALO GLOBULAR CLUSTERS IN M31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veljanoski, J.; Ferguson, A. M. N.; Bernard, E. J.; Penarrubia, J. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Mackey, A. D. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Mt Stromlo Observatory, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia); Huxor, A. P. [Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Zentrum fur Astronomie der Universitat Heidelberg, Monchhofstr. 12-14, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Irwin, M. J.; Chapman, S. C. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Cote, P. [NRC Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, British Columbia V9E 2E7 (Canada); Tanvir, N. R.; McConnachie, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Ibata, R. A.; Martin, N. F. [Observatoire de Strasbourg, 11 rue de l' Universite, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Fardal, M. [University of Massachusetts, Department of Astronomy, LGRT 619-E, 710 N. Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA 01003-9305 (United States); Lewis, G. F. [Institute of Astronomy, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2013-05-10

    We present the first kinematic analysis of the far outer halo globular cluster (GC) population in the Local Group galaxy M31. Our sample contains 53 objects with projected radii of {approx}20-130 kpc, 44 of which have no previous spectroscopic information. GCs with projected radii {approx}> 30 kpc are found to exhibit net rotation around the minor axis of M31, in the same sense as the inner GCs, albeit with a smaller amplitude of 79 {+-} 19 km s{sup -1}. The rotation-corrected velocity dispersion of the full halo GC sample is 106 {+-} 12 km s{sup -1}, which we observe to decrease with increasing projected radius. We find compelling evidence for kinematic coherence among GCs that project on top of halo substructure, including a clear signature of infall for GCs lying along the northwest stream. Using the tracer mass estimator, we estimate the dynamical mass of M31 within 200 kpc to be M{sub M31} = (1.2-1.5) {+-} 0.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} M{sub Sun }. This value is highly dependent on the chosen model and assumptions within.

  1. The DRAGON simulations: globular cluster evolution with a million stars

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Long; Aarseth, Sverre; Giersz, Mirek; Askar, Abbas; Berczik, Peter; Naab, Thorsten; Schadow, Riko; Kouwenhoven, M B N

    2016-01-01

    Introducing the DRAGON simulation project, we present direct $N$-body simulations of four massive globular clusters (GCs) with $10^6$ stars and 5$\\%$ primordial binaries at a high level of accuracy and realism. The GC evolution is computed with NBODY6++GPU and follows the dynamical and stellar evolution of individual stars and binaries, kicks of neutron stars and black holes, and the effect of a tidal field. We investigate the evolution of the luminous (stellar) and dark (faint stars and stellar remnants) GC components and create mock observations of the simulations (i.e. photometry, color-magnitude diagrams, surface brightness and velocity dispersion profiles). By connecting internal processes to observable features we highlight the formation of a long-lived 'dark' nuclear subsystem made of black holes (BHs), which results in a two-component structure. The inner core is dominated by the BH subsystem and experiences a core collapse phase within the first Gyr. It can be detected in the stellar (luminous) line-...

  2. A Search for Eclipsing Binaries in Galactic Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Von Braun, K

    2003-01-01

    We report on the discovery and analysis of short-period (0.1 days $< P <$ 5 days), photometrically varying binary stars around and below the main-sequence turnoff of the globular clusters (GCs) NGC 3201, M10, & M12. These eclipsing binaries (EBs) may be used to determine directly the distances to GCs and constrain the Population II stellar main-sequence masses. During our search for binaries, we discovered the signature of differential reddening across the cluster fields which was especially strong for NGC 3201 and M10. We correct for this differential reddening by calculating average $E_{V-I}$ values for stars in small subregions of the field with respect to a fiducial region, which significantly improves the appearance of the GC color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs). The reddening zero point to be added to the differential value is determined by isochrone fitting. The results of our differential dereddening are presented in the form of high-resolution extinction maps. Our search for EBs returned 14 vari...

  3. Formation of globular clusters induced by external ultraviolet radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Hasegawa, Kenji; Kitayama, Tetsu

    2009-01-01

    We present a novel scenario for globular cluster (GC) formation, where the ultraviolet (UV) background radiation effectively works so as to produce compact star clusters. Here, we explore the formation of GCs in UV radiation fields. For this purpose, we calculate baryon and dark matter (DM) dynamics in spherical symmetry, incorporating the self-shielding effects by solving the radiative transfer of UV radiation. In addition, we prescribe the star formation in cooled gas components and pursue the dynamics of formed stars. As a result, we find that the evolution of subgalactic objects in UV background radiation are separated into three types, that is, (1) prompt star formation, where less massive clouds ~10^{5-8} M_sun are promptly self-shielded and undergo star formation, (2) delayed star formation, where photoionized massive clouds >10^8 M_sun collapse despite high thermal pressure and are eventually self-shielded to form stars in a delayed fashion, and (3) supersonic infall, where photoionized less massive c...

  4. Dynamical formation of cataclysmic variables in globular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jongsuk; Vesperini, Enrico; Belloni, Diogo; Giersz, Mirek

    2017-01-01

    The formation and evolution of X-ray sources in globular clusters is likely to be affected by the cluster internal dynamics and the stellar interactions in the cluster dense environment. Several observational studies have revealed a correlation between the number of X-ray sources and the stellar encounter rate, and provided evidence of the role of dynamics in the formation of X-ray binaries. We have performed a survey of Monte Carlo simulations aimed at exploring the connection between the dynamics and formation of cataclysmic variables (CVs) and the origin of the observed correlation between the number of these objects, Ncv, and the stellar encounter rate, Γ. The results of our simulations show a correlation between Ncv and Γ, as found in observational data, illustrate the essential role played by the dynamics, and shed light on the dynamical history behind this correlation. CVs in our simulations are more centrally concentrated than single stars with masses close to those of turn-off stars, although this trend is stronger for CVs formed from primordial binaries undergoing exchange encounters, which include a population of more massive CVs absent in the group of CVs formed from binaries not suffering any component exchange.

  5. Ruprecht 106: the first single population Globular Cluster?

    CERN Document Server

    Villanova, S; Carraro, G; Bidin, C Moni; Munoz, C

    2013-01-01

    All old Galactic Globular Clusters studied in detail to date host at least two generations of stars, where the second is formed from gas polluted by processed material produced by massive stars of the first. This process can happen if the initial mass of the cluster exceeds a threshold above which ejecta are retained and a second generation is formed. A determination of this mass-threshold is mandatory in order to understand how GCs form. We analyzed 9 RGB stars belonging to the cluster Ruprecht 106. Targets were observed with the UVES@VLT2 spectrograph. Spectra cover a wide range and allowed us to measure abundances for light (O,Na,Mg,Al), alpha (Si,Ca,Ti), iron-peak (Sc,V,Cr,Mn,Fe,Co,Ni,Cu,Zn) and neutron-capture (Y,Zr,Ba,La,Ce,Pr,Nd,Sm,Eu,Dy,Pb) elements. Based on these abundances we show that Ruprecht 106 is the first convincing example of a single population GC (i.e. a true simple stellar population), although the sample is relatively small. This result is supported also by an independent photometric tes...

  6. On the Globular Cluster IMF below 1 Solar Mass

    CERN Document Server

    Paresce, F; Paresce, Francesco; Marchi, Guido De

    1999-01-01

    (Abridged) Accurate luminosity functions (LF) for a dozen globular clusters have now been measured at or just beyond their half-light radius using HST. They span almost the entire cluster main sequence below ~ 0.75 Msolar. All these clusters exhibit LF that rise continuously from an absolute I magnitude M_I ~ 6 to a peak at M_I ~ 8.5-9 and then drop with increasing M_I. Transformation of the LF into mass functions (MF) by means of the most recent mass luminosity relations that are consistent with all presently available data on the physical properties of low mass, low metallicity stars shows that all the LF observed so far can be obtained from MF having the shape of a log-normal distribution with characteristic mass m_c=0.33 +/- 0.03 Msolar and standard deviation sigma = 1.81 +/- 0.19. After correction for the effects of mass segregation, the variation of the ratio of the number of higher to lower mass stars with cluster mass or any simple orbital parameter or the expected time to disruption recently computed...

  7. A catalogue of helium abundance indicators from globular cluster photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandquist, Eric L.

    2000-04-01

    We present a survey of helium abundance indicators derived from a comprehensive study of globular cluster photometry in the literature. For each of the three indicators used, we conduct a thorough error analysis, and identify systematic errors in the computational procedures. For the population ratio RNHBNRGB, we find that there is no evidence of a trend with metallicity, although there appears to be real scatter in the values derived. Although this indicator is the one best able to provide useful absolute helium abundances, the mean value is Y~0.20, indicating the probable presence of additional systematic error. For the magnitude difference from the horizontal branch to the main sequence Δ and the RR Lyrae mass-luminosity exponent A, it is only possible to determine relative helium abundances reliably. This is due to continuing uncertainties in the absolute metallicity scale for Δ, and uncertainty in the RR Lyrae temperature scale for A. Both indicators imply that the helium abundance is approximately constant as a function of [Fe/H]. According to the A indicator, both Oosterhoff I and II group clusters have constant values independent of [Fe/H] and horizontal branch type. In addition, the two groups have slopes dlog/d[Fe/H] that are consistent with each other, but significantly smaller than the slope for the combined sample.

  8. Kinematic Decoupling of Globular Clusters with Extended Horizontal-Branch

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Young-Wook; Casetti-Dinescu, Dana I

    2007-01-01

    About 25% of the Milky Way globular clusters (GCs) exhibit unusually extended color distribution of stars in the horizontal-branch (HB) phase. This phenomenon is now best understood as due to the presence of helium enhanced second generation subpopulations, which has raised a possibility that these peculiar GCs might have a unique origin. Here we show that these GCs with extended HB are clearly distinct from other normal GCs in kinematics and mass. The GCs with extended HB are more massive than normal GCs, and are dominated by random motion with no correlation between kinematics and metallicity. Surprisingly, however, when they are excluded, most normal GCs in the inner halo show clear signs of dissipational collapse that apparently led to the formation of the disk. Normal GCs in the outer halo share their kinematic properties with the extended HB GCs, which is consistent with the accretion origin. Our result further suggests heterogeneous origins of GCs, and we anticipate this to be a starting point for more...

  9. The origin of the Milky Way globular clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Renaud, Florent; Gieles, Mark

    2016-01-01

    We present a cosmological zoom-in simulation of a Milky Way-like galaxy used to explore the formation and evolution of star clusters. We investigate in particular the origin of the bimodality observed in the colour and metallicity of globular clusters, and the environmental evolution through cosmic times in the form of tidal tensors. Our results self-consistently confirm previous findings that the blue, metal-poor clusters form in satellite galaxies which are accreted onto the Milky Way, while the red, metal-rich clusters form mostly in situ or, to a lower extent in massive, self-enriched galaxies merging with the Milky Way. By monitoring the tidal fields these populations experience, we find that clusters formed in situ (generally centrally concentrated) feel significantly stronger tides than the accreted ones, both in the present-day, and when averaged over their entire life. Furthermore, we note that the tidal field experienced by Milky Way clusters is significantly weaker in the past than at present-day, ...

  10. The first stages of the evolution of Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    D'Antona, F; Caloi, V; Antona, Francesca D'; Ventura, Paolo; Caloi, Vittoria

    2006-01-01

    The majority of the inhomogeneities in the chemical composition of Globular Cluster (GC) stars appear due to primordial enrichment. The most studied model today claims that the ejecta of Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars of high mass -those evolving during the first ~100Myr of the Clusters life- directly form a second generation of stars with abundance anomalies. In this talk, we review the status of the art with regard to this model, whose major problems are i) the modelling of the chemical anomalies is still not fully complete, and ii) it requires an IMF peculiarly enhanced in the intermediate mass stars. The model predicts enhanced helium abundance in the stars showing chemical anomalies, and the helium abundance distribution can be roughly derived from the morphology of the horizontal branch. Such distribution may possibly help to falsify the model for the first phases of evolution of GCs. As an illustration, we compare the results of the analysis of the HB morphology of some clusters.

  11. The Pulsar Population in Globular Clusters and in the Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Freire, Paulo C C

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, I review some of the basic properties of the pulsar population in globular clusters (GCs) and compare it with the the Galactic disk population. The neutron stars (NSs) in GCs were likely formed - and appear to continue forming - in highly symmetric supernovae (SNe), likely from accretion-induced collapse (AIC). I review the many pulsar finds and discuss some particularly well populated GCs and why they are so. I then discuss some particularly interesting objects, like millisecond pulsars (MSPs) with eccentric orbits, which were heavily perturbed by passing stars. Some of these systems, like NGC 1851A and NGC 6544B, are almost certainly the result of exchange interactions, i.e., they are witnesses to the very same processes that created the large population of MSPs in the first place. I also review briefly the problem posed by the presence of young pulsars in GCs (with a special emphasis on a sub-class of young pulsars, the super-energetic MSPs), which suggest continuing formation of NSs in low-...

  12. Dynamical Formation of Cataclysmic Variables in Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, Jongsuk; Belloni, Diogo; Giersz, Mirek

    2016-01-01

    The formation and evolution of X-ray sources in globular clusters is likely to be affected by the cluster internal dynamics and the stellar interactions in the cluster dense environment.Several observational studies have revealed a correlation between the number of X-ray sources and the stellar encounter rate and provided evidence of the role of dynamics in the formation of X-ray binaries. We have performed a survey of Monte-Carlo simulations aimed at exploring the connection between the dynamics and formation of cataclysmic variables (CVs) and the origin of the observed correlation between the number of these objects, $N_{\\rm cv}$, and the stellar encounter rate, $\\Gamma$.The results of our simulations show a correlation between $N_{\\rm cv}$ and $\\Gamma$ as found in observational data, illustrate the essential role played by dynamics, and shed light on the dynamical history behind this correlation. CVs in our simulations are more centrally concentrated than single stars with masses close to those of turn-off...

  13. Globular Cluster Mass Loss in the Context of Multiple Populations

    CERN Document Server

    Bastian, Nate

    2015-01-01

    Many scenarios for the origin of the chemical anomalies observed in globular clusters (GCs; i.e., multiple populations) require that GCs were much more massive at birth, up to $10-100\\times$, than they are presently. This is invoked in order to have enough material processed through first generation stars in order to form the observed numbers of enriched stars (inferred to be second generation stars in these models). If such mass loss was due to tidal stripping, gas expulsion, or tidal interaction with the birth environment, there should be clear correlations between the fraction of enriched stars and other cluster properties, whereas the observations show a remarkably uniform enriched fraction of $0.68\\pm0.07$ (from 33 observed GCs). If interpreted in the heavy mass loss paradigm, this means that all GCs lost the same fraction of their initial mass (between $95-98$\\%), regardless of their mass, metallicity, location at birth or subsequent migration, or epoch of formation. This is incompatible with prediction...

  14. Mid-infrared PL relations for Globular Cluster RR Lyrae

    CERN Document Server

    Dambis, A K; Zabolotskikh, M V

    2014-01-01

    The period - metallicity - WISE W1- and W2-band luminosity relations are derived for RR Lyrae stars based on WISE epoch photometry for 360 and 275 stars in 15 and 9 Galactic globular clusters, respectively. Our final relations have the form = gamma(W1) - (2.381 +/- 0.097) log PF + (0.096 +/- 0.021)[Fe/H] and = gamma(W2)-(2.269 +/- 0.127)log PF + (0.108 +/- 0.021)[Fe/H], where [Fe/H] values are on the scale of Carretta et al. (2009). We obtained two appreciably discrepant estimates for the zero points gamma(W1) and gamma(W2) of both relations: one based on a statistical-parallax analysis -- gamma(W1) = -0.829 +/- 0.093 and gamma(W2)=-0.776 +/- 0.093 and another, significantly brighter one, based on HST FGS trigonometric parallaxes -- gamma(W1, HST) =-1.150 +/- 0.077 and gamma(W2, HST) =-1.105 +/- 0.077. The period-metallicity-luminosity relations in the two bands yield highly consistent distance moduli for the calibrator clusters and the distance moduli computed using the W1- and W2-band relations with the H...

  15. Cortactin Adopts a Globular Conformation and Bundles Actin into Sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowieson, Nathan P.; King, Gordon; Cookson, David; Ross, Ian; Huber, Thomas; Hume, David A.; Kobe, Bostjan; Martin, Jennifer L. (Queensland); (Aust. Synch.)

    2008-08-21

    Cortactin is a filamentous actin-binding protein that plays a pivotal role in translating environmental signals into coordinated rearrangement of the cytoskeleton. The dynamic reorganization of actin in the cytoskeleton drives processes including changes in cell morphology, cell migration, and phagocytosis. In general, structural proteins of the cytoskeleton bind in the N-terminal region of cortactin and regulatory proteins in the C-terminal region. Previous structural studies have reported an extended conformation for cortactin. It is therefore unclear how cortactin facilitates cross-talk between structural proteins and their regulators. In the study presented here, circular dichroism, chemical cross-linking, and small angle x-ray scattering are used to demonstrate that cortactin adopts a globular conformation, thereby bringing distant parts of the molecule into close proximity. In addition, the actin bundling activity of cortactin is characterized, showing that fully polymerized actin filaments are bundled into sheet-like structures. We present a low resolution structure that suggests how the various domains of cortactin interact to coordinate its array of binding partners at sites of actin branching.

  16. The interaction between supermassive black holes and globular clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Spera, Mario; Capuzzo-Dolcetta, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Almost all galaxies along the Hubble sequence host a compact massive object (CMO) in their center. The CMO can be either a supermassive black hole (SMBH) or a very dense stellar cluster, also known as nuclear star cluster (NSC). Generally, heavier galaxies (mass >~ 10^{11} solar masses) host a central SMBH while lighter show a central NSC. Intermediate mass hosts, instead, contain both a NSC and a SMBH. One possible formation mechanisms of a NSC relies on the dry-merger (migratory) scenario, in which globular clusters (GCs) decay toward the center of the host galaxy and merge. In this framework, the absence of NSCs in high-mass galaxies can be imputed to destruction of the infalling GCs by the intense tidal field of the central SMBH. In this work, we report preliminary results of N-body simulations performed using our high-resolution, direct, code HiGPUs, to investigate the effects of a central SMBH on a single GC orbiting around it. By varying either the mass of the SMBH and the mass of the host galaxy, we d...

  17. EFFECTS OF HELIUM ENRICHMENT IN GLOBULAR CLUSTER POPULATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. R. Valcarce

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recientemente, el entendimiento de cúmulos globulares (CGs ha cambiado drásticamente debido a la mejora de las observaciones, tanto espectroscópicas como fotométricas, las cuales han revelado que no todos los CGs deben ser considerados poblaciones estelares simples. Mientras estudios espectroscópicos han mostrado diferentes grados de variación en elementos livianos en todos los CGs observados (e.g. anticorrelación entre O-Na, Carretta et al. 2009, estudios fotométricos han mostrado separaciones en algunas fases de los diagramas color-magnitud (DCM, donde la triple secuencia principal de NGC 2808 ha sido atribuida a diferencias en la abundancia de helio (AY, Piotto et al. 2007, el cual no puede ser medido con bastante precisión en CGs. En esta contribución mostramos los otros efectos que se deberían observar en DCM de CGs si AY es real.

  18. Study of Remote Globular Cluster Satellites of M87

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahai, Arushi; Shao, Andrew; Toloba, Elisa; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Peng, Eric W.; Zhang, Hao

    2017-01-01

    We present a sample of “orphan” globular clusters (GCs) with previously unknown parent galaxies, which we determine to be remote satellites of M87, a massive elliptical galaxy at the center of the Virgo Cluster of Galaxies. Because GCs were formed in the early universe along with their original parent galaxies, which were cannibalized by massive galaxies such as M87, they share similar age and chemical properties. In this study, we first confirm that M87 is the adoptive parent galaxy of our orphan GCs using photometric and spectroscopic data to analyze spatial and velocity distributions. Next, we increase the signal-to-noise ratio of our samples’ spectra through a process known as coaddition. We utilize spectroscopic absorption lines to determine the age and metallicity of our orphan GCs through comparison to stellar population synthesis models, which we then relate to the GCs’ original parent galaxies using a mass-metallicity relation. Our finding that remote GCs of M87 likely developed in galaxies with ~1010 solar masses implies that M87’s outer halo is formed of relatively massive galaxies, serving as important parameters for developing theories about the formation and evolution of massive galaxies.This research was funded in part by NASA/STScI and the National Science Foundation. Most of this work was carried out by high school students working under the auspices of the Science Internship Program at UC Santa Cruz.

  19. Defining local food

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Safania Normann

    2013-01-01

    Despite evolving local food research, there is no consistent definition of “local food.” Various understandings are utilized, which have resulted in a diverse landscape of meaning. The main purpose of this paper is to examine how researchers within the local food systems literature define local...... food, and how these definitions can be used as a starting point to identify a new taxonomy of local food based on three domains of proximity....

  20. [To define internet addiction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonioni, Federico

    2013-01-01

    Internet addiction is a new behavioral disorder difficult to define, especially when referring to young teenagers who make great use of web-mediated relationships. It's necessary to separate the cases of overt dependency on those in which the abuse of internet seems to have a different value, offering the only way to achieve the possible relationship. Internet is mediating a new way of communicating and thinking, this may favor the onset of clinical phenomena intended to surprise.

  1. Decidability of definability

    CERN Document Server

    Tsankov, Manuel Bodirsky; Michael Pinsker; Todor

    2010-01-01

    For a fixed infinite structure $\\Gamma$ with finite signature $\\tau$, we study the following computational problem: Input are quantifier-free first-order $\\tau$-formulas $\\phi_0,\\phi_1,\\dots,\\phi_n$ that define relations $R_0,R_1,\\dots,R_n$ over $\\Gamma$. The question is whether the relation $R_0$ is primitive positive definable from $R_1,\\ldots,R_n$, i.e., definable by a first-order formula that uses only relation symbols for $R_1, \\dots, R_n$, equality, conjunctions, and existential quantification (disjunction, negation, and universal quantification are forbidden). We show decidability of this problem for all structures $\\Gamma$ that have a first-order definition in an ordered homogeneous structure $\\Delta$ with a finite language whose age is a Ramsey class and determined by finitely many forbidden substructures. Examples for structures $\\Gamma$ with this property are the order of the rationals, the random graph, the homogeneous universal poset, the random tournament, all homogeneous universal $C$-relations...

  2. The Next Generation Virgo cluster Survey (NGVS). XXV. Fiducial panchromatic colors of Virgo core globular clusters and their comparison to model predictions

    CERN Document Server

    Powalka, Mathieu; Puzia, Thomas H; Peng, Eric W; Liu, Chengze; Muñoz, Roberto P; Blakeslee, John P; Côté, Patrick; Ferrarese, Laura; Roediger, Joel; Sánchez-Janssen, Rúben; Zhang, Hongxin; Durrell, Patrick R; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Gwyn, S D J; Hudelot, Patrick; Mei, Simona; Toloba, Elisa

    2016-01-01

    The central region of the Virgo cluster of galaxies contains thousands of globular clusters (GCs), an order of magnitude more than the numbers found in the Local Group. Relics of early star formation epochs in the universe, these GCs also provide ideal targets to test our understanding of the Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) of old stellar populations. Based on photometric data from the Next Generation Virgo cluster Survey (NGVS) and its near-infrared counterpart NGVS-IR, we select a robust sample of 1846 GCs with excellent photometry and spanning the full range of colors present in the Virgo core. The selection exploits the well defined locus of GCs in the uiK diagram and the fact that the globular clusters are marginally resolved in the images. We show that the GCs define a narrow sequence in 5-dimensional color space, with limited but real dispersion around the mean sequence. The comparison of these SEDs with the predictions of eleven widely used population synthesis models highlights differences betwe...

  3. Self-assembly of polar functionalities using noncovalent platforms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerckhoffs, Jessica M.C.A.; Crego-Calama, Mercedes; Luyten, Ingrid; Timmerman, Peter; Reinhoudt, David N.

    2000-01-01

    Small peptide fragments functionalized with dimelamine units spontaneously form well-defined assemblies. The hydrogen-bond donating and accepting sites in the peptide units are perfectly compatible with the hydrogen-bond assembly motif and slightly stabilize the assembly via additional hydrogen-bond

  4. Realization Techniques of Virtual Assembly Process Planning System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jian-hua; NING Ru-xin; TANG Cheng-tong

    2005-01-01

    The key realization techniques of virtual assembly process planning (VAPP) system are analyzed,including virtual assembly model, real-time collision detection, automatic constraint recognition algorithm, cable harness assembly process planning and visual assembly process plan at the workshop. A virtual assembly model based on hierarchical assembly task list (HATL) is put forward, in which assembly tasks are defined to express component assembling operations and are sequentially and hierarchically organized according to different subassemblies, which can perfectly model the construction process of product. And a multi-layer automatic geometry constraint recognition algorithm of how to identify assembly constraint relations in the virtual environment is proposed, then a four-layer collision detection algorithm is discussed. A VAPP system is built and some simple mechanical assemblies are used to illustrate the feasibility of the proposed method and algorithms.

  5. Wide-Field Survey of Globular Clusters in M31. II. Kinematics of the Globular Cluster System

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Myung Gyoon; Kim, Sang Chul; Park, Hong Soo; Geisler, Doug; Sarajedini, Ata; Harris, William E

    2007-01-01

    We present a kinematic analysis of the globular cluster(GC) system in M31. Using the photometric and spectroscopic database of 504 GCs, we have investigated the kinematics of the M31 GC system. We find that the all GC system shows strong rotation, with rotation amplitude of v_rot~190km/s, and that a weak rotation persists even for the outermost samples at |Y|>5kpc. The rotation-corrected velocity dispersion for the GC system is estimated to be sigma_{p,r}~130km/s, and it increases from sigma_{p,r}~120km/s at |Y|5kpc. These results are very similar to those for the metal-poor GCs. This shows that there is a dynamically hot halo in M31 that is rotating but primarily pressure-supported. We have identified 50 "friendless" GCs, and they appear to rotate around the major axis of M31. For the subsamples of metal-poor and metal-rich GCs, we have found that the metal-rich GCs are more centrally concentrated than the metal-poor GCs, and both subsamples show strong rotation. For the subsamples of bright and faint GCs, i...

  6. Defining Z in Q

    CERN Document Server

    Koenigsmann, Jochen

    2010-01-01

    We show that ${\\mathbb Z}$ is definable in ${\\mathbb Q}$ by a universal first-order formula in the language of rings. We also present an $\\forall\\exists$-formula for ${\\mathbb Z}$ in ${\\mathbb Q}$ with just one universal quantifier. We exhibit new diophantine subsets of ${\\mathbb Q}$ like the set of non-squares or the complement of the image of the norm map under a quadratic extension. Finally, we show that there is no existential formula for ${\\mathbb Z}$ in ${\\mathbb Q}$, provided one assumes a strong variant of the Bombieri-Lang Conjecture for varieties over ${\\mathbb Q}$ with many ${\\mathbb Q}$-rational points.

  7. RADIAL VELOCITIES FROM VLT-KMOS SPECTRA OF GIANT STARS IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER NGC 6388

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapenna, E.; Mucciarelli, A.; Lanzoni, B.; Ferraro, F. R.; Dalessandro, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Bologna, Viale Berti Pichat 6/2, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Origlia, L. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Via Ranzani, 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Valenti, E. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Cirasuolo, M. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh and STFC, UK Astronomy Technology Center Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, EH9 3HJ, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-01

    We present new radial velocity measurements for 82 stars, members of the Galactic globular cluster (GC) NGC 6388, obtained from ESO-VLT K-band Multi Object Spectrograph (KMOS) spectra acquired during the instrument Science Verification. The accuracy of the wavelength calibration is discussed and a number of tests of the KMOS response are presented. The cluster systemic velocity obtained (81.3 ± 1.5 km s{sup –1}) is in very good agreement with previous determinations. While a hint of ordered rotation is found between 9'' and 20'' from the cluster center, where the distribution of radial velocities is clearly bimodal, more data are needed before drawing any firm conclusions. The acquired sample of radial velocities has also been used to determine the cluster velocity dispersion (VD) profile between ∼9'' and 70'', supplementing previous measurements at r < 2'' and r > 60'' obtained with ESO-SINFONI and ESO-FLAMES spectroscopy, respectively. The new portion of the VD profile nicely matches the previous ones, better defining the knee of the distribution. The present work clearly shows the effectiveness of a deployable integral field unit in measuring the radial velocities of individual stars for determining the VD profile of Galactic GCs. It represents the pilot project for an ongoing large program with KMOS and FLAMES at the ESO-VLT, aimed at determining the next generation of VD and rotation profiles for a representative sample of GCs.

  8. A history of the gamma-ray burst flux at the Earth from Galactic globular clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Domainko, W; Feng, F

    2013-01-01

    Nearby gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are likely to have represented a significant threat to life on the Earth. Recent observations suggest that a significant source of such bursts is compact binary mergers in globular clusters. This link between globular clusters and GRBs offers the possibility to find time intervals in the past with higher probabilities of a nearby burst, by tracing globular cluster orbits back in time. Here we show that the expected flux from such bursts is not flat over the past 550 Myr but rather exhibits three broad peaks, at 70, 180 and 340 Myr ago. The main source for nearby GRBs for all three time intervals is the globular cluster 47 Tuc, a consequence of its large mass and high stellar encounter rate, as well as the fact that it is one of the globular clusters which comes quite close to the Sun. Mass extinction events indeed coincide with all three time intervals found in this study, although a chance coincidence is quite likely. Nevertheless, the identified time intervals can be used as a...

  9. The Gamma-Ray Pulsar Population of Globular Clusters: Implications for the GeV Excess

    CERN Document Server

    Hooper, Dan

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that the GeV excess, observed from the region surrounding the Galactic Center, might originate from a population of millisecond pulsars that formed in globular clusters. With this in mind, we employ the publicly available Fermi data to study the gamma-ray emission from 157 globular clusters, identifying a statistically significant signal from 25 of these sources (ten of which are not found in existing gamma-ray catalogs). We combine these observations with the predicted pulsar formation rate based on the stellar encounter rate of each globular cluster to constrain the gamma-ray luminosity function of millisecond pulsars in the Milky Way's globular cluster system. We find that this pulsar population exhibits a luminosity function that is quite similar to those millisecond pulsars observed in the field of the Milky Way (i.e. the thick disk). After pulsars are expelled from a globular cluster, however, they continue to lose rotational kinetic energy and become less luminous, causing their l...

  10. Mass evaporation rate of globular clusters in a strong tidal field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrid, Juan P.; Leigh, Nathan W. C.; Hurley, Jarrod R.; Giersz, Mirek

    2017-09-01

    The mass evaporation rate of globular clusters evolving in a strong Galactic tidal field is derived through the analysis of large, multimass N-body simulations. For comparison, we also study the same evaporation rates using mocca Monte Carlo models for globular cluster evolution. Our results show that the mass evaporation rate is a dynamical value, that is, far from a constant single number found in earlier analytical work and commonly used in the literature. Moreover, the evaporation rate derived with these simulations is higher than values previously published. These models also show that the value of the mass evaporation rate depends on the strength of the tidal field. We give an analytical estimate of the mass evaporation rate as a function of time and galactocentric distance ξ(RGC, t). Upon extrapolating this formula to smaller RGC values, our results provide tentative evidence for a very high ξ value at small RGC. Our results suggest that the corresponding mass-loss in the inner Galactic potential could be high and it should be accounted for when star clusters pass within it. This has direct relevance to nuclear cluster formation/growth via the infall of globular clusters through dynamical friction. As an illustrative example, we estimate how the evaporation rate increases for an ∼105 M⊙ globular cluster that decays through dynamical friction into the Galactic Centre. We discuss the findings of this work in relation to the formation of nuclear star clusters by inspiralling globular clusters.

  11. The Chemical Properties of Milky Way and M31 Globular Clusters: II. Stellar Population Model Predictions

    CERN Document Server

    Beasley, M A; Strader, J; Forbes, D A; Proctor, R N; Barmby, P; Huchra, J P; Beasley, Michael A.; Brodie, Jean P.; Strader, Jay; Forbes, Duncan A.; Proctor, Robert N.; Barmby, Pauline; Huchra, John P.

    2004-01-01

    We derive ages, metallicities and [alpha/Fe] ratios from the integrated spectra of 23 globular clusters in M31, by employing multivariate fits to two stellar population models. In parallel we analyze spectra of 21 Galactic globular clusters in order to facilitate a differential analysis. We find that the M31 globular clusters separate into three distinct components in age and metallicity. We identify an old, metal-poor group (7 clusters), an old, metal-rich group (10 clusters) and an intermediate age (3-6 Gyr), intermediate-metallicity ([Z/H]~-1) group (6 clusters). This third group is not identified in the Galactic globular cluster sample. The majority of globular clusters in both samples appear to be enhanced in alpha-elements, the degree of enhancement being model-dependent. The intermediate age GCs appear to be the most enhanced, with [alpha/Fe]~0.4. These clusters are clearly depressed in CN with respect to the models and the bulk of the M31 and Milky Way sample. Compared to the bulge of M31, M32 and NGC...

  12. Two stellar-mass black holes in the globular cluster M22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strader, Jay; Chomiuk, Laura; Maccarone, Thomas J; Miller-Jones, James C A; Seth, Anil C

    2012-10-04

    Hundreds of stellar-mass black holes probably form in a typical globular star cluster, with all but one predicted to be ejected through dynamical interactions. Some observational support for this idea is provided by the lack of X-ray-emitting binary stars comprising one black hole and one other star ('black-hole/X-ray binaries') in Milky Way globular clusters, even though many neutron-star/X-ray binaries are known. Although a few black holes have been seen in globular clusters around other galaxies, the masses of these cannot be determined, and some may be intermediate-mass black holes that form through exotic mechanisms. Here we report the presence of two flat-spectrum radio sources in the Milky Way globular cluster M22, and we argue that these objects are black holes of stellar mass (each ∼10-20 times more massive than the Sun) that are accreting matter. We find a high ratio of radio-to-X-ray flux for these black holes, consistent with the larger predicted masses of black holes in globular clusters compared to those outside. The identification of two black holes in one cluster shows that ejection of black holes is not as efficient as predicted by most models, and we argue that M22 may contain a total population of ∼5-100 black holes. The large core radius of M22 could arise from heating produced by the black holes.

  13. Large-scale study of the NGC 1399 globular cluster system in Fornax

    CERN Document Server

    Bassino, L P; Forte, J C; Dirsch, B; Richtler, T; Geisler, D; Schuberth, Y

    2006-01-01

    We present a Washington C and Kron-Cousins R photometric study of the globular cluster system of NGC 1399, the central galaxy of the Fornax cluster. A large areal coverage of 1 square degree around NGC 1399 is achieved with three adjoining fields of the MOSAIC II Imager at the CTIO 4-m telescope. Working on such a large field, we can perform the first indicative determination of the total size of the NGC 1399 globular cluster system. The estimated angular extent, measured from the NGC 1399 centre and up to a limiting radius where the areal density of blue globular clusters falls to 30 per cent of the background level, is 45 +/- 5 arcmin, which corresponds to 220 - 275 kpc at the Fornax distance. The bimodal colour distribution of this globular cluster system, as well as the different radial distribution of blue and red clusters, up to these large distances from the parent galaxy, are confirmed. The azimuthal globular cluster distribution exhibits asymmetries that might be understood in terms of tidal strippin...

  14. Variable stars in the VVV globular clusters. I. 2MASS-GC02 and Terzan10

    CERN Document Server

    Alonso-García, Javier; Catelan, Márcio; Ramos, Rodrigo Contreras; Gran, Felipe; Amigo, Pía; Leyton, Paul; Minniti, Dante

    2014-01-01

    The VISTA Variables in the Via Lactea (VVV) ESO Public Survey is opening a new window to study the inner Galactic globular clusters using their variable stars. These globular clusters have been neglected in the past due to the difficulties caused by the presence of an elevated extinction and high field stellar densities in their lines of sight. However, the discovery and study of any present variables in these clusters, especially RRLyrae stars, can help to greatly improve the accuracy of their physical parameters. It can also help to shed some light on the interrogations brought by the intriguing Oosterhoff dichotomy in the Galactic globular cluster system. In a series of papers we plan to explore the variable stars in the globular clusters falling inside the field of the VVV survey. In this first paper we search and study the variables present in two highly-reddened, moderately metal-poor, faint, inner Galactic globular clusters: 2MASS-GC02 and Terzan10. We report the discovery of sizable populations of RR ...

  15. Software-Defined Cluster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    聂华; 杨晓君; 刘淘英

    2015-01-01

    The cluster architecture has played an important role in high-end computing for the past 20 years. With the advent of Internet services, big data, and cloud computing, traditional clusters face three challenges: 1) providing flexible system balance among computing, memory, and I/O capabilities;2) reducing resource pooling overheads;and 3) addressing low performance-power efficiency. This position paper proposes a software-defined cluster (SDC) architecture to deal with these challenges. The SDC architecture inherits two features of traditional cluster: its architecture is multicomputer and it has loosely-coupled interconnect. SDC provides two new mechanisms: global I/O space (GIO) and hardware-supported native access (HNA) to remote devices. Application software can define a virtual cluster best suited to its needs from resources pools provided by a physical cluster, and traditional cluster ecosystems need no modification. We also discuss a prototype design and implementation of a 32-processor cloud server utilizing the SDC architecture.

  16. Globular Clusters Indicate That Ultra-diffuse Galaxies Are Dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, Michael A.; Trujillo, Ignacio

    2016-10-01

    We present an analysis of archival HST/ACS imaging in the F475W (g 475), F606W (V 606), and F814W (I 814) bands of the globular cluster (GC) system of a large (3.4 kpc effective radius) ultra-diffuse galaxy (DF17) believed to be located in the Coma Cluster of galaxies. We detect 11 GCs down to the 5σ completeness limit of the imaging (I 814 = 27 mag). Correcting for background and our detection limits yields a total population of GCs in this galaxy of 27 ± 5 and a V-band specific frequency S N = 28 ± 5. Based on comparisons to the GC systems of local galaxies, we show that both the absolute number and the colors of the GC system of DF17 are consistent with the GC system of a dark-matter-dominated dwarf galaxy with virial mass ˜9.0 × 1010 M ⊙ and a dark-to-stellar mass ratio M vir/M star ˜ 1000. Based on the stellar mass growth of the Milky Way, we show that DF17 cannot be understood as a failed Milky-Way-like system, but is more similar to quenched Large-Magellanic-Cloud-like systems. We find that the mean color of the GC population, g 475-I 814 = 0.91 ± 0.05 mag, coincides with the peak of the color distribution of intracluster GCs and is also similar to those of the blue GCs in the outer regions of massive galaxies. We suggest that both the intracluster GC population in Coma and the blue peak in the GC populations of massive galaxies may be fed—at least in part—by the disrupted equivalents of systems such as DF17.

  17. The state of globular clusters at birth - II. Primordial binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, Nathan W. C.; Giersz, Mirek; Marks, Michael; Webb, Jeremy J.; Hypki, Arkadiusz; Heinke, Craig O.; Kroupa, Pavel; Sills, Alison

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we constrain the properties of primordial binary populations in Galactic globular clusters. Using the MOCCA Monte Carlo code for cluster evolution, our simulations cover three decades in present-day total cluster mass. Our results are compared to the observations of Milone et al. using the photometric binary populations as proxies for the true underlying distributions, in order to test the hypothesis that the data are consistent with a universal initial binary fraction near unity and the binary orbital parameter distributions of Kroupa. With the exception of a few possible outliers, we find that the data are to first-order consistent with the universality hypothesis. Specifically, the present-day binary fractions inside the half-mass radius can be reproduced assuming either high initial binary fractions near unity with a dominant soft binary component as in the Kroupa distribution combined with high initial densities (104-106 M⊙ pc-3), or low initial binary fractions (˜5-10 per cent) with a dominant hard binary component combined with moderate initial densities near their present-day values (102-103 M⊙ pc-3). This apparent degeneracy can potentially be broken using the binary fractions outside the half-mass radius - only high initial binary fractions with a significant soft component combined with high initial densities can reproduce the observed anticorrelation between the binary fractions outside the half-mass radius and the total cluster mass. We further illustrate using the simulated present-day binary orbital parameter distributions and the technique first introduced in Leigh et al. that the relative fractions of hard and soft binaries can be used to further constrain both the initial cluster density and the initial mass-density relation. Our results favour an initial mass-density relation of the form r_h ∝ M_clus^{α } with α < 1/3, corresponding to an initial correlation between cluster mass and density.

  18. THE DYNAMICAL EVOLUTION OF STELLAR BLACK HOLES IN GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morscher, Meagan; Pattabiraman, Bharath; Rodriguez, Carl; Rasio, Frederic A.; Umbreit, Stefan, E-mail: m.morscher@u.northwestern.edu [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA), Northwestern University, Evanston, IL (United States)

    2015-02-10

    Our current understanding of the stellar initial mass function and massive star evolution suggests that young globular clusters (GCs) may have formed hundreds to thousands of stellar-mass black holes (BHs), the remnants of stars with initial masses from ∼20-100 M {sub ☉}. Birth kicks from supernova explosions may eject some BHs from their birth clusters, but most should be retained. Using a Monte Carlo method we investigate the long-term dynamical evolution of GCs containing large numbers of stellar BHs. We describe numerical results for 42 models, covering a broad range of realistic initial conditions, including up to 1.6 × 10{sup 6} stars. In almost all models we find that significant numbers of BHs (up to ∼10{sup 3}) are retained all the way to the present. This is in contrast to previous theoretical expectations that most BHs should be ejected dynamically within a few gigayears The main reason for this difference is that core collapse driven by BHs (through the Spitzer {sup m}ass segregation instability{sup )} is easily reverted through three-body processes, and involves only a small number of the most massive BHs, while lower-mass BHs remain well-mixed with ordinary stars far from the central cusp. Thus the rapid segregation of stellar BHs does not lead to a long-term physical separation of most BHs into a dynamically decoupled inner core, as often assumed previously. Combined with the recent detections of several BH X-ray binary candidates in Galactic GCs, our results suggest that stellar BHs could still be present in large numbers in many GCs today, and that they may play a significant role in shaping the long-term dynamical evolution and the present-day dynamical structure of many clusters.

  19. Feasibility of Electrospinning the Globular Proteins Hemoglobin and Myoglobin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine P. Barnes

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Various concentrations of the globular protein hemoglobin were successfully electrospun to create micro-fibrous mats of varying physical and mechanical characteristics. The electrospinning parameters are reported. One concentration of myoglobin was electrospun into a mat for comparison to the hemoglobin mats. Scanning electron microscopy revealed ribbon-like morphologies for the hemoglobin and myoglobin structures. Mean fiber width and thickness for each mat electrospun from a different hemoglobin concentration increased from 2.68 ± 0.83 to 3.55 ± 1.49 μm and from 0.49 ± 0.08 to 0.99 ± 0.41 μm, respectively, for increasing hemoglobin solution concentrations (from 150 to 225 mg/mL. For calculations of surface area to volume ratio for the four different electrospun hemoglobin concentrations, there was a negative correlation (r = -0.84 with concentration; the surface area to volume ratio ranged between 0.50 ± 0.16 and 1.53 ± 0.24 m2/cm3. Also, there appears to be a positive correlation between electrospun hemoglobin concentration and porosity, which increased with increasing concentration from 69.5 to 83.3 %. Following cross-linking with glutaraldehyde, the mechanical properties of two constructs were evaluated via uniaxial tensile testing to demonstrate handling capability. Results indicated that increased cross-linking time produced stiffer structures, as peak stress and modulus increased while strain at break decreased when the mats were cross-linked for 30 minutes with glutaraldehyde versus the 20 minute cross-linking time.

  20. The DRAGON simulations: globular cluster evolution with a million stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Long; Spurzem, Rainer; Aarseth, Sverre; Giersz, Mirek; Askar, Abbas; Berczik, Peter; Naab, Thorsten; Schadow, Riko; Kouwenhoven, M. B. N.

    2016-05-01

    Introducing the DRAGON simulation project, we present direct N-body simulations of four massive globular clusters (GCs) with 106 stars and 5 per cent primordial binaries at a high level of accuracy and realism. The GC evolution is computed with NBODY6++GPU and follows the dynamical and stellar evolution of individual stars and binaries, kicks of neutron stars and black holes (BHs), and the effect of a tidal field. We investigate the evolution of the luminous (stellar) and dark (faint stars and stellar remnants) GC components and create mock observations of the simulations (i.e. photometry, colour-magnitude diagrams, surface brightness and velocity dispersion profiles). By connecting internal processes to observable features, we highlight the formation of a long-lived `dark' nuclear subsystem made of BHs, which results in a two-component structure. The inner core is dominated by the BH subsystem and experiences a core-collapse phase within the first Gyr. It can be detected in the stellar (luminous) line-of-sight velocity dispersion profiles. The outer extended core - commonly observed in the (luminous) surface brightness profiles - shows no collapse features and is continuously expanding. We demonstrate how a King model fit to observed clusters might help identify the presence of post core-collapse BH subsystems. For global observables like core and half-mass radii, the direct simulations agree well with Monte Carlo models. Variations in the initial mass function can result in significantly different GC properties (e.g. density distributions) driven by varying amounts of early mass-loss and the number of forming BHs.

  1. A novel look at energy equipartition in globular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchini, P.; van de Ven, G.; Norris, M. A.; Schinnerer, E.; Varri, A. L.

    2016-06-01

    Two-body interactions play a major role in shaping the structural and dynamical properties of globular clusters (GCs) over their long-term evolution. In particular, GCs evolve towards a state of partial energy equipartition that induces a mass dependence in their kinematics. By using a set of Monte Carlo cluster simulations evolved in quasi-isolation, we show that the stellar mass dependence of the velocity dispersion σ(m) can be described by an exponential function σ2 ∝ exp (-m/meq), with the parameter meq quantifying the degree of partial energy equipartition of the systems. This simple parametrization successfully captures the behaviour of the velocity dispersion at lower as well as higher stellar masses, that is, the regime where the system is expected to approach full equipartition. We find a tight correlation between the degree of equipartition reached by a GC and its dynamical state, indicating that clusters that are more than about 20 core relaxation times old, have reached a maximum degree of equipartition. This equipartition-dynamical state relation can be used as a tool to characterize the relaxation condition of a cluster with a kinematic measure of the meq parameter. Vice versa, the mass dependence of the kinematics can be predicted knowing the relaxation time solely on the basis of photometric measurements. Moreover, any deviations from this tight relation could be used as a probe of a peculiar dynamical history of a cluster. Finally, our novel approach is important for the interpretation of state-of-the-art Hubble Space Telescope proper motion data, for which the mass dependence of kinematics can now be measured, and for the application of modelling techniques which take into consideration multimass components and mass segregation.

  2. Characterization of the velocity anisotropy of accreted globular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchini, P.; Sills, A.; Miholics, M.

    2017-10-01

    Galactic globular clusters (GCs) are believed to have formed in situ in the Galaxy as well as in dwarf galaxies later accreted on to the Milky Way. However, to date, there is no unambiguous signature to distinguish accreted GCs. Using specifically designed N-body simulations of GCs evolving in a variety of time-dependent tidal fields (describing the potential of a dwarf galaxy-Milky Way merger), we analyse the effects imprinted on the internal kinematics of an accreted GC. In particular, we look at the evolution of the velocity anisotropy. Our simulations show that at early phases, the velocity anisotropy is determined by the tidal field of the dwarf galaxy and subsequently the clusters will adapt to the new tidal environment, losing any signature of their original environment in a few relaxation times. At 10 Gyr, GCs exhibit a variety of velocity anisotropy profiles, namely, isotropic velocity distribution in the inner regions and either isotropy or radial/tangential anisotropy in the intermediate and outer regions. Independent of an accreted origin, the velocity anisotropy primarily depends on the strength of the tidal field cumulatively experienced by a cluster. Tangentially anisotropic clusters correspond to systems that have experienced stronger tidal fields and are characterized by higher tidal filling factor, r50/rj ≳ 0.17, higher mass-loss ≳ 60 per cent and relaxation times trel ≲ 109 Gyr. Interestingly, we demonstrate that the presence of tidal tails can significantly contaminate the measurements of velocity anisotropy when a cluster is observed in projection. Our characterization of the velocity anisotropy profiles in different tidal environments provides a theoretical benchmark for the interpretation of the unprecedented amount of three-dimensional kinematic data progressively available for Galactic GCs.

  3. Globular Cluster Systems in Brightest Cluster Galaxies. III: Beyond Bimodality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, William E.; Ciccone, Stephanie M.; Eadie, Gwendolyn M.; Gnedin, Oleg Y.; Geisler, Douglas; Rothberg, Barry; Bailin, Jeremy

    2017-01-01

    We present new deep photometry of the rich globular cluster (GC) systems around the Brightest Cluster Galaxies UGC 9799 (Abell 2052) and UGC 10143 (Abell 2147), obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) ACS and WFC3 cameras. For comparison, we also present new reductions of similar HST/ACS data for the Coma supergiants NGC 4874 and 4889. All four of these galaxies have huge cluster populations (to the radial limits of our data, comprising from 12,000 to 23,000 clusters per galaxy). The metallicity distribution functions (MDFs) of the GCs can still be matched by a bimodal-Gaussian form where the metal-rich and metal-poor modes are separated by ≃ 0.8 dex, but the internal dispersions of each mode are so large that the total MDF becomes very broad and nearly continuous from [Fe/H] ≃ ‑2.4 to solar. There are, however, significant differences between galaxies in the relative numbers of metal-rich clusters, suggesting that they underwent significantly different histories of mergers with massive gas-rich halos. Last, the proportion of metal-poor GCs rises especially rapidly outside projected radii R≳ 4 {R}{eff}, suggesting the importance of accreted dwarf satellites in the outer halo. Comprehensive models for the formation of GCs as part of the hierarchical formation of their parent galaxies will be needed to trace the systematic change in structure of the MDF with galaxy mass, from the distinctly bimodal form in smaller galaxies up to the broad continuum that we see in the very largest systems.

  4. Self-assembly in dilute mixtures of non-ionic and anionic surfactants and rhamnolipd biosurfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liley, J R; Penfold, J; Thomas, R K; Tucker, I M; Petkov, J T; Stevenson, P S; Banat, I M; Marchant, R; Rudden, M; Terry, A; Grillo, I

    2017-02-01

    The self-assembly of dilute aqueous solutions of a ternary surfactant mixture and rhamnolipid biosurfactant/surfactant mixtures has been studied by small angle neutron scattering. In the ternary surfactant mixture of octaethylene glycol monododecyl ether, C12E8, sodium dodecyl 6-benzene sulfonate, LAS, and sodium dioxyethylene monododecyl sulfate, SLES, small globular interacting micelles are observed over the entire composition and concentration range studied. The modelling of the scattering data strongly supports the assumption that the micelle compositions are close to the solution compositions. In the 5-component rhamnolipid/surfactant mixture of the mono-rhamnose, R1, di-rhamnose, R2, rhamnolipids with C12E8/LAS/SLES, globular micelles are observed over much of the concentration and composition range studied. However, for solutions relatively rich in rhamnolipid and LAS, lamellar/micellar coexistence is observed. The transition from globular to more planar structures arises from a synergistic packing in the 5 component mixture. It is not observed in the individual components nor in the ternary C12E8/LAS/SLES mixture at these relatively low concentrations. The results provide an insight into how synergistic packing effects can occur in the solution self-assembly of complex multi-component surfactant mixtures, and give rise to an unexpected evolution in the phase behaviour.

  5. Implementing Software Defined Radio

    CERN Document Server

    Grayver, Eugene

    2013-01-01

    Software Defined Radio makes wireless communications easier, more efficient, and more reliable. This book bridges the gap between academic research and practical implementation. When beginning a project, practicing engineers, technical managers, and graduate students can save countless hours by considering the concepts presented in these pages. The author covers the myriad options and trade-offs available when selecting an appropriate hardware architecture. As demonstrated here, the choice between hardware- and software-centric architecture can mean the difference between meeting an aggressive schedule and bogging down in endless design iterations. Because of the author’s experience overseeing dozens of failed and successful developments, he is able to present many real-life examples. Some of the key concepts covered are: Choosing the right architecture for the market – laboratory, military, or commercial Hardware platforms – FPGAs, GPPs, specialized and hybrid devices Standardization efforts to ens...

  6. Defining cyber warfare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan D. Mladenović

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Cyber conflicts represent a new kind of warfare that is technologically developing very rapidly. Such development results in more frequent and more intensive cyber attacks undertaken by states against adversary targets, with a wide range of diverse operations, from information operations to physical destruction of targets. Nevertheless, cyber warfare is waged through the application of the same means, techniques and methods as those used in cyber criminal, terrorism and intelligence activities. Moreover, it has a very specific nature that enables states to covertly initiate attacks against their adversaries. The starting point in defining doctrines, procedures and standards in the area of cyber warfare is determining its true nature. In this paper, a contribution to this effort was made through the analysis of the existing state doctrines and international practice in the area of cyber warfare towards the determination of its nationally acceptable definition.

  7. Short amino acid stretches can mediate amyloid formation in globular proteins: the Src homology 3 (SH3) case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Salvador; Zurdo, Jesús; Narayanan, Saravanakumar; Parreño, Matilde; Mangues, Ramón; Reif, Bernd; Chiti, Fabrizio; Giannoni, Elisa; Dobson, Christopher M; Aviles, Francesc X; Serrano, Luis

    2004-05-11

    Protein misfolding and deposition underlie an increasing number of debilitating human disorders. We have shown that model proteins unrelated to disease, such as the Src homology 3 (SH3) domain of the p58alpha subunit of bovine phosphatidyl-inositol-3'-kinase (PI3-SH3), can be converted in vitro into assemblies with structural and cytotoxic properties similar to those of pathological aggregates. By contrast, homologous proteins, such as alpha-spectrin-SH3, lack the capability of forming amyloid fibrils at a measurable rate under any of the conditions we have so far examined. However, transplanting a small sequence stretch (6 aa) from PI3-SH3 to alpha-spectrin-SH3, comprising residues of the diverging turn and adjacent RT loop, creates an amyloidogenic protein closely similar in its behavior to the original PI3-SH3. Analysis of specific PI3-SH3 mutants further confirms the involvement of this region in conferring amyloidogenic properties to this domain. Moreover, the inclusion in this stretch of two consensus residues favored in SH3 sequences substantially inhibits aggregation. These findings show that short specific amino acid stretches can act as mediators or facilitators in the incorporation of globular proteins into amyloid structures, and they support the suggestion that natural protein sequences have evolved in part to code for structural characteristics other than those included in the native fold, such as avoidance of aggregation.

  8. The Identification of Blue Horizontal Branch Stars in the Integrated Spectra of Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Schiavon, R P; Courteau, S; MacArthur, L

    2004-01-01

    A major uncertainty in the spectroscopic dating of extragalactic globular clusters concerns the degenerate effect that age and horizontal branch morphology have on the strength of Balmer lines. In this Letter we show that the ratio between the equivalent widths of Hdelta and Hbeta is far more sensitive to horizontal branch morphology than to age, thus making it possible to break the degeneracy. We show that it is possible to distinguish intermediate-age globular clusters from those whose Balmer lines are strengthened by the presence of blue horizontal branch stars, purely on the basis of the clusters' integrated spectra. The degeneracy between age and horizontal branch morphology can be lifted with Hbeta and Hdelta line strengths from spectra with S/N >= 30 per Angstrom, which is typical of current studies of integrated spectroscopy of extragalactic globular clusters.

  9. Binary Black Hole Mergers from Globular Clusters: Implications for Advanced LIGO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Carl L; Morscher, Meagan; Pattabiraman, Bharath; Chatterjee, Sourav; Haster, Carl-Johan; Rasio, Frederic A

    2015-07-31

    The predicted rate of binary black hole mergers from galactic fields can vary over several orders of magnitude and is extremely sensitive to the assumptions of stellar evolution. But in dense stellar environments such as globular clusters, binary black holes form by well-understood gravitational interactions. In this Letter, we study the formation of black hole binaries in an extensive collection of realistic globular cluster models. By comparing these models to observed Milky Way and extragalactic globular clusters, we find that the mergers of dynamically formed binaries could be detected at a rate of ∼100 per year, potentially dominating the binary black hole merger rate. We also find that a majority of cluster-formed binaries are more massive than their field-formed counterparts, suggesting that Advanced LIGO could identify certain binaries as originating from dense stellar environments.

  10. Understanding the central kinematics of globular clusters with simulated integrated-light IFU observations

    CERN Document Server

    Bianchini, Paolo; van de Ven, Glenn; Schinnerer, Eva

    2015-01-01

    The detection of intermediate mass black holes in the centres of globular clusters is highly controversial, as complementary observational methods often deliver significantly different results. In order to understand these discrepancies, we develop a procedure to simulate integral field unit (IFU) observations of globular clusters: Simulating IFU Star Cluster Observations (SISCO). The input of our software are realistic dynamical models of globular clusters that are then converted in a spectral data cube. We apply SISCO to Monte Carlo cluster simulations from Downing et al. (2010), with a realistic number of stars and concentrations. Using independent realisations of a given simulation we are able to quantify the stochasticity intrinsic to the problem of observing a partially resolved stellar population with integrated-light spectroscopy. We show that the luminosity-weighted IFU observations can be strongly biased by the presence of a few bright stars that introduce a scatter in the velocity dispersion measur...

  11. A Color-Magnitude Diagram for a Globular Cluster In the Giant Elliptical Galaxy NGC 5128

    CERN Document Server

    Harris, G L H; Harris, W E

    1998-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope has been used to obtain WFPC2 (V,I) photometry for a large sample of stars in the outer halo of the giant elliptical NGC 5128 (d = 4 Mpc). The globular cluster N5128-C44, at the center of the Planetary Camera field, is well enough resolved to permit the construction of a color-magnitude diagram (CMD) for it which covers the brightest two magnitudes of the giant branch. The CMD is consistent with that of a normal old, moderately low-metallicity ([Fe/H] = -1.30 globular cluster, distinctly more metal-poor than most of the field halo stars at the same projected location (which average [Fe/H] ~ -0.5). This is the most distant globular cluster in which direct color-magnitude photometry has been achieved to date, and the first one belonging to a giant E galaxy.

  12. An updated survey of globular clusters in M31. II Newly discovered bright and remote clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Galleti, S; Federici, L; Buzzoni, A; Pecci, F Fusi

    2007-01-01

    We present the first results of a large spectroscopic survey of candidate globular clusters located in the extreme outskirts of the nearby M31 galaxy. We obtained low resolution spectra of 48 targets selected from the XSC of 2MASS, as in Galleti et al. (2005). The observed candidates have been robustly classified according to their radial velocity and by verifying their extended/point-source nature from ground-based optical images. Among the 48 observed candidates clusters we found 5 genuine remote globular clusters. One of them has been already identified independently by Mackey et al. (2007), their GC1; the other four are completely new discoveries: B516, B517, B518, B519. The newly discovered clusters lie at projected distance 40 kpc 40 kpc. At odds with the Milky Way, M31 appears to have a significant population of very bright globular clusters in its extreme outskirts.

  13. Synthetic and observed photometric indices for globular clusters in the galaxy and M31

    CERN Document Server

    Covino, S; Malagnini, M L; Buzzoni, A

    1994-01-01

    Buzzoni's (1989) grid of synthetic spectral energy distributions, representative of old stellar populations, was used to derive colours in different photometric systems, and to compare the theoretical predictions with the observational data referring to about 120 globular clusters in the Galaxy and to 159 objects of the globular cluster system of M31. Synthetic and observed indices display an overall agreement in the composite planes of two-colour diagrams, thus in agreement with the standard evolutionary scenario leading, for globular clusters, to old stellar populations consistent with an age of 15 Gyr and a Salpeter initial mass function (IMF). The two main parameters modulating the cluster colour distributions are, as known, metallicity and horizontal branch morphology, while IMF slope and mass loss rate from stars in the red-giant branch and asymptotic-giant branch evolutionary stages produce only minor, although not negligible, effects on the integrated colours. The M31 and Galactic cluster populations ...

  14. Collisions of Free Floating Planets with Evolved Stars in Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Soker, N; Fregeau, J M; Soker, Noam; Rappaport, Saul; Fregeau, John

    2001-01-01

    We estimate the rate of collisions between stars and free-floating planets (FFPs) in globular clusters, in particular the collision of FFPs with red giant branch (RGB) stars. Recent dynamical simulations imply that the density of such objects could exceed million per cubic parsec near the cores of rich globular clusters. We show that in these clusters 5-10 per cents of all RGB stars near the core would suffer a collision with a FFP, and that such a collision can spin up the RGB star's envelope by an order of magnitude. In turn, the higher rotation rates may lead to enhanced mass-loss rates on the RGB, which could result in bluer horizontal branch (HB) stars. Hence, it is plausible that the presence of a large population of FFPs in a globular cluster can influence the distribution of stars on the HB of that cluster to a detectable degree.

  15. A NEW DISTANT MILKY WAY GLOBULAR CLUSTER IN THE PAN-STARRS1 3π SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laevens, Benjamin P. M.; Martin, Nicolas F. [Observatoire astronomique de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, UMR 7550, 11 rue de l' Université, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Sesar, Branimir; Rix, Hans-Walter; Schlafly, Edward F. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Bernard, Edouard J.; Ferguson, Annette M. N. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Slater, Colin T.; Bell, Eric F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Burgett, William S.; Chambers, Kenneth C.; Denneau, Larry; Kaiser, Nicholas; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Magnier, Eugene A.; Morgan, Jeffrey S.; Sweeney, William E. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Draper, Peter W.; Metcalfe, Nigel [Department of Physics, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Price, Paul A., E-mail: benjamin.laevens@astro.unistra.fr [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); and others

    2014-05-01

    We present a new satellite in the outer halo of the Galaxy, the first Milky Way satellite found in the stacked photometric catalog of the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System 1 (Pan-STARRS1) Survey. From follow-up photometry obtained with WFI on the MPG/ESO 2.2 m telescope, we argue that the object, located at a heliocentric distance of 145 ± 17 kpc, is the most distant Milky Way globular cluster yet known. With a total magnitude of M{sub V} = –4.3 ± 0.2 and a half-light radius of 20 ± 2 pc, it shares the properties of extended globular clusters found in the outer halo of our Galaxy and the Andromeda galaxy. The discovery of this distant cluster shows that the full spatial extent of the Milky Way globular cluster system has not yet been fully explored.

  16. A new distant Milky Way globular cluster in the Pan-STARRS1 3{\\pi} survey

    CERN Document Server

    Laevens, Benjamin P M; Sesar, Branimir; Bernard, Edouard J; Rix, Hans-Walter; Slater, Colin T; Bell, Eric F; Ferguson, Annette M N; Schlafly, Edward F; Burgett, William S; Chambers, Kenneth C; Denneau, Larry; Draper, Peter W; Kaiser, Nicholas; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Magnier, Eugene A; Metcalfe, Nigel; Morgan, Jeffrey S; Price, Paul A; Sweeney, William E; Tonry, John L; Wainscoat, Richard J; Waters, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    We present a new satellite in the outer halo of the Galaxy, the first Milky Way satellite found in the stacked photometric catalog of the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System 1 (Pan-STARRS1) Survey. From follow-up photometry obtained with WFI on the MPG/ESO 2.2m telescope, we argue that the object, located at a heliocentric distance of 145+/-17 kpc, is the most distant Milky Way globular cluster yet known. With a total magnitude of M_V=-4.3+/-0.2 and a half-light radius of 20+/-2 pc, it shares the properties of extended globular clusters found in the outer halo of our Galaxy and the Andromeda galaxy. The discovery of this distant cluster shows that the full spatial extent of the Milky Way globular cluster system has not yet been fully explored.

  17. Bright Stars and Metallicity Spread in the Globular Cluster omega Centauri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortolani, Sergio; Covino, Stefano; Carraro, Giovanni

    The globular cluster omega Centauri (NGC~5139) is the most massive and brightest cluster in our Galaxy. It has also a moderately high mass to light ratio (3.6) and an anomalous flattening (0.83) for a globular cluster. This cluster is also very interesting because it is one of a few examples of globular clusters with a measurable spread in the metal abundance (see Da Costa & Willumsen 1981, Norris et al. 1996, and Suntzeff and Kraft 1996 and references therein) and then it offers a unique, big sample of nearby stars having all the same distance and reddening but showing different metallicity (and age ?) effects. A recent paper by Norris et al. (1997) shows also an interesting correlation between kinematics and metal abundance.

  18. Bright Stars and Metallicity Spread in the Globular Cluster Omega Centauri

    CERN Document Server

    Ortolani, S; Carraro, G; Ortolani, Sergio; Covino, Stefano; Carraro, Giovanni

    1998-01-01

    The globular cluster Omega Centauri (NGC 5139) is the most massive and brightest cluster in our Galaxy. It has also a moderately high mass to light ratio (3.6) and an anomalous flattening (0.83) for a globular cluster. This cluster is also very interesting because it is one of a few examples of globular clusters with a measurable spread in the metal abundance (see Da Costa & Willumsen 1981, Norris et al. 1996, and Suntzeff and Kraft 1996 and references therein) and then it offers a unique, big sample of nearby stars having all the same distance and reddening but showing different metallicity (and age ?) effects. A recent paper by Norris et al. (1997) shows also an interesting correlation between kinematics and metal abundance.

  19. Spitzer Microlensing Program as a Probe for Globular Cluster Planets. Analysis of OGLE-2015-BLG-0448

    CERN Document Server

    Poleski, Radosław; Christie, Grant W; Udalski, Andrzej; Gould, Andrew; Bachelet, Etienne; Skottfelt, Jesper; Novati, Sebastiano Calchi; Szymański, M K; Soszyński, I; Pietrzyński, G; Wyrzykowski, Ł; Ulaczyk, K; Pietrukowicz, P; Kozłowski, Szymon; Skowron, J; Mróz, P; Pawlak, M; Beichman, C; Bryden, G; Carey, S; Fausnaugh, M; Gaudi, B S; Henderson, C B; Pogge, R W; Shvartzvald, Y; Wibking, B; Yee, J C; Beatty, T G; Eastman, J D; Drummond, J; Friedmann, M; Henderson, M; Johnson, J A; Kaspi, S; Maoz, D; McCormick, J; McCrady, N; Natusch, T; Ngan, H; Porritt, I; Relles, H M; Sliski, D H; Tan, T -G; Wittenmyer, R A; Wright, J T; Street, R A; Tsapras, Y; Bramich, D M; Horne, K; Snodgrass, C; Steele, I A; Menzies, J; Jaimes, R Figuera; Wambsganss, J; Schmidt, R; Cassan, A; Ranc, C; Mao, S; Bozza, V; Dominik, M; Hundertmark, M P G; Jørgensen, U G; Andersen, M I; Burgdorf, M J; Ciceri, S; D'Ago, G; Evans, D F; Gu, S -H; Hinse, T C; Kains, N; Kerins, E; Korhonen, H; Kuffmeier, M; Mancini, L; Popovas, A; Rabus, M; Rahvar, S; Rasmussen, R T; Southworth, G Scarpetta J; Surdej, J; Unda-Sanzana, E; Verma, P; von Essen, C; Wang, Y -B; Wertz, O

    2015-01-01

    The microlensing event OGLE-2015-BLG-0448 was observed by Spitzer and lay within the tidal radius of the globular cluster NGC 6558. The event had moderate magnification and was intensively observed, hence it had the potential to probe the distribution of planets in globular clusters. We measure the proper motion of NGC 6558 ($\\mu_{\\rm cl}$(N,E) = (+0.36+-0.10, +1.42+-0.10) mas/yr) as well as the source and show that the lens is not a cluster member. Even though this particular event does not probe the distribution of planets in globular clusters, other potential cluster lens events can be verified using our methodology. Additionally, we find that microlens parallax measured using OGLE photometry is consistent with the value found based on the light curve displacement between Earth and Spitzer.

  20. Constraints on the neutrino magnetic dipole moment: The tip-RGB luminosity of globular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arceo-Díaz, S.; Schröder, K.-P.; Zuber, K.; Jack, D.

    2015-10-01

    In this work we compared the predictions about the tip-RGB bolometric luminosity of low-mass stars in stellar models built with the Cambridge-STARS code for stellar evolution, with the evidence provided by the observational data of 25 globular clusters from the largest homogeneous database in the NIR. We found that 12 well populated globular clusters (headed up by omega Centauri, the largest globular cluster in the galaxy) suggest mu_{nu}≤ 2.2× 10(-12}mu_{B) , while the uncertainties of both the stellar models and the observations require the more robust constraint mu_{nu}≤ 2.6× 10(-12}mu_{B) . Finally, using synthetic spectra constructed with the PHOENIX code for stellar atmospheres, we qualitatively estimated the effect on the brightness of specific NIR-bands.

  1. On the disruption of pulsar and X-ray binaries in globular clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Verbunt, Frank

    2013-01-01

    The stellar encounter rate Gamma has been shown to be strongly correlated with the number of X-ray binaries in clusters and also to the number of radio pulsars. However, the pulsar populations in different clusters show remarkably different characteristics: in some GCs the population is dominated by binary systems, in others by single pulsars and exotic systems that result from exchange encounters. In this paper, we describe a second dynamical parameter for globular clusters, the encounter rate for a single binary, gamma. We find that this parameter provides a good characterization of the differences between the pulsar populations of different globular clusters. The higher gamma is for any particular globular cluster the more isolated pulsars and products of exchange interactions are observed. Furthermore, we also find that slow and "young" pulsars are found almost exclusively in clusters with a high gamma; this suggests that these kinds of objects are formed by the disruption of X-ray binaries, thus halting ...

  2. Numerical wave optics and the lensing of gravitational waves by globular clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Moylan, Andrew J; Scott, Susan M; Searle, Antony C; Bicknell, G V

    2008-01-01

    We consider the possible effects of gravitational lensing by globular clusters on gravitational waves from asymmetric neutron stars in our galaxy. In the lensing of gravitational waves, the long wavelength, compared with the usual case of optical lensing, can lead to the geometrical optics approximation being invalid, in which case a wave optical solution is necessary. In general, wave optical solutions can only be obtained numerically. We describe a computational method that is particularly well suited to numerical wave optics. This method enables us to compare the properties of several lens models for globular clusters without ever calling upon the geometrical optics approximation, though that approximation would sometimes have been valid. Finally, we estimate the probability that lensing by a globular cluster will significantly affect the detection, by ground-based laser interferometer detectors such as LIGO, of gravitational waves from an asymmetric neutron star in our galaxy, finding that the probability...

  3. Bayesian Analysis and Characterization of Multiple Populations in Galactic Globular Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner-Kaiser, Rachel A.; Stenning, David; Sarajedini, Ata; von Hippel, Ted; van Dyk, David A.; Robinson, Elliot; Stein, Nathan; Jefferys, William H.; BASE-9, HST UVIS Globular Cluster Treasury Program

    2017-01-01

    Globular clusters have long been important tools to unlock the early history of galaxies. Thus, it is crucial we understand the formation and characteristics of the globular clusters (GCs) themselves. Historically, GCs were thought to be simple and largely homogeneous populations, formed via collapse of a single molecular cloud. However, this classical view has been overwhelmingly invalidated by recent work. It is now clear that the vast majority of globular clusters in our Galaxy host two or more chemically distinct populations of stars, with variations in helium and light elements at discrete abundance levels. No coherent story has arisen that is able to fully explain the formation of multiple populations in globular clusters nor the mechanisms that drive stochastic variations from cluster to cluster.We use Cycle 21 Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations and HST archival ACS Treasury observations of 30 Galactic Globular Clusters to characterize two distinct stellar populations. A sophisticated Bayesian technique is employed to simultaneously sample the joint posterior distribution of age, distance, and extinction for each cluster, as well as unique helium values for two populations within each cluster and the relative proportion of those populations. We find the helium differences among the two populations in the clusters fall in the range of 0.04 to 0.11. Because adequate models varying in CNO are not presently available, we view these spreads as upper limits and present them with statistical rather than observational uncertainties. Evidence supports previous studies suggesting an increase in helium content concurrent with increasing mass of the cluster. We also find that the proportion of the first population of stars increases with mass. Our results are examined in the context of proposed globular cluster formation scenarios.

  4. Defining the Anthropocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Simon; Maslin, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Time is divided by geologists according to marked shifts in Earth's state. Recent global environmental changes suggest that Earth may have entered a new human-dominated geological epoch, the Anthropocene. Should the Anthropocene - the idea that human activity is a force acting upon the Earth system in ways that mean that Earth will be altered for millions of years - be defined as a geological time-unit at the level of an Epoch? Here we appraise the data to assess such claims, first in terms of changes to the Earth system, with particular focus on very long-lived impacts, as Epochs typically last millions of years. Can Earth really be said to be in transition from one state to another? Secondly, we then consider the formal criteria used to define geological time-units and move forward through time examining whether currently available evidence passes typical geological time-unit evidence thresholds. We suggest two time periods likely fit the criteria (1) the aftermath of the interlinking of the Old and New Worlds, which moved species across continents and ocean basins worldwide, a geologically unprecedented and permanent change, which is also the globally synchronous coolest part of the Little Ice Age (in Earth system terms), and the beginning of global trade and a new socio-economic "world system" (in historical terms), marked as a golden spike by a temporary drop in atmospheric CO2, centred on 1610 CE; and (2) the aftermath of the Second World War, when many global environmental changes accelerated and novel long-lived materials were increasingly manufactured, known as the Great Acceleration (in Earth system terms) and the beginning of the Cold War (in historical terms), marked as a golden spike by the peak in radionuclide fallout in 1964. We finish by noting that the Anthropocene debate is politically loaded, thus transparency in the presentation of evidence is essential if a formal definition of the Anthropocene is to avoid becoming a debate about bias. The

  5. MTI Focal Plane Assembly Design and Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballard, M.; Rienstra, J.L.

    1999-06-17

    The focal plane assembly for the Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI) consists of sensor chip assemblies, optical filters, and a vacuum enclosure. Sensor chip assemblies, composed of linear detector arrays and readout integrated circuits, provide spatial resolution in the cross-track direction for the pushbroom imager. Optical filters define 15 spectral bands in a range from 0.45 {micro}m to 10.7 {micro}m. All the detector arrays are mounted on a single focal plane and are designed to operate at 75 K. Three pairs of sensor chip assemblies (SCAs) are required to provide cross-track coverage in all 15 spectral bands. Each pair of SCAs includes detector arrays made from silicon, iridium antimonide, and mercury cadmium telluride. Read out integrated circuits multiplex the signals from the detectors to 18 separate video channels. Optical filter assemblies defining the spectral bands are mounted over the linear detector arrays. Each filter assembly consists of several filter strips bonded together side-by-side. The MTI focal plane assembly has been integrated with the rest of the payload and has undergone detailed testing and calibration. This paper includes representative test data for the various spectral bands and the overall performance of the focal plane assembly.

  6. Microchannel heat sink assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonde, Wayne L.; Contolini, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention provides a microchannel heat sink with a thermal range from cryogenic temperatures to several hundred degrees centigrade. The heat sink can be used with a variety of fluids, such as cryogenic or corrosive fluids, and can be operated at a high pressure. The heat sink comprises a microchannel layer preferably formed of silicon, and a manifold layer preferably formed of glass. The manifold layer comprises an inlet groove and outlet groove which define an inlet manifold and an outlet manifold. The inlet manifold delivers coolant to the inlet section of the microchannels, and the outlet manifold receives coolant from the outlet section of the microchannels. In one embodiment, the manifold layer comprises an inlet hole extending through the manifold layer to the inlet manifold, and an outlet hole extending through the manifold layer to the outlet manifold. Coolant is supplied to the heat sink through a conduit assembly connected to the heat sink. A resilient seal, such as a gasket or an O-ring, is disposed between the conduit and the hole in the heat sink in order to provide a watetight seal. In other embodiments, the conduit assembly may comprise a metal tube which is connected to the heat sink by a soft solder. In still other embodiments, the heat sink may comprise inlet and outlet nipples. The present invention has application in supercomputers, integrated circuits and other electronic devices, and is suitable for cooling materials to superconducting temperatures.

  7. Antibody mapping and tissue localization of globular and cysteine-rich regions of perlecan domain III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Ljubimov, A V; Sthanam, M;

    1995-01-01

    Perlecan is the best-characterized basement membrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan. It has a large (approximately 400 KD) core protein consisting of five distinct domains. Domain III, a centrally located domain, contains three globular domains separated by cysteine-rich epidermal growth factor (EGF...... blotting showed that six of the nine MAbs recognized Domain III of perlecan, three of them mapping to globular Subdomain IIIc, and the other three recognized epitopes within the cysteine-rich regions. All six MAbs stained every basement membrane of several mouse organs as well as some connective tissues...

  8. Age Estimates of Universe: from Globular Clusters to Cosmological Models and Probes

    CERN Document Server

    Fatima, Hira; Rahman, Syed Faisal Ur

    2016-01-01

    We performed the photometric analysis of M2 and M92 globular clusters in g and r bands of SLOAN photometric system. We transformed these g and r bands into BV bands of Johnson-Cousins photometric system and built the color magnitude diagram (CMD). We estimated the age, and metallicity of both the clusters, by fitting Padova isochrones of different age and metallicities onto the CMD. We studied Einstein and de Sitter model, bench mark model, the cosmological parameters by WMAP and Planck surveys. Finally, we compared estimated age of globular clusters to the ages from the cosmological models and cosmological parameters values of WMAP and Planck surveys.

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Metallicity estimates of M31 globular clusters (Galleti+, 2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galleti, S.; Bellazzini, M.; Buzzoni, A.; Federici, L.; Fusi Pecci, F.

    2010-04-01

    New empirical relations of [Fe/H] as a function of [MgFe] and Mg2 indices are based on the well-studied galactic globular clusters, complemented with theoretical model predictions for -0.2<=[Fe/H]<=+0.5. Lick indices for M31 clusters from various literature sources (225 clusters) and from new observations by our team (71 clusters) have been transformed into the Trager et al. (2000AJ....119.1645T) system, yielding new metallicity estimates for 245 globular clusters of M31. (3 data files).

  10. On defining dietary fibre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVries, Jonathan W

    2003-02-01

    Establishing a definition for dietary fibre has historically been a balance between nutrition knowledge and analytical method capabilities. While the most widely accepted physiologically-based definitions have generally been accurate in defining the dietary fibre in foods, scientists and regulators have tended, in practice, to rely on analytical procedures as the definitional basis in fact. As a result, incongruities between theory and practice have resulted in confusion regarding the components that make up dietary fibre. In November 1998 the president of the American Association of Cereal Chemists (AACC) appointed an expert scientific review committee and charged it with the task of reviewing and, if necessary, updating the definition of dietary fibre. The committee was further charged with assessing the state of analytical methodology and making recommendations relevant to the updated definition. After due deliberation, an updated definition of dietary fibre was delivered to the AACC Board of Directors for consideration and adoption (Anon, 2000; Jones 2000b). The updated definition includes the same food components as the historical working definition used for approximately 30 years (a very important point, considering that the majority of the research of the past 30 years delineating the positive health effects of dietary fibre is based on that working definition). However, the updated definition more clearly delineates the make-up of dietary fibre and its physiological functionality. As a result, relatively few changes will be necessary in analytical methodology. Current methodologies, in particular AACC-approved method of analysis 32-05 (Grami, 2000), Association of Official Analytical Chemists' official method of analysis 985.29 (Horwitz, 2000a) or AACC 32-07 (Grami, 2000) Association of Official Analytical Chemists 991.43 (Horwitz, 2000a) will continue to be sufficient and used for most foods. A small number of additional methods will be necessary to

  11. On the Globular Cluster Initial Mass Function below 1 Msolar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paresce, Francesco; De Marchi, Guido

    2000-05-01

    Accurate luminosity functions (LFs) for a dozen globular clusters have now been measured at or just beyond their half-light radius using HST. They span almost the entire cluster main sequence (MS) below 0.75 Msolar. All these clusters exhibit LFs that rise continuously from an absolute I magnitude MI~=6 to a peak at MI~=8.5-9 and then drop with increasing MI. Transformation of the LFs into mass functions (MFs) by means of mass-luminosity (ML) relations that are consistent with all presently available data on the physical properties of low-mass, low-metallicity stars shows that all the LFs observed so far can be obtained from MFs having the shape of a lognormal distribution with characteristic mass mc=0.33+/-0.03 Msolar and standard deviation σ=0.34+/-0.04. In particular, the LFs of the four clusters in the sample that extend well beyond the peak luminosity down to close to the hydrogen-burning limit (NGC 6341, NGC 6397, NGC 6752, and NGC 6809) can only be reproduced by such distributions and not by a single power law in the 0.1-0.6 Msolar range. After correction for the effects of mass segregation, the variation of the ratio of the number of higher to lower mass stars with cluster mass or any simple orbital parameter or the expected time to disruption recently computed for these clusters shows no statistically significant trend over a range of this last parameter of more than a factor of ~100. We conclude that the global MFs of these clusters have not been measurably modified by evaporation and tidal interactions with the Galaxy and, thus, should reflect the initial distribution of stellar masses. Since the lognormal function that we find is also very similar to the one obtained independently for much younger clusters and to the form expected theoretically, the implication seems to be unavoidable that it represents the true stellar initial mass function for this type of star in this mass range. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope

  12. Hunting for Optical Companions to Binary Msps in Globular Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Francesco

    2009-07-01

    Here we present a proposal which exploits the re-newed potential of HST after the Service Mission 4 for probing the population of binary Millisecond Pulsars {MSPs} in Globular Clusters. In particular we intend to: {1} extend the search for optical counterparts in Terzan 5, by pushing the performance of the WFC3 IR channel to sample the entire MS extension down to M=0.1 Mo; {2} perform a deep multi-band search of MSP companions with the WFC3, in 3 clusters {namely NGC6440, M28 and M5}, where recent radio observations have found particularly interesting objects; {3} derive an accurate radial velocity {with STIS} of the puzzling optical companion COM6266B recently discovered by our group, to firmly assess its cluster membership.This program is the result of a large collaboration among the three major groups {lead by Freire, Ransom and Possenti} which are performing extensive MSP search in GCs in the radio bands, and our group which has a large experience in performing accurate stellar photometry in crowded environments. This collaboration has produced a number of outstanding discoveries. In fact, three of the 6 optical counterparts to binary MSP companions known to date in GCs have been discovered by our group. The observations here proposed would easily double/triple the existing sample of known MSP companions, allowing the first meaningful approach to the study of the formation, evolution and recycling process of pulsar in GCs. Moreover, since most of binary MSPs in GCs are thought to form via stellar interactions in the high density core regions, the determination of the nature of the companion and the incidence of this collisionally induced population has a significant impact on our knowledge of the cluster dynamics. Even more interesting, the study of the optical companions to NSs in GCs allows one to derive tighter constraints {than those obtainable for NS binaries in the Galactic field} on the system properties. This has, in turn, an intrisic importance for

  13. Trazando el mapa genético de NGC 1316 a través de su sistema de cúmulos globulares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesto, L. A.; Faifer, F. R.; Forte, J. C.

    2015-08-01

    The giant early-type galaxy NGC 1316 (Fornax A) is an intermediate-age merger remnant (-- yrs), in which an unusual pattern of dust, formed by large filaments and dark structures, demands special attention. This galaxy belongs to Fornax, one of the closest and most studied galaxy clusters of the southern hemisphere. The dust structures pose an interesting challenge for photometry in the central regions. Based on the idea that Globular Clusters systems (GCS) constitute genuine tracers of the formation and evolution of galaxies that contain them, we present a multicolor photometric study of globular clusters candidates (GC) associated with NGC 1316. We performed the reduction and analysis of a mosaic of gri images obtained with the Gemini Multi-object Spectrograph (GMOS) camera, mounted on the Gemini South telescope. These GMOS data were combined with BVIgz photometry from the HST Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) as well as with published Washington photometry, and used to define a multicolor grid. This grid will be used to attempt to identify the properties of the different subpopulations of CG present in NGC 1316.

  14. BtcA, A class IA type III chaperone, interacts with the BteA N-terminal domain through a globular/non-globular mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Guttman

    Full Text Available Bordetella pertussis, the etiological agent of "whooping cough" disease, utilizes the type III secretion system (T3SS to deliver a 69 kDa cytotoxic effector protein, BteA, directly into the host cells. As with other T3SS effectors, prior to its secretion BteA binds BtcA, a 13.9 kDa protein predicted to act as a T3SS class IA chaperone. While this interaction had been characterized for such effector-chaperone pairs in other pathogens, it has yet to be fully investigated in Bordetella. Here we provide the first biochemical proof that BtcA is indeed a class IA chaperone, responsible for the binding of BteA's N-terminal domain. We bring forth extensive evidence that BtcA binds its substrate effector through a dual-interface binding mechanism comprising of non-globular and bi-globular interactions at a moderate micromolar level binding affinity. We demonstrate that the non-globular interactions involve the first 31 N-terminal residues of BteA287 and their removal leads to destabilization of the effector-chaperone complex and lower binding affinities to BtcA. These findings represent an important first step towards a molecular understanding of BteA secretion and cell entry.

  15. Probe tip heating assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Roger William; Oh, Yunje

    2016-10-25

    A heating assembly configured for use in mechanical testing at a scale of microns or less. The heating assembly includes a probe tip assembly configured for coupling with a transducer of the mechanical testing system. The probe tip assembly includes a probe tip heater system having a heating element, a probe tip coupled with the probe tip heater system, and a heater socket assembly. The heater socket assembly, in one example, includes a yoke and a heater interface that form a socket within the heater socket assembly. The probe tip heater system, coupled with the probe tip, is slidably received and clamped within the socket.

  16. Newnes electronics assembly handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Brindley, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Newnes Electronics Assembly Handbook: Techniques, Standards and Quality Assurance focuses on the aspects of electronic assembling. The handbook first looks at the printed circuit board (PCB). Base materials, basic mechanical properties, cleaning of assemblies, design, and PCB manufacturing processes are then explained. The text also discusses surface mounted assemblies and packaging of electromechanical assemblies, as well as the soldering process. Requirements for the soldering process; solderability and protective coatings; cleaning of PCBs; and mass solder/component reflow soldering are des

  17. Liquid-liquid interfacial nanoparticle assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emrick, Todd S.; Russell, Thomas P.; Dinsmore, Anthony; Skaff, Habib; Lin, Yao

    2008-12-30

    Self-assembly of nanoparticles at the interface between two fluids, and methods to control such self-assembly process, e.g., the surface density of particles assembling at the interface; to utilize the assembled nanoparticles and their ligands in fabrication of capsules, where the elastic properties of the capsules can be varied from soft to tough; to develop capsules with well-defined porosities for ultimate use as delivery systems; and to develop chemistries whereby multiple ligands or ligands with multiple functionalities can be attached to the nanoparticles to promote the interfacial segregation and assembly of the nanoparticles. Certain embodiments use cadmium selenide (CdSe) nanoparticles, since the photoluminescence of the particles provides a convenient means by which the spatial location and organization of the particles can be probed. However, the systems and methodologies presented here are general and can, with suitable modification of the chemistries, be adapted to any type of nanoparticle.

  18. Stimulated Globular Scattering of Laser Radiation in Photonic Crystals: Temperature Dependences

    CERN Document Server

    Gorelik, V S; Tcherniega, N V; Vodchits, A I

    2007-01-01

    Stimulated globular scattering (SGS) characteristics (frequency shifts, threshold, conversion efficiency) have been studied in photonic crystals (synthetic opal matrices and opal nanocomposites) at different temperatures. Results have been compared with stimulated Raman scattering investigations in calcite single crystals. In both cases temperature lowering from +20 C to -196 C resulted in the stimulated scattering energy increase and its redistribution to the higher order components.

  19. The Gaia-ESO Survey: Detailed Abundances in the Metal-poor Globular Cluster NGC 4372

    CERN Document Server

    Roman, I San; Geisler, D; Villanova, S; Kacharov, N; Koch, A; Carraro, G; Tautvaišiene, G; Vallenari, A; Alfaro, E J; Bensby, T; Flaccomio, E; Francois, P; Korn, A J; Pancino, E; Recio-Blanco, A; Smiljanic, R; Bergemann, M; Costado, M T; Damiani, F; Heiter, U; Hourihane, A; Jofré, P; Lardo, C; de Laverny, P; Masseron, T; Morbidelli, L; Sbordone, L; Sousa, S G; Worley, C C; Zaggia, S

    2015-01-01

    We present the abundance analysis for a sample of 7 red giant branch stars in the metal-poor globular cluster NGC 4372 based on UVES spectra acquired as part of the Gaia-ESO Survey. This is the first extensive study of this cluster from high resolution spectroscopy. We derive abundances of O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, Fe, Cr, Ni, Y, Ba, and La. We find a metallicity of [Fe/H] = -2.19 $\\pm$ 0.03 and find no evidence for a metallicity spread. This metallicity makes NGC 4372 one of the most metal-poor galactic globular clusters. We also find an {\\alpha}-enhancement typical of halo globular clusters at this metallicity. Significant spreads are observed in the abundances of light elements. In particular we find a Na-O anti-correlation. Abundances of O are relatively high compared with other globular clusters. This could indicate that NGC 4372 was formed in an environment with high O for its metallicity. A Mg-Al spread is also present which spans a range of more than 0.5 dex in Al abundances. Na is correlated wit...

  20. Parâmetros astrofísicos de estrelas gigantes do aglomerado globular 47 Tucanae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves-Brito, A.; Barbuy, B.

    2003-08-01

    Os aglomerados globulares são considerados laboratórios astrofísicos para a verificação da teoria de evolução estelar, bem como a trajetória químio-dinâmica das galáxias hospedeiras. Em particular, 47 Tucanae (NGC 104) configura-se como um dos mais extensivamente estudados aglomerados globulares da Galáxia devido a relativa proximidade ao Sol (R¤ = 4.5 kpc) e alta latitute galáctica (b = -44°,89). Neste trabalho, apresentamos a velocidade radial heliocêntrica e os parâmetros atmosféricos (Teff, logg, [Fe/H]) de 5 estrelas gigantes do aglomerado globular 47 Tucanae. Os espectros foram obtidos pelo espectrógrafo UVES (Ultaviolet Visual Echelle Spectrograph) de alta resolução (R = 60000) e alta razão sinal-ruído (S/N > 200), acoplado ao telescópio de 8,2m Kueyen do VLT (Very Large Telescope). Nós encontramos = -22,43 +/- 3,97 km/s, [Fe/H] ~ -0.7, 1,2 aglomerados globulares ricos em metais. Trabalho financiado pela FAPESP e pelo CNPq.

  1. Microstructure and rheology of globular protein gels in the presence of gelatin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ersch, C.; Meinders, M.B.J.; Bouwman, W.G.; Nieuwland, M.; Linden, van der E.; Venema, P.; Martin, A.H.

    2016-01-01

    The microstructure and rheological response of globular protein gels (whey protein isolate (WPI) and soy protein isolate (SPI)) in the presence of gelatin (type A, type B and hydrolyzed type A) was investigated. Microstructural information was obtained using a combination of confocal laser scanning

  2. Modelling the average spectrum expected from a population of gamma-ray globular clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Venter, C

    2015-01-01

    Millisecond pulsars occur abundantly in globular clusters. They are expected to be responsible for several spectral components in the radio through gamma-ray waveband (e.g., involving synchrotron and inverse Compton emission), as have been seen by Radio Telescope Effelsberg, Chandra X-ray Observatory, Fermi Large Area Telescope, and the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) in the case of Terzan 5 (with fewer spectral components seen for other globular clusters). H.E.S.S. has recently performed a stacking analysis involving 15 non-detected globular clusters and obtained quite constraining average flux upper limits above 230 GeV. We present a model that assumes millisecond pulsars as sources of relativistic particles and predicts multi-wavelength emission from globular clusters. We apply this model to the population of clusters mentioned above to predict the average spectrum and compare this to the H.E.S.S. upper limits. Such comparison allows us to test whether the model is viable, leading to possible co...

  3. An empirical Bayesian analysis applied to the globular cluster pulsar population

    CERN Document Server

    Turk, P J

    2013-01-01

    We describe an empirical Bayesian approach to determine the most likely size of an astronomical population of sources of which only a small subset are observed above some limiting flux density threshold. The method is most naturally applied to astronomical source populations at a common distance (e.g.,stellar populations in globular clusters), and can be applied even to populations where a survey detects no objects. The model allows for the inclusion of physical parameters of the stellar population and the detection process. As an example, we apply this method to the current sample of radio pulsars in Galactic globular clusters. Using the sample of flux density limits on pulsar surveys in 94 globular clusters published by Boyles et al., we examine a large number of population models with different dependencies. We find that models which include the globular cluster two-body encounter rate, $\\Gamma$, are strongly favoured over models in which this is not a factor. The optimal model is one in which the mean num...

  4. Dynamic globularization of a-phase in Ti6Al4V alloy during hot compression

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mutombo, K

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available of transformation of ß into a or vice-versa and the presence of different phases in the compressed Ti6Al4V sample. Globular alpha phase was revealed in the isothermally compressed sample in addition to martensitic and lamellar a/ß structures. The transition...

  5. FUV and Optical Spectroscopy of Hot Post-AGB Stars in Globular Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, William V.

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this program was to determine the atmospheric parameters (effective temperature and surface gravity) and abundances of the hot, post-AGB (PAGB) stars in globular clusters observed with the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT) on the Astro-l and 2 missions.

  6. UV Properties of Galactic Globular Clusters with GALEX I. The Color-Magnitude Diagrams

    CERN Document Server

    Schiavon, Ricardo P; Sohn, Sangmo T; Rood, Robert T; O'Connell, Robert W; Ferraro, Francesco R; Lanzoni, Barbara; Beccari, Giacomo; Rey, Soo-Chang; Rhee, Jaehyon; Rich, R Michael; Yoon, Suk-Jin; Lee, Young-Wook

    2012-01-01

    We present GALEX data for 44 Galactic globular clusters obtained during 3 GALEX observing cycles between 2004 and 2008. This is the largest homogeneous data set on the UV photometric properties of Galactic globular clusters ever collected. The sample selection and photometric analysis are discussed, and color-magnitude diagrams are presented. The blue and intermediate-blue horizontal branch is the dominant feature of the UV color-magnitude diagrams of old Galactic globular clusters. Our sample is large enough to display the remarkable variety of horizontal branch shapes found in old stellar populations. Other stellar types that are obviously detected are blue stragglers and post core-He burning stars. The main features of UV color-magnitude diagrams of Galactic globular clusters are briefly discussed. We establish the locus of post-core He burning stars in the UV color-magnitude diagram and present a catalog of candidate AGB-manqu \\'e, post early-AGB, and post-AGB stars within our cluster sample.

  7. Identification of Globular Cluster Stars in RAVE data I: Application to Stellar Parameter Calibration

    CERN Document Server

    Anguiano, B; Scholz, R -D; Grebel, E K; Seabroke, G; Kunder, A; Binney, J; McMillan, P J; Zwitter, T; Wyse, R F G; Kordopatis, G; Bienaymé, O; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Boeche, C; Freeman, K C; Gibson, B K; Gilmore, G; Munari, U; Navarro, J; Parker, Q; Reid, W; Siebert, A; Siviero, A; Steinmetz, M; Watson, F

    2015-01-01

    We present the identification of potential members of nearby Galactic globular clusters using radial velocities from the RAdial Velocity Experiment Data Release 4 (RAVE-DR4) survey database. Our identifications are based on three globular clusters -- NGC 3201, NGC 5139 ($\\omega$ Cen) and NGC 362 -- all of which are shown to have |RV|>100 km/s. The identification of globular cluster stars in RAVE DR4 data offers a unique opportunity to test the precision and accuracy of the stellar parameters determined with the currently available Stellar Parameter Pipelines (SPPs) used in the survey, as globular clusters are ideal testbeds for the validation of stellar atmospheric parameters, abundances, distances and ages. For both NGC 3201 and $\\omega$ Cen, there is compelling evidence for numerous members (> 10) in the RAVE database; in the case of NGC 362 the evidence is more ambiguous, and there may be significant foreground and/or background contamination in our kinematically-selected sample. A comparison of the RAVE-d...

  8. Estimating the parameters of globular cluster M 30 (NGC 7099) from time-series photometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kains, N.; Bramich, D.M.; Arellano Ferro, A.

    2013-01-01

    Aims. We present the analysis of 26 nights of V and I time-series observations from 2011 and 2012 of the globular cluster M 30 (NGC 7099). We used our data to search for variable stars in this cluster and refine the periods of known variables; we then used our variable star light curves to derive...

  9. ACS Photometry of the Remote M31 Globular Cluster B514

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galleti, S.; Federici, L.; Bellazzini, M.; Buzzoni, A.; Pecci, F. Fusi

    2006-10-01

    We present deep F606W, F814W ACS photometry of the recently discovered globular cluster B514, the outermost known globular in the M31 galaxy. The cluster appears quite extended, and member stars are unequivocally identified out to ~200 pc from the center. The color-magnitude diagram reveals a steep red giant branch (RGB), and a horizontal branch extending blueward of the instability strip, indicating that B514 is a classical old metal-poor globular cluster. The RGB locus and the position of the RGB bump are both consistent with a metallicity [Fe/H]~-1.8, in excellent agreement with spectroscopic estimates. A preliminary estimate of the integrated absolute V magnitude (MV<~-9.1) suggests that B514 is among the brightest globulars of M31. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI), which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  10. On the relation between globular cluster specific frequency and galaxy type

    CERN Document Server

    Kavelaars, J J

    1998-01-01

    The universality of the globular cluster luminosity function (GCLF) contrasts the variation seen in the specific frequency ($S_N$). The variation in $S_N$ has been shown to follow a linear relation with $L_X$ for brightest cluster galaxies (Blakeslee, J. 1997, Harris, W.E. et al. 1998). Further, the variation of $S_N$ with galactic radius within individual giant ellipticals is seen to be a constant fraction of the gas density (McLaughlin 1998). There are now a number of galaxies for which direct mass estimates based on the radial velocities of the globular clusters are available. By comparing the mass of galaxies determined in this way with the number of clusters within these galaxies we show that the fraction of mass which is converted into globular clusters is constant independent of galaxy type or environment. This implies that the process of globular cluster formation is not influenced by the host galaxy and supports the notion of the universal GCLF.

  11. Early disc accretion as the origin of abundance anomalies in globular clusters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastian, N.; Lamers, H.J.G.L.M.; de Mink, S.E.; Longmore, S.N.; Goodwin, S.P.; Gieles, M.

    2013-01-01

    Globular clusters (GCs), once thought to be well approximated as simple stellar populations (i.e. all stars having the same age and chemical abundance), are now known to host a variety of anomalies, such as multiple discrete (or spreads in) populations in colour-magnitude diagrams and abundance

  12. Computer organization and assembly language programming

    CERN Document Server

    Peterson, James L

    1978-01-01

    Computer Organization and Assembly Language Programming deals with lower level computer programming-machine or assembly language, and how these are used in the typical computer system. The book explains the operations of the computer at the machine language level. The text reviews basic computer operations, organization, and deals primarily with the MIX computer system. The book describes assembly language programming techniques, such as defining appropriate data structures, determining the information for input or output, and the flow of control within the program. The text explains basic I/O

  13. Evolution of Compact Binary Populations in Globular Clusters: A Boltzmann Study. II. Introducing Stochasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Sambaran; Ghosh, Pranab

    2008-06-01

    We continue the exploration that we began in Paper I of using the Boltzmann scheme to study the evolution of compact binary populations of globular clusters, introducing in this paper our method of handling the stochasticity inherent in the dynamical processes of binary formation, destruction, and hardening in globular clusters. We describe these stochastic processes as "Wiener processes," whereupon the Boltzmann equation becomes a stochastic partial differential equation, the solution of which involves the use of "Itō calculus" (this use being the first, to our knowledge, in this subject), in addition to ordinary calculus. As in Paper I, we focus on the evolution of (1) the number of X-ray binaries NXB in globular clusters and (2) the orbital period distribution of these binaries. We show that, although the details of the fluctuations in the above quantities differ from one "realization" to another of the stochastic processes, the general trends follow those found in the continuous-limit study of Paper I, and the average result over many such realizations is very close to the continuous-limit result. We investigate the dependence of NXB found by these calculations on two essential globular cluster properties, namely, the star-star and star-binary encounter rate parameters Γ and γ, for which we coined the name "Verbunt parameters" in Paper I. We compare our computed results with those from Chandra observations of Galactic globular clusters, showing that the expected scalings of NXB with the Verbunt parameters are in good agreement with those observed. We indicate additional features that can be incorporated into the scheme in the future, as well as how more elaborate problems can be tackled.

  14. A class of spherical, truncated, anisotropic models for application to globular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vita, Ruggero; Bertin, Giuseppe; Zocchi, Alice

    2016-05-01

    Recently, a class of non-truncated, radially anisotropic models (the so-called f(ν)-models), originally constructed in the context of violent relaxation and modelling of elliptical galaxies, has been found to possess interesting qualities in relation to observed and simulated globular clusters. In view of new applications to globular clusters, we improve this class of models along two directions. To make them more suitable for the description of small stellar systems hosted by galaxies, we introduce a "tidal" truncation by means of a procedure that guarantees full continuity of the distribution function. The new fT(ν)-models are shown to provide a better fit to the observed photometric and spectroscopic profiles for a sample of 13 globular clusters studied earlier by means of non-truncated models; interestingly, the best-fit models also perform better with respect to the radial-orbit instability. Then, we design a flexible but simple two-component family of truncated models to study the separate issues of mass segregation and multiple populations. We do not aim at a fully realistic description of globular clusters to compete with the description currently obtained by means of dedicated simulations. The goal here is to try to identify the simplest models, that is, those with the smallest number of free parameters, but still have the capacity to provide a reasonable description for clusters that are evidently beyond the reach of one-component models. With this tool, we aim at identifying the key factors that characterize mass segregation or the presence of multiple populations. To reduce the relevant parameter space, we formulate a few physical arguments based on recent observations and simulations. A first application to two well-studied globular clusters is briefly described and discussed.

  15. Distances, Ages, and Epoch of Formation of Globular Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carretta, Eugenio; Gratton, Raffaele G.; Clementini, Gisella; Fusi Pecci, Flavio

    2000-04-01

    We review the results on distances and absolute ages of Galactic globular clusters (GCs) obtained after the release of the Hipparcos catalog. Several methods aimed at the definition of the Population II local distance scale are discussed, and their results compared, exploiting new results for RR Lyraes in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). We find that the so-called short distance and long distance scales may be reconciled whether or not a consistent reddening scale is adopted for Cepheids and RR Lyrae variables in the LMC. Emphasis is given in the paper to the discussion of distances and ages of GCs derived using Hipparcos parallaxes of local subdwarfs. We find that the selection criteria adopted to choose the local subdwarfs, as well as the size of the corrections applied to existing systematic biases, are the main culprit for the differences found among the various independent studies that first used Hipparcos parallaxes and the subdwarf fitting technique. We also caution that the absolute age of M92 (usually considered one of the oldest clusters) still remains uncertain due to the lack of subdwarfs of comparable metallicity with accurate parallaxes. Distances and ages for the nine clusters discussed in a previous paper by Gratton et al. are rederived using an enlarged sample of local subdwarfs, which includes about 90% of the metal-poor dwarfs with accurate parallaxes (Δπ/πzero-age horizontal branch (ZAHB) absolute magnitude and metallicity for the nine program clusters turns out to be MV(ZAHB)=(0.18+/-0.09)([Fe/H]+1.5)+(0.53+/-0.12) Thanks to Hipparcos the major contribution to the total error budget associated with the subdwarf fitting technique has been moved from parallaxes to photometric calibrations, reddening, and metallicity scale. This total uncertainty still amounts to about +/-0.12 mag. We then compare the corresponding (true) LMC distance modulus μLMC=18.64+/-0.12 mag with other existing determinations. We conclude that at present the best

  16. G2C2 - IV: A novel approach to study the radial distributions of multiple populations in Galactic globular clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Vanderbeke, Joachim; De Rijcke, Sven; Baes, Maarten; West, Michael; Alonso-García, Javier; Kunder, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    We use the HB morphology of 48 Galactic GCs to study the radial distributions of the different stellar populations known to exist in globular clusters. Assuming that the (extremely) blue HB stars correspond to stars enriched in Helium and light elements, we compare the radial distributions of stars selected according to colour on the HB to trace the distribution of the secondary stellar populations in globular clusters. Unlike other cases, our data show that the populations are well mixed in 80% of the cases studied. This provides some constraints on the mechanisms proposed to pollute the interstellar medium in young globular clusters.

  17. Amyloid Structure and Assembly: Insights from Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldsbury, C.; Wall, J.; Baxa, U.; Simon, M. N.; Steven, A. C.; Engel, A.; Aebi, U.; Muller, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are filamentous protein aggregates implicated in several common diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and type II diabetes. Similar structures are also the molecular principle of the infectious spongiform encephalopathies such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, scrapie in sheep, and of the so-called yeast prions, inherited non-chromosomal elements found in yeast and fungi. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is often used to delineate the assembly mechanism and structural properties of amyloid aggregates. In this review we consider specifically contributions and limitations of STEM for the investigation of amyloid assembly pathways, fibril polymorphisms and structural models of amyloid fibrils. This type of microscopy provides the only method to directly measure the mass-per-length (MPL) of individual filaments. Made on both in vitro assembled and ex vivo samples, STEM mass measurements have illuminated the hierarchical relationships between amyloid fibrils and revealed that polymorphic fibrils and various globular oligomers can assemble simultaneously from a single polypeptide. The MPLs also impose strong constraints on possible packing schemes, assisting in molecular model building when combined with high-resolution methods like solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR).

  18. Impact of the degree of ethoxylation of the ethoxylated polysorbate nonionic surfactant on the surface self-assembly of hydrophobin-ethoxylated polysorbate surfactant mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penfold, Jeffrey; Thomas, Robert K; Li, Peixun; Petkov, Jordan T; Tucker, Ian; Cox, Andrew R; Hedges, Nick; Webster, John R P; Skoda, Maximilian W A

    2014-08-19

    Neutron reflectivity measurements have been used to study the surface adsorption of the polyethylene sorbitan monostearate surfactant, with degrees of ethoxylation varying from 3 to 20 ethylene oxide groups, with the globular protein hydrophobin. The surface interaction between the ethoxylated polysorbate nonionic surfactants and the hydrophobin results in self-assembly at the air-solution interface in the form of a well-defined layered surface structure. The surface interaction arises from a combination of the hydrophobic interaction between the surfactant alkyl chain and the hydrophobic patch on the surface of the hydrophobin, and the hydrophilic interaction between the ethoxylated sorbitan headgroup and the hydrophilic regions on the surface of the hydrophobin. The results presented show that varying the degree of ethoxylation of the polysorbate surfactant changes the interaction between the surfactant and the hydrophobin and the packing, and hence the evolution in the resulting surface structure. The optimal degree of ethoxylation for multilayer formation is over a broad range, from of order 6 to 17 ethylene oxide groups, and for degrees of ethoxylation of 3 and 20 only monolayer adsorption of either the surfactant or the hydrophobin is observed.

  19. Autonomous electrochromic assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berland, Brian Spencer; Lanning, Bruce Roy; Stowell, Jr., Michael Wayne

    2015-03-10

    This disclosure describes system and methods for creating an autonomous electrochromic assembly, and systems and methods for use of the autonomous electrochromic assembly in combination with a window. Embodiments described herein include an electrochromic assembly that has an electrochromic device, an energy storage device, an energy collection device, and an electrochromic controller device. These devices may be combined into a unitary electrochromic insert assembly. The electrochromic assembly may have the capability of generating power sufficient to operate and control an electrochromic device. This control may occur through the application of a voltage to an electrochromic device to change its opacity state. The electrochromic assembly may be used in combination with a window.

  20. On the absolute age of the metal-rich globular M71 (NGC 6838): I. optical photometry

    CERN Document Server

    Di Cecco, Alessandra; Moroni, Pier Giorgio Prada; Tognelli, Emanuele; Allard, France; Stetson, Peter B; Buonanno, Roberto; Ferraro, Ivan; Iannicola, Giacinto; Monelli, Matteo; Nonino, Mario; Pulone, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the absolute age of the Galactic globular cluster M71 (NGC 6838) by using optical ground-based images (u',g',r',i',z') collected with the MegaCam camera at the Canada-France-Hawaii-Telescope (CFHT). We performed a robust selection of field and cluster stars by applying a new method based on the 3D (r',u'-g',g'-r') Color-Color-Magnitude-Diagram. The comparison between the Color-Magnitude-Diagram of the candidate cluster stars and a new set of isochrones, at the locus of the Main Sequence Turn Off (MSTO), suggests an absolute age of 12+/-2 Gyr. The absolute age was also estimated using the difference in magnitude between the MSTO and the so-called main sequence knee, a well defined bending occurring in the lower main sequence. This feature was originally detected in the near-infrared (NIR) bands and explained as a consequence of an opacity mechanism (collisionally induced absorption of molecular hydrogen) in the atmosphere of cool low-mass stars (Bono et al. 2010). The same feature was also dete...

  1. Three discrete groups with homogeneous chemistry along the red giant branch in the globular cluster NGC 2808

    CERN Document Server

    Carretta, Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    We present the homogeneous reanalysis of Mg and Al abundances from high resolution UVES/FLAMES spectra for 31 red giants in the globular cluster NGC 2808. We found a well defined Mg-Al anticorrelation reaching a regime of subsolar Mg abundance ratios, with a spread of about 1.4 dex in [Al/Fe]. The main result from the improved statistics of our sample is that the distribution of stars is not continuous along the anticorrelation as they are neatly clustered into three distinct clumps each with different chemical composition. One group (P) shows the primordial composition of field stars of similar metallicity, and the other two (I and E) have increasing abundances of Al and decreasing abundances of Mg. The fraction of stars we found in the three components (P: 68%, I: 19%, E: 13%) is in excellent agreement with the number ratios computed for the three distinct main sequences in NGC 2808: for the first time there is a clear correspondence between discrete photometric sequences of dwarfs and distinct groups of gi...

  2. The absolute age of the globular cluster M15 using near-infrared adaptive optics images from PISCES/LBT

    CERN Document Server

    Monelli, M; Bono, G; Ferraro, I; Iannicola, G; Fiorentino, G; Arcidiacono, C; Massari, D; Boutsia, K; Briguglio, R; Busoni, L; Carini, R; Close, L; Cresci, G; Esposito, S; Fini, L; Fumana, M; Guerra, J C; Hill, J; Kulesa, C; Mannucci, F; McCarthy, D; Pinna, E; Puglisi, A; Quiros-Pacheco, F; Ragazzoni, R; Riccardi, A; Skemer, A; Xompero, M

    2015-01-01

    We present deep near-infrared (NIR) J, Ks photometry of the old, metal-poor Galactic globular cluster M\\,15 obtained with images collected with the LUCI1 and PISCES cameras available at the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). We show how the use of First Light Adaptive Optics system coupled with the (FLAO) PISCES camera allows us to improve the limiting magnitude by ~2 mag in Ks. By analyzing archival HST data, we demonstrate that the quality of the LBT/PISCES color magnitude diagram is fully comparable with analogous space-based data. The smaller field of view is balanced by the shorter exposure time required to reach a similar photometric limit. We investigated the absolute age of M\\,15 by means of two methods: i) by determining the age from the position of the main sequence turn-off; and ii) by the magnitude difference between the MSTO and the well-defined knee detected along the faint portion of the MS. We derive consistent values of the absolute age of M15, that is 12.9+-2.6 Gyr and 13.3+-1.1 Gyr, respectiv...

  3. The histone chaperone sNASP binds a conserved peptide motif within the globular core of histone H3 through its TPR repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Andrew; Lercher, Lukas; Singh, Hari R; Zinne, Daria; Timinszky, Gyula; Carlomagno, Teresa; Ladurner, Andreas G

    2016-04-20

    Eukaryotic chromatin is a complex yet dynamic structure, which is regulated in part by the assembly and disassembly of nucleosomes. Key to this process is a group of proteins termed histone chaperones that guide the thermodynamic assembly of nucleosomes by interacting with soluble histones. Here we investigate the interaction between the histone chaperone sNASP and its histone H3 substrate. We find that sNASP binds with nanomolar affinity to a conserved heptapeptide motif in the globular domain of H3, close to the C-terminus. Through functional analysis of sNASP homologues we identified point mutations in surface residues within the TPR domain of sNASP that disrupt H3 peptide interaction, but do not completely disrupt binding to full length H3 in cells, suggesting that sNASP interacts with H3 through additional contacts. Furthermore, chemical shift perturbations from(1)H-(15)N HSQC experiments show that H3 peptide binding maps to the helical groove formed by the stacked TPR motifs of sNASP. Our findings reveal a new mode of interaction between a TPR repeat domain and an evolutionarily conserved peptide motif found in canonical H3 and in all histone H3 variants, including CenpA and have implications for the mechanism of histone chaperoning within the cell.

  4. BASIC: A Simple and Accurate Modular DNA Assembly Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storch, Marko; Casini, Arturo; Mackrow, Ben; Ellis, Tom; Baldwin, Geoff S

    2017-01-01

    Biopart Assembly Standard for Idempotent Cloning (BASIC) is a simple, accurate, and robust DNA assembly method. The method is based on linker-mediated DNA assembly and provides highly accurate DNA assembly with 99 % correct assemblies for four parts and 90 % correct assemblies for seven parts [1]. The BASIC standard defines a single entry vector for all parts flanked by the same prefix and suffix sequences and its idempotent nature means that the assembled construct is returned in the same format. Once a part has been adapted into the BASIC format it can be placed at any position within a BASIC assembly without the need for reformatting. This allows laboratories to grow comprehensive and universal part libraries and to share them efficiently. The modularity within the BASIC framework is further extended by the possibility of encoding ribosomal binding sites (RBS) and peptide linker sequences directly on the linkers used for assembly. This makes BASIC a highly versatile library construction method for combinatorial part assembly including the construction of promoter, RBS, gene variant, and protein-tag libraries. In comparison with other DNA assembly standards and methods, BASIC offers a simple robust protocol; it relies on a single entry vector, provides for easy hierarchical assembly, and is highly accurate for up to seven parts per assembly round [2].

  5. Dynamic globularization prediction during cogging process of large size TC11 titanium alloy billet with lamellar structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-wu SONG; Shi-hong ZHANG; Ming CHENG

    2014-01-01

    The flow behavior and dynamic globularization of TC11 titanium alloy during subtransus deformation are investigated through hot compression tests. A constitutive model is established based on physical-based hardening model and phenomenological softening model. And based on the recrystallization mechanisms of globularization, the Avrami type kinetics model is established for prediction of globularization fraction and globularized grain size under large strain subtransus deformation of TC11 alloy. As the preliminary application of the previous results, the cogging process of large size TC11 alloy billet is simulated. Based on subroutine development of the DEFORM software, the coupled simulation of one fire cogging process is developed. It shows that the predicted results are in good agreement with the experimental results in forging load and microstructure characteristic, which validates the reliability of the developed FEM subroutine models.

  6. Chemical tagging in the SDSS-III/APOGEE survey: new identifications of halo stars with globular cluster origins

    CERN Document Server

    Martell, Sarah; Lucatello, Sara; Schiavon, Ricardo; Meszaros, Szabolcs; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Hernandez, Anibal Garcia; Beers, Tim; Nidever, David

    2016-01-01

    We present new identifications of five red giant stars in the Galactic halo with chemical abundance patterns that indicate they originally formed in globular clusters. Using data from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) Survey available through Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 12 (DR12), we first identify likely halo giants, and then search those for the well-known chemical tags associated with globular clusters, specifically enrichment in nitrogen and aluminum. We find that 2% of the halo giants in our sample have this chemical signature, in agreement with previous results. Following the interpretation in our previous work on this topic, this would imply that at least 13% of halo stars originally formed in globular clusters. Recent developments in the theoretical understanding of globular cluster formation raise questions about that interpretation, and we concede the possibility that these migrants represent a small fraction of the halo field. There are roughly as many st...

  7. The mass distribution of the Fornax dSph: constraints from its globular cluster distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, David R.; Dehnen, Walter; Read, Justin I.; Wilkinson, Mark I.

    2012-10-01

    Uniquely among the dwarf spheroidal (dSph) satellite galaxies of the Milky Way, Fornax hosts globular clusters. It remains a puzzle as to why dynamical friction has not yet dragged any of Fornax's five globular clusters to the centre, and also why there is no evidence that any similar star cluster has been in the past (for Fornax or any other tidally undisrupted dSph). We set up a suite of 2800 N-body simulations that sample the full range of globular cluster orbits and mass models consistent with all existing observational constraints for Fornax. In agreement with previous work, we find that if Fornax has a large dark matter core, then its globular clusters remain close to their currently observed locations for long times. Furthermore, we find previously unreported behaviour for clusters that start inside the core region. These are pushed out of the core and gain orbital energy, a process we call 'dynamical buoyancy'. Thus, a cored mass distribution in Fornax will naturally lead to a shell-like globular cluster distribution near the core radius, independent of the initial conditions. By contrast, cold dark matter-type cusped mass distributions lead to the rapid infall of at least one cluster within Δt = 1-2 Gyr, except when picking unlikely initial conditions for the cluster orbits (˜2 per cent probability), and almost all clusters within Δt = 10 Gyr. Alternatively, if Fornax has only a weakly cusped mass distribution, then dynamical friction is much reduced. While over Δt = 10 Gyr this still leads to the infall of one to four clusters from their present orbits, the infall of any cluster within Δt = 1-2 Gyr is much less likely (with probability 0-70 per cent, depending on Δt and the strength of the cusp). Such a solution to the timing problem requires (in addition to a shallow dark matter cusp) that in the past the globular clusters were somewhat further from Fornax than today; they most likely did not form within Fornax, but were accreted.

  8. MUSE crowded field 3D spectroscopy of over 12 000 stars in the globular cluster NGC 6397. I. The first comprehensive HRD of a globular cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husser, Tim-Oliver; Kamann, Sebastian; Dreizler, Stefan; Wendt, Martin; Wulff, Nina; Bacon, Roland; Wisotzki, Lutz; Brinchmann, Jarle; Weilbacher, Peter M.; Roth, Martin M.; Monreal-Ibero, Ana

    2016-04-01

    Aims: We demonstrate the high multiplex advantage of crowded field 3D spectroscopy with the new integral field spectrograph MUSE by means of a spectroscopic analysis of more than 12 000 individual stars in the globular cluster NGC 6397. Methods: The stars are deblended with a point spread function fitting technique, using a photometric reference catalogue from HST as prior, including relative positions and brightnesses. This catalogue is also used for a first analysis of the extracted spectra, followed by an automatic in-depth analysis via a full-spectrum fitting method based on a large grid of PHOENIX spectra. Results: We analysed the largest sample so far available for a single globular cluster of 18 932 spectra from 12 307 stars in NGC 6397. We derived a mean radial velocity of vrad = 17.84 ± 0.07 km s-1 and a mean metallicity of [Fe/H] = -2.120 ± 0.002, with the latter seemingly varying with temperature for stars on the red giant branch (RGB). We determine Teff and [Fe/H] from the spectra, and log g from HST photometry. This is the first very comprehensive Hertzsprung-Russell diagram (HRD) for a globular cluster based on the analysis of several thousands of stellar spectra, ranging from the main sequence to the tip of the RGB. Furthermore, two interesting objects were identified; one is a post-AGB star and the other is a possible millisecond-pulsar companion. Data products are available at http://muse-vlt.eu/scienceBased on observations obtained at the Very Large Telescope (VLT) of the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile (ESO Programme ID 60.A-9100(C)).

  9. Polymer Directed Protein Assemblies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijn, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Protein aggregation and protein self-assembly is an important occurrence in natural systems, and is in some form or other dictated by biopolymers. Very obvious influences of biopolymers on protein assemblies are, e. g., virus particles. Viruses are a multi-protein assembly of which the morphology is

  10. Polymer Directed Protein Assemblies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijn, Patrick

    Protein aggregation and protein self-assembly is an important occurrence in natural systems, and is in some form or other dictated by biopolymers. Very obvious influences of biopolymers on protein assemblies are, e. g., virus particles. Viruses are a multi-protein assembly of which the morphology is

  11. Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David H [Redondo Beach, CA

    2012-04-10

    Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies are provided. In an embodiment, by way of example only, a sensor mount assembly includes a busbar, a main body, a backing surface, and a first finger. The busbar has a first end and a second end. The main body is overmolded onto the busbar. The backing surface extends radially outwardly relative to the main body. The first finger extends axially from the backing surface, and the first finger has a first end, a second end, and a tooth. The first end of the first finger is disposed on the backing surface, and the tooth is formed on the second end of the first finger.

  12. Evidence for multiple populations in the massive globular cluster NGC 2419 from deep uVI LBT photometry

    CERN Document Server

    Beccari, G; Lardo, C; Bragaglia, A; Carretta, E; Dalessandro, E; Mucciarelli, A; Pancino, E

    2013-01-01

    We present accurate wide-field uVI photometry of the remote and massive Galactic globular cluster NGC 2419, aimed at searching for the u-V color spread along the Red Giant Branch (RGB) that is generally interpreted as the photometric signature of the presence of multiple populations in globular clusters. Focusing on the RGB stars in the magnitude range 19.80.0 lie preferentially on the blue side.

  13. Grasp Assist Device with Shared Tendon Actuator Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Bergelin, Bryan J. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A grasp assist device includes a glove with first and second tendon-driven fingers, a tendon, and a sleeve with a shared tendon actuator assembly. Tendon ends are connected to the respective first and second fingers. The actuator assembly includes a drive assembly having a drive axis and a tendon hook. The tendon hook, which defines an arcuate surface slot, is linearly translatable along the drive axis via the drive assembly, e.g., a servo motor thereof. The flexible tendon is routed through the surface slot such that the surface slot divides the flexible tendon into two portions each terminating in a respective one of the first and second ends. The drive assembly may include a ball screw and nut. An end cap of the actuator assembly may define two channels through which the respective tendon portions pass. The servo motor may be positioned off-axis with respect to the drive axis.

  14. Photovoltaic concentrator assembly with optically active cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plesniak, Adam P

    2014-01-21

    A photovoltaic concentrator assembly that includes a housing that defines an internal volume and includes a rim, wherein the rim defines an opening into the internal volume, a photovoltaic cell positioned in the internal volume, and an optical element that includes an optically active body and a flange extending outward from the body, wherein the flange is sealingly engaged with the rim of the housing to enclose the internal volume.

  15. Comparative analysis of the noncollagenous NC1 domain of type IV collagen: identification of structural features important for assembly, function, and pathogenesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Netzer, K. O.; Suzuki, K; Itoh, Y.; Hudson, B.G.; Khalifah, R. G.

    1998-01-01

    Type IV collagen alpha1-alpha6 chains have important roles in the assembly of basement membranes and are implicated in the pathogenesis of Goodpasture syndrome, an autoimmune disorder, and Alport syndrome, a hereditary renal disease. We report comparative sequence analyses and structural predictions of the noncollagenous C-terminal globular NC1 domain (28 sequences). The inferred tree verified that type IV collagen sequences fall into two groups, alpha1-like and alpha2-like, and suggested tha...

  16. Emerin self-assembly mechanism: role of the LEM domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Camille; Celli, Florian; Hendriks, Kitty; Zinke, Maximilian; Essawy, Nada; Herrada, Isaline; Arteni, Ana-Andreea; Theillet, François-Xavier; Alpha-Bazin, Béatrice; Armengaud, Jean; Coirault, Catherine; Lange, Adam; Zinn-Justin, Sophie

    2017-01-01

    At the nuclear envelope, the inner nuclear membrane protein emerin contributes to the interface between the nucleoskeleton and the chromatin. Emerin is an essential actor of the nuclear response to a mechanical signal. Genetic defects in emerin cause Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy. It was proposed that emerin oligomerization regulates nucleoskeleton binding, and impaired oligomerization contributes to the loss of function of emerin disease-causing mutants. We here report the first structural characterization of emerin oligomers. We identified an N-terminal emerin region from amino acid 1 to amino acid 132 that is necessary and sufficient for formation of long curvilinear filaments. In emerin monomer, this region contains a globular LEM domain and a fragment that is intrinsically disordered. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance analysis identifies the LEM β-fragment as part of the oligomeric structural core. However, the LEM domain alone does not self-assemble into filaments. Additional residues forming a β-structure are observed within the filaments that could correspond to the unstructured region in emerin monomer. We show that the delK37 mutation causing muscular dystrophy triggers LEM domain unfolding and increases emerin self-assembly rate. Similarly, inserting a disulfide bridge that stabilizes the LEM folded state impairs emerin N-terminal region self-assembly, whereas reducing this disulfide bridge triggers self-assembly. We conclude that the LEM domain, responsible for binding to the chromatin protein BAF, undergoes a conformational change during self-assembly of emerin N-terminal region. The consequences of these structural rearrangement and self-assembly events on emerin binding properties are discussed. © 2016 The Authors Journal compilation © 2016 FEBS.

  17. A direct role of Mad1 in the spindle assembly checkpoint beyond Mad2 kinetochore recruitment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Thomas; Larsen, Marie Sofie Yoo; Sedgwick, Garry G;

    2014-01-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) ensures accurate chromosome segregation by delaying entry into anaphase until all sister chromatids have become bi-oriented. A key component of the SAC is the Mad2 protein, which can adopt either an inactive open (O-Mad2) or active closed (C-Mad2) conformation...... in the SAC beyond recruitment of C-Mad2 to kinetochores has not yet been addressed. Here, we show that Mad1 is required for mitotic arrest even when C-Mad2 is artificially recruited to kinetochores, indicating that it has indeed an additional function in promoting the checkpoint. The C-terminal globular...

  18. Smart assembly of polymer fibers: lessons from major ampullate spider silk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viney, Christopher

    1996-02-01

    Studies of major ampullate silk (MAS), especially the secretions and fibers produced by the spider Nephila clavipes (golden orb weaver), have yielded several results of potential value to the materials scientist/engineer. There are lessons to be learned about synthesis, processing and microstructural design of high-tensile polymer fibers. The 'smart' aspect of silk production in nature concerns the ability of the spider to rapidly process a concentrated, viscous aqueous solution of silk protein (stored in the gland) into water-insoluble fiber on demand. This process centers on the assembly of a shear-sensitive supramolecular liquid crystalline phase by aggregation of the solubilized globular protein molecules.

  19. Soldering in electronics assembly

    CERN Document Server

    Judd, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Soldering in Electronics Assembly discusses several concerns in soldering of electronic assemblies. The book is comprised of nine chapters that tackle different areas in electronic assembly soldering. Chapter 1 discusses the soldering process itself, while Chapter 2 covers the electronic assemblies. Chapter 3 talks about solders and Chapter 4 deals with flux. The text also tackles the CS and SC soldering process. The cleaning of soldered assemblies, solder quality, and standards and specifications are also discussed. The book will be of great use to professionals who deal with electronic assem

  20. The Gaia-ESO Survey: Kinematics of seven Galactic globular clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Lardo, C; Bellazzini, M; Bragaglia, A; Donati, P; Gilmore, G; Randich, S; Feltzing, S; Jeffries, R D; Vallenari, A; Alfaro, E J; Prieto, C Allende; Flaccomio, E; Koposov, S E; Recio-Blanco, A; Bergemann, M; Carraro, G; Costado, M T; Damiani, F; Hourihane, A; Jofre, P; de Laverny, P; Marconi, G; Masseron, T; Morbidelli, L; Sacco, G G; Worley, C C

    2014-01-01

    The Gaia-ESO survey is a large public spectroscopic survey aimed at investigating the origin and formation history of our Galaxy by collecting spectroscopy of representative samples (about 10^5 Milky Way stars) of all Galactic stellar populations, in the field and in clusters. The survey uses globular clusters as intra- and inter-survey calibrators, deriving stellar atmospheric parameters and abundances of a significant number of stars in clusters, along with radial velocity determinations. We used precise radial velocities of a large number of stars in seven globular clusters (NGC 1851, NGC 2808, NGC 4372, NGC 4833, NGC 5927, NGC 6752, and NGC 7078) to validate pipeline results and to preliminarily investigate the cluster internal kinematics. Radial velocity measurements were extracted from FLAMES/GIRAFFE spectra processed by the survey pipeline as part of the second internal data release of data products to ESO. We complemented our sample with ESO archival data obtained with different instrument configurati...

  1. Formation of globular clusters induced by external ultraviolet radiation II: Three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, Makito; Hasegawa, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    We explore the possibility of the formation of globular clusters under ultraviolet (UV) background radiation. One-dimensional spherical symmetric radiation hydrodynamics (RHD) simulations by Hasegawa et al. have demonstrated that the collapse of low-mass (10^6-10^7 solar masses) gas clouds exposed to intense UV radiation can lead to the formation of compact star clusters like globular clusters (GCs) if gas clouds contract with supersonic infall velocities. However, three-dimensional effects, such as the anisotropy of background radiation and the inhomogeneity in gas clouds, have not been studied so far. In this paper, we perform three-dimensional RHD simulations in a semi-cosmological context, and reconsider the formation of compact star clusters in strong UV radiation fields. As a result, we find that although anisotropic radiation fields bring an elongated shadow of neutral gas, almost spherical compact star clusters can be procreated from a "supersonic infall" cloud, since photo-dissociating radiation supp...

  2. A peculiar HI cloud near the distant globular cluster Pal 4

    CERN Document Server

    van Loon, Jacco Th; Putman, Mary; Peek, Joshua E G; Gibson, Steven J; Douglas, Kevin A; Korpela, Eric J

    2009-01-01

    We present 21-cm observations of four Galactic globular clusters, as part of the on-going GALFA-HI Survey at Arecibo. We discovered a peculiar HI cloud in the vicinity of the distant (109 kpc) cluster Pal 4, and discuss its properties and likelihood of association with the cluster. We conclude that an association of the HI cloud and Pal 4 is possible, but that a chance coincidence between Pal 4 and a nearby compact high-velocity cloud cannot be ruled out altogether. New, more stringent upper limits were derived for the other three clusters: M 3, NGC 5466, and Pal 13. We briefly discuss the fate of globular cluster gas and the interaction of compact clouds with the Galactic Halo gas.

  3. Massive binaries and the enrichment of the interstellar medium in globular clusters

    CERN Document Server

    de Mink, S E; Langer, N; Izzard, R G

    2009-01-01

    Abundance anomalies observed in globular cluster stars indicate pollution with material processed by hydrogen burning. Two main sources have been suggested: asymptotic giant branch stars and massive stars rotating near the break-up limit. We discuss the potential of massive binaries as an interesting alternative source of processed material. We discuss observational evidence for mass shedding from interacting binaries. In contrast to the fast, radiatively driven winds of massive stars, this material is typically ejected with low velocity. We expect that it remains inside the potential well of a globular cluster and becomes available for the formation or pollution of a second generation of stars. We estimate that the amount of processed low-velocity material that can be ejected by massive binaries is larger than the contribution of two previously suggested sources combined.

  4. Neutrino and axion bounds from the globular cluster M5 (NGC 5904).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viaux, N; Catelan, M; Stetson, P B; Raffelt, G G; Redondo, J; Valcarce, A A R; Weiss, A

    2013-12-06

    The red-giant branch (RGB) in globular clusters is extended to larger brightness if the degenerate helium core loses too much energy in "dark channels." Based on a large set of archival observations, we provide high-precision photometry for the Galactic globular cluster M5 (NGC 5904), allowing for a detailed comparison between the observed tip of the RGB with predictions based on contemporary stellar evolution theory. In particular, we derive 95% confidence limits of g(ae)axion-electron coupling and μ(ν)<4.5×10(-12)μ(B) (Bohr magneton μ(B)=e/2m(e)) on a neutrino dipole moment, based on a detailed analysis of statistical and systematic uncertainties. The cluster distance is the single largest source of uncertainty and can be improved in the future.

  5. THE INFLUENCE OF POTASSIUM DICHROMATE Cr (VI ADMINISTRATION DURATION ON GLOBULAR RESISTANCE IN FEMALE RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LETIŢIA STANA

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The „in vivo” experiment has had as aim the study of different Cr(VI doses administration on globular resistance in female rats related to administration duration. Study was carried out on 56 female rats divided in 8 groups, 6 experimental and 2 control that received potassium dichromate in drinking water in doses of 25 ppm, 50 ppm and 75ppm Cr(VI, for 3 months, respectively, 6 months. Decrease of globular resistance (in terms of haemolysis degree in hypotonic solutions at increasing dose (up to 0.8% NaCl at 75 ppm dose in all experimental groups, in direct relation with the duration of administration was registered. Control groups were in physiological limits. The results of the present study revealed the affecting of erythrocyte membrane in function of administration duration and chromium intake level, because of oxidative lesions produced by it.

  6. Two distinct sequences of blue straggler stars in the globular cluster M30

    CERN Document Server

    Ferraro, F R; Dalessandro, E; Lanzoni, B; Sills, A; Rood, R T; Pecci, F Fusi; Karakas, A I; Miocchi, P; Bovinelli, S; 10.1038/nature08607

    2010-01-01

    Stars in globular clusters are generally believed to have all formed at the same time, early in the Galaxy's history. 'Blue stragglers' are stars massive enough that they should have evolved into white dwarfs long ago. Two possible mechanisms have been proposed for their formation: mass transfer between binary companions and stellar mergers resulting from direct collisions between two stars. Recently, the binary explanation was claimed to be dominant. Here we report that there are two distinct parallel sequences of blue stragglers in M30. This globular cluster is thought to have undergone 'core collapse', during which both the collision rate and the mass transfer activity in binary systems would have been enhanced. We suggest that the two observed sequences arise from the cluster core collapse, with the bluer population arising from direct stellar collisions and the redder one arising from the evolution of close binaries that are probably still experiencing an active phase of mass transfer.

  7. Preparation of semi-solid slurry containing fine and globular particles for wrought aluminum alloy 2024

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The semi-solid slurry of wrought aluminum alloy 2024 was prepared by a well developed rheocasting process, low superheat pouring with shearing field(LSPSF). The appreciate combination of pouring temperature and rotation speed of barrel, can give rise to a transition of the growth morphology of primary α(Al) from coarse-dendritic to coarse-particle-like and further to fine-globular. The combined effects of both localized rapid cooling and vigorous mixing during the initial stage of solidification can enhance wall nucleation and nuclei survival, which leads to the formation of fine-globular primary α(Al). By using semi-solid slurry prepared by LSPSF, direct squeeze cast cup-shaped component with improved mechanical properties such as yield strength of 198MPa, ultimate tensile strength of 306 MPa and elongation of 10.4%, can be obtained.

  8. The effect of unresolved binaries on globular cluster proper-motion dispersion profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Bianchini, P; van de Ven, G; Schinnerer, E; Bellini, A; van der Marel, R P; Watkins, L L; Anderson, J

    2016-01-01

    High-precision kinematic studies of globular clusters require an accurate knowledge of all possible sources of contamination. Amongst other sources, binary stars can introduce systematic biases in the kinematics. Using a set of Monte Carlo cluster simulations with different concentrations and binary fractions, we investigate the effect of unresolved binaries on proper-motion dispersion profiles, treating the simulations like HST proper-motion samples. Since globular clusters evolve towards a state of partial energy equipartition, more massive stars lose energy and decrease their velocity dispersion. As a consequence, on average, binaries have a lower velocity dispersion, since they are more massive kinematic tracers. We show that, in the case of clusters with high binary fraction (initial binary fraction of 50%) and high concentration (i.e., closer to energy equipartition), unresolved binaries introduce a color-dependent bias in the velocity dispersion of main-sequence stars of the order of 0.1-0.3 km s$^{-1}...

  9. On the metallicity distribution of the peculiar globular cluster M22

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Jae-Woo

    2016-01-01

    In our previous study, we showed that the peculiar globular cluster (GC) M22 contains two distinct stellar populations, namely the Ca-w and Ca-s groups with different physical properties, having different chemical compositions, spatial distributions and kinematics. We proposed that M22 is most likely formed via a merger of two GCs with heterogeneous metallicities in a dwarf galaxy environment and accreted later to our Galaxy. In their recent study, Mucciarelli et al. claimed that M22 is a normal mono-metallic globular cluster without any perceptible metallicity spread among the two groups of stars, which challenges our results and those of others. We devise new strategies for the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) abundance analysis of red giant branch (RGB) stars in GCs and show there exists a spread in the iron abundance distribution in M22.

  10. Supernovae and their expanding blast waves during the early evolution of Galactic globular clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo; Silich, Sergiy; Cassisi, Santi

    2015-01-01

    Our arguments deal with the early evolution of Galactic globular clusters and show why only a few of the supernovae products were retained within globular clusters and only in the most massive cases ($M \\ge 10^6$ Msol), while less massive clusters were not contaminated at all by supernovae. Here we show that supernova blast waves evolving in a steep density gradient undergo blowout and end up discharging their energy and metals into the medium surrounding the clusters. This inhibits the dispersal and the contamination of the gas left over from a first stellar generation. Only the ejecta from well centered supernovae, that evolve into a high density medium available for a second stellar generation in the most massive clusters would be retained. These are likely to mix their products with the remaining gas, leading in these cases eventually to an Fe contaminated second stellar generation.

  11. The SLUGGS Survey: Globular cluster system kinematics and substructure in NGC 4365

    CERN Document Server

    Blom, Christina; Brodie, Jean P; Foster, Caroline; Romanowsky, Aaron J; Spitler, Lee R; Strader, Jay

    2012-01-01

    We present a kinematic analysis of the globular cluster (GC) system of the giant elliptical galaxy NGC 4365 and find several distinct kinematic substructures. This analysis is carried out using radial velocities for 269 GCs, obtained with the DEIMOS instrument on the Keck II telescope as part of the SAGES Legacy Unifying Globulars and Galaxies Survey (SLUGGS). We find that each of the three (formerly identified) GC colour subpopulations reveal distinct rotation properties. The rotation of the green GC subpopulation is consistent with the bulk of NGC 4365's stellar light, which `rolls' about the photometric major axis. The blue and red GC subpopulations show `normal' rotation about the minor axis. We also find that the red GC subpopulation is rotationally dominated beyond 2.5 arcmin (~17 kpc) and that the root mean squared velocity of the green subpopulation declines sharply with radius suggesting a possible bias towards radial orbits relative to the other GC subpopulations. Additionally, we find a population ...

  12. Erosion of Globular Cluster Systems: The Influence of Radial Anisotropy, Central Black Holes and Dynamical Friction

    CERN Document Server

    Brockamp, Michael; Thies, Ingo; Baumgardt, Holger; Kroupa, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    We present the adaptable MUESLI code for investigating dynamics and erosion processes of globular clusters (GCs) in galaxies. MUESLI follows the orbits of individual clusters and applies internal and external dissolution processes to them. Orbit integration is based on the self-consistent field method in combination with a time-transformed leapfrog scheme, allowing us to handle velocity-dependent forces like triaxial dynamical friction. In a first application, the erosion of globular cluster systems (GCSs) in elliptical galaxies is investigated. Observations show that massive ellipticals have rich, radially extended GCSs, while some compact dwarf ellipticals contain no GCs at all. For several representative examples, spanning the full mass scale of observed elliptical galaxies, we quantify the influence of radial anisotropy, galactic density profiles, SMBHs, and dynamical friction on the GC erosion rate. We find that GC number density profiles are centrally flattened in less than a Hubble time, naturally expl...

  13. Globular Cluster Systems and the Missing Satellite Problem Implications for Cold Dark Matter Models

    CERN Document Server

    Côté, P; Marzke, R O; Cote, Patrick; West, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    We analyze the metallicity distributions of globular clusters belonging to 28 early-type galaxies in the survey of Kundu & Whitmore (2001). A Monte Carlo algorithm which simulates the chemical evolution of galaxies that grow hierarchically via dissipationless mergers is used to determine the most probable protogalactic mass function for each galaxy. Contrary to the claims of Kundu & Whitmore, we find that the observed metallicity distributions are in close agreement with the predictions of such hierarchical formation models. The mass spectrum of protogalactic fragments for the galaxies in our sample has a power-law behavior, with an exponent of roughly -2. This spectrum is indistinguishable from the mass spectrum of dark matter halos predicted by cold dark matter models for structure formation. We argue that these protogalactic fragments, the likely sites of globular cluster formation in the early universe, are the disrupted remains of the "missing" satellite galaxies predicted by cold dark matter mod...

  14. The ages of Galactic globular clusters in the context of self-enrichment

    CERN Document Server

    Decressin, T; Kroupa, P; Meynet, G; Charbonnel, C

    2008-01-01

    A significant fraction of stars in globular clusters (about 70%-85%) exhibit peculiar chemical patterns with strong abundance variations in light elements along with constant abundances in heavy elements. These abundance anomalies can be created in the H-burning core of a first generation of fast rotating massive stars and the corresponding elements are convoyed to the stellar surface thanks to rotational induced mixing. If the rotation of the stars is fast enough this matter is ejected at low velocity through a mechanical wind at the equator. It then pollutes the ISM from which a second generation of chemically anomalous stars can be formed. The proportion of anomalous to normal star observed today depends on at least two quantities : (1) the number of polluter stars; (2) the dynamical history of the cluster which may lose during its lifetime first and second generation stars in different proportions. Here we estimate these proportions based on dynamical models for globular clusters. When internal dynamical ...

  15. SUPERNOVAE AND THEIR EXPANDING BLAST WAVES DURING THE EARLY EVOLUTION OF GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo; Silich, Sergiy [Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica Óptica y Electrónica, AP 51, 72000 Puebla, México (Mexico); Muñoz-Tuñón, Casiana [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (Spain); Cassisi, Santi, E-mail: gtt@inaoep.mx, E-mail: cmt@iac.es, E-mail: cassisi@oa-teramo.inaf.it [INAF—Astronomical Observatory of Collurania, via M. Maggini, I-64100 Teramo (Italy)

    2015-11-20

    Our arguments deal with the early evolution of Galactic globular clusters and show why only a few of the supernovae (SNe) products were retained within globular clusters and only in the most massive cases (M ≥ 10{sup 6} M{sub ⊙}), while less massive clusters were not contaminated at all by SNe. Here, we show that SN blast waves evolving in a steep density gradient undergo blowout and end up discharging their energy and metals into the medium surrounding the clusters. This inhibits the dispersal and the contamination of the gas left over from a first stellar generation. Only the ejecta from well-centered SNe that evolve into a high-density medium available for a second stellar generation (2SG) in the most massive clusters would be retained. These are likely to mix their products with the remaining gas, eventually leading in these cases to an Fe-contaminated 2SG.

  16. Comparing Mid-Infrared Globular Cluster Colors With Population Synthesis Models

    CERN Document Server

    Barmby, P

    2012-01-01

    Several population synthesis models now predict integrated colors of simple stellar populations in the mid-infrared bands. To date, the models have not been extensively tested in this wavelength range. In a comparison of the predictions of several recent population synthesis models, the integrated colors are found to cover approximately the same range but to disagree in detail, for example on the effects of metallicity. To test against observational data, globular clusters are used as the closest objects to idealized groups of stars with a single age and single metallicity. Using recent mass estimates, we have compiled a sample of massive, old globular clusters in M31 which contain enough stars to guard against the stochastic effects of small-number statistics, and measured their integrated colors in the Spitzer/IRAC bands. Comparison of the cluster photometry in the IRAC bands with the model predictions shows that the models reproduce the cluster colors reasonably well, except for a small (not statistically ...

  17. Monte Carlo Simulations of Globular Cluster Evolution. III. Primordial Binary Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Fregeau, J M; Joshi, K J; Rasio, F A

    2003-01-01

    We study the dynamical evolution of globular clusters using our 2D Monte Carlo code with the inclusion of primordial binary interactions for equal-mass stars. We use approximate analytical cross sections for energy generation from binary-binary and binary-single interactions. After a brief period of slight contraction or expansion of the core over the first few relaxation times, all clusters enter a much longer phase of stable "binary burning" lasting many tens of relaxation times. The structural parameters of our models during this phase match well those of most observed globular clusters. At the end of this phase, clusters that have survived tidal disruption undergo deep core collapse, followed by gravothermal oscillations. Our results clearly show that the presence of even a small fraction of binaries in a cluster is sufficient to support the core against collapse significantly beyond the normal core collapse time predicted without the presence of binaries. For tidally truncated systems, collapse is easily...

  18. Heterogeneous self-assembled media for biopolymerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monnard, Pierre-Alain

    2011-01-01

    compartments and lipid-bilayer lattices. Another kind of media is represented by self-assembled phases in the reaction medium, e.g., in water-ice matrices that are formed by two co-existing aqueous phases (a solid phase and a concentrated liquid phase) when an aqueous solution is cooled below its freezing......Heterogeneous media, such as micro-structured aqueous environments, could offer an alternative approach to the synthesis of biopolymers with novel functions. Structured media are here defined as specialized, self-assembled structures that are formed, e.g, by amphiphiles, such as liposomes, emulsion...... point, but above the eutectic point. These media have the capacity to assemble chemical molecules or complex catalytic assemblies into unique configurations that are unstable or unavailable in bulk aqueous phases. Reactions can then proceed which do not readily occur in homogeneous solutions. To gauge...

  19. Composite fan stator assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donges, G.L.

    1993-07-13

    A composite fan stator assembly is described for a gas turbine engine having at least two fan rotor stages, the composite stator assembly comprising: an annular composite fan case assembly including an access port, the fan case assembly circumferentially disposed around first and second fan rotor stage locations, a composite fan stator stage supported by and extending radially inward of the fan case assembly and axially disposed between the two fan rotor stage locations, the fan stator stage includes at least one removable vane segment accessible for removal through the access port for assembly and reassembly, the composite fan case assembly including a separable composite forward fan case assembly and a separable composite aft fan case assembly spaced axially aft of the forward fan case assembly, the forward fan case assembly being bolted to the aft fan case assembly, wherein the composite fan stator stage is axially and radially trapped and supported by the forward and aft fan case assemblies. A composite stator vane assembly comprising: a composite inner shroud, a composite outer shroud disposed radially outward of the inner shroud, a plurality of vanes disposed between the shrouds, the vanes including a suction side and a pressure side and radially inner and outer roots, the roots extending through platforms of corresponding ones of the inner and outer shrouds, four box-type attachment elements corresponding to curved suction and pressure sides of the inner and outer roots, the box-type attachment elements having two connected legs angled with respect to each other, a first one of the legs extending along, conforming to the curve of, and bonded to a corresponding one of the airfoil root sides, and a second one of the legs extending along and bonded to a composite shroud surface.

  20. Comparative analysis of the noncollagenous NC1 domain of type IV collagen: identification of structural features important for assembly, function, and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netzer, K O; Suzuki, K; Itoh, Y; Hudson, B G; Khalifah, R G

    1998-06-01

    Type IV collagen alpha1-alpha6 chains have important roles in the assembly of basement membranes and are implicated in the pathogenesis of Goodpasture syndrome, an autoimmune disorder, and Alport syndrome, a hereditary renal disease. We report comparative sequence analyses and structural predictions of the noncollagenous C-terminal globular NC1 domain (28 sequences). The inferred tree verified that type IV collagen sequences fall into two groups, alpha1-like and alpha2-like, and suggested that vertebrate alpha3/alpha4 sequences evolved before alpha1/alpha2 and alpha5/alpha6. About one fifth of NC1 residues were identified to confer either the alpha1 or alpha2 group-specificity. These residues accumulate opposite charge in subdomain B of alpha1 (positive) and alpha2 (negative) sequences and may play a role in the stoichiometric chain selection upon type IV collagen assembly. Neural network secondary structure prediction on multiple aligned sequences revealed a subdomain core structure consisting of six hydrophobic beta-strands and one short alpha-helix with a significant hydrophobic moment. The existence of opposite charges in the alpha-helices may carry implications for intersubdomain interactions. The results provide a rationale for defining the epitope that binds Goodpasture autoantibodies and a framework for understanding how certain NC1 mutations may lead to Alport syndrome. A search algorithm, based entirely on amino acid properties, yielded a possible similarity of NC1 to tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP) and prompted an investigation of a possible functional relationship. The results indicate that NC1 preparations decrease the activity of matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 3 (MMP-2, MMP-3) toward a peptide substrate, though not to [14C]-gelatin. We suggest that an ancestral NC1 may have been incorporated into type IV collagen as an evolutionarily mobile domain carrying proteinase inhibitor function.

  1. A 20 cm Search for Pulsars in Globular Clusters with Arecibo and the GBT

    CERN Document Server

    Hessels, J W T; Freire, P C C; Kaspi, V M; Lorimer, D R; Ransom, S M; Stairs, I H; Backer, Donald C.; Freire, Paulo C.C.; Hessels, Jason W.T.; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Lorimer, Duncan R.; Ransom, Scott M.; Stairs, Ingrid H.

    2004-01-01

    We are conducting deep searches for radio pulsations at L-band (~ 20cm) towards more than 30 globular clusters using the 305m Arecibo telescope in Puerto Rico and the 100m Green Bank Telescope in West Virginia. With roughly three quarters of our search data analyzed, we have discovered 12 new millisecond pulsars, 11 of which are in binary systems, and at least three of which eclipse. We have timing solutions for several of these systems.

  2. [Long-range electron transfer in globular proteins by polaron excitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhno, V L; Chuev, G N

    1997-01-01

    Considering polaron model, we have calculated an electron state localized in the protein heme. Using these calculations: the electron density and electron energy, we estimated the self-exchange rate constant for cyt c (horse heart), its reorganization energy, matrix element, and dependence of this rate on the distance between hemes. The results are compared with the experimental data and other theoretical estimations. We discuss the role of polaron excitations in the long-range electron transfer in globular proteins.

  3. SIX NEW GALACTIC ORBITS OF GLOBULAR CLUSTERS IN A MILKY-WAY-LIKE GALAXY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Allen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Recientemente se han publicado nuevos movimientos propios absolutos para seis cúmulos globulares. Esto nos ha motivado para obtener las órbitas galácticas de estos cúmulos en diferentes variantes del potencial galáctico. Hemos utilizado un modelo de potencial axisimétrico, uno con barra y otro con barra y brazos espirales. Comparamos y discutimos las características orbitales para esos tres casos.

  4. A new X-ray transient in the globular cluster Terzan 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijnands, R.; Altamirano, D.; Heinke, C. O.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Pooley, D.

    2012-07-01

    As part of our program (PI: Altamirano) using Swift/XRT to monitor several globular clusters to detect transient behavior of X-ray binaries in those clusters, we obtained a 1.2 ksec observation of Terzan 5 on 6 July 2012. During this observation, we detect a clear excess of photons which was not present during previous Swift observations (i.e., 26 June 2012, 30 June 2012).

  5. Distribución en gran escala de los cúmulos globulares en Fornax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrov, P. G.

    Para analizar los cúmulos globulares azules y rojos de NGC 1399 asociados con NGC 1399 en particular, o si los cúmulos azules representaban un sistema asociado con el cúmulo de Fornax en general, se obtuvieron imágenes CCD de gran formato con el telescopio de 4m del CTIO, en las bandas C y T1. Se describe el método empleado y lo encontrado.

  6. Uncovering Multiple Populations with Washington Photometry: I. The Globular Cluster NGC 1851

    OpenAIRE

    Cummings, Jeffrey D.; Geisler, D; Villanova, S.; Carraro, G.

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of multiple populations (MPs) in globular clusters (GCs) has become a forefront area of research in astronomy. Multiple red giant branches (RGBs), subgiant branches (SGBs), and even main sequences (MSs) have now been observed photometrically in many GCs. UV photometry has been crucial in discovering and analyzing these MPs, but the Johnson U and the Stromgren and Sloan u filters that have generally been used are relatively inefficient and very sensitive to reddening and atmospher...

  7. Structural Changes Under Heat Treatment of High-Strength Cast Iron with Globular Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukanov, V. V.; Ziza, A. I.; Mikhailov, M. S.; Tsyganko, L. K.; Shandyba, G. A.

    2016-11-01

    High-strength cast iron of grade VCh50 with globular graphite is studied after isothermal quenching in the bainitic and martensitic ranges. The mechanical properties of the iron and the hardness of its structural components are determined. The fine structure of the iron with bainitic and martensitic matrix is studied. The effect of the tempering temperature after the isothermal quenching on the hardness and structure of the iron is estimated.

  8. La distribución multimodal de cúmulos globulares en la galaxia NGC 1399

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, J. C.; Ostrov, P. G.

    Se presenta una discusión de las características del diagrama de dos colores para un muestreo de 400 cúmulos globulares asociados con NGC 1399. Los resultados indican la presencia de, por lo menos, tres familias de cúmulos. La naturaleza de una cuarta componente, muy azul, no es clara aunque podría tratarse de cúmulos ``sueltos" asociados con el sistema de Fornax.

  9. MUSE crowded field 3D spectroscopy of over 12,000 stars in the globular cluster NGC 6397 - I. The first spectroscopic HRD of a globular cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Husser, Tim-Oliver; Dreizler, Stefan; Wendt, Martin; Wulff, Nina; Bacon, Roland; Wisotzki, Lutz; Brinchmann, Jarle; Weilbacher, Peter M; Roth, Martin M; Monreal-Ibero, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Aims. We demonstrate the high multiplex advantage of crowded field 3D spectroscopy using the new integral field spectrograph MUSE by means of a spectroscopic analysis of more than 12,000 individual stars in the globular cluster NGC 6397. Methods. The stars are deblended with a PSF fitting technique, using a photometric reference catalogue from HST as prior, including relative positions and brightnesses. This catalogue is also used for a first analysis of the extracted spectra, followed by an automatic in-depth analysis using a full-spectrum fitting method based on a large grid of PHOENIX spectra. Results. With 18,932 spectra from 12,307 stars in NGC 6397 we have analysed the largest sample so far available for a single globular cluster. We derived a mean radial velocity of vrad=17.84+-0.07 km/s and a mean metallicity of [Fe/H]=-2.120+-0.002, with the latter seemingly varying with temperature for stars on the RGB. We determine T_eff and [Fe/H] from the spectra, and log g from HST photometry. This is the first ...

  10. Potassium: a new actor on the globular cluster chemical evolution stage. The case of NGC 2808

    CERN Document Server

    Mucciarelli, A; Merle, T; Plez, B; Dalessandro, E; Ibata, R

    2015-01-01

    We derive [K/Fe] abundance ratios for 119 stars in the globular cluster NGC 2808, all of them having O, Na, Mg and Al abundances homogeneously measured in previous works. We detect an intrinsic star-to-star spread in the Potassium abundance. Moreover [K/Fe] abundance ratios display statistically significant correlations with [Na/Fe] and [Al/Fe], and anti-correlations with [O/Fe] and [Mg/Fe]. All the four Mg deficient stars ([Mg/Fe]<0.0) discovered so far in NGC 2808 are enriched in K by ~0.3 dex with respect to those with normal [Mg/Fe]. NGC 2808 is the second globular cluster, after NGC 2419, where a clear Mg-K anti-correlation is detected, albeit of weaker amplitude. The simultaneous correlation/anti-correlation of [K/Fe] with all the light elements usually involved in the chemical anomalies observed in globular cluster stars, strongly support the idea that these abundance patterns are due to the same self-enrichment mechanism that produces Na-O and Mg-Al anti-correlations. This finding suggests that det...

  11. The ACS survey of globular clusters. XIII. Photometric calibration in comparison with Stetson standards

    CERN Document Server

    Hempel, Maren; Anderson, Jay; Aparicio, Antonio; Bedin, Luigi R; Chaboyer, Brian; Majewski, Steven R; Marín-Franch, Antonio; Milone, Antonino; Paust, Nathaniel E Q; Piotto, Giampaolo; Reid, I Neill; Rosenberg, Alfred; Siegel, Michael

    2013-01-01

    In this study we compare the photometric data of 34 Milky Way globular clusters, observed within the ACS Treasury Program (PI: Ata Sarajedini) with the corresponding ground-based data, provided by the Photometric Standard Field Catalogs of Stetson (2000, 2005). We focus on the transformation between the HST/ACS F606W to V-band and F814W to I-band only. The goal is to assess the validity of the filter transformation equations by Sirianni et al.(2005) with respect to their dependence on metallicity, Horizontal Branch morphology, mass and integrated (V-I) colour of the various globular clusters. Such a dependence is expected due to the fact that the transformation equations are based on the observations of only one globular cluster, i.e., NGC 2419. Surprisingly, the correlation between offset and metallicity is found to be weak, with a low level significance. The correlation between offset and Horizontal Branch structure, as well as total cluster mass is still weaker. Based on the available data we do not find t...

  12. Diamonds on the Hat: Globular Clusters in The Sombrero Galaxy (M104)

    CERN Document Server

    Harris, W E; Forbes, D A; Bailin, J

    2009-01-01

    Images from the HST ACS are used to carry out a new photometric study of the globular clusters (GCs) in M104, the Sombrero galaxy. The primary focus of our study is the characteristic distribution function of linear sizes (SDF) of the GCs. We measure the effective radii for 652 clusters with PSF-convolved King and Wilson dynamical model fits. The SDF is remarkably similar to those measured for other large galaxies of all types, adding strong support to the view that it is a "universal" feature of globular cluster systems. We develop a more general interpretation of the size distribution function for globular clusters, proposing that the shape of the SDF that we see today for GCs is strongly influenced by the early rapid mass loss during their star forming stage, coupled with stochastic differences from cluster to cluster in the star formation efficiency (SFE) and their initial sizes. We find that the observed SDF shape can be accurately predicted by a simple model in which the protocluster clouds had characte...

  13. Optimal conditions to prepare fine globular granules with a multi-functional rotor processor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Shin-ichiro; Iwao, Yasunori; Ishida, Masayuki; Uchimoto, Takeaki; Miyagishima, Atsuo; Sonobe, Takashi; Itai, Shigeru

    2010-05-31

    The optimal manufacturing conditions to obtain fine globular granules with a narrow size of particle distribution were investigated for a multi-functional rotor processor. A fractional factorial design analysis was undertaken to find out the significant operational conditions influencing the following physical characteristics of the obtained granules: size distribution, roundness and water content. Operational conditions tested were binder flow rate, atomization pressure, slit air flow rate, rotating speed and temperature of inlet air. It was observed that: the proportion of fine particles (106-212 microm) was positively affected by the atomization pressure, while negatively affected by the slit air flow rate; and roundness and water content were positively affected by the binder flow rate. Furthermore, the multiple regression analysis enabled the identification of an optimal operating window for production of fine globular granules. Therefore, the present study demonstrated that the combination of experimental design and multiple regression analysis allows a better understanding of complicated granulating process of multi-functional rotor processor to obtain fine globular granules. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Charge State of the Globular Histone Core Controls Stability of the Nucleosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenley, Andrew T.; Adams, David A.; Onufriev, Alexey V.

    2010-01-01

    Presented here is a quantitative model of the wrapping and unwrapping of the DNA around the histone core of the nucleosome that suggests a mechanism by which this transition can be controlled: alteration of the charge state of the globular histone core. The mechanism is relevant to several classes of posttranslational modifications such as histone acetylation and phosphorylation; several specific scenarios consistent with recent in vivo experiments are considered. The model integrates a description based on an idealized geometry with one based on the atomistic structure of the nucleosome, and the model consistently accounts for both the electrostatic and nonelectrostatic contributions to the nucleosome free energy. Under physiological conditions, isolated nucleosomes are predicted to be very stable (38 ± 7 kcal/mol). However, a decrease in the charge of the globular histone core by one unit charge, for example due to acetylation of a single lysine residue, can lead to a significant decrease in the strength of association with its DNA. In contrast to the globular histone core, comparable changes in the charge state of the histone tail regions have relatively little effect on the nucleosome's stability. The combination of high stability and sensitivity explains how the nucleosome is able to satisfy the seemingly contradictory requirements for thermodynamic stability while allowing quick access to its DNA informational content when needed by specific cellular processes such as transcription. PMID:20816070

  15. The mass and radius evolution of globular clusters in tidal fields

    CERN Document Server

    Gieles, Mark

    2013-01-01

    We present a simple theory for the evolution of initially compact clusters in a tidal field. The fundamental ingredient of the model is that a cluster conducts a constant fraction of its own energy through the half-mass radius by two-body interactions every half-mass relaxation time. This energy is produced in a self-regulative way in the core by an (unspecified) energy source. We find that the half-mass radius increases during the first part (roughly half) of the evolution and decreases in the second half, while the escape rate is constant and set by the tidal field. We present evolutionary tracks and isochrones for clusters in terms of cluster half-mass density, cluster mass and galacto-centric radius. We find substantial agreement between model isochrones and Milky Way globular cluster parameters, which suggests that there is a balance between the flow of energy and the central energy production for almost all globular clusters. We also find that the majority of the globular clusters are still expanding to...

  16. No sign (yet) of intergalactic globular clusters in the Local Group

    CERN Document Server

    Mackey, Dougal; Leaman, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    We present Gemini/GMOS imaging of twelve candidate intergalactic globular clusters (IGCs) in the Local Group, identified in a recent survey of the SDSS footprint by di Tullio Zinn & Zinn (2015). Our image quality is sufficiently high, at $\\sim 0.4^{\\prime\\prime} - 0.7^{\\prime\\prime}$, that we are able to unambiguously classify all twelve targets as distant galaxies. To reinforce this conclusion we use GMOS images of globular clusters in the M31 halo, taken under very similar conditions, to show that any genuine clusters in the putative IGC sample would be straightforward to distinguish. Based on the stated sensitivity of the di Tullio Zinn & Zinn (2015) search algorithm, we conclude that there cannot be a significant number of IGCs with $M_V \\le -6$ lying unseen in the SDSS area if their properties mirror those of globular clusters in the outskirts of M31 -- even a population of $4$ would have only a $\\approx 1\\%$ chance of non-detection.

  17. Prediction of heat-induced polymerization of different globular food proteins in mixtures with wheat gluten.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrecht, Marlies A; Rombouts, Ine; De Ketelaere, Bart; Delcour, Jan A

    2017-04-15

    Egg, soy or whey protein co-exists with wheat gluten in different food products. Different protein types impact each other during heat treatment. A positive co-protein effect occurs when heat-induced polymerization of a mixture of proteins is more intense than that of the isolated proteins. The intrinsic protein characteristics of globular proteins which enhance polymerization in mixtures with gluten are unknown. In this report, a model was developed to predict potential co-protein effects in mixtures of gluten and globular proteins during heating at 100°C. A negative co-protein effect with addition of lysozyme, no co-protein effect with soy glycinin or egg yolk and positive co-protein effects with bovine serum albumin, (S-)ovalbumin, egg white, whole egg, defatted egg yolk, wheat albumins and wheat globulins were detected. The level of accessible free sulfhydryl groups and the surface hydrophobicity of unfolded globular proteins were the main characteristics in determining the co-protein effects in gluten mixtures.

  18. The primordial and evolutionary abundance variations in globular-cluster stars: a problem with two unknowns

    CERN Document Server

    Denissenkov, Pavel; Hartwick, David; Herwig, Falk; Weiss, Achim; Paxton, Bill

    2014-01-01

    Abundances of the proton-capture elements and their isotopes in globular-cluster stars correlate with each other in such a manner as if their variations were produced in high-temperature hydrogen burning at the same time in the past. In addition to these primordial abundance variations, the RGB stars in globular clusters, like their field counterparts, show the evolutionary variations of the C and N abundances and 12C/13C isotopic ratio. The latter are caused by extra mixing operating in the RGB star's radiative zone that separates the H-burning shell from the bottom of its convective envelope. We demonstrate that among the potential sources of the primordial abundance variations in globular-cluster stars proposed so far, such as the hot-bottom burning in massive AGB stars and H burning in the convective cores of supermassive and fast-rotating massive MS stars, only the supermassive MS stars with M > 10,000 Msun can explain all the abundance correlations without any fine-tuning of free parameters. We use our ...

  19. The SLUGGS survey: Globular cluster stellar population trends from weak absorption lines in stacked spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Usher, Christopher; Brodie, Jean P; Romanowsky, Aaron J; Strader, Jay; Conroy, Charlie; Foster, Caroline; Pastorello, Nicola; Pota, Vincenzo; Arnold, Jacob A

    2014-01-01

    As part of the SLUGGS survey, we stack 1137 Keck DEIMOS spectra of globular clusters from 10 galaxies to study their stellar populations in detail. The stacked spectra have median signal to noise ratios of $\\sim 90$ \\AA$^{-1}$. Besides the calcium triplet, we study weaker sodium, magnesium, titanium and iron lines as well as the H$\\alpha$ and higher order Paschen hydrogen lines. In general, the stacked spectra are consistent with old ages and a Milky Way-like initial mass function. However, we see different metal line index strengths at fixed colour and magnitude, and differences in the calcium triplet--colour relation from galaxy to galaxy. We interpret this as strong evidence for variations in the globular cluster colour--metallicity relation between galaxies. Two possible explanations for the colour--metallicity relation variations are that the average ages of globular clusters vary from galaxy to galaxy or that the average abundances of light elements (i.e. He, C, N and O) differ between galaxies. Stackin...

  20. No sign (yet) of intergalactic globular clusters in the Local Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, A. D.; Beasley, M. A.; Leaman, R.

    2016-07-01

    We present Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph (GMOS) imaging of 12 candidate intergalactic globular clusters (IGCs) in the Local Group, identified in a recent survey of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) footprint by di Tullio Zinn & Zinn. Our image quality is sufficiently high, at ˜0.4-0.7 arcsec, that we are able to unambiguously classify all 12 targets as distant galaxies. To reinforce this conclusion we use GMOS images of globular clusters in the M31 halo, taken under very similar conditions, to show that any genuine clusters in the putative IGC sample would be straightforward to distinguish. Based on the stated sensitivity of the di Tullio Zinn & Zinn search algorithm, we conclude that there cannot be a significant number of IGCs with MV ≤ -6 lying unseen in the SDSS area if their properties mirror those of globular clusters in the outskirts of M31 - even a population of 4 would have only a ≈1 per cent chance of non-detection.