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  1. Iodine deficiency disorders (IDD control in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrakant S Pandav

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Iodine deficiency disorders (IDD constitute the single largest cause of preventable brain damage worldwide. Majority of consequences of IDD are invisible and irreversible but at the same time these are preventable. In India, the entire population is prone to IDD due to deficiency of iodine in the soil of the subcontinent and consequently the food derived from it. To combat the risk of IDD, salt is fortified with iodine. However, an estimated 350 million people do not consume adequately iodized salt and, therefore, are at risk for IDD. Of the 325 districts surveyed in India so far, 263 are IDD-endemic. The current household level iodized salt coverage in India is 91 per cent with 71 per cent households consuming adequately iodized salt. The IDD control goal in India was to reduce the prevalence of IDD below 10 per cent in the entire country by 2012. What is required is a "mission approach" with greater coordination amongst all stakeholders of IDD control efforts in India. Mainstreaming of IDD control in policy making, devising State specific action plans to control IDD, strict implementation of Food Safety and Standards (FSS Act, 2006, addressing inequities in iodized salt coverage (rural-urban, socio-economic, providing iodized salt in Public Distribution System, strengthening monitoring and evaluation of IDD programme and ensuring sustainability of IDD control activities are essential to achieve sustainable elimination of IDD in India.

  2. Iodine deficiency disorders (IDD) in regions of Russia affected by Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerasimov, G.; Alexandrova, G.; Arbuzova, M.

    1996-01-01

    The present article provides an update on IDD in the Western regions of Russia (Bryansk, Kaluga, Tula and Orel) which were contaminated by radioactive fallout after the Chernobyl accident in 1986. These surveyed areas meet the criteria of ICCIDD/UNICEF/WHO for mild and moderate IDD. Higher iodine excretion and smaller goiter prevalence (mild level of IDD) were more typical for urban sites, while lower iodine levels and higher goiter endemicity (moderate level of IDD) were found in rural areas. IDD control programmes should be developed and implemented in Chernobyl areas and iodine excretion should be monitored continuously to minimize future thyroid abnormalities

  3. From Research to Policy to Programme: Success Story of Seven State Iodine Deficiency Disorders (IDD Survey in India

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    Chandrakant S Pandav

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Iodine Deficiency Disorders (IDD constitute the single largest cause of preventable brain damage worldwide. In India the entire population is prone to IDD due to deficiency of iodine in the soil of the subcontinent and consequently the food derived from it. Of these, an estimated 350 million people are at higher risk of IDDs as they consume salt with inadequate iodine. Every year nine million pregnant women and eight million newborns are at risk of IDD in India.On September 13, 2000, the Government of India lifted the ban at the national level on the sale of non-iodized salt (India Gazette 2000. Scientists, civil society, international agencies and other stakeholders joined ranks to fight against this retrograde step by the government of India. The four pronged approach to fight the removal of ban on non- iodized salt comprised of writing advocacy documents, meeting with stakeholders, media campaign and tracking of Universal Salt Iodization (USI in states by state iodine status surveys.But effective advocacy and media campaign were hampered by lack of scientific data substantiating the magnitude of Iodine Deficiency disorders (IDD in India. To address this lacuna, state level Iodine status surveys were planned in seven states of India and were executed over next five years in collaboration with various national and international stakeholders.State level IDD surveys were carried out in seven states (Kerala, Tamil Nadu, Orissa, Rajasthan, Bihar, Goa and Jharkhand from 2000 to 2006 by International Council for Control of Iodine Deficiency Disorders (ICCIDD in collaboration with state medical colleges, Micronutrient Initiative (MI and UNICEF. The surveys were carried as per the recommended guidelines of WHO/UNICEF/ICCIDD and used 30 cluster into 40 children sampling methodology. Children in the age group of 6-12 years, women in the household, retail shop keepers and other community stakeholders constituted the study population. All three indicators

  4. The goitre rate, its association with reproductive failure, and the knowledge of iodine deficiency disorders (IDD among women in Ethiopia: Cross-section community based study

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    Berhane Yemane

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Iodine deficiency is severe public health problem in Ethiopia. Although urinary iodine excretion level (UIE is a better indicator for IDD the goitre rate is commonly used to mark the public health significance. The range of ill effect of IDD is however beyond goitre in Ethiopia. In this study the prevalence of goitre and its association with reproductive failure, and the knowledge of women on Iodine Deficiency were investigated. Methods A cross-section community based study was conducted during February to May 2005 in 10998 women in child bearing age of 15 to 49 years. To assess the state of iodine deficiency in Ethiopia, a multistage "Proportional to Population Size" (PPS sampling methods was used, and WHO/UNICEF/ICCIDD recommended method for goitre classification. Results Total goitre prevalence (weighted was 35.8% (95% CI 34.5–37.1, 24.3% palpable and 11.5% visible goitre. This demonstrates that more than 6 million women were affected by goitre. Goitre prevalence in four regional states namely Southern Nation Nationalities and People (SNNP, Oromia, Bebshandul-Gumuz and Tigray was greater than 30%, an indication of severe iodine deficiency. In the rest of the regions except Gambella, the IDD situation was mild to moderate. According to WHO/UNICEF/ICCIDD this is a lucid indication that IDD is a major public health problem in Ethiopia. Women with goitre experience more pregnancy failure (X2 = 16.5, p 2 = 67.52; p Conclusion Ethiopia is at risk of iodine deficiency disorders. The findings presented in this report emphasis on a sustainable iodine intervention program targeted at population particularly reproductive age women. Nutrition education along with Universal Salt Iodization program and iodized oil capsule distribution in some peripheries where iodine deficiency is severe is urgently required.

  5. CAPs-IDD: Characteristics of Assessment Instruments for Psychiatric Disorders in Persons with Intellectual Developmental Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeilinger, E. L.; Nader, I. W.; Brehmer-Rinderer, B.; Koller, I.; Weber, G.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Assessment of psychiatric disorders in persons with an intellectual developmental disorder (IDD) can be performed with a variety of greatly differing instruments. This makes the choice of an instrument best suited for the intended purpose challenging. In this study, we developed a comprehensive set of characteristics for the evaluation…

  6. Iodine deficiency disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, S M [Pakistan Council for Science and Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    1994-12-31

    Iodine deficiency (IDD) is one of the common problem in the diet. Iodine deficiency as prevalence of goiter in population occurs in the mountainous areas. There is consensus that 800 million people are at risk of IDD from living in iodine deficient area and 190 million from goiter. Very high prevalence of IDD in different parts of the world are striking. It has generally observed that in iodine-deficient areas about 50% are affected with goiter, 1-5% from cretinsim and 20% from impaired mental and/or mortor function. (A.B.).

  7. Ensuring effective prevention of iodine-deficiency disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Völzke, Henry; Caron, Philippe Jean; Dahl, Lisbeth

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Programs initiated to prevent iodine deficiency disorders (IDD) may not remain effective due to changes in government policies, commercial factors, and human behavior that may affect the efficacy of IDD prevention programs in unpredictable directions. Monitoring and outcome studies...... by the lack of centralized standardization procedures. In addition, data on outcomes and the cost of achieving them are needed in order to provide evidence of the beneficial effects of IDD prevention in countries with mild iodine deficiency. CONCLUSION: Monitoring studies can be optimized by including...... in mildly iodine-deficient areas and that it should include populations from regions with different environmental, ethnic, and cultural backgrounds....

  8. Substance-related and addictive disorders among adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD): an Ontario population cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Elizabeth; Balogh, Robert; McGarry, Caitlin; Selick, Avra; Dobranowski, Kristin; Wilton, Andrew S; Lunsky, Yona

    2016-09-02

    Describe the prevalence of substance-related and addictive disorders (SRAD) in adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) and compare the sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of adults with IDD and SRAD to those with IDD or SRAD only. Population-based cohort study (the Health Care Access Research and Development Disabilities (H-CARDD) cohort). All legal residents of Ontario, Canada. 66 484 adults, aged 18-64, with IDD identified through linked provincial health and disability income benefits administrative data from fiscal year 2009. 96 589 adults, aged 18-64, with SRAD but without IDD drawn from the provincial health administrative data. Sociodemographic (age group, sex, neighbourhood income quintile, rurality) and clinical (psychiatric and chronic disease diagnoses, morbidity) characteristics. The prevalence of SRAD among adults with IDD was 6.4%, considerably higher than many previous reports and also higher than found for adults without IDD in Ontario (3.5%). Among those with both IDD and SRAD, the rate of psychiatric comorbidity was 78.8%, and the proportion with high or very high overall morbidity was 59.5%. The most common psychiatric comorbidities were anxiety disorders (67.6%), followed by affective (44.6%), psychotic (35.8%) and personality disorders (23.5%). These adults also tended to be younger and more likely to live in the poorest neighbourhoods compared with adults with IDD but no SRAD and adults with SRAD but no IDD. SRAD is a significant concern for adults with IDD. It is associated with high rates of psychiatric and other comorbidities, indicating that care coordination and system navigation may be important concerns. Attention should be paid to increasing the recognition of SRAD among individuals with IDD by both healthcare and social service providers and to improving staff skills in successfully engaging those with both IDD and SRAD. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not

  9. Successful efforts toward elimination iodine deficiency disorders in India

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    Kapil Umesh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Iodine deficiency (ID is the world′s single most important preventable cause of brain damage and mental retardation. Iodine deficiency disorders (IDDs is a public health problem in 130 countries, affecting 13% of the world population. The simplest solution to prevent the IDD is to consume iodized common salt every day. In India, significant progress has been achieved toward elimination of IDD, in the last 30 years. Satisfactory levels of urinary iodine excretion and iodine content of salt have been documented by the research surveys conducted by research scientists. The results indicate that we are progressing toward elimination of IDD. IDD is due to a nutritional deficiency, which is prima-rily that of iodine, in soil and water. IDD is known to re-appear if the IDD Control Program is not sustained. To ensure that the population continues to have intake of adequate amount of iodine, there is a need of i periodic surveys to assess the magnitude of the IDD with respect to impact of iodized salt (IS intervention; ii strengthening the health and nutrition education activities to create demand for IS and iii development of a monitoring information system (MIS for ensuring that the adequately IS is available to the beneficiaries.

  10. Iodine deficiency disorders in Sarawak, Malaysia.

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    Kiyu, A; Tambi, Z; Ahmad, Y

    1998-12-01

    The state of Sarawak in Malaysia has a high prevalence of iodine deficiency disorders (IDD). This has been revealed through a review of goitre surveys that were carried out in the State from the early 1970s to the 1990s. The primary cause was low iodine intake. Contributory factors were low iodine content in the soil and water as well as high cassava consumption. Virtual elimination of IDD is one of the nutritional goals of the IDD prevention and control programs. The strategies adopted include the iodination of coarse salt, which is sold in the market by shopkeepers and also provided free from government health clinics; legislation requiring that salt sold in IDD-gazetted areas must be iodised; and the use of iodinators to iodise water supplied by the gravity-feed system to villages and boarding schools in rural areas. The indicators used in the monitoring and evaluation of the program include the availability of iodised salt in the market and households, iodine levels in water supply that had been fitted with iodinators, goitre volume measured by ultrasound, and urinary iodine excretion among school children.

  11. The challenge of the global elimination of iodine deficiency disorders.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haar, van der F.

    1997-01-01

    Most nations of the world are well positioned for success in their pursuit of the virtual elimination of iodine deficiency disorders (IDD) by the year 2000. In 1990 at the World Summit for Children, Heads of State and Government had agreed on this global goal and in 1992 at the International

  12. Past, present, and future of iodine deficiency disorders in India: Need to look outside the blinkers

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    Gurmeet Kaur

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Iodine deficiency disorders (IDDs have been recognized as one of the major nutritional disorders throughout the world affecting 200 million people who are at risk and another 71 million suffering from goiter and other IDDs. These groups of disorders can affect every stage of life, but most vulnerable age group is between 6 and 12 years and these disorders together constitute the single largest preventable cause of brain damage leading to learning disabilities and psychomotor impairment. The existence of endemic goiter in an extensive belt along the southern slopes of the Himalayas, Alps, and Andes has long been described, but consistently high prevalence of IDDs outside the endemic zones and failure to attain goals set by the National Iodine Deficiency Disorder Control Program questions the strategy and achievements till date. Therefore, the present article is an attempt to critically examine the program since inception in India.

  13. Iodine requirements and the risks and benefits of correcting iodine deficiency in populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.

    2008-01-01

    Iodine deficiency has multiple adverse effects on growth and development due to inadequate thyroid hormone production that are termed the iodine deficiency disorders (IDD). IDD remains the most common cause of preventable mental impairment worldwide. IDD assessment methods include urinary iodine

  14. The Findings of Epidemiological Studies on the Prevalence of Iodine Deficiency Disorders in the Khorezm Region of Republic of Uzbekistan

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    S.I. Ismailov

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite the ongoing programs aimed at the liquidation of iodine deficiency in the Republic of Uzbekistan, a high prevalence of iodine deficiency disorders (IDD is being observed. As a result of epidemiological studies in 1998 and 2004 it was found that the prevalence of endemic goiter among children in the country was 64.5 and 51.6%, respectively. Dynamics of iodine deficiency decrease was associated with active work on liquidation of IDD: provision of salt-mining and salt-processing plants with iodizing equipment and potassium iodate, conducting of large-scale community health measures among different social gropus, on public enterprises and in private sector, carrying out of regular monitoring of iodine content in salt and urine. In May 2007 there was passed the law of Republic of Uzbekistan «About prevention of iodine deficiency disorders». In this work there was carried out the analysis of IDD in Khoresm region according to WHO recommendations, by sentinel method. It was revealed that prevalence of endemic goiter has been reduced to 38.7 % in 2012 (positive dymanics. We obtained data on the normal content of iodine in salt and urine — 75 and 60.6 %, respectively. Thus, it is found that the prevalence of IDD in the Khorezm region in the dynamics is reduced, although iodine deficiency remains severe.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: CDKL5 deficiency disorder

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    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions CDKL5 deficiency disorder CDKL5 deficiency disorder Printable PDF Open All Close All ... Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description CDKL5 deficiency disorder is characterized by seizures that begin ...

  16. Results of epidemiological studies on the prevalence of iodine deficiency disorders in the Republic of Uzbekistan

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    S.I. Ismailov

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. In spite of the works performed against iodine deficiency disorders (IDD, they still remain severe in Uzbekistan. The purpose of the study was to investigate the dynamics of the prevalence of IDD among the population in the Republic of Uzbekistan. Materials and methods. Epidemiological study of IDD in the Republic of Uzbekistan has been performed according to the World Health Organization (WHO recommendations. Degree of thyroid enlargement was determined according to the WHO classification. Such indexes, as assessment of urinary iodine concentration and evaluation of salt iodine concentration, have been analyzed. The data were compared with the results of previous years’ studies. Results. Estimation of the severity of IDD by the level of ioduria showed that the proportion of severe iodine deficiency (less than 20 μg/l decreased from 94.4 % in 1998 to 21.4 % in 2004, to 1.9 % in 2010 and to 1.9 % in 2016. The optimal level of iodine intake (more than 100 μg/l increased from 0 % in 1998 to 46.3 % in 2004, to 63.7 % in 2010 and 76.3 % in 2016. Comparative analysis of the prevalence of degree I and II diffuse goiter showed that in total the proportion of this disease was 72.8 % in 1998, 58.8 % in 2004, 40.2 % in 2010 and 28.3 % in 2016. Conclusions. The acceptance of law of Uzbekistan “On prevention of iodine deficiency diseases” in 2007 has substantially decreased the prevalence of IDD in Uzbekistan. Nevertheless, despite of large scale actions, our study of ioduria and salt iodine content in 2016 indicated that about 25 % of people in the country still prone to IDD.

  17. Iodine-deficiency disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Jooste, P.L.; Pandav, C.S.

    2008-01-01

    billion individuals worldwide have insufficient iodine intake, with those in south Asia and sub-Saharan Africa particularly affected. Iodine deficiency has many adverse effects on growth and development. These effects are due to inadequate production of thyroid hormone and are termed

  18. Iodine deficiency and thyroid disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Michael B; Boelaert, Kristien

    2015-04-01

    Iodine deficiency early in life impairs cognition and growth, but iodine status is also a key determinant of thyroid disorders in adults. Severe iodine deficiency causes goitre and hypothyroidism because, despite an increase in thyroid activity to maximise iodine uptake and recycling in this setting, iodine concentrations are still too low to enable production of thyroid hormone. In mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency, increased thyroid activity can compensate for low iodine intake and maintain euthyroidism in most individuals, but at a price: chronic thyroid stimulation results in an increase in the prevalence of toxic nodular goitre and hyperthyroidism in populations. This high prevalence of nodular autonomy usually results in a further increase in the prevalence of hyperthyroidism if iodine intake is subsequently increased by salt iodisation. However, this increase is transient because iodine sufficiency normalises thyroid activity which, in the long term, reduces nodular autonomy. Increased iodine intake in an iodine-deficient population is associated with a small increase in the prevalence of subclinical hypothyroidism and thyroid autoimmunity; whether these increases are also transient is unclear. Variations in population iodine intake do not affect risk for Graves' disease or thyroid cancer, but correction of iodine deficiency might shift thyroid cancer subtypes toward less malignant forms. Thus, optimisation of population iodine intake is an important component of preventive health care to reduce the prevalence of thyroid disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Iodine deficiency status and iodised salt consumption in Malaysia: findings from a national iodine deficiency disorders survey.

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    Selamat, Rusidah; Mohamud, Wan Nazaimoon Wan; Zainuddin, Ahmad Ali; Rahim, Nor Syamlina Che Abdul; Ghaffar, Suhaila Abdul; Aris, Tahir

    2010-01-01

    A nationwide cross-sectional school-based survey was undertaken among children aged 8-10 years old to determine the current iodine deficiency status in the country. Determination of urinary iodine (UI) and palpation of the thyroid gland were carried out among 18,012 and 18,078 children respectively while iodine test of the salt samples was done using Rapid Test Kits and the iodometric method. The results showed that based on WHO/ ICCIDD/UNICEF criteria, the national median UI was 109 μg/L [25th, 75th percentile (67, 166)] showing borderline adequacy. The overall national prevalence of iodine deficiency disorders (IDD) with UIMalaysia using adequately iodised salt as recommended by Malaysian Food Act 1983 of 20-30 ppm was only 6.8% (95% CI: 5.1, 9.0). In conclusion, although a goitre endemic was not present in Malaysia, almost half of the states in Peninsular Malaysia still have large proportion of UI level review on the current approach of the national IDD prevention and control programme.

  20. Interactions of vitamin A and iodine deficiencies: effects on the pituitary-thyroid axis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.

    2007-01-01

    Vitamin A (VA) deficiency (VAD) and the iodine deficiency disorders (IDD) affect > 30% of the global population and these deficiencies often coexist in vulnerable groups. VAD has multiple effects on the pituitary-thyroid axis; VA status modulates thyroid gland metabolism, peripheral metabolism of

  1. The story of iodine deficiency: An international challenge in nutrition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hetzel, B.S.

    1989-01-01

    Iodine deficiency is a risk factor for the growth and development of up to 800 million people living in iodine deficient environments throughout the world. The effects on growth and development, called the iodine deficiency disorders (IDD), comprise goiter, stillbirths and miscarriages, neonatal and juvenile thyroid deficiency, dwarfism, mental defects, deaf mutism, and spastic weakness and paralysis, as well as lesser degrees of loss of physical and mental function. All these effects are due to inadequate thyroid hormone production because iodine is an essential constituent of the thyroid hormone. In the West, IDD has been largely eliminated by the addition of iodine to the diet through iodized salt or through changes in food distribution and technology. IDD still persists in certain areas of Europe where these dietary changes have not occurred. In the Third World, IDD is a major problem in many countries with large populations, such as China, India, Indonesia, Nigeria, and Zaire. In these and other Third World countries, IDD is a significant barrier to social and economic progress which can be removed by correction of the deficiency. This book shows that elimination of iodine deficiency is feasible within the next decade, only requiring a modest financial and technical effort from the West. Part 1 reviews IDD in man and animals. Part 2 discusses the control of iodine deficiency disorders through iodine supplementation, and considers action at the national and international level. Part 3 presents a global review of the status of IDD control. There is a brief conclusion on the way forward to successful control programs.

  2. The story of iodine deficiency: An international challenge in nutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hetzel, B.S.

    1989-01-01

    Iodine deficiency is a risk factor for the growth and development of up to 800 million people living in iodine deficient environments throughout the world. The effects on growth and development, called the iodine deficiency disorders (IDD), comprise goiter, stillbirths and miscarriages, neonatal and juvenile thyroid deficiency, dwarfism, mental defects, deaf mutism, and spastic weakness and paralysis, as well as lesser degrees of loss of physical and mental function. All these effects are due to inadequate thyroid hormone production because iodine is an essential constituent of the thyroid hormone. In the West, IDD has been largely eliminated by the addition of iodine to the diet through iodized salt or through changes in food distribution and technology. IDD still persists in certain areas of Europe where these dietary changes have not occurred. In the Third World, IDD is a major problem in many countries with large populations, such as China, India, Indonesia, Nigeria, and Zaire. In these and other Third World countries, IDD is a significant barrier to social and economic progress which can be removed by correction of the deficiency. This book shows that elimination of iodine deficiency is feasible within the next decade, only requiring a modest financial and technical effort from the West. Part 1 reviews IDD in man and animals. Part 2 discusses the control of iodine deficiency disorders through iodine supplementation, and considers action at the national and international level. Part 3 presents a global review of the status of IDD control. There is a brief conclusion on the way forward to successful control programs

  3. Current iodine nutrition status and progress toward elimination of iodine deficiency disorders in Jazan, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alsanosy Rashad Mohammed

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The term iodine deficiency disorders (IDD refers to all the effects of iodine deficiency on growth and development in human and animal populations that can be prevented by correction of the iodine deficiency. The objective of this paper was to determine the iodine nutrition status among schoolchildren in the Jazan Region of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA, by measuring urinary iodine concentrations and by clinical assessments of goiter rate. Methods A school-based cross-sectional survey was conducted in the Jazan region of southwestern KSA from May to November 2010. A total of 311 children, aged 6–13 years, drawn from 12 schools, were selected by a three-stage cluster random sampling method. Data on sociodemographic characteristics were collected using a structured questionnaire. Urine samples were collected and physical examinations were conducted to determine the presence or absence of goiter. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 17.0. Chi square and independent t-tests were used for proportions and mean comparisons between groups. Results Out of 360 selected children, 311 were examined. There were 131 males (42% and 180 females (58%. The median urinary iodine concentration (UIC of the study group was 421 μg/L. The study population proportion with UIC > 300 μg/L was 74% with a higher proportion among males and urban populations. The proportion of children with UIC of 100–300 μg/L was only 21% and was significantly higher among females compared with males (p Conclusions The present study demonstrates a remarkable achievement in Universal Salt Iodization (USI and IDD elimination goals in the Jazan area. However, UIC levels reflect excessive iodine intake and may put the population at risk of adverse health consequences like iodine-induced hyperthyroidism and autoimmune thyroid diseases.

  4. Low Goiter Rate Associated with Small Average Thyroid Volume in Schoolchildren after the Elimination of Iodine Deficiency Disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peihua Wang

    Full Text Available After the implementation of the universal salt iodization (USI program in 1996, seven cross-sectional school-based surveys have been conducted to monitor iodine deficiency disorders (IDD among children in eastern China.This study aimed to examine the correlation of total goiter rate (TGR with average thyroid volume (Tvol and urinary iodine concentration (UIC in Jiangsu province after IDD elimination.Probability-proportional-to-size sampling was applied to select 1,200 children aged 8-10 years old in 30 clusters for each survey in 1995, 1997, 1999, 2001, 2002, 2005, 2009 and 2011. We measured Tvol using ultrasonography in 8,314 children and measured UIC (4,767 subjects and salt iodine (10,184 samples using methods recommended by the World Health Organization. Tvol was used to calculate TGR based on the reference criteria specified for sex and body surface area (BSA.TGR decreased from 55.2% in 1997 to 1.0% in 2009, and geometric means of Tvol decreased from 3.63 mL to 1.33 mL, along with the UIC increasing from 83 μg/L in 1995 to 407 μg/L in 1999, then decreasing to 243 μg/L in 2005, and then increasing to 345 μg/L in 2011. In the low goiter population (TGR 300 μg/L was associated with a smaller average Tvol in children.After IDD elimination in Jiangsu province in 2001, lower TGR was associated with smaller average Tvol. Average Tvol was more sensitive than TGR in detecting the fluctuation of UIC. A UIC of 300 μg/L may be defined as a critical value for population level iodine status monitoring.

  5. Thyroid disorders in mild iodine deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurberg, P; Nøhr, S B; Pedersen, K M; Hreidarsson, A B; Andersen, S; Bülow Pedersen, I; Knudsen, N; Perrild, H; Jørgensen, T; Ovesen, L

    2000-11-01

    Comparative epidemiologic studies in areas with low and high iodine intake and controlled studies of iodine supplementation have demonstrated that the major consequence of mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency for the health of the population is an extraordinarily high occurrence of hyperthyroidism in elderly subjects, especially women, with risk of cardiac arrhythmias, osteoporosis, and muscle wasting. The hyperthyroidism is caused by autonomous nodular growth and function of the thyroid gland and it is accompanied by a high frequency of goiter. Pregnant women and small children are not immediately endangered but the consequences of severe iodine deficiency for brain development are grave and a considerable safety margin is advisable. Moreover, a shift toward less malignant types of thyroid cancer and a lower radiation dose to the thyroid in case of nuclear fallout support that mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency should be corrected. However, there is evidence that a high iodine intake may be associated with more autoimmune hypothyroidism, and that Graves' disease may manifest at a younger age and be more difficult to treat. Hence, the iodine intake should be brought to a level at which iodine deficiency disorders are avoided but not higher. Iodine supplementation programs should aim at relatively uniform iodine intake, avoiding deficient or excessive iodine intake in subpopulations. To adopt such a strategy, surveillance programs are needed.

  6. IDD Archival Hardware Architecture and Workflow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendonsa, D; Nekoogar, F; Martz, H

    2008-10-09

    This document describes the functionality of every component in the DHS/IDD archival and storage hardware system shown in Fig. 1. The document describes steps by step process of image data being received at LLNL then being processed and made available to authorized personnel and collaborators. Throughout this document references will be made to one of two figures, Fig. 1 describing the elements of the architecture and the Fig. 2 describing the workflow and how the project utilizes the available hardware.

  7. The Status of Iodine Nutrition and Iodine Deficiency Disorders ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Iodine deficiency disorders are serious public health problems in Ethiopia. The aim of this study was to measure the prevalence and severity of iodine deficiency disorders among school children in Metekel Zone. Methods: A cross-sectional school based descriptive study was conducted between February 2011 ...

  8. What Are Treatments for Intellectual & Developmental Disabilities (IDDs)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Children with Down syndrome , fragile X syndrome , Rett syndrome , and other IDDs can often benefit from therapeutic speech therapy, occupational therapy, and exercises to improve their gross- and ...

  9. Thyroid disorders in mild iodine deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurberg, P; Nøhr, S B; Pedersen, K M

    2000-01-01

    Comparative epidemiologic studies in areas with low and high iodine intake and controlled studies of iodine supplementation have demonstrated that the major consequence of mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency for the health of the population is an extraordinarily high occurrence of hyperthyroidism...... endangered but the consequences of severe iodine deficiency for brain development are grave and a considerable safety margin is advisable. Moreover, a shift toward less malignant types of thyroid cancer and a lower radiation dose to the thyroid in case of nuclear fallout support that mild-to-moderate iodine...... deficiency should be corrected. However, there is evidence that a high iodine intake may be associated with more autoimmune hypothyroidism, and that Graves' disease may manifest at a younger age and be more difficult to treat. Hence, the iodine intake should be brought to a level at which iodine deficiency...

  10. Consensus statement on iodine deficiency disorders in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    But, Betty; Chan, C W; Chan, Fredriech; Chan, K W; Cheng, Anna W F; Cheung, Patrick; Choi, K L; Chow, C B; Chow, Francis C C; Eastman, Creswell; Fok, T F; Fung, L M; Gomes, Cynthia; Huen, K F; Ip, T P; Kung, Annie W C; Lam, Karen S L; Lam, Y Y; Lao, Terence; Lee, C Y; Lee, K F; Leung, Jenny; Leung, N K; Li, Dominic; Li, June; Lo, K W; Lo, Louis; Ng, K L; Siu, S C; Tam, Sidney; Tan, Kathryn C B; Tiu, S C; Tse, H Y; Tse, Winnie; Wong, Gary; Wong, Shell; Wong, William; Yeung, Vincent T F; Young, Rosie; Yu, C M; Yu, Richard

    2003-12-01

    This article reviews the available data on the study of iodine deficiency disorders in Hong Kong and to discuss the approach towards preventing such disorders in Hong Kong. The importance of iodine and iodine deficiency disorders is described, and the available data on the dietary iodine intake and urinary iodine concentration in different populations of Hong Kong are summarised and discussed. Dietary iodine insufficiency among pregnant women in Hong Kong is associated with maternal goitrogenesis and hypothyroxinaemia as well as neonatal hypothyroidism. Borderline iodine deficiency exists in the expectant mothers in Hong Kong. Women of reproductive age, and pregnant and lactating women should be made aware and educated to have an adequate iodine intake, such as iodised salt, as an interim measure. A steering group involving all stakeholders should be formed to advise on the strategy of ensuring adequate iodine intake, including universal iodisation of salt in Hong Kong. Continuous surveillance of iodine status in the Hong Kong population is necessary.

  11. Urea cycle disorder--argininosuccinic lyase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Neeta; Kirk, Pia Chatterjee; Holder, Ray; Precheur, Harry V

    2012-01-01

    An increased level of ammonia in the bloodstream, or hyperammonemia, is a symptom associated with metabolic disorders referred to as inborn errors of metabolism. Urea cycle disorder is a congenital abnormality or absence of one of the six enzymes involved in the elimination of ammonia. Administration of certain medications, high protein diet, excessive exercise, surgical procedures, or trauma can precipitate symptoms of mental confusion, seizure-like activity, and ataxia. This paper reviews the literature with insight into current treatment and management options of the disorder and modification of treatment for the dental patient. © 2012 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Thyroid disorders in mild iodine deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurberg, P; Nøhr, S B; Pedersen, K M

    2000-01-01

    in elderly subjects, especially women, with risk of cardiac arrhythmias, osteoporosis, and muscle wasting. The hyperthyroidism is caused by autonomous nodular growth and function of the thyroid gland and it is accompanied by a high frequency of goiter. Pregnant women and small children are not immediately...... endangered but the consequences of severe iodine deficiency for brain development are grave and a considerable safety margin is advisable. Moreover, a shift toward less malignant types of thyroid cancer and a lower radiation dose to the thyroid in case of nuclear fallout support that mild-to-moderate iodine...

  13. Combating micronutrient deficiency disorders amongst children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umesh Kapil

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Micronutrients (MN are the nutrients that are needed by the body in small quantities which play leading roles in the production of enzymes, hormones and other substances that help to regulate growth activity, development and functioning of the immune and reproductive systems. Children, adolescent boys & girls and expectant mothers form a vulnerable group in developing countries where economic stress and food security are issues of concern. MNs deficiencies, which have been considered as major risk factors in child survival are the leading cause of mental retardation, preventable blindness, morbidity, birth defects, morbidity and mortality. Micronutrient malnutrition has many adverse effects on human health, not all of which are clinically evident. Even moderate levels of deficiency (which can be detected by biochemical or clinical measurements can have serious detrimental effects on human function. Thus, in addition to the obvious and direct health effects, the existence of MN deficiency has profound implications for economic development and productivity, particularly in terms of the potentially huge public health costs and the loss of human capital formation.According to WHO mortality data, around 0.8 million deaths (1.5% of the total can be attributed to iron deficiency each year, and a similar number to vitamin A deficiency. In terms of the loss of healthy life, expressed in  disability-adjusted life years (DALYs, iron-deficiency anaemia results in  25 million DALYs lost (or 2.4% of the global total, vitamin A deficiency  in 18 million DALYs lost (or 1.8% of the global total and iodine deficiency  in 2.5 million DALYs lost (or 0.2% of the global total [1].A child belonging to low socio-economic families residing in poor environmental and sanitation settings consume low quantity of foods which deficient not only in 2-3 MNs Deficiencies but also in macronutrients. These children also suffer from recurrent episodes of morbidities which

  14. Combating micronutrient deficiency disorders amongst children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umesh Kapil

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Micronutrients (MN are the nutrients that are needed by the body in small quantities which play leading roles in the production of enzymes, hormones and other substances that help to regulate growth activity, development and functioning of the immune and reproductive systems. Children, adolescent boys & girls and expectant mothers form a vulnerable group in developing countries where economic stress and food security are issues of concern. MNs deficiencies, which have been considered as major risk factors in child survival are the leading cause of mental retardation, preventable blindness, morbidity, birth defects, morbidity and mortality. Micronutrient malnutrition has many adverse effects on human health, not all of which are clinically evident. Even moderate levels of deficiency (which can be detected by biochemical or clinical measurements can have serious detrimental effects on human function. Thus, in addition to the obvious and direct health effects, the existence of MN deficiency has profound implications for economic development and productivity, particularly in terms of the potentially huge public health costs and the loss of human capital formation. According to WHO mortality data, around 0.8 million deaths (1.5% of the total can be attributed to iron deficiency each year, and a similar number to vitamin A deficiency. In terms of the loss of healthy life, expressed in  disability-adjusted life years (DALYs, iron-deficiency anaemia results in  25 million DALYs lost (or 2.4% of the global total, vitamin A deficiency  in 18 million DALYs lost (or 1.8% of the global total and iodine deficiency  in 2.5 million DALYs lost (or 0.2% of the global total [1]. A child belonging to low socio-economic families residing in poor environmental and sanitation settings consume low quantity of foods which deficient not only in 2-3 MNs Deficiencies but also in macronutrients. These children also suffer from recurrent episodes of morbidities

  15. Iron Deficiency in Preschool Children with Autistic Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgic, Ayhan; Gurkan, Kagan; Turkoglu, Serhat; Akca, Omer Faruk; Kilic, Birim Gunay; Uslu, Runa

    2010-01-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) causes negative outcomes on psychomotor and behavioral development of infants and young children. Children with autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) are under risk for ID and this condition may increase the severity of psychomotor and behavioral problems, some of which already inherently exist in these children. In the present…

  16. Zinc deficiency is common in several psychiatric disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ole Grønli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mounting evidence suggests a link between low zinc levels and depression. There is, however, little knowledge about zinc levels in older persons with other psychiatric diagnoses. Therefore, we explore the zinc status of elderly patients suffering from a wide range of psychiatric disorders. METHODS: Clinical data and blood samples for zinc analyzes were collected from 100 psychogeriatric patients over 64 of age. Psychiatric and cognitive symptoms were assessed using the Montgomery and Aasberg Depression Rating Scale, the Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia, the Mini-Mental State Examination, the Clockdrawing Test, clinical interviews and a review of medical records. In addition, a diagnostic interview was conducted using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview instrument. The prevalence of zinc deficiency in patients with depression was compared with the prevalence in patients without depression, and the prevalence in a control group of 882 older persons sampled from a population study. RESULTS: There was a significant difference in zinc deficiency prevalence between the control group (14.4% and the patient group (41.0% (χ(2 = 44.81, df = 1, p<0.001. In a logistic model with relevant predictors, zinc deficiency was positively associated with gender and with serum albumin level. The prevalence of zinc deficiency in the patient group was significantly higher in patients without depression (i.e. with other diagnoses than in patients with depression as a main diagnosis or comorbid depression (χ(2 = 4.36, df = 1, p = 0.037. CONCLUSIONS: Zinc deficiency is quite common among psychogeriatric patients and appears to be even more prominent in patients suffering from other psychiatric disorders than depression. LIMITATIONS: This study does not provide a clear answer as to whether the observed differences represent a causal relationship between zinc deficiency and psychiatric symptoms. The blood sample collection time points

  17. Creatine Transporter Deficiency in Two Brothers with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Halil Ibrahim

    2018-01-15

    Creatine transporter deficiency (CTD) is a treatable, X-linked, inborn error of metabolism. Two brothers with autism spectrum disorder were diagnosed with CTD at the ages of 17 and 12 years. Both were found to have a previously reported hemizygous p.408delF (c.1216_1218delTTC) deletion mutation. Both patients were given creatine monohydrate, L-arginine, L-glycine and S-adenosylmethionine, which partially improved the behavioral problems. Serum creatinine levels, creatine peak at brain MR spectroscopy or creatine/creatinine ratio in urine should be evaluated to identify CTD in children with autistic behavior and language disorders.

  18. Analysis of DR4 haplotypes in insulin dependent diabetes (IDD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monos, D.S.; Radka, S.F.; Zmijewski, C.M.; Kamoun, M.

    1986-01-01

    Population studies indicate that HLA-DR4 is implicated in the susceptibility of IDD. However, biochemical characterization of the serologically defined DR4 haplotype from normal individuals revealed five DR4 and three DQW3 molecular forms. Hence, in this study, they investigated the heterogeneity of the DR4 haplotype, using B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (B-LCL) generated from patients with IDD and seropositive for DR4. Class II molecules, metabolically labeled with 35 S-methionine, were immunoprecipitated with monoclonal antibodies specific for DR(L243), DQ(N297), DQW3(IVD12) or DR and DQ(SG465) and analyzed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE). The isoelectrofocusing (IEF) conditions employed in this study allow representation only of the DR4 haplotype from either DR3/4 or DR4/4 cell lines. The analysis of six different DR4 haplotypes from seven IDD patients, revealed the presence of two DR4 β and two DQW3 β chains. Three of the six DR4 β haplotypes analyzed shared the same DR4 β chain and three others shared a different one. Additionally five of the six haplotypes shared a different one. Additionally five of the six haplotypes shared the same DQW3 β chain and only one was carrying a different one. Different combinations of the two DR4 and two DQW3 β chains constitute three distinct patterns of DR4 haplotypes. These results suggest the prevalence of a DQW3 β chain in the small sample of IDD patients studied. Studies of a large number of patients should clarify whether IDD is associated with unique variants of DR4 or DQW3 β chains

  19. STUDY ABOUT THE INCIDENCE OF HEARING-SPEAKING DISORDERS IN A POPULATION WITH MENTAL DEFICIENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Mihaela Tomulescu

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is about the incidence of hearing-speaking disorders in a population with mental deficiency. We studied 596 children interned in Neurology and Psychiatry Clinical Hospital of Oradea during the 1999 - 2001 period. In 596 children, 393 presented different types of mental deficiency. The most frequent disorders observed are hearing loss or deafness, deaf-mutism, mutism and speaking retardation. Also, we related an increased frequency in rural area and in group of children with severe mental deficiency.

  20. Prevalence of Vitamin D Deficiency in Adult Outpatients With Bipolar Disorder or Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boerman, Remco; Cohen, Dan; Schulte, Peter F J; Nugter, Annet

    2016-12-01

    Several studies show an association between schizophrenia and low levels of vitamin D. To date, there are only few studies about the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in patients with bipolar disorder. We hypothesized that vitamin D deficiency is less common among patients with bipolar disorder than among patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. A second hypothesis is that vitamin D deficiency is more prevalent among patients with schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, or bipolar disorders than among the general Dutch population.Most studies have been conducted with hospitalized patients; in this study, we only included outpatients. All outpatients of a center for bipolar disorders and all outpatients of 3 flexible assertive community treatment teams were asked to participate in this cross-sectional study. We included 118 patients with bipolar disorder and 202 patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. Vitamin D levels were deficient in 30.3% (95% confidence interval, 25.5-35.6) of the cases. The type of psychiatric disorder was not a predictor of vitamin D deficiency. The absolute difference in risk of deficiency between the study population and the Dutch Caucasian population was 23.8% (95% confidence interval, 18.3%-29.3%). In this study, vitamin D deficiency was 4.7 times more common among outpatients with bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, or schizoaffective disorder than among the Dutch general population.Given the high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency, we believe that outpatients with bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, or schizoaffective disorder should be considered at risk of having low levels of vitamin D. Annual measurement of vitamin D levels in psychiatric outpatients with these disorders seems to be justified to maintain bone health, muscle strength, and to prevent osteoporosis.

  1. Deficient fear extinction memory in posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicking, Manon; Steiger, Frauke; Nees, Frauke; Diener, Slawomira J; Grimm, Oliver; Ruttorf, Michaela; Schad, Lothar R; Winkelmann, Tobias; Wirtz, Gustav; Flor, Herta

    2016-12-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) might be maintained by deficient extinction memory. We used a cued fear conditioning design with extinction and a post-extinction phase to provoke the return of fear and examined the role of the interplay of amygdala, hippocampus and prefrontal regions. We compared 18 PTSD patients with two healthy control groups: 18 trauma-exposed subjects without PTSD (nonPTSD) and 18 healthy controls (HC) without trauma experience. They underwent a three-day ABC-conditioning procedure in a functional magnetic resonance imaging scanner. Two geometric shapes that served as conditioned stimuli (CS) were presented in the context of virtual reality scenes. Electric painful stimuli were delivered after one of the two shapes (CS+) during acquisition (in context A), while the other (CS-) was never paired with pain. Extinction was performed in context B and extinction memory was tested in a novel context C. The PTSD patients showed significantly higher differential skin conductance responses than the non-PTSD and HC and higher differential amygdala and hippocampus activity than the HC in context C. In addition, elevated arousal to the CS+ during extinction and to the CS- throughout the experiment was present in the PTSD patients but self-reported differential valence or contingency were not different. During extinction recall, differential amygdala activity correlated positively with the intensity of numbing and ventromedial prefrontal cortex activity correlated positively with behavioral avoidance. PTSD patients show heightened return of fear in neural and peripheral measures. In addition, self-reported arousal was high to both danger (CS+) and safety (CS-) cues. These results suggest that a deficient maintenance of extinction and a failure to identify safety signals might contribute to PTSD symptoms, whereas non-PTSD subjects seem to show normal responses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Brief Report: Childhood Disintegrative Disorder as a Likely Manifestation of Vitamin B12 Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Savita; Subodh, B. N.; Parakh, Preeti; Lahariya, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    Childhood disintegrative disorder is a rare disorder, characterized by regression of acquired skills after a period of normal development. The case of childhood disintegrative disorder presented here was found to have vitamin B12 deficiency and hyperhomocysteinemia on extensive evaluation to find a probable cause for regression. This case…

  3. Iodine deficiency and iodine excess in Jiangsu Province, China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, J.

    2001-01-01

    Keywords:
    iodine deficiency, iodine excess, endemic goiter, drinking water, iodine intake, thyroid function, thyroid size, iodized salt, iodized oil, IQ, physical development, hearing capacity, epidemiology, meta-analysis, IDD, randomized trial, intervention, USA, Bangladesh,

  4. Reward deficiency syndrome: genetic aspects of behavioral disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comings, D E; Blum, K

    2000-01-01

    The dopaminergic and opioidergic reward pathways of the brain are critical for survival since they provide the pleasure drives for eating, love and reproduction; these are called 'natural rewards' and involve the release of dopamine in the nucleus accumbens and frontal lobes. However, the same release of dopamine and production of sensations of pleasure can be produced by 'unnatural rewards' such as alcohol, cocaine, methamphetamine, heroin, nicotine, marijuana, and other drugs, and by compulsive activities such as gambling, eating, and sex, and by risk taking behaviors. Since only a minority of individuals become addicted to these compounds or behaviors, it is reasonable to ask what factors distinguish those who do become addicted from those who do not. It has usually been assumed that these behaviors are entirely voluntary and that environmental factors play the major role; however, since all of these behaviors have a significant genetic component, the presence of one or more variant genes presumably act as risk factors for these behaviors. Since the primary neurotransmitter of the reward pathway is dopamine, genes for dopamine synthesis, degradation, receptors, and transporters are reasonable candidates. However, serotonin, norepinephrine, GABA, opioid, and cannabinoid neurons all modify dopamine metabolism and dopamine neurons. We have proposed that defects in various combinations of the genes for these neurotransmitters result in a Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS) and that such individuals are at risk for abuse of the unnatural rewards. Because of its importance, the gene for the [figure: see text] dopamine D2 receptor was a major candidate gene. Studies in the past decade have shown that in various subject groups the Taq I A1 allele of the DRD2 gene is associated with alcoholism, drug abuse, smoking, obesity, compulsive gambling, and several personality traits. A range of other dopamine, opioid, cannabinoid, norepinephrine, and related genes have since been

  5. Prevalence of Iodine deficiency disorder in a highland district in Tigray

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    , Ethiopia. Brief Communication. Prevalence of Iodine deficiency disorder in a highland district in Tigray. Teklay Kidane1, Aregai Woldegebriel2. Abstract. A cross-sectional community based goiter prevalence survey was conducted in February ...

  6. Association between vitamin deficiency and metabolic disorders related to obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas-Valdés, Samanta; Tostes, Maria das Graças V; Anunciação, Pamella C; da Silva, Bárbara P; Sant'Ana, Helena M Pinheiro

    2017-10-13

    Inappropriate food behavior contributes to obesity and leads to vitamin deficiency. This review discusses the nutritional status of water- and fat-soluble vitamins in obese subjects. We verified that most vitamins are deficient in obese individuals, especially the fat-soluble vitamins, folic acid, vitamin B 12 and vitamin C. However, some vitamins have been less evaluated in cases of obesity. The adipose tissue is considered a metabolic and endocrine organ, which in excess leads to changes in body homeostasis, as well as vitamin deficiency which can aggravate the pathological state. Therefore, the evaluation of vitamin status is of fundamental importance in obese individuals.

  7. Rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder in patients with narcolepsy is associated with hypocretin-1 deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Stine; Gammeltoft, Steen; Jennum, Poul J

    2010-01-01

    Rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder is characterized by dream-enacting behaviour and impaired motor inhibition during rapid eye movement sleep. Rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder is commonly associated with neurodegenerative disorders, but also reported in narcolepsy with cataplexy....... Most narcolepsy with cataplexy patients lack the sleep-wake, and rapid eye movement sleep, motor-regulating hypocretin neurons in the lateral hypothalamus. In contrast, rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder and hypocretin deficiency are rare in narcolepsy without cataplexy. We hypothesized...... that rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder coexists with cataplexy in narcolepsy due to hypocretin deficiency. In our study, rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder was diagnosed by the International Classification of Sleep Disorders (2nd edition) criteria in 63 narcolepsy patients with or without...

  8. Soluble transferrin receptor: a differentiating marker between iron deficiency anaemia and anaemia of chronic disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saboor, M.; Moinuddin, A.; Naureen, A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Iron deficiency anaemia and anaemia of chronic disorders are the two major causes of microcytic and hypochromic anaemia. Many times the diagnosis of these conditions becomes difficult through conventional laboratory tests. Determination of soluble transferrin receptors is a helpful laboratory test for the differential diagnosis of these conditions. The study was conducted to evaluate the role of soluble transferrin receptors in the differential diagnosis between iron deficiency anaemia and anaemia of chronic disorders. Methods: A total of 80 blood samples were evaluated, i.e., 20 samples from normal adult male, 20 samples from normal adult female, 20 samples from iron deficiency anaemia group and 20 samples from patients with anaemia of chronic disorders. Soluble transferrin receptors were determined by ELISA technique using Quantikine IVD kit (R and D Systems). Results: There was significant difference in the levels of sTfR in iron deficiency anaemia and anaemia of chronic disorders. Statistically non-significant difference was observed between the levels of sTfR in patients with anaemia of chronic disorders as compared to normal control group. Conclusion: The sTfR determination can be used as a reliable differentiating marker in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anaemia and anaemia of chronic disorders. (author)

  9. Impact on infants' cognitive development of antenatal exposure to iron deficiency disorder and common mental disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thach Duc Tran

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to examine the effects of antenatal exposure to iron deficiency anemia (IDA and common mental disorders (CMD on cognitive development of 6 months old infants in a developing country. METHODS: A prospective population-based study in a rural province in Vietnam, which enrolled pregnant women at 12-20 weeks gestation and followed them up with their infants until six months postpartum. Criteria for IDA were Hb 30 years and primiparity had an indirect adverse effect on infants' Bayley cognitive scores. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that antenatal IDA and CMD both have adverse effects on child cognitive development, which if unrecognized and unaddressed are likely to be lasting. It is crucial that both these risks are considered by policy makers, clinicians, and researchers seeking to improve child cognitive function in developing countries.

  10. Hormone disorder and vitamin deficiency in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism spectrum disorders (ASDs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bala, Keziban Aslı; Doğan, Murat; Kaba, Sultan; Mutluer, Tuba; Aslan, Oktay; Doğan, Sekibe Zehra

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze thyroid hormones and antibodies, ferritin, vitamins B12 and D, adrenal and gonadal steroid levels, and celiac antibodies in children diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Between February 2014 and July 2014, a total of 77 children and adolescents (31 girls, 46 boys) who were admitted to the Van Training and Research Hospital were included in the study. The study population was divided into three groups including ADHD (n=34), ASD (n=16), and age- and sex-matched healthy controls (n=27). The diagnosis of ADHD was made on the basis of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders - Fifth Edition (DSM-5) and DSM-4 Turkish version with the diagnostic interview and Disruptive Behavior Disorder Rating Scale (DBDRS). The diagnosis of ASD was based on the DSM-4 and DSM-5 Turkish version with the diagnostic interview and the Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS). The blood samples were obtained between 8:00 and 9:00 A.M. There was a statistically significant difference in vitamin B12 and D levels and ferritin values among the three groups. The ASD group had the highest ferritin and the lowest vitamins B12 and D levels. Vitamin D levels of the ADHD group were significantly lower compared to the healthy controls. Our study results highlight the importance of supplementation of vitamins B12 and D in the ASD and ADHD patients.

  11. Rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder in patients with narcolepsy is associated with hypocretin-1 deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Stine; Gammeltoft, Steen; Jennum, Poul J

    2010-01-01

    variables were analysed in relation to cataplexy and hypocretin deficiency with uni- and multivariate logistic/linear regression models, controlling for possible rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder biasing factors (age, gender, disease duration, previous anti-cataplexy medication). Only hypocretin......Rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder is characterized by dream-enacting behaviour and impaired motor inhibition during rapid eye movement sleep. Rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder is commonly associated with neurodegenerative disorders, but also reported in narcolepsy with cataplexy....... Most narcolepsy with cataplexy patients lack the sleep-wake, and rapid eye movement sleep, motor-regulating hypocretin neurons in the lateral hypothalamus. In contrast, rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder and hypocretin deficiency are rare in narcolepsy without cataplexy. We hypothesized...

  12. Neuronal glucose transporter isoform 3 deficient mice demonstrate features of autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y; Fung, C; Shin, D; Shin, B-C; Thamotharan, S; Sankar, R; Ehninger, D; Silva, A; Devaskar, S U

    2010-03-01

    Neuronal glucose transporter (GLUT) isoform 3 deficiency in null heterozygous mice led to abnormal spatial learning and working memory but normal acquisition and retrieval during contextual conditioning, abnormal cognitive flexibility with intact gross motor ability, electroencephalographic seizures, perturbed social behavior with reduced vocalization and stereotypies at low frequency. This phenotypic expression is unique as it combines the neurobehavioral with the epileptiform characteristics of autism spectrum disorders. This clinical presentation occurred despite metabolic adaptations consisting of an increase in microvascular/glial GLUT1, neuronal GLUT8 and monocarboxylate transporter isoform 2 concentrations, with minimal to no change in brain glucose uptake but an increase in lactate uptake. Neuron-specific glucose deficiency has a negative impact on neurodevelopment interfering with functional competence. This is the first description of GLUT3 deficiency that forms a possible novel genetic mechanism for pervasive developmental disorders, such as the neuropsychiatric autism spectrum disorders, requiring further investigation in humans.

  13. Light deficiency confers breast cancer risk by endocrine disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suba, Zsuzsanna

    2012-09-01

    North-America and northern European countries exhibit the highest incidence rate of breast cancer, whereas women in southern regions are relatively protected. Immigrants from low cancer incidence regions to high-incidence areas might exhibit similarly higher or excessive cancer risk as compared with the inhabitants of their adoptive country. Additional cancer risk may be conferred by incongruence between their biological characteristics and foreign environment. Many studies established the racial/ethnic disparities in the risk and nature of female breast cancer in United States between African-American and Caucasian women. Mammary tumors in black women are diagnosed at earlier age, and are associated with higher rate of mortality as compared with cancers of white cases. Results of studies on these ethnic/racial differences in breast cancer incidence suggest that excessive pigmentation of dark skinned women results in a relative light-deficiency. Poor light exposure may explain the deleterious metabolic and hormonal alterations; such as insulin resistance, deficiencies of estrogen, thyroxin and vitamin-D conferring excessive cancer risk. The more northern the location of an adoptive country the higher the cancer risk for dark skinned immigrants. Recognition of the deleterious systemic effects of darkness and excessive melatonin synthesis enables cancer protection treatment for people living in light-deficient environment. Recent patents provide new methods for the prevention of hormonal and metabolic abnormities.

  14. Dopaminergic Neurogenetics of Sleep Disorders in Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Kenneth; Oscar-Berman, Marlene; Badgaiyan, Rajendra D; Khurshid, Khurshid A; Gold, Mark S

    2014-02-18

    It is well-known that sleep has a vital function especially as it relates to prevention of substance-related disorders as discussed in the DSM-V. We are cognizant that certain dopaminergic gene polymorphisms have been associated with various sleep disorders. The importance of "normal dopamine homeostasis" is tantamount for quality of life especially for the recovering addict. Since it is now know that sleep per se has been linked with metabolic clearance of neurotoxins in the brain, it is parsonomiuos to encourage continued research in sleep science, which should ultimately result in attenuation of sleep deprivation especially associated with substance related disorders.

  15. Steroid sulfatase-deficient mice exhibit endophenotypes relevant to Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Trent, Simon; Dennehy, Alison; Richardson, Heather; Ojarikre, Obah A.; Burgoyne, Paul S.; Humby, Trevor; Davies, William

    2012-01-01

    Summary Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a common neurodevelopmental condition characterised by inattention, impulsivity and hyperactivity; it is frequently co-morbid with anxiety and conduct disorders, sleep perturbation and abnormal consummatory behaviours. Recent studies have implicated the neurosteroid-modulating enzyme steroid sulfatase (STS) as a modulator of ADHD-related endophenotypes. The effects of steroid sulfatase deficiency on homecage activity, feeding/drinking...

  16. Guanidinoacetate methyltransferase (GAMT) deficiency: late onset of movement disorder and preserved expressive language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, Declan J; Ryan, Stephanie; Salomons, Gajja; Jakobs, Cornelis; Monavari, Ahmad; King, Mary D

    2009-05-01

    Guanidinoacetate methyltransferase (GAMT) deficiency is a disorder of creatine biosynthesis, characterized by early-onset learning disability and epilepsy in most affected children. Severe expressive language delay is a constant feature even in the mildest clinical phenotypes.We report the clinical, biochemical, imaging, and treatment data of two female siblings (18y and 13y) with an unusual phenotype of GAMT deficiency. The oldest sibling had subacute onset of a movement disorder at age 17 years, later than has been previously reported. The younger sibling had better language skills than previously described in this disorder. After treatment with creatine, arginine restriction and ornithine-supplemented diet, seizure severity and movement disorder were reduced but cognition did not improve. This report confirms that GAMT deficiency, a heterogeneous, potentially treatable disorder, detected by increased levels of guanidinoacetate in body fluids (e.g. plasma or urine) or by an abnormal creatine peak on magnetic resonance spectroscopy, should be considered in patients of any age with unexplained, apparently static learning disability and epilepsy.

  17. Impact on infants' cognitive development of antenatal exposure to iron deficiency disorder and common mental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Thach Duc; Biggs, Beverley-Ann; Tran, Tuan; Simpson, Julie Anne; Hanieh, Sarah; Dwyer, Terence; Fisher, Jane

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of antenatal exposure to iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and common mental disorders (CMD) on cognitive development of 6 months old infants in a developing country. A prospective population-based study in a rural province in Vietnam, which enrolled pregnant women at 12-20 weeks gestation and followed them up with their infants until six months postpartum. Criteria for IDA were Hb cognitive development was assessed by Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, 3rd Ed. Path analyses were performed to determine the direct and indirect, partly or fully mediated, causal effects of the antenatal exposures. A total of 497 pregnant women were recruited, of those 378 women provided complete data which were included in the analyses. Statistically significant direct adverse effects of persistent antenatal IDA (estimated difference of -11.62 points; 95% CI -23.01 to -0.22) and antenatal CMD (-4.80 points; 95% CI: -9.40 to -0.20) on infant Bayley cognitive scores at six months were found. Higher birthweight, household wealth, and self-rated sufficient supply of breastmilk were associated with higher cognitive scores. Maternal age >30 years and primiparity had an indirect adverse effect on infants' Bayley cognitive scores. These findings suggest that antenatal IDA and CMD both have adverse effects on child cognitive development, which if unrecognized and unaddressed are likely to be lasting. It is crucial that both these risks are considered by policy makers, clinicians, and researchers seeking to improve child cognitive function in developing countries.

  18. Impact on Infants’ Cognitive Development of Antenatal Exposure to Iron Deficiency Disorder and Common Mental Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Thach Duc; Biggs, Beverley-Ann; Tran, Tuan; Simpson, Julie Anne; Hanieh, Sarah; Dwyer, Terence; Fisher, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to examine the effects of antenatal exposure to iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and common mental disorders (CMD) on cognitive development of 6 months old infants in a developing country. Methods A prospective population-based study in a rural province in Vietnam, which enrolled pregnant women at 12–20 weeks gestation and followed them up with their infants until six months postpartum. Criteria for IDA were Hb cognitive development was assessed by Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, 3rd Ed. Path analyses were performed to determine the direct and indirect, partly or fully mediated, causal effects of the antenatal exposures. Results A total of 497 pregnant women were recruited, of those 378 women provided complete data which were included in the analyses. Statistically significant direct adverse effects of persistent antenatal IDA (estimated difference of −11.62 points; 95% CI −23.01 to −0.22) and antenatal CMD (−4.80 points; 95% CI: −9.40 to −0.20) on infant Bayley cognitive scores at six months were found. Higher birthweight, household wealth, and self-rated sufficient supply of breastmilk were associated with higher cognitive scores. Maternal age >30 years and primiparity had an indirect adverse effect on infants’ Bayley cognitive scores. Conclusions These findings suggest that antenatal IDA and CMD both have adverse effects on child cognitive development, which if unrecognized and unaddressed are likely to be lasting. It is crucial that both these risks are considered by policy makers, clinicians, and researchers seeking to improve child cognitive function in developing countries. PMID:24086390

  19. Direct support workforce supporting individuals with IDD: current wages, benefits, and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogenschutz, Matthew D; Hewitt, Amy; Nord, Derek; Hepperlen, Renee

    2014-10-01

    Abstract Direct support professionals (DSPs) and frontline supervisors (FLSs) play an integral role in the lives of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) and are often the individuals directly responsible for assisting people with IDD to live and fully participate in their communities. These two groups of workers have typically been employed at lower wages with limited access to fringe benefits, contributing to high rates of turnover compared to a similarly skilled worker in the United States. This article summarizes findings and is the first investigation in several years to systematically examine the wages, fringe benefits, and stability of the DSP and FLS workforces supporting individuals with IDD. Findings suggest that a typical DSP may expect to earn about $11.25 per hour, while FLSs may expect wages of about $15.45 hourly. Of concern, however, is that fringe benefit provision was quite limited in this sample. Implications, including relation to past reports of DSP workforce development, are discussed.

  20. Vitamin C deficiency exerts paradoxical cardiovascular effects in osteogenic disorder Shionogi (ODS) rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergely, Catherine; Goirand, Françoise; Ecarnot-Laubriet, Aline; Renard, Céline; Moreau, Daniel; Guilland, Jean-Claude; Dumas, Monique; Rochette, Luc

    2004-04-01

    Vitamin C is considered to be a very efficient water-soluble antioxidant, for which several new cardiovascular properties were recently described. The aim of this study was to determine in vivo the effects of a severe depletion of vitamin C on cardiac and vascular variables and reperfusion arrhythmias. For this purpose, we used a mutant strain of Wistar rats, osteogenic disorder Shionogi (ODS). After 15 d of consuming a vitamin C-deficient diet, ODS rats had a 90% decrease in plasma and tissue levels of ascorbate compared with ODS vitamin C-supplemented rats and normal Wistar rats. However, plasma antioxidant capacity, proteins, alpha-tocopherol, urate, catecholamines, lipids, and nitrate were not influenced by the vitamin C deficiency in ODS rats. Moreover, there was no difference between ODS vitamin C-deficient and -supplemented rats in heart rate and arterial pressure. After 5 min of an in vivo regional myocardial ischemia, various severe arrhythmias were observed, but their intensities were not modified by vitamin C in vitamin C-deficient ODS rats. The vascular reactivity, measured in vitro on thoracic arteries, was not altered by ascorbate deficiency in ODS rats. These unexpected results suggest that unidentified compensatory mechanisms play a role in maintaining normal cardiac function and vascular reactivity in vitamin C-deficient rats.

  1. Human Genetic Disorders and Knockout Mice Deficient in Glycosaminoglycan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuji Mizumoto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs are constructed through the stepwise addition of respective monosaccharides by various glycosyltransferases and maturated by epimerases and sulfotransferases. The structural diversity of GAG polysaccharides, including their sulfation patterns and sequential arrangements, is essential for a wide range of biological activities such as cell signaling, cell proliferation, tissue morphogenesis, and interactions with various growth factors. Studies using knockout mice of enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis of the GAG side chains of proteoglycans have revealed their physiological functions. Furthermore, mutations in the human genes encoding glycosyltransferases, sulfotransferases, and related enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis of GAGs cause a number of genetic disorders including chondrodysplasia, spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, and Ehlers-Danlos syndromes. This review focused on the increasing number of glycobiological studies on knockout mice and genetic diseases caused by disturbances in the biosynthetic enzymes for GAGs.

  2. Factors affecting sustainable iodine deficiency elimination in Pakistan: A global perspective

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    Rehman Mehmood Khattak

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Iodine deficiency remains a considerable challenge worldwide, even after decades of efforts to address the problem. The aim of this review is to present the current situation in historically iodine-deficient Pakistan regarding iodine nutritional status and place it in a global perspective. We collected relevant articles from online bibliographic databases and websites of concerned organizations that addressed prevalence of goiter/iodine deficiency and barriers to sustainable control. We divided the studies into pre- and post-1994, a landmark year when Pakistan formally adopted the universal salt iodization (USI programme. Overall, 56 studies reported goiter/iodine deficiency prevalence in Pakistan. Before 1994, six studies (30% reported a goiter prevalence ≥70%, while nine studies (45% reported a goiter prevalence between 30% and 70%. Only five studies (25% found a goiter prevalence less than 30%, of which only two studies reported prevalence <10%. From 1994 onwards, 15 studies (41.7% reported a goiter/iodine deficiency (ID prevalence ≥50%, of which seven studies reported prevalence ≥70%, while three studies (8.3% found a goiter prevalence of 30%–49%, nine studies (25% found a goiter prevalence of 10%–29%, and five studies (13.9% reported prevalence of <10%. Four studies (11.1% reported lower goiter prevalence but higher prevalence of iodine deficiency. The efforts in the past two decades resulted in up to a 50% decline in iodine deficiency disorders (IDD. Variable remaining factors and the recent results, however, indicate that this decline may be non-uniform and even over-estimated. Coordinated and regionally adopted efforts for eradication of IDD from all stakeholders should be pursued. Policy makers should take steps to protect future generations and alert concerned organizations about the importance of careful assessments and estimates of iodine nutritional status.

  3. Vitamin D deficiency: infertility and neurodevelopmental diseases (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, autism, and schizophrenia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berridge, Michael J

    2018-02-01

    The process of development depends on a number of signaling systems that regulates the progressive sequence of developmental events. Infertility and neurodevelopmental diseases, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, autism spectrum disorders, and schizophrenia, are caused by specific alterations in these signaling processes. Calcium signaling plays a prominent role throughout development beginning at fertilization and continuing through early development, implantation, and organ differentiation such as heart and brain development. Vitamin D plays a major role in regulating these signaling processes that control development. There is an increase in infertility and an onset of neurodevelopmental diseases when vitamin D is deficient. The way in which vitamin D deficiency acts to alter development is a major feature of this review. One of the primary functions of vitamin D is to maintain the phenotypic stability of both the Ca 2+ and redox signaling pathways that play such a key role throughout development.

  4. Prognosis of physiological disorders in physic nut to N, P, and K deficiency during initial growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Elcio Ferreira; Macedo, Fernando Giovannetti; Zanchim, Bruno José; Lima, Giuseppina Pace Pereira; Lavres, José

    2017-06-01

    The description of physiological disorders in physic nut plants deficient in nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) may help to predict nutritional imbalances before the appearance of visual symptoms and to guide strategies for early nutrient supply. The aim of this study was to evaluate the growth of physic nuts (Jatropha curcas L.) during initial development by analyzing the gas exchange parameters, nutrient uptake and use efficiency, as well as the nitrate reductase and acid phosphatase activities and polyamine content. Plants were grown in a complete nutrient solution and solutions from which N, P or K was omitted. The nitrate reductase activity, phosphatase acid activity, polyamine content and gas exchange parameters from leaves of N, P and K-deficient plants indicates earlier imbalances before the appearance of visual symptoms. Nutrient deficiencies resulted in reduced plant growth, although P- and K-deficient plants retained normal net photosynthesis (A), stomatal conductance (g s ) and instantaneous carboxylation efficiency (k) during the first evaluation periods, as modulated by the P and K use efficiencies. Increased phosphatase acid activity in P-deficient plants may also contribute to the P use efficiency and to A and gs during the first evaluations. Early physiological and biochemical evaluations of N-, P- and K-starved plants may rely on reliable, useful methods to predict early nutritional imbalances. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Creatine Transporter Deficiency: Screening of Males with Neurodevelopmental Disorders and Neurocognitive Characterization of a Case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurm, Audrey; Himelstein, Daniel; DʼSouza, Precilla; Rennert, Owen; Jiang, Susanqi; Olatunji, Damilola; Longo, Nicola; Pasquali, Marzia; Swedo, Susan; Salomons, Gajja S; Carrillo, Nuria

    2016-05-01

    Creatine transporter deficiency (CTD) is an X-linked, neurometabolic disorder associated with intellectual disability that is characterized by brain creatine (Cr) deficiency and caused by mutations in SLC6A8, the Cr transporter 1 protein gene. CTD is identified by elevated urine creatine/creatinine (Cr/Crn) ratio or reduced Cr peak on brain magnetic resonance spectroscopy; the diagnosis is confirmed by decreased Cr uptake in cultured fibroblasts, and/or identification of a mutation in the SLC6A8 gene. Prevalence studies suggest this disorder may be underdiagnosed. We sought to identify cases from a well-characterized cohort of children diagnosed with neurodevelopmental disorders. Urine screening for CTD was performed on a cohort of 46 males with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and 9 males with a history of non-ASD developmental delay (DD) classified with intellectual disability. We identified 1 patient with CTD in the cohort based on abnormal urine Cr/Crn, and confirmed the diagnosis by the identification of a novel frameshift mutation in the SLC6A8 gene. This patient presented without ASD but with intellectual disability, and was characterized by a nonspecific phenotype of early language delay and DD that persisted into moderate-to-severe intellectual disability, consistent with previous descriptions of CTD. Identification of patients with CTD is possible by measuring urine Cr and Crn levels and the current case adds to the growing literature of neurocognitive deficits associated with the disorder that affect cognition, language and behavior in childhood.

  6. The Transition to Adulthood of Young Adults with IDD: Parents' Joint Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Richard A.; Marshall, Sheila K.; Stainton, Tim; Wall, Jessie M.; Curle, Deirdre; Zhu, Ma; Munro, David; Murray, John; El Bouhali, Asmae; Parada, Filomena; Zaidman-Zait, Anat

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: Parents have found the transition to adulthood for their sons or daughters with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities (IDD) particularly challenging. The literature has not examined how parents work together and with others in face of this transition nor has it highlighted parental goals in this process. This study used a…

  7. More Job Services--Better Employment Outcomes: Increasing Job Attainment for People with IDD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nord, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Job search, job placement, and on-the-job supports are valuable services provided to many people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) to obtain work in the community. Investigating those who were unemployed at the time of service entry, this study seeks to extend understanding about the effect of services. Using extant data, a…

  8. Unidata Internet Data Distribution (IDD) and THematic Real-time Environmental Distributed Data Services (THREDDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domenico, B.

    2001-12-01

    Universities across the nation are transforming their teaching and research efforts through increased use of a rapidly expanding menu of environmental data. With funding from the Division of Atmospheric Sciences (ATM ) of the National Science Foundation (NSF), the Unidata Program is playing a central role in this transformation by enabling universities to employ innovative computing and networking technologies to acquire such data sets in real-time and use them routinely in their classrooms and research labs. Working with the Unidata Program Center (UPC), the Unidata community, comprising over 140 departments, has built a national Internet Data Distribution (IDD ) system. The IDD allows users to "subscribe" to certain sets of data products; IDD servers then deliver the requested data to their local servers as soon as they are available from the source. With the initial national implementation in 1994, the IDD may have been the original example of Internet "push" technology. It now provides the reliability, flexibility, and efficiency required by participating institutions. As the underlying Internet technology evolves, we anticipate dramatic increases in the volume of data delivered. We plan to augment the system to better serve disciplines outside the atmospheric sciences and to incorporate anticipated new networking technologies to minimize the impact of the IDD on the underlying network. Unidata has recently undertaken a new initiative called THREDDS (THematic Real-time Environmental Distributed Data Services) under a grant from the NSF Division of Undergraduate Education NSDL (National Science, Math, Engineering, Technology Education Digital Library). The goal of THREDDs is to make it possible for students, educators and researchers to publish, contribute, find, and interact with data relating to the Earth system in a convenient, effective, and integrated fashion. Just as the World Wide Web and digital-library technologies have simplified the process of

  9. Porphyrinuria in childhood autistic disorder is not associated with urinary creatinine deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nataf, Robert; Skorupka, Corinne; Lam, Alain; Springbett, Anthea; Lathe, Richard

    2008-08-01

    Urinary metabolite measurements are often normalized to levels of the ubiquitous metabolite creatinine (CRT) to take account of variations in fluid export. Following CRT normalization, excesses of porphyrins and isoprostanes have been reported in the urines of children with neurodevelopmental disorders. It was suggested (Whiteley et al., 2006, Pediatr. Int. 2006; 48: 292-297) that urinary CRT levels may be depressed in children with autism spectrum disorders. This prompted re-evaluation of CRT levels in such children. First matinal urinary CRT levels were compared between subjects in different diagnostic categories including autistic disorder, pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS) and hyperactivity, before and after correction for age and gender. A larger reference group, consisting of subjects with unrelated disorders and Asperger disorder, with no reported porphyrin excess, was also compared to the group with autistic disorder, both for CRT and for porphyrin (coproporphyrin, COPRO) excess. No significant difference in CRT was observed between any of the categories analyzed, also when corrected for age and gender. In contrast, urinary COPRO levels were significantly higher in autistic disorder versus reference groups, either when expressed as absolute values (independent of CRT levels) or when normalized to CRT. These data do not support a systematic reduction in urinary CRT levels in subjects with autism spectrum disorders including autistic disorder and PDD-NOS. Urinary COPRO excess in autistic disorder was not associated with or consequent upon urinary CRT deficiency. Differences between affected and control subjects in age and sampling time, as reported by Whiteley et al., may underlie the apparent CRT reduction.

  10. [Study on the iodine nutrition and iodine deficiency disorders status in pasturing areas of Tibet-a non-epidemic area of iodine deficiency disorders in serious iodine deficiency district].

    Science.gov (United States)

    DU, Dan; Li, Su-Mei; Li, Xiu-Wei; Wang, Hai-Yan; Li, Shu-Hua; Nima, Cangjue; Danzeng, Sangbu; Zhuang, Guang-Xiu

    2010-08-01

    To explore the status of iodine nutrition and iodine deficiency disorders in the pasturing areas and agricultural regions in Tibet. 30 families were selected respectively in pastoral Dangxiong county and agricultural Qushui county of Lasa. Drinking water and edible salt were collected for testing the iodine contents. In each type of the following populations including children aged 8 - 10, women of child-bearing age and male adults, 50 subjects were randomly sampled to examine their urinary iodine contents. Among them, 50 children and 50 women were randomly selected for goiter examination by palpation. Water iodine content was less than 2 µg/L, both in pasturing area and in agricultural areas. There was no iodized salt used in the families of pasturing areas, while 90% people consumed iodized salt in agricultural areas. The median of urinary iodine in pasturing area was 50.2 µg/L, significantly lower than that of agricultural area (193.2 µg/L). However, the goiter rate of children and women in pasturing area was significantly lower than that in agricultural area. Although iodine intake of populations in pasturing area of Tibet was severely deficient, there was no epidemic of Iodine Deficiency Disorders. This phenomenon noticed by the researchers deserved further investigation.

  11. Rasal2 deficiency reduces adipogenesis and occurrence of obesity-related disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqiang Zhu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Identification of additional regulatory factors involved in the onset of obesity is important to understand the mechanisms underlying this prevailing disease and its associated metabolic disorders and to develop therapeutic strategies. Through isolation and analysis of a mutant, we aimed to uncover the function of a Ras-GAP gene, Rasal2 (Ras protein activator like 2, in the development of obesity and related metabolic disorders and to obtain valuable insights regarding the mechanism underlying the function. Methods: An obesity-based genetic screen was performed to identify an insertional mutation that disrupts the expression of Rasal2 (Rasal2PB/PB mice. Important metabolic parameters, such as fat mass and glucose tolerance, were measured in Rasal2PB/PB mice. The impact of Rasal2 on adipogenesis was evaluated in the mutant mice and in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes treated with Rasal2 siRNA. Ras and ERK activities were then evaluated in Rasal2-deficient preadipocytes or mice, and their functional relationships with Rasal2 on adipogenesis were investigated by employing Ras and MEK inhibitors. Results: Rasal2PB/PB mice showed drastic decrease in Rasal2 expression and a lean phenotype. The mutant mice displayed decreased adiposity and resistance to high-fat diet induced metabolic disorders. Further analysis indicated that Rasal2 deficiency leads to impaired adipogenesis in vivo and in vitro. Moreover, while Rasal2 deficiency resulted in increased activity of both Ras and ERK in preadipocytes, reducing Ras, but not ERK, suppressed the impaired adipogenesis. Conclusions: Rasal2 promotes adipogenesis, which may critically contribute to its role in the development of obesity and related metabolic disorders and may do so by repressing Ras activity in an ERK-independent manner. Keywords: Ras, ERK, Ras-GAP, Glucose tolerance, High-fat diet, Diabetes

  12. Hematological Disorders following Gastric Bypass Surgery: Emerging Concepts of the Interplay between Nutritional Deficiency and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyi Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and the associated metabolic syndrome are among the most common and detrimental metabolic diseases of the modern era, affecting over 50% of the adult population in the United States. Surgeries designed to promote weight loss, known as bariatric surgery, typically involve a gastric bypass procedure and have shown high success rates for treating morbid obesity. However, following gastric bypass surgery, many patients develop chronic anemia, most commonly due to iron deficiency. Deficiencies of vitamins B1, B12, folate, A, K, D, and E and copper have also been reported after surgery. Copper deficiency can cause hematological abnormalities with or without neurological complications. Despite oral supplementation and normal serum concentrations of iron, copper, folate, and vitamin B12, some patients present with persistent anemia after surgery. The evaluation of hematologic disorders after gastric bypass surgery must take into account issues unique to the postsurgery setting that influence the development of anemia and other cytopenias. In this paper, the clinical characteristics and differential diagnosis of the hematological disorders associated with gastric bypass surgery are reviewed, and the underlying molecular mechanisms are discussed.

  13. Nutritional deficiencies and overweight prevalence among children with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmaya, Yael; Eilat-Adar, Sigal; Leitner, Yael; Reif, Shimon; Gabis, Lidia

    2015-03-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are at risk of developing nutritional deviations. Three to six year old children with ASD were compared to their typically developing siblings and to a typically developing age and gender matched control group, in order to evaluate their intake and body mass index. Nutrient intake was compared to the Dietary Reference Intake using three-day diet diaries completed by the parents. The sum percentage of nutritional deficiencies in the ASD group compared to the typical development group was 342.5% (±122.9%) vs. 275.9% (±106.8%), respectively (P=0.026). A trend toward higher deficiency in the ASD group was observed as compared to the sibling group 363% (±122.9%) vs. 283.2% (±94.7%) (P=0.071). A higher body mass index was found in the ASD group compared to their counterparts, despite their nutritional deficiencies. In conclusion, children with ASD are more likely to suffer from nutritional deficiencies despite higher body mass index. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. SLC39A8 Deficiency: A Disorder of Manganese Transport and Glycosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Julien H; Hogrebe, Max; Grüneberg, Marianne; DuChesne, Ingrid; von der Heiden, Ava L; Reunert, Janine; Schlingmann, Karl P; Boycott, Kym M; Beaulieu, Chandree L; Mhanni, Aziz A; Innes, A Micheil; Hörtnagel, Konstanze; Biskup, Saskia; Gleixner, Eva M; Kurlemann, Gerhard; Fiedler, Barbara; Omran, Heymut; Rutsch, Frank; Wada, Yoshinao; Tsiakas, Konstantinos; Santer, René; Nebert, Daniel W; Rust, Stephan; Marquardt, Thorsten

    2015-12-03

    SLC39A8 is a membrane transporter responsible for manganese uptake into the cell. Via whole-exome sequencing, we studied a child that presented with cranial asymmetry, severe infantile spasms with hypsarrhythmia, and dysproportionate dwarfism. Analysis of transferrin glycosylation revealed severe dysglycosylation corresponding to a type II congenital disorder of glycosylation (CDG) and the blood manganese levels were below the detection limit. The variants c.112G>C (p.Gly38Arg) and c.1019T>A (p.Ile340Asn) were identified in SLC39A8. A second individual with the variants c.97G>A (p.Val33Met) and c.1004G>C (p.Ser335Thr) on the paternal allele and c.610G>T (p.Gly204Cys) on the maternal allele was identified among a group of unresolved case subjects with CDG. These data demonstrate that variants in SLC39A8 impair the function of manganese-dependent enzymes, most notably β-1,4-galactosyltransferase, a Golgi enzyme essential for biosynthesis of the carbohydrate part of glycoproteins. Impaired galactosylation leads to a severe disorder with deformed skull, severe seizures, short limbs, profound psychomotor retardation, and hearing loss. Oral galactose supplementation is a treatment option and results in complete normalization of glycosylation. SLC39A8 deficiency links a trace element deficiency with inherited glycosylation disorders. Copyright © 2015 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Body Mass Disorders in Healthy Short Children and in Children with Growth Hormone Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaszewski, Paweł; Milde, Katarzyna; Majcher, Anna; Pyrżak, Beata; Tiryaki-Sonmez, Gul; Schoenfeld, Brad J

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the degree of adiposity and the incidence of body mass disorders, including abdominal obesity, in healthy short children and children with growth hormone deficiency. The study included 134 short children (height hormonal disorders and 71 patients (35 boys and 36 girls) with growth hormone deficiency. Basic somatic features were assessed and the study participants were categorized according to the percentage of body fat (%FAT), body mass index (BMI), and waist-to-height ratio (WHtR). We found that there were no significant differences in %FAT and the incidence of body weight disorders depending on gender or diagnosis. %FAT deficit was observed in 12-21% of the participants and underweight in almost every fourth child. Overweight involved 3-14% of the participants and obesity was diagnosed in isolated cases (0-3%); both were considerably lower compared to the estimates based on %FAT. Using the cut-off points of WHtR, abdominal adiposity was observed in 3-15% of the participants. In conclusion, quite a large number of short children (between 25 and 50%) are characterized by abnormal body fat or body mass index values. The results indicate a limited usefulness of BMI in evaluating the incidence of overweight and obesity in children characterized by a height deficit.

  16. High prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency in adolescent inpatients diagnosed with eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modan-Moses, Dalit; Levy-Shraga, Yael; Pinhas-Hamiel, Orit; Kochavi, Brigitte; Enoch-Levy, Adi; Vered, Iris; Stein, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies assessing vitamin D status in adolescents with eating disorders showed inconsistent results. The aim of the current study was to assess vitamin D status in a large cohort of adolescent inpatients with eating disorders and its relation to bone mineral density (BMD) and depression. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD), calcium, phosphorus, and alkaline phosphatase levels as well as BMD and depression were assessed on admission in 87 inpatients (aged 16 ± 2 years, females = 81) with eating disorders [anorexia nervosa (AN) = 64; bulimia nervosa (BN) = 5; eating disorders not otherwise specified-binge/purge type (EDNOS-B/P) = 18]. Mean 25OHD levels were 24.1 ± 7.5 ng/ml (25.0 ± 7.6, 25.4 ± 9.9, and 22.0 ± 9.9 ng/ml in patients with AB, BN, and EDNOS-B/P, respectively). Vitamin D deficiency (32 ng/ml, considered optimal by some experts. No associations were found between 25OHD levels and BMD or comorbid depression. 25OHD levels during winter were significantly lower than summer levels (p EDNOS-B/P type was low (-1.5 ± 1.1) and correlated with body mass index standard deviation score (p = .03). Adolescents with eating disorders show a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency. Given the risk of osteoporosis in this population, 25OHD levels found in this group may not offer optimal bone protection. Vitamin D levels should be routinely checked and supplementation should be administered as required. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. The interictal dysphoric disorder in patients with epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amiri, Moshgan; Pilebæk Hansen, Christian

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To examine adult epilepsy outpatients for the existence of the interictal dysphoric disorder (IDD) using the interictal dysphoric disorder inventory (IDDI), the overlap between IDD, depression, and anxiety, and the reproducibility of IDDI. METHODS: Epilepsy outpatients were assessed...... with the Danish IDDI and self-report inventories for depression and anxiety. Patients with abnormal scores were further assessed with the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI). Patients with IDD were asked to repeat IDDI for evaluating the reproducibility. Quality of life, well-being and adverse...... effects to antiepileptic drugs were determined. RESULTS: We included 169 patients, and 32 (19%) were diagnosed with IDD. Thirty patients were further assessed with MINI, and 17 (57%) were diagnosed with additional psychiatric disorders, mainly depression, dysthymia, and anxiety. Patients with IDD...

  18. 新疆阿克苏地区碘缺乏病综合干预效果追踪调查%A follow up observation of the effects of preventive measures on iodine deficiency disorders in Aksu, Xinjiang

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱艳艳; 李东阳; 廖飞; 阿不来提·阿不拉; 戴思芸; 阿依加马力·阿吾东; 钱明

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the iodine nutritional condition among populations in Aksu after implementing free iodized salt in population of Xinjiang.Methods According to the "National Iodine Deficiency Monitoring Programme (Revised)",totally 45 villages (towns) of subordinated 8 counties and Aksu City,Xinjiang were selected for collecting salt samples.Meanwhile,in 27 villages (towns) primary schools,school-aged children (8-10 years old) were selected for collecting disposable urine samples,B ultrasound was used to check thyroid volume and intelligence (IQ) was evaluated by China Combined Raven Test (CRT).Pregnant women were sampled for collecting their disposable urine near the primary schools.Both the children and pregnant women were evaluated the iodine deficiency disorders (IDD) knowledge awareness by questionnaire.The urine iodine concentration was measured by the ammonium persulfate digestion-As-Ce catalytic spectrophotometer method.The salt iodine concentration was measured by the direct titrimetric method,and other kinds of iodine in salt were measured by referee method (GB/T 13025.7-2012).Results A total of 2 700 household salt samples were collected,the average of iodine concentration in household salt was (26.95 ± 5.10) mg/kg.The coverage of household iodized salt was 98.56% (2 661/2 700).The coverage of edible iodized salt was 98.00% (2 646/2 700).A total of 2 159 urine samples were collected,the median of urine iodine concentration (UIC) among school-aged children (8-10 years old) was 235.50 μg/L.The total goiter rate was 1.51% (33/2 179) among children aged 8-10 years old.A total of 2 098 people were conducted IQ test,the average IQ was 88.03 ± 17.14.A total of 1 047 urine samples were collected,the median of UIC among pregnant women was 213.50 μg/L.The IDD knowledge awareness rate of children and women were 98.82% (751/760) and 99.23% (258/260),respectively.Conclusions The iodine nutrition is in an adequate range,awareness of IDD prevention

  19. Vitamin D Deficiency in HIV Infection: Not Only a Bone Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquale Mansueto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypovitaminosis D is a worldwide disorder, with a high prevalence in the general population of both Western and developing countries. In HIV patients, several studies have linked vitamin D status with bone disease, neurocognitive impairment, depression, cardiovascular disease, high blood pressure, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus, infections, autoimmune diseases like type 1 diabetes mellitus, and cancer. In this review, we focus on the most recent epidemiological and experimental data dealing with the relationship between vitamin D deficiency and HIV infection. We analysed the extent of the problem, pathogenic mechanisms, clinical implications, and potential benefits of vitamin D supplementation in HIV-infected subjects.

  20. The diabetes type 1 locus Idd6 modulates activity of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogner, Ute Christine; Lepault, Françoise; Gagnerault, Marie-Claude; Vallois, David; Morin, Joëlle; Avner, Philip; Boitard, Christian

    2006-01-01

    The genetic locus Idd6 confers susceptibility to the spontaneous development of type 1 diabetes in the NOD mouse. Our studies on disease resistance of the congenic mouse strain NOD.C3H 6.VIII showed that Idd6 influences T-cell activities in the peripheral immune system and suggest that a major mechanism by which the Idd6 locus modifies diabetes development is via modulation of regulatory T-cell activities. Our transfer experiments using total splenocytes and purified T-cells demonstrated that the locus specifically controls the efficiency of disease protection mediated by the regulatory CD4(+)CD25(+) T-cell subset. Our data also implicate the Idd6 locus in controlling the balance between infiltrating lymphocytes and antigen-presenting cells within the pancreatic islet.

  1. Wolman's disease and cholesteryl ester storage disorder: the phenotypic spectrum of lysosomal acid lipase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pericleous, Marinos; Kelly, Claire; Wang, Tim; Livingstone, Callum; Ala, Aftab

    2017-09-01

    Lysosomal acid lipase deficiency is a rare, autosomal recessive condition caused by mutations in the gene encoding lysosomal acid lipase (LIPA) that result in reduced or absent activity of this essential enzyme. The severity of the resulting disease depends on the nature of the underlying mutation and magnitude of its effect on enzymatic function. Wolman's disease is a severe disorder that presents during infancy, resulting in failure to thrive, hepatomegaly, and hepatic failure, and an average life expectancy of less than 4 months. Cholesteryl ester storage disorder arises later in life and is less severe, although the two diseases share many common features, including dyslipidaemia and transaminitis. The prevalence of these diseases has been estimated at one in 40 000 to 300 000, but many cases are undiagnosed and unreported, and awareness among clinicians is low. Lysosomal acid lipase deficiency-which can be diagnosed using dry blood spot testing-is often misdiagnosed as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), hereditary dyslipidaemia, or cryptogenic cirrhosis. There are no formal guidelines for treatment of these patients, and treatment options are limited. In this Review we appraise the existing literature on Wolman's disease and cholesteryl ester storage disease, and discuss available treatments, including enzyme replacement therapy, oral lipid-lowering therapy, stem-cell transplantation, and liver transplantation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Vitamin D across growth hormone (GH) disorders: From GH deficiency to GH excess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciresi, A; Giordano, C

    2017-04-01

    The interplay between vitamin D and the growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I system is very complex and to date it is not fully understood. GH directly regulates renal 1 alpha-hydroxylase activity, although the action of GH in modulating vitamin D metabolism may also be IGF-I mediated. On the other hand, vitamin D increases circulating IGF-I and the vitamin D deficiency should be normalized before measurement of IGF-I concentrations to obtain reliable and unbiased IGF-I values. Indeed, linear growth after treatment of nutritional vitamin D deficiency seems to be mediated through activation of the GH/IGF-I axis and it suggests an important role of vitamin D as a link between the proliferating cartilage cells of the growth plate and GH/IGF-I secretion. Vitamin D levels are commonly lower in patients with GH deficiency (GHD) than in controls, with a variable prevalence of insufficiency or deficiency, and this condition may worsen the already known cardiovascular and metabolic risk of GHD, although this finding is not common to all studies. In addition, data on the impact of GH treatment on vitamin D levels in GHD patients are quite conflicting. Conversely, in active acromegaly, a condition characterized by a chronic GH excess, both increased and decreased vitamin D levels have been highlighted, and the interplay between vitamin D and the GH/IGF-I axis becomes even more complicated when we consider the acromegaly treatment, both medical and surgical. The current review summarizes the available data on vitamin D in the main disorders of the GH/IGF-I axis, providing an overview of the current state of the art. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. P450 oxidoreductase deficiency: a disorder of steroidogenesis with multiple clinical manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Walter L

    2012-10-23

    Cytochrome P450 enzymes catalyze the biosynthesis of steroid hormones and metabolize drugs. There are seven human type I P450 enzymes in mitochondria and 50 type II enzymes in endoplasmic reticulum. Type II enzymes, including both drug-metabolizing and some steroidogenic enzymes, require electron donation from a two-flavin protein, P450 oxidoreductase (POR). Although knockout of the POR gene causes embryonic lethality in mice, we discovered human POR deficiency as a disorder of steroidogenesis associated with the Antley-Bixler skeletal malformation syndrome and found mild POR mutations in phenotypically normal adults with infertility. Assay results of mutant forms of POR using the traditional but nonphysiologic assay (reduction of cytochrome c) did not correlate with patient phenotypes; assays based on the 17,20 lyase activity of P450c17 (CYP17) correlated with clinical phenotypes. The POR sequence in 842 normal individuals revealed many polymorphisms; amino acid sequence variant A503V is encoded by ~28% of human alleles. POR A503V has about 60% of wild-type activity in assays with CYP17, CYP2D6, and CYP3A4, but nearly wild-type activity with P450c21, CYP1A2, and CYP2C19. Activity of a particular POR variant with one P450 enzyme will not predict its activity with another P450 enzyme: Each POR-P450 combination must be studied individually. Human POR transcription, initiated from an untranslated exon, is regulated by Smad3/4, thyroid receptors, and the transcription factor AP-2. A promoter polymorphism reduces transcription to 60% in liver cells and to 35% in adrenal cells. POR deficiency is a newly described disorder of steroidogenesis, and POR variants may account for some genetic variation in drug metabolism.

  4. Intervention for Anxiety and Problem Behavior in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskowitz, Lauren J.; Walsh, Caitlin E.; Mulder, Emile; McLaughlin, Darlene Magito; Hajcak, Greg; Carr, Edward G.; Zarcone, Jennifer R.

    2017-01-01

    There is little research on the functional assessment and treatment of anxiety and related problem behavior in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), particularly those with intellectual and developmental disability (IDD). In a recent study, we evaluated a multimethod strategy for assessing anxiety in children with ASD and IDD ("Am J…

  5. 海南省碘缺乏病高危地区重点人群调查结果%Iodine deficiency disorders in high-risk areas of Hainan province from 2007 to 2009: an analysis of survey results

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王红美; 苏英迪; 黄曼; 江苏娟; 吴柳坚; 王善青

    2010-01-01

    目的 了解海南省缺碘高危地区碘缺乏病防治现状和防治措施落实效果.方法 2007-2009年,采用典型抽样方法,在海南省碘盐覆盖率低的8个市(县),以乡为单位搜索10岁以下新发地方性克汀病(地克病)患儿;在乡小学校,抽取8~10岁儿童,采用触诊、B超法检查儿童甲状腺;收集儿童尿样;测定儿童智商(IQ);对五年级学生进行健康教育问卷调查.入户采集育龄妇女尿样和家中食用盐样,同时对妇女进行健康教育问卷调查.尿碘测定采用砷铈催化分光光度法,盐碘测定采用半定量法,IQ测定采用中国联合型瑞文测验(CRT-C2).结果 共调查72个乡(镇),其中8~10儿童7937名、育龄妇女1797名、5年级学生4128名,线索调查发现疑似新发地克病患儿1例.居民碘盐覆盖率由2007年的44.6%(629/1411)提高到2009年的92.1%(1688/1832).儿童甲状腺肿大(甲肿)率触诊法、B超法由2007年的5.9%(269/4548)、6.0%(274/4548)下降到2009年的1.6%(24/1461)、0.1%(2/1461);尿碘中位数由2007年的97.4μg/L上升2009年165.0μg/L;尿碘<50.0μg/L和<100.0μg/L的比例由2007年的21.4%(973/4548)、51.2%(2329/4548)下降到2009年的75%(110/1461)、23.4%(342/1461);育龄妇女尿碘中位数由2007年的73.7μg/L上升到2009年的126.1μg/L,其中孕妇的尿碘中位数由2007年的55.7μg/L上升到2008年117.9μg/L、2009年的121.5 μg/L,但仍<150.0μg/L.五年级学生、育龄妇女碘缺乏病的健康教育问卷调查及格率分别由2007年29.8%(446/1495)、24.1%(179/742)提高到2009年65.8%(732/1112)、72.1%(264/366).儿童IQ值为90.4±16.0,IQ低下(≤69)的比例为12.6%(1000/7937).结论 海南省高危地区碘缺乏病病情逐年改善,但孕妇碘营养水平仍较低,今后应加强对孕妇的补碘.%Objective To know the prevalence of iodine deficiency disorders(IDD) and the implementation of control measures against the disorders in high-risk areas of Hainan province. Methods Typical

  6. The Incidence of Functional Disorders and Clinical Symptoms that May be Associated with Lactase Deficiency in Infants of Lviv

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.V. Tkach

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Today, the violations of the digestive system in children of the first years of life remain the actual problem of practical pediatrics and are the common cause for parents to visit a doctor. The importance in the genesis of functional disorders of the digestive system in children of this age may belongs to lactase deficiency. 327 children from Lviv were included in the questionnaire survey. The aim of the study was to evaluate the incidence of clinical symptoms that may be associated with lactase deficiency in infants. Among the clinical symptoms in young children, according to the survey, regurgitation and colic, stool disorders dominated. The diagnosis of lactase deficiency was established in 3.4 % (11 of children, 2.8 % (9 children received enzyme of lactase.

  7. Alkyl-dihydroxyacetonephosphate synthase. Fate in peroxisome biogenesis disorders and identification of the point mutation underlying a single enzyme deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vet, E. C.; IJlst, L.; Oostheim, W.; Wanders, R. J.; van den Bosch, H.

    1998-01-01

    Peroxisomes play an indispensible role in ether lipid biosynthesis as evidenced by the deficiency of ether phospholipids in fibroblasts and tissues from patients suffering from a number of peroxisomal disorders. Alkyl-dihydroxyacetonephosphate synthase, a peroxisomal enzyme playing a key role in the

  8. The High Prevalence of Anemia in Cambodian Children and Women Cannot Be Satisfactorily Explained by Nutritional Deficiencies or Hemoglobin Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieringa, Frank Tammo; Dahl, Miriam; Chamnan, Chhoun; Poirot, Etienne; Kuong, Khov; Sophonneary, Prak; Sinuon, Muth; Greuffeille, Valerie; Hong, Rathavuth; Berger, Jacques; Dijkhuizen, Marjoleine Amma; Laillou, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anemia is highly prevalent in Cambodian women and children, but data on causes of anemia are scarce. We performed a national micronutrient survey in children and women that was linked to the Cambodian Demographic Health Survey 2014 (CDHS-2014) to assess the prevalence of micronutrient deficiency, hemoglobin disorders and intestinal parasite infection. Methods: One-sixth of households from the CDHS-2014 were selected for a follow-up visit for the micronutrient survey. Households were visited from two weeks to two months after the CDHS-2014 visit. Data on micronutrient status were available for 1512 subjects (792 children and 720 women). Results: Anemia was found in 43% of the women and 53% of the children. Hemoglobin disorders affected >50% of the population, with Hemoglobin-E the most prevalent disorder. Deficiencies of iron (ferritin children, the prevalence of iron, vitamin A, vitamin B12 or folic acid deficiency was anemia in children, whereas in the women none of the factors was significantly associated with anemia. Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) was more prevalent in children children and women, the prevalence of IDA was anemia were hookworm infection and zinc and folic acid deficiency. Over 40% of the anemia was not caused by nutritional factors. Conclusion: The very high prevalence of anemia in Cambodian women and children cannot be explained solely by micronutrient deficiencies and hemoglobin disorders. Micronutrient interventions to improve anemia prevalence are likely to have limited impact in the Cambodian setting. The focus of current interventions to reduce the high prevalence of anemia in children and women should be broadened to include zinc and folic acid as well as effective anti-hookworm measures. PMID:27338454

  9. Relationship between severity of depression symptoms and iron deficiency anemia in women with major depressive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed gholamreza Noorazar

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Iron deficiency (ID is a common nutritional problem lead to many unintended consequences such as decrease energy, immune system problems, and neurological dysfunction. The most common psychological disorder is depression. A patient with ID anemia (IDA show signs and symptoms of behavioral and mood disorders like depression. Methods: In this study, 100 female patients with diagnosed major depression in years 2010 and 2011 were studied. In all patients standard Hamilton depression rating scale (HDRS was used to evaluate depression severity. Blood samples were taken for complete blood count difference analysis and evaluating anemia and in those with hemoglobin (Hb < 12 mg/dl, ferritin, and total iron binding capacity were checked to evaluate IDA. Results: Patients mean age was 36.34 ± 10.43 years old. Mean HDRS score was 32.20 ± 4.07. 19 had anemia, and among them 8% had IDA. Mean HDRS score in patients with IDA (33.37 ± 1.90 was higher than those without (32.09 ± 4.19, but the difference was not significant (P = 0.39. There was no difference between patients with and without anemia in HDRS score. The negative relation was observed between Hb levels, and HDRS score (Pearson correlation = -0.21, P = 0.03. Conclusion: We observed that the negative correlation between Hb levels and HDRS score. It demonstrates the effect of Hb decrease and anemia occurrence on depression severity; however, it needs more studies.

  10. Analysis of field survey results for iodine deficiency disorders in high-risk areas of China%我国碘缺乏病高危地区重点调查结果分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李全乐; 苏晓辉; 于钧; 张树彬; 刘鹏; 纪晓红; 刘守军; 孙殿军

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the occurrence of new cretinism cases and the prevalence of endemic goiter, and the reason of lower coverage rate of iodized salt in the iodine deficiency disorders(IDD) high-risk areas of China, so as to put forward target prevention measures for these areas. Methods A hundred and one counties from 11 provinces(autonomous regions, municipality), such as Tibet, Qinghai, Xinjiang, Gansu, Ningxia, Sichuan, Hainan, Chongqing, Yunnan, Guangxi, Inner Mongolia, were chosen into the survey by simple random sampling. In the counties of high risk, typical sampling principle was used. In the selected townships, searching for new cretinism cases were carried out in the children under 10 years old, the thyroid volume of children aged 8-10 years old were determined by B-ultrasonography methods and their urinary iodine (UI) were determined by As3-Ce catalytic spectrophotometry, the intelligence quotient(IQ) values of children aged 8-10 years old were measured by the combined Raven Test in China. In the household survey, the housewives were asked to fill in the questionnaire, the iodized salt coverage rates and the UI levels of child-bearing age women were investigated, the salt iodine content was determined using self-quantitative kit. Epi Info software was used to analyze the determination results. Results In the 101 high-risk counties, 249 were diagnosed as new cretinism cases from 4122 suspected cases searched. The goiter rate of children aged 8-10 years old by B-ultrasound was 8.28% (4434/53 541), 44 counties had goiter rates in the range of 5%-20%, 5 counties had goiter rates in the range of 20%-30%, and 3 counties had goiter rates of 30%. The mean IQ of children was 85.44, and the percentage of IQ value less than 70 was 16.52%(8713/52 745). The median urinary iodine(MUI) of children was 154.69 μg/L, the percentage of UI less than 50 μg/L was 17.26% (9069/52 558). Twenty-five counties had a MUI of children less than 100 μg/L. The MUI of

  11. Iron Deficiency Parameters in Children and Adolescents with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percinel, Ipek; Yazici, Kemal Utku; Ustundag, Bilal

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study is to compare iron deficiency parameters in patients with stimulant-naive attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and healthy controls, to investigate whether there are differences among the ADHD presentations, and to evaluate the relationship between ADHD symptom severity and serum ferritin levels. In addition, ADHD-Predominantly Inattentive (ADHD-PI) patients with restrictive hyperactivity/impulsivity symptoms were evaluated as a separate group with "restrictive inattention presentation" (ADHD-Rest) and were compared with other groups. Patients with ADHD-Rest are typically defined as having six or more symptoms of inattention and fewer than three symptoms of hyperactivity/impulsivity. A total of 200 ADHD cases consisting of 100 ADHD-Combine (ADHD-C) and 100 ADHD-PI and a total of 100 healthy control cases were included in the study. The Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School Age Children-Present and Lifetime Version was performed in a semi-structured interview during the diagnosis. The Turgay DSM-IV-Based Child and Adolescent Behavior Disorders Screening and Rating Scale, the Conners' Rating Scale-Revised: Long Form (Parent-Teacher) (CPRSR:L, CTRS-R:L) were used for clinical evaluation. Hemogram, serum iron, iron binding capacity and serum ferritin levels were assessed. There were no significant differences between the ADHD patients and the healthy control cases in terms of iron deficiency parameters. Further, there were no significant differences among the ADHD presentations in terms of the same parameters, nor were there any significant differences when the groups were examined after the identification of the ADHD-Rest. The CPRS-R:L Hyperactivity and the CTRS-R:L Hyperactivity scores were negatively correlated with serum ferritin level in the ADHD group. To our knowledge, our current study is the first to compare serum ferritin levels in ADHD-Rest with other presentations of ADHD, and included the largest

  12. The transition to adulthood of young adults with IDD: Parents' joint projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Richard A; Marshall, Sheila K; Stainton, Tim; Wall, Jessie M; Curle, Deirdre; Zhu, Ma; Munro, David; Murray, John; El Bouhali, Asmae; Parada, Filomena; Zaidman-Zait, Anat

    2018-03-01

    Parents have found the transition to adulthood for their sons or daughters with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities (IDD) particularly challenging. The literature has not examined how parents work together and with others in face of this transition nor has it highlighted parental goals in this process. This study used a perspective based on joint, goal-direct action to describe the projects that Canadian parents engaged in together and with others relative to this transition. Using the qualitative action-project method, joint projects between parents and with others were identified from their conversations and followed for 6 months. Three groups of projects were described: equipping the young adult for adult life, connecting for personal support and managing day-to-day while planning for the future. Parents act together and with others relative to the transition to adulthood of their young adult children with IDD. These projects are complex and differ in goals, steps, resources and emotional regulation and motivation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Reinforcement and stimulant medication ameliorate deficient response inhibition in children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosch, Keri S.; Fosco, Whitney D.; Pelham, William E.; Waxmonsky, James G.; Bubnik, Michelle G.; Hawk, Larry W.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the degree to which reinforcement, stimulant medication, and their combination impact response inhibition in children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Across three studies, participants with ADHD (n=111, 25 girls) and typically-developing (TD) controls (n=33, 6 girls) completed a standard version of the stop signal task (SST) and/or a reinforcement-manipulation SST with performance-contingent points. In two of these studies, these tasks were performed under placebo or 0.3 and 0.6 mg/kg methylphenidate (MPH) conditions. Cross-study comparisons were conducted to test hypotheses regarding the separate and combined effects of reinforcement and methylphenidate on response inhibition among children with ADHD relative to TD controls. Baseline response inhibition was worse among children with ADHD compared to controls. MPH produced dose-related improvements in response inhibition in children with ADHD; compared to non-medicated TD controls, 0.3 mg/kg MPH normalized deficient response inhibition, and 0.6 mg/kg MPH resulted in better inhibition in children with ADHD. Reinforcement improved response inhibition to a greater extent for children with ADHD than for TD children, normalizing response inhibition. The combination of MPH and reinforcement improved response inhibition among children with ADHD compared to reinforcement alone and MPH alone, also resulting in normalization of response inhibition despite repeated task exposure. Deficient response inhibition commonly observed in children with ADHD is significantly improved with MPH and/or reinforcement, normalizing inhibition relative to TD children tested under standard conditions. PMID:25985978

  14. Is high prevalence of Vitamin D deficiency evidence for autism disorder?: In a highly endogamous population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bener, Abdulbari; Khattab, Azhar O.; Al-Dabbagh, Mohamad M.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To determine the association between Vitamin D and autism, and the difference in level of Vitamin D in autism children and control. Design: Case–control study conducted between June 2011 and May 2013, among autism at the Hamad Medical Corporation and controls at the School Health Clinics and Primary Health Care Clinics Subjects and Methods: A total of 254 cases and 254 controls. The Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule-Generic is a semi-structured, standardized assessment of social interaction, communication, play and imaginative use of materials for individuals suspected of having autism spectrum disorders. Data on clinical manifestations and laboratory, family history, body mass index (BMI) and clinical biochemistry variables including serum 25-hydroxy Vitamin D, calcium, phosphorus and magnesium were obtained. Univariate and multivariate statistical analyzes were performed. Results: Of the total number of 508 children surveyed, 254 of autism and 254 of healthy children were contacted. The mean age (± standard deviation, in years) for autism versus control children was 5.51 ± 1.58 versus 5.76 ± 1.56. There were statistically significant differences between autism and healthy children control subjects with respect to educational level of mother (P = 0.016); occupation of mother (P = 0.005); BMI (P 30 ng/ml). Similarly, of the total 254 of healthy children 8.3% had severe Vitamin D deficiency (30 ng/ml). Furthermore, there was statistically significant differences between autism and control subjects with respect to the serum level of Vitamin D (P = 0.023). Conclusion: The present study revealed that Vitamin D deficiency was higher in autism children compared to healthy children and supplementing infants with Vitamin D might be a safe and more effective strategy for reducing the risk of autism. PMID:25624924

  15. Iodine Deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.

    2009-01-01

    Iodine deficiency has multiple adverse effects in humans, termed iodine deficiency disorders, due to inadequate thyroid hormone production. Globally, it is estimated that 2 billion individuals have an insufficient iodine intake, and South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa are particularly affected.

  16. The high prevalence of anemia in Cambodian children and women cannot be satisfactorily explained by nutritional deficiencies or hemoglobin disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieringa, Frank Tammo; Dahl, Miriam; Chamnan, Chhoun

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anemia is highly prevalent in Cambodian women and children, but data on causes of anemia are scarce. We performed a national micronutrient survey in children and women that was linked to the Cambodian Demographic Health Survey 2014 (CDHS-2014) to assess the prevalence of micronutrient...... for 1512 subjects (792 children and 720 women). RESULTS: Anemia was found in 43% of the women and 53% of the children. Hemoglobin disorders affected >50% of the population, with Hemoglobin-E the most prevalent disorder. Deficiencies of iron (ferritin ... and hemoglobinopathy were significantly associated with anemia in children, whereas in the women none of the factors was significantly associated with anemia. Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) was more prevalent in children

  17. Parent Involvement in Meaningful Post-School Experiences for Young Adults with IDD and Pervasive Support Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Zachary; Lehr, Donna; Pelerin, Dana; Huang, Shuoxi; Lederer, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    Despite initiatives supporting young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) to engage in post-secondary education and integrated employment, those with more intensive support needs are not as easily involved in these post-school experiences. In an effort to learn from positive examples, we examined parent involvement in…

  18. Intact reflexive but deficient voluntary social orienting in autism spectrum disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Anne Kirchgessner

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Impairment in social interactions is a primary characteristic of people diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD. Although these individuals tend to orient less to naturalistic social cues than do typically developing (TD individuals, laboratory experiments testing social orienting in ASD have been inconclusive, possibly because of a failure to fully isolate reflexive (stimulus-driven and voluntary (goal-directed social orienting processes. The purpose of the present study was to separately examine potential reflexive and/or voluntary social orienting differences in individuals with ASD relative to TD controls. Subjects (ages 7-14 with high-functioning ASD and a matched control group completed three gaze cueing tasks on an iPad in which individuals briefly saw a face with averted gaze followed by a target after a variable delay. Two tasks were 100% predictive with either all congruent (target appears in gaze direction or all incongruent (target appears opposite from gaze direction trials, respectively. Another task was non-predictive with these same trials (half congruent and half incongruent intermixed randomly. Response times (RTs to the target were used to calculate reflexive (incongruent condition RT – congruent condition RT and voluntary (non-predictive condition RT – predictive condition RT gaze cueing effects. Subjects also completed two additional non-social orienting tasks (ProPoint and AntiPoint. Subjects with ASD demonstrate intact reflexive but deficient voluntary gaze following. Similar results were found in a separate test of non-social orienting. This suggests problems with using social cues, but only in a goal-directed fashion, in our sample of high-functioning individuals with ASD. Such findings may not only explain inconclusive previous findings but more importantly be critical for understanding social dysfunctions in ASD and for developing future interventions.

  19. CCDC115 Deficiency Causes a Disorder of Golgi Homeostasis with Abnormal Protein Glycosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Jos C; Cirak, Sebahattin; van Scherpenzeel, Monique; Timal, Sharita; Reunert, Janine; Rust, Stephan; Pérez, Belén; Vicogne, Dorothée; Krawitz, Peter; Wada, Yoshinao; Ashikov, Angel; Pérez-Cerdá, Celia; Medrano, Celia; Arnoldy, Andrea; Hoischen, Alexander; Huijben, Karin; Steenbergen, Gerry; Quelhas, Dulce; Diogo, Luisa; Rymen, Daisy; Jaeken, Jaak; Guffon, Nathalie; Cheillan, David; van den Heuvel, Lambertus P; Maeda, Yusuke; Kaiser, Olaf; Schara, Ulrike; Gerner, Patrick; van den Boogert, Marjolein A W; Holleboom, Adriaan G; Nassogne, Marie-Cécile; Sokal, Etienne; Salomon, Jody; van den Bogaart, Geert; Drenth, Joost P H; Huynen, Martijn A; Veltman, Joris A; Wevers, Ron A; Morava, Eva; Matthijs, Gert; Foulquier, François; Marquardt, Thorsten; Lefeber, Dirk J

    2016-02-04

    Disorders of Golgi homeostasis form an emerging group of genetic defects. The highly heterogeneous clinical spectrum is not explained by our current understanding of the underlying cell-biological processes in the Golgi. Therefore, uncovering genetic defects and annotating gene function are challenging. Exome sequencing in a family with three siblings affected by abnormal Golgi glycosylation revealed a homozygous missense mutation, c.92T>C (p.Leu31Ser), in coiled-coil domain containing 115 (CCDC115), the function of which is unknown. The same mutation was identified in three unrelated families, and in one family it was compound heterozygous in combination with a heterozygous deletion of CCDC115. An additional homozygous missense mutation, c.31G>T (p.Asp11Tyr), was found in a family with two affected siblings. All individuals displayed a storage-disease-like phenotype involving hepatosplenomegaly, which regressed with age, highly elevated bone-derived alkaline phosphatase, elevated aminotransferases, and elevated cholesterol, in combination with abnormal copper metabolism and neurological symptoms. Two individuals died of liver failure, and one individual was successfully treated by liver transplantation. Abnormal N- and mucin type O-glycosylation was found on serum proteins, and reduced metabolic labeling of sialic acids was found in fibroblasts, which was restored after complementation with wild-type CCDC115. PSI-BLAST homology detection revealed reciprocal homology with Vma22p, the yeast V-ATPase assembly factor located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Human CCDC115 mainly localized to the ERGIC and to COPI vesicles, but not to the ER. These data, in combination with the phenotypic spectrum, which is distinct from that associated with defects in V-ATPase core subunits, suggest a more general role for CCDC115 in Golgi trafficking. Our study reveals CCDC115 deficiency as a disorder of Golgi homeostasis that can be readily identified via screening for abnormal

  20. PX-RICS-deficient mice mimic autism spectrum disorder in Jacobsen syndrome through impaired GABAA receptor trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Tsutomu; Arima-Yoshida, Fumiko; Sakaue, Fumika; Nasu-Nishimura, Yukiko; Takeda, Yasuko; Matsuura, Ken; Akshoomoff, Natacha; Mattson, Sarah N; Grossfeld, Paul D; Manabe, Toshiya; Akiyama, Tetsu

    2016-03-16

    Jacobsen syndrome (JBS) is a rare congenital disorder caused by a terminal deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11. A subset of patients exhibit social behavioural problems that meet the diagnostic criteria for autism spectrum disorder (ASD); however, the underlying molecular pathogenesis remains poorly understood. PX-RICS is located in the chromosomal region commonly deleted in JBS patients with autistic-like behaviour. Here we report that PX-RICS-deficient mice exhibit ASD-like social behaviours and ASD-related comorbidities. PX-RICS-deficient neurons show reduced surface γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAAR) levels and impaired GABAAR-mediated synaptic transmission. PX-RICS, GABARAP and 14-3-3ζ/θ form an adaptor complex that interconnects GABAAR and dynein/dynactin, thereby facilitating GABAAR surface expression. ASD-like behavioural abnormalities in PX-RICS-deficient mice are ameliorated by enhancing inhibitory synaptic transmission with a GABAAR agonist. Our findings demonstrate a critical role of PX-RICS in cognition and suggest a causal link between PX-RICS deletion and ASD-like behaviour in JBS patients.

  1. Iron, Magnesium, Vitamin D, and Zinc Deficiencies in Children Presenting with Symptoms of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia Villagomez

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD is a neurodevelopmental disorder increasing in prevalence. Although there is limited evidence to support treating ADHD with mineral/vitamin supplements, research does exist showing that patients with ADHD may have reduced levels of vitamin D, zinc, ferritin, and magnesium. These nutrients have important roles in neurologic function, including involvement in neurotransmitter synthesis. The aim of this paper is to discuss the role of each of these nutrients in the brain, the possible altered levels of these nutrients in patients with ADHD, possible reasons for a differential level in children with ADHD, and safety and effect of supplementation. With this knowledge, clinicians may choose in certain patients at high risk of deficiency, to screen for possible deficiencies of magnesium, vitamin D, zinc, and iron by checking RBC-magnesium, 25-OH vitamin D, serum/plasma zinc, and ferritin. Although children with ADHD may be more likely to have lower levels of vitamin D, zinc, magnesium, and iron, it cannot be stated that these lower levels caused ADHD. However, supplementing areas of deficiency may be a safe and justified intervention.

  2. Molecular Diagnosis of 5α-Reductase Type II Deficiency in Brazilian Siblings with 46,XY Disorder of Sex Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maricilda Palandi de Mello

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The steroid 5α-reductase type II enzyme catalyzes the conversion of testosterone (T to dihydrotestosterone (DHT, and its deficiency leads to undervirilization in 46,XY individuals, due to an impairment of this conversion in genital tissues. Molecular analysis in the steroid 5α-reductase type II gene (SRD5A2 was performed in two 46,XY female siblings. SRD5A2 gene sequencing revealed that the patients were homozygous for p.Gln126Arg missense mutation, which results from the CGA > CAA nucleotide substitution. The molecular result confirmed clinical diagnosis of 46,XY disorder of sex development (DSD for the older sister and directed the investigation to other family members. Studies on SRD5A2 protein structure showed severe changes at NADPH binding region indicating that structural modeling analysis can be useful to evaluate the deleterious role of a mutation as causing 5α-reductase type II enzyme deficiency.

  3. Current status of iodine deficiency-related disorders prophylaxis in Slovakia - the life's work of Julian Podoba remained unfinished.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podoba, J; Racova, K; Urbankova, H; Srbecky, M

    2016-01-01

    Prophylaxis of iodine deficiency-related disorders with iodized salt in Slovakia was introduced in 1951. This prophylactic measure yielded remarkably good results. Endemic goiter and endemic cretinism disappeared. Sufficient iodine intake, mainly in children and adolescents, was confirmed in several local and international studies carried out in the period 1991-95. Unfortunately, since seventies, there has been no institution which would have dealt with iodine prophylaxis in such an extent as this important measure of Slovak preventive medicine would require. Neither systematic monitoring of iodine intake nor systematic population epidemiological studies have been carried out. We do not have any data on the iodine intake in pregnant women, the most vulnerable population group in relation to the iodine deficiency. During the period June 2014 - October 2015, we examined iodine excretion in 426 probands from three regions of Slovakia with an emphasis on the pregnant women. Iodine intake was found to be sufficient, even more than adequate, in all age groups of Slovak population. The only population group with iodine intake borderline or very mild iodine deficiency are pregnant women. 1/ Iodine nutrition in Slovakia is generally sufficient, even oversteps the requirement, with the exception of pregnant women. Iodine intake in pregnant women should be fortified by iodine containing multivitamin preparations. 2/ We recommend to include the examination of urinary iodine into the screening of thyropathies in early pregnancy. 3/ It is not enough to implement the iodine deficiency-related disorders prevention programs, it is also necessary to stabilize such programs over time and balance the benefits with possible side effects of this program.

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine ... prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the current ...

  5. Elevated systemic glutamic acid level in the non-obese diabetic mouse is Idd linked and induces beta cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banday, Viqar Showkat; Lejon, Kristina

    2017-02-01

    Although type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a T-cell-mediated disease in the effector stage, the mechanism behind the initial beta cell assault is less understood. Metabolomic differences, including elevated levels of glutamic acid, have been observed in patients with T1D before disease onset, as well as in pre-diabetic non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. Increased levels of glutamic acid damage both neurons and beta cells, implying that this could contribute to the initial events of T1D pathogenesis. We investigated the underlying genetic factors and consequences of the increased levels of glutamic acid in NOD mice. Serum glutamic acid levels from a (NOD×B6)F 2 cohort (n = 182) were measured. By genome-wide and Idd region targeted microsatellite mapping, genetic association was detected for six regions including Idd2, Idd4 and Idd22. In silico analysis of potential enzymes and transporters located in and around the mapped regions that are involved in glutamic acid metabolism consisted of alanine aminotransferase, glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase, aldehyde dehydrogenase 18 family, alutamyl-prolyl-tRNA synthetase, glutamic acid transporters GLAST and EAAC1. Increased EAAC1 protein expression was observed in lysates from livers of NOD mice compared with B6 mice. Functional consequence of the elevated glutamic acid level in NOD mice was tested by culturing NOD. Rag2 -/- Langerhans' islets with glutamic acid. Induction of apoptosis of the islets was detected upon glutamic acid challenge using TUNEL assay. Our results support the notion that a dysregulated metabolome could contribute to the initiation of T1D. We suggest that targeting of the increased glutamic acid in pre-diabetic patients could be used as a potential therapy. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Mood disorder with mixed, psychotic features due to vitamin b12 deficiency in an adolescent: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tufan Ali

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Vitamin B12 is one of the essential vitamins affecting various systems of the body. Reports of psychiatric disorders due to its deficiency mostly focus on middle aged and elderly patients. Here we report a case of vitamin B 12 deficiency in a 16-year old, male adolescent who presented with mixed mood disorder symptoms with psychotic features. Chief complaints were “irritability, regressive behavior, apathy, crying and truancy” which lasted for a year. Premorbid personality was unremarkable with no substance use/exposure or infections. No stressors were present. The patient was not vegetarian. Past medical history and family history was normal. Neurological examination revealed glossitis, ataxia, rigidity in both shoulders, cog-wheel rigidity in the left elbow, bilateral problems of coordination in cerebellar examination, reduced swinging of the arms and masked face. Romberg’s sign was present. Laboratory evaluations were normal. Endoscopy and biopsy revealed atrophy of the gastric mucosa with Helicobacter Pylori colonization. Schilling test was suggestive of malabsorbtion. He was diagnosed with Mood disorder with Mixed, Psychotic Features due to Vitamin B12 Deficiency and risperidone 0.5 mg/day and intramuscular vitamin B12 500 mcg/day were started along with referral for treatment of Helicobacter pylori. A visit on the second week revealed no psychotic features. Romberg’s sign was negative and cerebellar tests were normal. Extrapyramidal symptoms were reduced while Vitamin B12 levels were elevated. Risperidone was stopped and parenteral Vitamin B12 treatment was continued with monthly injections for 3 months. Follow-up endoscopy and biopsy at the first month demonstrated eradication of H. pylori. He was followed monthly for another 6 months and psychiatric symptoms did not recur at the time of last evaluation. Despite limitations, this case may underline the observation that mood disorders with psychotic features

  7. Vitamin D Deficiency in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Patients with Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcal Infections: A Case Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelik, Gonca; Taş, Didem; Tahiroğlu, Ayşegül; Avci, Ayşe; Yüksel, Bilgin; Çam, Perihan

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies have indicated that vitamin D deficiency is common in psychiatric patients, particularly in those with neuropsychiatric disorders such as autism and schizophrenia. Vitamin D is an important neurosteroid hormone and immunomodulatory agent that also has bone metabolic effects. There has been an increasing interest in immune-related neuropsychiatric symptoms that are triggered by group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal infections. In this study, we aimed to compare the serum levels of vitamin D between obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) patients with pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS) and control subjects. Thirty-three OCD patients with PANDAS and 20 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-(OH) D), calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, and parathormone levels of the two groups were compared. Serum 25-(OH) D levels of vitamin D deficiency. The children's Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (YBOCS) and Clinical Global Impression (CGI) were used to assess the severity of OCD symptoms. There was no significant difference in serum 25-(OH) D levels between the patient and control groups. However, vitamin D deficiency was significantly more frequent in the patient group than in the control group (48.5% vs. 20.0%; p=0.038). Moreover, OCD patients with vitamin D deficiency had higher rates of comorbid ADHD than those without vitamin D deficiency (87.5% vs. 52.6%; p=0.027). While serum phosphorus levels were negatively correlated with age as well as alkaline phosphatase and ASO levels, they were positively correlated with the YBOCS total score and global severity score. Serum parathormone levels were positively correlated with the YBOCS total score, compulsion score, obsession score, and global severity score. This study supports the hypothesis that an association between vitamin D metabolism and PANDAS-related OCD exists. We suggest that biochemical

  8. Factor VII deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000548.htm Factor VII deficiency To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Factor VII (seven) deficiency is a disorder caused by a ...

  9. Glucose transporter-1 deficiency syndrome : the expanding clinical and genetic spectrum of a treatable disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leen, Wilhelmina G.; Klepper, Joerg; Verbeek, Marcel M.; Leferink, Maike; Hofste, Tom; van Engelen, Baziel G.; Wevers, Ron A.; Arthur, Todd; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Ballhausen, Diana; Bekhof, Jolita; van Bogaert, Patrick; Carrilho, Ines; Chabrol, Brigitte; Champion, Michael P.; Coldwell, James; Clayton, Peter; Donner, Elizabeth; Evangeliou, Athanasios; Ebinger, Friedrich; Farrell, Kevin; Forsyth, Rob J.; de Goede, Christian G. E. L.; Gross, Stephanie; Grunewald, Stephanie; Holthausen, Hans; Jayawant, Sandeep; Lachlan, Katherine; Laugel, Vincent; Leppig, Kathy; Lim, Ming J.; Mancini, Grazia; Della Marina, Adela; Martorell, Loreto; McMenamin, Joe; Meuwissen, Marije E. C.; Mundy, Helen; Nilsson, Nils O.; Panzer, Axel; Poll-The, Bwee T.; Rauscher, Christian; Rouselle, Christophe M. R.; Sandvig, Inger; Scheffner, Thomas; Sheridan, Eamonn; Simpson, Neil; Sykora, Parol; Tomlinson, Richard; Trounce, John; Webb, David; Weschke, Bernhard; Scheffer, Hans; Willemsen, Michel A.

    Glucose transporter-1 deficiency syndrome is caused by mutations in the SLC2A1 gene in the majority of patients and results in impaired glucose transport into the brain. From 2004-2008, 132 requests for mutational analysis of the SLC2A1 gene were studied by automated Sanger sequencing and multiplex

  10. Glucose transporter-1 deficiency syndrome: The expanding clinical and genetic spectrum of a treatable disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.G. Leen (Wilhelmina); J. Klepper (Joerg); M.M. Verbeek (Marcel); M. Leferink (Maike); T. Hofste (Tom); B.G.M. van Engelen (Baziel); R.A. Wevers (Ron); T. Arthur (Todd); N. Bahi-Buisson (Nadia); D. Ballhausen (Diana); J. Bekhof (Jolita); P. van Bogaert (Patrick); I. Carrilho (Inês); B. Chabrol (Brigitte); M.P. Champion (Michael); J. Coldwell (James); P. Clayton (Peter); E. Donner (Elizabeth); A. Evangeliou (Athanasios); F. Ebinger (Friedrich); K. Farrell (Kevin); R.J. Forsyth (Rob); C.G.E.L. de Goede (Christian); S. Gross (Stephanie); S. Grünewald (Sonja); H. Holthausen (Hans); S. Jayawant (Sandeep); K. Lachlan (Katherine); V. Laugel (Vincent); K. Leppig (Kathy); M.J. Lim (Ming); G.M.S. Mancini (Grazia); A.D. Marina; L. Martorell (Loreto); J. McMenamin (Joe); M.E.C. Meuwissen (Marije); H. Mundy (Helen); N.O. Nilsson (Nils); A. Panzer (Axel); B.T. Poll-The; C. Rauscher (Christian); C.M.R. Rouselle (Christophe); I. Sandvig (Inger); T. Scheffner (Thomas); E. Sheridan (Eamonn); N. Simpson (Neil); P. Sykora (Parol); R. Tomlinson (Richard); J. Trounce (John); D.W.M. Webb (David); B. Weschke (Bernhard); H. Scheffer (Hans); M.A. Willemsen (Michél)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractGlucose transporter-1 deficiency syndrome is caused by mutations in the SLC2A1 gene in the majority of patients and results in impaired glucose transport into the brain. From 2004-2008, 132 requests for mutational analysis of the SLC2A1 gene were studied by automated Sanger sequencing

  11. Glucose transporter-1 deficiency syndrome: the expanding clinical and genetic spectrum of a treatable disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leen, Wilhelmina G.; Klepper, Joerg; Verbeek, Marcel M.; Leferink, Maike; Hofste, Tom; van Engelen, Baziel G.; Wevers, Ron A.; Arthur, Todd; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Ballhausen, Diana; Bekhof, Jolita; van Bogaert, Patrick; Carrilho, Inês; Chabrol, Brigitte; Champion, Michael P.; Coldwell, James; Clayton, Peter; Donner, Elizabeth; Evangeliou, Athanasios; Ebinger, Friedrich; Farrell, Kevin; Forsyth, Rob J.; de Goede, Christian G. E. L.; Gross, Stephanie; Grunewald, Stephanie; Holthausen, Hans; Jayawant, Sandeep; Lachlan, Katherine; Laugel, Vincent; Leppig, Kathy; Lim, Ming J.; Mancini, Grazia; Marina, Adela Della; Martorell, Loreto; McMenamin, Joe; Meuwissen, Marije E. C.; Mundy, Helen; Nilsson, Nils O.; Panzer, Axel; Poll-The, Bwee T.; Rauscher, Christian; Rouselle, Christophe M. R.; Sandvig, Inger; Scheffner, Thomas; Sheridan, Eamonn; Simpson, Neil; Sykora, Parol; Tomlinson, Richard; Trounce, John; Webb, David; Weschke, Bernhard; Scheffer, Hans; Willemsen, Michél A.

    2010-01-01

    Glucose transporter-1 deficiency syndrome is caused by mutations in the SLC2A1 gene in the majority of patients and results in impaired glucose transport into the brain. From 2004-2008, 132 requests for mutational analysis of the SLC2A1 gene were studied by automated Sanger sequencing and multiplex

  12. Glucose transporter-1 deficiency syndrome: the expanding clinical and genetic spectrum of a treatable disorder.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leen, W.G.; Klepper, J.; Verbeek, M.M.; Leferink, M.; Hofste, T.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Wevers, R.A.; Arthur, T.; Bahi-Buisson, N.; Ballhausen, D.; Bekhof, J.; Bogaert, P. van; Carrilho, I.; Chabrol, B.; Champion, M.P.; Coldwell, J.; Clayton, P.; Donner, E.; Evangeliou, A.; Ebinger, F.; Farrell, K.; Forsyth, R.J.; Goede, C.G. de; Gross, S.; Grunewald, S.; Holthausen, H.; Jayawant, S.; Lachlan, K.; Laugel, V.; Leppig, K.; Lim, M.J.; Mancini, G.; Marina, A.D.; Martorell, L.; McMenamin, J.; Meuwissen, M.E.; Mundy, H.; Nilsson, N.O.; Panzer, A.; Poll-The, B.T.; Rauscher, C.; Rouselle, C.M.; Sandvig, I.; Scheffner, T.; Sheridan, E.; Simpson, N.; Sykora, P.; Tomlinson, R.; Trounce, J.; Webb, D.; Weschke, B.; Scheffer, H.; Willemsen, M.A.A.P.

    2010-01-01

    Glucose transporter-1 deficiency syndrome is caused by mutations in the SLC2A1 gene in the majority of patients and results in impaired glucose transport into the brain. From 2004-2008, 132 requests for mutational analysis of the SLC2A1 gene were studied by automated Sanger sequencing and multiplex

  13. Neuronal Glucose Transporter Isoform 3 Deficient Mice Demonstrate Features of Autism Spectrum Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Yuanzi; Fung, Camille; Shin, Don; Shin, Bo-Chul; Thamotharan, Shanthie; Sankar, Raman; Ehninger, Dan; Silva, Alcino; Devaskar, Sherin U.

    2009-01-01

    Neuronal glucose transporter (GLUT) isoform 3 deficiency in null heterozygous mice led to abnormal spatial learning and working memory but normal acquisition and retrieval during contextual conditioning, abnormal cognitive flexibility with intact gross motor ability, electroencephalographic seizures, perturbed social behavior with reduced vocalization and stereotypies at low frequency. This phenotypic expression is unique as it combines the neurobehavioral with the epileptiform characteristic...

  14. X-Linked Creatine Transporter Deficiency Presenting as a Mitochondrial Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hathaway, S.C.; Friez, M.; Limbo, K.; Parker, C.; Salomons, G.S.; Vockley, J.; Wood, T.; Abdul-Rahman, O.A.

    2010-01-01

    X-linked creatine transporter defect is caused by mutations in SLC6A8 at Xq28, which encodes the sodium-dependent creatine transporter. Reduction in creatine uptake results in elevated urine creatine and CSF creatine deficiency, which can be detected on magnetic resonance spectroscopy. We report a

  15. 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels, vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency in patients with bone and musculoskeletal disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.V. Povoroznyuk

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. Vitamin D deficiency is prevalent in all the world countries. Recent studies show the correlation between vitamin D deficiency and musculoskeletal disorders. The purpose of this study is to examine vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency prevalence in patients of various ages, who have musculoskeletal disorders, and to reveal the influence of seasonal factors on these conditions. Materials and methods. 3460 patients of the Ukrainian Scientific Medical Center of Osteoporosis Problems, aged 1 to 92 years, who were referred by other specialists to the center for bone state evaluation, were examined. A majority of the patients presented with osteoporosis and its complications, spinal osteochondrosis, knee and hip osteoarthritis (mean age — 52.90 ± 21.10 years. Most of the patients were women (83.5 %. 25(ОНD and parathyroid hormone analyses were performed by means of electrochemiluminescent method (Elecsys 2010 analyzer, Roche Diagnostics, Germany and cobas test-systems. Statistica 6.0 software package (Copyright StatSoft, Inc., 1984–2001 was also used. Results. Among the patients with musculoskeletal pathology, the highest 25(ОНD level was noted in the age group of 1–9 years and the lowest — in the age group of 80 and over. Age negatively influenced 25(ОНD values. Prevalence of vitamin D deficiency among the patients with musculoskeletal pathology was 37.3 %, vitamin D insufficiency — 30.6 %; 32.1 % of patients had normal vitamin D status. Normal 25(OHD level was found in 38.0 % of children, 33.2 % of adults and in 29.6 % of elderly patients. Month of blood sampling had a significant influence on 25(ОНD content (F = 7.49; p < 0.001. The highest significant differences in 25(ОНD levels during the summer vs. winter months were observed in the age groups of 10–19 (18.2 %, 40–49 (17.3 %, 30–39 (16.2 % и 1–9 years (16.1 %. There were no significant seasonal differences observed in the elderly patients (60

  16. Vitamin D Deficiency and a Blunted Parathyroid Hormone Response in Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avcil, Sibelnur; Uysal, Pinar; Yilmaz, Mustafa; Erge, Duygu; Demirkaya, Sevcan K; Eren, Esra

    2017-03-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is the most frequently diagnosed neuropsychiatric disorder of childhood. The etiopathogenesis of ADHD has not been fully defined. Recent evidence has suggested a pathophysiological role of vitamin D deficiency in ADHD. In this study, we evaluated the serum levels of 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25(OH)D), parathyroid hormone (PTH), calcium (Ca), phosphate (P), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) in children with ADHD. The study group consisted of 105 children diagnosed with ADHD according to DSM-IV-TR criteria. A control group, matched for age and gender, was composed of 95 healthy children. Venous blood samples were collected, and 25(OH)D, PTH, Ca, P, and ALP levels were measured. The mean serum 25(OH)D, Ca, and P levels of the children with ADHD were significantly lower than those of the healthy controls. There were no significant differences between the groups regarding PTH and ALP. Serum PTH levels were found to be normal, but vitamin D deficiency, hypocalcemia, and hypophosphatemia were observed in children with ADHD. There was no correlation between serum PTH and Ca levels in children with ADHD, whereas, there was a negative correlation between serum PTH and Ca levels in healthy controls. There was no correlation between serum 25(OH)D and PTH levels in children with ADHD, whereas, there was a negative correlation between serum 25(OH)D and PTH levels in healthy controls. There were no significant differences in all parameters' levels among the subtypes of ADHD. The findings suggest that ADHD is associated with vitamin D deficiency, blunted PTH response, and impaired Ca homeostasis in children.

  17. Headache and neuropsychic disorders in the puerperium: a case report with suspected deficiency of urea cycle enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonini, Maria Clara; Bignamini, V; Mattioli, M

    2011-05-01

    An enzymatic abnormality of the urea cycle is a metabolic disorder occasionally seen in adults, but particularly in the puerperium. The main risk is acute hyperammoniemic encephalopathy, leading to psychosis, coma and even death if not diagnosed promptly and treated appropriately. Headache is frequent in the puerperium normally manifesting between 3 and 6 days after delivery. We describe here a 39-year-old woman, who 3 days after delivery presented diffuse tension-type headache and depression, followed by behavioral disorders, psychomotor agitation, epileptic seizures, and finally coma 2 days later. Pregnancy and normal delivery: routine blood chemistry findings, CT scan, MR imaging, angio-MR of the brain, and lumbar puncture were normal. EEG when seizures started, it showed diffuse slowing, as in the case of metabolic encephalopathy. This led us to assay blood ammonia, which was high at >400 mmol. Liver function and abdominal US were normal; hence, we suspected a urea cycle enzymatic abnormality, and requested for genetic tests. These confirmed a congenital primary metabolic deficiency of arginine succinate synthetase, with high citrullinemia (type II, adult form). Dialysis was started promptly, with initially iv arginine, then orally, plus medical therapy for the hyperammoniemia and a low protein diet; plasma ammonia dropped swiftly to normal, and her state of consciousness gradually improved until all the clinical symptoms had resolved. Ammonia assay should always be considered in the first few days of the puerperium in women with headache and behavioral disorders, to exclude an inborn deficiency of the urea cycle, which may have gone unnoticed until then.

  18. Altered synaptic phospholipid signaling in PRG-1 deficient mice induces exploratory behavior and motor hyperactivity resembling psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Patrick; Petzold, Sandra; Sommer, Angela; Nitsch, Robert; Schwegler, Herbert; Vogt, Johannes; Roskoden, Thomas

    2018-01-15

    Plasticity related gene 1 (PRG-1) is a neuron specific membrane protein located at the postsynaptic density of glutamatergic synapses. PRG-1 modulates signaling pathways of phosphorylated lipid substrates such as lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). Deletion of PRG-1 increases presynaptic glutamate release probability leading to neuronal over-excitation. However, due to its cortical expression, PRG-1 deficiency leading to increased glutamatergic transmission is supposed to also affect motor pathways. We therefore analyzed the effects of PRG-1 function on exploratory and motor behavior using homozygous PRG-1 knockout (PRG-1 -/- ) mice and PRG-1/LPA 2 -receptor double knockout (PRG-1 -/- /LPA 2 -/- ) mice in two open field settings of different size and assessing motor behavior in the Rota Rod test. PRG-1 -/- mice displayed significantly longer path lengths and higher running speed in both open field conditions. In addition, PRG-1 -/- mice spent significantly longer time in the larger open field and displayed rearing and self-grooming behavior. Furthermore PRG-1 -/- mice displayed stereotypical behavior resembling phenotypes of psychiatric disorders in the smaller sized open field arena. Altogether, this behavior is similar to the stereotypical behavior observed in animal models for psychiatric disease of autistic spectrum disorders which reflects a disrupted balance between glutamatergic and GABAergic synapses. These differences indicate an altered excitation/inhibition balance in neuronal circuits in PRG-1 -/- mice as recently shown in the somatosensory cortex [38]. In contrast, PRG-1 -/- /LPA 2 -/- did not show significant changes in behavior in the open field suggesting that these specific alterations were abolished when the LPA 2 -receptor was lacking. Our findings indicate that PRG-1 deficiency led to over-excitability caused by an altered LPA/LPA 2 -R signaling inducing a behavioral phenotype typically observed in animal models for psychiatric disorders. Copyright

  19. [The role of inositol deficiency in the etiology of polycystic ovary syndrome disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakimiuk, Artur J; Szamatowicz, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    Inositol acts as a second messenger in insulin signaling pathway Literature data suggest inositol deficiency in insulin-resistant women with the polycystic ovary syndrome. Supplementation of myo-inisitol decreases insulin resistance as it works as an insulin sensitizing agent. The positive role of myo-inositol in the treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome has been of increased evidence recently The present review presents the effects of myo-inositol on the ovarian, hormonal and metabolic parameters in women with PCOS.

  20. Chapter 29: historical aspects of the major neurological vitamin deficiency disorders: overview and fat-soluble vitamin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanska, Douglas J

    2010-01-01

    The vitamine doctrine: Although diseases resulting from vitamin deficiencies have been known for millennia, such disorders were generally attributed to toxic or infectious causes until the "vitamin doctrine" was developed in the early 20th century. In the late-19th century, a physiologically complete diet was believed to require only sufficient proteins, carbohydrates, fats, inorganic salts, and water. From 1880-1912, Lunin, Pekelharing, and Hopkins found that animals fed purified mixtures of known food components failed to grow or even lost weight and died, unless the diet was supplemented with small amounts of milk, suggesting that "accessory food factors" are required in trace amounts for normal growth. By this time, Funk suggested that deficiencies of trace dietary factors, which he labeled "vitamines" on the mistaken notion that they were "vital amines," were responsible for such diseases as beriberi, scurvy, rickets, and pellagra. Vitamin A deficiency eye disease: Night blindness was recognized by the ancient Egyptians and Greeks, and many authorities from Galen onward advocated liver as a curative. Outbreaks of night blindness were linked to nutritional causes in the 18th and 19th centuries by von Bergen, Schwarz, and others. Corneal ulceration was reported in 1817 by Magendie among vitamin A-deficient dogs fed for several weeks on a diet limited to sugar and water, although he erroneously attributed this to a deficiency of dietary nitrogen (i.e. protein). Subsequently, corneal epithelial defects, often in association with night blindness, were recognized in malnourished individuals subsisting on diets now recognizable as deficient in vitamin A by Budd, Livingstone, von Hubbenet, Bitot, Mori, Ishihari, and others. During World War I, Bloch conducted a controlled clinical trial of different diets among malnourished Danish children with night blindness and keratomalacia and concluded that whole milk, butter, and cod-liver oil contain a fat-soluble substance

  1. Disorders of bone-mineral metabolism and their correction with women who have body weight deficiency at pregravid stage and during pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. P. Shelestova

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The processes in bone-mineral metabolism provide normal course of pregnancy, labour and fetus development, women with body weight deficiency are at risk reduction of bone tissue mineral density, progressing of osteopenia and osteoporosis. This shows the necessity of medical and preventive measures that have the aim to correct calcium- phosphorus and bone metabolism with women who have body weight deficiency. Aim. To elaborate and to evaluate medical and preventive measures that have the aim to correct disorders in bone-mineral metabolism with women who have body weight deficiency at pregravid stage and during pregnancy. Materials and methods. The efficiency of adding combined medicine of calcium carbonate and cholecalciferol and dietary nourishment to traditional treatment that affected the state of bone-mineral metabolism with women who have body weight deficiency at pregravid stage and during pregnancy was studied. Results. With women who have body weight deficiency at pregravid stage and during pregnancy it is noted statistically considerable reduction in blood of total calcium and bone tissue markers that grows with the course of gestation. The changes in mineral density of bone tissue can be seen from the existence of osteopenic syndrome at pregravid stage that occurs with every third woman who has body weight deficiency and with every second before labour. The use of elaborated medical and preventive measures including combined medicine of calcium carbonate and cholecalciferol allows to normalize the indexes of bone-mineral metabolism with women who have body weight deficiency. Conclusions. Women with body weight deficiency already at pregravid stage have disorders in bone metabolism and coming of pregnancy lead to aggravation of bone metabolism disorders. The additional use of combined medicine of calcium carbonate and cholecalciferol and dietary nourishment made the indexes of calcium-phosphorus and bone metabolism better and osteopenic

  2. Color vision deficiency compensation for Visual Processing Disorder using Hardy-Rand-Rittler test and color transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbin, Jessie R.; Pinugu, Jasmine Nadja J.; Bautista, Joshua Ian C.; Nebres, Pauline D.; Rey Hipolito, Cipriano M.; Santella, Jose Anthony A.

    2017-06-01

    Visual processing skill is used to gather visual information from environment however, there are cases that Visual Processing Disorder (VPD) occurs. The so called visual figure-ground discrimination is a type of VPD where color is one of the factors that contributes on this type. In line with this, color plays a vital role in everyday living, but individuals that have limited and inaccurate color perception suffers from Color Vision Deficiency (CVD) and still not aware on their case. To resolve this case, this study focuses on the design of KULAY, a Head-Mounted Display (HMD) device that can assess whether a user has a CVD or not thru the standard Hardy-Rand-Rittler (HRR) test. This test uses pattern recognition in order to evaluate the user. In addition, color vision deficiency simulation and color correction thru color transformation is also a concern of this research. This will enable people with normal color vision to know how color vision deficient perceives and vice-versa. For the accuracy of the simulated HRR assessment, its results were validated thru an actual assessment done by a doctor. Moreover, for the preciseness of color transformation, Structural Similarity Index Method (SSIM) was used to compare the simulated CVD images and the color corrected images to other reference sources. The output of the simulated HRR assessment and color transformation shows very promising results indicating effectiveness and efficiency of the study. Thus, due to its form factor and portability, this device is beneficial in the field of medicine and technology.

  3. A treatable cause of myelopathy and vision loss mimicking neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder: late-onset biotinidase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Sanem; Serin, Mine; Canda, Ebru; Eraslan, Cenk; Tekin, Hande; Ucar, Sema Kalkan; Gokben, Sarenur; Tekgul, Hasan; Serdaroglu, Gul

    2017-06-01

    Biotinidase deficiency is characterized by severe neurological manifestations as hypotonia, lethargy, ataxia, hearing loss, seizures and developmental retardation in its classical form. Late-onset biotinidase deficiency presents distinctly from the classical form such as limb weakness and vision problems. A 14-year-old boy presented with progressive vision loss and upper limb weakness. The patient was initiated steroid therapy with a preliminary diagnosis of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder due to the craniospinal imaging findings demonstrating optic nerve, brainstem and longitudinally extensive spinal cord involvement. Although the patient exhibited partial clinical improvement after pulse steroid therapy, craniocervical imaging performed one month after the initiation of steroid therapy did not show any regression. The CSF IgG index was <0.8 (normal: <0.8), oligoclonal band and aquaporin-4 antibodies were negative. Metabolic investigations revealed a low biotinidase enzyme activity 8% (0.58 nmoL/min/mL; normal range: 4.4 to 12). Genetic testing showed c.98-104delinsTCC and p.V457 M mutations in biotinidase (BTD) gene. At the third month of biotin replacement therapy, control craniospinal MRI demonstrated a complete regression of the lesions. The muscle strength of the case returned to normal. His visual acuity was 7/10 in the left eye and 9/10 in the right. The late-onset form of the biotinidase deficiency should be kept in mind in all patients with myelopathy with or without vision loss, particularly in those with inadequate response to steroid therapy. The family screening is important to identify asymptomatic individuals and timely treatment.

  4. Targeting CPS1 in the treatment of Carbamoyl phosphate synthetase 1 (CPS1) deficiency, a urea cycle disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez-Fernandez, Carmen; Häberle, Johannes

    2017-04-01

    Carbamoyl phosphate synthetase 1 (CPS1) deficiency (CPS1D) is a rare autosomal recessive urea cycle disorder (UCD), which can lead to life-threatening hyperammonemia. Unless promptly treated, it can result in encephalopathy, coma and death, or intellectual disability in surviving patients. Over recent decades, therapies for CPS1D have barely improved leaving the management of these patients largely unchanged. Additionally, in many cases, current management (protein-restriction and supplementation with citrulline and/or arginine and ammonia scavengers) is insufficient for achieving metabolic stability, highlighting the importance of developing alternative therapeutic approaches. Areas covered: After describing UCDs and CPS1D, we give an overview of the structure- function of CPS1. We then describe current management and potential novel treatments including N-carbamoyl-L-glutamate (NCG), pharmacological chaperones, and gene therapy to treat hyperammonemia. Expert opinion: Probably, the first novel CPS1D therapies to reach the clinics will be the already commercial substance NCG, which is the standard treatment for N-acetylglutamate synthase deficiency and has been proven to rescue specific CPS1D mutations. Pharmacological chaperones and gene therapy are under development too, but these two technologies still have key challenges to be overcome. In addition, current experimental therapies will hopefully add further treatment options.

  5. The Effects of Sinapic Acid on the Development of Metabolic Disorders Induced by Estrogen Deficiency in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Zych

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Sinapic acid is a natural phenolic acid found in fruits, vegetables, and cereals, exerting numerous pharmacological effects. The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of sinapic acid on biochemical parameters related to glucose and lipid metabolism, as well as markers of antioxidant abilities and parameters of oxidative damage in the blood serum in estrogen-deficient rats. The study was performed on 3-month-old female Wistar rats, divided into 5 groups, including sham-operated control rats, ovariectomized control rats, and ovariectomized rats administered orally with estradiol (0.2 mg/kg or sinapic acid (5 and 25 mg/kg for 28 days. The levels of estradiol, progesterone, interleukin 18, insulin, glucose, fructosamine, lipids, and enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidants (superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione; total antioxidant capacity; and oxidative damage parameters (thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, protein carbonyl groups, and advanced oxidation protein products were determined in the serum. Estradiol counteracted the carbohydrate and cholesterol metabolism disorders induced by estrogen deficiency. Sinapic acid increased the serum estradiol concentration; decreased insulin resistance and the triglyceride and total cholesterol concentrations; and favorably affected the parameters of antioxidant abilities (reduced glutathione, superoxide dismutase and oxidative damage (advanced oxidation protein products.

  6. Bipolar and Related Disorders Induced by Sodium 4-Phenylbutyrate in a Male Adolescent with Bile Salt Export Pump Deficiency Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Giovanni; Simonetti, Giulia; Pirillo, Martina; Taruschio, Gianfranco; Andreone, Pietro

    2016-09-01

    Bile Salt Export Pump (BSEP) Deficiency disease, including Progressive Familial Intrahepatic Cholestasis type 2 (PFIC2), is a rare disease, usually leading within the first ten years to portal hypertension, liver failure, hepatocellular carcinoma. Often liver transplantation is needed. Sodium 4-phenylbutyrate (4-PB) seems to be a potential therapeutic compound for PFIC2. Psychiatric side effects in the adolescent population are little known and little studied since the drug used to treat children and infants. So we described a case of Caucasian boy, suffering from a late onset PFIC2, listed for a liver transplant when he was sixteen and treated with 4-FB (200 mg per kilogram of body weight per day). The drug was discontinued for the onset of bipolar and related disorders. This case illustrates possible psychiatric side effects of the drug.

  7. A zebrafish model of congenital disorders of glycosylation with phosphomannose isomerase deficiency reveals an early opportunity for corrective mannose supplementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Chu

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG have recessive mutations in genes required for protein N-glycosylation, resulting in multi-systemic disease. Despite the well-characterized biochemical consequences in these individuals, the underlying cellular defects that contribute to CDG are not well understood. Synthesis of the lipid-linked oligosaccharide (LLO, which serves as the sugar donor for the N-glycosylation of secretory proteins, requires conversion of fructose-6-phosphate to mannose-6-phosphate via the phosphomannose isomerase (MPI enzyme. Individuals who are deficient in MPI present with bleeding, diarrhea, edema, gastrointestinal bleeding and liver fibrosis. MPI-CDG patients can be treated with oral mannose supplements, which is converted to mannose-6-phosphate through a minor complementary metabolic pathway, restoring protein glycosylation and ameliorating most symptoms, although liver disease continues to progress. Because Mpi deletion in mice causes early embryonic lethality and thus is difficult to study, we used zebrafish to establish a model of MPI-CDG. We used a morpholino to block mpi mRNA translation and established a concentration that consistently yielded 13% residual Mpi enzyme activity at 4 days post-fertilization (dpf, which is within the range of MPI activity detected in fibroblasts from MPI-CDG patients. Fluorophore-assisted carbohydrate electrophoresis detected decreased LLO and N-glycans in mpi morphants. These deficiencies resulted in 50% embryonic lethality by 4 dpf. Multi-systemic abnormalities, including small eyes, dysmorphic jaws, pericardial edema, a small liver and curled tails, occurred in 82% of the surviving larvae. Importantly, these phenotypes could be rescued with mannose supplementation. Thus, parallel processes in fish and humans contribute to the phenotypes caused by Mpi depletion. Interestingly, mannose was only effective if provided prior to 24 hpf. These data provide insight into treatment efficacy

  8. Endocrine and metabolic disorders associated with human immune deficiency virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unachukwu, C N; Uchenna, D I; Young, E E

    2009-01-01

    Many reports have described endocrine and metabolic disorders in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. This article reviewed various reports in the literature in order to increase the awareness and thus the need for early intervention when necessary. Data were obtained from MEDLINE, Google search and otherjournals on 'HIV, Endocrinopathies/Metabolic Disorders' from 1985 till 2007. Studies related to HIV associated endocrinopathies and metabolic disorders in the last two decades were reviewed. Information on epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of the target organ endocrinopathies and metabolic disorders in HIV/AIDS were extracted from relevant literature. Endocrine and metabolic disturbances occur in the course of HIV infection. Pathogenesis includes direct infection of endocrine glands by HIV or opportunistic organisms, infiltration by neoplasms and side effects of drugs. Adrenal insufficiency is the commonest HIV endocrinopathy with cytomegalovirus adrenalitis occurring in 40-88% of cases. Thyroid dysfunction may occur as euthyroid sick syndrome or sub-clinical hypothyroidism. Hypogonadotrophic dysfunction accounts for 75% of HIV-associated hypogonadism, with prolonged amenorrhoea being three times more likely in the women. Pancreatic dysfunction may result in hypoglycaemia or diabetes mellitus (DM). Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) especially protease inhibitors has been noted to result in insulin resistance and lipodystrophy. Virtually every endocrine organ is involved in the course of HIV infection. Detailed endocrinological and metabolic evaluation and appropriate treatment is necessary in the optimal management of patients with HIV infection in our environment.

  9. CCDC115 Deficiency Causes a Disorder of Golgi Homeostasis with Abnormal Protein Glycosylation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Jos C.; Cirak, Sebahattin; van Scherpenzeel, Monique; Timal, Sharita; Reunert, Janine; Rust, Stephan; Pérez, Belén; Vicogne, Dorothée; Krawitz, Peter; Wada, Yoshinao; Ashikov, Angel; Pérez-Cerdá, Celia; Medrano, Celia; Arnoldy, Andrea; Hoischen, Alexander; Huijben, Karin; Steenbergen, Gerry; Quelhas, Dulce; Diogo, Luisa; Rymen, Daisy; Jaeken, Jaak; Guffon, Nathalie; Cheillan, David; van den Heuvel, Lambertus P.; Maeda, Yusuke; Kaiser, Olaf; Schara, Ulrike; Gerner, Patrick; van den Boogert, Marjolein A. W.; Holleboom, Adriaan G.; Nassogne, Marie-Cécile; Sokal, Etienne; Salomon, Jody; van den Bogaart, Geert; Drenth, Joost P. H.; Huynen, Martijn A.; Veltman, Joris A.; Wevers, Ron A.; Morava, Eva; Matthijs, Gert; Foulquier, François; Marquardt, Thorsten; Lefeber, Dirk J.

    2016-01-01

    Disorders of Golgi homeostasis form an emerging group of genetic defects. The highly heterogeneous clinical spectrum is not explained by our current understanding of the underlying cell-biological processes in the Golgi. Therefore, uncovering genetic defects and annotating gene function are

  10. NUTRITIONAL DISORDERS BY DEFICIENCY IN SUNFLOWER var. CATISSOL-01 DESORDENS NUTRICIONAIS POR DEFICIÊNCIA EM GIRASSOL var. CATISSOL-01

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato de Mello Prado

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available

    This study was carried out in aerated nutritive solution to evaluate the effect of macronutrients, boron, and zinc omission on plant growth, dry matter production, visual symptoms and nutritional status of sunflower. The experiment was arranged in a completely randomized design with two replications and nine treatments corresponding to the complete solution (macro and micronutrients and individual omission of N, P, K, Ca, S, Mg, B and Zn. We measured plant height, number of leaves, stem diameter, leaf area and dry matter, and leaf content of macro and micronutrients. The individual omissions of N, P, K, and Ca were the most limiting to plant dry matter production, and resulted in morphological alterations represented by characteristical visual symptoms of the nutritional deficiency of each element.

    KEY-WORDS: Helianthus annuus; deficiency; nutritional disorder; nutrients; visual symptom.

    Objetivando-se avaliar o efeito da omissão de macronutrientes, de boro e de zinco no crescimento, na produção de matéria seca, nos sintomas visuais e no estado nutricional de plantas de girassol. Conduziu-se um experimento em solução nutritiva aerada. O delineamento experimental foi inteiramente casualizado, com nove tratamentos, que corresponderam à solução completa (macro e micronutrientes e à omissão individual de N, P, K, Ca, S, Mg, B e Zn, em duas repetições. Avaliou-se a altura das plantas, o número de folhas, o diâmetro do caule, a área foliar e a matéria seca, além do teor foliar de macro e micronutrientes. As omissões individuais de N, P, K e Ca foram as mais limitantes para o crescimento vegetativo do girassol, avaliado sobre a produção de matéria seca das plantas. Isso resultou em alterações morfológicas que se traduziram em sintomas visuais característicos da defici

  11. Nutritional and Acquired Deficiencies in Inositol Bioavailability. Correlations with Metabolic Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Dinicola

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Communities eating a western-like diet, rich in fat, sugar and significantly deprived of fibers, share a relevant increased risk of both metabolic and cancerous diseases. Even more remarkable is that a low-fiber diet lacks some key components—as phytates and inositols—for which a mechanistic link has been clearly established in the pathogenesis of both cancer and metabolic illness. Reduced bioavailability of inositol in living organisms could arise from reduced food supply or from metabolism deregulation. Inositol deregulation has been found in a number of conditions mechanistically and epidemiologically associated to high-glucose diets or altered glucose metabolism. Indeed, high glucose levels hinder inositol availability by increasing its degradation and by inhibiting both myo-Ins biosynthesis and absorption. These underappreciated mechanisms may likely account for acquired, metabolic deficiency in inositol bioavailability.

  12. Wachstumsstörung bei SHOX-Defizienz // SHOX Deficiency Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steichen-Gersdorf E

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available SHOX haploinsufficiency has been reported in some individuals with idiopathic short stature. The clinical phenotype covers the spectrum from idiopathic short stature, mesomelic short stature to Leri-Weill syndrome. The skeletal dysproportion increases from early childhood to adulthood. The phenotype is variable even within families. Growth hormone treatment increases height in patients with SHOX deficiency. p bKurzfassung:/b Die SHOX-Defizienz ist eine wesentliche Ursache für Kleinwuchs. Der klinische Schweregrad reicht vom idiopathischen Kleinwuchs bis zum Leri-Weill-Syndrom mit mesomelem Kleinwuchs und Madelung-Deformität. Eine zunehmende Störung der Körperproportionen mit mesomeler Verkürzung der Gliedmaßen wird erst im Schulalter evident. Der Phänotyp einer SHOX-Defizienz ist sehr variabel, auch innerhalb von Familien. Diese Form der Wachstumsstörung stellt eine anerkannte Indikation für eine Wachstumshormontherapie dar.

  13. GLUT1 deficiency syndrome as a cause of encephalopathy that includes cognitive disability, treatment-resistant infantile epilepsy and a complex movement disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, John M

    2012-05-01

    Glucose transporter-1 (GLUT1) deficiency syndrome is caused by heterozygous mutations in the SLC2A1 gene, resulting in impaired glucose transport into the brain. It is characterized by a low glucose concentration in the cerebrospinal fluid (hypoglycorrhachia) in the absence of hypoglycemia, in combination with low to normal lactate in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). It often results in treatment-resistant infantile epilepsy with progressive developmental disabilities and a complex movement disorder. Recognizing GLUT1 deficiency syndrome is important, since initiation of a ketogenic diet can reduce the frequency of seizures and the severity of the movement disorder. There can be a considerable delay in diagnosing GLUT1 deficiency syndrome, and this point is illustrated by the natural history of this disorder in a 21-year-old woman with severe, progressive neurological disabilities. Her encephalopathy consisted of treatment-resistant seizures, a complex movement disorder, progressive intellectual disability, and deceleration of her head growth after late infancy. Focused evaluation at age 21 revealed GLUT1 deficiency caused by a novel heterozygous missence mutation in exon 7 (c.938C > A; p.Ser313Try) in SLC2A1 as the cause for her disabilities. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Poliovirus excretion among persons with primary immune deficiency disorders: summary of a seven-country study series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Ivanova, Olga; Driss, Nadia; Tiongco-Recto, Marysia; da Silva, Rajiva; Shahmahmoodi, Shohreh; Sazzad, Hossain M S; Mach, Ondrej; Kahn, Anna-Lea; Sutter, Roland W

    2014-11-01

    Persons with primary immune deficiency disorders (PID), especially those disorders affecting the B-cell system, are at substantially increased risk of paralytic poliomyelitis and can excrete poliovirus chronically. However, the risk of prolonged or chronic excretion is not well characterized in developing countries. We present a summary of a country study series on poliovirus excretion among PID cases. Cases with PID from participating institutions were enrolled during the first year and after obtaining informed consent were tested for polioviruses in stool samples. Those cases excreting poliovirus were followed on a monthly basis during the second year until 2 negative stool samples were obtained. A total of 562 cases were enrolled in Bangladesh, China, Iran, Philippines, Russia, Sri Lanka, and Tunisia during 2008-2013. Of these, 17 (3%) shed poliovirus, including 2 cases with immunodeficient vaccine-derived poliovirus. Poliovirus was detected in a single sample from 5/17 (29%) cases. One case excreted for more than 6 months. None of the cases developed paralysis during the study period. Chronic polioviruses excretion remains a rare event even among individuals with PID. Nevertheless, because these individuals were not paralyzed they would have been missed by current surveillance; therefore, surveillance for polioviruses among PID should be established. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Notch-deficient skin induces a lethal systemic B-lymphoproliferative disorder by secreting TSLP, a sentinel for epidermal integrity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadmehr Demehri

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Epidermal keratinocytes form a highly organized stratified epithelium and sustain a competent barrier function together with dermal and hematopoietic cells. The Notch signaling pathway is a critical regulator of epidermal integrity. Here, we show that keratinocyte-specific deletion of total Notch signaling triggered a severe systemic B-lymphoproliferative disorder, causing death. RBP-j is the DNA binding partner of Notch, but both RBP-j-dependent and independent Notch signaling were necessary for proper epidermal differentiation and lipid deposition. Loss of both pathways caused a persistent defect in skin differentiation/barrier formation. In response, high levels of thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP were released into systemic circulation by Notch-deficient keratinocytes that failed to differentiate, starting in utero. Exposure to high TSLP levels during neonatal hematopoiesis resulted in drastic expansion of peripheral pre- and immature B-lymphocytes, causing B-lymphoproliferative disorder associated with major organ infiltration and subsequent death, a previously unappreciated systemic effect of TSLP. These observations demonstrate that local skin perturbations can drive a lethal systemic disease and have important implications for a wide range of humoral and autoimmune diseases with skin manifestations.

  16. Health Information Infrastructure for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (I/DD) Living in Supported Accommodation: Communication, Co-Ordination and Integration of Health Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahm, Maria R; Georgiou, Andrew; Balandin, Susan; Hill, Sophie; Hemsley, Bronwyn

    2017-10-25

    People with intellectual and/or developmental disability (I/DD) commonly have complex health care needs, but little is known about how their health information is managed in supported accommodation, and across health services providers. This study aimed to describe the current health information infrastructure (i.e., how data and information are collected, stored, communicated, and used) for people with I/DD living in supported accommodation in Australia. It involved a scoping review and synthesis of research, policies, and health documents relevant in this setting. Iterative database and hand searches were conducted across peer-reviewed articles internationally in English and grey literature in Australia (New South Wales) up to September 2015. Data were extracted from the selected relevant literature and analyzed for content themes. Expert stakeholders were consulted to verify the authors' interpretations of the information and content categories. The included 286 sources (peer-reviewed n = 27; grey literature n = 259) reflect that the health information for people with I/DD in supported accommodation is poorly communicated, coordinated and integrated across isolated systems. 'Work-as-imagined' as outlined in policies, does not align with 'work-as-done' in reality. This gap threatens the quality of care and safety of people with I/DD in these settings. The effectiveness of the health information infrastructure and services for people with I/DD can be improved by integrating the information sources and placing people with I/DD and their supporters at the centre of the information exchange process.

  17. Alpha-CaMKII deficiency causes immature dentate gyrus, a novel candidate endophenotype of psychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamasaki Nobuyuki

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Elucidating the neural and genetic factors underlying psychiatric illness is hampered by current methods of clinical diagnosis. The identification and investigation of clinical endophenotypes may be one solution, but represents a considerable challenge in human subjects. Here we report that mice heterozygous for a null mutation of the alpha-isoform of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (alpha-CaMKII+/- have profoundly dysregulated behaviours and impaired neuronal development in the dentate gyrus (DG. The behavioral abnormalities include a severe working memory deficit and an exaggerated infradian rhythm, which are similar to symptoms seen in schizophrenia, bipolar mood disorder and other psychiatric disorders. Transcriptome analysis of the hippocampus of these mutants revealed that the expression levels of more than 2000 genes were significantly changed. Strikingly, among the 20 most downregulated genes, 5 had highly selective expression in the DG. Whereas BrdU incorporated cells in the mutant mouse DG was increased by more than 50 percent, the number of mature neurons in the DG was dramatically decreased. Morphological and physiological features of the DG neurons in the mutants were strikingly similar to those of immature DG neurons in normal rodents. Moreover, c-Fos expression in the DG after electric footshock was almost completely and selectively abolished in the mutants. Statistical clustering of human post-mortem brains using 10 genes differentially-expressed in the mutant mice were used to classify individuals into two clusters, one of which contained 16 of 18 schizophrenic patients. Nearly half of the differentially-expressed probes in the schizophrenia-enriched cluster encoded genes that are involved in neurogenesis or in neuronal migration/maturation, including calbindin, a marker for mature DG neurons. Based on these results, we propose that an "immature DG" in adulthood might induce alterations in behavior and

  18. Low dimensional temporal organization of spontaneous eye blinks in adults with developmental disabilities and stereotyped movement disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mei-Hua; Bodfish, James W; Lewis, Mark H; Newell, Karl M

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the mean rate and time-dependent sequential organization of spontaneous eye blinks in adults with intellectual and developmental disability (IDD) and individuals from this group who were additionally categorized with stereotypic movement disorder (IDD+SMD). The mean blink rate was lower in the IDD+SMD group than the IDD group and both of these groups had a lower blink rate than a contrast group of healthy adults. In the IDD group the n to n+1 sequential organization over time of the eye-blink durations showed a stronger compensatory organization than the contrast group suggesting decreased complexity/dimensionality of eye-blink behavior. Very low blink rate (and thus insufficient time series data) precluded analysis of time-dependent sequential properties in the IDD+SMD group. These findings support the hypothesis that both IDD and SMD are associated with a reduction in the dimension and adaptability of movement behavior and that this may serve as a risk factor for the expression of abnormal movements.

  19. Membrane omega-3 Fatty Acid deficiency as a preventable risk factor for comorbid coronary heart disease in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Robert K

    2009-01-01

    Major depression disorder (MDD) significantly increases the risk for coronary heart disease (CHD) which is a leading cause of mortality in patients with MDD. Moreover, depression is frequently observed in a subset of patients following acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and increases risk for mortality. Here evidence implicating omega-3 (n-3) fatty acid deficiency in the pathoaetiology of CHD and MDD is reviewed, and the hypothesis that n-3 fatty acid deficiency is a preventable risk factor for CHD comorbidity in MDD patients is evaluated. This hypothesis is supported by cross-national and cross-sectional epidemiological surveys finding an inverse correlation between n-3 fatty acid status and prevalence rates of both CHD and MDD, prospective studies finding that lower dietary or membrane EPA+DHA levels increase risk for both MDD and CHD, case-control studies finding that the n-3 fatty acid status of MDD patients places them at high risk for emergent CHD morbidity and mortality, meta-analyses of controlled n-3 fatty acid intervention studies finding significant advantage over placebo for reducing depression symptom severity in MDD patients, and for secondary prevention of cardiac events in CHD patients, findings that n-3 fatty acid status is inversely correlated with other documented CHD risk factors, and patients diagnosed with MDD after ACS exhibit significantly lower n-3 fatty acid status compared with nondepressed ACS patients. This body of evidence provides strong support for future studies to evaluate the effects of increasing dietary n-3 fatty acid status on CHD comorbidity and mortality in MDD patients.

  20. Elevated PYY is associated with energy deficiency and indices of subclinical disordered eating in exercising women with hypothalamic amenorrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheid, Jennifer L; Williams, Nancy I; West, Sarah L; VanHeest, Jaci L; De Souza, Mary Jane

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold: (1) to determine if gastrointestinal hormones, associated with energy intake and energy balance, are altered in exercising women with hypothalamic amenorrhea and (2) to assess the association between gastrointestinal hormones and behavioural indicators of subclinical disordered eating in exercising women with hypothalamic amenorrhea. This cross-sectional study analyzed serum ghrelin, peptide YY (PYY), glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), menstrual status (by E1G and PdG), resting energy expenditure (REE), and subclinical eating behaviours in sedentary ovulatory (SedOv), exercising ovulatory (ExOv), and exercising amenorrheic (ExAmen) women. Groups were similar with respect to age (23.8+/-0.6 years) and BMI (21.4+/-0.3 kg/m(2)). The ratio of REE to predicted REE (REE:predicted REE) was 0.94+/-0.02, 0.94+/-0.02, and 0.88+/-0.02 in the SedOv, ExOv, and ExAmen groups, respectively. The REE:predicted REE in the ExAmen group was consistent with an energy deficiency. LogPYY, ghrelin, dietary cognitive restraint, and drive for thinness were elevated in the ExAmen group compared to other groups. GLP-1 concentrations were similar among groups. LogPYY correlated with drive for thinness and REE/FFM. In conclusion, fasting PYY and ghrelin concentrations are elevated in exercising women with FHA and both gastrointestinal peptides may serve as a proxy indicator of energy deficiency in this population.

  1. Common variants in the G protein beta3 subunit gene and thyroid disorders in a formerly iodine-deficient population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Völzke, Henry; Bornhorst, Alexa; Rimmbach, Christian; Petersenn, Holger; Geissler, Ingrid; Nauck, Matthias; Wallaschofski, Henri; Kroemer, Heyo K; Rosskopf, Dieter

    2009-10-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins are key mediators of signals from membrane receptors-including the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor-to cellular effectors. Gain-of-function mutations in the TSH receptor and the Galpha(S) subunit occur frequently in hyperfunctioning thyroid nodules and differentiated thyroid carcinomas, whereby the T allele of a common polymorphism (825C>T, rs5443) in the G protein beta3 subunit gene (GNB3) is associated with increased G protein-mediated signal transduction and a complex phenotype. The aim of this study was to investigate whether this common polymorphism affects key parameters of thyroid function and morphology and influences the pathogenesis of thyroid diseases in the general population. The population-based cross-sectional Study of Health in Pomerania is a general health survey with focus on thyroid diseases in northeast Germany, a formerly iodine-deficient area. Data from 3428 subjects (1800 men and 1628 women) were analyzed for an association of the GNB3 genotype with TSH, free triiodothyronine and thyroxine levels, urine iodine and thiocyanate excretion, and thyroid ultrasound morphology including thyroid volume, presence of goiter, and thyroid nodules. There was no association between GNB3 genotype status and the functional or morphological thyroid parameters investigated, neither in crude analyses nor upon multivariable analyses including known confounders of thyroid disorders. Based on the data from this large population-based survey, we conclude that the GNB3 825C>T polymorphism does not affect key parameters of thyroid function and morphology in the general population of a formerly iodine-deficient area.

  2. Genetics Home Reference: corticosterone methyloxidase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyperreninemic hypoaldosteronism steroid 18-hydroxylase deficiency steroid 18-oxidase deficiency Visser-Cost syndrome ... Potassium Test Health Topic: Adrenal Gland Disorders Health Topic: Fluid ...

  3. Orbital and spin effects for the upper critical field in As-deficient disordered Fe pnictide superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, G; Drechsler, S-L; Kozlova, N; Hamann-Borrero, J E; Behr, G; Nenkov, K; Freudenberger, J; Koehler, A; Knupfer, M; Buechner, B; Schultz, L; Bartkowiak, M; Klauss, H-H; Maeter, H; Kwadrin, A; Amato, A; Luetkens, H; Khasanov, R; Arushanov, E; Rosner, H

    2009-01-01

    We report upper critical field B c2 (T) data for LaO 0.9 F 0.1 FeAs 1-δ in a wide temperature and field range up to 60 T. The large slope of B c2 ∼- 5.4 to -6.6 T K -1 near an improved T c ∼28.5 K of the in-plane B c2 (T) contrasts with a flattening starting near 23 K above 30 T we regard as the onset of Pauli-limited behaviour (PLB) with B c2 (0)∼63-68 T. We interpret a similar hitherto unexplained flattening of the B c2 (T) curves reported for at least three other disordered closely related systems, Co-doped BaFe 2 As 2 , (Ba,K) Fe 2 As 2 and NdO 0.7 F 0.3 FeAs (all single crystals), for applied fields H parallel (a,b), also as a manifestation of PLB. Their Maki parameters have been estimated by analysing their B c2 (T) data within the Werthamer-Helfand-Hohenberg approach. The pronounced PLB of (Ba, K)Fe 2 As 2 single crystals obtained from an Sn flux is attributed also to a significant As deficiency detected by wavelength dispersive x-ray spectroscopy as reported by Ni et al (2008 Phys. Rev. B 78 014507). Consequences of our results are discussed in terms of disorder effects within conventional superconductivity (CSC) and unconventional superconductivity (USC). USC scenarios with nodes on individual Fermi surface sheets (FSS), e.g. p- and d-wave SC, can be discarded for our samples. The increase of dB c2 /dT| T c by sizeable disorder provides evidence for an important intraband (intra-FSS) contribution to the orbital upper critical field. We suggest that it can be ascribed either to an impurity-driven transition from s ± USC to CSC of an extended s ++ -wave state or to a stabilized s ± -state provided As-vacancies cause predominantly strong intraband scattering in the unitary limit. We compare our results with B c2 data from the literature, which often show no PLB for fields below 60-70 T probed so far. A novel disorder-related scenario of a complex interplay of SC with two different competing magnetic instabilities is suggested.

  4. Chapter 30: historical aspects of the major neurological vitamin deficiency disorders: the water-soluble B vitamins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanska, Douglas J

    2010-01-01

    This historical review addresses major neurological disorders associated with deficiencies of water-soluble B vitamins: beriberi, Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, pellagra, neural tube defects, and subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord. Beriberi: Beriberi was known for millennia in Asia, but was not described by a European until the 17th century when Brontius in the Dutch East Indies reported the progressive sensorimotor polyneuropathy. The prevalence of beriberi increased greatly in Asia with a change in the milling process for rice in the late 19th century. In the 1880s, Takaki demonstrated the benefits of dietary modification in sailors, and later instituted dietary reforms in the Japanese Navy, which largely eradicated beriberi from the Japanese Navy by 1887. In 1889 Eijkman in Java serendipitously identified dietary factors as a major contributor to "chicken polyneuritis," which he took to be an animal model for beriberi; the polyneuritis could be cured or prevented by feeding the chickens either unpolished rice or rice polishings. By 1901, Grijns, while continuing studies of beriberi in Java, suggested a dietary deficiency explanation for beriberi after systematically eliminating deficiencies of known dietary components and excluding a toxic effect. Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome: In the late 1870s, Wernicke identified a clinicopathological condition with ophthalmoparesis, nystagmus, ataxia, and encephalopathy, associated with punctate hemorrhages symmetrically arranged in the grey matter around the third and fourth ventricles and the aqueduct of Sylvius. In the late 1880s, Korsakoff described a spectrum of cognitive disorders, including a confabulatory amnestic state following an agitated delirium, occurring in conjunction with peripheral polyneuropathy. Beginning around 1900, investigators recognized the close relationship between Korsakoff's psychosis, delirium tremens, and Wernicke's encephalopathy, but not until several decades later were Wernicke

  5. Brain monoamine oxidase B and A in human parkinsonian dopamine deficiency disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Junchao; Rathitharan, Gausiha; Meyer, Jeffrey H; Furukawa, Yoshiaki; Ang, Lee-Cyn; Boileau, Isabelle; Guttman, Mark; Hornykiewicz, Oleh; Kish, Stephen J

    2017-09-01

    See Jellinger (doi:10.1093/awx190) for a scientific commentary on this article. The enzyme monoamine oxidases (B and A subtypes, encoded by MAOB and MAOA, respectively) are drug targets in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. Inhibitors of MAOB are used clinically in Parkinson's disease for symptomatic purposes whereas the potential disease-modifying effect of monoamine oxidase inhibitors is debated. As astroglial cells express high levels of MAOB, the enzyme has been proposed as a brain imaging marker of astrogliosis, a cellular process possibly involved in Parkinson's disease pathogenesis as elevation of MAOB in astrocytes might be harmful. Since brain monoamine oxidase status in Parkinson's disease is uncertain, our objective was to measure, by quantitative immunoblotting in autopsied brain homogenates, protein levels of both monoamine oxidases in three different degenerative parkinsonian disorders: Parkinson's disease (n = 11), multiple system atrophy (n = 11), and progressive supranuclear palsy (n = 16) and in matched controls (n = 16). We hypothesized that if MAOB is 'substantially' localized to astroglial cells, MAOB levels should be generally associated with standard astroglial protein measures (e.g. glial fibrillary acidic protein). MAOB levels were increased in degenerating putamen (+83%) and substantia nigra (+10%, non-significant) in multiple system atrophy; in caudate (+26%), putamen (+27%), frontal cortex (+31%) and substantia nigra (+23%) of progressive supranuclear palsy; and in frontal cortex (+33%), but not in substantia nigra of Parkinson's disease, a region we previously reported no increase in astrocyte protein markers. Although the magnitude of MAOB increase was less than those of standard astrocytic markers, significant positive correlations were observed amongst the astrocyte proteins and MAOB. Despite suggestions that MAOA (versus MAOB) is primarily responsible for metabolism of dopamine in dopamine neurons, there was no loss of the

  6. Genetic hemoglobin disorders rather than iron deficiency are a major predictor of hemoglobin concentration in women of reproductive age in rural prey Veng, Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakochuk, Crystal D; Whitfield, Kyly C; Barr, Susan I; Lamers, Yvonne; Devlin, Angela M; Vercauteren, Suzanne M; Kroeun, Hou; Talukder, Aminuzzaman; McLean, Judy; Green, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is common in Cambodian women. Potential causes include micronutrient deficiencies, genetic hemoglobin disorders, inflammation, and disease. We aimed to investigate factors associated with anemia (low hemoglobin concentration) in rural Cambodian women (18-45 y) and to investigate the relations between hemoglobin disorders and other iron biomarkers. Blood samples were obtained from 450 women. A complete blood count was conducted, and serum and plasma were analyzed for ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR), folate, vitamin B-12, retinol binding protein (RBP), C-reactive protein (CRP), and α1 acid glycoprotein (AGP). Hemoglobin electrophoresis and multiplex polymerase chain reaction were used to determine the prevalence and type of genetic hemoglobin disorders. Overall, 54% of women had a genetic hemoglobin disorder, which included 25 different genotypes (most commonly, hemoglobin E variants and α(3.7)-thalassemia). Of the 420 nonpregnant women, 29.5% had anemia (hemoglobin 8.3 mg/L), hemoglobin disorders, respectively. There was no biochemical evidence of vitamin A deficiency (RBP 5 mg/L) and 26% (AGP >1 g/L) of nonpregnant women, respectively. By using an adjusted linear regression model, the strongest predictors of hemoglobin concentration were hemoglobin E homozygous disorder and pregnancy status. Other predictors were 2 other heterozygous traits (hemoglobin E and Constant Spring), parity, RBP, log ferritin, and vitamin B-12. Multiple biomarkers for anemia and iron deficiency were significantly influenced by the presence of hemoglobin disorders, hence reducing their diagnostic sensitivity. Further investigation of the unexpectedly low prevalence of IDA in Cambodian women is warranted. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  7. Competency-Based Training and Worker Turnover in Community Supports for People with IDD: Results from a Group Randomized Controlled Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogenschutz, Matthew; Nord, Derek; Hewitt, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Turnover among direct support professionals (DSPs) in community support settings for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) has been regarded as a challenge since tracking of this workforce began in the 1980s. This study utilized a group randomized controlled design to test the effects of a competency-based training…

  8. 2011年三亚市碘缺乏病调查结果分析%Iodine deficiency disorders in Sanya in 2011: an analysis of a survey results

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄梅香

    2012-01-01

    目的 了解三亚市碘缺乏病防治现状,为防治碘缺乏病提供科学依据.方法 按《海南省2011年碘缺乏病监测方案》要求,在三亚市按东、南、西、北、中5个方位各抽取1个镇(区),在每个镇(区)再按东、南、西、北4个方位各抽取1个行政村,每个行政村抽取盐样15份、育龄妇女尿样8份,生活饮用水样1份.在每个镇(区)抽取1所小学,每所小学抽取8~ 10岁儿童40名,进行甲状腺检查,智商测定,取尿样测定尿碘.在每所小学抽取5年级学生33名进行健康教育问卷调查和家庭食用盐检测(半定量检测).盐碘测定采用直接滴定法;尿碘、水碘测定采用砷铈催化分光光度测定法;儿童智商测定采用联合型瑞文测验农村版.结果 共检测居民盐样300份,盐碘中位数为31.0 mg/kg,碘盐覆盖率为96.67%(290/300),合格碘盐食用率为96.00%(288/300).共测定200名儿童尿样,尿碘中位数为194.60 μg/L,尿碘范围18.50 ~ 655.10 μg/L,<50 μg/L和50~<100 μg/L的比例分别为4.00%(8/200)和13.50%(27/200);共调查200名儿童甲状腺,触诊法甲状腺肿大率为1.00%(2/200);儿童智商均值为97.66,智商≤69的有8名,在70 ~ 79的有20名.对165名学生进行了健康教育问卷调查,平均得分为3.24,其中有43人不及格,不及格率为26.06%;家中盐样测定,碘盐覆盖率为96.36%(159/165).160名育龄妇女尿碘中位数为162.95 μg,/L,尿碘范围在9.50 ~ 908.80 μg/L,<100 μg/L的占19.38%(31/160);家中盐样测定,合格碘盐食用率为96.90%(155/160).5个乡镇(区)20份水样测定,水碘全部< 10.0 μg/L.结论 三亚市仍属于外环境缺碘地区,虽然总体上已达到消除碘缺乏病目标,但仍有部分儿童和育龄妇女存在碘营养不足.%Objective In order to understand the Sanya of iodine deficiency disorders(IDD) prevention and cure,and to provide a scientific basis for formulating corresponding control measures

  9. Storage Pool Deficiencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Deficiency Factor V Deficiency Combined FV & FVIII Deficiencies Factor VII Deficiency Factor X Deficiency Factor XI Deficiency Factor ... Deficiency Factor V Deficiency Combined FV & FVIII Deficiencies Factor VII Deficiency Factor X Deficiency Factor XI Deficiency Factor ...

  10. The co-occurrence of mental disorders in children and adolescents with intellectual disability/intellectual developmental disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munir, Kerim M

    2016-03-01

    The study summarizes supportive epidemiological data regarding the true co-occurrence (comorbidity) and course of mental disorders in children with intellectual disability/intellectual developmental disorders (ID/IDD) across the lifespan. Published studies involving representative populations of children and adolescents with ID/IDD have demonstrated a three to four-fold increase in prevalence of co-occurring mental disorders. The effect of age, sex, and severity (mild, moderate, severe, and profound) and socioeconomic status on prevalence is currently not clearly understood. To date there are no prevalence estimates of co-occurring mental disorders in youth identified using the new DSM-5 (and proposed ICD-11) definition of ID/IDD using measures of intellectual functions and deficits in adaptive functioning with various severity levels defined on the basis of adaptive functioning, and not intellectual quotient scores. The true relationship between two forms of morbidity remains complex and causal relationships that may be true for one disorder may not apply to another. The new conceptualization of ID/IDD offers a developmentally better informed psychobiological approach that can help distinguish co-occurrence of mental disorders within the neurodevelopmental section with onset during the developmental period as well as the later onset of other mental disorders.

  11. Genetics Home Reference: factor VII deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Factor VII deficiency Factor VII deficiency Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Factor VII deficiency is a rare bleeding disorder that varies ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: tyrosine hydroxylase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions TH deficiency Tyrosine hydroxylase deficiency Printable PDF Open All Close All ... Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) deficiency is a disorder that primarily ...

  13. Iodine Deficiency and Excess Coexist in China and Induce Thyroid Dysfunction and Disease: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fangang; Liu, Shoujun; Fan, Zhipeng; Wu, Junhua; Sun, Dianjun

    2014-01-01

    Background In spite of the salt iodization, iodine deficiency disorders (IDD) have not been sustainably eliminated in China. There are coastal areas with low iodized salt coverage rates (iodine nutrition is inadequate) and other areas with excessive amounts of iodine in the drinking water. Objective This study aimed to clarify the association of iodine deficiencies resulting from a low coverage rate of iodized salt, excess iodine intake from drinking water with thyroid function and disease in adults. Design A cross-sectional study was conducted in adults in different iodine nutrition areas in three provinces in China. Results The prevalence of thyroid nodules was 15.52%, 8.66% and 22.17% in the iodine excess, sufficient and deficient groups, respectively. The prevalence of subclinical hypothyroidism was 20.09%, 10.41%, and 2.25% in the excess, sufficient and deficient iodine groups, respectively. The prevalence of subclinical hyperthyroidism and overt hyperthyroidism in the iodine deficient group was higher than that in the iodine excess group ( = 9.302, p = 0.002) and iodine sufficient group ( = 7.553, p = 0.006). Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) was significantly correlated with excess iodine intake (β = 1.764,P = 0.001) and deficient iodine intake (β = −1.219, P = 0.028). Conclusions Thyroid nodules are more likely to be present in the iodine excess and deficient areas than in the iodine sufficient areas. Subclinical hyperthyroidism and overt hyperthyroidism are more likely to be prevalent in the iodine deficient areas than in the iodine excess or sufficient areas. Subclinical hypothyroidism is more likely to be prevalent in the high iodine intake areas than in the iodine deficient or sufficient areas. Median TSH may be deemed as an alternative indicator for monitoring the iodine nutrition status of the adult population in iodine excess and deficient areas. PMID:25375854

  14. Iodine deficiency and excess coexist in china and induce thyroid dysfunction and disease: a cross-sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Du

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In spite of the salt iodization, iodine deficiency disorders (IDD have not been sustainably eliminated in China. There are coastal areas with low iodized salt coverage rates (iodine nutrition is inadequate and other areas with excessive amounts of iodine in the drinking water. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to clarify the association of iodine deficiencies resulting from a low coverage rate of iodized salt, excess iodine intake from drinking water with thyroid function and disease in adults. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study was conducted in adults in different iodine nutrition areas in three provinces in China. RESULTS: The prevalence of thyroid nodules was 15.52%, 8.66% and 22.17% in the iodine excess, sufficient and deficient groups, respectively. The prevalence of subclinical hypothyroidism was 20.09%, 10.41%, and 2.25% in the excess, sufficient and deficient iodine groups, respectively. The prevalence of subclinical hyperthyroidism and overt hyperthyroidism in the iodine deficient group was higher than that in the iodine excess group ([Formula: see text] = 9.302, p = 0.002 and iodine sufficient group ([Formula: see text] = 7.553, p = 0.006. Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH was significantly correlated with excess iodine intake (β = 1.764,P = 0.001 and deficient iodine intake (β = -1.219, P = 0.028. CONCLUSIONS: Thyroid nodules are more likely to be present in the iodine excess and deficient areas than in the iodine sufficient areas. Subclinical hyperthyroidism and overt hyperthyroidism are more likely to be prevalent in the iodine deficient areas than in the iodine excess or sufficient areas. Subclinical hypothyroidism is more likely to be prevalent in the high iodine intake areas than in the iodine deficient or sufficient areas. Median TSH may be deemed as an alternative indicator for monitoring the iodine nutrition status of the adult population in iodine excess and deficient areas.

  15. Perancangan Media Promosi Kesehatan Pencegahan Gaki Pada Anak Sd Di Daerah Endemik Di Provinsi Bali

    OpenAIRE

    Suiraoka, Suharyanto Supardi dan Fatwa Sari Tetra Dewi, I Putu

    2012-01-01

    Background: Iodine Deficiency Disorders (IDD) is a serious problem in Indonesia. IDD control program was implemented through some preventive action, included iodized salt. Housewives knowledge regarding IDD is a factor that could influence the availability of iodized salt in household. Their knowledge could be improved through knowledge improvement of Primary school children regarding IDD, because they considered as one of message carriers in the household. Health education activity at...

  16. The Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test and carbohydrate-deficient transferrin in alcohol-related sickness absence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermansson, Ulric; Helander, Anders; Brandt, Lena; Huss, Anders; Rönnberg, Sten

    2002-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that elevated, risky levels of alcohol consumption may lead to higher rates of sickness absence. However, no studies have examined the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) or serum carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (CDT) in relation to sickness absence in the workplace. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between sick-days, 12 months before screening, and the AUDIT and CDT (CDTect kit). Serum gamma-glutamyltransferase also was used for comparison. The study was carried out over 36 months in a large workplace and formed part of an ongoing controlled study. In conjunction with a routine health examination, employees were offered the opportunity to undergo an alcohol screening. Absence data were obtained from the company payroll system, and sickness absence was analyzed by using a three-ordinal level cumulative logistic model on the number of sick-days. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) are reported. Of the 989 subjects who participated in the study, 193 (19.5%) screened positive in relation to either the AUDIT (>or=8 points) or CDT (women), or both. Employees who screened positive with the AUDIT had a significantly higher proportion of sick-days (p = 0.047) compared with those who screened negative (OR = 1.4, CI 1.0-1.9). Neither long, continuous periods of sickness absence nor absence on Mondays or Fridays gave a clear indication of individuals who screened positive on the AUDIT or CDT test. Our data indicate that individuals with moderately elevated or risky levels of alcohol consumption show an increase in sick-days. Accordingly, workplaces have a good reason for using a more systematic approach to alcohol screening in routine workplace health examinations.

  17. The role of registries in rare genetic lipid disorders: Review and introduction of the first global registry in lipoprotein lipase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Stroes, Erik; Soran, Handrean; Johnson, Colin; Moulin, Philippe; Iotti, Giorgio; Zibellini, Marco; Ossenkoppele, Bas; Dippel, Michaela; Averna, Maurizio R

    2017-07-01

    A good understanding of the natural history of rare genetic lipid disorders is a pre-requisite for successful patient management. Disease registries have been helpful in this regard. Lipoprotein Lipase Deficiency (LPLD) is a rare, autosomal-recessive lipid disorder characterized by severe hypertriglyceridemia and a very high risk for recurrent acute pancreatitis, however, only limited data are available on its natural course. Alipogene tiparvovec (Glybera ® ) is the first gene therapy to receive Marketing Authorization in the European Union; GENIALL (GENetherapy In the MAnagement of Lipoprotein Lipase Deficiency), a 15-year registry focusing on LPLD was launched in 2014 as part of its Risk Management Plan. The aim of this publication is to introduce the GENIALL Registry within a structured literature review of registries in rare genetic lipid disorders. A total of 11 relevant initiatives/registries were identified (homozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia (hoFH) [n = 5]; LPLD [n = 1]; Lysosomal Acid Lipase Deficiency [LALD, n = 1], detection of mutations in genetic lipid disorders [n = 4]). Besides one product registry in hoFH and the LALD registry, all other initiatives are local or country-specific. GENIALL is the first global prospective registry in LPLD that will collect physician and patient generated data on the natural course of LPLD, as well as long-term outcomes of gene therapy. There is a limited number of international initiatives focusing on the natural course of specific rare genetic lipid disorders. The GENIALL LPLD Registry could be the first step towards a future broader global initiative that collects data related to familial chylomicronemia syndrome and their underlying genetic causes. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Science Science Home Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision ... prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... exploring about iron-deficiency anemia. Read more New treatments for disorders that lead to iron-deficiency anemia. We are ... and other pathways. This could help develop new therapies for conditions that ... behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... A-Z Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science Science Home Blood Disorders ... infancy has lasting effects. We are interested in learning how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, ... iron-deficiency anemia can cause serious complications, including heart failure and development delays in children. Explore this ...

  2. Intracranial Hemorrhage: A Devastating Outcome of Congenital Bleeding Disorders-Prevalence, Diagnosis, and Management, with a Special Focus on Congenital Factor XIII Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Seyed Ezatolla Rafiee; Jalalvand, Masumeh; Assadollahi, Vahideh; Tabibian, Shadi; Dorgalaleh, Akbar

    2018-04-01

    Intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) is a medical emergency. In congenital bleeding disorders, ICH is a devastating presentation accompanied with a high rate of morbidity and mortality. The prevalence of ICH is highly variable among congenital bleeding disorders, with the highest incidence observed in factor (F) XIII deficiency (FXIIID) (∼30%). This life-threatening presentation is less common in afibrinogenemia, FVIII, FIX, FVII, and FX deficiencies, and is rare in severe FV and FII deficiencies, type 3 von Willebrand disease and inherited platelet function disorders (IPFDs). In FXIIID, this diathesis most often occurs after trauma in children, whereas spontaneous ICH is more frequent in adults. About 15% of patients with FXIIID and ICH die; the bleeding causes 80% of deaths in this coagulopathy. Although in FXIIID, the bleed most commonly is intraparenchymal (> 90%), epidural, subdural, and subarachnoid hemorrhages also have been reported, albeit rarely. As this life-threatening bleeding causes neurological complications, early diagnosis can prevent further expansion of the hematoma and secondary damage. Neuroimaging plays a crucial role in the diagnosis of ICH, but signs and symptoms in patients with severe FXIIID should trigger replacement therapy even before establishment of the diagnosis. Although a high dose of FXIII concentrate can reduce the rate of morbidity and mortality of ICH in FXIIID, it may occasionally trigger inhibitor development, thus complicating ICH management and future prophylaxis. Nevertheless, replacement therapy is the mainstay of treatment for ICH in FXIIID. Neurosurgery is performed in patients with FXIIID and epidural hematoma and a hemorrhage diameter exceeding 2 cm or a volume of ICH is more than 30 cm 3 . Contact sports are not recommended in people with FXIIID as they can elicit ICH. However, a considerable number of safe sports and activities have been suggested to have more benefits than dangers for patients with congenital bleeding

  3. 46,XY disorder of sex development due to 17-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 3 deficiency: a plea for timely genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimbly, Chelsey; Caluseriu, Oana; Metcalfe, Peter; Jetha, Mary M; Rosolowsky, Elizabeth T

    2016-01-01

    17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 3 (17βHSD3) deficiency is a rare cause of disorder of sex development (DSD) due to impaired conversion of androstenedione to testosterone. Traditionally, the diagnosis was determined by βHCG-stimulated ratios of testosterone:androstenedione stimulation (1500 IU IM for 2 days) suggested 17βHSD3 deficiency although androstenedione was only minimally stimulated (4.5 nmol/L to 5.4 nmol/L). Expedient genetic testing for the HSD17B3 gene provided the unequivocal diagnosis. We advocate for urgent genetic testing in rare causes of DSD as indeterminate hormone results can delay diagnosis and prolong intervention.

  4. Glutamate carboxypeptidase II and folate deficiencies result in reciprocal protection against cognitive and social deficits in mice: implications for neurodevelopmental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaevitz, Laura R; Picker, Jonathan D; Rana, Jasmine; Kolodny, Nancy H; Shane, Barry; Berger-Sweeney, Joanne E; Coyle, Joseph T

    2012-06-01

    Interactions between genetic and environmental risk factors underlie a number of neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia (SZ) and autism (AD). Due to the complexity and multitude of the genetic and environmental factors attributed to these disorders, recent research strategies focus on elucidating the common molecular pathways through which these multiple risk factors may function. In this study, we examine the combined effects of a haplo-insufficiency of glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII) and dietary folic acid deficiency. In addition to serving as a neuropeptidase, GCPII catalyzes the absorption of folate. GCPII and folate depletion interact within the one-carbon metabolic pathway and/or of modulate the glutamatergic system. Four groups of mice were tested: wild-type, GCPII hypomorphs, and wild-types and GCPII hypomorphs both fed a folate deficient diet. Due to sex differences in the prevalence of SZ and AD, both male and female mice were assessed on a number of behavioral tasks including locomotor activity, rotorod, social interaction, prepulse inhibition, and spatial memory. Wild-type mice of both sexes fed a folic acid deficient diet showed motor coordination impairments and cognitive deficits, while social interactions were decreased only in males. GCPII mutant mice of both sexes also exhibited reduced social propensities. In contrast, all folate-depleted GCPII hypomorphs performed similarly to untreated wild-type mice, suggesting that reduced GCPII expression and folate deficiency are mutually protective. Analyses of folate and neurometabolite levels associated with glutamatergic function suggest several potential mechanisms through which GCPII and folate may be interacting to create this protective effect. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Atypical Manifestation of LPS-Responsive beige- like anchor (LRBA Deficiency Syndrome as an Autoimmune Endocrine Disorder without Enteropathy and Immunodeficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrzad Bakhtiar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Monogenic primary immunodeficiency syndromes can affect one or more endocrine organs by autoimmunity during childhood. Clinical manifestations include type1 diabetes mellitus, hypothyroidism, adrenal insufficiency and vitiligo. LPS-responsive beige-like anchor protein (LRBA deficiency was described in 2012 as a novel primary immunodeficiency, predominantly causing immune dysregulation and early onset enteropathy. We describe the heterogeneous clinical course of LRBA deficiency in two siblings, mimicking an autoimmune polyendocrine disorder in one of them in presence of the same underlying genetic mutation. The third child of consanguineous Egyptian parents (Patient 1 presented at six months of age with intractable enteropathy and failure to thrive. Later on he developed symptoms of adrenal insufficiency, autoimmune haemolytic anaemia, thrombocytopenia, and infectious complications due to immunosuppressive treatment. The severe enteropathy was non-responsive to the standard treatment and led to death at the age of 22 years. His younger sister (Patient 2 presented at the age of 12 to the endocrinology department with decompensated hypothyroidism, perioral vitiligo, delayed pubertal development, and growth failure without enteropathy and immunodeficiency.Using whole-exome sequencing (WES we identified a homozygous frameshift mutation (c.6862delT, p.Y2288MfsX29 in the LRBA gene in both siblings. To our knowledge our patient (patient 2 is the first case of LRBA deficiency described with predominant endocrine phenotype without immunodeficiency and enteropathy. LRBA deficiency should be considered as underlying disease in pediatric patients presenting with autoimmune endocrine symptoms. The same genetic mutation can manifest with a broad phenotypic spectrum without genotype-phenotype correlation. The awareness for disease symptoms among non-immunologists might be a key to early diagnosis. Further functional studies in LRBA deficiency are necessary to

  6. High-throughput tandem mass spectrometry multiplex analysis for newborn urinary screening of creatine synthesis and transport disorders, Triple H syndrome and OTC deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auray-Blais, Christiane; Maranda, Bruno; Lavoie, Pamela

    2014-09-25

    Creatine synthesis and transport disorders, Triple H syndrome and ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency are treatable inborn errors of metabolism. Early screening of patients was found to be beneficial. Mass spectrometry analysis of specific urinary biomarkers might lead to early detection and treatment in the neonatal period. We developed a high-throughput mass spectrometry methodology applicable to newborn screening using dried urine on filter paper for these aforementioned diseases. A high-throughput methodology was devised for the simultaneous analysis of creatine, guanidineacetic acid, orotic acid, uracil, creatinine and respective internal standards, using both positive and negative electrospray ionization modes, depending on the compound. The precision and accuracy varied by screening for inherited disorders by biochemical laboratories. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Infant motor development in rural Vietnam and intrauterine exposures to anaemia, iron deficiency and common mental disorders: a prospective community-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Thach D; Tran, Tuan; Simpson, Julie A; Tran, Ha T; Nguyen, Trang T; Hanieh, Sarah; Dwyer, Terence; Biggs, Beverley-Ann; Fisher, Jane

    2014-01-08

    Antenatal anaemia, iron deficiency and common mental disorders (CMD) are prevalent in low- and middle-income countries. The aim of this study was to examine the direct and indirect effects of antenatal exposures to these risks and infant motor development. A cohort of women who were pregnant with a single foetus and between 12 and 20 weeks pregnant in 50 randomly-selected rural communes in Ha Nam province was recruited. Participants provided data twice during pregnancy (early and late gestation) and twice after giving birth (8 weeks and 6 months postpartum). The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale was used at all four data collection waves to detect CMD (score ≥ 4). Maternal anaemia (Hb anaemia was 21.5% in early pregnancy and 24.4% in late pregnancy. There was 4.1% iron deficiency at early pregnancy and 48.2% at late pregnancy. Clinically significant symptoms of CMD were apparent among 40% women in early pregnancy and 28% in late pregnancy. There were direct adverse effects on infant BSID-M scores at 6 months of age due to antenatal anaemia in late pregnancy (an estimated mean reduction of 2.61 points, 95% Confidence Interval, CI, 0.57 to 4.65) and CMD in early pregnancy (7.13 points, 95% CI 3.13 to 11.13). Iron deficiency and anaemia in early pregnancy were indirectly related to the outcome via anaemia during late pregnancy. Antenatal anaemia, iron deficiency, and CMD have a negative impact on subsequent infant motor development. These findings highlight the need to improve the quality of antenatal care when developing interventions for pregnant women that aim to optimise early childhood development in low- and middle-income countries.

  8. The Perception of Substance Use Disorder among Clinicians, Caregivers and Family Members of Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDerNagel, Joanne E. L.; van Duijvenbode, Neomi; Ruedrich, Stephen; Ayu, Astri P.; Schellekens, Arnt F. A.

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: Substance use disorders (SUD) are common among individuals with intellectual and developmental disorders (IDD). The quality of care individuals with these conditions receive can be affected by perceptions and attributions of SUD among clinicians, professional caregivers, and family members. The aim of this study was to explore such…

  9. Iodine Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fax/Phone Home » Iodine Deficiency Leer en Español Iodine Deficiency Iodine is an element that is needed ... world’s population remains at risk for iodine deficiency. Iodine Deficiency FAQs WHAT IS THE THYROID GLAND? The ...

  10. TMEM199 Deficiency Is a Disorder of Golgi Homeostasis Characterized by Elevated Aminotransferases, Alkaline Phosphatase, and Cholesterol and Abnormal Glycosylation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Jos C.; Timal, Sharita; van Scherpenzeel, Monique; Michelakakis, Helen; Vicogne, Dorothée; Ashikov, Angel; Moraitou, Marina; Hoischen, Alexander; Huijben, Karin; Steenbergen, Gerry; van den Boogert, Marjolein A. W.; Porta, Francesco; Calvo, Pier Luigi; Mavrikou, Mersyni; Cenacchi, Giovanna; van den Bogaart, Geert; Salomon, Jody; Holleboom, Adriaan G.; Rodenburg, Richard J.; Drenth, Joost P. H.; Huynen, Martijn A.; Wevers, Ron A.; Morava, Eva; Foulquier, François; Veltman, Joris A.; Lefeber, Dirk J.

    2016-01-01

    Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDGs) form a genetically and clinically heterogeneous group of diseases with aberrant protein glycosylation as a hallmark. A subgroup of CDGs can be attributed to disturbed Golgi homeostasis. However, identification of pathogenic variants is seriously

  11. Competency-Based Training and Worker Turnover in Community Supports for People With IDD: Results From a Group Randomized Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogenschutz, Matthew; Nord, Derek; Hewitt, Amy

    2015-06-01

    Turnover among direct support professionals (DSPs) in community support settings for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) has been regarded as a challenge since tracking of this workforce began in the 1980s. This study utilized a group randomized controlled design to test the effects of a competency-based training intervention for DSPs on site-level turnover rates over a one year period. Results suggested that, compared with the control group, sites receiving the training intervention experienced a significant decrease in annual turnover, when multiple factors were controlled. Implications, including the importance of considering quality training as a long term organizational investment and intervention to reduce turnover, are discussed.

  12. Brain Lateralization in Mice Is Associated with Zinc Signaling and Altered in Prenatal Zinc Deficient Mice That Display Features of Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Grabrucker

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of studies have reported changes in the hemispheric dominance in autism spectrum disorder (ASD patients on functional, biochemical, and morphological level. Since asymmetry of the brain is also found in many vertebrates, we analyzed whether prenatal zinc deficient (PZD mice, a mouse model with ASD like behavior, show alterations regarding brain lateralization on molecular and behavioral level. Our results show that hemisphere-specific expression of marker genes is abolished in PZD mice on mRNA and protein level. Using magnetic resonance imaging, we found an increased striatal volume in PZD mice with no change in total brain volume. Moreover, behavioral patterns associated with striatal lateralization are altered and the lateralized expression of dopamine receptor 1 (DR1 in the striatum of PZD mice was changed. We conclude that zinc signaling during brain development has a critical role in the establishment of brain lateralization in mice.

  13. Distinctive features of single nucleotide alterations in induced pluripotent stem cells with different types of DNA repair deficiency disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Kohji; Sakaguchi, Hironari; Sakamoto-Abutani, Rie; Nakanishi, Mahito; Nishimura, Ken; Yamazaki-Inoue, Mayu; Ohtaka, Manami; Periasamy, Vaiyapuri Subbarayan; Alshatwi, Ali Abdullah; Higuchi, Akon; Hanaoka, Kazunori; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Takada, Shuji; Hata, Kenichiro; Toyoda, Masashi; Umezawa, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    Disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have been used as a model to analyze pathogenesis of disease. In this study, we generated iPSCs derived from a fibroblastic cell line of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) group A (XPA-iPSCs), a rare autosomal recessive hereditary disease in which patients develop skin cancer in the areas of skin exposed to sunlight. XPA-iPSCs exhibited hypersensitivity to ultraviolet exposure and accumulation of single-nucleotide substitutions when compared with ataxia telangiectasia-derived iPSCs that were established in a previous study. However, XPA-iPSCs did not show any chromosomal instability in vitro, i.e. intact chromosomes were maintained. The results were mutually compensating for examining two major sources of mutations, nucleotide excision repair deficiency and double-strand break repair deficiency. Like XP patients, XPA-iPSCs accumulated single-nucleotide substitutions that are associated with malignant melanoma, a manifestation of XP. These results indicate that XPA-iPSCs may serve a monitoring tool (analogous to the Ames test but using mammalian cells) to measure single-nucleotide alterations, and may be a good model to clarify pathogenesis of XP. In addition, XPA-iPSCs may allow us to facilitate development of drugs that delay genetic alteration and decrease hypersensitivity to ultraviolet for therapeutic applications. PMID:27197874

  14. Genetics Home Reference: complement component 2 deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topic: Immune System and Disorders Health Topic: Lupus Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) Complement component 2 deficiency Additional NIH Resources (1 link) National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases: Primary Immune Deficiency Diseases Educational Resources (6 ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: ataxia with vitamin E deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions Ataxia with vitamin E deficiency Ataxia with vitamin E deficiency Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Ataxia with vitamin E deficiency is a disorder that impairs the body's ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked creatine deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions X-linked creatine deficiency X-linked creatine deficiency Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description X-linked creatine deficiency is an inherited disorder that primarily affects ...

  17. Clinical and biochemical presentation of siblings with COG-7 deficiency, a lethal multiple O- and N-glycosylation disorder.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaapen, L.J.; Bakker, J.A.; Meer, S.B. van der; Sijstermans, H.J.; Steet, R.A.; Wevers, R.A.; Jaeken, J.

    2005-01-01

    Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG) represent a group of inherited multiorgan diseases caused by defects in the biosynthesis of glycoproteins. We report on two dysmorphic siblings with severe liver disease who died at the age of a few weeks. Increased activities of lysosomal enzymes in

  18. Deficient Attention Is Hard to Find: Applying the Perceptual Load Model of Selective Attention to Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang-Pollock, Cynthia L.; Nigg, Joel T.; Carr, Thomas H.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Whether selective attention is a primary deficit in childhood Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) remains in active debate. Methods: We used the "perceptual load" paradigm to examine both early and late selective attention in children with the Primarily Inattentive (ADHD-I) and Combined subtypes (ADHD-C) of ADHD. Results:…

  19. Increase in tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase of bone at the early stage of ascorbic acid deficiency in the ascorbate-requiring Osteogenic Disorder Shionogi (ODS) rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, A; Tsukamoto, I

    2003-08-01

    The effect of ascorbic acid deficiency on bone metabolism was evaluated using the ascorbate-requiring Osteogenic Disorder Shionogi (ODS) rat model. Ascorbic acid (Asc)-deficient rats gained body weight in a manner similar to Asc-supplemented rats (control) during 3 weeks, but began to lose weight during the 4th week of Asc deficiency. The tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) activity in serum increased to about 2-fold the control value in the rats fed the Asc-free diet for 2, 3, and 4 weeks (AscD2, AscD3, and AscD4), while a decrease in the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity was observed only in AscD4 rats. The serum pyridinoline cross-linked carboxyterminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) level significantly increased to 1.3-, 1.4-, and 1.9-fold of that in the controls in AscD2, D3, and D4, respectively. The ALP activity in the distal femur was unchanged in AscD1, D2, and D3, but decreased to 50% of the control level in AscD4 rats. The TRAP activity in the distal femur increased to about 2-fold of that in the controls in the AscD2 and D3 and decreased to the control level in the AscD4 rats. The amount of hydroxyproline in the distal femur significantly decreased to about 80%, 70%, and 60% of the control in AscD2, D3, and D4 rats, respectively. These decreases were associated with a similar reduction in the calcium content of the distal femur. Histochemical analysis of the distal femur showed an increase in TRAP-positive cells in AscD2 and AscD3 rats and a decrease in the trabecular bone in AscD2, D3, and D4 rats. These results suggested that a deficiency of Asc stimulated bone resorption at an early stage, followed by a decrease in bone formation in mature ODS rats which already had a well-developed collagen matrix and fully differentiated osteoblasts.

  20. Protean manifestations of vitamin D deficiency, part 3: association with cardiovascular disease and disorders of the central and peripheral nervous systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, David S H

    2011-05-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is associated with the risk factors of inflammation, insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction, and left ventricular hypertrophy. As a result there is an increase in cardiovascular events (CVEs) associated with vitamin D deficiency. Vitamin D deficiency itself or secondary hyperparathyroidism or both may be responsible for the increase in CVEs. Correction of vitamin D deficiency may decrease the incidence of CVEs. Vitamin D deficiency is also associated with Alzheimer disease, schizophrenia, depression, and chronic pain and muscle weakness. Vitamin D deficiency is early treated with oral vitamin D supplements which may improve the manifestations of the diseases associated with vitamin D deficiency.

  1. Health Deficiencies

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of all health deficiencies currently listed on Nursing Home Compare, including the nursing home that received the deficiency, the associated inspection date,...

  2. Fatal hepatic short-chain L-3-hydroxyacyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency: clinical, biochemical, and pathological studies on three subjects with this recently identified disorder of mitochondrial beta-oxidation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennett, M. J.; Spotswood, S. D.; Ross, K. F.; Comfort, S.; Koonce, R.; Boriack, R. L.; IJlst, L.; Wanders, R. J.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the clinical, biochemical, and pathological findings in three infants with hepatic short-chain L-3-hydroxyacyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase (SCHAD) deficiency, a recently recognized disorder of the mitochondrial oxidation of straight-chain fatty acids. Candidate subjects were

  3. Long-chain fatty acid triglyceride (TG) metabolism disorder impairs male fertility: a study using adipose triglyceride lipase deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaki, Hidetake; Kim, Namhyo; Nakamura, Hitomi; Kumasawa, Keiichi; Kamata, Eriko; Hirano, Ken-Ichi; Kimura, Tadashi

    2017-07-01

    Does the deletion of adipose triglyceride lipase (Atgl) gene impair male fertility? The deletion of Atgl gene impaired male fertility but the effect was partially reversed by a low long-chain triglyceride (TG) diet. ATGL specifically hydrolyses long-chain fatty acid TG to diacylglycerol and a high level of expression of ATGL in testes has been reported. However, the role of ATGL in male fertility is unknown. To investigate the effect of deletion of Atgl gene on male fertility, cauda epididymides and testes were collected from wild-type, heterozygous and homozygous Atgl-deficient mice at 10 weeks of age and epididymal sperm analysis and histological analysis of the testes were performed. To investigate whether a medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) replacement diet mitigated the impaired male fertility by deletion of Atgl gene, homozygous Atgl-deficient mice were fed a MCT replacement diet, or a standard diet including long-chain triglycerides (LCTs) in a control group, for 6 weeks from 5 weeks of age (n = 22). The systematic and local effects of the MCT replacement diet on spermatogenesis and sperm maturation in the epididymis were analyzed at 10 weeks of age. Hematoxylin and eosin staining in paraffin-embedded sections of testes and Oil Red O staining in frozen sections of testes were performed. The epididymal sperm concentrations were analyzed. Statistical analyses were performed using the Student's t-test or Mann-Whitney U test with Shapiro-Wilk Normality test. Although heterozygous mice were fertile and showed a similar number of epididymal total and motile sperm concentrations to wild-type mice, the deletion of Atgl gene in homozygous mice led to accumulation of TG deposits in testes and impaired spermatogenesis. The deletion of Atgl gene also impaired the sperm maturation process required for sperm to acquire the ability to move forward in the epididymis. The MCT replacement diet for 6 weeks increased the plasma level of non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) (1

  4. Autism as a disorder of deficiency of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and altered metabolism of polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Undurti N

    2013-10-01

    Autism has a strong genetic and environmental basis in which inflammatory markers and factors concerned with synapse formation, nerve transmission, and information processing such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs): arachidonic (AA), eicosapentaenoic (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acids (DHA) and their products and neurotransmitters: dopamine, serotonin, acetylcholine, γ-aminobutyric acid, and catecholamines and cytokines are altered. Antioxidants, vitamins, minerals, and trace elements are needed for the normal metabolism of neurotrophic factors, eicosanoids, and neurotransmitters, supporting reports of their alterations in autism. But, the exact relationship among these factors and their interaction with genes and proteins concerned with brain development and growth is not clear. It is suggested that maternal infections and inflammation and adverse events during intrauterine growth of the fetus could lead to alterations in the gene expression profile and proteomics that results in dysfunction of the neuronal function and neurotransmitters, alteration(s) in the metabolism of PUFAs and their metabolites resulting in excess production of proinflammatory eicosanoids and cytokines and a deficiency of anti-inflammatory cytokines and bioactive lipids that ultimately results in the development of autism. Based on these evidences, it is proposed that selective delivery of BDNF and methods designed to augment the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines and eicosanoids and PUFAs may prevent, arrest, or reverse the autism disease process. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... A-Z Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science Science Home Blood Disorders ... Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) ... We are interested in learning how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life ...

  6. Arginase-1 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Yuan Yan; Baron, Garrett; Schulze, Andreas; Funk, Colin D

    2015-12-01

    Arginase-1 (ARG1) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that affects the liver-based urea cycle, leading to impaired ureagenesis. This genetic disorder is caused by 40+ mutations found fairly uniformly spread throughout the ARG1 gene, resulting in partial or complete loss of enzyme function, which catalyzes the hydrolysis of arginine to ornithine and urea. ARG1-deficient patients exhibit hyperargininemia with spastic paraparesis, progressive neurological and intellectual impairment, persistent growth retardation, and infrequent episodes of hyperammonemia, a clinical pattern that differs strikingly from other urea cycle disorders. This review briefly highlights the current understanding of the etiology and pathophysiology of ARG1 deficiency derived from clinical case reports and therapeutic strategies stretching over several decades and reports on several exciting new developments regarding the pathophysiology of the disorder using ARG1 global and inducible knockout mouse models. Gene transfer studies in these mice are revealing potential therapeutic options that can be exploited in the future. However, caution is advised in extrapolating results since the lethal disease phenotype in mice is much more severe than in humans indicating that the mouse models may not precisely recapitulate human disease etiology. Finally, some of the functions and implications of ARG1 in non-urea cycle activities are considered. Lingering questions and future areas to be addressed relating to the clinical manifestations of ARG1 deficiency in liver and brain are also presented. Hopefully, this review will spark invigorated research efforts that lead to treatments with better clinical outcomes.

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... infection. A history of gastrointestinal surgery, such as weight-loss surgery—especially gastric bypass—or gastrectomy. Certain rare ... prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or even heart failure . Increased risk of infections Motor or cognitive development delays in children Pregnancy complications, ... Upper endoscopy to look for bleeding in the esophagus, stomach, and the first part of the ... blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the current ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... A-Z Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science Science Home Blood Disorders ... Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) programs. Our ... more information about Donor Iron Deficiency Study - Red Blood Cells ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and save lives. We are committed to advancing science and translating discoveries into clinical practice to promote the prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the current and future NHLBI efforts to improve health through ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia. We stimulate high-impact research. Our Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) Program now includes ... Studies (REDS) program Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) Program Non-NHLBI ...

  12. EFFECT OF GROWTH HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY ON THE QUALITY OF LIFE IN WOMEN WITH GROWTH HORMONE DEFICIENCY WHO HAVE A HISTORY OF ACROMEGALY VERSUS OTHER DISORDERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valassi, Elena; Brick, Danielle J.; Johnson, Jessica C.; Biller, Beverly M. K.; Klibanski, Anne; Miller, Karen K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the response in quality of life (QoL) to growth hormone (GH) replacement in women with GH deficiency (GHD) and a history of acromegaly with that in women with GHD of other causes. Methods Fifty-five women with GHD were studied: 17 with prior acromegaly and 38 with other causes of GHD. We compared two 6-month, randomized, placebo-controlled studies of GH therapy in women with hypopituitarism conducted with use of the same design—one in women with a history of acromegaly and one in women with no prior acromegaly. QoL was assessed with the following questionnaires: the QoL-Assessment of Growth Hormone deficiency in Adults (AGHDA), the Symptom Questionnaire, and the 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36). Results The 2 groups had comparable mean pretreatment age, body mass index, and QoL scores and comparable mean GH dose at 6 months (0.61 ± 0.30 versus 0.67 ± 0.27 mg daily). After 6 months of GH replacement therapy, women with GHD and prior acromegaly demonstrated a greater improvement in AGHDA score, four SF-36 subscales (Role Limitations due to Physical Health, Energy or Fatigue, Emotional Well-Being, and Social Functioning), and the Somatic Symptoms subscale of the Symptom Questionnaire than did women with GHD of other causes. Poorer pretreatment QoL was associated with a greater improvement in QoL after administration of GH. Conclusion In this study, GH replacement therapy improved QoL in women with GHD and a history of acromegaly but not in women with GHD due to other hypothalamic and pituitary disorders. Further studies are needed to determine the long-term risks versus benefits of GH replacement in patients who develop GHD after definitive treatment for acromegaly. PMID:22440981

  13. Deficient attention is hard to find: applying the perceptual load model of selective attention to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang-Pollock, Cynthia L; Nigg, Joel T; Carr, Thomas H

    2005-11-01

    Whether selective attention is a primary deficit in childhood Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) remains in active debate. We used the perceptual load paradigm to examine both early and late selective attention in children with the Primarily Inattentive (ADHD-I) and Combined subtypes (ADHD-C) of ADHD. No evidence emerged for selective attention deficits in either of the subtypes, but sluggish cognitive tempo was associated with abnormal early selection. At least some, and possibly most, children with DSM-IV ADHD have normal selective attention. Results support the move away from theories of attention dysfunction as primary in ADHD-C. In ADHD-I, this was one of the first formal tests of posterior attention network dysfunction, and results did not support that theory. However, ADHD children with sluggish cognitive tempo (SCT) warrant more study for possible early selective attention deficits.

  14. Burden of Hemoglobinopathies (Thalassemia, Sickle Cell Disorders and G6PD Deficiency) in Iran, 1990-2010: findings from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Nazila; Naderimagham, Shohreh; Ghasemian, Anoosheh; Saeedi Moghaddam, Sahar; Gohari, Kimia; Zareiy, Saeid; Sobhani, Sahar; Modirian, Mitra; Kompani, Farzad

    2015-08-01

    Hemoglobinopathies are known as the most common genetic disorders in Iran. The paper aims to provide global estimates of deaths and disability adjusted life years (DALYs) due to hemoglobinopathies in Iran by sex and age during 1990 to 2010 and describe the challenges due to limitations of the Global Burden of Disease Study 2010 (GBD 2010). GBD 2010 estimates of the numbers of deaths and years of life lost (YLLs) due to premature mortality were calculated using the Cause of Death Ensemble model (CODEm). Years of life lost due to disability (YLDs) were computed by multiplication of prevalence, the disability weight for occurrence of sequelae, and the duration of symptoms. Prevalence was estimated through a systematic search of published and available unpublished data sources, with a Bayesian meta-regression model developed for GBD 2010. Disability weights were produced using collected data from population-based surveys. Uncertainty from all inputs was incorporated into the computations of DALYs using simulation methods. We aim to prepare and criticize the results of GBD 2010 and provide some recommendations for reaching better conclusions about the burden of hemoglobinopathies in Iran. Between 1990 and 2010, the overall deaths attributed to hemoglobinopathies decreased from 0.51% to 0.36% of total deaths, with the corresponding burden declining from 1% to 0.82% of total DALYs. There was a reduction in deaths and DALYs rates for all ages and the rates attributed to all ages followed the same pattern in Iranian men and women. The highest DALYs for hemoglobinopathies, thalassemia, sickle cell disorder, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD-D) were found in those aged less than 5 years. The collective burden of all of these hemoglobin disorder was lower in 2010 than in 1990. Although the screening programs in Iran have been very successful in reducing the number of thalassemia patients between 1990 to 2010, in order to provide a better estimation of the

  15. Effectiveness of Parents-Focused Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy on Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Symptoms, Obesity and Self-Esteem of Overweight Children with Attention Deficient Hyperactivity Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsaneh Karbasi Amel

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD is the most common behavioral problems that cause hyperactivity, attention deficits, academic failure, and emotional and behavioral problems in preschool and elementary school that is often hidden from the parents' eyes. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of parent-based cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT on ADHD symptoms (including attention deficit disorder, restlessness, and impulsivity, overweight and self-esteem of 6–11-year-old obese children with attention deficit hyperactivity in Isfahan. Materials and Methods: This quasi-experimental study was carried out on 40 children aged 6–11 years with ADHD and overweight or obesity (above the 85th percentile in weight for age, height, and sex diagram that their parents referred to Isfahan child and adolescent psychiatric clinic of Ali Asghar Hospital in 2015. For twenty patients, only ADHD treatment was applied, and they received no other intervention, but the others in experimental group participated in CBT sessions. Analysis tools were Coppersmith Self-Esteem Scale, ADHD conners' test, and the body mass index (BMI. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance with repeated measurements. Results: CBT by teaching parents had a significant effect on ADHD symptoms, the self-esteem of overweight and obese children with ADHD in posttest and follow-up. The results also showed that had a significant effect on ADHD symptoms, overweight and self-esteem of the obese children with ADHD (P < 0.001. Conclusions: Parents focused CBT can be considered as a complementary treatment for reducing ADHD symptoms and BMI and increased self-esteem in the obese ADHD children.

  16. Effectiveness of Parents-Focused Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy on Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Symptoms, Obesity and Self-Esteem of Overweight Children with Attention Deficient Hyperactivity Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbasi Amel, Afsaneh; Karbasi Amel, Saeed; Erfan, Arefeh

    2018-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is the most common behavioral problems that cause hyperactivity, attention deficits, academic failure, and emotional and behavioral problems in preschool and elementary school that is often hidden from the parents' eyes. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of parent-based cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) on ADHD symptoms (including attention deficit disorder, restlessness, and impulsivity), overweight and self-esteem of 6-11-year-old obese children with attention deficit hyperactivity in Isfahan. This quasi-experimental study was carried out on 40 children aged 6-11 years with ADHD and overweight or obesity (above the 85 th percentile in weight for age, height, and sex diagram) that their parents referred to Isfahan child and adolescent psychiatric clinic of Ali Asghar Hospital in 2015. For twenty patients, only ADHD treatment was applied, and they received no other intervention, but the others in experimental group participated in CBT sessions. Analysis tools were Coppersmith Self-Esteem Scale, ADHD conners' test, and the body mass index (BMI). Data were analyzed using analysis of variance with repeated measurements. CBT by teaching parents had a significant effect on ADHD symptoms, the self-esteem of overweight and obese children with ADHD in posttest and follow-up. The results also showed that had a significant effect on ADHD symptoms, overweight and self-esteem of the obese children with ADHD ( P < 0.001). Parents focused CBT can be considered as a complementary treatment for reducing ADHD symptoms and BMI and increased self-esteem in the obese ADHD children.

  17. THE DISORDERS OF THE LIPID METABOLISM IN THE EXPERIMENTAL ESTROGENIC DEFICIENCY AND THE EFFECT OF THE VEGETAL ANTIOXIDANTS DIET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Badoi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In our days we have a great number of cardiovascular diseases with atherosclerotic etiopathogeny. That`s whythere is a important preocupation for identifying the atherogenic risk factors (lipid metabolism disorders. This studyfollows the effects of the ovarian hormones deficit in surgical menopause (experimental ovariectomy. The absence of theendogen estrogens disrupts the lipid metabolism and diminishes the antioxidant capacity. Another goal was to evaluatethe lipid profile improved by taking a flax seed diet rich in phytoestrogens. The experiment will be performed on whiterats, females, of the Wistar race. The supplementary diet with flax seeds will be administered to the ovariectomizedgroups as well as to the control groups. In the case of animals with a hormonal deficit (ovariectomy we found thepresence of dyslipidemia: hypercholesterolemia and/or hypertriglyceridemia. Supplementing the diet with flax seeds ledto the decreasing of the total seric cholesterol (p>0.05 and of the seric triglycerides (p0.05, after supplementing the diet with whole flax seeds, which suggests the protection of theendothelium, with the diminishing of the risk of triggering endothelial dysfunction. These results demonstrate thebeneficial effects of phytoestrogens from flax seed on lipid metabolism in experimental menopause.

  18. Neurobiological evidence for attention bias to food, emotional dysregulation, disinhibition and deficient somatosensory awareness in obesity with binge eating disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviram-Friedman, Roni; Astbury, Nerys; Ochner, Christopher N; Contento, Isobel; Geliebter, Allan

    2018-02-01

    To refine the biobehavioral markers of binge eating disorder (BED). We conducted fMRI brain scans using images of high energy processed food (HEPF), low energy unprocessed food (LEUF), or non-foods (NF) in 42 adults (obese with BED [obese -BED; n=13] and obese with no BED [obese non-BED; n=29]) selected via ads. Two blood oxygenated level dependent (BOLD) signal contrast maps were examined: food versus nonfood, and HEPF versus LEUF. In addition, score differences on the disinhibition scale were correlated with BOLD signals. food versus nonfood showed greater BOLD activity for BED in emotional, motivational and somatosensory brain areas: insula, anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), Brodmann areas (BA) 19 & 32, inferior parietal lobule (IPL), posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), and lingual, postcentral, middle temporal and cuneate gyri (p≤0.005; k≥88). HEPF versus LEUF showed greater BOLD activity for BED in inhibitory brain regions: BA 6, middle and superior frontal gyri (pFood images elicited neural activity indicating attention bias (cuneate & PCG), emotion dysregulation (BA 19 & 32), and disinhibition (MFG, BA6 & SFG) in obese with BED. These may help tailor a treatment for the obesity with BED phenotype. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Helping to eliminate vitamin A deficiency disorders using nuclear and related techniques. Report of an IAEA consultants' meeting, 30 November - 2 December 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    A Consultants' Meeting was convened by the IAEA from 30 November to 2 December 1994, and made recommendations on the objectives and strategies of a new Coordinated Research Programme (CRP), ''Helping to Eliminate Vitamin A Deficiency Disorders Using Nuclear and Related Techniques''. The objectives of the CRP will be to i) develop and/or modify isotopic and related techniques for measuring whole body retinol stores and carotenoid bioavailability and bioconversion which can be transferred to food-based vitamin A intervention programmes in developing countries; ii) evaluate and improve the sensitivity of commonly used biological, ecological, and dietary indicators of vitamin A status in human populations; iii) formulate model protocols which incorporate isotopic and related techniques in evaluations of intervention programmes, in collaboration with expert nutrition groups (e.g., WHO, FAO, UNICEF, MI, USAID, etc.). Priority will be given to proposals which aim to improve or validate the deuterated retinol dilution method for measuring retinol stores, particularly during pregnancy or during the complementary feeding in young children, and which propose to develop appropriate methods for measuring absorption and the bioavailability of provitamin A carotenoids. The production of uniformly-labelled carotenoids is of particular interest but proposals which use extrinsic labels as well as non-isotopic methods will also be considered. The studies should be conducted in developing countries through collaborations via 'twinning' relationships between scientists of developing and industrialized countries. 19 refs, 2 figs

  20. Hepatic fibrosis and carcinogenesis in α1-antitrypsin deficiency: a prototype for chronic tissue damage in gain-of-function disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlmutter, David H; Silverman, Gary A

    2011-03-01

    In α1-antitrypsin (AT) deficiency, a point mutation renders a hepatic secretory glycoprotein prone to misfolding and polymerization. The mutant protein accumulates in the endoplasmic reticulum of liver cells and causes hepatic fibrosis and hepatocellular carcinoma by a gain-of-function mechanism. Genetic and/or environmental modifiers determine whether an affected homozygote is susceptible to hepatic fibrosis/carcinoma. Two types of proteostasis mechanisms for such modifiers have been postulated: variation in the function of intracellular degradative mechanisms and/or variation in the signal transduction pathways that are activated to protect the cell from protein mislocalization and/or aggregation. In recent studies we found that carbamazepine, a drug that has been used safely as an anticonvulsant and mood stabilizer, reduces the hepatic load of mutant AT and hepatic fibrosis in a mouse model by enhancing autophagic disposal of this mutant protein. These results provide evidence that pharmacological manipulation of endogenous proteostasis mechanisms is an appealing strategy for chemoprophylaxis in disorders involving gain-of-function mechanisms.

  1. Does Periconceptional Fish Consumption by Parents Affect the Incidence of Autism Spectrum Disorder and Intelligence Deficiency? A Case-control Study in Tianjin, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Lei; CUI Shan Shan; HAN Yu; DAI Wei; SU Yuan Yuan; ZHANG Xin

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to explore the association between periconceptional fish consumption by parents and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and intelligence deficiency (ID). Methods A case-control study was conducted through a questionnaire with 108 ASD cases, 79 ID cases, and 108 controls. The ASD and ID cases were students from special educational schools in Tianjin from 2012 to 2014. The age- and sex-matched controls were from a high school, three primary schools, and a kindergarten in Tianjin. Multivariate logistic regression was performed. Results Paternal habit of eating hairtail before fertilization, maternal preference for fruits during pregnancy, and maternal habit of eating grass carp during pregnancy were preventive factors for ASD. Paternal habit of drinking alcohol before fertilization was a risk factor for ID, whereas maternal preference for fruits during pregnancy and maternal habit of eating crucian carp during pregnancy were protective factors for ID. Conclusion Parental fish consumption is beneficial for the prevention of ASD and ID. Meanwhile, the protective effects of fish consumption on ASD and ID differ. More attention should be paid to the combined effect of other food when eating fish.

  2. Behaviour planning and problem solving deficiencies in children with symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder from the Balobedu culture, Limpopo province, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pila-Nemutandani, Refilwe Gloria; Meyer, Anneke

    2016-07-01

    To compare planning behaviour (frontal lobe functioning) in children with and without symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). A total of 90 children (45 with symptoms of ADHD and 45 matched controls without ADHD symptoms) of both genders, who were medication naïve, from the Balobedu culture (Limpopo province, South Africa), aged 7-13 years, participated in the study. The performance of the two groups was compared on a test of planning and problem solving, the Tower of London (ToL) task. The results were analysed as a function of gender and ADHD subtype. The Finger Tapping test (testing fine motor skills) was used as a control test to verify that the expected differences were not due to poor motor skills. The children with ADHD symptoms scored significantly lower than the non-ADHD comparison group which indicated deficiency in frontal lobe functioning (p = 0.00). The difference in performance was not due to poor motor control (p = 0.70). Children with ADHD symptoms show deficits in behavioural planning which indicates impairment of functions of the frontal areas supplied by the mesocortical dopamine branch. More so than others, the ADHD Inattentive and Combined subtypes showed poor performance in the Tower of London task, indicating poor organisational and planning skills in these groups. The results also did show that the difference was not due to problems with motor control and that the ToL task is a culture-fair instrument for testing planning behaviour.

  3. Genetics Home Reference: arginase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... belongs to a class of genetic diseases called urea cycle disorders. The urea cycle is a sequence of reactions ... links) Baby's First Test GeneReview: Arginase Deficiency GeneReview: Urea Cycle Disorders Overview MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Hereditary urea cycle abnormality National ...

  4. Deficient neural activity subserving decision-making during reward waiting time in intertemporal choice in adult attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todokoro, Ayako; Tanaka, Saori C; Kawakubo, Yuki; Yahata, Noriaki; Ishii-Takahashi, Ayaka; Nishimura, Yukika; Kano, Yukiko; Ohtake, Fumio; Kasai, Kiyoto

    2018-04-24

    Impulsivity, which significantly affects social adaptation, is an important target behavioral characteristic in interventions for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Typically, people are willing to wait longer to acquire greater rewards. Impulsivity in ADHD may be associated with brain dysfunction in decision-making involving waiting behavior under such situations. We tested the hypothesis that brain circuitry during a period of waiting (i.e., prior to the acquisition of reward) is altered in adults with ADHD. The participants included 14 medication-free adults with ADHD and 16 healthy controls matched for age, sex, IQ, and handedness. The behavioral task had participants choose between a delayed, larger monetary reward and an immediate, smaller monetary reward, where the reward waiting time actually occurred during functional magnetic resonance imaging measurement. We tested for group differences in the contrast values of blood-oxygen-level dependent signals associated with the length of waiting time, calculated using the parametric modulation method. While the two groups did not differ in the time discounting rate, the delay-sensitive contrast values were significantly lower in the caudate and visual cortex in individuals with ADHD. The higher impulsivity scores were significantly associated with lower delay-sensitive contrast values in the caudate and visual cortex. These results suggest that deficient neural activity affects decision-making involving reward waiting time during intertemporal choice tasks, and provide an explanation for the basis of impulsivity in adult ADHD. © 2018 The Author. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2018 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  5. Short-chain Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency: studies in a large family adding to the complexity of the disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bok, Levinus A.; Vreken, Peter; Wijburg, Frits A.; Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Gregersen, Niels; Corydon, Morten J.; Waterham, Hans R.; Duran, Marinus

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To understand the expanding clinical and biochemical spectrum of short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCAD) deficiency, the impact of which is not fully understood. STUDY DESIGN: We studied a family with SCAD deficiency and determined urinary ethylmalonic acid excretion, plasma

  6. Molecular characterization of FXI deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berber, Ergul

    2011-02-01

    Factor XI (FXI) deficiency is a rare autosomal bleeding disease associated with genetic defects in the FXI gene. It is a heterogeneous disorder with variable tendency in bleeding and variable causative FXI gene mutations. It is characterized as a cross-reacting material-negative (CRM-) FXI deficiency due to decreased FXI levels or cross-reacting material-positive (CRM+) FXI deficiency due to impaired FXI function. Increasing number of mutations has been reported in FXI mutation database, and most of the mutations are affecting serine protease (SP) domain of the protein. Functional characterization for the mutations helps to better understand the molecular basis of FXI deficiency. Prevalence of the disease is higher in certain populations such as Ashkenazi Jews. The purpose of this review is to give an overview of the molecular basis of congenital FXI deficiency.

  7. Where Environment Meets Cognition: A Focus on Two Developmental Intellectual Disability Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. De Toma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most challenging questions in neuroscience is to dissect how learning and memory, the foundational pillars of cognition, are grounded in stable, yet plastic, gene expression states. All known epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation, histone modifications, chromatin remodelling, and noncoding RNAs regulate brain gene expression, both during neurodevelopment and in the adult brain in processes related to cognition. On the other hand, alterations in the various components of the epigenetic machinery have been linked to well-known causes of intellectual disability disorders (IDDs. Two examples are Down Syndrome (DS and Fragile X Syndrome (FXS, where global and local epigenetic alterations lead to impairments in synaptic plasticity, memory, and learning. Since epigenetic modifications are reversible, it is theoretically possible to use epigenetic drugs as cognitive enhancers for the treatment of IDDs. Epigenetic treatments act in a context specific manner, targeting different regions based on cell and state specific chromatin accessibility, facilitating the establishment of the lost balance. Here, we discuss epigenetic studies of IDDs, focusing on DS and FXS, and the use of epidrugs in combinatorial therapies for IDDs.

  8. Where Environment Meets Cognition: A Focus on Two Developmental Intellectual Disability Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toma, I De; Gil, L Manubens; Ossowski, S; Dierssen, M

    2016-01-01

    One of the most challenging questions in neuroscience is to dissect how learning and memory, the foundational pillars of cognition, are grounded in stable, yet plastic, gene expression states. All known epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation, histone modifications, chromatin remodelling, and noncoding RNAs regulate brain gene expression, both during neurodevelopment and in the adult brain in processes related to cognition. On the other hand, alterations in the various components of the epigenetic machinery have been linked to well-known causes of intellectual disability disorders (IDDs). Two examples are Down Syndrome (DS) and Fragile X Syndrome (FXS), where global and local epigenetic alterations lead to impairments in synaptic plasticity, memory, and learning. Since epigenetic modifications are reversible, it is theoretically possible to use epigenetic drugs as cognitive enhancers for the treatment of IDDs. Epigenetic treatments act in a context specific manner, targeting different regions based on cell and state specific chromatin accessibility, facilitating the establishment of the lost balance. Here, we discuss epigenetic studies of IDDs, focusing on DS and FXS, and the use of epidrugs in combinatorial therapies for IDDs.

  9. Tanzania national survey on iodine deficiency: impact after twelve years of salt iodation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimboka Sabas

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In many low-income countries, children are at high risk of iodine deficiency disorders, including brain damage. In the early 1990s, Tanzania, a country that previously suffered from moderate to severe iodine deficiency, adopted universal salt iodation (USI as an intervention strategy, but its impact remained unknown. Methods We report on the first national survey in mainland Tanzania, conducted in 2004 to assess the extent to which iodated salt was used and its apparent impact on the total goitre prevalence (TGP and urinary iodine concentrations (UIC among the schoolchildren after USI was initiated. In 2004, a cross-sectional goitre survey was conducted; covering 140,758 schoolchildren aged 6 - 18 years were graded for goitre according to new WHO goitre classification system. Comparisons were made with district surveys conducted throughout most of the country during the 1980s and 90s. 131,941 salt samples from households were tested for iodine using rapid field test kits. UIC was determined spectrophotometrically using the ammonium persulfate digestion method in 4523 sub-sampled children. Results 83.6% (95% CI: 83.4 - 83.8 of salt samples tested positive for iodine. Whereas the TGP was about 25% on average in the earlier surveys, it was 6.9% (95%CI: 6.8-7.0 in 2004. The TGP for the younger children, 6-9 years old, was 4.2% (95%CI: 4.0-4.4, n = 41,965. In the 27 goitre-endemic districts, TGP decreased from 61% (1980s to 12.3% (2004. The median UIC was 204 (95% CF: 192-215 μg/L. Only 25% of children had UIC Conclusion Our study demonstrates a marked improvement in iodine nutrition in Tanzania, twelve years after the initiation of salt iodation programme. The challenge in sustaining IDD elimination in Tanzania is now two-fold: to better reach the areas with low coverage of iodated salt, and to reduce iodine intake in areas where it is excessive. Particular attention is needed in improving quality control at production level and

  10. Nutrition and Goiter Status of Primary School Children in Ibadan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rev Olaleye

    Sanusi R. A. and Ekerette N. N.. Department of Human Nutrition, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Nigeria. ABSTRACT: Iodine Deficiency Disorders (IDD) has continued to be of significant health problem in some communities.

  11. ARALAR/AGC1 deficiency, a neurodevelopmental disorder with severe impairment of neuronal mitochondrial respiration, does not produce a primary increase in brain lactate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juaristi, Inés; García-Martín, María L; Rodrigues, Tiago B; Satrústegui, Jorgina; Llorente-Folch, Irene; Pardo, Beatriz

    2017-07-01

    ARALAR/AGC1 (aspartate-glutamate mitochondrial carrier 1) is an important component of the NADH malate-aspartate shuttle (MAS). AGC1-deficiency is a rare disease causing global cerebral hypomyelination, developmental arrest, hypotonia, and epilepsy (OMIM ID #612949); the aralar-KO mouse recapitulates the major findings in humans. This study was aimed at understanding the impact of ARALAR-deficiency in brain lactate levels as a biomarker. We report that lactate was equally abundant in wild-type and aralar-KO mouse brain in vivo at postnatal day 17. We find that lactate production upon mitochondrial blockade depends on up-regulation of lactate formation in astrocytes rather than in neurons. However, ARALAR-deficiency decreased cell respiration in neurons, not astrocytes, which maintained unchanged respiration and lactate production. As the primary site of ARALAR-deficiency is neuronal, this explains the lack of accumulation of brain lactate in ARALAR-deficiency in humans and mice. On the other hand, we find that the cytosolic and mitochondrial components of the glycerol phosphate shuttle are present in astrocytes with similar activities. This suggests that glycerol phosphate shuttle is the main NADH shuttle in astrocytes and explains the absence of effects of ARALAR-deficiency in these cells. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  12. A rare combination: congenital factor VII deficiency with Chiari malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bay, Ali; Aktekin, Elif; Erkutlu, Ibrahim

    2015-12-01

    Congenital factor (VII) deficiency is a rare bleeding disorder. We present a patient with congenital FVII deficiency and congenital hydrocephalus who underwent a ventriculoperitoneal shunt operation and needed no prophylaxis after the procedure.

  13. What Are Rare Clotting Factor Deficiencies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Deficiency Factor V Deficiency Combined FV & FVIII Deficiencies Factor VII Deficiency Factor X Deficiency Factor XI Deficiency Factor ... Deficiency Factor V Deficiency Combined FV & FVIII Deficiencies Factor VII Deficiency Factor X Deficiency Factor XI Deficiency Factor ...

  14. Birth control necessary to limit family size in tribal couples with aberrant heterosis of G-6-PD deficiency and sickle cell disorders in India: an urgency of creating awareness and imparting genetic counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balgir, R S

    2010-06-01

    (i) To study the outcome of ignorance and lack of awareness about sickle cell disease and G-6-PD deficiency among Dhelki Kharia tribal families of Orissa, and (ii) to study the reproductive output in relation to clinical genetics and patho-physiological implications. A random genetic study of screening for hemoglobinopathies and G-6-PD deficiency among Dhelki Kharia tribal community in Sundargarh district of Orissa was carried out for intervention during the year 2000-2004. A total of 81 Dhelki Kharia families were screened and six families with double heterozygosity for above genetic anomalies were encountered. About 2-3 ml. intravenous blood samples were collected in EDTA by disposable syringes and needles after taking informed consent from each individual in the presence of a doctor and community leaders and sent to laboratory at Bhubaneswar for hematological investigations. Analysis was carried out following the standard procedures after cross checking for quality control. There were 12 (about 52%) children out of 23 who were either suffering from sickle cell trait or disease in concurrence with G-6-PD deficiency in hemizygous/heterozygous/homozygous condition in Dhelki Kharia tribal community of Orissa. There were on an average 3.83 number of surviving (range 2-6) children per mother in families of G-6-PD deficiency and sickle cell disorders. The average number of children (3.83) born (range 2-6 children) per mother to carrier/affected mother was much higher than the average for India (2.73). It is very difficult to maintain the normal health of an affected child with aberrant anomalies due to exorbitant cost of treatment, frequent transfusions and huge involvement of economy. One of the implications of aberrant heterosis is its adverse affects on routine individual physiology and hard activities. It is suggested to limit the family size in carrier couples to avoid aberrant heterosis of hereditary hemolytic disorders in their offsprings.

  15. Immunological characterization and transcription profiling of peripheral blood (PB monocytes in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD and specific polysaccharide antibody deficiency (SPAD: case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyonouchi Harumi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction There exists a small subset of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD characterized by fluctuating behavioral symptoms and cognitive skills following immune insults. Some of these children also exhibit specific polysaccharide antibody deficiency (SPAD, resulting in frequent infection caused by encapsulated organisms, and they often require supplemental intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG (ASD/SPAD. This study assessed whether these ASD/SPAD children have distinct immunological findings in comparison with ASD/non-SPAD or non-ASD/SPAD children. Case description We describe 8 ASD/SPAD children with worsening behavioral symptoms/cognitive skills that are triggered by immune insults. These ASD/SPAD children exhibited delayed type food allergy (5/8, treatment-resistant seizure disorders (4/8, and chronic gastrointestinal (GI symptoms (5/8 at high frequencies. Control subjects included ASD children without SPAD (N = 39, normal controls (N = 37, and non-ASD children with SPAD (N = 12. Discussion and Evaluation We assessed their innate and adaptive immune responses, by measuring the production of pro-inflammatory and counter-regulatory cytokines by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs in responses to agonists of toll like receptors (TLR, stimuli of innate immunity, and T cell stimulants. Transcription profiling of PB monocytes was also assessed. ASD/SPAD PBMCs produced less proinflammatory cytokines with agonists of TLR7/8 (IL-6, IL-23, TLR2/6 (IL-6, TLR4 (IL-12p40, and without stimuli (IL-1ß, IL-6, and TNF-α than normal controls. In addition, cytokine production of ASD/SPAD PBMCs in response to T cell mitogens (IFN-γ, IL-17, and IL-12p40 and candida antigen (Ag (IL-10, IL-12p40 were less than normal controls. ASD/non-SPAD PBMDs revealed similar results as normal controls, while non-ASD/SPAD PBMCs revealed lower production of IL-6, IL-10 and IL-23 with a TLR4 agonist. Only common features observed between ASD/SPAD and non

  16. Isolated sulfite oxidase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupar, C A; Gillett, J; Gordon, B A; Ramsay, D A; Johnson, J L; Garrett, R M; Rajagopalan, K V; Jung, J H; Bacheyie, G S; Sellers, A R

    1996-12-01

    Isolated sulfite oxidase (SO) deficiency is an autosomal recessively inherited inborn error of sulfur metabolism. In this report of a ninth patient the clinical history, laboratory results, neuropathological findings and a mutation in the sulfite oxidase gene are described. The data from this patient and previously published patients with isolated sulfite oxidase deficiency and molybdenum cofactor deficiency are summarized to characterize this rare disorder. The patient presented neonatally with intractable seizures and did not progress developmentally beyond the neonatal stage. Dislocated lenses were apparent at 2 months. There was increased urine excretion of sulfite and S-sulfocysteine and a decreased concentration of plasma cystine. A lactic acidemia was present for 6 months. Liver sulfite oxidase activity was not detectable but xanthine dehydrogenase activity was normal. The boy died of respiratory failure at 32 months. Neuropathological findings of cortical necrosis and extensive cavitating leukoencephalopathy were reminiscent of those seen in severe perinatal asphyxia suggesting an etiology of energy deficiency. A point mutation that resulted in a truncated protein missing the molybdenum-binding site has been identified.

  17. Validation of Evidence-Based Fall Prevention Programs for Adults with Intellectual and/or Developmental Disorders: A Modified Otago Exercise Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renfro, Mindy; Bainbridge, Donna B; Smith, Matthew Lee

    2016-01-01

    Evidence-based fall prevention (EBFP) programs significantly decrease fall risk, falls, and fall-related injuries in community-dwelling older adults. To date, EBFP programs are only validated for use among people with normal cognition and, therefore, are not evidence-based for adults with intellectual and/or developmental disorders (IDD) such as Alzheimer's disease and related dementias, cerebral vascular accident, or traumatic brain injury. Adults with IDD experience not only a higher rate of falls than their community-dwelling, cognitively intact peers but also higher rates and earlier onset of chronic diseases, also known to increase fall risk. Adults with IDD experience many barriers to health care and health promotion programs. As the lifespan for people with IDD continues to increase, issues of aging (including falls with associated injury) are on the rise and require effective and efficient prevention. A modified group-based version of the Otago Exercise Program (OEP) was developed and implemented at a worksite employing adults with IDD in Montana. Participants were tested pre- and post-intervention using the Center for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) Stopping Elderly Accidents Deaths and Injuries (STEADI) tool kit. Participants participated in progressive once weekly, 1-h group exercise classes and home programs over a 7-week period. Discharge planning with consumers and caregivers included home exercise, walking, and an optional home assessment. Despite the limited number of participants ( n  = 15) and short length of participation, improvements were observed in the 30-s Chair Stand Test, 4-Stage Balance Test, and 2-Minute Walk Test. Additionally, three individuals experienced an improvement in ambulation independence. Participants reported no falls during the study period. Promising results of this preliminary project underline the need for further study of this modified OEP among adults with IDD. Future multicenter study should include more

  18. Genetics Home Reference: common variable immune deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disorders are immune thrombocytopenia purpura, which is an abnormal bleeding disorder caused by a decrease in cell fragments involved ... antibodies makes it difficult for people with this disorder to fight off infections. Abnormal and deficient immune responses over time likely contribute ...

  19. German Adjuvant Intergroup Node-positive Study (GAIN): a phase III trial comparing two dose-dense regimens (iddEPC versus ddEC-PwX) in high-risk early breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möbus, V; von Minckwitz, G; Jackisch, C; Lück, H-J; Schneeweiss, A; Tesch, H; Elling, D; Harbeck, N; Conrad, B; Fehm, T; Huober, J; Müller, V; Bauerfeind, I; du Bois, A; Loibl, S; Nekljudova, V; Untch, M; Thomssen, C

    2017-08-01

    Dose-dense (dd) regimens are one of the preferred options for the adjuvant treatment of breast cancer patients with intermediate to high risk. The German Adjuvant Intergroup Node-positive trial aimed at optimizing intense dd (idd) strategies by evaluating drug combinations and the addition of capecitabine. Women (aged 18 years and biologically <65 years) with histologically involved axillary lymph nodes were randomly assigned to receive three courses each of epirubicin (E) 150 mg/m2, paclitaxel (P) 225 mg/m2 and cyclophosphamide (C) 2500 mg/m2 (reduced to 2000 mg/m2 after recruitment of 1200 patients) q2w intravenously (i.v.) (iddEPC-regimen) or ddEC (E 112.5 mg/m2 + C 600 mg/m2, i.v. q2w for 4 cycles) followed by paclitaxel weekly (Pw 67.5 mg/m2 i.v. q8d for 10 weeks) plus capecitabine (X 2000 mg/m2 p.o. days 1-14, q22 for 4 cycles) (ddEC-PwX-regimen). Further randomization assigned patients to ibandronate for 2 years versus observation and to pegfilgrastim day 2 versus 4. From June 2004 to August 2008, 2994 patients were randomized to either iddEPC (N = 1498), or ddEC-PwX (N = 1496) and started treatment. Median age was 50 years; pN1 (37.8%), pN2 (35.3%); pN3 (26.9%); 46.4% were G3 tumors; 76.9% hormone receptor-positive and 22% HER2-positive. After a median follow-up of 74 months, 645 events and 383 deaths were recorded. Hematological adverse events grades 3-4 were more common with iddEPC (P < 0.001), nonhematological with ddEC-PwX (P = 0.04), even if the toxicity profile of the two regimens was different. At 5 years, estimated disease-free survival rates for ddEC-PwX and iddEPC were 81.7% [95% confidence interval (CI) 79.5-83.6] versus 80.2% (95% CI 78.0-82.2). Hazard ratio (HR)=0.95 (95% CI 0.81-1.11, log-rank P = 0.49). Five-year overall survival rates were 89.4% for ddEC-PwX (95% CI 87.7-91.0) and 89.0% for iddEPC (95% CI 87.2-90.6), HR = 0.85 (95% CI 0.69-1.04, log-rank P = 0.10). Adding

  20. Growth hormone deficiency and hyperthermia during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, A; Hjortskov, N; Jepsen, Leif

    1995-01-01

    Sweat secretion is often disturbed in patients with GH secretory disorders. Hyperhidrosis is a classic feature of acromegaly, and it has recently been shown that GH-deficient patients exhibit decreased sweating capacity after pilocarpine stimulation of the skin. Thus, patients with GH-deficiency ...

  1. Vitamin K deficiency bleeding of the newborn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitamin K deficiency bleeding of the newborn (VKDB) is a bleeding disorder in babies. It most often ... A lack of vitamin K may cause severe bleeding in newborn babies. Vitamin K plays an important role in blood clotting. Babies often ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: GABA-transaminase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Description GABA-transaminase deficiency is a brain disease (encephalopathy) that begins in infancy. Babies with this disorder ... genetic testing? What is precision medicine? What is newborn screening? New Pages LMNA-related congenital muscular dystrophy ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  4. Depression diagnoses following the identification of bipolar disorder: costly incongruent diagnoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schultz Jennifer F

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous research has documented that the symptoms of bipolar disorder are often mistaken for unipolar depression prior to a patient's first bipolar diagnosis. The assumption has been that once a patient receives a bipolar diagnosis they will no longer be given a misdiagnosis of depression. The objectives of this study were 1 to assess the rate of subsequent unipolar depression diagnosis in individuals with a history of bipolar disorder and 2 to assess the increased cost associated with this potential misdiagnosis. Methods This study utilized a retrospective cohort design using administrative claims data from 2002 and 2003. Patient inclusion criteria for the study were 1 at least 2 bipolar diagnoses in 2002, 2 continuous enrollment during 2002 and 2003, 3 a pharmacy benefit, and 4 age 18 to 64. Patients with at least 2 unipolar depression diagnoses in 2003 were categorized as having an incongruent diagnosis of unipolar depression. We used propensity scoring to control for selection bias. Utilization was evaluated using negative binomial models. We evaluated cost differences between patient cohorts using generalized linear models. Results Of the 7981 patients who met all inclusion criteria for the analysis, 17.5% (1400 had an incongruent depression diagnosis (IDD. After controlling for background differences, individuals who received an IDD had higher rates of inpatient and outpatient psychiatric utilization and cost, on average, an additional $1641 per year compared to individuals without an IDD. Conclusions A strikingly high proportion of bipolar patients are given the differential diagnosis of unipolar depression after being identified as having bipolar disorder. Individuals with an IDD had increased acute psychiatric care services, suggesting higher levels of relapses, and were at risk for inappropriate treatment, as antidepressant therapy without a concomitant mood-stabilizing medication is contraindicated in bipolar

  5. Iron deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Morten; Bosselmann, Helle; Gaborit, Freja

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both iron deficiency (ID) and cardiovascular biomarkers are associated with a poor outcome in heart failure (HF). The relationship between different cardiovascular biomarkers and ID is unknown, and the true prevalence of ID in an outpatient HF clinic is probably overlooked. OBJECTIVES.......043). CONCLUSION: ID is frequent in an outpatient HF clinic. ID is not associated with cardiovascular biomarkers after adjustment for traditional confounders. Inflammation, but not neurohormonal activation is associated with ID in systolic HF. Further studies are needed to understand iron metabolism in elderly HF...

  6. Peroxisome biogenesis disorders: identification of a new complementation group distinct from peroxisome-deficient CHO mutants and not complemented by human PEX 13

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shimozawa, N.; Suzuki, Y.; Zhang, Z.; Imamura, A.; Tsukamoto, T.; Osumi, T.; Tateishi, K.; Okumoto, K.; Fujiki, Y.; Orii, T.; Barth, P. G.; Wanders, R. J.; Kondo, N.

    1998-01-01

    Ten complementation groups of generalized peroxisome biogenesis disorders (PBD), (excluding rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata) have been identified using complementation analysis. Four of the genes involved have been identified using two different methods of (1) genetic functional complementation

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... belongs to a class of genetic diseases called urea cycle disorders. The urea cycle is a sequence of reactions ... Baby's First Test GeneReview: Ornithine Transcarbamylase Deficiency GeneReview: Urea Cycle Disorders Overview MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Hereditary urea cycle abnormality National ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you are diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia. Risk Factors You may have an increased risk for iron- ... iron-deficiency anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to moderate iron-deficiency anemia, or red blood cell transfusion for severe iron-deficiency anemia. You may ... body needs iron to make healthy red blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because ...

  12. Vitamin Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are unique to specific vitamin deficiencies. Folate-deficiency anemia risk factors include: Undergoing hemodialysis for kidney failure. ... the metabolism of folate. Vitamin B-12 deficiency anemia risk factors include: Lack of intrinsic factor. Most ...

  13. Intervention for Anxiety and Problem Behavior in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Intellectual Disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskowitz, Lauren J; Walsh, Caitlin E; Mulder, Emile; McLaughlin, Darlene Magito; Hajcak, Greg; Carr, Edward G; Zarcone, Jennifer R

    2017-12-01

    There is little research on the functional assessment and treatment of anxiety and related problem behavior in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), particularly those with intellectual and developmental disability (IDD). In a recent study, we evaluated a multimethod strategy for assessing anxiety in children with ASD and IDD (Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 118:419-434, 2013). In the present study, we developed treatments for the anxiety and associated problem behavior in these same children. A multiple baseline design was used to evaluate the effectiveness of a multicomponent intervention package, incorporating individualized strategies from Positive Behavior Support and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. During intervention, all three participants showed substantial decreases in anxiety and problem behavior and significant increases in respiratory sinus arrhythmia in the situations that had previously been identified as anxiety-provoking.

  14. Clinical and Biochemical Pitfalls in the Diagnosis of Peroxisomal Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klouwer, Femke C. C.; Huffnagel, Irene C.; Ferdinandusse, Sacha; Waterham, Hans R.; Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Engelen, Marc; Poll-The, Bwee Tien

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisomal disorders are a heterogeneous group of genetic metabolic disorders, caused by a defect in peroxisome biogenesis or a deficiency of a single peroxisomal enzyme. The peroxisomal disorders include the Zellweger spectrum disorders, the rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata spectrum disorders,

  15. Pituitary disorders and their extra-pituitary implications : observations in patients with nonfunctioning pituitary macroadenoma and the IGSF1 deficiency syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joustra, S.D.

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis, we explored pituitary functioning and extra-pituitary implications of two pituitary disorders in humans. In part A, we focused on the long-term consequences of the diagnosis and treatment of nonfunctioning pituitary macroadenoma (NFMA) on hypothalamic regulation of circadian

  16. Dopamine beta-hydroxylase deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senard Jean-Michel

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DβH deficiency is a very rare form of primary autonomic failure characterized by a complete absence of noradrenaline and adrenaline in plasma together with increased dopamine plasma levels. The prevalence of DβH deficiency is unknown. Only a limited number of cases with this disease have been reported. DβH deficiency is mainly characterized by cardiovascular disorders and severe orthostatic hypotension. First symptoms often start during a complicated perinatal period with hypotension, muscle hypotonia, hypothermia and hypoglycemia. Children with DβH deficiency exhibit reduced ability to exercise because of blood pressure inadaptation with exertion and syncope. Symptoms usually worsen progressively during late adolescence and early adulthood with severe orthostatic hypotension, eyelid ptosis, nasal stuffiness and sexual disorders. Limitation in standing tolerance, limited ability to exercise and traumatic morbidity related to falls and syncope may represent later evolution. The syndrome is caused by heterogeneous molecular alterations of the DBH gene and is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. Restoration of plasma noradrenaline to the normal range can be achieved by therapy with the synthetic precursor of noradrenaline, L-threo-dihydroxyphenylserine (DOPS. Oral administration of 100 to 500 mg DOPS, twice or three times daily, increases blood pressure and reverses the orthostatic intolerance.

  17. Pathogenesis of peroxisomal deficiency disorders (Zellweger syndrome may be mediated by misregulation of the GABAergic system via the diazepam binding inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breitling Rainer

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Zellweger syndrome (ZS is a fatal inherited disease caused by peroxisome biogenesis deficiency. Patients are characterized by multiple disturbances of lipid metabolism, profound hypotonia and neonatal seizures, and distinct craniofacial malformations. Median live expectancy of ZS patients is less than one year. While the molecular basis of peroxisome biogenesis and metabolism is known in considerable detail, it is unclear how peroxisome deficiency leads to the most severe neurological symptoms. Recent analysis of ZS mouse models has all but invalidated previous hypotheses. Hypothesis We suggest that a regulatory rather than a metabolic defect is responsible for the drastic impairment of brain function in ZS patients. Testing the hypothesis Using microarray analysis we identify diazepam binding inhibitor/acyl-CoA binding protein (DBI as a candidate protein that might be involved in the pathogenic mechanism of ZS. DBI has a dual role as a neuropeptide antagonist of GABA(A receptor signaling in the brain and as a regulator of lipid metabolism. Repression of DBI in ZS patients could result in an overactivation of GABAergic signaling, thus eventually leading to the characteristic hypotonia and seizures. The most important argument for a misregulation of GABA(A in ZS is, however, provided by the striking similarity between ZS and "benzodiazepine embryofetopathy", a malformation syndrome observed after the abuse of GABA(A agonists during pregnancy. Implications of the hypothesis We present a tentative mechanistic model of the effect of DBI misregulation on neuronal function that could explain some of the aspects of the pathology of Zellweger syndrome.

  18. Asupan yodium dan asupan goitrogenik hubungannya dengan status gangguan akibat kekurangan yodium (GAKY pada anak sekolah dasar di Kabupaten Dairi Provinsi Sumatera Utara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urbanus Sitohang

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Iodine deficiency disorder (IDD is a health problem which affects the quality of human resources. IDD is caused by lack of iodine substance. The substance is needed for numerous syntheses and metabolism in the body, particularly thyroid glands. IDD may also be caused by high consumption goitrogenic substance. Objective: The study was meant to identify relationship between iodine and thiocyanate intake and IDD, and to identify differences in iodine and thiocyanate intake based on endemic level. Method: This was an observational study with cross sectional design. Method used were palpation of goiter glands to measure endemic level, food recall, and food frequency questionnaire (FFQ to measure iodine and thiocyanate intake, ammonium persulfate digestion to measure urine iodine excretion. Data analysis used chi-square, Pearson correlation and anova. Results: The result of chi-square analysis showed that there was no significant relationship between iodine intake and IDD (p > 0.05, CI 95%: 0,34–1,18, but there was significant relationship between iodine intake and urine iodine excretion (p 0.05, CI 95%: 0.48–1.97. The result of Pearson correlation test showed that there was no significant relationship between iodine and thiocyanate FFQ and IDD (p > 0.05; there was no significant relationship (but there was a tendency between thiocyanate FFQ and IDD (p > 0.05. There were significant differences in iodine intake, thiocyanate intake,  iodine FFQ and thiocyanate FFQ based on endemic level (p > 0.05. Conclusion: There was relationship between iodine intake and IDD/non-IDD, but there was relationship between urine iodine excretion and IDD. Children with IDD had higher consumption of thiocyanate than those who did not have IDD. There were differences in all measurements based on endemic level.

  19. Dihydropyrimidine Dehydrogenase Deficiency in Two Malaysian Siblings with Abnormal MRI Findings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Bee Chin; Mohd Rawi, Rowani; Meinsma, Rutger; Meijer, Judith; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.; van Kuilenburg, André B. P.

    2014-01-01

    Dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder of the pyrimidine metabolism. Deficiency of this enzyme leads to an accumulation of thymine and uracil and a deficiency of metabolites distal to the catabolic enzyme. The disorder presents with a wide clinical

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency anemia is a ... address the cause of your iron deficiency, such as any underlying bleeding. If undiagnosed or untreated, iron- ...

  1. Japanese family with congenital factor VII deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakakibara, Kanae; Okayama, Yoshiki; Fukushima, Kenji; Kaji, Shunsaku; Muraoka, Michiko; Arao, Yujiro; Shimada, Akira

    2015-10-01

    Congenital factor VII (FVII) deficiency is a rare bleeding disorder with autosomal recessive inheritance. The present female patient was diagnosed with congenital FVII deficiency because of low hepaplastin test (HPT), although vitamin K was given. Heterozygous p.A191T mutation was detected in the peripheral blood, and the same mutation was also found in the mother and sister. To the best of our knowledge, this is the fourth reported case of p.A191T mutation of FVII in the literature and the first to be reported in Japan. FVII coagulation activity (FVII:C) in asymptomatic heterozygous carriers is mildly reduced. Therefore, some patients may not be accurately diagnosed with congenital FVII deficiency. In infants with low HPT without vitamin K deficiency, congenital FVII deficiency should be considered. © 2015 Japan Pediatric Society.

  2. Bioavailability of iron and zinc from human diets: Nutrient delivery technology salt fortification in human nutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raghuramulu, N.

    1992-01-01

    Iodine deficiency disorders (IDD), iron deficiency anaemia(IDA) and zinc deficiency are common problems in India. The discussions in this paper centers on the selection of the vehicles which could be used to successfully deliver essential nutrients into the daily diet of the general population of india and the identification of compounds which inhibit the intestinal absorption of zinc. 40 refs, 11 tabs

  3. Syndromes associated with nutritional deficiency and excess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jen, Melinda; Yan, Albert C

    2010-01-01

    Normal functioning of the human body requires a balance between nutritional intake and metabolism, and imbalances manifest as nutritional deficiencies or excess. Nutritional deficiency states are associated with social factors (war, poverty, famine, and food fads), medical illnesses with malabsorption (such as Crohn disease, cystic fibrosis, and after bariatric surgery), psychiatric illnesses (eating disorders, autism, alcoholism), and medications. Nutritional excess states result from inadvertent or intentional excessive intake. Cutaneous manifestations of nutritional imbalance can herald other systemic manifestations. This contribution discusses nutritional deficiency and excess syndromes with cutaneous manifestations of particular interest to clinical dermatologists. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Data analysis of surveillance results of iodine deficiency disorders in Guangdong Province in 2011%2011年广东省碘缺乏病监测结果分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟文; 刘礼平; 杨通; 林立丰; 池海珊; 张姗花

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the effectiveness of prevention program on iodine deficiency disorders and iodine nutritional status of residents in Guangdong Province.Methods Probability proportionate to size sampling(PPS) was employed in surveillance of iodine deficiency disorders.Thirty counties(cities,districts) were selected in Guangdong Province.In each county(city,district) one township(street) was selected; in each township (street) one primary school was selected and in each primary school 40 children aged 8-10 were chosen to examine their thyroid and to collect salt samples at their home for determination of salt iodine.Out of the 40 children,12 children were chosen to collect urine samples for determination of urinary iodine.From the primary schools chosen,40 grade 5 students were selected for intelligence quotient(IQ) test.In the nearby of the primary schools,3 townships(towns,street) were selected and in each township(town,street) 5 pregnant and 5 lactating women were selected to collect their urine samples for determination of urinary iodine.Type-B ultrasonic was used in measuring the thyroid volume.The iodine content of urine samples was measured by the method of arsenic and cerium catalysis spectrophotometry.The iodine content of salt was determined quantitatively with the titration method.IQ was tested by Chinese combined Raven's test.According to geographical location and the implementation of iodized salt,the effects of iodized salt on iodine deficiency disorders were analyzed in the plains and the Pearl River Delta Coastal region with mild iodine deficiency(iodized salt implementation region,referred to as the plains and the PRD),historical iodine deficiency areas (iodized implementation region) and the eastern and the western coastal areas of Guangdong(areas with non-iodized salt problem,referred to as the eastern and the western Guangdong).Results A total of 1200 children aged 8 to 10 were examined by type-B ultrasonic test,and goiter rate was 3.5% (42

  5. Bleeding Disorders Treatment Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Deficiency Factor V Deficiency Combined FV & FVIII Deficiencies Factor VII Deficiency Factor X Deficiency Factor XI Deficiency Factor ... Deficiency Factor V Deficiency Combined FV & FVIII Deficiencies Factor VII Deficiency Factor X Deficiency Factor XI Deficiency Factor ...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: myopathy with deficiency of iron-sulfur cluster assembly enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Myopathy with deficiency of iron-sulfur cluster assembly enzyme Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... Myopathy with deficiency of iron-sulfur cluster assembly enzyme is an inherited disorder that primarily affects muscles ...

  7. Identification of two novel mutations in OCTN2 of three patients with systemic carnitine deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaz, F. M.; Scholte, H. R.; Ruiter, J.; Hussaarts-Odijk, L. M.; Pereira, R. R.; Schweitzer, S.; de Klerk, J. B.; Waterham, H. R.; Wanders, R. J.

    1999-01-01

    Systemic carnitine deficiency is a potentially lethal, autosomal recessive disorder characterized by cardiomyopathy, myopathy, recurrent episodes of hypoketotic hypoglycemia, hyperammonemia, and failure to thrive. This form of carnitine deficiency is caused by a defect in the active cellular uptake

  8. [Osteomalacia and vitamin D deficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rader, C P; Corsten, N; Rolf, O

    2015-09-01

    Vitamin D and calcium deficiency has a higher incidence in the orthopedic-trauma surgery patient population than generally supposed. In the long term this can result in osteomalacia, a form of altered bone mineralization in adults, in which the cartilaginous, non-calcified osteoid does not mature to hard bone. The current value of vitamin D and its importance for bones and other body cells are demonstrated. The causes of vitamin D deficiency are insufficient sunlight exposure, a lack of vitamin D3 and calcium, malabsorption, and rare alterations of VDR signaling and phosphate metabolism. The main symptoms are bone pain, fatigue fractures, muscular cramps, muscle pain, and gait disorders, with an increased incidence of falls in the elderly. Osteopathies induced by pharmaceuticals, tumors, rheumatism or osteoporosis have to be considered as the main differential diagnoses. In addition to the recording of symptoms and medical imaging, the diagnosis of osteomalacia should be ensured by laboratory parameters. Adequate treatment consists of the high-dose intake of vitamin D3 and the replacement of phosphate if deficient. Vitamin D is one of the important hormone-like vitamins and is required in all human cells. Deficiency of vitamin D has far-reaching consequences not only for bone, but also for other organ systems.

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... fatigue or tiredness, shortness of breath, or chest pain. If your doctor diagnoses you with iron-deficiency ... Common symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia include: Chest pain Coldness in the hands and feet Difficulty concentrating ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... heart failure . Increased risk of infections Motor or cognitive development delays in children Pregnancy complications, such as ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about exciting research areas that NHLBI is exploring about iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia can cause serious complications, including heart failure and development delays in children. Explore this Health ... lead to iron-deficiency anemia include: End-stage kidney failure, where there is blood loss during dialysis. ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia can cause serious complications, including heart failure and development delays in children. Explore this Health ... to iron-deficiency anemia include: End-stage kidney failure, where there is blood loss during dialysis. People ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... view the colon directly. What if my doctor thinks something else is causing my iron-deficiency anemia? ... deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in premature ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... mg and women need 18 mg. After age 51, both men and women need 8 mg. Pregnant ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about exciting research areas that NHLBI is exploring about iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia. These conditions include: Intestinal and digestive conditions, such as celiac disease; inflammatory bowel diseases, ... iron-deficiency anemia , such as bleeding in the digestive or urinary tract or heavy menstrual bleeding, your ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen ... the size of your liver and spleen. Blood tests Based on results from blood tests to screen ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, lean red meat, ... signs of iron-deficiency anemia include: Brittle nails ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... your doctor may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen ...

  20. Fire Safety Deficiencies

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of all fire safety deficiencies currently listed on Nursing Home Compare, including the nursing home that received the deficiency, the associated inspection...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... learning how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ... Cells From Iron-deficient Donors: Recovery and Storage Quality. Learn more about participating in a clinical trial . ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... leaving cells where it is stored or from being absorbed in the duodenum, the first part of ... treatments for iron-deficiency anemia. Living With After being diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia, it is important ...

  4. DNA repair deficiency in neurodegeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Dennis Kjølhede; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Stevnsner, Tinna V.

    2011-01-01

    Deficiency in repair of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage has been linked to several neurodegenerative disorders. Many recent experimental results indicate that the post-mitotic neurons are particularly prone to accumulation of unrepaired DNA lesions potentially leading to progressive...... neurodegeneration. Nucleotide excision repair is the cellular pathway responsible for removing helix-distorting DNA damage and deficiency in such repair is found in a number of diseases with neurodegenerative phenotypes, including Xeroderma Pigmentosum and Cockayne syndrome. The main pathway for repairing oxidative...... base lesions is base excision repair, and such repair is crucial for neurons given their high rates of oxygen metabolism. Mismatch repair corrects base mispairs generated during replication and evidence indicates that oxidative DNA damage can cause this pathway to expand trinucleotide repeats, thereby...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... if you are diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia. Risk Factors You may have an increased risk for iron-deficiency anemia because of your age, ... or sex. Age You may be at increased risk for iron deficiency at certain ages: Infants between ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español ... bleeding Consuming less than recommended daily amounts of iron Iron-deficiency anemia can be caused by getting ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topics News & Resources Intramural Research Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer ... and symptoms as well as complications from iron-deficiency anemia. Research for Your Health The NHLBI is part of the U.S. Department ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... anemia, your doctor may order the following blood tests to diagnose iron-deficiency anemia: Complete blood count (CBC) to ... than normal when viewed under a microscope. Different tests help your doctor diagnose iron-deficiency anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia, blood ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  10. Nutritional disorders in chrysanthemums

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roorda van Eysinga, J.P.N.L.; Smilde, K.W.

    1980-01-01

    This book is a guide to diagnosing nutritional disorders in chrysanthemums. Deficiencies and toxicities are included, fifteen in all. Colour plates and descriptions are given for nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, magnesium, calcium, sulphur, boron, copper, manganese, iron and zinc deficiency and for

  11. Carnitine Deficiency and Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anouk de Bruyn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present two cases of carnitine deficiency in pregnancy. In our first case, systematic screening revealed L-carnitine deficiency in the first born of an asymptomatic mother. In the course of her second pregnancy, maternal carnitine levels showed a deficiency as well. In a second case, a mother known with carnitine deficiency under supplementation was followed throughout her pregnancy. Both pregnancies had an uneventful outcome. Because carnitine deficiency can have serious complications, supplementation with carnitine is advised. This supplementation should be continued throughout pregnancy according to plasma concentrations.

  12. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency; the single most ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Glucose- 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency is the most common enzymatic disorder of the red cell and an important risk factor for neonatal jaundice. Methodology: The aim of the study was to determine the incidence of G-6-PD deficiency among jaundiced neonates, and describe the associated morbidity ...

  13. Class switch recombination in selective IgA-deficient subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lone Hummelshøj; Ryder, L P; Nielsen, L K

    2006-01-01

    Selective IgA deficiency is a common immunodeficiency in Caucasians, but the molecular basis of the disorder remains elusive. To address this issue we examined the molecular events leading to IgA production. Naive IgD positive B cells were purified from four donors with IgA deficiency and four...

  14. Soluble Transferrin Receptor - A Marker For Iron Deficiency; A Review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Parameters for measuring iron deficiency have been established for decades and have served clinicians in the management of this nutritional disorder. The bone marrow still remains the gold standard in the final diagnosis of iron deficiency. However, researchers have been able to identify the dominating role of the ...

  15. Maternal vitamin D deficiency: a culprit for hypocalcaemia induced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: A rare but reversible cause of dilated cardiomyopathy occurs in infants born to vitamin D deficient mothers due to hypocalcaemia. Case Report: We report a case of dilated cardiomyopathy due to hypocalcaemia secondary to maternal vitamin D deficiency in an infant presented with seizure disorder and heart ...

  16. A Rare Case of β-Ketothiolase Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Modh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We are reporting a case of β-ketothiolase deficiency, a rare disorder of amino acid metabolism. A 10 month old child presented with complaints of vomiting, convulsions, fever and altered sensorium that on investigations showed metabolic acidosis, hyperammonemia and ketosis. Gas chromatography/ mass spectroscopic examination was suggestive of β-ketothiolase deficiency.

  17. Vitamin D deficiency and heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pilz, Stefan; Tomaschitz, Andreas; Drechsler, Christiane; de Boer, Rudolf A.

    Vitamin D deficiency is present in the vast majority of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and correcting a poor vitamin D status is recommended as a treatment of CKD-mineral and bone disorders. In this review, we summarize the molecular and clinical data on the role of vitamin D status for

  18. Genetics Home Reference: purine nucleoside phosphorylase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the expand/collapse boxes. Description Purine nucleoside phosphorylase deficiency is one of several disorders that damage the immune system and cause severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). People with SCID lack virtually all immune protection from foreign invaders such as bacteria, viruses, and ...

  19. Autosomal dominant transmission of GLUT1 deficiency.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klepper, J.; Willemsen, M.A.A.P.; Verrips, A.; Guertsen, E.; Herrmann, R.; Kutzick, C.; Florcken, A.; Voit, T.

    2001-01-01

    GLUT1 deficiency is caused by a defect in the facilitative glucose transporter GLUT1. Impaired glucose transport across brain tissue barriers is reflected by hypoglycorrhachia and results in an epileptic encephalopathy with developmental delay and motor disorders. Recently heterozygous mutations in

  20. Quantitative proteomics suggests metabolic reprogramming during ETHE1 deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahebekhtiari, Navid; Thomsen, Michelle M.; Sloth, Jens Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    Deficiency of mitochondrial sulfur dioxygenase (ETHE1) causes the severe metabolic disorder ethylmalonic encephalopathy, which is characterized by early-onset encephalopathy and defective cytochrome C oxidase because of hydrogen sulfide accumulation. Although the severe systemic consequences of t...

  1. Skin morphological changes in growth hormone deficiency and acromegaly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Merete Wolder; Thulesen, J; Feldt-Rasmussen, U

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the histomorphology of skin and its appendages, especially eccrine sweat glands, in patients with GH disorders, because reduced sweating ability in patients with growth hormone deficiency (GHD) is associated with increased risk of hyperthermia under stressed conditions....

  2. New insights into iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camaschella, Clara

    2017-07-01

    Recent advances in iron metabolism have stimulated new interest in iron deficiency (ID) and its anemia (IDA), common conditions worldwide. Absolute ID/IDA, i.e. the decrease of total body iron, is easily diagnosed based on decreased levels of serum ferritin and transferrin saturation. Relative lack of iron in specific organs/tissues, and IDA in the context of inflammatory disorders, are diagnosed based on arbitrary cut offs of ferritin and transferrin saturation and/or marker combination (as the soluble transferrin receptor/ferritin index) in an appropriate clinical context. Most ID patients are candidate to traditional treatment with oral iron salts, while high hepcidin levels block their absorption in inflammatory disorders. New iron preparations and new treatment modalities are available: high-dose intravenous iron compounds are becoming popular and indications to their use are increasing, although long-term side effects remain to be evaluated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Validation of Evidence-Based Fall Prevention Programs for Adults with Intellectual and/or Developmental Disorders (FallPAIDD: A Modified Otago Exercise Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mindy Renfro

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Evidence-based fall prevention (EBFP programs significantly decrease fall risk, falls, and fall-related injuries in community-dwelling older adults. To date, EBFP programs are only validated for use among people with normal cognition and, therefore, are not evidence-based for adults with intellectual and/or developmental disorders (IDD such as Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias (ADRD, cerebral vascular accident (CVA, or traumatic brain injury (TBI. BACKGROUND: Adults with IDD experience not only a higher rate of falls than their community-dwelling, cognitively intact peers, but also higher rates and earlier onset of chronic diseases, also known to increase fall risk. Adults with IDD experience many barriers to healthcare and health promotion programs. As the lifespan for people with IDD continues to increase, issues of aging (including falls with associated injury are on the rise and require effective and efficient prevention. METHODS: A modified group-based version of the Otago Exercise Program (OEP was developed and implemented at a worksite employing adults with IDD in Montana. Participants were tested pre and post-intervention using the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC STopping Elderly Accidents Deaths and Injuries (STEADI tool kit. Participants participated in progressive once weekly, one-hour group exercise classes and home programs over a 7-week period. Discharge planning with consumers and caregivers included home exercise, walking, and an optional home assessment. RESULTS: Despite the limited number of participants (n=15 and short length of participation, improvements were observed in the 30-Second Chair Stand Test, 4-Stage Balance Test, and 2-Minute Walk Test. Additionally, three individuals experienced an improvement in ambulation independence. Participants reported no falls during the study period. DISCUSSION: Promising results of this preliminary project underline the need for further study

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... increased need for iron during growth spurts. Older adults, especially those over age ... athletes. Athletes, especially young females, are at risk for iron deficiency. Endurance ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) programs. Our ... more information about Donor Iron Deficiency Study - Red Blood Cells ...

  6. Clinical and sociodemographic variables associated with interictal dysphoric disorder and interictal personality in patients with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy: A controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araújo Filho, Gerardo Maria; Tarifa, Bruna; Santos, Raquel Espagnolla; de Oliveira Dias, Ana Laura; Ulliano, Júlia Rodrigues Leandro; Marques, Lucia Helena Neves

    2017-04-01

    Psychiatric disorders (PD) have an elevated prevalence and an important negative impact on patients with epilepsy (PWE) since they are associated with lower quality of life and clinical refractoriness. However, it is also necessary to identify behavioral conditions possibly associated with epilepsy that are not part of the standard psychiatric classifications, such as Interictal Dysphoric Disorder (IDD) and Interictal Personality (IP). The frequency of IDD and IP in patients with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy and mesial temporal sclerosis (TLE-MTS) was assessed. The Brazilian versions of the Neurobehavioral Inventory (NBI) and Interictal Dysphoric Disorder Inventory (IDDI) were applied to patients and to a control group. Psychiatric standard assessment was conducted through the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Psychiatric Disorders - 5th edition (DSM-5). The value of p considered significant was Disorder was observed in 18 patients (18.4%) and IP in 36 (37.9%). Interictal Dysphoric Disorder was associated with left-sided MTS (OR=3.22; p=0.008), previous psychiatric treatment (OR=4.29; p=0.007), and more than one AED used (OR=2.73; p=0.02) while presence of bilateral MTS (OR=3.27; p=0.008), longer disease duration (OR=3.39; p=0.006), and presence of Major Depressive Disorder (OR=4.73; p=0.004) were associated with IP. In the present study, there was a high prevalence of IDD and IP in patients with drug-resistant TLE-MTS; studies should be conducted to identify the presence of behavioral conditions that are not present in the conventional psychiatric classifications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Muscle phosphorylase kinase deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, N; Orngreen, M C; Echaniz-Laguna, A

    2012-01-01

    To examine metabolism during exercise in 2 patients with muscle phosphorylase kinase (PHK) deficiency and to further define the phenotype of this rare glycogen storage disease (GSD).......To examine metabolism during exercise in 2 patients with muscle phosphorylase kinase (PHK) deficiency and to further define the phenotype of this rare glycogen storage disease (GSD)....

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... loss and lead to iron-deficiency anemia. Common causes of blood loss that lead to iron-deficiency anemia include: Bleeding in your GI tract, from an ulcer, colon cancer, or regular use of medicines such as aspirin ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia. Search the NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools (RePORT) to learn about research that ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... blocks the intestine from taking up iron. Other medical conditions Other medical conditions that may lead to iron-deficiency anemia ... daily amount of iron. If you have other medical conditions that cause iron-deficiency anemia , such as ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Are you curious about how inflammation from chronic diseases can cause iron-deficiency anemia? Read more When there is ... DBDR) is a leader in research on the causes, prevention, and treatment of blood diseases, including iron-deficiency anemia. Search the NIH Research ...

  13. Nutritional iron deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Hurrell, R.F.

    2007-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the leading risk factors for disability and death worldwide, affecting an estimated 2 billion people. Nutritional iron deficiency arises when physiological requirements cannot be met by iron absorption from diet. Dietary iron bioavailability is low in populations consuming

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topics section only, or the News and Resources section. NHLBI Entire Site NHLBI Entire Site Health ... español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type of anemia that occurs if you do not have enough iron in your body. People with mild or moderate iron-deficiency anemia ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because your body’s intake of iron is too ... clamping of your newborn’s umbilical cord at the time of delivery. This may help prevent iron-deficiency ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen ... check the size of your liver and spleen. Blood tests Based on results from blood tests to screen ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... also are hoping to determine which iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children who do not consume the daily recommended amount of iron. Read less Participate in NHLBI Clinical Trials We lead or sponsor many studies related to iron-deficiency anemia. See if you ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... en español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type of anemia that occurs if you do not ... iron-deficiency anemia and help rule out other types of anemia. Treatment will explain treatment-related complications ...

  20. Iron deficiency in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijterschout, L.

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) is the most common micronutrient deficiency in the world. Iron is involved in oxygen transport, energy metabolism, immune response, and plays an important role in brain development. In infancy, ID is associated with adverse effects on cognitive, motor, and behavioral development

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... anemia. Return to Signs, Symptoms, and Complications to review signs and symptoms as well as complications from iron-deficiency ... NIH]) Heavy Menstrual Bleeding (Centers for Disease Control and ... Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron-Deficiency Anemia (National Library ...

  2. Iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - iron deficiency ... iron from old red blood cells. Iron deficiency anemia develops when your body's iron stores run low. ... You may have no symptoms if the anemia is mild. Most of the time, ... slowly. Symptoms may include: Feeling weak or tired more often ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... be at risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, ... you are experiencing side effects such as a bad metallic taste, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, or upset stomach. ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... how we are using current research and advancing research to prevent iron-deficiency anemia. Participate in NHLBI Clinical Trials will explain our ongoing clinical studies that are investigating prevention strategies for iron-deficiency anemia. Signs, Symptoms, and Complications ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... The Science Science Home Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart ... Donor Studies (REDS) program Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) Program Non- ...

  6. Inherited coagulation factor VII and X deficiencies associated with severe bleeding diathesis: Molecular genetics and pathophysiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borensztajn, K.; Spek, C. A.

    2005-01-01

    The rare inherited coagulation disorders are a fascinating group of diseases that have provided us with important insights into the structure and functions of their respective deficient proteins. Factor (F)VII deficiency is the commonest of these inherited disorders of coagulation, whereas FX

  7. Vitamin B12 deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Ralph; Allen, Lindsay H; Bjørke-Monsen, Anne-Lise

    2017-01-01

    , subclinical deficiency affects between 2.5% and 26% of the general population depending on the definition used, although the clinical relevance is unclear. B12 deficiency can affect individuals at all ages, but most particularly elderly individuals. Infants, children, adolescents and women of reproductive age...... remain debated. Management depends on B12 supplementation, either via high-dose oral routes or via parenteral administration. This Primer describes the current knowledge surrounding B12 deficiency, and highlights improvements in diagnostic methods as well as shifting concepts about the prevalence, causes...

  8. Behavioral impairments in animal models for zinc deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone eHagmeyer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Apart from teratogenic and pathological effects of zinc deficiency such as the occurrence of skin lesions, anorexia, growth retardation, depressed wound healing, altered immune function, impaired night vision, and alterations in taste and smell acuity, characteristic behavioral changes in animal models and human patients suffering from zinc deficiency have been observed. Given that it is estimated that about 17% of the worldwide population are at risk for zinc deficiency and that zinc deficiency is associated with a variety of brain disorders and disease states in humans, it is of major interest to investigate, how these behavioral changes will affect the individual and a putative course of a disease. Thus, here, we provide a state of the art overview about the behavioral phenotypes observed in various models of zinc deficiency, among them environmentally produced zinc deficient animals as well as animal models based on a genetic alteration of a particular zinc homeostasis gene. Finally, we compare the behavioral phenotypes to the human condition of mild to severe zinc deficiency and provide a model, how zinc deficiency that is associated with many neurodegenerative and neuropsychological disorders might modify the disease pathologies.

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... body to absorb iron from the gastrointestinal tract (GI tract). Blood loss When you lose blood, you ... to iron-deficiency anemia include: Bleeding in your GI tract, from an ulcer, colon cancer, or regular ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... for gastrointestinal bleeding To see if gastrointestinal bleeding is causing your iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may order the following procedures to guide treatment . Fecal ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... complications, including heart failure and development delays in children. Explore this Health ... red blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because your body’s intake of iron ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Supplement Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron-Deficiency Anemia (National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus) ... Privacy Policy Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Accessibility Copyright and Usage No FEAR ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... our clinical trials . Are you a frequent blood donor living in New York City? This study is looking at how iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, ...

  14. Vitamin D Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to other diseases. In children, it can cause rickets. Rickets is a rare disease that causes the bones ... and children are at higher risk of getting rickets. In adults, severe vitamin D deficiency leads to ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat premature newborns with low hemoglobin levels. ... are hoping to determine which iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children who ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and Strategic Vision Leadership Scientific Divisions Operations and Administration Advisory Committees Budget and Legislative Information Jobs and ... may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia may cause the following complications: Depression Heart problems. If you do not have enough ... these usually go away within a day or two. Red blood cell transfusions. These may be used ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... more. Read less Reminders Return to Causes to review how blood loss, not consuming the recommended amount ... iron-deficiency anemia. Return to Risk Factors to review family history, lifestyle, unhealthy environments, or other factors ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... same for boys and girls. From birth to 6 months, babies need 0.27 mg of iron. ... for iron deficiency at certain ages: Infants between 6 and 12 months, especially if they are fed ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... detect signs of iron-deficiency anemia and help rule out other types of anemia. Treatment will explain ... your blood. More testing may be needed to rule out other types of anemia. Tests for gastrointestinal ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... red blood cells, called hemolysis . Hemolysis, in this case, is caused by strong muscle contractions and the ... to prevent iron-deficiency anemia. Participate in NHLBI Clinical Trials will explain our ongoing clinical studies that ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... to improve health through research and scientific discovery. Improving health with current research Learn about the following ... deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in premature ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... A-Z Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness ... If your doctor diagnoses you with iron-deficiency anemia, your treatment will depend on the cause and severity of the condition. Your ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... your blood may be normal even if the total amount of iron in your body is low. ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... interferes with the body’s ability to make hemoglobin. Family history and genetics Von Willebrand disease is an ... deficiency anemia. Return to Risk Factors to review family history, lifestyle, unhealthy environments, or other factors that ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... diagnoses you with iron-deficiency anemia, your treatment will depend on the cause and severity of the ... of iron. The recommended daily amounts of iron will depend on your age, sex, and whether you ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... from developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, ... iron is needed, such as childhood and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... heart failure . Increased risk of infections Motor or cognitive development delays in children Pregnancy complications, such as ... iron-deficiency anemia may require intravenous (IV) iron therapy or a blood transfusion . Iron supplements Your doctor ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... absorb iron and lead to iron-deficiency anemia. These conditions include: Intestinal and digestive conditions, such as ... tract. Inflammation from congestive heart failure or obesity . These chronic conditions can lead to inflammation that may ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ... Visit Children and Clinical Studies to hear experts, parents, and children talk about their experiences with clinical ...

  11. Factor V deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000550.htm Factor V deficiency To use the sharing features on ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  12. Factor II deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000549.htm Factor II deficiency To use the sharing features on ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  13. Factor X deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000553.htm Factor X deficiency To use the sharing features on ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... is caused by strong muscle contractions and the impact of feet repeatedly striking the ground, such as ... funding on iron-deficiency anemia. We stimulate high-impact research. Our Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... may be diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia if you have low iron or ferritin levels in your blood. More testing may be needed to rule out other types of anemia. Tests for gastrointestinal ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... for your body to absorb iron from the gastrointestinal tract (GI tract). Blood loss When you lose blood, ... iron deficiency. Endurance athletes lose iron through their gastrointestinal tracts. They also lose iron through the breakdown of ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... vegetables. Foods rich in vitamin C, such as oranges, strawberries, and tomatoes, may help increase your absorption ... deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend erythropoiesis stimulating agents (esa) . These medicines stimulate the bone marrow to ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... were born prematurely may be at an even higher risk, as most of a newborn’s iron stores ... men of the same age. Women are at higher risk for iron-deficiency anemia under some circumstances, ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Iron-Deficiency Anemia (National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus) Building 31 31 Center Drive Bethesda, MD 20892 Learn ... and Usage No FEAR Act Grants and Funding Building 31 31 Center Drive Bethesda, MD 20892 Learn ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... may recommend erythropoiesis stimulating agents (esa) . These medicines stimulate the bone marrow to make more red blood ... NHLBI is funding on iron-deficiency anemia. We stimulate high-impact research. Our Trans-Omics for Precision ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... tests, especially in infants and small children Heavy menstrual periods Injury or surgery Urinary tract bleeding Consuming ... iron-deficiency anemia from trauma, surgery, or heavy menstrual periods. Individuals with a gene for hemophilia, including ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and naproxen Certain rare genetic conditions such as hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, which causes bleeding in the bowels ... iron-deficiency anemia may cause the following complications: Depression Heart problems. If you do not have enough ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... lead in their blood from their environment or water. Lead interferes with the body’s ability to make ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... also often take other medicines—such as proton pump inhibitors, anticoagulants, or blood thinners—that may cause iron-deficiency anemia. Proton pump inhibitors interfere with iron absorption, and blood thinners ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Cells From Iron-deficient Donors: Recovery and Storage Quality. Learn more about participating in a clinical trial . View all trials from ClinicalTrials.gov . Visit Children and Clinical Studies to hear experts, parents, and ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Look for Treatment will discuss medicines and eating pattern changes that your doctors may recommend if you ... iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... girls. From birth to 6 months, babies need 0.27 mg of iron. This number goes up ... screen blood donors for low iron stores. Reliable point-of-care testing may help identify iron deficiency ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... striking the ground, such as with marathon runners. Sex Girls and women between the ages of 14 ... developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron- ... factors , such as if you are following a vegetarian eating pattern, your doctor may recommend changes to ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia. Proton pump inhibitors interfere with iron absorption, and blood thinners increase the likelihood of bleeding ... oranges, strawberries, and tomatoes, may help increase your absorption of iron. If you are pregnant, talk to ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may order a blood test called a complete blood count ( ... your risk factors , do a physical exam, or order blood tests or other diagnostic tests. Physical exam ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... duodenum, the first part of the small intestine just beyond the stomach. Even if you have enough ... clamping of your newborn’s umbilical cord at the time of delivery. This may help prevent iron-deficiency ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... less than 12 g/dl for women is diagnostic of anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia, red blood ... both full-term and preterm infants. Look for Diagnosis will explain tests and procedures that your doctor ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... less than 12 g/dl for women is diagnostic of anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia, red blood ... physical exam, or order blood tests or other diagnostic tests. Physical exam Your doctor may ask about ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, ... iron-fortified foods that have iron added. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you choose nonmeat ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... bleeding. If undiagnosed or untreated, iron-deficiency anemia can cause serious complications, including heart failure and development ... iron is too low. Low intake of iron can happen because of blood loss, consuming less than ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... improved health for people with iron-deficiency anemia. Recipient Epidemiology Donor Studies program findings help to protect blood donors . NHLBI’s Recipient Epidemiology Donor Studies (REDS) program , which began in ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... a frequent blood donor living in New York City? This study is looking at how iron-deficiency ... frequently. This study is located in New York City, and is recruiting by invitation only. View more ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... to 11 mg for children ages 7 to 12 months, and down to 7 mg for children ... deficiency at certain ages: Infants between 6 and 12 months, especially if they are fed only breast ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... in our clinical trials . Are you a frequent blood donor living in New York City? This study is looking at how iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia may cause the following complications: Depression Heart problems. If you do not have enough ... prevent complications such as abnormal heart rhythms and depression. Learn the warning signs of serious complications and ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... prevent complications such as abnormal heart rhythms and depression. Learn the warning signs of serious complications and ... donors for low iron stores. Reliable point-of-care testing may help identify iron deficiency before potentially ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... be at risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for ... Surgery, upper endoscopy or colonoscopy, to stop bleeding. Healthy lifestyle changes To help you meet your daily ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... breastfeeding women older than 18 need 9 mg. Problems absorbing iron Even if you consume the recommended ... interested in learning how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... starch. Restless legs syndrome Shortness of breath Weakness Complications Undiagnosed or untreated iron-deficiency anemia may cause ... as complete blood count and iron studies. Prevent complications over your lifetime To prevent complications from iron- ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... you do not have enough iron in your body. People with mild or moderate iron-deficiency anemia ... and where to find more information. Causes Your body needs iron to make healthy red blood cells. ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the current and future NHLBI efforts to improve health through research and ... blood donors. Cardiovascular Health Study identifies predictors of future health problems in older adults. The NHLBI-sponsored ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... as most of a newborn’s iron stores are developed during the third trimester of pregnancy. Children between ... This makes it harder to stop bleeding and can increase the risk of iron-deficiency anemia from ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... an MCV of less than 80 femtoliters (fL). Prevention strategies If you have certain risk factors , such ... explain our ongoing clinical studies that are investigating prevention strategies for iron-deficiency anemia. Signs, Symptoms, and ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... symptoms. More severe iron-deficiency anemia may cause fatigue or tiredness, shortness of breath, or chest pain. ... in the hands and feet Difficulty concentrating Dizziness Fatigue, or feeling tired, is the most common symptom. ...

  11. Manganese deficiency in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Sidsel Birkelund; Jensen, Poul Erik; Husted, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential plant micronutrient with an indispensable function as a catalyst in the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII). Even so, Mn deficiency frequently occurs without visual leaf symptoms, thereby masking the distribution and dimension of the problem...... restricting crop productivity in many places of the world. Hence, timely alleviation of latent Mn deficiency is a challenge in promoting plant growth and quality. We describe here the key mechanisms of Mn deficiency in plants by focusing on the impact of Mn on PSII stability and functionality. We also address...... the mechanisms underlying the differential tolerance towards Mn deficiency observed among plant genotypes, which enable Mn-efficient plants to grow on marginal land with poor Mn availability....

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... to learn more about iron-deficiency anemia, our role in research and clinical trials to improve health, ... of Blood Diseases and Resources (DBDR) is a leader in research on the causes, prevention, and treatment ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Treatment will explain treatment-related complications or side effects. Diagnosis Iron-deficiency anemia may be detected during ... to your doctor if you are experiencing side effects such as a bad metallic taste, vomiting, diarrhea, ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... an increased risk for iron-deficiency anemia because of your age, unhealthy environments, family ... 12 months, especially if they are fed only breast milk or are fed formula that is not fortified ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... blood tests, especially in infants and small children Heavy menstrual periods Injury or surgery Urinary tract bleeding ... of iron-deficiency anemia from trauma, surgery, or heavy menstrual periods. Individuals with a gene for hemophilia, ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, ... is needed, such as childhood and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron- ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Individuals with a gene for hemophilia, including symptomatic female carriers who have heavy menstrual periods, may be ... anemia. Endurance activities and athletes. Athletes, especially young females, are at risk for iron deficiency. Endurance athletes ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and Strategic Vision Leadership Scientific Divisions Operations and Administration Advisory Committees Budget and Legislative Information Jobs and ... blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because your body’s intake of iron is too ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... MCV of less than 80 femtoliters (fL). Prevention strategies If you have certain risk factors , such as ... our ongoing clinical studies that are investigating prevention strategies for iron-deficiency anemia. Signs, Symptoms, and Complications ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. ... heavy menstrual bleeding, your doctor will want to control these other conditions to prevent you from developing ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... lead to iron-deficiency anemia include: End-stage kidney failure, where there is blood loss during dialysis. People who have chronic kidney disease also often take other medicines—such as ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... may be at risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk ... upper endoscopy or colonoscopy, to stop bleeding. Healthy lifestyle changes To help you meet your daily recommended ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... endoscopy or colonoscopy, to stop bleeding. Healthy lifestyle changes To help you meet your daily recommended iron ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Chest pain Coldness in the hands and feet Difficulty concentrating Dizziness Fatigue, or feeling tired, is the ... Our support of SBIR/STTR programs is helping advance research in iron-deficiency anemia, in part by ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... infancy has lasting effects. We are interested in learning how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life ... Customer Service/Center for Health Information Email Alerts Jobs and Careers Site Index About NHLBI National Institute ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... family history and genetics , lifestyle habits, or sex. Age You may be at increased risk for iron ... Signs, Symptoms, and Complications Iron-deficiency anemia can range from mild to severe. People with mild or ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron to prepare for blood loss during delivery. Screening and Prevention Your doctor may screen you for ... and symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia. Return to Screening and Prevention to review tests to screen for ...

  8. Vitamin D deficiency and stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D comprises a group of fat-soluble pro-hormones, obtained from sun exposure, food, and supplements, and it must undergo two hydroxylation reactions to be activated in the body. Several studies have shown the role of vitamin D in mineral metabolism regulation, especially calcium, phosphorus, and bone metabolism. Some factors such as inadequate vitamin intake and liver or kidney disorders can lead to vitamin D deficiency. Furthermore, vitamin D malnutrition may also be linked to susceptibility to chronic diseases such as heart failure, peripheral artery disease, high blood pressure, cognitive impairment including foggy brain and memory loss, and autoimmune diseases including diabetes type I. Recent research has revealed that low levels of vitamin D increase the risk of cardiovascular-related morbidity (Sato et al., 2004 and mortality (Pilz et al., 2008. Also, hypertension contributes to a reduction in bone mineral density and increase in the incidence of stroke and death. This article reviews the function and physiology of vitamin D and examines the effects of vitamin D deficiency on susceptibility to stroke, as a cardiovascular event, and its morbidity and subsequent mortality.

  9. Lipoprotein lipase deficiency with visceral xanthomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Servaes, Sabah; Bellah, Richard [Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Verma, Ritu [Department of Gastroenterology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Pawel, Bruce [Department of Pathology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2010-08-15

    Lipoprotein lipase deficiency (LLD) is a rare metabolic disorder that typically presents with skin xanthomas and pancreatitis in childhood. We report a case of LLD in an infant who presented with jaundice caused by a pancreatic head mass. Abdominal imaging also incidentally revealed hyperechoic renal masses caused by renal xanthomas. This appearance of the multiple abdominal masses makes this a unique infantile presentation of LLD. (orig.)

  10. Sleep transitions in hypocretin-deficient narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Gertrud Laura; Knudsen, Stine; Jennum, Poul

    2013-08-01

    Narcolepsy is characterized by instability of sleep-wake, tonus, and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep regulation. It is associated with severe hypothalamic hypocretin deficiency, especially in patients with cataplexy (loss of tonus). As the hypocretin neurons coordinate and stabilize the brain's sleep-wake pattern, tonus, and REM flip-flop neuronal centers in animal models, we set out to determine whether hypocretin deficiency and/or cataplexy predicts the unstable sleep-wake and REM sleep pattern of the human phenotype. We measured the frequency of transitions in patients with narcolepsy between sleep-wake states and to/from REM and NREM sleep stages. Patients were subdivided by the presence of +/- cataplexy and +/- hypocretin-1 deficiency. Sleep laboratory studies conducted from 2001-2011. In total 63 narcolepsy patients were included in the study. Cataplexy was present in 43 of 63 patients and hypocretin-1 deficiency was present in 37 of 57 patients. Hypocretin-deficient patients with narcolepsy had a significantly higher frequency of sleep-wake transitions (P = 0.014) and of transitions to/from REM sleep (P = 0.044) than patients with normal levels of hypocretin-1. Patients with cataplexy had a significantly higher frequency of sleep-wake transitions (P = 0.002) than those without cataplexy. A multivariate analysis showed that transitions to/from REM sleep were predicted mainly by hypocretin-1 deficiency (P = 0.011), whereas sleep-wake transitions were predicted mainly by cataplexy (P = 0.001). In human narcolepsy, hypocretin deficiency and cataplexy are both associated with signs of destabilized sleep-wake and REM sleep control, indicating that the disorder may serve as a human model for the sleep-wake and REM sleep flip-flop switches.

  11. [Iron deficiency and pica].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, J A; Marcos, J; Risueño, C E; de Cos, C; López, R; Capote, F J; Martín, M V; Gil, J L

    1998-02-01

    To study the relationship between pica and iron-lack anaemia in a series of iron-deficiency patients in order to establish the pathogenesis of such relationship. Four-hundred and thirty-three patients were analysed. Pica was studied by introducing certain diet queries into the clinical history. All patients received oral iron and were periodically controlled with the usual clinico-haematological procedures. Pica was present in 23 patients (5.3%). Eight nourishing (namely, coffee grains, almonds, chocolate, ice, lettuce, carrots, sunflower seeds and bread) and 2 non-nourishing (clay and paper) substances were involved. A second episode of pica appeared in 9 cases upon relapsing of iron deficiency. Both anaemia and pica were cured by etiologic and substitutive therapy in all instances. No clear correlation was found with either socio-economic status or pathogenetic causes of iron deficiency and pica, and no haematological differences were seen between patients with pica and those without this alteration. (1) The pathogenesis of pica is unclear, although it appears unrelated to the degree of iron deficiency. (2) According to the findings in this series, pica seems a consequence of iron deficiency rather than its cause. (3) Adequate therapy can cure both conditions, although pica may reappear upon relapse of iron deficiency.

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... The Science Science Home Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart ... our role in research and clinical trials to improve health, and where to find more information. Causes ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science Science Home Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topics A-Z Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science Science Home Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart ...

  16. Late-onset ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency: An under recognized cause of metabolic encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Rush, Eric T; Hartmann, Julianne E; Skrabal, Jill C; Rizzo, William B

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency is the most common inherited disorder of the urea cycle, has a variable phenotype, and is caused by mutations in the OTC gene. We report three cases of ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency to illustrate the late-onset presentation of this disorder and provide strategies for diagnosis and treatment. The patients were maternal first cousins, presenting with hyperammonemia and obtundation. Urea cycle disorder was not initially suspected in the...

  17. Optic neuropathy in a patient with pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Small, Juan E. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Gonzalez, Guido E. [Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Clinica Alemana de Santiago, Departmento de Imagenes, Santiago (Chile); Nagao, Karina E.; Walton, David S. [Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and Harvard Medical School, Department of Ophthalmology, Boston, MA (United States); Caruso, Paul A. [Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2009-10-15

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) deficiency is a genetic disorder of mitochondrial metabolism. The clinical manifestations range from severe neonatal lactic acidosis to chronic neurodegeneration. Optic neuropathy is an uncommon clinical sequela and the imaging findings of optic neuropathy in these patients have not previously been described. We present a patient with PDH deficiency with bilateral decreased vision in whom MRI demonstrated bilateral optic neuropathy and chiasmopathy. (orig.)

  18. Optic neuropathy in a patient with pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small, Juan E.; Gonzalez, Guido E.; Nagao, Karina E.; Walton, David S.; Caruso, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) deficiency is a genetic disorder of mitochondrial metabolism. The clinical manifestations range from severe neonatal lactic acidosis to chronic neurodegeneration. Optic neuropathy is an uncommon clinical sequela and the imaging findings of optic neuropathy in these patients have not previously been described. We present a patient with PDH deficiency with bilateral decreased vision in whom MRI demonstrated bilateral optic neuropathy and chiasmopathy. (orig.)

  19. Isolated acquired factor VII deficiency: review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulliez, Sylvie M N; Devreese, Katrien M J

    2016-04-01

    Isolated acquired factor VII (FVII) deficiency is a rare haemorrhagic disorder. We report what is currently known about the pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of acquired FVII deficiency. We performed a literature search and included all articles published between 1980 and August 2015. Acquired FVII deficiency has been reported in 42 patients. There are well-established clinical diseases associated with acquired FVII deficiency, most notably infections, malignancy and haematological stem cell transplantation. The exact pathogenesis of the diseases is still unknown, but different pathophysiological hypotheses have been suggested. The clinical manifestation of acquired FVII deficiency varies greatly in severity; asymptomatic course as well as severe life-threatening bleeding diathesis and fatal bleedings have been described.

  20. What Are Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (IDDs)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... one thing, or too little of another can cause problems with overall body and brain function. Phenylketonuria (PKU) and congenital hypothyroidism are examples of metabolic conditions that can lead ...

  1. IDD 2.0: Physiological Resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-15

    and equine athletes 4-10 . The most common symptoms in humans is abdominal discomfort and inappetance, with more severe signs like vomiting...suppression therapy may help to preserve the willingness of the dog to eat and drink, thereby reducing the logistical challenges of enhanced nutrient and...172 7. Murray MJ, Schusser GF, Pipers FS et al. (), Factors associated with gastric lesions in thoroughbred racehorses, Equine Vet J. 1996;28: 368

  2. Purine nucleoside phosphorylase deficiency in two unrelated Saudi patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alangari, Abdullah; AlHarbi, Abdullah; AlGhonaium Abdulaziz; Santisteban, Ines; Hershfield, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive metabolic disorder that results in combined immunodeficiency, neurologic dysfunction and autoimmunity. PNP deficiency has never been reported from Saudi Arabia or in patients with an Arabic ethnic background. We report on two Saudi girls with PNP deficiency. Both showed severe lymphopenia and neurological involvement. Sequencing of the PNP gene of one girl revealed a novel missense mutation Pro146>Leu in exon 4 due to a change in the codon from CCT>CTT. Expression of PNP (146L) cDNA in E coli indicated that the mutation greatly reduced, but did not completely eliminate PNP activity. (author)

  3. Sleep Deficiency and Deprivation Leading to Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Kohansieh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep plays a vital role in an individual’s mental, emotional, and physiological well-being. Not only does sleep deficiency lead to neurological and psychological disorders, but also the literature has explored the adverse effects of sleep deficiency on the cardiovascular system. Decreased quantity and quality of sleep have been linked to cardiovascular disease (CVD risk factors, such as hypertension, obesity, diabetes, and dyslipidemia. We explore the literature correlating primary sleep deficiency and deprivation as a cause for cardiovascular disease and cite endothelial dysfunction as a common underlying mechanism.

  4. Antepartum Ornithine Transcarbamylase Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitoshi Nakajima

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (OTCD is the most common type urea cycle enzyme deficiencies. This syndrome results from a deficiency of the mitochondrial enzyme ornithine transcarbamylase, which catalyzes the conversion of ornithine and carbamoyl phosphate to citrullin. Our case was a 28-year-old female diagnosed with OTCD following neurocognitive deficit during her first pregnancy. Although hyperammonemia was suspected as the cause of the patient's mental changes, there was no evidence of chronic liver disease. Plasma amino acid and urine organic acid analysis revealed OTCD. After combined modality treatment with arginine, sodium benzoate and hemodialysis, the patient's plasma ammonia level stabilized and her mental status returned to normal. At last she recovered without any damage left.

  5. Vitamin Excess and Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diab, Liliane; Krebs, Nancy F

    2018-04-01

    The published literature supports the high prevalence of supplement use in children and adolescents in the United States. Pediatricians today are faced with questions from parents and patients about the benefits, safety, efficacy, and correct dose of vitamins and minerals. In this article, we review 7 vitamins with the most clinical relevance as judged by abundance in food, risks and symptoms of deficiency, and potential for toxicity. Specifically, we focus on possible clinical scenarios that can be indicative of nutritional deficiency. We synthesize and summarize guidelines from nutrition experts, various medical societies, the World Health Organization, and the American Academy of Pediatrics. © American Academy of Pediatrics, 2018. All rights reserved.

  6. Impact of neonatal iron deficiency on hippocampal DNA methylation and gene transcription in a porcine biomedical model of cognitive development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schachtschneider, Kyle M.; Liu, Yingkai; Rund, Laurie A.; Madsen, Ole; Johnson, Rodney W.; Groenen, Martien A.M.; Schook, Lawrence B.

    2016-01-01


    Background

    Iron deficiency is a common childhood micronutrient deficiency that results in altered hippocampal function and cognitive disorders. However, little is known about the mechanisms through which neonatal iron deficiency results in long lasting alterations in hippocampal gene

  7. Implementation of Double Fortified Salt in India is based on Low Scientific Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umesh Kapil

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Micronutrient malnutrition (MNM can affect all age groups, but young children and women of reproductive age are most at risk of developing micronutrient deficiencies. Iodine Deficiency Disorders (IDD and Iron Deficiency Anaemia (IDA are two important Public Health problems. Out of 342 districts surveyed, so far IDD is a major public health problem in 286 districts. No state in India is free from iodine deficiency (1. Iron Deficiency Anaemia is reported in about 70% of the population across all age groups (2. The magnitude of Vitamin B12 deficiency is documented to be about 73.5% in the adolescents (3 and Zinc deficiency is reported in about 49.4% amongst children (4. In addition, there are deficiencies of other micronutrients and minerals like Folic Acid, Vitamin D which are of public health concern. Fortification of food is one of three primary strategies to combat micronutrient deficiencies. Fortification is defined by the World Health Organization (WHO and Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO as "the practice of deliberately increasing the content of an essential micronutrient, i.e. Vitamins and minerals (including trace elements in a food irrespective of whether the nutrients were originally present in the food before processing or not, so as to improve the nutritional quality of the food supply and to provide a public health benefit with minimal risk to health”. Food fortification is one of the most cost effective ways to make up for the deficient vitamins and minerals in low quality diets. The edible salt is the most widely used food vehicle for fortification with micronutrients (5. Fortification of salt with iodine, to prevent IDD, under the National Iodine Deficiency Disorders Control Programme, is in operation since 1962 (1. This intervention has led to significant prevention and control of IDD (6. Recently, the technology has been developed for fortification of salt with iron and iodine commonly known as DFS, to simultaneously

  8. What Is Combined Deficiency of Vitamin K-Dependent Clotting Factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Deficiency Factor V Deficiency Combined FV & FVIII Deficiencies Factor VII Deficiency Factor X Deficiency Factor XI Deficiency Factor ... Deficiency Factor V Deficiency Combined FV & FVIII Deficiencies Factor VII Deficiency Factor X Deficiency Factor XI Deficiency Factor ...

  9. Diagnosis, Treatment and Follow-Up in Four Children with Biotinidase Deficiency from Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afroze, B.; Wasay, M.

    2013-01-01

    Biotinidase deficiency is an inherited disorder in which the vitamin biotin is not recycled. If untreated, affected individuals develop neurological and cutaneous symptoms. Untreated individuals with biotinidase deficiency either succumb to disease or are left with significant morbidity. We describe clinical course and follow-up of 4 children from Pakistan. All 4 presented with classical symptoms of biotinidase deficiency and responded dramatically to oral biotin within days to weeks. Biotinidase deficiency is reported in Pakistani children from different part of world, however; there is no such report from Pakistan. This highlights lack of awareness of biotinidase deficiency among physicians in Pakistan. (author)

  10. Biopterin-deficient hyperphenylalaninemia: Diagnosis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Nikolaeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The term phenylketonuria encompasses some genetically heterogeneous diseases from a group of hereditary amino acid metabolic disorders, the key biochemical sign of which is a steady increase in blood phenylalanine levels – hyperphenylalaninemia. Phenylketonuria is a most common disease of the above group; its rate in the Russian Federation is 1:7140 neonates. The rare causes of hyperphenylalaninemia include the cofactor (biopterin-deficient forms associated with tetrahydrobiopterin deficiency, leading to the blocked metabolic pathways for converting phenylalanine to tyrosine and for synthesizing catecholamine and serotonin precursors (L-dopa and 5-hydroxytryptophan. The distinguishing feature of all cofactor forms of hyperphenylalaninemia is the inefficiency of an isolated low-protein diet. Cofactor therapy with sapropterin in combination with correction of neuromediatory disorders is used in the combination treatment of these patients. The paper presents a case history of a child with severe biopterin-deficient hyperphenylalaninemia resulting from a defect in the PTS gene. The clinical example illustrates difficulties associated with the diagnosis of cofactor hyperphenylalaninemia and with long individual dosage adjustments for medications. 

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... grams per deciliter (g/dl) for men and less than 12 g/dl for women is diagnostic of anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia, ... blood levels of iron will be low, or less than 10 micromoles per liter (mmol/L) for both men and women. Normal levels are 10 to 30 mmol/L. ...

  12. Alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolk, Jan; Seersholm, Niels; Kalsheker, Noor

    2006-01-01

    The Alpha One International Registry (AIR), a multinational research program focused on alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency, was formed in response to a World Health Organization recommendation. Each of the nearly 20 participating countries maintains a national registry of patients with AAT defic...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is blood loss during dialysis. People who have chronic kidney disease also often take other medicines—such as proton ... reduces iron absorption. Other treatments If you have chronic kidney disease and iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend ...

  14. Vitamin B12 deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitamin B12 (B12; also known as cobalamin) is a B vitamin that has an important role in cellular metabolism, especially in DNA synthesis, methylation and mitochondrial metabolism. Clinical B12 deficiency with classic haematological and neurological manifestations is relatively uncommon. However, sub...

  15. Leukocyte adhesion deficiencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Vijver, Edith; van den Berg, Timo K.; Kuijpers, Taco W.

    2013-01-01

    During inflammation, leukocytes play a key role in maintaining tissue homeostasis through elimination of pathogens and removal of damaged tissue. Leukocytes migrate to the site of inflammation by crawling over and through the blood vessel wall, into the tissue. Leukocyte adhesion deficiencies (ie,

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children who do not consume the daily recommended amount ... and Clinical Studies to hear experts, parents, and children talk about their experiences with clinical ... Anemia Arrhythmia Blood Donation Blood Tests Blood ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Working at the NHLBI Contact and FAQs Accessible Search Form Search the NHLBI, use the drop down list to ... treatment of blood diseases, including iron-deficiency anemia. Search the NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools (RePORT) ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in premature or very small newborns . In collaboration with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how ...

  19. Iron deficiency in children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cell and excess iron is stored as ferritin to protect the cell from oxidative ... iron deficiency has negative effects during pregnancy and in the postpartum period, which affects maternal health ... use of undiluted cow's milk and a predominant cow's milk intake in .... on bone marrow smear or biopsy for the definitive diagnosis of.

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Certain conditions or medicines can decrease your body’s ability to absorb iron and lead to iron-deficiency ... environment or water. Lead interferes with the body’s ability to make hemoglobin. Family history and genetics Von ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... supplements. Iron supplements can change how certain medicines work. Your doctor may suggest check-ups to make sure your ... To prevent complications from iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may ... during certain stages of life when more iron is needed, such as childhood ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... an MCV of less than 80 femtoliters (fL). Prevention strategies If you have certain risk factors , such as if you are following a ... unhealthy environments, or other factors that increase your risk of developing iron-deficiency ... to Screening and Prevention to review tests to screen for and strategies ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Services’ National Institutes of Health (NIH)—the Nation’s biomedical research agency that makes important scientific discoveries to improve ... efforts for iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about exciting research areas that ... This could help develop new therapies for conditions that affect the balance of iron ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Complications Undiagnosed or untreated iron-deficiency anemia may cause the following complications: Depression Heart problems. If you do not have enough hemoglobin-carrying red blood cells, your heart has to work harder to move oxygen-rich blood through your ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat premature newborns with low hemoglobin levels. We also are hoping to determine which iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children ...

  6. MCAD deficiency in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Brage Storstein; Lund, Allan Meldgaard; Hougaard, David Michael

    2012-01-01

    Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MCADD) is the most common defect of fatty acid oxidation. Many countries have introduced newborn screening for MCADD, because characteristic acylcarnitines can easily be identified in filter paper blood spot samples by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/M...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... NHLBI News NHLBI in the Press Research Features All Events Past Events Upcoming Events About NHLBI About NHLBI Home Mission and Strategic Vision ... deficient Donors: Recovery and Storage Quality. Learn more about ... trial . View all trials from ClinicalTrials.gov . Visit Children and Clinical ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... do not have enough iron in your body. People with mild or moderate iron-deficiency anemia may ... as a TMRPSS6 gene mutation that causes a person’s body to make too much of a hormone ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in ... deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend heart-healthy eating and choosing iron-rich foods, especially during certain stages of life when more ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in premature or very small newborns . In collaboration with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in you getting less than the recommended daily amount of iron. Frequent blood donation. Individuals who donate blood often may be ...

  12. Familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lack an enzyme called lipoprotein lipase. Without this enzyme, the body cannot break down fat from digested food. Fat particles called chylomicrons build up in the blood. Risk factors include a family history of lipoprotein lipase deficiency. The condition is usually ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A-Z Grants ... health for people with iron-deficiency anemia. Recipient Epidemiology Donor Studies program findings help to protect blood ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in premature or very small newborns . In collaboration with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat premature newborns with low hemoglobin levels. We also are hoping to determine which iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the body. When your heart has to work harder, this can lead to several conditions: irregular heartbeats called arrhythmias , a heart murmur , an ... chronic conditions, iron-deficiency anemia can make their condition worse or result in treatments not working as well. Look for Diagnosis will discuss any ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... normally stores but has used up. Increase your intake of vitamin C to help your body absorb iron. Avoid drinking black tea, which reduces iron absorption. Other treatments If you have chronic kidney disease and iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Medicine (TOPMed) Program Non-NHLBI resources Anemia (National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus) Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease ( ... Supplement Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron-Deficiency Anemia (National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus) Building 31 31 Center Drive ...

  19. Resurrection of vitamin D deficiency and rickets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holick, Michael F.

    2006-01-01

    The epidemic scourge of rickets in the 19th century was caused by vitamin D deficiency due to inadequate sun exposure and resulted in growth retardation, muscle weakness, skeletal deformities, hypocalcemia, tetany, and seizures. The encouragement of sensible sun exposure and the fortification of milk with vitamin D resulted in almost complete eradication of the disease. Vitamin D (where D represents D2 or D3) is biologically inert and metabolized in the liver to 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], the major circulating form of vitamin D that is used to determine vitamin D status. 25(OH)D is activated in the kidneys to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D], which regulates calcium, phosphorus, and bone metabolism. Vitamin D deficiency has again become an epidemic in children, and rickets has become a global health issue. In addition to vitamin D deficiency, calcium deficiency and acquired and inherited disorders of vitamin D, calcium, and phosphorus metabolism cause rickets. This review summarizes the role of vitamin D in the prevention of rickets and its importance in the overall health and welfare of infants and children. PMID:16886050

  20. Cobalamin Deficiency: Clinical Picture and Radiological Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Briani

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin B12 deficiency causes a wide range of hematological, gastrointestinal, psychiatric and neurological disorders. Hematological presentation of cobalamin deficiency ranges from the incidental increase of mean corpuscular volume and neutrophil hypersegmentation to symptoms due to severe anemia, such as angor, dyspnea on exertion, fatigue or symptoms related to congestive heart failure, such as ankle edema, orthopnea and nocturia. Neuropsychiatric symptoms may precede hematologic signs and are represented by myelopathy, neuropathy, dementia and, less often, optic nerve atrophy. The spinal cord manifestation, subacute combined degeneration (SCD, is characterized by symmetric dysesthesia, disturbance of position sense and spastic paraparesis or tetraparesis. The most consistent MRI finding is a symmetrical abnormally increased T2 signal intensity confined to posterior or posterior and lateral columns in the cervical and thoracic spinal cord. Isolated peripheral neuropathy is less frequent, but likely overlooked. Vitamin B12 deficiency has been correlated negatively with cognitive functioning in healthy elderly subjects. Symptoms include slow mentation, memory impairment, attention deficits and dementia. Optic neuropathy occurs occasionally in adult patient. It is characterized by symmetric, painless and progressive visual loss. Parenteral replacement therapy should be started soon after the vitamin deficiency has been established.

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies ...

  2. The ketogenic diet is well tolerated and can be effective in patients with argininosuccinate lyase deficiency and refractory epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peuscher, Rosanne; Dijsselhof, Monique E.; Abeling, Nico G.; van Rijn, Margreet; van Spronsen, Francjan J.; Bosch, Annet M.

    2012-01-01

    Argininosuccinate lyase (ASL) deficiency (MIM 608310, McKusick 207900) is a rare disorder of the urea cycle, which leads to a deficiency of arginine and hyperammonemia. Epilepsy is a frequent complication of this disorder. A ketogenic diet (KD) can be a very effective therapy for refractory

  3. Iron deficiency and cognitive functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jáuregui-Lobera I

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ignacio Jáuregui-Lobera Department of Nutrition and Bromatology, Pablo de Olavide University, Seville, Spain Abstract: Micronutrient deficiencies, especially those related to iodine and iron, are linked to different cognitive impairments, as well as to potential long-term behavioral changes. Among the cognitive impairments caused by iron deficiency, those referring to attention span, intelligence, and sensory perception functions are mainly cited, as well as those associated with emotions and behavior, often directly related to the presence of iron deficiency anemia. In addition, iron deficiency without anemia may cause cognitive disturbances. At present, the prevalence of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia is 2%–6% among European children. Given the importance of iron deficiency relative to proper cognitive development and the alterations that can persist through adulthood as a result of this deficiency, the objective of this study was to review the current state of knowledge about this health problem. The relevance of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia, the distinction between the cognitive consequences of iron deficiency and those affecting specifically cognitive development, and the debate about the utility of iron supplements are the most relevant and controversial topics. Despite there being methodological differences among studies, there is some evidence that iron supplementation improves cognitive functions. Nevertheless, this must be confirmed by means of adequate follow-up studies among different groups. Keywords: iron deficiency, anemia, cognitive functions, supplementation

  4. Adult growth hormone deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Gupta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult growth hormone deficiency (AGHD is being recognized increasingly and has been thought to be associated with premature mortality. Pituitary tumors are the commonest cause for AGHD. Growth hormone deficiency (GHD has been associated with neuropsychiatric-cognitive, cardiovascular, neuromuscular, metabolic, and skeletal abnormalities. Most of these can be reversed with growth hormone therapy. The insulin tolerance test still remains the gold standard dynamic test to diagnose AGHD. Growth hormone is administered subcutaneously once a day, titrated to clinical symptoms, signs and IGF-1 (insulin like growth factor-1. It is generally well tolerated at the low-doses used in adults. Pegylated human growth hormone therapy is on the horizon, with a convenient once a week dosing.

  5. Late onset arginase deficiency presenting with encephalopathy and midbrain hyperintensity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boby Varkey Maramattom

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Urea cycle disorders (UCD are very rare metabolic disorders that present with encephalopathy and hyperammonemia. Of the UCDs, Arginase deficiency (ARD is the rarest and presents in childhood with a progressive spastic diplegia or seizures. Acute presentation in adulthood is extremely unusual. [1] We present the first case of adult onset ARD presenting with encephalopathy and diffusion weighted MRI findings that resembled a moustache in the midbrain.

  6. Cockayne syndrome: a case with hyperinsulinemia and growth hormone deficiency.

    OpenAIRE

    Park, S. K.; Chang, S. H.; Cho, S. B.; Baek, H. S.; Lee, D. Y.

    1994-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder of childhood characterized by cachectic dwarfism with senile-like appearance, mental retardation, photosensitive dermatitis, loss of adipose tissue, pigmentary degeneration of retina, microcephaly, deafness, skeletal and neurologic abnormalities. We describe here an 18 year old boy with Cockayne syndrome who had, in addition to the typical features of the disorder, fasting hyperinsulinemia and growth hormone deficiency.

  7. Epidemiology of SHOX deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolosi, A; Caruso-Nicoletti, M

    2010-06-01

    Deletion of short stature homeobox-containing (SHOX) gene, in the pseudoautosomal region (PAR1) of X and Y chromosomes, is an important cause of short stature. Homozygous loss of SHOX results in the more severe Langer mesomelic dysplasia, while SHOX haploinsufficiency cause a wide spectrum of short stature phenotypes, including patients with Turner syndrome, Leri Weill dyschondrosteosis (LWD), and idiopathic short stature (ISS). In Turner syndrome, haploinsufficiency of SHOX gene, as well as short stature, are present in 100%; nevertheless, SHOX deficiency accounts for only two-thirds of Turner patients' short stature. In LWD the prevalence of SHOX gene anomalies varies from 56% to 100%. This wide range might be due to different factors such as selection criteria of patients, sample size, and method used for screening SHOX mutations. The real challenge is to establish the prevalence of SHOX deficiency in ISS children given that published studies have reported this association with a very broad frequency range varying from 1.5% to 15%. An important variable in these studies is represented by the method used for screening SHOX mutations and sometimes by differences in patient selection. Short stature is present by definition in 3 out of 100 subjects; if we consider a frequency of SHOX defects of 3% among ISS, we should expect a population prevalence of 1 in 1000. This prevalence would be higher than that of GH deficiency (1:3,500) and of Turner syndrome (1:2,500 females), suggesting that SHOX deficiency could be one of the most frequent monogenetic causes of short stature.

  8. Biotin and biotinidase deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Zempleni, Janos; Hassan, Yousef I; Wijeratne, Subhashinee SK

    2008-01-01

    Biotin is a water-soluble vitamin that serves as an essential coenzyme for five carboxylases in mammals. Biotin-dependent carboxylases catalyze the fixation of bicarbonate in organic acids and play crucial roles in the metabolism of fatty acids, amino acids and glucose. Carboxylase activities decrease substantially in response to biotin deficiency. Biotin is also covalently attached to histones; biotinylated histones are enriched in repeat regions in the human genome and appear to play a role...

  9. Omega-3 deficiency impairs honey bee learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arien, Yael; Dag, Arnon; Zarchin, Shlomi; Masci, Tania

    2015-01-01

    Deficiency in essential omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), particularly the long-chain form of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), has been linked to health problems in mammals, including many mental disorders and reduced cognitive performance. Insects have very low long-chain PUFA concentrations, and the effect of omega-3 deficiency on cognition in insects has not been studied. We show a low omega-6:3 ratio of pollen collected by honey bee colonies in heterogenous landscapes and in many hand-collected pollens that we analyzed. We identified Eucalyptus as an important bee-forage plant particularly poor in omega-3 and high in the omega-6:3 ratio. We tested the effect of dietary omega-3 deficiency on olfactory and tactile associative learning of the economically highly valued honey bee. Bees fed either of two omega-3–poor diets, or Eucalyptus pollen, showed greatly reduced learning abilities in conditioned proboscis-extension assays compared with those fed omega-3–rich diets, or omega-3–rich pollen mixture. The effect on performance was not due to reduced sucrose sensitivity. Omega-3 deficiency also led to smaller hypopharyngeal glands. Bee brains contained high omega-3 concentrations, which were only slightly affected by diet, suggesting additional peripheral effects on learning. The shift from a low to high omega-6:3 ratio in the Western human diet is deemed a primary cause of many diseases and reduced mental health. A similar shift seems to be occurring in bee forage, possibly an important factor in colony declines. Our study shows the detrimental effect on cognitive performance of omega-3 deficiency in a nonmammal. PMID:26644556

  10. Genetic disorders of the anterior pituitary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teller, W M

    1985-01-01

    This survey deals with disorders caused by genetically disturbed function of the anterior pituitary gland. Genetic Dwarfism may be caused by isolated growth hormone deficiency (IGHD) or panpituitary diseases, such as congenital absence of the pituitary or familial panhypopituitarism. Genetic disturbances of isolated pituitary hormone secretion without dwarfism may occur as isolated gonadotropin deficiency (IGD), isolated luteinizing hormone deficiency ("fertile eunuch"), Kallmann syndrome (olfactogenital dysplasia), isolated thyrotropin deficiency (ITD) and isolated corticotropin deficiency (ICD). Pituitary dysfunction may also be associated with other genetic disease entities.

  11. Electron transfer flavoprotein deficiency: Functional and molecular aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiff, M; Froissart, R; Olsen, Rikke Katrine Jentoft

    2006-01-01

    Multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MADD) is a recessively inherited metabolic disorder that can be due to a deficiency of electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) or its dehydrogenase (ETF-ubiquinone oxidoreductase). ETF is a mitochondrial matrix protein consisting of alpha- (30kDa) and beta......- (28kDa) subunits encoded by the ETFA and ETFB genes, respectively. In the present study, we have analysed tissue samples from 16 unrelated patients with ETF deficiency, and we report the results of ETF activity, Western blot analysis and mutation analysis. The ETF assay provides a reliable diagnostic...... tool to confirm ETF deficiency in patients suspected to suffer from MADD. Activity ranged from less than 1 to 16% of controls with the most severely affected patients disclosing the lowest activity values. The majority of patients had mutations in the ETFA gene while only two of them harboured...

  12. Inhibitor development after liver transplantation in congenital factor VII deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, W-S Q; Chang, K-O; Cheuk, D K-L; Leung, Y-Y R; Chan, G C-F; Chan, S-C; Ha, S-Y

    2016-09-01

    Congenital factor VII (FVII) deficiency is the commonest type of the rare bleeding disorders. Very few cases of congenital FVII deficiency developed inhibitor and liver transplant is considered as definitive treatment. In the literature, twelve patients with congenital FVII deficiency developed inhibitors. Two had spontaneous resolution of inhibitors and one did not respond to high dose recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa) and died. Regarding liver transplant in congenital FVII patients, seven patients underwent liver transplant with good prognosis. We report a 5-year-old girl with confirmed severe congenital FVII deficiency since neonatal period. She suffered from recurrent intracranial bleeding despite rFVIIa replacement. After auxiliary liver transplant at the age of 4, she continued to show persistent deranged clotting profile and was found to have inhibitor towards FVII. Interestingly, she was still responsive to rFVIIa replacement. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Global developmental delay in guanidionacetate methyltransferase deficiency : differences in formal testing and clinical observation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbruggen, Krijn T.; Knijff, Wilma A.; Soorani-Lunsing, Roelineke J.; Sijens, Paul E.; Verhoeven, Nanda M.; Salomons, Gajja S.; Goorhuis-Brouwer, Siena M.; van Spronsen, Francjan J.

    Guanidinoacetate N-methyltransferase (GAMT) deficiency is a defect in the biosynthesis of creatine (Cr). So far, reports have not focused on the description of developmental abilities in this disorder. Here, we present the result of formal testing of developmental abilities in a GAMT-deficient

  14. Child’s Intellect and Iodine Deficiency: Mechanisms of Negative Impact and Ways of Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.V. Berezhnoy

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a review of scientific literature on the effect of iodine deficiency on the intellectual development of the child. The conclusion was made about the need for a mass iodine prophylaxis in the population and the individual one — in groups at high risk of iodine deficiency disorders, which include children, pregnant women and nursing mothers.

  15. Iodine deficiency and endemic goitre in the Langkloof area of South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    available at the local grocery stores but only small percentages of households ..... dietary factor or factors, did, however, improve the situation in this area during the .... guarantee success in eradicating iodine deficiency and endemic goitre. ... lB, ads. The Prevenrion and Control of lod;ne Deficiency Disorders. Amsterdam: ...

  16. A Patient With Pyruvate Carboxylase Deficiency and Nemaline Rods on Muscle Biopsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Unal, Ozlem; Orhan, Diclehan; Ostergaard, Elsebet

    2013-01-01

    Nemaline rods are the pathologic hallmark of nemaline myopathy, but they have also been described as a secondary phenomenon in a variety of other disorders. Nemaline rods have not been reported in pyruvate carboxylase deficiency before. Here we present a patient with pyruvate carboxylase deficiency...

  17. Prevention of Iron-Deficiency Anemia in Infants and Children of Preschool Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomon, Samuel J.

    Iron-deficiency anemia is almost certainly the most prevalent nutritional disorder among infants and young children in the United States. Anemia is frequently seen among children of low socioeconomic status but is probably also the most frequent nutritional deficiency disease seen among children cared for by private doctors. Possible reasons for…

  18. Familial LCAT deficiency: from renal replacement to enzyme replacement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoekenbroek, R. M.; van den Bergh Weerman, M. A.; Hovingh, G. K.; Potter van Loon, B. J.; Siegert, C. E. H.; Holleboom, A. G.

    2013-01-01

    Familial LCAT deficiency (FLD) is a recessive lipid disorder ultimately leading to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). We present two brothers with considerable variation in the age at which they developed ESRD. Kidney biopsies revealed both tubular and glomerular pathology. To date, no causal therapy

  19. L-arginine:glycine amidinotransferase deficiency protects from metabolic syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Choe, C.U.; Nabuurs, C.I.H.C.; Stockebrand, M.C.; Neu, A.; Nunes, P.M.; Morellini, F.; Sauter, K.; Schillemeit, S.; Hermans-Borgmeyer, I.; Marescau, B.; Heerschap, A.; Isbrandt, D.

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorylated creatine (Cr) serves as an energy buffer for ATP replenishment in organs with highly fluctuating energy demand. The central role of Cr in the brain and muscle is emphasized by severe neurometabolic disorders caused by Cr deficiency. Common symptoms of inborn errors of creatine

  20. Hyper-IgD syndrome or mevalonate kinase deficiency.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoffels, M.; Simon, A.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The hyper-IgD and periodic fever syndrome (HIDS) is one of the classical monogenetic hereditary autoinflammatory disorders, and together with the more severe mevalonic aciduria it is also known as 'mevalonate kinase deficiency' (MKD). In this study, we will give an overview of the

  1. Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waddell, Leigh; Wiley, Veronica; Carpenter, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    The fatty acid oxidation disorder most commonly identified by tandem mass spectrometry newborn screening is the potentially fatal medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MCAD). In clinically presenting cases, 80% are homozygous for the common mutation, c.985A > G and 18% heterozygous. We ...

  2. Iron deficiency and neurologic disease in children | Chiabi | Clinics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Iron deficiency is a frequent disorder and a public health problem especially in children and pregnant women. The clinical manifestations are varied, and the most dreaded are neurologic. These neurologic manifestations are often missed as differential diagnosis in current clinical practice. The authors review iron ...

  3. Iodine deficiency and functional performance of schoolchildren in Benin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Briel-van Ingen, van den T.

    2001-01-01

    The notion that iodine deficiency may lead not only to goiter and cretinism, but to a much wider range of disorders, from stillbirth and abortions, to hearing problems and mental and physical underdevelopment began to be accepted beyond the research community since the early 1980's. In 1990 it was

  4. Clinical, genetic, and enzymatic characterization of P450 oxidoreductase deficiency in four patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sahakitrungruang, Taninee

    2009-12-01

    P450 oxidoreductase (POR) deficiency causes disordered steroidogenesis; severe mutations cause genital ambiguity in both sexes plus the Antley-Bixler skeletal malformation syndrome, whereas mild mutations can cause adult infertility.

  5. L-arginine:glycine amidinotransferase deficiency protects from metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Chi-un; Nabuurs, Christine; Stockebrand, Malte C; Neu, Axel; Nunes, Patricia; Morellini, Fabio; Sauter, Kathrin; Schillemeit, Stefan; Hermans-Borgmeyer, Irm; Marescau, Bart; Heerschap, Arend; Isbrandt, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorylated creatine (Cr) serves as an energy buffer for ATP replenishment in organs with highly fluctuating energy demand. The central role of Cr in the brain and muscle is emphasized by severe neurometabolic disorders caused by Cr deficiency. Common symptoms of inborn errors of creatine synthesis or distribution include mental retardation and muscular weakness. Human mutations in l-arginine:glycine amidinotransferase (AGAT), the first enzyme of Cr synthesis, lead to severely reduced Cr and guanidinoacetate (GuA) levels. Here, we report the generation and metabolic characterization of AGAT-deficient mice that are devoid of Cr and its precursor GuA. AGAT-deficient mice exhibited decreased fat deposition, attenuated gluconeogenesis, reduced cholesterol levels and enhanced glucose tolerance. Furthermore, Cr deficiency completely protected from the development of metabolic syndrome caused by diet-induced obesity. Biochemical analyses revealed the chronic Cr-dependent activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which stimulates catabolic pathways in metabolically relevant tissues such as the brain, skeletal muscle, adipose tissue and liver, suggesting a mechanism underlying the metabolic phenotype. In summary, our results show marked metabolic effects of Cr deficiency via the chronic activation of AMPK in a first animal model of AGAT deficiency. In addition to insights into metabolic changes in Cr deficiency syndromes, our genetic model reveals a novel mechanism as a potential treatment option for obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  6. Simultaneous occurrence of hereditary C6 and C2 deficiency in a French-Canadian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delâge, J M; Lehner-Netsch, G; Lafleur, R; Simard, J; Brun, G; Prochazka, E

    1979-06-01

    The sera of four sisters were found to lack the sixth component of complement (C6) and the serum of one was also partially deficient in the second component (C2). Two other blood relatives were found to be heterozygous for both deficiencies, while only one sibling had normal values. The father of these eight siblings was heterozygous for C2D and C6D and in the third generation, six children were heterozygous for C6 deficiency was treated for chronic active brucel-transmitted; the C6 deficiency was not linked to the HLA system, while the C2-deficiency segregated with the haplotype A10,B18. The proband, homozygous for C6 deficiency was treated for chronic active Brucellosis and in another sibling with C6 deficiency, toxoplasmosis was diagnosed. Neither bleeding disorders nor a tendency to collagen diseases have been observed and the opsonic activity was normal in the sera of all family members.

  7. The evaluation of iron deficiency and anemia in male blood donors with other related factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousefinejad Vahid

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Background: Iron deficiency is one of the most common nutritional disorders worldwide and blood donation may cause iron depletion. Limited studies with large sample size have been done on male donors. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia among male donors in the Kurdistan Organization of Blood Transfusion in Iran. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study. Sample size was 1184 blood donors selected by systematic random sampling. Hemoglobin, serum iron, serum ferritin, total iron banding capacity (TIBC and transferin saturation were measured in donors. Iron depletion, lack of iron stores, iron deficiency, iron deficiency anemia and anemia were evaluated among them. Data was analyzed with SPSS software and X΂, one-way ANOVA, and LSD test. Results: Iron deficiency, anemia, iron deficiency anemia, iron depletion and lack of iron resources were seen in 2.3, 4.08, 2.14, 22.76 and 4.66 percent respectively. There was a significant relationship of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia with instances of donation and interval from last donation (P < 0.05. A significant relationship was seen between iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia among blood donors with more than ten times blood donation (P < 0.05. Conclusions: This study showed regular male donors require especial attention. Therefore, serum ferritin is recommended as a more adequate index to use for iron deficiency screening and planning purposes for iron supplementation among them.

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and Blood Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart ... include: Bleeding in your GI tract, from an ulcer, colon cancer, or regular use of medicines such as aspirin ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... contribute to differences in disease severity and how patients respond to treatment. The NHLBI Strategic Vision highlights ... Donor Studies (REDS) program Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) Program Non- ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and Blood Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases ... include: Bleeding in your GI tract, from an ulcer, colon cancer, or regular use of medicines such as aspirin ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A- ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and ... lose blood, you lose iron. Certain conditions or medicines can cause blood loss and lead to iron- ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available Skip to main content U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Health Topics Health Topics A-Z Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science Science Home Blood Disorders ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... body’s ability to make hemoglobin. Family history and genetics Von Willebrand disease is an inherited bleeding disorder ... If your condition is caused by certain rare genetic conditions, such as a TMRPSS6 gene mutation, you ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... interferes with the body’s ability to make hemoglobin. Family history and genetics Von Willebrand disease is an inherited bleeding disorder that affects the blood’s ability to clot. This makes it ...

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  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... trimester of pregnancy. Children between ages 1 and 2, especially if they drink a lot of cow’s milk. Cow’s milk is low in ... Willebrand disease is an inherited bleeding disorder ...

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  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Willebrand disease is an inherited bleeding disorder that affects the blood’s ability to clot. This makes it ... could help develop new therapies for conditions that affect the balance of iron in the body and ...

  2. Pseudoachondroplasia with immune deficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kultursay, N.; Taneli, B.; Cavusoglu, A.

    1988-01-01

    A 5-year old boy was admitted to the hospital with failure to thrive since he was 2 years old, with weakness in his legs and a waddling gait. He has normal mental development. His parents are normal phenotypically and are unrelated. In analysing his pedigree only a grandfather is described to have waddling gait. He has a normal craniofacial appearance but a disproportionate body with normal trunk and short extremities with height below the 3rd percentile. The diagnosis of pseudoachondroplasia was made on clinical, radiological and laboratory findings. He also had immune deficiency characterised by low T-lymphocyte populations and a low level of serum immunoglobulin A. (orig.)

  3. Primary Carnitine Deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jan; Hougaard, David M; Sandhu, Noreen

    2017-01-01

    Primary carnitine deficiency (PCD) causes low levels of carnitine in patients potentially leading to metabolic and cardiac symptoms. Newborn screening for PCD is now routine in many countries by measuring carnitine levels in infants. In this study we report Apgar scores, length and weight...... scores, length and weight compared to controls. Newborns with PCD and newborns born to mothers with PCD had significantly lower levels of free carnitine (fC0) than controls. Screening algorithms focusing only on fC0 had a high rate of detection of newborns with PCD. Sample collection 4-9 days after birth...

  4. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quak, S H; Saha, N; Tay, J S

    1996-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) in man is an X-linked enzyme. The deficiency of this enzyme is one of the most common inherited metabolic disorders in man. In Singapore, three clinical syndromes associated with G6PD deficiency had been described: severe haemolysis in neonates with kernicterus, haemoglobinuria and "viral hepatitis"-like syndrome. The human G6PD monomer consists of 515 amino acids. Only the tetrameric or dimeric forms composed of a single type subunit are catylitically active. The complete amino acid sequence of G6PD had been elucidated in man and various other animals. The region of high homology among the enzymes of various animals is presumably functionally active. Among the Chinese in Singapore, three common molecular variants had been identified: Canton (nt 1376 G --> T), Kaiping (nt 1388 G --> A) and Mediterranean (nt 563 C --> T) in frequencies of 24%, 21% and 10% respectively. In addition, two common mutants (Gaozhou, nt 95 A --> G and Chinese 5, nt 1024 C --> T) have been detected in Singapore Chinese in low frequencies. In Malays, 6 different deficient variants are known in Singapore (3 new, 1 Mahidol, 1 Indonesian and 1 Mediterranean).

  5. Faktor-faktor yang berhubungan dengan kejadian GAKY pada anak sekolah dasar di pinggiran pantai Kota Palu Provinsi Sulawesi Tengah

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Normawaty Patuti

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Iodine deficiency disorder (IDD is one of serious health problems considering that it has great impact to survival and quality of human resources. The core problem of IDD is initially caused by lack of iodine in water and soil, then heightened by goitrogenic substances in the food consumed, more pollutants as side effects of industrial waste, the blocking agent which naturally exists in water and soil in the surrounding dwelling places. Objective: The study aimed to identify factors affecting the prevalence of IDD among elementary school children at coastal region. Method: The study was analytic observational with cross sectional design. Population and samples of the study were elementary school children of grade 4-6 proportionally chosen that fulfiled inclusion criteria. Variables observed were consumption pattern, environment (drinking water plumbum, and children’s hemoglobin. Data analysis used computer software at signifiance level p0.05, drinking water plumbum level to the prevalence of IDD (p>0.05. Conclusion: There was signifiant effect of consumption pattern of protein, iodine and hemoglobin level to the prevalence of IDD among elementary school children at coastal region of Palu Municipality. There was no effect of drinking water plumbum level to the prevalence of IDD among elementary school children at coastal region of Palu Municipality.

  6. Vitamin D/dietary calcium deficiency rickets and pseudo-vitamin D deficiency rickets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glorieux, Francis H; Pettifor, John M

    2014-01-01

    This review describes the pathogenesis, clinical presentation and biochemical perturbations found in privational (nutritional) rickets and pseudo-vitamin D deficiency rickets (PDDR), an autosomal recessive condition with loss of function mutations in CYP27B1. It may seem strange to combine a discussion on privational rickets and PDDR as a single topic, but privational rickets and PDDR present with similar clinical signs and symptoms and with similar perturbations in bone and mineral metabolism. Of interest is the characteristic lack of features of rickets at birth in infants with PDDR, a finding which has also been reported in infants born to vitamin D-deficient mothers. This highlights the independence of the fetus and neonate from the need for vitamin D to maintain calcium homeostasis during this period. The variable roles of vitamin D deficiency and dietary calcium deficiency in the pathogenesis of privational rickets are discussed and the associated alterations in vitamin D metabolism highlighted. Although PDDR is a rare autosomal recessive disorder, results of long-term follow-up are now available on the effect of treatment with calcitriol, and these are discussed. Areas of uncertainty, such as should affected mothers breastfeed their infants, are emphasized. PMID:24818008

  7. Medical comorbidity of sleep disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikeos, Dimitris; Georgantopoulos, Georgios

    2011-07-01

    Recently published literature indicates that sleep disorders present with medical comorbidities quite frequently. The coexistence of a sleep disorder with a medical disorder has a substantial impact for both the patient and the health system. Insomnia and hypersomnia are highly comorbid with medical conditions, such as chronic pain and diabetes, as well as with various cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, urinary and neurological disorders. Restless legs syndrome and periodic leg movement syndrome have been associated with iron deficiency, kidney disease, diabetes, and neurological, autoimmune, cardiovascular and respiratory disorders. Rapid eye movement behaviour disorder has been described as an early manifestation of serious central nervous system diseases; thus, close neurological monitoring of patients referring with this complaint is indicated. Identification and management of any sleep disorder in medical patients is important for optimizing the course and prognosis. Of equal importance is the search for undetected medical disorder in patients presenting with sleep disorders.

  8. Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labrune Philippe

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency (G6P deficiency, or glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI, is a group of inherited metabolic diseases, including types Ia and Ib, characterized by poor tolerance to fasting, growth retardation and hepatomegaly resulting from accumulation of glycogen and fat in the liver. Prevalence is unknown and annual incidence is around 1/100,000 births. GSDIa is the more frequent type, representing about 80% of GSDI patients. The disease commonly manifests, between the ages of 3 to 4 months by symptoms of hypoglycemia (tremors, seizures, cyanosis, apnea. Patients have poor tolerance to fasting, marked hepatomegaly, growth retardation (small stature and delayed puberty, generally improved by an appropriate diet, osteopenia and sometimes osteoporosis, full-cheeked round face, enlarged kydneys and platelet dysfunctions leading to frequent epistaxis. In addition, in GSDIb, neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction are responsible for tendency towards infections, relapsing aphtous gingivostomatitis, and inflammatory bowel disease. Late complications are hepatic (adenomas with rare but possible transformation into hepatocarcinoma and renal (glomerular hyperfiltration leading to proteinuria and sometimes to renal insufficiency. GSDI is caused by a dysfunction in the G6P system, a key step in the regulation of glycemia. The deficit concerns the catalytic subunit G6P-alpha (type Ia which is restricted to expression in the liver, kidney and intestine, or the ubiquitously expressed G6P transporter (type Ib. Mutations in the genes G6PC (17q21 and SLC37A4 (11q23 respectively cause GSDIa and Ib. Many mutations have been identified in both genes,. Transmission is autosomal recessive. Diagnosis is based on clinical presentation, on abnormal basal values and absence of hyperglycemic response to glucagon. It can be confirmed by demonstrating a deficient activity of a G6P system component in a liver biopsy. To date, the diagnosis is most

  9. Pyruvate carboxylase deficiency: An underestimated cause of lactic acidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Habarou

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Pyruvate carboxylase (PC is a biotin-containing mitochondrial enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of pyruvate to oxaloacetate, thereby being involved in gluconeogenesis and in energy production through replenishment of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle with oxaloacetate. PC deficiency is a very rare metabolic disorder. We report on a new patient affected by the moderate form (the American type A. Diagnosis was nearly fortuitous, resulting from the revision of an initial diagnosis of mitochondrial complex IV (C IV defect. The patient presented with severe lactic acidosis and pronounced ketonuria, associated with lethargy at age 23 months. Intellectual disability was noted at this time. Amino acids in plasma and organic acids in urine did not show patterns of interest for the diagnostic work-up. In skin fibroblasts PC showed no detectable activity whereas biotinidase activity was normal. We had previously reported another patient with the severe form of PC deficiency and we show that she also had secondary C IV deficiency in fibroblasts. Different anaplerotic treatments in vivo and in vitro were tested using fibroblasts of both patients with 2 different types of PC deficiency, type A (patient 1 and type B (patient 2. Neither clinical nor biological effects in vivo and in vitro were observed using citrate, aspartate, oxoglutarate and bezafibrate. In conclusion, this case report suggests that the moderate form of PC deficiency may be underdiagnosed and illustrates the challenges raised by energetic disorders in terms of diagnostic work-up and therapeutical strategy even in a moderate form.

  10. Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis in a Patient with Undiagnosed Factor VII Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qadir, Hira; Rashid, Anila; Adil, Salman Naseem

    2017-09-01

    Factor VII (FVII) deficiency is one of the rare inherited bleeding disorders. Thrombosis has been occasionally described in inherited FVII deficiency. Here, we report a young female with undiagnosed FVII deficiency who presented with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST). Oral contraceptive pill was found to be prothrombotic risk factor. The CVSToccurred in spite of the congenital FVII deficiency indicating that no definitive antithrombotic protection is assured by this defect. Low molecular weight heparin and anti-Xa assay were found to be safe choice of anticoagulation and monitoring, respectively, in this patient.

  11. Neuroendocrine and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Adults with Pituitary Growth Hormone Deficiency (Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.I. Ismailov

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In this article authors discussed the results of literature review, which has been dedicated to study of different complications of growth hormone deficiency in adults, referring to the literature of the last 10–15 years. Based on this analysis, the authors concluded that in adults with growth hormone deficiency there is an adverse profile of cardiovascular risk. Patients with growth hormone deficiency have an adverse lipid profile, elevated body mass index, increased waist circumference and a high risk of hypertension. These disorders are likely to explain the increased cardiovascular mortality observed in patients with hypopituitarism, regardless of the etiology of growth hormone deficiency in adults.

  12. Iodine deficiency status of school going children in coastal region of bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayedur Rahman Miah; Chowdhury Habibur Rasul; Ashoke Kumar Paul

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Bangladesh is an iodine deficient zone, affected mainly in the northern part i.e., in Himalayan belt along Brahmaputra and Jamuna River. Severity of' iodine deficiency can be assessed by prevalence of goitre and urinary iodine excretion. The latest nationwide survey of Iodine Deficiency Disorders of' Bangladesh in 1993 showed prevalence of goitre 47.1% in all age and sex group and 69% of the population had urinary iodine excretion 100 mcg/L. Conclusion: On the basis of goitre prevalence and urinary iodine excretion, coastal region of Bangladesh is a mild iodine deficient zone. (authors)

  13. Developmental vitamin D deficiency alters MK-801-induced behaviours in adult offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesby, James P; O'Loan, Jonathan C; Alexander, Suzanne; Deng, Chao; Huang, Xu-Feng; McGrath, John J; Eyles, Darryl W; Burne, Thomas H J

    2012-04-01

    Developmental vitamin D (DVD) deficiency is a candidate risk factor for developing schizophrenia in humans. In rodents DVD deficiency induces subtle changes in the way the brain develops. This early developmental insult leads to select behavioural changes in the adult, such as an enhanced response to amphetamine-induced locomotion in female DVD-deficient rats but not in male DVD-deficient rats and an enhanced locomotor response to the N-methyl-D: -aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, MK-801, in male DVD-deficient rats. However, the response to MK-801-induced locomotion in female DVD-deficient rats is unknown. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to further examine this behavioural finding in male and female rats and assess NMDA receptor density. DVD-deficient Sprague Dawley rats were assessed for locomotion, ataxia, acoustic startle response (ASR) and prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the ASR to multiple doses of MK-801. The NMDA receptor density in relevant brain regions was assessed in a drug-naive cohort. DVD deficiency increased locomotion in response to MK-801 in both sexes. DVD-deficient rats also showed an enhanced ASR compared with control rats, but PPI was normal. Moreover, DVD deficiency decreased NMDA receptor density in the caudate putamen of both sexes. These results suggest that a transient prenatal vitamin D deficiency has a long-lasting effect on NMDA-mediated signalling in the rodent brain and may be a plausible candidate risk factor for schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric disorders.

  14. Neurologic Manifestations of Vitamin B Deficiency after Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punchai, Suriya; Hanipah, Zubaidah Nor; Meister, Katherine M; Schauer, Philip R; Brethauer, Stacy A; Aminian, Ali

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the incidence, clinical presentation, and outcomes of neurologic disorders secondary to vitamin B deficiencies following bariatric surgery. Patients at a single academic institution who underwent bariatric surgery and developed neurologic complications secondary to low levels of vitamins B1, B2, B6, and B12 between the years 2004 and 2015 were studied. In total, 47 (0.7%) bariatric surgical patients (Roux-en-Y gastric bypass n = 36, sleeve gastrectomy n = 9, and duodenal switch n = 2) developed neurologic manifestations secondary to vitamin B deficiencies. Eleven (23%) patients developed postoperative anatomical complications contributed to poor oral intake. Median duration to onset of neurologic manifestation following surgery was 12 months (IQR, 5-32). Vitamin deficiencies reported in the cohort included B1 (n = 30), B2 (n = 1), B6 (n = 12), and B12 (n = 12) deficiency. The most common manifestations were paresthesia (n = 31), muscle weakness (n = 15), abnormal gait (n = 11), and polyneuropathy (n = 7). Four patients were diagnosed with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) which was developed after gastric bypass (n = 3) and sleeve gastrectomy (n = 1). Seven patients required readmission for management of severe vitamin B deficiencies. Overall, resolution of neurologic symptoms with nutritional interventions and pharmacotherapy was noted in 40 patients (85%). The WKS was not reversible, and all four patients had residual mild ataxia and nystagmus at the last follow-up time. Nutritional neurologic disorders secondary to vitamin B deficiency are relatively uncommon after bariatric surgery. While neurologic disorders are reversible in most patients (85%) with vitamin replacements, persistent residual neurologic symptoms are common in patients with WKS.

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Topics A-Z Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science Science Home Blood Disorders ... Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and ... of Health [NIH]) Heavy Menstrual Bleeding (Centers for Disease Control ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and ... stimulate high-impact research. Our Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) Program now includes participants with anemia, which ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... stored in their body. This is the largest study to have looked at iron levels in blood donors. Results from the REDS program ... Von Willebrand Disease Other Resources NHLBI resources ... Health Study Recipient Epidemiology Donor Studies (REDS) program Blood Disorders ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... to main content U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Health Topics Health Topics A-Z Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science Science Home Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Sleep Science and ...

  19. PGM1 deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voermans, N C; Preisler, N; Madsen, K L

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in PGM1 (phosphoglucomutase 1) cause Glycogen Storage Disease type XIV, which is also a congenital disorder of protein N-glycosylation. It presents throughout life as myopathy with additional systemic symptoms. We report the effect of oral galactose treatment during five months in a pat...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science Science Home Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Sleep ... and save lives. We are committed to advancing science and translating discoveries ... to promote the prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, and ...