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Sample records for deficiency activates dna

  1. Esophageal carcinogenesis in the rat: zinc deficiency, DNA methylation and alkyltransferase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newberne, P M; Broitman, S; Schrager, T F

    1997-01-01

    Rats fed zinc-deficient diets and given an esophageal carcinogen, methylbenzylnitrosamine, develop tumors in greater incidence and with increased frequency compared to zinc-supplemented rats. This greater susceptibility is associated with a unique esophageal lesion, parakeratosis, with markedly increased epithelial necrosis and cell proliferation. Recent studies have shown that the increased susceptibility to tumorigenesis was further associated with a number of metabolic and biochemical alterations including increased binding of the carcinogen to DNA, shifts in O6-methylguanine (O6MeG)/7-methylguanine ratios and suggestions that the promutagen O6MeG lesion is not repaired effectively in the zinc-deficient esophagus; the latter was not reflected in the amount of O6-methyltransferase activity, however. The weight of evidence supports a presumption that zinc deficiency interferes with normal DNA repair mechanisms, the nature of which is not clear. An interesting additional finding was that zinc deficiency alone was associated with esophageal tumor induction, without carcinogen, which indicates that genetic material in the zinc-deficient esophageal epithelium is damaged sufficiently, without further chemical injury, to result in loss of control of cell proliferation. Manipulation of the time of exposure to zinc deficiency and carcinogen exposure defined the initiation period as most affected by the deficiency. Furthermore, reduced carcinogen exposure (and less toxicity), along with zinc deficiency, permits development of more tumors of the endophytic type, the form more relevant to human esophageal tumors. The groundwork, as described in this paper, has now been prepared to directly address the latter issue, endophytic tumors, and the putative relation of zinc deficiency to esophageal cancer in human populations.

  2. Pyrimidine Pool Disequilibrium Induced by a Cytidine Deaminase Deficiency Inhibits PARP-1 Activity, Leading to the Under Replication of DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Gemble

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Genome stability is jeopardized by imbalances of the dNTP pool; such imbalances affect the rate of fork progression. For example, cytidine deaminase (CDA deficiency leads to an excess of dCTP, slowing the replication fork. We describe here a novel mechanism by which pyrimidine pool disequilibrium compromises the completion of replication and chromosome segregation: the intracellular accumulation of dCTP inhibits PARP-1 activity. CDA deficiency results in incomplete DNA replication when cells enter mitosis, leading to the formation of ultrafine anaphase bridges between sister-chromatids at "difficult-to-replicate" sites such as centromeres and fragile sites. Using molecular combing, electron microscopy and a sensitive assay involving cell imaging to quantify steady-state PAR levels, we found that DNA replication was unsuccessful due to the partial inhibition of basal PARP-1 activity, rather than slower fork speed. The stimulation of PARP-1 activity in CDA-deficient cells restores replication and, thus, chromosome segregation. Moreover, increasing intracellular dCTP levels generates under-replication-induced sister-chromatid bridges as efficiently as PARP-1 knockdown. These results have direct implications for Bloom syndrome (BS, a rare genetic disease combining susceptibility to cancer and genomic instability. BS results from mutation of the BLM gene, encoding BLM, a RecQ 3'-5' DNA helicase, a deficiency of which leads to CDA downregulation. BS cells thus have a CDA defect, resulting in a high frequency of ultrafine anaphase bridges due entirely to dCTP-dependent PARP-1 inhibition and independent of BLM status. Our study describes previously unknown pathological consequences of the distortion of dNTP pools and reveals an unexpected role for PARP-1 in preventing DNA under-replication and chromosome segregation defects.

  3. Pyrimidine Pool Disequilibrium Induced by a Cytidine Deaminase Deficiency Inhibits PARP-1 Activity, Leading to the Under Replication of DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Gemble

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Genome stability is jeopardized by imbalances of the dNTP pool; such imbalances affect the rate of fork progression. For example, cytidine deaminase (CDA deficiency leads to an excess of dCTP, slowing the replication fork. We describe here a novel mechanism by which pyrimidine pool disequilibrium compromises the completion of replication and chromosome segregation: the intracellular accumulation of dCTP inhibits PARP-1 activity. CDA deficiency results in incomplete DNA replication when cells enter mitosis, leading to the formation of ultrafine anaphase bridges between sister-chromatids at "difficult-to-replicate" sites such as centromeres and fragile sites. Using molecular combing, electron microscopy and a sensitive assay involving cell imaging to quantify steady-state PAR levels, we found that DNA replication was unsuccessful due to the partial inhibition of basal PARP-1 activity, rather than slower fork speed. The stimulation of PARP-1 activity in CDA-deficient cells restores replication and, thus, chromosome segregation. Moreover, increasing intracellular dCTP levels generates under-replication-induced sister-chromatid bridges as efficiently as PARP-1 knockdown. These results have direct implications for Bloom syndrome (BS, a rare genetic disease combining susceptibility to cancer and genomic instability. BS results from mutation of the BLM gene, encoding BLM, a RecQ 3'-5' DNA helicase, a deficiency of which leads to CDA downregulation. BS cells thus have a CDA defect, resulting in a high frequency of ultrafine anaphase bridges due entirely to dCTP-dependent PARP-1 inhibition and independent of BLM status. Our study describes previously unknown pathological consequences of the distortion of dNTP pools and reveals an unexpected role for PARP-1 in preventing DNA under-replication and chromosome segregation defects.

  4. DNA repair deficiency in neurodegeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Dennis Kjølhede; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Stevnsner, Tinna V.

    2011-01-01

    : homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining. Ataxia telangiectasia and related disorders with defects in these pathways illustrate that such defects can lead to early childhood neurodegeneration. Aging is a risk factor for neurodegeneration and accumulation of oxidative mitochondrial DNA damage......Deficiency in repair of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage has been linked to several neurodegenerative disorders. Many recent experimental results indicate that the post-mitotic neurons are particularly prone to accumulation of unrepaired DNA lesions potentially leading to progressive...... neurodegeneration. Nucleotide excision repair is the cellular pathway responsible for removing helix-distorting DNA damage and deficiency in such repair is found in a number of diseases with neurodegenerative phenotypes, including Xeroderma Pigmentosum and Cockayne syndrome. The main pathway for repairing oxidative...

  5. Arsenite binding-induced zinc loss from PARP-1 is equivalent to zinc deficiency in reducing PARP-1 activity, leading to inhibition of DNA repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xi; Zhou, Xixi [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Du, Libo [Center for Molecular Science, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Liu, Wenlan [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Liu, Yang [Center for Molecular Science, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Hudson, Laurie G. [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Liu, Ke Jian, E-mail: kliu@salud.unm.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Inhibition of DNA repair is a recognized mechanism for arsenic enhancement of ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage and carcinogenesis. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), a zinc finger DNA repair protein, has been identified as a sensitive molecular target for arsenic. The zinc finger domains of PARP-1 protein function as a critical structure in DNA recognition and binding. Since cellular poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation capacity has been positively correlated with zinc status in cells, we hypothesize that arsenite binding-induced zinc loss from PARP-1 is equivalent to zinc deficiency in reducing PARP-1 activity, leading to inhibition of DNA repair. To test this hypothesis, we compared the effects of arsenite exposure with zinc deficiency, created by using the membrane-permeable zinc chelator TPEN, on 8-OHdG formation, PARP-1 activity and zinc binding to PARP-1 in HaCat cells. Our results show that arsenite exposure and zinc deficiency had similar effects on PARP-1 protein, whereas supplemental zinc reversed these effects. To investigate the molecular mechanism of zinc loss induced by arsenite, ICP-AES, near UV spectroscopy, fluorescence, and circular dichroism spectroscopy were utilized to examine arsenite binding and occupation of a peptide representing the first zinc finger of PARP-1. We found that arsenite binding as well as zinc loss altered the conformation of zinc finger structure which functionally leads to PARP-1 inhibition. These findings suggest that arsenite binding to PARP-1 protein created similar adverse biological effects as zinc deficiency, which establishes the molecular mechanism for zinc supplementation as a potentially effective treatment to reverse the detrimental outcomes of arsenic exposure. - Highlights: • Arsenite binding is equivalent to zinc deficiency in reducing PARP-1 function. • Zinc reverses arsenic inhibition of PARP-1 activity and enhancement of DNA damage. • Arsenite binding and zinc loss alter the conformation of zinc finger

  6. Constitutive Activation of AKT Pathway Inhibits TNF-induced Apoptosis in Mitochondrial DNA-Deficient human myelogenous leukemia ML-1a

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Seigo; Naito, Akihiro; Asano, Takayuki; Evans, Teresa T; Reddy, Shrikanth A.G.; Higuchi, Masahiro

    2008-01-01

    TNF plus protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide induced apoptosis in human myelogenous leukemia ML-1a but not in C19, respiration minus mitochondrial DNA deficient C19 cells, derived from ML-1a. To investigate how mitochondrial DNA depletion inhibits apoptosis, we investigated AKT. Both AKT and its phosphorylated form were observed only in C19, indicating that depletion of mtDNA increased protein and the active form of AKT. Treatment of C19 with LY294002, which inhibits PI-3 kinase and inh...

  7. SLAP deficiency decreases dsDNA autoantibody production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Lisa K; Pennington, Luke F; Shaw, Laura A; Brown, Meredith; Treacy, Eric C; Friend, Samantha F; Hatlevik, Øyvind; Rubtsova, Kira; Rubtsov, Anatoly V; Dragone, Leonard L

    2014-02-01

    Src-like adaptor protein (SLAP) adapts c-Cbl, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, to activated components of the BCR signaling complex regulating BCR levels and signaling in developing B cells. Based on this function, we asked whether SLAP deficiency could decrease the threshold for tolerance and eliminate development of autoreactive B cells in two models of autoantibody production. First, we sensitized mice with a dsDNA mimetope that causes an anti-dsDNA response. Despite equivalent production of anti-peptide antibodies compared to BALB/c controls, SLAP(-/-) mice did not produce anti-dsDNA. Second, we used the 56R tolerance model. SLAP(-/-) 56R mice had decreased levels of dsDNA-reactive antibodies compared to 56R mice due to skewed light chain usage. Thus, SLAP is a critical regulator of B-cell development and function and its deficiency leads to decreased autoreactive B cells that are otherwise maintained by inefficient receptor editing or failed negative selection.

  8. Restoration of normal embryogenesis by mitochondrial supplementation in pig oocytes exhibiting mitochondrial DNA deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagnone, Gael L M; Tsai, Te-Sha; Makanji, Yogeshwar; Matthews, Pamela; Gould, Jodee; Bonkowski, Michael S; Elgass, Kirstin D; Wong, Ashley S A; Wu, Lindsay E; McKenzie, Matthew; Sinclair, David A; St John, Justin C

    2016-03-18

    An increasing number of women fail to achieve pregnancy due to either failed fertilization or embryo arrest during preimplantation development. This often results from decreased oocyte quality. Indeed, reduced mitochondrial DNA copy number (mitochondrial DNA deficiency) may disrupt oocyte quality in some women. To overcome mitochondrial DNA deficiency, whilst maintaining genetic identity, we supplemented pig oocytes selected for mitochondrial DNA deficiency, reduced cytoplasmic maturation and lower developmental competence, with autologous populations of mitochondrial isolate at fertilization. Supplementation increased development to blastocyst, the final stage of preimplantation development, and promoted mitochondrial DNA replication prior to embryonic genome activation in mitochondrial DNA deficient oocytes but not in oocytes with normal levels of mitochondrial DNA. Blastocysts exhibited transcriptome profiles more closely resembling those of blastocysts from developmentally competent oocytes. Furthermore, mitochondrial supplementation reduced gene expression patterns associated with metabolic disorders that were identified in blastocysts from mitochondrial DNA deficient oocytes. These results demonstrate the importance of the oocyte's mitochondrial DNA investment in fertilization outcome and subsequent embryo development to mitochondrial DNA deficient oocytes.

  9. Folate deficiency increases mtDNA and D-1 mtDNA deletion in aged brain of mice lacking uracil-DNA glycosylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronenberg, Golo; Gertz, Karen; Overall, Rupert W; Harms, Christoph; Klein, Jeanette; Page, Melissa M; Stuart, Jeffrey A; Endres, Matthias

    2011-04-01

    Strong epidemiological and experimental evidence links folate deficiency and resultant hyperhomocysteinemia with cognitive decline and neurodegeneration. Here, we tested the hypothesis that uracil misincorporation contributes to mitochondrial pathology in aged brain following folate deprivation. In a 2 × 2 design, 14-month-old mice lacking uracil DNA glycosylase (Ung-/-) versus wild-type controls were subjected to a folate-deficient versus a regular diet for six weeks. Folate-deficient feeding significantly enhanced mtDNA content and overall abundance of the D-1 mtDNA deletion in brain of Ung-/-, but not of wild-type mice. Independent of folate status, the frequency of the D-1 mtDNA deletion in mtDNA was significantly increased in Ung-/- mice. The rate of mitochondrial biogenesis as assessed at six weeks of the experimental diet by mRNA expression levels of transcriptional coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator (PGC)-1α and of mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) was not affected by either Ung-/- genotype or short-term folate deficiency. Similarly, citrate synthase (CS) activity in the brain did not differ across experimental groups. By contrast, independent of genotype, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity was significantly reduced in folate-deficient animals. Our results suggest that impaired uracil excision repair causes an increase in mitochondrial mutagenesis in aged brain along with a compensatory increase in mtDNA content in response to low folate status. Folate deficiency may contribute to neurodegeneration via mtDNA damage.

  10. Nucleotide Salvage Deficiencies, DNA Damage and Neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Fasullo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Nucleotide balance is critically important not only in replicating cells but also in quiescent cells. This is especially true in the nervous system, where there is a high demand for adenosine triphosphate (ATP produced from mitochondria. Mitochondria are particularly prone to oxidative stress-associated DNA damage because nucleotide imbalance can lead to mitochondrial depletion due to low replication fidelity. Failure to maintain nucleotide balance due to genetic defects can result in infantile death; however there is great variability in clinical presentation for particular diseases. This review compares genetic diseases that result from defects in specific nucleotide salvage enzymes and a signaling kinase that activates nucleotide salvage after DNA damage exposure. These diseases include Lesch-Nyhan syndrome, mitochondrial depletion syndromes, and ataxia telangiectasia. Although treatment options are available to palliate symptoms of these diseases, there is no cure. The conclusions drawn from this review include the critical role of guanine nucleotides in preventing neurodegeneration, the limitations of animals as disease models, and the need to further understand nucleotide imbalances in treatment regimens. Such knowledge will hopefully guide future studies into clinical therapies for genetic diseases.

  11. Kinetics and thermodynamics of exonuclease-deficient DNA polymerases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspard, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    A kinetic theory is developed for exonuclease-deficient DNA polymerases, based on the experimental observation that the rates depend not only on the newly incorporated nucleotide, but also on the previous one, leading to the growth of Markovian DNA sequences from a Bernoullian template. The dependencies on nucleotide concentrations and template sequence are explicitly taken into account. In this framework, the kinetic and thermodynamic properties of DNA replication, in particular, the mean growth velocity, the error probability, and the entropy production are calculated analytically in terms of the rate constants and the concentrations. Theory is compared with numerical simulations for the DNA polymerases of T7 viruses and human mitochondria.

  12. DNA repair and transcription deficiency syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Vermeulen (Wim)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractThe genetic information of all living organisms is stored in DNA, a long macromolecule composed of four different nucleotides. Preservation of the sequence of nucleotides, defining the genetic code, is a prerequisite for a faithful transmission of the genetic information to subsequent ge

  13. Deficiency of Bloom syndrome helicase activity is radiomimetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, David P; Topaloglu, Ozlem; Zhang, Yonggang; Bunz, Fred

    2008-11-01

    Bloom syndrome is caused by homozygous mutations in BLM, which encodes a RecQ DNA helicase. Patient-derived cells deficient in BLM helicase activity exhibit genetic instability--apparent cytogenetically as sister chromatid exchanges--and activated DNA damage signaling. In this report, we show that BLM-knockout colorectal cancer cells exhibited endogenous, ATM-dependent double-strand DNA break responses similar to those recently observed in Bloom syndrome patient-derived cells. Xenograft tumors established from BLM-deficient cancer cells were not radiosensitive, but exhibited growth impairment that was comparable to that of wild type tumors treated with a single, high dose of ionizing radiation. These results suggest that pharmacological inhibitors of BLM would have a radiomimetic effect and that transient inhibition of BLM activity might be a viable strategy for anticancer therapy.

  14. Frataxin Deficiency Promotes Excess Microglial DNA Damage and Inflammation that Is Rescued by PJ34.

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    Yan Shen

    Full Text Available An inherited deficiency in the frataxin protein causes neurodegeneration of the dorsal root ganglia and Friedreich's ataxia (FA. Frataxin deficiency leads to oxidative stress and inflammatory changes in cell and animal models; however, the cause of the inflammatory changes, and especially what causes brain microglial activation is unclear. Here we investigated: 1 the mechanism by which frataxin deficiency activates microglia, 2 whether a brain-localized inflammatory stimulus provokes a greater microglial response in FA animal models, and 3 whether an anti-inflammatory treatment improves their condition. Intracerebroventricular administration of LPS induced higher amounts of microglial activation in the FA mouse model vs controls. We also observed an increase in oxidative damage in the form of 8-oxoguanine (8-oxo-G and the DNA repair proteins MUTYH and PARP-1 in cerebellar microglia of FA mutant mice. We hypothesized that frataxin deficiency increases DNA damage and DNA repair genes specifically in microglia, activating them. siRNA-mediated frataxin knockdown in microglial BV2 cells clearly elevated DNA damage and the expression of DNA repair genes MUTYH and PARP-1. Frataxin knockdown also induced a higher level of PARP-1 in MEF cells, and this was suppressed in MUTYH-/- knockout cells. Administration of the PARP-1 inhibitor PJ34 attenuated the microglial activation induced by intracerebroventricular injection of LPS. The combined administration of LPS and angiotensin II provoke an even stronger activation of microglia and neurobehavioral impairment. PJ34 treatment attenuated the neurobehavioral impairments in FA mice. These results suggest that the DNA repair proteins MUTYH and PARP-1 may form a pathway regulating microglial activation initiated by DNA damage, and inhibition of microglial PARP-1 induction could be an important therapeutic target in Friedreich's ataxia.

  15. Analysis of mitochondrial DNA sequences in patients with isolated or combined oxidative phosphorylation system deficiency.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hinttala, R.; Smeets, R.; Moilanen, J.S.; Ugalde, C.; Uusimaa, J.; Smeitink, J.A.M.; Majamaa, K.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Enzyme deficiencies of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system may be caused by mutations in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) or in the nuclear DNA. OBJECTIVE: To analyse the sequences of the mtDNA coding region in 25 patients with OXPHOS system deficiency to identify the underlying g

  16. Base excision repair deficient mice lacking the Aag alkyladenine DNA glycosylase.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.P. Engelward (Bevin); G. Weeda (Geert); M.D. Wyatt; J.L.M. Broekhof (Jose'); J. de Wit (Jan); I. Donker (Ingrid); J.M. Allan (James); B. Gold (Bert); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); L.D. Samson (Leona)

    1997-01-01

    textabstract3-methyladenine (3MeA) DNA glycosylases remove 3MeAs from alkylated DNA to initiate the base excision repair pathway. Here we report the generation of mice deficient in the 3MeA DNA glycosylase encoded by the Aag (Mpg) gene. Alkyladenine DNA glycosylase turns out to be the major DNA glyc

  17. Base excision repair deficient mice lacking the Aag alkyladenine DNA glycosylase.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.P. Engelward (Bevin); G. Weeda (Geert); M.D. Wyatt; J.L.M. Broekhof (Jose'); J. de Wit (Jan); I. Donker (Ingrid); J.M. Allan (James); B. Gold (Bert); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); L.D. Samson (Leona)

    1997-01-01

    textabstract3-methyladenine (3MeA) DNA glycosylases remove 3MeAs from alkylated DNA to initiate the base excision repair pathway. Here we report the generation of mice deficient in the 3MeA DNA glycosylase encoded by the Aag (Mpg) gene. Alkyladenine DNA glycosylase turns out to be the major DNA glyc

  18. A distinct response to endogenous DNA damage in the development of Nbs1-deficient cortical neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui Li; Yun-Gui Yang; Yunzhou Gao; Zhao-Qi Wang; Wei-Min Tong

    2012-01-01

    Microcephaly is a clinical characteristic for human nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS,mutated in NBS1 gene),a chromosomal instability syndrome.However,the underlying molecular pathogenesis remains elusive.In the present study,we demonstrate that neuronal disruption ofNBS (Nbn in mice) causes microcephaly characterized by the reduction of cerebral cortex and corpus cailosum,recapitulating neuronal anomalies in human NBS.Nbs1-deficient neocortex shows accumulative endogenous DNA damage and defective activation ofAtaxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR)-Chk1 pathway upon DNA damage.Notably,in contrast to massive apoptotic cell death in Nbs1-deficient cerebella,activation of p53 leads to a defective neuroprogenitor proliferation in neocortex,likely via specific persistent induction of hematopoietic zinc finger (Hzf) that preferentially promotes p53-mediated cell cycle arrest whilst inhibiting apoptosis.Moreover,Trp53 mutations substantially rescue the microcephaly in Nbs1-deficient mice.Thus,the present results reveal the first clue that developing neurons at different regions of brain selectively respond to endogenous DNA damage,and underscore an important role for Nbs1 in neurogenesis.

  19. The oxidative stress responsive transcription factor Pap1 confers DNA damage resistance on checkpoint-deficient fission yeast cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrie Belfield

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic cells invoke mechanisms to promote survival when confronted with cellular stress or damage to the genome. The protein kinase Chk1 is an integral and conserved component of the DNA damage response pathway. Mutation or inhibition of Chk1 results in mitotic death when cells are exposed to DNA damage. Oxidative stress activates a pathway that results in nuclear accumulation of the bZIP transcription factor Pap1. We report the novel finding that fission yeast Pap1 confers resistance to drug- and non-drug-induced DNA damage even when the DNA damage checkpoint is compromised. Multi-copy expression of Pap1 restores growth to chk1-deficient cells exposed to camptothecin or hydroxyurea. Unexpectedly, increased Pap1 expression also promotes survival of chk1-deficient cells with mutations in genes encoding DNA ligase (cdc17 or DNA polymerase δ (cdc6, but not DNA replication initiation mutants. The ability of Pap1 to confer resistance to DNA damage was not specific to chk1 mutants, as it also improved survival of rad1- and rad9-deficient cells in the presence of CPT. To confer resistance to DNA damage Pap1 must localize to the nucleus and be transcriptionally active.

  20. Molecular and immunological characterization of DNA ligase IV deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jinqiu; Tang, Wenjing; An, Yunfei; Tang, Maozhi; Wu, Junfeng; Qin, Tao; Zhao, Xiaodong

    2016-02-01

    DNA ligase IV (LIG4) deficiency is an extremely rare autosomal recessive primary immunodeficiency disease caused by the LIG4 mutation. To date, fewer than 30 cases of patients have been reported worldwide. No reversion mutations have been previously identified in LIG4. This study enrolled seven Chinese patients with LIG4 deficiency who presented with combined immunodeficiency, microcephaly, and growth retardation. One patient (P1) acquired non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Four patients had impaired T cell proliferation function and skewed T cell receptor diversity. Five novel mutations in LIG4 and a potential hotspot mutation (c.833G>T; p.R278L) in the Chinese population were identified. TA cloning analysis of T cells, NK cells, granulocytes, and oral mucosa cells in P6 revealed wild-type clones and clones that contained both maternally and paternally inherited mutations, indicating possible somatic reversion which need further investigation since no functional or protein assays were possible for all the patients died and no cell lines were available.

  1. Iron deficiency and iron excess damage mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Patrick B; Knutson, Mitchell D; Paler-Martinez, Andres; Lee, Sonia; Xu, Yu; Viteri, Fernando E; Ames, Bruce N

    2002-02-19

    Approximately two billion people, mainly women and children, are iron deficient. Two studies examined the effects of iron deficiency and supplementation on rats. In study 1, mitochondrial functional parameters and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage were assayed in iron-deficient (mitochondrial respiratory control ratios and increased levels of oxidants in polymorphonuclear-leukocytes, as assayed by dichlorofluorescein (P mitochondrial malfunction. Although excess iron has been known to cause oxidative damage, the observation of oxidant-induced damage to mitochondria from iron deficiency has been unrecognized previously. Untreated iron deficiency, as well as excessive-iron supplementation, are deleterious and emphasize the importance of maintaining optimal iron intake.

  2. The progeroid phenotype of Ku80 deficiency is dominant over DNA-PKCS deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwin Reiling

    Full Text Available Ku80 and DNA-PKCS are both involved in the repair of double strand DNA breaks via the nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ pathway. While ku80-/- mice exhibit a severely reduced lifespan and size, this phenotype is less pronounced in dna-pkcs-/- mice. However, these observations are based on independent studies with varying genetic backgrounds. Here, we generated ku80-/-, dna-pkcs-/- and double knock out mice in a C57Bl6/J*FVB F1 hybrid background and compared their lifespan, end of life pathology and mutation frequency in liver and spleen using a lacZ reporter. Our data confirm that inactivation of Ku80 and DNA-PKCS causes reduced lifespan and bodyweights, which is most severe in ku80-/- mice. All mutant mice exhibited a strong increase in lymphoma incidence as well as other aging-related pathology (skin epidermal and adnexal atrophy, trabacular bone reduction, kidney tubular anisokaryosis, and cortical and medullar atrophy and severe lymphoid depletion. LacZ mutation frequency analysis did not show strong differences in mutation frequencies between knock out and wild type mice. The ku80-/- mice had the most severe phenotype and the Ku80-mutation was dominant over the DNA-PKCS-mutation. Presumably, the more severe degenerative effect of Ku80 inactivation on lifespan compared to DNA-PKCS inactivation is caused by additional functions of Ku80 or activity of free Ku70 since both Ku80 and DNA-PKCS are essential for NHEJ.

  3. 40 CFR 798.5500 - Differential growth inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: âBacterial DNA damage or repair tests.â 798.5500 Section... inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA damage or repair tests.” (a... killing or growth inhibition of repair deficient bacteria in a set of repair proficient and deficient...

  4. Mechanistic Rationale to Target PTEN-Deficient Tumor Cells with Inhibitors of the DNA Damage Response Kinase ATM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Nuala; Hanna, Conor; Walker, Steven M; Gonda, David; Li, Jie; Wikstrom, Katarina; Savage, Kienan I; Butterworth, Karl T; Chen, Clark; Harkin, D Paul; Prise, Kevin M; Kennedy, Richard D

    2015-06-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is an important signaling molecule in the DNA damage response (DDR). ATM loss of function can produce a synthetic lethal phenotype in combination with tumor-associated mutations in FA/BRCA pathway components. In this study, we took an siRNA screening strategy to identify other tumor suppressors that, when inhibited, similarly sensitized cells to ATM inhibition. In this manner, we determined that PTEN and ATM were synthetically lethal when jointly inhibited. PTEN-deficient cells exhibited elevated levels of reactive oxygen species, increased endogenous DNA damage, and constitutive ATM activation. ATM inhibition caused catastrophic DNA damage, mitotic cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis specifically in PTEN-deficient cells in comparison with wild-type cells. Antioxidants abrogated the increase in DNA damage and ATM activation in PTEN-deficient cells, suggesting a requirement for oxidative DNA damage in the mechanism of cell death. Lastly, the ATM inhibitor KU-60019 was specifically toxic to PTEN mutant cancer cells in tumor xenografts and reversible by reintroduction of wild-type PTEN. Together, our results offer a mechanistic rationale for clinical evaluation of ATM inhibitors in PTEN-deficient tumors.

  5. Novel mechanism of regulation of the DNA repair enzyme OGG1 in tuberin-deficient cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Samy L.; Bhandari, Besant K.; Sadek, Nahed; Abboud-Werner, Sherry L.; Abboud, Hanna E.

    2010-01-01

    Tuberin (protein encodes by tuberous sclerosis complex 2, Tsc2) deficiency is associated with the decrease in the DNA repair enzyme 8-oxoG-DNA glycosylase (OGG1) in tumour kidney of tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) patients. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the mechanisms by which tuberin regulates OGG1. The partial deficiency in tuberin expression that occurs in the renal proximal tubular cells and kidney cortex of the Eker rat is associated with decreased activator protein 4 (AP4) and OGG1 expression. A complete deficiency in tuberin is associated with loss of AP4 and OGG1 expression in kidney tumour from Eker rats and the accumulation of significant levels of 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine. Knockdown of tuberin expression in human renal epithelial cells (HEK293) with small interfering RNA (siRNA) also resulted in a marked decrease in the expression of AP4 and OGG1. In contrast, overexpression of tuberin in HEK293 cells increased the expression of AP4 and OGG1 proteins. Downregulation of AP4 expression using siRNA resulted in a significant decrease in the protein expression of OGG1. Immunoprecipitation studies show that AP4 is associated with tuberin in cells. Gel shift analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation identified the transcription factor AP4 as a positive regulator of the OGG1 promoter. AP4 DNA-binding activity is significantly reduced in Tsc2−/− as compared with Tsc2+/+ cells. Transcriptional activity of the OGG1 promoter is also decreased in tuberin-null cells compared with wild-type cells. These data indicate a novel role for tuberin in the regulation of OGG1 through the transcription factor AP4. This regulation may be important in the pathogenesis of kidney tumours in patients with TSC disease. PMID:20837600

  6. Paraoxonase and arylesterase activities in children with iron deficiency anemia and vitamin B12 deficiency anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koc, Ahmet; Cengiz, Murad; Ozdemir, Zeynep Canan; Celik, Hakim

    2012-05-01

    Paraoxonase-1 is an esterase enzyme and it has 3 types of activity, namely paraoxonase, arylesterase, and diazoxonase. It has been reported that paraoxonase-1 deficiency is related to increased susceptibility to development of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to investigate serum paraoxonase and arylesterase activities in children with iron deficiency anemia and vitamin B(12) deficiency anemia. Thirty children with iron deficiency anemia, 30 children with vitamin B(12) deficiency anemia, and 40 healthy children aged 6 months to 6 years were enrolled in this study. Serum paraoxonase and arylesterase activities were measured with a spectrophotometer by using commercially available kits. Mean paraoxonase and arylesterase activities in vitamin B(12) deficiency anemia group (103 ± 73 and 102 ± 41 U/L, respectively) were significantly lower than mean activities of control group (188 ± 100 and 147 ± 34 U/L, respectively; P iron deficiency anemia group (165 ± 103 and 138 ± 39 U/L, respectively; P iron deficiency anemia and control groups (P > .05). Paraoxonase and arylesterase activities significantly increased after treatment with vitamin B(12) in vitamin B(12) deficiency anemia; however, there were no significant changes in the activities of these enzymes after iron treatment in iron deficiency anemia group. Important correlations were found between vitamin B(12) levels and both paraoxonase and arylesterase activities (r = .367, P deficiency anemia causes important reductions in paraoxonase and arylesterase activities, and after vitamin B(12) therapy the activities of these enzymes returned to near-normal levels.

  7. Thymidine kinase 1 deficient cells show increased survival rate after UV-induced DNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, T; Rasmussen, Lene Juel; Munch-Petersen, Birgitte

    2010-01-01

    Balanced deoxynucleotide pools are known to be important for correct DNA repair, and deficiency for some of the central enzymes in deoxynucleotide metabolism can cause imbalanced pools, which in turn can lead to mutagenesis and cell death. Here we show that cells deficient for the thymidine salvage...

  8. RAD51AP1-deficiency in vertebrate cells impairs DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parplys, Ann C; Kratz, Katja; Speed, Michael C; Leung, Stanley G; Schild, David; Wiese, Claudia

    2014-12-01

    RAD51-associated protein 1 (RAD51AP1) is critical for homologous recombination (HR) by interacting with and stimulating the activities of the RAD51 and DMC1 recombinases. In human somatic cells, knockdown of RAD51AP1 results in increased sensitivity to DNA damaging agents and to impaired HR, but the formation of DNA damage-induced RAD51 foci is unaffected. Here, we generated a genetic model system, based on chicken DT40 cells, to assess the phenotype of fully inactivated RAD51AP1 in vertebrate cells. Targeted inactivation of both RAD51AP1 alleles has no effect on either viability or doubling-time in undamaged cells, but leads to increased levels of cytotoxicity after exposure to cisplatin or to ionizing radiation. Interestingly, ectopic expression of GgRAD51AP1, but not of HsRAD51AP1 is able to fully complement in cell survival assays. Notably, in RAD51AP1-deficient DT40 cells the resolution of DNA damage-induced RAD51 foci is greatly slowed down, while their formation is not impaired. We also identify, for the first time, an important role for RAD51AP1 in counteracting both spontaneous and DNA damage-induced replication stress. In human and in chicken cells, RAD51AP1 is required to maintain wild type speed of replication fork progression, and both RAD51AP1-depleted human cells and RAD51AP1-deficient DT40 cells respond to replication stress by a slow-down of replication fork elongation rates. However, increased firing of replication origins occurs in RAD51AP1-/- DT40 cells, likely to ensure the timely duplication of the entire genome. Taken together, our results may explain why RAD51AP1 commonly is overexpressed in tumor cells and tissues, and we speculate that the disruption of RAD51AP1 function could be a promising approach in targeted tumor therapy.

  9. Amylase activity in substrate deficiency aerobic granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chuen-Chi; Lee, Duu-Jong; Lai, Juin-Yih

    2009-01-01

    Immunohistochemical staining was applied together with the multicolor fluorescent scheme to demonstrate the amylase activity for polysaccharide hydrolysis in stored or starved aerobic granules that are in substrate deficiency. If sufficient nutrients were present, alpha-amylase and beta-amylase were found close to the surface layer of the original granules. Following storage or starvation during which most external nutrients were depleted, the alpha-amylase and beta-amylase were distributed over the entire granule interior, suggesting endogenous respiration at the core of the granule. In particular, the fluorescent intensities of alpha-amylase and beta-amylase were enriched 5-20 microm from the edge of the internal cavity, suggesting the strong correlation between polysaccharide hydrolysis and the formation of interior cavities. The secreted amylase was located near the living cells, suggesting that the polysaccharide hydrolysis is restricted to local environment that occurs near the functional strains. Internal hydrolysis within the core, for the case of both proteins and polysaccharides should correspond in principle to the loss of granule stability.

  10. Characterization of environmental chemicals with potential for DNA damage using isogenic DNA repair-deficient chicken DT40 cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kimiyo N; Hirota, Kouji; Kono, Koichi; Takeda, Shunichi; Sakamuru, Srilatha; Xia, Menghang; Huang, Ruili; Austin, Christopher P; Witt, Kristine L; Tice, Raymond R

    2011-08-01

    Included among the quantitative high throughput screens (qHTS) conducted in support of the US Tox21 program are those being evaluated for the detection of genotoxic compounds. One such screen is based on the induction of increased cytotoxicity in seven isogenic chicken DT40 cell lines deficient in DNA repair pathways compared to the parental DNA repair-proficient cell line. To characterize the utility of this approach for detecting genotoxic compounds and identifying the type(s) of DNA damage induced, we evaluated nine of 42 compounds identified as positive for differential cytotoxicity in qHTS (actinomycin D, adriamycin, alachlor, benzotrichloride, diglycidyl resorcinol ether, lovastatin, melphalan, trans-1,4-dichloro-2-butene, tris(2,3-epoxypropyl)isocyanurate) and one non-cytotoxic genotoxic compound (2-aminothiamine) for (1) clastogenicity in mutant and wild-type cells; (2) the comparative induction of γH2AX positive foci by melphalan; (3) the extent to which a 72-hr exposure duration increased assay sensitivity or specificity; (4) the use of 10 additional DT40 DNA repair-deficient cell lines to better analyze the type(s) of DNA damage induced; and (5) the involvement of reactive oxygen species in the induction of DNA damage. All compounds but lovastatin and 2-aminothiamine were more clastogenic in at least one DNA repair-deficient cell line than the wild-type cells. The differential responses across the various DNA repair-deficient cell lines provided information on the type(s) of DNA damage induced. The results demonstrate the utility of this DT40 screen for detecting genotoxic compounds, for characterizing the nature of the DNA damage, and potentially for analyzing mechanisms of mutagenesis.

  11. Interaction between ATM and PARP-1 in response to DNA damage and sensitization of ATM deficient cells through PARP inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Murcia Gilbert

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract ATM and PARP-1 are two of the most important players in the cell's response to DNA damage. PARP-1 and ATM recognize and bound to both single and double strand DNA breaks in response to different triggers. Here we report that ATM and PARP-1 form a molecular complex in vivo in undamaged cells and this association increases after γ-irradiation. ATM is also modified by PARP-1 during DNA damage. We have also evaluated the impact of PARP-1 absence or inhibition on ATM-kinase activity and have found that while PARP-1 deficient cells display a defective ATM-kinase activity and reduced γ-H2AX foci formation in response to γ-irradiation, PARP inhibition on itself is able to activate ATM-kinase. PARP inhibition induced γ H2AX foci accumulation, in an ATM-dependent manner. Inhibition of PARP also induces DNA double strand breaks which were dependent on the presence of ATM. As consequence ATM deficient cells display an increased sensitivity to PARP inhibition. In summary our results show that while PARP-1 is needed in the response of ATM to gamma irradiation, the inhibition of PARP induces DNA double strand breaks (which are resolved in and ATM-dependent pathway and activates ATM kinase.

  12. The progeroid phenotype of Ku80 deficiency is dominant over DNA-PKCS deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reiling, Erwin; Dollé, Martijn E T; Youssef, Sameh A; Lee, Moonsook; Nagarajah, Bhawani; Roodbergen, Marianne; de With, Piet; de Bruin, Alain; Hoeijmakers, Jan H; Vijg, Jan; van Steeg, Harry; Hasty, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Ku80 and DNA-PKCS are both involved in the repair of double strand DNA breaks via the nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway. While ku80-/- mice exhibit a severely reduced lifespan and size, this phenotype is less pronounced in dna-pkcs-/- mice. However, these observations are based on independent

  13. The progeroid phenotype of Ku80 deficiency Is dominant over DNA-PK CS deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Reiling (Erwin); M.E.T. Dollé (Martijn); A.R. Youssef; M. Lee (Moonsook); B. Nagarajah (Bhawani); M. Roodbergen (Marianne); P. de With (Piet); A. de Bruin (Alain); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); J. Vijg (Jan); H. van Steeg (Harry); P. Hasty (Paul)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractKu80 and DNA-PKCS are both involved in the repair of double strand DNA breaks via the nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway. While ku80-/- mice exhibit a severely reduced lifespan and size, this phenotype is less pronounced in dna-pkcs -/- mice. However, these observations are based

  14. Mesencephalic complex I deficiency does not correlate with parkinsonism in mitochondrial DNA maintenance disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palin, Eino J H; Paetau, Anders; Suomalainen, Anu

    2013-08-01

    Genetic evidence from recessively inherited Parkinson's disease has indicated a clear causative role for mitochondrial dysfunction in Parkinson's disease. This role has long been discussed based on findings that toxic inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory complex I caused parkinsonism and that tissues of patients with Parkinson's disease show complex I deficiency. Disorders of mitochondrial DNA maintenance are a common cause of inherited neurodegenerative disorders, and lead to mitochondrial DNA deletions or depletion and respiratory chain defect, including complex I deficiency. However, parkinsonism associates typically with defects of catalytic domain of mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma. Surprisingly, however, not all mutations affecting DNA polymerase gamma manifest as parkinsonism, but, for example, spacer region mutations lead to spinocerebellar ataxia and/or severe epilepsy. Furthermore, defective Twinkle helicase, a close functional companion of DNA polymerase gamma in mitochondrial DNA replication, results in infantile-onset spinocerebellar ataxia, epilepsy or adult-onset mitochondrial myopathy, but not typically parkinsonism. Here we sought for clues for this specificity in the neurological manifestations of mitochondrial DNA maintenance disorders by studying mesencephalic neuropathology of patients with DNA polymerase gamma or Twinkle defects, with or without parkinsonism. We show here that all patients with mitochondrial DNA maintenance disorders had neuronopathy in substantia nigra, most severe in DNA polymerase gamma-associated parkinsonism. The oculomotor nucleus was also affected, but less severely. In substantia nigra, all patients had a considerable decrease of respiratory chain complex I, but other respiratory chain enzymes were not affected. Complex I deficiency did not correlate with parkinsonism, age, affected gene or inheritance. We conclude that the cell number in substantia nigra correlated well with parkinsonism in DNA polymerase gamma

  15. Deficiencies

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of all deficiencies currently listed on Nursing Home Compare, including the nursing home that received the deficiency, the associated inspection date,...

  16. DNA-based diagnosis of arylsulfatase A deficiencies as a supplement to enzyme assay: a case in point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulter-Mackie, M B; Applegarth, D A; Toone, J; Vallance, H

    1997-02-01

    To identify the molecular basis of arylsulfatase A deficiency in a family at risk for metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) and determine the genetic risk in the offspring. Mutations in the arylsulfatase A gene were identified by PCR amplification and restriction enzyme digestion. Individuals had previously been tested for arylsulfatase A activity. Assays of arylsulfatase A activity had resulted in ambiguous results for MLD carrier identification. DNA analysis clearly identified two MLD mutations in the family, and an unsuspected arylsulfatase A pseudodeficiency. The DNA information immediately clarified the MLD risk for the family and confirmed that a newborn with low arylsulfatase A activity was unaffected. The overlap between activities for various combinations of MLD and pseudodeficiency alleles and the variability inherent in the assay of arylsulfatase A complicate the interpretation of activity levels in families at risk for MLD. Use of simple molecular biological tests for pseudodeficiency and the common MLD mutations in combination with the enzyme data can facilitate carrier identification and prenatal diagnosis.

  17. The exonuclease activity of DNA polymerase γ is required for ligation during mitochondrial DNA replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macao, Bertil; Uhler, Jay P.; Siibak, Triinu; Zhu, Xuefeng; Shi, Yonghong; Sheng, Wenwen; Olsson, Monica; Stewart, James B.; Gustafsson, Claes M.; Falkenberg, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) polymerase γ (POLγ) harbours a 3′–5′ exonuclease proofreading activity. Here we demonstrate that this activity is required for the creation of ligatable ends during mtDNA replication. Exonuclease-deficient POLγ fails to pause on reaching a downstream 5′-end. Instead, the enzyme continues to polymerize into double-stranded DNA, creating an unligatable 5′-flap. Disease-associated mutations can both increase and decrease exonuclease activity and consequently impair DNA ligation. In mice, inactivation of the exonuclease activity causes an increase in mtDNA mutations and premature ageing phenotypes. These mutator mice also contain high levels of truncated, linear fragments of mtDNA. We demonstrate that the formation of these fragments is due to impaired ligation, causing nicks near the origin of heavy-strand DNA replication. In the subsequent round of replication, the nicks lead to double-strand breaks and linear fragment formation. PMID:26095671

  18. Bone Aging in DNA Repair Deficient Trichothiodystrophy Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.E.M. Diderich (Karin)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractOur genome is continuously damaged by environmental, endogenous agents as well as by the instrinsic instability of DNA. For example, UV light gives rise to helix-distorting cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and pyrimidine-(6,4)-pyrimidone adducts (6-4PPs). Ionizing radiation can cause

  19. DNA mismatch repair deficiency in sporadic colorectal cancer and Lynch Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Poulogiannis, George; Frayling, Ian; Arends, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Abstract DNA mismatch repair (MMR) deficiency is one of the best understood forms of genetic instability in colorectal cancer (CRC), and is characterised by the loss of function of the MMR pathway. Failure to repair replication-associated errors due to a defective MMR system allows persistence of mismatch mutations all over the genome, but especially in regions of repetitive DNA known as microsatellites, giving rise to the phenomenon of microsatellite instability (MSI). A high freq...

  20. BRCA Mutations, DNA Repair Deficiency, and Ovarian Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oktay, Kutluk; Turan, Volkan; Titus, Shiny; Stobezki, Robert; Liu, Lin

    2015-09-01

    Oocyte aging has a significant impact on reproductive outcomes both quantitatively and qualitatively. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the age-related decline in reproductive success have not been fully addressed. BRCA is known to be involved in homologous DNA recombination and plays an essential role in double-strand DNA break repair. Given the growing body of laboratory and clinical evidence, we performed a systematic review on the current understanding of the role of DNA repair in human reproduction. We find that BRCA mutations negatively affect ovarian reserve based on convincing evidence from in vitro and in vivo results and prospective studies. Because decline in the function of the intact gene occurs at an earlier age, women with BRCA1 mutations exhibit accelerated ovarian aging, unlike those with BRCA2 mutations. However, because of the still robust function of the intact allele in younger women and because of the masking of most severe cases by prophylactic oophorectomy or cancer, it is less likely one would see an effect of BRCA mutations on fertility until later in reproductive age. The impact of BRCA2 mutations on reproductive function may be less visible because of the delayed decline in the function of normal BRCA2 allele. BRCA1 function and ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated (ATM)-mediated DNA repair may also be important in the pathogenesis of age-induced increase in aneuploidy. BRCA1 is required for meiotic spindle assembly, and cohesion function between sister chromatids is also regulated by ATM family member proteins. Taken together, these findings strongly suggest the implication of BRCA and DNA repair malfunction in ovarian aging.

  1. Maternal vitamin B12 deficiency and abnormal cell-free DNA results in pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuring-Blom, Heleen; Lichtenbelt, Klaske; van Galen, Karin; Elferink, Martin; Weiss, Marjan; Vermeesch, Joris Robert; Page-Christiaens, Lieve

    2016-01-01

    What's Already Known about this Topic? Prenatal testing with cell-free DNA may incidentally identify maternal genetic anomalies and malignancies. What does this Study Add? Profound vitamin B12 deficiency with intramedullary hemolysis may cause abnormal genomic patterns that can be detected by

  2. Restricted diet delays accelerated ageing and genomic stress in DNA-repair-deficient mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.P. Vermeij (Wilbert); M. Dollé (MartijnE.T.); E. Reiling (Erwin); D. Jaarsma (Dick); C. Payan-Gomez; C.R. Bombardieri (Cíntia R.); Wu, H.; A.J.M. Roks (Anton); S.M. Botter (Sander); B.C.J. van der Eerden (Bram); S.A. Youssef (Sameh Ahmed); R. Kuiper (Ruud); B. Nagarajah (Bhawani); C.T.M. van Oostrom (Conny); R.M.C. Brandt (Renata); S. Barnhoorn (Sander); S. Imholz (Sandra); J.L.A. Pennings (Jeroen L.A.); A. de Bruin (Alain); Gyenis, Á.; J. Pothof (Joris); J. Vijg (Jan); H. van Steeg (Harry); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractMice deficient in the DNA excision-repair gene Ercc1 (Ercc1Δ/-) show numerous accelerated ageing features that limit their lifespan to 4-6 months. They also exhibit a 'survival response', which suppresses growth and enhances cellular maintenance. Such a response resembles the anti-ageing

  3. Restricted diet delays accelerated ageing and genomic stress in DNA-repair-deficient mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeij, W. P.; Dolle, M. E. T.; Reiling, E.; Jaarsma, D.; Payan-Gomez, C.; Bombardieri, C. R.; Wu, H.; Roks, A. J. M.; Botter, S. M.; van der Eerden, B. C.; Youssef, S. A.; Kuiper, R. V.; Nagarajah, B.; van Oostrom, C. T.; Brandt, R. M. C.; Barnhoorn, S.; Imholz, S.; Pennings, J. L. A.; de Bruin, A.; Gyenis, A.; Pothof, J.; Vijg, J.; van Steeg, H.; Hoeijmakers, J. H. J.

    2016-01-01

    Mice deficient in the DNA excision-repair gene Ercc1 (Ercc1(Delta/-)) show numerous accelerated ageing features that limit their lifespan to 4-6 months(1-4). They also exhibit a 'survival response', which suppresses growth and enhances cellular maintenance. Such a response resembles the anti-ageing

  4. Restricted diet delays accelerated ageing and genomic stress in DNA-repair-deficient mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeij, W P; Dollé, M E T; Reiling, E; Jaarsma, D|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/323051928; Payan-Gomez, C; Bombardieri, C R; Wu, H; Roks, A J M; Botter, S M; van der Eerden, B C; Youssef, S A; Kuiper, R V|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/305415042; Nagarajah, B; van Oostrom, C T; Brandt, R M C; Barnhoorn, S; Imholz, S; Pennings, J L A; de Bruin, A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304837261; Gyenis, Á; Pothof, J; Vijg, J; van Steeg, H; Hoeijmakers, J H J

    2016-01-01

    Mice deficient in the DNA excision-repair gene Ercc1 (Ercc1(∆/-)) show numerous accelerated ageing features that limit their lifespan to 4-6 months. They also exhibit a 'survival response', which suppresses growth and enhances cellular maintenance. Such a response resembles the anti-ageing response

  5. DNA-based diagnosis of isolated sulfite oxidase deficiency by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Ching-Wan; Li, Chi-Keung; Lai, Chi-Kong; Tong, Sui-Fan; Chan, Kwok-Yin; Ng, Grace Sui-Fun; Yuen, Yuet-Ping; Cheng, Anna Wai-Fun; Chan, Yan-Wo

    2002-01-01

    Isolated sulfite oxidase deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disease, characterized by severe neurological abnormalities, seizures, mental retardation, and dislocation of the ocular lenses, that often leads to death in infancy. There is a special demand for prenatal diagnosis, since no effective treatment is available for isolated sulfite oxidase deficiency. Until now, the cDNA sequence of the sulfite oxidase (SUOX) gene has been available, but the genomic sequence of the SUOX gene has not been published. In this study, we have performed a DNA-based diagnosis of isolated sulfite oxidase deficiency in a Chinese patient. To do so, we designed oligonucleotide primers for amplification of the predicted exons and intron-exon boundaries of the SUOX gene obtained from the completed draft version of the human genome. Using overlapping PCR products, we confirmed the flanking intronic sequences of the coding exons and that the entire 466-residue mature peptide is encoded by the last exon of the gene. We then performed mutation detection using denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC). The DHPLC chromatogram of exon 2b showed the presence of heteroduplex peaks only after mixing of the mutant DNA with the wild-type DNA, indicating the presence of a homozygous mutation. Direct DNA sequencing showed a homozygous base substitution at codon 160, changing the codon from CGG to CAG, which changes the amino acid from arginine to glutamine, i.e., R160Q. The DNA-based diagnosis of isolated sulfite oxidase deficiency will enable us to make an accurate determination of carrier status and to perform prenatal diagnosis of this disease. The availability of the genomic sequences of human genes from the completed draft human genome sequence will simplify the development of molecular genetic diagnoses of human diseases from peripheral blood DNA.

  6. Local chromatin microenvironment determines DNMT activity : from DNA methyltransferase to DNA demethylase or DNA dehydroxymethylase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wijst, Monique G. P.; Venkiteswaran, Muralidhar; Chen, Hui; Xu, Guo-Liang; Plosch, Torsten; Rots, Marianne G.

    2015-01-01

    Insights on active DNA demethylation disproved the original assumption that DNA methylation is a stable epigenetic modification. Interestingly, mammalian DNA methyltransferases 3A and 3B (DNMT-3A and -3B) have also been reported to induce active DNA demethylation, in addition to their well-known fun

  7. Fetal Gene Therapy for Ornithine Transcarbamylase Deficiency by Intrahepatic Plasmid DNA-Micro-Bubble Injection Combined with Hepatic Ultrasound Insonation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Yoshie; Kakimoto, Takashi; Yuan, Wenji; Kuno, Shuichi; Yamashita, Hiromasa; Chiba, Toshio

    2016-06-01

    We evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of hepatic transfection of plasmid DNA using micro-bubbles and ultrasound insonation for fetal correction of ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) deficiency in mice. Twenty-three sparse-fur heterozygous pregnant mice (day 16 of gestation) were divided into three groups: injection of plasmid-DNA micro-bubble mixture into fetal liver with ultrasound insonation (Tr, n = 11); control group 1 (C1), injection of plasmid-DNA micro-bubble mixture into fetal liver with no insonation (n = 5); and control group 2 (C2), injection of saline-micro-bubble mixture into fetal liver with ultrasound insonation (n = 7). Levels of blood ammonia and urinary orotic acid were significantly lower in the Tr group than in the C1 and C2 groups (p < 0.05, p < 0.01, respectively), whereas OTC activity was not different between groups. Therefore, ultrasound insonation with micro-bubbles enhanced plasmid DNA transfection into fetal mouse liver, leading to one of the therapeutic methods in ammonia metabolism. This might provide more time for OTC-deficient infants until liver transplantation. Copyright © 2016 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. DNA polymerase-α regulates type I interferon activation through cytosolic RNA:DNA synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starokadomskyy, Petro; Gemelli, Terry; Rios, Jonathan J.; Xing, Chao; Wang, Richard C.; Li, Haiying; Pokatayev, Vladislav; Dozmorov, Igor; Khan, Shaheen; Miyata, Naoteru; Fraile, Guadalupe; Raj, Prithvi; Xu, Zhe; Xu, Zigang; Ma, Lin; Lin, Zhimiao; Wang, Huijun; Yang, Yong; Ben-Amitai, Dan; Orenstein, Naama; Mussaffi, Huda; Baselga, Eulalia; Tadini, Gianluca; Grunebaum, Eyal; Sarajlija, Adrijan; Krzewski, Konrad; Wakeland, Edward K.; Yan, Nan; de la Morena, Maria Teresa; Zinn, Andrew R.; Burstein, Ezra

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant nucleic acids generated during viral replication are the main trigger for antiviral immunity, and mutations disrupting nucleic acid metabolism can lead to autoinflammatory disorders. Here we investigated the etiology of X-linked reticulate pigmentary disorder (XLPDR), a primary immunodeficiency with autoinflammatory features. We discovered that XLPDR is caused by an intronic mutation that disrupts expression of POLA1, the gene encoding the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase-α. Unexpectedly, POLA1 deficiency results in increased type I interferon production. This enzyme is necessary for RNA:DNA primer synthesis during DNA replication and strikingly, POLA1 is also required for the synthesis of cytosolic RNA:DNA, which directly modulates interferon activation. Altogether, this work identified POLA1 as a critical regulator of the type I interferon response. PMID:27019227

  9. FOLATE DEFICIENCY REGULATES EXPRESSION OF DNA POLYMERASE β IN RESPONSE TO OXIDATIVE STRESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unnikrishnan, Archana; Prychitko, Tom M.; Patel, Hiral V.; Chowdhury, Mahbuba E.; Pilling, Amanda B.; Ventrella-Lucente, Lisa F.; Papakonstantinou, Erin V.; Cabelof, Diane C.; Heydari, Ahmad R.

    2010-01-01

    Folate deficiency has been shown to influence carcinogenesis by creating an imbalance in the base excision repair (BER) pathway impacting BER homeostasis. The inability to mount a BER response to oxidative stress in a folate deficient environment results in the accumulation of DNA repair intermediates, i.e., DNA strand breaks. Our data indicate that upregulation in β-pol expression in response to oxidative stress is inhibited by folate deficiency at the level of gene expression. Alteration in expression of β-pol in a folate deficient environment is not due to epigenetic changes in the core promoter of the β-pol gene, i.e., the CpG islands within the β-pol promoter remain unmethylated in the presence and/or absence of folate. However, the promoter analysis studies show a differential binding of regulatory factor(s) to the −36 to −7 region (the folic acid response region, FARR) within the core promoter of β-pol. Moreover, we observe a tight correlation between the level of binding of regulatory factor(s) with the FARR and inhibition of β-pol expression. Based on these findings, we propose that folate deficiency results in an upregulation/stability of negative regulatory factor(s) interacting with FARR, repressing the upregulation of the β-pol gene in response to oxidative stress. PMID:21070850

  10. Challenge assay: A functional biomarker for exposure-induced DNA repair deficiency and for risk of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, William W; Giri, Ashok K; Ruchirawat, Mathuros

    2010-01-01

    A variety of biomarkers have been used to monitor exposed populations to determine potential health hazards from their exposure to environmental toxic agents. However, the majority of these biomarkers have been focused onto the identification of biological damage from the exposure. Therefore, there is a need to develop functional biomarkers that can identify exposure-induced functional deficiencies. More importantly, these deficiencies should be positioned along pathways that are responsible for the development of specific diseases. One of such pathways belongs to the extensive and complex DNA-repair machinery. The machinery thus becomes a large target for damage from environmental toxic agents. The hypothesis is that damage to any component of a repair pathway will interfere with the pathway-specific repair activities. Therefore, when cells from exposed populations are challenged with a DNA-damaging agent in vitro, the in vivo exposure-induced repair deficiency will be dramatically amplified and the deficiency will be detectable in a challenge assay as increased chromosome aberrations, micronuclei or un-repaired DNA strand breaks. The challenge assay has been used in different laboratories to show that a variety of exposed populations (with exposure to air pollutants, arsenic, benzene, butadiene, cigarette smoke, incense smoke, lead, mercury, pesticides, uranium or xylene but not to low concentrations of air pollutants or butadiene) expressed abnormal challenge response. The predicted health consequences of some of these studies have also been validated. Therefore, the challenge assay is a useful functional biomarker for population studies. Details of the challenge assay and its application will be presented in this review.

  11. Antioxidant dietary deficiency induces caspase activation in chick skeletal muscle cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Nunes

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis and necrosis are two distinct forms of cell death that can occur in response to different agents and stress conditions. In order to verify if the oxidative stress induced by dietary selenium and vitamin E deficiencies can lead muscle cells to apoptosis, one-day-old chicks were reared using diets differing in their vitamin E (0 or 10 IU/kg and selenium (0 or 0.15 ppm supplementation. Chick skeletal muscle tissue was obtained from 28-day-old animals and used to verify apoptosis occurrence based on caspase activity detection and DNA fragmentation. Antioxidant deficiency significantly increased caspase-like activity assessed by the hydrolysis of fluorogenic peptide substrates (Abz-peptidyl-EDDnp at lambdaexc = 320 nm and lambdaem = 420 nm. Proteolytic activation was not accompanied by typical internucleosomal DNA fragmentation detected by field inversion gel electrophoresis. Although the general caspase inhibitor N-benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp(O-Me fluoromethyl ketone (Z-VAD-fmk (0 to 80 muM did not block caspase-like activity when preincubated for 30 min with muscle homogenates, the hydrolyzed substrates presented the same cleavage profile in HPLC (at the aspartic acid residue when incubated with the purified recombinant enzyme caspase-3. These data indicate that oxidative stress causes caspase-like activation in muscle cells and suggest that cell death associated with exudative diathesis (dietary deficiency of selenium and vitamin E can follow the apoptotic pathway.

  12. Selenium Deficiency Attenuates Chicken Duodenal Mucosal Immunity via Activation of the NF-κb Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhe; Qu, Yanpeng; Wang, Jianfa; Wu, Rui

    2016-08-01

    Selenium (Se) deficiency can cause intestinal mucosal inflammation, which is related to activation of nuclear transcription factor kappa-B (NF-κB) signaling pathway. However, the mechanism of inflammatory response in chicken duodenal mucosa caused by Se deficiency and its relationship with the NF-κB signaling pathway remain elusive. In this study, we firstly obtained Se-deficient chickens bred with 0.01 mg/kg Se and the normal chickens bred with 0.4 mg/kg Se for 35 days. Then, NF-κB signaling pathway, secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA), inflammatory cytokines, oxidized glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione activities were determined. The results showed that Se deficiency obviously enhanced p50, p65, and p65 DNA-binding activities. The phosphorylation of IκB-α and phosphorylation of kappa-B kinase subunit alpha (IKKα) and IKKα were elevated, but IκB-α was decreased (P mucosal immunity via activation of NF-κB signaling pathway regulated by redox activity, which suggested that Se is a crucial host factor involved in regulating inflammation.

  13. Extensive ssDNA end formation at DNA double-strand breaks in non-homologous end-joining deficient cells during the S phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stenerlöw Bo

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Efficient and correct repair of DNA damage, especially DNA double-strand breaks, is critical for cellular survival. Defects in the DNA repair may lead to cell death or genomic instability and development of cancer. Non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ is the major repair pathway for DNA double-strand breaks in mammalian cells. The ability of other repair pathways, such as homologous recombination, to compensate for loss of NHEJ and the ways in which contributions of different pathways are regulated are far from fully understood. Results In this report we demonstrate that long single-stranded DNA (ssDNA ends are formed at radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks in NHEJ deficient cells. At repair times ≥ 1 h, processing of unrejoined DNA double-strand breaks generated extensive ssDNA at the DNA ends in cells lacking the NHEJ protein complexes DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK or DNA Ligase IV/XRCC4. The ssDNA formation was cell cycle dependent, since no ssDNA ends were observed in G1-synchronized NHEJ deficient cells. Furthermore, in wild type cells irradiated in the presence of DNA-PKcs (catalytic subunit of DNA-PK inhibitors, or in DNA-PKcs deficient cells complemented with DNA-PKcs mutated in six autophosphorylation sites (ABCDE, no ssDNA was formed. The ssDNA generation also greatly influences DNA double-strand break quantification by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, resulting in overestimation of the DNA double-strand break repair capability in NHEJ deficient cells when standard protocols for preparing naked DNA (i. e., lysis at 50°C are used. Conclusion We provide evidence that DNA Ligase IV/XRCC4 recruitment by DNA-PK to DNA double-strand breaks prevents the formation of long ssDNA ends at double-strand breaks during the S phase, indicating that NHEJ components may downregulate an alternative repair process where ssDNA ends are required.

  14. Detection of coding microsatellite frameshift mutations in DNA mismatch repair-deficient mouse intestinal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woerner, Stefan M; Tosti, Elena; Yuan, Yan P; Kloor, Matthias; Bork, Peer; Edelmann, Winfried; Gebert, Johannes

    2015-11-01

    Different DNA mismatch repair (MMR)-deficient mouse strains have been developed as models for the inherited cancer predisposing Lynch syndrome. It is completely unresolved, whether coding mononucleotide repeat (cMNR) gene mutations in these mice can contribute to intestinal tumorigenesis and whether MMR-deficient mice are a suitable molecular model of human microsatellite instability (MSI)-associated intestinal tumorigenesis. A proof-of-principle study was performed to identify mouse cMNR-harboring genes affected by insertion/deletion mutations in MSI murine intestinal tumors. Bioinformatic algorithms were developed to establish a database of mouse cMNR-harboring genes. A panel of five mouse noncoding mononucleotide markers was used for MSI classification of intestinal matched normal/tumor tissues from MMR-deficient (Mlh1(-/-) , Msh2(-/-) , Msh2(LoxP/LoxP) ) mice. cMNR frameshift mutations of candidate genes were determined by DNA fragment analysis. Murine MSI intestinal tumors but not normal tissues from MMR-deficient mice showed cMNR frameshift mutations in six candidate genes (Elavl3, Tmem107, Glis2, Sdccag1, Senp6, Rfc3). cMNRs of mouse Rfc3 and Elavl3 are conserved in type and length in their human orthologs that are known to be mutated in human MSI colorectal, endometrial and gastric cancer. We provide evidence for the utility of a mononucleotide marker panel for detection of MSI in murine tumors, the existence of cMNR instability in MSI murine tumors, the utility of mouse subspecies DNA for identification of polymorphic repeats, and repeat conservation among some orthologous human/mouse genes, two of them showing instability in human and mouse MSI intestinal tumors. MMR-deficient mice hence are a useful molecular model system for analyzing MSI intestinal carcinogenesis.

  15. Survival and tumorigenesis in O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase-deficient mice following cyclophosphamide exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Nagasubramanian, Ramamoorthy; Hansen, Ryan J.; Delaney, Shannon M.; Cherian, Mathew M.; Samson, Leona D.; Kogan, Scott C.; Dolan, M Eileen

    2008-01-01

    O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) deficiency is associated with an increased susceptibility to alkylating agent toxicity. To understand the contribution of MGMT in protecting against cyclophosphamide (CP)-induced toxicity, mutagenesis and tumorigenesis, we compared the biological effects of this agent in transgenic Mgmt knockout and wild-type mice. In addition, neurofibromin (Nf1)+/− background was used to increase the likelihood of CP-induced tumorigenesis. Cohorts of Mgmt-profic...

  16. Increased sensitivity of DNA damage response-deficient cells to stimulated microgravity-induced DNA lesions.

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    Nan Li

    Full Text Available Microgravity is a major stress factor that astronauts have to face in space. In the past, the effects of microgravity on genomic DNA damage were studied, and it seems that the effect on genomic DNA depends on cell types and the length of exposure time to microgravity or simulated microgravity (SMG. In this study we used mouse embryonic stem (MES and mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF cells to assess the effects of SMG on DNA lesions. To acquire the insight into potential mechanisms by which cells resist and/or adapt to SMG, we also included Rad9-deleted MES and Mdc1-deleted MEF cells in addition to wild type cells in this study. We observed significant SMG-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs in Rad9-/- MES and Mdc1-/- MEF cells but not in their corresponding wild type cells. A similar pattern of DNA single strand break or modifications was also observed in Rad9-/- MES. As the exposure to SMG was prolonged, Rad9-/- MES cells adapted to the SMG disturbance by reducing the induced DNA lesions. The induced DNA lesions in Rad9-/- MES were due to SMG-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS. Interestingly, Mdc1-/- MEF cells were only partially adapted to the SMG disturbance. That is, the induced DNA lesions were reduced over time, but did not return to the control level while ROS returned to a control level. In addition, ROS was only partially responsible for the induced DNA lesions in Mdc1-/- MEF cells. Taken together, these data suggest that SMG is a weak genomic DNA stress and can aggravate genomic instability in cells with DNA damage response (DDR defects.

  17. Successful bone marrow transplantation in a patient with DNA ligase IV deficiency and bone marrow failure

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    Bechtold Astrid

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA Ligase IV deficiency syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by hypomorphic mutations in the DNA ligase IV gene (LIG4. The clinical phenotype shows overlap with a number of other rare syndromes, including Seckel syndrome, Nijmegen breakage syndrome, and Fanconi anemia. Thus the clinical diagnosis is often delayed and established by exclusion. Methods We describe a patient with pre- and postnatal growth retardation and dysmorphic facial features in whom the diagnoses of Seckel-, Dubowitz-, and Nijmegen breakage syndrome were variably considered. Cellular radiosensitivity in the absence of clinical manifestations of Ataxia telangiectasia lead to the diagnosis of DNA ligase IV (LIG4 deficiency syndrome, confirmed by compound heterozygous mutations in the LIG4 gene. At age 11, after a six year history of progressive bone marrow failure and increasing transfusion dependency the patient was treated with matched sibling donor hematopoetic stem cell transplantation (HSCT using a fludarabine-based conditioning regimen without irradiation. Results The post-transplantation course was uneventful with rapid engraftment leading to complete and stable chimerism. Now at age 16, the patient has gained weight and is in good clinical condition. Conclusion HSCT using mild conditioning without irradiation qualifies as treatment of choice in LIG4-deficient patients who have a matched sibling donor.

  18. Genetic and biochemical characterization of human AP endonuclease 1 mutants deficient in nucleotide incision repair activity.

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    Aurore Gelin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1 is a key DNA repair enzyme involved in both base excision repair (BER and nucleotide incision repair (NIR pathways. In the BER pathway, APE1 cleaves DNA at AP sites and 3'-blocking moieties generated by DNA glycosylases. In the NIR pathway, APE1 incises DNA 5' to a number of oxidatively damaged bases. At present, physiological relevance of the NIR pathway is fairly well established in E. coli, but has yet to be elucidated in human cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: We identified amino acid residues in the APE1 protein that affect its function in either the BER or NIR pathway. Biochemical characterization of APE1 carrying single K98A, R185A, D308A and double K98A/R185A amino acid substitutions revealed that all mutants exhibited greatly reduced NIR and 3'-->5' exonuclease activities, but were capable of performing BER functions to some extent. Expression of the APE1 mutants deficient in the NIR and exonuclease activities reduced the sensitivity of AP endonuclease-deficient E. coli xth nfo strain to an alkylating agent, methylmethanesulfonate, suggesting that our APE1 mutants are able to repair AP sites. Finally, the human NIR pathway was fully reconstituted in vitro using the purified APE1, human flap endonuclease 1, DNA polymerase beta and DNA ligase I proteins, thus establishing the minimal set of proteins required for a functional NIR pathway in human cells. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, these data further substantiate the role of NIR as a distinct and separable function of APE1 that is essential for processing of potentially lethal oxidative DNA lesions.

  19. Folate deficiency induces neurodegeneration and brain dysfunction in mice lacking uracil DNA glycosylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronenberg, Golo; Harms, Christoph; Sobol, Robert W; Cardozo-Pelaez, Fernando; Linhart, Heinz; Winter, Benjamin; Balkaya, Mustafa; Gertz, Karen; Gay, Shanna B; Cox, David; Eckart, Sarah; Ahmadi, Michael; Juckel, Georg; Kempermann, Gerd; Hellweg, Rainer; Sohr, Reinhard; Hörtnagl, Heide; Wilson, Samuel H; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Endres, Matthias

    2008-07-09

    Folate deficiency and resultant increased homocysteine levels have been linked experimentally and epidemiologically with neurodegenerative conditions like stroke and dementia. Moreover, folate deficiency has been implicated in the pathogenesis of psychiatric disorders, most notably depression. We hypothesized that the pathogenic mechanisms include uracil misincorporation and, therefore, analyzed the effects of folate deficiency in mice lacking uracil DNA glycosylase (Ung-/-) versus wild-type controls. Folate depletion increased nuclear mutation rates in Ung-/- embryonic fibroblasts, and conferred death of cultured Ung-/- hippocampal neurons. Feeding animals a folate-deficient diet (FD) for 3 months induced degeneration of CA3 pyramidal neurons in Ung-/- but not Ung+/+ mice along with decreased hippocampal expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor protein and decreased brain levels of antioxidant glutathione. Furthermore, FD induced cognitive deficits and mood alterations such as anxious and despair-like behaviors that were aggravated in Ung-/- mice. Independent of Ung genotype, FD increased plasma homocysteine levels, altered brain monoamine metabolism, and inhibited adult hippocampal neurogenesis. These results indicate that impaired uracil repair is involved in neurodegeneration and neuropsychiatric dysfunction induced by experimental folate deficiency.

  20. DNA Microarray technology reveals similar gene expression patterns in rats with vitamin A deficiency and chemically induced colitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nur, T.; Peijnenburg, A.A.C.M.; Noteborn, H.P.J.M.; Baykus, H.; Reifen, R.

    2002-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that vitamin A deficiency may induce or intensify inflammatory changes in the rat gastrointestinal system. The present study was designed to compare the expression profiles of rat models of vitamin A deficiency and induced colitis. cDNA-microarray technology was used to dete

  1. DNA hypomethylation of CBS promoter induced by folate deficiency is a potential noninvasive circulating biomarker for colorectal adenocarcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Geng; Lu, Chao-Jing; Pan, Shu-Jun; Zhang, Yin-Ling; Miao, Hui; Shan, Shi; Zhu, Xiao-Ting; Zhang, Yi

    2017-08-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation patterns, which induced by folate deficiency, play important roles in tumorigenesis of colorectal cancer (CRC). Some DNA methylation alterations can also be detected in cell-free DNA (cfDNA) of patients' plasma, making cfDNA an ideal noninvasive circulating biomarker. However, exact DNA methylation alterations induced by folate deficiency in tumorigenesis of CRC and exact potential circulating cfDNA methylation biomarker are still unclear. Therefore, DNA methylation patterns of the normal human colon mucosal epithelial cell line (NCM460), cultured with normal or low folate content, were screened and the DNA hypomethylation of cystathionine-beta-synthase (CBS) promoter was further validated in vitro and vivo. Then, the correlation analysis between folate level, DNA methylation alteration in promoter and expression of CBS was carried out in vitro and vivo. Further, the methylation patterns of CBS promoter in plasma cfDNA were detected and statistically correlated with pathological parameters and clinical outcome. Our study showed that DNA hypomethylation in CBS promoter, induced by folate deficiency, would lead to up-regulation of CBS both in vitro and vivo. Patients with cfDNA hypomethylation of CBS promoter in plasma were correlated with high tumor stage and poor clinical outcome. In addition, cfDNA hypomethylation of CBS promoter in plasma was shown to be an independent prognostic factor for recurrence and cancer-related death in CRC. Our results indicated that DNA hypomethylation of CBS promoter induced by folate deficiency could serve as a potential noninvasive circulating biomarker and may be helpful in developing more effective prognostic markers for CRC.

  2. Diagnosis of alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency by DNA analysis of children with liver disease

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    De TOMMASO Adriana Maria Alves

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Background - Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency is a genetic disorder which is transmitted in a co-dominant, autosomal form. Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency affects mainly the lungs and the liver leading, in the latter case, to neonatal cholestasis, chronic hepatitis or cirrhosis. A precise diagnosis of Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency may be obtained by biochemical or molecular analysis. Objective - The purpose of this study was to use DNA analysis to examine the presence of an alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency in 12 children suspected of having this deficiency and who showed laboratory and clinical characteristics of the disease. Patients and Methods - Twelve patients, aged 3 months to 19 years, who had serum alpha-1-antitrypsin levels lower than normal and/or had hepatic disease of undefined etiology were studied. The mutant alleles S and Z of the alpha-1-antitrypsin gene were investigated in the 12 children. Alpha-1-antitrypsin gene organization was analyzed by amplification of genoma through the polymerase chain reaction and digestion with the restriction enzymes Xmnl (S allele and Taq 1 (Z allele. Results - Seven of the 12 patients had chronic liver disease of undefined etiology and the other five patients had low serum levels of alpha-1-antitrypsin as well as a diagnosis of neonatal cholestasis and/or chronic liver disease of undefined etiology. Five of the 12 patients were homozygous for the Z allele (ZZ and two had the S allele with another allele (*S different from Z. Conclusion - These results show that alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency is relatively frequent in children with chronic hepatic disease of undefined etiology and/or low alpha-1-antitrypsin levels (41.6%. A correct diagnosis is important for effective clinical follow-up and for genetic counseling.

  3. DNA methylation profile of Aire-deficient mouse medullary thymic epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guoying; Hirabayashi, Keiji; Sato, Shinya; Akiyama, Nobuko; Akiyama, Taishin; Shiota, Kunio; Yagi, Shintaro

    2012-11-02

    Medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) are characterized by ectopic expression of self-antigens during the establishment of central tolerance. The autoimmune regulator (Aire), which is specifically expressed in mTECs, is responsible for the expression of a large repertoire of tissue-restricted antigens (TRAs) and plays a role in the development of mTECs. However, Aire-deficient mTECs still express TRAs. Moreover, a subset of mTECs, which are considered to be at a stage of terminal differentiation, exists in the Aire-deficient thymus. The phenotype of a specific cell type in a multicellular organism is governed by the epigenetic regulation system. DNA methylation modification is an important component of this system. Every cell or tissue type displays a DNA methylation profile, consisting of tissue-dependent and differentially methylated regions (T-DMRs), and this profile is involved in cell-type-specific genome usage. The aim of this study was to examine the DNA methylation profile of mTECs by using Aire-deficient mTECs as a model. We identified the T-DMRs of mTECs (mTEC-T-DMRs) via genome-wide DNA methylation analysis of Aire(-/-) mTECs by comparison with the liver, brain, thymus, and embryonic stem cells. The hypomethylated mTEC-T-DMRs in Aire(-/-) mTECs were associated with mTEC-specific genes, including Aire, CD80, and Trp63, as well as other genes involved in the RANK signaling pathway. While these mTEC-T-DMRs were also hypomethylated in Aire(+/+) mTECs, they were hypermethylated in control thymic stromal cells. We compared the pattern of DNA methylation levels at a total of 55 mTEC-T-DMRs and adjacent regions and found that the DNA methylation status was similar for Aire(+/+) and Aire(-/-) mTECs but distinct from that of athymic cells and tissues. These results indicate a unique DNA methylation profile that is independent of Aire in mTECs. This profile is distinct from other cell types in the thymic microenvironment and is indicated to be involved in the

  4. Reduced cellular DNA repair capacity after environmentally relevant arsenic exposure. Influence of Ogg1 deficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bach, Jordi; Peremartí, Jana; Annangi, Balasubramnayam [Grup de Mutagènesi, Departament de Genètica i de Microbiologia, Facultat de Biociències, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Cerdanyola del Vallès, Barcelona (Spain); Marcos, Ricard, E-mail: ricard.marcos@uab.es [Grup de Mutagènesi, Departament de Genètica i de Microbiologia, Facultat de Biociències, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Cerdanyola del Vallès, Barcelona (Spain); CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública, ISCIII, Madrid (Spain); Hernández, Alba, E-mail: alba.hernandez@uab.es [Grup de Mutagènesi, Departament de Genètica i de Microbiologia, Facultat de Biociències, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Cerdanyola del Vallès, Barcelona (Spain); CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública, ISCIII, Madrid (Spain)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Repair ability under long-term exposure to arsenic was tested using the comet assay. • Effects were measured under Ogg1 wild-type and deficient backgrounds. • Exposed cells repair less efficiency the DNA damage induced by SA, KBrO{sub 3}, MMA{sup III} or UVC radiation. • Oxidative damage and Ogg1 deficient background exacerbate repair deficiencies. • Overexpression of the arsenic metabolizing enzyme As3mt acts as adaptive mechanism. - Abstract: Inorganic arsenic (i-As) is a genotoxic and carcinogenic environmental contaminant known to affect millions of people worldwide. Our previous work demonstrated that chronic sub-toxic i-As concentrations were able to induce biologically significant levels of genotoxic and oxidative DNA damage that were strongly influenced by the Ogg1 genotype. In order to study the nature of the observed levels of damage and the observed differences between MEF Ogg1{sup +/+} and Ogg1{sup −/−} genetic backgrounds, the genotoxic and oxidative DNA repair kinetics of 18-weeks exposed MEF cells were evaluated by the comet assay. Results indicate that MEF Ogg1{sup +/+} and Ogg1{sup −/−} cells chronically exposed to i-As repair the DNA damage induced by arsenite, potassium bromide and UVC radiation less efficiently than control cells, being that observation clearly more pronounced in MEF Ogg1{sup −/−} cells. Consequently, exposed cells accumulate a higher percentage of unrepaired DNA damage at the end of the repair period. As an attempt to eliminate i-As associated toxicity, chronically exposed MEF Ogg1{sup −/−} cells overexpress the arsenic metabolizing enzyme As3mt. This adaptive response confers cells a significant resistance to i-As-induced cell death, but at expenses of accumulating high levels of DNA damage due to their repair impairment. Overall, the work presented here evidences that i-As chronic exposure disrupts the normal cellular repair function, and that oxidative DNA damage—and Ogg1 deficiency

  5. Synthetic lethal targeting of DNA double strand break repair deficient cells by human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE1) inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Rebeka; McNeill, Daniel R.; Abbotts, Rachel; Mohammed, Mohammed Z.; Zdzienicka, Małgorzata Z.; Qutob, Haitham; Seedhouse, Claire; Laughton, Charles A.; Fischer, Peter M.; Patel, Poulam M.; Wilson, David M.; Madhusudan, Srinivasan

    2013-01-01

    An apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site is an obligatory cytotoxic intermediate in DNA Base Excision Repair (BER) that is processed by human AP endonuclease 1 (APE1). APE1 is essential for BER and an emerging drug target in cancer. We have isolated novel small molecule inhibitors of APE1. In the current study we have investigated the ability of APE1 inhibitors to induce synthetic lethality in a panel of DNA double strand break (DSB) repair deficient and proficient cells; a) Chinese hamster (CH) cells: BRCA2 deficient (V-C8), ATM deficient (V-E5), wild type (V79) and BRCA2 revertant (V-C8(Rev1)). b) Human cancer cells: BRCA1 deficient (MDA-MB-436), BRCA1 proficient (MCF-7), BRCA2 deficient (CAPAN-1 and HeLa SilenciX cells), BRCA2 proficient (PANC1 and control SilenciX cells). We also tested synthetic lethality (SL) in CH ovary cells expressing a dominant–negative form of APE1 (E8 cells) using ATM inhibitors and DNA-PKcs inhibitors (DSB inhibitors). APE1 inhibitors are synthetically lethal in BRCA and ATM deficient cells. APE1 inhibition resulted in accumulation of DNA DSBs and G2/M cell cycle arrest. Synthetic lethality was also demonstrated in CH cells expressing a dominant–negative form of APE1 treated with ATM or DNA-PKcs inhibitors. We conclude that APE1 is a promising synthetic lethality target in cancer. PMID:22377908

  6. Serum paraoxonase 1 activity in patients with iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedikbasi, Asuman; Akalin, Nilgul; Gunaldi, Meral; Yilmaz, Deniz; Mert, Meral; Harmankaya, Ozlem; Soylu, Aliye; Karakaya, Pinar; Kumbasar, Abdulbaki

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In this study we aimed to detect paraoxonase 1 (PON-1) activity in iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and to compare it with healthy controls by observing the change after iron therapy. Material and methods In this study, 50 adult patients with IDA and 40 healthy subjects were enrolled. All patients were analyzed at the beginning and after treatment according to laboratory assessments. Results Mean paraoxonase and arylesterase activities in the iron deficiency anemia group were significantly lower than mean activities of the control group (102.4 ±19.2 U/l and 163.3 ±13.68 U/l, respectively and 157.3 ±26.4 U/l and 256.1 ±24.6 U/l, respectively; p = 0.0001 for both). Paraoxonase and arylesterase activities significantly increased after treatment for IDA (143.2 ±13.9 and 197.6 ±27.9 U/l, respectively, p = 0.0001). Mean activities after treatment with iron were significantly lower than mean activities in the control group (p = 0.002; p = 0.0001 respectively). Conclusions Paraoxonase and arylesterase activities in patients with IDA significantly increased after treatment with iron therapy. In adults IDA may also be one of the factors associated with increased risk of atherosclerosis. PMID:27478448

  7. Signaling from Mus81-Eme2-Dependent DNA Damage Elicited by Chk1 Deficiency Modulates Replication Fork Speed and Origin Usage

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    Hervé Técher

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian cells deficient in ATR or Chk1 display moderate replication fork slowing and increased initiation density, but the underlying mechanisms have remained unclear. We show that exogenous deoxyribonucleosides suppress both replication phenotypes in Chk1-deficient, but not ATR-deficient, cells. Thus, in the absence of exogenous stress, depletion of either protein impacts the replication dynamics through different mechanisms. In addition, Chk1 deficiency, but not ATR deficiency, triggers nuclease-dependent DNA damage. Avoiding damage formation through invalidation of Mus81-Eme2 and Mre11, or preventing damage signaling by turning off the ATM pathway, suppresses the replication phenotypes of Chk1-deficient cells. Damage and resulting DDR activation are therefore the cause, not the consequence, of replication dynamics modulation in these cells. Together, we identify moderate reduction of precursors available for replication as an additional outcome of DDR activation. We propose that resulting fork slowing, and subsequent firing of backup origins, helps replication to proceed along damaged templates.

  8. Damage-induced DNA replication stalling relies on MAPK-activated protein kinase 2 activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Köpper, Frederik; Bierwirth, Cathrin; Schön, Margarete

    2013-01-01

    DNA damage can obstruct replication forks, resulting in replicative stress. By siRNA screening, we identified kinases involved in the accumulation of phosphohistone 2AX (γH2AX) upon UV irradiation-induced replication stress. Surprisingly, the strongest reduction of phosphohistone 2AX followed...... replication impaired by gemcitabine or by Chk1 inhibition. This rescue strictly depended on translesion DNA polymerases. In conclusion, instead of being an unavoidable consequence of DNA damage, alterations of replication speed and origin firing depend on MK2-mediated signaling....... knockdown of the MAP kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2), a kinase currently implicated in p38 stress signaling and G2 arrest. Depletion or inhibition of MK2 also protected cells from DNA damage-induced cell death, and mice deficient for MK2 displayed decreased apoptosis in the skin upon UV irradiation...

  9. Ectopic TLX1 expression accelerates malignancies in mice deficient in DNA-PK.

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    Konstantin Krutikov

    Full Text Available The noncluster homeobox gene HOX11/TLX1 (TLX1 is detected at the breakpoint of the t(10;14(q24;q11 chromosome translocation in patients with T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL. This translocation results in the inappropriate expression of TLX1 in T cells. The oncogenic potential of TLX1 was demonstrated in IgHμ-TLX1(Tg mice which develop mature B cell lymphoma after a long latency period, suggesting the requirement of additional mutations to initiate malignancy. To determine whether dysregulation of genes involved in the DNA damage response contributed to tumor progression, we crossed IgHμ-TLX1(Tg mice with mice deficient in the DNA repair enzyme DNA-PK (Prkdc(Scid/Scid mice. IgHµ-TLX1(TgPrkdc(Scid/Scid mice developed T-ALL and acute myeloid leukemia (AML with reduced latency relative to control Prkdc(Scid/Scid mice. Further analysis of thymi from premalignant mice revealed greater thymic cellularity concomitant with increased thymocyte proliferation and decreased apoptotic index. Moreover, premalignant and malignant thymocytes exhibited impaired spindle checkpoint function, in association with aneuploid karyotypes. Gene expression profiling of premalignant IgHµ-TLX1(TgPrkdc(Scid/Scid thymocytes revealed dysregulated expression of cell cycle, apoptotic and mitotic spindle checkpoint genes in double negative 2 (DN2 and DN3 stage thymocytes. Collectively, these findings reveal a novel synergy between TLX1 and impaired DNA repair pathway in leukemogenesis.

  10. Reduced cellular DNA repair capacity after environmentally relevant arsenic exposure. Influence of Ogg1 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Jordi; Peremartí, Jana; Annangi, Balasubramnayam; Marcos, Ricard; Hernández, Alba

    2015-09-01

    Inorganic arsenic (i-As) is a genotoxic and carcinogenic environmental contaminant known to affect millions of people worldwide. Our previous work demonstrated that chronic sub-toxic i-As concentrations were able to induce biologically significant levels of genotoxic and oxidative DNA damage that were strongly influenced by the Ogg1 genotype. In order to study the nature of the observed levels of damage and the observed differences between MEF Ogg1(+/+) and Ogg1(-/-) genetic backgrounds, the genotoxic and oxidative DNA repair kinetics of 18-weeks exposed MEF cells were evaluated by the comet assay. Results indicate that MEF Ogg1(+/+) and Ogg1(-/-) cells chronically exposed to i-As repair the DNA damage induced by arsenite, potassium bromide and UVC radiation less efficiently than control cells, being that observation clearly more pronounced in MEF Ogg1(-/-) cells. Consequently, exposed cells accumulate a higher percentage of unrepaired DNA damage at the end of the repair period. As an attempt to eliminate i-As associated toxicity, chronically exposed MEF Ogg1(-/-) cells overexpress the arsenic metabolizing enzyme As3mt. This adaptive response confers cells a significant resistance to i-As-induced cell death, but at expenses of accumulating high levels of DNA damage due to their repair impairment. Overall, the work presented here evidences that i-As chronic exposure disrupts the normal cellular repair function, and that oxidative DNA damage-and Ogg1 deficiency-exacerbates this phenomenon. The observed cell death resistance under a chronic scenario of genotoxic and oxidative stress may in turn contribute to the carcinogenic effects of i-As.

  11. SUMO-1 possesses DNA binding activity

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    Wieruszeski Jean-Michel

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conjugation of small ubiquitin-related modifiers (SUMOs is a frequent post-translational modification of proteins. SUMOs can also temporally associate with protein-targets via SUMO binding motifs (SBMs. Protein sumoylation has been identified as an important regulatory mechanism especially in the regulation of transcription and the maintenance of genome stability. The precise molecular mechanisms by which SUMO conjugation and association act are, however, not understood. Findings Using NMR spectroscopy and protein-DNA cross-linking experiments, we demonstrate here that SUMO-1 can specifically interact with dsDNA in a sequence-independent fashion. We also show that SUMO-1 binding to DNA can compete with other protein-DNA interactions at the example of the regulatory domain of Thymine-DNA Glycosylase and, based on these competition studies, estimate the DNA binding constant of SUMO1 in the range 1 mM. Conclusion This finding provides an important insight into how SUMO-1 might exert its activity. SUMO-1 might play a general role in destabilizing DNA bound protein complexes thereby operating in a bottle-opener way of fashion, explaining its pivotal role in regulating the activity of many central transcription and DNA repair complexes.

  12. Cells Deficient in the Fanconi Anemia Protein FANCD2 are Hypersensitive to the Cytotoxicity and DNA Damage Induced by Coffee and Caffeic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos-Morón, Estefanía; Calderón-Montaño, José Manuel; Orta, Manuel Luis; Guillén-Mancina, Emilio; Mateos, Santiago; López-Lázaro, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have found a positive association between coffee consumption and a lower risk of cardiovascular disorders, some cancers, diabetes, Parkinson and Alzheimer disease. Coffee consumption, however, has also been linked to an increased risk of developing some types of cancer, including bladder cancer in adults and leukemia in children of mothers who drink coffee during pregnancy. Since cancer is driven by the accumulation of DNA alterations, the ability of the coffee constituent caffeic acid to induce DNA damage in cells may play a role in the carcinogenic potential of this beverage. This carcinogenic potential may be exacerbated in cells with DNA repair defects. People with the genetic disease Fanconi Anemia have DNA repair deficiencies and are predisposed to several cancers, particularly acute myeloid leukemia. Defects in the DNA repair protein Fanconi Anemia D2 (FANCD2) also play an important role in the development of a variety of cancers (e.g., bladder cancer) in people without this genetic disease. This communication shows that cells deficient in FANCD2 are hypersensitive to the cytotoxicity (clonogenic assay) and DNA damage (γ-H2AX and 53BP1 focus assay) induced by caffeic acid and by a commercial lyophilized coffee extract. These data suggest that people with Fanconi Anemia, or healthy people who develop sporadic mutations in FANCD2, may be hypersensitive to the carcinogenic activity of coffee. PMID:27399778

  13. Cells Deficient in the Fanconi Anemia Protein FANCD2 are Hypersensitive to the Cytotoxicity and DNA Damage Induced by Coffee and Caffeic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estefanía Burgos-Morón

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have found a positive association between coffee consumption and a lower risk of cardiovascular disorders, some cancers, diabetes, Parkinson and Alzheimer disease. Coffee consumption, however, has also been linked to an increased risk of developing some types of cancer, including bladder cancer in adults and leukemia in children of mothers who drink coffee during pregnancy. Since cancer is driven by the accumulation of DNA alterations, the ability of the coffee constituent caffeic acid to induce DNA damage in cells may play a role in the carcinogenic potential of this beverage. This carcinogenic potential may be exacerbated in cells with DNA repair defects. People with the genetic disease Fanconi Anemia have DNA repair deficiencies and are predisposed to several cancers, particularly acute myeloid leukemia. Defects in the DNA repair protein Fanconi Anemia D2 (FANCD2 also play an important role in the development of a variety of cancers (e.g., bladder cancer in people without this genetic disease. This communication shows that cells deficient in FANCD2 are hypersensitive to the cytotoxicity (clonogenic assay and DNA damage (γ-H2AX and 53BP1 focus assay induced by caffeic acid and by a commercial lyophilized coffee extract. These data suggest that people with Fanconi Anemia, or healthy people who develop sporadic mutations in FANCD2, may be hypersensitive to the carcinogenic activity of coffee.

  14. Oxidative DNA damage after acute exposure to arsenite and monomethylarsonous acid in biomethylation-deficient human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orihuela, Ruben; Kojima, Chikara; Tokar, Erik J; Person, Rachel J; Xu, Yuanyuan; Qu, Wei; Waalkes, Michael P

    2013-07-01

    The carcinogen inorganic arsenic (iAs) undergoes biomethylation (BMT) in some cells. The methylated metabolite, monomethylarsonous (MMA(3+)), may cause oxidative DNA damage (ODD). With chronic iAs exposure, BMT-competent cells show ODD while BMT-deficient do not. To further define these events, we studied ODD produced by acute iAs or MMA(3+) in the BMT-deficient human prostate cell line, RWPE-1. ODD, measured by the immuno-spin trapping method, was assessed after exposure to iAs or MMA(3+) alone, with the arsenic BMT inhibitor selenite or after glutathione (GSH) depletion. The expression of oxidative stress-related genes (HO-1, SOD-1, SOD-2, Nrf2 and Keap-1) was also assessed. Exposure to iAs at 24 h (0-20 µM), stimulated ODD only at levels above the LC50 of a 48 h exposure (17 µM). If iAs induced ODD, it also activated oxidative stress-related genes. Selenium did not alter iAs-induced ODD. MMA(3+) at 24 h (0-0.5 µM) caused ODD at levels below the LC50 of a 48 h exposure (1.5 µM), which were greatly increased by GSH depletion but not selenite. MMA(3+) induced ODD at levels not activating oxidant stress response genes. Overall, iAs induced ODD in BMT-deficient cells only at toxic levels. MMA(3+) caused ODD at non-toxic levels, independently of cellular BMT capacity and in a fashion not requiring further BMT.

  15. Tob deficiency superenhances osteoblastic activity after ovariectomy to block estrogen deficiency-induced osteoporosis

    OpenAIRE

    Usui, Michihiko; Yoshida, Yutaka; Tsuji, Kunikazu; OIKAWA, kaoru; Miyazono, Kohei; Ishikawa, Isao; YAMAMOTO, Tadashi; Nifuji, Akira; Noda, Masaki

    2004-01-01

    Tob (transducer of erbB2) is a member of antiproliferative family proteins and acts as a bone morphogenic protein inhibitor as well as a suppressor of proliferation in T cells, which have been implicated in postmenopausal bone loss. To determine the effect of Tob deficiency on estrogen deficiency-induced bone loss, we analyzed bone metabolism after ovariectomy or sham operation in Tob-deficient mice. Ovariectomy in WT mice decreased trabecular bone volume and bone mineral density (BMD) as exp...

  16. Biochemical activity and gene analysis of inherited protein C and antithrombin deficiency in two Chinese pedigrees

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周荣富; 傅启华; 王文斌; 谢爽; 胡翊群; 王学锋; 王振义; 王鸿利

    2004-01-01

    Background We identified the gene mutations in two Chinese pedigree of type Ⅰ hereditary protein C deficiency and type Ⅰ hereditary antithrombin deficiency.Methods The plasma level of protein C activity (PC∶ A), protein C antigen (PC∶ Ag) , protein S activity, antithrombin activity (AT∶ A) and antithrombin antigen (AT∶ Ag) of propositi and two family members were detected using ELISA and chromogenic assay, respectively. All exons and intron-exon boundaries of protein C gene and antithrombin gene were analyzed by direct sequencing of the corresponding amplified PCR products in DNA from the propositus. Results The plasma PC∶ A and PC∶ Ag of propositus 1 was 26% and 1.43 mg/dl, respectively. The PC∶ Ag and PC∶ A of his father were normal. The decreased PC∶ A level was seen in his mother and 4 of his maternal pedigree. PS∶ A and AT∶ A were all normal in pedigree 1 members. A C5498T heterozygous mutation in exon 3 of protein C gene, resulting in the substitution of Arg for Trp at the 15th amino acid, was identified in propositus 1 and 8 of his relatives. The plasma AT∶ A and AT∶ Ag of propositus 2 was 48.6% and 10.4 mg/dl, respectively. The reduced AT∶ A and AT∶ Ag levels were found in his father and 5 of paternal pedigree. PC∶ A, PC∶ Ag and PS∶ A were all in normal range. A heterozygous 13387-9G deletion in exon 6 of antithrombin gene was identified in propositus 2. This mutation introduced a frameshift and a premature stop at codon 426 and existed in 6 members of pedigree 2.Conclusion The C5498T heterozygous mutation in exon 3 of protein C gene, first reported in China, leads to type I hereditary protein C deficiency. The 13387-9G deletion, a novel mutation, can cause antithrombin deficiency and thrombosis.

  17. Robust food anticipatory activity in BMAL1-deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie S Pendergast

    Full Text Available Food availability is a potent environmental cue that directs circadian locomotor activity in rodents. Even though nocturnal rodents prefer to forage at night, daytime food anticipatory activity (FAA is observed prior to short meals presented at a scheduled time of day. Under this restricted feeding regimen, rodents exhibit two distinct bouts of activity, a nocturnal activity rhythm that is entrained to the light-dark cycle and controlled by the master clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN and a daytime bout of activity that is phase-locked to mealtime. FAA also occurs during food deprivation, suggesting that a food-entrainable oscillator (FEO keeps time in the absence of scheduled feeding. Previous studies have demonstrated that the FEO is anatomically distinct from the SCN and that FAA is observed in mice lacking some circadian genes essential for timekeeping in the SCN. In the current study, we optimized the conditions for examining FAA during restricted feeding and food deprivation in mice lacking functional BMAL1, which is critical for circadian rhythm generation in the SCN. We found that BMAL1-deficient mice displayed FAA during restricted feeding in 12hr light:12hr dark (12L:12D and 18L:6D lighting cycles, but distinct activity during food deprivation was observed only in 18L:6D. While BMAL1-deficient mice also exhibited robust FAA during restricted feeding in constant darkness, mice were hyperactive during food deprivation so it was not clear that FAA consistently occurred at the time of previously scheduled food availability. Taken together, our findings suggest that optimization of experimental conditions such as photoperiod may be necessary to visualize FAA in genetically modified mice. Furthermore, the expression of FAA may be possible without a circadian oscillator that depends on BMAL1.

  18. DNA damage and gene therapy of xeroderma pigmentosum, a human DNA repair-deficient disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupuy, Aurélie [Laboratory of Genetic Instability and Oncogenesis UMR8200CNRS, Institut Gustave Roussy and University Paris-Sud, Villejuif (France); Sarasin, Alain, E-mail: alain.sarasin@gustaveroussy.fr [Laboratory of Genetic Instability and Oncogenesis UMR8200CNRS, Institut Gustave Roussy and University Paris-Sud, Villejuif (France); Service de Génétique, Institut Gustave Roussy (France)

    2015-06-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Full correction of mutation in the XPC gene by engineered nucleases. • Meganucleases and TALENs are inhibited by 5-MeC for inducing double strand breaks. • Gene therapy of XP cells is possible using homologous recombination for DSB repair. - Abstract: Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a genetic disease characterized by hypersensitivity to ultra-violet and a very high risk of skin cancer induction on exposed body sites. This syndrome is caused by germinal mutations on nucleotide excision repair genes. No cure is available for these patients except a complete protection from all types of UV radiations. We reviewed the various techniques to complement or to correct the genetic defect in XP cells. We, particularly, developed the correction of XP-C skin cells using the fidelity of the homologous recombination pathway during repair of double-strand break (DSB) in the presence of XPC wild type sequences. We used engineered nucleases (meganuclease or TALE nuclease) to induce a DSB located at 90 bp of the mutation to be corrected. Expression of specific TALE nuclease in the presence of a repair matrix containing a long stretch of homologous wild type XPC sequences allowed us a successful gene correction of the original TG deletion found in numerous North African XP patients. Some engineered nucleases are sensitive to epigenetic modifications, such as cytosine methylation. In case of methylated sequences to be corrected, modified nucleases or demethylation of the whole genome should be envisaged. Overall, we showed that specifically-designed TALE-nuclease allowed us to correct a 2 bp deletion in the XPC gene leading to patient's cells proficient for DNA repair and showing normal UV-sensitivity. The corrected gene is still in the same position in the human genome and under the regulation of its physiological promoter. This result is a first step toward gene therapy in XP patients.

  19. DNA damage and gene therapy of xeroderma pigmentosum, a human DNA repair-deficient disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuy, Aurélie; Sarasin, Alain

    2015-06-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a genetic disease characterized by hypersensitivity to ultra-violet and a very high risk of skin cancer induction on exposed body sites. This syndrome is caused by germinal mutations on nucleotide excision repair genes. No cure is available for these patients except a complete protection from all types of UV radiations. We reviewed the various techniques to complement or to correct the genetic defect in XP cells. We, particularly, developed the correction of XP-C skin cells using the fidelity of the homologous recombination pathway during repair of double-strand break (DSB) in the presence of XPC wild type sequences. We used engineered nucleases (meganuclease or TALE nuclease) to induce a DSB located at 90 bp of the mutation to be corrected. Expression of specific TALE nuclease in the presence of a repair matrix containing a long stretch of homologous wild type XPC sequences allowed us a successful gene correction of the original TG deletion found in numerous North African XP patients. Some engineered nucleases are sensitive to epigenetic modifications, such as cytosine methylation. In case of methylated sequences to be corrected, modified nucleases or demethylation of the whole genome should be envisaged. Overall, we showed that specifically-designed TALE-nuclease allowed us to correct a 2 bp deletion in the XPC gene leading to patient's cells proficient for DNA repair and showing normal UV-sensitivity. The corrected gene is still in the same position in the human genome and under the regulation of its physiological promoter. This result is a first step toward gene therapy in XP patients.

  20. DNA Topoisomerases Maintain Promoters in a State Competent for Transcriptional Activation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jakob Madsen; Fredsøe, Jacob Christian; Rødgaard, Morten Terpager;

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the role of DNA topoisomerases in transcription, we have studied global gene expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells deficient for topoisomerases I and II and performed single-gene analyses to support our findings. The genome-wide studies show a general transcriptional down-re...... transcriptional activation of genes with a repressible/inducible mode of regulation....

  1. Macrophage activation induced by Brucella DNA suppresses bacterial intracellular replication via enhancing NO production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Wang, Lin; Sun, Changjiang; Yang, Li; Tang, Bin; Sun, Wanchun; Peng, Qisheng

    2015-12-01

    Brucella DNA can be sensed by TLR9 on endosomal membrane and by cytosolic AIM2-inflammasome to induce proinflammatory cytokine production that contributes to partially activate innate immunity. Additionally, Brucella DNA has been identified to be able to act as a major bacterial component to induce type I IFN. However, the role of Brucella DNA in Brucella intracellular growth remains unknown. Here, we showed that stimulation with Brucella DNA promote macrophage activation in TLR9-dependent manner. Activated macrophages can suppresses wild type Brucella intracellular replication at early stage of infection via enhancing NO production. We also reported that activated macrophage promotes bactericidal function of macrophages infected with VirB-deficient Brucella at the early or late stage of infection. This study uncovers a novel function of Brucella DNA, which can help us further elucidate the mechanism of Brucella intracellular survival.

  2. DNA double-strand breaks and ATM activation by transcription-blocking DNA lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sordet, Olivier; Nakamura, Asako J; Redon, Christophe E; Pommier, Yves

    2010-01-15

    A taxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), the deficiency of which causes a severe neurodegenerative disease, is a crucial mediator for the DNA double-strand break (DSB) response. We recently showed that transcription-blocking topoisomerase I cleavage complexes (TOP1cc) produce DSBs related to R-loop formation and activate ATM in post-mitotic neurons and lymphocytes. Here we discuss how TOP1cc can produce transcription arrest with R-loop formation and generate DSBs that activate ATM, as well as data suggesting that those transcription-dependent DSBs tend to form at the IgH locus and at specific genomic sites. We also address the potential roles of ATM in response to transcription-blocking TOP1cc.

  3. DNA polymerase activity of tomato fruit chromoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, E C; Carrillo, N

    1990-11-26

    DNA polymerase activity was measured in chromoplasts of ripening tomato fruits. Plastids isolated from young leaves or mature red fruits showed similar DNA polymerase activities. The same enzyme species was present in either chloroplasts or chromoplasts as judged by pH and temperature profiles, sensitivities towards different inhibitors and relative molecular mass (Mr 88 kDa). The activities analyzed showed the typical behaviour of plastid-type polymerases. The results presented here suggest that chromoplast maintain their DNA synthesis potential in fruit tissue at chloroplast levels. Consequently, the sharp decrease of the plastid chromosome transcription observed at the onset of fruit ripening could not be due to limitations in the availability of template molecules. Other mechanisms must be involved in the inhibition of chromoplast RNA synthesis.

  4. Mutator Phenotype and DNA Double-Strand Break Repair in BLM Helicase-Deficient Human Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Tetsuya; Yasui, Manabu

    2016-01-01

    Bloom syndrome (BS), an autosomal recessive disorder of the BLM gene, predisposes sufferers to various cancers. To investigate the mutator phenotype and genetic consequences of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in BS cells, we developed BLM helicase-deficient human cells by disrupting the BLM gene. Cells with a loss of heterozygosity (LOH) due to homologous recombination (HR) or nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) can be restored with or without site-directed DSB induction. BLM cells exhibited a high frequency of spontaneous interallelic HR with crossover, but noncrossover events with long-tract gene conversions also occurred. Despite the highly interallelic HR events, BLM cells predominantly produced hemizygous LOH by spontaneous deletion. These phenotypes manifested during repair of DSBs. Both NHEJ and HR appropriately repaired DSBs in BLM cells, resulting in hemizygous and homozygous LOHs, respectively. However, the magnitude of the LOH was exacerbated in BLM cells, as evidenced by large deletions and long-tract gene conversions with crossover. BLM helicase suppresses the elongation of branch migration and crossover of double Holliday junctions (HJs) during HR repair, and a deficiency in this enzyme causes collapse, abnormal elongation, and/or preferable resolution to crossover of double HJs, resulting in a large-scale LOH. This mechanism underlies the predisposition for cancer in BS. PMID:27601585

  5. Mutator Phenotype and DNA Double-Strand Break Repair in BLM Helicase-Deficient Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Tetsuya; Yasui, Manabu; Honma, Masamitsu

    2016-12-01

    Bloom syndrome (BS), an autosomal recessive disorder of the BLM gene, predisposes sufferers to various cancers. To investigate the mutator phenotype and genetic consequences of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in BS cells, we developed BLM helicase-deficient human cells by disrupting the BLM gene. Cells with a loss of heterozygosity (LOH) due to homologous recombination (HR) or nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) can be restored with or without site-directed DSB induction. BLM cells exhibited a high frequency of spontaneous interallelic HR with crossover, but noncrossover events with long-tract gene conversions also occurred. Despite the highly interallelic HR events, BLM cells predominantly produced hemizygous LOH by spontaneous deletion. These phenotypes manifested during repair of DSBs. Both NHEJ and HR appropriately repaired DSBs in BLM cells, resulting in hemizygous and homozygous LOHs, respectively. However, the magnitude of the LOH was exacerbated in BLM cells, as evidenced by large deletions and long-tract gene conversions with crossover. BLM helicase suppresses the elongation of branch migration and crossover of double Holliday junctions (HJs) during HR repair, and a deficiency in this enzyme causes collapse, abnormal elongation, and/or preferable resolution to crossover of double HJs, resulting in a large-scale LOH. This mechanism underlies the predisposition for cancer in BS. Copyright © 2016 Suzuki et al.

  6. Treatment of short stature and growth hormone deficiency in children with somatotropin (rDNA origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana S Hardin

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Dana S HardinOhio State University and Columbus Children’s Hospital, Columbus, Ohio, USAAbstract: Somatotropin (growth hormone, GH of recombinant DNA origin has provided a readily available and safe drug that has greatly improved management of children and adolescents with GH deficiency (GHD and other disorders of growth. In the US and Europe, regulatory agencies have given approval for the use of GH in children and adults who meet specific criteria. However, clinical and ethical controversies remain regarding the diagnosis of GHD, dosing of GH, duration of therapy and expected outcomes. Areas which also require consensus include management of pubertal patients, transitioning pediatric patients to adulthood, management of children with idiopathic short stature and the role of recombinant IGF-1 in treatment. Additionally, studies have demonstrated anabolic benefits of GH in children who have inflammatory-based underlying disease and efficacy of GH in overcoming growth delays in people treated chronically with corticosteroids. These areas are open for possible new uses of this drug. This review summarizes current indications for GH use in children and discusses areas of clinical debate and potential anabolic uses in chronic illness.Keywords: somatotropin, growth hormone deficiency, children, short stature

  7. Synthetic lethal targeting of DNA double strand break repair deficient cells by human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE1) inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Sultana, Rebeka; McNeill, Daniel R.; Abbotts, Rachel; Mohammed, Mohammed Z.; Zdzienicka, Małgorzata Z.; Qutob, Haitham; Seedhouse, Claire; Charles A. Laughton; Fischer, Peter M.; Patel, Poulam M.; Wilson, David M.; Madhusudan, Srinivasan

    2012-01-01

    An apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site is an obligatory cytotoxic intermediate in DNA Base Excision Repair (BER) that is processed by human AP endonuclease 1 (APE1). APE1 is essential for BER and an emerging drug target in cancer. We have isolated novel small molecule inhibitors of APE1. In the current study we have investigated the ability of APE1 inhibitors to induce synthetic lethality in a panel of DNA double strand break (DSB) repair deficient and proficient cells; a) Chine...

  8. DNA polymerase-α regulates the activation of type I interferons through cytosolic RNA:DNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starokadomskyy, Petro; Gemelli, Terry; Rios, Jonathan J; Xing, Chao; Wang, Richard C; Li, Haiying; Pokatayev, Vladislav; Dozmorov, Igor; Khan, Shaheen; Miyata, Naoteru; Fraile, Guadalupe; Raj, Prithvi; Xu, Zhe; Xu, Zigang; Ma, Lin; Lin, Zhimiao; Wang, Huijun; Yang, Yong; Ben-Amitai, Dan; Orenstein, Naama; Mussaffi, Huda; Baselga, Eulalia; Tadini, Gianluca; Grunebaum, Eyal; Sarajlija, Adrijan; Krzewski, Konrad; Wakeland, Edward K; Yan, Nan; de la Morena, Maria Teresa; Zinn, Andrew R; Burstein, Ezra

    2016-05-01

    Aberrant nucleic acids generated during viral replication are the main trigger for antiviral immunity, and mutations that disrupt nucleic acid metabolism can lead to autoinflammatory disorders. Here we investigated the etiology of X-linked reticulate pigmentary disorder (XLPDR), a primary immunodeficiency with autoinflammatory features. We discovered that XLPDR is caused by an intronic mutation that disrupts the expression of POLA1, which encodes the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase-α. Unexpectedly, POLA1 deficiency resulted in increased production of type I interferons. This enzyme is necessary for the synthesis of RNA:DNA primers during DNA replication and, strikingly, we found that POLA1 is also required for the synthesis of cytosolic RNA:DNA, which directly modulates interferon activation. Together this work identifies POLA1 as a critical regulator of the type I interferon response.

  9. Hypomethylation of serum blood clot DNA, but not plasma EDTA-blood cell pellet DNA, from vitamin B12-deficient subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eoin P Quinlivan

    Full Text Available Vitamin B12, a co-factor in methyl-group transfer, is important in maintaining DNA (deoxycytidine methylation. Using two independent assays we examined the effect of vitamin B12-deficiency (plasma vitamin B12<148 pmol/L on DNA methylation in women of childbearing age. Coagulated blood clot DNA from vitamin B12-deficient women had significantly (p<0.001 lower percentage deoxycytidine methylation (3.23±0.66%; n = 248 and greater [3 H]methyl-acceptance (42,859±9,699 cpm; n = 17 than DNA from B12-replete women (4.44±0.18%; n = 128 and 26,049±2,814 cpm; n = 11 [correlation between assays: r = -0.8538; p<0.001; n = 28]. In contrast, uncoagulated EDTA-blood cell pellet DNA from vitamin B12-deficient and B12-replete women exhibited similar percentage methylation (4.45±0.15%; n = 77 vs. 4.47±0.15%; n = 47 and [3 H]methyl-acceptance (27,378±4,094 cpm; n = 17 vs. 26,610±2,292 cpm; n = 11. Therefore, in simultaneously collected paired blood samples, vitamin B12-deficiency was associated with decreased DNA methylation only in coagulated samples. These findings highlight the importance of sample collection methods in epigenetic studies, and the potential impact biological processes can have on DNA methylation during collection.

  10. Repair of ultraviolet-damaged transforming DNA in a mismatch repair-deficient strain of Haemophilus influenzae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagci, H.; Stuy, J.H. (Florida State Univ., Tallahassee (USA). Dept. of Biological Science)

    1982-03-01

    Ultraviolet inactivation of Haemophilus influenzae transforming DNA followed inverse square root kinetics in both mismatch repair-proficient (hex/sup +/) and deficient (hex-1) recipients. No DNA concentration effect was seen with UV-excision repair-deficient (uvr/sup -/) strains. Low-efficiency genetic markers remained more sensitive than high-efficiency ones when they were assayed on excision repair-deficient hex/sup +/ uvr/sup -/ strains. They were equally resistant when hex/sup -/ uvr/sup -/ recipients were used. This was explained by assuming that recombinational repair of UV lesions in the donor strand and mismatch repair of the recipient strand may overlap and cause double strand interruptions. This will eliminate low-efficiency transformants.

  11. Rearrangement of Rag-1 recombinase gene in DNA-repair deficient/immunodeficient ``wasted`` mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woloschak, G.E.; Weaver, P.; Churchill, M.; Chang-Liu, C-M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Libertin, C.R. [Loyola Univ., Maywood, IL (United States)

    1992-11-01

    Mice recessive for the autosomal gene ``wasted`` (wst) display a disease pattern which includes increased sensitivity to the killing effects of ionizing radiation, immunodeficiency, and neurologic dysfunction. The recent cloning and characterization of recombinase genes (Rag-l/Rag-2) expressed in lymphoid and possibly central nervous system tissues prompted us to examine expression of these genes in DNA repair-deficient/immunodeficient wasted mice. Our results revealed that in thymus tissue, a small Rag-I transcript (1.0 kb) was detected in wst/wst mice that was not evident in thymus from control mice. In wst/{sm_bullet} mice, a two-fold increase in Rag-1 mRNA was evident in thymus tissue. Rag-2 mRNA could only be detected in thymus tissue from wst/{sm_bullet} and not from wst/wst or parental control BCF, mice. Southern blots revealed a rearrangement or deletion within the Rag-1 gene of affected wasted mice that was not evident in known strain-specific parental or littermate controls. These results support the idea that the Rag-1 gene may map at or near the locus for the wasted mutation. In addition, they suggest the importance of recombinase function in normal immune and central nervous system development as well as the potential contribution of this gene family to the normal repair of radiation-induced DNA damage.

  12. Comprehensive Behavioral Analysis of Activating Transcription Factor 5-Deficient Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemura, Mariko; Ogura, Tae; Matsuzaki, Ayako; Nakano, Haruo; Takao, Keizo; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Yuji

    2017-01-01

    Activating transcription factor 5 (ATF5) is a member of the CREB/ATF family of basic leucine zipper transcription factors. We previously reported that ATF5-deficient (ATF5(-/-)) mice demonstrated abnormal olfactory bulb development due to impaired interneuron supply. Furthermore, ATF5(-/-) mice were less aggressive than ATF5(+/+) mice. Although ATF5 is widely expressed in the brain, and involved in the regulation of proliferation and development of neurons, the physiological role of ATF5 in the higher brain remains unknown. Our objective was to investigate the physiological role of ATF5 in the higher brain. We performed a comprehensive behavioral analysis using ATF5(-/-) mice and wild type littermates. ATF5(-/-) mice exhibited abnormal locomotor activity in the open field test. They also exhibited abnormal anxiety-like behavior in the light/dark transition test and open field test. Furthermore, ATF5(-/-) mice displayed reduced social interaction in the Crawley's social interaction test and increased pain sensitivity in the hot plate test compared with wild type. Finally, behavioral flexibility was reduced in the T-maze test in ATF5(-/-) mice compared with wild type. In addition, we demonstrated that ATF5(-/-) mice display disturbances of monoamine neurotransmitter levels in several brain regions. These results indicate that ATF5 deficiency elicits abnormal behaviors and the disturbance of monoamine neurotransmitter levels in the brain. The behavioral abnormalities of ATF5(-/-) mice may be due to the disturbance of monoamine levels. Taken together, these findings suggest that ATF5(-/-) mice may be a unique animal model of some psychiatric disorders.

  13. Mitochondrial respiratory chain enzyme assay and DNA analysis in peripheral blood leukocytes for the etiological study of Chinese children with Leigh syndrome due to complex I deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yan Yan; Wu, Tong Fei; Liu, Yu Peng; Wang, Qiao; Li, Xi Yuan; Zhang, Yao; Song, Jin Qing; Wang, Yu Jie; Yang, Yan Ling

    2013-02-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I enzyme deficiency is the most commonly seen mitochondrial respiratory chain disorder. Although screening and diagnostic methods are available overseas, clinically feasible diagnostic methods have not yet been established in China. In this study, four Chinese boys with Leigh syndrome due to complex I deficiency were diagnosed by mitochondrial respiratory chain enzyme assay and DNA analysis using peripheral blood leukocytes. Four patients were admitted at the age of 5-14 years because of unexplained progressive neuromuscular symptoms, including motor developmental delay or regression, weakness, and seizures. Their cranial magnetic resonance imaging revealed typical finding as Leigh syndrome. Peripheral leukocyte mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I activities were found decreased to 9.6-33.1 nmol/min/mg mitochondrial protein(control 44.0 ± 5.4 nmol/min/mg). The ratios of complex I to citrate synthase activity were also decreased (8.9-19.8% in patients vs. control 48 ± 11%). Three mtDNA mutations were identified from three out of four patients, supporting the diagnosis of complex I deficiency. Point mutations m.10191T>C in mitochondrial ND3 gene, m.13513G>A in ND5 gene and m.14,453G>A in ND6 gene were detected in three patients.

  14. As deficiências auditivas relacionadas às alterações do DNA mitocondrial. Hearing loss related to mitochondrial DNA changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria F. P. de Carvalho

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available A deficiência auditiva é sintoma comum que pode apresentar várias etiologias, entre elas as causadas por alterações genéticas. As mutações genéticas podem ocorrer em genes nucleares e mitocondriais. A mitocôndria, uma organela intracelular, tem o seu próprio genoma (DNA, que é uma molécula circular e é transmitido exclusivamente pela mãe. As mutações do DNA mitocondrial são transmitidas pela linhagem materna, mas podem ocorrer mutações espontâneas. O fenótipo, ou expressão clínica, da mutação mitocondrial vai depender da quantidade de DNA mitocondrial mutante existente na célula, situação conhecida como heteroplasmia. A mitocôndria tem a função de disponibilizar energia para as células sob a forma de ATP (trifosfato de adenosina. Os órgãos que requerem grande quantidade de energia são mais comumente acometidos em casos de mutações do DNA mitocondrial, como células nervosas, musculares, endócrinas, ópticas e auditivas. Como a cóclea é grande consumidora de energia, uma mutação no DNA mitocondrial de células ciliadas causa deficiência auditiva do tipo neurossensorial, bilateral, simétrica e progressiva. As deficiências auditivas causadas por mutações no DNA mitocondrial correspondem a 0,5% a 1% de todas as deficiências auditivas de origem genética. Foi realizada uma extensa revisão bibliográfica, a fim de estudar as deficiências auditivas causadas por alterações no DNA mitocondrial. A deficiência auditiva pode se apresentar na forma isolada (forma não sindrômica, como nos casos de hiper-sensibilidade aos antibióticos aminoglicosídeos e presbiacusia, ou associada a outras doenças (forma sindrômica, como na síndrome de Kearns-Sayre e diabete e surdez de herança materna.Hearing loss is a common symptom that may be manifested by many etiologies and it is frequently associated to genetic problems. Genetic mutations may occur in nuclear or mitochondrial genes. Mitochondria are

  15. Rapid DNA extraction protocol for detection of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency from dried blood spots by real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struniawski, R; Szpechcinski, A; Poplawska, B; Skronski, M; Chorostowska-Wynimko, J

    2013-01-01

    The dried blood spot (DBS) specimens have been successfully employed for the large-scale diagnostics of α1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency as an easy to collect and transport alternative to plasma/serum. In the present study we propose a fast, efficient, and cost effective protocol of DNA extraction from dried blood spot (DBS) samples that provides sufficient quantity and quality of DNA and effectively eliminates any natural PCR inhibitors, allowing for successful AAT genotyping by real-time PCR and direct sequencing. DNA extracted from 84 DBS samples from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients was genotyped for AAT deficiency variants by real-time PCR. The results of DBS AAT genotyping were validated by serum IEF phenotyping and AAT concentration measurement. The proposed protocol allowed successful DNA extraction from all analyzed DBS samples. Both quantity and quality of DNA were sufficient for further real-time PCR and, if necessary, for genetic sequence analysis. A 100% concordance between AAT DBS genotypes and serum phenotypes in positive detection of two major deficiency S- and Z- alleles was achieved. Both assays, DBS AAT genotyping by real-time PCR and serum AAT phenotyping by IEF, positively identified PI*S and PI*Z allele in 8 out of the 84 (9.5%) and 16 out of 84 (19.0%) patients, respectively. In conclusion, the proposed protocol noticeably reduces the costs and the hand-on-time of DBS samples preparation providing genomic DNA of sufficient quantity and quality for further real-time PCR or genetic sequence analysis. Consequently, it is ideally suited for large-scale AAT deficiency screening programs and should be method of choice.

  16. CX-5461 is a DNA G-quadruplex stabilizer with selective lethality in BRCA1/2 deficient tumours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hong; Di Antonio, Marco; McKinney, Steven; Mathew, Veena; Ho, Brandon; O'Neil, Nigel J.; Santos, Nancy Dos; Silvester, Jennifer; Wei, Vivien; Garcia, Jessica; Kabeer, Farhia; Lai, Daniel; Soriano, Priscilla; Banáth, Judit; Chiu, Derek S.; Yap, Damian; Le, Daniel D.; Ye, Frank B.; Zhang, Anni; Thu, Kelsie; Soong, John; Lin, Shu-chuan; Tsai, Angela Hsin Chin; Osako, Tomo; Algara, Teresa; Saunders, Darren N.; Wong, Jason; Xian, Jian; Bally, Marcel B.; Brenton, James D.; Brown, Grant W.; Shah, Sohrab P.; Cescon, David; Mak, Tak W.; Caldas, Carlos; Stirling, Peter C.; Hieter, Phil; Balasubramanian, Shankar; Aparicio, Samuel

    2017-01-01

    G-quadruplex DNAs form four-stranded helical structures and are proposed to play key roles in different cellular processes. Targeting G-quadruplex DNAs for cancer treatment is a very promising prospect. Here, we show that CX-5461 is a G-quadruplex stabilizer, with specific toxicity against BRCA deficiencies in cancer cells and polyclonal patient-derived xenograft models, including tumours resistant to PARP inhibition. Exposure to CX-5461, and its related drug CX-3543, blocks replication forks and induces ssDNA gaps or breaks. The BRCA and NHEJ pathways are required for the repair of CX-5461 and CX-3543-induced DNA damage and failure to do so leads to lethality. These data strengthen the concept of G4 targeting as a therapeutic approach, specifically for targeting HR and NHEJ deficient cancers and other tumours deficient for DNA damage repair. CX-5461 is now in advanced phase I clinical trial for patients with BRCA1/2 deficient tumours (Canadian trial, NCT02719977, opened May 2016). PMID:28211448

  17. A human cellular sequence implicated in trk oncogene activation is DNA damage inducible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Ishai, R.; Scharf, R.; Sharon, R.; Kapten, I. (Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa (Israel))

    1990-08-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum cells, which are deficient in the repair of UV light-induced DNA damage, have been used to clone DNA-damage-inducible transcripts in human cells. The cDNA clone designated pC-5 hybridizes on RNA gel blots to a 1-kilobase transcript, which is moderately abundant in nontreated cells and whose synthesis is enhanced in human cells following UV irradiation or treatment with several other DNA-damaging agents. UV-enhanced transcription of C-5 RNA is transient and occurs at lower fluences and to a greater extent in DNA-repair-deficient than in DNA-repair-proficient cells. Southern blot analysis indicates that the C-5 gene belongs to a multigene family. A cDNA clone containing the complete coding sequence of C-5 was isolated. Sequence analysis revealed that it is homologous to a human cellular sequence encoding the amino-terminal activating sequence of the trk-2h chimeric oncogene. The presence of DNA-damage-responsive sequences at the 5' end of a chimeric oncogene could result in enhanced expression of the oncogene in response to carcinogens.

  18. Rearrangement of RAG-1 recombinase gene in DNA-repair deficient ``wasted`` mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woloschak, G.E.; Libertin, C.R.; Weaver, P. [Loyola Univ., Chicago, IL (United States); Churchill, M.; Chang-Liu, C.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1993-11-01

    Mice recessive for the autosomal gene ``wasted`` wst display a disease pattern which includes increased sensitivity to the killing effects of ionizing radiation, immunodeficiency, and neurologic dysfunction. The recent cloning and characterization of recombinase genes (RAG-l/RAG-2) expressed in lymphoid and possibly central nervous system tissues prompted us to examine expression of these genes in DNA repair-deficient/immunodeficient wasted mice. Our results revealed expression of RAG-1 mRNA in spinal cord (but not brain) of control mice; no expression of RAG-1 mRNA was detected in spinal cord or brain from wst/wst mice or their normal littermates (wst/{center_dot}mice). In thymus tissue, a small RAG-1 transcript (1.0 kb) was detected in wst/wst mice that was not evident in thymus from control mice. In wst/{center_dot}mice, a two-fold increase in RAG-1 mRNA was evident in thymus tissue. RAG-2 mRNA could only be detected in thymus tissue from wst/{center_dot} and not from wst/wst or parental control BCF{sub 1} mice. Southern blots revealed a rearrangement/deletion within the RAG-1 gene of affected wasted mice, not evident in known strain-specific parental or littermate controls. These results support the idea that the RAG-1 gene may map at or near the locus for the wasted mutation. In addition, they suggest the importance of recombinase function in normal immune and central nervous system development as well as the potential contribution of this gene family to the normal repair of radiation-induced DNA damage.

  19. Functional variants of human APE1 rescue the DNA repair defects of the yeast AP endonuclease/3'-diesterase-deficient strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiqiang; Ayoub, Emily; Mazouzi, Abdelghani; Grin, Inga; Ishchenko, Alexander A; Fan, Jinjiang; Yang, Xiaoming; Harihar, Taramatti; Saparbaev, Murat; Ramotar, Dindial

    2014-10-01

    Human APE1 is an essential enzyme performing functions in DNA repair and transcription. It possesses four distinct repair activities acting on a variety of base and sugar derived DNA lesions. APE1 has seven cysteine residues and Cys65, and to a lesser extent Cys93 and Cys99, is uniquely involved in maintaining a subset of transcription factors in the reduced and active state. Four of the cysteines Cys93, 99, 208 and 310 of APE1 are located proximal to its active site residues Glu96, Asp210 and His309 involved in processing damaged DNA, raising the possibility that missense mutation of these cysteines could alter the enzyme DNA repair functions. An earlier report documented that serine substitution of the individual cysteine residues did not affect APE1 ability to cleave an abasic site oligonucleotide substrate in vitro, except for Cys99Ser, although any consequences of these variants in the repair of in vivo DNA lesions were not tested. Herein, we mutated all seven cysteines of APE1, either singly or in combination, to alanine and show that none of the resulting variants interfered with the enzyme DNA repair functions. Cross-specie complementation analysis reveals that these APE1 cysteine variants fully rescued the yeast DNA repair deficient strain YW778, lacking AP endonucleases and 3'-diesterases, from toxicities caused by DNA damaging agents. Moreover, the elevated spontaneous mutations arising in strain YW778 from the lack of the DNA repair activities were completely suppressed by the APE1 cysteine variants. These findings suggest that the cysteine residues of APE1 are unlikely to play a role in the DNA repair functions of the enzyme in vivo. We also examine other APE1 missense mutations and provide the first evidence that the variant Asp308Ala with normal AP endonuclease, but devoid of 3'→5' exonuclease, displays hypersensitivity to the anticancer drug bleomycin, and not to other agents, suggesting that it has a defect in processing unique DNA lesions

  20. Small-molecule inhibitors identify the RAD52-ssDNA interaction as critical for recovery from replication stress and for survival of BRCA2 deficient cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hengel, Sarah R; Malacaria, Eva; Folly da Silva Constantino, Laura; Bain, Fletcher E; Diaz, Andrea; Koch, Brandon G; Yu, Liping; Wu, Meng; Pichierri, Pietro; Spies, M Ashley; Spies, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The DNA repair protein RAD52 is an emerging therapeutic target of high importance for BRCA-deficient tumors. Depletion of RAD52 is synthetically lethal with defects in tumor suppressors BRCA1, BRCA2 and PALB2. RAD52 also participates in the recovery of the stalled replication forks. Anticipating that ssDNA binding activity underlies the RAD52 cellular functions, we carried out a high throughput screening campaign to identify compounds that disrupt the RAD52-ssDNA interaction. Lead compounds were confirmed as RAD52 inhibitors in biochemical assays. Computational analysis predicted that these inhibitors bind within the ssDNA-binding groove of the RAD52 oligomeric ring. The nature of the inhibitor-RAD52 complex was validated through an in silico screening campaign, culminating in the discovery of an additional RAD52 inhibitor. Cellular studies with our inhibitors showed that the RAD52-ssDNA interaction enables its function at stalled replication forks, and that the inhibition of RAD52-ssDNA binding acts additively with BRCA2 or MUS81 depletion in cell killing. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14740.001 PMID:27434671

  1. Whole-Genome Profiling of a Novel Mutagenesis Technique Using Proofreading-Deficient DNA Polymerase δ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuh Shiwa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel mutagenesis technique using error-prone DNA polymerase δ (polδ, the disparity mutagenesis model of evolution, has been successfully employed to generate novel microorganism strains with desired traits. However, little else is known about the spectra of mutagenic effects caused by disparity mutagenesis. We evaluated and compared the performance of the polδMKII mutator, which expresses the proofreading-deficient and low-fidelity polδ, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae haploid strain with that of the commonly used chemical mutagen ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS. This mutator strain possesses exogenous mutant polδ supplied from a plasmid, tthereby leaving the genomic one intact. We measured the mutation rate achieved by each mutagen and performed high-throughput next generation sequencing to analyze the genome-wide mutation spectra produced by the 2 mutagenesis methods. The mutation frequency of the mutator was approximately 7 times higher than that of EMS. Our analysis confirmed the strong G/C to A/T transition bias of EMS, whereas we found that the mutator mainly produces transversions, giving rise to more diverse amino acid substitution patterns. Our present study demonstrated that the polδMKII mutator is a useful and efficient method for rapid strain improvement based on in vivo mutagenesis.

  2. ATM-deficient human fibroblast cells are resistant to low levels of DNA double-strand break induced apoptosis and subsequently undergo drug-induced premature senescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jun; Jo, Yong Hwa; Cho, Chang Hoon; Choe, Wonchae; Kang, Insug; Baik, Hyung Hwan [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, 26 Kyunghee-daero, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Kyung-Sik, E-mail: sky9999@khu.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, 26 Kyunghee-daero, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A-T cells were not hypersensitive to low levels of DNA DSBs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A-T cells have enhanced Akt but defect in activation of p53 and apoptotic proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A-T cells underwent premature senescence after DNA damage accumulated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemotherapeutic effect in cancer therapy may be associated with premature senescence. -- Abstract: DNA DSBs are induced by IR or radiomimetic drugs such as doxorubicin. It has been indicated that cells from ataxia-telangiectasia patients are highly sensitive to radiation due to defects in DNA repair, but whether they have impairment in apoptosis has not been fully elucidated. A-T cells showed increased sensitivity to high levels of DNA damage, however, they were more resistant to low doses. Normal cells treated with combination of KU55933, a specific ATM kinase inhibitor, and doxorubicin showed increased resistance as they do in a similar manner to A-T cells. A-T cells have higher viability but more DNA breaks, in addition, the activations of p53 and apoptotic proteins (Bax and caspase-3) were deficient, but Akt expression was enhanced. A-T cells subsequently underwent premature senescence after treatment with a low dose of doxorubicin, which was confirmed by G2 accumulation, senescent morphology, and SA-{beta}-gal positive until 15 days repair incubation. Finally, A-T cells are radio-resistant at low doses due to its defectiveness in detecting DNA damage and apoptosis, but the accumulation of DNA damage leads cells to premature senescence.

  3. Construction of DNA damage response gene pprI function-deficient and function-complementary mutants in Deinococcus radiodurans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Guanjun; LU Huiming; HUANG Lifen; HUA Yuejin

    2005-01-01

    PprI, a DNA damage response factor from the extraordinary radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans, plays a central regulatory role in multiple DNA damage repair. In this study, a fusion DNA fragment carrying kanamycin resistance gene with the D. Radiodurans groEL promoter was cloned by PCR amplification and reversely inserted into the pprI locus in the genome of the wild-type strain R1. The resulting pprI-deficient strain, designated YR1, was very sensitive to ionizing radiation. Meanwhile, the re- combinant DNA fragment was cloned into the shuttle vector pRADZ3, and resulted in plasmid pRADK with kanamycin resistance in D. Radiodurans. The fragments containing complete pprI gene and 3'-terminal deletion pprI△ were cloned into plasmid pRADK. The resulted plasmids designated pRADKpprI and pRADKpprI△ were then transformed to YR1. Results show that YR1 carrying pRADKpprI was able to fully restore the extreme radioresistance to the same level as the wild-type D. Raiodurans R1, whereas YR1 pRADKpprI△ failed to do so. Construction of DNA repair switch PprI function-deficient and function-complementary mutants in D. Radiodurans is not only useful to elucidating the relationship between domains and functions of PprI protein, but also opens the door to the further studies of the biological functions of PprI protein in vivo.

  4. Photon-deficient bone scan lesion as a precursor of active Paget's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaspers, M.M.J.R.; Pauwels, E.K.J.; Blom, J. (Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Leiden (Netherlands)); Harinck, H.I.J. (Clinical Investigation Unit, Department of Endocrinology, University Hospital Leiden, Netherands)

    1984-05-15

    A case is presented in which a Pagetoid lesion was demonstrated as a photon-deficient area (cold spot) on the bone scan. This area changed into a hot spot 3 years after its discovery. Clinical and radiological observations provide evidence that a scintigraphically photon-deficient area may represent a precursor of active Paget's disease.

  5. Identification and quantification of nitrogen nutrient deficiency in the activated sludge process using respirometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ning, Z.; Patry, G.G.; Spanjers, H.

    2000-01-01

    Experimental protocols to identify and quantify nitrogen nutrient deficiency in the activated sludge process were developed and tested using respirometry. Respirometric experiments showed that when a nitrogen nutrient deficient sludge is exposed to ammonia nitrogen, the oxygen uptake rate (OUR) of t

  6. Identification and quantification of nitrogen nutrient deficiency in the activated sludge process using respirometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ning, Z.; Patry, G.G.; Spanjers, H.

    2000-01-01

    Experimental protocols to identify and quantify nitrogen nutrient deficiency in the activated sludge process were developed and tested using respirometry. Respirometric experiments showed that when a nitrogen nutrient deficient sludge is exposed to ammonia nitrogen, the oxygen uptake rate (OUR) of

  7. DNA ligase 1 deficient plants display severe growth defects and delayed repair of both DNA single and double strand breaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bray Clifford M

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA ligase enzymes catalyse the joining of adjacent polynucleotides and as such play important roles in DNA replication and repair pathways. Eukaryotes possess multiple DNA ligases with distinct roles in DNA metabolism, with clear differences in the functions of DNA ligase orthologues between animals, yeast and plants. DNA ligase 1, present in all eukaryotes, plays critical roles in both DNA repair and replication and is indispensable for cell viability. Results Knockout mutants of atlig1 are lethal. Therefore, RNAi lines with reduced levels of AtLIG1 were generated to allow the roles and importance of Arabidopsis DNA ligase 1 in DNA metabolism to be elucidated. Viable plants were fertile but displayed a severely stunted and stressed growth phenotype. Cell size was reduced in the silenced lines, whilst flow cytometry analysis revealed an increase of cells in S-phase in atlig1-RNAi lines relative to wild type plants. Comet assay analysis of isolated nuclei showed atlig1-RNAi lines displayed slower repair of single strand breaks (SSBs and also double strand breaks (DSBs, implicating AtLIG1 in repair of both these lesions. Conclusion Reduced levels of Arabidopsis DNA ligase 1 in the silenced lines are sufficient to support plant development but result in retarded growth and reduced cell size, which may reflect roles for AtLIG1 in both replication and repair. The finding that DNA ligase 1 plays an important role in DSB repair in addition to its known function in SSB repair, demonstrates the existence of a previously uncharacterised novel pathway, independent of the conserved NHEJ. These results indicate that DNA ligase 1 functions in both DNA replication and in repair of both ss and dsDNA strand breaks in higher plants.

  8. Homologous DNA strand exchange activity of the human mitochondrial DNA helicase TWINKLE

    OpenAIRE

    Sen, Doyel; Patel, Gayatri; Smita S Patel

    2016-01-01

    A crucial component of the human mitochondrial DNA replisome is the ring-shaped helicase TWINKLE—a phage T7-gene 4-like protein expressed in the nucleus and localized in the human mitochondria. Our previous studies showed that despite being a helicase, TWINKLE has unique DNA annealing activity. At the time, the implications of DNA annealing by TWINKLE were unclear. Herein, we report that TWINKLE uses DNA annealing function to actively catalyze strand-exchange reaction between the unwinding su...

  9. DNA adduct kinetics in reproductive tissues of DNA repair proficient and deficient male mice after oral exposure to benzo(a)pyrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhofstad, Nicole; van Oostrom, Conny Th M; van Benthem, Jan; van Schooten, Frederik J; van Steeg, Harry; Godschalk, Roger W L

    2010-03-01

    Benzo(a)pyrene (B[a]P) can induce somatic mutations, whereas its potential to induce germ cell mutations is unclear. There is circumstantial evidence that paternal exposure to B[a]P can result in germ cell mutations. Since DNA adducts are thought to be a prerequisite for B[a]P induced mutations, we studied DNA adduct kinetics by (32)P-postlabeling in sperm, testes and lung tissues of male mice after a single exposure to B[a]P (13 mg/kg bw, by gavage). To investigate DNA adduct formation at different stages of spermatogenesis, mice were sacrificed at Day 1, 4, 7, 10, 14, 21, 32, and 42 after exposure. In addition, DNA repair deficient (Xpc(-/-)) mice were used to study the contribution of nucleotide excision repair in DNA damage removal. DNA adducts were detectable with highest levels in lung followed by sperm and testis. Maximum adduct levels in the lung and testis were observed at Day 1 after exposure, while adduct levels in sperm reached maximum levels at approximately 1 week after exposure. Lung tissue and testis of Xpc(-/-) mice contained significantly higher DNA adduct levels compared to wild type (Wt) mice over the entire 42 day observation period (P adduct half-life between Xpc(-/-) and Wt mice were only observed in testis. In sperm, DNA adduct levels were significantly higher in Xpc(-/-) mice than in Wt mice only at Day 42 after exposure (P = 0.01). These results indicate that spermatogonia and testes are susceptible for the induction of DNA damage and rely on nucleotide excision repair for maintaining their genetic integrity.

  10. Lamin A Is an Endogenous SIRT6 Activator and Promotes SIRT6-Mediated DNA Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrestha Ghosh

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The nuclear lamins are essential for various molecular events in the nucleus, such as chromatin organization, DNA replication, and provision of mechanical support. A specific point mutation in the LMNA gene creates a truncated prelamin A termed progerin, causing Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS. SIRT6 deficiency leads to defective genomic maintenance and accelerated aging similar to HGPS, suggesting a potential link between lamin A and SIRT6. Here, we report that lamin A is an endogenous activator of SIRT6 and facilitates chromatin localization of SIRT6 upon DNA damage. Lamin A promotes SIRT6-dependent DNA-PKcs (DNA-PK catalytic subunit recruitment to chromatin, CtIP deacetylation, and PARP1 mono-ADP ribosylation in response to DNA damage. The presence of progerin jeopardizes SIRT6 activation and compromises SIRT6-mediated molecular events in response to DNA damage. These data reveal a critical role for lamin A in regulating SIRT6 activities, suggesting that defects in SIRT6 functions contribute to impaired DNA repair and accelerated aging in HGPS.

  11. The CXXC finger 5 protein is required for DNA damage-induced p53 activation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is a critical component of the DNA damage response pathway that induces a set of genes responsible for cell cycle arrest,senescence,apoptosis,and DNA repair.The ataxia te-langiectasia mutated protein kinase(ATM) responds to DNA-damage stimuli and signals p53 stabiliza-tion and activation,thereby facilitating transactivation of p53 inducible genes and maintainence of genome integrity.In this study,we identified a CXXC zinc finger domain containing protein termed CF5 as a critical component in the DNA damage signaling pathway.CF5 induces p53 transcriptional activity and apoptosis in cells expressing wild type p53 but not in p53-deficient cells.Knockdown of CF5 in-hibits DNA damage-induced p53 activation as well as cell cycle arrest.Furthermore,CF5 physically interacts with ATM and is required for DNA damage-induced ATM phosphorylation but not its recruitment to chromatin.These findings suggest that CF5 plays a crucial role in ATM-p53 signaling in response to DNA damage.

  12. Viability and DNA damage responses of TPPII-deficient Myc- and Ras-transformed fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsurumi, Chizuko; Firat, Elke; Gaedicke, Simone [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Freiburg, Freiburg (Germany); Huai, Jisen [Institute of Molecular Medicine and Cell Research, Center for Biochemistry and Molecular Cell Research, Albert-Ludwig University, Freiburg (Germany); Mandal, Pankaj Kumar [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Institute of Clinical Molecular Biology and Tumor Genetics, Muenchen (Germany); Niedermann, Gabriele, E-mail: gabriele.niedermann@uniklinik-freiburg.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Freiburg, Freiburg (Germany)

    2009-09-04

    Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPPII) is a giant cytosolic protease. Previous protease inhibitor, overexpression and siRNA studies suggested that TPPII is important for viability and proliferation of tumor cells, and for their ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage response. The possibility that TPPII could be targeted for tumor therapy prompted us to study its role in transformed cells following genetic TPPII deletion. We generated cell lines from primary fibroblasts having conditional (floxed) TPPII alleles, transformed them with both the c-myc and H-ras oncogenes, and deleted TPPII using retroviral self-deleting Cre recombinase. Clonally derived TPPIIflox/flox and TPPII-/- transformed fibroblasts showed no influences of TPPII expression on basal cell survival and proliferation, nor on radiation-induced p53 activation, p21 induction, cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, or clonogenic cell death. Thus, our results do not support a generally important role of TPPII for viability and proliferation of transformed cells or their p53-mediated DNA damage response.

  13. DNA Evidence Uncompromised by Active Oxygen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Castelló

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, forensic sciences can make use of the potential of instrumental analysis techniques to obtain information from the smallest, even invisible, samples. However, as laboratory techniques improve, so too should the procedures applied in the search for and initial testing of clues in order to be equally effective. This requires continuous revision so that those procedures may resolve the problems that samples present. As far as bloodstains are concerned, there are methods available that are recognized as being both highly sensitive and effective. Nevertheless, the marketing of new cleaning products, those that contain active oxygen, has raised doubts about the ability of those procedures to detect blood. It has been shown that stains washed with these detergents (and still visible invalidated both the presumptive test (reduced phenolphthalein, luminol, and Bluestar® and that applied for determining human hemoglobin. These findings have caused considerable concern both within the forensic and scientific community, and among the general public, so obliging us to seek solutions. In this work, the effect of these new cleaning products on DNA analyses is studied. The results, encouraging ones, show that these detergents, despite invalidating all other tests, do not hinder the extraction, or the subsequent analysis, of DNA.

  14. DNA damage and apoptosis in mononuclear cells from glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-deficient patients (G6PD Aachen variant) after UV irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efferth, T; Fabry, U; Osieka, R

    2001-03-01

    Patients affected with X chromosome-linked, hereditary glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency suffer from life-threatening hemolytic crises after intake of certain drugs or foods. G6PD deficiency is associated with low levels of reduced glutathione. We analyzed mononuclear white blood cells (MNC) of three males suffering from the German G6PD Aachen variant, four heterozygote females of this family, one G6PD-deficient male from another family coming from Iran, and six healthy male volunteers with respect to their DNA damage in two different genes (G6PD and T-cell receptor-delta) and their propensity to enter apoptosis after UV illumination (0.08-5.28 J/cm2). As determined by PCR stop assays, there was more UV-induced DNA damage in MNC of G6PD-deficient male patients than in those of healthy subjects. MNC of G6PD-deficient patients showed a higher rate of apoptosis after UV irradiation than MNC of healthy donors. MNC of heterozygote females showed intermediate rates of DNA damage and apoptosis. It is concluded that increased DNA damage may be a result of deficient detoxification of reactive oxygen species by glutathione and may ultimately account for the higher rate of apoptosis in G6PD-deficient MNC.

  15. B-cell activating factor receptor deficiency is associated with an adult-onset antibody deficiency syndrome in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Warnatz, Klaus; Salzer, Ulrich; Rizzi, Marta; Fischer, Beate; Gutenberger, Sylvia; Böhm, Joachim; Kienzler, Anne-Kathrin; Pan-Hammarström, Qiang; Hammarström, Lennart; Rakhmanov, Mirzokhid; Schlesier, Michael; Grimbacher, Bodo; Peter, Hans-Hartmut; Eibel, Hermann

    2009-01-01

    B-cell survival depends on signals induced by B-cell activating factor (BAFF) binding to its receptor (BAFF-R). In mice, mutations in BAFF or BAFF-R cause B-cell lymphopenia and antibody deficiency. Analyzing BAFF-R expression and BAFF-binding to B cells in common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) patients, we identified two siblings carrying a homozygous deletion in the BAFF-R gene. Removing most of the BAFF-R transmembrane part, the deletion precludes BAFF-R expression. Without BAFF-R, B-cel...

  16. A novel DNA joining activity catalyzed by T4 DNA ligase

    OpenAIRE

    Western, L M; Rose, S..J.

    1991-01-01

    The use of T4 and E. coli DNA ligases in genetic engineering technology is usually associated with nick-closing activity in double stranded DNA or ligation of 'sticky-ends' to produce recombinant DNA molecules. We describe in this communication the ability of T4 DNA ligase to catalyze intramolecular loop formation between annealed oligodeoxyribonucleotides wherein Watson-Crick base pairing is absent on one side of the ligation site. Enzyme concentration, loop size, substrate specificity, and ...

  17. Purification of total DNA extracted from activated sludge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Purification of the total DNA extracted from activated sludge samples was studied. The effects of extraction buffers and lysis treatments (lysozyme, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), sonication, mechanical mill and thermal shock) on yield and purity of the total DNA extracted from activated sludge were investigated. It was found that SDS and mechanical mill were the most effective ways for cell lysis, and both gave the highest DNA yields, while by SDS and thermal shock, the purest DNA extract could be obtained. The combination of SDS with other lysis treatment, such as sonication and thermal shock, could apparently increase the DNA yields but also result in severe shearing. For the purification of the crude DNA extract, polyvinyl polypyrrolidone was used for the removal of humic contaminants. Cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide, potassium acetate and phenol/chloroform were used to remove proteins and polysaccharides from crude DNA. Crude DNA was further purified by isopropanol precipitation. Thus, a suitable protocol was proposed for DNA extraction, yielding about 49.9 mg (DNA)/g volatile suspended solids, and the DNA extracts were successfully used in PCR amplifications for 16S rDNA and 16S rDNA V3 region. The PCR products of 16S rDNA V3 region allowed the DGGE analysis (denatured gradient gel electrophoresis) to be possible.

  18. Escherichia coli DnaE Polymerase Couples Pyrophosphatase Activity to DNA Replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Lapenta

    Full Text Available DNA Polymerases generate pyrophosphate every time they catalyze a step of DNA elongation. This elongation reaction is generally believed as thermodynamically favoured by the hydrolysis of pyrophosphate, catalyzed by inorganic pyrophosphatases. However, the specific action of inorganic pyrophosphatases coupled to DNA replication in vivo was never demonstrated. Here we show that the Polymerase-Histidinol-Phosphatase (PHP domain of Escherichia coli DNA Polymerase III α subunit features pyrophosphatase activity. We also show that this activity is inhibited by fluoride, as commonly observed for inorganic pyrophosphatases, and we identified 3 amino acids of the PHP active site. Remarkably, E. coli cells expressing variants of these catalytic residues of α subunit feature aberrant phenotypes, poor viability, and are subject to high mutation frequencies. Our findings indicate that DNA Polymerases can couple DNA elongation and pyrophosphate hydrolysis, providing a mechanism for the control of DNA extension rate, and suggest a promising target for novel antibiotics.

  19. Active DNA demethylation by oxidation and repair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhizhong Gong; Jian-Kang Zhu

    2011-01-01

    DNA methylation and demethylation are increasingly recognized as important epigenetic factors in both plants and animals.DNA methylation,which is catalyzed by DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs),is a relatively stable and heritable modification that controls gene expression,cellular differentiation,genomic imprinting,paramutation,transposon movement,X-inactivation,and embryogenesis [1].The methylation of cytosine to 5-methylcytosine (5mC) is an important example of DNA modification in animals and plants.This highlight concerns DNA demethylation mechanisms in mammals and whether they are similar to that in plants.

  20. DNA double-strand break induction in Ku80-deficient CHO cells following Boron Neutron Capture Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masunaga Shinichiro

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Boron neutron capture reaction (BNCR is based on irradiation of tumors after accumulation of boron compound. 10B captures neutrons and produces an alpha (4He particle and a recoiled lithium nucleus (7Li. These particles have the characteristics of high linear energy transfer (LET radiation and have marked biological effects. The purpose of this study is to verify that BNCR will increase cell killing and slow disappearance of repair protein-related foci to a greater extent in DNA repair-deficient cells than in wild-type cells. Methods Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1 cells and a DNA double-strand break (DSB repair deficient mutant derivative, xrs-5 (Ku80 deficient CHO mutant cells, were irradiated by thermal neutrons. The quantity of DNA-DSBs following BNCR was evaluated by measuring the phosphorylation of histone protein H2AX (gamma-H2AX and 53BP1 foci using immunofluorescence intensity. Results Two hours after neutron irradiation, the number of gamma-H2AX and 53BP1 foci in the CHO-K1 cells was decreased to 36.5-42.8% of the levels seen 30 min after irradiation. In contrast, two hours after irradiation, foci levels in the xrs-5 cells were 58.4-69.5% of those observed 30 min after irradiation. The number of gamma-H2AX foci in xrs-5 cells at 60-120 min after BNCT correlated with the cell killing effect of BNCR. However, in CHO-K1 cells, the RBE (relative biological effectiveness estimated by the number of foci following BNCR was increased depending on the repair time and was not always correlated with the RBE of cytotoxicity. Conclusion Mutant xrs-5 cells show extreme sensitivity to ionizing radiation, because xrs-5 cells lack functional Ku-protein. Our results suggest that the DNA-DSBs induced by BNCR were not well repaired in the Ku80 deficient cells. The RBE following BNCR of radio-sensitive mutant cells was not increased but was lower than that of radio-resistant cells. These results suggest that gamma-ray resistant cells have

  1. Induction and Persistence of Large γH2AX Foci by High Linear Energy Transfer Radiation in DNA-Dependent protein kinase–Deficient Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bracalente, Candelaria; Ibañez, Irene L. [Departamento de Micro y Nanotecnología, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Molinari, Beatriz [Departamento de Radiobiología, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Palmieri, Mónica [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Kreiner, Andrés [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnología, Universidad Nacional de San Martín, San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Valda, Alejandro [Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnología, Universidad Nacional de San Martín, San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); and others

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the cell response to DNA double-strand breaks induced by low and high linear energy transfer (LET) radiations when the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs), an essential protein of the nonhomologous end-joining repair pathway, lacks kinase activity. Methods and Materials: CHO10B2, a Chinese hamster ovary cell line, and its derived radiosensitive mutant cell line, irs-20, lacking DNA-PKcs activity, were evaluated after 0 to 3 Gy of γ-rays, plateau and Bragg peak protons, and lithium beams by clonogenic assay, and as a measurement of double-strand breaks, phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX) foci number and size were quantified by immunocytofluorescence. Results: Irs-20 exhibited greater radiosensitivity and a higher amount of γH2AX foci than CHO10B2 at 6 hours after irradiation for all types of radiations. Remarkably, CHO10B2 and irs-20 maintained their difference in radiosensitivity after high-LET radiation. Six hours after low-LET radiations, irs-20 did not reach basal levels of γH2AX at high doses, whereas CHO10B2 recovered basal levels for all doses. After high-LET radiation, only CHO10B2 exhibited a reduction in γH2AX foci, but it never reached basal levels. Persistent foci in irs-20 confirmed a repair deficiency. Interestingly, after 30 minutes of high-LET radiation both cell lines exhibited large foci (size >0.9 μm{sup 2}) related to the damage nature, whereas at 6 hours irs-20 showed a higher amount of large foci than CHO10B2, with a 7-fold increase at 3 Gy, that could also be associated to radiosensitivity. Conclusions: We demonstrated, for the first time, an association between deficient DNA-PKcs activity and not only high levels of H2AX phosphorylation but also persistence and size increase of γH2AX foci after high-LET irradiation.

  2. Jasmonate signaling is activated in the very early stages of iron deficiency responses in rice roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takanori; Itai, Reiko Nakanishi; Senoura, Takeshi; Oikawa, Takaya; Ishimaru, Yasuhiro; Ueda, Minoru; Nakanishi, Hiromi; Nishizawa, Naoko K

    2016-07-01

    Under low iron availability, plants induce the expression of various genes involved in iron uptake and translocation at the transcriptional level. This iron deficiency response is affected by various plant hormones, but the roles of jasmonates in this response are not well-known. We investigated the involvement of jasmonates in rice iron deficiency responses. High rates of jasmonate-inducible genes were induced during the very early stages of iron deficiency treatment in rice roots. Many jasmonate-inducible genes were also negatively regulated by the ubiquitin ligases OsHRZ1 and OsHRZ2 and positively regulated by the transcription factor IDEF1. Ten out of 35 genes involved in jasmonate biosynthesis and signaling were rapidly induced at 3 h of iron deficiency treatment, and this induction preceded that of known iron deficiency-inducible genes involved in iron uptake and translocation. Twelve genes involved in jasmonate biosynthesis and signaling were also upregulated in HRZ-knockdown roots. Endogenous concentrations of jasmonic acid and jasmonoyl isoleucine tended to be rapidly increased in roots in response to iron deficiency treatment, whereas these concentrations were higher in HRZ-knockdown roots under iron-sufficient conditions. Analysis of the jasmonate-deficient cpm2 mutant revealed that jasmonates repress the expression of many iron deficiency-inducible genes involved in iron uptake and translocation under iron sufficiency, but this repression is partly canceled under an early stage of iron deficiency. These results indicate that jasmonate signaling is activated during the very early stages of iron deficiency, which is partly regulated by IDEF1 and OsHRZs.

  3. Formaldehyde catabolism is essential in cells deficient for the Fanconi anemia DNA-repair pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosado, Ivan V; Langevin, Frédéric; Crossan, Gerry P; Takata, Minoru; Patel, Ketan J

    2011-11-13

    Metabolism is predicted to generate formaldehyde, a toxic, simple, reactive aldehyde that can damage DNA. Here we report a synthetic lethal interaction in avian cells between ADH5, encoding the main formaldehyde-detoxifying enzyme, and the Fanconi anemia (FA) DNA-repair pathway. These results define a fundamental role for the combined action of formaldehyde catabolism and DNA cross-link repair in vertebrate cell survival.

  4. Electronic Activation of a DNA Nanodevice Using a Multilayer Nanofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hyejoong; Ranallo, Simona; Rossetti, Marianna; Heo, Jiwoong; Shin, Jooseok; Park, Kwangyong; Ricci, Francesco; Hong, Jinkee

    2016-10-01

    A method to control activation of a DNA nanodevice by supplying a complementary DNA (cDNA) strand from an electro-responsive nanoplatform is reported. To develop functional nanoplatform, hexalayer nanofilm is precisely designed by layer-by-layer assembly technique based on electrostatic interaction with four kinds of materials: Hydrolyzed poly(β-amino ester) can help cDNA release from the film. A cDNA is used as a key building block to activate DNA nanodevice. Reduced graphene oxides (rGOs) and the conductive polymer provide conductivity. In particular, rGOs efficiently incorporate a cDNA in the film via several interactions and act as a barrier. Depending on the types of applied electronic stimuli (reductive and oxidative potentials), a cDNA released from the electrode can quantitatively control the activation of DNA nanodevice. From this report, a new system is successfully demonstrated to precisely control DNA release on demand. By applying more advanced form of DNA-based nanodevices into multilayer system, the electro-responsive nanoplatform will expand the availability of DNA nanotechnology allowing its improved application in areas such as diagnosis, biosensing, bioimaging, and drug delivery.

  5. Transcription profiles of boron-deficiency-responsive genes in citrus rootstock root by suppression subtractive hybridization and cDNA microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Gao-Feng; Liu, Yong-Zhong; Sheng, Ou; Wei, Qing-Jiang; Yang, Cheng-Quan; Peng, Shu-Ang

    2014-01-01

    Boron (B) deficiency has seriously negative effect on citrus production. Carrizo citrange (CC) has been reported as a B-deficiency tolerant rootstock. However, the molecular mechanism of its B-deficiency tolerance remained not well-explored. To understand the molecular basis of citrus rootstock to B-deficiency, suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) and microarray approaches were combined to identify the potential important or novel genes responsive to B-deficiency. Firstly four SSH libraries were constructed for the root tissue of two citrus rootstocks CC and Trifoliate orange (TO) to compare B-deficiency treated and non-treated plants. Then 7680 clones from these SSH libraries were used to construct a cDNA array and microarray analysis was carried out to verify the expression changes of these clones upon B-deficiency treatment at various time points compared to the corresponding controls. A total of 139 unigenes that were differentially expressed upon B-deficiency stress either in CC or TO were identified from microarray analysis, some of these genes have not previously been reported to be associated with B-deficiency stress. In this work, several genes involved in cell wall metabolism and transmembrane transport were identified to be highly regulated under B-deficiency stress, and a total of 23 metabolic pathways were affected by B-deficiency, especially the lignin biosynthesis pathway, nitrogen metabolism, and glycolytic pathway. All these results indicated that CC was more tolerant than TO to B-deficiency stress. The B-deficiency responsive genes identified in this study could provide further information for understanding the mechanisms of B-deficiency tolerance in citrus.

  6. SCREENING OF 6-PYRUVOYL-TETRAHYDROPTERIN SYNTHASE ACTIVITY DEFICIENCY AMONG HYPERP HENYLALANINEMIC PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DURDI QUJEQ

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available A deficiency of the phenylalanine hydroxylase activity or its cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin may"nlead to hyperphenylalamnemia and as a result, loss of IQ, poor school performance, and"nbehavior problems occurs. Deficiency in 6-pyruvoyl-tetrahydropterin synthase activity is the"nmajor cause of tetrahydrobiopterin deficient phenylketonuria. In this study, blood specimens"nfrom 165 healthy volunteers and 127 children with phenylketonuria were used to determine"nthe 6-pyruvoyl-tetrahydropterin synthase activity. It was found that the activity of 6-"npyruvoyl- tetrahydropterin synthase was decreased in comparison with control [23.46 +/-"n2.94, (mean +/- SD, mmol/ ml/h, n=I27 vs. 127.63 +/- 4.52, n=165, p<0.05]. Results of"nthis study indicate that examination of 6-pyruvoyl-tetrahydropterin synthase activity is helpful"nand may lead to the diagnosis cause of hyperphenylalaninemia.

  7. Vitamin D deficiency and its association with disease activity in new cases of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonakdar, Z S; Jahanshahifar, L; Jahanshahifar, F; Gholamrezaei, A

    2011-10-01

    Evidence has shown a relationship between vitamin D deficiency and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We evaluated the frequency of vitamin D deficiency and its association with disease activity in new cases of SLE. Women with newly diagnosed SLE, based on the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria, were enrolled consecutively. Those receiving vitamin D supplements and postmenopausal women were not included. Disease activity was measured by the BILAG index (2004) and serum concentration of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) was measured by radioimmunoassay method. Forty SLE patients with mean age of 25.3 ± 4.2 years were studied. Severe, moderate, and mild vitamin D deficiency, corresponding to serum 25[OH]D concentrations of Lupus Assessment Group (BILAG) index score (r = -0.486, p = 0.001). Those with a more severe vitamin D deficiency had also higher concentrations of liver enzymes (p vitamin D deficiency at the time of diagnosis that is associated with a higher disease activity. Routine screening for vitamin D deficiency and its prompt treatment in patients with newly diagnosed SLE is recommended.

  8. Increased anticoagulant activity of thrombin-binding DNA aptamers by nanoscale organization on DNA nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rangnekar, Abhijit; Zhang, Alex M.; Shiyuan Li, Susan;

    2012-01-01

    Control over thrombin activity is much desired to regulate blood clotting in surgical and therapeutic situations. Thrombin-binding RNA and DNA aptamers have been used to inhibit thrombin activity and thus the coagulation cascade. Soluble DNA aptamers, as well as two different aptamers tethered by...

  9. Congenital DNA repair deficiency results in protection against renal ischemia reperfusion injury in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Susa (Denis); J.R. Mitchell (James); M. Verweij (Marielle); H.W.M. van de Ven (Marieke); H.P. Roest (Henk); S. van den Engel (Sandra); I.M. Bajema (Ingeborg); K. Mangundap (Kirsten); J.N.M. IJzermans (Jan); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); R.W.F. de Bruin (Ron)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractCockayne syndrome and other segmental progerias with inborn defects in DNA repair mechanisms are thought to be due in part to hypersensitivity to endogenous oxidative DNA damage. The accelerated aging-like symptoms of this disorder include dysmyelination within the central nervous system

  10. Congenital DNA repair deficiency results in protection against renal ischemia reperfusion injury in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Susa (Denis); J.R. Mitchell (James); M. Verweij (Marielle); H.W.M. van de Ven (Marieke); H.P. Roest (Henk); S. van den Engel (Sandra); I.M. Bajema (Ingeborg); K. Mangundap (Kirsten); J.N.M. IJzermans (Jan); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); R.W.F. de Bruin (Ron)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractCockayne syndrome and other segmental progerias with inborn defects in DNA repair mechanisms are thought to be due in part to hypersensitivity to endogenous oxidative DNA damage. The accelerated aging-like symptoms of this disorder include dysmyelination within the central nervous system

  11. [Transketolase activity in thiamine deficiency of the kidney in rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) following continous feeding with raw hearring].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmitz, R; Spannhof, L

    1977-04-01

    The feeding of crude, thiaminase-containing herring to rainbow trout produced external symptoms of thiamine deficiency after a period of 150 days. The level of transketolase activity in the kidney decreased continuously until the first appearance of deficiency symptoms, while the TPP effect showed an upward trend. After prolonged feeding of crude herring the decline of transketolase activity is accompanied by a deficiency of the apoenzyme of transketolase. The administration of thiamine-containing food to the thiamine-deficient animals induced an immediate increase n transketolase activity. Once the external deficiency symptoms are very pronounced the death of the animal can only, if at all, be prevented by an injectionof thiaminie.

  12. Deficiency of double-strand DNA break repair does not impair Mycobacterium tuberculosis virulence in multiple animal models of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaton, Brook E; Barkan, Daniel; Bongiorno, Paola; Karakousis, Petros C; Glickman, Michael S

    2014-08-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis persistence within its human host requires mechanisms to resist the effector molecules of host immunity, which exert their bactericidal effects through damaging pathogen proteins, membranes, and DNA. Substantial evidence indicates that bacterial pathogens, including M. tuberculosis, require DNA repair systems to repair the DNA damage inflicted by the host during infection, but the role of double-strand DNA break (DSB) repair systems is unclear. Double-strand DNA breaks are the most cytotoxic form of DNA damage and must be repaired for chromosome replication to proceed. M. tuberculosis elaborates three genetically distinct DSB repair systems: homologous recombination (HR), nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), and single-strand annealing (SSA). NHEJ, which repairs DSBs in quiescent cells, may be particularly relevant to M. tuberculosis latency. However, very little information is available about the phenotype of DSB repair-deficient M. tuberculosis in animal models of infection. Here we tested M. tuberculosis strains lacking NHEJ (a Δku ΔligD strain), HR (a ΔrecA strain), or both (a ΔrecA Δku strain) in C57BL/6J mice, C3HeB/FeJ mice, guinea pigs, and a mouse hollow-fiber model of infection. We found no difference in bacterial load, histopathology, or host mortality between wild-type and DSB repair mutant strains in any model of infection. These results suggest that the animal models tested do not inflict DSBs on the mycobacterial chromosome, that other repair pathways can compensate for the loss of NHEJ and HR, or that DSB repair is not required for M. tuberculosis pathogenesis.

  13. DNA replication origin activation in space and time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragkos, Michalis; Ganier, Olivier; Coulombe, Philippe; Méchali, Marcel

    2015-06-01

    DNA replication begins with the assembly of pre-replication complexes (pre-RCs) at thousands of DNA replication origins during the G1 phase of the cell cycle. At the G1-S-phase transition, pre-RCs are converted into pre-initiation complexes, in which the replicative helicase is activated, leading to DNA unwinding and initiation of DNA synthesis. However, only a subset of origins are activated during any S phase. Recent insights into the mechanisms underlying this choice reveal how flexibility in origin usage and temporal activation are linked to chromosome structure and organization, cell growth and differentiation, and replication stress.

  14. A DNA enzyme with N-glycosylase activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, T. L.; Ordoukhanian, P.; Joyce, G. F.

    2000-01-01

    In vitro evolution was used to develop a DNA enzyme that catalyzes the site-specific depurination of DNA with a catalytic rate enhancement of about 10(6)-fold. The reaction involves hydrolysis of the N-glycosidic bond of a particular deoxyguanosine residue, leading to DNA strand scission at the apurinic site. The DNA enzyme contains 93 nucleotides and is structurally complex. It has an absolute requirement for a divalent metal cation and exhibits optimal activity at about pH 5. The mechanism of the reaction was confirmed by analysis of the cleavage products by using HPLC and mass spectrometry. The isolation and characterization of an N-glycosylase DNA enzyme demonstrates that single-stranded DNA, like RNA and proteins, can form a complex tertiary structure and catalyze a difficult biochemical transformation. This DNA enzyme provides a new approach for the site-specific cleavage of DNA molecules.

  15. Prophage spontaneous activation promotes DNA release enhancing biofilm formation in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarida Carrolo

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus is able to form biofilms in vivo and previous studies propose that pneumococcal biofilms play a relevant role both in colonization and infection. Additionally, pneumococci recovered from human infections are characterized by a high prevalence of lysogenic bacteriophages (phages residing quiescently in their host chromosome. We investigated a possible link between lysogeny and biofilm formation. Considering that extracellular DNA (eDNA is a key factor in the biofilm matrix, we reasoned that prophage spontaneous activation with the consequent bacterial host lysis could provide a source of eDNA, enhancing pneumococcal biofilm development. Monitoring biofilm growth of lysogenic and non-lysogenic pneumococcal strains indicated that phage-infected bacteria are more proficient at forming biofilms, that is their biofilms are characterized by a higher biomass and cell viability. The presence of phage particles throughout the lysogenic strains biofilm development implicated prophage spontaneous induction in this effect. Analysis of lysogens deficient for phage lysin and the bacterial major autolysin revealed that the absence of either lytic activity impaired biofilm development and the addition of DNA restored the ability of mutant strains to form robust biofilms. These findings establish that limited phage-mediated host lysis of a fraction of the bacterial population, due to spontaneous phage induction, constitutes an important source of eDNA for the S. pneumoniae biofilm matrix and that this localized release of eDNA favors biofilm formation by the remaining bacterial population.

  16. miR-29 Represses the Activities of DNA Methyltransferases and DNA Demethylases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izuho Hatada

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Members of the microRNA-29 (miR-29 family directly target the DNA methyltransferases, DNMT3A and DNMT3B. Disturbances in the expression levels of miR-29 have been linked to tumorigenesis and tumor aggressiveness. Members of the miR-29 family are currently thought to repress DNA methylation and suppress tumorigenesis by protecting against de novo methylation. Here, we report that members of the miR-29 family repress the activities of DNA methyltransferases and DNA demethylases, which have opposing roles in control of DNA methylation status. Members of the miR-29 family directly inhibited DNA methyltransferases and two major factors involved in DNA demethylation, namely tet methylcytosine dioxygenase 1 (TET1 and thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG. Overexpression of miR-29 upregulated the global DNA methylation level in some cancer cells and downregulated DNA methylation in other cancer cells, suggesting that miR-29 suppresses tumorigenesis by protecting against changes in the existing DNA methylation status rather than by preventing de novo methylation of DNA.

  17. CLK-1 protein has DNA binding activity specific to O(L) region of mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbunova, Vera; Seluanov, Andrei

    2002-04-10

    Mutations in the clk-1 gene of Caenorhabditis elegans extend worm life span and slow down a variety of physiological processes. Here we report that C. elegans CLK-1 as well as its mouse homologue have DNA binding activity that is specific to the O(L) region of mitochondrial DNA. DNA binding activity of CLK-1 is inhibited by ADP, and is altered by mutations that extend nematode life span. Our results suggest that, in addition to its enzymatic function in ubiquinone biosynthesis, CLK-1 is involved in the regulation of mtDNA replication or transcription.

  18. Hyperhomocysteinemia-Induced Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 Promoter DNA Methylation by Nuclear Factor-κB/DNA Methyltransferase 1 in Apolipoprotein E-Deficient Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ju; Jiang, Yideng; Yang, Anning; Sun, Weiwei; Ma, Changjian; Ma, Shengchao; Gong, Huihui; Shi, Yingkang; Wei, Jun

    2013-04-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia is considered to be a significant risk factor in atherosclerosis and plays an important role in it. The purpose of this study was to determine the molecular mechanism of blood monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) promoter DNA hypomethylation in the formation of atherosclerosis induced by hyperhomocysteinemia, and to explore the effect of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB)/DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) in this mechanism. The atherosclerotic effect of MCP-1 in apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) and wild-type C57BL/6J mice was evaluated using atherosclerotic lesion area; serum NF-κB, MCP-1, and DNMT1 levels; and MCP-1 promoter DNA methylation expression. In vitro, the mechanism responsible for the effect of NF-κB/DNMT1 on foam cells was investigated by measuring NF-κB and DNMT1 levels to determine whether NF-κB/DNMT1 had an effect on gene expression. Compared with the control group, atherosclerotic lesions in ApoE(-/-) mice fed a high methionine diet significantly increased, as did the expression of MCP-1. In vitro study showed that pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate treatment down-regulated levels of NF-κB and raised DNMT1 concentrations, confirming the effect of NF-κB/DNMT1 in the MCP-1 promoter DNA methylation process. In conclusion, our results suggest that through NF-κB/DNMT1, MCP-1 promoter DNA hypomethylation may play a key role in formation of atherosclerosis under hyperhomocysteinemia.

  19. Absence of superoxide dismutase activity causes nuclear DNA fragmentation during the aging process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muid, Khandaker Ashfaqul; Karakaya, Hüseyin Çaglar; Koc, Ahmet, E-mail: ahmetkoc@iyte.edu.tr

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • Aging process increases ROS accumulation. • Aging process increases DNA damage levels. • Absence of SOD activity does not cause DNA damage in young cells. • Absence of SOD activity accelerate aging and increase oxidative DNA damages during the aging process. - Abstract: Superoxide dismutases (SOD) serve as an important antioxidant defense mechanism in aerobic organisms, and deletion of these genes shortens the replicative life span in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Even though involvement of superoxide dismutase enzymes in ROS scavenging and the aging process has been studied extensively in different organisms, analyses of DNA damages has not been performed for replicatively old superoxide dismutase deficient cells. In this study, we investigated the roles of SOD1, SOD2 and CCS1 genes in preserving genomic integrity in replicatively old yeast cells using the single cell comet assay. We observed that extend of DNA damage was not significantly different among the young cells of wild type, sod1Δ and sod2Δ strains. However, ccs1Δ mutants showed a 60% higher amount of DNA damage in the young stage compared to that of the wild type cells. The aging process increased the DNA damage rates 3-fold in the wild type and more than 5-fold in sod1Δ, sod2Δ, and ccs1Δ mutant cells. Furthermore, ROS levels of these strains showed a similar pattern to their DNA damage contents. Thus, our results confirm that cells accumulate DNA damages during the aging process and reveal that superoxide dismutase enzymes play a substantial role in preserving the genomic integrity in this process.

  20. Exome-wide somatic microsatellite variation is altered in cells with DNA repair deficiencies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zalman Vaksman

    Full Text Available Microsatellites (MST, tandem repeats of 1-6 nucleotide motifs, are mutational hot-spots with a bias for insertions and deletions (INDELs rather than single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. The majority of MST instability studies are limited to a small number of loci, the Bethesda markers, which are only informative for a subset of colorectal cancers. In this paper we evaluate non-haplotype alleles present within next-gen sequencing data to evaluate somatic MST variation (SMV within DNA repair proficient and DNA repair defective cell lines. We confirm that alleles present within next-gen data that do not contribute to the haplotype can be reliably quantified and utilized to evaluate the SMV without requiring comparisons of matched samples. We observed that SMV patterns found in DNA repair proficient cell lines without DNA repair defects, MCF10A, HEK293 and PD20 RV:D2, had consistent patterns among samples. Further, we were able to confirm that changes in SMV patterns in cell lines lacking functional BRCA2, FANCD2 and mismatch repair were consistent with the different pathways perturbed. Using this new exome sequencing analysis approach we show that DNA instability can be identified in a sample and that patterns of instability vary depending on the impaired DNA repair mechanism, and that genes harboring minor alleles are strongly associated with cancer pathways. The MST Minor Allele Caller used for this study is available at https://github.com/zalmanv/MST_minor_allele_caller.

  1. DNA nuclease activity of Rev-coupled transition metal chelates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyner, Jeff C; Keuper, Kevin D; Cowan, J A

    2012-06-07

    Artificial nucleases containing Rev-coupled metal chelates based on combinations of the transition metals Fe(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), and Cu(2+) and the chelators DOTA, DTPA, EDTA, NTA, tripeptide GGH, and tetrapeptide KGHK have been tested for DNA nuclease activity. Originally designed to target reactive transition metal chelates (M-chelates) to the HIV-1 Rev response element mRNA, attachment to the arginine-rich Rev peptide also increases DNA-binding affinity for the attached M-chelates. Apparent K(D) values ranging from 1.7 to 3.6 µM base pairs for binding of supercoiled pUC19 plasmid DNA by Ni-chelate-Rev complexes were observed, as a result of electrostatic attraction between the positively-charged Rev peptide and negatively-charged DNA. Attachment of M-chelates to the Rev peptide resulted in enhancements of DNA nuclease activity ranging from 1-fold (no enhancement) to at least 13-fold (for Cu-DTPA-Rev), for the rate of DNA nicking, with second order rate constants for conversion of DNA(supercoiled) to DNA(nicked) up to 6 × 10(6) M(-1) min(-1), and for conversion of DNA(nicked) to DNA(linear) up to 1 × 10(5) M(-1) min(-1). Freifelder-Trumbo analysis and the ratios of linearization and nicking rate constants (k(lin)/k(nick)) revealed concerted mechanisms for nicking and subsequent linearization of plasmid DNA for all of the Rev-coupled M-chelates, consistent with higher DNA residency times for the Rev-coupled M-chelates. Observed rates for Rev-coupled M-chelates were less skewed by differing DNA-binding affinities than for M-chelates lacking Rev, as a result of the narrow range of DNA-binding affinities observed, and therefore relationships between DNA nuclease activity and other catalyst properties, such as coordination unsaturation, the ability to consume ascorbic acid and generate diffusible radicals, and the identity of the metal center, are now clearly illustrated in light of the similar DNA-binding affinities of all M-chelate-Rev complexes. This work

  2. Extraction DNA from Activated Sludge-Comparing with Soil Sample

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢冰; 奚旦立; 陈季华

    2003-01-01

    DNA directly extraction from activated sludge and soil sample with enzyme lyses methods was investigated in this paper. DNA yield from activated sludge was 3.0 mg/g. VLSS, and 28.2-43.8 μg/g soil respectively. The resulting DNA is suitable for PCR.By studied methods, higher quality and quantity of sludge DNA could be obtained rapidly and inexpensively from large number of samples, and the PCR product obtained from this protocol was not affected by contaminated higher concentration of heavy metals.

  3. Intrachromosomal recombination between highly diverged DNA sequences is enabled in human cells deficient in Bloom helicase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yibin; Li, Shen; Smith, Krissy; Waldman, Barbara Criscuolo; Waldman, Alan S

    2016-05-01

    Mutation of Bloom helicase (BLM) causes Bloom syndrome (BS), a rare human genetic disorder associated with genome instability, elevation of sister chromatid exchanges, and predisposition to cancer. Deficiency in BLM homologs in Drosophila and yeast brings about significantly increased rates of recombination between imperfectly matched sequences ("homeologous recombination," or HeR). To assess whether BLM deficiency provokes an increase in HeR in human cells, we transfected an HeR substrate into a BLM-null cell line derived from a BS patient. The substrate contained a thymidine kinase (tk)-neo fusion gene disrupted by the recognition site for endonuclease I-SceI, as well as a functional tk gene to serve as a potential recombination partner for the tk-neo gene. The two tk sequences on the substrate displayed 19% divergence. A double-strand break was introduced by expression of I-SceI and repair events were recovered by selection for G418-resistant clones. Among 181 events recovered, 30 were accomplished via HeR with the balance accomplished by nonhomologous end-joining. The frequency of HeR events in the BS cells was elevated significantly compared to that seen in normal human fibroblasts or in BS cells complemented for BLM expression. We conclude that BLM deficiency enables HeR in human cells.

  4. A recombinant DNA vaccine protects mice deficient in the alpha/beta interferon receptor against lethal challenge with Usutu virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Acebes, Miguel A; Blázquez, Ana-Belén; Cañas-Arranz, Rodrigo; Vázquez-Calvo, Ángela; Merino-Ramos, Teresa; Escribano-Romero, Estela; Sobrino, Francisco; Saiz, Juan-Carlos

    2016-04-19

    Usutu virus (USUV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus whose circulation had been confined to Africa since it was first detected in 1959. However, in the last decade USUV has emerged in Europe causing episodes of avian mortality and sporadic severe neuroinvasive infections in humans. Remarkably, adult laboratory mice exhibit limited susceptibility to USUV infection, which has impaired the analysis of the immune responses, thus complicating the evaluation of virus-host interactions and of vaccine candidates against this pathogen. In this work, we showed that mice deficient in the alpha/beta interferon receptor (IFNAR (-/-) mice) were highly susceptible to USUV infection and provided a lethal challenge model for vaccine testing. To validate this infection model, a plasmid DNA vaccine candidate encoding the precursor of membrane (prM) and envelope (E) proteins of USUV was engineered. Transfection of cultured cells with this plasmid resulted in expression of USUV antigens and the assembly and secretion of small virus-like particles also known as recombinant subviral particles (RSPs). A single intramuscular immunization with this plasmid was sufficient to elicit a significant level of protection against challenge with USUV in IFNAR (-/-) mice. The characterization of the humoral response induced revealed that DNA vaccination primed anti-USUV antibodies, including neutralizing antibodies. Overall, these results probe the suitability of IFNAR (-/-) mice as an amenable small animal model for the study of USUV host virus interactions and vaccine testing, as well as the feasibility of DNA-based vaccine strategies for the control of this pathogen.

  5. Iron Deficiency Decreases the Fe(III)-Chelate Reducing Activity of Leaf Protoplasts1

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Vallejo, Elena B.; Morales, Fermín; Cistué, Luis; Abadía, Anunciación; Abadía, Javier

    2000-01-01

    The ferric-chelate reductase (FC-R) activity of mesophyll protoplasts isolated from Fe-sufficient (control) and Fe-deficient sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) leaves has been characterized. Measurements were made in an ionic environment similar to that in the apoplastic space of the sugar beet mesophyll cells. The FC-R activity of Fe-sufficient and Fe-deficient protoplasts was dependent on light. Fe deficiency decreased markedly the FC-R activity per protoplast surface unit. The optimal pH for the activity of the FC-R in mesophyll protoplasts was in the range 5.5 to 6.0, typical of the apoplastic space. Beyond pH 6.0, the activity of the FC-R in mesophyll protoplasts decreased markedly in both Fe-sufficient and Fe-deficient protoplasts. These data suggest that both the intrinsic decrease in FC-R activity per protoplast surface and a possible shift in the pH of the apoplastic space could lead to the accumulation of physiologically inactive Fe pools in chlorotic leaves. PMID:10677427

  6. Honey, I Shrunk the DNA : DNA Length as a Probe for Nucleic-Acid Enzyme Activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oijen, Antoine M. van

    2007-01-01

    The replication, recombination, and repair of DNA are processes essential for the maintenance of genomic information and require the activity of numerous enzymes that catalyze the polymerization or digestion of DNA. This review will discuss how differences in elastic properties between single- and d

  7. Honey, I Shrunk the DNA : DNA Length as a Probe for Nucleic-Acid Enzyme Activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oijen, Antoine M. van

    2007-01-01

    The replication, recombination, and repair of DNA are processes essential for the maintenance of genomic information and require the activity of numerous enzymes that catalyze the polymerization or digestion of DNA. This review will discuss how differences in elastic properties between single- and d

  8. Screen for abnormal mitochondrial phenotypes in mouse embryonic stem cells identifies a model for succinyl-CoA ligase deficiency and mtDNA depletion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taraka R. Donti

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in subunits of succinyl-CoA synthetase/ligase (SCS, a component of the citric acid cycle, are associated with mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, elevation of methylmalonic acid (MMA, and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA depletion. A FACS-based retroviral-mediated gene trap mutagenesis screen in mouse embryonic stem (ES cells for abnormal mitochondrial phenotypes identified a gene trap allele of Sucla2 (Sucla2SAβgeo, which was used to generate transgenic mice. Sucla2 encodes the ADP-specific β-subunit isoform of SCS. Sucla2SAβgeo homozygotes exhibited recessive lethality, with most mutants dying late in gestation (e18.5. Mutant placenta and embryonic (e17.5 brain, heart and muscle showed varying degrees of mtDNA depletion (20–60%. However, there was no mtDNA depletion in mutant liver, where the gene is not normally expressed. Elevated levels of MMA were observed in embryonic brain. SCS-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs demonstrated a 50% reduction in mtDNA content compared with wild-type MEFs. The mtDNA depletion resulted in reduced steady state levels of mtDNA encoded proteins and multiple respiratory chain deficiencies. mtDNA content could be restored by reintroduction of Sucla2. This mouse model of SCS deficiency and mtDNA depletion promises to provide insights into the pathogenesis of mitochondrial diseases with mtDNA depletion and into the biology of mtDNA maintenance. In addition, this report demonstrates the power of a genetic screen that combines gene trap mutagenesis and FACS analysis in mouse ES cells to identify mitochondrial phenotypes and to develop animal models of mitochondrial dysfunction.

  9. Role of teh Rad52 Amino-terminal DNA Binding Activity in DNA Strand Capture in Homologous Recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Idina; Hallwyl, Swee Chuang Lim; Seong, Changhyun

    2009-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rad52 protein promotes homologous recombination by nucleating the Rad51 recombinase onto replication protein A-coated single-stranded DNA strands and also by directly annealing such strands. We show that the purified rad52-R70A mutant protein, with a compromised amino...... conversion intermediates reveals that rad52-R70A cells can mediate DNA strand invasion but are unable to complete the recombination event. These results provide evidence that DNA binding by the evolutionarily conserved amino terminus of Rad52 is needed for the capture of the second DNA end during homologous......-terminal DNA binding domain, is capable of Rad51 delivery to DNA but is deficient in DNA annealing. Results from chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments find that rad52-R70A associates with DNA double-strand breaks and promotes recruitment of Rad51 as efficiently as wild-type Rad52. Analysis of gene...

  10. Oxidized mitochondrial DNA activates the NLRP3 inflammasome during apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Kenichi; Crother, Timothy R; Karlin, Justin; Dagvadorj, Jargalsaikhan; Chiba, Norika; Chen, Shuang; Ramanujan, V Krishnan; Wolf, Andrea J; Vergnes, Laurent; Ojcius, David M; Rentsendorj, Altan; Vargas, Mario; Guerrero, Candace; Wang, Yinsheng; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Underhill, David M; Town, Terrence; Arditi, Moshe

    2012-03-23

    We report that in the presence of signal 1 (NF-κB), the NLRP3 inflammasome was activated by mitochondrial apoptotic signaling that licensed production of interleukin-1β (IL-1β). NLRP3 secondary signal activators such as ATP induced mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis, resulting in release of oxidized mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) into the cytosol, where it bound to and activated the NLRP3 inflammasome. The antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 inversely regulated mitochondrial dysfunction and NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Mitochondrial DNA directly induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation, because macrophages lacking mtDNA had severely attenuated IL-1β production, yet still underwent apoptosis. Both binding of oxidized mtDNA to the NLRP3 inflammasome and IL-1β secretion could be competitively inhibited by the oxidized nucleoside 8-OH-dG. Thus, our data reveal that oxidized mtDNA released during programmed cell death causes activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. These results provide a missing link between apoptosis and inflammasome activation, via binding of cytosolic oxidized mtDNA to the NLRP3 inflammasome.

  11. The 'de novo' DNA methyltransferase Dnmt3b compensates the Dnmt1-deficient intestinal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Ellen N; Sheaffer, Karyn L; Kaestner, Klaus H

    2016-01-25

    Dnmt1 is critical for immediate postnatal intestinal development, but is not required for the survival of the adult intestinal epithelium, the only rapidly dividing somatic tissue for which this has been shown. Acute Dnmt1 deletion elicits dramatic hypomethylation and genomic instability. Recovery of DNA methylation state and intestinal health is dependent on the de novo methyltransferase Dnmt3b. Ablation of both Dnmt1 and Dnmt3b in the intestinal epithelium is lethal, while deletion of either Dnmt1 or Dnmt3b has no effect on survival. These results demonstrate that Dnmt1 and Dnmt3b cooperate to maintain DNA methylation and genomic integrity in the intestinal epithelium.

  12. Novel roles for MLH3 deficiency and TLE6-like amplification in DNA mismatch repair-deficient gastrointestinal tumorigenesis and progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng-Chieh Chen

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available DNA mismatch repair suppresses gastrointestinal tumorgenesis. Four mammalian E. coli MutL homologues heterodimerize to form three distinct complexes: MLH1/PMS2, MLH1/MLH3, and MLH1/PMS1. To understand the mechanistic contributions of MLH3 and PMS2 in gastrointestinal tumor suppression, we generated Mlh3(-/-;Apc(1638N and Mlh3(-/-;Pms2(-/-;Apc(1638N (MPA mice. Mlh3 nullizygosity significantly increased Apc frameshift mutations and tumor multiplicity. Combined Mlh3;Pms2 nullizygosity further increased Apc base-substitution mutations. The spectrum of MPA tumor mutations was distinct from that observed in Mlh1(-/-;Apc(1638N mice, implicating the first potential role for MLH1/PMS1 in tumor suppression. Because Mlh3;Pms2 deficiency also increased gastrointestinal tumor progression, we used array-CGH to identify a recurrent tumor amplicon. This amplicon contained a previously uncharacterized Transducin enhancer of Split (Tle family gene, Tle6-like. Expression of Tle6-like, or the similar human TLE6D splice isoform in colon cancer cells increased cell proliferation, colony-formation, cell migration, and xenograft tumorgenicity. Tle6-like;TLE6D directly interact with the gastrointestinal tumor suppressor RUNX3 and antagonize RUNX3 target transactivation. TLE6D is recurrently overexpressed in human colorectal cancers and TLE6D expression correlates with RUNX3 expression. Collectively, these findings provide important insights into the molecular mechanisms of individual MutL homologue tumor suppression and demonstrate an association between TLE mediated antagonism of RUNX3 and accelerated human colorectal cancer progression.

  13. DNA repair deficiency as a susceptibility marker for spontaneous lymphoma in golden retriever dogs: a case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas H Thamm

    Full Text Available There is accumulating evidence that an individual's inability to accurately repair DNA damage in a timely fashion may in part dictate a predisposition to cancer. Dogs spontaneously develop lymphoproliferative diseases such as lymphoma, with the golden retriever (GR breed being at especially high risk. Mechanisms underlying such breed susceptibility are largely unknown; however, studies of heritable cancer predisposition in dogs may be much more straightforward than similar studies in humans, owing to a high degree of inbreeding and more limited genetic heterogeneity. Here, we conducted a pilot study with 21 GR with lymphoma, 20 age-matched healthy GR and 20 age-matched healthy mixed-breed dogs (MBD to evaluate DNA repair capability following exposure to either ionizing radiation (IR or the chemical mutagen bleomycin. Inter-individual variation in DNA repair capacity was evaluated in stimulated canine lymphoctyes exposed in vitro utilizing the G2 chromosomal radiosensitivity assay to quantify clastogen-induced chromatid-type aberrations (gaps and breaks. Golden retrievers with lymphoma demonstrated elevated sensitivity to induction of chromosome damage following either challenge compared to either healthy GR or MBD at multiple doses and time points. Using the 75(th percentile of chromatid breaks per 1,000 chromosomes in the MBD population at 4 hours post 1.0 Gy IR exposure as a benchmark to compare cases and controls, GR with lymphoma were more likely than healthy GR to be classified as "sensitive" (odds ratio = 21.2, 95% confidence interval 2.3-195.8. Furthermore, our preliminary findings imply individual (rather than breed susceptibility, and suggest that deficiencies in heritable factors related to DNA repair capabilities may be involved in the development of canine lymphoma. These studies set the stage for larger confirmatory studies, as well as candidate-based approaches to probe specific genetic susceptibility factors.

  14. HIF1α is required for osteoclast activation by estrogen deficiency in postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyauchi, Yoshiteru; Sato, Yuiko; Kobayashi, Tami; Yoshida, Shigeyuki; Mori, Tomoaki; Kanagawa, Hiroya; Katsuyama, Eri; Fujie, Atsuhiro; Hao, Wu; Miyamoto, Kana; Tando, Toshimi; Morioka, Hideo; Matsumoto, Morio; Chambon, Pierre; Johnson, Randall S; Kato, Shigeaki; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Miyamoto, Takeshi

    2013-10-08

    In women, estrogen deficiency after menopause frequently accelerates osteoclastic bone resorption, leading to osteoporosis, the most common skeletal disorder. However, mechanisms underlying osteoporosis resulting from estrogen deficiency remain largely unknown. Here we show that in bone-resorbing osteoclasts, estrogen-dependent destabilization of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF1α), which is unstable in the presence of oxygen, plays a pivotal role in promoting bone loss in estrogen-deficient conditions. In vitro, HIF1α was destabilized by estrogen treatment even in hypoxic conditions, and estrogen loss in ovariectomized (Ovx) mice stabilized HIF1α in osteoclasts and promoted their activation and subsequent bone loss in vivo. Osteoclast-specific HIF1α inactivation antagonized bone loss in Ovx mice and osteoclast-specific estrogen receptor alpha deficient mice, both models of estrogen-deficient osteoporosis. Oral administration of a HIF1α inhibitor protected Ovx mice from osteoclast activation and bone loss. Thus, HIF1α represents a promising therapeutic target in osteoporosis.

  15. Synaptic proteome changes in a DNA repair deficient Ercc1 mouse model of accelerated aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Végh (Marlene); M.C. de Waard (Monique); I. van der Pluijm (Ingrid); Y. Ridwan (Yanto); M.J.M. Sassen (Marion J.); P. van Nierop (Pim); R.C. van der Schors (Roel); K.W. Li (Ka Wan); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); A.B. Smit (August); R.E. van Kesteren (Ronald)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractCognitive decline is one of the earliest hallmarks of both normal and pathological brain aging. Here we used Ercc1 mutant mice, which are impaired in multiple DNA repair systems and consequently show accelerated aging and progressive memory deficits, to identify changes in the levels of

  16. SIRT1 promotes DNA repair activity in response to radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jae-Min; Lee, Kee-Ho [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-01

    Human SIRT1 controls various physiological responses including cell fate, stress, and aging, through deacetylation of its specific substrate protein. In processing DNA damage signaling, SIRT1 attenuates a cellular apoptotic response by deacetylation of p53 tumor suppressor. Ectopically over-expressed SIRT1 resulted in the increase of repair of DNA strand breakages produced by radiation. On the other hand, repression of endogenous SIRT1 expression by SIRT1 siRNA led to the decrease of this repair activity, indicating that SIRT1 can regulate DNA repair capacity of cells with DNA strand breaks.

  17. Deficiencies of active electronic radiation protection dosimeters in pulsed fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankerhold, U; Hupe, O; Ambrosi, P

    2009-07-01

    Nowadays nearly all radiation fields used for X-ray diagnostics are pulsed. These fields are characterised by a high dose rate during the pulse and a short pulse duration in the range of a few milliseconds. The use of active electronic dosimeters has increased in the past few years, but these types of dosimeters might possibly not measure reliably in pulsed radiation fields. Not only personal dosimeters but also area dosimeters that are used mainly for dose rate measurements are concerned. These cannot be substituted by using passive dosimeter types. The characteristics of active electronic dosimeters determined in a continuous radiation field cannot be transferred to those in pulsed fields. Some provisional measurements with typical electronic dosimeters in pulsed radiation fields are presented to reveal this basic problem.

  18. Positive regulation of DNA double strand break repair activity during differentiation of long life span cells: the example of adipogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Meulle

    Full Text Available Little information is available on the ability of terminally differentiated cells to efficiently repair DNA double strand breaks (DSBs, and one might reasonably speculate that efficient DNA repair of these threatening DNA lesions, is needed in cells of long life span with no or limited regeneration from precursor. Few tissues are available besides neurons that allow the study of DNA DSBs repair activity in very long-lived cells. Adipocytes represent a suitable model since it is generally admitted that there is a very slow turnover of adipocytes in adult. Using both Pulse Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE and the disappearance of the phosphorylated form of the histone variant H2AX, we demonstrated that the ability to repair DSBs is increased during adipocyte differentiation using the murine pre-adipocyte cell line, 3T3F442A. In mammalian cells, DSBs are mainly repaired by the non-homologous end-joining pathway (NHEJ that relies on the DNA dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK activity. During the first 24 h following the commitment into adipogenesis, we show an increase in the expression and activity of the catalytic sub-unit of the DNA-PK complex, DNA-PKcs. The increased in DNA DSBs repair activity observed in adipocytes was due to the increase in DNA-PK activity as shown by the use of DNA-PK inhibitor or sub-clones of 3T3F442A deficient in DNA-PKcs using long term RNA interference. Interestingly, the up-regulation of DNA-PK does not regulate the differentiation program itself. Finally, similar positive regulation of DNA-PKcs expression and activity was observed during differentiation of primary culture of pre-adipocytes isolated from human sub-cutaneous adipose tissue. Our results show that DNA DSBs repair activity is up regulated during the early commitment into adipogenesis due to an up-regulation of DNA-PK expression and activity. In opposition to the general view that DNA DSBs repair is decreased during differentiation, our results demonstrate

  19. BMN 673, a novel and highly potent PARP1/2 inhibitor for the treatment of human cancers with DNA repair deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yuqiao; Rehman, Farah L; Feng, Ying; Boshuizen, Julia; Bajrami, Ilirjana; Elliott, Richard; Wang, Bing; Lord, Christopher J; Post, Leonard E; Ashworth, Alan

    2013-09-15

    PARP1/2 inhibitors are a class of anticancer agents that target tumor-specific defects in DNA repair. Here, we describe BMN 673, a novel, highly potent PARP1/2 inhibitor with favorable metabolic stability, oral bioavailability, and pharmacokinetic properties. Potency and selectivity of BMN 673 was determined by biochemical assays. Anticancer activity either as a single-agent or in combination with other antitumor agents was evaluated both in vitro and in xenograft cancer models. BMN 673 is a potent PARP1/2 inhibitor (PARP1 IC50 = 0.57 nmol/L), but it does not inhibit other enzymes that we have tested. BMN 673 exhibits selective antitumor cytotoxicity and elicits DNA repair biomarkers at much lower concentrations than earlier generation PARP1/2 inhibitors (such as olaparib, rucaparib, and veliparib). In vitro, BMN 673 selectively targeted tumor cells with BRCA1, BRCA2, or PTEN gene defects with 20- to more than 200-fold greater potency than existing PARP1/2 inhibitors. BMN 673 is readily orally bioavailable, with more than 40% absolute oral bioavailability in rats when dosed in carboxylmethyl cellulose. Oral administration of BMN 673 elicited remarkable antitumor activity in vivo; xenografted tumors that carry defects in DNA repair due to BRCA mutations or PTEN deficiency were profoundly sensitive to oral BMN 673 treatment at well-tolerated doses in mice. Synergistic or additive antitumor effects were also found when BMN 673 was combined with temozolomide, SN38, or platinum drugs. BMN 673 is currently in early-phase clinical development and represents a promising PARP1/2 inhibitor with potentially advantageous features in its drug class. ©2013 AACR.

  20. eNOS Activation by HDL Is Impaired in Genetic CETP Deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomaraschi, Monica; Ossoli, Alice; Pozzi, Silvia; Nilsson, Peter; Cefalu, Angelo B.; Averna, Maurizio; Kuivenhoven, Jan Albert; Hovingh, G. Kees; Veglia, Fabrizio; Franceschini, Guido; Calabresi, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the CETP gene resulting in defective CETP activity have been shown to cause remarkable elevations of plasma HDL-C levels, with the accumulation in plasma of large, buoyant HDL particles enriched in apolipoprotein E. Genetic CETP deficiency thus represents a unique tool to evaluate how s

  1. Arginine Deficiency Causes Runting in the Suckling Period by Selectively Activating the Stress Kinase GCN2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. van Marion; S. Sankaranarayanan; C. de Theije; P. van Dijk; P. Lindsey; M.C. Lamers; H.P. Harding; D. Ron; W.H. Lamers; S.E. Koehler

    2011-01-01

    Suckling "F/A2" mice, which overexpress arginase-I in their enterocytes, develop a syndrome (hypoargininemia, reduced hair and muscle growth, impaired B-cell maturation) that resembles IGF1 deficiency. The syndrome may result from an impaired function of the GH-IGF1 axis, activation of the stress-ki

  2. eNOS Activation by HDL Is Impaired in Genetic CETP Deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomaraschi, Monica; Ossoli, Alice; Pozzi, Silvia; Nilsson, Peter; Cefalu, Angelo B.; Averna, Maurizio; Kuivenhoven, Jan Albert; Hovingh, G. Kees; Veglia, Fabrizio; Franceschini, Guido; Calabresi, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the CETP gene resulting in defective CETP activity have been shown to cause remarkable elevations of plasma HDL-C levels, with the accumulation in plasma of large, buoyant HDL particles enriched in apolipoprotein E. Genetic CETP deficiency thus represents a unique tool to evaluate how

  3. Prenatal Iron Deficiency in Guinea Pigs Increases Locomotor Activity but Does Not Influence Learning and Memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Fiset

    Full Text Available The objective of the current study was to determine whether prenatal iron deficiency induced during gestation in guinea pigs affected locomotor activity and learning and memory processes in the progeny. Dams were fed either iron-deficient anemic or iron-sufficient diets throughout gestation and lactation. After weaning, all pups were fed an iron-sufficient diet. On postnatal day 24 and 40, the pups' locomotor activity was observed within an open-field test, and from postnatal day 25 to 40, their learning and memory processes were assessed within a Morris Water Maze. The behavioural and cognitive tests revealed that the iron deficient pup group had increased locomotor activity, but solely on postnatal day 40, and that there were no group differences in the Morris Water Maze. In the general discussion, we propose that prenatal iron deficiency induces an increase in nervousness due to anxiety in the progeny, which, in the current study, resulted in an increase of locomotor activity.

  4. Atypical hamstrings electromyographic activity as a compensatory mechanism in anterior cruciate ligament deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerboom, AL; Hof, AL; Halbertsma, JPK; van Raaij, JJAM; Schenk, W; Diercks, RL; van Horn, [No Value; van Horn, J.R.

    2001-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficiency may cause functional instability of the knee (noncopers), while other patients compensate and perform at the same level as before injury (copers). This pilot study investigated whether there is a compensatory electromyographic (EMG) activity of the hamstri

  5. BACE1 deficiency causes altered neuronal activity and neurodegeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Xiangyou; Zhou, Xiangdong; He, Wanxia; Yang, Jun; Xiong, Wenchen; Wong, Philip; Wilson, Christopher G.; Yan, Riqiang

    2010-01-01

    BACE1 is required for the release of β–amyloid (Aβ) in vivo, and inhibition of BACE1 activity is targeted for reducing Aβ generation in Alzheimer's patients. In order to further our understanding of the safe use of BACE1 inhibitors in human patients, we aimed to study the physiological functions of BACE1 by characterizing BACE1–null mice. Here we report the finding of spontaneous behavioral seizures in BACE1–null mice. Electroencephalographic recordings revealed abnormal spike-wave discharges...

  6. Rapamycin decreases DNA damage accumulation and enhances cell growth of WRN-deficient human fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Bidisha; Cypro, Alexander; Martin, George M; Oshima, Junko

    2014-06-01

    Werner syndrome (WS), caused by mutations at the WRN helicase gene, is a progeroid syndrome characterized by multiple features consistent with accelerated aging. Aberrant double-strand DNA damage repair leads to genomic instability and reduced replicative lifespan of somatic cells. We observed increased autophagy in WRN knockdown cells; this was further increased by short-term rapamycin treatment. Long-term rapamycin treatment resulted in improved growth rate, reduced accumulation of DNA damage foci and improved nuclear morphology; autophagy markers were reduced to near-normal levels, possibly due to clearance of damaged proteins. These data suggest that protein aggregation plays a role in the development of WS phenotypes and that the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 pathway is a potential therapeutic target of WS.

  7. Salidroside stimulates DNA repair enzyme Parp-1 activity in mouse HSC maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue; Sipple, Jared; Pang, Qishen; Du, Wei

    2012-05-03

    Salidroside is a phenylpropanoid glycoside isolated from the medicinal plant Rhodiola rosea, which has potent antioxidant properties. Here we show that salidroside prevented the loss of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in mice under oxidative stress. Quiescent HSCs were recruited into cell cycling on in vivo challenge with oxidative stress, which was blocked by salidroside. Surprisingly, salidroside does not prevent the production of reactive oxygen species but reduces hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA-strand breaks in bone marrow cells enriched for HSCs. We tested whether salidroside enhances oxidative DNA damage repair in mice deficient for 5 DNA repair pathways known to be involved in oxidative DNA damage repair; we found that salidroside activated poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1), a component of the base excision repair pathway, in mouse bone marrow HSCs as well as primary fibroblasts and human lymphoblasts. PARP-1 activation by salidroside protects quiescent HSCs from oxidative stress-induced cycling in native animals and self-renewal defect in transplanted recipients, which was abrogated by genetic ablation or pharmacologic inhibition of PARP-1. Together, these findings suggest that activation of PARP-1 by salidroside could affect the homeostasis and function of HSCs and contribute to the antioxidant effects of salidroside.

  8. Antimycobacterial activity of DNA intercalator inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis primase DnaG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajadeera, Chathurada; Willby, Melisa J; Green, Keith D; Shaul, Pazit; Fridman, Micha; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie; Posey, James E; Tsodikov, Oleg V

    2015-03-01

    Owing to the rise in drug resistance in tuberculosis combined with the global spread of its causative pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), innovative anti mycobacterial agents are urgently needed. Recently, we developed a novel primase-pyrophosphatase assay and used it to discover inhibitors of an essential Mtb enzyme, primase DnaG (Mtb DnaG), a promising and unexplored potential target for novel antituberculosis chemotherapeutics. Doxorubicin, an anthracycline antibiotic used as an anticancer drug, was found to be a potent inhibitor of Mtb DnaG. In this study, we investigated both inhibition of Mtb DnaG and the inhibitory activity against in vitro growth of Mtb and M. smegmatis (Msm) by other anthracyclines, daunorubicin and idarubicin, as well as by less cytotoxic DNA intercalators: aloe-emodin, rhein and a mitoxantrone derivative. Generally, low-μM inhibition of Mtb DnaG by the anthracyclines was correlated with their low-μM minimum inhibitory concentrations. Aloe-emodin displayed threefold weaker potency than doxorubicin against Mtb DnaG and similar inhibition of Msm (but not Mtb) in the mid-μM range, whereas rhein (a close analog of aloe-emodin) and a di-glucosylated mitoxantrone derivative did not show significant inhibition of Mtb DnaG or antimycobacterial activity. Taken together, these observations strongly suggest that several clinically used anthracyclines and aloe-emodin target mycobacterial primase, setting the stage for a more extensive exploration of this enzyme as an antibacterial target.

  9. DNA-PKcs deficiency sensitizes the human hepatoma HepG2 cells to cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil through suppression of the PI3K/Akt/NF-κB pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yuan; Chai, Zongtao; Wang, Dansong; Kuang, Tiantao; Wu, Wenchuan; Lou, Wenhui

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of DNA-PKcs deficiency on the chemosensitivity of human hepatoma HepG2 cells to cisplatin (CDDP) and 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu), and to explore the underlying molecular mechanism. After transfection with DNA-PKcs siRNA or control siRNA, HepG2 cells were exposed to combination treatment of CDDP and 5-Fu. The cell viability, DNA damage, cell apoptosis, intracellular reactive oxygen species and glutathione (GSH) level, expression of apoptosis related proteins, activity of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/AKT) pathway, and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathways were assessed. The combination of CDDP and 5-Fu had a synergistic cytotoxic effect in HepG2 cells in terms of the cell viability, DNA damage, apoptosis, and oxidative stress level. DNA-PKcs siRNA could sensitize the HepG2 cells to the combined treatment. DNA-PKcs suppression further reduced the Akt phosphorylation level and Bcl-2 expression in HepG2 cells exposed to CDDP and 5-Fu, but enhanced the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins p53 and caspase-3. Moreover, CDDP could inhibit the transcriptional activity of NF-κB through degradation of IkB-α, while 5-Fu alone seemed in some extent increases the NF-κB activity. The combined treatment with CDDP and 5-Fu resulted in significantly decrease of the transcriptional activity of NF-κB, which was further aggravated by DNA-PKcs siRNA treatment. In conclusion, DNA-PKcs suppression had complementary effects in combination with CDDP and 5-Fu treatment in HepG2 cells, which was associated with suppression of NF-κB signaling pathway cascade, activation of caspase-3 and p53, as well as down-regulation of Bcl-2 and GSH.

  10. Rearrangement of Rag-1 recombinase gene in DNA-repair deficient/immunodeficient wasted'' mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woloschak, G.E.; Weaver, P.; Churchill, M.; Chang-Liu, C-M. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Libertin, C.R. (Loyola Univ., Maywood, IL (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Mice recessive for the autosomal gene wasted'' (wst) display a disease pattern which includes increased sensitivity to the killing effects of ionizing radiation, immunodeficiency, and neurologic dysfunction. The recent cloning and characterization of recombinase genes (Rag-l/Rag-2) expressed in lymphoid and possibly central nervous system tissues prompted us to examine expression of these genes in DNA repair-deficient/immunodeficient wasted mice. Our results revealed that in thymus tissue, a small Rag-I transcript (1.0 kb) was detected in wst/wst mice that was not evident in thymus from control mice. In wst/[sm bullet] mice, a two-fold increase in Rag-1 mRNA was evident in thymus tissue. Rag-2 mRNA could only be detected in thymus tissue from wst/[sm bullet] and not from wst/wst or parental control BCF, mice. Southern blots revealed a rearrangement or deletion within the Rag-1 gene of affected wasted mice that was not evident in known strain-specific parental or littermate controls. These results support the idea that the Rag-1 gene may map at or near the locus for the wasted mutation. In addition, they suggest the importance of recombinase function in normal immune and central nervous system development as well as the potential contribution of this gene family to the normal repair of radiation-induced DNA damage.

  11. Young Zanzibari Children with Iron Deficiency, Iron Deficiency Anemia, Stunting, or Malaria Have Lower Motor Activity Scores and Spend Less Time in Locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motor activity improves cognitive and social-emotional development through a child’s exploration of his or her physical and social environment. This study assessed anemia, iron deficiency, hemoglobin (Hb), length-for-age Z-score (LAZ), and malaria infection as predictors of motor activity in 771 chi...

  12. Schistosome satellite DNA encodes active hammerhead ribozymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferbeyre, G; Smith, J M; Cedergren, R

    1998-07-01

    Using a computer program designed to search for RNA structural motifs in sequence databases, we have found a hammerhead ribozyme domain encoded in the Smalpha repetitive DNA of Schistosoma mansoni. Transcripts of these repeats are expressed as long multimeric precursor RNAs that cleave in vitro and in vivo into unit-length fragments. This RNA domain is able to engage in both cis and trans cleavage typical of the hammerhead ribozyme. Further computer analysis of S. mansoni DNA identified a potential trans cleavage site in the gene coding for a synaptobrevin-like protein, and RNA transcribed from this gene was efficiently cleaved by the Smalpha ribozyme in vitro. Similar families of repeats containing the hammerhead domain were found in the closely related Schistosoma haematobium and Schistosomatium douthitti species but were not present in Schistosoma japonicum or Heterobilharzia americana, suggesting that the hammerhead domain was not acquired from a common schistosome ancestor.

  13. Long-term boron-deficiency-responsive genes revealed by cDNA-AFLP differ between Citrus sinensis roots and leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Bin eLu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Seedlings of Citrus sinensis (L. Osbeck were supplied with boron (B-deficient (without H3BO3 or -sufficient (10 µM H3BO3 nutrient solution for 15 weeks. We identified 54 (38 and 38 (45 up (down-regulated cDNA-AFLP bands (transcript-derived fragments, TDFs from B-deficient leaves and roots, respectively. These TDFs were mainly involved in protein and amino acid metabolism, carbohydrate and energy metabolism, nucleic acid metabolism, cell transport, signal transduction, and stress response and defense. The majority of the differentially expressed TDFs were isolated only from B-deficient roots or leaves, only seven TDFs with the same GenBank ID were isolated from the both. In addition, ATP biosynthesis-related TDFs were induced in B-deficient roots, but unaffected in B-deficient leaves. Most of the differentially expressed TDFs associated with signal transduction and stress defense were down-regulated in roots, but up-regulated in leaves. TDFs related to protein ubiquitination and proteolysis were induced in B-deficient leaves except for one TDF, while only two down-regulated TDFs associated with ubiquitination were detected in B-deficient roots. Thus, many differences existed in long-term B-deficiency-responsive genes between roots and leaves. In conclusion, our findings provided a global picture of the differential responses occurring in B-deficient roots and leaves and revealed new insight into the different adaptive mechanisms of C. sinensis roots and leaves to B-deficiency at the transcriptional level.

  14. Hyper-inflammation and skin destruction mediated by rosiglitazone activation of macrophages in IL-6 deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Das, Lopa M; Rosenjack, Julie; Au, Liemin;

    2015-01-01

    Injury initiates recruitment of macrophages to support tissue repair; however, excessive macrophage activity may exacerbate tissue damage causing further destruction and subsequent delay in wound repair. Here we show that the peroxisome proliferation-activated receptor-γ agonist, rosiglitazone......-antibodies against IL-6, mimicking IL-6 deficiency in human diseases. IL-6 deficiency when combined with Rosi-mediated upregulation of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 leads to an altered ratio of nuclear signal transducer and activator of transcription 3/NF-κB that allows hyper-induction of inducible nitric oxide...... synthase (iNOS). Macrophages activated in this manner cause de novo tissue destruction, recapitulating human chronic wounds, and can be reversed in vivo by recombinant IL-6, blocking macrophage infiltration, or neutralizing iNOS. This study provides insight into an unanticipated paradoxical role of Rosi...

  15. Cytokine secretion and NK cell activity in human ADAM17 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukerman, Pinchas; Eisenstein, Eli M; Chavkin, Maor; Schmiedel, Dominik; Wong, Eitan; Werner, Marion; Yaacov, Barak; Averbuch, Diana; Molho-Pessach, Vered; Stepensky, Polina; Kaynan, Noa; Bar-On, Yotam; Seidel, Einat; Yamin, Rachel; Sagi, Irit; Elpeleg, Orly; Mandelboim, Ofer

    2015-12-29

    Genetic deficiencies provide insights into gene function in humans. Here we describe a patient with a very rare genetic deficiency of ADAM17. We show that the patient's PBMCs had impaired cytokine secretion in response to LPS stimulation, correlating with the clinical picture of severe bacteremia from which the patient suffered. ADAM17 was shown to cleave CD16, a major NK killer receptor. Functional analysis of patient's NK cells demonstrated that his NK cells express normal levels of activating receptors and maintain high surface levels of CD16 following mAb stimulation. Activation of individual NK cell receptors showed that the patient's NK cells are more potent when activated directly by CD16, albeit no difference was observed in Antibody Depedent Cytotoxicity (ADCC) assays. Our data suggest that ADAM17 inhibitors currently considered for clinical use to boost CD16 activity should be cautiously applied, as they might have severe side effects resulting from impaired cytokine secretion.

  16. Ataxia telangiectasia mutated activation by transcription- and topoisomerase I-induced DNA double-strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sordet, Olivier; Redon, Christophe E; Guirouilh-Barbat, Josée; Smith, Susan; Solier, Stéphanie; Douarre, Céline; Conti, Chiara; Nakamura, Asako J; Das, Benu B; Nicolas, Estelle; Kohn, Kurt W; Bonner, William M; Pommier, Yves

    2009-08-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), the deficiency of which causes a severe neurodegenerative disease, is a crucial mediator for the DNA damage response (DDR). As neurons have high rates of transcription that require topoisomerase I (TOP1), we investigated whether TOP1 cleavage complexes (TOP1cc)-which are potent transcription-blocking lesions-also produce transcription-dependent DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) with ATM activation. We show the induction of DSBs and DDR activation in post-mitotic primary neurons and lymphocytes treated with camptothecin, with the induction of nuclear DDR foci containing activated ATM, gamma-H2AX (phosphorylated histone H2AX), activated CHK2 (checkpoint kinase 2), MDC1 (mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1) and 53BP1 (p53 binding protein 1). The DSB-ATM-DDR pathway was suppressed by inhibiting transcription and gamma-H2AX signals were reduced by RNase H1 transfection, which removes transcription-mediated R-loops. Thus, we propose that Top1cc produce transcription arrests with R-loop formation and generate DSBs that activate ATM in post-mitotic cells.

  17. Role of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 in transcriptional activation of ceruloplasmin by iron deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, C. K.; Mazumder, B.; Fox, P. L.

    2000-01-01

    A role of the copper protein ceruloplasmin (Cp) in iron metabolism is suggested by its ferroxidase activity and by the tissue iron overload in hereditary Cp deficiency patients. In addition, plasma Cp increases markedly in several conditions of anemia, e.g. iron deficiency, hemorrhage, renal failure, sickle cell disease, pregnancy, and inflammation. However, little is known about the cellular and molecular mechanism(s) involved. We have reported that iron chelators increase Cp mRNA expression and protein synthesis in human hepatocarcinoma HepG2 cells. Furthermore, we have shown that the increase in Cp mRNA is due to increased rate of transcription. We here report the results of new studies designed to elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying transcriptional activation of Cp by iron deficiency. The 5'-flanking region of the Cp gene was cloned from a human genomic library. A 4774-base pair segment of the Cp promoter/enhancer driving a luciferase reporter was transfected into HepG2 or Hep3B cells. Iron deficiency or hypoxia increased luciferase activity by 5-10-fold compared with untreated cells. Examination of the sequence showed three pairs of consensus hypoxia-responsive elements (HREs). Deletion and mutation analysis showed that a single HRE was necessary and sufficient for gene activation. The involvement of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) was shown by gel-shift and supershift experiments that showed HIF-1alpha and HIF-1beta binding to a radiolabeled oligonucleotide containing the Cp promoter HRE. Furthermore, iron deficiency (and hypoxia) did not activate Cp gene expression in Hepa c4 hepatoma cells deficient in HIF-1beta, as shown functionally by the inactivity of a transfected Cp promoter-luciferase construct and by the failure of HIF-1 to bind the Cp HRE in nuclear extracts from these cells. These results are consistent with in vivo findings that iron deficiency increases plasma Cp and provides a molecular mechanism that may help to understand these

  18. Mitochondrial DNA Activates the NLRP3 Inflammasome and Predisposes to Type 1 Diabetes in Murine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlos, Daniela; Costa, Frederico R. C.; Pereira, Camila A.; Rocha, Fernanda A.; Yaochite, Juliana N. U.; Oliveira, Gabriela G.; Carneiro, Fernando S.; Tostes, Rita C.; Ramos, Simone G.; Zamboni, Dario S.; Camara, Niels O. S.; Ryffel, Bernhard; Silva, João S.

    2017-01-01

    Although a correlation between polymorphisms of NOD-like receptor family-pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) and predisposition to type 1 diabetes (T1D) has been identified, the potential function and activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in T1D have not been clarified. The present study shows that non-obese diabetic mice exhibited increased NLRP3, and pro-IL-1β gene expression in pancreatic lymph nodes (PLNs). Similar increases in gene expression of NLRP3, apoptosis associated speck like protein (ASC) and pro-IL-1β were induced by multiple low doses of streptozotocin (STZ) in C57BL/6 mice. In addition, diabetic C57BL/6 mice also exhibited increased IL-1β protein expression in the pancreatic tissue at day 7, which remained elevated until day 15. Diabetic mice also showed increased positive caspase-1 macrophages in the PLNs, which were decreased in NLRP3−/− mice, but not in ASC−/− mice, after STZ treatment. NLRP3- and IL-1R-deficient mice, but not ASC-deficient mice, showed reduced incidence of diabetes, less insulitis, lower hyperglycemia, and normal insulin levels compared to wild-type (WT) diabetic mice. Notably, these mice also displayed a decrease in IL-17-producing CD4 and CD8 T cells (Th17 and Tc17) and IFN-γ-producing CD4 and CD8 T cells (Th1 and Tc1) in the PLNs. Following STZ treatment to induce T1D, NLRP3-deficient mice also exhibited an increase in myeloid-derived suppressor cell and mast cell numbers in the PLNs along with a significant increase in IL-6, IL-10, and IL-4 expression in the pancreatic tissue. Interestingly, diabetic mice revealed increased circulating expression of genes related to mitochondrial DNA, such as cytochrome b and cytochrome c, but not NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 (NADH). Mitochondrial DNA (mDNA) from diabetic mice, but not from non-diabetic mice, induced significant IL-1β production and caspase-1 activation by WT macrophages, which was reduced in NLRP3−/− macrophages. Finally, mDNA administration in vivo increased

  19. Iron deficiency causes a shift in AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK subunit composition in rat skeletal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merrill John F

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As a cellular energy sensor, the 5’AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK is activated in response to energy stresses such as hypoxia and muscle contraction. To determine effects of iron deficiency on AMPK activation and signaling, as well as the AMPK subunit composition in skeletal muscle, rats were fed a control (C=50-58 mg/kg Fe or iron deficient (ID=2-6 mg/kg Fe diet for 6–8 wks. Results Their respective hematocrits were 47.5% ± 1.0 and 16.5% ± 0.6. Iron deficiency resulted in 28.3% greater muscle fatigue (p Conclusions This study indicates that chronic iron deficiency causes a shift in the expression of AMPKα, β, and γ subunit composition. Iron deficiency also causes chronic activation of AMPK as well as an increase in AMPKα1 activity in exercised skeletal muscle.

  20. Rescue of DNA-PK Signaling and T-Cell Differentiation by Targeted Genome Editing in a prkdc Deficient iPSC Disease Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamim H Rahman

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In vitro disease modeling based on induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs provides a powerful system to study cellular pathophysiology, especially in combination with targeted genome editing and protocols to differentiate iPSCs into affected cell types. In this study, we established zinc-finger nuclease-mediated genome editing in primary fibroblasts and iPSCs generated from a mouse model for radiosensitive severe combined immunodeficiency (RS-SCID, a rare disorder characterized by cellular sensitivity to radiation and the absence of lymphocytes due to impaired DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK activity. Our results demonstrate that gene editing in RS-SCID fibroblasts rescued DNA-PK dependent signaling to overcome radiosensitivity. Furthermore, in vitro T-cell differentiation from iPSCs was employed to model the stage-specific T-cell maturation block induced by the disease causing mutation. Genetic correction of the RS-SCID iPSCs restored T-lymphocyte maturation, polyclonal V(DJ recombination of the T-cell receptor followed by successful beta-selection. In conclusion, we provide proof that iPSC-based in vitro T-cell differentiation is a valuable paradigm for SCID disease modeling, which can be utilized to investigate disorders of T-cell development and to validate gene therapy strategies for T-cell deficiencies. Moreover, this study emphasizes the significance of designer nucleases as a tool for generating isogenic disease models and their future role in producing autologous, genetically corrected transplants for various clinical applications.

  1. Viruses and the DNA Damage Response: Activation and Antagonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luftig, Micah A

    2014-11-01

    Viruses must interact with their hosts in order to replicate; these interactions often provoke the evolutionarily conserved response to DNA damage, known as the DNA damage response (DDR). The DDR can be activated by incoming viral DNA, during the integration of retroviruses, or in response to the aberrant DNA structures generated upon replication of DNA viruses. Furthermore, DNA and RNA viral proteins can induce the DDR by promoting inappropriate S phase entry, by modifying cellular DDR factors directly, or by unintentionally targeting host DNA. The DDR may be antiviral, although viruses often require proximal DDR activation of repair and recombination factors to facilitate replication as well as downstream DDR signaling suppression to ensure cell survival. An unintended consequence of DDR attenuation during infection is the long-term survival and proliferation of precancerous cells. Therefore, the molecular basis for DDR activation and attenuation by viruses remains an important area of study that will likely provide key insights into how viruses have evolved with their hosts.

  2. Paraoxonase and arylesterase activities in adults with vitamin B12 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guney, Tekin; Alisik, Murat; Alkan, Afra; Basturk, Abdulkadir; Akinci, Sema; Hacibekiroglu, Tuba; Dilek, Imdat; Erel, Ozcan

    2015-09-12

    Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate paraoxonase (PON) and arylesterase (ARES) enzyme activity in adults with vitamin B12 deficiency, and specific changes in the activities of these enzymes following vitamin B12 treatment. Methods A total of 46 patients with vitamin B12 deficiency (aged 18-82 years) and 45 healthy volunteer controls (aged 19-64 years) participated in this study. Venous blood samples were collected, and serum vitamin B12, homocysteine (HCY), methylmalonic acid, PON1, and ARES levels were measured. Results Paired comparison showed that pre- and post-treatment values for PON and ARES were similar between patients and controls (both P > 0.05). There was no statistically significant relationship between patients' pre-/post-treatment PON or HCY levels and serum vitamin B12 levels, compared with those of the control group (P > 0.05). Discussion The results of the present study do not support the hypothesis that the antioxidant enzymes PON and ARES have an underlying role in vitamin B12 deficiency and related hyperhomocysteinemia. Our findings suggest that PON and ARES do not play a role in the systemic effects of vitamin B12 deficiency.

  3. Activation of Electron-Deficient Quinones through Hydrogen-Bond-Donor-Coupled Electron Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turek, Amanda K; Hardee, David J; Ullman, Andrew M; Nocera, Daniel G; Jacobsen, Eric N

    2016-01-11

    Quinones are important organic oxidants in a variety of synthetic and biological contexts, and they are susceptible to activation towards electron transfer through hydrogen bonding. Whereas this effect of hydrogen bond donors (HBDs) has been observed for Lewis basic, weakly oxidizing quinones, comparable activation is not readily achieved when more reactive and synthetically useful electron-deficient quinones are used. We have successfully employed HBD-coupled electron transfer as a strategy to activate electron-deficient quinones. A systematic investigation of HBDs has led to the discovery that certain dicationic HBDs have an exceptionally large effect on the rate and thermodynamics of electron transfer. We further demonstrate that these HBDs can be used as catalysts in a quinone-mediated model synthetic transformation. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. CD44 deficiency inhibits unloading-induced cortical bone loss through downregulation of osteoclast activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuheng; Zhong, Guohui; Sun, Weijia; Zhao, Chengyang; Zhang, Pengfei; Song, Jinping; Zhao, Dingsheng; Jin, Xiaoyan; Li, Qi; Ling, Shukuan; Li, Yingxian

    2015-01-01

    The CD44 is cellular surface adhesion molecule that is involved in physiological processes such as hematopoiesis, lymphocyte homing and limb development. It plays an important role in a variety of cellular functions including adhesion, migration, invasion and survival. In bone tissue, CD44 is widely expressed in osteoblasts, osteoclasts and osteocytes. However, the mechanisms underlying its role in bone metabolism remain unclear. We found that CD44 expression was upregulated during osteoclastogenesis. CD44 deficiency in vitro significantly inhibited osteoclast activity and function by regulating the NF-κB/NFATc1-mediated pathway. In vivo, CD44 mRNA levels were significantly upregulated in osteoclasts isolated from the hindlimb of tail-suspended mice. CD44 deficiency can reduce osteoclast activity and counteract cortical bone loss in the hindlimb of unloaded mice. These results suggest that therapeutic inhibition of CD44 may protect from unloading induced bone loss by inhibiting osteoclast activity.

  5. Synthesis, DNA interaction and antimicrobial activities of three rimantadine analogues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Bing-Mi; Zhang, Jun [Department of Pharmacy, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China); Wang, Xin, E-mail: wangxinlnu@163.com [Department of Pharmacy, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China); Zhang, Li-Ping; Liu, Yang [Department of Pharmacy, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China); Niu, Hua-Ying [Jinan Dachpharm Development Co., Ltd., Jinan 250100 (China); Liu, Bin, E-mail: liubinzehao@163.com [Department of Pharmacy, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China)

    2015-03-15

    The interactions of three rimantadine analogues (RAs) with calf thymus deoxyribonucleic acid (ct-DNA) in buffer solution (pH 7.4) were investigated using berberine (BR) as a probe by various methods. Fluorescence studies revealed that the RAs interacted with DNA in vitro and the quenchings were all static. Furthermore, the binding modes of these compounds to DNA were disclosed as groove binding supported by absorption spectroscopy, viscosity measurement and denatured DNA experiment. The antimicrobial activities of the RAs were also evaluated in Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, and they all exhibited good bacteriostasic effects. The results might provide an important reference for investigation of the molecular mechanism associated with the DNA binding of the RAs. - Highlights: • Three rimantadine analogues were synthesized. • The RAs effectively quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of DNA via a static combination. • These analogues can bind to DNA via groove binding mode. • The antimicrobial activities of three analogues were also evaluated by the disk diffusion method.

  6. NCOA4 transcriptional coactivator inhibits activation of DNA replication origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellelli, Roberto; Castellone, Maria Domenica; Guida, Teresa; Limongello, Roberto; Dathan, Nina Alayne; Merolla, Francesco; Cirafici, Anna Maria; Affuso, Andrea; Masai, Hisao; Costanzo, Vincenzo; Grieco, Domenico; Fusco, Alfredo; Santoro, Massimo; Carlomagno, Francesca

    2014-07-01

    NCOA4 is a transcriptional coactivator of nuclear hormone receptors that undergoes gene rearrangement in human cancer. By combining studies in Xenopus laevis egg extracts and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), we show here that NCOA4 is a minichromosome maintenance 7 (MCM7)-interacting protein that is able to control DNA replication. Depletion-reconstitution experiments in Xenopus laevis egg extracts indicate that NCOA4 acts as an inhibitor of DNA replication origin activation by regulating CMG (CDC45/MCM2-7/GINS) helicase. NCOA4(-/-) MEFs display unscheduled origin activation and reduced interorigin distance; this results in replication stress, as shown by the presence of fork stalling, reduction of fork speed, and premature senescence. Together, our findings indicate that NCOA4 acts as a regulator of DNA replication origins that helps prevent inappropriate DNA synthesis and replication stress.

  7. Evidence for unfolded protein response activation in monocytes from individuals with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carroll, Tomás P

    2010-04-15

    The hereditary disorder alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency results from mutations in the SERPINA1 gene and presents with emphysema in young adults and liver disease in childhood. The most common form of AAT deficiency occurs because of the Z mutation, causing the protein to fold aberrantly and accumulate in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). This leads to ER stress and contributes significantly to the liver disease associated with the condition. In addition to hepatocytes, AAT is also synthesized by monocytes, neutrophils, and epithelial cells. In this study we show for the first time that the unfolded protein response (UPR) is activated in quiescent monocytes from ZZ individuals. Activating transcription factor 4, X-box binding protein 1, and a subset of genes involved in the UPR are increased in monocytes from ZZ compared with MM individuals. This contributes to an inflammatory phenotype with ZZ monocytes exhibiting enhanced cytokine production and activation of the NF-kappaB pathway when compared with MM monocytes. In addition, we demonstrate intracellular accumulation of AAT within the ER of ZZ monocytes. These are the first data showing that Z AAT protein accumulation induces UPR activation in peripheral blood monocytes. These findings change the current paradigm regarding lung inflammation in AAT deficiency, which up until now was derived from the protease-anti-protease hypothesis, but which now must include the exaggerated inflammatory response generated by accumulated aberrantly folded AAT in circulating blood cells.

  8. Acquired idiopathic ADAMTS13 activity deficient thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura in a population from Japan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanori Matsumoto

    Full Text Available Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP is a type of thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA. Studies report that the majority of TTP patients present with a deficiency of ADAMTS13 activity. In a database of TMA patients in Japan identified between 1998 and 2008, 186 patients with first onset of acquired idiopathic (ai ADAMTS13-deficient TTP (ADAMTS13 activity <5% were diagnosed. The median age of onset of TTP in this group of patients was 54 years, 54.8% were female, 75.8% had renal involvement, 79.0% had neurologic symptoms, and 97.8% had detectable inhibitors to ADAMTS13 activity. Younger patients were less likely to present with renal or neurologic dysfunction (p<0.01, while older patients were more likely to die during the TTP hospitalization (p<0.05. Findings from this cohort in Japan differ from those reported previously from the United States, Europe, and Korea with respect to age at onset (two decades younger in the other cohort and gender composition (60% to 100% female in the other cohort. We conclude that in one of the largest cohorts of ai-TTP with severe deficiency of ADAMTS13 activity reported to date, demographic characteristics differ in Japanese patients relative to those reported from a large Caucasian registry from Western societies. Additional studies exploring these findings are needed.

  9. Inaccurate DNA synthesis in cell extracts of yeast producing active human DNA polymerase iota.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alena V Makarova

    Full Text Available Mammalian Pol ι has an unusual combination of properties: it is stimulated by Mn(2+ ions, can bypass some DNA lesions and misincorporates "G" opposite template "T" more frequently than incorporates the correct "A." We recently proposed a method of detection of Pol ι activity in animal cell extracts, based on primer extension opposite the template T with a high concentration of only two nucleotides, dGTP and dATP (incorporation of "G" versus "A" method of Gening, abbreviated as "misGvA". We provide unambiguous proof of the "misGvA" approach concept and extend the applicability of the method for the studies of variants of Pol ι in the yeast model system with different cation cofactors. We produced human Pol ι in baker's yeast, which do not have a POLI ortholog. The "misGvA" activity is absent in cell extracts containing an empty vector, or producing catalytically dead Pol ι, or Pol ι lacking exon 2, but is robust in the strain producing wild-type Pol ι or its catalytic core, or protein with the active center L62I mutant. The signature pattern of primer extension products resulting from inaccurate DNA synthesis by extracts of cells producing either Pol ι or human Pol η is different. The DNA sequence of the template is critical for the detection of the infidelity of DNA synthesis attributed to DNA Pol ι. The primer/template and composition of the exogenous DNA precursor pool can be adapted to monitor replication fidelity in cell extracts expressing various error-prone Pols or mutator variants of accurate Pols. Finally, we demonstrate that the mutation rates in yeast strains producing human DNA Pols ι and η are not elevated over the control strain, despite highly inaccurate DNA synthesis by their extracts.

  10. The conserved Est1 protein stimulates telomerase DNA extension activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeZwaan, Diane C.; Freeman, Brian C.

    2009-01-01

    The first telomerase cofactor identified was the budding yeast protein Est1, which is conserved through humans. While it is evident that Est1 is required for telomere DNA maintenance, understanding its mechanistic contributions to telomerase regulation has been limited. In vitro, the primary effect of Est1 is to activate telomerase-mediated DNA extension. Although Est1 displayed specific DNA and RNA binding, neither activity contributed significantly to telomerase stimulation. Rather Est1 mediated telomerase upregulation through direct contacts with the reverse transcriptase subunit. In addition to intrinsic Est1 functions, we found that Est1 cooperatively activated telomerase in conjunction with Cdc13 and that the combinatorial effect was dependent upon a known salt-bridge interaction between Est1 (K444) and Cdc13 (E252). Our studies provide insights into the molecular events used to control the enzymatic activity of the telomerase holoenzyme. PMID:19805136

  11. Activation of ATM by DNA Damaging Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-09-01

    activate ATM and/or ATM-dependent pathways 15 [61]. Indeed, phosphorylation of p53 on serines 20 and include quercetin [65], kaempferol , apigenin, and...protein [67] Phosphorylation on serine 15 [67] Kaempferol DSBf, SSBe Stimulation of kinase activity [67] Accumulation of p53 protein [67] Phosphorylation

  12. DNA mismatch repair deficiency and hereditary syndromes in Latino patients with colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricker, Charité N; Hanna, Diana L; Peng, Cheng; Nguyen, Nathalie T; Stern, Mariana C; Schmit, Stephanie L; Idos, Greg E; Patel, Ravi; Tsai, Steven; Ramirez, Veronica; Lin, Sonia; Shamasunadara, Vinay; Barzi, Afsaneh; Lenz, Heinz-Josef; Figueiredo, Jane C

    2017-10-01

    The landscape of hereditary syndromes and clinicopathologic characteristics among US Latino/Hispanic individuals with colorectal cancer (CRC) remains poorly understood. A total of 265 patients with CRC who were enrolled in the Hispanic Colorectal Cancer Study were included in the current study. Information regarding CRC risk factors was elicited through interviews, and treatment and survival data were abstracted from clinical charts. Tumor studies and germline genetic testing results were collected from medical records or performed using standard molecular methods. The mean age of the patients at the time of diagnosis was 53.7 years (standard deviation, 10.3 years), and 48.3% were female. Overall, 21.2% of patients reported a first-degree or second-degree relative with CRC; 3.4% met Amsterdam I/II criteria. With respect to Bethesda guidelines, 38.5% of patients met at least 1 criterion. Of the 161 individuals who had immunohistochemistry and/or microsatellite instability testing performed, 21 (13.0%) had mismatch repair (MMR)-deficient (dMMR) tumors. dMMR tumors were associated with female sex (61.9%), earlier age at the time of diagnosis (50.4 ± 12.4 years), proximal location (61.9%), and first-degree (23.8%) or second-degree (9.5%) family history of CRC. Among individuals with dMMR tumors, 13 (61.9%) had a germline MMR mutation (MutL homolog 1 [MLH1] in 6 patients; MutS homolog 2 [MSH2] in 4 patients; MutS homolog 6 [MHS6] in 2 patients; and PMS1 homolog 2, mismatch repair system component [PMS2] in 1 patient). The authors identified 2 additional MLH1 mutation carriers by genetic testing who had not received immunohistochemistry/microsatellite instability testing. In total, 5.7% of the entire cohort were confirmed to have Lynch syndrome. In addition, 6 individuals (2.3%) had a polyposis phenotype. The percentage of dMMR tumors noted among Latino individuals (13%) is similar to estimates in non-Hispanic white individuals. In the current study, the majority of

  13. [Effect of phosphorus deficiency on activity of acid phosphatase exuded by wheat roots].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Haiguo; Zhang, Fusuo

    2002-03-01

    The activity of acid phosphatase exuded by roots, the tissue location of the enzyme, and the relationship between the enzyme activity and phosphorus efficiency of wheat were studied. The results showed that the activity of acid phosphatase exuded by wheat 81(85)5-3-3-3 and NC37 under P-sufficiency treat were lower than those under P-deficiency, and the enzyme activity of the former variety was significantly higher than that of the latter. There was a significant difference in the enzyme activity among 12 wheat genotypes grown under P-deficiency treat. Acid phosphatase was exuded by epidermis cell of root, especially by epidermal cell of root apex. Thus, there was a linear relationship between the enzyme activity and the surface area of root or the number of root apexes. It implied that the enzyme activity was markedly related to the size of root system. The linear relationship between relative grain yield and acid phosphatase activity was significant. It indicates that the enzyme activity could be used as an early indicator to select P-efficient wheat genotypes.

  14. RUNX1 induces DNA replication independent of active DNA demethylation at SPI1 regulatory regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Shubham; Suzuki, Takahiro; Li, Jing-Ru; Maeda, Shiori; Kishima, Mami; Nishimura, Hajime; Shimizu, Yuri; Suzuki, Harukazu

    2017-04-04

    SPI1 is an essential transcription factor (TF) for the hematopoietic lineage, in which its expression is tightly controlled through a -17-kb upstream regulatory region and a promoter region. Both regulatory regions are demethylated during hematopoietic development, although how the change of DNA methylation status is performed is still unknown. We found that the ectopic overexpression of RUNX1 (another key TF in hematopoiesis) in HEK-293T cells induces almost complete DNA demethylation at the -17-kb upstream regulatory region and partial but significant DNA demethylation at the proximal promoter region. This DNA demethylation occurred in mitomycin-C-treated nonproliferating cells at both regulatory regions, suggesting active DNA demethylation. Furthermore, ectopic RUNX1 expression induced significant endogenous SPI1 expression, although its expression level was much lower than that of natively SPI1-expressing monocyte cells. These results suggest the novel role of RUNX1 as an inducer of DNA demethylation at the SPI1 regulatory regions, although the mechanism of RUNX1-induced DNA demethylation remains to be explored.

  15. A systematic proteomic study of irradiated DNA repair deficient Nbn-mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Melchers

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The NBN gene codes for the protein nibrin, which is involved in the detection and repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs. The NBN gene is essential in mammals. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have used a conditional null mutant mouse model in a proteomics approach to identify proteins with modified expression levels after 4 Gy ionizing irradiation in the absence of nibrin in vivo. Altogether, amongst approximately 8,000 resolved proteins, 209 were differentially expressed in homozygous null mutant mice in comparison to control animals. One group of proteins significantly altered in null mutant mice were those involved in oxidative stress and cellular redox homeostasis (p<0.0001. In substantiation of this finding, analysis of Nbn null mutant fibroblasts indicated an increased production of reactive oxygen species following induction of DSBs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In humans, biallelic hypomorphic mutations in NBN lead to Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS, an autosomal recessive genetic disease characterised by extreme radiosensitivity coupled with growth retardation, immunoinsufficiency and a very high risk of malignancy. This particularly high cancer risk in NBS may be attributable to the compound effect of a DSB repair defect and oxidative stress.

  16. Quercetin-Iron Complex: Synthesis, Characterization, Antioxidant, DNA Binding, DNA Cleavage, and Antibacterial Activity Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Aun; Xu, Xiuquan; Xia, Li; Xia, Changkun; Tang, Jian; Ouyang, Zhen

    2016-11-01

    Quercetin-iron (II) complex was synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry, scanning electron micrography and molar conductivity. The low molar conductivity value investigates the non-electrolyte nature of the complex. The elemental analysis and other physical and spectroscopic methods reveal the 1:2 stoichiometric ratio (metal:ligand) of the complex. Antioxidant study of the quercetin and its metal complex against 2, 2-di-phenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl radical showed that the complex has much more radical scavenging activity than free quercetin. The interaction of quercetin-iron (II) complex with DNA was determined using ultraviolet visible spectra, fluorescence spectra and agarose gel electrophoresis. The results showed that quercetin-iron (II) complex can intercalate moderately with DNA, quench a strong intercalator ethidium bromide and compete for the intercalative binding sites. The complex showed significant cleavage of pBR 322 DNA from supercoiled form to nicked circular form and these cleavage effects were dose-dependent. Moreover, the mechanism of DNA cleavage indicated that it was an oxidative cleavage pathway. These results revealed the potential nuclease activity of complex to cleave DNA. In addition, antibacterial activity of complex on E.coli and S. aureus was also investigated. The results showed that complex has higher antibacterial activity than ligand.

  17. Methamphetamine Increases Locomotion and Dopamine Transporter Activity in Dopamine D5 Receptor-Deficient Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Seiji Hayashizaki; Shinobu Hirai; Yumi Ito; Yoshiko Honda; Yosefu Arime; Ichiro Sora; Haruo Okado; Tohru Kodama; Masahiko Takada

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine regulates the psychomotor stimulant activities of amphetamine-like substances in the brain. The effects of dopamine are mediated through five known dopamine receptor subtypes in mammals. The functional relevance of D5 dopamine receptors in the central nervous system is not well understood. To determine the functional relevance of D5 dopamine receptors, we created D5 dopamine receptor-deficient mice and then used these mice to assess the roles of D5 dopamine receptors in the behaviora...

  18. Plasminogen activation independent of uPA and tPA maintains wound healing in gene-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Leif R; Green, Kirsty A; Stoop, Allart A

    2006-01-01

    Simultaneous ablation of the two known activators of plasminogen (Plg), urokinase-type (uPA) and the tissue-type (tPA), results in a substantial delay in skin wound healing. However, wound closure and epidermal re-epithelialization are significantly less impaired in uPA;tPA double-deficient mice...... than in Plg-deficient mice. Skin wounds in uPA;tPA-deficient mice treated with the broad-spectrum matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitor galardin (N-[(2R)-2-(hydroxamido-carbonylmethyl)-4-methylpentanoyl]-L-tryptophan methylamide) eventually heal, whereas skin wounds in galardin-treated Plg......-deficient mice do not heal. Furthermore, plasmin is biochemically detectable in wound extracts from uPA;tPA double-deficient mice. In vivo administration of a plasma kallikrein (pKal)-selective form of the serine protease inhibitor ecotin exacerbates the healing impairment of uPA;tPA double-deficient wounds...

  19. Gap-filling and bypass at the replication fork are both active mechanisms for tolerance of low-dose ultraviolet-induced DNA damage in the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinet, Annabel; Vessoni, Alexandre T; Rocha, Clarissa R R; Gottifredi, Vanesa; Biard, Denis; Sarasin, Alain; Menck, Carlos F M; Stary, Anne

    2014-02-01

    Ultraviolet (UV)-induced DNA damage are removed by nucleotide excision repair (NER) or can be tolerated by specialized translesion synthesis (TLS) polymerases, such as Polη. TLS may act at stalled replication forks or through an S-phase independent gap-filling mechanism. After UVC irradiation, Polη-deficient (XP-V) human cells were arrested in early S-phase and exhibited both single-strand DNA (ssDNA) and prolonged replication fork stalling, as detected by DNA fiber assay. In contrast, NER deficiency in XP-C cells caused no apparent defect in S-phase progression despite the accumulation of ssDNA and a G2-phase arrest. These data indicate that while Polη is essential for DNA synthesis at ongoing damaged replication forks, NER deficiency might unmask the involvement of tolerance pathway through a gap-filling mechanism. ATR knock down by siRNA or caffeine addition provoked increased cell death in both XP-V and XP-C cells exposed to low-dose of UVC, underscoring the involvement of ATR/Chk1 pathway in both DNA damage tolerance mechanisms. We generated a unique human cell line deficient in XPC and Polη proteins, which exhibited both S- and G2-phase arrest after UVC irradiation, consistent with both single deficiencies. In these XP-C/Polη(KD) cells, UVC-induced replicative intermediates may collapse into double-strand breaks, leading to cell death. In conclusion, both TLS at stalled replication forks and gap-filling are active mechanisms for the tolerance of UVC-induced DNA damage in human cells and the preference for one or another pathway depends on the cellular genotype. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Partial complementation of a DNA ligase I deficiency by DNA ligase III and its impact on cell survival and telomere stability in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Chalony, Catherine; Hoffschir, Françoise; Gauthier, Laurent R; Gross, Julia; Biard, Denis S; Boussin, François D; Pennaneach, Vincent

    2012-09-01

    DNA ligase I (LigI) plays a central role in the joining of strand interruptions during replication and repair. In our current study, we provide evidence that DNA ligase III (LigIII) and XRCC1, which form a complex that functions in single-strand break repair, are required for the proliferation of mammalian LigI-depleted cells. We show from our data that in cells with either dysfunctional LigI activity or depleted of this enzyme, both LigIII and XRCC1 are retained on the chromatin and accumulate at replication foci. We also demonstrate that the LigI and LigIII proteins cooperate to inhibit sister chromatid exchanges but that only LigI prevents telomere sister fusions. Taken together, these results suggest that in cells with dysfunctional LigI, LigIII contributes to the ligation of replication intermediates but not to the prevention of telomeric instability.

  1. Activation of DNA damage response signaling by condensed chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Rebecca C; Burman, Bharat; Kruhlak, Michael J; Misteli, Tom

    2014-12-11

    The DNA damage response (DDR) occurs in the context of chromatin, and architectural features of chromatin have been implicated in DNA damage signaling and repair. Whereas a role of chromatin decondensation in the DDR is well established, we show here that chromatin condensation is integral to DDR signaling. We find that, in response to DNA damage chromatin regions transiently expand before undergoing extensive compaction. Using a protein-chromatin-tethering system to create defined chromatin domains, we show that interference with chromatin condensation results in failure to fully activate DDR. Conversely, forced induction of local chromatin condensation promotes ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)- and ATR-dependent activation of upstream DDR signaling in a break-independent manner. Whereas persistent chromatin compaction enhanced upstream DDR signaling from irradiation-induced breaks, it reduced recovery and survival after damage. Our results demonstrate that chromatin condensation is sufficient for activation of DDR signaling and is an integral part of physiological DDR signaling.

  2. Differential regulation of AMPK activation in leptin- and creatine-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockebrand, Malte; Sauter, Kathrin; Neu, Axel; Isbrandt, Dirk; Choe, Chi-un

    2013-10-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key sensor and regulator of energy homeostasis. Previously, we demonstrated that intracellular energy depletion by L-arginine:glycine amidinotransferase (AGAT) deficiency resulted in AMPK activation and protected from metabolic syndrome. In the present study, we show tissue-specific leptin dependence of AMPK activation by energy depletion. We investigated leptin-dependent AMPK regulation in AGAT- and leptin-deficient (d/d ob/ob) mice. Like ob/ob mice, but unlike d/d mice, d/d ob/ob mice were obese and glucose intolerant. Therefore, leptin is a prerequisite for resistance to metabolic syndrome in AGAT-deficient mice. Quantitative Western blots revealed a 4-fold increase in AMPK activation in skeletal muscle of d/d ob/ob mice (P<0.001). However, AMPK activation was absent in white adipose tissue (WAT) and liver. Compared with blood glucose levels in ob/ob mice, fasting levels were still reduced and therefore did not show leptin dependence (wild-type, 79.4±3.9 mg/dl; d/d, 68.4±3.2 mg/dl; P<0.05). In ob/ob mice and wild-type mice, 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-D-ribofuranoside (AICAR), in combination with leptin, augmented glucose tolerance compared with AICAR alone, whereas no improvement was found under conditions of high-fat-diet feeding. These findings reveal a previously unknown synergistic AMPK activation by leptin and intracellular energy depletion, suggesting that AMPK activation can be therapeutically effective in metabolic syndrome only if leptin sensitivity is preserved.

  3. Replication fork stability confers chemoresistance in BRCA-deficient cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chaudhuri, Arnab Ray; Callen, Elsa; Ding, Xia;

    2016-01-01

    Cells deficient in the Brca1 and Brca2 genes have reduced capacity to repair DNA double-strand breaks by homologous recombination and consequently are hypersensitive to DNA-damaging agents, including cisplatin and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. Here we show that loss of the MLL3....../4 complex protein, PTIP, protects Brca1/2-deficient cells from DNA damage and rescues the lethality of Brca2-deficient embryonic stem cells. However, PTIP deficiency does not restore homologous recombination activity at double-strand breaks. Instead, its absence inhibits the recruitment of the MRE11...... nuclease to stalled replication forks, which in turn protects nascent DNA strands from extensive degradation. More generally, acquisition of PARP inhibitors and cisplatin resistance is associated with replication fork protection in Brca2-deficient tumour cells that do not develop Brca2 reversion mutations...

  4. DNA Break Mapping Reveals Topoisomerase II Activity Genome-Wide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Baranello

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Genomic DNA is under constant assault by endogenous and exogenous DNA damaging agents. DNA breakage can represent a major threat to genome integrity but can also be necessary for genome function. Here we present approaches to map DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs and single-strand breaks (SSBs at the genome-wide scale by two methods called DSB- and SSB-Seq, respectively. We tested these methods in human colon cancer cells and validated the results using the Topoisomerase II (Top2-poisoning agent etoposide (ETO. Our results show that the combination of ETO treatment with break-mapping techniques is a powerful method to elaborate the pattern of Top2 enzymatic activity across the genome.

  5. Apn1 AP-endonuclease is essential for the repair of oxidatively damaged DNA bases in yeast frataxin-deficient cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefevre, Sophie; Brossas, Caroline; Auchère, Françoise; Boggetto, Nicole; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Santos, Renata

    2012-09-15

    Frataxin deficiency results in mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress and it is the cause of the hereditary neurodegenerative disease Friedreich ataxia (FA). Here, we present evidence that one of the pleiotropic effects of oxidative stress in frataxin-deficient yeast cells (Δyfh1 mutant) is damage to nuclear DNA and that repair requires the Apn1 AP-endonuclease of the base excision repair pathway. Major phenotypes of Δyfh1 cells are respiratory deficit, disturbed iron homeostasis and sensitivity to oxidants. These phenotypes are weak or absent under anaerobiosis. We show here that exposure of anaerobically grown Δyfh1 cells to oxygen leads to down-regulation of antioxidant defenses, increase in reactive oxygen species, delay in G1- and S-phases of the cell cycle and damage to mitochondrial and nuclear DNA. Nuclear DNA lesions in Δyfh1 cells are primarily caused by oxidized bases and single-strand breaks that can be detected 15-30 min after oxygen exposition. The Apn1 enzyme is essential for the repair of the DNA lesions in Δyfh1 cells. Compared with Δyfh1, the double Δyfh1Δapn1 mutant shows growth impairment, increased mutagenesis and extreme sensitivity to H(2)O(2). On the contrary, overexpression of the APN1 gene in Δyfh1 cells decreases spontaneous and induced mutagenesis. Our results show that frataxin deficiency in yeast cells leads to increased DNA base oxidation and requirement of Apn1 for repair, suggesting that DNA damage and repair could be important features in FA disease progression.

  6. Synthesis and biological activity of benzamide DNA minor groove binders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Gul Shahzada; Pilkington, Lisa I; Barker, David

    2016-02-01

    A range of di- and triaryl benzamides were synthesised to investigate the effect of the presence and nature of a polar sidechain, bonding and substitution patterns and functionalisation of benzylic substituents. These compounds were tested for their antiproliferative activity as well as their DNA binding activity. The most active compounds in all assays were unsymmetrical triaryl benzamides with a bulky or alkylating benzylic substituent and a polar amino sidechain.

  7. Sequence-specific activation of the DNA sensor cGAS by Y-form DNA structures as found in primary HIV-1 cDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzner, Anna-Maria; Hagmann, Cristina Amparo; Goldeck, Marion; Wolter, Steven; Kübler, Kirsten; Wittmann, Sabine; Gramberg, Thomas; Andreeva, Liudmila; Hopfner, Karl-Peter; Mertens, Christina; Zillinger, Thomas; Jin, Tengchuan; Xiao, Tsan Sam; Bartok, Eva; Coch, Christoph; Ackermann, Damian; Hornung, Veit; Ludwig, Janos; Barchet, Winfried; Hartmann, Gunther; Schlee, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Cytosolic DNA that emerges during infection with a retrovirus or DNA virus triggers antiviral type I interferon responses. So far, only double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) over 40 base pairs (bp) in length has been considered immunostimulatory. Here we found that unpaired DNA nucleotides flanking short base-paired DNA stretches, as in stem-loop structures of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) derived from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), activated the type I interferon-inducing DNA sensor cGAS in a sequence-dependent manner. DNA structures containing unpaired guanosines flanking short (12- to 20-bp) dsDNA (Y-form DNA) were highly stimulatory and specifically enhanced the enzymatic activity of cGAS. Furthermore, we found that primary HIV-1 reverse transcripts represented the predominant viral cytosolic DNA species during early infection of macrophages and that these ssDNAs were highly immunostimulatory. Collectively, our study identifies unpaired guanosines in Y-form DNA as a highly active, minimal cGAS recognition motif that enables detection of HIV-1 ssDNA.

  8. Molecular analysis of the Deinococcus radiodurans recA locus and identification of a mutation site in a DNA repair-deficient mutant, rec30.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narumi, I; Satoh, K; Kikuchi, M; Funayama, T; Kitayama, S; Yanagisawa, T; Watanabe, H; Yamamoto, K

    1999-12-07

    Deinococcus radiodurans strain rec30, which is a DNA damage repair-deficient mutant, has been estimated to be defective in the deinococcal recA gene. To identify the mutation site of strain rec30 and obtain information about the region flanking the gene, a 4.4-kb fragment carrying the wild-type recA gene was sequenced. It was revealed that the recA locus forms a polycistronic operon with the preceding cistrons (orf105a and orf105b). Predicted amino acid sequences of orf105a and orf105b showed substantial similarity to the competence-damage inducible protein (cinA gene product) from Streptococcus pneumoniae and the 2'-5' RNA ligase from Escherichia coli, respectively. By analyzing polymerase chain reaction (PCR) fragments derived from the genomic DNA of strain rec30, the mutation site in the strain was identified as a single G:C to A:T transition which causes an amino acid substitution at position 224 (Gly to Ser) of the deinococcal RecA protein. Furthermore, we succeeded in expressing both the wild-type and mutant recA genes of D. radiodurans in E. coli without any obvious toxicity or death. The gamma-ray resistance of an E. coli recA1 strain was fully restored by the expression of the wild-type recA gene of D. radiodurans that was cloned in an E. coli vector plasmid. This result is consistent with evidence that RecA proteins from many bacterial species can functionally complement E. coli recA mutants. In contrast with the wild-type gene, the mutant recA gene derived from strain rec30 did not complement E. coli recA1, suggesting that the mutant RecA protein lacks functional activity for recombinational repair.

  9. Rutin-Nickel Complex: Synthesis, Characterization, Antioxidant, DNA Binding, and DNA Cleavage Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Aun; Bano, Shumaila; Xu, Xiuquan; Zhang, Rong Xian; Khalid, Haider; Iqbal, Furqan Muhammad; Xia, Changkun; Tang, Jian; Ouyang, Zhen

    2016-12-17

    The rutin-nickel (II) complex (RN) was synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, UV-visible spectroscopy, IR, mass spectrometry, (1)H NMR, TG-DSC, SEM, and molar conductivity. The low molar conductivity value investigates the non-electrolyte nature of the complex. The elemental analysis and other physical and spectroscopic methods reveal the 1:2 stoichiometric ratio (metal/ligand) of the complex. An antioxidant study of rutin and its metal complex against DPPH radical showed that the complex has more radical scavenging activity than free rutin. The interaction of complex RN with DNA was determined using fluorescence spectra and agarose gel electrophoresis. The results showed that RN can intercalate moderately with DNA, quench a strong intercalator ethidium bromide (EB), and compete for the intercalative binding sites. The complex showed significant cleavage of pBR 322 DNA from supercoiled form (SC) to nicked circular form (NC), and these cleavage effects were dose-dependent. Moreover, the mechanism of DNA cleavage indicated that it was a hydrolytic cleavage pathway. These results revealed the potential nuclease activity of the complex to cleave DNA.

  10. Study of the activity of DNA polymerases β and λ using 5-formyluridine containing DNA substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavrik O. I.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To investigate the TLS-activity of human DNA polymerases β and λ (pols β and λ using 5-formyluridine (5-foU containing DNA duplexes which are imitating the intermediates during replication of the leading DNA strand, and to study the influence of replication factors hRPA and hPCNA on this activity. Methods. The EMSA and the methods of enzyme’s kinetics were used. Results. The capability of pols β and λ to catalyze DNA synthesis across 5-foU was investigated and the kinetic characteristics of this process in the presence and in the absence of protein factors hRPA and hPCNA were evaluated. Conclusions. It was shown that: (i both proteins are able to catalyze TLS on used DNA substrates regardless of the reaction conditions, however, pol λ was more accurate enzyme; (ii hRPA can stimulate the efficacy of the nonmutagenic TLS catalyzed by pol at the nucleotide incorporation directly opposite of 5-foU, at the same time it doesn’t influence the incorporation efficacy if the damage displaced into the duplex; (iii hPCNA doesn’t influence the efficacy of TLS catalyzed by both enzymes.

  11. A type I IFN-dependent DNA damage response regulates the genetic program and inflammasome activation in macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Abigail J; Carrero, Javier A; Hung, Putzer J; Tubbs, Anthony T; Andrews, Jared M; Edelson, Brian T; Calderon, Boris; Innes, Cynthia L; Paules, Richard S; Payton, Jacqueline E; Sleckman, Barry P

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages produce genotoxic agents, such as reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, that kill invading pathogens. Here we show that these agents activate the DNA damage response (DDR) kinases ATM and DNA-PKcs through the generation of double stranded breaks (DSBs) in murine macrophage genomic DNA. In contrast to other cell types, initiation of this DDR depends on signaling from the type I interferon receptor. Once activated, ATM and DNA-PKcs regulate a genetic program with diverse immune functions and promote inflammasome activation and the production of IL-1β and IL-18. Indeed, following infection with Listeria monocytogenes, DNA-PKcs-deficient murine macrophages produce reduced levels of IL-18 and are unable to optimally stimulate IFN-γ production by NK cells. Thus, genomic DNA DSBs act as signaling intermediates in murine macrophages, regulating innate immune responses through the initiation of a type I IFN-dependent DDR. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.24655.001 PMID:28362262

  12. SLP65 deficiency results in perpetual V(D)J recombinase activity in pre-B-lymphoblastic leukemia and B-cell lymphoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprangers, M; Feldhahn, N; Liedtke, S; Jumaa, H; Siebert, R; Müschen, M

    2006-08-24

    Perpetual V(D)J recombinase activity involving multiple DNA double-strand break events in B-cell lineage leukemia and lymphoma cells may introduce secondary genetic aberrations leading towards malignant progression. Here, we investigated defective negative feedback signaling through the (pre-) B-cell receptor as a possible reason for deregulated V(D)J recombinase activity in B-cell malignancy. On studying 28 cases of pre-B-lymphoblastic leukemia and 27 B-cell lymphomas, expression of the (pre-) B-cell receptor-related linker molecule SLP65 (SH2 domain-containing lymphocyte protein of 65 kDa) was found to be defective in seven and five cases, respectively. SLP65 deficiency correlates with RAG1/2 expression and unremitting V(H) gene rearrangement activity. Reconstitution of SLP65 expression in SLP65-deficient leukemia and lymphoma cells results in downregulation of RAG1/2 expression and prevents both de novo V(H)-DJ(H) rearrangements and secondary V(H) replacement. We conclude that iterative V(H) gene rearrangement represents a frequent feature in B-lymphoid malignancy, which can be attributed to SLP65 deficiency in many cases.

  13. Fatty Acid Accumulation and Resulting PPARα Activation in Fibroblasts due to Trifunctional Protein Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masato Wakabayashi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To examine fatty acid accumulation and its toxic effects in cells, we analyzed skin fibroblasts from six patients with mitochondrial trifunctional protein deficiency, who had abnormalities in the second through fourth reactions in fatty acid β-oxidation system. We found free fatty acid accumulation, enhanced three acyl-CoA dehydrogenases, catalyzing the first reaction in the β-oxidation system and being assumed to have normal activities in these patients, and PPARα activation that was confirmed in the experiments using MK886, a PPARα specific antagonist and fenofibrate, a PPARα specific agonist. These novel findings suggest that the fatty acid accumulation and the resulting PPARα activation are major causes of the increase in the β-oxidation ability as probable compensation for fatty acid metabolism in the patients’ fibroblasts, and that enhanced cell proliferation and increased oxidative stress due to the PPARα activation relate to the development of specific clinical features such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, slight hepatomegaly, and skeletal myopathy. Additionally, significant suppression of the PPARα activation by means of MK886 treatment is assumed to provide a new method of treating this deficiency.

  14. Macrophage CGI-58 Deficiency Activates ROS-Inflammasome Pathway to Promote Insulin Resistance in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongming Miao

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Overnutrition activates a proinflammatory program in macrophages to induce insulin resistance (IR, but its molecular mechanisms remain incompletely understood. Here, we show that saturated fatty acid and lipopolysaccharide, two factors implicated in high-fat diet (HFD-induced IR, suppress macrophage CGI-58 expression. Macrophage-specific CGI-58 knockout (MaKO in mice aggravates HFD-induced glucose intolerance and IR, which is associated with augmented systemic/tissue inflammation and proinflammatory activation of adipose tissue macrophages. CGI-58-deficient macrophages exhibit mitochondrial dysfunction due to defective peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPARγ signaling. Consequently, they overproduce reactive oxygen species (ROS to potentiate secretion of proinflammatory cytokines by activating NLRP3 inflammasome. Anti-ROS treatment or NLRP3 silencing prevents CGI-58-deficient macrophages from oversecreting proinflammatory cytokines and from inducing proinflammatory signaling and IR in the cocultured fat slices. Anti-ROS treatment also prevents exacerbation of inflammation and IR in HFD-fed MaKO mice. Our data thus establish CGI-58 as a suppressor of overnutrition-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation in macrophages.

  15. Both membrane-dependent and DNA damage-dependent signal transduction chains are activated following UV irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blattner, C.; Knebel, A.; Bender, K.; Rahmsdorf, H.J.; Herrlich, P. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. fuer Genetik

    1997-03-01

    Irradiation of cultured cells with short wave length ultraviolet light (UVC) activates at least two types of signal transduction chains which ultimately lead to changes in gene expression. One type involves cell surface receptors and is activated with very rapid kinetics. One or several membrane associated protein tyrosine phosphatases are inhibited in less than one minute following UV exposure. Consequently the dephosphorylation of tyrosine-phosphorylated growth factor receptors is impaired. This process is ligand-independent and suggests spontaneous autophosphorylation activity of receptor tyrosine kinases. The UV-induced auto-phosphorylations trigger-signal transduction to the nucleus and activate transcription of immediate early genes such as c-fos. The other type of signal transduction chain has its origin in DNA damage. It occurs with delayed kinetics. We analyzed several human fibroblastic cell lines with distinct deficiencies in nucleotide excision repair mechanisms for the dose dependence of UV-induced late appearing and stable collagenase I mRNA. Several cell lines with deficiencies in the preferential repair of transcribed genes required lower doses of UV than wild type cells or cells solely deficient in the repair of the overall genome. These data suggest the existence of a signal transduction cascade whose stimulation is elicited by lesions in transcribed genes. It appears that similar or identical transcription factors are activated by both types of UV-induced signal transduction. For instance the transcription factor NF{kappa}B is activated by both, a DNA damage independent and a DNA damage dependent signal transduction chain. (authors)

  16. Catalytic activity of APOBEC3F is required for efficient restriction of Vif-deficient human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albin, John S; Brown, William L; Harris, Reuben S

    2014-02-01

    APOBEC3 proteins are DNA cytosine deaminases that restrict the replication of human immunodeficiency virus deficient in the counterdefense protein Vif. Here, we address the capacity of APOBEC3F to restrict via deaminase-dependent and -independent mechanisms by monitoring spreading infections in diverse T cell lines. Our data indicate that only a deaminase-proficient protein is capable of long-term restriction of Vif-deficient HIV in T cells, analogous to prior reports for APOBEC3G. This indicates that the principal mechanism of APOBEC3F restriction is deaminase-dependent.

  17. Protein and DNA analysis for the prenatal diagnosis of alpha2-laminin-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Lydia U; Gollop, Thomas R; Naccache, Nadyr F; Pavanello, Rita C M; Zanoteli, Edmar; Zatz, Mayana; Vainzof, Mariz

    2004-09-01

    Congenital muscular dystrophies (CMD) are characterized by neonatal hypotonia and/or artrogriposis associated with a dystrophic muscle biopsy. The CMD1A form is caused by a deficiency of the alpha2 chain of laminin 2 (LAMA2 gene at 6q2), a protein present in the basal lamina of muscle fibers, in Schwann cells, epidermis, and in fetal trophoblastic tissue. This allows its study for prenatal diagnosis in the chorionic villous (CV), which was performed in a family with one deceased affected CMD1A child. Immunohistochemical analysis of the CV using antibodies against the C- and N-terminal domains of the alpha2-laminin protein showed a normal positive labeling for both antibodies in the "at-risk" CV, which did not differ from the normal control CV. The integrity of the CV membrane was confirmed through the analysis with antibodies against alpha1, beta1, and gamma1 laminins. DNA study using markers flanking the 6q2 region showed that the affected patient and the "at-risk" fetus did not share the same haplotype. Therefore, the fetus was considered normal through both methodologies, which was confirmed after the birth of a clinically normal male baby. As the LAMA2 gene is very large and the spectrum of mutations causing disease is wide, the analysis of the protein in muscle biopsy has been largely used for the diagnosis. Besides, the possibility to detect it in the chorionic villous, mainly using positive markers, also offers a powerful tool for prenatal diagnosis.

  18. Activation of SIRT1 Attenuates Klotho Deficiency-Induced Arterial Stiffness and Hypertension by Enhancing AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Diansa; Zuo, Zhong; Tian, Jing; Ali, Quaisar; Lin, Yi; Lei, Han; Sun, Zhongjie

    2016-11-01

    Arterial stiffness is an independent risk factor for stroke and myocardial infarction. This study was designed to investigate the role of SIRT1, an important deacetylase, and its relationship with Klotho, a kidney-derived aging-suppressor protein, in the pathogenesis of arterial stiffness and hypertension. We found that the serum level of Klotho was decreased by ≈45% in patients with arterial stiffness and hypertension. Interestingly, Klotho haplodeficiency caused arterial stiffening and hypertension, as evidenced by significant increases in pulse wave velocity and blood pressure in Klotho-haplodeficient (KL(+/-)) mice. Notably, the expression and activity of SIRT1 were decreased significantly in aortic endothelial and smooth muscle cells in KL(+/-) mice, suggesting that Klotho deficiency downregulates SIRT1. Treatment with SRT1720 (15 mg/kg/d, IP), a specific SIRT1 activator, abolished Klotho deficiency-induced arterial stiffness and hypertension in KL(+/-) mice. Klotho deficiency was associated with significant decreases in activities of AMP-activated protein kinase α (AMPKα) and endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) in aortas, which were abolished by SRT1720. Furthermore, Klotho deficiency upregulated NADPH oxidase activity and superoxide production, increased collagen expression, and enhanced elastin fragmentation in the media of aortas. These Klotho deficiency-associated changes were blocked by SRT1720. In conclusion, this study provides the first evidence that Klotho deficiency downregulates SIRT1 activity in arterial endothelial and smooth muscle cells. Pharmacological activation of SIRT1 may be an effective therapeutic strategy for arterial stiffness and hypertension. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. xCT deficiency induces autophagy via endoplasmic reticulum stress activated p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase and mTOR in sut melanocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, XueTing; Li, Yang; Zhao, Rui; Yan, Fei; Ma, YiXuan; Zhao, LiPing; Qiao, Haixuan

    2016-01-01

    xCT, the functional subunit of the system xc(-) encoded by the Slc7a11 gene, plays an important role in maintaining intracellular glutathione (GSH) levels. In previous study, we have indicated that xCT deficiency induces OS and that OS triggers apoptosis through JNK pathway, however, this induction of apoptotic features did not fully explain the cell death induced by xCT deficiency. In the current study, we demonstrated that sut melanocytes of xCT deficiency showed activation of both ER stress and autophagy. And that the activation of autophagy by xCT deficiency was mediated by ER stress induced activation of p38 MAPK and NF-κB pathways and subsequently inhibited functions of Akt/mTOR/p70S6K survival pathways, ultimately led to autophagic cell death of sut melanocytes. Our novel results provided important insights into understanding the mechanism associated with xCT deficiency.

  20. Hematologic and surgical management of the dental patient with plasminogen activator deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheitler, L E; Hart, N; Phillips, G; Weinberg, J B

    1988-12-01

    Anticoagulation therapy is used to treat patients with a variety of hemostatic disorders in an attempt to prevent thrombus formation. A thorough understanding of the patient's medical history is essential before dental treatment that may require alteration of this anticoagulation therapy. Alteration of anticoagulation therapy should be undertaken only after consultation with the patient's physician because some patients are at greater risk than others for thrombus formation or hemorrhage. This case of a 29-year-old man with plasminogen activator deficiency illustrates how consultation can result in a coordinated treatment plan for medical and dental management formulated to help ensure safe surgical treatment for these medically compromised patients.

  1. Antibody activation using DNA-based logic gates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Brian M G; van Rosmalen, Martijn; van Beek, Lotte; Merkx, Maarten

    2015-02-16

    Oligonucleotide-based molecular circuits offer the exciting possibility to introduce autonomous signal processing in biomedicine, synthetic biology, and molecular diagnostics. Here we introduce bivalent peptide-DNA conjugates as generic, noncovalent, and easily applicable molecular locks that allow the control of antibody activity using toehold-mediated strand displacement reactions. Employing yeast as a cellular model system, reversible control of antibody targeting is demonstrated with low nM concentrations of peptide-DNA locks and oligonucleotide displacer strands. Introduction of two different toehold strands on the peptide-DNA lock allowed signal integration of two different inputs, yielding logic OR- and AND-gates. The range of molecular inputs could be further extended to protein-based triggers by using protein-binding aptamers. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Biologic characteristic studies of DNA mismatch—repair enzyme hMSH2—deficient cell strain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HeY; ZhuaZX

    2002-01-01

    The effect of hMSH2 enzyme-deficiency on the cell growing phenotypes,cell ultrastructure,growth character and cell cycle were observed with electronic microscopy examination,cell counting and flow cytometry.hMSH2-deficient cell strain was constructed by transfecting hMSH2 recombination plasmid of antisense RNA into human embryo lung fibroblasts(HLF).In hMSH2-deficient cells,there were a lot of morphological changes under electronic microscopy,such as irregular shape,a lot of protuberances on the surface of cell,the enlarged nuclei.The average time of double increment of HLF and hMSH2-deficient cells were 1.0d and 0.78d,respectively.This suggested that the cell proliferation of hMSH2-deficient cells was greater than that of HLF.The distribution of HLF and hMSH2-deficient cells in G1,G2 and S phases was different.A large part of hMSH2-deficient cells was blocked in G1 phase.hMSH2-deficient cells increased,but it is still not a typical malignant cells.Thus,this cell strain could be used as biologic material to detect mutagenesis of environmental chemicals.

  3. Vitamin C deficiency in weanling guinea pigs: differential expression of oxidative stress and DNA repair in liver and brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Trueba, Gilberto Perez; Poulsen, Henrik E;

    2007-01-01

    Neonates are particularly susceptible to malnutrition due to their limited reserves of micronutrients and their rapid growth. In the present study, we examined the effect of vitamin C deficiency on markers of oxidative stress in plasma, liver and brain of weanling guinea pigs. Vitamin C deficiency...

  4. Diversities in virulence, antifungal activity, pigmentation and DNA fingerprint among strains of Burkholderia glumae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karki, Hari S; Shrestha, Bishnu K; Han, Jae Woo; Groth, Donald E; Barphagha, Inderjit K; Rush, Milton C; Melanson, Rebecca A; Kim, Beom Seok; Ham, Jong Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Burkholderia glumae is the primary causal agent of bacterial panicle blight of rice. In this study, 11 naturally avirulent and nine virulent strains of B. glumae native to the southern United States were characterized in terms of virulence in rice and onion, toxofalvin production, antifungal activity, pigmentation and genomic structure. Virulence of B. glumae strains on rice panicles was highly correlated to virulence on onion bulb scales, suggesting that onion bulb can be a convenient alternative host system to efficiently determine the virulence of B. glumae strains. Production of toxoflavin, the phytotoxin that functions as a major virulence factor, was closely associated with the virulence phenotypes of B. glumae strains in rice. Some strains of B. glumae showed various levels of antifungal activity against Rhizoctonia solani, the causal agent of sheath blight, and pigmentation phenotypes on casamino acid-peptone-glucose (CPG) agar plates regardless of their virulence traits. Purple and yellow-green pigments were partially purified from a pigmenting strain of B. glumae, 411gr-6, and the purple pigment fraction showed a strong antifungal activity against Collectotrichum orbiculare. Genetic variations were detected among the B. glumae strains from DNA fingerprinting analyses by repetitive element sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) for BOX-A1R-based repetitive extragenic palindromic (BOX) or enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) sequences of bacteria; and close genetic relatedness among virulent but pigment-deficient strains were revealed by clustering analyses of DNA fingerprints from BOX-and ERIC-PCR.

  5. Diversities in virulence, antifungal activity, pigmentation and DNA fingerprint among strains of Burkholderia glumae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari S Karki

    Full Text Available Burkholderia glumae is the primary causal agent of bacterial panicle blight of rice. In this study, 11 naturally avirulent and nine virulent strains of B. glumae native to the southern United States were characterized in terms of virulence in rice and onion, toxofalvin production, antifungal activity, pigmentation and genomic structure. Virulence of B. glumae strains on rice panicles was highly correlated to virulence on onion bulb scales, suggesting that onion bulb can be a convenient alternative host system to efficiently determine the virulence of B. glumae strains. Production of toxoflavin, the phytotoxin that functions as a major virulence factor, was closely associated with the virulence phenotypes of B. glumae strains in rice. Some strains of B. glumae showed various levels of antifungal activity against Rhizoctonia solani, the causal agent of sheath blight, and pigmentation phenotypes on casamino acid-peptone-glucose (CPG agar plates regardless of their virulence traits. Purple and yellow-green pigments were partially purified from a pigmenting strain of B. glumae, 411gr-6, and the purple pigment fraction showed a strong antifungal activity against Collectotrichum orbiculare. Genetic variations were detected among the B. glumae strains from DNA fingerprinting analyses by repetitive element sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR for BOX-A1R-based repetitive extragenic palindromic (BOX or enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC sequences of bacteria; and close genetic relatedness among virulent but pigment-deficient strains were revealed by clustering analyses of DNA fingerprints from BOX-and ERIC-PCR.

  6. Diversities in Virulence, Antifungal Activity, Pigmentation and DNA Fingerprint among Strains of Burkholderia glumae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karki, Hari S.; Shrestha, Bishnu K.; Han, Jae Woo; Groth, Donald E.; Barphagha, Inderjit K.; Rush, Milton C.; Melanson, Rebecca A.; Kim, Beom Seok; Ham, Jong Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Burkholderia glumae is the primary causal agent of bacterial panicle blight of rice. In this study, 11 naturally avirulent and nine virulent strains of B. glumae native to the southern United States were characterized in terms of virulence in rice and onion, toxofalvin production, antifungal activity, pigmentation and genomic structure. Virulence of B. glumae strains on rice panicles was highly correlated to virulence on onion bulb scales, suggesting that onion bulb can be a convenient alternative host system to efficiently determine the virulence of B. glumae strains. Production of toxoflavin, the phytotoxin that functions as a major virulence factor, was closely associated with the virulence phenotypes of B. glumae strains in rice. Some strains of B. glumae showed various levels of antifungal activity against Rhizoctonia solani, the causal agent of sheath blight, and pigmentation phenotypes on casamino acid-peptone-glucose (CPG) agar plates regardless of their virulence traits. Purple and yellow-green pigments were partially purified from a pigmenting strain of B. glumae, 411gr-6, and the purple pigment fraction showed a strong antifungal activity against Collectotrichum orbiculare. Genetic variations were detected among the B. glumae strains from DNA fingerprinting analyses by repetitive element sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) for BOX-A1R-based repetitive extragenic palindromic (BOX) or enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) sequences of bacteria; and close genetic relatedness among virulent but pigment-deficient strains were revealed by clustering analyses of DNA fingerprints from BOX-and ERIC-PCR. PMID:23028972

  7. Regulation of Calcitriol Biosynthesis and Activity: Focus on Gestational Vitamin D Deficiency and Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Olmos-Ortiz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D has garnered a great deal of attention in recent years due to a global prevalence of vitamin D deficiency associated with an increased risk of a variety of human diseases. Specifically, hypovitaminosis D in pregnant women is highly common and has important implications for the mother and lifelong health of the child, since it has been linked to maternal and child infections, small-for-gestational age, preterm delivery, preeclampsia, gestational diabetes, as well as imprinting on the infant for life chronic diseases. Therefore, factors that regulate vitamin D metabolism are of main importance, especially during pregnancy. The hormonal form and most active metabolite of vitamin D is calcitriol. This hormone mediates its biological effects through a specific nuclear receptor, which is found in many tissues including the placenta. Calcitriol synthesis and degradation depend on the expression and activity of CYP27B1 and CYP24A1 cytochromes, respectively, for which regulation is tissue specific. Among the factors that modify these cytochromes expression and/or activity are calcitriol itself, parathyroid hormone, fibroblast growth factor 23, cytokines, calcium and phosphate. This review provides a current overview on the regulation of vitamin D metabolism, focusing on vitamin D deficiency during gestation and its impact on pregnancy outcomes.

  8. [Retrotransposons: selfish DNA or active epigenetic players in somatic cells?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidez, Fabien

    2014-01-01

    Transposable elements (TE) represent around 40% of the human genome. They are endogenous mobile DNA sequences able to jump and duplicate in the host genome. TE have long been considered as "junk" DNA but are now believed to be important regulators of gene expression by participating to the establishment of the DNA methylation profile. Recent advances in genome sequencing reveals a higher transposition frequency and TE driven gene expression in somatic cells than previously thought. As TE propagation is deleterious and may be involved in oncogenic mechanisms, host cells have developed silencing mechanisms mainly described in germinal and embryonic cells. However, somatic cells are also proned to TE transposition and use specific mechanisms involving tumor suppressor proteins including p53, Rb and PLZF. These transcription factors specifically target genomic retrotransposon sequences, histone deacetylase and DNA methylase activities, inducing epigenetic modifications related to gene silencing. Thus, these transcription factors negatively regulate TE expression by the formation of DNA methylation profil in somatic cells possibly associated with oncogenic mechanisms.

  9. Control of DNA replication in a transformed lymphoid cell line: coexistence of activator and inhibitor activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffman, F D; Fresa, K L; Oglesby, I; Cohen, S

    1991-12-01

    Proliferating lymphocytes contain an intracellular factor, ADR (activator of DNA replication), which can initiate DNA synthesis in isolated quiescent nuclei. Resting lymphocytes lack ADR activity and contain an intracellular inhibitory factor that suppresses DNA synthesis in normal but not transformed nuclei. In this study we describe a MOLT-4 subline that produces both the activator and inhibitory activities which can be separated by ammonium sulfate fractionation. The inhibitor is heat stable and inhibits ADR-mediated DNA replication in a dose-dependent manner. It does not inhibit DNA polymerase alpha activity. The inhibitor must be present at the initiation of DNA replication to be effective, as it loses most of its effectiveness if it is added after replication has begun. The presence of inhibitory activity in proliferating MOLT-4 cells, taken with the previous observation that inhibitor derived from normal resting cells does not affect DNA synthesis by MOLT-4 nuclei, suggests that failure of a down-regulating signal may play an important role in proliferative disorder.

  10. Human transcriptional coactivator PC4 stimulates DNA end joining and activates DSB repair activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batta, Kiran; Yokokawa, Masatoshi; Takeyasu, Kunio; Kundu, Tapas K

    2009-01-23

    Human transcriptional coactivator PC4 is a highly abundant nuclear protein that is involved in diverse cellular processes ranging from transcription to chromatin organization. Earlier, we have shown that PC4, a positive activator of p53, overexpresses upon genotoxic insult in a p53-dependent manner. In the present study, we show that PC4 stimulates ligase-mediated DNA end joining irrespective of the source of DNA ligase. Pull-down assays reveal that PC4 helps in the association of DNA ends through its C-terminal domain. In vitro nonhomologous end-joining assays with cell-free extracts show that PC4 enhances the joining of noncomplementary DNA ends. Interestingly, we found that PC4 activates double-strand break (DSB) repair activity through stimulation of DSB rejoining in vivo. Together, these findings demonstrate PC4 as an activator of nonhomologous end joining and DSB repair activity.

  11. Genotrim, a DNA-customized nutrigenomic product, targets genetic factors of obesity: hypothesizing a dopamine-glucose correlation demonstrating reward deficiency syndrome (RDS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Kenneth; Chen, Thomas J H; Meshkin, Brian; Downs, B William; Gordon, Cory A; Blum, Seth; Mangucci, Julie F; Braverman, Eric R; Arcuri, Vanessa; Deutsch, Roger; Pons, Manuel-Martinez-

    2007-01-01

    Obesity is the second largest cause of preventable death in the United States. Historically, obesity was considered a behavioral problem that could be simply addressed with behavioral modifications in diet and exercise. As scientific advancements have demonstrated in other neurological healthcare conditions such as alcoholism, there are important biological and genetic components that limit the efficacy of behavioral adjustments alone. In light of data suggesting frequent co-morbidities to obesity, including diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis, osteoporosis, and potentially others, we hypothesize that the biologic and genetic factors, synergistically with behavioral modifications, must be addressed to adequately treat this disease. We hypothesize that one such genetic factor that influences behavior and thus obesity is a predisposition to glucose craving and the overall effect of dopaminergic activity in the reward center of the brain. This defect drives individuals to engage in activities of behavioral excess, which will increase brain dopamine function, for which we have created the term reward deficiency syndrome (RDS) to categorize such biological influences on behavior. Consuming large quantities of alcohol or carbohydrates (carbohydrate bingeing) stimulates the brain's production of and utilization of dopamine. So too does the intake of crack/cocaine and the abuse of nicotine. We are proposing that a novel approach to nutritional supplementation may be required to target the RDS role in obesity. In this regard, Genotrim, a DNA based customized nutraceutical has been designed and is currently under investigation in several clinical studies. This is the first hypothesis paper whereby this new paradigm shift in thinking about obesity is presented.

  12. Iron Deficiency-induced Increase of Root Branching Contributes to the Enhanced Root Ferric Chelate Reductase Activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chong-Wei Jin; Wei-Wei Chen; Zhi-Bin Meng; Shao-Jian Zheng

    2008-01-01

    In various plant species, Fe deficiency increases lateral root branching. However, whether this morphological alteration contributes to the Fe deficiency-induced physiological responses still remains to be demonstrated. In the present research, we demonstrated that the lateral root development of red clover (Trifolium pretense L.) was significantly enhanced by Fe deficient treatment, and the total lateral root number correlated well with the Fe deficiency-induced ferric chelate reductase (FCR) activity. By analyzing the results from Dasgan et al. (2002), we also found that although the two tomato genotypes line227/1 (P1) and Roza (P2) and their reciprocal F1 hybrid lines ("P1 × P2" and "P2 × P1 ") were cultured under two different lower Fe conditions (10-6 and 10-7 M FeEDDHA), their FCR activities are significantly correlated with the lateral root number. More interestingly, the -Fe chlorosis tolerant ability of these four tomato lines displays similar trends with the lateral root density. Taking these results together, it was proposed that the Fe deficiency-induced increases of the lateral root should play an important role in resistance to Fe deficiency, which may act as harnesses of a useful trait for the selection and breeding of more Fe-efficiant crops among the genotypes that have evolved a Fe deficiency-induced Fe uptake system.

  13. The ATPase activity of Fml1 is essential for its roles in homologous recombination and DNA repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Saikat; Whitby, Matthew C.

    2012-01-01

    In fission yeast, the DNA helicase Fml1, which is an orthologue of human FANCM, is a key component of the machinery that drives and governs homologous recombination (HR). During the repair of DNA double-strand breaks by HR, it limits the occurrence of potentially deleterious crossover recombinants, whereas at stalled replication forks, it promotes HR to aid their recovery. Here, we have mutated conserved residues in Fml1’s Walker A (K99R) and Walker B (D196N) motifs to determine whether its activities are dependent on its ability to hydrolyse ATP. Both Fml1K99R and Fml1D196N are proficient for DNA binding but totally deficient in DNA unwinding and ATP hydrolysis. In vivo both mutants exhibit a similar reduction in recombination at blocked replication forks as a fml1Δ mutant indicating that Fml1’s motor activity, fuelled by ATP hydrolysis, is essential for its pro-recombinogenic role. Intriguingly, both fml1K99R and fml1D196N mutants exhibit greater sensitivity to genotoxins and higher levels of crossing over during DSB repair than a fml1Δ strain. These data suggest that without its motor activity, the binding of Fml1 to its DNA substrate can impede alternative mechanisms of repair and crossover avoidance. PMID:22844101

  14. Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) and hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) deficiencies affect expression of lipolytic activities in mouse adipose tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morak, Maria; Schmidinger, Hannes; Riesenhuber, Gernot; Rechberger, Gerald N; Kollroser, Manfred; Haemmerle, Guenter; Zechner, Rudolf; Kronenberg, Florian; Hermetter, Albin

    2012-12-01

    Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) and hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) are key enzymes involved in intracellular degradation of triacylglycerols. It was the aim of this study to elucidate how the deficiency in one of these proteins affects the residual lipolytic proteome in adipose tissue. For this purpose, we compared the lipase patterns of brown and white adipose tissue from ATGL (-/-) and HSL (-/-) mice using differential activity-based gel electrophoresis. This method is based on activity-recognition probes possessing the same substrate analogous structure but carrying different fluorophores for specific detection of the enzyme patterns of two different tissues in one electrophoresis gel. We found that ATGL-deficiency in brown adipose tissue had a profound effect on the expression levels of other lipolytic and esterolytic enzymes in this tissue, whereas HSL-deficiency hardly showed any effect in brown adipose tissue. Neither ATGL- nor HSL-deficiency greatly influenced the lipase patterns in white adipose tissue. Enzyme activities of mouse tissues on acylglycerol substrates were analyzed as well, showing that ATGL-and HSL-deficiencies can be compensated for at least in part by other enzymes. The proteins that responded to ATGL-deficiency in brown adipose tissue were overexpressed and their activities on acylglycerols were analyzed. Among these enzymes, Es1, Es10, and Es31-like represent lipase candidates as they catalyze the hydrolysis of long-chain acylglycerols.

  15. Development of Fe-deficiency responses in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) roots: involvement of plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Orto, M; Santi, S; De Nisi, P; Cesco, S; Varanini, Z; Zocchi, G; Pinton, R

    2000-04-01

    One of the mechanisms through which some strategy I plants respond to Fe-deficiency is an enhanced acidification of the rhizosphere due to proton extrusion. It was previously demonstrated that under Fe-deficiency, a strong increase in the H(+)-ATPase activity of plasma membrane (PM) vesicles isolated from cucumber roots occurred. This result was confirmed in the present work and supported by measurement of ATP-dependent proton pumping in inside-out plasma membrane vesicles. There was also an attempt to clarify the regulatory mechanism(s) which lead to the activation of the H(+)-ATPase under Fe-deficiency conditions. Plasma membrane proteins from Fe-deficient roots submitted to immunoblotting using polyclonal antibodies showed an increased level in the 100 kDa polypeptide. When the plasma membrane proteins were treated with trypsin a 90 kDa band appeared. This effect was accompanied by an increase in the enzyme activity, both in the Fe-deficient and in the Fe-sufficient extracts. These results suggest that the increase in the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity seen under Fe-deficiency is due, at least in part, to an increased steady-state level of the 100 kDa polypeptide.

  16. Vitamin D3 deficiency increases DNA damage and modify the expression of genes associated with hypertension in normotensive and hypertensive rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Silva Machado

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D3 is a lipophilic micronutrient obtained from the diet (salmon, sardines, mackerel and cod liver oil or by the conversion of 7-dehydrocholesterol on skin after exposure to UVB radiation. This vitamin participates in several cellular processes, contributes to the maintenance of calcium concentrations, acts on phosphorus absorption, and is also related to the development and progression of chronic diseases. In hypertension, it is known that vitamin D3 act on renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, regulates the gene expression and can induce or attenuate oxidative DNA damage. Vitamin D3 deficiency is present in 30-50% of human population (Pilz et al., 2009, and has been associated with increase of chromosomal instability and DNA damage (Nair-Shalliker; Armstrong; Fenech, 2012. Since experimental and clinical studies have suggested a relationship between vitamin D3 and blood pressure, the aim of this study was to evaluate whether vitamin D3 deficiency or supplementation lead to an increase or decrease in DNA damage, regulates the expression of genes associated with hypertension and changes the systolic blood pressure. Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR, used as a model of human essential hypertension, and their normotensive controls (Wistar Kyoto – WKY were fed a control diet (vitamin D3 at 1.000 UI/kg, a deficient diet (vitamin D3 at 0 UI/kg or a supplemented diet (vitamin D3 at 10.000 UI/kg for 12 weeks. DNA damage was assessed by comet assay in cardiac muscle tissue and blood tissue, following the methodology proposed by Singh et al. (1988 and Tice et al. (2000; gene expression of 84 genes was assessed by RT2ProfilerTM PCR Array in cardiac muscle tissue; and systolic blood pressure was measured weekly by a noninvasive method using tail plethysmography. In SHR and WKY rats, vitamin D3 deficiency increased DNA damage in the blood tissue and did not change the DNA damage in cardiac muscle tissue; vitamin D3 supplementation maintained the

  17. Targeted impairment of thymidine kinase 2 expression in cells induces mitochondrial DNA depletion and reveals molecular mechanisms of compensation of mitochondrial respiratory activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villarroya, Joan, E-mail: joanvillarroya@gmail.com [Institut de Recerca, Hospital Universitari de la Vall d' Hebron, Barcelona (Spain); Institut de Recerca l' Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Lara, Mari-Carmen [Institut de Recerca, Hospital Universitari de la Vall d' Hebron, Barcelona (Spain); Department of Neurology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Centro de Investigacion Biomedica en Red de Enfermedades Raras (CIBERER), ISCIII (Spain); Dorado, Beatriz [Department of Neurology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Garrido, Marta [Unitat de Biologia Cel.lular i Molecular, IMIM-Hospital del Mar, Barcelona (Spain); Garcia-Arumi, Elena [Institut de Recerca, Hospital Universitari de la Vall d' Hebron, Barcelona (Spain); Centro de Investigacion Biomedica en Red de Enfermedades Raras (CIBERER), ISCIII (Spain); Meseguer, Anna [Institut de Recerca, Hospital Universitari de la Vall d' Hebron, Barcelona (Spain); Hirano, Michio [Department of Neurology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Vila, Maya R. [Institut de Recerca, Hospital Universitari de la Vall d' Hebron, Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-04-08

    Highlights: {yields} We impaired TK2 expression in Ost TK1{sup -} cells via siRNA-mediated interference (TK2{sup -}). {yields} TK2 impairment caused severe mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion in quiescent cells. {yields} Despite mtDNA depletion, TK2{sup -} cells show high cytochrome oxidase activity. {yields} Depletion of mtDNA occurs without imbalance in the mitochondrial dNTP pool. {yields} Nuclear-encoded ENT1, DNA-pol {gamma}, TFAM and TP gene expression is lowered in TK2{sup -} cells. -- Abstract: The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion syndrome comprises a clinically heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by reductions of the mtDNA abundance, without associated point mutations or rearrangements. We have developed the first in vitro model to study of mtDNA depletion due to reduced mitochondrial thymidine kinase 2 gene (TK2) expression in order to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in mtDNA depletion syndrome due to TK2 mutations. Small interfering RNA targeting TK2 mRNA was used to decrease TK2 expression in Ost TK1{sup -} cells, a cell line devoid of endogenous thymidine kinase 1 (TK1). Stable TK2-deficient cell lines showed a reduction of TK2 levels close to 80%. In quiescent conditions, TK2-deficient cells showed severe mtDNA depletion, also close to 80% the control levels. However, TK2-deficient clones showed increased cytochrome c oxidase activity, higher cytochrome c oxidase subunit I transcript levels and higher subunit II protein expression respect to control cells. No alterations of the deoxynucleotide pools were found, whereas a reduction in the expression of genes involved in nucleoside/nucleotide homeostasis (human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1, thymidine phosphorylase) and mtDNA maintenance (DNA-polymerase {gamma}, mitochondrial transcription factor A) was observed. Our findings highlight the importance of cellular compensatory mechanisms that enhance the expression of respiratory components to ensure respiratory activity

  18. A DNA enzyme with Mg(2+)-Dependent RNA Phosphoesterase Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breaker, Ronald R.; Joyce, Gerald F.

    1995-01-01

    Previously we demonstrated that DNA can act as an enzyme in the Pb(2+)-dependent cleavage of an RNA phosphoester. This is a facile reaction, with an uncatalyzed rate for a typical RNA phosphoester of approx. 10(exp -4)/ min in the presence of 1 mM Pb(OAc)2 at pH 7.0 and 23 C. The Mg(2+) - dependent reaction is more difficult, with an uncatalyzed rate of approx. 10(exp -7)/ min under comparable conditions. Mg(2+) - dependent cleavage has special relevance to biology because it is compatible with intracellular conditions. Using in vitro selection, we sought to develop a family of phosphoester-cleaving DNA enzymes that operate in the presence of various divalent metals, focusing particularly on the Mg(2+) - dependent reaction. Results: We generated a population of greater than 10(exp 13) DNAs containing 40 random nucleotides and carried out repeated rounds of selective amplification, enriching for molecules that cleave a target RNA phosphoester in the presence of 1 mM Mg(2+), Mn(2+), Zn(2+) or Pb(2+). Examination of individual clones from the Mg(2+) lineage after the sixth round revealed a catalytic motif comprised of a three-stem junction.This motif was partially randomized and subjected to seven additional rounds of selective amplification, yielding catalysts with a rate of 0.01/ min. The optimized DNA catalyst was divided into separate substrate and enzyme domains and shown to have a similar level of activity under multiple turnover conditions. Conclusions: We have generated a Mg(2+) - dependent DNA enzyme that cleaves a target RNA phosphoester with a catalytic rate approx. 10(exp 5) - fold greater than that of the uncatalyzed reaction. This activity is compatible with intracellular conditions, raising the possibility that DNA enzymes might be made to operate in vivo.

  19. Cardiovascular effects of copper deficiency on activity of superoxide dismutase in diabetic nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed A Al-Bayati

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Copper (Cu is essential both for its role in antioxidant enzymes, like Cu/zinc (Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD and ceruloplasmin, as well as its role in lysyl oxidase, essential for the strength and integrity of the heart and blood vessels. With such a central role in cardiovascular health, Cu has been generally overlooked in the debate over improving our cardiovascular health. Cu deficiency has produced many of the same abnormalities present in cardiovascular disease. It seems almost certain that Cu plays a large role in the development of this killer disease, not because of its excess in the diet, but rather its deficiency. Aim: This study was undertaken to investigate the cardiovascular effects of Cu deficiency on the activity of SOD in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM with and without diabetic nephropathy. Materials and Methods: Fifty-five patients with T2DM were recruited in this study which were divided into two subgroups based on the presence of microalbuminuria, the first group (microal buminuric group, n = 31 had a microalbuminuria between 30 and 299 μg/mg. The second group (normoal buminuric group, n = 29 had an albumin level less than 30 μg/mg. The two diabetic groups were compared to the control group (n = 37. Results: The results of our study showed a significant reduction in the levels of SOD enzyme associated with an increased urinary Cu excretion in microalbuminuric group compared to the control group at P < 0.05. Conclusions: The current study illustrates that the regulation of the blood concentrations of Cu may be a potential therapeutic target for prevention and treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

  20. Non-B DNA-forming sequences and WRN deficiency independently increase the frequency of base substitution in human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bacolla, Albino; Wang, Guliang; Jain, Aklank

    2011-01-01

    determined non-B DNA-induced mutation frequencies and spectra in human U2OS osteosarcoma cells and assessed the role of WRN in isogenic knockdown (WRN-KD) cells using a supF gene mutation reporter system flanked by triplex- or Z-DNA-forming sequences. Although both non-B DNA and WRN-KD served to increase...

  1. Slow mitochondrial repair of 5'-AMP renders mtDNA susceptible to damage in APTX deficient cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akbari, Mansour; Sykora, Peter; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2015-01-01

    Aborted DNA ligation events in eukaryotic cells can generate 5'-adenylated (5'-AMP) DNA termini that can be removed from DNA by aprataxin (APTX). Mutations in APTX cause an inherited human disease syndrome characterized by early-onset progressive ataxia with ocular motor apraxia (AOA1). APTX...

  2. New spiro-acridines: DNA interaction, antiproliferative activity and inhibition of human DNA topoisomerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Sinara Mônica Vitalino de; Lafayette, Elizabeth Almeida; Silva, Willams Leal; Lima Serafim, Vanessa de; Menezes, Thais Meira; Neves, Jorge Luiz; Ruiz, Ana Lucia Tasca Gois; Carvalho, João Ernesto de; Moura, Ricardo Olímpio de; Beltrão, Eduardo Isidoro Carneiro; Carvalho Júnior, Luiz Bezerra de; Lima, Maria do Carmo Alves de

    2016-11-01

    Two new spiro-acridines were synthesized by introducing cyano-N-acylhydrazone between the acridine and phenyl rings followed by spontaneous cyclization. The final compounds (E)-1'-(benzylideneamino)-5'-oxo-1',5'-dihydro-10H-spiro[acridine-9,2'-pyrrole]-4'-carbonitrile (AMTAC-01) and (E)-1'-((4-methoxybenzylidene)amino)-5'-oxo-1',5'-dihydro-10H-spiro[acridine-9,2'-pyrrole]-4'-carbonitrile (AMTAC-02) were evaluated for their interactions with calf thymus DNA, antiproliferative and human topoisomerase I and IIα inhibitory activities. Both compounds presented ability to bind DNA. The binding constant determined by UV-vis spectroscopy was found to be 10(4)M(-1). Antiproliferative assay demonstrated that AMTAC-01 and AMTAC-02 were most active against prostate and melanoma tumor cell lines, respectively. The compound did not present Topo I inhibitory activity. However, both derivatives displayed topoisomerase IIα inhibitory activity comparable to amsacrine, and AMTAC-02 was more potent than AMTAC-01 with methoxy substituent group on phenyl ring. This study demonstrates that the new derivatives are promising molecules with topoisomerase IIα inhibitory and antiproliferative activities.

  3. Isolated sulfite oxidase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relinque, B; Bardallo, L; Granero, M; Jiménez, P J; Luna, S

    2015-03-10

    Sulfite oxidase deficiency is an uncommon metabolic disease. Only few cases of its isolated form have been reported in the literature. We report a case of severe neonatal onset. A newborn baby of 41 weeks gestational age, weighted at birth of 3240 grams and had an Apgar score of 6-10-10. Fifty-three hours after being born, the baby started with seizures that were refractory to antiepileptic treatment. Brain function was monitored using a-EEG. Laboratory and imaging tests were performed. All of them were consistent with sulfite oxidase deficiency. The diagnosis was confirmed by genetic testing. We highlight the importance of this disease as part of the differential diagnosis of seizures during the neonatal period, as well as the importance of the therapeutic support based on dietary restrictions. It's also remarkable the possibility of prenatal diagnosis by quantifying enzyme activity and it's also possible carrying out DNA mutational analysis.

  4. Effects of DNA end configuration on XRCC4-DNA ligase IV and its stimulation of Artemis activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerodimos, Christina A; Chang, Howard H Y; Watanabe, Go; Lieber, Michael R

    2017-08-25

    In humans, nonhomologous DNA end-joining (NHEJ) is the major pathway by which DNA double-strand breaks are repaired. Recognition of each broken DNA end by the DNA repair protein Ku is the first step in NHEJ, followed by the iterative binding of nucleases, DNA polymerases, and the XRCC4-DNA ligase IV (X4-LIV) complex in an order influenced by the configuration of the two DNA ends at the break site. The endonuclease Artemis improves joining efficiency by functioning in a complex with DNA-dependent protein kinase, catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) that carries out endonucleolytic cleavage of 5' and 3' overhangs. Previously, we observed that X4-LIV alone can stimulate Artemis activity on 3' overhangs, but this DNA-PKcs-independent endonuclease activity of Artemis awaited confirmation. Here, using in vitro nuclease and ligation assays, we find that stimulation of Artemis nuclease activity by X4-LIV and the efficiency of blunt-end ligation are determined by structural configurations at the DNA end. Specifically, X4-LIV stimulated Artemis to cut near the end of 3' overhangs without the involvement of other NHEJ proteins. Of note, this ligase complex is not able to stimulate Artemis activity at hairpins or at 5' overhangs. We also found that X4-LIV and DNA-PKcs interfere with one another with respect to stimulating Artemis activity at 3' overhangs, favoring the view that these NHEJ proteins are sequentially rather than concurrently recruited to DNA ends. These data suggest specific functional and positional relationships among these components that explain genetic and molecular features of NHEJ and V(D)J recombination within cells. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Synthesis, characterization, DNA binding, DNA cleavage, protein binding and cytotoxic activities of Ru(II) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thota, Sreekanth; Vallala, Srujana; Yerra, Rajeshwar; Rodrigues, Daniel Alencar; Raghavendra, Nulgumnalli Manjunathaiah; Barreiro, Eliezer J

    2016-01-01

    We report on the synthesis of novel Ru(II) compounds (Ru-1 to Ru-8) bearing R-pdc, 4-Cl-pbinh ligands (where R=4-CF3, 4-F, 4-OH pdc=3-phenyl-5-(1H-pyrrol-2-yl)-4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrazole-1-carbothioamide, pbinh=phenoxybenzylidene isonicotinyl hydrazides) and their in vitro antitumor activity toward the cell lines murine leukemia L1210, human lymphocyte CEM, human epithelial cervical carcinoma HeLa, BEL-7402 and Molt4/C8. Some of the complexes exhibited more potent antiproliferative activity against cell lines than the standard drug cisplatin. Ruthenium complex Ru-2 displayed potent cytotoxicity with than that of cisplatin. DNA-binding, DNA cleavage and protein binding properties of ruthenium complexes with these ligands are reported. Interactions of these ruthenium complexes with DNA revealed an intercalative mode of binding between them. Synchronous fluorescence spectra proved that the interaction of ruthenium complexes with bovine serum albumin (BSA) resulted in a conformational change of the latter.

  6. Replication stress activates DNA repair synthesis in mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minocherhomji, Sheroy; Ying, Songmin; Bjerregaard, Victoria A; Bursomanno, Sara; Aleliunaite, Aiste; Wu, Wei; Mankouri, Hocine W; Shen, Huahao; Liu, Ying; Hickson, Ian D

    2015-12-10

    Oncogene-induced DNA replication stress has been implicated as a driver of tumorigenesis. Many chromosomal rearrangements characteristic of human cancers originate from specific regions of the genome called common fragile sites (CFSs). CFSs are difficult-to-replicate loci that manifest as gaps or breaks on metaphase chromosomes (termed CFS 'expression'), particularly when cells have been exposed to replicative stress. The MUS81-EME1 structure-specific endonuclease promotes the appearance of chromosome gaps or breaks at CFSs following replicative stress. Here we show that entry of cells into mitotic prophase triggers the recruitment of MUS81 to CFSs. The nuclease activity of MUS81 then promotes POLD3-dependent DNA synthesis at CFSs, which serves to minimize chromosome mis-segregation and non-disjunction. We propose that the attempted condensation of incompletely duplicated loci in early mitosis serves as the trigger for completion of DNA replication at CFS loci in human cells. Given that this POLD3-dependent mitotic DNA synthesis is enhanced in aneuploid cancer cells that exhibit intrinsically high levels of chromosomal instability (CIN(+)) and replicative stress, we suggest that targeting this pathway could represent a new therapeutic approach.

  7. Vitamin D deficiency and leisure time activities in the elderly: are all pastimes the same?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina De Rui

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Optimal vitamin D status is important for overall health and well-being, particularly in the elderly. Although vitamin D synthesis in the skin declines with age, exposure to sunlight still seems to help older-aged adults to achieve adequate serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD levels. Elderly people would therefore benefit from outdoor leisure activities, but the effects of different types of pastime on serum 25OHD levels have yet to be thoroughly investigated. AIMS: To assess the association of different pastimes with 25OHD deficiency in elderly subjects. METHODS: A sample of 2,349 community-dwelling elderly individuals (1,389 females and 960 males enrolled in the Progetto Veneto Anziani was analyzed. Brisk walking, cycling, gardening and fishing were classed as outdoor activities, and dancing and gym workouts as indoor pastimes. Any activities undertaken for at least 1 hour/week during the previous month were considered as being practiced regularly. Logistic regression models were used to estimate the association between different pastimes and 25OHD deficiency. RESULTS: Serum 25OHD levels were significantly higher in individuals who engaged in outdoor pastimes (+25% in women, +27.7% in men compared to those who did not. In particular, subjects regularly practicing gardening or cycling had higher serum 25OHD levels than those who did not, whereas 25OHD levels differed little between subjects who did or did not undertake indoor activities. Among the outdoor pastimes considered, logistic regression analysis confirmed a lower likelihood of vitamin D deficiency (25OHD<50 nmol/L for cyclists (OR 0.51, 95% CI 0.37-0.69 in women; OR 0.50, 95% CI 0.29-0.87 in men and gardeners (OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.47-0.83 in women; OR 0.46, 95% CI 0.26-0.80, but not for brisk walkers. CONCLUSIONS: Regular cycling and gardening reduce the likelihood of inadequate vitamin D status in Caucasian elderly people, irrespective of their age, BMI and comorbidities, and of

  8. Lethal effects of /sup 32/P decay on transfecting activity of Bacillus subtillis phage phie DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loveday, K.S.

    1979-07-15

    Disintegration of /sup 32/P present in the DNA of Bacillus subtilis phage phie (a phage containing double-strand DNA) results in the loss of viability of intact phage as well as transfecting activity of isolated DNA. Only 1/12 of the /sup 32/P disintegrations per phage DNA equivalent inactivities the intact phage while nearly every disintegration inactivates the transfecting DNA. This result provides evidence for a single-strand intermediate in the transfection of B. subtilis by phie DNA.

  9. Depression of sink activity precedes the inhibition of biomass production in tomato plants subjected to potassium deficiency stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanai, S; Ohkura, K; Adu-Gyamfi, J J; Mohapatra, P K; Nguyen, N T; Saneoka, H; Fujita, K

    2007-01-01

    Tomato [Solanum lycopersicum (formerly Lycopersicon esculentum) L. cv. Momotarou] plants were grown hydroponically inside the greenhouse of Hiroshima University, Japan. The adverse effects of potassium (K) deficiency stress on the source-sink relationship during the early reproductive period was examined by withdrawing K from the rooting medium for a period of 21 d. Fruits and stem were the major sink organs for the carbon assimilates from the source. A simple non-destructive micro-morphometric technique was used to measure growth of these organs. The effect of K deficiency was studied on the apparent photosynthesis (source activity), leaf area, partitioning (13)C, sugar concentration, K content, and fruit and stem diameters of the plant. Compared with the control, K deficiency treatment severely decreased biomass of all organs. The treatment also depressed leaf photosynthesis and transport of (13)C assimilates, but the impact of stress on these activities became evident only after fruit and stem diameter expansions were down-regulated. These results suggested that K deficiency diminished sink activity in tomato plants prior to its effect on the source activity because of a direct effect on the water status of the former. The lack of demand in growth led to the accumulation of sugars in leaves and concomitant fall in photosynthetic activity. Since accumulation of K and sugars in the fruit was not affected, low K levels of the growing medium might not have affected the fruit quality. The micro-morphometric technique can be used as a reliable tool for monitoring K deficiency during fruiting of tomato. K deficiency directly hindered assimilate partitioning, and the symptoms were considered more detrimental compared with P deficiency.

  10. Chk2 Activation Dependence on Nbs1 after DNA Damage

    OpenAIRE

    Buscemi, Giacomo; Savio, Camilla; Zannini, Laura; Miccichè, Francesca; Masnada, Debora; Nakanishi, Makoto; Tauchi, Hiroshi; Komatsu, Kenshi; Mizutani, Shuki; Khanna, KumKum; Chen, Phil; Concannon, Patrick; Chessa, Luciana; Delia, Domenico

    2001-01-01

    The checkpoint kinase Chk2 has a key role in delaying cell cycle progression in response to DNA damage. Upon activation by low-dose ionizing radiation (IR), which occurs in an ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-dependent manner, Chk2 can phosphorylate the mitosis-inducing phosphatase Cdc25C on an inhibitory site, blocking entry into mitosis, and p53 on a regulatory site, causing G1 arrest. Here we show that the ATM-dependent activation of Chk2 by γ- radiation requires Nbs1, the gene product ...

  11. 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase activity in vitro in lung and kidney of essential fatty acid-deficient rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Harald S.; Toft, B.S.

    1978-01-01

    Weanling rats were fed for 6 months on a diet deficient in essential fatty acids: either fat-free, or with 28% (w/w) partially hydrogenated fish oil. Control rats were fed a diet with 28% (w/w) arachis oil for 6 months. 15-Hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase activity was determined as initial rates...... of the two groups on diets deficient in essential fatty acids as compared to the control group. No difference was observed in dehydrogenase activity in the kidneys. The dehydrogenase may be of importance for the regulation of the level of endogenous prostaglandins and, thus, a decrease in activity could...

  12. Cystatin B-deficient mice have increased expression of apoptosis and glial activation genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lieuallen, Kimberly; Pennacchio, Len A.; Park, Morgan; Myers, Richard M.; Lennon, Gregory G.

    2001-07-05

    Loss-of-function mutations in the cystatin B (Cstb) gene cause a neurological disorder known as Unverricht Lundborg disease (EPM1) in human patients. Mice that lack Cstb provide a mammalian model for EPM1 by displaying progressive ataxia and myoclonic seizures. We analyzed RNAs from brains of Cstb-deficient mice by using modified differential display, oligonucleotide microarray hybridization and quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction to examine the molecular consequences of the lack of Cstb. We identified seven genes that have consistently increased transcript levels in neurological tissues from the knockout mice. These genes are cathepsin S, C1q B-chain of complement (C1qB), beta-2-microglobulin, glial fibrillary acidic protein (Gfap), apolipoprotein D, fibronectin 1 and metallothionein II, which are expected to be involved in increased proteolysis, apoptosis and glial activation. The molecular changes in Cstb-deficient mice are consistent with the pathology found in the mouse model and may provide clues towards the identification of therapeutic points of intervention for EPM1 patients.

  13. DNA Topoisomerases maintain promoters in a state competent for transcriptional activation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob Madsen Pedersen

    Full Text Available To investigate the role of DNA topoisomerases in transcription, we have studied global gene expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells deficient for topoisomerases I and II and performed single-gene analyses to support our findings. The genome-wide studies show a general transcriptional down-regulation upon lack of the enzymes, which correlates with gene activity but not gene length. Furthermore, our data reveal a distinct subclass of genes with a strong requirement for topoisomerases. These genes are characterized by high transcriptional plasticity, chromatin regulation, TATA box presence, and enrichment of a nucleosome at a critical position in the promoter region, in line with a repressible/inducible mode of regulation. Single-gene studies with a range of genes belonging to this group demonstrate that topoisomerases play an important role during activation of these genes. Subsequent in-depth analysis of the inducible PHO5 gene reveals that topoisomerases are essential for binding of the Pho4p transcription factor to the PHO5 promoter, which is required for promoter nucleosome removal during activation. In contrast, topoisomerases are dispensable for constitutive transcription initiation and elongation of PHO5, as well as the nuclear entrance of Pho4p. Finally, we provide evidence that topoisomerases are required to maintain the PHO5 promoter in a superhelical state, which is competent for proper activation. In conclusion, our results reveal a hitherto unknown function of topoisomerases during transcriptional activation of genes with a repressible/inducible mode of regulation.

  14. Circadian regulation of food-anticipatory activity in molecular clock-deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nana N Takasu

    Full Text Available In the mammalian brain, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN of the anterior hypothalamus is considered to be the principal circadian pacemaker, keeping the rhythm of most physiological and behavioral processes on the basis of light/dark cycles. Because restriction of food availability to a certain time of day elicits anticipatory behavior even after ablation of the SCN, such behavior has been assumed to be under the control of another circadian oscillator. According to recent studies, however, mutant mice lacking circadian clock function exhibit normal food-anticipatory activity (FAA, a daily increase in locomotor activity preceding periodic feeding, suggesting that FAA is independent of the known circadian oscillator. To investigate the molecular basis of FAA, we examined oscillatory properties in mice lacking molecular clock components. Mice with SCN lesions or with mutant circadian periods were exposed to restricted feeding schedules at periods within and outside circadian range. Periodic feeding led to the entrainment of FAA rhythms only within a limited circadian range. Cry1(-/- mice, which are known to be a "short-period mutant," entrained to a shorter period of feeding cycles than did Cry2(-/- mice. This result indicated that the intrinsic periods of FAA rhythms are also affected by Cry deficiency. Bmal1(-/- mice, deficient in another essential element of the molecular clock machinery, exhibited a pre-feeding increase of activity far from circadian range, indicating a deficit in circadian oscillation. We propose that mice possess a food-entrainable pacemaker outside the SCN in which canonical clock genes such as Cry1, Cry2 and Bmal1 play essential roles in regulating FAA in a circadian oscillatory manner.

  15. Circadian regulation of food-anticipatory activity in molecular clock-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takasu, Nana N; Kurosawa, Gen; Tokuda, Isao T; Mochizuki, Atsushi; Todo, Takeshi; Nakamura, Wataru

    2012-01-01

    In the mammalian brain, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the anterior hypothalamus is considered to be the principal circadian pacemaker, keeping the rhythm of most physiological and behavioral processes on the basis of light/dark cycles. Because restriction of food availability to a certain time of day elicits anticipatory behavior even after ablation of the SCN, such behavior has been assumed to be under the control of another circadian oscillator. According to recent studies, however, mutant mice lacking circadian clock function exhibit normal food-anticipatory activity (FAA), a daily increase in locomotor activity preceding periodic feeding, suggesting that FAA is independent of the known circadian oscillator. To investigate the molecular basis of FAA, we examined oscillatory properties in mice lacking molecular clock components. Mice with SCN lesions or with mutant circadian periods were exposed to restricted feeding schedules at periods within and outside circadian range. Periodic feeding led to the entrainment of FAA rhythms only within a limited circadian range. Cry1(-/-) mice, which are known to be a "short-period mutant," entrained to a shorter period of feeding cycles than did Cry2(-/-) mice. This result indicated that the intrinsic periods of FAA rhythms are also affected by Cry deficiency. Bmal1(-/-) mice, deficient in another essential element of the molecular clock machinery, exhibited a pre-feeding increase of activity far from circadian range, indicating a deficit in circadian oscillation. We propose that mice possess a food-entrainable pacemaker outside the SCN in which canonical clock genes such as Cry1, Cry2 and Bmal1 play essential roles in regulating FAA in a circadian oscillatory manner.

  16. Fission yeast Pxd1 promotes proper DNA repair by activating Rad16XPF and inhibiting Dna2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Min Zhang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Structure-specific nucleases play crucial roles in many DNA repair pathways. They must be precisely controlled to ensure optimal repair outcomes; however, mechanisms of their regulation are not fully understood. Here, we report a fission yeast protein, Pxd1, that binds to and regulates two structure-specific nucleases: Rad16XPF-Swi10ERCC1 and Dna2-Cdc24. Strikingly, Pxd1 influences the activities of these two nucleases in opposite ways: It activates the 3' endonuclease activity of Rad16-Swi10 but inhibits the RPA-mediated activation of the 5' endonuclease activity of Dna2. Pxd1 is required for Rad16-Swi10 to function in single-strand annealing, mating-type switching, and the removal of Top1-DNA adducts. Meanwhile, Pxd1 attenuates DNA end resection mediated by the Rqh1-Dna2 pathway. Disabling the Dna2-inhibitory activity of Pxd1 results in enhanced use of a break-distal repeat sequence in single-strand annealing and a greater loss of genetic information. We propose that Pxd1 promotes proper DNA repair by differentially regulating two structure-specific nucleases.

  17. Hairpin DNA probe based surface plasmon resonance biosensor used for the activity assay of E. coli DNA ligase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Qingfen; Xue, Ying; Yao, Xin; Lu, Wu

    2010-02-01

    Using hairpin DNA probe self-structure change during DNA ligation process, a sensitive, label-free and simple method of E. coli DNA ligase assay via a home-built high-resolution surface plasmon resonance (SPR) instrument was developed. The DNA ligation process was monitored in real-time and the effects of single-base mutation on the DNA ligation process were investigated. Then an assay of E. coli DNA ligase was completed with a lower detection limit (0.6 nM), wider concentration range and better reproducibility. Moreover, the influence of Quinacrine on the activity of E. coli DNA ligase was also studied, which demonstrated that our method was useful for drug screening.

  18. Chromatin Collapse during Caspase-dependent Apoptotic Cell Death Requires DNA Fragmentation Factor, 40-kDa Subunit-/Caspase-activated Deoxyribonuclease-mediated 3′-OH Single-strand DNA Breaks*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias-Guimarais, Victoria; Gil-Guiñon, Estel; Sánchez-Osuna, María; Casanelles, Elisenda; García-Belinchón, Mercè; Comella, Joan X.; Yuste, Victor J.

    2013-01-01

    Apoptotic nuclear morphology and oligonucleosomal double-strand DNA fragments (also known as DNA ladder) are considered the hallmarks of apoptotic cell death. From a classic point of view, these two processes occur concomitantly. Once activated, DNA fragmentation factor, 40-kDa subunit (DFF40)/caspase-activated DNase (CAD) endonuclease hydrolyzes the DNA into oligonucleosomal-size pieces, facilitating the chromatin package. However, the dogma that the apoptotic nuclear morphology depends on DNA fragmentation has been questioned. Here, we use different cellular models, including MEF CAD−/− cells, to unravel the mechanism by which DFF40/CAD influences chromatin condensation and nuclear collapse during apoptosis. Upon apoptotic insult, SK-N-AS cells display caspase-dependent apoptotic nuclear alterations in the absence of internucleosomal DNA degradation. The overexpression of a wild-type form of DFF40/CAD endonuclease, but not of different catalytic-null mutants, restores the cellular ability to degrade the chromatin into oligonucleosomal-length fragments. We show that apoptotic nuclear collapse requires a 3′-OH endonucleolytic activity even though the internucleosomal DNA degradation is impaired. Moreover, alkaline unwinding electrophoresis and In Situ End-Labeling (ISEL)/In Situ Nick Translation (ISNT) assays reveal that the apoptotic DNA damage observed in the DNA ladder-deficient SK-N-AS cells is characterized by the presence of single-strand nicks/breaks. Apoptotic single-strand breaks can be impaired by DFF40/CAD knockdown, abrogating nuclear collapse and disassembly. In conclusion, the highest order of chromatin compaction observed in the later steps of caspase-dependent apoptosis relies on DFF40/CAD-mediated DNA damage by generating 3′-OH ends in single-strand rather than double-strand DNA nicks/breaks. PMID:23430749

  19. Physical activity and bone mineral density in postmenopausal women without estrogen deficiency in menstrual history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amila Kapetanović

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The estrogen defi ciency after menopause leads to accelerated loss of bone mass. The aim of this study was to examine influence of physical activity on bone mineral density in postmenopausal women who hadn’t a deficit of estrogen in their menstrual history.Methods: This prospective study included 100 postmenopausal women, ages between 50 and 65, living in Sarajevo area without estrogen deficiency in menstrual history. The women in the examination group had osteoporosis. The women in the control group had osteopenia or normal mineral bone density. Mineral bone density was measured at the lumbar spine and proximal femur by Dual–Energy X–ray Absorptiometry using Hologic QDR-4000 scanner. To assess level of physical activity an International Physical Activity Questionnaire - Long Form was used.Results: In the examination group of women who had no history of menstrual estrogen deficit, level of physical activity was low in 52.00% female, and in 48.00% women level of physical activity was moderate. In the control group of women who had no history of menstrual estrogen defi cit in 10.00% female level of physical activity was low, and in 90.00% female level of physical activity was moderate. The difference in levels of physical activity between the two groups was statistically significant, X2 test = 20.6, p <0.005.Conclusion: Results of this study suggest that moderate physical activity has positive impact on bone mineral density in postmenopausal women without estrogen defi ciency in menstrual history and has the potential to reduce rapid bone loss after menopause.

  20. Two distinct DNA ligase activities in mitotic extracts of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos, W; Tappe, N; Talamantez, J; Friedberg, E C; Tomkinson, A E

    1997-01-01

    Four biochemically distinct DNA ligases have been identified in mammalian cells. One of these enzymes, DNA ligase I, is functionally homologous to the DNA ligase encoded by the Saccharomyces cerevisiae CDC9 gene. Cdc9 DNA ligase has been assumed to be the only species of DNA ligase in this organism. In the present study we have identified a second DNA ligase activity in mitotic extracts of S. cerevisiae with chromatographic properties different from Cdc9 DNA ligase, which is the major DNA joi...

  1. Repair of DNA lesions induced by ultraviolet irradiation and aromatic amines in normal and repair-deficient human lymphoblastoid cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevnsner, Tinna; Frandsen, Henrik; Autrup, Herman

    1995-01-01

    A host cell reactivation (HCR) assay was employed to study the capacity of a normal and three repair-deficient human lymphoblastoid cell lines to repair DNA damage induced by UV irradiation and the aromatic amines 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) and N-acetyl-2-aminofluorene....... In the XP-D cell line, which had practically no DNA repair capacity, AAF adducts had a more potent inhibitory effect on gene expression than UV and PhIP adducts. When corrected for this inhibitory effect, the wild-type, XP-C and CS-B cell lines repaired low levels of AAF and UV adducts with similar...

  2. Coordinate activation of Shh and PI3K signaling in PTEN-deficient glioblastoma: new therapeutic opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filbin, Mariella Gruber; Dabral, Sukriti K; Pazyra-Murphy, Maria F; Ramkissoon, Shakti; Kung, Andrew L; Pak, Ekaterina; Chung, Jarom; Theisen, Matthew A; Sun, Yanping; Franchetti, Yoko; Sun, Yu; Shulman, David S; Redjal, Navid; Tabak, Barbara; Beroukhim, Rameen; Wang, Qi; Zhao, Jean; Dorsch, Marion; Buonamici, Silvia; Ligon, Keith L; Kelleher, Joseph F; Segal, Rosalind A

    2013-11-01

    In glioblastoma, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling is frequently activated by loss of the tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN). However, it is not known whether inhibiting PI3K represents a selective and effective approach for treatment. We interrogated large databases and found that sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling is activated in PTEN-deficient glioblastoma. We demonstrate that the SHH and PI3K pathways synergize to promote tumor growth and viability in human PTEN-deficient glioblastomas. A combination of PI3K and SHH signaling inhibitors not only suppressed the activation of both pathways but also abrogated S6 kinase (S6K) signaling. Accordingly, targeting both pathways simultaneously resulted in mitotic catastrophe and tumor apoptosis and markedly reduced the growth of PTEN-deficient glioblastomas in vitro and in vivo. The drugs tested here appear to be safe in humans; therefore, this combination may provide a new targeted treatment for glioblastoma.

  3. Fatal infantile cardiac glycogenosis with phosphorylase kinase deficiency and a mutation in the gamma2-subunit of AMP-activated protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akman, Hasan O; Sampayo, James N; Ross, Fiona A; Scott, John W; Wilson, Gregory; Benson, Lee; Bruno, Claudio; Shanske, Sara; Hardie, D Grahame; Dimauro, Salvatore

    2007-10-01

    A 10-wk-old infant girl with severe hypertrophy of the septal and atrial walls by cardiac ultrasound, developed progressive ventricular wall thickening and died of aspiration pneumonia at 5 mo of age. Postmortem examination revealed ventricular hypertrophy and massive atrial wall thickening due to glycogen accumulation. A skeletal muscle biopsy showed increased free glycogen and decreased activity of phosphorylase b kinase (PHK). The report of a pathogenic mutation (R531Q) in the gene (PRKAG2) encoding the gamma2 subunit of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in three infants with congenital hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, glycogen storage, and "pseudo PHK deficiency" prompted us to screen this gene in our patient. We found a novel (R384T) heterozygous mutation in PRKAG2, affecting an arginine residue in the N-terminal AMP-binding domain. Like R531Q, this mutation reduces the binding of AMP and ATP to the isolated nucleotide-binding domains, and prevents activation of the heterotrimer by metabolic stress in intact cells. The mutation was not found in DNA from the patient's father, the only available parent, and is likely to have arisen de novo. Our studies confirm that mutations in PRKAG2 can cause fatal infantile cardiomyopathy, often associated with apparent PHK deficiency.

  4. Mapping of DNA Hypermethylation and Hypomethylation induced by Folate Deficiency in Sporadic Colorectal Cancer and Clinical Implication Analysis of Hypermethylation Pattern in CBS Promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zaizhong; He, Yang; Tu, Xiaohuang; Huang, Sheng; Chen, Zhuo; Wang, Lie; Song, Jingxiang

    2017-04-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation patterns play a major role in tumorigenesis and the effects of nutrients, especially folate in the diet, on methylation changes is of great importance in colorectal cancer (CRC). Folate deficiency would disrupt methylation patterns; however, its exact effects on DNA methylation patterns in CRC are unclear. This study was performed to gain insight into the methylation changes induced by folate deficiency and the putative role of methylation pattern diversities of related genes in the clinical outcome of CRC. The NimbleGen MeDIP chip (Methylated DNA Immunoprecipitation chip) assay was used in high-resolution mapping of DNA methylation patterns in the normal human colon mucosal epithelial cell line, NCM460 cultured with or without folate. Aberrant CpG island methylation patterns in the promoter of genes were identified by chip assay and then were confirmed in paired colorectal tissues and corresponding non-malignant tissues obtained from patients by bisulfate sequencing PCR (BSP). Of the total, the expression of cystathionine-beta-synthase (CBS) involved in methyl metabolism and its important substrate, homocysteine, were all detected by realtime RT-PCR and immunostaining. We also analyzed the data of its hypermethylation level statistically correlated with pathological parameters and the clinical outcome in malignant tissues. The chip assay showed that there are 17 genes with hyper or hypomethylation in CpG islands of promoter on chromosome 21, and 8 of them seemed to be associated with tumorigenesis. Among the total, a hypermethylation patterns existed in the promoter of CBS in CRC (p CBS and the accumulation of homocysteine in vitro and vivo (p CBS hypermethylation level is correlated with age (p CBS hypermethylation level significantly correlated with recurrence rate (p = 0.039) and overall survival (p = 0.012) independent of pT stage, pN stage, and liver metastasis. Folate deficiency could induce aberrant DNA methylation patterns and gene

  5. Bacterial community analysis of activated sludge: an evaluation of four commonly used DNA extraction methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanysacker, L.; Declerck, S.A.J.; Hellemans, B.; De Meester, L.; Vankelecom, I.; Declerck, P.

    2010-01-01

    The effectiveness of three commercially available direct DNA isolation kits (Mobio, Fast, Qiagen) and one published direct DNA extraction protocol (Bead) for extracting bacterial DNA from different types of activated sludge was investigated and mutually compared. The DNA quantity and purity were

  6. Bacterial community analysis of activated sludge: an evaluation of four commonly used DNA extraction methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanysacker, L.; Declerck, S.A.J.; Hellemans, B.; De Meester, L.; Vankelecom, I.; Declerck, P.

    2010-01-01

    The effectiveness of three commercially available direct DNA isolation kits (Mobio, Fast, Qiagen) and one published direct DNA extraction protocol (Bead) for extracting bacterial DNA from different types of activated sludge was investigated and mutually compared. The DNA quantity and purity were det

  7. Menstrual irregularities and energy deficiency in physically active women: the role of ghrelin, PYY and adipocytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheid, Jennifer L; De Souza, Mary Jane

    2010-01-01

    Menstrual cycle irregularities are often observed among physically active women and athletes who participate in physical activity ranging from recreational to competitive exercise training. Further, such irregularities have been casually linked to an energy deficiency where caloric intake is inadequate for exercise energy expenditure resulting in a suppressive effect on growth and reproduction. Adaptations consistent with chronic energy deficiency, including reductions in resting energy expenditure and total triiodothyronine, have been observed in exercising women with functional hypothalamic amenorrhea (FHA). Gut peptides and adipocytokines also appear to be altered in exercising women with FHA and have been hypothesized to be involved in the etiology of FHA. Ghrelin concentrations are elevated in exercising women with FHA. Interestingly, while fasting ghrelin, an orexigenic peptide, is elevated in women with FHA, PYY, an orexigenic peptide, is paradoxically also elevated in women with anorexia nervosa and exercising women with FHA. Leptin, an adipocytokine, is also suppressed in FHA associated with exercise and anorexia. A critical leptin concentration threshold is suggested to be necessary for regular menses to occur. Ghrelin, PYY, and leptin all have the ability to cross the blood brain barrier and, in the hypothalamus, can modulate appetite and food intake, and are hypothesized to affect the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis. Future studies are needed to determine if ghrelin, PYY, or leptin play a direct role in the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis, and if these signals can be altered by improving energy status secondary to increasing caloric intake and initiate the reversal of amenorrhea. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Chk2 Activation Dependence on Nbs1 after DNA Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscemi, Giacomo; Savio, Camilla; Zannini, Laura; Miccichè, Francesca; Masnada, Debora; Nakanishi, Makoto; Tauchi, Hiroshi; Komatsu, Kenshi; Mizutani, Shuki; Khanna, KumKum; Chen, Phil; Concannon, Patrick; Chessa, Luciana; Delia, Domenico

    2001-01-01

    The checkpoint kinase Chk2 has a key role in delaying cell cycle progression in response to DNA damage. Upon activation by low-dose ionizing radiation (IR), which occurs in an ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-dependent manner, Chk2 can phosphorylate the mitosis-inducing phosphatase Cdc25C on an inhibitory site, blocking entry into mitosis, and p53 on a regulatory site, causing G1 arrest. Here we show that the ATM-dependent activation of Chk2 by γ- radiation requires Nbs1, the gene product involved in the Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS), a disorder that shares with AT a variety of phenotypic defects including chromosome fragility, radiosensitivity, and radioresistant DNA synthesis. Thus, whereas in normal cells Chk2 undergoes a time-dependent increased phosphorylation and induction of catalytic activity against Cdc25C, in NBS cells null for Nbs1 protein, Chk2 phosphorylation and activation are both defective. Importantly, these defects in NBS cells can be complemented by reintroduction of wild-type Nbs1, but neither by a carboxy-terminal deletion mutant of Nbs1 at amino acid 590, unable to form a complex with and to transport Mre11 and Rad50 in the nucleus, nor by an Nbs1 mutated at Ser343 (S343A), the ATM phosphorylation site. Chk2 nuclear expression is unaffected in NBS cells, hence excluding a mislocalization as the cause of failed Chk2 activation in Nbs1-null cells. Interestingly, the impaired Chk2 function in NBS cells correlates with the inability, unlike normal cells, to stop entry into mitosis immediately after irradiation, a checkpoint abnormality that can be corrected by introduction of the wild-type but not the S343A mutant form of Nbs1. Altogether, these findings underscore the crucial role of a functional Nbs1 complex in Chk2 activation and suggest that checkpoint defects in NBS cells may result from the inability to activate Chk2. PMID:11438675

  9. Variety of DNA Replication Activity Among Cyanobacteria Correlates with Distinct Respiration Activity in the Dark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohbayashi, Ryudo; Yamamoto, Jun-Ya; Watanabe, Satoru; Kanesaki, Yu; Chibazakura, Taku; Miyagishima, Shin-Ya; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi

    2016-11-10

    Cyanobacteria exhibit light-dependent cell growth since most of their cellular energy is obtained by photosynthesis. In Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942, one of the model cyanobacteria, DNA replication depends on photosynthetic electron transport. However, the critical signal for the regulatory mechanism of DNA replication has not been identified. In addition, conservation of this regulatory mechanism has not been investigated among cyanobacteria. To understand this regulatory signal and its dependence on light, we examined the regulation of DNA replication under both light and dark conditions among three model cyanobacteria, S. elongatus PCC 7942, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. Interestingly, DNA replication activity in Synechocystis and Anabaena was retained when cells were transferred to the dark, although it was drastically decreased in S. elongatus. Glycogen metabolism and respiration were higher in Synechocystis and Anabaena than in S. elongatus in the dark. Moreover, DNA replication activity in Synechocystis and Anabaena was reduced to the same level as that in S. elongatus by inhibition of respiratory electron transport after transfer to the dark. These results demonstrate that there is disparity in DNA replication occurring in the dark among cyanobacteria, which is caused by the difference in activity of respiratory electron transport.

  10. Study of neutral red interaction with DNA by resolution of rank deficient multi-way fluorescence data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghaddam, Fatemeh Ghasemi; Kompany Zare, Mohsen; Gholami, Somayeh

    2012-01-01

    The interaction of neutral red (NR) as an efficient anticancer drug with DNA was studied under physiological pH condition. Three-way data array were recorded by measuring excitation-emission fluorescence during the titration of neutral red with DNA at constant pH. The acid-base equilibrium constant...

  11. Benzo[a]pyrene (BP) DNA adduct formation in DNA repair-deficient p53 haploinsufficient [Xpa(-/-)p53(+/-)] and wild-type mice fed BP and BP plus chlorophyllin for 28 days.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Kaarthik; Pratt, M Margaret; Beland, Frederick A; Churchwell, Mona I; McMullen, Gail; Olivero, Ofelia A; Pogribny, Igor P; Poirier, Miriam C

    2012-11-01

    We have evaluated DNA damage (DNA adduct formation) after feeding benzo[a]pyrene (BP) to wild-type (WT) and cancer-susceptible Xpa(-/-)p53(+/-) mice deficient in nucleotide excision repair and haploinsufficient for the tumor suppressor p53. DNA damage was evaluated by high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC/ES-MS/MS), which measures r7,t8,t9-trihydroxy-c-10-(N (2)-deoxyguanosyl)-7,8,9,10-tetrahydrobenzo[a]pyrene (BPdG), and a chemiluminescence immunoassay (CIA), using anti-r7,t8-dihydroxy-t-9,10-epoxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydrobenzo[a]pyrene (BPDE)-DNA antiserum, which measures both BPdG and the other stable BP-DNA adducts. When mice were fed 100 ppm BP for 28 days, BP-induced DNA damage measured in esophagus, liver and lung was typically higher in Xpa(-/-)p53(+/-) mice, compared with WT mice. This result is consistent with the previously observed tumor susceptibility of Xpa(-/-)p53(+/-) mice. BPdG, the major DNA adduct associated with tumorigenicity, was the primary DNA adduct formed in esophagus (a target tissue in the mouse), whereas total BP-DNA adducts predominated in higher levels in the liver (a non-target tissue in the mouse). In an attempt to lower BP-induced DNA damage, we fed the WT and Xpa(-/-)p53(+/-) mice 0.3% chlorophyllin (CHL) in the BP-containing diet for 28 days. The addition of CHL resulted in an increase of BP-DNA adducts in esophagus, liver and lung of WT mice, a lowering of BPdG in esophagi of WT mice and livers of Xpa(-/-)p53(+/-) mice and an increase of BPdG in livers of WT mice. Therefore, the addition of CHL to a BP-containing diet showed a lack of consistent chemoprotective effect, indicating that oral CHL administration may not reduce PAH-DNA adduct levels consistently in human organs.

  12. Microfluidic DNA microarrays in PMMA chips: streamlined fabrication via simultaneous DNA immobilization and bonding activation by brief UV exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabourin, David; Petersen, J; Snakenborg, Detlef

    2010-01-01

    This report presents and describes a simple and scalable method for producing functional DNA microarrays within enclosed polymeric, PMMA, microfluidic devices. Brief (30 s) exposure to UV simultaneously immobilized poly(T)poly(C)-tagged DNA probes to the surface of unmodified PMMA and activated t...

  13. Microfluidic DNA microarrays in PMMA chips: streamlined fabrication via simultaneous DNA immobilization and bonding activation by brief UV exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabourin, David; Petersen, J; Snakenborg, Detlef

    2010-01-01

    This report presents and describes a simple and scalable method for producing functional DNA microarrays within enclosed polymeric, PMMA, microfluidic devices. Brief (30 s) exposure to UV simultaneously immobilized poly(T)poly(C)-tagged DNA probes to the surface of unmodified PMMA and activated t...

  14. Reduced prostasin (CAP1/PRSS8) activity eliminates HAI-1 and HAI-2 deficiency-associated developmental defects by preventing matriptase activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szabo, Roman; Uzzun Sales, Katiuchia; Kosa, Peter

    2012-01-01

    to placental labyrinth failure, and neural tube defects in HAI-2-deficient embryos. Inactivation of genes encoding c-Met, protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2), or the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) alpha subunit all failed to rescue embryonic lethality, suggesting that deregulated matriptase...... neural tube closure. Paradoxically, although matriptase auto-activates and is a well-established upstream epidermal activator of prostasin, biochemical analysis of matriptase- and prostasin-deficient placental tissues revealed a requirement of prostasin for conversion of the matriptase zymogen to active...

  15. Methanol teratogenicity in mutant mice with deficient catalase activity and transgenic mice expressing human catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, Michelle T; Wiley, Michael J; Wells, Peter G

    2013-04-01

    The role of catalase in methanol (MeOH) teratogenesis is unclear. In rodents it both detoxifies reactive oxygen species (ROS) and metabolizes MeOH and its formic acid (FA) metabolite. We treated pregnant mice expressing either high (hCat) or low catalase activity (aCat), or their wild-type (WT) controls, with either MeOH (4g/kg ip) or saline. hCat mice and WTs were similarly susceptible to MeOH-initiated ophthalmic abnormalities and cleft palates. aCat and WT mice appeared resistant, precluding assessment of the developmental impact of catalase deficiency. Catalase activity was respectively increased at least 1.5-fold, and decreased by at least 35%, in hCat and aCat embryos and maternal livers. MeOH and FA pharmacokinetic profiles were similar among hCat, aCat and WT strains. Although the hCat results imply no ROS involvement, embryo culture studies suggest this may be confounded by maternal factors and/or a requirement for higher catalase activity in the hCat mice.

  16. Deficiencies and excessive human complement system activation in disorders of multifarious etiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichaczek-Goska, Dorota

    2012-01-01

    Complement is an integral part of the immune system protecting the host organism against invasion and proliferation of various microorganisms. It is also involved in the removal of the body's own damaged and altered cells. Activation of the complement system is a very precise process and it is strictly controlled by regulatory proteins present in both plasma and at host cells' surfaces. C3 protein plays a major role in the complement activation and generation of immune responses. Deficiencies of the C3 and other complement components, so-called early and late complement proteins, contribute to the emergence of recurrent bacterial, viral and fungal infections. The low level of mannose-binding lectin is also important. This protein plays a protective role in the early stages of infection and in the control of inflammation. Its deficit is one of the most common reasons for human immunodeficiency, observed in microbial infections as well as in autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. On the other hand, the excessive activation of complement proteins is often discovered to be the reason for many diseases. These include e.g. autoimmune diseases, Alzheimer's syndrome, schizophrenia, atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome, angioedema, macular degeneration, and Crohn's disease.

  17. Microglia activation and interaction with neuronal cells in a biochemical model of mevalonate kinase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tricarico, Paola Maura; Piscianz, Elisa; Monasta, Lorenzo; Kleiner, Giulio; Crovella, Sergio; Marcuzzi, Annalisa

    2015-08-01

    Mevalonate kinase deficiency is a rare disease whose worst manifestation, characterised by severe neurologic impairment, is called mevalonic aciduria. The progressive neuronal loss associated to cell death can be studied in vitro with a simplified model based on a biochemical block of the mevalonate pathway and a subsequent inflammatory trigger. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the mevalonate blocking on glial cells (BV-2) and the following effects on neuronal cells (SH-SY5Y) when the two populations were cultured together. To better understand the cross-talk between glial and neuronal cells, as it happens in vivo, BV-2 and SH-SY5Y were co-cultured in different experimental settings (alone, transwell, direct contact); the effect of mevalonate pathway biochemical block by Lovastatin, followed by LPS inflammatory trigger, were evaluated by analysing programmed cell death and mitochondrial membrane potential, cytokines' release and cells' morphology modifications. In this experimental condition, glial cells underwent an evident activation, confirmed by elevated pro-inflammatory cytokines release, typical of these disorders, and a modification in morphology. Moreover, the activation induced an increase in apoptosis. When glial cells were co-cultured with neurons, their activation caused an increase of programmed cell death also in neuronal cells, but only if the two populations were cultured in direct contact. Our findings, being aware of the limitations related to the cell models used, represent a preliminary step towards understanding the pathological and neuroinflammatory mechanisms occurring in mevalonate kinase diseases. Contact co-culture between neuronal and microglial cells seems to be a good model to study mevalonic aciduria in vitro, and to contribute to the identification of potential drugs able to block microglial activation for this orphan disease. In fact, in such a pathological condition, we demonstrated that microglial cells are

  18. Deficient orthographic and phonological representations in children with dyslexia revealed by brain activation patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Fan; Bitan, Tali; Chou, Tai-Li; Burman, Douglas D.

    2008-01-01

    Background The current study examined the neuro-cognitive network of visual word rhyming judgment in 14 children with dyslexia and 14 age-matched control children (8- to 14-year-olds) using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Methods In order to manipulate the difficulty of mapping orthography to phonology, we used conflicting and non-conflicting trials. The words in conflicting trials either had similar orthography but different phonology (e.g., pint-mint) or similar phonology but different orthography (e.g., jazz-has). The words in non-conflicting trials had similar orthography and phonology (e.g., gate-hate) or different orthography and phonology (e.g., press-list). Results There were no differences in brain activation between the controls and children with dyslexia in the easier non-conflicting trials. However, the children with dyslexia showed less activation than the controls in left inferior frontal gyrus (BA 45/44/47/9), left inferior parietal lobule (BA 40), left inferior temporal gyrus/fusiform gyrus (BA 20/37) and left middle temporal gyrus (BA 21) for the more difficult conflicting trials. For the direct comparison of conflicting minus non-conflicting trials, controls showed greater activation than children with dyslexia in left inferior frontal gyrus (BA 9/45/46) and medial frontal gyrus (BA 8). Children with dyslexia did not show greater activation than controls for any comparison. Conclusions Reduced activation in these regions suggests that children with dyslexia have deficient orthographic representations in ventral temporal cortex as well as deficits in mapping between orthographic and phonological representations in inferior parietal cortex. The greater activation for the controls in inferior frontal gyrus could reflect more effective top-down modulation of posterior representations. PMID:17073983

  19. The mismatch repair system modulates curcumin sensitivity through induction of DNA strand breaks and activation of G2-M checkpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhihua; Jin, ShunQian; Yalowich, Jack C; Brown, Kevin D; Rajasekaran, Baskaran

    2010-03-01

    The highly conserved mismatch (MMR) repair system corrects postreplicative errors and modulates cellular responses to genotoxic agents. Here, we show that the MMR system strongly influences cellular sensitivity to curcumin. Compared with MMR-proficient cells, isogenically matched MMR-deficient cells displayed enhanced sensitivity to curcumin. Similarly, cells suppressed for MLH1 or MSH2 expression by RNA interference displayed increased curcumin sensitivity. Curcumin treatment generated comparable levels of reactive oxygen species and the mutagenic adduct 8-oxo-guanine in MMR-proficient and MMR-deficient cells; however, accumulation of gammaH2AX foci, a marker for DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), occurred only in MMR-positive cells in response to curcumin treatment. Additionally, MMR-positive cells showed activation of Chk1 and induction of G(2)-M cell cycle checkpoint following curcumin treatment and inhibition of Chk1 by UCN-01 abrogated Chk1 activation and heightened apoptosis in MMR-proficient cells. These results indicate that curcumin triggers the accumulation of DNA DSB and induction of a checkpoint response through a MMR-dependent mechanism. Conversely, in MMR-compromised cells, curcumin-induced DSB is significantly blunted, and as a result, cells fail to undergo cell cycle arrest, enter mitosis, and die through mitotic catastrophe. The results have potential therapeutic value, especially in the treatment of tumors with compromised MMR function.

  20. The DNA glycosylases Ogg1 and Nth1 do not contribute to Ig class switching in activated mouse splenic B cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna J Ucher

    Full Text Available During activation of B cells to undergo class switching, B cell metabolism is increased, and levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS are increased. ROS can oxidize DNA bases resulting in substrates for the DNA glycosylases Ogg1 and Nth1. Ogg1 and Nth1 excise oxidized bases, and nick the resulting abasic sites, forming single-strand DNA breaks (SSBs as intermediates during the repair process. In this study, we asked whether splenic B cells from mice deficient in these two enzymes would show altered class switching and decreased DNA breaks in comparison with wild-type mice. As the c-myc gene frequently recombines with the IgH S region in B cells induced to undergo class switching, we also analyzed the effect of deletion of these two glycosylases on DSBs in the c-myc gene. We did not detect a reduction in S region or c-myc DSBs or in class switching in splenic B cells from Ogg1- or Nth1-deficient mice or from mice deficient in both enzymes.

  1. DNA Fingerprinting Using PCR: A Practical Forensic Science Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyun-Jung; Ahn, Jung Hoon; Ko, Minsu

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a forensic science simulation programme applicable for use in colleges. Students were asked to find a putative suspect by DNA fingerprinting using a simple protocol developed in this study. DNA samples were obtained from a hair root and a drop of blood, common sources of DNA in forensic science. The DNA fingerprinting protocol…

  2. DNA Fingerprinting Using PCR: A Practical Forensic Science Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyun-Jung; Ahn, Jung Hoon; Ko, Minsu

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a forensic science simulation programme applicable for use in colleges. Students were asked to find a putative suspect by DNA fingerprinting using a simple protocol developed in this study. DNA samples were obtained from a hair root and a drop of blood, common sources of DNA in forensic science. The DNA fingerprinting protocol…

  3. High incidence of HPV-associated head and neck cancers in FA deficient mice is associated with E7's induction of DNA damage through its inactivation of pocket proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Wook Park

    Full Text Available Fanconi anemia (FA patients are highly susceptible to solid tumors at multiple anatomical sites including head and neck region. A subset of head and neck cancers (HNCs is associated with 'high-risk' HPVs, particularly HPV16. However, the correlation between HPV oncogenes and cancers in FA patients is still unclear. We previously learned that FA deficiency in mice predisposes HPV16 E7 transgenic mice to HNCs. To address HPV16 E6's oncogenic potential under FA deficiency in HNCs, we utilized HPV16 E6-transgenic mice (K14E6 and HPV16 E6/E7-bi-transgenic mice (K14E6E7 on genetic backgrounds sufficient or deficient for one of the fanc genes, fancD2 and monitored their susceptibility to HNCs. K14E6 mice failed to develop tumor. However, E6 and fancD2-deficiency accelerated E7-driven tumor development in K14E6E7 mice. The increased tumor incidence was more correlated with E7-driven DNA damage than proliferation. We also found that deficiency of pocket proteins, pRb, p107, and p130 that are well-established targets of E7, could recapitulate E7's induction of DNA damage. Our findings support the hypothesis that E7 induces HPV-associated HNCs by promoting DNA damage through the inactivation of pocket proteins, which explains why a deficiency in DNA damage repair would increase susceptibility to E7-driven cancer. Our results further demonstrate the unexpected finding that FA deficiency does not predispose E6 transgenic mice to HNCs, indicating a specificity in the synergy between FA deficiency and HPV oncogenes in causing HNCs.

  4. Bacillus subtilis strain deficient for the protein-tyrosine kinase PtkA exhibits impaired DNA replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petranovic, Dina; Michelsen, Ole; Zahradka, K

    2007-01-01

    in this study. We were unable to identify any striking phenotypes related to control of UDP-glucose dehydrogenases, natural competence and DNA lesion repair; however, a very strong phenotype of ΔptkA emerged with respect to DNA replication and cell cycle control, as revealed by flow cytometry and fluorescent...... microscopy. B. subtilis cells lacking the kinase PtkA accumulated extra chromosome equivalents, exhibited aberrant initiation mass for DNA replication and an unusually long D period.......A/PtpZ was previously shown to regulate the phosphorylation state of UDP-glucose dehydrogenases and single-stranded DNA-binding proteins. This promiscuity towards substrates is reminiscent of eukaryal kinases and has prompted us to investigate possible physiological effects of ptkA and ptpZ gene inactivations...

  5. DNA topoisomerase II activity in nonreplicating, transcriptionally inactive, chicken late spermatids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, J; Mezquita, C

    1989-06-01

    To study a possible differential involvement of type I and type II DNA topoisomerases in the functional and structural changes that chromatin undergoes during spermatogenesis, we have determined both enzymatic activities in chicken testis cell nuclei at successive stages of differentiation. Whereas DNA topoisomerase I varies in parallel with transcriptional activity, DNA topoisomerase II was present in both replicating, transcriptionally active chicken testis cells and nonreplicating, transcriptionally inactive late spermatids. The presence of DNA topoisomerase II activity in late spermatids and, in addition, the relative increment of drug-induced topo-II-mediated DNA cleavage detected in these cells, suggest that DNA topoisomerase II might modulate the topology of DNA during the marked changes that chromatin structure undergoes in the nucleohistone-nucleoprotamine transition at the end of the spermiogenesis and could be involved in the final organization of DNA within the nucleus of the male gamete.

  6. Inoculation effects of endophytic fungus (Piriformospora indica on antioxidant enzyme activity and wheat tolerance under phosphorus deficiency in hydroponic system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Rahmani Iranshahi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Information about the effect of endophytic fungus Piriformospora indica on wheat response to stress conditions is very limited and sometime contradictory. This greenhouse research was conducted in a hydroponic culture to investigate the inoculation effects of mycorrizhal-like fungus, P. indica, on enzymatic and non–enzymatic defense mechanisms of wheat (Triticum aestivum L., cv. Niknejad at two levels of phosphorus (P supply (deficient and sufficient. The experiment was factorial, based on a completely randomized design with three replications. Sixty days after applying the treatments, plants were harvested and shoot dry weight and concentration of P, iron, zinc and activity of antioxidant enzymes like catalase (CAT, ascorbate peroxidase (APX, guaiacol peroxidase (GPX and chlorophyll a, b and carotenoids contents were measured. Results showed that P-deficiency reduced shoot dry weight and concentration of P and iron and increased concentration of zinc in the shoots. Inoculation of wheat roots with P. indica in P-deficiency condition resulted in significant increasing of shoot dry weight and P concentration. Also, chlorophyll a, b contents and concentration of carotenoids in P-deficiency condition was significantly higher than P-sufficiency condition. Inoculation of P. indica to wheat roots decreased chorophyll a, b contents and concentration of carotenoids. Inoculation of P. indica in P-deficiency condition significantly decreased the activity of GPX and significantly increased the activity of CAT and GPX in P-sufficiency condition. In general, inoculation of fungus P. indica to wheat plant could be recommended as an effective method to alleviate deleterious effects of P-deficiency and increase its tolerance to this stress.

  7. Biologically active vitamin B12 compounds in foods for preventing deficiency among vegetarians and elderly subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Fumio; Yabuta, Yukinori; Tanioka, Yuri; Bito, Tomohiro

    2013-07-17

    The usual dietary sources of vitamin B12 are animal-source based foods, including meat, milk, eggs, fish, and shellfish, although a few plant-based foods such as certain types of dried lavers (nori) and mushrooms contain substantial and considerable amounts of vitamin B12, respectively. Unexpectedly, detailed characterization of vitamin B12 compounds in foods reveals the presence of various corrinoids that are inactive in humans. The majority of edible blue-green algae (cyanobacteria) and certain edible shellfish predominately contain an inactive corrinoid known as pseudovitamin B12. Various factors affect the bioactivity of vitamin B12 in foods. For example, vitamin B12 is partially degraded and loses its biological activity during cooking and storage of foods. The intrinsic factor-mediated gastrointestinal absorption system in humans has evolved to selectively absorb active vitamin B12 from naturally occurring vitamin B12 compounds, including its degradation products and inactive corrinoids that are present in daily meal foods. The objective of this review is to present up-to-date information on various factors that can affect the bioactivity of vitamin B12 in foods. To prevent vitamin B12 deficiency in high-risk populations such as vegetarians and elderly subjects, it is necessary to identify plant-source foods that contain high levels of bioactive vitamin B12 and, in conjunction, to prepare the use of crystalline vitamin B12-fortified foods.

  8. Cytochrome c oxidase deficiency accelerates mitochondrial apoptosis by activating ceramide synthase 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüll, S; Günther, S D; Brodesser, S; Seeger, J M; Tosetti, B; Wiegmann, K; Pongratz, C; Diaz, F; Witt, A; Andree, M; Brinkmann, K; Krönke, M; Wiesner, R J; Kashkar, H

    2015-03-12

    Although numerous pathogenic changes within the mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) have been associated with an elevated occurrence of apoptosis within the affected tissues, the mechanistic insight into how mitochondrial dysfunction initiates apoptotic cell death is still unknown. In this study, we show that the specific alteration of the cytochrome c oxidase (COX), representing a common defect found in mitochondrial diseases, facilitates mitochondrial apoptosis in response to oxidative stress. Our data identified an increased ceramide synthase 6 (CerS6) activity as an important pro-apoptotic response to COX dysfunction induced either by chemical or genetic approaches. The elevated CerS6 activity resulted in accumulation of the pro-apoptotic C16 : 0 ceramide, which facilitates the mitochondrial apoptosis in response to oxidative stress. Accordingly, inhibition of CerS6 or its specific knockdown diminished the increased susceptibility of COX-deficient cells to oxidative stress. Our results provide new insights into how mitochondrial RC dysfunction mechanistically interferes with the apoptotic machinery. On the basis of its pivotal role in regulating cell death upon COX dysfunction, CerS6 might potentially represent a novel target for therapeutic intervention in mitochondrial diseases caused by COX dysfunction.

  9. Megakaryocyte-specific RhoA deficiency causes macrothrombocytopenia and defective platelet activation in hemostasis and thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pleines, Irina; Hagedorn, Ina; Gupta, Shuchi

    2011-01-01

    of a and dense granules downstream of G(13) and G(q). Furthermore, RhoA was essential for integrin-mediated clot retraction but not for actomyosin rearrangements and spreading of activated platelets on fibrinogen. In vivo, RhoA deficiency resulted in markedly prolonged tail bleeding times but also significant...

  10. Embryonic turkey liver: activities of biotransformation enzymes and activation of DNA-reactive carcinogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrone, Carmen E.; Duan, Jian Dong; Jeffrey, Alan M.; Williams, Gary M. [New York Medical College, Department of Pathology, Valhalla (United States); Ahr, Hans-Juergen; Schmidt, Ulrich [Bayer AG, Institute of Toxicology, Wuppertal (Germany); Enzmann, Harald H. [Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices, Bonn (Germany)

    2004-10-01

    Avian embryos are a potential alternative model for chemical toxicity and carcinogenicity research. Because the toxic and carcinogenic effects of some chemicals depend on bioactivation, activities of biotransformation enzymes and formation of DNA adducts in embryonic turkey liver were examined. Biochemical analyses of 22-day in ovoturkey liver post-mitochondrial fractions revealed activities of the biotransformation enzymes 7-ethoxycoumarin de-ethylase (ECOD), 7-ethoxyresorufin de-ethylase (EROD), aldrin epoxidase (ALD), epoxide hydrolase (EH), glutathione S-transferase (GST), and UDP-glucuronyltransferase (GLUT). Following the administration of phenobarbital (24 mg/egg) on day 21, enzyme activities of ECOD, EROD, ALD, EH and GLUT, but not of GST, were increased by two-fold or higher levels by day 22. In contrast, acute administration of 3-methylcholanthrene (5 mg/egg) induced only ECOD and EROD activities. Bioactivation of structurally diverse pro-carcinogens was also examined using {sup 32}P-postlabeling for DNA adducts. In ovoexposure of turkey embryos on day 20 of gestation to 2-acetylaminofluorene (AAF), 4,4'-methylenebis(2-chloroaniline) (MOCA), benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), and 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx) resulted in the formation of DNA adducts in livers collected by day 21. Some of the DNA adducts had {sup 32}P-postlabeling chromatographic migration patterns similar to DNA adducts found in livers from Fischer F344 rats exposed to the same pro-carcinogens. We conclude that 21-day embryonic turkey liver is capable of chemical biotransformation and activation of genotoxic carcinogens to form DNA adducts. Thus, turkey embryos could be utilized to investigate potential chemical toxicity and carcinogenicity. (orig.)

  11. Loss of H3K9me3 Correlates with ATM Activation and Histone H2AX Phosphorylation Deficiencies in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haoyue; Sun, Linlin; Wang, Kun; Wu, Di; Trappio, Mason; Witting, Celeste; Cao, Kan

    2016-01-01

    Compelling evidence suggests that defective DNA damage response (DDR) plays a key role in the premature aging phenotypes in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS). Studies document widespread alterations in histone modifications in HGPS cells, especially, the global loss of histone H3 trimethylated on lysine 9 (H3K9me3). In this study, we explore the potential connection(s) between H3K9me3 loss and the impaired DDR in HGPS. When cells are exposed to a DNA-damaging agent Doxorubicin (Dox), double strand breaks (DSBs) are generated that result in the phosphorylation of histone H2A variant H2AX (gammaH2AX) within an hour. We find that the intensities of gammaH2AX foci appear significantly weaker in the G0/G1 phase HGPS cells compared to control cells. This reduction is associated with a delay in the recruitment of essential DDR factors. We further demonstrate that ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is responsible for the amplification of gammaH2AX signals at DSBs during G0/G1 phase, and its activation is inhibited in the HGPS cells that display significant loss of H3K9me3. Moreover, methylene (MB) blue treatment, which is known to save heterochromatin loss in HGPS, restores H3K9me3, stimulates ATM activity, increases gammaH2AX signals and rescues deficient DDR. In summary, this study demonstrates an early DDR defect of attenuated gammaH2AX signals in G0/G1 phase HGPS cells and provides a plausible connection between H3K9me3 loss and DDR deficiency. PMID:27907109

  12. Annexin A7 deficiency potentiates cardiac NFAT activity promoting hypertrophic signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voelkl, Jakob; Alesutan, Ioana; Pakladok, Tatsiana; Viereck, Robert; Feger, Martina; Mia, Sobuj [Department of Physiology, University of Tübingen, Tübingen (Germany); Schönberger, Tanja [Department of Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Tübingen, Tübingen (Germany); Noegel, Angelika A. [Center for Biochemistry, Institute of Biochemistry I, University of Cologne, Köln (Germany); Gawaz, Meinrad [Department of Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Tübingen, Tübingen (Germany); Lang, Florian, E-mail: florian.lang@uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Physiology, University of Tübingen, Tübingen (Germany)

    2014-02-28

    Highlights: • Cardiac Anxa7 expression was up-regulated following TAC. • The hypertrophic response following TAC was augmented in Anxa7-deficient mice. • Silencing of Anxa7 increased indicators of HL-1 cardiomyocytes hypertrophy. • Silencing of Anxa7 induced Nfatc1 nuclear translocation. • Silencing of Anxa7 enhanced NFAT-dependent transcriptional activity. - Abstract: Annexin A7 (Anxa7) is a cytoskeletal protein interacting with Ca{sup 2+} signaling which in turn is a crucial factor for cardiac remodeling following cardiac injury. The present study explored whether Anxa7 participates in the regulation of cardiac stress signaling. To this end, mice lacking functional Anxa7 (anxa7{sup −/−}) and wild-type mice (anxa7{sup +/+}) were investigated following pressure overload by transverse aortic constriction (TAC). In addition, HL-1 cardiomyocytes were silenced with Anxa7 siRNA and treated with isoproterenol. Transcript levels were determined by quantitative RT-PCR, transcriptional activity by luciferase reporter assay and protein abundance by Western blotting and confocal microscopy. As a result, TAC treatment increased the mRNA and protein levels of Anxa7 in wild-type mice. Moreover, TAC increased heart weight to body weight ratio and the cardiac mRNA levels of αSka, Nppb, Col1a1, Col3a1 and Rcan1, effects more pronounced in anxa7{sup −/−} mice than in anxa7{sup +/+} mice. Silencing of Anxa7 in HL-1 cardiomyocytes significantly increased nuclear localization of Nfatc1. Furthermore, Anxa7 silencing increased NFAT-dependent transcriptional activity as well as αSka, Nppb, and Rcan1 mRNA levels both, under control conditions and following β-adrenergic stimulation by isoproterenol. These observations point to an important role of annexin A7 in the regulation of cardiac NFAT activity and hypertrophic response following cardiac stress conditions.

  13. Efficient isolation of sperm with high DNA integrity and stable chromatin packaging by a combination of density-gradient centrifugation and magnetic-activated cell sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Hee-Jun; Kwak, Su-Jin; Kim, Seok-Gi; Kim, Youn-Young; Park, Ji-Young; Yoo, Chang-Seok; Park, Il-Hae; Sun, Hong-Gil; Kim, Jae-Won; Lee, Kyeong-Ho

    2016-12-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the correlations of the sperm DNA fragmentation index (DFI) with semen parameters and apoptosis, and to investigate the effects of density-gradient centrifugation (DGC) and magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS) on reducing the proportion of sperm with DNA fragmentation and protamine deficiency. Semen analysis and a sperm DNA fragmentation assay were performed to assess the correlations between semen parameters and the DFI in 458 semen samples. Sperm with progressive motility or non-apoptosis were isolated by DGC or MACS, respectively, in 29 normozoospermic semen samples. The effects of DGC or MACS alone and of DGC and MACS combined on reducing the amount of sperm in the sample with DNA fragmentation and protamine deficiency were investigated. The sperm DFI showed a significant correlation (r=-0.347, p<0.001) with sperm motility and morphology (r=-0.114, p<0.05) but not with other semen parameters. The DFI (11.5%±2.0%) of semen samples was significantly reduced by DGC (8.1%±4.1%) or MACS alone (7.4%±3.9%) (p<0.05). The DFI was significantly further reduced by a combination of DGC and MACS (4.1%±1.3%, p<0.05). Moreover, the combination of DGC and MACS (1.6%±1.1%, p<0.05) significantly reduced the protamine deficiency rate of semen samples compared to DGC (4.4%±3.2%) or MACS alone (3.4%±2.2%). The combination of DGC and MACS may be an effective method to isolate high-quality sperm with progressive motility, non-apoptosis, high DNA integrity, and low protamine deficiency in clinical use.

  14. Structural chromosome abnormalities, increased DNA strand breaks and DNA strand break repair deficiency in dermal fibroblasts from old female human donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalfalah, Faiza; Seggewiß, Sabine; Walter, Regina; Tigges, Julia; Moreno-Villanueva, María; Bürkle, Alexander; Ohse, Sebastian; Busch, Hauke; Boerries, Melanie; Hildebrandt, Barbara; Royer-Pokora, Brigitte; Boege, Fritz

    2015-02-01

    Dermal fibroblasts provide a paradigmatic model of cellular adaptation to long-term exogenous stress and ageing processes driven thereby. Here we addressed whether fibroblast ageing analysedex vivo entails genome instability. Dermal fibroblasts from human female donors aged 20-67 years were studied in primary culture at low population doubling. Under these conditions, the incidence of replicative senescence and rates of age-correlated telomere shortening were insignificant. Genome-wide gene expression analysis revealed age-related impairment of mitosis, telomere and chromosome maintenance and induction of genes associated with DNA repair and non-homologous end-joining, most notably XRCC4 and ligase 4. We observed an age-correlated drop in proliferative capacity and age-correlated increases in heterochromatin marks, structural chromosome abnormalities (deletions, translocations and chromatid breaks), DNA strand breaks and histone H2AX-phosphorylation. In a third of the cells from old and middle-aged donors repair of X-ray induced DNA strand breaks was impaired despite up-regulation of DNA repair genes. The distinct phenotype of genome instability, increased heterochromatinisation and (in 30% of the cases futile) up-regulation of DNA repair genes was stably maintained over several cell passages indicating that it represents a feature of geroconversion that is distinct from cellular senescence, as it does not encompass a block of proliferation.

  15. Lesch-Nyhan syndrome: mRNA expression of HPRT in patients with enzyme proven deficiency of HPRT and normal HPRT coding region of the DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Khue Vu; Naviaux, Robert K; Paik, Kacie K; Nyhan, William L

    2012-08-01

    Inherited mutation of the purine salvage enzyme, hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gives rise to Lesch-Nyhan syndrome (LNS) or Lesch-Nyhan variants (LNV). We report a case of two LNS affected members of a family with deficiency of activity of HPRT in intact cultured fibroblasts in whom mutation could not be found in the HPRT coding sequence but there was markedly decreased HPRT expression of mRNA. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Methionine sulfoxide reductase B3 deficiency stimulates heme oxygenase-1 expression via ROS-dependent and Nrf2 activation pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Geun-Hee; Kim, Ki Young; Kim, Hwa-Young, E-mail: hykim@ynu.ac.kr

    2016-05-13

    Methionine sulfoxide reductase B3 (MsrB3), which is primarily found in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), is an important protein repair enzyme that stereospecifically reduces methionine-R-sulfoxide residues. We previously found that MsrB3 deficiency arrests the cell cycle at the G{sub 1}/S stage through up-regulation of p21 and p27. In this study, we report a critical role of MsrB3 in gene expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), which has an anti-proliferative effect associated with p21 up-regulation. Depletion of MsrB3 elevated HO-1 expression in mammalian cells, whereas MsrB3 overexpression had no effect. MsrB3 deficiency increased cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), particularly in the mitochondria. ER stress, which is associated with up-regulation of HO-1, was also induced by depletion of MsrB3. Treatment with N-acetylcysteine as an ROS scavenger reduced augmented HO-1 levels in MsrB3-depleted cells. MsrB3 deficiency activated Nrf2 transcription factor by enhancing its expression and nuclear import. The activation of Nrf2 induced by MsrB3 depletion was confirmed by increased expression levels of its other target genes, such as γ-glutamylcysteine ligase. Taken together, these data suggest that MsrB3 attenuates HO-1 induction by inhibiting ROS production, ER stress, and Nrf2 activation. -- Highlights: •MsrB3 depletion induces HO-1 expression. •MsrB3 deficiency increases cellular ROS and ER stress. •MsrB3 deficiency activates Nrf2 by increasing its expression and nuclear import. •MsrB3 attenuates HO-1 induction by inhibiting ROS production and Nrf2 activation.

  17. Adaptation to HIF-1 deficiency by upregulation of the AMP/ATP ratio and phosphofructokinase activation in hepatomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Airley Rachel E

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIF-1 deficiency has marked effects on tumour glycolysis and growth. We therefore investigated the consequences of HIF-1 deficiency in mice, using the well established Hepa-1 wild-type (WT and HIF-1β-deficient (c4 model. These mechanisms could be clinically relevant, since HIF-1 is now a therapeutic target. Methods Hepa-1 WT and c4 tumours grown in vivo were analysed by 18FDG-PET and 19FDG Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy for glucose uptake; by HPLC for adenine nucleotides; by immunohistochemistry for GLUTs; by immunoblotting and by DIGE followed by tandem mass spectrometry for protein expression; and by classical enzymatic methods for enzyme activity. Results HIF-1β deficient Hepa-1 c4 tumours grew significantly more slowly than WT tumours, and (as expected showed significantly lower expression of many glycolytic enzymes. However, HIF-1β deficiency caused no significant change in the rate of glucose uptake in c4 tumours compared to WT when assessed in vivo by measuring fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG uptake. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated less GLUT-1 in c4 tumours, whereas GLUT-2 (liver type was similar to WT. Factors that might upregulate glucose uptake independently of HIF-1 (phospho-Akt, c-Myc were shown to have either lower or similar expression in c4 compared to WT tumours. However the AMP/ATP ratio was 4.5 fold higher (p Conclusions Despite their defective HIF-1 and consequent down-regulation of glycolytic enzyme expression, Hepa-1 c4 tumours maintain glucose uptake and glycolysis because the resulting low [ATP] high [AMP] allosterically activate PFK-1. This mechanism of resistance would keep glycolysis functioning and also result in activation of AMP-Kinase and growth inhibition; it may have major implications for the therapeutic activity of HIF inhibitors in vivo. Interestingly, this control mechanism does not involve transcriptional control or proteomics, but rather the classical activation and inhibition mechanisms

  18. Detecting the movement and spawning activity of bigheaded carps with environmental DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Richard A.; Rees, Christopher B.; Coulter, Alison A.; Merkes, Christopher; McCalla, Sunnie; Touzinsky, Katherine F; Walleser, Liza R.; Goforth, Reuben R.; Amberg, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Bigheaded carps are invasive fishes threatening to invade the Great Lakes basin and establish spawning populations, and have been monitored using environmental DNA (eDNA). Not only does eDNA hold potential for detecting the presence of species, but may also allow for quantitative comparisons like relative abundance of species across time or space. We examined the relationships among bigheaded carp movement, hydrography, spawning and eDNA on the Wabash River, IN, USA. We found positive relationships between eDNA and movement and eDNA and hydrography. We did not find a relationship between eDNA and spawning activity in the form of drifting eggs. Our first finding demonstrates how eDNA may be used to monitor species abundance, whereas our second finding illustrates the need for additional research into eDNA methodologies. Current applications of eDNA are widespread, but the relatively new technology requires further refinement.

  19. Folate deficiency facilitates recruitment of upstream binding factor to hot spots of DNA double-strand breaks of rRNA genes and promotes its transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Qiu; Li, Caihua; Song, Xiaozhen; Wu, Lihua; Jiang, Qian; Qiu, Zhiyong; Cao, Haiyan; Yu, Kaihui; Wan, Chunlei; Li, Jianting; Yang, Feng; Huang, Zebing; Niu, Bo; Jiang, Zhengwen; Zhang, Ting

    2016-12-06

    The biogenesis of ribosomes in vivo is an essential process for cellular functions. Transcription of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes is the rate-limiting step in ribosome biogenesis controlled by environmental conditions. Here, we investigated the role of folate antagonist on changes of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) landscape in mouse embryonic stem cells. A significant DSB enhancement was detected in the genome of these cells and a large majority of these DSBs were found in rRNA genes. Furthermore, spontaneous DSBs in cells under folate deficiency conditions were located exclusively within the rRNA gene units, representing a H3K4me1 hallmark. Enrichment H3K4me1 at the hot spots of DSB regions enhanced the recruitment of upstream binding factor (UBF) to rRNA genes, resulting in the increment of rRNA genes transcription. Supplement of folate resulted in a restored UBF binding across DNA breakage sites of rRNA genes, and normal rRNA gene transcription. In samples from neural tube defects (NTDs) with low folate level, up-regulation of rRNA gene transcription was observed, along with aberrant UBF level. Our results present a new view by which alterations in folate levels affects DNA breakage through epigenetic control leading to the regulation of rRNA gene transcription during the early stage of development.

  20. A designer bleomycin with significantly improved DNA cleavage activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sheng-Xiong; Feng, Zhiyang; Wang, Liyan; Galm, Ute; Wendt-Pienkowski, Evelyn; Yang, Dong; Tao, Meifeng; Coughlin, Jane M; Duan, Yanwen; Shen, Ben

    2012-08-15

    The bleomycins (BLMs) are used clinically in combination with a number of other agents for the treatment of several types of tumors, and the BLM, etoposide, and cisplatin treatment regimen cures 90-95% of metastatic testicular cancer patients. BLM-induced pneumonitis is the most feared, dose-limiting side effect of BLM in chemotherapy, which can progress into lung fibrosis and affect up to 46% of the total patient population. There have been continued efforts to develop new BLM analogues in the search for anticancer drugs with better clinical efficacy and lower lung toxicity. We have previously cloned and characterized the biosynthetic gene clusters for BLMs from Streptomyces verticillus ATCC15003, tallysomycins from Streptoalloteichus hindustanus E465-94 ATCC31158, and zorbamycin (ZBM) from Streptomyces flavoviridis SB9001. Comparative analysis of the three biosynthetic machineries provided the molecular basis for the formulation of hypotheses to engineer novel analogues. We now report engineered production of three new analogues, 6'-hydroxy-ZBM, BLM Z, and 6'-deoxy-BLM Z and the evaluation of their DNA cleavage activities as a measurement for their potential anticancer activity. Our findings unveiled: (i) the disaccharide moiety plays an important role in the DNA cleavage activity of BLMs and ZBMs, (ii) the ZBM disaccharide significantly enhances the potency of BLM, and (iii) 6'-deoxy-BLM Z represents the most potent BLM analogue known to date. The fact that 6'-deoxy-BLM Z can be produced in reasonable quantities by microbial fermentation should greatly facilitate follow-up mechanistic and preclinical studies to potentially advance this analogue into a clinical drug.

  1. Synthesis and study of antiproliferative, antitopoisomerase II, DNA-intercalating and DNA-damaging activities of arylnaphthalimides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana-Espinoza, Patricia; García-Luis, Jonay; Amesty, Angel; Martín-Rodríguez, Patricia; Lorenzo-Castrillejo, Isabel; Ravelo, Angel G; Fernández-Pérez, Leandro; Machín, Félix; Estévez-Braun, Ana

    2013-11-01

    A series of arylnaphthalimides were designed and synthesized to overcome the dose-limiting cytotoxicity of N-acetylated metabolites arising from amonafide, the prototypical antitumour naphthalimide whose biomedical properties have been related to its ability to intercalate the DNA and poison the enzyme Topoisomerase II. Thus, these arylnaphthalimides were first evaluated for their antiproliferative activity against two tumour cell lines and for their antitopoisomerase II in vitro activities, together with their ability to intercalate the DNA in vitro and also through docking modelization. Then, the well-known DNA damage response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was employed to critically evaluate whether these novel compounds can damage the DNA in vivo. By performing all these assays we conclude that the 5-arylsubstituted naphthalimides not only keep but also improve amonafide's biological activities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Temporal phasing of locomotor activity, heart rate rhythmicity, and core body temperature is disrupted in VIP receptor 2-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannibal, Jens; Hsiung, Hansen M; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Neurons of the brain's biological clock located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) generate circadian rhythms of physiology (core body temperature, hormone secretion, locomotor activity, sleep/wake, and heart rate) with distinct temporal phasing when entrained by the light/dark (LD...... within individual neurons. To further increase the understanding of the role of VPAC2 signaling in circadian regulation, we implanted telemetric devices and simultaneously measured core body temperature, spontaneous activity, and heart rate in a strain of VPAC2-deficient mice and compared...... these observations with observations made from mice examined by wheel-running activity. The study demonstrates that VPAC2 signaling is necessary for a functional circadian clock driving locomotor activity, core body temperature, and heart rate rhythmicity, since VPAC2-deficient mice lose the rhythms in all three...

  3. Regulation of the activity of the dual-function DnaA protein in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Fernandez, Carmen; Gonzalez, Diego; Collier, Justine

    2011-01-01

    DnaA is a conserved essential bacterial protein that acts as the initiator of chromosomal replication as well as a master transcriptional regulator in Caulobacter crescentus. Thus, the intracellular levels of active DnaA need to be tightly regulated during the cell cycle. Our previous work suggested that DnaA may be regulated at the level of its activity by the replisome-associated protein HdaA. Here, we describe the construction of a mutant DnaA protein [DnaA(R357A)]. The R357 residue in the AAA+ domain of the C. crescentus DnaA protein is equivalent to the R334 residue of the E. coli DnaA protein, which is required for the Regulatory Inactivation of DnaA (RIDA). We found that the expression of the DnaA(R357A) mutant protein in C. crescentus, but not the expression of the wild-type DnaA protein at similar levels, causes a severe phenotype of over-initiation of chromosomal replication and that it blocks cell division. Thus, the mutant DnaA(R357A) protein is hyper-active to promote the initiation of DNA replication, compared to the wild-type DnaA protein. DnaA(R357A) could not replace DnaA in vivo, indicating that the switch in DnaA activity once chromosomal replication has started may be an essential process in C. crescentus. We propose that the inactivation of DnaA is the main mechanism ensuring that chromosomal replication starts only once per cell cycle. We further observed that the R357A substitution in DnaA does not promote the activity of DnaA as a direct transcriptional activator of four important genes, encoding HdaA, the GcrA master cell cycle regulator, the FtsZ cell division protein and the MipZ spatial regulator of cell division. Thus, the AAA+ domain of DnaA may play a role in temporally regulating the bifunctionality of DnaA by reallocating DnaA molecules from initiating DNA replication to transcribing genes within the unique DnaA regulon of C. crescentus.

  4. Regulation of the activity of the dual-function DnaA protein in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Fernandez-Fernandez

    Full Text Available DnaA is a conserved essential bacterial protein that acts as the initiator of chromosomal replication as well as a master transcriptional regulator in Caulobacter crescentus. Thus, the intracellular levels of active DnaA need to be tightly regulated during the cell cycle. Our previous work suggested that DnaA may be regulated at the level of its activity by the replisome-associated protein HdaA. Here, we describe the construction of a mutant DnaA protein [DnaA(R357A]. The R357 residue in the AAA+ domain of the C. crescentus DnaA protein is equivalent to the R334 residue of the E. coli DnaA protein, which is required for the Regulatory Inactivation of DnaA (RIDA. We found that the expression of the DnaA(R357A mutant protein in C. crescentus, but not the expression of the wild-type DnaA protein at similar levels, causes a severe phenotype of over-initiation of chromosomal replication and that it blocks cell division. Thus, the mutant DnaA(R357A protein is hyper-active to promote the initiation of DNA replication, compared to the wild-type DnaA protein. DnaA(R357A could not replace DnaA in vivo, indicating that the switch in DnaA activity once chromosomal replication has started may be an essential process in C. crescentus. We propose that the inactivation of DnaA is the main mechanism ensuring that chromosomal replication starts only once per cell cycle. We further observed that the R357A substitution in DnaA does not promote the activity of DnaA as a direct transcriptional activator of four important genes, encoding HdaA, the GcrA master cell cycle regulator, the FtsZ cell division protein and the MipZ spatial regulator of cell division. Thus, the AAA+ domain of DnaA may play a role in temporally regulating the bifunctionality of DnaA by reallocating DnaA molecules from initiating DNA replication to transcribing genes within the unique DnaA regulon of C. crescentus.

  5. CB1 receptor deficiency decreases wheel-running activity: consequences on emotional behaviours and hippocampal neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubreucq, Sarah; Koehl, Muriel; Abrous, Djoher N; Marsicano, Giovanni; Chaouloff, Francis

    2010-07-01

    Chronic voluntary wheel-running activity has been reported to hypersensitise central CB1 receptors in mice. On the other hand, pharmacological findings suggest that the CB1 receptor could be involved in wheel-running behaviour and in running-induced neurogenesis in the hippocampus. We analysed wheel-running behaviour for 6 weeks and measured its consequences on hippocampal neurogenesis in CB1 knockout (CB1(-/-)) animals, compared to wild-type (CB1(+/+)) littermates. Because wheel running has been shown to affect locomotor reactivity in novel environments, memory for aversive events and depression-like behaviours, we also assessed these behaviours in control and running CB1(+/+) and CB1(-/-) mice. When compared with running CB1(+/+) mice, the distance covered weekly by CB1(-/-) mice was decreased by 30-40%, an observation accounted for by decreased time spent and maximal velocity on the wheels. Analyses of running distances with respect to the light/dark cycle revealed that mutant covered less distance throughout both the inactive and the active phases of that cycle. Locomotion in an activity cage, exploration in an open field, and immobility time in the forced swim test proved insensitive to chronic wheel running in either genotype. Wheel running, per se, did not influence the expression and extinction of cued fear memory but counteracted in a time-dependent manner the deficiency of extinction measured in CB1(-/-) mice. Hippocampal neurogenesis, assessed by doublecortin labelling of immature neurons in the dentate gyrus, was lowered by 40% in control CB1(-/-) mice, compared to control CB1(+/+) mice. Although CB1(-/-) mice ran less than their wild-type littermates, the 6-week running protocol increased neurogenesis to similar extents (37-39%) in both genotypes. This study suggests that mouse CB1 receptors control wheel running but not its neurogenic consequences in the hippocampus.

  6. Investigation of DNA binding, DNA photocleavage, topoisomerase I inhibition and antioxidant activities of water soluble titanium(IV) phthalocyanine compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özel, Arzu; Barut, Burak; Demirbaş, Ümit; Biyiklioglu, Zekeriya

    2016-04-01

    The binding mode of water soluble peripherally tetra-substituted titanium(IV) phthalocyanine (Pc) compounds Pc1, Pc2 and Pc3 with calf thymus (CT) DNA was investigated by using UV-Vis spectroscopy and thermal denaturation studies in this work. The results of DNA binding constants (Kb) and the changes in the thermal denaturation profile of DNA with the addition of Pc compounds indicated that Pc1, Pc2 and Pc3 are able to bind to CT-DNA with different binding affinities. DNA photocleavage studies of Pc compounds were performed in the absence and presence of oxidizing agents such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), ascorbic acid (AA) and 2-mercaptoethanol (ME) using the agarose gel electrophoresis method at irradiation 650 nm. According to the results of electrophoresis studies, Pc1, Pc2 and Pc3 cleaved of supercoiled pBR322 DNA via photocleavage pathway. The Pc1, Pc2 and Pc3 compounds were examined for topoisomerase I inhibition by measuring the relaxation of supercoiled pBR322 DNA. The all of Pc compounds inhibited topoisomerase I at 20 μM concentration. A series of antioxidant assays, including 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay, superoxide radical scavenging (SOD) assay and metal chelating effect assay were performed for Pc1, Pc2 and Pc3 compounds. The results of antioxidant assays indicated that Pc1, Pc2 and Pc3 compounds have remarkable superoxide radical scavenging activities, moderate 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl activities and metal chelating effect activities. All the experimental studies showed that Pc1, Pc2 and Pc3 compounds bind to CT-DNA via minor groove binding, cleave of supercoiled pBR322 DNA via photocleavage pathway, inhibit topoisomerase I and have remarkable superoxide radical scavenging activities. Thanks to these properties the Pc1, Pc2 and Pc3 compounds are suitable agents for photo dynamic therapy.

  7. Temporal phasing of locomotor activity, heart rate rhythmicity, and core body temperature is disrupted in VIP receptor 2-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannibal, Jens; Hsiung, Hansen M; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    2011-01-01

    these observations with observations made from mice examined by wheel-running activity. The study demonstrates that VPAC2 signaling is necessary for a functional circadian clock driving locomotor activity, core body temperature, and heart rate rhythmicity, since VPAC2-deficient mice lose the rhythms in all three...... to that of wild-type mice. The use of telemetric devices to measure circadian locomotor activity, temperature, and heart rate, together with the classical determination of circadian rhythms of wheel-running activity, raises questions about how representative wheel-running activity may be of other behavioral...

  8. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase deficiency causes organ-specific autoimmune disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Hase

    Full Text Available Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID expressed by germinal center B cells is a central regulator of somatic hypermutation (SHM and class switch recombination (CSR. Humans with AID mutations develop not only the autosomal recessive form of hyper-IgM syndrome (HIGM2 associated with B cell hyperplasia, but also autoimmune disorders by unknown mechanisms. We report here that AID-/- mice spontaneously develop tertiary lymphoid organs (TLOs in non-lymphoid tissues including the stomach at around 6 months of age. At a later stage, AID-/- mice develop a severe gastritis characterized by loss of gastric glands and epithelial hyperplasia. The disease development was not attenuated even under germ-free (GF conditions. Gastric autoantigen -specific serum IgM was elevated in AID-/- mice, and the serum levels correlated with the gastritis pathological score. Adoptive transfer experiments suggest that autoimmune CD4+ T cells mediate gastritis development as terminal effector cells. These results suggest that abnormal B-cell expansion due to AID deficiency can drive B-cell autoimmunity, and in turn promote TLO formation, which ultimately leads to the propagation of organ-specific autoimmune effector CD4+ T cells. Thus, AID plays an important role in the containment of autoimmune diseases by negative regulation of autoreactive B cells.

  9. Autophagy deficiency in macrophages enhances NLRP3 inflammasome activity and chronic lung disease following silica exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessop, Forrest; Hamilton, Raymond F; Rhoderick, Joseph F; Shaw, Pamela K; Holian, Andrij

    2016-10-15

    Autophagy is an important metabolic mechanism that can promote cellular survival following injury. The specific contribution of autophagy to silica-induced inflammation and disease is not known. The objective of these studies was to determine the effects of silica exposure on the autophagic pathway in macrophages, as well as the general contribution of autophagy in macrophages to inflammation and disease. Silica exposure enhanced autophagic activity in vitro in Bone Marrow derived Macrophages and in vivo in Alveolar Macrophages isolated from silica-exposed mice. Impairment of autophagy in myeloid cells in vivo using Atg5(fl/fl)LysM-Cre(+) mice resulted in enhanced cytotoxicity and inflammation after silica exposure compared to littermate controls, including elevated IL-18 and the alarmin HMGB1 in the whole lavage fluid. Autophagy deficiency caused some spontaneous inflammation and disease. Greater silica-induced acute inflammation in Atg5(fl/fl)LysM-Cre(+) mice correlated with increased fibrosis and chronic lung disease. These studies demonstrate a critical role for autophagy in suppressing silica-induced cytotoxicity and inflammation in disease development. Furthermore, this data highlights the importance of basal autophagy in macrophages and other myeloid cells in maintaining lung homeostasis.

  10. Deficiency of the DNA repair protein nibrin increases the basal but not the radiation induced mutation frequency in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wessendorf, Petra [Institute of Medical and Human Genetics, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, D-13353 Berlin (Germany); Vijg, Jan [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Michael F. Price Center, 1301 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Nussenzweig, André [Laboratory of Genome Integrity, National Cancer Institute, National Institute of Health, 37 Convent Drive, Room 1106, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Digweed, Martin, E-mail: martin.digweed@charite.de [Institute of Medical and Human Genetics, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, D-13353 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • lacZ mutant frequencies measured in vivo in mouse models of radiosensitive Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome. • Spontaneous mutation frequencies are increased in lymphatic tissue due to Nbn mutation. • Single base transitions, not deletions, dominate the mutation spectrum. • Radiation induced mutation frequencies are not increased due to Nbn mutation. - Abstract: Nibrin (NBN) is a member of a DNA repair complex together with MRE11 and RAD50. The complex is associated particularly with the repair of DNA double strand breaks and with the regulation of cell cycle check points. Hypomorphic mutation of components of the complex leads to human disorders characterised by radiosensitivity and increased tumour occurrence, particularly of the lymphatic system. We have examined here the relationship between DNA damage, mutation frequency and mutation spectrum in vitro and in vivo in mouse models carrying NBN mutations and a lacZ reporter plasmid. We find that NBN mutation leads to increased spontaneous DNA damage in fibroblasts in vitro and high basal mutation rates in lymphatic tissue of mice in vivo. The characteristic mutation spectrum is dominated by single base transitions rather than the deletions and complex rearrangements expected after abortive repair of DNA double strand breaks. We conclude that in the absence of wild type nibrin, the repair of spontaneous errors, presumably arising during DNA replication, makes a major contribution to the basal mutation rate. This applies also to cells heterozygous for an NBN null mutation. Mutation frequencies after irradiation in vivo were not increased in mice with nibrin mutations as might have been expected considering the radiosensitivity of NBS patient cells in vitro. Evidently apoptosis is efficient, even in the absence of wild type nibrin.

  11. Enhanced imaging of DNA via active quality factor control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphris, A. D. L.; Round, A. N.; Miles, M. J.

    2001-10-01

    Adsorption processes at single molecule level are of fundamental importance for the understanding and development of biomaterials. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has played a critical role in this field due to its high resolution and ability to image in a liquid environment. We present a method that improves the dynamic force sensitivity and the resolution of a conventional AFM. This is achieved via a positive feedback loop that enhances the effective quality factor of the cantilever in a liquid environment to values in excess of 300, compared to a nominal value of ˜1. This active quality factor enhancement has been used to image DNA and an increase in the height of the molecule observed.

  12. Antenatal diagnosis of tetrahydrobiopterin deficiency by quantification of pterins in amniotic fluid and enzyme activity in fetal and extrafetal tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blau, N; Kierat, L; Matasovic, A; Leimbacher, W; Heizmann, C W; Guardamagna, O; Ponzone, A

    1994-05-01

    Prenatal diagnosis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) deficiency was undertaken by evaluating the pterin patterns in amniotic fluid and the specific enzyme activities in fetal or extrafetal tissues. This allowed the prenatal diagnosis in 19 pregnancies at risk. In 8 families with a child already affected by dihydropteridine reductase deficiency 4 fetuses were diagnosed as homozygotes and 4 as heterozygotes for the defect. In 11 families with a child affected by 6-pyruvoyl tetrahydropterin synthase deficiency 4 fetuses were homozygous, 4 heterozygous and 3 normal. This study also advanced our knowledge of tetrahydrobiopterin metabolism during fetal development. The key enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of BH4 are expressed early and allow the fetus to be autotrophous for its cofactor requirement. In a twin pregnancy, both fetuses were diagnosed to be heterozygotes for dihydropteridine reductase deficiency and primapterin (7-biopterin) in amniotic fluid was increased. This indicates that pterin-4 alpha-carbinolamine dehydratase activity seems to be differently expressed during fetal life. As a consequence, pterins detected in amniotic fluid are of fetal origin and 6- and 7-substituted pterins can be present in amniotic fluid in higher proportions when compared with other body fluids.

  13. Iron Deficiency Anemia, Active Component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2002-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    shortness of breath, headache, dizzi- ness, irritability, and glossitis.2 In general, treatment of IDA is directed at the under- lying cause of...5. Zhu A, Kaneshiro M, Kaunitz JD. Evaluation and treatment of iron deficiency anemia: a gastroenterological perspective. Dig Dis Sci. 2010;55...between African-Americans and whites: the roles of iron deficiency and α- thalassemia on hemoglobin levels and mean corpuscular volume. Blood. 2005;106

  14. Enhanced Synaptic Activity and Epileptiform Events in the Embryonic KCC2 Deficient Hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalilov, Ilgam; Chazal, Geneviève; Chudotvorova, Ilona; Pellegrino, Christophe; Corby, Séverine; Ferrand, Nadine; Gubkina, Olena; Nardou, Romain; Tyzio, Roman; Yamamoto, Sumii; Jentsch, Thomas J; Hübner, Christian A; Gaiarsa, Jean-Luc; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Medina, Igor

    2011-01-01

    The neuronal potassium-chloride co-transporter 2 [indicated thereafter as KCC2 (for protein) and Kcc2 (for gene)] is thought to play an important role in the post natal excitatory to inhibitory switch of GABA actions in the rodent hippocampus. Here, by studying hippocampi of wild-type (Kcc2(+/+)) and Kcc2 deficient (Kcc2(-/-)) mouse embryos, we unexpectedly found increased spontaneous neuronal network activity at E18.5, a developmental stage when KCC2 is thought not to be functional in the hippocampus. Embryonic Kcc2(-/-) hippocampi have also an augmented synapse density and a higher frequency of spontaneous glutamatergic and GABA-ergic postsynaptic currents than naïve age matched neurons. However, intracellular chloride concentration ([Cl(-)](i)) and the reversal potential of GABA-mediated currents (E(GABA)) were similar in embryonic Kcc2(+/+) and Kcc2(-/-) CA3 neurons. In addition, KCC2 immunolabeling was cytoplasmic in the majority of neurons suggesting that the molecule is not functional as a plasma membrane chloride co-transporter. Collectively, our results show that already at an embryonic stage, KCC2 controls the formation of synapses and, when deleted, the hippocampus has a higher density of GABA-ergic and glutamatergic synapses and generates spontaneous and evoked epileptiform activities. These results may be explained either by a small population of orchestrating neurons in which KCC2 operates early as a chloride exporter or by transporter independent actions of KCC2 that are instrumental in synapse formation and networks construction.

  15. Mice with DNA repair gene Ercc1 deficiency in a neural crest lineage are a model for late-onset Hirschsprung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selfridge, Jim; Song, Liang; Brownstein, David G; Melton, David W

    2010-06-04

    The Ercc1 gene is essential for nucleotide excision repair and is also important in recombination repair and the repair of interstrand crosslinks. We have previously used a floxed Ercc1 allele with a keratinocyte-specific Cre recombinase transgene to inactivate Ercc1 in the epidermal layer of the skin and so generate a mouse model for UV-induced non-melanoma skin cancer. Now, in an attempt to generate a model for UV-induced melanoma, we have used the floxed Ercc1 allele in combination with a Cre transgene under the control of the tyrosinase gene promoter to produce mice with Ercc1-deficient melanocytes that are hypersensitive to UV irradiation. These animals developed normally, but died when 4-6 months old with severe colonic obstruction. Melanocytes are derived from the neural crest and the tyrosinase promoter is also expressed in additional neural crest-derived lineages, including the progenitors of the parasympathetic nervous system that innervates the gastrointestinal tract and controls gut peristalsis. A functional enteric nervous system developed in floxed Ercc1 mice with the tyrosinase Cre transgene, but was found to have degenerated in the colons of affected mice. We suggest that accumulating unrepaired endogenous DNA damage in the Ercc1-deficient colonic parasympathetic ganglia leads to the degeneration of this network and results in a colonic obstructive disorder that resembles late-onset Hirschsprung disease in man.

  16. DNA-based prenatal diagnosis for severe and variant forms of multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenation deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Rikke K J; Andresen, Brage S; Christensen, Ernst;

    2005-01-01

    , prenatal diagnosis of MADD has relied mostly on second-trimester biochemical analyses of amniotic fluid or cultured amniocytes. We report here on an alternative DNA-based approach for prenatal diagnosis in pregnancies at risk of MADD. METHODS: We used our knowledge of the mutational status in three...

  17. Nucleotide excision repair deficiency increases levels of acrolein-derived cyclic DNA adduct and sensitizes cells to apoptosis induced by docosahexaenoic acid and acrolein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jishen; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Xuan, Zhuoli; Dyba, Marcin; Fu, Ying; Sen, Supti; Berry, Deborah; Creswell, Karen; Hu, Jiaxi; Roy, Rabindra; Chung, Fung-Lung

    2016-07-01

    The acrolein derived cyclic 1,N(2)-propanodeoxyguanosine adduct (Acr-dG), formed primarily from ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) under oxidative conditions, while proven to be mutagenic, is potentially involved in DHA-induced apoptosis. The latter may contribute to the chemopreventive effects of DHA. Previous studies have shown that the levels of Acr-dG are correlated with apoptosis induction in HT29 cells treated with DHA. Because Acr-dG is shown to be repaired by the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway, to further investigate the role of Acr-dG in apoptosis, in this study, NER-deficient XPA and its isogenic NER-proficient XAN1 cells were treated with DHA. The Acr-dG levels and apoptosis were sharply increased in XPA cells, but not in XAN1 cells when treated with 125μM of DHA. Because DHA can induce formation of various DNA damage, to specifically investigate the role of Acr-dG in apoptosis induction, we treated XPA knockdown HCT116+ch3 cells with acrolein. The levels of both Acr-dG and apoptosis induction increased significantly in the XPA knockdown cells. These results clearly demonstrate that NER deficiency induces higher levels of Acr-dG in cells treated with DHA or acrolein and sensitizes cells to undergo apoptosis in a correlative manner. Collectively, these results support that Acr-dG, a ubiquitously formed mutagenic oxidative DNA adduct, plays a role in DHA-induced apoptosis and suggest that it could serve as a biomarker for the cancer preventive effects of DHA.

  18. Hepatic deficiency of the pioneer transcription factor FoxA restricts hepatitis B virus biosynthesis by the developmental regulation of viral DNA methylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa C McFadden

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The FoxA family of pioneer transcription factors regulates hepatitis B virus (HBV transcription, and hence viral replication. Hepatocyte-specific FoxA-deficiency in the HBV transgenic mouse model of chronic infection prevents the transcription of the viral DNA genome as a result of the failure of the developmentally controlled conversion of 5-methylcytosine residues to cytosine during postnatal hepatic maturation. These observations suggest that pioneer transcription factors such as FoxA, which mark genes for expression at subsequent developmental steps in the cellular differentiation program, mediate their effects by reversing the DNA methylation status of their target genes to permit their ensuing expression when the appropriate tissue-specific transcription factor combinations arise during development. Furthermore, as the FoxA-deficient HBV transgenic mice are viable, the specific developmental timing, abundance and isoform type of pioneer factor expression must permit all essential liver gene expression to occur at a level sufficient to support adequate liver function. This implies that pioneer transcription factors can recognize and mark their target genes in distinct developmental manners dependent upon, at least in part, the concentration and affinity of FoxA for its binding sites within enhancer and promoter regulatory sequence elements. This selective marking of cellular genes for expression by the FoxA pioneer factor compared to HBV may offer the opportunity for the specific silencing of HBV gene expression and hence the resolution of chronic HBV infections which are responsible for approximately one million deaths worldwide annually due to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma.

  19. Vitamin B2 deficiency enhances the pro-inflammatory activity of adipocyte, consequences for insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur-Bialy, Agnieszka Irena; Pocheć, Ewa

    2017-06-01

    Adipose tissue is an endocrine organ important for regulation of such physiological processes as energy metabolism or lipids homeostasis. In an obesity state, it participates in the induction of chronic systemic inflammation accompanied by pro-inflammatory cytokines and fatty acid elevation. For this reasons, adipose tissue is involved in, e.g., insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes or hyperlipidemia development. In our previous study, we have shown that riboflavin deficiency induces a pathological pro-inflammatory response of macrophages, the main component of adipose tissue. Therefore, in the current study, we investigated the alteration of the pro-inflammatory activity of adipocytes. The study was conducted on mouse 3T3 L1 preadipocytes differentiated to adipocyte and culture in the state of riboflavin deficiency (3.1nM) or control condition (10.4nM). The cell viability, adiposity and glucose uptake was assessed. Moreover, mRNA expression, as well as crucial pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNFα, IL-6) and adipokines (adiponectin, leptin, resistin) release and NFκB activation, were evaluated. Results showed that riboflavin deprivation induced a significant elevation in adipocyte lipolysis and enhance obesity-related apoptosis of adipocytes. The generation of reactive oxygen species was enhanced in riboflavin-deficient adipocytes by 43%. Moreover, NFκB phosphorylation and the expression and release of both TNFα, IL-6 as well as leptin were elevated in a deficient group what was accompanied by a reduction of adiponectin level. Our study shows that riboflavin deficiency can promote the intensification of pro-inflammatory activity of adipocyte cells, leading consequently to the severity of chronic inflammation that accompanies obesity state. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Mechanism Underlying Post-menopausal Osteoporosis: HIF1α is Required for Osteoclast Activation by Estrogen Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    The aging of the population worldwide has sharply increased the number of post-menopausal osteoporosis patients. Bone fragility caused by osteoporosis often results in fractures; therefore, controlling osteoporosis is crucial to prevent such injuries. To date, various drugs to treat osteoporosis have been developed and launched; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying post-menopausal osteoporosis have not been fully elucidated, and additional factors that could be targeted to treat patients remain to be characterized. Recently, hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF1α) was identified as essential for osteoclast activation, an activity that promotes bone loss following menopausal estrogen deficiency. Although osteoclasts, which are located in hypoxic regions of the bone surface, express HIF1α mRNA, in pre-menopausal conditions the presence of estrogen decreases HIF1α protein levels in these cells. In menopausal conditions, however, estrogen deficiency allows HIF1α protein to accumulate in osteoclasts, leading to osteoclast activation and bone loss. Osteoclast-specific conditional HIF1α inactivation protects mice from estrogen deficiency-induced osteoclast activation and bone loss, as does systemic administration of a HIF1α inhibitor. Therefore, HIF1α represents a potential therapeutic target to prevent osteoclast activation and bone loss in post-menopausal patients.

  1. Reduced prostasin (CAP1/PRSS8 activity eliminates HAI-1 and HAI-2 deficiency-associated developmental defects by preventing matriptase activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Szabo

    Full Text Available Loss of either hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor (HAI-1 or -2 is associated with embryonic lethality in mice, which can be rescued by the simultaneous inactivation of the membrane-anchored serine protease, matriptase, thereby demonstrating that a matriptase-dependent proteolytic pathway is a critical developmental target for both protease inhibitors. Here, we performed a genetic epistasis analysis to identify additional components of this pathway by generating mice with combined deficiency in either HAI-1 or HAI-2, along with genes encoding developmentally co-expressed candidate matriptase targets, and screening for the rescue of embryonic development. Hypomorphic mutations in Prss8, encoding the GPI-anchored serine protease, prostasin (CAP1, PRSS8, restored placentation and normal development of HAI-1-deficient embryos and prevented early embryonic lethality, mid-gestation lethality due to placental labyrinth failure, and neural tube defects in HAI-2-deficient embryos. Inactivation of genes encoding c-Met, protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2, or the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC alpha subunit all failed to rescue embryonic lethality, suggesting that deregulated matriptase-prostasin activity causes developmental failure independent of aberrant c-Met and PAR-2 signaling or impaired epithelial sodium transport. Furthermore, phenotypic analysis of PAR-1 and matriptase double-deficient embryos suggests that the protease may not be critical for focal proteolytic activation of PAR-2 during neural tube closure. Paradoxically, although matriptase auto-activates and is a well-established upstream epidermal activator of prostasin, biochemical analysis of matriptase- and prostasin-deficient placental tissues revealed a requirement of prostasin for conversion of the matriptase zymogen to active matriptase, whereas prostasin zymogen activation was matriptase-independent.

  2. 75 FR 28811 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Proposed Actions Under the NIH...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA... Office of Biotechnology Activities (OBA) by the Institutional Biosafety Committee at Lawrence Livermore... Biotechnology Activities, National Institutes of Health. BILLING CODE 4140-01-P ...

  3. Sulfolobus Replication Factor C stimulates the activity of DNA Polymerase B1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xing, Xuanxuan; Zhang, Likui; Guo, Li;

    2014-01-01

    Replication factor C (RFC) is known to function in loading proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) onto primed DNA, allowing PCNA to tether DNA polymerase for highly processive DNA synthesis in eukaryotic and archaeal replication. In this report, we show that an RFC complex from...... with the ability of RFC to facilitate DNA binding by PolB1 through protein-protein interaction. These results suggest that Sulfolobus RFC may play a role in recruiting DNA polymerase for efficient primer extension, in addition to clamp loading, during DNA replication....... the hyperthermophilic archaea of the genus Sulfolobus physically interacts with DNA polymerase B1 (PolB1) and enhances both the polymerase and 3'-5' exonuclease activities of PolB1 in an ATP-independent manner. Stimulation of the PolB1 activity by RFC is independent of the ability of RFC to bind DNA but is consistent...

  4. Cobalamin deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Wolfgang; Obeid, Rima

    2012-01-01

    Cobalamin (Cbl, vitamin B12) consists of a corrinoid structure with cobalt in the centre of the molecule. Neither humans nor animals are able to synthesize this vitamin. Foods of animal source are the only natural source of cobalamin in human diet. There are only two enzymatic reactions in mammalian cells that require cobalamin as cofactor. Methylcobolamin is a cofactor for methionine synthase. The enzyme methylmalonyl-CoA-mutase requires adenosylcobalamin as a cofactor. Therefore, serum concentrations of homocysteine (tHcy) and methylmalonic acid (MMA) will increase in cobalamin deficiency. The cobalamin absorption from diet is a complex process that involves different proteins: haptocorrin, intrinsic factor and transcobalamin (TC). Cobalamin that is bound to TC is called holotranscobalamin (holoTC) which is the metabolically active vitamin B12 fraction. HoloTC consists 6 and 20% of total cobalamin whereas 80% of total serum cobalamin is bound to another binding protein, haptocorrin. Cobalamin deficiency is common worldwide. Cobalamin malabsorption is common in elderly subjects which might explain low vitamin status. Subjects who ingest low amount of cobalamin like vegetarians develop vitamin deficiency. No single parameter can be used to diagnose cobalamin deficiency. Total serum cobalamin is neither sensitive nor it is specific for cobalamin deficiency. This might explain why many deficient subjects would be overlooked by utilizing total cobalamin as status marker. Concentration of holotranscobalamin (holoTC) in serum is an earlier marker that becomes decreased before total serum cobalamin. Concentrations of MMA and tHcy increase in blood of cobalamin deficient subjects. Despite limitations of these markers in patients with renal dysfunction, concentrations of MMA and tHcy are useful functional markers of cobalamin status. The combined use of holoTC and MMA assays may better indicate cobalamin status than either of them. Because Cbl deficiency is a risk factor

  5. Blocking TLR2 activity diminishes and stabilizes advanced atherosclerotic lesions in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-xing WANG; Xiao-xi LV; Jia-ping WANG; Hui-min YAN; Zi-yan WANG; Han-zhi LIU; Xiao-ming FU

    2013-01-01

    Aim:Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) signaling plays a critical role in the initiation of atherosclerosis.The aim of this study was to investigate whether blocking TLR2 activity could produce therapeutic effects on advanced atherosclerosis.Methods:Forty-week old apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE-/-) mice fed on a normal diet were intravenously injected with a TLR2-neutralizing antibody or with an isotype-matched IgG for 18 weeks.Double-knockout ApoE-/-Tlr2-/-mice were taken as a positive control.At the end of the treatments,the plasma lipid levels were measured,and the plaque morphology,pro-inflammatory cytokines expression and apoptosis in arteries were analyzed.In the second part of this study,6-week old ApoE-/-and ApoE-/-Tlr2-/-mice fed on a high-cholesterol diet for 12 to 24 weeks,the expression levels of TLR2 and apoptotic markers in arteries were examined.Results:Blockade of TLR2 activity with TLR2-neutralizing antibody or knockout of Tlr2 gene did not alter the plasma lipid levels in ApoE-/-mice.However,the pharmacologic and genetic manipulations significantly reduced the plaque size and vessel stenosis,and increased plaque stability in the brachiocephalic arteries.The protective effects of TLR2 antagonism were associated with the suppressed expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α and the inactivation of transcription factors NF-KB and Stat3.In addition,blocking TLR2 activity attenuated ER stress-induced macrophage apoptosis in the brachiocephalic arteries,which could promote the resolution of necrotic cores in advanced atherosclerosis.Moreover,high-cholesterol diet more prominently accelerated atherosclerotic formation and increased the expression of pro-apoptotic protein CHOP and apoptosis in ApoE-/-mice than in ApoE-/-Tlr2-/-mice.Conclusion:The pharmacologic or genetic blockade of TLR2 activity diminishes and stabilizes advanced atherosclerotic lesions in ApoE-/-mice.Thus,targeting TLR2 signaling may be a promising therapeutic strategy against

  6. A cytosolic activator of DNA replication is tyrosine phosphorylated in its active form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresa, K L; Autieri, M V; Coffman, F D; Georgoff, I; Cohen, S

    1993-04-01

    Cytosolic extracts from actively dividing lymphoid cells have been shown to induce DNA synthesis in isolated, quiescent nuclei. An initiating factor in such extracts (activator of DNA replication; ADR) is a > 90-kDa aprotinin-binding protein whose activity is inhibitable not only by aprotinin, but also by several other protease inhibitors as well. Although cytosol from non-proliferating lymphocytes is devoid of ADR activity, we have shown that these preparations can be induced to express ADR activity by brief exposure to a membrane-enriched fraction of spontaneously proliferating MOLT-4 cells via a kinase-dependent mechanism. In the present study, we examine the role of tyrosine kinases in this process. Three inhibitors of tyrosine kinases (genistein, kaempferol, and quercetin) can inhibit the in vitro generation of ADR activity. In vitro generation of ADR activity is associated with the de novo phosphorylation of several proteins, many of which are detectable using anti-phosphotyrosine monoclonal antibodies. ADR itself may be tyrosine phosphorylated in active form as immunoprecipitation using such monoclonal antibodies leads to the depletion of its activity. Moreover, immunoprecipitation results in the removal of several de novo tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins, including species at approximately 122, 105, 93, 86, 79, and 65 kDa. A subset of de novo-phosphorylated proteins, migrating at approximately 105, 93, and 70 kDa, also bound to aprotinin, suggesting that at least one of these proteins may represent ADR itself.

  7. Systematic analysis of DNA damage induction and DNA repair pathway activation by continuous wave visible light laser micro-irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britta Muster

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Laser micro-irradiation can be used to induce DNA damage with high spatial and temporal resolution, representing a powerful tool to analyze DNA repair in vivo in the context of chromatin. However, most lasers induce a mixture of DNA damage leading to the activation of multiple DNA repair pathways and making it impossible to study individual repair processes. Hence, we aimed to establish and validate micro-irradiation conditions together with inhibition of several key proteins to discriminate different types of DNA damage and repair pathways using lasers commonly available in confocal microscopes. Using time-lapse analysis of cells expressing fluorescently tagged repair proteins and also validation of the DNA damage generated by micro-irradiation using several key damage markers, we show that irradiation with a 405 nm continuous wave laser lead to the activation of all repair pathways even in the absence of exogenous sensitization. In contrast, we found that irradiation with 488 nm laser lead to the selective activation of non-processive short-patch base excision and single strand break repair, which were further validated by PARP inhibition and metoxyamine treatment. We conclude that these low energy conditions discriminated against processive long-patch base excision repair, nucleotide excision repair as well as double strand break repair pathways.

  8. Spatial ordering and abnormal optical activity of DNA liquid-crystalline dispersion particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, S. V.; Yevdokimov, Yu. M.

    2016-12-01

    In our work, we investigate physicochemical and optical properties of double-strand DNA dispersions. The study of these properties is of biological interest, because it allows one to describe the characteristics of certain classes of chromosomes and DNA containing viruses. The package pattern of DNA molecules in the dispersions particles (DP) is examined. The consideration of the DNA liquid-crystalline DP optical activity based on the theory of electromagnetic wave absorption by large molecular aggregates has been performed. The investigation is also focused on various effects induced by the interaction between biological active compounds and DNA in the content of liquid-crystalline DP.

  9. Cytidine-5'-monophosphate-N-acetylneuraminic acid. Asialoglycoprotein sialic acid transferase activity in liver and serum of patients with juvenile hepatic cirrhosis and alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlenschmidt, M S; Peters, S P; Pinkard, O D; Glew, R H; Sharp, H

    1976-04-08

    The molecular basis for the accumulation of a substance which displays the immunological reactivity of alpha-1-antitrypsin within vesicles of liver parenchymal cells of individuals with hepatic cirrhosis and serum alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency remains unclear. We recently reported that serum from a patient with alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency and hepatic cirrhosis was substantially deficient in sialyltransferease (EC 2.4.99.1) an enzyme which transfers sialic acid from cytidine 5'-monophosphate-N-acetylneuraminic acid to a variety of asialoglycoprotein acceptors. In the present report we have extended these studies to include serum from five additional patients with alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency and juvenile hepatic cirrhosis as well as a liver specimen obtained at autopsy of one of these patients. We find the sialytransferase activity in serum from six patients with alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency and hepatic cirrhosis to be 50% of healthy pediatric control values and 30% of pediatric patients with liver disease. However, serum from family members homozygous for alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency but without hepatic cirrhosis, and serum from patients with a variety of other kinds of liver disease, failed to exhibit the marked sialytransferase deficiency. Similar assays carried out on a homogenate of a liver sample from one patient with alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency and hepatic cirrhosis indicated that the deficiency of sialyltransferase activity was not demonstrable in liver. Furthermore, a comparative kinetic analysis of serum and liver sialytransferase in normal and afflicted individuals failed to detect differences in substrate affinities which might account for a decrease in functional sialyltransferase capacity in individuals with alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency and hepatic cirrhosis. These observations suggest that the serum sialyltransferase deficiency in such patients probably arises after chronic and extensive liver disease involving hepatic accumulation of

  10. CaMKKβ is involved in AMP-activated protein kinase activation by baicalin in LKB1 deficient cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Ma

    Full Text Available AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK plays an important role in mediating energy metabolism and is controlled mainly by two upstream kinases, LKB1 or Ca(2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase-β (CaMKKβ. Previously, we found that baicalin, one of the major flavonoids in a traditional Chinese herb medicine, Scutellaria baicalensis, protects against the development of hepatic steatosis in rats feeding with a high-fat diet by the activation of AMPK, but, the underlying mechanism for AMPK activation is unknown. Here we show that in two LKB1-deficient cells, HeLa and A549 cells, baicalin activates AMPK by α Thr-172 phosphorylation and subsequent phosphorylation of its downstream target, acetyl CoA carboxylase, at Ser-79, to a similar degree as does in HepG2 cells (that express LKB1. Pharmacologic inhibition of CaMKKβ by its selective inhibitor STO-609 markedly inhibits baicalin-induced AMPK activation in both HeLa and HepG2 cells, indicating that CaMKKβ is the responsible AMPK kinase. We also show that treatment of baicalin causes a larger increase in intracellular Ca(2+ concentration ([Ca(2+](i, although the maximal level of [Ca(2+](i is lower in HepG2 cells compared to HeLa cells. Chelation of intracellular free Ca(2+ by EDTA and EGTA, or depletion of intracellular Ca(2+ stores by the endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+-ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin abrogates baicalin-induced activation of AMPK in HeLa cells. Neither cellular ATP nor the production of reactive oxygen species is altered by baicalin. Finally, in HeLa cells, baicalin treatment no longer decreases intracellular lipid accumulation caused by oleic acid after inhibition of CaMKKβ by STO-609. These results demonstrate that a potential Ca(2+/CaMKKβ dependent pathway is involved in the activation of AMPK by baicalin and suggest that CaMKKβ likely acts as an upstream kinase of AMPK in response to baicalin.

  11. Factor XI Deficiency Alters the Cytokine Response and Activation of Contact Proteases during Polymicrobial Sepsis in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles E Bane

    Full Text Available Sepsis, a systemic inflammatory response to infection, is often accompanied by abnormalities of blood coagulation. Prior work with a mouse model of sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP suggested that the protease factor XIa contributed to disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC and to the cytokine response during sepsis. We investigated the importance of factor XI to cytokine and coagulation responses during the first 24 hours after CLP. Compared to wild type littermates, factor XI-deficient (FXI-/- mice had a survival advantage after CLP, with smaller increases in plasma levels of TNF-α and IL-10 and delayed IL-1β and IL-6 responses. Plasma levels of serum amyloid P, an acute phase protein, were increased in wild type mice 24 hours post-CLP, but not in FXI-/- mice, supporting the impression of a reduced inflammatory response in the absence of factor XI. Surprisingly, there was little evidence of DIC in mice of either genotype. Plasma levels of the contact factors factor XII and prekallikrein were reduced in WT mice after CLP, consistent with induction of contact activation. However, factor XII and PK levels were not reduced in FXI-/- animals, indicating factor XI deficiency blunted contact activation. Intravenous infusion of polyphosphate into WT mice also induced changes in factor XII, but had much less effect in FXI deficient mice. In vitro analysis revealed that factor XIa activates factor XII, and that this reaction is enhanced by polyanions such polyphosphate and nucleic acids. These data suggest that factor XI deficiency confers a survival advantage in the CLP sepsis model by altering the cytokine response to infection and blunting activation of the contact (kallikrein-kinin system. The findings support the hypothesis that factor XI functions as a bidirectional interface between contact activation and thrombin generation, allowing the two processes to influence each other.

  12. Connexin26 (GJB2) deficiency reduces active cochlear amplification leading to late-onset hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Y; Chen, J; Liang, C; Zong, L; Chen, J; Jones, R O; Zhao, H-B

    2015-01-22

    Connexin26 (Cx26, GJB2) mutations account for >50% of nonsyndromic hearing loss. The deafness is not always congenital. A large group of these patients (∼30%) demonstrate a late-onset hearing loss, starting in childhood. They have normal hearing early in life and are therefore good candidates for applying protective and therapeutic interventions. However, the underlying deafness mechanism is unclear. In this study, we used a time-controlled, inducible gene knockout technique to knockout Cx26 expression in the cochlea after birth. We found that deletion of Cx26 after postnatal day 5 (P5) in mice could lead to late-onset hearing loss. Similar to clinical observations, the mice demonstrated progressive, mild to moderate hearing loss. The hearing loss initiated at high frequencies and then extended to the middle- and low-frequency range. The cochlea showed normal development and had no apparent hair cell loss. However, distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) was reduced. The reduction was also progressive and large at high-frequencies. Consistent with DPOAE reduction, we found that outer hair cell electromotility-associated nonlinear capacitance was shifted to the right and the slope of voltage dependence was reduced. The endocochlear potential was reduced in Cx26 conditional knockout (cKO) mice but the reduction was not associated with progressive hearing loss. These data suggest that Cx26 deficiency may impair active cochlear amplification leading to late-onset hearing loss. Our study also helps develop newer protective and therapeutic interventions to this common nonsyndromic hearing loss.

  13. Production of truncated MBD4 protein by frameshift mutation in DNA mismatch repair-deficient cells enhances 5-fluorouracil sensitivity that is independent of hMLH1 status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Satoshi; Iwaizumi, Moriya; Tseng-Rogenski, Stephanie; Hamaya, Yasushi; Miyajima, Hiroaki; Kanaoka, Shigeru; Sugimoto, Ken; Carethers, John M

    2016-07-02

    Methyl-CpG binding domain protein 4 (MBD4) is a DNA glycosylase that can remove 5-fluorodeoxyuracil from DNA as well as repair T:G or U:G mismatches. MBD4 is a target for frameshift mutation with DNA mismatch repair (MMR) deficiency, creating a truncated MBD4 protein (TruMBD4) that lacks its glycosylase domain. Here we show that TruMBD4 plays an important role for enhancing 5-fluorouracil (5FU) sensitivity in MMR-deficient colorectal cancer cells. We found biochemically that TruMBD4 binds to 5FU incorporated into DNA with higher affinity than MBD4. TruMBD4 reduced the 5FU affinity of the MMR recognition complexes that determined 5FU sensitivity by previous reports, suggesting other mechanisms might be operative to trigger cytotoxicity. To analyze overall 5FU sensitivity with TruMBD4, we established TruMBD4 overexpression in hMLH1-proficient or -deficient colorectal cancer cells followed by treatment with 5FU. 5FU-treated TruMBD4 cells demonstrated diminished growth characteristics compared to controls, independently of hMLH1 status. Flow cytometry revealed more 5FU-treated TruMBD4 cells in S phase than controls. We conclude that patients with MMR-deficient cancers, which show characteristic resistance to 5FU therapy, may be increased for 5FU sensitivity via secondary frameshift mutation of the base excision repair gene MBD4.

  14. Nuclear translocation contributes to regulation of DNA excision repair activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Nina Østergaard; Andersen, Sofie Dabros; Lützen, Anne;

    2009-01-01

    , it is evident that proteins from the different DNA repair pathways interact [Y. Wang, D. Cortez, P. Yazdi, N. Neff, S.J. Elledge, J. Qin, BASC, a super complex of BRCA1-associated proteins involved in the recognition and repair of aberrant DNA structures, Genes Dev. 14 (2000) 927-939; M. Christmann, M......DNA mutations are circumvented by dedicated specialized excision repair systems, such as the base excision repair (BER), nucleotide excision repair (NER), and mismatch repair (MMR) pathways. Although the individual repair pathways have distinct roles in suppressing changes in the nuclear DNA.......T. Tomicic, W.P. Roos, B. Kaina, Mechanisms of human DNA repair: an update, Toxicology 193 (2003) 3-34; N.B. Larsen, M. Rasmussen, L.J. Rasmussen, Nuclear and mitochondrial DNA repair: similar pathways? Mitochondrion 5 (2005) 89-108]. Protein interactions are not only important for function, but also...

  15. A superstructure-based electrochemical assay for signal-amplified detection of DNA methyltransferase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Yang, Yin; Dong, Huilei; Cai, Chenxin

    2016-12-15

    DNA methyltransferase (MTase) activity is highly correlated with the occurrence and development of cancer. This work reports a superstructure-based electrochemical assay for signal-amplified detection of DNA MTase activity using M.SssI as an example. First, low-density coverage of DNA duplexes on the surface of the gold electrode was achieved by immobilized mercaptohexanol, followed by immobilization of DNA duplexes. The duplex can be cleaved by BstUI endonuclease in the absence of DNA superstructures. However, the cleavage is blocked after the DNA is methylated by M.SssI. The DNA superstructures are formed with the addition of helper DNA. By using an electroactive complex, RuHex, which can bind to DNA double strands, the activity of M.SssI can be quantitatively detected by differential pulse voltammetry. Due to the high site-specific cleavage by BstUI and signal amplification by the DNA superstructure, the biosensor can achieve ultrasensitive detection of DNA MTase activity down to 0.025U/mL. The method can be used for evaluation and screening of the inhibitors of MTase, and thus has potential in the discovery of methylation-related anticancer drugs.

  16. The human DNA-activated protein kinase, DNA-PK: Substrate specificity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, C.W.; Connelly, M.A.; Zhang, H.; Sipley, J.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Biology Dept.; Lees-Miller, S.P.; Lintott, L.G. [Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada). Dept. of Biological Sciences; Sakaguchi, Kazuyasu; Appella, E. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States). Lab. of Cell Biology

    1994-11-05

    Although much has been learned about the structure and function of p53 and the probable sequence of subsequent events that lead to cell cycle arrest, little is known about how DNA damage is detected and the nature of the signal that is generated by DNA damage. Circumstantial evidence suggests that protein kinases may be involved. In vitro, human DNA-PK phosphorylates a variety of nuclear DNA-binding, regulatory proteins including the tumor suppressor protein p53, the single-stranded DNA binding protein RPA, the heat shock protein hsp90, the large tumor antigen (TAg) of simian virus 40, a variety of transcription factors including Fos, Jun, serum response factor (SRF), Myc, Sp1, Oct-1, TFIID, E2F, the estrogen receptor, and the large subunit of RNA polymerase II (reviewed in Anderson, 1993; Jackson et al., 1993). However, for most of these proteins, the sites that are phosphorylated by DNA-PK are not known. To determine if the sites that were phosphorylated in vitro also were phosphorylated in vivo and if DNA-PK recognized a preferred protein sequence, the authors identified the sites phosphorylated by DNA-PK in several substrates by direct protein sequence analysis. Each phosphorylated serine or threonine is followed immediately by glutamine in the polypeptide chain; at no other positions are the amino acid residues obviously constrained.

  17. The human DNA-activated protein kinase, DNA-PK: Substrate specificity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, C.W.; Connelly, M.A.; Zhang, H.; Sipley, J.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Biology Dept.; Lees-Miller, S.P.; Lintott, L.G. [Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada). Dept. of Biological Sciences; Sakaguchi, Kazuyasu; Appella, E. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States). Lab. of Cell Biology

    1994-11-05

    Although much has been learned about the structure and function of p53 and the probable sequence of subsequent events that lead to cell cycle arrest, little is known about how DNA damage is detected and the nature of the signal that is generated by DNA damage. Circumstantial evidence suggests that protein kinases may be involved. In vitro, human DNA-PK phosphorylates a variety of nuclear DNA-binding, regulatory proteins including the tumor suppressor protein p53, the single-stranded DNA binding protein RPA, the heat shock protein hsp90, the large tumor antigen (TAg) of simian virus 40, a variety of transcription factors including Fos, Jun, serum response factor (SRF), Myc, Sp1, Oct-1, TFIID, E2F, the estrogen receptor, and the large subunit of RNA polymerase II (reviewed in Anderson, 1993; Jackson et al., 1993). However, for most of these proteins, the sites that are phosphorylated by DNA-PK are not known. To determine if the sites that were phosphorylated in vitro also were phosphorylated in vivo and if DNA-PK recognized a preferred protein sequence, the authors identified the sites phosphorylated by DNA-PK in several substrates by direct protein sequence analysis. Each phosphorylated serine or threonine is followed immediately by glutamine in the polypeptide chain; at no other positions are the amino acid residues obviously constrained.

  18. Reduced prostasin (CAP1/PRSS8) activity eliminates HAI-1 and HAI-2 deficiency-associated developmental defects by preventing matriptase activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szabo, Roman; Uzzun Sales, Katiuchia; Kosa, Peter;

    2012-01-01

    to placental labyrinth failure, and neural tube defects in HAI-2-deficient embryos. Inactivation of genes encoding c-Met, protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2), or the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) alpha subunit all failed to rescue embryonic lethality, suggesting that deregulated matriptase...

  19. The single-strand DNA binding activity of human PC4 preventsmutagenesis and killing by oxidative DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jen-Yeu; Sarker, Altaf Hossain; Cooper, Priscilla K.; Volkert, Michael R.

    2004-02-01

    Human positive cofactor 4 (PC4) is a transcriptional coactivator with a highly conserved single-strand DNA (ssDNA) binding domain of unknown function. We identified PC4 as a suppressor of the oxidative mutator phenotype of the Escherichia coli fpg mutY mutant and demonstrate that this suppression requires its ssDNA binding activity. Yeast mutants lacking their PC4 ortholog Sub1 are sensitive to hydrogen peroxide and exhibit spontaneous and peroxide induced hypermutability. PC4 expression suppresses the peroxide sensitivity of the yeast sub l{Delta} mutant, suggesting that the human protein has a similar function. A role for yeast and human proteins in DNA repair is suggested by the demonstration that Sub1 acts in a peroxide-resistance pathway involving Rad2 and by the physical interaction of PC4 with the human Rad2 homolog XPG. We show XPG recruits PC4 to a bubble-containing DNA substrate with resulting displacement of XPG and formation of a PC4-DNA complex. We discuss the possible requirement for PC4 in either global or transcription-coupled repair of oxidative DNA damage to mediate the release of XPG bound to its substrate.

  20. Macrophage peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ deficiency delays skin wound healing through impairing apoptotic cell clearance in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, H.; Shi, R.; Luo, B.; Yang, X.; Qiu, L; Xiong, J.; Jiang, M; Y. Liu; Zhang, Z; Wu, Y

    2015-01-01

    Skin wound macrophages are key regulators of skin repair and their dysfunction causes chronic, non-healing skin wounds. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) regulates pleiotropic functions of macrophages, but its contribution in skin wound healing is poorly defined. We observed that macrophage PPARγ expression was upregulated during skin wound healing. Furthermore, macrophage PPARγ deficiency (PPARγ-knock out (KO)) mice exhibited impaired skin wound healing with reduced co...

  1. Hereditary deficiency of the second component of complement (C2) in man: correlation of C2 haemolytic activity with immunochemical measurements of C2 protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruddy, S.; Klemperer, M. R.; Rosen, F. S.; Austen, K. F.; Kumate, J.

    1970-01-01

    Measurements of the nine components of complement in the serums of 16 members of a kindred have established the diagnosis of hereditary deficiency of the second component of complement (C2). The autosomal recessive mode of inheritance resembles that of previously described families with C2 deficiency. Both C2 activity determinations with a stoichiometric haemolytic assay and C2 protein measurements with electroimmunodiffusion against antibody monospecific for C2 detect the heterozygous deficient state. Antigenic analysis, in vitro reconstitution experiments, and the constant ratio of C2 function to C2 protein indicate that the C2 synthesized by heterozygotes is indistinguishable from normal human C2. Studies of neonatal homozygous deficient serum and maternal heterozygous deficient serum show that transplacental passage of C2 does not occur. C2 deficiency in this family is not associated with clinical defects in host resistance. ImagesFIG. 3 PMID:4987909

  2. Research of DNA Damage Induced by Free Radicals in Syndrome of Spleen Qi Deficiency%脾气虚证自由基导致DNA损伤变化探析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丛培玮; 尚冰; 许南阳; 史冰洁; 王蕊芳

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This research was to explore the changing rule of DNA attacked hy free radicals and oxidative damage in rats with spleen qi deficiency, understanding the role of spleen qi deficiency in the development process of spleen disease and providing experimental evidence for further research. Methods: Fatty diet plus over fatigue method was used to establish the model for 14 days, and the last 24 h urine samples were taken to measure the content of 8-OHdG, and the SOD, GSH-Px, T-AOC and MDA contents were measured in brain cortex and serum. Results: In serum and cerebral cortex, the contents of SOD, GSH-Px, T-AOC and MDA in the model group showed a significant difference ( P<0.05 ) .The 8-OHdG in the urine samples of the model group was increased significantly ( P<0.05 ) .Conclusion : There is a clear reduction of antioxidant enzyme activities and free radical damage in spleen qi deficiency model, but the spleen qi deficiency state in which stage of the spleen diseases is needed to be understood in-depth studies.%目的:探讨脾气虚状态下模型大鼠体内DNA受到自由基攻击和氧化损伤的程度,了解脾气虚在中医脾病发展过程中的地位,进一步为脾气虚证提供实验学依据.方法:采用“饮食不节+疲劳过度”复合方法造模14天后,取大鼠最后24 h尿样测定8-OHdG的含量,取脑皮质和血清测定SOD、GSH-Px、T-AOC、MDA的含量.结果:脾气虚模型组大鼠血清和脑皮质中SOD、GSH-Px、T-AOC和MDA含量与正常组相比均有显著差异(P<0.05).模型组尿样中8-OHdG含量也有明显上调趋势(P<0.05)结论:脾气虚模型大鼠体内存在着明显的自由基损伤和抗氧化酶活性的降低,但脾气虚状态处于脾病全程的何种阶段尚需深入研究了解.

  3. Histone deacetylase inhibitors selectively target homology dependent DNA repair defective cells and elevate non-homologous endjoining activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Smith

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We have previously used the ATAD5-luciferase high-throughput screening assay to identify genotoxic compounds with potential chemotherapeutic capabilities. The successful identification of known genotoxic agents, including the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi trichostatin A (TSA, confirmed the specificity of the screen since TSA has been widely studied for its ability to cause apoptosis in cancer cells. Because many cancers have acquired mutations in DNA damage checkpoints or repair pathways, we hypothesized that these cancers may be susceptible to treatments that target compensatory pathways. Here, we used a panel of isogenic chicken DT40 B lymphocyte mutant and human cell lines to investigate the ability of TSA to define selective pathways that promote HDACi toxicity. RESULTS: HDACi induced a DNA damage response and reduced viability in all repair deficient DT40 mutants although ATM-nulls were least affected. The most dramatic sensitivity was observed in mutants lacking the homology dependent repair (HDR factor BLM or the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ and HDR factors, KU/RAD54, suggesting an involvement of either HDR or NHEJ in HDACi-induced cell death. To extend these findings, we measured the frequencies of HDR and NHEJ after HDACi treatment and monitored viability in human cell lines comparably deficient in HDR or NHEJ. Although no difference in HDR frequency was observed between HDACi treated and untreated cells, HDR-defective human cell lines were clearly more sensitive than wild type. Unexpectedly, cells treated with HDACis showed a significantly elevated NHEJ frequency. CONCLUSIONS: HDACi targeting drugs induced significant increases in NHEJ activity in human cell lines but did not alter HDR frequency. Moreover, HDR is required for cellular resistance to HDACi therapy; therefore, NHEJ does not appear to be a critical axis for HDACi resistance. Rather, HDACi compounds induced DNA damage, most likely double strand breaks

  4. Top3 processes recombination intermediates and modulates checkpoint activity after DNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mankouri, Hocine W; Hickson, Ian D

    2006-01-01

    Mutation of TOP3 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae causes poor growth, hyperrecombination, and a failure to fully activate DNA damage checkpoints in S phase. Here, we report that overexpression of a dominant-negative allele of TOP3, TOP3(Y356F), which lacks the catalytic (decatenation) activity of Top3......, causes impaired S-phase progression and the persistence of abnormal DNA structures (X-shaped DNA molecules) after exposure to methylmethanesulfonate. The impaired S-phase progression is due to a persistent checkpoint-mediated cell cycle delay and can be overridden by addition of caffeine. Hence......, the catalytic activity of Top3 is not required for DNA damage checkpoint activation, but it is required for normal S-phase progression after DNA damage. We also present evidence that the checkpoint-mediated cell cycle delay and persistence of X-shaped DNA molecules resulting from overexpression of TOP3(Y356F...

  5. Checkpoint for DNA integrity at the first mitosis after oocyte activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin; Trimarchi, James R; Smith, Peter J S; Keefe, David L

    2002-06-01

    Activation of oocytes, arrested at the meiosis II (MII) in mammals, initiates meiotic release, mitotic divisions, and development. Unlike most somatic cell types, MII arrested female germ cells lack an efficient DNA integrity checkpoint control. Here we present evidence showing a unique checkpoint for DNA integrity at first mitosis after oocyte activation. Mouse oocytes carrying intact DNA cleaved normally after meiotic release, whereas 50% of oocytes harboring damaged DNA manifested cytofragmentation, a morphological hallmark of apoptosis. If not activated, DNA-damaged MII oocytes did not show apoptotic fragmentation. Further, activated, enucleated oocytes or enucleated fertilized oocytes also underwent cytofragmentation, implicating cytoplasmic coordination of the fragmentation process, independent of the nucleus. Depolymerization of either actin filaments or microtubules induced no cytofragmentation, but inhibited fragmentation upon oocyte activation. During the process of fragmentation, microtubule networks formed, then microtubule asters congregated at discrete locations, around which fragmented cellular bodies formed. Mitotic spindles, however, were not formed inactivated oocytes with damaged or absent DNA; in contrast, normal mitotic spindles were formed in activated oocytes with intact DNA. These results demonstrate that damaged DNA or absence of DNA leads to cytofragmentation after oocyte activation. Further, we found a mechanism of cytoskeletal involvement in the process of cytofragmentation. In addition, possible implication of the present findings in somatic cell cloning and human clinical embryology is discussed.

  6. Chimeric negative regulation of p14ARF and TBX1 by a t(9;22) translocation associated with melanoma, deafness, and DNA repair deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xiaohui; Anzick, Sarah L; Khan, Sikandar G; Ueda, Takahiro; Stone, Gary; Digiovanna, John J; Tamura, Deborah; Wattendorf, Daniel; Busch, David; Brewer, Carmen C; Zalewski, Christopher; Butman, John A; Griffith, Andrew J; Meltzer, Paul S; Kraemer, Kenneth H

    2013-09-01

    Melanoma is the most deadly form of skin cancer and DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) is the most frequent interstitial deletion syndrome. We characterized a novel balanced t(9;22)(p21;q11.2) translocation in a patient with melanoma, DNA repair deficiency, and features of DGS including deafness and malformed inner ears. Using chromosome sorting, we located the 9p21 breakpoint in CDKN2A intron 1. This resulted in underexpression of the tumor suppressor p14 alternate reading frame (p14ARF); the reduced DNA repair was corrected by transfection with p14ARF. Ultraviolet radiation-type p14ARF mutations in his melanoma implicated p14ARF in its pathogenesis. The 22q11.2 breakpoint was located in a palindromic AT-rich repeat (PATRR22). We identified a new gene, FAM230A, that contains PATRR22 within an intron. The 22q11.2 breakpoint was located 800 kb centromeric to TBX1, which is required for inner ear development. TBX1 expression was greatly reduced. The translocation resulted in a chimeric transcript encoding portions of p14ARF and FAM230A. Inhibition of chimeric p14ARF-FAM230A expression increased p14ARF and TBX1 expression and improved DNA repair. Expression of the chimera in normal cells produced dominant negative inhibition of p14ARF. Similar chimeric mRNAs may mediate haploinsufficiency in DGS or dominant negative inhibition of other genes such as those involved in melanoma.

  7. Effects of a high-fat diet on spontaneous metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 deficient and wild-type mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    We investigated the effects of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) deficiency on spontaneous metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) in PAI-1 deficient (PAI-1-/-) and wildtype mice (C57BL/6J background) fed the AIN93G diet or that diet modified with 45% calories from fat. The high-fat diet i...

  8. Metastasis of transgenic breast cancer in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 gene-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almholt, Kasper; Nielsen, Boye Schnack; Frandsen, Thomas Leth;

    2003-01-01

    of metastasizing breast cancer. In these tumors, the expression pattern of uPA and PAI-1 resembles that of human ductal breast cancer and plasminogen is required for efficient metastasis. In a cohort of 63 transgenic mice that were either PAI-1-deficient or wild-type sibling controls, primary tumor growth...... limiting for tumor vascularization and metastasis, or that there is a functional redundancy between PAI-1 and other inhibitors of the uPA/plasmin system, masking the effect of PAI-1 deficiency....

  9. Distinct structural features of TFAM drive mitochondrial DNA packaging versus transcriptional activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Huu B; Lovely, Geoffrey A; Phillips, Rob; Chan, David C

    2014-01-01

    TFAM (transcription factor A, mitochondrial) is a DNA-binding protein that activates transcription at the two major promoters of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)--the light strand promoter (LSP) and the heavy strand promoter 1 (HSP1). Equally important, it coats and packages the mitochondrial genome. TFAM has been shown to impose a U-turn on LSP DNA; however, whether this distortion is relevant at other sites is unknown. Here we present crystal structures of TFAM bound to HSP1 and to nonspecific DNA. In both, TFAM similarly distorts the DNA into a U-turn. Yet, TFAM binds to HSP1 in the opposite orientation from LSP explaining why transcription from LSP requires DNA bending, whereas transcription at HSP1 does not. Moreover, the crystal structures reveal dimerization of DNA-bound TFAM. This dimerization is dispensable for DNA bending and transcriptional activation but is important in DNA compaction. We propose that TFAM dimerization enhances mitochondrial DNA compaction by promoting looping of the DNA.

  10. Vitamin D Deficiency in Egyptian Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients: How Prevalent and Does It Impact Disease Activity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abaza, Nouran M.; El-Mallah, Reem M.; Shaaban, Asmaa; Mobasher, Sameh A.; Al-hassanein, Khaled F.; Abdel Zaher, Amr A.; El-kabarity, Rania H.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The emerging role of vitamin D in immunology and autoimmune disorders has been a worldwide interest in the last decade. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients are particularly at a delicate position predisposing them to suffer from vitamin D deficiency due to the multiple risk factors accompanying the disease. Whether vitamin D deficiency is also involved as a risk factor for developing SLE and affecting its course is a considerable concern. OBJECTIVES The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in SLE patients and its relation to disease. MATERIALS AND METHODS In our observational cross-sectional study, serum levels of vitamin D [25(OH)D] in 60 SLE patients and 30 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were assessed and estimated for deficiency and insufficiency at 10 and 30 ng/mL, respectively. Disease activity was evaluated by SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI), irreversible organ damage by Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology Damage Index (SLICC/ACR DI), and severity by Severity of Disease Index. Fatigue was measured by visual analog scale. RESULTS Significantly lower levels of 25(OH)D were found in SLE patients (17.6 ± 6.9 ng/mL) in comparison to controls (79.0 ± 28.7 ng/mL), with a statistically high significant difference (t = −11.2, P < 0.001). High prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency was detected as 73.3% and 23.3%, respectively. Vitamin D had a highly significant negative correlation with SLEDAI (r = −0.495, P < 0.001), SLICC (r = −0.431, P < 0.05), and fatigue (r = −0.436, P < 0.05). CONCLUSION Vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency were found to be prevalent in SLE patients in our study and related to disease activity and fatigue. If needed, routine screening and consequent repletion of vitamin D are recommended in SLE patients. Restoring adequate vitamin D levels in SLE patients should be more explored as a potential yet

  11. nifH Promoter Activity Is Regulated by DNA Supercoiling in Sinorhizobium meliloti

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Jie LIU; Biao HU; Jia-Bi ZHU; Shan-Jiong SHEN; Guan-Qiao YU

    2005-01-01

    In prokaryotes, DNA supercoiling regulates the expression of many genes; for example, the expression of Klebsiella pneumoniae nifLA operon depends on DNA negative supercoiling in anaerobically grown cells, which indicates that DNA supercoiling might play a role in gene regulation of the anaerobic response. Since the expression of the nifH promoter in Sinorhizobium meliloti is not repressed by oxygen, it is proposed that the status of DNA supercoiling may not affect the expression of the nifH promoter. We tested this hypothesis by analyzing nifH promoter activity in wild-type and gyr- Escherichia coli in the presence and absence of DNA gyrase inhibitors. Our results show that gene expression driven by the S.meliloti nifH promoter requires the presence of active DNA gyrase. Because DNA gyrase increases the number of negative superhelical turns in DNA in the presence of ATP, our data indicate that negative supercoiling is also important for nifH promoter activity. Our study also shows that the DNA supercoilingdependent S. meliloti nifH promoter activity is related to the trans-acting factors NtrC and NifA that activate it. DNA supercoiling appeared to have a stronger effect on NtrC-activated nifH promoter activity than on NifA-activated promoter activity. Collectively, these results from the S. meliloti nifH promoter model system seem to indicate that, in addition to regulating gene expression during anaerobic signaling, DNA supercoiling may also provide a favorable topology for trans-acting factor binding and promoter activation regardless of oxygen status.

  12. Replication stress activates DNA repair synthesis in mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minocherhomji, Sheroy; Ying, Songmin; Bjerregaard, Victoria A

    2015-01-01

    mitosis serves as the trigger for completion of DNA replication at CFS loci in human cells. Given that this POLD3-dependent mitotic DNA synthesis is enhanced in aneuploid cancer cells that exhibit intrinsically high levels of chromosomal instability (CIN(+)) and replicative stress, we suggest...

  13. A functional deficiency of TERA/VCP/p97 contributes to impaired DNA repair in multiple polyglutamine diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Kyota; Nakamura, Yoko; Oka, Tsutomu; Ito, Hikaru; Tamura, Takuya; Tagawa, Kazuhiko; Sasabe, Toshikazu; Katsuta, Asuka; Motoki, Kazumi; Shiwaku, Hiroki; Sone, Masaki; Yoshida, Chisato; Katsuno, Masahisa; Eishi, Yoshinobu; Murata, Miho; Taylor, J Paul; Wanker, Erich E; Kono, Kazuteru; Tashiro, Satoshi; Sobue, Gen; La Spada, Albert R; Okazawa, Hitoshi

    2013-01-01

    It is hypothesized that a common underlying mechanism links multiple neurodegenerative disorders. Here we show that transitional endoplasmic reticulum ATPase (TERA)/valosin-containing protein (VCP)/p97 directly binds to multiple polyglutamine disease proteins (huntingtin, ataxin-1, ataxin-7 and androgen receptor) via polyglutamine sequence. Although normal and mutant polyglutamine proteins interact with TERA/VCP/p97, only mutant proteins affect dynamism of TERA/VCP/p97. Among multiple functions of TERA/VCP/p97, we reveal that functional defect of TERA/VCP/p97 in DNA double-stranded break repair is critical for the pathology of neurons in which TERA/VCP/p97 is located dominantly in the nucleus in vivo. Mutant polyglutamine proteins impair accumulation of TERA/VCP/p97 and interaction of related double-stranded break repair proteins, finally causing the increase of unrepaired double-stranded break. Consistently, the recovery of lifespan in polyglutamine disease fly models by TERA/VCP/p97 corresponds well to the improvement of double-stranded break in neurons. Taken together, our results provide a novel common pathomechanism in multiple polyglutamine diseases that is mediated by DNA repair function of TERA/VCP/p97.

  14. Deficiency of the Caenorhabditis elegans DNA polymerase eta homologue increases sensitivity to UV radiation during germ-line development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkumo, Tsuyoshi; Masutani, Chikahide; Eki, Toshihiko; Hanaoka, Fumio

    2006-01-01

    Defects in the human XPV/POLH gene result in the variant form of the disease xeroderma pigmentosum (XP-V). The gene encodes DNA polymerase eta (Poleta), which catalyzes translesion synthesis (TLS) past UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and other lesions. To further understand the roles of Poleta in multicellular organisms, we analyzed phenotypes caused by suppression of Caenorhabditis elegans POLH (Ce-POLH) by RNA interference (RNAi). F1 and F2 progeny from worms treated by Ce-POLH-specific RNAi grew normally, but F1 eggs laid by worms treated by RNAi against Ce-POLD, which encodes Poldelta did not hatch. These results suggest that Poldelta but not Poleta is essential for C. elegans embryogenesis. Poleta-targeted embryos UV-irradiated after egg laying were only moderately sensitive. In contrast, Poleta-targeted embryos UV-irradiated prior to egg laying exhibited severe sensitivity, indicating that Poleta contributes significantly to damage tolerance in C. elegans in early embryogenesis but only modestly at later stages. As early embryogenesis is characterized by high levels of DNA replication, Poleta may confer UV resistance in C. elegans, perhaps by catalyzing TLS in early embryogenesis.

  15. Temporal phasing of locomotor activity, heart rate rhythmicity, and core body temperature is disrupted in VIP receptor 2-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannibal, Jens; Hsiung, Hansen M; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    2011-03-01

    Neurons of the brain's biological clock located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) generate circadian rhythms of physiology (core body temperature, hormone secretion, locomotor activity, sleep/wake, and heart rate) with distinct temporal phasing when entrained by the light/dark (LD) cycle. The neuropeptide vasoactive intestinal polypetide (VIP) and its receptor (VPAC2) are highly expressed in the SCN. Recent studies indicate that VIPergic signaling plays an essential role in the maintenance of ongoing circadian rhythmicity by synchronizing SCN cells and by maintaining rhythmicity within individual neurons. To further increase the understanding of the role of VPAC2 signaling in circadian regulation, we implanted telemetric devices and simultaneously measured core body temperature, spontaneous activity, and heart rate in a strain of VPAC2-deficient mice and compared these observations with observations made from mice examined by wheel-running activity. The study demonstrates that VPAC2 signaling is necessary for a functional circadian clock driving locomotor activity, core body temperature, and heart rate rhythmicity, since VPAC2-deficient mice lose the rhythms in all three parameters when placed under constant conditions (of either light or darkness). Furthermore, although 24-h rhythms for three parameters are retained in VPAC2-deficient mice during the LD cycle, the temperature rhythm displays markedly altered time course and profile, rising earlier and peaking ∼4-6 h prior to that of wild-type mice. The use of telemetric devices to measure circadian locomotor activity, temperature, and heart rate, together with the classical determination of circadian rhythms of wheel-running activity, raises questions about how representative wheel-running activity may be of other behavioral parameters, especially when animals have altered circadian phenotype.

  16. ERK kinases modulate the activation of PI3 kinase related kinases (PIKKs) in DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaozeng; Yan, Judy; Tang, Damu

    2013-12-01

    DNA damage response (DDR) is the critical surveillance mechanism in maintaining genome integrity. The mechanism activates checkpoints to prevent cell cycle progression in the presence of DNA lesions, and mediates lesion repair. DDR is coordinated by three apical PI3 kinase related kinases (PIKKs), including ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM), ATM- and Rad3-related (ATR), and DNA-PKcs (the catalytic subunit of the DNA dependent protein kinase). These kinases are activated in response to specific DNA damage or lesions, resulting in checkpoint activation and DNA lesion repair. While it is clear that the pathways of ATM, ATR, and DNA-PK are the core components of DDR, there is accumulating evidence revealing the involvement of other cellular pathways in regulating DDR; this is in line with the concept that in addition to being a nuclear event DDR is also a cellular process. One of these pathways is the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) pathway. ERK is a converging point of multiple signal transduction pathways involved in cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Adding to this list of pathways is the recent development of ERK in DDR. The ERK kinases (ERK1 and ERK2) contribute to the proper execution of DDR in terms of checkpoint activation and the repair of DNA lesions. This review summarizes the contributions of ERK to DDR with emphasis on the relationship of ERK kinases with the activation of ATM, ATR, and DNA-PKcs.

  17. Deficiency in p53 is required for doxorubicin induced transcriptional activation of NF-κB target genes in human breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalmases, Alba; González, Irene; Menendez, Silvia; Arpí, Oriol; Corominas, Josep Maria; Servitja, Sonia; Tusquets, Ignasi; Chamizo, Cristina; Rincón, Raúl; Espinosa, Lluis; Bigas, Anna; Eroles, Pilar; Furriol, Jessica; Lluch, Anna; Rovira, Ana; Albanell, Joan; Rojo, Federico

    2014-01-01

    NF-κB has been linked to doxorubicin resistance in breast cancer patients. NF-κB nuclear translocation and DNA binding in doxorubicin treated-breast cancer cells have been extensively examined; however its functional relevance at transcriptional level on NF-κB -dependent genes and the biological consequences are unclear. We studied NF-κB -dependent gene expression induced by doxorubicin in breast cancer cells and fresh human cancer specimens with different genetic backgrounds focusing on their p53 status. NF-κB -dependent signature of doxorubicin was identified by gene expression microarrays in breast cancer cells treated with doxorubicin and the IKKβ-inhibitor MLN120B, and confirmed ex vivo in human cancer samples. The association with p53 was functionally validated. Finally, NF-κB activation and p53 status was determined in a cohort of breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant doxorubicin-based chemotherapy. Doxorubicin treatment in the p53-mutated MDA-MB-231 cells resulted in NF NF-κB driven-gene transcription signature. Modulation of genes related with invasion, metastasis and chemoresistance (ICAM-1, CXCL1, TNFAIP3, IL8) were confirmed in additional doxorubicin-treated cell lines and fresh primary human breast tumors. In both systems, p53-defcient background correlated with the activation of the NF-κB -dependent signature. Furthermore, restoration of p53WT in the mutant p53 MDA-MB-231 cells impaired NF-κB driven transcription induced by doxorubicin. Moreover, a p53 deficient background and nuclear NF-κB /p65 in breast cancer patients correlated with reduced disease free-survival. This study supports that p53 deficiency is necessary for a doxorubicin driven NF-κB -response that limits doxorubicin cytotoxicity in breast cancer and is linked to an aggressive clinical behavior. PMID:24344116

  18. Acai juice attenuates atherosclerosis in apoe deficient mice through antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objective - Acai fruit pulp has received much attention because of its high antioxidant capacity and potential anti-inflammatory effects. In this study, athero-protective effects of açaí juice were investigated in apolipoprotein E deficient (apoE -/-) mice. Methods and Results - ApoE-/- mice were f...

  19. Biotin deficiency in the rat as a model for reduced pyruvate carboxylase activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrijver, Jacobus

    1978-01-01

    The investigations described in this thesis are a contribution to the study of Leigh's disease (Subacute Necrotizing Encephalomyelopathy, SNE). SNE resembles in neuropathology Wernicke's encephalopathy, which is caused by thiamine deficiency. The scope and the purpose of the present study is given i

  20. Aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase enzyme activity in deficient patients and heterozygotes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, M.M.; Geurtz, P.B.H.; Willemsen, M.A.A.P.; Wevers, R.A.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterised by developmental delay, motor retardation and autonomic dysfunction. Very low concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of homovanillic acid (HVA) and 5-hydroxy indole acetic acid

  1. Catalytic activity of tetrahydrobiopterin in dihydropteridine reductase deficiency and indications for treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponzone, A; Guardamagna, O; Dianzani, I; Ponzone, R; Ferrero, G B; Spada, M; Cotton, R G

    1993-02-01

    It is now widely accepted that tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), the natural cofactor of aromatic amino acid hydroxylases, in the absence of its regenerating enzyme dihydropteridine reductase (DHPR), will function only stoichiometrically in the phenylalanine (Phe) hydroxylating system. This has limited the use of pterin cofactor in diagnosis and treatment of patients suffering from inherited DHPR deficiency, one of the most common forms of hyperphenylalaninemia caused by BH4 deficiency. This is despite the observation of a dramatic fall in serum Phe concentration after BH4 loading in such patients. In this study, quantitation of this phenomenon was obtained by comparing the kinetics of serum Phe after either a simple Phe or a combined Phe plus BH4 oral loading in patients with Phe hydroxylase or with DHPR deficiency. Only in the latter was the total body clearance of Phe enhanced up to 5 times by the cofactor administration, resulting in the molar equivalent of Phe hydroxylated/mol of BH4 ranging from at least 6 to 10, against the postulated 1. As a consequence, BH4 administration should be attempted therapeutically in DHPR-deficient patients, thus avoiding a lifelong Phe-restricted diet. Preliminary experience with such treatment is given with two cases.

  2. Renin-angiotensin system activity in vitamin D deficient, obese individuals with hypertension: An urban Indian study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar Kota

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Elevated renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS activity is an important mechanism in the development of hypertension. Both obesity and 25-hydroxy vitamin D [25(OHD] deficiency have been associated with hypertension and augmented renin-angiotensin system (RAS activity. We tried to test the hypothesis that vitamin D deficiency and obesity are associated with increased RAS activity in Indian patients with hypertension. Materials and Methods: Fifty newly detected hypertensive patients were screened. Patients with secondary hypertension, chronic kidney disease, or coronary artery disease were excluded. Patients underwent measurement of vitamin D and plasma renin and plasma aldosterone concentrations. They were divided into three groups according to their baseline body mass index (BMI; normal <25 kg/m 2 , overweight 25-29.9 kg/m 2 and obese ≥30 kg/m 2 and 25(OHD levels (deficient <20 ng/ml, insufficient 20-29 ng/ml and optimal ≥30 ng/ml. Results: A total of 50 (male:female = 32:18 patients were included, with a mean age of 49.5 ± 7.8 years, mean BMI of 28.3 ± 3.4 kg/m 2 and a mean 25(OHD concentration of 18.5 ± 6.4 ng/ml. Mean systolic blood pressure (SBP was 162.4 ± 20.2 mm Hg and mean diastolic blood pressure (DBP was 100.2 ± 11.2 mm Hg. All the three blood pressure parameters [SBP, DBP and mean arterial pressure (MAP] were significantly higher among individuals with lower 25(OHD levels. The P values for trends in SBP, DBP and MAP were 0.009, 0.01 and 0.007, respectively. Though all the three blood pressure parameters (SBP, DBP and MAP were higher among individuals with higher BMIs, they were not achieving statistical significance. Increasing trends in PRA and PAC were noticed with lower 25(OHD and higher BMI levels. Conclusion: Vitamin D deficiency and obesity are associated with stimulation of RAAS activity. Vitamin D supplementation along with weight loss may be studied as a therapeutic strategy to reduce tissue RAS

  3. Production of anti-double-stranded DNA antibodies in activated lymphocyte derived DNA induced lupus model was dependent on CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Z; Xu, L; Xu, W; Xiong, S

    2012-04-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that activated lymphocyte derived DNA (ALD-DNA) could function as an autoantigen to induce production of anti-double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA) antibodies in syngeneic BALB/c mice. Here we carefully evaluated the potential role of T cells in the induction of anti-dsDNA antibody. We demonstrated that ALD-DNA could effectively induce production of anti-dsDNA antibodies in vivo and in vitro. In contrast, ALD-DNA could not induce the generation of anti-dsDNA antibodies in nude mice. We further showed that in vivo depletion of CD3(+) T cells blocked the induction of anti-dsDNA antibodies in BALB/c mice. Notably, we demonstrated that CD4(+) but not CD8(+) T cells conferred ALD-DNA to induce anti-dsDNA antibodies. Finally, we demonstrated that adoptive transfer of CD4(+) T cells could rescue ALD-DNA induced anti-dsDNA antibodies in nude mice. Our results suggested that T helper cells were required for ALD-DNA to induce anti-dsDNA antibodies. These findings could further our understanding about the immunogenic properties of DNA and throw new light on SLE pathogenesis.

  4. Effects of DNA on immunoglobulin production stimulating activity of alcohol dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, T; Furutani, H; Sasaki, T; Sugahara, T

    1999-09-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase-I (ADH-I) derived from horse liver stimulated IgM production by human-human hybridoma, HB4C5 cells and lymphocytes. The IPSF activity of ADH-I was suppressed by coexistence of short DNA whose chain length is less than 200 base pairs (bp) and fibrous DNA in a dose-dependent manner. These DNA preparations completely inhibited the IPSF activity at the concentration of 250 mug/ml and 1.0 mg/ml, respectively. DNA sample termed long DNA whose average chain length is 400-7000 bp slightly stimulated IPSF activity at 0.06 mug/ml. However, long DNA suppressed IPSF activity by half at 1.0 mg/ml. The laser confocal microscopic analysis had revealed that ADH-I was incorporated by HB4C5 cells. The uptake of ADH-I was strongly inhibited by short DNA and fibrous DNA. However, long DNA did not suppress the internalization of ADH-I into HB4C5 cells. These findings indicate that short DNA and fibrous DNA depress IPSF activity of ADH-I by inhibiting the internalization of this enzyme. According to the gel-filtration analysis using HPLC, ADH-I did not directly interact with short DNA. It is expected from these findings that short DNA influences HB4C5 cells to suppress the internalization of ADH-I. Moreover, these facts also strongly suggest that ADH-I acts as IPSF after internalization into the cell.

  5. Antithrombin deficiency and decreased protein C activity in a young man with venous thromboembolism: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Tian, Min; Cui, Guanglin; Wang, Dao Wen

    2017-08-31

    Antithrombin and protein C are two crucial members in the anticoagulant system and play important roles in hemostasis. Mutations in SERPINC1 and PROC lead to deficiency or dysfunction of the two proteins, which could result in venous thromboembolism (VTE). Here, we report a Chinese 22-year-old young man who developed recurrent and serious VTE in cerebral veins, visceral veins, and deep veins of the lower extremity. Laboratory tests and direct sequencing of PROC and SERPINC1 were conducted for the patient and his family members. Coagulation tests revealed that the patient presented type I antithrombin deficiency combined with decreased protein C activity resulting from a small insertion mutation c.848_849insGATGT in SERPINC1 and a short deletion variant c.572_574delAGA in PROC. This combination of the two mutations was absent in 400 healthy subjects each from southern and northern China. Then, we summarized all the mutations of the SERPINC1 and PROC gene reported in the Chinese Han population. This study demonstrates that the combination of antithrombin deficiency and decreased protein C activity can result in severe VTE and that the coexistence of different genetic factors may increase the risk of VTE.

  6. 75 FR 31795 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Amended Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA...-Curay, Acting Director, Office of Biotechnology Activities, National Institutes of Health. BILLING CODE...

  7. Can cytotoxic activity of anthracyclines be related to DNA damage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, M; Horichi, N; Mazouzi, Z; Bungo, M; Saijo, N; Tapiero, H

    1990-02-01

    Accumulation, cytotoxicity, and DNA damages produced by doxorubicin (DOX), pirarubicin (THP-DOX), fluoro-doxorubicin (ME2303) or its isolated metabolite M1 have been investigated in human myelogenous leukemia cells, sensitive (K562) and resistant to DOX (K562/DOX). These compounds differed by lipophilicity and/or sugar moiety either with (DOX, THP-DOX) or without (ME2303, M1) amino group. In K562 cells, the cytotoxicity was correlated to DNA single-stranded breaks and the intracellular drug amount of DOX or M1. This was not true when the cells were treated with THP-DOX or ME2303. In addition, THP-DOX produced total DNA protein cross-linking. In K562 cells DNA damage was not repaired, while in K562/DOX repair of DNA damage produced by all drugs could be observed. Although in K562/DOX cells drug accumulation was much reduced, higher intracellular drug concentration was required to induce similar level of cytotoxicity and DNA damage. Thus, cytotoxicity produced by anthracycline is not always associated with DNA damage. Different level of resistance to DOX, THP-DOX, ME2303 or M1 is associated with reduced drug accumulation which varies with the structure.

  8. Comparable levels of activity and antigen in factor XII deficiency: a study of 21 homozygotes and 58 heterozygotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girolami, A; Gavasso, S; Pacquola, E; Cabrio, L; Lombardi, A M; Girolami, B

    2005-07-01

    Results of coagulation studies on 21 homozygote patients with factor XII (FXII) deficiency revealed that all of them had no cross-reacting material (CRM) in their plasma. The 58 heterozygotes had in every instance an antigen level comparable to that of clotting activity namely, approximately 50% of normal. An analysis of all pertinent literature also showed that the presence of CRM is very rare in FXII deficiency. CRM is present in approximately 5% of homozygote patients. More precisely, seven of 145 patients. Only in one case, the antigen level was normal (FXII Washington). This prevalence appears lower than that observed for another contact phase factor (prekallikrein). The significance of blood abnormal forms of FXII has not been completely clarified yet. Their study appears useful in the attempt of clarifying the structure-function relation of factor XII.

  9. Apoptosis may underlie the pathology of zinc-deficient skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Dallas; Varigos, George; Ackland, M Leigh

    2006-02-01

    The trace element zinc is essential for the survival and function of all cells. Zinc deficiency, whether nutritional or genetic, is fatal if left untreated. The effects of zinc deficiency are particularly obvious in the skin, seen as an erythematous rash, scaly plaques, and ulcers. Electron microscopy reveals degenerative changes within keratinocytes. Despite the well-documented association between zinc deficiency and skin pathology, it is not clear which cellular processes are most sensitive to zinc deficiency and could account for the typical pathological features. We used the cultured HaCaT keratinocyte line to obtain insight into the cellular effects of zinc deficiency, as these cells show many characteristics of normal skin keratinocytes. Zinc deficiency was induced by growing cells in the presence of the zinc chelator, TPEN, or by growth in zinc-deficient medium. Growth of cells in zinc-deficient medium resulted in a 44% reduction of intracellular zinc levels and a 75% reduction in the activity of the zinc-dependent enzyme, 5'-nucleotidase, relative to the control cells. Over a period of 7 days of exposure to zinc-deficient conditions, no changes in cell viability and growth, or in the cytoskeletal and cell adhesion systems, were found in HaCaT cells. At 7 days, however, induction of apoptosis was indicated by the presence of DNA fragmentation and expression of active caspase-3 in cells. These results demonstrate that apoptosis is the earliest detectable cellular change induced by zinc deficiency in HaCaT keratinocytes. Our observations account for many of the features of zinc deficiency, including the presence of degenerate nuclei, chromatin aggregates and abnormal organization of keratin, that may represent the later stages of apoptosis. In summary, a major causal role for apoptosis in the pathology of zinc deficiency in the skin is proposed. This role is consistent with the previously unexplained diverse range of degenerative cellular changes seen at the

  10. Kinetic characterization of exonuclease-deficient Staphylococcus aureus PolC, a C-family replicative DNA polymerase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indrajit Lahiri

    Full Text Available PolC is the C-family replicative polymerase in low G+C content Gram-positive bacteria. To date several structures of C-family polymerases have been reported, including a high resolution crystal structure of a ternary complex of PolC with DNA and incoming deoxynucleoside triphosphate (dNTP. However, kinetic information needed to understand the enzymatic mechanism of C-family polymerases is limited. For this study we have performed a detailed steady-state and pre-steady-state kinetic characterization of correct dNTP incorporation by PolC from the Gram-positive pathogen Staphylococcus aureus, using a construct lacking both the non-conserved N-terminal domain and the 3'-5' exonuclease domain (Sau-PolC-ΔNΔExo. We find that Sau-PolC-ΔNΔExo has a very fast catalytic rate (k(pol 330 s(-1 but also dissociates from DNA rapidly (k(off ∼150 s(-1, which explains the low processivity of PolC in the absence of sliding clamp processivity factor. Although Sau-PolC-ΔNΔExo follows the overall enzymatic pathway defined for other polymerases, some significant differences exist. The most striking feature is that the nucleotidyl transfer reaction for Sau-PolC-ΔNΔExo is reversible and is in equilibrium with dNTP binding. Simulation of the reaction pathway suggests that rate of pyrophosphate release, or a conformational change required for pyrophosphate release, is much slower than rate of bond formation. The significance of these findings is discussed in the context of previous data showing that binding of the β-clamp processivity factor stimulates the intrinsic nucleotide incorporation rate of the C-family polymerases, in addition to increasing processivity.

  11. Zinc deficiency and the activities of lipoprotein lipase in plasma and tissues of rats force-fed diets with coconut oil or fish oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettler, S I; Eder, K; Kettler, A; Kirchgessner, M

    2000-03-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the effect of zinc deficiency on the activities of lipoprotein lipase in postheparin serum and tissues of rats fed diets containing either coconut oil or fish oil as dietary fat, using a bifactorial experimental design. To ensure an adequate food intake, all the rats were force-fed by gastric tube. Experimental diets contained either 0.8 mg zinc/kg (zinc-deficient diets) or 40 mg zinc/kg (zinc-adequate diets). The effects of zinc deficiency on the activities of lipoprotein lipase in postheparin serum and postprandial triglyceride concentrations and distribution of apolipoproteins in serum lipoproteins depended on the type of dietary fat. Zinc-deficient rats fed the coconut oil diet exhibited a reduced activity of lipoprotein lipase in postheparin serum and adipose tissue, markedly increased concentrations of triglycerides in serum, and a markedly reduced content of apolipoprotein C in triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and high density lipoproteins compared with zinc-adequate rats fed coconut oil. By contrast, zinc-deficient rats fed the fish oil diet did not exhibit reduced activities of lipoprotein lipase in postheparin serum and adipose tissue and increased concentrations of serum lipids compared with zinc-adequate rats fed the fish oil diet. This study suggests that a reduced activity of lipoprotein lipase might contribute to increased postprandial concentrations of serum triglycerides observed in zinc-deficient animals. However, it also demonstrates that the effects of zinc deficiency on lipoprotein metabolism are influenced by dietary fatty acids.

  12. TNF-α is involved in activating DNA fragmentation in skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbó, N; Busquets, S; van Royen, M; Alvarez, B; López-Soriano, F J; Argilés, J M

    2002-01-01

    Intraperitoneal administration of 100 μg kg−1 (body weight) of tumour necrosis factor-α to rats for 8 consecutive days resulted in a significant decrease in protein content, which was concomitant with a reduction in DNA content. Interestingly, the protein/DNA ratio was unchanged in the skeletal muscle of the tumour necrosis factor-α-treated animals as compared with the non-treated controls. Analysis of muscle DNA fragmentation clearly showed enhanced laddering in the skeletal muscle of tumour necrosis factor-α-treated animals, suggesting an apoptotic phenomenon. In a different set of experiments, mice bearing a cachexia-inducing tumour (the Lewis lung carcinoma) showed an increase in muscle DNA fragmentation (9.8-fold) as compared with their non-tumour-bearing control counterparts as previously described. When gene-deficient mice for tumour necrosis factor-α receptor protein I were inoculated with Lewis lung carcinoma, they were also affected by DNA fragmentation; however the increase was only 2.1-fold. These results suggest that tumour necrosis factor-α partly mediates DNA fragmentation during experimental cancer-associated cachexia. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 86, 1012–1016. DOI: 10.1038/sj/bjc/6600167 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:11953838

  13. The orally active and bioavailable ATR kinase inhibitor AZD6738 potentiates the anti-tumor effects of cisplatin to resolve ATM-deficient non-small cell lung cancer in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendetti, Frank P; Lau, Alan; Schamus, Sandra; Conrads, Thomas P; O'Connor, Mark J; Bakkenist, Christopher J

    2015-12-29

    ATR and ATM are DNA damage signaling kinases that phosphorylate several thousand substrates. ATR kinase activity is increased at damaged replication forks and resected DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). ATM kinase activity is increased at DSBs. ATM has been widely studied since ataxia telangiectasia individuals who express no ATM protein are the most radiosensitive patients identified. Since ATM is not an essential protein, it is widely believed that ATM kinase inhibitors will be well-tolerated in the clinic. ATR has been widely studied, but advances have been complicated by the finding that ATR is an essential protein and it is widely believed that ATR kinase inhibitors will be toxic in the clinic. We describe AZD6738, an orally active and bioavailable ATR kinase inhibitor. AZD6738 induces cell death and senescence in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines. AZD6738 potentiates the cytotoxicity of cisplatin and gemcitabine in NSCLC cell lines with intact ATM kinase signaling, and potently synergizes with cisplatin in ATM-deficient NSCLC cells. In contrast to expectations, daily administration of AZD6738 and ATR kinase inhibition for 14 consecutive days is tolerated in mice and enhances the therapeutic efficacy of cisplatin in xenograft models. Remarkably, the combination of cisplatin and AZD6738 resolves ATM-deficient lung cancer xenografts.

  14. HIPK2 restricts SIRT1 activity upon severe DNA damage by a phosphorylation-controlled mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, E; Polonio-Vallon, T; Meister, M; Matt, S; Bitomsky, N; Herbel, C; Liebl, M; Greiner, V; Kriznik, B; Schumacher, S; Krieghoff-Henning, E; Hofmann, T G

    2016-01-01

    Upon severe DNA damage a cellular signalling network initiates a cell death response through activating tumour suppressor p53 in association with promyelocytic leukaemia (PML) nuclear bodies. The deacetylase Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) suppresses cell death after DNA damage by antagonizing p53 acetylation. To facilitate efficient p53 acetylation, SIRT1 function needs to be restricted. How SIRT1 activity is regulated under these conditions remains largely unclear. Here we provide evidence that SIRT1 activity is limited upon severe DNA damage through phosphorylation by the DNA damage-responsive kinase HIPK2. We found that DNA damage provokes interaction of SIRT1 and HIPK2, which phosphorylates SIRT1 at Serine 682 upon lethal damage. Furthermore, upon DNA damage SIRT1 and HIPK2 colocalize at PML nuclear bodies, and PML depletion abrogates DNA damage-induced SIRT1 Ser682 phosphorylation. We show that Ser682 phosphorylation inhibits SIRT1 activity and impacts on p53 acetylation, apoptotic p53 target gene expression and cell death. Mechanistically, we found that DNA damage-induced SIRT1 Ser682 phosphorylation provokes disruption of the complex between SIRT1 and its activator AROS. Our findings indicate that phosphorylation-dependent restriction of SIRT1 activity by HIPK2 shapes the p53 response. PMID:26113041

  15. SUMO-1 regulates the conformational dynamics of Thymine-DNA Glycosylase regulatory domain and competes with its DNA binding activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eilebrecht Sebastian

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human thymine-DNA glycosylase (TDG plays a dual role in base excision repair of G:U/T mismatches and in transcription. Regulation of TDG activity by SUMO-1 conjugation was shown to act on both functions. Furthermore, TDG can interact with SUMO-1 in a non-covalent manner. Results Using NMR spectroscopy we have determined distinct conformational changes in TDG upon either covalent sumoylation on lysine 330 or intermolecular SUMO-1 binding through a unique SUMO-binding motif (SBM localized in the C-terminal region of TDG. The non-covalent SUMO-1 binding induces a conformational change of the TDG amino-terminal regulatory domain (RD. Such conformational dynamics do not exist with covalent SUMO-1 attachment and could potentially play a broader role in the regulation of TDG functions for instance during transcription. Both covalent and non-covalent processes activate TDG G:U repair similarly. Surprisingly, despite a dissociation of the SBM/SUMO-1 complex in presence of a DNA substrate, SUMO-1 preserves its ability to stimulate TDG activity indicating that the non-covalent interactions are not directly involved in the regulation of TDG activity. SUMO-1 instead acts, as demonstrated here, indirectly by competing with the regulatory domain of TDG for DNA binding. Conclusions SUMO-1 increases the enzymatic turnover of TDG by overcoming the product-inhibition of TDG on apurinic sites. The mechanism involves a competitive DNA binding activity of SUMO-1 towards the regulatory domain of TDG. This mechanism might be a general feature of SUMO-1 regulation of other DNA-bound factors such as transcription regulatory proteins.

  16. Coordinate activation of inflammatory gene networksalveolar destruction and neonatal death in AKNA deficient mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenbin Ma; Woong-Kyung Suh; Hitoshi Okada; Tak W Mak; Yang Zhou; Michael R Blackburn; Hector Martinez-Valdez; Blanca Ortiz-Quintero; Roberto Rangel; Morgan R McKeller; Sara Herrera-Rodriguez; Eliseo F Castillo; Kimberly S Schluns; Mary Hall; Huiyuan Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Gene expression can be regulated by chromatin modifiers,transcription factors and proteins that modulate DNA architecture.Among the latter,AT-hook transcription factors have emerged as multifaceted regulators that can activate or repress broad A/T-rich gene networks.Thus,alterations of AT-hook genes could affect the transcription of multiple genes causing global cell dysfunction.Here we report that targeted deletions of mouse AKNA,a hypothetical AT-hook-like transcription factor,sensitize mice to pathogen-induced inflammation and cause sudden neonatal death.Compared with wild-type littermates,AKNA KO mice appeared weak,failedto thrive and most died by postnatal day 10.Systemic inflammation,predominantly in the lungs,was accompanied by enhanced leukocyte infiltration and alveolar destruction.Cytologic,immunohistochemical and molecular analyses revealed CD11b+Gr1+ neutrophils as major tissue infiltrators,neutrophilic granule protein,cathelin-related antimicrobial peptide and S100A8/9 as neutrophil-specific chemoattracting factors,interleukin-1β and interferon-γ as proinflammatory mediators,and matrix metalloprotease 9 as a plausible proteolytic trigger of alveolar damage.AKNA KO bone marrow transplants in wildtype recipients reproduced the severe pathogen-induced reactions and confirmed the involvement of neutrophils in acute inflammation.Moreover,promoter/reporter experiments showed that AKNA could act as a gene repressor.Our results support the concept of coordinated pathway-specific gene regulation functions modulating the intensity of inflammatory responses,reveal neutrophils as prominent mediators of acute inflammation and suggest mechanisms underlying the triggering of acute and potentially fatal immune reactions.

  17. Synthesis, DNA Binding, and Antiproliferative Activity of Novel Acridine-Thiosemicarbazone Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinara Mônica Vitalino de Almeida

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the acridine nucleus was used as a lead-compound for structural modification by adding different substituted thiosemicarbazide moieties. Eight new (Z-2-(acridin-9-ylmethylene-N-phenylhydrazinecarbothioamide derivatives (3a–h were synthesized, their antiproliferative activities were evaluated, and DNA binding properties were performed with calf thymus DNA (ctDNA by electronic absorption and fluorescence spectroscopies. Both hyperchromic and hypochromic effects, as well as red or blue shifts were demonstrated by addition of ctDNA to the derivatives. The calculated binding constants ranged from 1.74 × 104 to 1.0 × 106 M−1 and quenching constants from −0.2 × 104 to 2.18 × 104 M−1 indicating high affinity to ctDNA base pairs. The most efficient compound in binding to ctDNA in vitro was (Z-2-(acridin-9-ylmethylene-N- (4-chlorophenyl hydrazinecarbothioamide (3f, while the most active compound in antiproliferative assay was (Z-2-(acridin-9-ylmethylene-N-phenylhydrazinecarbothioamide (3a. There was no correlation between DNA-binding and in vitro antiproliferative activity, but the results suggest that DNA binding can be involved in the biological activity mechanism. This study may guide the choice of the size and shape of the intercalating part of the ligand and the strategic selection of substituents that increase DNA-binding or antiproliferative properties.

  18. Unraveling the Fanconi anaemia-DNA repair connection through DNA helicase and translocase activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, L H

    2005-08-16

    How the Fanconi anaemia (FA) chromosome stability pathway functions to cope with interstrand crosslinks and other DNA lesions has been elusive, even after FANCD1 proved to be BRCA2, a partner of Rad51 in homologous recombination. The identification and characterization of two new Fanconi proteins having helicase motifs, FANCM and FANCJ/BRIP1/BACH1, implicates the FANC nuclear core complex as a participant in recognizing or processing damaged DNA, and the BRIP1 helicase as acting independently of this complex.

  19. High-fat Diet Enhances and Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Deficiency Attenuates Bone Loss in Mice with Lewis Lung Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lin; Nielsen, Forrest H; Sundaram, Sneha; Cao, Jay

    2015-07-01

    This study determined the effects of a high-fat diet and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 deficiency (Pai1(-/-)) on the bone structure in male C57BL/6 mice bearing Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) in lungs. Significant reduction in bone volume fraction (BV/TV), trabecular number (Tb.N) and bone mineral density (BMD) in femurs and vertebrae were found in LLC-bearing mice compared to non-tumor-bearing mice. In LLC-bearing mice, the high-fat diet compared to the AIN93G control diet significantly reduced BV/TV, Tb.N and BMD in femurs and BV/TV in vertebrae. The high-fat diet significantly reduced BMD in vertebrae in wild-type mice but not in Pai1(-/-) mice. Compared to wild-type mice, PAI1 deficiency significantly increased BV/TV and Tb.N in femurs. The plasma concentration of osteocalcin was significantly lower and that of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRAP5b) was significantly higher in LLC-bearing mice. The high-fat diet significantly reduced plasma osteocalcin and increased TRAP5b. Deficiency in PAI1 prevented the high-fat diet-induced increases in plasma TRAP5b. These findings demonstrate that a high-fat diet enhances, whereas PAI1 deficiency, attenuates metastasis-associated bone loss, indicating that a high-fat diet and PAI1 contribute to metastasis-associated bone deterioration. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  20. Regulation of DnaA Assembly and Activity: Taking Directions From the Genome

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    To ensure proper timing of chromosome duplication during the cell cycle, bacteria must carefully regulate the activity of initiator protein, DnaA, and its interactions with the unique replication origin, oriC. Although several protein regulators of DnaA are known, recent evidence suggests that DnaA recognition sites, in multiple genomic locations, also play an important role in controlling assembly of pre-replication complexes. In oriC, closely spaced high and low affinity recognition sites d...

  1. A methylation-stimulated DNA machine: an autonomous isothermal route to methyltransferase activity and inhibition analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Changfeng; Wen, Yanqin; Peng, Hongzhen; Long, Yitao; He, Yao; Huang, Qing; Li, Di; Fan, Chunhai

    2011-04-01

    The operation of DNA nanomachines is generally triggered by either conformational changes of DNA nanostructure or external environmental stimuli. In the present study, we demonstrate an alternative driving force, DNA methylation, to stimulate DNA machine operation. DNA methylation changes neither DNA sequence and conformation nor external environment, however, blocks its cleavage by corresponding methylation-sensitive restriction endonuclease. We thus designed a strand displacement amplification DNA machine, which could be stimulated upon DNA methylation and then autonomously generates accumulated amounts of peroxidase-mimicking DNAzyme signaling machine products in an isothermal manner. The machine product DNAzyme could catalyze the H(2)O(2)-mediated oxidation of 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzo thiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS(2-)) to a colored product ABTS(·-). This methylation-stimulated DNA machine was further used as a colorimetric assay for analysis of methyltransferases activities and screening of methylation inhibitors. As compared with classical methylation assay, this facile isothermal DNA machine avoids the introduction of methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction and radioactive labels, which might be employed as an effective tool for DNA methylation analysis.

  2. Dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids induce plasminogen activator activity and DNA damage in rabbit spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokoli, A N; Lavrentiadou, S N; Zervos, I A; Tsantarliotou, M P; Georgiadis, M P; Nikolaidis, E A; Botsoglou, N; Boscos, C M; Taitzoglou, I A

    2017-02-20

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect(s) of dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFA) on rabbit semen. Adult rabbit bucks were assigned to two groups that were given two diets, a standard diet (control) and a diet supplemented with ω-3 PUFA. Sperm samples were collected from all bucks with the use of an artificial vagina in 20-day intervals, for a total period of 120 days. The enrichment of membranes in ω-3 PUFA was manifested by the elevation of the 22:5 ω-3 (docosapentaenoic acid [DPA]) levels within 40 days. This increase in DPA content did not affect semen characteristics (i.e., concentration, motility and viability). However, it was associated with the induction of lipid peroxidation in spermatozoa, as determined on the basis of the malondialdehyde content. Lipid peroxidation was associated with DNA fragmentation in ω-3 PUFA-enriched spermatozoa and a concomitant increase in plasminogen activator (PA) activity. The effects of ω-3 PUFA on sperm cells were evident within 40 days of ω-3 PUFA dietary intake and exhibited peack values on day 120. Our findings suggest that an ω-3 PUFA-rich diet may not affect semen characteristics; however, it may have a negative impact on the oxidative status and DNA integrity of the spermatozoa, which was associated with an induction of PAs activity.

  3. ATM and Chk2-dependent phosphorylation of MDMX contribute to p53 activation after DNA damage

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Lihong; Gilkes, Daniele M.; Pan, Yu; Lane, William S; Chen, Jiandong

    2005-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor is activated after DNA damage to maintain genomic stability and prevent transformation. Rapid activation of p53 by ionizing radiation is dependent on signaling by the ATM kinase. MDM2 and MDMX are important p53 regulators and logical targets for stress signals. We found that DNA damage induces ATM-dependent phosphorylation and degradation of MDMX. Phosphorylated MDMX is selectively bound and degraded by MDM2 preceding p53 accumulation and activation. Reduction of MDMX...

  4. Developmental activity variations of DNA polymerase α,δ,ε in mouse forebrains and spleens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨荣武; 陆长德

    1995-01-01

    The levels of DNA polymerase α,δ,ε were examined in the neonatal mouse forebrains andspleens.The levels of DNA polymerase α were determined by the difference of polymerase activity in theabsence and the presence of α specific inhibitor,BuPdGTP,or its monoclonal antibody.The levels of DNApolymerase δ were determined in H · A fractions after separating it from the other two enzymes.The levelsof DNA polymerase ε were identified in H · A fractions by the use of α-monoclonal antibody or BuPdGTP.Results showed that in the mouse forebrain DNA polymerase α,δ,ε activities are the highest before birth,decline sharply following birth and are very low on the 8th day and hardly detectable on the 17th day;as forthe mouse spleen,however,DNA polymerase α,δ,ε activities are the lowest at birth,increase rapidly afterbirth and reach their maxima on the 8th day and then decline gradually but remain in higher levels.Theseresults not only prove that DNA polymerase α and δ take part in cell DNA replication but also suggest thatDNA polymerase ε is involved in DNA replication.

  5. A novel type of replicative enzyme harbouring ATPase, primase and DNA polymerase activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipps, Georg; Röther, Susanne; Hart, Christina; Krauss, Gerhard

    2003-01-01

    Although DNA replication is a process common in all domains of life, primase and replicative DNA polymerase appear to have evolved independently in the bacterial domain versus the archaeal/eukaryal branch of life. Here, we report on a new type of replication protein that constitutes the first member of the DNA polymerase family E. The protein ORF904, encoded by the plasmid pRN1 from the thermoacidophile archaeon Sulfolobus islandicus, is a highly compact multifunctional enzyme with ATPase, primase and DNA polymerase activity. Recombinant purified ORF904 hydrolyses ATP in a DNA-dependent manner. Deoxynucleotides are preferentially used for the synthesis of primers ∼8 nucleotides long. The DNA polymerase activity of ORF904 synthesizes replication products of up to several thousand nucleotides in length. The primase and DNA polymerase activity are located in the N-terminal half of the protein, which does not show homology to any known DNA polymerase or primase. ORF904 constitutes a new type of replication enzyme, which could have evolved indepen dently from the eubacterial and archaeal/eukaryal proteins of DNA replication. PMID:12743045

  6. High Telomerase Activity Correlates with the Stabilities of Genome and DNA Ploidy in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Izumi

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant tumors have telomerase activity, which is thought to play a critical role in tumor growth. However, the relation between telomerase activity and genomic DNA status in tumor cells is poorly understood. In the present study, we examined telomerase activity in 13 clear cell type renal cell carcinomas (CRCCs with similar clinicopathologic features by telomeric repeat amplification protocol assay (TRAP. Based on TRAP assay results, we divided the CRCCs into two groups: a high telomerase activity group and a low/no telomerase activity group. We then analyzed genomic aberration, DNA ploidy, and telomere status in these two groups by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH, laser scanning cytometry (LSC, and telomere-specific fluorescence in situ hybridization (T-FISH, respectively. CGH showed the high telomerase activity group to have fewer genomic changes than the low/no telomerase activity group, which had many genomic aberrations. Moreover, with LSC, DNA diploid cells were found more frequently in the high telomerase activity group than in the low/no telomerase activity group. In addition, T-FISH revealed strong telomere signal intensity in the high telomerase activity group compared with that of the low/no telomerase activity group. These results suggest that telomerase activity is linked to genomic DNA status and that high telomerase activity is associated with genomic stability, DNA ploidy, and telomere length in CRCC.

  7. Iron deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Morten; Bosselmann, Helle; Gaborit, Freja

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both iron deficiency (ID) and cardiovascular biomarkers are associated with a poor outcome in heart failure (HF). The relationship between different cardiovascular biomarkers and ID is unknown, and the true prevalence of ID in an outpatient HF clinic is probably overlooked. OBJECTIVES.......043). CONCLUSION: ID is frequent in an outpatient HF clinic. ID is not associated with cardiovascular biomarkers after adjustment for traditional confounders. Inflammation, but not neurohormonal activation is associated with ID in systolic HF. Further studies are needed to understand iron metabolism in elderly HF...

  8. Exogenous Nitric Oxide Alleviated the Inhibition of Photosynthesis and Antioxidant Enzyme Activities in Iron-Deficient Chinese Cabbage(Brassica chinensis L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Fei; WANG Xiu-feng; SHI Qing-hua; WANG Mei-ling; YANG Feng-juan; GAO Qing-hai

    2008-01-01

    The effects of exogenous nitric oxide(NO)on plant growth,chlorophyll contents,photosynthetic and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters as well as lipid peroxidation and activities of antioxidant enzymes were investigated in Chinese cabbage plants exposed to iron(Fe)deficiency.Iron deficiency led to serious chlorosis in Chinese cabbage leaves,and resulted in significant decrease in plant growth,photosynthetic pigments,net photosynthetic rate,Fv/Fm,ΦPsⅡand activities of antioxidant enzymes,and increase in lipid peroxidation.While treatment with SNP,a NO donor,it could revert the iron deficiency symptoms,increased photosynthetic rate as well as activities of antioxidant enzymes,and protected membrane from lipid peroxidation,as a result,the growth inhibition of Chinese cabbage by Fe deficiency was alleviated.

  9. Mitochondrial network complexity and pathological decrease in complex I activity are tightly correlated in isolated human complex I deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopman, Werner J H; Visch, Henk-Jan; Verkaart, Sjoerd; van den Heuvel, Lambertus W P J; Smeitink, Jan A M; Willems, Peter H G M

    2005-10-01

    Complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) is the largest multisubunit assembly of the oxidative phosphorylation system, and its malfunction is associated with a wide variety of clinical syndromes ranging from highly progressive, often early lethal, encephalopathies to neurodegenerative disorders in adult life. The changes in mitochondrial structure and function that are at the basis of the clinical symptoms are poorly understood. Video-rate confocal microscopy of cells pulse-loaded with mitochondria-specific rhodamine 123 followed by automated analysis of form factor (combined measure of length and degree of branching), aspect ratio (measure of length), and number of revealed marked differences between primary cultures of skin fibroblasts from 13 patients with an isolated complex I deficiency. These differences were independent of the affected subunit, but plotting of the activity of complex I, normalized to that of complex IV, against the ratio of either form factor or aspect ratio to number revealed a linear relationship. Relatively small reductions in activity appeared to be associated with an increase in form factor and never with a decrease in number, whereas relatively large reductions occurred in association with a decrease in form factor and/or an increase in number. These results demonstrate that complex I activity and mitochondrial structure are tightly coupled in human isolated complex I deficiency. To further prove the relationship between aberrations in mitochondrial morphology and pathological condition, fibroblasts from two patients with a different mutation but a highly fragmented mitochondrial phenotype were fused. Full restoration of the mitochondrial network demonstrated that this change in mitochondrial morphology was indeed associated with human complex I deficiency.

  10. DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stent, Gunther S.

    1970-01-01

    This history for molecular genetics and its explanation of DNA begins with an analysis of the Golden Jubilee essay papers, 1955. The paper ends stating that the higher nervous system is the one major frontier of biological inquiry which still offers some romance of research. (Author/VW)

  11. Dysregulated TLR3-Dependent Signaling and Innate Immune Activation in Superoxide-Deficient Macrophages From Non-Obese Diabetic Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Seleme, Maria C.; Lei, Weiqi; Burg, Ashley R.; Goh, Kah Yong; Metz, Allison; Steele, Chad; Tse, Hubert M.

    2012-01-01

    In Type 1 diabetes (T1D), reactive oxygen species (ROS) and pro-inflammatory cytokines produced by macrophages and other innate immune cells destroy pancreatic β-cells while promoting autoreactive T cell maturation. Superoxide-deficient Non-Obese Diabetic mice (NOD.Ncf1m1J) are resistant to spontaneous diabetes, revealing the integral role of ROS-signaling in T1D. Here, we evaluate the innate immune activation state of bone marrow-derived macrophages (BM-Mϕ) from NOD and NOD.Ncf1m1J mice afte...

  12. Effects of AMPK activation on insulin sensitivity and metabolism in leptin-deficient ob/ob mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachariah Tom, Robby; Garcia-Roves, Pablo M; Sjögren, Rasmus J O

    2014-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a heterotrimeric complex, composed of a catalytic subunit (α) and two regulatory subunits (β and γ), which act as a metabolic sensor to regulate glucose and lipid metabolism. A mutation in the γ3 subunit (AMPKγ3(R225Q)) increases basal AMPK phosphorylation......-deficient ob/ob (ob/ob-γ3(R225Q)) mice. Glycogen content was increased, triglyceride content was decreased, and diacylglycerol and ceramide content were unaltered in gastrocnemius muscle from ob/ob-γ3(R225Q) mice, whereas glucose tolerance was unaltered. Insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in extensor digitorum...

  13. Production of active glycosylation-deficient γ-secretase complex for crystallization studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Andrés Ricardo; Dimitrov, Mitko; Gerber, Hermeto; Braman, Virginie; Hacker, David L; Wurm, Florian M; Fraering, Patrick C

    2015-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD)-associated γ-secretase is a ubiquitously expressed multi-subunit protease complex embedded in the lipid bilayer of cellular compartments including endosomes and the plasma membrane. Although γ-secretase is of crucial interest for AD drug discovery, its atomic structure remains unresolved. γ-Secretase assembly and maturation is a multistep process, which includes extensive glycosylation on nicastrin (NCT), the only γ-secretase subunit having a large extracellular domain. These posttranslational modifications lead to protein heterogeneity that likely prevents the three-dimensional (3D) crystallization of the protease complex. To overcome this issue, we have engineered a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line deficient in complex sugar modifications (CHO lec1) to overexpress the four subunits of γ-secretase as a functional complex. We purified glycosylation-deficient γ-secretase from this recombinant cell line (CL1-9) and fully glycosylated γ-secretase from a recombinant CHO DG44-derived cell line (SS20). We characterized both complexes biochemically and pharmacologically in vitro. Interestingly, we found that the complex oligosaccharides, which largely decorate the extracellular domain of fully glycosylated NCT, are not involved in the proper assembly and maturation of the complex, and are dispensable for the specific generation, in physiological ratios, of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) cleavage products. In conclusion, we propose a novel bioengineering approach for the production of functional glycosylation-deficient γ-secretase, which may be suitable for crystallization studies. We expect that these findings will contribute both to solving the high-resolution 3D structure of γ-secretase and to structure-based drug discovery for AD.

  14. Small terminase couples viral DNA binding to genome-packaging ATPase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Ankoor; Bhardwaj, Anshul; Datta, Pinaki; Lander, Gabriel C; Cingolani, Gino

    2012-08-08

    Packaging of viral genomes into empty procapsids is powered by a large DNA-packaging motor. In most viruses, this machine is composed of a large (L) and a small (S) terminase subunit complexed with a dodecamer of portal protein. Here we describe the 1.75 Å crystal structure of the bacteriophage P22 S-terminase in a nonameric conformation. The structure presents a central channel ∼23 Å in diameter, sufficiently large to accommodate hydrated B-DNA. The last 23 residues of S-terminase are essential for binding to DNA and assembly to L-terminase. Upon binding to its own DNA, S-terminase functions as a specific activator of L-terminase ATPase activity. The DNA-dependent stimulation of ATPase activity thus rationalizes the exclusive specificity of genome-packaging motors for viral DNA in the crowd of host DNA, ensuring fidelity of packaging and avoiding wasteful ATP hydrolysis. This posits a model for DNA-dependent activation of genome-packaging motors of general interest in virology.

  15. The cell-free fetal DNA fraction in maternal blood decreases after physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlütter, Jacob Mørup; Hatt, Lotte; Bach, Cathrine;

    2014-01-01

    of cycling with a pulse-rate of 150 beats per minute. The concentrations of cffDNA (DYS14) and cfDNA (RASSF1A) were assessed using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: The fetal fraction decreased significantly in all participants after physical activity (p 

  16. Probing substrate interactions in the active tunnel of a catalytically deficient cellobiohydrolase (Cel7)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westh, Peter; Colussi, Francieli; Sørensen, Trine Holst

    2015-01-01

    Cellobiohydrolases (CBHs) break down cellulose sequentially by sliding along the crystal surface with a single cellulose strand threaded through the catalytic tunnel of the enzyme. This so-called processive mechanism relies on a complex pattern of enzyme-substrate interactions, which need...... to be addressed in molecular descriptions of processivity and its driving forces. Here, we have used titration calorimetry to study interactions of cellooligosaccharides (COS) and a catalytically deficient variant (E212Q) of the enzyme Cel7A from Trichoderma reesei. This enzyme has about 10 glucopyranose sub...

  17. Biglycan deficiency increases osteoclast differentiation and activity due to defective osteoblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bi, Yanming; Nielsen, Karina L; Kilts, Tina M;

    2006-01-01

    the effects of Bgn on 1alpha, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (1,25-(OH)(2)D(3))-induced osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption in an co-culture of calvariae-derived pre-osteoblasts and osteoclast precursors derived from spleen or bone marrow. Time course and dose response experiments showed that tartrate...... protease inhibitor (slpi) in bgn deficient osteoblasts treated with 1,25-(OH)(2)D(3). These findings point to a novel molecular factor made by osteoblasts that could potentially be involved in LPS-induced osteolysis....

  18. DNA structural elements required for ERCC1-XPF endonuclease activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.L. de Laat (Wouter); E. Appeldoorn (Esther); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); N.G.J. Jaspers (Nicolaas)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractThe heterodimeric complex ERCC1-XPF is a structure-specific endonuclease responsible for the 5' incision during mammalian nucleotide excision repair (NER). Additionally, ERCC1-XPF is thought to function in the repair of interstrand DNA cross-links and, by analogy to the

  19. An intrinsic DFF40/CAD endonuclease deficiency impairs oligonucleosomal DNA hydrolysis during caspase-dependent cell death: a common trait in human glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Osuna, María; Martínez-Escardó, Laura; Granados-Colomina, Carla; Martínez-Soler, Fina; Pascual-Guiral, Sònia; Iglesias-Guimarais, Victoria; Velasco, Roser; Plans, Gerard; Vidal, Noemi; Tortosa, Avelina; Barcia, Carlos; Bruna, Jordi; Yuste, Victor J

    2016-07-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) or grade IV astrocytoma is one of the most devastating human cancers. The loss of DFF40/CAD, the key endonuclease that triggers oligonucleosomal DNA fragmentation during apoptosis, has been linked to genomic instability and cell survival after radiation. Despite the near inevitability of GBM tumor recurrence after treatment, the relationship between DFF40/CAD and GBM remains unexplored. We studied the apoptotic behavior of human GBM-derived cells after apoptotic insult. We analyzed caspase activation and the protein levels and subcellular localization of DFF40/CAD apoptotic endonuclease. DFF40/CAD was also evaluated in histological sections from astrocytic tumors and nontumoral human brain. We showed that GBM cells undergo incomplete apoptosis without generating oligonucleosomal DNA degradation despite the correct activation of executioner caspases. The major defect of GBM cells relied on the improper accumulation of DFF40/CAD at the nucleoplasmic subcellular compartment. Supporting this finding, DFF40/CAD overexpression allowed GBM cells to display oligonucleosomal DNA degradation after apoptotic challenge. Moreover, the analysis of histological slices from astrocytic tumors showed that DFF40/CAD immunoreactivity in tumoral GFAP-positive cells was markedly reduced when compared with nontumoral samples. Our data highlight the low expression levels of DFF40/CAD and the absence of DNA laddering as common molecular traits in GBM. These findings could be of major importance for understanding the malignant behavior of remaining tumor cells after radiochemotherapy. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. 维生素D缺乏和 DNA甲基化在年龄相关性黄斑变性中的研究现状%Advances in vitamin D deficiency and DNA methylation in age - related macular degeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张博; 白洁; 董丽; 刘平; 郑轶

    2016-01-01

    年龄相关性黄斑变性( age-related macular degeneration,  AMD)是世界范围内中老年人视力丧失的主要疾病之一,是多病因多因素多机制介导的慢性退行性眼科疾病。AMD确切发病机制仍不明确,众多研究发现年龄、遗传、营养失衡、表观遗传学、氧化应激、补体激活和炎症反应等多种因素参与其发病。近年来研究发现机体维生素D水平和DNA甲基化与AMD发病有一定关系。以下将维生素D缺乏和DNA甲基化在AMD发病机制的作用进行简要综述。%•Age-related macular degeneration ( AMD) is one of the main diseases in the world leading to vision loss in the elderly, and is a multi-factorial and multi-mechanism mediated chronic degenerative eye disease. The exact pathogenesis of AMD is still not clear, and many studies found that age, genetic factors, nutritional imbalance, epigenetics, oxidative stress, a variety of complement factors activation and inflammatory reaction were involved in the pathogenesis. Recent studies have found that vitamin D levels and DNA methylation were closely related to AMD. Thus, a simple generalization of vitamin D deficiency and DNA methylation in the pathogenesis of AMD were made.

  1. Protozoan ALKBH8 Oxygenases Display both DNA Repair and tRNA Modification Activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zdżalik, Daria; Vågbø, Cathrine B; Kirpekar, Finn

    2014-01-01

    , interestingly, two protozoan ALKBH8s also catalyzed wobble uridine modification of tRNA, thus displaying a dual in vitro activity. Also, we found the modification status of tRNAGly(UCC) to be unaltered in an ALKBH8 deficient mutant of Agrobacterium tumefaciens, indicating that bacterial ALKBH8s have a function...

  2. Molecular Analysis of Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase Gene in Immunoglobulin-E Deficient Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Roa

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how class switch recombination (CSR is regulated to produce immunoglobulin E (IgE has become fundamental because of the dramatic increase in the prevalence of IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions. CSR requires the induction of the enzyme AICDA in B cells. Mutations in AICDA have been linked to Hyper-IgM syndrome (HIGM2, which shows absence of switching to IgE as well as to IgG and IgA. Although isolated IgE deficiency is a rare entity, here we show some individuals with normal serum IgM, IgG, and IgA levels that had undetectable total serum IgE levels. We have analyzed the AICDA gene in these individuals to determine if there are mutations in AICDA that could lead to selective IgE deficiency. Conformational sensitive gel electrophoresis (CSGE and sequencing analysis of AICDA coding sequences demonstrated sequence heterogeneity due to 5923A/G and 7888C/T polymorphisms, but did not reveal any novel mutation that might explain the selective IgE deficit.

  3. Endothelial IL-33 Expression Is Augmented by Adenoviral Activation of the DNA Damage Machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stav-Noraas, Tor Espen; Edelmann, Reidunn J; Poulsen, Lars La Cour; Sundnes, Olav; Phung, Danh; Küchler, Axel M; Müller, Fredrik; Kamen, Amine A; Haraldsen, Guttorm; Kaarbø, Mari; Hol, Johanna

    2017-04-15

    IL-33, required for viral clearance by cytotoxic T cells, is generally expressed in vascular endothelial cells in healthy human tissues. We discovered that endothelial IL-33 expression was stimulated as a response to adenoviral transduction. This response was dependent on MRE11, a sensor of DNA damage that can also be activated by adenoviral DNA, and on IRF1, a transcriptional regulator of cellular responses to viral invasion and DNA damage. Accordingly, we observed that endothelial cells responded to adenoviral DNA by phosphorylation of ATM and CHK2 and that depletion or inhibition of MRE11, but not depletion of ATM, abrogated IL-33 stimulation. In conclusion, we show that adenoviral transduction stimulates IL-33 expression in endothelial cells in a manner that is dependent on the DNA-binding protein MRE11 and the antiviral factor IRF1 but not on downstream DNA damage response signaling. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  4. Immune cell activation from multivalent interactions with liquid-crystalline polycation-DNA complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Nathan; Jin, Fan; Lande, Roberto; Curk, Tine; Xian, Wujing; Frasca, Loredana; Dobnikar, Jure; Frenkel, Daan; Gilliet, Michel; Wong, Gerard

    2014-03-01

    Microbial DNA can trigger type I interferon (IFN) production in plasmacytoid cells (pDCs) by binding to endosomal toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9). TLR9 in pDCs do not normally respond to self-DNA, but in certain autoimmune diseases self-DNA can complex with the polycationic antimicrobial peptide LL37 into condensed structures which allow DNA to access endosomal compartments and stimulate TLR9 in pDCs. We use x-ray studies and cell measurements of IFN secretion by pDCs to show that a broad range of polycation-DNA complexes stimulate pDCs and elucidate the criterion for high IFN production. Furthermore, we show via experiments and computer simulations that the distinguishing factor for why certain complexes activate pDCs while others do not is the self-assembled structure of the liquid-crystalline polycation-DNA complex.

  5. CUPRAC colorimetric and electroanalytical methods determining antioxidant activity based on prevention of oxidative DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzunboy, Seda; Çekiç, Sema Demirci; Eksin, Ece; Erdem, Arzum; Apak, Reşat

    2017-02-01

    An unbalanced excess of oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) can give oxidative hazard to DNA and other biomacromolecules under oxidative stress conditions. While the 'comet' assay for measuring DNA damage is neither specific nor practical, monitoring oxidative changes on individual DNA bases and other oxidation products needs highly specialized equipment and operators. Thus, we developed a modified CUPRAC (cupric ion reducing antioxidant capacity) colorimetric method to determine the average total damage on DNA produced by Fenton oxidation, taking advantage of the fact that the degradation products of DNA but not the original macromolecule is CUPRAC-responsive. The DNA-protective effects of water-soluble antioxidants were used to devise a novel antioxidant activity assay, considered to be physiologically more realistic than those using artificial probes. Our method, based on the measurement of DNA oxidative products with CUPRAC colorimetry proved to be 2 orders-of-magnitude more sensitive than the widely used TBARS (thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances) colorimetric assay used as reference. Additionally, the DNA damage was electrochemically investigated using pencil graphite electrodes (PGEs) as DNA sensor platform in combination with differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The interaction of the radical species with DNA in the absence/presence of antioxidants was detected according to the changes in guanine oxidation signal.

  6. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma B cell-specific deficient mice have an impaired antibody response1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramon, Sesquile; Bancos, Simona; Thatcher, Thomas H.; Murant, Thomas I.; Moshkani, Safiehkhatoon; Sahler, Julie M.; Bottaro, Andrea; Sime, Patricia J.; Phipps, Richard P.

    2012-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. PPARγ, a ligand activated transcription factor, has important anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative functions and it has been associated with diseases including diabetes, scarring and atherosclerosis among others. PPARγ is expressed in most bone marrow derived cells and influences their function. PPARγ ligands can stimulate human B cell differentiation and promote antibody production. A knowledge gap is that the role of PPARγ in B cells under physiological conditions is not known. We developed a new B cell-specific PPARγ (B-PPARγ) knockout mouse and explored the role of PPARγ during both the primary and secondary immune response. Here, we show that PPARγ deficiency in B cells decreases germinal center B cells and plasma cell development as well as the levels of circulating antigen-specific antibodies during a primary challenge. Inability to generate germinal center B cells and plasma cells is correlated to decreased MHC class II expression and decreased Bcl-6 and Blimp-1 levels. Furthermore, B-PPARγ-deficient mice have an impaired memory response, characterized by low titers of antigen-specific antibodies and low numbers of antigen-experienced antibody-secreting cells. However, B-PPARγ-deficient mice have no differences in B cell population distribution within neither primary nor secondary lymphoid organs during development. This is the first report to show under physiological conditions that PPARγ expression in B cells is required for an efficient B cell-mediated immune response as it regulates B cell differentiation and antibody production. PMID:23041568

  7. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ B cell-specific-deficient mice have an impaired antibody response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramon, Sesquile; Bancos, Simona; Thatcher, Thomas H; Murant, Thomas I; Moshkani, Safiehkhatoon; Sahler, Julie M; Bottaro, Andrea; Sime, Patricia J; Phipps, Richard P

    2012-11-15

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. PPARγ, a ligand-activated transcription factor, has important anti-inflammatory and antiproliferative functions, and it has been associated with diseases including diabetes, scarring, and atherosclerosis, among others. PPARγ is expressed in most bone marrow-derived cells and influences their function. PPARγ ligands can stimulate human B cell differentiation and promote Ab production. A knowledge gap is that the role of PPARγ in B cells under physiological conditions is not known. We developed a new B cell-specific PPARγ (B-PPARγ) knockout mouse and explored the role of PPARγ during both the primary and secondary immune response. In this article, we show that PPARγ deficiency in B cells decreases germinal center B cells and plasma cell development, as well as the levels of circulating Ag-specific Abs during a primary challenge. Inability to generate germinal center B cells and plasma cells is correlated to decreased MHC class II expression and decreased Bcl-6 and Blimp-1 levels. Furthermore, B-PPARγ-deficient mice have an impaired memory response, characterized by low titers of Ag-specific Abs and low numbers of Ag-experienced, Ab-secreting cells. However, B-PPARγ-deficient mice have no differences in B cell population distribution within primary or secondary lymphoid organs during development. This is the first report, to our knowledge, to show that, under physiological conditions, PPARγ expression in B cells is required for an efficient B cell-mediated immune response as it regulates B cell differentiation and Ab production.

  8. Altered membrane NTPase activity in Lesch-Nyhan disease fibroblasts: comparison with HPRT knockout mice and HPRT-deficient cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Cibele S; Jinnah, Hyder A; Shirley, Thomas L; Nyhan, William L; Seifert, Roland

    2005-06-01

    Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND) is a rare disorder caused by a defect of an enzyme in the purine salvage pathway, hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT). It is still unknown how the metabolic defect translates into the complex neuropsychiatric phenotype characterized by self-injurious behavior, dystonia and mental retardation. There are abnormalities in purine and pyrimidine nucleotide content in HPRT-deficient cells. We hypothesized that altered nucleotide concentrations in HPRT deficiency change G-protein-mediated signal transduction. Therefore, our original study aim was to examine the high-affinity GTPase activity of G-proteins in membranes from primary human skin and immortalized mouse skin fibroblasts, rat B103 neuroblastoma cells and mouse Neuro-2a neuroblastoma cells. Unexpectedly, in membranes from human fibroblasts, B103- and Neuro-2a cells, V(max) of low-affinity nucleoside 5'-triphosphatase (NTPase) activities was decreased up to 7-fold in HPRT deficiency. In contrast, in membranes from mouse fibroblasts, HPRT deficiency increased NTPase activity up to 4-fold. The various systems analyzed differed from each other in terms of K(m) values for NTPs, absolute V(max) values and K(i) values for nucleoside 5'-[beta,gamma-imido]triphosphates. Our data show that altered membrane NTPase activity is a biochemical hallmark of HPRT deficiency, but species and cell-type differences have to be considered. Thus, future studies on biochemical changes in LND should be conducted in parallel in several HPRT-deficient systems.

  9. The Emerging Nexus of Active DNA Demethylation and Mitochondrial Oxidative Metabolism in Post-Mitotic Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Meng

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The variable patterns of DNA methylation in mammals have been linked to a number of physiological processes, including normal embryonic development and disease pathogenesis. Active removal of DNA methylation, which potentially regulates neuronal gene expression both globally and gene specifically, has been recently implicated in neuronal plasticity, learning and memory processes. Model pathways of active DNA demethylation involve ten-eleven translocation (TET methylcytosine dioxygenases that are dependent on oxidative metabolites. In addition, reactive oxygen species (ROS and oxidizing agents generate oxidative modifications of DNA bases that can be removed by base excision repair proteins. These potentially link the two processes of active DNA demethylation and mitochondrial oxidative metabolism in post-mitotic neurons. We review the current biochemical understanding of the DNA demethylation process and discuss its potential interaction with oxidative metabolism. We then summarise the emerging roles of both processes and their interaction in neural plasticity and memory formation and the pathophysiology of neurodegeneration. Finally, possible therapeutic approaches for neurodegenerative diseases are proposed, including reprogramming therapy by global DNA demethylation and mitohormesis therapy for locus-specific DNA demethylation in post-mitotic neurons.

  10. DNA repair activity in fish and interest in ecotoxicology: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienzler, Aude; Bony, Sylvie; Devaux, Alain

    2013-06-15

    The knowledge of DNA repair in a target species is of first importance as it is the primary line of defense against genotoxicants, and a better knowledge of DNA repair capacity in fish could help to interpret genotoxicity data and/or assist in the choice of target species, developmental stage and tissues to focus on, both for environmental biomonitoring studies and DNA repair testing. This review focuses in a first part on what is presently known on a mechanistic basis, about the various DNA repair systems in fish, in vivo and in established cell lines. Data on base excision repair (BER), direct reversal with O⁶-alkylguanine transferase and double strand breaks repair, although rather scarce, are being reviewed, as well as nucleotide excision repair (NER) and photoreactivation repair (PER), which are by far the most studied repair mechanisms in fish. Most of these repair mechanisms seem to be strongly species and tissue dependent; they also depend on the developmental stage of the organisms. BER is efficient in vivo, although no data has been found on in vitro models. NER activity is quite low or even inexistent depending on the studies; however this lack is partly compensated by a strong PER activity, especially in early developmental stage. In a second part, a survey of the ecotoxicological studies integrating DNA repair as a parameter responding to single or mixture of contaminant is realized. Three main approaches are being used: the measurement of DNA repair gene expression after exposure, although it has not yet been clearly established whether gene expression is indicative of repair capacity; the monitoring of DNA damage removal by following DNA repair kinetics; and the modulation of DNA repair activity following exposure in situ, in order to assess the impact of exposure history on DNA repair capacity. Since all DNA repair processes are possible targets for environmental pollutants, we can also wonder at which extent such a modulation of repair capacities

  11. False-positive myeloperoxidase binding activity due to DNA/anti-DNA antibody complexes: a source for analytical error in serologic evaluation of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jethwa, H S; Nachman, P H; Falk, R J; Jennette, J C

    2000-09-01

    Anti-myeloperoxidase antibodies (anti-MPO) are a major type of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA). While evaluating anti-MPO monoclonal antibodies from SCG/Kj mice, we observed several hybridomas that appeared to react with both MPO and DNA. Sera from some patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) also react with MPO and DNA. We hypothesized that the MPO binding activity is a false-positive result due to the binding of DNA, contained within the antigen binding site of anti-DNA antibodies, to the cationic MPO. Antibodies from tissue culture supernatants from 'dual reactive' hybridomas were purified under high-salt conditions (3 M NaCl) to remove any antigen bound to antibody. The MPO and DNA binding activity were measured by ELISA. The MPO binding activity was completely abrogated while the DNA binding activity remained. The MPO binding activity was restored, in a dose-dependent manner, by the addition of increasing amount of calf-thymus DNA (CT-DNA) to the purified antibody. Sera from six patients with SLE that reacted with both MPO and DNA were treated with DNase and showed a decrease in MPO binding activity compared with untreated samples. MPO binding activity was observed when CT-DNA was added to sera from SLE patients that initially reacted with DNA but not with MPO. These results suggest that the DNA contained within the antigen binding site of anti-DNA antibodies could bind to the highly cationic MPO used as substrate antigen in immunoassays, resulting in a false-positive test.

  12. Polymerase/DNA interactions and enzymatic activity: multi-parameter analysis with electro-switchable biosurfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Andreas; Schräml, Michael; Strasser, Ralf; Daub, Herwin; Myers, Thomas; Heindl, Dieter; Rant, Ulrich

    2015-07-01

    The engineering of high-performance enzymes for future sequencing and PCR technologies as well as the development of many anticancer drugs requires a detailed analysis of DNA/RNA synthesis processes. However, due to the complex molecular interplay involved, real-time methodologies have not been available to obtain comprehensive information on both binding parameters and enzymatic activities. Here we introduce a chip-based method to investigate polymerases and their interactions with nucleic acids, which employs an electrical actuation of DNA templates on microelectrodes. Two measurement modes track both the dynamics of the induced switching process and the DNA extension simultaneously to quantitate binding kinetics, dissociation constants and thermodynamic energies. The high sensitivity of the method reveals previously unidentified tight binding states for Taq and Pol I (KF) DNA polymerases. Furthermore, the incorporation of label-free nucleotides can be followed in real-time and changes in the DNA polymerase conformation (finger closing) during enzymatic activity are observable.

  13. DNA binding activity of Anabaena sensory rhodopsin transducer probed by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Hyun; Kim, So Young; Jung, Kwang-Hwan; Kim, Doseok

    2015-01-01

    Anabaena sensory rhodopsin transducer (ASRT) is believed to be a major player in the photo-signal transduction cascade, which is triggered by Anabaena sensory rhodopsin. Here, we characterized DNA binding activity of ASRT probed by using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. We observed clear decrease of diffusion coefficient of DNA upon binding of ASRT. The dissociation constant, K(D), of ASRT to 20 bp-long DNA fragments lied in micro-molar range and varied moderately with DNA sequence. Our results suggest that ASRT may interact with several different regions of DNA with different binding affinity for global regulation of several genes that need to be activated depending on the light illumination.

  14. Alpha 1,3-Galactosyltransferase Deficiency in Pigs Increases Sialyltransferase Activities That Potentially Raise Non-Gal Xenoantigenicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Yi Park

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined whether deficiency of the GGTA1 gene in pigs altered the expression of several glycosyltransferase genes. Real-time RT-PCR and glycosyltransferase activity showed that 2 sialyltransferases [α2,3-sialyltransferase (α2,3ST and α2,6-sialyltransferase (α2,6ST] in the heterozygote GalT KO liver have higher expression levels and activities compared to controls. Enzyme-linked lectin assays indicated that there were also more sialic acid-containing glycoconjugate epitopes in GalT KO livers than in controls. The elevated level of sialic-acid-containing glycoconjugate epitopes was due to the low level of α-Gal in heterozygote GalT KO livers. Furthermore, proteomics analysis showed that heterozygote GalT KO pigs had a higher expression of NAD+-isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH, which is related to the CMP-N-acetylneuraminic acid hydroxylase (CMAH enzyme reaction. These findings suggest the deficiency of GGTA1 gene in pigs results in increased production of N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc due to an increase of α2,6-sialyltransferase and a CMAH cofactor, NAD+-IDH. This indicates that Neu5Gc may be a critical xenoantigen. The deletion of the CMAH gene in the GalT KO background is expected to further prolong xenograft survival.

  15. Matriptase-2 mutations in iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia patients provide new insights into protease activation mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, Andrew J; Quesada, Victor; Sanchez, Mayka; Garabaya, Cecilia; Sardà, María P; Baiget, Montserrat; Remacha, Angel; Velasco, Gloria; López-Otín, Carlos

    2009-10-01

    Mutations leading to abrogation of matriptase-2 proteolytic activity in humans are associated with an iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) due to elevated hepcidin levels. Here we describe two novel heterozygous mutations within the matriptase-2 (TMPRSS6) gene of monozygotic twin girls exhibiting an IRIDA phenotype. The first is the frameshift mutation (P686fs) caused by the insertion of the four nucleotides CCCC in exon 16 (2172_2173insCCCC) that is predicted to terminate translation before the catalytic serine. The second mutation is the di-nucleotide substitution c.467C>A and c.468C>T in exon 3 that causes the missense mutation A118D in the SEA domain of the extracellular stem region of matriptase-2. Functional analysis of both variant matriptase-2 proteases has revealed that they lead to ineffective suppression of hepcidin transcription. We also demonstrate that the A118D SEA domain mutation causes an intra-molecular structural imbalance that impairs matriptase-2 activation. Collectively, these results extend the pattern of TMPRSS6 mutations associated with IRIDA and functionally demonstrate that mutations affecting protease regions other than the catalytic domain may have a profound impact in the regulatory role of matriptase-2 during iron deficiency.

  16. Vitamin B12 deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitamin B12 (B12; also known as cobalamin) is a B vitamin that has an important role in cellular metabolism, especially in DNA synthesis, methylation and mitochondrial metabolism. Clinical B12 deficiency with classic haematological and neurological manifestations is relatively uncommon. However, sub...

  17. Binding Potency of Heparin Immobilized on Activated Charcoal for DNA Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snezhkova, E A; Tridon, A; Evrard, B; Nikolaev, V G; Uvarov, V Yu; Tsimbalyuk, R S; Ivanuk, A A; Komov, V V; Sakhno, L A

    2016-02-01

    In vitro experiments showed that heparin adsorbed on activated charcoal can bind antibodies raised against native and single-stranded DNA in a diluted sera pool with a high level of these DNA. Thus, heparin used as anticoagulant during hemosorption procedure can demonstrate supplementary therapeutic activity resulting from its interaction with various agents involved in acute and chronic inflammatory reactions such as DNA- and RNA-binding substances, proinflammatory cytokines, complement components, growth factors, etc. Research and development of heparin-containing carbonic adsorbents for the therapy of numerous inflammatory and autoimmune diseases seems to be a promising avenue in hematology.

  18. EFFECTS OF METHAMPHETAMINE ON LOCOMOTOR ACTIVITY AND THALAMIC GENE EXPRESSION IN LEPTIN-DEFICIENT OBESE MICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Betina; González, Candela; Bisagno, Verónica; Urbano, Francisco J.

    2017-01-01

    Leptin is an adipose-derived hormone that regulates energy balance. Leptin receptors are expressed in extrahypothalamic sites and several reports showed that leptin can influence feeding and locomotor behavior via direct actions on dopaminergic neurons. The leptin deficient mouse (ob/ob) has been used as an animal model of blunted leptin action, and presents with obesity and mild type 2 diabetes. We used ob/ob mice to study the effect of repeated 7-day methamphetamine (METH) administration analyzing locomotion, behavioral sensitization, and somatosensory thalamic mRNA expression of voltage-gated calcium channels and glutamatergic receptors using RT-PCR. We observed reduced METH-mediated responses in ob/ob mice associated with enhanced in mRNA expression of key voltage-gated and glutamate receptors in the somatosensory thalamus. Results described here are important for understanding the control of locomotion and thalamocortical excitability by leptin.

  19. Inflating a chain of x-ray deficient bubbles by a single jet activity episode

    CERN Document Server

    Refaelovich, Michael

    2012-01-01

    We show that a continuous jet with time-independent launching properties can inflate a chain of close and overlapping X-ray deficient bubbles. Using the numerical code PLUTO we run 2.5D hydrodynamic simulations and study the interaction of the jets with the intra-cluster medium (ICM). A key process is vortex fragmentation due to several mechanisms, including vortex-shedding and Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instabilities. Our results can account for the structure of two opposite chains of close bubbles as observed in the galaxy cluster Hydra A and galaxy group NGC 5813. Our results imply that the presence of multiple pairs of bubbles does not necessarily imply several jet-launching episodes. This finding might have implications to feedback mechanisms operating by jets.

  20. Iodine Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2017 By ATA | Featured , Iodine Deficiency , News Releases , Potassium Iodide (KI) | No Comments IDD NEWSLETTER – February 2017 VOLUME ... 2016 By ATA | Featured , Iodine Deficiency , News Releases , Potassium Iodide (KI) | No Comments IDD NEWSLETTER – November 2015 (PDF ...

  1. Genome-wide localization of Rrm3 and Pif1 DNA helicases at stalled active and inactive DNA replication forks of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Emma Rossi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The genome of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is sequenced and the location and dynamic of activation of DNA replication origins are known. G1 synchronized yeast cells can be released into S-phase in the presence of hydroxyurea (HU (1, which slows down DNA replication and retains replication forks in proximity of DNA replication origins. In this condition, the Chromatin Immuno-Precipitation on chip (ChIP on chip (2–4 of replisome components allows the precise localization of all active DNA replication forks. This analysis can be coupled with the ssDNA-BromodeoxyUridine (ssDNA-BrdU Immuno-Precipitation on chip (ssDNA-BrdU IP on chip technique (5–7, which detects the location of newly synthesized DNA. Comparison of binding and BrdU incorporation profiles allows to locate a factor of interest at DNA replication forks genome wide. We present datasets deposited in the gene expression omnibus (GEO database under accession number GSE68214, which show how the DNA helicases Rrm3 and Pif1 (8 associate to active and inactive DNA replication forks.

  2. Active vitamin D deficiency mediated by extracellular calcium and phosphorus results in male infertility in young mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Weiwei; Chen, Lulu; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Rong; Goltzman, David; Miao, Dengshun

    2015-01-01

    We used mice with targeted deletion of 25-hydroxyvitamin D-1 α-hydroxylase [1α(OH)ase(-/-)] to investigate whether 1,25(OH)2D3 deficiency results in male infertility mediated by 1,25(OH)2D3 or extracellular calcium and phosphorus. Male 1α(OH)ase(-/-) and their wild-type littermates fed either a normal diet or a rescue diet from weaning were mated at 6-14 wk of age with female wild-type mice on the same diet. The fertility efficiency of females was analyzed, and the reproductive phenotypes of males were evaluated by histopathological and molecular techniques. Hypocalcemic and hypophosphatemic male 1α(OH)ase(-/-) mice on a normal diet developed infertility characterized by hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, with downregulation of testicular calcium channels, lower intracellular calcium levels, decreased sperm count and motility, and histological abnormalities of the testes. The proliferation of spermatogenic cells was decreased with downregulation of cyclin E and CDK2 and upregulation of p53 and p21 expression, whereas apoptosis of spermatogenic cells was increased with upregulation of Bax and p-caspase 3 expression and downregulation of Bcl-xl expression. When serum calcium and phosphorus were normalized by the rescue diet, the defective reproductive phenotype in the male 1α(OH)ase(-/-) mice, including the hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, decreased sperm count and motility, histological abnormalities of testis, and defective spermatogenesis, was reversed. These results indicate that the infertility seen in male 1,25(OH)2D3-deficient mice is not a direct effect of active vitamin D deficiency on the reproductive system but is an indirect effect mediated by extracellular calcium and phosphorus. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  3. DNA double-strand breaks activate ATM independent of mitochondrial dysfunction in A549 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalifa, Lidza; Gewandter, Jennifer S; Staversky, Rhonda J; Sia, Elaine A; Brookes, Paul S; O'Reilly, Michael A

    2014-10-01

    Excessive nuclear or mitochondrial DNA damage can lead to mitochondrial dysfunction, decreased energy production, and increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Although numerous cell signaling pathways are activated when cells are injured, the ataxia telangiectasia mutant (ATM) protein has emerged as a major regulator of the response to both mitochondrial dysfunction and nuclear DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Because mitochondrial dysfunction is often a response to excessive DNA damage, it has been difficult to determine whether nuclear and/or mitochondrial DNA DSBs activate ATM independent of mitochondrial dysfunction. In this study, mitochondrial and nuclear DNA DSBs were generated in the A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cell line by infecting with retroviruses expressing the restriction endonuclease PstI fused to a mitochondrial targeting sequence (MTS) or nuclear localization sequence (NLS) and a hemagglutinin antigen epitope tag (HA). Expression of MTS-PstI-HA or NLS-PstI-HA activated the DNA damage response defined by phosphorylation of ATM, the tumor suppressor protein p53 (TP53), KRAB-associated protein (KAP)-1, and structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC)-1. Phosphorylated ATM and SMC1 were detected in nuclear fractions, whereas phosphorylated TP53 and KAP1 were detected in both mitochondrial and nuclear fractions. PstI also enhanced expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 and inhibited cell growth. This response to DNA damage occurred in the absence of detectable mitochondrial dysfunction and excess production of ROS. These findings reveal that DNA DSBs are sufficient to activate ATM independent of mitochondrial dysfunction and suggest that the activated form of ATM and some of its substrates are restricted to the nuclear compartment, regardless of the site of DNA damage.

  4. Glutamine synthetase I-deficiency in Mesorhizobium loti differentially affects nodule development and activity in Lotus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chungopast, Sirinapa; Thapanapongworakul, Pilunthana; Matsuura, Hiroyuki; Van Dao, Tan; Asahi, Toshimasa; Tada, Kuninao; Tajima, Shigeyuki; Nomura, Mika

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we focused on the effect of glutamine synthetase (GSI) activity in Mesorhizobium loti on the symbiosis between the host plant, Lotus japonicus, and the bacteroids. We used a signature-tagged mutant of M. loti (STM30) with a transposon inserted into the GSI (mll0343) gene. The L. japonicus plants inoculated with STM30 had significantly more nodules, and the occurrence of senesced nodules was much higher than in plants inoculated with the wild-type. The acetylene reduction activity (ARA) per nodule inoculated with STM30 was lowered compared to the control. Also, the concentration of chlorophyll, glutamine, and asparagine in leaves of STM30-infected plants was found to be reduced. Taken together, these data demonstrate that a GSI deficiency in M. loti differentially affects legume-rhizobia symbiosis by modifying nodule development and metabolic processes.

  5. Direct inhibition of excision/synthesis DNA repair activities by cadmium: Analysis on dedicated biochips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candeias, S., E-mail: serge.candeias@cea.fr [CEA, INAC, SCIB, UJF and CNRS, LCIB (UMR-E 3 CEA-UJF and FRE 3200), Laboratoire Lesions des Acides Nucleiques, 17 Rue des Martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); CEA, DSV, iRTSV, LBBSI, UMR 5092 CNRS, F-38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Pons, B.; Viau, M.; Caillat, S.; Sauvaigo, S. [CEA, INAC, SCIB, UJF and CNRS, LCIB (UMR-E 3 CEA-UJF and FRE 3200), Laboratoire Lesions des Acides Nucleiques, 17 Rue des Martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2010-12-10

    The well established toxicity of cadmium and cadmium compounds results from their additive effects on several key cellular processes, including DNA repair. Mammalian cells have evolved several biochemical pathways to repair DNA lesions and maintain genomic integrity. By interfering with the homeostasis of redox metals and antioxidant systems, cadmium promotes the development of an intracellular environment that results in oxidative DNA damage which can be mutagenic if unrepaired. Small base lesions are recognised by specialized glycosylases and excised from the DNA molecule. The resulting abasic sites are incised, and the correct sequences restored by DNA polymerases using the opposite strands as template. Bulky lesions are recognised by a different set of proteins and excised from DNA as part of an oligonucleotide. As in base repair, the resulting gaps are filled by DNA polymerases using the opposite strands as template. Thus, these two repair pathways consist in excision of the lesion followed by DNA synthesis. In this study, we analysed in vitro the direct effects of cadmium exposure on the functionality of base and nucleotide DNA repair pathways. To this end, we used recently described dedicated microarrays that allow the parallel monitoring in cell extracts of the repair activities directed against several model base and/or nucleotide lesions. Both base and nucleotide excision/repair pathways are inhibited by CdCl{sub 2}, with different sensitivities. The inhibitory effects of cadmium affect mainly the recognition and excision stages of these processes. Furthermore, our data indicate that the repair activities directed against different damaged bases also exhibit distinct sensitivities, and the direct comparison of cadmium effects on the excision of uracile in different sequences even allows us to propose a hierarchy of cadmium sensibility within the glycosylases removing U from DNA. These results indicate that, in our experimental conditions, cadmium is a

  6. 78 FR 12074 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Actions Under the NIH Guidelines...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA... recommendations of the RAC, the NIH Office of Biotechnology Activities (OBA) concluded that more specific guidance... address or by fax at 301-496-9839 or by mail to the Office of Biotechnology Activities, National...

  7. 76 FR 62816 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Action Under the NIH Guidelines for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA... Biotechnology Activities (OBA) is updating Appendix B of the NIH Guidelines to specify the risk group (RG...: October 3, 2011. Jacqueline Corrigan-Curay, Acting Director, Office of Biotechnology Activities, National...

  8. 78 FR 27977 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Proposed Actions Under the NIH...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA... Acid Molecules (NIH Guidelines) SUMMARY: The NIH Office of Biotechnology Activities (NIH OBA) proposes... by mail to the NIH Office of Biotechnology Activities, National Institutes of Health, 6705 Rockledge...

  9. 75 FR 21008 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Proposed Actions Under the NIH...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA... the NIH Guidelines. SUMMARY: In March 2009, the NIH Office of Biotechnology Activities (OBA) published... e-mail address or by fax to 301-496-9839 or mail to the Office of Biotechnology Activities, National...

  10. 75 FR 69687 - Office of Biotechnology Activities Recombinant DNA Research: Proposed Actions Under the NIH...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-15

    ... of Biotechnology Activities Recombinant DNA Research: Proposed Actions Under the NIH Guidelines for... system has been submitted to the NIH Office of Biotechnology Activities (OBA). The data to be considered... Biotechnology Activities, National Institutes of Health, 6705 Rockledge Drive, Suite 750, MSC 7985, Bethesda...

  11. 75 FR 42114 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Proposed Action Under the NIH...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA... transgenic rodent and a non-transgenic rodent). The NIH Office of Biotechnology Activities (OBA) received a... to the same email address or by fax to 301-496-9839 or mail to the Office of Biotechnology Activities...

  12. Developmental heterogeneity in DNA packaging patterns influences T-cell activation and transmigration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumya Gupta

    Full Text Available Cellular differentiation programs are accompanied by large-scale changes in nuclear organization and gene expression. In this context, accompanying transitions in chromatin assembly that facilitates changes in gene expression and cell behavior in a developmental system are poorly understood. Here, we address this gap and map structural changes in chromatin organization during murine T-cell development, to describe an unusual heterogeneity in chromatin organization and associated functional correlates in T-cell lineage. Confocal imaging of DNA assembly in cells isolated from bone marrow, thymus and spleen reveal the emergence of heterogeneous patterns in DNA organization in mature T-cells following their exit from the thymus. The central DNA pattern dominated in immature precursor cells in the thymus whereas both central and peripheral DNA patterns were observed in naïve and memory cells in circulation. Naïve T-cells with central DNA patterns exhibited higher mechanical pliability in response to compressive loads in vitro and transmigration assays in vivo, and demonstrated accelerated expression of activation-induced marker CD69. T-cell activation was characterized by marked redistribution of DNA assembly to a central DNA pattern and increased nuclear size. Notably, heterogeneity in DNA patterns recovered in cells induced into quiescence in culture, suggesting an internal regulatory mechanism for chromatin reorganization. Taken together, our results uncover an important component of plasticity in nuclear organization, reflected in chromatin assembly, during T-cell development, differentiation and transmigration.

  13. Barley aleurone cell death is not apoptotic: characterization of nuclease activities and DNA degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fath, A; Bethke, P C; Jones, R L

    1999-11-01

    Barley aleurone cells undergo programmed cell death (PCD) when exposed to gibberellic acid (GA), but incubation in abscisic acid (ABA) prevent PCD. We tested the hypothesis that PCD in aleurone cells occurs by apoptosis, and show that the hallmark of apoptosis, namely DNA cleavage into 180 bp fragments, plasma membrane blebbing, and the formation of apoptotic bodies do not occur when aleurone cells die. We show that endogenous barley aleurone nucleases and nucleases present in enzymes used for protoplast preparation degrade aleurone DNA and that DNA degradation by these nucleases is rapid and can result in the formation of 180 bp DNA ladders. Methods are described that prevent DNA degradation during isolation from aleurone layers or protoplasts. Barley aleurone cells contain three nucleases whose activities are regulated by GA and ABA. CA induction and ABA repression of nuclease activities correlate with PCD in aleurone cells. Cells incubated in ABA remain alive and do not degrade their DNA, but living aleurone cells treated with GA accumulate nucleases and hydrolyze their nuclear DNA. We propose that barley nucleases play a role in DNA cleavage during aleurone PCD.

  14. Impaired nocifensive behaviours and mechanical hyperalgesia, but enhanced thermal allodynia in pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sándor, K; Kormos, V; Botz, B; Imreh, A; Bölcskei, K; Gaszner, B; Markovics, A; Szolcsányi, J; Shintani, N; Hashimoto, H; Baba, A; Reglodi, D; Helyes, Z

    2010-10-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide-38 (PACAP-38) and its receptors (PAC1 and VPAC) have been shown in the spinal dorsal horn, dorsal root ganglia and sensory nerve terminals. Data concerning the role of PACAP in central pain transmission are controversial and we have recently published its divergent peripheral effects on nociceptive processes. The aim of the present study was to investigate acute somatic and visceral nocifensive behaviours, partial sciatic nerve ligation-evoked chronic neuropathic, as well as resiniferatoxin-induced inflammatory thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia in PACAP deficient (PACAP(-/-)) mice to elucidate its overall function in pain transmission. Neuronal activation was investigated with c-Fos immunohistochemistry. Paw lickings in the early (0-5 min) and late (20-45 min) phases of the formalin test were markedly reduced in PACAP(-/-) mice. Acetic acid-evoked abdominal contractions referring to acute visceral chemonociception was also significantly attenuated in PACAP knockout animals. In both models, the excitatory role of PACAP was supported by markedly greater c-Fos expression in the periaqueductal grey and the somatosensory cortex. In PACAP-deficient animals neuropathic mechanical hyperalgesia was absent, while c-Fos immunopositivity 20 days after the operation was significantly higher. In this chronic model, these neurons are likely to indicate the activation of secondary inhibitory pathways. Intraplantarly injected resiniferatoxin-evoked mechanical hyperalgesia involving both peripheral and central processes was decreased, but thermal allodynia mediated by only peripheral mechanisms was increased in PACAP(-/-) mice. These data clearly demonstrate an overall excitatory role of PACAP in pain transmission originating from both exteroceptive and interoceptive areas, it is also involved in central sensitization. This can be explained by the signal transduction mechanisms of its identified receptors, both PAC1 and VPAC

  15. Intermolecular DNA ligation activity of eukaryotic toposiomerase II: Potential roles in nucleic acid recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gale, K.C.R.

    1992-01-01

    Single-stranded [phi]X174 (+) strand DNA was used as a model substrate for topoisomerase II to determine whether double-stranded DNA cleavage observed in vitro reflects the in vivo intermediate in the enzyme's catalytic cycle and to investigate potential mechanisms for topoisomerase II-mediated DNA recombination. As found previously for topoisomerase II-mediated cleavage of double-stranded DNA, the enzyme was covalently linked to the 5[prime]-termini of cleaved [phi]X174 molecules. Optimal reaction conditions were similar for the two substrates. In contrast to results with double-stranded molecules, single-stranded DNA cleavage increased with time, was not reversible, and did not require the presence of SDS. Cleavage products generated in the absence of protein denaturant contained free 3[prime]-OH DNA termini. These results strongly suggest that the covalent topoisomerase II-cleaved DNA complex observed in vitro is the active intermediate in the enzyme's catalytic code. Topoisomerase II is capable of joining cleaved [phi]X174 (+) strand DNA to duplex oligonucleotide acceptor molecules by an intermolecular ligation reaction. Intermolecular DNA ligation proceeded in a time and oligonucleotide concentration dependent fashion. The covalent linkage is between the 5[prime]-phosphate of [phi]X174 (+) strand DNA and the 3[prime]-OH of oligonucleotide acceptor molecules. The reaction was dependent on the presence of a divalent cation, was inhibited by salt, and was not affected by the presence of ATP. The enzyme was capable of ligating [phi]X174 (+) strand DNA to double-stranded oligonucleotides that contained 5[prime]-overhang, 3[prime]-overhang, or blunt ends. Single-stranded, nicked, or gapped oligonucleotides could also be used as acceptor molecules. These results demonstrate that the type II enzyme has an intrinsic ability to mediate illegitimate DNA recombination in vitro and suggests possible roles for topoisomerase II in nucleic acid recombination in vivo.

  16. Zinc transporter 7 deficiency affects lipid synthesis in adipocytes by inhibiting insulin-dependent Akt activity and glucose uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mice deficient for zinc transporter 7 (Znt7) are mildly zinc deficient, accompanied with low body weight gain and body fat accumulation. To investigate the underlying mechanism of Znt7 deficiency in body adiposity, we investigated fatty acid composition and insulin sensitivity in visceral (epididyma...

  17. Overproduction of stomatal lineage cells in Arabidopsis mutants defective in active DNA demethylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamuro, Chizuko; Miki, Daisuke; Zheng, Zhimin; Ma, Jun; Wang, Jing; Yang, Zhenbiao; Dong, Juan; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2014-06-05

    DNA methylation is a reversible epigenetic mark regulating genome stability and function in many eukaryotes. In Arabidopsis, active DNA demethylation depends on the function of the ROS1 subfamily of genes that encode 5-methylcytosine DNA glycosylases/lyases. ROS1-mediated DNA demethylation plays a critical role in the regulation of transgenes, transposable elements and some endogenous genes; however, there have been no reports of clear developmental phenotypes in ros1 mutant plants. Here we report that, in the ros1 mutant, the promoter region of the peptide ligand gene EPF2 is hypermethylated, which greatly reduces EPF2 expression and thereby leads to a phenotype of overproduction of stomatal lineage cells. EPF2 gene expression in ros1 is restored and the defective epidermal cell patterning is suppressed by mutations in genes in the RNA-directed DNA methylation pathway. Our results show that active DNA demethylation combats the activity of RNA-directed DNA methylation to influence the initiation of stomatal lineage cells.

  18. Effects of amino acids and its metabolites on prolidase activity against various iminodipeptides in erythrocytes from normal human and a patient with prolidase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Nakayama, Kazuko; Awata, Shiro; Wang, Weifang; Yamashita, Koichi; Manabe, Masanobu; Kodama, Hiroyuki

    2004-12-01

    The characteristics of prolidase in erythrocytes from controls and patient with prolidase deficiency were investigated. The erythrocytes were isolated from the heparinized blood of normal human and a patient with prolidase deficiency. Effects of various amino acids and their metabolites on prolidase activity against iminodipeptides in presence of 1 mmol/l MnCl(2) were investigated. Prolidase activity against glycylproline in erythrocytes from normal human was strongly enhanced by glycine, L-alanine, L-serine with MnCl(2), but the activity was strongly inhibited by L-valine, and L-leucine. However, the stereoisomers, D-leucine and D-valine enhanced the activity. The prolidase activity against methionylproline in erythrocytes from the patient with prolidase deficiency was also enhanced by glycine, L-alanine and L-serine. The activity was inhibited by l-leucine, but D-leucine and L-valine enhanced the activity against various iminodipeptides. Prolidase activity against glycylproline in normal human erythrocytes and against methionylproline from the prolidase-deficient patient was enhanced strongly by glycine, alanine and serine with MnCl(2). However, this activity was inhibited by L-leucine, but was enhanced by D-leucine.

  19. Tissue-type plasminogen activator deficiency delays bone repair: roles of osteoblastic proliferation and vascular endothelial growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawao, Naoyuki; Tamura, Yukinori; Okumoto, Katsumi; Yano, Masato; Okada, Kiyotaka; Matsuo, Osamu; Kaji, Hiroshi

    2014-08-01

    Further development in research of bone regeneration is necessary to meet the clinical demand for bone reconstruction. Recently, we reported that plasminogen is crucial for bone repair through enhancement of vessel formation. However, the details of the role of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) in the bone repair process still remain unknown. Herein, we examined the effects of plasminogen activators on bone repair after a femoral bone defect using tPA-deficient (tPA(-/-)) and uPA-deficient (uPA(-/-)) mice. Bone repair of the femur was delayed in tPA(-/-) mice, unlike that in wild-type (tPA(+/+)) mice. Conversely, the bone repair was comparable between wild-type (uPA(+/+)) and uPA(-/-) mice. The number of proliferative osteoblasts was decreased at the site of bone damage in tPA(-/-) mice. Moreover, the proliferation of primary calvarial osteoblasts was reduced in tPA(-/-) mice. Recombinant tPA facilitated the proliferation of mouse osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells. The proliferation enhanced by tPA was antagonized by the inhibition of endogenous annexin 2 by siRNA and by the inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 phosphorylation in MC3T3-E1 cells. Vessel formation as well as the levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) were decreased at the damaged site in tPA(-/-) mice. Our results provide novel evidence that tPA is crucial for bone repair through the facilitation of osteoblast proliferation related to annexin 2 and ERK1/2 as well as enhancement of vessel formation related to VEGF and HIF-1α at the site of bone damage. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  20. DNA end binding activity and Ku70/80 heterodimer expression in human colorectal tumor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paola Mazzarelli; Carolina Gravina; Marco Caricato; Maria Luana Poeta; Monica Rinaldi; Sergio Valeri; Roberto Coppola; Vito Michele Fazio; Paola Parrella; Davide Seripa; Emanuela Signori; Giuseppe Perrone; Carla Rabitti; Domenico Borzomati; Armando Gabbrielli; Maria Giovanna Matera

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To determine the DNA binding activity and protein levels of the Ku70/80 heterodimer, the functional mediator of the NHEJ activity, in human colorectal carcinogenesis.METHODS: The Ku70/80 DNA-binding activity was determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assays in 20 colon adenoma and 15 colorectal cancer samples as well as matched normal colonic tissues. Nuclear and cytoplasmic protein expression was determined by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis.RESULTS: A statistically significant difference was found in both adenomas and carcinomas as compared to matched normal colonic mucosa (P<0.00). However,changes in binding activity were not homogenous with approximately 50% of the tumors showing a clear increase in the binding activity, 30% displaying a modest increase and 15% showing a decrease of the activity.Tumors, with increased DNA-binding activity, also showed a statistically significant increase in Ku70 and Ku86nuclear expression, as determined by Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses (P<0.001). Cytoplasmic protein expression was found in pathological samples,but not in normal tissues either from tumor patients or from healthy subjects.CONCLUSION: Overall, our DNA-binding activity and protein level are consistent with a substantial activation of the NHEJ pathway in colorectal tumors. Since the NHEJ is an error prone mechanism, its abnormal activation can result in chromosomal instability and ultimately lead to tumorigenesis.

  1. On-bead fluorescent DNA nanoprobes to analyze base excision repair activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gines, Guillaume; Saint-Pierre, Christine; Gasparutto, Didier, E-mail: didier.gasparutto@cea.fr

    2014-02-17

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •On magnetic beads fluorescent enzymatic assays. •Simple, easy, non-radioactive and electrophoresis-free functional assay. •Lesion-containing hairpin DNA probes are selective for repair enzymes. •The biosensing platform allows the measurement of DNA repair activities from purified enzymes or within cell free extracts. -- Abstract: DNA integrity is constantly threatened by endogenous and exogenous agents that can modify its physical and chemical structure. Changes in DNA sequence can cause mutations sparked by some genetic diseases or cancers. Organisms have developed efficient defense mechanisms able to specifically repair each kind of lesion (alkylation, oxidation, single or double strand break, mismatch, etc). Here we report the adjustment of an original assay to detect enzymes’ activity of base excision repair (BER), that supports a set of lesions including abasic sites, alkylation, oxidation or deamination products of bases. The biosensor is characterized by a set of fluorescent hairpin-shaped nucleic acid probes supported on magnetic beads, each containing a selective lesion targeting a specific BER enzyme. We have studied the DNA glycosylase alkyl-adenine glycosylase (AAG) and the human AP-endonuclease (APE1) by incorporating within the DNA probe a hypoxanthine lesion or an abasic site analog (tetrahydrofuran), respectively. Enzymatic repair activity induces the formation of a nick in the damaged strand, leading to probe's break, that is detected in the supernatant by fluorescence. The functional assay allows the measurement of DNA repair activities from purified enzymes or in cell-free extracts in a fast, specific, quantitative and sensitive way, using only 1 pmol of probe for a test. We recorded a detection limit of 1 μg mL{sup −1} and 50 μg mL{sup −1} of HeLa nuclear extracts for APE1 and AAG enzymes, respectively. Finally, the on-bead assay should be useful to screen inhibitors of DNA repair

  2. Label-free molecular beacon for real-time monitoring of DNA polymerase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Changbei; Liu, Haisheng; Wang, Jun; Jin, Shunxin; Wang, Kemin

    2016-05-01

    Traditional methods for assaying DNA polymerase activity are discontinuous, time consuming, and laborious. Here, we report a new approach for label-free and real-time monitoring of DNA polymerase activity using a Thioflavin T (ThT) probe. In the presence of DNA polymerase, the DNA primer could be elongated through polymerase reaction to open MB1, leading to the release of the G-quartets. These then bind to ThT to form ThT/G-quadruplexes with an obvious fluorescence generation. It exhibits a satisfying detection result for the activity of DNA polymerase with a low detection limit of 0.05 unit/ml. In addition, no labeling with a fluorophore or a fluorophore-quencher pair is required; this method is fairly simple, fast, and low cost. Furthermore, the proposed method was also applied to assay the inhibition of DNA polymerase activity. This approach may offer potential applications in drug screening, clinical diagnostics, and some other related biomedical research.

  3. Distinct mechanisms for DNA cleavage by myoglobin with a designed heme active center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuan; Du, Ke-Jie; Gao, Shu-Qin; He, Bo; Wen, Ge-Bo; Tan, Xiangshi; Lin, Ying-Wu

    2016-03-01

    Heme proteins perform diverse biological functions, of which myoglobin (Mb) is a representative protein. In this study, the O2 carrier Mb was shown to cleave double stranded DNA upon aerobic dithiothreitol-induced reduction, which is fine-tuned by an additional distal histidine, His29 or His43, engineered in the heme active center. Spectroscopic (UV-vis and EPR) and inhibition studies suggested that free radicals including singlet oxygen and hydroxyl radical are responsible for efficient DNA cleavage via an oxidative cleavage mechanism. On the other hand, L29E Mb, with a distinct heme active center involving three water molecules in the met form, was found to exhibit an excellent DNA cleavage activity that was not depending on O2. Inhibition and ligation studies demonstrated for the first time that L29E Mb cleaves double stranded DNA into both the nicked circular and linear forms via a hydrolytic cleavage mechanism, which resembles native endonucleases. This study provides valuable insights into the distinct mechanisms for DNA cleavage by heme proteins, and lays down a base for creating artificial DNA endonucleases by rational design of heme proteins. Moreover, this study suggests that the diverse functions of heme proteins can be fine-tuned by rational design of the heme active center with a hydrogen-bonding network.

  4. Transposable DNA elements and life history traits: II. Transposition of P DNA elements in somatic cells reduces fitness, mating activity, and locomotion of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, R C; Thompson, J N; Barker, J S; Huai, H

    1999-01-01

    Some transposable DNA elements in higher organisms are active in somatic cells, as well as in germinal cells. What effect does the movement of DNA elements in somatic cells have on life history traits? It has previously been reported that somatically active P and mariner elements in Drosophila induce genetic damage and significantly reduce lifespan. In this study, we report that the movement of P elements in somatic cells also significantly reduces fitness, mating activity, and locomotion of Drosophila melanogaster. If other elements cause similar changes in life history traits, it is doubtful if transposable DNA elements remain active for long in somatic cells in natural populations.

  5. Fast skeletal muscle troponin activation increases force of mouse fast skeletal muscle and ameliorates weakness due to nebulin-deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Jeong Lee

    Full Text Available The effect of the fast skeletal muscle troponin activator, CK-2066260, on calcium-induced force development was studied in skinned fast skeletal muscle fibers from wildtype (WT and nebulin deficient (NEB KO mice. Nebulin is a sarcomeric protein that when absent (NEB KO mouse or present at low levels (nemaline myopathy (NM patients with NEB mutations causes muscle weakness. We studied the effect of fast skeletal troponin activation on WT muscle and tested whether it might be a therapeutic mechanism to increase muscle strength in nebulin deficient muscle. We measured tension-pCa relations with and without added CK-2066260. Maximal active tension in NEB KO tibialis cranialis fibers in the absence of CK-2066260 was ∼60% less than in WT fibers, consistent with earlier work. CK-2066260 shifted the tension-calcium relationship leftwards, with the largest relative increase (up to 8-fold at low to intermediate calcium levels. This was a general effect that was present in both WT and NEB KO fiber bundles. At pCa levels above ∼6.0 (i.e., calcium concentrations <1 µM, CK-2066260 increased tension of NEB KO fibers to beyond that of WT fibers. Crossbridge cycling kinetics were studied by measuring k(tr (rate constant of force redevelopment following a rapid shortening/restretch. CK-2066260 greatly increased k(tr at submaximal activation levels in both WT and NEB KO fiber bundles. We also studied the sarcomere length (SL dependence of the CK-2066260 effect (SL 2.1 µm and 2.6 µm and found that in the NEB KO fibers, CK-2066260 had a larger effect on calcium sensitivity at the long SL. We conclude that fast skeletal muscle troponin activation increases force at submaximal activation in both wildtype and NEB KO fiber bundles and, importantly, that this troponin activation is a potential therapeutic mechanism for increasing force in NM and other skeletal muscle diseases with loss of muscle strength.

  6. Inhibition of human DNA ligase I activity by zinc and cadmium and the fidelity of ligation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Shu Wei; Becker, F.F. [Univ. of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Chan, J.Y.H. [Chinese Univ. of Hong Kong, New Territories (Hong Kong)

    1996-12-31

    Heavy metals, including zinc (Zn) and cadmium (Cd), are potentially important genotoxic agents in our environment. Here we report that human DNA ligase I, the major form of the enzyme in replicative cells, is a target for Zn and Cd ions. ZnCl{sub 2} at 0.8 mM caused complete inhibition of DNA ligase I activity, whereas only 0.04 mM CdCl{sub 2} was required to achieve a similar effect. Both metals affected all three steps of the reaction, namely, the formation of ligase-AMP intermediate, the transfer of the AMP to DNA and the ligation reaction that succeeds the formation of the AMP-DNA complex. Unlike F-ara-ATP and the natural protein inhibitor of DNA ligase-I, these metals may affect different domains of the enzyme. Moreover, these metal ions did not increase that rate of misligation of F-ara-A-modified DNA or mismatched DNA substrates, but considerable misligation was observed for the T:C mispairing. These data support the notion of high fidelity of the human DNA ligases and that the major action of these metal ions on the enzyme is their inhibitory function. 31 refs., 6 figs.

  7. New metal based drugs: Spectral, electrochemical, DNA-binding, surface morphology and anticancer activity properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çeşme, Mustafa; Gölcü, Aysegul; Demirtaş, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    The NSAID piroxicam (PRX) drug was used for complex formation reactions with Cu(II), Zn(II) and Pt(II) metal salts have been synthesized. Then, these complexes have been characterized by spectroscopic and analytical techniques. Thermal behavior of the complexes were also investigated. The electrochemical properties of all complexes have been investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) using glassy carbon electrode. The biological activity of the complexes has been evaluated by examining their ability to bind to fish sperm double strand DNA (FSFSdsDNA) with UV spectroscopy. UV studies of the interaction of the PRX and its complexes with FSdsDNA have shown that these compounds can bind to FSdsDNA. The binding constants of the compounds with FSdsDNA have also been calculated. The morphology of the FSdsDNA, PRX, metal ions and metal complexes has been investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). To get the SEM images, the interaction of compounds with FSdsDNA has been studied by means of differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) at FSdsDNA modified pencil graphite electrode (PGE). The decrease in intensity of the guanine oxidation signals has been used as an indicator for the interaction mechanism. The effect of proliferation PRX and complexes were examined on the HeLA and C6 cells using real-time cell analyzer with four different concentrations.

  8. Inhibition of human DNA ligase I activity by zinc and cadmium and the fidelity of ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, S W; Becker, F F; Chan, J Y

    1996-01-01

    Heavy metals, including zinc (Zn) and cadmium (Cd), are potentially important genotoxic agents in our environment. Here we report that human DNA ligase I, the major form of the enzyme in replicative cells, is a target for Zn and Cd ions. ZnCl2 at 0.8 mM caused complete inhibition of DNA ligase I activity, whereas only 0.04 mM CdCl2 was required to achieve a similar effect. Both metals affected all three steps of the reaction, namely, the formation of ligase-AMP intermediate, the transfer of the AMP to DNA and the ligation reaction that succeeds the formation of the AMP-DNA complex. Unlike F-ara-ATP and the natural protein inhibitor of DNA ligase-I, these metals may affect different domains of the enzyme. Moreover, these metal ions did not increase the rate of misligation of F-ara-A-modified DNA or mismatched DNA substrates, but considerable misligation was observed for the T:C mispairing. These data support the notion of high fidelity of the human DNA ligases and that the major action of these metal ions on the enzyme is their inhibitory function.

  9. p53 activates G₁ checkpoint following DNA damage by doxorubicin during transient mitotic arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Sun-Yi; Jang, Young-Joo

    2015-03-10

    Recovery from DNA damage is critical for cell survival. The serious damage is not able to be repaired during checkpoint and finally induces cell death to prevent abnormal cell growth. In this study, we demonstrated that 8N-DNA contents are accumulated via re-replication during prolonged recovery period containing serious DNA damage in mitotic cells. During the incubation for recovery, a mitotic delay and initiation of an abnormal interphase without cytokinesis were detected. Whereas a failure of cytokinesis occurred in cells with no relation with p53/p21, re-replication is an anomalous phenomenon in the mitotic DNA damage response in p53/p21 negative cells. Cells with wild-type p53 are accumulated just prior to the initiation of DNA replication through a G₁ checkpoint after mitotic DNA damage, even though p53 does not interrupt pre-RC assembly. Finally, these cells undergo cell death by apoptosis. These data suggest that p53 activates G₁ checkpoint in response to mitotic DNA damage. Without p53, cells with mitotic DNA damage undergo re-replication leading to accumulation of damage.

  10. Zinc-regulated DNA binding of the yeast Zap1 zinc-responsive activator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avery G Frey

    Full Text Available The Zap1 transcription factor of Saccharomyces cerevisiae plays a central role in zinc homeostasis by controlling the expression of genes involved in zinc metabolism. Zap1 is active in zinc-limited cells and repressed in replete cells. At the transcriptional level, Zap1 controls its own expression via positive autoregulation. In addition, Zap1's two activation domains are regulated independently of each other by zinc binding directly to those regions and repressing activation function. In this report, we show that Zap1 DNA binding is also inhibited by zinc. DMS footprinting showed that Zap1 target gene promoter occupancy is regulated with or without transcriptional autoregulation. These results were confirmed using chromatin immunoprecipitation. Zinc regulation of DNA binding activity mapped to the DNA binding domain indicating other parts of Zap1 are unnecessary for this control. Overexpression of Zap1 overrode DNA binding regulation and resulted in constitutive promoter occupancy. Under these conditions of constitutive binding, both the zinc dose response of Zap1 activity and cellular zinc accumulation were altered suggesting the importance of DNA binding control to zinc homeostasis. Thus, our results indicated that zinc regulates Zap1 activity post-translationally via three independent mechanisms, all of which contribute to the overall zinc responsiveness of Zap1.

  11. DNA methylation in mouse embryonic stem cells and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, Tom; Gilbert, Nick; Ramsahoye, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    Mammalian development is associated with considerable changes in global DNA methylation levels at times of genomic reprogramming. Normal DNA methylation is essential for development but, despite considerable advances in our understanding of the DNA methyltransferases, the reason that development fails when DNA methylation is deficient remains unclear. Furthermore, although much is known about the enzymes that cause DNA methylation, comparatively little is known about the mechanisms or significance of active demethylation in early development. In this review, we discuss the roles of the various DNA methyltransferases and their likely functions in development.

  12. Anthracyclines induce double-strand DNA breaks at active gene promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Kemp, Christopher J; Henikoff, Steven

    2015-03-01

    Doxorubicin is a widely used chemotherapeutic drug that intercalates between DNA base-pairs and poisons Topoisomerase II, although the mechanistic basis for cell killing remains speculative. Doxorubicin and related anthracycline compounds have been shown to increase nucleosome turnover and/or eviction around promoters, which suggests that the resulting enhanced exposure of DNA might underlie cell killing. Previously, we showed that low doses of anthracyclines increase nucleosome turnover around active gene promoters, which suggests that loss of nucleosomes might contribute to cancer cell killing. Here we apply a genome-wide method to precisely map DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in cancer cells. We find that spontaneous DSBs occur preferentially around promoters of active genes, and that both anthracyclines and etoposide, a Topoisomerase II poison, increase DSBs around promoters, although CpG islands are conspicuously protected from DSBs. We propose that torsion-based enhancement of nucleosome turnover by anthracyclines exposes promoter DNA, ultimately causing DSBs around promoters.

  13. Genome-wide analysis of heteroduplex DNA in mismatch repair-deficient yeast cells reveals novel properties of meiotic recombination pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle Martini

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Meiotic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs initiate crossover (CO recombination, which is necessary for accurate chromosome segregation, but DSBs may also repair as non-crossovers (NCOs. Multiple recombination pathways with specific intermediates are expected to lead to COs and NCOs. We revisited the mechanisms of meiotic DSB repair and the regulation of CO formation, by conducting a genome-wide analysis of strand-transfer intermediates associated with recombination events. We performed this analysis in a SK1 × S288C Saccharomyces cerevisiae hybrid lacking the mismatch repair (MMR protein Msh2, to allow efficient detection of heteroduplex DNAs (hDNAs. First, we observed that the anti-recombinogenic activity of MMR is responsible for a 20% drop in CO number, suggesting that in MMR-proficient cells some DSBs are repaired using the sister chromatid as a template when polymorphisms are present. Second, we observed that a large fraction of NCOs were associated with trans-hDNA tracts constrained to a single chromatid. This unexpected finding is compatible with dissolution of double Holliday junctions (dHJs during repair, and it suggests the existence of a novel control point for CO formation at the level of the dHJ intermediate, in addition to the previously described control point before the dHJ formation step. Finally, we observed that COs are associated with complex hDNA patterns, confirming that the canonical double-strand break repair model is not sufficient to explain the formation of most COs. We propose that multiple factors contribute to the complexity of recombination intermediates. These factors include repair of nicks and double-stranded gaps, template switches between non-sister and sister chromatids, and HJ branch migration. Finally, the good correlation between the strand transfer properties observed in the absence of and in the presence of Msh2 suggests that the intermediates detected in the absence of Msh2 reflect normal intermediates.

  14. DNA damage and repair activity after broccoli intake in young healthy smokers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riso, Patrizia; Martini, Daniela; Møller, Peter;

    2010-01-01

    Cruciferous vegetables contain compounds with antioxidant properties (e.g. carotenoids, vitamin C and folates) and can alter the activity of xenobiotic metabolism (i.e. isothiocyanates). These constituents may be particularly important for subjects who are exposed to free radicals and genotoxic....... Blood was collected before and after each period. The level of oxidatively damaged DNA lesions (formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase-sensitive sites), resistance to ex vivo H(2)O(2) treatment and repair of oxidised DNA lesions were measured in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We also measured...

  15. The Anticomplementary Activity of ’Fusobacterium polymorphum’ in Normal and C-4 Deficient Sources of Guinea Pig Complement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-12

    Dentistry A U University of Maryland * Baltimore, Maryland. 21201 Short Title.: Anticoinplementary Activity of F. poiymorphwn 1. Present Address...C-4 Deficient GP sera (C4D). The C4D was kindly provided by Dr. Jerry A. Winkelstein, Depart- ment of Pediatrics , The Johns Hopkins School of...Plaque on Epoxy Resin Crowns in Man. 3. Periodontol. 46: 10—26. S ! S ~ L 5- ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 20a

  16. FUNCTIONALITY OF STUDENTS WITH PHYSICAL DEFICIENCY IN WRITING AND COMPUTER USE ACTIVITIES

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fernanda Matrigani Mercado Gutierres de Queiroz; Lígia Maria Presumido Braccialli

    2017-01-01

    ... in: Describe the functionality of students with physical disabilities, in the Multifunctional Resource Rooms, for activities of writing and computer use, according to the perception of the teachers...

  17. Prioritising weed management activities in a data deficient environment: the Pilbara islands, Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohr, Cheryl; Passeretto, Kellie; Lohr, Michael; Keighery, Greg

    2015-12-01

    Along the Pilbara coast of Western Australia (WA) there are approximately 598 islands with a total area of around 500 km(2). Budget limitations and logistical complexities mean the management of these islands tends to be opportunistic. Until now there has been no review of the establishment and impacts of weeds on Pilbara islands or any attempt to prioritise island weed management. In many instances only weed occurrence has been documented, creating a data deficient environment for management decision making. The purpose of this research was to develop a database of weed occurrences on WA islands and to create a prioritisation process that will generate a ranked list of island-weed combinations using currently available data. Here, we describe a model using the pairwise comparison formulae in the Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP), four metrics describing the logistical difficulty of working on each island (island size, ruggedness, travel time, and tenure), and two well established measures of conservation value of an island (maximum representation and effective maximum rarity of eight features). We present the sensitivity of the island-weed rankings to changes in weights applied to each decision criteria using Kendall's tau statistics. We also present the top 20 ranked island-weed combinations for four modelling scenarios. Many conservation prioritisation tools exist. However, many of these tools require extrapolation to fill data gaps and require specific management objectives and dedicated budgets. To our knowledge, this study is one of a few attempts to prioritise conservation actions using data that are currently available in an environment where management may be opportunistic and spasmodic due to budgetary restrictions.

  18. Cortical activity of children with dyslexia during natural speech processing: evidence of auditory processing deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putter-Katz, Hanna; Kishon-Rabin, Liat; Sachartov, Emma; Shabtai, Esther L; Sadeh, Michelle; Weiz, Raphael; Gadoth, Natan; Pratt, Hillel

    2005-01-01

    Children with dyslexia have difficulties with phonological processing. It is assumed that deficits in auditory temporal processing underlie the phonological difficulties of dyslectic subjects (i.e. the processing of rapid acoustic changes that occur in speech). In this study we assessed behavioral and electrophysiological evoked brain responses of dyslectic and skilled reading children while performing a set of hierarchically structured auditory tasks. Stimuli consisted of auditory natural unmodified speech that was controlled for the parameter of changing rate of main acoustic cues: vowels (slowly changing speech cues: /i/ versus /u/) and consonant-vowel (CV) syllables (rapidly changing speech cues: /da/ versus /ga/). Brain auditory processing differed significantly between groups: reaction time of dyslectic readers was prolonged in identifying speech stimuli and increased with increased phonological demand. Latencies of auditory evoked responses (auditory event related potentials [AERPs]) recorded during syllable identification of the dyslectic group were prolonged relative to those of skilled readers. Moreover, N1 amplitudes during vowel processing were larger for the dyslectic children and P3 amplitudes during CV processing were smaller for the dyslectic children. From the results of this study it is evident that the latency and amplitude of AERPs are sensitive measures of the complexity of phonological processing in skilled and dyslectic readers. These results may be signs of deficient auditory processing of natural speech under normal listening conditions as a contributing factor to reading difficulties in dyslexia. Detecting a dysfunction in the central auditory processing pathway might lead to early detection of children who may benefit from phonetic-acoustic training methods.

  19. Prioritising weed management activities in a data deficient environment: the Pilbara islands, Western Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl Lohr

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Along the Pilbara coast of Western Australia (WA there are approximately 598 islands with a total area of around 500 km2. Budget limitations and logistical complexities mean the management of these islands tends to be opportunistic. Until now there has been no review of the establishment and impacts of weeds on Pilbara islands or any attempt to prioritise island weed management. In many instances only weed occurrence has been documented, creating a data deficient environment for management decision making. The purpose of this research was to develop a database of weed occurrences on WA islands and to create a prioritisation process that will generate a ranked list of island-weed combinations using currently available data. Here, we describe a model using the pairwise comparison formulae in the Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP, four metrics describing the logistical difficulty of working on each island (island size, ruggedness, travel time, and tenure, and two well established measures of conservation value of an island (maximum representation and effective maximum rarity of eight features. We present the sensitivity of the island-weed rankings to changes in weights applied to each decision criteria using Kendall's tau statistics. We also present the top 20 ranked island-weed combinations for four modelling scenarios. Many conservation prioritisation tools exist. However, many of these tools require extrapolation to fill data gaps and require specific management objectives and dedicated budgets. To our knowledge, this study is one of a few attempts to prioritise conservation actions using data that are currently available in an environment where management may be opportunistic and spasmodic due to budgetary restrictions.

  20. VHL-deficient renal cancer cells gain resistance to mitochondria-activating apoptosis inducers by activating AKT through the IGF1R-PI3K pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Ryuji; Harada, Hiroshi; Hirota, Kiichi

    2016-10-01

    We previously developed (2-deoxyglucose)-(ABT-263) combination therapy (2DG-ABT), which induces apoptosis by activating Bak in the mitochondria of highly glycolytic cells with varied genetic backgrounds. However, the rates of apoptosis induced by 2DG-ABT were lower in von Hippel-Lindau (VHL)-deficient cancer cells. The re-expression of VHL protein in these cells lowered IGF1R expression in a manner independent of oxygen concentration. Lowering IGF1R expression via small interfering RNA (siRNA) sensitized the cells to 2DG-ABT, suggesting that IGF1R interfered with the activation of apoptosis by the mitochondria. To determine which of the two pathways activated by IGF1R, the Ras-ERK pathway or the PI3K-AKT pathway, was involved in the impairment of mitochondria activation, the cells were treated with a specific inhibitor of either PI3K or ERK, and 2DG-ABT was added to activate the mitochondria. The apoptotic rates resulting from 2DG-ABT treatment were higher in the cells treated with the PI3K inhibitor, while the rates remained approximately the same in the cells treated with the ERK inhibitor. In 2DG-ABT-sensitive cells, a 4-h 2DG treatment caused the dissociation of Mcl-1 from Bak, while ABT treatment alone caused the dissociation of Bcl-xL from Bak without substantially reducing Mcl-1 levels. In 2DG-ABT-resistant cells, Mcl-1 dissociated from Bak only when AKT activity was inhibited during the 4-h 2DG treatment. Thus, in VHL-deficient cells, IGF1R activated AKT and stabilized the Bak-Mcl-1 complex, thereby conferring cell resistance to apoptosis.

  1. Factors Influencing the DNA Nuclease Activity of Iron, Cobalt, Nickel, and Copper Chelates

    OpenAIRE

    Joyner, Jeff C.; Reichfield, Jared; Cowan, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    A library of complexes that included iron, cobalt, nickel, and copper chelates of cyclam, cyclen, DOTA, DTPA, EDTA, tripeptide GGH, tetrapeptide KGHK, NTA, and TACN was evaluated for DNA nuclease activity, ascorbate consumption, superoxide and hydroxyl radical generation, and reduction potential under physiologically relevant conditions. Plasmid DNA cleavage rates demonstrated by combinations of each complex and biological coreactants were quantified by gel electrophoresis, yielding second-or...

  2. DNA-PK Mediates AKT Activation and Apoptosis Inhibition in Clinically Acquired Platinum Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Euan A. Stronach

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Clinical resistance to chemotherapy is a frequent event in cancer treatment and is closely linked to poor outcome. High-grade serous (HGS ovarian cancer is characterized by p53 mutation and high levels of genomic instability. Treatment includes platinum-based chemotherapy and initial response rates are high; however, resistance is frequently acquired, at which point treatment options are largely palliative. Recent data indicate that platinumresistant clones exist within the sensitive primary tumor at presentation, implying resistant cell selection after treatment with platinum chemotherapy. The AKT pathway is central to cell survival and has been implicated in platinum resistance. Here, we show that platinum exposure induces an AKT-dependent, prosurvival, DNA damage response in clinically platinum-resistant but not platinum-sensitive cells. AKT relocates to the nucleus of resistant cells where it is phosphorylated specifically on S473 by DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK, and this activation inhibits cisplatin-mediated apoptosis. Inhibition of DNA-PK or AKT, but not mTORC2, restores platinum sensitivity in a panel of clinically resistant HGS ovarian cancer cell lines: we also demonstrate these effects in other tumor types. Re-sensitization is associated with prevention of AKT-mediated BAD phosphorylation. Strikingly, in patient-matched sensitive cells, we do not see enhanced apoptosis on combining cisplatin with AKT or DNA-PK inhibition. Insulin-mediated activation of AKT is unaffected by DNA-PK inhibitor treatment, suggesting that this effect is restricted to DNA damage–mediated activation of AKT and that, clinically, DNA-PK inhibition might prevent platinum-induced AKT activation without interfering with normal glucose homeostasis, an unwanted toxicity of direct AKT inhibitors.

  3. Inhibition of malaria parasite growth by quinomycin A and its derivatives through DNA-intercalating activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayase, Hiroki; Watanabe, Nobumoto; Lim, Chung Liang; Nogawa, Toshihiko; Komatsuya, Keisuke; Kita, Kiyoshi; Osada, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Quinomycin A and its derivatives were identified as potent antimalarial (Plasmodium falciparum) agents in a screen of the RIKEN NPDepo chemical library. IC50 values of quinomycin A and UK-63,598 were approximately 100 times lower than that of the antimalarial drug chloroquine. This activity was mitigated by the addition of plasmid DNA, suggesting that these compounds act against parasites by intercalating into their DNA.

  4. Effects of calmodulin on DNA-binding activity of heat shock transcription factor in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The DNA-binding activity of heat shock transcription factor (HSF) was induced by heat shock (HS) of a whole cell extract. Addition of antiserum, specific to CaM, to a whole cell extract reduced bind of the HSF to the heat shock element (HSE) with maize, and the re-addition of CaM to the sample restored the activity of the HSF for binding to HSE. In addition, DNA-binding activity of the HSF was also induced by directly adding CaM to a whole cell extract at non-HS temperature with maize. Similar results were obtained with wheat and tomato. Our observations provide the first example of the involvement of CaM in regulation of the DNA-binding activity of the HSF.

  5. Deficiency of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein family DNA binding prevents malignant conversion of adenoma to carcinoma in NNK-induced lung carcinogenesis in the mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimura Shioko

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins (C/EBPs play important roles in carcinogenesis of many tumors including the lung. Since multiple C/EBPs are expressed in lung, the combinatorial expression of these C/EBPs on lung carcinogenesis is not known. Methods A transgenic mouse line expressing a dominant negative A-C/EBP under the promoter of lung epithelial Clara cell secretory protein (CCSP gene in doxycycline dependent fashion was subjected to 4-(methylnitrosamino-1-(3-pyridyl-1-butanone (NNK-induced lung carcinogenesis bioassay in the presence and absence of doxycycline, and the effect of abolition of DNA binding activities of C/EBPs on lung carcinogenesis was examined. Results A-C/EBP expression was found not to interfere with tumor development; however, it suppressed the malignant conversion of adenoma to carcinoma during NNK-induced lung carcinogenesis. The results suggested that Ki67 may be used as a marker for lung carcinomas in mouse. Conclusions The DNA binding of C/EBP family members can be used as a potential molecular target for lung cancer therapy.

  6. Bloom syndrome helicase stimulates RAD51 DNA strand exchange activity through a novel mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugreev, Dmitry V; Mazina, Olga M; Mazin, Alexander V

    2009-09-25

    Loss or inactivation of BLM, a helicase of the RecQ family, causes Bloom syndrome, a genetic disorder with a strong predisposition to cancer. Although the precise function of BLM remains unknown, genetic data has implicated BLM in the process of genetic recombination and DNA repair. Previously, we demonstrated that BLM can disrupt the RAD51-single-stranded DNA filament that promotes the initial steps of homologous recombination. However, this disruption occurs only if RAD51 is present in an inactive ADP-bound form. Here, we investigate interactions of BLM with the active ATP-bound form of the RAD51-single-stranded DNA filament. Surprisingly, we found that BLM stimulates DNA strand exchange activity of RAD51. In contrast to the helicase activity of BLM, this stimulation does not require ATP hydrolysis. These data suggest a novel BLM function that is stimulation of the RAD51 DNA pairing. Our results demonstrate the important role of the RAD51 nucleoprotein filament conformation in stimulation of DNA pairing by BLM.

  7. Liquid-crystalline ordering of antimicrobial peptide-DNA complexes controls TLR9 activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Nathan W.; Jin, Fan; Lande, Roberto; Curk, Tine; Xian, Wujing; Lee, Calvin; Frasca, Loredana; Frenkel, Daan; Dobnikar, Jure; Gilliet, Michel; Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2015-07-01

    Double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) can trigger the production of type I interferon (IFN) in plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) by binding to endosomal Toll-like receptor-9 (TLR9; refs , , , , ). It is also known that the formation of DNA-antimicrobial peptide complexes can lead to autoimmune diseases via amplification of pDC activation. Here, by combining X-ray scattering, computer simulations, microscopy and measurements of pDC IFN production, we demonstrate that a broad range of antimicrobial peptides and other cationic molecules cause similar effects, and elucidate the criteria for amplification. TLR9 activation depends on both the inter-DNA spacing and the multiplicity of parallel DNA ligands in the self-assembled liquid-crystalline complex. Complexes with a grill-like arrangement of DNA at the optimum spacing can interlock with multiple TLR9 like a zipper, leading to multivalent electrostatic interactions that drastically amplify binding and thereby the immune response. Our results suggest that TLR9 activation and thus TLR9-mediated immune responses can be modulated deterministically.

  8. Functional intersection of ATM and DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit in coding end joining during V(D)J recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Baeck-Seung; Gapud, Eric J; Zhang, Shichuan

    2013-01-01

    -PKcs deficiency leads to a nearly complete block in coding join formation, as DNA-PKcs is required to activate Artemis, the endonuclease that opens hairpin-sealed coding ends. In contrast to loss of DNA-PKcs protein, here we show that inhibition of DNA-PKcs kinase activity has no effect on coding join formation...... when ATM is present and its kinase activity is intact. The ability of ATM to compensate for DNA-PKcs kinase activity depends on the integrity of three threonines in DNA-PKcs that are phosphorylation targets of ATM, suggesting that ATM can modulate DNA-PKcs activity through direct phosphorylation of DNA...

  9. 76 FR 3150 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Action Under the NIH Guidelines for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA...). On July 20, 2010 the NIH Office of Biotechnology Activities (OBA) published a proposed action (75 FR... contact OBA by e- mail at oba@od.nih.gov , telephone, 301-496-9838 or mail to the Office of Biotechnology...

  10. 76 FR 27653 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Action Under the NIH Guidelines for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA.... lactis certified host-vector 1 system. In addition, the Office of Biotechnology Activities is updating...: Background documentation and additional information can be obtained from the Office of Biotechnology...

  11. Histone tails regulate DNA methylation by allosterically activating de novo methyltransferase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin-Zhong Li; Guo-Liang Xu; Zheng Huang; Qing-Yan Cui; Xue-Hui Song; Lin Du; Albert Jeltsch; Ping Chen; Guohong Li; En Li

    2011-01-01

    Cytosine methylation of genomic DNA controls gene expression and maintains genome stability. How a specific DNA sequence is targeted for methylation by a methyltransferase is largely unknown. Here, we show that histone H3 tails lacking lysine 4 (K4) methylation function as an allosteric activator for methyltransferase Dnmt3a by binding to its plant homeodomain (PHD). In vitro, histone H3 peptides stimulated the methylation activity of Dnmt3a up to 8-fold, in a manner reversely correlated with the level of K4 methylation. The biological significance of allosteric regulation was manifested by molecular modeling and identification of key residues in both the PHD and the catalytic domain of Dnmt3a whose mutations impaired the stimulation of methylation activity by H3 peptides but not the binding of H3 peptides. Significantly, these mutant Dnmt3a proteins were almost inactive in DNA methylation when expressed in mouse embryonic stem cells while their recruitment to genomic targets was unaltered. We therefore propose a two-step mechanism for de novo DNA methylation - first recruitment of the methyltransferase probably assisted by a chromatin- or DNA-binding factor, and then allosteric activation depending on the interaction between Dnmt3a and the histone tails - the latter might serve as a checkpoint for the methylation activity.

  12. ATM and Chk2-dependent phosphorylation of MDMX contribute to p53 activation after DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lihong; Gilkes, Daniele M; Pan, Yu; Lane, William S; Chen, Jiandong

    2005-10-05

    The p53 tumor suppressor is activated after DNA damage to maintain genomic stability and prevent transformation. Rapid activation of p53 by ionizing radiation is dependent on signaling by the ATM kinase. MDM2 and MDMX are important p53 regulators and logical targets for stress signals. We found that DNA damage induces ATM-dependent phosphorylation and degradation of MDMX. Phosphorylated MDMX is selectively bound and degraded by MDM2 preceding p53 accumulation and activation. Reduction of MDMX level by RNAi enhances p53 response to DNA damage. Loss of ATM prevents MDMX degradation and p53 stabilization after DNA damage. Phosphorylation of MDMX on S342, S367, and S403 were detected by mass spectrometric analysis, with the first two sites confirmed by phosphopeptide-specific antibodies. Mutation of MDMX on S342, S367, and S403 each confers partial resistance to MDM2-mediated ubiquitination and degradation. Phosphorylation of S342 and S367 in vivo require the Chk2 kinase. Chk2 also stimulates MDMX ubiquitination and degradation by MDM2. Therefore, the E3 ligase activity of MDM2 is redirected to MDMX after DNA damage and contributes to p53 activation.

  13. Disaccharidase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayless, T M; Christopher, N L

    1969-02-01

    This review of the literature and current knowledge concerning a nutritional disorder of disaccharidase deficiency discusses the following topics: 1) a description of disorders of disaccharide digestion; 2) some historical perspective on the laboratory and bedside advances in the past 10 years that have helped define a group of these digestive disorders; 3) a classification of conditions causing disaccharide intolerance; and 4) a discussion of some of the specific clinical syndromes emphasizing nutritional consequences of these syndromes. The syndromes described include congenital lactase deficiency, acquired lactase deficiency in teenagers and adults, acquired generalized disaccharidase deficiency secondary to diffuse mucosal damage, acquired lactose intolerance secondary to alterations in the intestinal transit, sucrase-isomaltase deficiencies, and other disease associations connected with