WorldWideScience

Sample records for defense response electronic

  1. Proceedings of the Electronic Test Equipment Division’s Annual Program Review of ’Electronic Test Equipment Industry Response to Emerging Defense Requirements’ Held in Arlington, VA on 10-11 May 1984

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    J j ELECTRONIC TEST EQUIPMENT INDUSTRY RESPONSE TO EMERGING DEFENSE REQUIREMENTS TECHNICAL LIBRARY held at the Hyatt Arlington Hotel ...Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition Mangement KEYNOTE ADDRESS 13 LtG. Donald M. Babers, Deputy Commanding General for Material

  2. Electronics Industry Study Report: Semiconductors and Defense Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Lucent Technologies, Madrid, Spain Ministry of Defense, Madrid, Spain Ministry Of Defense, Prague, Czech Republic Tesla Blatna, Blatna, Czech... Nicolas Mokhoff , “Nanotechnology Will Even Out Semi Cycles,” Electronic Engineering Times, November 25, 2002, p. 20 61 Rob Fixmer, “Moore’s Law...2001). Moad, Jeff and Vaas, Lisa, IT Job Outlook, eWeek, 10/7/02, Vol. 19, Issue 40, p. 37 Mokhoff, Nicolas . “Nanotechnology Will Even Out Semi

  3. Electronic Data Interchange (EDI): Using Electronic Commerce to Enhance Defense Logistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    AD-A238 559 Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) Using Electronic Commerce to Enhance Defense Logistics Judith E. Payne, Robert H. Anderson N STATEN= A... electronic commerce to enhance defense logistics / Judith L. Payne and Robert H, Anderson. "Prepared for the Assistant Sccretary of Defense (Production and...by RAND 1700 Main Street, P.O. Box 2138, Santa Monica, CA 90407-2138 | ,! R-4030-P&L Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) Using Electronic Commerce to

  4. Strategic Plan for Electronic Commerce, Defense Personnel Support Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-07-01

    AD-A274 243 Strategic Plan for Electronic Commerce Defense Personnel Support Center DTIC %!" . FLECTE .: UEC3 0 199 3 -I CUSTOMER SATISFACTION 93 12...220 3 &tiuini nm Best Available Copy Strategic Plan for Electronic Commerce Defense Personnel Support Center NTIS C? ~- j CUSTOMER Avao OrK...Concept of Operations and Projects ........... 6-4 Benefits and Costs of Electronic Commerce in the Medical Directorate

  5. Civil Defense, U. S. A.: A Programmed Orientation to Civil Defense. Unit 5. Governmental Responsibilities for Civil Defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defense Civil Preparedness Agency (DOD), Battle Creek, MI.

    A description of the laws and orders that provide necessary legal authorization for civil defense activities is provided. In addition, an outline of the responsibilities of all governments and the role of the private sector in civil defense is presented. Topics discussed include: (1) Legal authority for civil defense, (2) Civil defense…

  6. Insect response to plant defensive protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu-Salzman, Keyan; Zeng, Rensen

    2015-01-07

    Plant protease inhibitors (PIs) are natural plant defense proteins that inhibit proteases of invading insect herbivores. However, their anti-insect efficacy is determined not only by their potency toward a vulnerable insect system but also by the response of the insect to such a challenge. Through the long history of coevolution with their host plants, insects have developed sophisticated mechanisms to circumvent antinutritional effects of dietary challenges. Their response takes the form of changes in gene expression and the protein repertoire in cells lining the alimentary tract, the first line of defense. Research in insect digestive proteases has revealed the crucial roles they play in insect adaptation to plant PIs and has brought about a new appreciation of how phytophagous insects employ this group of molecules in both protein digestion and counterdefense. This review provides researchers in related fields an up-to-date summary of recent advances.

  7. Mental imagery affects subsequent automatic defense responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muriel A Hagenaars

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Automatic defense responses promote survival and appropriate action under threat. They have also been associated with the development of threat-related psychiatric syndromes. Targeting such automatic responses during threat may be useful in populations with frequent threat exposure. Here, two experiments explored whether mental imagery as a pre-trauma manipulation could influence fear bradycardia (a core characteristic of freezing during subsequent analogue trauma (affective picture viewing. Image-based interventions have proven successful in the treatment of threat-related disorders, and are easily applicable. In Experiment 1 43 healthy participants were randomly assigned to an imagery script condition. Participants executed a passive viewing task with blocks of neutral, pleasant and unpleasant pictures after listening to an auditory script that was either related (with a positive or a negative outcome or unrelated to the unpleasant pictures from the passive viewing task. Heart rate was assessed during script listening and during passive viewing. Imagining negative related scripts resulted in greater bradycardia (neutral-unpleasant contrast than imagining positive scripts, especially unrelated. This effect was replicated in Experiment 2 (N = 51, again in the neutral-unpleasant contrast. An extra no-script condition showed that bradycardia was not induced by the negative related script, but rather that a positive script attenuated bradycardia. These preliminary results might indicate reduced vigilance after unrelated positive events. Future research should replicate these findings using a larger sample. Either way, the findings show that highly automatic defense behavior can be influenced by relatively simple mental imagery manipulations.

  8. Extracellular Alkalinization as a Defense Response in Potato Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Moroz, Natalia; Fritch, Karen R.; Marcec, Matthew J.; Tripathi, Diwaker; Smertenko, Andrei; Tanaka, Kiwamu

    2017-01-01

    A quantitative and robust bioassay to assess plant defense response is important for studies of disease resistance and also for the early identification of disease during pre- or non-symptomatic phases. An increase in extracellular pH is known to be an early defense response in plants. In this study, we demonstrate extracellular alkalinization as a defense response in potatoes. Using potato suspension cell cultures, we observed an alkalinization response against various pathogen- and plant-de...

  9. Flexible resource allocation during plant defense responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack C. Schultz

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Plants are organisms composed of modules connected by xylem and phloem transport streams. Attack by both insects and pathogens elicits sometimes rapid defense responses in the attacked module. We have also known for some time that proteins are often reallocated away from pathogen-infected tissues, while the same infection sites may draw carbohydrates to them. This has been interpreted as a tug of war in which the plant withdraws critical resources to block microbial growth while the microbes attempt to acquire more resources. Sink-source regulated transport among modules of critical resources, particularly carbon and nitrogen, is also altered in response to attack. Insects and jasmonate can increase local sink strength, drawing carbohydrates that support defense production. Shortly after attack, carbohydrates may also be drawn to the root. The rate and direction of movement of photosynthate or signals in phloem in response to attack is subject to constraints that include branching, degree of connection among tissues, distance between sources and sinks, proximity, strength, and number of competing sinks, and phloem loading/unloading regulators. Movement of materials (e.g., amino acids, signals to or from attack sites in xylem is less well understood but is partly driven by transpiration. The root is an influential sink and may regulate sink-source interactions and transport above and below ground as well as between the plant and the rhizosphere and nearby, connected plants. Research on resource translocation in response to pathogens or herbivores has focused on biochemical mechanisms; whole-plant research is needed to determine which, if any, of these plant behaviors actually influence plant fitness.

  10. Priming of antiherbivore defensive responses in plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinwon Kim; Gary W.Felton

    2013-01-01

    Defense priming is defined as increased readiness of defense induction.A growing body of literature indicates that plants (or intact parts of a plant) are primed in anticipation of impending environmental stresses,both biotic and abiotic,and upon the following stimulus,induce defenses more quickly and strongly.For instance,some plants previously exposed to herbivore-inducible plant volatiles (HIPVs) from neighboring plants under herbivore attack show faster or stronger defense activation and enhanced insect resistance when challenged with secondary insect feeding.Research on priming of antiherbivore defense has been limited to the HIPV-mediated mechanism until recently,but significant advances were made in the past three years,including non-HIPV-mediated defense priming,epigenetic modifications as the molecular mechanism of priming,and others.It is timely to consider the advances in research on defense priming in the plantinsect interactions.

  11. Extracellular Alkalinization as a Defense Response in Potato Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroz, Natalia; Fritch, Karen R.; Marcec, Matthew J.; Tripathi, Diwaker; Smertenko, Andrei; Tanaka, Kiwamu

    2017-01-01

    A quantitative and robust bioassay to assess plant defense response is important for studies of disease resistance and also for the early identification of disease during pre- or non-symptomatic phases. An increase in extracellular pH is known to be an early defense response in plants. In this study, we demonstrate extracellular alkalinization as a defense response in potatoes. Using potato suspension cell cultures, we observed an alkalinization response against various pathogen- and plant-derived elicitors in a dose- and time-dependent manner. We also assessed the defense response against a variety of potato pathogens, such as protists (Phytophthora infestans and Spongospora subterranea) and fungi (Verticillium dahliae and Colletotrichum coccodes). Our results show that extracellular pH increases within 30 min in proportion to the number of pathogen spores added. Consistently with the alkalinization effect, the higher transcription level of several defense-related genes and production of reactive oxygen species was observed. Our results demonstrate that the alkalinization response is an effective marker to study early stages of defense response in potatoes. PMID:28174578

  12. Defense response in Nopal Cladodes infiltrated with Salmonella Typhimurium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foodborne outbreaks associated with fresh produce have increased in recent years. Pre-harvest contamination of fresh produce via irrigation water, soil, or other animal vectors may be responsible for many of these outbreaks. We evaluated defense response of nopal plants when contaminated in intern...

  13. Modulation of Intestinal Epithelial Defense Responses by Probiotic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, L Y M; Chen, Z J; Shah, N P; El-Nezami, H

    2016-12-09

    Probiotics are live microorganisms, which when administered in food confer numerous health benefits. In previous studies about beneficial effects of probiotic bacteria to health, particularly in the fields of intestinal mucosa defense responses, specific probiotics, in a strain-dependent manner, show certain degree of potential to reinforce the integrity of intestinal epithelium and/or regulate some immune components. The mechanism of probiotic action is an area of interest. Among all possible routes of modulation by probiotics of intestinal epithelial cell-mediated defense responses, modulations of intestinal barrier function, innate, and adaptive mucosal immune responses, as well as signaling pathways are considered to play important role in the intestinal defense responses against pathogenic bacteria. This review summarizes the beneficial effects of probiotic bacteria to intestinal health together with the mechanisms affected by probiotic bacteria: barrier function, innate, and adaptive defense responses such as secretion of mucins, defensins, trefoil factors, immunoglobulin A (IgA), Toll-like receptors (TLRs), cytokines, gut associated lymphoid tissues, and signaling pathways.

  14. Defensive functions and responsible metabolites of microbial endophytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increasing evidence indicates that plant microbiomes are influence by ecological successes of plant hosts. Further, endophytic microbes such as bacteria and fungi greatly affect plant stress tolerance and are responsible for defensive reaction to several forms of herbivory. What is not yet clear i...

  15. 75 FR 60690 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement (DFARS); Electronic Ordering Procedures (DFARS...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... FAR 52.216-18, Ordering. The benefit of this rule to small business is that it will make electronic... Supplement (DFARS); Electronic Ordering Procedures (DFARS Case 2009-D037) AGENCY: Defense Acquisition... is proposing to amend the Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement to address...

  16. The Venturia Apple Pathosystem: Pathogenicity Mechanisms and Plant Defense Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopaljee Jha

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Venturia inaequalis is the causal agent of apple scab, a devastating disease of apple. We outline several unique features of this pathogen which are useful for molecular genetics studies intended to understand plant-pathogen interactions. The pathogenicity mechanisms of the pathogen and overview of apple defense responses, monogenic and polygenic resistance, and their utilization in scab resistance breeding programs are also reviewed.

  17. Thermodynamic responses of electronic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Pérez, Marco; Ayers, Paul W.; Gázquez, José L.; Vela, Alberto

    2017-09-01

    We present how the framework of the temperature-dependent chemical reactivity theory can describe the panorama of different types of interactions between an electronic system and external reagents. The key reactivity indicators are responses of an appropriate state function (like the energy or grand potential) to the variables that determine the state of the system (like the number of electrons/chemical potential, external potential, and temperature). We also consider the response of the average electron density to appropriate perturbations. We present computable formulas for these reactivity indicators and discuss their chemical utility for describing electronic, electrostatic, and thermal changes associated with chemical processes.

  18. 41 CFR 101-26.603 - Electronic items available from the Defense Logistics Agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Electronic items available from the Defense Logistics Agency. 101-26.603 Section 101-26.603 Public Contracts and Property... items available from the Defense Logistics Agency. Executive agencies shall satisfy their requirements...

  19. Strategic defensiveness: public and private responses to group criticism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornsey, Matthew J; Frederiks, Elisha; Smith, Joanne R; Ford, Lindsay

    2007-12-01

    This paper explores the strategic processes associated with responding to group criticism. In Experiment 1, Australians received criticism of their country from either an in-group or an out-group member. When participants believed their evaluations of the criticisms were private, they reported being more defensive when criticized by an out-group relative to an in-group member. However, this intergroup sensitivity effect disappeared on some measures when participants were led to believe their evaluations of the criticisms could be seen by an in-group audience. In Experiment 2, which focused on participants' identity as social science students, the attenuation of the intergroup sensitivity effect emerged only when the in-group audience was relatively high-status. Furthermore, in both experiments, increased reports of defensiveness in public only occurred in response to an in-group critic and not to an out-group critic. Theoretical and practical implications for intergroup and intragroup communication are discussed.

  20. Physcomitrella patens Activates Defense Responses against the Pathogen Colletotrichum gloeosporioides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Reboledo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The moss Physcomitrella patens is a suitable model plant to analyze the activation of defense mechanisms after pathogen assault. In this study, we show that Colletotrichum gloeosporioides isolated from symptomatic citrus fruit infects P. patens and cause disease symptoms evidenced by browning and maceration of tissues. After C. gloeosporioides infection, P. patens reinforces the cell wall by the incorporation of phenolic compounds and induces the expression of a Dirigent-protein-like encoding gene that could lead to the formation of lignin-like polymers. C. gloeosporioides-inoculated protonemal cells show cytoplasmic collapse, browning of chloroplasts and modifications of the cell wall. Chloroplasts relocate in cells of infected tissues toward the initially infected C. gloeosporioides cells. P. patens also induces the expression of the defense genes PAL and CHS after fungal colonization. P. patens reporter lines harboring the auxin-inducible promoter from soybean (GmGH3 fused to β-glucuronidase revealed an auxin response in protonemal tissues, cauloids and leaves of C. gloeosporioides-infected moss tissues, indicating the activation of auxin signaling. Thus, P. patens is an interesting plant to gain insight into defense mechanisms that have evolved in primitive land plants to cope with microbial pathogens.

  1. Heavy Metal Stress and Some Mechanisms of Plant Defense Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolghassem Emamverdian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Unprecedented bioaccumulation and biomagnification of heavy metals (HMs in the environment have become a dilemma for all living organisms including plants. HMs at toxic levels have the capability to interact with several vital cellular biomolecules such as nuclear proteins and DNA, leading to excessive augmentation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. This would inflict serious morphological, metabolic, and physiological anomalies in plants ranging from chlorosis of shoot to lipid peroxidation and protein degradation. In response, plants are equipped with a repertoire of mechanisms to counteract heavy metal (HM toxicity. The key elements of these are chelating metals by forming phytochelatins (PCs or metallothioneins (MTs metal complex at the intra- and intercellular level, which is followed by the removal of HM ions from sensitive sites or vacuolar sequestration of ligand-metal complex. Nonenzymatically synthesized compounds such as proline (Pro are able to strengthen metal-detoxification capacity of intracellular antioxidant enzymes. Another important additive component of plant defense system is symbiotic association with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungi. AM can effectively immobilize HMs and reduce their uptake by host plants via binding metal ions to hyphal cell wall and excreting several extracellular biomolecules. Additionally, AM fungi can enhance activities of antioxidant defense machinery of plants.

  2. Paracoccidioides spp. catalases and their role in antioxidant defense against host defense responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamayo, Diana; Muñoz, José F; Almeida, Agostinho J; Puerta, Juan D; Restrepo, Ángela; Cuomo, Christina A; McEwen, Juan G; Hernández, Orville

    2017-03-01

    Dimorphic human pathogenic fungi interact with host effector cells resisting their microbicidal mechanisms. Yeast cells are able of surviving within the tough environment of the phagolysosome by expressing an antioxidant defense system that provides protection against host-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS). This includes the production of catalases (CATs). Here we identified and analyzed the role of CAT isoforms in Paracoccidioides, the etiological agent of paracoccidioidomycosis. Firstly, we found that one of these isoforms was absent in the closely related dimorphic pathogen Coccidioides and dermatophytes, but all of them were conserved in Paracoccidioides, Histoplasma and Blastomyces species. We probed the contribution of CATs in Paracoccidioides by determining the gene expression levels of each isoform through quantitative RT-qPCR, in both the yeast and mycelia phases, and during the morphological switch (transition and germination), as well as in response to oxidative agents and during interaction with neutrophils. PbCATP was preferentially expressed in the pathogenic yeast phase, and was associated to the response against exogenous H2O2. Therefore, we created and analyzed the virulence defects of a knockdown strain for this isoform, and found that CATP protects yeast cells from H2O2 generated in vitro and is relevant during lung infection. On the other hand, CATA and CATB seem to contribute to ROS homeostasis in Paracoccidioides cells, during endogenous oxidative stress. CAT isoforms in Paracoccidioides might be coordinately regulated during development and dimorphism, and differentially expressed in response to different stresses to control ROS homeostasis during the infectious process, contributing to the virulence of Paracoccidioides. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Herbivore defense responses and associated herbivore defense mechanism as revealed by comparing a resistant wild soybean with a susceptible cultivar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyi Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Plants have evolved sophisticated defense mechanisms against herbivores to help them adapt to the environment. Understanding the defense mechanisms in plants can help us control insects in a more effective manner. In this study, we found that compared with Tianlong 2 (a cultivated soybean with insect susceptibility, ED059 (a wild soybean line with insect resistance contains sharper pubescence tips, as well as lower transcript levels of wound-induced protein kinase (WIPK and salicylic acid-induced protein kinase (SIPK, which are important mitogen-activated protein kinases involved in early defense response to herbivores. The observed lower transcript levels of WIPK and SIPK induced higher levels of jasmonic acid (JA, JA biosynthesis enzymes (AOC3 and some secondary metabolites in ED059. Functional analysis of the KTI1 gene via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation in Arabidopsis thaliana indicated that it plays an important role in herbivore defense in ED059. We further investigated the molecular response of third-instar Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner larvae to Tianlong 2 and ED059. We found apoptotic cells only in the midguts of larvae that fed on ED059. Compared with larvae reared on the susceptible cultivar Tianlong 2, transcript levels of catalase (CAT and glutathione S-transferase (GST were up-regulated, whereas those of CAR, CHSB, and TRY were down-regulated in larvae that fed on the highly resistant variety ED059. We propose that these differences underlie the different herbivore defense responses of ED059 and Tianlong 2.

  4. Defense Information Systems Agency Management of Trouble Tickets for Electronic Commerce/Electronic Data Interchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    received, 15 were requests for quotes. The causes were break down of modems, and failure of computer equipment and software at the Columbus and Ogden...transaction identified on the trouble ticket? Yes 15 No 115 7. Do you have access to the trouble ticket resolution diary at Ogden NEP? Yes 10 No 120 8...Information Systems Agency, Arlington, VA Defense Megacenter Columbus , OH Defense Megacenter Mechanicsburg, PA Defense Megacenter Ogden, UT Non

  5. Potassium phosphite primes defense responses in potato against Phytophthora infestans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machinandiarena, Milagros Florencia; Lobato, María Candela; Feldman, Mariana Laura; Daleo, Gustavo Raúl; Andreu, Adriana Balbina

    2012-09-15

    Although phosphite is widely used to protect plants from pathogenic oomycetes on a wide range of horticultural crops, the molecular mechanisms behind phosphite induced resistance are poorly understood. The aim of this work was to assess the effects of potassium phosphite (KPhi) on potato plant defense responses to infection with Phytophtora infestans (Pi). Pathogen development was severely restricted and there was also an important decrease in lesion size in infected KPhi-treated leaves. We demonstrated that KPhi primed hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion production in potato leaves at 12 h post-inoculation with Pi. Moreover, the KPhi-treated leaves showed an increased and earlier callose deposition as compared with water-treated plants, beginning 48 h after inoculation. In contrast, callose deposition was not detected in water-treated leaves until 72 h after inoculation. In addition, we carried out RNA gel blot analysis of genes implicated in the responses mediated by salicylic (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA). To this end, we examined the temporal expression pattern of StNPR1 and StWRKY1, two transcription factors related to SA pathway, and StPR1 and StIPII, marker genes related to SA and JA pathways, respectively. The expression of StNPR1 and StWRKY1 was enhanced in response to KPhi treatment. In contrast, StIPII was down regulated in both KPhi- and water-treated leaves, until 48 h after infection with Pi, suggesting that the regulation of this gene could be independent of the KPhi treatment. Our results indicate that KPhi primes the plant for an earlier and more intense response to infection and that SA would mediate this response.

  6. Overcompensation of herbivore reproduction through hyper-suppression of plant defenses in response to competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmel, Bernardus C J; Ataide, Livia M S; Chafi, Rachid; Villarroel, Carlos A; Alba, Juan M; Schuurink, Robert C; Kant, Merijn R

    2017-06-01

    Spider mites are destructive arthropod pests on many crops. The generalist herbivorous mite Tetranychus urticae induces defenses in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) and this constrains its fitness. By contrast, the Solanaceae-specialist Tetranychus evansi maintains a high reproductive performance by suppressing tomato defenses. Tetranychus evansi outcompetes T. urticae when infesting the same plant, but it is unknown whether this is facilitated by the defenses of the plant. We assessed the extent to which a secondary infestation by a competitor affects local plant defense responses (phytohormones and defense genes), mite gene expression and mite performance. We observed that T. evansi switches to hyper-suppression of defenses after its tomato host is also invaded by its natural competitor T. urticae. Jasmonate (JA) and salicylate (SA) defenses were suppressed more strongly, albeit only locally at the feeding site of T. evansi, upon introduction of T. urticae to the infested leaflet. The hyper-suppression of defenses coincided with increased expression of T. evansi genes coding for salivary defense-suppressing effector proteins and was paralleled by an increased reproductive performance. Together, these observations suggest that T. evansi overcompensates its reproduction through hyper-suppression of plant defenses in response to nearby competitors. We hypothesize that the competitor-induced overcompensation promotes competitive population growth of T. evansi on tomato. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  7. Limited response of ponderosa pine bole defenses to wounding and fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaylord, Monica L; Hofstetter, Richard W; Kolb, Thomas E; Wagner, Michael R

    2011-04-01

    Tree defense against bark beetles (Curculionidae: Scolytinae) and their associated fungi generally comprises some combination of constitutive (primary) and induced (secondary) defenses. In pines, the primary constitutive defense against bark beetles consists of preformed resin stored in resin ducts. Induced defenses at the wound site (point of beetle entry) in pines may consist of an increase in resin flow and necrotic lesion formation. The quantity and quality of both induced and constitutive defenses can vary by species and season. The inducible defense response in ponderosa pine is not well understood. Our study examined the inducible defense response in ponderosa pine using traumatic mechanical wounding, and wounding with and without fungal inoculations with two different bark beetle-associated fungi (Ophiostoma minus and Grosmannia clavigera). Resin flow did not significantly increase in response to any treatment. In addition, necrotic lesion formation on the bole after fungal inoculation was minimal. Stand thinning, which has been shown to increase water availability, had no, or inconsistent, effects on inducible tree defense. Our results suggest that ponderosa pine bole defense against bark beetles and their associated fungi is primarily constitutive and not induced.

  8. The MAP kinase substrate MKS1 is a regulator of plant defense responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasson, Erik; Jenkins, Thomas; Brodersen, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 (MPK4) functions as a regulator of pathogen defense responses, because it is required for both repression of salicylic acid (SA)-dependent resistance and for activation of jasmonate (JA)-dependent defense gene expression. To understand MPK4 signaling mechanisms, we used...

  9. Spatiotemporal heterogenesssity of tomato induced defense responses affects spider mite performance and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmel, Bernardus C J; Ataide, Livia M S; Kant, Merijn R

    2017-08-31

    When feeding from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), the generalist spider mite Tetranychus urticae induces jasmonate (JA)- and salicylate (SA)-regulated defense responses that hamper its performance. The related T. evansi, a Solanaceae-specialist, suppresses these defenses, thereby upholding a high performance. On a shared leaf, T. urticae can be facilitated by T. evansi, likely via suppression of defenses by the latter. Yet, when infesting the same plant, T. evansi outcompetes T. urticae. Recently, we found that T. evansi intensified suppression of defenses locally, i.e. at its feeding site, after T. urticae mites were introduced onto adjacent leaf tissue. This hyper-suppression is paralleled by an increased oviposition rate of T. evansi, probably promoting its competitive population growth. Here we present additional data that not only provide insight into the spatiotemporal dynamics of defense induction and suppression by mites, but that also suggest T. evansi to manipulate more than JA and SA defenses alone.

  10. Gene expression analysis during cassava defense response to bacterial blight disease

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Cassava bacterial blight (CBB) caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. manihotis (Xam) is a destructive disease in the South América and África and yield losses range between 12 and 100%. Cytochemistry and biochemistry of defense response to CBB have been well studied. However, the response of the plant to pathogen attack at the molecular and cellular level remains uncharacterized. Identification of genes associated with defense responses is one of most critical steps leading to the elucidation ...

  11. Suppression of Salicylic Acid-Mediated Plant Defense Responses During Initial Infection of Dyer's Woad by Puccinia thlaspeos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Puccinia thlaspeos is a microcyclic rust pathogen that is being investigated as a potential biocontrol agent of the noxious weed, dyer’s woad (Isatis tinctoria. Although, the initial events in the colonization of dyer’s woad by the rust pathogen has been elucidated using scanning electron microscopy and PCR, little is known regarding the susceptibility response of this plant to its rust pathogen. Approach: The induction kinetics and amplitude of the Salicylic Acid (SA-responsive Pathogenesis-Related (PR genes, PR-1, â-1, 3-glucanase and ChiA in the compatible interaction between the rust pathogen Puccinia thlaspeos and dyer’s woad were examined during the first 72 h of the infection process. Furthermore SA, an inducer of plant defense response was applied to infected plants in order to reprogram the host defense response at periods that coincided with key events of the infection process. Results: PR genes were upregulated following host penetration by the pathogen. A subsequent pathogen-mediated suppression of PR genes was seen that corresponded with haustorium formation. This was followed by a second up-regulation of these genes that was, in turn, followed by a second long-term pathogen-induced suppression of the defense response that appears to allow successful infections in dyer’s woad. Exogenous application of SA to uninoculated plants led to activation of defense responses by 8 h after treatment. In treatments where inoculated plants were treated with SA, responses differed depending on the timing of SA application. Application of SA at times corresponding to the pre-haustorial and posthaustorial phases of infection triggered an up-regulation of defense genes and increased protection against the pathogen. However, the application of SA during haustorium formation could not override the pathogen-mediated suppression of defense responses and consequently, did not offer the host increased protection. Conclusion

  12. Peptidoglycan from fermentation by-product triggers defense responses in grapevine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Chen

    Full Text Available Plants are constantly under attack from a variety of microorganisms, and rely on a series of complex detection and response systems to protect themselves from infection. Here, we found that a by-product of glutamate fermentation triggered defense responses in grapevine, increasing the expression of defense response genes in cultured cells, foliar chitinase activity, and resistance to infection by downy mildew in leaf explants. To identify the molecule that triggered this innate immunity, we fractionated and purified candidates extracted from Corynebacterium glutamicum, a bacterium used in the production of amino acids by fermentation. Using hydrolysis by lysozyme, a silkworm larva plasma detection system, and gel filtration analysis, we identified peptidoglycan as inducing the defense responses. Peptidoglycans of Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, and Staphylococcus aureus also generated similar defensive responses.

  13. 41 CFR 101-26.605 - Items other than petroleum products and electronic items available from the Defense Logistics...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... petroleum products and electronic items available from the Defense Logistics Agency. 101-26.605 Section 101... available from the Defense Logistics Agency. Agencies required to use GSA supply sources should also use... Logistics Agency, the catalog will contain only those items in Federal supply classification classes which...

  14. Heterogeneity of defensive responses after exposure to trauma: blunted autonomic reactivity in response to startling sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Andrea, Wendy; Pole, Nnamdi; DePierro, Jonathan; Freed, Steven; Wallace, D Brian

    2013-10-01

    Research on threat responses, particularly among trauma-exposed individuals, has traditionally focused on increased autonomic arousal and reactivity. However, clinical features associated with trauma exposure, such as dissociation (e.g., shutting down or "spacing out") manifest as the opposite pattern: non-reactivity and blunted arousal. These clinical features suggest that the possibility of threat responses other than fight/flight, namely, immobilization may be undergirded by hyper- or hypo-arousal. The goal of this paper is to examine autonomic responses to a stressful stimulus (acoustic startle) using analytic approaches which have been previously used to examine defensive responses before: heart rate acceleration, heart rate deceleration, and skin conductance response. We examined these responses in relation to symptoms (Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, or PTSD, and dissociation) and trauma exposure (cumulative exposure, age of onset) in a sample of trauma-exposed college students. We found evidence of blunted reactivity, with decreased acceleration and skin conductance, but with increased deceleration, particularly among individuals who had significant symptoms and early exposure to multiple types of trauma. However, individuals with sub-clinical symptoms and more attenuated exposure had large heart rate acceleration and skin conductance responses during the task. Taken together, these findings suggest that moderate symptoms and trauma exposure are related to exaggerated autonomic responses, while extreme symptoms and trauma exposure are related to blunted autonomic responses. These findings further suggest heterogeneity of stress responses within individuals with PTSD and with trauma exposure. © 2013.

  15. Seaweed Polysaccharides and Derived Oligosaccharides Stimulate Defense Responses and Protection Against Pathogens in Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Alejandra Moenne; Jorge Castro; Jeannette Vera; Alberto Gonzalez

    2011-01-01

    Plants interact with the environment by sensing “non-self” molecules called elicitors derived from pathogens or other sources. These molecules bind to specific receptors located in the plasma membrane and trigger defense responses leading to protection against pathogens. In particular, it has been shown that cell wall and storage polysaccharides from green, brown and red seaweeds (marine macroalgae) corresponding to ulvans, alginates, fucans, laminarin and carrageenans can trigger defense res...

  16. IBR5 Modulates Temperature-Dependent, R Protein CHS3-Mediated Defense Responses in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingyan Liu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Plant responses to low temperature are tightly associated with defense responses. We previously characterized the chilling-sensitive mutant chs3-1 resulting from the activation of the Toll and interleukin 1 receptor-nucleotide binding-leucine-rich repeat (TIR-NB-LRR-type resistance (R protein harboring a C-terminal LIM (Lin-11, Isl-1 and Mec-3 domains domain. Here we report the identification of a suppressor of chs3, ibr5-7 (indole-3-butyric acid response 5, which largely suppresses chilling-activated defense responses. IBR5 encodes a putative dual-specificity protein phosphatase. The accumulation of CHS3 protein at chilling temperatures is inhibited by the IBR5 mutation. Moreover, chs3-conferred defense phenotypes were synergistically suppressed by mutations in HSP90 and IBR5. Further analysis showed that IBR5, with holdase activity, physically associates with CHS3, HSP90 and SGT1b (Suppressor of the G2 allele of skp1 to form a complex that protects CHS3. In addition to the positive role of IBR5 in regulating CHS3, IBR5 is also involved in defense responses mediated by R genes, including SNC1 (Suppressor of npr1-1, Constitutive 1, RPS4 (Resistance to P. syringae 4 and RPM1 (Resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola 1. Thus, the results of the present study reveal a role for IBR5 in the regulation of multiple R protein-mediated defense responses.

  17. Herbivore Oral Secreted Bacteria Trigger Distinct Defense Responses in Preferred and Non-Preferred Host Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie; Chung, Seung Ho; Peiffer, Michelle; Rosa, Cristina; Hoover, Kelli; Zeng, Rensen; Felton, Gary W

    2016-06-01

    Insect symbiotic bacteria affect host physiology and mediate plant-insect interactions, yet there are few clear examples of symbiotic bacteria regulating defense responses in different host plants. We hypothesized that plants would induce distinct defense responses to herbivore- associated bacteria. We evaluated whether preferred hosts (horsenettle) or non-preferred hosts (tomato) respond similarly to oral secretions (OS) from the false potato beetle (FPB, Leptinotarsa juncta), and whether the induced defense triggered by OS was due to the presence of symbiotic bacteria in OS. Both horsenettle and tomato damaged by antibiotic (AB) treated larvae showed higher polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity than those damaged by non-AB treated larvae. In addition, application of OS from AB treated larvae induced higher PPO activity compared with OS from non-AB treated larvae or water treatment. False potato beetles harbor bacteria that may provide abundant cues that can be recognized by plants and thus mediate corresponding defense responses. Among all tested bacterial isolates, the genera Pantoea, Acinetobacter, Enterobacter, and Serratia were found to suppress PPO activity in tomato, while only Pantoea sp. among these four isolates was observed to suppress PPO activity in horsenettle. The distinct PPO suppression caused by symbiotic bacteria in different plants was similar to the pattern of induced defense-related gene expression. Pantoea inoculated FPB suppressed JA-responsive genes and triggered a SA-responsive gene in both tomato and horsenettle. However, Enterobacter inoculated FPB eliminated JA-regulated gene expression and elevated SA-regulated gene expression in tomato, but did not show evident effects on the expression levels of horsenettle defense-related genes. These results indicate that suppression of plant defenses by the bacteria found in the oral secretions of herbivores may be a more widespread phenomenon than previously indicated.

  18. Carrageenans from red seaweeds as promoters of growth and elicitors of defense response in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pushp Sheel Shukla

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Plants incessantly encounter abiotic and biotic stresses that limit their growth and productivity. However, conversely, plant growth can also be induced by treatments with various abiotic and biotic elicitors. Carrageenans are sulfated linear polysaccharides that represent major cellular constituents of seaweeds belonging to red algae (Rhodophyta. Recent research has unraveled the biological activity of carrageenans and of their oligomeric forms, the oligo carrageenans (OCs, as promoters of plant growth and as elicitors of defense responses against pests and diseases. In this review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms by which carrageenans and OCs mediate plant growth and plant defense responses. Carrageenans and OCs improve plant growth by regulating various metabolic processes such as photosynthesis and ancillary pathways, cell division, purine and pyrimidine synthetic pathways as well as metabolic pathways involved in nitrogen and sulfur assimilation. Carrageenans and OCs also induce plant defense responses against viroids, viruses, bacteria, fungi and insects by modulating the activity of different defense pathways, including salicylate, jasmonate and ethylene signaling pathways. Further studies will likely substantiate the beneficial effects of carrageenans and of OCs on plant growth and plant defense responses and open new avenues for their use in agriculture and horticultural industry.

  19. Gene expression analysis during cassava defense response to bacterial blight disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soto-Suárez Mauricio

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Cassava bacterial blight (CBB caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. manihotis (Xam is a destructive disease in the South América and África and yield losses range between 12 and 100%. Cytochemistry and biochemistry of defense response to CBB have been well studied. However, the response of the plant to pathogen attack at the molecular and cellular level remains uncharacterized. Identification of genes associated with defense responses is one of most critical steps leading to the elucidation of disease resistance mechanisms in cassava. In this study, we identified differentially expressed genes during pathogen attack by subtractive hybridization, using the Differential Subtraction Chain method (DSC. A population of cDNA obtained from infected plants was used as ";treatment"; and a population of cDNA obtained from healthy plants was used as ";control";. 1536 clones were isolated from the resistant varieties (MBRA 685 and SG 107-35. Of these, 110 randomly selected clones were sequenced and a homology search was conducted. The sequence analysis showed that 14 cDNA clones shared homology with plant genes involved in defense responses, 70 clones were either homologous to plant genes of unknown function or showed no homology, representing new genes potentially involved in cassava defense responses. A cDNA microarray was constructed by spotting the clones identified from our subtractive libraries. Other clones potentially involved in cassava defense responses were also included. The cassava defense cDNA microarray was used to confirm the differential expression of the clones. Keywords: cassava, bacterial blight, gene expression, subtractive library, microarrays.

  20. Defense responses in two ecotypes of Lotus japonicus against non-pathogenic Pseudomonas syringae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar D Bordenave

    Full Text Available Lotus japonicus is a model legume broadly used to study many important processes as nitrogen fixing nodule formation and adaptation to salt stress. However, no studies on the defense responses occurring in this species against invading microorganisms have been carried out at the present. Understanding how this model plant protects itself against pathogens will certainly help to develop more tolerant cultivars in economically important Lotus species as well as in other legumes. In order to uncover the most important defense mechanisms activated upon bacterial attack, we explored in this work the main responses occurring in the phenotypically contrasting ecotypes MG-20 and Gifu B-129 of L. japonicus after inoculation with Pseudomonas syringae DC3000 pv. tomato. Our analysis demonstrated that this bacterial strain is unable to cause disease in these accessions, even though the defense mechanisms triggered in these ecotypes might differ. Thus, disease tolerance in MG-20 was characterized by bacterial multiplication, chlorosis and desiccation at the infiltrated tissues. In turn, Gifu B-129 plants did not show any symptom at all and were completely successful in restricting bacterial growth. We performed a microarray based analysis of these responses and determined the regulation of several genes that could play important roles in plant defense. Interestingly, we were also able to identify a set of defense genes with a relative high expression in Gifu B-129 plants under non-stress conditions, what could explain its higher tolerance. The participation of these genes in plant defense is discussed. Our results position the L. japonicus-P. syringae interaction as a interesting model to study defense mechanisms in legume species.

  1. Distinct roles of jasmonates and aldehydes in plant-defense responses.

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    E Wassim Chehab

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many inducible plant-defense responses are activated by jasmonates (JAs, C(6-aldehydes, and their corresponding derivatives, produced by the two main competing branches of the oxylipin pathway, the allene oxide synthase (AOS and hydroperoxide lyase (HPL branches, respectively. In addition to competition for substrates, these branch-pathway-derived metabolites have substantial overlap in regulation of gene expression. Past experiments to define the role of C(6-aldehydes in plant defense responses were biased towards the exogenous application of the synthetic metabolites or the use of genetic manipulation of HPL expression levels in plant genotypes with intact ability to produce the competing AOS-derived metabolites. To uncouple the roles of the C(6-aldehydes and jasmonates in mediating direct and indirect plant-defense responses, we generated Arabidopsis genotypes lacking either one or both of these metabolites. These genotypes were subsequently challenged with a phloem-feeding insect (aphids: Myzus persicae, an insect herbivore (leafminers: Liriomyza trifolii, and two different necrotrophic fungal pathogens (Botrytis cinerea and Alternaria brassicicola. We also characterized the volatiles emitted by these plants upon aphid infestation or mechanical wounding and identified hexenyl acetate as the predominant compound in these volatile blends. Subsequently, we examined the signaling role of this compound in attracting the parasitoid wasp (Aphidius colemani, a natural enemy of aphids. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This study conclusively establishes that jasmonates and C(6-aldehydes play distinct roles in plant defense responses. The jasmonates are indispensable metabolites in mediating the activation of direct plant-defense responses, whereas the C(6-aldehyes are not. On the other hand, hexenyl acetate, an acetylated C(6-aldehyde, is the predominant wound-inducible volatile signal that mediates indirect defense responses by directing tritrophic

  2. Overexpression of AtSHN1/WIN1 provokes unique defense responses.

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    Dikla Sela

    Full Text Available The plant cell cuticle serves as the first barrier protecting plants from mechanical injury and invading pathogens. The cuticle can be breached by cutinase-producing pathogens and the degradation products may activate pathogenesis signals in the invading pathogens. Cuticle degradation products may also trigger the plant's defense responses. Botrytis cinerea is an important plant pathogen, capable of attacking and causing disease in a wide range of plant species. Arabidopsis thaliana shn1-1D is a gain-of-function mutant, which has a modified cuticular lipid composition. We used this mutant to examine the effect of altering the whole-cuticle metabolic pathway on plant responses to B. cinerea attack. Following infection with B. cinerea, the shn1-1D mutant discolored more quickly, accumulated more H2O2, and showed accelerated cell death relative to wild-type (WT plants. Whole transcriptome analysis of B. cinerea-inoculated shn1-1D vs. WT plants revealed marked upregulation of genes associated with senescence, oxidative stress and defense responses on the one hand, and genes involved in the magnitude of defense-response control on the other. We propose that altered cutin monomer content and composition of shn1-1D plants triggers excessive reactive oxygen species accumulation and release which leads to a strong, unique and uncontrollable defense response, resulting in plant sensitivity and death.

  3. Reducing Defensive Responses to Thoughts of Death: Meditation, Mindfulness, and Buddhism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young Chin; Pyszczynski, Tom

    2017-08-24

    Three studies investigated the effects of meditation on responses to reminders of death. Study 1 took a quasi-experimental approach, comparing defensive responses to mortality salience (MS) of South Korean participants with varying levels of experience with Buddhism and meditation. Whereas non-Buddhists without meditation showed the typical increase in worldview defense after mortality salience (MS), this effect was not found among non-Buddhists immediately after an initial meditation experience, nor among lay Buddhists who meditated regularly or Buddhist monks with intensive meditation experience. Study 2, a fully randomized experiment, showed that MS increased worldview defense among South Koreans at a meditation training who were assessed before meditating but not among participants assessed after their first meditation experience. Study 3 showed that whereas American students without prior meditation experience showed increased worldview defense and suppression of death-related thoughts after MS, these effects were eliminated immediately after an initial meditation experience. Death thought accessibility mediated the effect of MS on worldview defense without meditation, but meditation eliminated this mediation. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Sulforaphane prevents pulmonary damage in response to inhaled arsenic by activating the Nrf2-defense response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Yi [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, School of Public Health, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning 110001 (China); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, University of Arizona, 1703 East Mabel Street, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Tao, Shasha [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, University of Arizona, 1703 East Mabel Street, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Lian, Fangru [Department of Pathology, University of Arizona, 1501 North Campbell Ave, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States); Chau, Binh T. [Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, The University of Arizona, 1501 North Campbell Ave, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States); Chen, Jie; Sun, Guifan [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, School of Public Health, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning 110001 (China); Fang, Deyu [Department of Pathology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Lantz, R. Clark [Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, The University of Arizona, 1501 North Campbell Ave, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States); Arizona Cancer Center, University of Arizona, 1515 North Campbell Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States); Zhang, Donna D., E-mail: dzhang@pharmacy.arizona.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, University of Arizona, 1703 East Mabel Street, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Arizona Cancer Center, University of Arizona, 1515 North Campbell Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Exposure to arsenic is associated with an increased risk of lung disease. Novel strategies are needed to reduce the adverse health effects associated with arsenic exposure in the lung. Nrf2, a transcription factor that mediates an adaptive cellular defense response, is effective in detoxifying environmental insults and prevents a broad spectrum of diseases induced by environmental exposure to harmful substances. In this report, we tested whether Nrf2 activation protects mice from arsenic-induced toxicity. We used an in vivo arsenic inhalation model that is highly relevant to low environmental human exposure to arsenic-containing dusts. Two-week exposure to arsenic-containing dust resulted in pathological alterations, oxidative DNA damage, and mild apoptotic cell death in the lung; all of which were blocked by sulforaphane (SF) in an Nrf2-dependent manner. Mechanistically, SF-mediated activation of Nrf2 alleviated inflammatory responses by modulating cytokine production. This study provides strong evidence that dietary intervention targeting Nrf2 activation is a feasible approach to reduce adverse health effects associated with arsenic exposure. -- Highlights: ► Exposed to arsenic particles and/or SF have elevated Nrf2 and its target genes. ► Sulforaphane prevents pathological alterations, oxidative damage and cell death. ► Sulforaphane alleviates infiltration of inflammatory cells into the lungs. ► Sulforaphane suppresses arsenic-induced proinflammatory cytokine production.

  5. Erwinia carotovora elicitors and Botrytis cinerea activate defense responses in Physcomitrella patens

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    Bentancor Marcel

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vascular plants respond to pathogens by activating a diverse array of defense mechanisms. Studies with these plants have provided a wealth of information on pathogen recognition, signal transduction and the activation of defense responses. However, very little is known about the infection and defense responses of the bryophyte, Physcomitrella patens, to well-studied phytopathogens. The purpose of this study was to determine: i whether two representative broad host range pathogens, Erwinia carotovora ssp. carotovora (E.c. carotovora and Botrytis cinerea (B. cinerea, could infect Physcomitrella, and ii whether B. cinerea, elicitors of a harpin (HrpN producing E.c. carotovora strain (SCC1 or a HrpN-negative strain (SCC3193, could cause disease symptoms and induce defense responses in Physcomitrella. Results B. cinerea and E.c. carotovora were found to readily infect Physcomitrella gametophytic tissues and cause disease symptoms. Treatments with B. cinerea spores or cell-free culture filtrates from E.c. carotovoraSCC1 (CF(SCC1, resulted in disease development with severe maceration of Physcomitrella tissues, while CF(SCC3193 produced only mild maceration. Although increased cell death was observed with either the CFs or B. cinerea, the occurrence of cytoplasmic shrinkage was only visible in Evans blue stained protonemal cells treated with CF(SCC1 or inoculated with B. cinerea. Most cells showing cytoplasmic shrinkage accumulated autofluorescent compounds and brown chloroplasts were evident in a high proportion of these cells. CF treatments and B. cinerea inoculation induced the expression of the defense-related genes: PR-1, PAL, CHS and LOX. Conclusion B. cinerea and E.c. carotovora elicitors induce a defense response in Physcomitrella, as evidenced by enhanced expression of conserved plant defense-related genes. Since cytoplasmic shrinkage is the most common morphological change observed in plant PCD, and that harpins and B

  6. Phosphoinositide-signaling is one component of a robust plant defense response.

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    Imara Yasmin Perera

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The phosphoinositide pathway and inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate (InsP3 have been implicated in plant responses to many abiotic stresses; however, their role in response to biotic stress is not well characterized. In the current study, we show that both basal defense and systemic acquired resistance responses are affected in transgenic plants constitutively expressing the human type I inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase (InsP 5-ptase which have greatly reduced InsP3 levels. Flagellin induced Ca2+-release as well as the expressions of some flg22 responsive genes were attenuated in the InsP 5-ptase plants. Furthermore, the InsP 5-ptase plants were more susceptible to virulent and avirulent strains of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (PstDC3000. The InsP 5-ptase plants had lower basal salicylic acid (SA levels and the induction of SAR in systemic leaves was reduced and delayed. Reciprocal exudate experiments showed that although the InsP 5-ptase plants produced equally effective molecules that could trigger PR-1 gene expression in wild type plants, exudates collected from either wild type or InsP 5-ptase plants triggered less PR-1 gene expression in InsP 5-ptase plants. Additionally, expression profiles indicated that several defense genes including PR-1, PR-2, PR-5 and AIG1 were basally down regulated in the InsP 5-ptase plants compared with wild type. Upon pathogen attack, expression of these genes was either not induced or showed delayed induction in systemic leaves. Our study shows that phosphoinositide signaling is one component of the plant defense network and is involved in both basal and systemic responses. The dampening of InsP3-mediated signaling affects Ca2+ release, modulates defense gene expression and compromises plant defense responses.

  7. Individual differences in defensive stress-responses: The potential relevance for psychopathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niermann, H.C.M.; Figner, B.; Roelofs, K.

    2017-01-01

    Alterations in primary freeze and fight-or-flight reactions in animals have been associated with increased vulnerability to develop anxious or aggressive symptomatology. Despite the potential relevance of these primary defensive responses for human stress-coping, they are still largely unexplored in

  8. Nuclear Disarmament and the Insanity Defense: What Happened to Political Responsiveness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, John H.; Shaver, Kelly G.

    A study which explored the degree to which belief in a politically responsive/unresponsive world might be related to opinions concerning nuclear disarmament, the insanity defense, and women's rights is described. A total of 206 male and female undergraduates completed a 63-item questionnaire consisting of 46 Likert-format I-E items and 17 attitude…

  9. Transcriptional response of bronchial epithelial cells to Pseudomonas aeruginosa: identification of early mediators of host defense.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, J.B.; Sterkenburg, M.A. van; Rabe, K.F.; Schalkwijk, J.; Hiemstra, P.S.; Datson, N.A.

    2005-01-01

    The airway epithelium responds to microbial exposure by altering expression of a variety of genes to increase innate host defense. We aimed to delineate the early transcriptional response in human primary bronchial epithelial cells exposed for 6 h to a mixture of IL-1beta and TNF-alpha or heat-inact

  10. Ethanol cellular defense induce unfolded protein response in yeast

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    Elisabet eNavarro-Tapia

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol is a valuable industrial product and a common metabolite used by many cell types. However, this molecule produces high levels of cytotoxicity affecting cellular performance at several levels. In the presence of ethanol, cells must adjust some of their components, such as the membrane lipids to maintain homeostasis. In the case of microorganism as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ethanol is one of the principal products of their metabolism and is the main stress factor during fermentation. Although many efforts have been made, mechanisms of ethanol tolerance are not fully understood and very little evidence is available to date for specific signaling by ethanol in the cell. This work studied two Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, CECT10094 and Temohaya-MI26, isolated from flor wine and agave fermentation (a traditional fermentation from Mexico respectively, which differ in ethanol tolerance, in order to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the ethanol stress response and the reasons for different ethanol tolerance. The transcriptome was analyzed after ethanol stress and, among others, an increased activation of genes related with the unfolded protein response (UPR and its transcription factor, Hac1p, was observed in the tolerant strain CECT10094. We observed that this strain also resist more UPR agents than Temohaya-MI26 and the UPR-ethanol stress correlation was corroborated observing growth of 15 more strains and discarding UPR correlation with other stresses as thermal or oxidative stress. Furthermore, higher activation of UPR pathway in the tolerant strain CECT10094 was observed using a UPR mCherry reporter. Finally, we observed UPR activation in response to ethanol stress in other S. cerevisiae ethanol tolerant strains as the wine strains T73 and EC1118. This work demonstrates that the UPR pathway is activated under ethanol stress occurring in a standard fermentation and links this response to an enhanced ethanol tolerance. Thus

  11. Defensive Hostility: Psychosocial Correlates and Associations with Cardiovascular Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-04-21

    caffeinated drinks ( coffee , tea, most sodas) for two hours before your scheduled appointment. The completion of the questionnaires should take...high HR reactors were not different from low HR reactors on resting HR, blood pressu re, or serum lipid concentration . A second study replicated...individuals who endorsed suppression of anger items exhibited the greatest cardiovascular responses during Stroop and a math task. Furthermore, Mills

  12. Activation of Defense Response Pathways by OGs and Fig22 Elicitors in Arabidopsis Seedlings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Carine Denoux; Roberta Galletti; Nicole Mammarella; Suresh Gopalan; Danièle Werck; Giulia De Lorenzo; Simone Ferrari; Frederick M. Ausubel; Julia Dewdney

    2008-01-01

    We carried out transcriptional profiling analysis in 10-d-old Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings treated with oligogalacturonides (OGs), oligosaccharides derived from the plant cell wall, or the bacterial flagellin peptide Fig22, general elicitors of the basal defense response in plants. Although detected by different receptors, both OGs and Flg22 trigger a fast and transient response that is both similar and comprehensive, and characterized by activation of early stages of multiple defense signaling pathways, particularly JA-associated processes. However, the response to Fig22 is stronger in both the number of genes differentially expressed and the amplitude of change. The magnitude of induction of individual genes is in both cases dose-dependent, but, even at very high concentrations, OGs do not induce a response that is as comprehensive as that seen with Flg22. While high doses of either microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP) elicit a late response that includes activation of senescence processes, SA-dependent secretory pathway genes and PR1 expression are substantially induced only by Flg22. These results suggest a lower threshold for activation of early responses than for sustained or SA-mediated late defenses. Expression patterns of amino-cyclopropane-carboxylate synthase genes also implicate ethylene biosynthesis in regulation of the late innate immune response.

  13. Jasmonic acid carboxyl methyltransferase regulates development and herbivory-induced defense response in rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinfeng Qi; Yonggen Lou; Jiancai Li; Xiu Han; Ran Li; Jianqiang Wu; Haixin Yu; Lingfei Hu; Yutao Xiao; Jing Lu

    2016-01-01

    Jasmonic acid (JA) and related metabolites play a key role in plant defense and growth. JA carboxyl methyltransferase (JMT) may be involved in plant defense and development by methylating JA to methyl jasmonate (MeJA) and thus influencing the concentrations of JA and related metabolites. However, no JMT gene has been well characterized in monocotyledon defense and development at the molecular level. After we cloned a rice JMT gene, OsJMT1, whose encoding protein was localized in the cytosol, we found that the recombinant OsJMT1 protein catalyzed JA to MeJA. OsJMT1 is up-regulated in response to infestation with the brown planthopper (BPH; Nilaparvata lugens). Plants in which OsJMT1 had been overexpressed (oe-JMT plants) showed reduced height and yield. These oe-JMT plants also exhibited increased MeJA levels but reduced levels of herbivore-induced JA and jasmonoyl-isoleucine (JA-Ile). The oe-JMT plants were more attractive to BPH female adults but showed increased resistance to BPH nymphs, probably owing to the different responses of BPH female adults and nymphs to the changes in levels of H2O2 and MeJA in oe-JMT plants. These results indicate that OsJMT1, by altering levels of JA and related metabolites, plays a role in regulating plant development and herbivore-induced defense responses in rice.

  14. Virus and dsRNA-triggered transcriptional responses reveal key components of honey bee antiviral defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brutscher, Laura M; Daughenbaugh, Katie F; Flenniken, Michelle L

    2017-07-25

    Recent high annual losses of honey bee colonies are associated with many factors, including RNA virus infections. Honey bee antiviral responses include RNA interference and immune pathway activation, but their relative roles in antiviral defense are not well understood. To better characterize the mechanism(s) of honey bee antiviral defense, bees were infected with a model virus in the presence or absence of dsRNA, a virus associated molecular pattern. Regardless of sequence specificity, dsRNA reduced virus abundance. We utilized next generation sequencing to examine transcriptional responses triggered by virus and dsRNA at three time-points post-infection. Hundreds of genes exhibited differential expression in response to co-treatment of dsRNA and virus. Virus-infected bees had greater expression of genes involved in RNAi, Toll, Imd, and JAK-STAT pathways, but the majority of differentially expressed genes are not well characterized. To confirm the virus limiting role of two genes, including the well-characterized gene, dicer, and a probable uncharacterized cyclin dependent kinase in honey bees, we utilized RNAi to reduce their expression in vivo and determined that virus abundance increased, supporting their involvement in antiviral defense. Together, these results further our understanding of honey bee antiviral defense, particularly the role of a non-sequence specific dsRNA-mediated antiviral pathway.

  15. The MAP kinase substrate MKS1 is a regulator of plant defense responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasson, Erik; Jenkins, Thomas; Brodersen, Peter; Thorgrimsen, Stephan; Petersen, Nikolaj H T; Zhu, Shijiang; Qiu, Jin-Long; Micheelsen, Pernille; Rocher, Anne; Petersen, Morten; Newman, Mari-Anne; Bjørn Nielsen, Henrik; Hirt, Heribert; Somssich, Imre; Mattsson, Ole; Mundy, John

    2005-07-20

    Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 (MPK4) functions as a regulator of pathogen defense responses, because it is required for both repression of salicylic acid (SA)-dependent resistance and for activation of jasmonate (JA)-dependent defense gene expression. To understand MPK4 signaling mechanisms, we used yeast two-hybrid screening to identify the MPK4 substrate MKS1. Analyses of transgenic plants and genome-wide transcript profiling indicated that MKS1 is required for full SA-dependent resistance in mpk4 mutants, and that overexpression of MKS1 in wild-type plants is sufficient to activate SA-dependent resistance, but does not interfere with induction of a defense gene by JA. Further yeast two-hybrid screening revealed that MKS1 interacts with the WRKY transcription factors WRKY25 and WRKY33. WRKY25 and WRKY33 were shown to be in vitro substrates of MPK4, and a wrky33 knockout mutant was found to exhibit increased expression of the SA-related defense gene PR1. MKS1 may therefore contribute to MPK4-regulated defense activation by coupling the kinase to specific WRKY transcription factors.

  16. Preliminary studies on differential defense responses induced during plant communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Ying PENG; Zhong Hai LI; Hui XIANG; Jian Hua HUANG; Shi Hai JIA; Xue Xia MIAO; Yong Ping HUANG

    2005-01-01

    We compared the expression patterns of three representative genes in undamaged tomato and tobacco plants in response to exposure to either tomato or tobacco fed on by Helicoverpa armigera (cotton bollworm). When tomato and tobacco, two species of one family, were incubated in the chambers with the tomato plants damaged by the cotton bollworm, the expression of the PR1, BGL2, and PAL genes was up-regulated in leaves of both plants. However, the levels of gene expression were significantly higher in the tomato than that in the tobacco. In addition, the activities of enzymes, peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase, and lipoxygenase were found to be higher in the tomato than those in the tobacco. Similar results were obtained when the damaged plants were replaced by the tobacco.

  17. Molecular defense response of oil palm to Ganoderma infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, C-L; Tan, Y-C

    2015-06-01

    Basal stem rot (BSR) of oil palm roots is due to the invasion of fungal mycelia of Ganoderma species which spreads to the bole of the stem. In addition to root contact, BSR can also spread by airborne basidiospores. These fungi are able to break down cell wall components including lignin. BSR not only decreases oil yield, it also causes the stands to collapse thus causing severe economic loss to the oil palm industry. The transmission and mode of action of Ganoderma, its interactions with oil palm as a hemibiotroph, and the molecular defence responses of oil palm to the infection of Ganoderma boninense in BSR are reviewed, based on the transcript profiles of infected oil palms. The knowledge gaps that need to be filled in oil palm-Ganoderma molecular interactions i.e. the associations of hypersensitive reaction (HR)-induced cell death and reactive oxygen species (ROS) kinetics to the susceptibility of oil palm to Ganoderma spp., the interactions of phytohormones (salicylate, jasmonate and ethylene) at early and late stages of BSR, and cell wall strengthening through increased production of guaiacyl (G)-type lignin, are also discussed.

  18. Plant defense response against Fusarium oxysporum and strategies to develop tolerant genotypes in banana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarupa, V; Ravishankar, K V; Rekha, A

    2014-04-01

    Soil-borne fungal pathogen, Fusarium oxysporum causes major economic losses by inducing necrosis and wilting symptoms in many crop plants. Management of fusarium wilt is achieved mainly by the use of chemical fungicides which affect the soil health and their efficiency is often limited by pathogenic variability. Hence understanding the nature of interaction between pathogen and host may help to select and improve better cultivars. Current research evidences highlight the role of oxidative burst and antioxidant enzymes indicating that ROS act as an important signaling molecule in banana defense response against Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. cubense. The role of jasmonic acid signaling in plant defense against necrotrophic pathogens is well recognized. But recent studies show that the role of salicylic acid is complex and ambiguous against necrotrophic pathogens like Fusarium oxysporum, leading to many intriguing questions about its relationship between other signaling compounds. In case of banana, a major challenge is to identify specific receptors for effector proteins like SIX proteins and also the components of various signal transduction pathways. Significant progress has been made to uncover the role of defense genes but is limited to only model plants such as Arabidopsis and tomato. Keeping this in view, we review the host response, pathogen diversity, current understanding of biochemical and molecular changes that occur during host and pathogen interaction. Developing resistant cultivars through mutation, breeding, transgenic and cisgenic approaches have been discussed. This would help us to understand host defenses against Fusarium oxysporum and to formulate strategies to develop tolerant cultivars.

  19. Inducible defenses in Olympia oysters in response to an invasive predator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Jillian M; Griffith, Kaylee R; Sanford, Eric

    2017-01-13

    The prey naiveté hypothesis suggests that native prey may be vulnerable to introduced predators because they have not evolved appropriate defenses. However, recent evidence suggests that native prey sometimes exhibit induced defenses to introduced predators, as a result of rapid evolution or other processes. We examined whether Olympia oysters (Ostrea lurida) display inducible defenses in the presence of an invasive predator, the Atlantic oyster drill (Urosalpinx cinerea), and whether these responses vary among oyster populations from estuaries with and without this predator. We spawned oysters from six populations distributed among three estuaries in northern California, USA, and raised their offspring through two generations under common conditions to minimize effects of environmental history. We exposed second-generation oysters to cue treatments: drills eating oysters, drills eating barnacles, or control seawater. Oysters from all populations grew smaller shells when exposed to drill cues, and grew thicker and harder shells when those drills were eating oysters. Oysters exposed to drills eating other oysters were subsequently preyed upon at a slower rate. Although all oyster populations exhibited inducible defenses, oysters from the estuary with the greatest exposure to drills grew the smallest shells suggesting that oyster populations have evolved adaptive differences in the strength of their responses to predators. Our findings add to a growing body of literature that suggests that marine prey may be less likely to exhibit naiveté in the face of invasive predators than prey in communities that are more isolated from native predators, such as many freshwater and terrestrial island ecosystems.

  20. Involvement of the Electrophilic Isothiocyanate Sulforaphane in Arabidopsis Local Defense Responses1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Mats X.; Nilsson, Anders K.; Johansson, Oskar N.; Boztaş, Gülin; Adolfsson, Lisa E.; Pinosa, Francesco; Petit, Christel Garcia; Aronsson, Henrik; Mackey, David; Tör, Mahmut; Hamberg, Mats; Ellerström, Mats

    2015-01-01

    Plants defend themselves against microbial pathogens through a range of highly sophisticated and integrated molecular systems. Recognition of pathogen-secreted effector proteins often triggers the hypersensitive response (HR), a complex multicellular defense reaction where programmed cell death of cells surrounding the primary site of infection is a prominent feature. Even though the HR was described almost a century ago, cell-to-cell factors acting at the local level generating the full defense reaction have remained obscure. In this study, we sought to identify diffusible molecules produced during the HR that could induce cell death in naive tissue. We found that 4-methylsulfinylbutyl isothiocyanate (sulforaphane) is released by Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaf tissue undergoing the HR and that this compound induces cell death as well as primes defense in naive tissue. Two different mutants impaired in the pathogen-induced accumulation of sulforaphane displayed attenuated programmed cell death upon bacterial and oomycete effector recognition as well as decreased resistance to several isolates of the plant pathogen Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis. Treatment with sulforaphane provided protection against a virulent H. arabidopsidis isolate. Glucosinolate breakdown products are recognized as antifeeding compounds toward insects and recently also as intracellular signaling and bacteriostatic molecules in Arabidopsis. The data presented here indicate that these compounds also trigger local defense responses in Arabidopsis tissue. PMID:25371552

  1. Stage-Related Defense Response Induction in Tomato Plants by Nesidiocoris tenuis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naselli, Mario; Urbaneja, Alberto; Siscaro, Gaetano; Jaques, Josep A.; Zappalà, Lucia; Flors, Víctor; Pérez-Hedo, Meritxell

    2016-01-01

    The beneficial effects of direct predation by zoophytophagous biological control agents (BCAs), such as the mirid bug Nesidiocoris tenuis, are well-known. However, the benefits of zoophytophagous BCAs’ relation with host plants, via induction of plant defensive responses, have not been investigated until recently. To date, only the females of certain zoophytophagous BCAs have been demonstrated to induce defensive plant responses in tomato plants. The aim of this work was to determine whether nymphs, adult females, and adult males of N. tenuis are able to induce defense responses in tomato plants. Compared to undamaged tomato plants (i.e., not exposed to the mirid), plants on which young or mature nymphs, or adult males or females of N. tenuis fed and developed were less attractive to the whitefly Bemisia tabaci, but were more attractive to the parasitoid Encarsia formosa. Female-exposed plants were more repellent to B. tabaci and more attractive to E. formosa than were male-exposed plants. When comparing young- and mature-nymph-exposed plants, the same level of repellence was obtained for B. tabaci, but mature-nymph-exposed plants were more attractive to E. formosa. The repellent effect is attributed to the signaling pathway of abscisic acid, which is upregulated in N. tenuis-exposed plants, whereas the parasitoid attraction was attributed to the activation of the jasmonic acid signaling pathway. Our results demonstrate that all motile stages of N. tenuis can trigger defensive responses in tomato plants, although these responses may be slightly different depending on the stage considered. PMID:27472328

  2. Stage-Related Defense Response Induction in Tomato Plants by Nesidiocoris tenuis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Naselli

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The beneficial effects of direct predation by zoophytophagous biological control agents (BCAs, such as the mirid bug Nesidiocoris tenuis, are well-known. However, the benefits of zoophytophagous BCAs’ relation with host plants, via induction of plant defensive responses, have not been investigated until recently. To date, only the females of certain zoophytophagous BCAs have been demonstrated to induce defensive plant responses in tomato plants. The aim of this work was to determine whether nymphs, adult females, and adult males of N. tenuis are able to induce defense responses in tomato plants. Compared to undamaged tomato plants (i.e., not exposed to the mirid, plants on which young or mature nymphs, or adult males or females of N. tenuis fed and developed were less attractive to the whitefly Bemisia tabaci, but were more attractive to the parasitoid Encarsia formosa. Female-exposed plants were more repellent to B. tabaci and more attractive to E. formosa than were male-exposed plants. When comparing young- and mature-nymph-exposed plants, the same level of repellence was obtained for B. tabaci, but mature-nymph-exposed plants were more attractive to E. formosa. The repellent effect is attributed to the signaling pathway of abscisic acid, which is upregulated in N. tenuis-exposed plants, whereas the parasitoid attraction was attributed to the activation of the jasmonic acid signaling pathway. Our results demonstrate that all motile stages of N. tenuis can trigger defensive responses in tomato plants, although these responses may be slightly different depending on the stage considered.

  3. Erwinia amylovora type three-secreted proteins trigger cell death and defense responses in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degrave, A; Fagard, M; Perino, C; Brisset, M N; Gaubert, S; Laroche, S; Patrit, O; Barny, M-A

    2008-08-01

    Erwinia amylovora is the bacterium responsible for fire blight, a necrotic disease affecting plants of the rosaceous family. E. amylovora pathogenicity requires a functional type three secretion system (T3SS). We show here that E. amylovora triggers a T3SS-dependent cell death on Arabidopsis thaliana. The plants respond by inducing T3SS-dependent defense responses, including salicylic acid (SA)-independent callose deposition, activation of the SA defense pathway, reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, and part of the jasmonic acid/ethylene defense pathway. Several of these reactions are similar to what is observed in host plants. We show that the cell death triggered by E. amylovora on A. thaliana could not be simply explained by the recognition of AvrRpt2 ea by the resistance gene product RPS2. We then analyzed the role of type three-secreted proteins (T3SPs) DspA/E, HrpN, and HrpW in the induction of cell death and defense reactions in A. thaliana following infection with the corresponding E. amylovora mutant strains. HrpN and DspA/E were found to play an important role in the induction of cell death, activation of defense pathways, and ROS accumulation. None of the T3SPs tested played a major role in the induction of SA-independent callose deposition. The relative importance of T3SPs in A. thaliana is correlated with their relative importance in the disease process on host plants, indicating that A. thaliana can be used as a model to study their role.

  4. Evidences for involvement of endogenous cAMP in Arabidopsis defense responses to Verticillium toxins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing JIANG; Ling Wen FAN; Wei Hua WU

    2005-01-01

    Although there were reports suggesting the involvement of endogenous cAMP in plant defense signaling cascades,there is no direct evidence supporting this notion yet and the detailed mechanism is unclear. In the present study, we have used pathogenic fungi Verticillium dahliae and Arabidopsis plants as a model system of plant-microb interaction to demonstrate the function of endogenous cAMP in Arabidopsis defense responses. Both V. dahliae inoculation and Verticillium toxins injection induced typical "wilt" symptoms in Arabidopsis seedlings. When either 8-Br-AMP (a membrane permeable cAMP analogue) or salicylic acid (SA) was applied to Arabidopsis, the plants became resistant to V. dahliae toxins. However, addition of 8-Br-AMP did not increase the resistance of Arabidopsis transgenic plants deficient in SA to the toxins, suggesting that cAMP might act upstream of SA in plant defense signaling pathway.Indeed, 8-Br-cAMP and forskolin, an activator of adenylyl cyclase, significantly stimulated the endogenous SA level in plants, whereas DDA, an inhibitor of adenylyl cyclase dramatically reduced toxin-induced SA increase. Both the endogenous cAMP and SA increased significantly in Arabidopsis seedlings treated with toxins. Furthermore, transcription level of pathogenesis-related protein 1 gene (PR1) was strongly induced by both 8-Br-cAMP and the toxin treatment. Taken together, our data demonstrate that endogenous cAMP is involved in plant defense responses against Verticilliumsecreted toxins by regulating the production of the known signal SA in plant defense pathway.

  5. 76 FR 13397 - DOE Response to Recommendation 2010-2 of the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, Pulse Jet...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-11

    ... Response to Recommendation 2010-2 of the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, Pulse Jet Mixing at the... Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 2010-2, concerning Pulse Jet Mixing at the Waste... Board (Board) Recommendation 2010-2, Pulse Jet Mixing at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization...

  6. EFFECT OF CORTICOTROPIN-RELEASING FACTOR ANTAGONIST ON BEHAVIORAL AND NEUROENDOCRINE RESPONSES DURING EXPOSURE TO DEFENSIVE BURYING PARADIGM IN RATS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KORTE, SM; KORTEBOUWS, GAH; BOHUS, B; KOOB, GF

    1994-01-01

    Defensive burying behavior is a coping strategy in rodents in response to an aversive stimulus where fear will facilitate burying and treatment with anxiolytics will result in less burying. To test the hypothesis that endogenous corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is involved in the defensive buryi

  7. Identification of Biomarkers for Defense Response to Plasmopara viticola in a Resistant Grape Variety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Chitarrini

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Downy mildew (Plasmopara viticola is one of the most destructive diseases of the cultivated species Vitis vinifera. The use of resistant varieties, originally derived from backcrosses of North American Vitis spp., is a promising solution to reduce disease damage in the vineyards. To shed light on the type and the timing of pathogen-triggered resistance, this work aimed at discovering biomarkers for the defense response in the resistant variety Bianca, using leaf discs after inoculation with a suspension of P. viticola. We investigated primary and secondary metabolism at 12, 24, 48, and 96 h post-inoculation (hpi. We used methods of identification and quantification for lipids (LC-MS/MS, phenols (LC-MS/MS, primary compounds (GC-MS, and semi-quantification for volatile compounds (GC-MS. We were able to identify and quantify or semi-quantify 176 metabolites, among which 53 were modulated in response to pathogen infection. The earliest changes occurred in primary metabolism at 24–48 hpi and involved lipid compounds, specifically unsaturated fatty acid and ceramide; amino acids, in particular proline; and some acids and sugars. At 48 hpi, we also found changes in volatile compounds and accumulation of benzaldehyde, a promoter of salicylic acid-mediated defense. Secondary metabolism was strongly induced only at later stages. The classes of compounds that increased at 96 hpi included phenylpropanoids, flavonols, stilbenes, and stilbenoids. Among stilbenoids we found an accumulation of ampelopsin H + vaticanol C, pallidol, ampelopsin D + quadrangularin A, Z-miyabenol C, and α-viniferin in inoculated samples. Some of these compounds are known as phytoalexins, while others are novel biomarkers for the defense response in Bianca. This work highlighted some important aspects of the host response to P. viticola in a commercial variety under controlled conditions, providing biomarkers for a better understanding of the mechanism of plant defense and a

  8. Exposure to electronic cigarettes impairs pulmonary anti-bacterial and anti-viral defenses in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussan, Thomas E; Gajghate, Sachin; Thimmulappa, Rajesh K; Ma, Jinfang; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Sudini, Kuladeep; Consolini, Nicola; Cormier, Stephania A; Lomnicki, Slawo; Hasan, Farhana; Pekosz, Andrew; Biswal, Shyam

    2015-01-01

    Electronic cigarettes (E-cigs) have experienced sharp increases in popularity over the past five years due to many factors, including aggressive marketing, increased restrictions on conventional cigarettes, and a perception that E-cigs are healthy alternatives to cigarettes. Despite this perception, studies on health effects in humans are extremely limited and in vivo animal models have not been generated. Presently, we determined that E-cig vapor contains 7 x 10(11) free radicals per puff. To determine whether E-cig exposure impacts pulmonary responses in mice, we developed an inhalation chamber for E-cig exposure. Mice that were exposed to E-cig vapor contained serum cotinine concentrations that are comparable to human E-cig users. E-cig exposure for 2 weeks produced a significant increase in oxidative stress and moderate macrophage-mediated inflammation. Since, COPD patients are susceptible to bacterial and viral infections, we tested effects of E-cigs on immune response. Mice that were exposed to E-cig vapor showed significantly impaired pulmonary bacterial clearance, compared to air-exposed mice, following an intranasal infection with Streptococcus pneumonia. This defective bacterial clearance was partially due to reduced phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages from E-cig exposed mice. In response to Influenza A virus infection, E-cig exposed mice displayed increased lung viral titers and enhanced virus-induced illness and mortality. In summary, this study reports a murine model of E-cig exposure and demonstrates that E-cig exposure elicits impaired pulmonary anti-microbial defenses. Hence, E-cig exposure as an alternative to cigarette smoking must be rigorously tested in users for their effects on immune response and susceptibility to bacterial and viral infections.

  9. Exposure to electronic cigarettes impairs pulmonary anti-bacterial and anti-viral defenses in a mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas E Sussan

    Full Text Available Electronic cigarettes (E-cigs have experienced sharp increases in popularity over the past five years due to many factors, including aggressive marketing, increased restrictions on conventional cigarettes, and a perception that E-cigs are healthy alternatives to cigarettes. Despite this perception, studies on health effects in humans are extremely limited and in vivo animal models have not been generated. Presently, we determined that E-cig vapor contains 7 x 10(11 free radicals per puff. To determine whether E-cig exposure impacts pulmonary responses in mice, we developed an inhalation chamber for E-cig exposure. Mice that were exposed to E-cig vapor contained serum cotinine concentrations that are comparable to human E-cig users. E-cig exposure for 2 weeks produced a significant increase in oxidative stress and moderate macrophage-mediated inflammation. Since, COPD patients are susceptible to bacterial and viral infections, we tested effects of E-cigs on immune response. Mice that were exposed to E-cig vapor showed significantly impaired pulmonary bacterial clearance, compared to air-exposed mice, following an intranasal infection with Streptococcus pneumonia. This defective bacterial clearance was partially due to reduced phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages from E-cig exposed mice. In response to Influenza A virus infection, E-cig exposed mice displayed increased lung viral titers and enhanced virus-induced illness and mortality. In summary, this study reports a murine model of E-cig exposure and demonstrates that E-cig exposure elicits impaired pulmonary anti-microbial defenses. Hence, E-cig exposure as an alternative to cigarette smoking must be rigorously tested in users for their effects on immune response and susceptibility to bacterial and viral infections.

  10. Mapping of Defense Response Gene Homologs and Their Association with Resistance Loci in Maize

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Defense response genes in higher plant species are involved in a variety of signal tranaduction pathways and biochemical reactions to counterattack invading pathogens. In this study, a total of 366 non-redundant defense response gene homologs (DRHs), Including 124 unigenes/expressed sequence tags, 226 tentative consensuses, and 16 DRH contigs have been identified by mining the Maize Genetics and Genomics and The Institute for Genomic Research maize databases using 35 essential defense response genes. Of 366 DRHs, 202 are mapped to 152 loci across ten maize chromosomes via both the genetic and in silico mapping approaches. The mapped DRHs seem to cluster together rather than be evenly distributed along the maize genome. Approximately half of these DHRs are located in regions harboring either major resistance genes or quantitative trait loci(QTL). Therefore, this comprehensive DRH linkage map will provide reference sequences to Identify either positional candidate genes for resistance genes and/or QTLs or to develop makers for fine-mapping and marker-assisted selection of resistance genes and/or QTLs.

  11. Regulation of Arabidopsis defense responses against Spodoptera littoralis by CPK-mediated calcium signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishihama Nobuaki

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant Ca2+ signals are involved in a wide array of intracellular signaling pathways after pest invasion. Ca2+-binding sensory proteins such as Ca2+-dependent protein kinases (CPKs have been predicted to mediate the signaling following Ca2+ influx after insect herbivory. However, until now this prediction was not testable. Results To investigate the roles CPKs play in a herbivore response-signaling pathway, we screened the characteristics of Arabidopsis CPK mutants damaged by a feeding generalist herbivore, Spodoptera littoralis. Following insect attack, the cpk3 and cpk13 mutants showed lower transcript levels of plant defensin gene PDF1.2 compared to wild-type plants. The CPK cascade was not directly linked to the herbivory-induced signaling pathways that were mediated by defense-related phytohormones such as jasmonic acid and ethylene. CPK3 was also suggested to be involved in a negative feedback regulation of the cytosolic Ca2+ levels after herbivory and wounding damage. In vitro kinase assays of CPK3 protein with a suite of substrates demonstrated that the protein phosphorylates transcription factors (including ERF1, HsfB2a and CZF1/ZFAR1 in the presence of Ca2+. CPK13 strongly phosphorylated only HsfB2a, irrespective of the presence of Ca2+. Furthermore, in vivo agroinfiltration assays showed that CPK3-or CPK13-derived phosphorylation of a heat shock factor (HsfB2a promotes PDF1.2 transcriptional activation in the defense response. Conclusions These results reveal the involvement of two Arabidopsis CPKs (CPK3 and CPK13 in the herbivory-induced signaling network via HsfB2a-mediated regulation of the defense-related transcriptional machinery. This cascade is not involved in the phytohormone-related signaling pathways, but rather directly impacts transcription factors for defense responses.

  12. Non-host defense response in a novel Arabidopsis-Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri pathosystem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanfu An

    Full Text Available Citrus canker, caused by Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc, is one of the most destructive diseases of citrus. Progress of breeding citrus canker-resistant varieties is modest due to limited resistant germplasm resources and lack of candidate genes for genetic manipulation. The objective of this study is to establish a novel heterologous pathosystem between Xcc and the well-established model plant Arabidopsis thaliana for defense mechanism dissection and resistance gene identification. Our results indicate that Xcc bacteria neither grow nor decline in Arabidopsis, but induce multiple defense responses including callose deposition, reactive oxygen species and salicylic aicd (SA production, and defense gene expression, indicating that Xcc activates non-host resistance in Arabidopsis. Moreover, Xcc-induced defense gene expression is suppressed or attenuated in several well-characterized SA signaling mutants including eds1, pad4, eds5, sid2, and npr1. Interestingly, resistance to Xcc is compromised only in eds1, pad4, and eds5, but not in sid2 and npr1. However, combining sid2 and npr1 in the sid2npr1 double mutant compromises resistance to Xcc, suggesting genetic interactions likely exist between SID2 and NPR1 in the non-host resistance against Xcc in Arabidopsis. These results demonstrate that the SA signaling pathway plays a critical role in regulating non-host defense against Xcc in Arabidopsis and suggest that the SA signaling pathway genes may hold great potential for breeding citrus canker-resistant varieties through modern gene transfer technology.

  13. Airborne megawatt class free-electron laser for defense and security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy Whitney; David Douglas; George Neil

    2005-03-01

    An airborne megawatt (MW) average power Free-Electron Laser (FEL) is now a possibility. In the process of shrinking the FEL parameters to fit on ship, a surprisingly lightweight and compact design has been achieved. There are multiple motivations for using a FEL for a high-power airborne system for Defense and Security: Diverse mission requirements can be met by a single system. The MW of light can be made available with any time structure for time periods from microseconds to hours, i.e. there is a nearly unlimited magazine. The wavelength of the light can be chosen to be from the far infrared (IR) to the near ultraviolet (UV) thereby best meeting mission requirements. The FEL light can be modulated for detecting the same pattern in the small fraction of light reflected from the target resulting in greatly enhanced targeting control. The entire MW class FEL including all of its subsystems can be carried by large commercial size airplanes or on an airship. Adequate electrical power can be generated on the plane or airship to run the FEL as long as the plane or airship has fuel to fly. The light from the FEL will work well with relay mirror systems. The required R&D to achieve the MW level is well understood. The coupling of the capabilities of an airborne FEL to diverse mission requirements provides unique opportunities.

  14. LysM receptor-like kinases to improve plant defense response against fungal pathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Jinrong; Stacey, Gary; Stacey, Minviluz; Zhang, Xuecheng

    2013-10-15

    Perception of chitin fragments (chitooligosaccharides) is an important first step in plant defense response against fungal pathogen. LysM receptor-like kinases (LysM RLKs) are instrumental in this perception process. LysM RLKs also play a role in activating transcription of chitin-responsive genes (CRGs) in plants. Mutations in the LysM kinase receptor genes or the downstream CRGs may affect the fungal susceptibility of a plant. Mutations in LysM RLKs or transgenes carrying the same may be beneficial in imparting resistance against fungal pathogens.

  15. LysM receptor-like kinases to improve plant defense response against fungal pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Jinrong [Columbia, MO; Stacey, Gary [Columbia, MO; Stacey, Minviluz [Columbia, MO; Zhang, Xuecheng [Columbia, MO

    2012-01-17

    Perception of chitin fragments (chitooligosaccharides) is an important first step in plant defense response against fungal pathogen. LysM receptor-like kinases (LysM RLKs) are instrumental in this perception process. LysM RLKs also play a role in activating transcription of chitin-responsive genes (CRGs) in plants. Mutations in the LysM kinase receptor genes or the downstream CRGs may affect the fungal susceptibility of a plant. Mutations in LysM RLKs or transgenes carrying the same may be beneficial in imparting resistance against fungal pathogens.

  16. Host defense peptides as effector molecules of the innate immune response: a sledgehammer for drug resistance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinstraesser, Lars; Kraneburg, Ursula M; Hirsch, Tobias; Kesting, Marco; Steinau, Hans-Ulrich; Jacobsen, Frank; Al-Benna, Sammy

    2009-09-09

    Host defense peptides can modulate the innate immune response and boost infection-resolving immunity, while dampening potentially harmful pro-inflammatory (septic) responses. Both antimicrobial and/or immunomodulatory activities are an integral part of the process of innate immunity, which itself has many of the hallmarks of successful anti-infective therapies, namely rapid action and broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities. This gives these peptides the potential to become an entirely new therapeutic approach against bacterial infections. This review details the role and activities of these peptides, and examines their applicability as development candidates for use against bacterial infections.

  17. Seaweed Polysaccharides and Derived Oligosaccharides Stimulate Defense Responses and Protection Against Pathogens in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Moenne

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Plants interact with the environment by sensing “non-self” molecules called elicitors derived from pathogens or other sources. These molecules bind to specific receptors located in the plasma membrane and trigger defense responses leading to protection against pathogens. In particular, it has been shown that cell wall and storage polysaccharides from green, brown and red seaweeds (marine macroalgae corresponding to ulvans, alginates, fucans, laminarin and carrageenans can trigger defense responses in plants enhancing protection against pathogens. In addition, oligosaccharides obtained by depolymerization of seaweed polysaccharides also induce protection against viral, fungal and bacterial infections in plants. In particular, most seaweed polysaccharides and derived oligosaccharides trigger an initial oxidative burst at local level and the activation of salicylic (SA, jasmonic acid (JA and/or ethylene signaling pathways at systemic level. The activation of these signaling pathways leads to an increased expression of genes encoding: (i Pathogenesis-Related (PR proteins with antifungal and antibacterial activities; (ii defense enzymes such as pheylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL and lipoxygenase (LOX which determine accumulation of phenylpropanoid compounds (PPCs and oxylipins with antiviral, antifugal and antibacterial activities and iii enzymes involved in synthesis of terpenes, terpenoids and/or alkaloids having antimicrobial activities. Thus, seaweed polysaccharides and their derived oligosaccharides induced the accumulation of proteins and compounds with antimicrobial activities that determine, at least in part, the enhanced protection against pathogens in plants.

  18. Complement regulatory protein genes in channel catfish and their involvement in disease defense response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chen; Zhang, Jiaren; Yao, Jun; Liu, Shikai; Li, Yun; Song, Lin; Li, Chao; Wang, Xiaozhu; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2015-11-01

    Complement system is one of the most important defense systems of innate immunity, which plays a crucial role in disease defense responses in channel catfish. However, inappropriate and excessive complement activation could lead to potential damage to the host cells. Therefore the complement system is controlled by a set of complement regulatory proteins to allow normal defensive functions, but prevent hazardous complement activation to host tissues. In this study, we identified nine complement regulatory protein genes from the channel catfish genome. Phylogenetic and syntenic analyses were conducted to determine their orthology relationships, supporting their correct annotation and potential functional inferences. The expression profiles of the complement regulatory protein genes were determined in channel catfish healthy tissues and after infection with the two main bacterial pathogens, Edwardsiella ictaluri and Flavobacterium columnare. The vast majority of complement regulatory protein genes were significantly regulated after bacterial infections, but interestingly were generally up-regulated after E. ictaluri infection while mostly down-regulated after F. columnare infection, suggesting a pathogen-specific pattern of regulation. Collectively, these findings suggested that complement regulatory protein genes may play complex roles in the host immune responses to bacterial pathogens in channel catfish.

  19. "Hand down, man down." Analysis of defensive adjustments in response to the hot hand in basketball using novel defense metrics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Csapo

    Full Text Available The hot-hand phenomenon, according to which a player's performance is significantly elevated during certain phases relative to the expected performance based on the player's base rate, has left many researchers and fans in basketball puzzled: The vast majority of players, coaches and fans believe in its existence but statistical evidence supporting this belief has been scarce. It has frequently been argued that the hot hand in basketball is unobservable because of strategic adjustments and defensive interference of the opposing team. We use a dataset with novel metrics, such as the number of defenders and the defensive intensity for each shot attempt, which enable us to directly measure defensive pressure. First, we examine how the shooting percentage of NBA players changes relative to the attributes of each metric. We find that it is of lesser importance by how many defenders a player is guarded but that defensive intensity, e.g., whether a defender raises his hand when his opponent shoots, has a larger impact on shot difficulty. Second, we explore how the underlying metrics and shooting accuracy change as a function of streak length. Our results indicate that defensive pressure and shot difficulty increase (decrease during hot (cold streaks, so that defenders seem to behave according to the hot-hand belief and try to force hot players into more difficult shots. However, we find that shooting percentages of presumably hot players do not increase and that shooting performance is not related to streakiness, so that the defenders' hot-hand behavior cannot be considered ecologically rational. Therefore, we are unable to find evidence in favor of the hot-hand effect even when accounting for defensive pressure.

  20. "Hand down, man down." Analysis of defensive adjustments in response to the hot hand in basketball using novel defense metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csapo, Peter; Raab, Markus

    2014-01-01

    The hot-hand phenomenon, according to which a player's performance is significantly elevated during certain phases relative to the expected performance based on the player's base rate, has left many researchers and fans in basketball puzzled: The vast majority of players, coaches and fans believe in its existence but statistical evidence supporting this belief has been scarce. It has frequently been argued that the hot hand in basketball is unobservable because of strategic adjustments and defensive interference of the opposing team. We use a dataset with novel metrics, such as the number of defenders and the defensive intensity for each shot attempt, which enable us to directly measure defensive pressure. First, we examine how the shooting percentage of NBA players changes relative to the attributes of each metric. We find that it is of lesser importance by how many defenders a player is guarded but that defensive intensity, e.g., whether a defender raises his hand when his opponent shoots, has a larger impact on shot difficulty. Second, we explore how the underlying metrics and shooting accuracy change as a function of streak length. Our results indicate that defensive pressure and shot difficulty increase (decrease) during hot (cold) streaks, so that defenders seem to behave according to the hot-hand belief and try to force hot players into more difficult shots. However, we find that shooting percentages of presumably hot players do not increase and that shooting performance is not related to streakiness, so that the defenders' hot-hand behavior cannot be considered ecologically rational. Therefore, we are unable to find evidence in favor of the hot-hand effect even when accounting for defensive pressure.

  1. 75 FR 65439 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Electronic Subcontracting Reporting System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-25

    ...-602-0350. Mail: Defense Acquisition Regulations System, Attn: Ms. Cassandra R. Freeman, OUSD (AT&L... be posted to http://www.regulations.gov . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. Cassandra R. Freeman... procurement. Clare M. Zebrowski, Editor, Defense Acquisition Regulations System. 0 Therefore, 48 CFR parts 219...

  2. Calmodulin-binding transcription activator (CAMTA) 3 mediates biotic defense responses in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galon, Yael; Nave, Roy; Boyce, Joy M; Nachmias, Dikla; Knight, Marc R; Fromm, Hillel

    2008-03-19

    Calmodulin-binding transcription activator (CAMTA) 3 (also called SR1) is a calmodulin-binding transcription factor in Arabidopsis. Two homozygous T-DNA insertion mutants (camta3-1, camta3-2) showed enhanced spontaneous lesions. Transcriptome analysis of both mutants revealed 6 genes with attenuated expression and 99 genes with elevated expression. Of the latter, 32 genes are related to defense against pathogens (e.g. WRKY33, PR1 and chitinase). Propagation of a virulent strain of the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae and the fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea were attenuated in both mutants. Moreover, both mutants accumulated high levels of H2O2. We suggest that CAMTA3 regulates the expression of a set of genes involved in biotic defense responses.

  3. Induced defense responses in rice plants against small brown planthopper infestation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Canxing; Duan; Jiaojiao; Yu; Jianyu; Bai; Zhendong; Zhu; Xiaoming; Wang

    2014-01-01

    The small brown planthopper(SBPH), Laodelphax striatellus Fallén(Homoptera: Delphacidae), is a serious pest of rice(Oryza sativa L.) in China. To understand the mechanisms of rice resistance to SBPH, defense response genes and related defense enzymes were examined in resistant and susceptible rice varieties in response to SBPH infestation. The salicylic acid(SA) synthesis-related genes phenylalanine ammonia-lyase(PAL), NPR1, EDS1 and PAD4 were induced rapidly and to a much higher level in the resistant variety Kasalath than in the susceptible cultivar Wuyujing 3 in response to SBPH infestation. The expression level of PAL in the Kasalath rice at 12 h post-infestation(hpi) increased 7.52-fold compared with the un-infested control, and the expression level in Kasalath was 49.63, 87.18, 57.36 and 75.06 times greater than that in Wuyujing 3 at 24, 36, 48 and 72 hpi, respectively. However, the transcriptional levels of the jasmonic acid(JA) synthesis-related genes LOX and AOS2 in resistant Kasalath were significantly lower than in susceptible Wuyujing 3 at 24, 36, 48 and 72 hpi. The activities of the defense enzymes PAL, peroxidase(POD), and polyphenol oxidase(PPO) increased remarkably in Kasalath in response to SBPH infestation, and were closely correlated with the PAL gene transcript level. Our results indicated that the SA signaling pathway was activated in the resistant Kasalath rice variety in response to SBPH infestation and that the gene PAL played a considerable role in the resistance to SBPH.

  4. Attenuated defense response and low basal blood pressure in orexin knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayaba, Yuji; Nakamura, Akira; Kasuya, Yoshitoshi; Ohuchi, Takashi; Yanagisawa, Masashi; Komuro, Issei; Fukuda, Yasuichiro; Kuwaki, Tomoyuki

    2003-09-01

    The perifornical area of the hypothalamus has been known as the center for the defense response, or "fight or flight" response, which is characterized by a concomitant rise in arterial blood pressure (AP), heart rate (HR), and respiratory frequency (Rf). We examined whether orexin, a recently identified hypothalamic neuropeptide, contributes to the defense response and basal cardiovascular regulation using orexin knockout mice. Microinjection of a GABA-A receptor antagonist, bicuculline methiodide (0.1-1 mM in 20 nl), to the perifornical area in urethane-anesthetized wild-type mice elicited dose-dependent increases in AP, HR, and Rf. Although similar changes were observed in orexin knockout mice, intensities were smaller and duration was shorter than those in wild-type mice. Moreover, in an awake and freely moving condition, telemeter-indwelling orexin knockout mice showed diminished cardiovascular and behavioral responses to emotional stress in the resident-intruder test. We also found that basal AP in orexin knockout mice was significantly lower in both anesthetized (117 +/- 8 mmHg in wild type and 92 +/- 3 in knockout) and conscious (125 +/- 6 mmHg in wild type and 109 +/- 2 in knockout) conditions. alpha-Adrenergic blockade with prazosin or ganglion blockade with hexamethonium canceled the difference in basal AP. HR and cardiac contractile parameters by echocardiography did not differ between the two strains of mice. These results indicate lower sympathetic vasoconstrictor tone in knockout mice. The present study suggests that orexin-containing neurons in the perifornical area play a role as one of the efferent pathways of defense response and also operate as a regulator of AP at basal condition by activating sympathetic outflow.

  5. Induced defense responses in rice plants against small brown planthopper infestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canxing Duan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The small brown planthopper (SBPH, Laodelphax striatellus Fallén (Homoptera: Delphacidae, is a serious pest of rice (Oryza sativa L. in China. To understand the mechanisms of rice resistance to SBPH, defense response genes and related defense enzymes were examined in resistant and susceptible rice varieties in response to SBPH infestation. The salicylic acid (SA synthesis-related genes phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL, NPR1, EDS1 and PAD4 were induced rapidly and to a much higher level in the resistant variety Kasalath than in the susceptible cultivar Wuyujing 3 in response to SBPH infestation. The expression level of PAL in the Kasalath rice at 12 h post-infestation (hpi increased 7.52-fold compared with the un-infested control, and the expression level in Kasalath was 49.63, 87.18, 57.36 and 75.06 times greater than that in Wuyujing 3 at 24, 36, 48 and 72 hpi, respectively. However, the transcriptional levels of the jasmonic acid (JA synthesis-related genes LOX and AOS2 in resistant Kasalath were significantly lower than in susceptible Wuyujing 3 at 24, 36, 48 and 72 hpi. The activities of the defense enzymes PAL, peroxidase (POD, and polyphenol oxidase (PPO increased remarkably in Kasalath in response to SBPH infestation, and were closely correlated with the PAL gene transcript level. Our results indicated that the SA signaling pathway was activated in the resistant Kasalath rice variety in response to SBPH infestation and that the gene PAL played a considerable role in the resistance to SBPH.

  6. Theater Missile Defense Extended Test Range Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement - Eglin Gulf Test Range. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-07-01

    DOD Department of Defense DRMO Defense Reutilization Marketing Office EA Environmental Assessment ECAC Electronic Compatibility Analysis Center...natural attractions (kayaking, birdwatching , hiking, participating in cultural events); responsible travel to natural areas which conserves the

  7. Response of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) leaf surface defenses to exogenous methyl jasmonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Heather C; Ro, Dae-kyun; Rieseberg, Loren H

    2012-01-01

    Helianthus annuus, the common sunflower, produces a complex array of secondary compounds that are secreted into glandular trichomes, specialized structures found on leaf surfaces and anther appendages of flowers. The primary components of these trichome secretions are sesquiterpene lactones (STL), a diverse class of compounds produced abundantly by the plant family Compositae and believed to contribute to plant defense against herbivory. We treated wild and cultivated H. annuus accessions with exogenous methyl jasmonate, a plant hormone that mediates plant defense against insect herbivores and certain classes of fungal pathogens. The wild sunflower produced a higher density of glandular trichomes on its leaves than the cultivar. Comparison of the profiles of glandular trichome extracts obtained by liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy (LC-MS) showed that wild and cultivated H. annuus were qualitatively similar in surface chemistry, although differing in the relative size and proportion of various compounds detected. Despite observing consistent transcriptional responses to methyl jasmonate treatment, we detected no significant effect on glandular trichome density or LC-MS profile in cultivated or wild sunflower, with wild sunflower exhibiting a declining trend in overall STL production and foliar glandular trichome density of jasmonate-treated plants. These results suggest that glandular trichomes and associated compounds may act as constitutive defenses or require greater levels of stimulus for induction than the observed transcriptional responses to exogenous jasmonate. Reduced defense investment in domesticated lines is consistent with predicted tradeoffs caused by selection for increased yield; future research will focus on the development of genetic resources to explicitly test the ecological roles of glandular trichomes and associated effects on plant growth and fitness.

  8. Response of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. leaf surface defenses to exogenous methyl jasmonate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather C Rowe

    Full Text Available Helianthus annuus, the common sunflower, produces a complex array of secondary compounds that are secreted into glandular trichomes, specialized structures found on leaf surfaces and anther appendages of flowers. The primary components of these trichome secretions are sesquiterpene lactones (STL, a diverse class of compounds produced abundantly by the plant family Compositae and believed to contribute to plant defense against herbivory. We treated wild and cultivated H. annuus accessions with exogenous methyl jasmonate, a plant hormone that mediates plant defense against insect herbivores and certain classes of fungal pathogens. The wild sunflower produced a higher density of glandular trichomes on its leaves than the cultivar. Comparison of the profiles of glandular trichome extracts obtained by liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy (LC-MS showed that wild and cultivated H. annuus were qualitatively similar in surface chemistry, although differing in the relative size and proportion of various compounds detected. Despite observing consistent transcriptional responses to methyl jasmonate treatment, we detected no significant effect on glandular trichome density or LC-MS profile in cultivated or wild sunflower, with wild sunflower exhibiting a declining trend in overall STL production and foliar glandular trichome density of jasmonate-treated plants. These results suggest that glandular trichomes and associated compounds may act as constitutive defenses or require greater levels of stimulus for induction than the observed transcriptional responses to exogenous jasmonate. Reduced defense investment in domesticated lines is consistent with predicted tradeoffs caused by selection for increased yield; future research will focus on the development of genetic resources to explicitly test the ecological roles of glandular trichomes and associated effects on plant growth and fitness.

  9. Interplay of Pathogen-Induced Defense Responses and Symbiotic Establishment in Medicago truncatula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Chen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Suppression of host innate immunity appears to be required for the establishment of symbiosis between rhizobia and host plants. In this study, we established a system that included a host plant, a bacterial pathogen and a symbiotic rhizobium to study the role of innate immunity during symbiotic interactions. A pathogenic bacterium, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato strain DC3000 (Pst DC3000, was shown to cause chlorosis in Medicago truncatula A17. Sinorhizobium meliloti strain Sm2011 (Sm2011 and Pst DC3000 strain alone induced similar defense responses in M. truncatula. However, when co-inoculated, Sm2011 specifically suppressed the defense responses induced by Pst DC3000, such as MAPK activation and ROS production. Inoculation with Sm2011 suppressed the transcription of defense-related genes triggered by Pst DC3000 infection, including the receptor of bacterial flagellin (FLS2, pathogenesis-related protein 10 (PR10, and the transcription factor WRKY33. Interestingly, inoculation with Pst DC3000 specifically inhibited the expression of the symbiosis marker genes nodule inception and nodulation pectate lyase and reduced the numbers of infection threads and nodules on M. truncatula A17 roots, indicating that Pst DC3000 inhibits the establishment of symbiosis in M. truncatula. In addition, defense-related genes, such as MAPK3/6, RbohC, and WRKY33, exhibited a transient increase in their expression in the early stage of symbiosis with Sm2011, but the expression dropped down to normal levels at later symbiotic stages. Our results suggest that plant innate immunity plays an antagonistic role in symbiosis by directly reducing the numbers of infection threads and nodules.

  10. Interplay of Pathogen-Induced Defense Responses and Symbiotic Establishment in Medicago truncatula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tao; Duan, Liujian; Zhou, Bo; Yu, Haixiang; Zhu, Hui; Cao, Yangrong; Zhang, Zhongming

    2017-01-01

    Suppression of host innate immunity appears to be required for the establishment of symbiosis between rhizobia and host plants. In this study, we established a system that included a host plant, a bacterial pathogen and a symbiotic rhizobium to study the role of innate immunity during symbiotic interactions. A pathogenic bacterium, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato strain DC3000 (Pst DC3000), was shown to cause chlorosis in Medicago truncatula A17. Sinorhizobium meliloti strain Sm2011 (Sm2011) and Pst DC3000 strain alone induced similar defense responses in M. truncatula. However, when co-inoculated, Sm2011 specifically suppressed the defense responses induced by Pst DC3000, such as MAPK activation and ROS production. Inoculation with Sm2011 suppressed the transcription of defense-related genes triggered by Pst DC3000 infection, including the receptor of bacterial flagellin (FLS2), pathogenesis-related protein 10 (PR10), and the transcription factor WRKY33. Interestingly, inoculation with Pst DC3000 specifically inhibited the expression of the symbiosis marker genes nodule inception and nodulation pectate lyase and reduced the numbers of infection threads and nodules on M. truncatula A17 roots, indicating that Pst DC3000 inhibits the establishment of symbiosis in M. truncatula. In addition, defense-related genes, such as MAPK3/6, RbohC, and WRKY33, exhibited a transient increase in their expression in the early stage of symbiosis with Sm2011, but the expression dropped down to normal levels at later symbiotic stages. Our results suggest that plant innate immunity plays an antagonistic role in symbiosis by directly reducing the numbers of infection threads and nodules.

  11. Genome-wide transcriptional responses to a lipid hydroperoxide: adaptation occurs without induction of oxidant defenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alic, Nazif; Felder, Thomas; Temple, Mark D; Gloeckner, Christian; Higgins, Vincent J; Briza, Peter; Dawes, Ian W

    2004-07-01

    Free radicals can initiate the oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids in cells through the process of lipid peroxidation. The genome-wide transcriptional changes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae after treatment with the toxic lipid peroxidation product linoleic acid hydroperoxide (LoaOOH) were identified. High-dose treatment led to a switch in transcription from biosynthetic to protective functions. This response encompassed a set of genes stimulated predominantly by LoaOOH, and not by other oxidants or heat shock, which contained components of the pleiotropic drug resistance system. The dose dependence of the transcriptional response revealed that large and widespread changes occur only in response to higher doses. Pretreatment of cells with sublethal doses of LoaOOH induces resistance to an otherwise lethal dose through the process of adaptation. Adaptive doses elicited a more subtle transcriptional response affecting metabolic functions, including an increase in the capacity for detoxification and downregulation of the rate of protein synthesis. Surprisingly, the cellular response to adaptive doses did not include induction of oxidative-stress defense enzymes nor of transcripts involved in general cellular defense systems.

  12. Ralstonia solanacearum extracellular polysaccharide is a specific elicitor of defense responses in wilt-resistant tomato plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annett Milling

    Full Text Available Ralstonia solanacearum, which causes bacterial wilt of diverse plants, produces copious extracellular polysaccharide (EPS, a major virulence factor. The function of EPS in wilt disease is uncertain. Leading hypotheses are that EPS physically obstructs plant water transport, or that EPS cloaks the bacterium from host plant recognition and subsequent defense. Tomato plants infected with R. solanacearum race 3 biovar 2 strain UW551 and tropical strain GMI1000 upregulated genes in both the ethylene (ET and salicylic acid (SA defense signal transduction pathways. The horizontally wilt-resistant tomato line Hawaii7996 activated expression of these defense genes faster and to a greater degree in response to R. solanacearum infection than did susceptible cultivar Bonny Best. However, EPS played different roles in resistant and susceptible host responses to R. solanacearum. In susceptible plants the wild-type and eps(- mutant strains induced generally similar defense responses. But in resistant Hawaii7996 tomato plants, the wild-type pathogens induced significantly greater defense responses than the eps(- mutants, suggesting that the resistant host recognizes R. solanacearum EPS. Consistent with this idea, purified EPS triggered significant SA pathway defense gene expression in resistant, but not in susceptible, tomato plants. In addition, the eps(- mutant triggered noticeably less production of defense-associated reactive oxygen species in resistant tomato stems and leaves, despite attaining similar cell densities in planta. Collectively, these data suggest that bacterial wilt-resistant plants can specifically recognize EPS from R. solanacearum.

  13. Host Active Defense Responses Occur within 24 Hours after Pathogen Inoculation in the Rice Blast System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhong-hua; JIA Yu-lin; LIN Hui; Adair INTERN; Barbara VALENT; J. Neil RUTGER

    2007-01-01

    Phenotypical, cytological and molecular responses of rice to the fungus Magnaporthe grisea were studied using rice cultivars and lesion mimic plants. The cultivar Katy was susceptible to several virulent M. grisea isolates, and a Sekiguchi like-lesion mimic mutant of Katy (LmmKaty) showed enhanced resistance to these isolates. Lesion mimic phenotype of LmmKaty was rapidly induced by virulent M. grisea isolates or by avirulent ones only at high levels of inoculum.Autofluorescence (a sign of an active defense response) was visible under ultraviolet light 24 h after localized inoculation in the incompatible interaction, whereas, not evident in the compatible interaction. Autofluorescence was also observed in LmmKaty 20 h after pathogen inoculation, indicating that rapid cell death is a mechanism of LmmKaty to restrict pathogen invasion. Rapid accumulations of defense related (DR) gene transcripts, phenylalanine ammonia lyase and β-glucanase,were observed beginning at 6 h and were obvious at 16 h and 24 h after inoculation in an incompatible interaction. Rapid transcript accumulations of PR-1 and chitinase had occurred by 24 h after inoculation in an incompatible interaction.Accumulations of these transcripts were delayed in the compatible interaction. These results indicate that host active defense responses occur 24 h after pathogen inoculation and that LmmKaty exhibits enhanced resistance to M. grisea. It is suggested that the autofluorescence and expression of the DR genes after heavy inoculation are important cytological and molecular markers respectively for early determination of the host response to M. grisea in the rice blast system.

  14. Exact electromagnetic response of Landau level electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Dung Xuan; Gromov, Andrey

    2017-02-01

    We present a simple method that allows us to calculate the electromagnetic response of noninteracting electrons in a strong magnetic field to arbitrary order in the gradients of external electric and magnetic fields. We illustrate the method on both nonrelativistic and massless Dirac electrons filling N Landau levels. First, we derive an exact relation between the electromagnetic response of the nonrelativistic and Dirac electrons in the lowest Landau level. Next, we obtain a closed form expression for the polarization operator in the large-N (or weak magnetic field) limit. We explicitly show that in the large-N limit the random phase approximation (RPA) computation of the polarization tensor agrees—in leading and subleading order in N —with a Fermi liquid computation to all orders in the gradient expansion and for arbitrary value of the g factor. Finally, we show that in the large-N limit the nonrelativistic polarization tensor agrees with Dirac's in the leading and subleading orders in N , provided that the Berry phase of the Dirac cone is taken into account via replacement N ⟶N +1 /2 .

  15. Exact Electromagnetic Response of Landau Level Electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Nguyen, Dung Xuan

    2016-01-01

    We present a simple method that allows to calculate the electromagnetic response of non-interacting electrons in strong magnetic field to arbitrary order in the gradients of external electric and magnetic fields. We illustrate the method on both non-relativistic and massless Dirac electrons filling $N$ Landau levels. First, we derive an exact relation between the electromagnetic response of the non-relativistic and Dirac electrons in the lowest Landau level. Next, we obtain a closed form expression for the polarization operator in the large $N$ (or weak magnetic field) limit. We explicitly show that in the large $N$ limit the random phase approximation (RPA) computation of the polarization tensor agrees - in leading and sub-leading order in $N$ - with a Fermi liquid computation to {\\it all} orders in the gradient expansion and for arbitrary value of the $\\mathrm{g}$-factor. Finally, we show that in the large $N$ limit the non-relativistic polarization tensor agrees with Dirac's in the leading and sub-leading ...

  16. Plant methyl salicylate induces defense responses in the rhizobacterium Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kazuo

    2015-04-01

    Bacillus subtilis is a rhizobacterium that promotes plant growth and health. Cultivation of B. subtilis with an uprooted weed on solid medium produced pleat-like architectures on colonies near the plant. To test whether plants emit signals that affect B. subtilis colony morphology, we examined the effect of plant-related compounds on colony morphology. Bacillus subtilis formed mucoid colonies specifically in response to methyl salicylate, which is a plant-defense signal released in response to pathogen infection. Methyl salicylate induced mucoid colony formation by stimulating poly-γ-glutamic acid biosynthesis, which formed enclosing capsules that protected the cells from exposure to antimicrobial compounds. Poly-γ-glutamic acid synthesis depended on the DegS-DegU two-component regulatory system, which activated DegSU-dependent gene transcription in response to methyl salicylate. Bacillus subtilis did not induce plant methyl salicylate production, indicating that the most probable source of methyl salicylate in the rhizosphere is pathogen-infected plants. Methyl salicylate induced B. subtilis biosynthesis of the antibiotics bacilysin and fengycin, the latter of which exhibited inhibitory activity against the plant pathogenic fungus Fusarium oxysporum. We propose that B. subtilis may sense plants under pathogen attack via methyl salicylate, and express defense responses that protect both B. subtilis and host plants in the rhizosphere. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Alteration of antioxidant defense status precedes humoral immune response abnormalities in macrosomia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddouche, Mustapha; Aribi, Mourad; Moulessehoul, Soraya; Smahi, Mohammed Chems-Eddine Ismet; Lammani, Mohammed; Benyoucef, Mohammed

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background This study aimed to investigate whether the anomalies affecting the antioxidant and humoral immune defenses could start at birth and to check whether the decrease in antioxidant defenses may precede the immune abnormalities in macrosomic newborns. Material/Methods Thirty macrosomic and 30 sex-matched control newborns were recruited for a retrospective case-control study at the Maghnia Maternity Hospital of Tlemcen Department (Algeria). Results The serum IgG levels were similar in both groups. However, plasma ORAC, albumin, vitamin E, SOD, CAT and GSH-Px levels were significantly decreased in macrosomic as compared to control newborns, yet no difference was observed after adjustment for weight. Additionally, serum concentrations of complement C3, MDA and XO were significantly higher in macrosomic as compared to controls before adjustment for weight. Moreover, macrosomia was significantly associated with high levels of complement C3 (OR=8, p=0.002); whereas no association with those of IgG was observed (OR0.05). Furthermore, macrosomia was significantly associated with low levels of ORAC (OR=4.96, p=0.027), vitamin E (OR=4.5, p=0.018), SOD (OR=6.88, p=0.020) and CAT (OR=5.67, p=0.017), and with high levels of MDA (OR=10.29, p=0.005). Conclusions Abnormalities of the humoral defense system in excessive weight could be preceded by alterations of the anti-oxidative defense and by inflammatory response and activation of innate immunity at birth. Additionally, excessive weight could be a potential factor contributing to decreased anti-oxidative capacity and increased oxidative stress. PMID:22037745

  18. Alteration of antioxidant defense status precedes humoral immune response abnormalities in macrosomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddouche, Mustapha; Aribi, Mourad; Moulessehoul, Soraya; Smahi, Mohammed Chems-Eddine Ismet; Lammani, Mohammed; Benyoucef, Mohammed

    2011-11-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether the anomalies affecting the antioxidant and humoral immune defenses could start at birth and to check whether the decrease in antioxidant defenses may precede the immune abnormalities in macrosomic newborns. Thirty macrosomic and 30 sex-matched control newborns were recruited for a retrospective case-control study at the Maghnia Maternity Hospital of Tlemcen Department (Algeria). The serum IgG levels were similar in both groups. However, plasma ORAC, albumin, vitamin E, SOD, CAT and GSH-Px levels were significantly decreased in macrosomic as compared to control newborns, yet no difference was observed after adjustment for weight. Additionally, serum concentrations of complement C3, MDA and XO were significantly higher in macrosomic as compared to controls before adjustment for weight. Moreover, macrosomia was significantly associated with high levels of complement C3 (OR=8, p=0.002); whereas no association with those of IgG was observed (OR0.05). Furthermore, macrosomia was significantly associated with low levels of ORAC (OR=4.96, p=0.027), vitamin E (OR=4.5, p=0.018), SOD (OR=6.88, p=0.020) and CAT (OR=5.67, p=0.017), and with high levels of MDA (OR=10.29, p=0.005). Abnormalities of the humoral defense system in excessive weight could be preceded by alterations of the anti-oxidative defense and by inflammatory response and activation of innate immunity at birth. Additionally, excessive weight could be a potential factor contributing to decreased anti-oxidative capacity and increased oxidative stress.

  19. Soybean aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae) response to soybean plant defense: stress levels, tradeoffs, and cross-virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enders, Laramy; Bickel, Ryan; Brisson, Jennifer; Heng-Moss, Tiffany; Siegfried, Blair; Zera, Anthony; Miller, Nick

    2014-02-01

    A variety of management methods to control the soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura) have been investigated since its invasion into North America in 2000, among them plant resistance has emerged as a viable option for reducing aphid damage to soybeans and preventing outbreaks. Plant resistance methods often use natural soybean plant defenses that impose stress on aphids by reducing fitness and altering behavior. Research efforts have heavily focused on identification and development of aphid resistant soybean varieties, leaving much unknown about soybean aphid response to stressful host plant defenses. In this study, we aimed to 1) evaluate lifetime fitness consequences and phenotypic variation in response to host plant-induced stress and 2) investigate whether trade-offs involving fitness costs and/or cross-virulence to multiple antibiotic soybean varieties exists. We compared aphid survival and reproduction during and after a short period of exposure to soybeans with the Rag2 resistance gene and measured aphid clonal variation in response to Rag2 soybeans. In addition, we measured the performance of Rag2 virulent and avirulent aphids on five soybean varieties with various forms of antibiotic resistance. Our results indicate that plant defenses impose high levels of stress and have long-term fitness consequences, even after aphids are removed from resistant plants. We identified one aphid clone that was able to colonize Rag2 among the seven clones tested, suggesting that virulent genotypes may be prevalent in natural populations. Finally, although we did not find evidence of cross-virulence to multiple antibiotic soybean varieties, our results suggest independent mechanisms of aphid virulence to Rag1 and Rag2 that may involve fitness costs.

  20. The Post-Cold War Defense Draw Down: The Defense Industry’s Response, Trends, and Changing Business Direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-01

    marketing strategy evolved. MILSPECS/MILSTDS. The first factor we encountered revolved around MILSPECS and MILSTDS. This is an area of federal contracting...team had developed the marketing strategy which they wanted to convey to potential prime defense contractors. Due to their small size, high quality...and a core competence marketing strategy defined, we next began developing a marketing plan. Because the manufacturing plant was already working near

  1. Defense/stress responses activated by chitosan in sycamore cultured cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malerba, Massimo; Crosti, Paolo; Cerana, Raffaella

    2012-01-01

    Chitosan (CHT) is a natural, non-toxic, and inexpensive compound obtained by partial alkaline deacetylation of chitin, the main component of the exoskeleton of crustaceans and other arthropods. The unique physiological and biological properties of CHT make this polymer useful for a wide range of industries. In agriculture, CHT is used to control numerous pre- and postharvest diseases on various horticultural commodities. In recent years, much attention has been devoted to CHT as an elicitor of defense responses in plants, which include raising of cytosolic Ca(2+), activation of MAP kinases, callose apposition, oxidative burst, hypersensitive response, synthesis of abscisic acid, jasmonate, phytoalexins, and pathogenesis-related proteins. In this work, we investigated the effects of different CHT concentrations on some defense/stress responses of sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) cultured cells. CHT induced accumulation of dead cells, and of cells with fragmented DNA, production of H(2)O(2) and nitric oxide, release of cytochrome c from the mitochondrion, accumulation of regulative 14-3-3 proteins in the cytosol and of HSP70 molecular chaperone binding protein in the endoplasmic reticulum, accompanied by marked modifications in the architecture of this cell organelle.

  2. The Sinorhizobium (Ensifer) fredii HH103 Type 3 Secretion System Suppresses Early Defense Responses to Effectively Nodulate Soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Guerrero, Irene; Pérez-Montaño, Francisco; Monreal, José Antonio; Preston, Gail M; Fones, Helen; Vioque, Blanca; Ollero, Francisco Javier; López-Baena, Francisco Javier

    2015-07-01

    Plants that interact with pathogenic bacteria in their natural environments have developed barriers to block or contain the infection. Phytopathogenic bacteria have evolved mechanisms to subvert these defenses and promote infection. Thus, the type 3 secretion system (T3SS) delivers bacterial effectors directly into the plant cells to alter host signaling and suppress defenses, providing an appropriate environment for bacterial multiplication. Some rhizobial strains possess a symbiotic T3SS that seems to be involved in the suppression of host defenses to promote nodulation and determine the host range. In this work, we show that the inactivation of the Sinorhizobium (Ensifer) fredii HH103 T3SS negatively affects soybean nodulation in the early stages of the symbiotic process, which is associated with a reduction of the expression of early nodulation genes. This symbiotic phenotype could be the consequence of the bacterial triggering of soybean defense responses associated with the production of salicylic acid (SA) and the impairment of the T3SS mutant to suppress these responses. Interestingly, the early induction of the transcription of GmMPK4, which negatively regulates SA accumulation and defense responses in soybean via WRKY33, could be associated with the differential defense responses induced by the parental and the T3SS mutant strain.

  3. Metabolomic analysis of primary metabolites in citrus leaf during defense responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, Tomonori; Matsukawa, Tetsuya; Kajiyama, Shin'ichiro

    2017-03-01

    Mechanical damage is one of the unavoidable environmental stresses to plant growth and development. Plants induce a variety of reactions which defend against natural enemies and/or heal the wounded sites. Jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA), defense-related plant hormones, are well known to be involved in induction of defense reactions and play important roles as signal molecules. However, defense related metabolites are so numerous and diverse that roles of individual compounds are still to be elucidated. In this report, we carried out a comprehensive analysis of metabolic changes during wound response in citrus plants which are one of the most commercially important fruit tree families. Changes in amino acid, sugar, and organic acid profiles in leaves were surveyed after wounding, JA and SA treatments using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) in seven citrus species, Citrus sinensis, Citrus limon, Citrus paradisi, Citrus unshiu, Citrus kinokuni, Citrus grandis, and Citrus hassaku. GC/MS data were applied to multivariate analyses including hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA), primary component analysis (PCA), and orthogonal partial least squares-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) to extract stress-related compounds. HCA showed the amino acid cluster including phenylalanine and tryptophan, suggesting that amino acids in this cluster are concertedly regulated during responses against treatments. OPLS-DA exhibited that tryptophan was accumulated after wounding and JA treatments in all species tested, while serine was down regulated. Our results suggest that tryptophan and serine are common biomarker candidates in citrus plants for wound stress. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Systemin in Solanum nigrum. The tomato-homologous polypeptide does not mediate direct defense responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Silvia; Baldwin, Ian T

    2006-12-01

    We extend Ryan's seminal work on the 18-amino acid polypeptide systemin in tomato's (Solanum lycopersicum) systemic wound response to the closely related solanaceous species Solanum nigrum. We compared wild-type plants to plants transformed with an inverted repeat prosystemin construct (IRSys) to silence the expression of the endogenous S. nigrum prosystemin gene. In wild-type plants elicited with wounding + oral secretions from Manduca sexta larvae, trypsin-proteinase inhibitors (TPIs) accumulated even though prosystemin transcripts were down-regulated. Neither reducing the endogenous systemin levels by RNAi nor complementing the plants with systemin by exogenously supplying the polypeptide through excised stems significantly increased TPI activity, indicating that systemin and TPIs are not correlated in S. nigrum. The performance of two herbivore species from two feeding guilds, M. sexta larvae and Myzus persicae nicotianae, did not differ between wild-type and IRSys plants, demonstrating that varying endogenous systemin levels do not alter the direct defenses of S. nigrum. Field experiments with wild-type and IRSys plants and the flea beetle Epitrix pubescens supported these glasshouse data. That levels of oral secretion-elicited jasmonic acid did not differ between wild-type and IRSys plants suggests that systemin is unlikely to mediate jasmonate signaling in S. nigrum as it does in tomato. We conclude that the tomato-homologous polypeptide does not mediate direct defense responses in S. nigrum.

  5. Putrescine regulating by stress-responsive MAPK cascade contributes to bacterial pathogen defense in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su-Hyun; Kim, Sun-Hwa; Yoo, Seung-Jin; Min, Kwang-Hyun; Nam, Seung-Hee; Cho, Baik Ho; Yang, Kwang-Yeol

    2013-08-09

    Polyamines in plants are involved in various physiological and developmental processes including abiotic and biotic stress responses. We investigated the expression of ADCs, which are key enzymes in putrescine (Put) biosynthesis, and roles of Put involving defense response in Arabidopsis. The increased expression of ADC1 and ADC2, and the induction of Put were detected in GVG-NtMEK2(DD) transgenic Arabidopsis, whereas, their performance was partially compromised in GVG-NtMEK2(DD)/mpk3 and GVG-NtMEK2(DD)/mpk6 mutant following DEX treatment. The expression of ADC2 was highly induced by Pst DC3000 inoculation, while the transcript levels of ADC1 were slightly up-regulated. Compared to the WT plant, Put content in the adc2 knock-out mutant was reduced after Pst DC3000 inoculation, and showed enhanced susceptibility to pathogen infection. The adc2 mutant exhibited reduced expression of PR-1 after bacterial infection and the growth of the pathogen was about 4-fold more than that in the WT plant. Furthermore, the disease susceptibility of the adc2 mutant was recovered by the addition of exogenous Put. Taken together, these results suggest that Arabidopsis MPK3 and MPK6 play a positive role in the regulation of Put biosynthesis, and that Put contributes to bacterial pathogen defense in Arabidopsis.

  6. Nonpathogenic strains of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum trigger progressive bean defense responses during appressorium-mediated penetration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veneault-Fourrey, Claire; Laugé, Richard; Langin, Thierry

    2005-08-01

    The fungal bean pathogen Colletotrichum lindemuthianum differentiates appressoria in order to penetrate bean tissues. We showed that appressorium development in C. lindemuthianum can be divided into three stages, and we obtained three nonpathogenic strains, including one strain blocked at each developmental stage. H18 was blocked at the appressorium differentiation stage; i.e., no genuine appressoria were formed. H191 was blocked at the appressorium maturation stage; i.e., appressoria exhibited a pigmentation defect and developed only partial internal turgor pressure. H290 was impaired in appressorium function; i.e., appressoria failed to penetrate into bean tissues. Furthermore, these strains could be further discriminated according to the bean defense responses that they induced. Surprisingly, appressorium maturation, but not appressorium function, was sufficient to induce most plant defense responses tested (superoxide ion production and strong induction of pathogenesis-related proteins). However, appressorium function (i.e., entry into the first host cell) was necessary for avirulence-mediated recognition of the fungus.

  7. Enhanced Agrobacterium-mediated transformation efficiencies in monocot cells is associated with attenuated defense responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wan-Jun; Dewey, Ralph E; Boss, Wendy; Phillippy, Brian Q; Qu, Rongda

    2013-02-01

    Plant defense responses can lead to altered metabolism and even cell death at the sites of Agrobacterium infection, and thus lower transformation frequencies. In this report, we demonstrate that the utilization of culture conditions associated with an attenuation of defense responses in monocot plant cells led to highly improved Agrobacterium-mediated transformation efficiencies in perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.). The removal of myo-inositol from the callus culture media in combination with a cold shock pretreatment and the addition of L-Gln prior to and during Agrobacterium-infection resulted in about 84 % of the treated calluses being stably transformed. The omission of myo-inositol from the callus culture media was associated with the failure of certain pathogenesis related genes to be induced after Agrobacterium infection. The addition of a cold shock and supplemental Gln appeared to have synergistic effects on infection and transformation efficiencies. Nearly 60 % of the stably transformed calluses regenerated into green plantlets. Calluses cultured on media lacking myo-inositol also displayed profound physiological and biochemical changes compared to ones cultured on standard growth media, such as reduced lignin within the cell walls, increased starch and inositol hexaphosphate accumulation, enhanced Agrobacterium binding to the cell surface, and less H(2)O(2) production after Agrobacterium infection. Furthermore, the cold treatment greatly reduced callus browning after infection. The simple modifications described in this report may have broad application for improving genetic transformation of recalcitrant monocot species.

  8. Scopolamine in Brugmansia suaveolens (Solanaceae): defense, allocation, costs, and induced response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Marcos Nopper; Sartoratto, Adilson; Trigo, José Roberto

    2007-02-01

    Brugmansia suaveolens (Solanaceae) contains tropane alkaloids (TAs), which can act as chemical defenses. Selective pressures might modulate the allocation of alkaloids within the plant, as postulated by optimal-defense theory. By tracing scopolamine, the most abundant TA in this species, we found that scopolamine in an artificial diet, in concentrations similar to those in leaves of B. suaveolens, increased mortality and prolonged developmental time of the larvae of the generalist noctuid moth Spodoptera frugiperda. A diet of undamaged leaves of B. suaveolens also showed a large negative effect on the growth of larvae of S. frugiperda compared to a diet of leaves of Ricinus communis, a species that did not have negative effects on this moth; more valuable plant parts, such as young leaves, flowers, and unripe fruits with seeds, have higher scopolamine concentrations than other tissues; leaves of B. suaveolens increase their content of scopolamine after artificial damage. The highest induction was found 24 hr after the damage, and after that, scopolamine content decreased to constitutive levels. This increase represented a cost, because in another experiment, a treatment with methyl jasmonate, an elicitor hormone, increased scopolamine production 9.5-fold and decreased leaf growth 2.3-fold; a diet of artificially damaged leaves of B. suaveolens showed a negative effect on the growth of larvae of S. furgiperda compared to undamaged leaves, suggesting that damage by herbivores induces resistance. Our data are in line with the optimal-defense theory, but experiments in the field with herbivores that share an evolutionary history with B. suaveolens must be undertaken to understand the dynamics of TA allocation in response to herbivory.

  9. Plant Virus Differentially Alters the Plant's Defense Response to Its Closely Related Vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaobin; Pan, Huipeng; Xie, Wen; Wu, Qingjun; Wang, Shaoli; Liu, Yang; Fang, Yong; Chen, Gong; Gao, Xiwu; Zhang, Youjun

    2013-01-01

    Background The whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae), is one of the most widely distributed agricultural pests. In recent years, B. tabaci Q has invaded China, and Q has displaced B in many areas now. In a number of regions of the world, invasion by B and/or Q has been followed by outbreaks of tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV). Our previous study showed TYLCV directly and indirectly modified the feeding behavior of B. tabaci in favor of Q rather than B. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we quantified the salicylic acid (SA) titers and relative gene expression of SA in tomato leaves that were infested with viruliferous or non-viruliferous B and Q. We also measured the impacts of exogenous SA on the performance of B and Q, including the effects on ovary development. SA titer was always higher in leaves that were infested with viruliferous B than with viruliferous Q, whereas the SA titer did not differ between leaves infested with non-viruliferous B and Q. The relative gene expression of SA signaling was increased by feeding of viruliferous B but was not increased by feeding of viruliferous Q. The life history traits of B and Q were adversely affected on SA-treated plants. On SA-treated plants, both B and Q had lower fecundity, shorter longevity, longer developmental time and lower survival rate than on untreated plants. Compared with whiteflies feeding on control plants, those feeding on SA-treated plants had fewer oocytes and slower ovary development. On SA-treated plants, viruliferous B had fewer oocytes than viruliferous Q. Conclusions/Significance These results indicate that TYLCV tends to induce SA-regulated plant defense against B but SA-regulated plant defense against Q was reduced. In other words, Q may have a mutualistic relationship with TYLCV that results in the reduction of the plant's defense response. PMID:24391779

  10. The biocontrol endophytic bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens PICF7 induces systemic defense responses in aerial tissues upon colonization of olive roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen eGómez-Lama Cabanás

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas fluorescens PICF7, a native olive root endophyte and effective biocontrol agent (BCA against Verticillium wilt of olive, is able to trigger a broad range of defense responses in root tissues of this woody plant. In order to elucidate whether strain PICF7 also induces systemic defense responses in above-ground organs, aerial tissues of olive plants grown under non-gnotobiotic conditions were collected at different time points after root bacterization with this endophytic BCA. A suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH cDNA library, enriched in up-regulated genes, was generated. This strategy enabled the identification of 376 ESTs (99 contigs and 277 singlets, many of them related to response to different stresses. Five ESTs, involved in defense responses, were selected to carry out time-course quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR experiments aiming to: (i validate the induction of these genes, and (ii shed light on their expression pattern along time (from 1 to 15 days. Induction of olive genes potentially coding for lypoxigenase 2, catalase, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase and phenylananine ammonia-lyase was thus confirmed at some time points. Computational analysis also revealed that different transcription factors were up-regulated in olive aerial tissues (i.e. jerf, bHLH, WRKYs, as previously reported for roots. Results confirmed that root colonization by this endophytic bacterium does not only trigger defense responses in this organ but also mount a wide array of systemic defense responses in distant tissues (stems, leaves. This sheds light on how olive plants respond to the ‘non-hostile’ colonization by a bacterial endophyte and how induced defense response can contribute to the biocontrol activity of strain PICF7.

  11. Mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways are required for melatonin-mediated defense responses in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyoung Yool; Back, Kyoungwhan

    2016-04-01

    Melatonin enhances pathogen resistance by inducing the expression of a number of plant defense-related genes. To examine whether the melatonin-mediated pathogen resistance is associated with mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades, Arabidopsis and tobacco leaves were treated with melatonin and investigated for MAPK activation using an antiphospho-p44/42 MAPK (Erk1/2) monoclonal antibody. Two MAPKs, MPK3 and MPK6, were activated rapidly and transiently by 1 μm melatonin treatment in Arabidopsis. Its tobacco ortholog MAPKs were also activated. The activation of MPK3 and MPK6 by 2-hydroxymelatonin and N-acetylserotonin was also observed, albeit to a lesser degree than that by melatonin. Furthermore, MAPK activation by melatonin was uncoupled from G-protein signaling, because melatonin efficiently activated two MAPKs in a G-protein β knockout mutant (agb1). Suppression of both MPK3 and MPK6 in transgenic Arabidopsis exhibited significant decreases in the induction of defense-related gene expression and pathogen resistance relative to wild-type plants. Using an array of MAP kinase kinase (MKK) knockout mutants, we found that four MKKs, namely MKK4, MKK5, MKK7, and MKK9, are responsible for the activation of MPK3 and MPK6 by melatonin, indicating that melatonin-mediated innate immunity is triggered by MAPK signaling through MKK4/5/7/9-MPK3/6 cascades.

  12. Elicitor-Induced Defense Responses in Solanum lycopersicum against Ralstonia solanacearum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Itishree; Mukherjee, Arup K.; Acharya, Priyambada

    2013-01-01

    We investigated on important parameters of induced resistance in hydroponic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) against Ralstonia solanacearum using the elicitors chitosan (CHT), salicylic acid (SA), and jasmonic acid (JA). The increase in total phenolic content of roots by the elicitors was significantly higher than control. Most pronounced increase in lignin synthesis was triggered by SA followed by CHT. At 24 h post-elicitation (hpe), the activity of phenylalanine ammonia lyase was 4.5 times higher than control elicited by CHT. The peroxidase activity was about 86 nkat/mg protein at 24 hpe in case of SA and 78 nkat/mg protein in case of CHT. The activity of polyphenol oxidase increased several folds by the elicitors. Cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase activity increased to the maximum at 48 hpe under the influence of CHT. The results indicate that the elicitors SA and CHT induced effective defense responses in tomato plants against R. solanacearum. This was evident from reduced vascular browning and wilting symptoms of tomato plants treated with SA and CHT and challenged subsequently with R. solanacearum. This reduced disease incidence in tomato by SA and CHT may be a result of cell wall strengthening through deposition of lignin and the coincident induction of defense enzymes. PMID:24187521

  13. Reducing honey bee defensive responses and social wasp colonization with methyl anthranilate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankiw, Tanya

    2009-07-01

    Human victims of a massive number of stings have been steadily increasing since the invasion of Africanized honey bees (Apis mellifera) to the United States in 1990. Multiple honey bee stings may result in venom toxicity, leading to renal failure and even death. Here we tested the efficacy of methyl anthranilate as a honey bee repellent during a massive defensive response by Africanized honey bees. An aerosolized solution of 10% methyl anthranilate reduced the number of defensive bee hits to a retreating victim by 95% compared with a water control. One hundred fifty milliliters of the 10% methyl anthranilate solution sprayed onto stationary foam balls covered with black suede leather located 2 m from provoked Africanized colonies received 80% fewer stings than targets treated with water. Methyl anthranilate (100%) delivered through a UV blocking 3 mil polyethylene pouch was 100% effective in preventing Polistes colonization in wildlife observation huts and from the roof overhang of home patios. Although methyl anthranilate was not 100% effective in preventing honey bee stinging, it seemed to reduce number of stings below the average human LD50, indicative of a promising tool for preventing honey bee venom toxicity and wasp colonization.

  14. Elicitor-Induced Defense Responses in Solanum lycopersicum against Ralstonia solanacearum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhamoy Mandal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated on important parameters of induced resistance in hydroponic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum against Ralstonia solanacearum using the elicitors chitosan (CHT, salicylic acid (SA, and jasmonic acid (JA. The increase in total phenolic content of roots by the elicitors was significantly higher than control. Most pronounced increase in lignin synthesis was triggered by SA followed by CHT. At 24 h post-elicitation (hpe, the activity of phenylalanine ammonia lyase was 4.5 times higher than control elicited by CHT. The peroxidase activity was about 86 nkat/mg protein at 24 hpe in case of SA and 78 nkat/mg protein in case of CHT. The activity of polyphenol oxidase increased several folds by the elicitors. Cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase activity increased to the maximum at 48 hpe under the influence of CHT. The results indicate that the elicitors SA and CHT induced effective defense responses in tomato plants against R. solanacearum. This was evident from reduced vascular browning and wilting symptoms of tomato plants treated with SA and CHT and challenged subsequently with R. solanacearum. This reduced disease incidence in tomato by SA and CHT may be a result of cell wall strengthening through deposition of lignin and the coincident induction of defense enzymes.

  15. Cyanobacterial inoculation elicits plant defense response and enhanced Zn mobilization in maize hybrids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radha Prasanna

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation evaluated the effect of inoculating different cyanobacterial formulations on a set of hybrids of maize, in terms of plant defense enzyme activity, soil health parameters, Zn concentration, and yields. Microbial inoculation showed significant effects on accumulation of Zn in flag leaf, with A4 (Anabaena–Azotobacter biofilm recording the highest values. Analysis of variance (ANOVA indicated that both the hybrids and cyanobacterial treatments brought about significant variation in terms of glomalin-related soil proteins and polysaccharides in soil and the activity of defense enzymes in roots and shoots of the plants. Cyanobacterial inoculants—A4 (Anabaena–Azotobacter biofilm and A1 (Anabaena sp.–Providencia sp., CW1 + PW5 enhanced the activity of peroxidase, PAL and PPO in roots, which also showed a positive correlation with Zn concentration in the flag leaf. Grain yield ranged from 7.0 to 7.29 t/ha among the different inoculants. Comparative analyses of treatments showed that A3 (Anabaena–Trichoderma-biofilmed formulation and hybrid B8 (Bio-9681 were superior in terms of parameters investigated. This represents the first report on the genotypic responses of maize hybrids to cyanobacteria-based inoculants. Future research should focus on dissecting the role of root exudates and cyanobacteria-mediated Zn mobilization pathway in maize.

  16. nip, a symbiotic Medicago truncatula mutant that forms root nodules with aberrant infection threads and plant defense-like response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veereshlingam, Harita; Haynes, Janine G; Penmetsa, R Varma; Cook, Douglas R; Sherrier, D Janine; Dickstein, Rebecca

    2004-11-01

    To investigate the legume-Rhizobium symbiosis, we isolated and studied a novel symbiotic mutant of the model legume Medicago truncatula, designated nip (numerous infections and polyphenolics). When grown on nitrogen-free media in the presence of the compatible bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti, the nip mutant showed nitrogen deficiency symptoms. The mutant failed to form pink nitrogen-fixing nodules that occur in the wild-type symbiosis, but instead developed small bump-like nodules on its roots that were blocked at an early stage of development. Examination of the nip nodules by light microscopy after staining with X-Gal for S. meliloti expressing a constitutive GUS gene, by confocal microscopy following staining with SYTO-13, and by electron microscopy revealed that nip initiated symbiotic interactions and formed nodule primordia and infection threads. The infection threads in nip proliferated abnormally and very rarely deposited rhizobia into plant host cells; rhizobia failed to differentiate further in these cases. nip nodules contained autofluorescent cells and accumulated a brown pigment. Histochemical staining of nip nodules revealed this pigment to be polyphenolic accumulation. RNA blot analyses demonstrated that nip nodules expressed only a subset of genes associated with nodule organogenesis, as well as elevated expression of a host defense-associated phenylalanine ammonia lyase gene. nip plants were observed to have abnormal lateral roots. nip plant root growth and nodulation responded normally to ethylene inhibitors and precursors. Allelism tests showed that nip complements 14 other M. truncatula nodulation mutants but not latd, a mutant with a more severe nodulation phenotype as well as primary and lateral root defects. Thus, the nip mutant defines a new locus, NIP, required for appropriate infection thread development during invasion of the nascent nodule by rhizobia, normal lateral root elongation, and normal regulation of host defense-like responses

  17. Electronic cigarette exposure triggers neutrophil inflammatory responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higham, Andrew; Rattray, Nicholas J W; Dewhurst, Jennifer A; Trivedi, Drupad K; Fowler, Stephen J; Goodacre, Royston; Singh, Dave

    2016-05-17

    The use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigs) is increasing and there is widespread perception that e-cigs are safe. E-cigs contain harmful chemicals; more research is needed to evaluate the safety of e-cig use. Our aim was to investigate the effects of e-cigs on the inflammatory response of human neutrophils. Neutrophils were exposed to e-cig vapour extract (ECVE) and the expression of CD11b and CD66b was measured by flow cytometry and MMP-9 and CXCL8 by ELISA. We also measured the activity of neutrophil elastase (NE) and MMP-9, along with the activation of inflammatory signalling pathways. Finally we analysed the biochemical composition of ECVE by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. ECVE caused an increase in the expression of CD11b and CD66b, and increased the release of MMP-9 and CXCL8. Furthermore, there was an increase in NE and MMP-9 activity and an increase in p38 MAPK activation. We also identified several harmful chemicals in ECVE, including known carcinogens. ECVE causes a pro-inflammatory response from human neutrophils. This raises concerns over the safety of e-cig use.

  18. TcNPR3 from Theobroma cacao functions as a repressor of the pathogen defense response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zi; Zhang, Yufan; Maximova, Siela N; Guiltinan, Mark J

    2013-12-06

    Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) NON-EXPRESSOR OF PR1 (NPR1) is a transcription coactivator that plays a central role in regulating the transcriptional response to plant pathogens. Developing flowers of homozygous npr3 mutants are dramatically more resistant to infection by the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae, suggesting a role of NPR3 as a repressor of NPR1-mediated defense response with a novel role in flower development. We report here the characterization of a putative NPR3 gene from the tropical tree species Theobroma cacao (TcNPR3). Like in Arabidopsis, TcNPR3 was constitutively expressed across a wide range of tissue types and developmental stages but with some differences in relative levels compared to Arabidopsis. To test the function of TcNPR3, we performed transgenic complementation analysis by introducing a constitutively expressing putative TcNPR3 transgene into an Arabidopsis npr3 mutant. TcNPR3 expressing Arabidopsis plants were partially restored to the WT pathogen phenotype (immature flowers susceptible to bacterial infection). To test TcNPR3 function directly in cacao tissues, a synthetic microRNA targeting TcNPR3 mRNA was transiently expressed in cacao leaves using an Agrobacterium-infiltration method. TcNPR3 knock down leaf tissues were dramatically more resistance to infection with Phytophthora capsici in a leaf bioassay, showing smaller lesion sizes and reduced pathogen replication. We conclude that TcNPR3 functions similar to the Arabidopsis NPR3 gene in the regulation of the cacao defense response. Since TcNPR3 did not show a perfect complementation of the Arabidopsis NPR3 mutation, the possibility remains that other functions of TcNPR3 remain to be found. This novel knowledge can contribute to the breeding of resistant cacao varieties against pathogens through molecular markers based approaches or biotechnological strategies.

  19. Vascular defense responses in rice: peroxidase accumulation in xylem parenchyma cells and xylem wall thickening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilaire, E.; Young, S. A.; Willard, L. H.; McGee, J. D.; Sweat, T.; Chittoor, J. M.; Guikema, J. A.; Leach, J. E.

    2001-01-01

    The rice bacterial blight pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae is a vascular pathogen that elicits a defensive response through interaction with metabolically active rice cells. In leaves of 12-day-old rice seedlings, the exposed pit membrane separating the xylem lumen from the associated parenchyma cells allows contact with bacterial cells. During resistant responses, the xylem secondary walls thicken within 48 h and the pit diameter decreases, effectively reducing the area of pit membrane exposed for access by bacteria. In susceptible interactions and mock-inoculated controls, the xylem walls do not thicken within 48 h. Xylem secondary wall thickening is developmental and, in untreated 65-day-old rice plants, the size of the pit also is reduced. Activity and accumulation of a secreted cationic peroxidase, PO-C1, were previously shown to increase in xylem vessel walls and lumen. Peptide-specific antibodies and immunogold-labeling were used to demonstrate that PO-C1 is produced in the xylem parenchyma and secreted to the xylem lumen and walls. The timing of the accumulation is consistent with vessel secondary wall thickening. The PO-C1 gene is distinct but shares a high level of similarity with previously cloned pathogen-induced peroxidases in rice. PO-C1 gene expression was induced as early as 12 h during resistant interactions and peaked between 18 and 24 h after inoculation. Expression during susceptible interactions was lower than that observed in resistant interactions and was undetectable after infiltration with water, after mechanical wounding, or in mature leaves. These data are consistent with a role for vessel secondary wall thickening and peroxidase PO-C1 accumulation in the defense response in rice to X. oryzae pv. oryzae.

  20. Capsicum annuum WRKY transcription factor d (CaWRKYd) regulates hypersensitive response and defense response upon Tobacco mosaic virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Sung Un; Choi, La Mee; Lee, Gil-Je; Kim, Young Jin; Paek, Kyung-Hee

    2012-12-01

    WRKY transcription factors regulate biotic, abiotic, and developmental processes. In terms of plant defense, WRKY factors have important roles as positive and negative regulators via transcriptional regulation or protein-protein interaction. Here, we report the characterization of the gene encoding Capsicum annuum WRKY transcription factor d (CaWRKYd) isolated from microarray analysis in the Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)-P(0)-inoculated hot pepper plants. CaWRKYd belongs to the WRKY IIa group, a very small clade in the WRKY subfamily, and WRKY IIa group has positive/negative regulatory roles in Arabidopsis and rice. CaWRKYd transcripts were induced by various plant defense-related hormone treatments and TMV-P(0) inoculation. Silencing of CaWRKYd affected TMV-P(0)-mediated hypersensitive response (HR) cell death and accumulation of TMV-P(0) coat protein in local and systemic leaves. Furthermore, expression of some pathogenesis-related (PR) genes and HR-related genes was reduced in the CaWRKYd-silenced plants compared with TRV2 vector control plants upon TMV-P(0) inoculation. CaWRKYd was confirmed to bind to the W-box. Thus CaWRKYd is a newly identified Capsicum annuum WRKY transcription factor that appears to be involved in TMV-P(0)-mediated HR cell death by regulating downstream gene expression.

  1. Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus Elicits a Sugarcane Defense Response Against a Pathogenic Bacteria Xanthomonas albilineans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinagre, Fabiano; Estevez, Yandi; Bernal, Aydiloide; Perez, Juana; Cavalcanti, Janaina; Santana, Ignacio; Hemerly, Adriana S

    2006-01-01

    A new role for the plant growth-promoting nitrogen-fixing endophytic bacteria Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus has been identified and characterized while it is involved in the sugarcane-Xanthomonas albilineans pathogenic interactions. Living G.diazotrophicus possess and/or produce elicitor molecules which activate the sugarcane defense response resulting in the plant resistance to X. albilineans, in this particular case controlling the pathogen transmission to emerging agamic shoots. A total of 47 differentially expressed transcript derived fragments (TDFs) were identified by cDNA-AFLP. Transcripts showed significant homologies to genes of the ethylene signaling pathway (26%), proteins regulates by auxins (9%), β-1,3 Glucanase proteins (6%) and ubiquitin genes (4%), all major signaling mechanisms. Results point toward a form of induction of systemic resistance in sugarcane-G. diazotrophicus interactions which protect the plant against X. albilineans attack. PMID:19516988

  2. Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus Elicits a Sugarcane Defense Response Against a Pathogenic Bacteria Xanthomonas albilineans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arencibia, Ariel D; Vinagre, Fabiano; Estevez, Yandi; Bernal, Aydiloide; Perez, Juana; Cavalcanti, Janaina; Santana, Ignacio; Hemerly, Adriana S

    2006-09-01

    A new role for the plant growth-promoting nitrogen-fixing endophytic bacteria Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus has been identified and characterized while it is involved in the sugarcane-Xanthomonas albilineans pathogenic interactions. Living G.diazotrophicus possess and/or produce elicitor molecules which activate the sugarcane defense response resulting in the plant resistance to X. albilineans, in this particular case controlling the pathogen transmission to emerging agamic shoots. A total of 47 differentially expressed transcript derived fragments (TDFs) were identified by cDNA-AFLP. Transcripts showed significant homologies to genes of the ethylene signaling pathway (26%), proteins regulates by auxins (9%), beta-1,3 Glucanase proteins (6%) and ubiquitin genes (4%), all major signaling mechanisms. Results point toward a form of induction of systemic resistance in sugarcane-G. diazotrophicus interactions which protect the plant against X. albilineans attack.

  3. Purification and characterization of a novel hypersensitive response-inducing elicitor from Magnaporthe oryzae that triggers defense response in rice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingjia Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Magnaporthe oryzae, the rice blast fungus, might secrete certain proteins related to plant-fungal pathogen interactions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we report the purification, characterization, and gene cloning of a novel hypersensitive response-inducing protein elicitor (MoHrip1 secreted by M. oryzae. The protein fraction was purified and identified by de novo sequencing, and the sequence matched the genomic sequence of a putative protein from M. oryzae strain 70-15 (GenBank accession No. XP_366602.1. The elicitor-encoding gene mohrip1 was isolated; it consisted of a 429 bp cDNA, which encodes a polypeptide of 142 amino acids with a molecular weight of 14.322 kDa and a pI of 4.53. The deduced protein, MoHrip1, was expressed in E. coli. And the expression protein collected from bacterium also forms necrotic lesions in tobacco. MoHrip1 could induce the early events of the defense response, including hydrogen peroxide production, callose deposition, and alkalization of the extracellular medium, in tobacco. Moreover, MoHrip1-treated rice seedlings possessed significantly enhanced systemic resistance to M. oryzae compared to the control seedlings. The real-time PCR results indicated that the expression of some pathogenesis-related genes and genes involved in signal transduction could also be induced by MoHrip1. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The results demonstrate that MoHrip1 triggers defense responses in rice and could be used for controlling rice blast disease.

  4. Response of direct or priming defense against Botrytis cinerea to methyl jasmonate treatment at different concentrations in grape berries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kaituo; Liao, Yunxia; Kan, Jianquan; Han, Lin; Zheng, Yonghua

    2015-02-02

    This study was conducted to characterize the forms of disease resistance induced by methyl jasmonate (MeJA) in harvested grape berries and to evaluate the impact of the induced resistance on fruit quality. The results showed that MeJA treatment at concentrations from 10 to 100μmol/L could effectively induce disease resistance against Botrytis cinerea and reduce disease incidence in grape berries. The induced disease resistance was tightly associated with increased H2O2 generation, enhanced expression of the defense-related gene VvNPR1.1 and accumulation of stilbene phytoalexins such as tran-resveratrol and its oligomer (trans-)ε-viniferin. The expression of the defense-related gene and synthesis of phytoalexins in 10μmol/L MeJA-treated grape berries were only significantly enhanced upon inoculating the berries with B. cinerea, whereas the 50 or 100μmol/L of MeJA treatment directly induced these defense responses. Hence, we deduce that the low concentration of MeJA (10μmol/L) triggered a priming defense mechanism, while higher concentrations of MeJA (50 or 100μmol/L) directly activated defense responses, thus enhancing disease resistance in grape berries. Moreover, the primed grape berries maintained higher contents of soluble sugars and higher DPPH radical scavenging activity and reducing power compared with those expressing direct defense responses. These results indicate that priming of defense is a cost-effective strategy to protect harvested grape berries from B. cinerea infection in terms of minimizing quality loss.

  5. Optical response of correlated electron systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslov, Dmitrii L.; Chubukov, Andrey V.

    2017-02-01

    Recent progress in experimental techniques has made it possible to extract detailed information on dynamics of carriers in a correlated electron material from its optical conductivity, σ (Ω,T) . This review consists of three parts, addressing the following three aspects of optical response: (1) the role of momentum relaxation; (2) Ω /T scaling of the optical conductivity of a Fermi-liquid metal, and (3) the optical conductivity of non-Fermi-liquid metals. In the first part (section 2), we analyze the interplay between the contributions to the conductivity from normal and umklapp electron–electron scattering. As a concrete example, we consider a two-band metal and show that although its optical conductivity is finite it does not obey the Drude formula. In the second part (sections 3 and 4), we re-visit the Gurzhi formula for the optical scattering rate, 1/τ (Ω,T)\\propto {{ Ω }2}+4{π2}{{T}2} , and show that a factor of 4{π2} is the manifestation of the ‘first-Matsubara-frequency rule’ for boson response, which states that 1/τ (Ω,T) must vanish upon analytic continuation to the first boson Matsubara frequency. However, recent experiments show that the coefficient b in the Gurzhi-like form, 1/τ (Ω,T)\\propto {{ Ω }2}+b{π2}{{T}2} , differs significantly from b  =  4 in most of the cases. We suggest that the deviations from Gurzhi scaling may be due to the presence of elastic but energy-dependent scattering, which decreases the value of b below 4, with b  =  1 corresponding to purely elastic scattering. In the third part (section 5), we consider the optical conductivity of metals near quantum phase transitions to nematic and spin-density-wave states. In the last case, we focus on ‘composite’ scattering processes, which give rise to a non-Fermi-liquid behavior of the optical conductivity at T  =  0: {σ\\prime}(Ω )\\propto {{ Ω }-1/3} at low frequencies and {σ\\prime}(Ω )\\propto {{ Ω }-1} at higher frequencies. We

  6. 76 FR 25566 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement (DFARS); Electronic Ordering Procedures (DFARS...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-05

    ..., Ordering, currently permits ordering officials to specify e-mail as an ``electronic commerce method'' so... explicitly permit the use of e-mail as a recognized electronic commerce method. The respondent recommended... the possibility for miscommunication. Another respondent stated that electronic commerce is a...

  7. Implementation of Electronic Commerce in the Department of Defense and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-12-01

    President Clinton’s Executive Memorandum of 26 October 1993 mandated that all Federal Government agencies implement Electronic Commerce (EC) in order... Electronic Commerce /Electronic Data Interchange (EC/EDI) architecture. The NASA employed an Internet based tool, the NASA Acquisition Internet Service

  8. The defense-responsive genes showing enhanced and repressed expression after pathogen infection in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周斌; 彭开蔓; 储昭晖; 王石平; 张启发

    2002-01-01

    Despite large numbers of studies about defense response, processes involved in the resistance of plants to incompatible pathogens are still largely uncharacterized. The objective of this study was to identify genes involved in defense response by cDNA array analysis and to gain knowledge about the functions of the genes involved in defense response. Approximately 20000 rice cDNA clones were arrayed on nylon filters. RNA samples isolated from different rice lines after infection with incompatible strains or isolates of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae or Pyricularia grisea, respectively, were used to synthesize cDNA as probes for screening the cDNA arrays. A total of 100 differentially expressed unique sequences were identified from 5 pathogen-host combinations. Fifty-three sequences were detected as showing enhanced expression and 47 sequences were detected as showing repressed expression after pathogen infection. Sequence analysis revealed that most of the 100 sequences had various degrees of homology with genes in databases which encode or putatively encode transcription regulating proteins, translation regulating proteins, transport proteins, kinases, metabolic enzymes, and proteins involved in other functions. Most of the genes have not been previously reported as being involved in the disease resistance response in rice. The results from cDNA arrays, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and RNA gel blot analysis suggest that activation or repression of most of these genes might occur commonly in the defense response.

  9. Modulation of antioxidant defense and immune response in zebra fish (Danio rerio) using dietary sodium propionate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Roghieh; Hoseinifar, Seyed Hossein; Kavandi, Morteza

    2016-12-01

    The present study explores the effect of dietary sodium propionate on mucosal immune response and expression of antioxidant enzyme genes in zebra fish (Danio rerio). Six hundred healthy zebra fish (0.42 ± 0.06 g) supplied, randomly stocked in 12 aquariums and fed on basal diets supplemented with different levels of sodium propionate [0 (control), 5, 10 and 20 g kg(-1)] for 8 weeks. At the end of the feeding trial, mucosal immune parameters (TNF-α, IL-1β, Lyz), antioxidant enzyme (SOD, CAT) as well as heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) gene expression were measured. The results revealed feeding on sodium propionate significantly up-regulated inflammatory response genes (TNF-α, IL-1β, Lyz) in a dose-dependent manner (P fish fed the basal diet and deceased with elevation of sodium propionate levels in the diet. These results showed beneficial effects of dietary sodium propionate on mucosal immune response as well as the antioxidant defense of zebra fish.

  10. Polyamines attenuate ethylene-mediated defense responses to abrogate resistance to Botrytis cinerea in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambeesan, Savithri; AbuQamar, Synan; Laluk, Kristin; Mattoo, Autar K; Mickelbart, Michael V; Ferruzzi, Mario G; Mengiste, Tesfaye; Handa, Avtar K

    2012-02-01

    Transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) lines overexpressing yeast spermidine synthase (ySpdSyn), an enzyme involved in polyamine (PA) biosynthesis, were developed. These transgenic lines accumulate higher levels of spermidine (Spd) than the wild-type plants and were examined for responses to the fungal necrotrophs Botrytis cinerea and Alternaria solani, bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000, and larvae of the chewing insect tobacco hornworm (Manduca sexta). The Spd-accumulating transgenic tomato lines were more susceptible to B. cinerea than the wild-type plants; however, responses to A. solani, P. syringae, or M. sexta were similar to the wild-type plants. Exogenous application of ethylene precursors, S-adenosyl-Met and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid, or PA biosynthesis inhibitors reversed the response of the transgenic plants to B. cinerea. The increased susceptibility of the ySpdSyn transgenic tomato to B. cinerea was associated with down-regulation of gene transcripts involved in ethylene biosynthesis and signaling. These data suggest that PA-mediated susceptibility to B. cinerea is linked to interference with the functions of ethylene in plant defense.

  11. Inducible Defenses with a "Twist": Daphnia barbata Abandons Bilateral Symmetry in Response to an Ancient Predator

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Predation is one of the most important drivers of natural selection. In consequence a huge variety of anti-predator defenses have evolved in prey species. Under unpredictable and temporally variable predation pressure, the evolution of phenotypically plastic defensive traits is favored. These "inducible defenses", range from changes in behavior, life history, physiology to morphology and can be found in almost all taxa from bacteria to vertebrates. An important group of model organisms in eco...

  12. The Arabidopsis ubiquitin ligases ATL31 and ATL6 control the defense response as well as the carbon/nitrogen response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maekawa, Shugo; Sato, Takeo; Asada, Yutaka; Yasuda, Shigetaka; Yoshida, Midori; Chiba, Yukako; Yamaguchi, Junji

    2012-06-01

    In higher plants, the metabolism of carbon (C) and nitrogen nutrients (N) is mutually regulated and referred to as the C and N balance (C/N). Plants are thus able to optimize their growth depending on their cellular C/N status. Arabidopsis ATL31 and ATL6 encode a RING-type ubiquitin ligases which play a critical role in the C/N status response (Sato et al. in Plant J 60:852-864, 2009). Since many ATL members are involved in the plant defense response, the present study evaluated whether the C/N response regulators ATL31 and ATL6 are involved in defense responses. Our results confirmed that ATL31 and ATL6 expression is up-regulated with the microbe-associated molecular patterns elicitors flg22 and chitin as well as with infections with Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst. DC3000). Moreover, transgenic plants overexpressing ATL31 and ATL6 displayed increased resistance to Pst. DC3000. In accordance with these data, loss of ATL31 and ATL6 function in an atl31 atl6 double knockout mutant resulted in reduced resistance to Pst. DC3000. In addition, the molecular cross-talk between C/N and the defense response was investigated by mining public databases. The analysis identified the transcription factors MYB51 and WRKY33, which are involved in the defense response, and their transcripts levels correlate closely with ATL31 and ATL6. Further study demonstrated that the expression of ATL31, ATL6 and defense marker genes including MYB51 and WRKY33 were regulated by C/N conditions. Taken together, these results indicate that ATL31 and ATL6 function as key components of both C/N regulation and the defense response in Arabidopsis.

  13. 76 FR 37798 - DOE Response to Recommendation 2010-2 of the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, Pulse Jet...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-28

    ... Response to Recommendation 2010-2 of the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, Pulse Jet Mixing at the..., concerning Pulse Jet Mixing at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant, to the Department of Energy. In... Safety Board (Board) Recommendation 2010-2, Pulse Jet Mixing (PJM) at the Waste Treatment...

  14. Plant responses to hidden herbivores: European corn borer (ECB; Ostrinia nubilalis) attack on maize induces both defense and susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbivore-induced plant defenses have been widely described following attack on leaves; however, less attention has been paid to analogous local processes that occur in stems or roots. Early attempts to characterize maize responses to stem boring by European corn borer (ECB; Ostrinia nubilalis) larv...

  15. Temporal and spatial resolution of activated plant defense responses in leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana infected with Dickeya dadantii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Luisa ePérez-Bueno

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The necrotrophic bacteria Dickeya dadantii is the causal agent of soft-rot disease in a broad range of hosts. The model plant Nicotiana benthamiana, commonly used as experimental host for a very broad range of plant pathogens, is susceptible to infection by D. dadantii. The inoculation with D. dadantii at high dose seems to overcome the plant defense capacity, inducing maceration and death of the tissue, although restricted to the infiltrated area. By contrast, the output of the defense response to low dose inoculation is inhibition of maceration and limitation in the growth, or even eradication, of bacteria. Responses of tissue invaded by bacteria (neighbouring the infiltrated areas after 2-3 days post-inoculation included: i inhibition of photosynthesis in terms of photosystem II efficiency; ii activation of energy dissipation as non-photochemical quenching in photosystem II, which is related to the activation of plant defense mechanisms; and iii accumulation of secondary metabolites in cell walls of the epidermis (lignins and the apoplast of the mesophyll (phytoalexins. Infiltrated tissues showed an increase in the content of the main hormones regulating stress responses, including abscisic acid (ABA, jasmonic acid (JA and salicylic acid (SA. We propose a mechanism involving the three hormones by which N. benthamiana could activate an efficient defense response against D. dadantii.

  16. Bodily ownership modulation in defensive responses: physiological evidence in brain-damaged patients with pathological embodiment of other's body parts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossataro, C; Gindri, P; Mezzanato, T; Pia, L; Garbarini, F

    2016-06-13

    Do conscious beliefs about the body affect defensive mechanisms within the body? To answer this question we took advantage from a monothematic delusion of bodily ownership, in which brain-damaged patients misidentify alien limbs as their own. We investigated whether the delusional belief that an alien hand is their own hand modulates a subcortical defensive response, such as the hand-blink reflex. The blink, dramatically increases when the threated hand is inside the defensive peripersonal-space of the face. In our between-subjects design, including patients and controls, the threat was brought near the face either by the own hand or by another person's hand. Our results show an ownership-dependent modulation of the defensive response. In controls, as well as in the patients' intact-side, the response enhancement is significantly greater when the threat was brought near the face by the own than by the alien hand. Crucially, in the patients' affected-side (where the pathological embodiment occurs), the alien (embodied) hand elicited a response enhancement comparable to that found when the threat is brought near the face by the real hand. These findings suggest the existence of a mutual interaction between our conscious beliefs about the body and the physiological mechanisms within the body.

  17. Defensive responses to threat scenarios in Brazilians reproduce the pattern of Hawaiian Americans and non-human mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Shuhama

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A former study with scenarios conducted in Hawaii has suggested that humans share with non-human mammals the same basic defensive strategies - risk assessment, freezing, defensive threat, defensive attack, and flight. The selection of the most adaptive strategy is strongly influenced by features of the threat stimulus - magnitude, escapability, distance, ambiguity, and availability of a hiding place. Aiming at verifying if these strategies would be consistent in a different culture, 12 defensive scenarios were translated into Portuguese and adapted to the Brazilian culture. The sample consisted of male and female undergraduate students divided into two groups: 76 students, who evaluated the five dimensions of each scenario and 248 medical students, who chose the most likely response for each scenario. In agreement with the findings from studies of non-human mammal species, the scenarios were able to elicit different defensive behavioral responses, depending on features of the threat. "Flight" was chosen as the most likely response in scenarios evaluated as an unambiguous and intense threat, but with an available route of escape, whereas "attack" was chosen in an unambiguous, intense and close dangerous situation without an escape route. Less urgent behaviors, such as "check out", were chosen in scenarios evaluated as less intense, more distant and more ambiguous. Moreover, the results from the Brazilian sample were similar to the results obtained in the original study with Hawaiian students. These data suggest that a basic repertoire of defensive strategies is conserved along the mammalian evolution because they share similar functional benefits in maintaining fitness.

  18. Asian tsunami relief: Department of Defense public health response: policy and strategic coordination considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarantino, Dave

    2006-10-01

    The Asian tsunami of December 26, 2004, was one of the most devastating natural disasters in modern history. In particular, this disaster created massive, unique, public health threats, necessitating equally massive public health response efforts. The U.S. government (USG), including the Department of Defense (DoD), played a pivotal role in the response. This article examines some of the central policy issues and strategic coordination and planning measures involved in the public health response. The nearly unanimous consensus of international public health experts has been that the potential public health crisis in the aftermath of the Asian tsunami was averted largely because of the coordinated efforts of host nation officials and professionals, international and nongovernmental health organizations, and bilateral donors, especially the USG, including the DoD. The DoD played a central role in public health efforts through coordination and communication assistance, logistical and materiel support, disease surveillance activities, health needs assessments, and the contributions of the USS Mercy hospital ship. The core lessons involve the importance of an early, dedicated, public health response as a component of the overall disaster relief effort, as well as seamless coordination of health sector stakeholders in the USG and with those of the international community and affected host nations, which allows each organization to play to its strengths and to avoid duplication. The Asian tsunami relief effort highlighted the value of civil-military cooperation in disaster relief, particularly in the area of public health. The prominent role of the DoD in tsunami relief efforts, including public health efforts, also yielded beneficial secondary effects by bolstering security cooperation and winning "hearts and minds" in the region.

  19. Surveillance-activated defenses block the ROS-induced mitochondrial unfolded protein response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva D Runkel

    Full Text Available Disturbance of cellular functions results in the activation of stress-signaling pathways that aim at restoring homeostasis. We performed a genome-wide screen to identify components of the signal transduction of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPR(mt to a nuclear chaperone promoter. We used the ROS generating complex I inhibitor paraquat to induce the UPR(mt, and we employed RNAi exposure post-embryonically to allow testing genes whose knockdown results in embryonic lethality. We identified 54 novel regulators of the ROS-induced UPR(mt. Activation of the UPR(mt, but not of other stress-signaling pathways, failed when homeostasis of basic cellular mechanisms such as translation and protein transport were impaired. These mechanisms are monitored by a recently discovered surveillance system that interprets interruption of these processes as pathogen attack and depends on signaling through the JNK-like MAP-kinase KGB-1. Mutation of kgb-1 abrogated the inhibition of ROS-induced UPR(mt, suggesting that surveillance-activated defenses specifically inhibit the UPR(mt but do not compromise activation of the heat shock response, the UPR of the endoplasmic reticulum, or the SKN-1/Nrf2 mediated response to cytosolic stress. In addition, we identified PIFK-1, the orthologue of the Drosophila PI 4-kinase four wheel drive (FWD, and found that it is the only known factor so far that is essential for the unfolded protein responses of both mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum. This suggests that both UPRs may share a common membrane associated mechanism.

  20. Inducible Defenses with a "Twist": Daphnia barbata Abandons Bilateral Symmetry in Response to an Ancient Predator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Quirin; Rabus, Max; Wolfschoon Ribeiro, Bernard; Laforsch, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Predation is one of the most important drivers of natural selection. In consequence a huge variety of anti-predator defenses have evolved in prey species. Under unpredictable and temporally variable predation pressure, the evolution of phenotypically plastic defensive traits is favored. These "inducible defenses", range from changes in behavior, life history, physiology to morphology and can be found in almost all taxa from bacteria to vertebrates. An important group of model organisms in ecological, evolutionary and environmental research, water fleas of the genus Daphnia (Crustacea: Cladocera), are well known for their ability to respond to predators with an enormous variety of inducible morphological defenses. Here we report on the "twist", a body torsion, as a so far unrecognized inducible morphological defense in Daphnia, expressed by Daphnia barbata exposed to the predatory tadpole shrimp Triops cancriformis. This defense is realized by a twisted carapace with the helmet and the tail spine deviating from the body axis into opposing directions, resulting in a complete abolishment of bilateral symmetry. The twisted morphotype should considerably interfere with the feeding apparatus of the predator, contributing to the effectiveness of the array of defensive traits in D. barbata. As such this study does not only describe a completely novel inducible defense in the genus Daphnia but also presents the first report of a free living Bilateria to flexibly respond to predation risk by abandoning bilateral symmetry.

  1. Inducible Defenses with a "Twist": Daphnia barbata Abandons Bilateral Symmetry in Response to an Ancient Predator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quirin Herzog

    Full Text Available Predation is one of the most important drivers of natural selection. In consequence a huge variety of anti-predator defenses have evolved in prey species. Under unpredictable and temporally variable predation pressure, the evolution of phenotypically plastic defensive traits is favored. These "inducible defenses", range from changes in behavior, life history, physiology to morphology and can be found in almost all taxa from bacteria to vertebrates. An important group of model organisms in ecological, evolutionary and environmental research, water fleas of the genus Daphnia (Crustacea: Cladocera, are well known for their ability to respond to predators with an enormous variety of inducible morphological defenses. Here we report on the "twist", a body torsion, as a so far unrecognized inducible morphological defense in Daphnia, expressed by Daphnia barbata exposed to the predatory tadpole shrimp Triops cancriformis. This defense is realized by a twisted carapace with the helmet and the tail spine deviating from the body axis into opposing directions, resulting in a complete abolishment of bilateral symmetry. The twisted morphotype should considerably interfere with the feeding apparatus of the predator, contributing to the effectiveness of the array of defensive traits in D. barbata. As such this study does not only describe a completely novel inducible defense in the genus Daphnia but also presents the first report of a free living Bilateria to flexibly respond to predation risk by abandoning bilateral symmetry.

  2. 76 FR 61350 - DOE Response to Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board's Request for Clarification on...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-04

    ... Vorderbrueggen, Nuclear Engineer, Departmental Representative to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, Office of Health, Safety and Security, U.S. Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Avenue, SW... Representative to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, Office of Health, Safety and Security....

  3. Silicon induced systemic defense responses in perennial ryegrass against Magnaporthe oryzae infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sustainable integrated disease management for gray leaf spot of perennial ryegrass may involve use of plant defense elicitors with compatible traditional fungicides to reduce disease incidence and severity. Silicon (Si) is a potential inducer or modulator of plant defenses against different pathogen...

  4. Electronic response to nuclear breathing mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, Hendrik; Ruffini, Remo [ICRANet, P.zza della Repubblica 10, I-65122 Pescara, Italy Dipartimento di Fisica and ICRA, Sapienza Università di Roma P.le Aldo Moro 5, I-00185 Rome (Italy); ICRANet, University of Nice-Sophia Antipolis, 28 Av. de Valrose, 06103 Nice Cedex 2 (France); Xue, She-Sheng [ICRANet, P.zza della Repubblica 10, I-65122 Pescara, Italy Dipartimento di Fisica and ICRA, Sapienza Università di Roma P.le Aldo Moro 5, I-00185 Rome (Italy)

    2015-12-17

    Based on our previous work on stationary oscillation modes of electrons around giant nuclei, we show how to treat a general driving force on the electron gas, such as the one generated by the breathing mode of the nucleus, by means of the spectral method. As an example we demonstrate this method for a system with Z = 10{sup 4} in β-equilibrium with the electrons compressed up to the nuclear radius. In this case the stationary modes can be obtained analytically, which allows for a very speedy numerical calculation of the final result.

  5. Narboh D, a Respiratory Burst Oxidase Homolog in Nicotiana attenuata, is Required for Late Defense Responses After Herbivore Attack

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinsong Wu; Lei Wang; Hendrik Wünsche; Ian T.Baldwin

    2013-01-01

    The superoxide (O2-)-generating NADPH oxidases are crucial for the defense of plants against attack from pathogens; however,it remains unknown whether they also mediate responses against chewing insect herbivores.The transcripts of the respiratory burst NADPH oxidase homolog Narboh D in Nicotiana attenuate are rapidly and transiently elicited by wounding,and are amplified when Manduca sexta oral secretions (OS) are added to the wounds.The fatty-acid-amino-acid-conjugates (FACs),demonstrably the major elicitors in M.sexta OS,are responsible for the increase in Narboh D transcripts.Silencing Narboh D significantly reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels after OS elicitation,but neither OS-elicited jasmonic acid (JA) or JA-isoleucine (JA-Ile) bursts,pivotal hormones that regulates plant resistance to herbivores,nor early transcripts of herbivore defense-related genes (NaJAR4 and NaPAL1),were influenced.However,late OS-elicited increases in trypsin proteinase inhibitors (TPIs),as well as the transcript levels of defense genes such as polyphenol oxidase,TPI and Thionin were significantly reduced.In addition,Narboh D-silenced plants were more vulnerable to insect herbivores,especially the larvae of the generalist Spodoptera littoralis.We thus conclude that Narboh D-based defenses play an important role in late herbivore-elicited responses.

  6. Mapping of heterologous expressed sequence tags as an alternative to microarrays for study of defense responses in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Postnikova Olga A

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray technology helped to accumulate an immense pool of data on gene expression changes in response to different environmental factors. Yet, computer- generated gene profiling using expressed sequence tags (EST represents a valuable alternative to microarrays, which allows efficient discovery of homologous sequences in evolutionarily different species and comparison of gene sets on the whole genome scale. In this study, we used publicly available EST database derived from different plant species infected with a variety of pathogens, to generate an expression profile of homologous genes involved in defense response of a model organism, Arabidopsis thaliana. Results EST-driven prediction identified 4,935 genes (16% of the total Arabidopsis genome which, according to the origin of EST sets, were associated with defense responses in the reference genome. Profiles of defense-related genes, obtained by mapping of heterologous EST, represent putative Arabidopsis homologs of the corresponding species. Comparison of these profiles in pairs and locating common genes allowed estimating similarity between defense-related gene sets of different plant species. To experimentally support computer data, we arbitrarily selected a number of transcription factor genes (TF detected by EST mapping. Their expression levels were examined by real-time polymerase chain reaction during infection with yellow strain of Cucumber mosaic virus, a compatible virus systemically infecting Arabidopsis. We observed that 65% of the designated TF were upregulated in accordance with the EST-generated profile. Conclusion We demonstrated that heterologous EST mapping may be efficiently used to reveal genes involved in host defense responses to pathogens. Upregulated genes identified in this study substantially overlap with those previously obtained by microarrays.

  7. Proteome Analysis for Defense Response of Apple Leaves Induced by Alternaria Blotch ,Alternaria alternata Apple Pathotype

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Caixia Zhang; Zhuang Li; Liyi Zhang; Yi Tian; Guodong Kang; Ying Chen; Peihua Cong

    2012-01-01

    Apple (Ma/us domestica) is considered a model fruit plant owing to its world-wide economic importance,and a large number of cultivars dominate world fruit production.To date,the cultivation of apple has been limited by many kinds of fungal diseases,and among the many fungal diseases affecting apple trees,Alternaria blotch,the disease caused by Alternaria alternata apple pathotype,is spreading worldwide and results in severe negative effect on apple production.Currently,management of a fungal disease such as Alternaria blotch mainly through traditional chemical control agents instead of using resistant cultivars.As in apple,the molecular mechanism of disease resistance against A.altemata apple pathotype has not been illustrated clearly,although most of the genes have been identified in apple,little is known about the biological roles for each protein in that plant.Considering that apple Altemaria blotch is the usual diseases influencing apple production,further studies about the interaction mechanism between the pathogen and its host,particularly some host self-defense response mechanisms which closely related to the anti-disease properties of apple should be performed.In this work we aimed to generate fundamental insights into the plant' s defense responses to infection with Altemaria blotch using a proteomics approach,to aid in the development and breeding of high-quality disease-resistant apple varieties.One seedlings which derived from the cross of ‘Huacui’ and ‘Golden Delicious’,with highly resistant,were chosen to be hosts for this study.The sample leaves were inoculated with spore suspension of A.altemata apple pathotype,and the control samples were treated with water instead of inoculums.Following inoculation,the samples were harvested 48 h after inoculation.The whole experiment was repeated three times in order to get a reliable result.The total soluble protein extracts prepared using modified phenol-precipitation procedures.Total protein extracts

  8. BABA-primed defense responses to Phytophthora infestans in the next vegetative progeny of potato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta eFloryszak-Wieczorek

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The transcript of the PR1 gene accumulation as an informative marker of systemic acquired resistance (SAR was analyzed in β-aminobutyric acid (BABA primed potato in the short-lasting (3 days and long-lasting (28 days time periods after induction and in the vegetative descendants of primed plants derived from tubers and from in vitro seedlings. BABA pretreatment resulted either in minimal or no PR1 gene expression, but sequential treatment with BABA followed by virulent P. infestans provided data on the imprint of post-stress information and its duration until fertilization, in the form of an enhanced PR1 transcript accumulation and a transient increase of basal resistance to the late blight disease. The primed state for defense of the susceptible potato cultivar was transmitted to its vegetative progeny as a potentiated PR1 mRNA accumulation following challenge inoculation. However,variation was observed between vegetative accessions of the BABA-primed potato genotype in responsiveness to disease. In contrast to plants derived from tubers, potato propagated through in vitro seedlings largely lost inducible resistance traits, although itretained primed PR1 gene expression.

  9. Glyphosate Suppression of an Elicited Defense Response : Increased Susceptibility of Cassia obtusifolia to a Mycoherbicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon, A; Amsellem, Z; Gressel, J

    1992-02-01

    The major effort in developing pathogenic fungi into potential mycoherbicides is aimed at increasing fungal virulence to weeds without affecting crop selectivity. Specific suppression of biosynthesis of a phytoalexin derived from the shikimate pathway in Cassia obtusifolia L. by a sublethal dose (50 micromolar) of glyphosate increased susceptibility to the mycoherbicide Alternaria cassiae Jurair & Khan. Glyphosate applied with conidia suppressed phytoalexin synthesis beginning at 12 hours, but not an earlier period 8 to 10 hours after inoculation. The phytoalexin synthesis elicited by fungal inoculation was also suppressed by darkness. The magnitudes of virulence of the mycoherbicide in the dark or with glyphosate in the light were both higher than after inoculation in the light with the same concentration of conidia in the absence of glyphosate. Five times less inoculum was needed to cause disease symptoms when applied with glyphosate than without. Glyphosate did not render A. cassiae virulent on soybean (Glycine max), a crop related to the host. These results suggest that a specific inhibition of a weed's elicited defense response can be a safe way to enhance virulence and improve the efficacy of the mycoherbicide.

  10. Identification and validation of reference genes for transcript normalization in strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) defense responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amil-Ruiz, Francisco; Garrido-Gala, José; Blanco-Portales, Rosario; Folta, Kevin M; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan; Caballero, José L

    2013-01-01

    Strawberry (Fragaria spp) is an emerging model for the development of basic genomics and recombinant DNA studies among rosaceous crops. Functional genomic and molecular studies involve relative quantification of gene expression under experimental conditions of interest. Accuracy and reliability are dependent upon the choice of an optimal reference control transcript. There is no information available on validated endogenous reference genes for use in studies testing strawberry-pathogen interactions. Thirteen potential pre-selected strawberry reference genes were tested against different tissues, strawberry cultivars, biotic stresses, ripening and senescent conditions, and SA/JA treatments. Evaluation of reference candidate's suitability was analyzed by five different methodologies, and information was merged to identify best reference transcripts. A combination of all five methods was used for selective classification of reference genes. The resulting superior reference genes, FaRIB413, FaACTIN, FaEF1α and FaGAPDH2 are strongly recommended as control genes for relative quantification of gene expression in strawberry. This report constitutes the first systematic study to identify and validate optimal reference genes for accurate normalization of gene expression in strawberry plant defense response studies.

  11. Selective lignin downregulation leads to constitutive defense response expression in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego-Giraldo, Lina; Jikumaru, Yusuke; Kamiya, Yuji; Tang, Yuhong; Dixon, Richard A

    2011-05-01

    • Downregulation of hydroxycinnamoyl CoA: shikimate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase (HCT) in alfalfa (Medicago sativa) reduces lignin levels and improves forage quality and saccharification efficiency for bioethanol production. However, the plants have reduced stature. It was previously reported that HCT-down-regulated Arabidopsis have impaired auxin transport, but this has recently been disproved. • To address the basis for the phenotypes of lignin-modified alfalfa, we measured auxin transport, profiled a range of metabolites including flavonoids and hormones, and performed in depth transcriptome analyses. • Auxin transport is unaffected in HCT antisense alfalfa despite increased flavonoid biosynthesis. The plants show increased cytokinin and reduced auxin levels, and gibberellin levels and sensitivity are both reduced. Levels of salicylic, jasmonic and abscisic acids are elevated, associated with massive upregulation of pathogenesis and abiotic stress-related genes and enhanced tolerance to fungal infection and drought. • We suggest that HCT downregulated alfalfa plants exhibit constitutive activation of defense responses, triggered by release of bioactive cell wall fragments and production of hydrogen peroxide as a result of impaired secondary cell wall integrity. © 2011 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2011 New Phytologist Trust.

  12. Defense Response Characteristics of Suburban Pine Stands of Krasnoyarsk City at Early Stage of Anthropogenous Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. G. Polyakova

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In 2002–2013, on permanent sample plots (PPs, the condition of suburban middle-aged pine stands of Krasnoyarsk was investigated. Annual assessments of parameters of defense response of stem phloem of the sample trees on the action of extractives from mycelium Ceratocystis laricicola (Redfern & Minter were carried out. The size of a phloem necrosis and its shift along a stem relative to inoculation hole were measured. The pine stands (polluted and conditionally background are convenient for determining condition changes at early stages of damage. These stands are affected by different anthropogenic factors, but don't differ in vigor state as visually estimated on a 6-point scale of Forest Regulation of Russian Federation. PPs have similar forest inventory characteristics, except for PPs on an edge of polluted pine forest where the site class is reduced. Significant shift of necrosis in phloem up on a stem within two years following a year when there was a spring creeping fire is registered. It proves the reversal of normal basipetal transport of assimilates toward crown and feasibility of using necrosis asymmetry for assessment of fire influence on physiological condition of pine stands. The increase of necroses size (decrease of resistance after a fire was noted during later period in comparison with reversal of transport of assimilates in the stem. Influence of a chemical burn of needles on acropetal shift of necrosis was expressed to a lesser extent in comparison with a fire.

  13. Splenic autotransplantation in rabbits: no restoration of response to host defense

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective:TO explore the effectiveness of splenic tissue autotransplantation in restoring host defense. Methods: Rabbits were divided into three groups,Sham Operation(SO), Splenic Autotransplantation(SA)and Total Splenectomy(TS), and dynamic changes in histology and immunology were observed for over 24 weeks. Results: Histologic study shows that the white pulps were poorly developed and central arterioles disappeared in the regenerated splenic tissue. The weight of regenerated spleens recovered six months later in SA was 11% of that in SO, and was significantly reduced comparing with the implanted weight( P <0.05). Tere were no significant difference in the number of T lymphocytes and the levels of serum lysozyme among the three groups. A poor antibody response by the rabbits of SA and TS as compared to those of SO was noted after the primary intravenous administration with sheep red blood cells. After the challenge with type 3 pneumococci intravenously, pneumococcal clearance from bloodstream in SA did not differ significantly from that in TS,but was marKedly delayed compared with that in SO(P<0.01). Conclusion: The results indicate that the low quantity and poor quality of the regenerated spleens may contribute to the inferior immunoprotective ability of 1/3 splenic autotransplantation. Therefore, it implies that the regenerated spleens can not fully compensate the original one in im-munology, especially, host resistance to infection.

  14. Thc6 protein, isolated from Trichoderma harzianum, can induce maize defense response against Curvularia lunata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Lili; Fu, Kehe; Yu, Chuanjin; Li, Yingying; Li, Yaqian; Chen, Jie

    2015-05-01

    Mutant T66 was isolated from 450 mutants (constructed with Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation method) of Trichoderma harzianum. Maize seeds coated with T66 were more susceptible to Curvularia lunata when compared with those coated with wild-type (WT) strain. The disease index of maize treated with T66 and WT were 62.5 and 42.1%, respectively. Further research showed T-DNA has inserted into the ORF of one gene, which resulted in the functional difference between WT and T66. The gene was cloned and named Thc6, which encodes a novel 327 amino acid protein. To investigate its function, we obtained knockout, complementation, and overexpression mutants of Thc6. Challenge inoculation studies suggested that the Thc6 overexpression mutant can reduce the disease index of maize inbred line Huangzao 4 against the leaf spot pathogen (C. lunata). Meanwhile, The Thc6 mutants were found to affect the resistance of maize inbred line Huangzao 4 against C. lunata by enhancing the activation of jasmonate-responsive genes expression. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) data further confirmed that the concentration of jasmonate in the induced maize exhibits a parallel change tendency with the expression level of defense-related genes. Hence, the Thc6 gene could be participated in the induced resistance of maize inbred line Huangzao 4 against C. lunata infection through a jasmonic acid-dependent pathway. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Electron momentum distribution and electronic response of ceramic borides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heda, N. L.; Meena, B. S.; Mund, H. S.; Sahariya, Jagrati; Kumar, Kishor; Ahuja, B. L.

    2017-03-01

    Isotropic Compton profiles of transition metal based ceramics TaB and VB have been measured using 137Cs (661.65 keV) γ-ray Compton spectrometer. The experimental momentum densities are compared with those deduced using linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) with Hartree-Fock (HF), density functional theory (DFT) with Wu-Cohen generalized gradient approximation (WCGGA) and also the hybridization of HF and DFT (namely B3PW and PBE0) schemes. It is found that LCAO-DFT-WCGGA scheme based profiles give an overall better agreement with the experimental data, for both the borides. In addition, we have computed the Mulliken's population (MP) charge transfer data, energy bands, density of states and Fermi surface topology of both the borides using full potential-linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) and LCAO methods with DFT-WCGGA scheme. Cross-overs of Fermi level by the energy bands corresponding to B-2p and valence d-states of transition metals lead to metallic character in both the compounds. Equal-valence-electron-density profiles and MP analysis suggest more ionic character of VB than that of TaB.

  16. Electron momentum distribution and electronic response of ceramic borides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heda, N.L. [Department of Pure and Applied Physics, University of Kota, Kota 324005 (India); Meena, B.S.; Mund, H.S. [Department of Physics, Mohanlal Sukhadia University, Udaipur 313001 (India); Sahariya, Jagrati [Department of Physics, Manipal University, Jaipur 303007 (India); Kumar, Kishor [Department of Physics, Mohanlal Sukhadia University, Udaipur 313001 (India); Ahuja, B.L., E-mail: blahuja@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Mohanlal Sukhadia University, Udaipur 313001 (India)

    2017-03-15

    Isotropic Compton profiles of transition metal based ceramics TaB and VB have been measured using {sup 137}Cs (661.65 keV) γ-ray Compton spectrometer. The experimental momentum densities are compared with those deduced using linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) with Hartree-Fock (HF), density functional theory (DFT) with Wu-Cohen generalized gradient approximation (WCGGA) and also the hybridization of HF and DFT (namely B3PW and PBE0) schemes. It is found that LCAO-DFT-WCGGA scheme based profiles give an overall better agreement with the experimental data, for both the borides. In addition, we have computed the Mulliken's population (MP) charge transfer data, energy bands, density of states and Fermi surface topology of both the borides using full potential-linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) and LCAO methods with DFT-WCGGA scheme. Cross-overs of Fermi level by the energy bands corresponding to B-2p and valence d-states of transition metals lead to metallic character in both the compounds. Equal-valence-electron-density profiles and MP analysis suggest more ionic character of VB than that of TaB.

  17. Microbial pathogens trigger host DNA double-strand breaks whose abundance is reduced by plant defense responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junqi Song

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Immune responses and DNA damage repair are two fundamental processes that have been characterized extensively, but the links between them remain largely unknown. We report that multiple bacterial, fungal and oomycete plant pathogen species induce double-strand breaks (DSBs in host plant DNA. DNA damage detected by histone γ-H2AX abundance or DNA comet assays arose hours before the disease-associated necrosis caused by virulent Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato. Necrosis-inducing paraquat did not cause detectable DSBs at similar stages after application. Non-pathogenic E. coli and Pseudomonas fluorescens bacteria also did not induce DSBs. Elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS is common during plant immune responses, ROS are known DNA damaging agents, and the infection-induced host ROS burst has been implicated as a cause of host DNA damage in animal studies. However, we found that DSB formation in Arabidopsis in response to P. syringae infection still occurs in the absence of the infection-associated oxidative burst mediated by AtrbohD and AtrbohF. Plant MAMP receptor stimulation or application of defense-activating salicylic acid or jasmonic acid failed to induce a detectable level of DSBs in the absence of introduced pathogens, further suggesting that pathogen activities beyond host defense activation cause infection-induced DNA damage. The abundance of infection-induced DSBs was reduced by salicylic acid and NPR1-mediated defenses, and by certain R gene-mediated defenses. Infection-induced formation of γ-H2AX still occurred in Arabidopsis atr/atm double mutants, suggesting the presence of an alternative mediator of pathogen-induced H2AX phosphorylation. In summary, pathogenic microorganisms can induce plant DNA damage. Plant defense mechanisms help to suppress rather than promote this damage, thereby contributing to the maintenance of genome integrity in somatic tissues.

  18. V-ATPase Is Involved in Silkworm Defense Response against Bombyx mori Nucleopolyhedrovirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Lü

    Full Text Available Silkworms are usually susceptible to the infection of Bombyx mori (B. mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV, which can cause significant economic loss. However, some silkworm strains are identified to be highly resistant to BmNPV. To explore the silkworm genes involved in this resistance in the present study, we performed comparative real-time PCR, ATPase assay, over-expression and sub-cellular localization experiments. We found that when inoculated with BmNPV both the expression and activity of V-ATPase were significantly up-regulated in the midgut column cells (not the goblet cells of BmNPV-resistant strains (NB and BC8, the main sites for the first step of BmNPV invasion, but not in those of a BmNPV-susceptible strain 306. Furthermore, this up-regulation mainly took place during the first 24 hours post inoculation (hpi, the essential period required for establishment of virus infection, and then was down-regulated to normal levels. Amazingly, transient over-expression of V-ATPase c subunit in BmNPV-infected silkworm cells could significantly inhibit BmNPV proliferation. To our knowledge this is the first report demonstrating clearly that V-ATPase is indeed involved in the defense response against BmNPV. Our data further suggests that prompt and potent regulation of V-ATPase may be essential for execution of this response, which may enable fast acidification of endosomes and/or lysosomes to render them competent for degradation of invading viruses.

  19. The mosquito melanization response is implicated in defense against the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Yassine

    Full Text Available Mosquito immunity studies have focused mainly on characterizing immune effector mechanisms elicited against parasites, bacteria and more recently, viruses. However, those elicited against entomopathogenic fungi remain poorly understood, despite the ubiquitous nature of these microorganisms and their unique invasion route that bypasses the midgut epithelium, an important immune tissue and physical barrier. Here, we used the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae as a model to investigate the role of melanization, a potent immune effector mechanism of arthropods, in mosquito defense against the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana, using in vivo functional genetic analysis and confocal microscopy. The temporal monitoring of fungal growth in mosquitoes injected with B. bassiana conidia showed that melanin eventually formed on all stages, including conidia, germ tubes and hyphae, except the single cell hyphal bodies. Nevertheless, melanin rarely aborted the growth of any of these stages and the mycelium continued growing despite being melanized. Silencing TEP1 and CLIPA8, key positive regulators of Plasmodium and bacterial melanization in A. gambiae, abolished completely melanin formation on hyphae but not on germinating conidia or germ tubes. The detection of a layer of hemocytes surrounding germinating conidia but not hyphae suggested that melanization of early fungal stages is cell-mediated while that of late stages is a humoral response dependent on TEP1 and CLIPA8. Microscopic analysis revealed specific association of TEP1 with surfaces of hyphae and the requirement of both, TEP1 and CLIPA8, for recruiting phenoloxidase to these surfaces. Finally, fungal proliferation was more rapid in TEP1 and CLIPA8 knockdown mosquitoes which exhibited increased sensitivity to natural B. bassiana infections than controls. In sum, the mosquito melanization response retards significantly B. bassiana growth and dissemination, a finding that may be exploited to

  20. The mosquito melanization response is implicated in defense against the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassine, Hassan; Kamareddine, Layla; Osta, Mike A

    2012-01-01

    Mosquito immunity studies have focused mainly on characterizing immune effector mechanisms elicited against parasites, bacteria and more recently, viruses. However, those elicited against entomopathogenic fungi remain poorly understood, despite the ubiquitous nature of these microorganisms and their unique invasion route that bypasses the midgut epithelium, an important immune tissue and physical barrier. Here, we used the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae as a model to investigate the role of melanization, a potent immune effector mechanism of arthropods, in mosquito defense against the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana, using in vivo functional genetic analysis and confocal microscopy. The temporal monitoring of fungal growth in mosquitoes injected with B. bassiana conidia showed that melanin eventually formed on all stages, including conidia, germ tubes and hyphae, except the single cell hyphal bodies. Nevertheless, melanin rarely aborted the growth of any of these stages and the mycelium continued growing despite being melanized. Silencing TEP1 and CLIPA8, key positive regulators of Plasmodium and bacterial melanization in A. gambiae, abolished completely melanin formation on hyphae but not on germinating conidia or germ tubes. The detection of a layer of hemocytes surrounding germinating conidia but not hyphae suggested that melanization of early fungal stages is cell-mediated while that of late stages is a humoral response dependent on TEP1 and CLIPA8. Microscopic analysis revealed specific association of TEP1 with surfaces of hyphae and the requirement of both, TEP1 and CLIPA8, for recruiting phenoloxidase to these surfaces. Finally, fungal proliferation was more rapid in TEP1 and CLIPA8 knockdown mosquitoes which exhibited increased sensitivity to natural B. bassiana infections than controls. In sum, the mosquito melanization response retards significantly B. bassiana growth and dissemination, a finding that may be exploited to design transgenic

  1. Second Line of Defense: Electronic Maintenance Reports, Local Maintenance Provider User Guide, Rev. 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leigh, Richard J.

    2012-09-01

    The Electronic Maintenance Report forms allow Local Maintenance Providers (LMP) and other program staff to enter maintenance information into a simple and secure system. This document describes the features and information required to complete the Maintenance Report forms. It is expected that all Corrective Maintenance Reports from LMPs will be submitted electronically into the SLD Portal. As an exception (e.g., when access to the SLD Portal is unavailable), Maintenance Reports can be submitted via a secure Adobe PDF form available through the Sustainability Manager assigned to each country.

  2. Signaling in plant resistance responses: divergence and cross-talk of defense pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieterse, C.M.J.; Schaller, A.; Mauch-Mani, B.; Conrath, U.

    2006-01-01

    Plants possess inducible defense mechanisms to protect themselves against attack by microbial pathogens and herbivorous insects. The endogenous signalling molecules salicylic acid, ethylene, and jasmonic acid, and the peptide messenger systemin play important roles in the regulation of these induced

  3. Second Line of Defense Help Desk: Electronic Maintenance Reports - Local Maintenance Provider User Guide Rev. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leigh, Richard J.

    2011-12-14

    The Electronic Maintenance Report forms present a uniform dataset for analysis of Sustainability metrics. These forms collect readily minable data while allowing the attachment of site-specific checklists or other supporting files for review by the Sustainability Manager and Program Management.

  4. Chinese Responses to U.S. Military Transformation and Implications for the Department of Defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    capability, warning capability, and anti-air ____________ 43 Chen Fangyou ( ), Naval Campaign Teaching Materials ( ), Bei- jing: National Defense...because the enemy may simply unplug the network, denying access to the target set, or patch the relevant vul- nerabilities, thus obviating all prior...for DoD Chen Fangyou ( ), Naval Campaign Teaching Materials ( ), Beijing: National Defense University Press, 1991. Chen Huan, “The Third Military

  5. Metallothionein-mediated antioxidant defense system and its response to exercise training are impaired in human type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheede-Bergdahl, Celena; Penkowa, Milena; Hidalgo, Juan

    2005-01-01

    the MT-I+II-mediated antioxidant capacity and its response to exercise training in the skeletal muscle of patients with type 2 diabetes, biopsies and blood samples were taken from 13 matched subjects (type 2 diabetes n = 8, control subjects n = 5) both before and after 8 weeks of exercise training......-I+II in muscle and plasma, as well as the deficient MT-I+II response to exercise, indicate that this antioxidant defense is impaired. This study presents a novel candidate in the pathogenesis of complications related to oxidative stress in type 2 diabetes.......Oxidative stress is implicated in diabetes complications, during which endogenous antioxidant defenses have important pathophysiological consequences. To date, the significance of endogenous antioxidants such as metallothioneins I and II (MT-I+II) in type 2 diabetes remains unclear. To examine...

  6. How Streptomyces anulatus Primes Grapevine Defenses to Cope with Gray Mold: A Study of the Early Responses of Cell Suspensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parul Vatsa-Portugal

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Gray mold, caused by Botrytis cinerea, is one of the most destructive diseases of grapevine and is controlled with an intense application of fungicides. As alternatives to chemicals, beneficial microbes may promote plant health by stimulating the plant’s immune system. An actinomycete, Streptomyces anulatus S37, has been screened from the rhizosphere microbiome of healthy Vitis vinifera on the basis of its ability to promote grapevine growth and to induce resistance against various phytopathogens, including B. cinerea. However, molecular mechanisms involved locally after direct perception of these bacteria by plant cells still remain unknown. This study focuses on local defense events induced in grapevine cells during interactions with S. anulatus S37 before and after pathogen challenge. We demonstrated that S. anulatus S37 induced early responses including oxidative burst, extracellular alkalinization, activation of protein kinases, induction of defense gene expression and phytoalexin accumulation, but not the programmed cell death. Interestingly, upon challenge with the B. cinerea, the S. anulatus S37 primed grapevine cells for enhanced defense reactions with a decline in cell death. In the presence of the EGTA, a calcium channel inhibitor, the induced oxidative burst, and the protein kinase activity were inhibited, but not the extracellular alkalinization, suggesting that Ca2+ may also contribute upstream to the induced defenses. Moreover, desensitization assays using extracellular pH showed that once increased by S. anulatus S37, cells became refractory to further stimulation by B. cinerea, suggesting that grapevine cells perceive distinctly beneficial and pathogenic microbes.

  7. Different Narrow-Band Light Ranges Alter Plant Secondary Metabolism and Plant Defense Response to Aphids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rechner, Ole; Neugart, Susanne; Schreiner, Monika; Wu, Sasa; Poehling, Hans-Michael

    2016-10-01

    Light of different wavelengths affects various physiological processes in plants. Short-wavelength radiation (like UV) can activate defense pathways in plants and enhance the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites (such as flavonoids and glucosinolates) responsible for resistance against certain herbivorous insects. The intensity of light-induced, metabolite-based resistance is plant- and insect species-specific and depends on herbivore feeding guild and specialization. In this study, broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica) plants were grown for 4 weeks in a climate chamber under conventional fluorescent tubes and were additionally treated with UV-B (310 nm), UV-A (365 or 385 nm), or violet (420 nm) light generated with UV-B tubes or light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The objective was to determine the influence of narrow bandwidths of light (from UV-B to violet) on plant secondary metabolism and on the performance of the cabbage aphid Brevicoryne brassicae (a specialist) and the green peach aphid Myzus persicae (a generalist). Among flavonol glycosides, specific quercetin and kaempferol glycosides increased markedly under UV-B, while among glucosinolates only 4-methoxy-3-indolylmethyl showed a 2-fold increase in plants exposed to UV-B and UV-A. The concentration of 3-indolylmethyl glucosinolate in broccoli plants increased with UV-B treatment. Brevicoryne brassicae adult weights and fecundity were lower on UV-B treated plants compared to UV-A or violet light-treated plants. Adult weights and fecundity of M. persicae were increased under UV-B and UV-A treatments. When specific light wavelengths are used to induce metabolic changes in plants, the specificity of the induced effects on herbivores should be considered.

  8. Defense response of susceptible and resistant Biomphalaria alexandrina snails against Schistosoma mansoni infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iman F. Abou-El-Naga

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In Egypt, Biomphalaria alexandrina is the intermediate host for Schistosoma mansoni. The fates of Schistosoma miracidia in the snails varies between different species of Biomphalaria. The internal defense system is one of the factors that influence the susceptibility pattern of the snails. The interaction between Biomphalaria snails and S. mansoni needs to be identified for each species, and even between the members of the same species with different degrees of susceptibility. In the present study, the first generation of susceptible and resistant parents of B. alexandrina was examined histologically at the 30th day post exposure. The study includes the characterization of the immune response, as expressed by tissue reactions, of susceptible and resistant B. alexandrina snails against S. mansoni. It was also designed to determine the impact of the resistance increase in parent snails, on the mechanisms of interaction of their offspring against infection. The results showed that the infection rate of the offspring from the susceptible parents was 92%. No susceptible offspring was produced from the resistant parents. When the parents were of equal number of susceptible and resistant snails, they gave an offspring with an infection rate of 20%. Susceptible snails that had susceptible parents showed a higher degree of susceptibility than those that had both susceptible and resistant parents. A common feature of the resistant snails was the absence of any viable parasites. The tissue reactions of the resistant snails having only resistant parents occurred at the site of miracidial penetration. In resistant snails for which susceptible ones were included in their parents, the reactions occurred in the deep tissues. These results characterized the immune response of B. alexandrina snails against Schistosoma infection which was found to occur by two different mechanisms. One type of defense occurs in highly resistant snails, and employs direct

  9. Silencing of host basal defense response-related gene expression increases susceptibility of Nicotiana benthamiana to Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaji, Vasudevan; Sessa, Guido; Smart, Christine D

    2011-03-01

    Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis is an actinomycete, causing bacterial wilt and canker disease of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). We used virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) to identify genes playing a role in host basal defense response to C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis infection using Nicotiana benthamiana as a model plant. A preliminary VIGS screen comprising 160 genes from tomato known to be involved in defense-related signaling identified a set of 14 genes whose suppression led to altered host-pathogen interactions. Expression of each of these genes and three additional targets was then suppressed in larger-scale VIGS experiments and the effect of silencing on development of wilt disease symptoms and bacterial growth during an N. benthamiana-C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis compatible interaction was determined. Disease susceptibility and in planta bacterial population size were enhanced by silencing genes encoding N. benthamiana homologs of ubiquitin activating enzyme, snakin-2, extensin-like protein, divinyl ether synthase, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase 2, and Pto-like kinase. The identification of genes having a role in the host basal defense-response to C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis advances our understanding of the plant responses activated by C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis and raises possibilities for devising novel and effective molecular strategies to control bacterial canker and wilt in tomato.

  10. Constitutively active Arabidopsis MAP Kinase 3 triggers defense responses involving salicylic acid and SUMM2 resistance protein

    KAUST Repository

    Genot, Baptiste

    2017-04-12

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are important regulators of plant immunity. Most of the knowledge about the function of these pathways is derived from loss-of-function approaches. Using a gain-of-function approach, we investigated the responses controlled by a constitutively active (CA) MPK3 in Arabidopsis thaliana. CA-MPK3 plants are dwarfed and display a massive de-repression of defense genes associated with spontaneous cell death as well as accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), phytoalexins and the stress-related hormones ethylene and salicylic acid (SA). Remarkably CA-MPK3/sid2 and CA-MPK3/ein2-50 lines which are impaired in SA synthesis and ethylene signaling, respectively, retain most of the CA-MPK3-associated phenotypes, indicating that constitutive activity of MPK3 can bypass SA and ethylene signaling to activate defense responses. A comparative analysis of the molecular phenotypes of CA-MPK3 and mpk4 autoimmunity suggested convergence between the MPK3 and MPK4-guarding modules. In support of this model, CA-MPK3 crosses with summ1 and summ2, two known suppressors of mpk4, resulted in a partial reversion of the CA-MPK3 phenotypes. Overall, our data unravel a novel mechanism by which the MAPK signaling network contributes to a robust defense response system.

  11. Relative roles of the cellular and humoral responses in the Drosophila host defense against three gram-positive bacterial infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine T Nehme

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Two NF-kappaB signaling pathways, Toll and immune deficiency (imd, are required for survival to bacterial infections in Drosophila. In response to septic injury, these pathways mediate rapid transcriptional activation of distinct sets of effector molecules, including antimicrobial peptides, which are important components of a humoral defense response. However, it is less clear to what extent macrophage-like hemocytes contribute to host defense. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In order to dissect the relative importance of humoral and cellular defenses after septic injury with three different gram-positive bacteria (Micrococcus luteus, Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, we used latex bead pre-injection to ablate macrophage function in flies wildtype or mutant for various Toll and imd pathway components. We found that in all three infection models a compromised phagocytic system impaired fly survival--independently of concomitant Toll or imd pathway activation. Our data failed to confirm a role of the PGRP-SA and GNBP1 Pattern Recognition Receptors for phagocytosis of S. aureus. The Drosophila scavenger receptor Eater mediates the phagocytosis by hemocytes or S2 cells of E. faecalis and S. aureus, but not of M. luteus. In the case of M. luteus and E. faecalis, but not S. aureus, decreased survival due to defective phagocytosis could be compensated for by genetically enhancing the humoral immune response. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results underscore the fundamental importance of both cellular and humoral mechanisms in Drosophila immunity and shed light on the balance between these two arms of host defense depending on the invading pathogen.

  12. Comparison of Fusarium graminearum transcriptomes on living or dead wheat differentiates substrate-responsive and defense-responsive genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Boedi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium graminearum is an opportunistic pathogen of cereals where it causes severe yield losses and concomitant mycotoxin contamination of the grains. The pathogen has mixed biotrophic and necrotrophic (saprophytic growth phases during infection and the regulatory networks associated with these phases have so far always been analyzed together. In this study we compared the transcriptomes of fungal cells infecting a living, actively defending plant representing the mixed live style (pathogenic growth on living flowering wheat heads to the response of the fungus infecting identical, but dead plant tissues (cold-killed flowering wheat heads representing strictly saprophytic conditions. We found that the living plant actively suppressed fungal growth and promoted much higher toxin production in comparison to the identical plant tissue without metabolism suggesting that molecules signaling secondary metabolite induction are not pre-existing or not stable in the plant in sufficient amounts before infection. Differential gene expression analysis was used to define gene sets responding to the active or the passive plant as main impact factor and driver for gene expression. We correlated our results to the published F. graminearum transcriptomes, proteomes and secretomes and found that only a limited number of in planta- expressed genes require the living plant for induction but the majority uses simply the plant tissue as signal. Many secondary metabolite (SM gene clusters show a heterogeneous expression pattern within the cluster indicating that different genetic or epigenetic signals govern the expression of individual genes within a physically linked cluster. Our bioinformatic approach also identified fungal genes which were actively repressed by signals derived from the active plant and may thus represent direct targets of the plant defense against the invading pathogen.

  13. Comparison of Fusarium graminearum Transcriptomes on Living or Dead Wheat Differentiates Substrate-Responsive and Defense-Responsive Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boedi, Stefan; Berger, Harald; Sieber, Christian; Münsterkötter, Martin; Maloku, Imer; Warth, Benedikt; Sulyok, Michael; Lemmens, Marc; Schuhmacher, Rainer; Güldener, Ulrich; Strauss, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Fusarium graminearum is an opportunistic pathogen of cereals where it causes severe yield losses and concomitant mycotoxin contamination of the grains. The pathogen has mixed biotrophic and necrotrophic (saprophytic) growth phases during infection and the regulatory networks associated with these phases have so far always been analyzed together. In this study we compared the transcriptomes of fungal cells infecting a living, actively defending plant representing the mixed live style (pathogenic growth on living flowering wheat heads) to the response of the fungus infecting identical, but dead plant tissues (cold-killed flowering wheat heads) representing strictly saprophytic conditions. We found that the living plant actively suppressed fungal growth and promoted much higher toxin production in comparison to the identical plant tissue without metabolism suggesting that molecules signaling secondary metabolite induction are not pre-existing or not stable in the plant in sufficient amounts before infection. Differential gene expression analysis was used to define gene sets responding to the active or the passive plant as main impact factor and driver for gene expression. We correlated our results to the published F. graminearum transcriptomes, proteomes, and secretomes and found that only a limited number of in planta- expressed genes require the living plant for induction but the majority uses simply the plant tissue as signal. Many secondary metabolite (SM) gene clusters show a heterogeneous expression pattern within the cluster indicating that different genetic or epigenetic signals govern the expression of individual genes within a physically linked cluster. Our bioinformatic approach also identified fungal genes which were actively repressed by signals derived from the active plant and may thus represent direct targets of the plant defense against the invading pathogen. PMID:27507961

  14. Polarization response of RHIC electron lens lattices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. H. Ranjbar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Depolarization response for a system of two orthogonal snakes at irrational tunes is studied in depth using lattice independent spin integration. In particular we consider the effect of overlapping spin resonances in this system, to understand the impact of phase, tune, relative location and threshold strengths of the spin resonances. These results are benchmarked and compared to two dimensional direct tracking results for the RHIC e-lens lattice and the standard lattice. Finally we consider the effect of longitudinal motion via chromatic scans using direct six dimensional lattice tracking.

  15. Arabidopsis BRCA2 and RAD51 proteins are specifically involved in defense gene transcription during plant immune responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shui; Durrant, Wendy E.; Song, Junqi; Spivey, Natalie W.; Dong, Xinnian

    2010-01-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a plant immune response associated with both transcriptional reprogramming and increased homologous DNA recombination (HR). SNI1 is a negative regulator of SAR and HR, as indicated by the increased basal expression of defense genes and HR in sni1. We found that the sni1 phenotypes are rescued by mutations in BREAST CANCER 2 (BRCA2). In humans, BRCA2 is a mediator of RAD51 in pairing of homologous DNA. Mutations in BRCA2 cause predisposition to breast/ovarian cancers; however, the role of the BRCA2–RAD51 complex in transcriptional regulation remains unclear. In Arabidopsis, both brca2 and rad51 were found to be hypersusceptible not only to genotoxic substances, but also to pathogen infections. A whole-genome microarray analysis showed that downstream of NPR1, BRCA2A is a major regulator of defense-related gene transcription. ChIP demonstrated that RAD51 is specifically recruited to the promoters of defense genes during SAR. This recruitment is dependent on the SAR signal salicylic acid (SA) and on the function of BRCA2. This study provides the molecular evidence showing that the BRCA2–RAD51 complex, known for its function in HR, also plays a direct and specific role in transcription regulation during plant immune responses. PMID:21149701

  16. Sinorhizobium meliloti nifA gene exerts a pleiotropic effect on nodulation through the enhanced plant defense response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Sinorhizobium meliloti nifA gene is required for the expression of a bunch of nif and fix genes. Here, we report its pleiotropic effects on the nodule formation. Compared with wild type strain, nifA mutant significantly reduced nodule suppression rate in split-root system. The plants inoculated with mutant strain produced lower amount of daidzein and less necrotic cells on their roots. In addition, the defense genes failed to be evoked by nifA mutant at the early nodulation stage. These findings indicated that host defense response was one of the mechanisms mediated by nifA gene to regulate nodule formation during symbiosis. Even though nifA mutant could increase the number of nodules in host plant, it synthesized lower Nod factors than wild type. This suggested that nifA gene mediated multiple and diverse instances in nodulation formation.

  17. Induction of wheat defense related genes in response to Puccinia striiformis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheat stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, is one of the most important diseases of wheat worldwide. To isolate defense-related genes against the pathogen, a suppression subtractive hybridization library was constructed for an incompatible interaction. From the library, 652 se...

  18. Pheromone-induced priming of a defensive response in Western flower thrips

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruijn, P.J.A.; Egas, M.; Janssen, A.; Sabelis, M.W.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract The Western flower thrips Frankliniella occidentalis produces conspicuous anal droplets that function as a direct defense against various predators. These droplets also function in pheromonal communication in that they contain a mixture of decyl acetate and dodecyl acetate, which acts as an

  19. Maize defense response against the european corn borer (Ostrinia nubilaslis): a losing battle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goal of this research is to understand how maize stems respond to European corn borer (ECB) damage and how these defense tactics affect the invading ECB. We measured the levels of the plant hormones, jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene, as well as the transcript levels of their key biosynthetic en...

  20. Spodoptera exigua caterpillar feeding induces rapid defense responses in maize leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insects such as beet armyworm caterpillars (Spodoptera exigua) cause extensive damage to maize (Zea mays) by consuming foliar tissue. Maize plants respond to insect attack by triggering defense mechanisms that involve massive changes in gene expression, biosynthesis of specialized metabolites and de...

  1. The MAP kinase substrate MKS1 is a regulator of plant defense responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasson, E.; Jenkins, T.; Brodersen, P.;

    2005-01-01

    -dependent resistance, but does not interfere with induction of a defense gene by JA. Further yeast two-hybrid screening revealed that MKS1 interacts with the WRKY transcription factors WRKY25 and WRKY33. WRKY25 and WRKY33 were shown to be in vitro substrates of MPK4, and a wrky33 knockout mutant was found to exhibit...

  2. Transcriptomic profiling of soybean in response to high-intensity UV-B irradiation reveals stress defense signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Young Yoon

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The depletion of the ozone layer in the stratosphere has led to a dramatic spike in ultraviolet B (UV-B intensity and increased UV-B light levels. The direct absorption of high-intensity UV-B induces complex abiotic stresses in plants, including excessive light exposure, heat, and dehydration. However, UV-B stress signaling mechanisms in plants including soybean (Glycine max [L.] remain poorly understood. Here, we surveyed the overall transcriptional responses of two soybean genotypes, UV-B-sensitive Cheongja 3 and UV-B-resistant Buseok, to continuous UV-B irradiation for 0 (control, 0.5, and 6 h using RNA-seq analysis. Homology analysis using UV-B-related genes from Arabidopsis thaliana revealed differentially expressed genes (DEGs likely involved in UV-B stress responses. Functional classification of the DEGs showed that the categories of immune response, stress defense signaling, and reactive oxygen species (ROS metabolism were over-represented. UV-B-resistant Buseok utilized phosphatidic acid-dependent signaling pathways (based on subsequent reactions of phospholipase C and diacylglycerol kinase rather than phospholipase D in response to UV-B exposure at high fluence rates, and genes involved in its downstream pathways, such as ABA signaling, mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades, and ROS overproduction, were upregulated in this genotype. In addition, the DEGs for TIR-NBS-LRR and heat shock proteins are positively activated. These results suggest that defense mechanisms against UV-B stress at high fluence rates are separate from the photomorphogenic responses utilized by plants to adapt to low-level UV light. Our study provides valuable information for deep understanding of UV-B stress defense mechanisms and for the development of resistant soybean genotypes that survive under high-intensity UV-B stress.

  3. Phytohormone and Putative Defense Gene Expression Differentiates the Response of ‘Hayward’ Kiwifruit to Psa and Pfm Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirstin V. Wurms

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae (Psa and Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidifoliorum (Pfm are closely related pathovars infecting kiwifruit, but Psa is considered one of the most important global pathogens, whereas Pfm is not. In this study of Actinidia deliciosa ‘Hayward’ responses to the two pathovars, the objective was to test whether differences in plant defense responses mounted against the two pathovars correlated with the contrasting severity of the symptoms caused by them. Results showed that Psa infections were always more severe than Pfm infections, and were associated with highly localized, differential expression of phytohormones and putative defense gene transcripts in stem tissue closest to the inoculation site. Phytohormone concentrations of jasmonic acid (JA, jasmonate isoleucine (JA-Ile, salicylic acid (SA and abscisic acid were always greater in stem tissue than in leaves, and leaf phytohormones were not affected by pathogen inoculation. Pfm inoculation induced a threefold increase in SA in stems relative to Psa inoculation, and a smaller 1.6-fold induction of JA. Transcript expression showed no effect of inoculation in leaves, but Pfm inoculation resulted in the greatest elevation of the SA marker genes, PR1 and glucan endo-1,3-beta-glucosidase (β-1,3-glucosidase (32- and 25-fold increases, respectively in stem tissue surrounding the inoculation site. Pfm inoculation also produced a stronger response than Psa inoculation in localized stem tissue for the SA marker gene PR6, jasmonoyl-isoleucine-12-hydrolase (JIH1, which acts as a negative marker of the JA pathway, and APETALA2/Ethylene response factor 2 transcription factor (AP2 ERF2, which is involved in JA/SA crosstalk. WRKY40 transcription factor (a SA marker was induced equally in stems by wounding (mock inoculation and pathovar inoculation. Taken together, these results suggest that the host appears to mount a stronger, localized, SA-based defense response to Pfm

  4. Tomato NAC transcription factor SlSRN1 positively regulates defense response against biotic stress but negatively regulates abiotic stress response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Liu

    Full Text Available Biotic and abiotic stresses are major unfavorable factors that affect crop productivity worldwide. NAC proteins comprise a large family of transcription factors that play important roles in plant growth and development as well as in responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. In a virus-induced gene silencing-based screening to identify genes that are involved in defense response against Botrytis cinerea, we identified a tomato NAC gene SlSRN1 (Solanum lycopersicum Stress-related NAC1. SlSRN1 is a plasma membrane-localized protein with transactivation activity in yeast. Expression of SlSRN1 was significantly induced by infection with B. cinerea or Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst DC3000, leading to 6-8 folds higher than that in the mock-inoculated plants. Expression of SlSRN1 was also induced by salicylic acid, jasmonic acid and 1-amino cyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid and by drought stress. Silencing of SlSRN1 resulted in increased severity of diseases caused by B. cinerea and Pst DC3000. However, silencing of SlSRN1 resulted in increased tolerance against oxidative and drought stresses. Furthermore, silencing of SlSRN1 accelerated accumulation of reactive oxygen species but attenuated expression of defense genes after infection by B. cinerea. Our results demonstrate that SlSRN1 is a positive regulator of defense response against B. cinerea and Pst DC3000 but is a negative regulator for oxidative and drought stress response in tomato.

  5. Response of cellulose nitrate track detectors to electron doses

    CERN Document Server

    Segovia, N; Moreno, A; Vazquez-Polo, G; Santamaría, T; Aranda, P; Hernández, A

    1999-01-01

    In order to study alternative dose determination methods, the bulk etching velocity and the latent track annealing of LR 115 track detectors was studied during electron irradiation runs from a Pelletron accelerator. For this purpose alpha irradiated and blank detectors were exposed to increasing electron doses from 10.5 to 317.5 kGy. After the irradiation with electrons the detectors were etched under routine conditions, except for the etching time, that was varied for each electron dose in order to reach a fixed residual thickness. The variation of the bulk etching velocity as a function of each one of the electron doses supplied, was interpolated in order to obtain dosimetric response curves. The observed annealing effect on the latent tracks is discussed as a function of the total electron doses supplied and the temperature.

  6. Jasmonate response decay and defense metabolite accumulation contributes to age-regulated dynamics of plant insect resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Ying-Bo; Liu, Yao-Qian; Chen, Dian-Yang; Chen, Fang-Yan; Fang, Xin; Hong, Gao-Jie; Wang, Ling-Jian; Wang, Jia-Wei; Chen, Xiao-Ya

    2017-01-01

    Immunity deteriorates with age in animals but comparatively little is known about the temporal regulation of plant resistance to herbivores. The phytohormone jasmonate (JA) is a key regulator of plant insect defense. Here, we show that the JA response decays progressively in Arabidopsis. We show that this decay is regulated by the miR156-targeted SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE9 (SPL9) group of proteins, which can interact with JA ZIM-domain (JAZ) proteins, including JAZ3. As SPL9 levels gradually increase, JAZ3 accumulates and the JA response is attenuated. We provide evidence that this pathway contributes to insect resistance in young plants. Interestingly however, despite the decay in JA response, older plants are still comparatively more resistant to both the lepidopteran generalist Helicoverpa armigera and the specialist Plutella xylostella, along with increased accumulation of glucosinolates. We propose a model whereby constitutive accumulation of defense compounds plays a role in compensating for age-related JA-response attenuation during plant maturation. PMID:28067238

  7. Deep sequencing analysis reveals a TMV mutant with a poly(A) tract reduces host defense responses in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Song; Wong, Sek-Man

    2017-07-15

    Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) possesses an upstream pseudoknotted domain (UPD), which is important for replication. After substituting the UPD with an internal poly(A) tract (43 nt), a mutant TMV-43A was constructed. TMV-43A replicated slower than TMV and induced a non-lethal mosaic symptom in Nicotiana benthamiana. In this study, deep sequencing was performed to detect the differences of small RNA profiles between TMV- and TMV-43A-infected N. benthamiana. The results showed that TMV-43A produced lesser amount of virus-derived interfering RNAs (vsiRNAs) than that of TMV. However, the distributions of vsiRNAs generation hotspots between TMV and TMV-43A were similar. Expression of genes related to small RNA biogenesis in TMV-43A-infected N. benthamiana was significantly lower than that of TMV, which leads to generation of lesser vsiRNAs. The expressions of host defense response genes were up-regulated after TMV infection, as compared to TMV-43A-infected plants. Host defense response to TMV-43A infection was lower than that to TMV. The absence of UPD might contribute to the reduced host response to TMV-43A. Our study provides valuable information in the role of the UPD in eliciting host response genes after TMV infection in N. benthamiana. (187 words). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A Novel Meloidogyne incognita Effector Misp12 Suppresses Plant Defense Response at Latter Stages of Nematode Parasitism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jialian; Li, Shaojun; Mo, Chenmi; Wang, Gaofeng; Xiao, Xueqiong; Xiao, Yannong

    2016-01-01

    Secreted effectors in plant root-knot nematodes (RKNs, or Meloidogyne spp.) play key roles in their parasite processes. Currently identified effectors mainly focus on the early stage of the nematode parasitism. There are only a few reports describing effectors that function in the latter stage. In this study, we identified a potential RKN effector gene, Misp12, that functioned during the latter stage of parasitism. Misp12 was unique in the Meloidogyne spp., and highly conserved in Meloidogyne incognita. It encoded a secretory protein that specifically expressed in the dorsal esophageal gland, and highly up-regulated during the female stages. Transient expression of Misp12-GUS-GFP in onion epidermal cell showed that Misp12 was localized in cytoplast. In addition, in planta RNA interference targeting Misp12 suppressed the expression of Misp12 in nematodes and attenuated parasitic ability of M. incognita. Furthermore, up-regulation of jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) pathway defense-related genes in the virus-induced silencing of Misp12 plants, and down-regulation of SA pathway defense-related genes in Misp12-expressing plants indicated the gene might be associated with the suppression of the plant defense response. These results demonstrated that the novel nematode effector Misp12 played a critical role at latter parasitism of M. incognita.

  9. Elucidation of defense-related signaling responses to spot blotch infection in bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Ranabir; Sharaff, Murali; Pradhan, Maitree; Sethi, Avinash; Bandyopadhyay, Tirthankar; Mishra, Vinod K; Chand, Ramesh; Chowdhury, Apurba K; Joshi, Arun K; Pandey, Shree P

    2016-04-01

    Spot blotch disease, caused by Bipolaris sorokiniana, is an important threat to wheat, causing an annual loss of ~17%. Under epidemic conditions, these losses may be 100%, yet the molecular responses of wheat to spot blotch remain almost uncharacterized. Moreover, defense-related phytohormone signaling genes have been poorly characterized in wheat. Here, we have identified 18 central components of salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA), ethylene (ET), and enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1) signaling pathways as well as the genes of the phenylpropanoid pathway in wheat. In time-course experiments, we characterized the reprogramming of expression of these pathways in two contrasting genotypes: Yangmai #6 (resistant to spot blotch) and Sonalika (susceptible to spot blotch). We further evaluated the performance of a population of recombinant inbred lines (RILs) by crossing Yangmai#6 and Sonalika (parents) and subsequent selfing to F10 under field conditions in trials at multiple locations. We characterized the reprogramming of defense-related signaling in these RILs as a consequence of spot blotch attack. During resistance to spot blotch attack, wheat strongly elicits SA signaling (SA biogenesis as well as the NPR1-dependent signaling pathway), along with WRKY33 transcription factor, followed by an enhanced expression of phenylpropanoid pathway genes. These may lead to accumulation of phenolics-based defense metabolites that may render resistance against spot blotch. JA signaling may synergistically contribute to the resistance. Failure to elicit SA (and possibly JA) signaling may lead to susceptibility against spot blotch infection in wheat.

  10. Development of a Response Planner using the UCT Algorithm for Cyber Defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    14 2.5.5 SAT/CSP Planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 2.6 Markovian Decision Problems ( MDP ...square H Host reward value R Network reward value w Weight of Host Q Average Reward in UCT algorithm xvii List of Acronyms Acronym Definition MDP Markovian...network state based on the network operator’s preference is the second important area to building a cyber defense planner. Networks vary in composition and

  11. Security Assistance and Cooperation: Shared Responsibility of the Departments of State and Defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-04

    MODA Section 1081, P.L. 112-81 (3)) Provides management, training, and other support Yes Wales (formerly Warsaw) Initiative Fund (Activities...Initially designed for Afghanistan, the Ministry of Defense Advisors Program ( MODA ) was established as a global authority by the FY2012 NDAA (P.L...112-81, Section 1081, as amended). MODA enables senior DOD civilian experts to advise their counterparts abroad on matters such as personnel and

  12. CHARACTERIZATION OF HOST PLANT DEFENSE RESPONSES TO PARASITIZATION BY Orobanche aegyptiaca

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    Orobanche (spp.) are parasitic plants that attack the roots of many important crops. O. aegyptiaca penetrates the host root (aided by digestive enzymes) and forms connections to the host vascular tissue, from which it will withdraw all of its water and nutrient requirements. In order to control this weed, it is important to understand the relationship between the host and the parasite. To investigate how parasitism effects host defense pathways, we are studying the patterns of expression o...

  13. Sucrose-mediated priming of plant defense responses and broad-spectrum disease resistance by overexpression of the maize pathogenesis-related PRms protein in rice plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Ariza, Jorge; Campo, Sonia; Rufat, Mar; Estopà, Montserrat; Messeguer, Joaquima; San Segundo, Blanca; Coca, María

    2007-07-01

    Expression of pathogenesis-related (PR) genes is part of the plant's natural defense response against pathogen attack. The PRms gene encodes a fungal-inducible PR protein from maize. Here, we demonstrate that expression of PRms in transgenic rice confers broad-spectrum protection against pathogens, including fungal (Magnaporthe oryzae, Fusarium verticillioides, and Helminthosporium oryzae) and bacterial (Erwinia chrysanthemi) pathogens. The PRms-mediated disease resistance in rice plants is associated with an enhanced capacity to express and activate the natural plant defense mechanisms. Thus, PRms rice plants display a basal level of expression of endogenous defense genes in the absence of the pathogen. PRms plants also exhibit stronger and quicker defense responses during pathogen infection. We also have found that sucrose accumulates at higher levels in leaves of PRms plants. Sucrose responsiveness of rice defense genes correlates with the pathogen-responsive priming of their expression in PRms rice plants. Moreover, pretreatment of rice plants with sucrose enhances resistance to M. oryzae infection. Together, these results support a sucrose-mediated priming of defense responses in PRms rice plants which results in broad-spectrum disease resistance.

  14. Dynamics of defense responses and cell fate change during Arabidopsis-Pseudomonas syringae interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safae Hamdoun

    Full Text Available Plant-pathogen interactions involve sophisticated action and counteraction strategies from both parties. Plants can recognize pathogen derived molecules, such as conserved pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs and effector proteins, and subsequently activate PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI and effector-triggered immunity (ETI, respectively. However, pathogens can evade such recognitions and suppress host immunity with effectors, causing effector-triggered susceptibility (ETS. The differences among PTI, ETS, and ETI have not been completely understood. Toward a better understanding of PTI, ETS, and ETI, we systematically examined various defense-related phenotypes of Arabidopsis infected with different Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola ES4326 strains, using the virulence strain DG3 to induce ETS, the avirulence strain DG34 that expresses avrRpm1 (recognized by the resistance protein RPM1 to induce ETI, and HrcC(- that lacks the type three secretion system to activate PTI. We found that plants infected with different strains displayed dynamic differences in the accumulation of the defense signaling molecule salicylic acid, expression of the defense marker gene PR1, cell death formation, and accumulation/localization of the reactive oxygen species, H2O2. The differences between PTI, ETS, and ETI are dependent on the doses of the strains used. These data support the quantitative nature of PTI, ETS, and ETI and they also reveal qualitative differences between PTI, ETS, and ETI. Interestingly, we observed the induction of large cells in the infected leaves, most obviously with HrcC(- at later infection stages. The enlarged cells have increased DNA content, suggesting a possible activation of endoreplication. Consistent with strong induction of abnormal cell growth by HrcC(-, we found that the PTI elicitor flg22 also activates abnormal cell growth, depending on a functional flg22-receptor FLS2. Thus, our study has revealed a comprehensive

  15. Antioxidant defense response induced by Trichoderma viride against Aspergillus niger Van Tieghem causing collar rot in groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajera, H P; Katakpara, Zinkal A; Patel, S V; Golakiya, B A

    2016-02-01

    The study was conducted to examine the antioxidant enzymes induced by Trichoderma viride JAU60 as initial defense response during invasion of rot pathogen Aspergillus niger Van Tieghem in five groundnut varieties under pot culture. Seed treatment of T. viride JAU60 reduced 51-58% collar rot disease incidence in different groundnut varieties under pathogen infected soil culture. The activities of the antioxidant enzymes, viz., superoxide dismutase (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1), guaiacol peroxidase (GPX, EC 1.11.1.7) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX, EC 1.11.1.11), elevated in response to pathogen infection, in higher rate by tolerant varieties (J-11 and GG-2) compared with susceptible (GAUG-10, GG-13, GG-20) and further induced by T. viride treatment. Trichoderma treatment remarkably increased the 2.3 fold SOD, 5 fold GPX and 2.5 fold APX activities during disease development in tolerant varieties and the same was found about 1.2, 1.5 and 2.0 folds, respectively, in susceptible varieties. Overall, T. viride JAU60 treated seedlings (T3) witnessed higher activities of SOD (1.5 fold), GPX (3.25 fold) and APX (1.25 fold) than pathogen treatment (T2) possibly suggest the induction of antioxidant defense response by Trichoderma bio-controller to combat oxidative burst produced by invading pathogen.

  16. Arabidopsis thaliana natural variation reveals connections between UV radiation stress and plant pathogen-like defense responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piofczyk, Thomas; Jeena, Ganga; Pecinka, Ales

    2015-08-01

    UV radiation is a ubiquitous component of solar radiation that affects plant growth and development. Here we studied growth related traits of 345 Arabidopsis thaliana accessions in response to UV radiation stress. We analyzed the genetic basis of this natural variation by genome-wide association studies, which suggested a specific candidate genomic region. RNA-sequencing of three sensitive and three resistant accessions combined with mutant analysis revealed five large effect genes. Mutations in PHE ammonia lyase 1 (PAL1) and putative kinase At1g76360 rendered Arabidopsis hypersensitive to UV stress, while loss of function from putative methyltransferase At4g22530, novel plant snare 12 (NPSN12) and defense gene activated disease resistance 2 (ADR2) conferred higher UV stress resistance. Three sensitive accessions showed strong ADR2 transcriptional activation, accumulation of salicylic acid (SA) and dwarf growth upon UV stress, while these phenotypes were much less affected in resistant plants. The phenotype of sensitive accessions resembles autoimmune reactions due to overexpression of defense related genes, and suggests that natural variation in response to UV radiation stress is driven by pathogen-like responses in Arabidopsis.

  17. An analysis of the effect of STEM initiatives on socially responsible diversity management in the US aerospace and defense industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson-Oliver, Patrick

    Workforce diversity is a growing concern at a global level and enlightened economic self-interest and corporate image compels industries to leverage it as a competitive advantage. The US aerospace and defense industry (US ADI) addresses workforce diversity through socially responsible diversity management. Prior research into the topic of approaching workforce diversity as a business rationale and a moral imperative has been limited. Scharmer and Kaufer's (2013) Theory U guided this longitudinal explanatory quantitative study, leading from the future as it emerged relative to socially responsible diversity management to compel industry to remove blind spots and co-create an economy that benefits all by promoting workforce diversity as a dual agenda. This study filled a research gap investigating the business case for diversity as a dual agenda in aerospace industry science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines. The study also investigated the America COMPETES Act as a moderator of the relationship between historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) and industry. Data was retrieved for secondary data analysis from the National Science Foundation (NSF) and other public government services and agency websites. Two hypotheses were tested using quantitative analysis including descriptive statistics, linear regression, ANOVA, and two factor analysis. The statistical results were analyzed and deductive logic employed to develop conclusions for the study. There was a significant relationship found between both predictors and socially responsible diversity management. The results reinforce the necessity for the aerospace defense industry to promote the dual agenda of the business case for diversity as complementary; not as competing mandates.

  18. Transcriptional Analysis of The Adaptive Digestive System of The Migratory Locust in Response to Plant Defensive Protease Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spit, Jornt; Holtof, Michiel; Badisco, Liesbet; Vergauwen, Lucia; Vogel, Elise; Knapen, Dries; vanden Broeck, Jozef

    2016-09-01

    Herbivorous insects evolved adaptive mechanisms to compensate for the presence of plant defensive protease inhibitors (PI) in their food. The underlying regulatory mechanisms of these compensatory responses remain largely elusive. In the current study, we investigated the initiation of this adaptive response in the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria, via microarray analysis of gut tissues. Four hours after dietary uptake of PIs, 114 and 150 transcripts were respectively found up- or downregulated. The results suggest a quick trade-off between compensating for potential loss of digestive activity on the one hand, and stress tolerance, defense, and structural integrity of the gut on the other hand. We additionally addressed the role of a group of related upregulated hexamerin-like proteins in the PI-induced response. Simultaneous knockdown of corresponding transcripts by means of RNA interference resulted in a reduced capacity of the locust nymphs to cope with the effects of PI. Moreover, since insect hexamerins have been shown to bind Juvenile Hormone (JH), we also investigated the effect of JH on the proteolytic digestion in L. migratoria. Our results indicate that JH has a stimulatory effect on the expression of three homologous chymotrypsin genes, while knocking down the JH receptor (methoprene tolerant) led to opposite effects.

  19. Role of UPR Pathway in Defense Response of Aedes aegypti against Cry11Aa Toxin from Bacillus thuringiensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Bravo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The insecticidal Cry toxins are pore-forming toxins produced by the bacteria Bacillus thuringiensis that disrupt insect-midgut cells. Cells can trigger different survival mechanisms to counteract the effects of sub-lytic doses of pore forming toxins. Particularly, two signaling pathways have been demonstrated to play a role in the defense mechanism to other toxins in Caenorhabditis elegans and in mammalian cells. These are the unfolded protein response (UPR and the sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBP pathways, which are proposed to facilitate membrane repair responses. In this work we analyzed the role of these pathways in Aedes aegypti response to intoxication with Cry11Aa toxin. We show that UPR is activated upon toxin ingestion. The role of these two pathways was analyzed in vivo by using RNA interference. We silenced the expression of specific proteins in A. aegypti larvae. Gene silencing of Ire-1 and Xbp-1 proteins from UPR system, resulted in hypersensitive to Cry11Aa toxin action. In contrast, silencing of Cas-1, Scap and S2P from SREBP pathway had no affect on Cry11Aa toxicity in A. aegypti larvae. However, the role of SREBP pathway requires further studies to be conclusive. Our data indicate that the UPR pathway is involved in the insect defense against Cry toxins.

  20. Mercuric iodide dosimeter response to high energy electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loewinger, E.; Nissenbaum, J.; Schieber, M.M.

    1988-01-01

    Mercuric iodide solid state dosimeter response to high energy electron beams of up to 35 MeV is reported. High sensitivity of up to 1.5 V/cGy was observed with a 200 V external bias, as well as several mV/cGy, with no external bias for small volume (approx. 10 mm/sup 3/) detectors. The physical characteristics of the detector response are discussed, showing the feasibility of mercuric iodide as a reliable dosimeter for high energy electron beams.

  1. Activation of the unfolded protein response is required for defenses against bacterial pore-forming toxin in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry J Bischof

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Pore-forming toxins (PFTs constitute the single largest class of proteinaceous bacterial virulence factors and are made by many of the most important bacterial pathogens. Host responses to these toxins are complex and poorly understood. We find that the endoplasmic reticulum unfolded protein response (UPR is activated upon exposure to PFTs both in Caenorhabditis elegans and in mammalian cells. Activation of the UPR is protective in vivo against PFTs since animals that lack either the ire-1-xbp-1 or the atf-6 arms of the UPR are more sensitive to PFT than wild-type animals. The UPR acts directly in the cells targeted by the PFT. Loss of the UPR leads to a normal response against unrelated toxins or a pathogenic bacterium, indicating its PFT-protective role is specific. The p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAPK kinase pathway has been previously shown to be important for cellular defenses against PFTs. We find here that the UPR is one of the key downstream targets of the p38 MAPK pathway in response to PFT since loss of a functional p38 MAPK pathway leads to a failure of PFT to properly activate the ire-1-xbp-1 arm of the UPR. The UPR-mediated activation and response to PFTs is distinct from the canonical UPR-mediated response to unfolded proteins both in terms of its activation and functional sensitivities. These data demonstrate that the UPR, a fundamental intracellular pathway, can operate in intrinsic cellular defenses against bacterial attack.

  2. Activation of the unfolded protein response is required for defenses against bacterial pore-forming toxin in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry J Bischof

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Pore-forming toxins (PFTs constitute the single largest class of proteinaceous bacterial virulence factors and are made by many of the most important bacterial pathogens. Host responses to these toxins are complex and poorly understood. We find that the endoplasmic reticulum unfolded protein response (UPR is activated upon exposure to PFTs both in Caenorhabditis elegans and in mammalian cells. Activation of the UPR is protective in vivo against PFTs since animals that lack either the ire-1-xbp-1 or the atf-6 arms of the UPR are more sensitive to PFT than wild-type animals. The UPR acts directly in the cells targeted by the PFT. Loss of the UPR leads to a normal response against unrelated toxins or a pathogenic bacterium, indicating its PFT-protective role is specific. The p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAPK kinase pathway has been previously shown to be important for cellular defenses against PFTs. We find here that the UPR is one of the key downstream targets of the p38 MAPK pathway in response to PFT since loss of a functional p38 MAPK pathway leads to a failure of PFT to properly activate the ire-1-xbp-1 arm of the UPR. The UPR-mediated activation and response to PFTs is distinct from the canonical UPR-mediated response to unfolded proteins both in terms of its activation and functional sensitivities. These data demonstrate that the UPR, a fundamental intracellular pathway, can operate in intrinsic cellular defenses against bacterial attack.

  3. UVR8 Mediates UV-B-Induced Arabidopsis Defense Responses against Botrytis cinerea by Controlling Sinapate Accumulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Patricia V. Demkura; Carlos L. Ballaré

    2012-01-01

    Light is emerging as a central regulator of plant immune responses against herbivores and pathogens.Solar UV-B radiation plays an important role as a positive modulator of plant defense.However,since UV-B photons can interact with a wide spectrum of molecular targets in plant tissues,the mechanisms that mediate their effects on plant defense have remained elusive.Here,we show that ecologically meaningful doses of UV-B radiation increase Arabidopsis resistance to the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea and that this effect is mediated by the photoreceptor UVR8.The UV-B effect on plant resistance was conserved in mutants impaired in jasmonate (JA) signaling (jar1-1 and P35S:JAZ10.4) or metabolism of tryptophan-derived defense compounds (pen2-1,pad3-1,pen2 pad3),suggesting that neither regulation of the JA pathway nor changes in levels of indolic glucosinolates (iGS) or camalexin are involved in this response.UV-B radiation,acting through UVR8,increased the levels of flavonoids and sinapates in leaf tissue.The UV-B effect on pathogen resistance was still detectable in tt4-f,a mutant deficient in chalcone synthase and therefore impaired in the synthesis of flavonoids,but was absent in fah1-7,a mutant deficient in ferulic acid 5-hydroxylase,which is essential for sinapate biosynthesis.Collectively,these results indicate that UVR8 plays an important role in mediating the effects of UV-B radiation on pathogen resistance by controlling the expression of the sinapate biosynthetic pathway.

  4. Defense Responses to Short-term Hypoxia and Seawater Acidification in the Thick Shell Mussel Mytilus coruscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Yanming; Liu, Yimeng; Zhao, Xin; Dupont, Sam; Hu, Menghong; Wu, Fangli; Huang, Xizhi; Li, Jiale; Lu, Weiqun; Wang, Youji

    2017-01-01

    The rising anthropogenic atmospheric CO2 results in the reduction of seawater pH, namely ocean acidification (OA). In East China Sea, the largest coastal hypoxic zone was observed in the world. This region is also strongly impacted by ocean acidification as receiving much nutrient from Changjiang and Qiantangjiang, and organisms can experience great short-term natural variability of DO and pH in this area. In order to evaluate the defense responses of marine mussels under this scenario, the thick shell mussel Mytilus coruscus were exposed to three pH/pCO2 levels (7.3/2800 μatm, 7.7/1020 μatm, 8.1/376 μatm) at two dissolved oxygen concentrations (DO, 2.0, 6.0 mg L(-1)) for 72 h. Results showed that byssus thread parameters, such as the number, diameter, attachment strength and plaque area were reduced by low DO, and shell-closing strength was significantly weaker under both hypoxia and low pH conditions. Expression patterns of genes related to mussel byssus protein (MBP) were affected by hypoxia. Generally, hypoxia reduced MBP1 and MBP7 expressions, but increased MBP13 expression. In conclusion, both hypoxia and low pH induced negative effects on mussel defense responses, with hypoxia being the main driver of change. In addition, significant interactive effects between pH and DO were observed on shell-closing strength. Therefore, the adverse effects induced by hypoxia on the defense of mussels may be aggravated by low pH in the natural environments.

  5. Arsenic alters transcriptional responses to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection and decreases antimicrobial defense of human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodale, Britton C; Rayack, Erica J; Stanton, Bruce A

    2017-09-15

    Arsenic contamination of drinking water and food threatens the health of hundreds of millions of people worldwide by increasing the risk of numerous diseases. Arsenic exposure has been associated with infectious lung disease in epidemiological studies, but it is not yet understood how ingestion of low levels of arsenic increases susceptibility to bacterial infection. Accordingly, the goal of this study was to examine the effect of arsenic on gene expression in primary human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells and to determine if arsenic altered epithelial cell responses to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen. Bronchial epithelial cells line the airway surface, providing a physical barrier and serving critical roles in antimicrobial defense and signaling to professional immune cells. We used RNA-seq to define the transcriptional response of HBE cells to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and investigated how arsenic affected HBE gene networks in the presence and absence of the bacterial challenge. Environmentally relevant levels of arsenic significantly changed the expression of genes involved in cellular redox homeostasis and host defense to bacterial infection, and decreased genes that code for secreted antimicrobial factors such as lysozyme. Using pathway analysis, we identified Sox4 and Nrf2-regulated gene networks that are predicted to mediate the arsenic-induced decrease in lysozyme secretion. In addition, we demonstrated that arsenic decreased lysozyme in the airway surface liquid, resulting in reduced lysis of Microccocus luteus. Thus, arsenic alters the expression of genes and proteins in innate host defense pathways, thereby decreasing the ability of the lung epithelium to fight bacterial infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Methods to increase response to postal and electronic questionnaires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Philip James; Roberts, Ian; Clarke, Mike J; Diguiseppi, Carolyn; Wentz, Reinhard; Kwan, Irene; Cooper, Rachel; Felix, Lambert M; Pratap, Sarah

    2009-07-08

    Postal and electronic questionnaires are widely used for data collection in epidemiological studies but non-response reduces the effective sample size and can introduce bias. Finding ways to increase response to postal and electronic questionnaires would improve the quality of health research. To identify effective strategies to increase response to postal and electronic questionnaires. We searched 14 electronic databases to February 2008 and manually searched the reference lists of relevant trials and reviews, and all issues of two journals. We contacted the authors of all trials or reviews to ask about unpublished trials. Where necessary, we also contacted authors to confirm methods of allocation used and to clarify results presented. We assessed the eligibility of each trial using pre-defined criteria. Randomised controlled trials of methods to increase response to postal or electronic questionnaires. We extracted data on the trial participants, the intervention, the number randomised to intervention and comparison groups and allocation concealment. For each strategy, we estimated pooled odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) in a random-effects model. We assessed evidence for selection bias using Egger's weighted regression method and Begg's rank correlation test and funnel plot. We assessed heterogeneity among trial odds ratios using a Chi(2) test and the degree of inconsistency between trial results was quantified using the I(2) statistic. PostalWe found 481 eligible trials. The trials evaluated 110 different ways of increasing response to postal questionnaires. We found substantial heterogeneity among trial results in half of the strategies. The odds of response were at least doubled using monetary incentives (odds ratio 1.87; 95% CI 1.73 to 2.04; heterogeneity P textual representation of response categories (1.19; 95% CI 1.05 to 1.36), and giving a deadline (1.18; 95% CI 1.03 to 1.34). The odds of response tripled when a picture was included in

  7. Normoergic NO-dependent changes, triggered by a SAR inducer in potato, create more potent defense responses to Phytophthora infestans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janus, Łukasz; Milczarek, Grzegorz; Arasimowicz-Jelonek, Magdalena; Abramowski, Dariusz; Billert, Hanna; Floryszak-Wieczorek, Jolanta

    2013-10-01

    In our experimental approach we examined how potato leaves exposed to a chemical agent might induce nitric oxide (NO) dependent biochemical modifications for future mobilization of an effective resistance to Phytophthora infestans. After potato leaf treatment with one of the following SAR inducers, i.e. β-aminobutyric acid (BABA), 2,6-dichloroisonicotinic acid (INA) or Laminarin, we observed enhanced NO generation concomitant with biochemical changes related to a slight superoxide anion (O2(-)) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) accumulation dependent on minimal NADPH oxidase and peroxidase activities, respectively. These rather normoergic changes, linked to the NO message, were mediated by the temporary down-regulation of S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR). In turn, after challenge inoculation signal amplification promoted potato resistance manifested in the up-regulation of GSNOR activity tuned with the depletion of the SNO pool, which was observed by our team earlier (Floryszak-Wieczorek et al., 2012). Moreover, hyperergic defense responses related to an early and rapid O2(-)and H2O2 overproduction together with a temporary increase in NADPH oxidase and peroxidase activities were noted. BABA treatment was the most effective against P. infestans resulting in the enhanced activity of β-1,3-glucanase and callose deposition. Our results indicate that NO-mediated biochemical modifications might play an important role in creating more potent defense responses of potato to a subsequent P. infestans attack.

  8. Systemin in Solanum nigrum. The Tomato-Homologous Polypeptide Does Not Mediate Direct Defense Responses1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Silvia; Baldwin, Ian T.

    2006-01-01

    We extend Ryan's seminal work on the 18-amino acid polypeptide systemin in tomato's (Solanum lycopersicum) systemic wound response to the closely related solanaceous species Solanum nigrum. We compared wild-type plants to plants transformed with an inverted repeat prosystemin construct (IRSys) to silence the expression of the endogenous S. nigrum prosystemin gene. In wild-type plants elicited with wounding + oral secretions from Manduca sexta larvae, trypsin-proteinase inhibitors (TPIs) accumulated even though prosystemin transcripts were down-regulated. Neither reducing the endogenous systemin levels by RNAi nor complementing the plants with systemin by exogenously supplying the polypeptide through excised stems significantly increased TPI activity, indicating that systemin and TPIs are not correlated in S. nigrum. The performance of two herbivore species from two feeding guilds, M. sexta larvae and Myzus persicae nicotianae, did not differ between wild-type and IRSys plants, demonstrating that varying endogenous systemin levels do not alter the direct defenses of S. nigrum. Field experiments with wild-type and IRSys plants and the flea beetle Epitrix pubescens supported these glasshouse data. That levels of oral secretion-elicited jasmonic acid did not differ between wild-type and IRSys plants suggests that systemin is unlikely to mediate jasmonate signaling in S. nigrum as it does in tomato. We conclude that the tomato-homologous polypeptide does not mediate direct defense responses in S. nigrum. PMID:17071641

  9. Defense-Related Responses in Fruit of the Nonhost Chili Pepper against Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. glycines Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Pae Chang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. glycines (Xag is a necrotrophic bacterial pathogen of the soybean that causes bacterial pustules and is a nonhost pathogen of the chili pepper. In the current study, chili pepper fruit wound inoculated in planta with Xag 8ra formed necrotic lesions on the fruit surface and induced several structural and chemical barriers systemically in the fruit tissue. The initial defense response included programmed cell death of necrotizing and necrotized cells, which was characterized by nuclear DNA cleavage, as detected by TUNEL-confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM, and phosphatidylserine exposure on cell walls distal to the infection site, as detected by Annexin V FLUOS-CLSM. These two responses may facilitate cell killing and enhance transportation of cell wall materials used for cell wall thickening, respectively. The cells beneath the necrotic tissue were enlarged and divided to form periclinal cell walls, resulting in extensive formation of several parallel boundary layers at the later stages of infection, accompanying the deposition of wall fortification materials for strengthening structural defenses. These results suggest that nonhost resistance of chili pepper fruit against the nonhost necrotrophic pathogen Xag 8ra is activated systematically from the initial infection until termination of the infection cycle, resulting in complete inhibition of bacterial pathogenesis by utilizing organ-specific in situ physiological events governed by the expression of genes in the plant fruit organ.

  10. A temporal analysis of the relationships between social stress, humoral immune response and glutathione-related antioxidant defenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Luciane; Dafre, Alcir Luiz; Carobrez, Sonia Gonçalves; Gasparotto, Odival Cezar

    2008-10-10

    The exposure to different kinds of stress impacts on the reactive oxygen species production with potential risk to the integrity of the tissues. Psychological or biological stress is responsible for a significant increase in the oxidative stress markers and also for activation of the antioxidant defense system. In this study, we analyzed the relationships between social stress, humoral immune response and glutathione-related antioxidant defenses. Groups of male Swiss mice were subjected to different lengths of social stress exposure (social confrontation) which varied from 1 up to 13 days. As a biological stressor, 10(9) sheep red blood cells (SRBC)/mL were injected by intraperitoneal route. As controls, animals not subjected to social stress and/or injected with vehicle solution were used. The serum samples and the cerebral cortex were collected at 4 h, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, and 13 days after the end of social confrontation. The results indicated that the antioxidant enzymes activities were affected by psychological as well as by biological stressor. These alterations were dependent on the timing of stress exposure which resulted in a positive or in a negative correlation between the antibody titres to SRBC and antioxidant enzymes. We also discuss the possible role of SRBC injection in the modulation of the effects of psychosocial stress on antioxidant metabolism.

  11. Isolation and characterization of a spotted leaf 32 mutant with early leaf senescence and enhanced defense response in rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Liting; Wang, Yihua; Liu, Ling-long; Wang, Chunming; Gan, Ting; Zhang, Zhengyao; Wang, Yunlong; Wang, Di; Niu, Mei; Long, Wuhua; Li, Xiaohui; Zheng, Ming; Jiang, Ling; Wan, Jianmin

    2017-01-01

    Leaf senescence is a complex biological process and defense responses play vital role for rice development, their molecular mechanisms, however, remain elusive in rice. We herein reported a rice mutant spotted leaf 32 (spl32) derived from a rice cultivar 9311 by radiation. The spl32 plants displayed early leaf senescence, identified by disintegration of chloroplasts as cellular evidence, dramatically decreased contents of chlorophyll, up-regulation of superoxide dismutase enzyme activity and malondialdehyde, as physiological characteristic, and both up-regulation of senescence-induced STAY GREEN gene and senescence-associated transcription factors, and down-regulation of photosynthesis-associated genes, as molecular indicators. Positional cloning revealed that SPL32 encodes a ferredoxin-dependent glutamate synthase (Fd-GOGAT). Compared to wild type, enzyme activity of GOGAT was significantly decreased, and free amino acid contents, particularly for glutamate and glutamine, were altered in spl32 leaves. Moreover, the mutant was subjected to uncontrolled oxidative stress due to over-produced reactive oxygen species and damaged scavenging pathways, in accordance with decreased photorespiration rate. Besides, the mutant showed higher resistance to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. Oryzae than its wild type, coupled with up-regulation of four pathogenesis-related marker genes. Taken together, our results highlight Fd-GOGAT is associated with the regulation of leaf senescence and defense responses in rice. PMID:28139777

  12. “Hand down, Man down.” Analysis of Defensive Adjustments in Response to the Hot Hand in Basketball Using Novel Defense Metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csapo, Peter; Raab, Markus

    2014-01-01

    The hot-hand phenomenon, according to which a player’s performance is significantly elevated during certain phases relative to the expected performance based on the player’s base rate, has left many researchers and fans in basketball puzzled: The vast majority of players, coaches and fans believe in its existence but statistical evidence supporting this belief has been scarce. It has frequently been argued that the hot hand in basketball is unobservable because of strategic adjustments and defensive interference of the opposing team. We use a dataset with novel metrics, such as the number of defenders and the defensive intensity for each shot attempt, which enable us to directly measure defensive pressure. First, we examine how the shooting percentage of NBA players changes relative to the attributes of each metric. We find that it is of lesser importance by how many defenders a player is guarded but that defensive intensity, e.g., whether a defender raises his hand when his opponent shoots, has a larger impact on shot difficulty. Second, we explore how the underlying metrics and shooting accuracy change as a function of streak length. Our results indicate that defensive pressure and shot difficulty increase (decrease) during hot (cold) streaks, so that defenders seem to behave according to the hot-hand belief and try to force hot players into more difficult shots. However, we find that shooting percentages of presumably hot players do not increase and that shooting performance is not related to streakiness, so that the defenders’ hot-hand behavior cannot be considered ecologically rational. Therefore, we are unable to find evidence in favor of the hot-hand effect even when accounting for defensive pressure. PMID:25474443

  13. Protein poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation regulates arabidopsis immune gene expression and defense responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Baomin; Liu, Chenglong; de Oliveira, Marcos V V; Intorne, Aline C; Li, Bo; Babilonia, Kevin; de Souza Filho, Gonçalo A; Shan, Libo; He, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Perception of microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) elicits transcriptional reprogramming in hosts and activates defense to pathogen attacks. The molecular mechanisms underlying plant pattern-triggered immunity remain elusive. A genetic screen identified Arabidopsis poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase 1 (atparg1) mutant with elevated immune gene expression upon multiple MAMP and pathogen treatments. Poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) is predicted to remove poly(ADP-ribose) polymers on acceptor proteins modified by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) with three PARPs and two PARGs in Arabidopsis genome. AtPARP1 and AtPARP2 possess poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activity, and the activity of AtPARP2 was enhanced by MAMP treatment. AtPARG1, but not AtPARG2, carries glycohydrolase activity in vivo and in vitro. Importantly, mutation (G450R) in atparg1 blocks its activity and the corresponding residue is highly conserved and essential for human HsPARG activity. Consistently, mutant atparp1atparp2 plants exhibited compromised immune gene activation and enhanced susceptibility to pathogen infections. Our study indicates that protein poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation plays critical roles in plant immune gene expression and defense to pathogen attacks.

  14. Protein poly(ADP-ribosylation regulates arabidopsis immune gene expression and defense responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baomin Feng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Perception of microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs elicits transcriptional reprogramming in hosts and activates defense to pathogen attacks. The molecular mechanisms underlying plant pattern-triggered immunity remain elusive. A genetic screen identified Arabidopsis poly(ADP-ribose glycohydrolase 1 (atparg1 mutant with elevated immune gene expression upon multiple MAMP and pathogen treatments. Poly(ADP-ribose glycohydrolase (PARG is predicted to remove poly(ADP-ribose polymers on acceptor proteins modified by poly(ADP-ribose polymerases (PARPs with three PARPs and two PARGs in Arabidopsis genome. AtPARP1 and AtPARP2 possess poly(ADP-ribose polymerase activity, and the activity of AtPARP2 was enhanced by MAMP treatment. AtPARG1, but not AtPARG2, carries glycohydrolase activity in vivo and in vitro. Importantly, mutation (G450R in atparg1 blocks its activity and the corresponding residue is highly conserved and essential for human HsPARG activity. Consistently, mutant atparp1atparp2 plants exhibited compromised immune gene activation and enhanced susceptibility to pathogen infections. Our study indicates that protein poly(ADP-ribosylation plays critical roles in plant immune gene expression and defense to pathogen attacks.

  15. Rethinking Defensive Information Warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-06-01

    electronic warfare, and special information operations. Defensive information operations ensure timely, accurate, and relevant information access...information and information systems. IA, physical security, OPSEC, counter-deception, counter-psyops, CI, EW, and special information operations. Ensure

  16. Metallothionein-mediated antioxidant defense system and its response to exercise training are impaired in human type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheede-Bergdahl, Celena; Penkowa, Milena; Hidalgo, Juan

    2005-01-01

    the MT-I+II-mediated antioxidant capacity and its response to exercise training in the skeletal muscle of patients with type 2 diabetes, biopsies and blood samples were taken from 13 matched subjects (type 2 diabetes n = 8, control subjects n = 5) both before and after 8 weeks of exercise training....... Immunohistochemical analysis revealed reduced MT-I+II levels in the skeletal muscle of type 2 diabetic subjects compared with control subjects. Control subjects produced a robust increase of MT-I+II in response to training; however, in type 2 diabetes, MT-I+II levels remained essentially unchanged. Significantly...... lower levels of MT-I+II were also detected in the plasma of type 2 diabetic subjects compared with control subjects. These results suggest that, in control subjects, the MT-I+II defense system is active and inducible within skeletal muscle tissue and plasma. In type 2 diabetes, reduced levels of MT...

  17. Accelerated Insertion of Materials-Electronics (AIM-E). Delivery Order 0011: Production of Electronic Type-Specific Buckytubes for Next Generation Defense Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    walled c arbon n anotubes ( SWNTs), t he r efinement of t he r aw S WNT m aterial t o yield a high p urity electronic t ype s eparated f orm o f t...urther r efinement . Unidym w as also developing an alternative m ethod of SWNT production, 2 specifically, an MGPx p rocess w ith e mphasis o n...owever, t he pr ocess s till r equired r efinement an d s cale-up t o pr oduce l arge vol umes of material. At this point JVIC continued the work

  18. Responses of antioxidant defenses to Cu and Zn stress in two aquatic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Maria-Manuel; Carvalho, Agostinho; Pascoal, Cláudia; Rodrigues, Fernando; Cássio, Fernanda

    2007-05-15

    Aquatic hyphomycetes are fungi that play a key role in plant litter decomposition in streams. Even though these fungi occur in metal-polluted streams, the mechanisms underlying their tolerance to metals are poorly documented. We addressed the effects of Zn and Cu in Varicosporium elodeae and Heliscus submersus by examining metal adsorption to cell walls, plasma membrane integrity and production of reactive oxygen species at metal concentrations inhibiting biomass production in 50% or 80%. The activity of the enzymes catalase, superoxide dismutase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase was measured to elucidate their role in coping with oxidative stress induced by metals at short- (14 h) and long- (8 days) term exposure. Results show that V. elodeae was more susceptible to the toxic effects induced by Cu and Zn than H. submersus, as indicated by more extensive inhibition of biomass production. Both metals, particularly Cu, induced oxidative stress in the two fungal species, as shown by the noticeable recovery of biomass production in the presence of an antioxidant agent. In both fungi, Cu induced a more severe disruption of plasma membrane integrity than Zn. Our studies on antioxidant defenses showed that catalase had a greater role alleviating stress induced by Zn and Cu than superoxide dismutase. Chronic metal stress also stimulated the production of NADPH, via the pentose phosphate pathway by increasing the activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. Our results suggest that the tolerance of aquatic hyphomycetes to Cu and Zn is associated with the ability of these fungi to initiate an efficient antioxidant defense system.

  19. Maize homologs of CCoAOMT and HCT, two key enzymes in lignin biosynthesis, form complexes with the NLR Rp1 protein to modulate the defense response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disease resistance (R) genes encode nucleotide binding leucine-rich-repeat (NLR) proteins that confer resistance to specific pathogens. Upon pathogen recognition they trigger a defense response that usually includes a so-called hypersensitive response (HR), a rapid localized cell death at the site o...

  20. Unusual electronic and magnetic responses from sulfur-decorated graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Choongyu; Cybart, S. A.; Wu, S. M.; Dynes, R. C.; Shin, S. J.; Haller, E. E.; Kim, S.; Kim, K.; Min, B. I.; Rappoport, T. G.; Jozwiak, C.; Fedorov, A. V.; Mo, S.-K.; Castro Neto, A. H.; Lee, D.-H.; Lanzara, A.

    Interactions between two different materials can produce strong electronic correlations that do not exist when each material stands alone. We search for such correlations from graphene, a non-magnetic semi-metal, decorated by sulfur, a diamagnetic insulator, using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and magneto-transport measurements. Sulfur-decorated graphene exhibits unusual electronic and magnetic responses that are clearly distinguished from clean graphene. Our findings provide intriguing insights on the search for novel quantum phases in graphene-based compounds.

  1. Transgenic expression of the dicotyledonous pattern recognition receptor EFR in rice leads to ligand-dependent activation of defense responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Schwessinger

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Plant plasma membrane localized pattern recognition receptors (PRRs detect extracellular pathogen-associated molecules. PRRs such as Arabidopsis EFR and rice XA21 are taxonomically restricted and are absent from most plant genomes. Here we show that rice plants expressing EFR or the chimeric receptor EFR::XA21, containing the EFR ectodomain and the XA21 intracellular domain, sense both Escherichia coli- and Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo-derived elf18 peptides at sub-nanomolar concentrations. Treatment of EFR and EFR::XA21 rice leaf tissue with elf18 leads to MAP kinase activation, reactive oxygen production and defense gene expression. Although expression of EFR does not lead to robust enhanced resistance to fully virulent Xoo isolates, it does lead to quantitatively enhanced resistance to weakly virulent Xoo isolates. EFR interacts with OsSERK2 and the XA21 binding protein 24 (XB24, two key components of the rice XA21-mediated immune response. Rice-EFR plants silenced for OsSERK2, or overexpressing rice XB24 are compromised in elf18-induced reactive oxygen production and defense gene expression indicating that these proteins are also important for EFR-mediated signaling in transgenic rice. Taken together, our results demonstrate the potential feasibility of enhancing disease resistance in rice and possibly other monocotyledonous crop species by expression of dicotyledonous PRRs. Our results also suggest that Arabidopsis EFR utilizes at least a subset of the known endogenous rice XA21 signaling components.

  2. Pseudomonas fluorescens induces strain-dependent and strain-independent host plant responses in defense networks, primary metabolism and photosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelletier, Dale A [ORNL; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L [ORNL; Karve, Abhijit A [ORNL; Lu, Tse-Yuan S [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Chen, Jay [ORNL; Martin, Madhavi Z [ORNL; Jawdy, Sara [ORNL; Weston, David [ORNL; Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Colonization of plants by nonpathogenic Pseudomonas fluorescens strains can confer enhanced defense capacity against a broad spectrum of pathogens. Few studies, however, have linked defense pathway regulation to primary metabolism and physiology. In this study, physiological data, metabolites, and transcript profiles are integrated to elucidate how molecular networks initiated at the root-microbe interface influence shoot metabolism and whole-plant performance. Experiments with Arabidopsis thaliana were performed using the newly identified P. fluorescens GM30 or P. fluorescens Pf-5 strains. Co-expression networks indicated that Pf-5 and GM30 induced a subnetwork specific to roots enriched for genes participating in RNA regulation, protein degradation, and hormonal metabolism. In contrast, only GM30 induced a subnetwork enriched for calcium signaling, sugar and nutrient signaling, and auxin metabolism, suggesting strain dependence in network architecture. In addition, one subnetwork present in shoots was enriched for genes in secondary metabolism, photosynthetic light reactions, and hormone metabolism. Metabolite analysis indicated that this network initiated changes in carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism. Consistent with this, we observed strain-specific responses in tryptophan and phenylalanine abundance. Both strains reduced host plant carbon gain and fitness, yet provided a clear fitness benefit when plants were challenged with the pathogen P. syringae DC3000.

  3. Comprehensive transcript profiling of Pto- and Prf-mediated host defense responses to infection by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mysore, Kirankumar S; Crasta, Oswald R; Tuori, Robert P; Folkerts, Otto; Swirsky, Peter B; Martin, Gregory B

    2002-11-01

    The disease resistance gene Pto encodes a serine/threonine protein kinase that confers resistance in tomato to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato strains that express the effector protein AvrPto. Pto-mediated resistance to bacterial speck disease also requires Prf, a protein with leucine-rich repeats and a putative nucleotide-binding site, although the role of Prf in the defense pathway is not known. We used GeneCalling, an open-architecture, mRNA-profiling technology, to identify genes that are either induced or suppressed in leaves 4 h after bacterial infection in the Pto- and Prf-mediated tomato-Pseudomonas(avrPto) interaction. Over 135 000 individual cDNA fragments representing an estimated 90% of the transcripts expressed in tomato leaves were examined and 432 differentially expressed genes were identified. The genes encode over 25 classes of proteins including 11 types of transcription factors and many signal transduction components. Differential expression of 91% of the genes required both Pto and Prf. Interestingly, differential expression of 32 genes did not require Pto but was dependent on Prf. Thus, our data support a role for Prf early in the Pto pathway and indicate that Prf can also function as an independent host recognition determinant of bacterial infection. Comprehensive expression profiling of the Pto-mediated defense response allows the development of many new hypotheses about the molecular basis of resistance to bacterial speck disease.

  4. A genome-wide association study of the maize hypersensitive defense response identifies genes that cluster in related pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bode A Olukolu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Much remains unknown of molecular events controlling the plant hypersensitive defense response (HR, a rapid localized cell death that limits pathogen spread and is mediated by resistance (R- genes. Genetic control of the HR is hard to quantify due to its microscopic and rapid nature. Natural modifiers of the ectopic HR phenotype induced by an aberrant auto-active R-gene (Rp1-D21, were mapped in a population of 3,381 recombinant inbred lines from the maize nested association mapping population. Joint linkage analysis was conducted to identify 32 additive but no epistatic quantitative trait loci (QTL using a linkage map based on more than 7000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. Genome-wide association (GWA analysis of 26.5 million SNPs was conducted after adjusting for background QTL. GWA identified associated SNPs that colocalized with 44 candidate genes. Thirty-six of these genes colocalized within 23 of the 32 QTL identified by joint linkage analysis. The candidate genes included genes predicted to be in involved programmed cell death, defense response, ubiquitination, redox homeostasis, autophagy, calcium signalling, lignin biosynthesis and cell wall modification. Twelve of the candidate genes showed significant differential expression between isogenic lines differing for the presence of Rp1-D21. Low but significant correlations between HR-related traits and several previously-measured disease resistance traits suggested that the genetic control of these traits was substantially, though not entirely, independent. This study provides the first system-wide analysis of natural variation that modulates the HR response in plants.

  5. Mining whole genomes and transcriptomes of Jatropha (Jatropha curcas) and Castor bean (Ricinus communis) for NBS-LRR genes and defense response associated transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Archit; Jaiswal, Varun; Chanumolu, Sree Krishna; Malhotra, Nikhil; Pal, Tarun; Chauhan, Rajinder Singh

    2014-11-01

    Jatropha (Jatropha curcas L.) and Castor bean (Ricinus communis) are oilseed crops of family Euphorbiaceae with the potential of producing high quality biodiesel and having industrial value. Both the bioenergy plants are becoming susceptible to various biotic stresses directly affecting the oil quality and content. No report exists as of today on analysis of Nucleotide Binding Site-Leucine Rich Repeat (NBS-LRR) gene repertoire and defense response transcription factors in both the plant species. In silico analysis of whole genomes and transcriptomes identified 47 new NBS-LRR genes in both the species and 122 and 318 defense response related transcription factors in Jatropha and Castor bean, respectively. The identified NBS-LRR genes and defense response transcription factors were mapped onto the respective genomes. Common and unique NBS-LRR genes and defense related transcription factors were identified in both the plant species. All NBS-LRR genes in both the species were characterized into Toll/interleukin-1 receptor NBS-LRRs (TNLs) and coiled-coil NBS-LRRs (CNLs), position on contigs, gene clusters and motifs and domains distribution. Transcript abundance or expression values were measured for all NBS-LRR genes and defense response transcription factors, suggesting their functional role. The current study provides a repertoire of NBS-LRR genes and transcription factors which can be used in not only dissecting the molecular basis of disease resistance phenotype but also in developing disease resistant genotypes in Jatropha and Castor bean through transgenic or molecular breeding approaches.

  6. Identification of putative TAL effector targets of the citrus canker pathogens shows functional convergence underlying disease development and defense response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Andre L A; Carazzolle, Marcelo F; Abe, Valeria Y; de Oliveira, Maria L P; Domingues, Mariane N; Silva, Jaqueline C; Cernadas, Raul A; Benedetti, Celso E

    2014-02-25

    Transcriptional activator-like (TAL) effectors, formerly known as the AvrBs3/PthA protein family, are DNA-binding effectors broadly found in Xanthomonas spp. that transactivate host genes upon injection via the bacterial type three-secretion system. Biologically relevant targets of TAL effectors, i.e. host genes whose induction is vital to establish a compatible interaction, have been reported for xanthomonads that colonize rice and pepper; however, citrus genes modulated by the TAL effectors PthA"s" and PthC"s" of the citrus canker bacteria Xanthomonas citri (Xc) and Xanthomonas aurantifolii pathotype C (XaC), respectively, are poorly characterized. Of particular interest, XaC causes canker disease in its host lemon (Citrus aurantifolia), but triggers a defense response in sweet orange. Based on, 1) the TAL effector-DNA binding code, 2) gene expression data of Xc and XaC-infiltrated sweet orange leaves, and 3) citrus hypocotyls transformed with PthA2, PthA4 or PthC1, we have identified a collection of Citrus sinensis genes potentially targeted by Xc and XaC TAL effectors. Our results suggest that similar with other strains of Xanthomonas TAL effectors, PthA2 and PthA4, and PthC1 to some extent, functionally converge. In particular, towards induction of genes involved in the auxin and gibberellin synthesis and response, cell division, and defense response. We also present evidence indicating that the TAL effectors act as transcriptional repressors and that the best scoring predicted DNA targets of PthA"s" and PthC"s" in citrus promoters predominantly overlap with or localize near to TATA boxes of core promoters, supporting the idea that TAL effectors interact with the host basal transcriptional machinery to recruit the RNA pol II and start transcription. The identification of PthA"s" and PthC"s" targets, such as the LOB (lateral organ boundary) and CCNBS genes that we report here, is key for the understanding of the canker symptoms development during host

  7. Electronic Commerce: Case Analyses and Tools Utilized in the Accomplishment of Buying Activities Within the Department of Defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-09-01

    electronic business or e -business processes (how the business is conducted), and electronic commerce ( Ecommerce ...BACKGROUND .........................................3 C. DEFINITIONS ........................................5 1. Electronic Commerce ( Ecommerce ...cases discussed within this thesis: 1. Electronic Commerce ( Ecommerce ) According to the Federal Register, electronic commerce is a means to

  8. A mixture of peptides and sugars derived from plant cell walls increases plant defense responses to stress and attenuates ageing-associated molecular changes in cultured skin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apone, Fabio; Tito, Annalisa; Carola, Antonietta; Arciello, Stefania; Tortora, Assunta; Filippini, Lucio; Monoli, Irene; Cucchiara, Mirna; Gibertoni, Simone; Chrispeels, Maarten J; Colucci, Gabriella

    2010-02-15

    Small peptides and aminoacid derivatives have been extensively studied for their effect of inducing plant defense responses, and thus increasing plant tolerance to a wide range of abiotic stresses. Similarly to plants, these compounds can activate different signaling pathways in mammalian skin cells as well, leading to the up-regulation of anti-aging specific genes. This suggests the existence of analogous defense response mechanisms, well conserved both in plants and animal cells. In this article, we describe the preparation of a new mixture of peptides and sugars derived from the chemical and enzymatic digestion of plant cell wall glycoproteins. We investigate the multiple roles of this product as potential "biostimulator" to protect plants from abiotic stresses, and also as potential cosmeceutical. In particular, the molecular effects of the peptide/sugar mixture of inducing plant defense responsive genes and protecting cultured skin cells from oxidative burst damages were deeply evaluated.

  9. Stress responses sculpt the insect immune system, optimizing defense in an ever-changing world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamo, Shelley Anne

    2017-01-01

    A whole organism, network approach can help explain the adaptive purpose of stress-induced changes in immune function. In insects, mediators of the stress response (e.g. stress hormones) divert molecular resources away from immune function and towards tissues necessary for fight-or-flight behaviours. For example, molecules such as lipid transport proteins are involved in both the stress and immune responses, leading to a reduction in disease resistance when these proteins are shifted towards being part of the stress response system. Stress responses also alter immune system strategies (i.e. reconfiguration) to compensate for resource losses that occur during fight-or flight events. In addition, stress responses optimize immune function for different physiological conditions. In insects, the stress response induces a pro-inflammatory state that probably enhances early immune responses.

  10. Responses to falling lll: defense mechanisms used by women with Turner syndrome and variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Lúcia Soares Chvatal

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Article extracted from the doctoral research entitled "Experiences of the infertility phenomenon by patients suffering from Turner syndrome and variants: a clinical-qualitative study" approved by the University of Campinas. OBJECTIVES: To understand the defenses employed by women suffering from TS and different ways of dealing with the disease. METHOD: Qualitative research with exploratory design, non-experimental. The instrument consisted of a semidirect psychological interview, involving 13 women, undergoing semestral medical follow-up at the Center for Integral Attention to Women's Health (CAISM, and whose sampling was determined by saturation. Data was interpreted using the psychodynamic approach along with an eclectic framework of theoretical references for discussion in the spirit of interdisciplinary approach. RESULTS:These women displayed psychosocial conflicts such as difficulties in interpersonal relationships; feelings of resignation, anger, impotence, devaluation and depression symptoms. Defenses used were: repression, denial, annulment, fantasizing, adaptation and sublimation. DISCUSSION: Women suffering from TS and variants must deal with the disease's organic and psychic implications that cause great suffering and often hinder a saner social insertion. In this case, the study's findings can guide ambulatory psychological support concomitantly to the routine clinical protocol.OBJETIVO:Conhecer as defesas utilizadas por mulheres com síndrome de Turner (ST ou formas variantes para lidar com a doença. MÉTODO: Pesquisa qualitativa com desenho exploratório, não experimental. O instrumento consistiu em entrevista psicológica semidirigida, aplicada em 13 mulheres, cuja amostragem deu-se por saturação, as quais fazem acompanhamento semestral no Centro de Atendimento Integral à Saúde da Mulher. Os dados foram interpretados utilizando-se da abordagem psicodinâmica, aliada a um quadro eclético de referenciais te

  11. Involvement of an antioxidant defense system in the adaptive response to cadmium in maize seedlings (Zea mays L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xianghua; Liu, Cuiying; Zhao, Xiaoyan; Li, Renying; Deng, Wenjing

    2014-11-01

    Chemical and biological analyses were used to investigate the growth response and antioxidant defense mechanism of maize seedlings (Zea mays L.) grown in soils with 0-100 mg kg(-1) Cd. Results showed that maize seedlings have strong abilities to accumulate and tolerate high concentrations of Cd. For soil with 50 mg kg(-1) Cd, the Cd contents in roots and shoots of maize seedlings are as large as 295.6 and 153.0 mg kg(-1) DW, respectively, without visible symptoms of toxicity. Lower soil Cd concentrations lead to a decrease in reduced glutathione (GSH) content in leaves of maize seedlings, whereas higher soil Cd concentrations resulted in an increase in the activities of superoxide dismutase, guaiacol peroxidase, catalase, and ascorbate peroxidase. Maize seedlings have strong capacities to adapt to low concentrations of Cd by consuming GSH and to develop an antioxidative enzyme system to defend against high-Cd stress.

  12. Growth and chemical defense in relation to resource availability: tradeoffs or common responses to environmental stress?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. S. Almeida-Cortez

    Full Text Available One aspect of plant defense is the production of constitutive secondary compounds that confer toxicity on herbivores and pathogens. The purpose of this study was to compare patterns of plant tissue toxicity across gradients of irradiance and nutrient content. We measured the potential toxicity (1/LC50 of extracts of six species of herbaceous Asteraceae grown under controlled conditions of temperature (25ºC, humidity (80%, photoperiod (16 h/day, in a range of concentrations of a modified Hoagland hydroponic solution (full-strength, 1/5 dilute, 1/10 dilute, and 1/50 dilute and under two different light intensities (250 and 125 mumol/m²/s. The plants grew from seed for 42 days post-germination, and randomly chosen plants were harvested each 7 days. We did a general measure of potential phytochemical toxicity using an alcohol extraction of secondary compounds followed by brine shrimp (Artemia sp. bioassay. Contrary to the carbon/nutrient balance hypothesis, tissue toxicity generally increased with decreasing irradiance and nutrient levels, so that plants whose growth was most restricted had tissues that were most toxic, although there were species-specific differences in this trend.

  13. Proteomic analysis of Daphnia magna hints at molecular pathways involved in defensive plastic responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Phenotypic plasticity in defensive traits occurs in many species when facing heterogeneous predator regimes. The waterflea Daphnia is well-known for showing a variety of these so called inducible defences. However, molecular mechanisms underlying this plasticity are poorly understood so far. We performed proteomic analysis on Daphnia magna exposed to chemical cues of the predator Triops cancriformis. D. magna develops an array of morphological changes in the presence of Triops including changes of carapace morphology and cuticle hardening. Results Using the 2D-DIGE technique, 1500 protein spots could be matched and quantified. We discovered 179 protein spots with altered intensity when comparing Triops exposed animals to a control group, and 69 spots were identified using nano-LC MS/MS. Kairomone exposure increased the intensity of spots containing muscle proteins, cuticle proteins and chitin-modifying enzymes as well as enzymes of carbohydrate and energy metabolism. The yolk precursor protein vitellogenin decreased in abundance in 41 of 43 spots. Conclusion Identified proteins may be either directly involved in carapace stability or reflect changes in energy demand and allocation costs in animals exposed to predator kairomones. Our results present promising candidate proteins involved in the expression of inducible defences in Daphnia and enable further in depth analysis of this phenomenon. PMID:24762235

  14. Possible role of glutamine synthetase in the NO signaling response in root nodules by contributing to the antioxidant defenses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Santos Silva

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is emerging as an important regulatory player in the Rhizobium-legume symbiosis. The occurrence of NO during several steps of the symbiotic interaction suggests an important, but yet unknown, signaling role of this molecule for root nodule formation and functioning. The identification of the molecular targets of NO is key for the assembly of the signal transduction cascade that will ultimately help to unravel NO function. We have recently shown that the key nitrogen assimilatory enzyme Glutamine Synthetase (GS is a molecular target of NO in root nodules of Medicago truncatula, being post-translationally regulated by tyrosine nitration in relation to nitrogen fixation. In functional nodules of M. truncatula NO formation has been located in the bacteroid containing cells of the fixation zone, where the ammonium generated by bacterial nitrogenase is released to the plant cytosol and assimilated into the organic pools by plant GS. We propose that the NO-mediated GS post-translational inactivation is connected to nitrogenase inhibition induced by NO and is related to metabolite channeling to boost the nodule antioxidant defenses. Glutamate, a substrate for GS activity is also the precursor for the synthesis of glutathione (GSH, which is highly abundant in root nodules of several plant species and known to play a major role in the antioxidant defense participating in the ascorbate/GSH cycle. Existing evidence suggests that upon NO-mediated GS inhibition, glutamate could be channeled for the synthesis of GSH. According to this hypothesis, GS would be involved in the NO-signaling responses in root nodules and the NO-signaling events would meet the nodule metabolic pathways to provide an adaptive response to the inhibition of symbiotic nitrogen fixation by reactive nitrogen species (RNS.

  15. Heterogeneity in Signaled Active Avoidance: Substantive and Methodological Relevance of Diversity in Instrumental Defensive Responses to Threat Cues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Robert Galatzer-Levy

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Individuals exposed to traumatic stressors follow divergent patterns including resilience and chronic stress. However, researchers utilizing animal models that examine threat responses typically use central tendency statistics that assume population homogeneity, potentially overlooking fundamental differences that can explain human diversity in response to traumatic stressors. The current study tests this assumption by identifying and replicating common heterogeneous patterns of response to signaled active avoidance (AA training where rats are trained to prevent an aversive outcome (shock by performing a instrumental behavior (shuttling between chambers during the presentation of a conditioned threat cue (tone. Study 1 conducted three days of signaled AA training (n = 81 animals and study 2 conducted five days of training (n = 186 animals. Four trajectories were identified in both samples including animals that acquired and retained avoidance behavior on the first day (Rapid Avoiders: 22% & 25%; those who never successfully acquired avoidance (Non-Avoiders; 20% &16%; a modal class who acquired avoidance over three days (Modal Avoiders; 37% & 50%; and a population who demonstrated a slow pattern of avoidance, failed to fully acquire avoidance in study 1 and did acquire avoidance on days 4 and 5 in study 2 (Slow Avoiders; 22.0% & 9%. With the exception of the Slow Avoiders in Study 1, populations that acquired demonstrated rapid step-like increases leading to asymptotic levels of avoidance. These findings indicate that avoidance responses are heterogeneous in a way that may be informative for understanding resilience and chronic stress responses such as PTSD as well as the nature of instrumental behavior acquisition. Characterizing heterogeneous populations based on their response to threat cues would increase the accuracy and translatability of such models and potentially lead to new discoveries that explain diversity in instrumental defensive

  16. Increased virus replication in mammalian cells by blocking intracellular innate defense responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, W. de; Haasnoot, J.; Velden, J. van der; Montfort, T. van; Zorgdrager, F.; Paxton, W.; Cornelissen, M.; Kuppeveld, F.J.M. van; Haan, P. de; Berkhout, B.

    2008-01-01

    The mammalian innate immune system senses viral infection by recognizing viral signatures and activates potent antiviral responses. Besides the interferon (IFN) response, there is accumulating evidence that RNA silencing or RNA interference (RNAi) serves as an antiviral mechanism in mammalian cells.

  17. Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species in Defense/Stress Responses Activated by Chitosan in Sycamore Cultured Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Malerba

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan (CHT is a non-toxic and inexpensive compound obtained by deacetylation of chitin, the main component of the exoskeleton of arthropods as well as of the cell walls of many fungi. In agriculture CHT is used to control numerous diseases on various horticultural commodities but, although different mechanisms have been proposed, the exact mode of action of CHT is still unknown. In sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L. cultured cells, CHT induces a set of defense/stress responses that includes production of H2O2 and nitric oxide (NO. We investigated the possible signaling role of these reactive molecules in some CHT-induced responses by means of inhibitors of production and/or scavengers. The results show that both reactive nitrogen and oxygen species are not only a mere symptom of stress conditions but are involved in the responses induced by CHT in sycamore cells. In particular, NO appears to be involved in a cell death form induced by CHT that shows apoptotic features like DNA fragmentation, increase in caspase-3-like activity and release of cytochrome c from the mitochondrion. On the contrary, reactive oxygen species (ROS appear involved in a cell death form induced by CHT that does not show these apoptotic features but presents increase in lipid peroxidation.

  18. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in defense/stress responses activated by chitosan in sycamore cultured cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malerba, Massimo; Cerana, Raffaella

    2015-01-29

    Chitosan (CHT) is a non-toxic and inexpensive compound obtained by deacetylation of chitin, the main component of the exoskeleton of arthropods as well as of the cell walls of many fungi. In agriculture CHT is used to control numerous diseases on various horticultural commodities but, although different mechanisms have been proposed, the exact mode of action of CHT is still unknown. In sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) cultured cells, CHT induces a set of defense/stress responses that includes production of H2O2 and nitric oxide (NO). We investigated the possible signaling role of these reactive molecules in some CHT-induced responses by means of inhibitors of production and/or scavengers. The results show that both reactive nitrogen and oxygen species are not only a mere symptom of stress conditions but are involved in the responses induced by CHT in sycamore cells. In particular, NO appears to be involved in a cell death form induced by CHT that shows apoptotic features like DNA fragmentation, increase in caspase-3-like activity and release of cytochrome c from the mitochondrion. On the contrary, reactive oxygen species (ROS) appear involved in a cell death form induced by CHT that does not show these apoptotic features but presents increase in lipid peroxidation.

  19. Defining the Roles, Responsibilities, and Functions for Data Science Within the Defense Intelligence Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Aaron Frank , Rebeca Orrie, Michael Watson C O R P O R A T I O N Limited Print and Electronic Distribution Rights This document and trademark(s...by an analyst or researcher. This type of identifi- cation can be time-consuming and potentially full of errors. GENIE learns from ana - 1 Interview...criteria. As a result, RDM allows data scientists to provide an ana - lytic framework that helps multiple, often competing stakeholders agree on a course

  20. Nonadiabatic electron response in the Hasegawa-Wakatani equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoltzfus-Dueck, T. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Teilinstitut Greifswald, Wendelsteinstr. 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); Scott, B. D. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstraße 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Krommes, J. A. [PPPL, Princeton University, P.O. Box 451, MS 28, Princeton, New Jersey 08543–0451 (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Tokamak edge turbulence is strongly influenced by parallel electron physics, which relaxes density and potential fluctuations towards electron adiabatic response. Beginning with the paradigmatic Hasegawa-Wakatani equations (HWEs) for resistive tokamak edge turbulence, a unique decomposition of the electric potential (φ) into adiabatic (a) and nonadiabatic (b) portions is derived, based on the requirement that a neither drive nor respond to the parallel current j{sub ∥}. The form of the decomposition clarifies that, at perpendicular scales large relative to the sound radius, the electron adiabatic response controls the nonzonal φ, not the fluctuating density n. Simple energy balance arguments allow one to rigorously bound the ratio of rms nonzonal nonadiabatic fluctuations (b(tilde sign)) relative to adiabatic ones (ã). The role of the vorticity nonlinearity in transferring energy between adiabatic and nonadiabatic fluctuations aids intuitive understanding of self-sustained turbulence in the HWEs. When the normalized parallel resistivity is weak, b(tilde sign) becomes effectively slaved, allowing the reduction to an approximate one-field model that remains valid for strong turbulence. In addition to guiding physical intuition, the one-field reduction should greatly ease further analytical manipulations. Direct numerical simulation of the 2D HWEs confirms the convergence of the asymptotic formula for b(tilde sign)

  1. Defense Health Agency and the Deployment of the Electronic Health Record: Building an Organizational Framework for Implementation and Sustainment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    change. In On Change Management (pp. 137–154). Boston, MA: Harvard Business Review Press. Best, M., & Neuhauser, D. (2004). Ignaz Semmelweiss and...pp. 47–62). Boston, MA: Harvard Business Review Press. 72 Government Accountability Office. (2015). Defense health care reform: Actions needed to...2012). Commentary #1. In HBR Guide to Project Management (96–98). Boston: Harvard Business Review Press. 73 Murphy, J. (2011). Leading from the

  2. Acute mechano-electronic responses in twisted phosphorene nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Woosun; Kang, Kisung; Soon, Aloysius

    2016-08-01

    Many different forms of mechanical and structural deformations have been employed to alter the electronic structure of various modern two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials. Given the recent interest in the new class of 2D nanomaterials - phosphorene, here we investigate how the rotational strain-dependent electronic properties of low-dimensional phosphorene may be exploited for technological gain. Here, using first-principles density-functional theory, we investigate the mechanical stability of twisted one-dimensional phosphorene nanoribbons (TPNR) by measuring their critical twist angle (θc) and shear modulus as a function of the applied mechanical torque. We find a strong anisotropic, chirality-dependent mechano-electronic response in the hydrogen-passivated TPNRs upon vortical deformation, resulting in a striking difference in the change in the carrier effective mass as a function of torque angle (and thus, the corresponding change in carrier mobility) between the zigzag and armchair directions in these TPNRs. The accompanied tunable band-gap energies for the hydrogen-passivated zigzag TPNRs may then be exploited for various key opto-electronic nanodevices.Many different forms of mechanical and structural deformations have been employed to alter the electronic structure of various modern two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials. Given the recent interest in the new class of 2D nanomaterials - phosphorene, here we investigate how the rotational strain-dependent electronic properties of low-dimensional phosphorene may be exploited for technological gain. Here, using first-principles density-functional theory, we investigate the mechanical stability of twisted one-dimensional phosphorene nanoribbons (TPNR) by measuring their critical twist angle (θc) and shear modulus as a function of the applied mechanical torque. We find a strong anisotropic, chirality-dependent mechano-electronic response in the hydrogen-passivated TPNRs upon vortical deformation, resulting in a

  3. Activation of neuronal defense mechanisms in response to pathogenic factors triggering induction of amyloidosis in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltsev, Alexander V; Santockyte, Rasa; Bystryak, Simon; Galzitskaya, Oxana V

    2014-01-01

    We present a new model for etiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) which postulates early involvement of specialized neuroprotective mechanisms in the pathology of AD. These neuroprotective mechanisms work in concert to regulate metabolic homeostasis in healthy neuronal cells, but contribute to the distinctive cytopathic phenotype of neuronal degeneration in AD. According to this model, two molecular/genetic hallmarks of AD, amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition and tau hyperphosphorylation, are associated with neuronal mechanisms for dissipating thermal energy associated with high levels of protein synthesis in highly temperature-sensitive neuronal cells. Development of effective methods of AD treatment will require a better understanding of how this neuronal defense system is activated in response to cytopathological triggers in sporadic AD. The cause and effect link between synthesis and processing of amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP) and the AD terminal phenotype of neurofibrillary tangles and neuron loss involve the formation of Aβ peptides that accumulate as oligomers, cannot be controlled by neurons, and are toxic to the surrounding neuronal membranes. We analyze experimental and clinical studies that have investigated the correlation between phosphorylation of some transport proteins and increased synthesis of proteins in neurons. We also review the evidence related to the possibility that protein hyperphosphorylation may be a byproduct of energetic imbalances in AD cells associated with high levels of protein synthesis, and that activation of defense systems, through which energy-rich molecules are eliminated from the site of protein synthesis and are sequestered to the peripheral neuronal areas, may bring about some of the distinctive morphological features of AD.

  4. Phase responses of harmonics reflected from radio-frequency electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzaro, Gregory J.; McGowan, Sean F.; Gallagher, Kyle A.; Sherbondy, Kelly D.; Martone, Anthony F.; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2016-05-01

    The phase responses of nonlinear-radar targets illuminated by stepped frequencies are studied. Data is presented for an experimental radar and two commercial electronic targets at short standoff ranges. The amplitudes and phases of harmonics generated by each target at each frequency are captured over a 100-MHz-wide transmit band. As in the authors' prior work, target detection is demonstrated by receiving at least one harmonic of at least one transmit frequency. In the present work, experiments confirm that the phase of a harmonic reflected from a radio-frequency electronic target at a standoff distance is linear versus frequency. Similar to traditional wideband radar, the change of the reflected phase with respect to frequency indicates the range to the nonlinear target.

  5. LrABCF1, a GCN-type ATP-binding cassette transporter from Lilium regale, is involved in defense responses against viral and fungal pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are essential for membrane translocation in diverse biological processes, such as plant development and defense response. Here, a general control non-derepressible (GCN)-type ABC transporter gene, designated LrABCF1, was identified from Cucumber mosaic virus (...

  6. Effects of dietary L-glutamine supplementation on specific and general defense responses in mice immunized with inactivated Pasteurella multocida vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuai; Liu, Shuping; Zhang, Fengmei; Ren, Wenkai; Li, Nengzhang; Yin, Jie; Duan, Jielin; Peng, Yuanyi; Liu, Gang; Yin, Yulong; Wu, Guoyao

    2014-10-01

    Little is known about effects of dietary glutamine supplementation on specific and general defense responses in a vaccine-immunized animal model. Thus, this study determined roles for dietary glutamine supplementation in specific and general defense responses in mice immunized with inactivated Pasteurella multocida vaccine. The measured variables included: (1) the production of pathogen-specific antibodies; (2) mRNA levels for pro-inflammatory cytokines, toll-like receptors and anti-oxidative factors; and (3) the distribution of P. multocida in tissues and the expression of its major virulence factors in vivo. Dietary supplementation with 0.5 % glutamine had a better protective role than 1 or 2 % glutamine against P. multocida infection in vaccine-immunized mice, at least partly resulting from its effects in modulation of general defense responses. Dietary glutamine supplementation had little effects on the production of P. multocida-specific antibodies. Compared to the non-supplemented group, dietary supplementation with 0.5 % glutamine had no effect on bacterial burden in vivo but decreased the expression of major virulence factors in the spleen. Collectively, supplementing 0.5 % glutamine to a conventional diet provides benefits in vaccine-immunized mice by enhancing general defense responses and decreasing expression of specific virulence factors.

  7. Development of Electronic Commerce and Its Application in Defense Procurement%电子商务的发展及其在国防采办中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    仲斌

    2000-01-01

    The US DoD has introduced Electronic Commerce and related technologies into their defense procurement reform. This proves to be more efficient and economic, and has laid foundation for the realization of paperless procurement. By analyzing the US DoD experiment, this paper demonstrates the feasibility of introducing Electronic Commerce technologies into China's weaponry construction step by step.

  8. Mir1-CP, a novel defense cysteine protease accumulates in maize vascular tissues in response to herbivory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Lorena; Camas, Alberto; Shivaji, Renuka; Ankala, Arunkanth; Williams, Paul; Luthe, Dawn

    2007-07-01

    When lepidopteran larvae feed on the insect-resistant maize genotype Mp708 there is a rapid accumulation of a defensive cysteine protease, Maize insect resistance 1-cysteine protease (Mir1-CP), at the feeding site. Silver-enhanced immunolocalization visualized with both light and transmission electron microscopy was used to determine the location of Mir1-CP in the maize leaf. The results indicated that Mir1-CP is localized predominantly in the phloem of minor and intermediate veins. After 24 h of larval feeding, Mir1-CP increased in abundance in the vascular parenchyma cells and in the thick-walled sieve element (TSE); it was also found localized to the bundle sheath and mesophyll cells. In situ hybridization of mRNA encoding Mir1-CP indicated that the primary sites of Mir1-CP synthesis in the whorl are the vascular parenchyma and bundle sheath cells. In addition to the phloem, Mir1-CP was also found in the metaxylem of the leaf and root. After 24 h of foliar feeding, the amount of Mir1-CP in the root xylem increased and it appeared to move from xylem parenchyma into the root metaxylem elements. The accumulation of Mir1-CP in maize vascular elements suggests Mir1-CP may move through these tissues to defend against insect herbivores.

  9. Analysis of the roles of NrdR and DnaB from Streptococcus pyogenes in response to host defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Okada, Ryo; Isaka, Masanori; Tatsuno, Ichiro; Isobe, Ken-Ichi; Hasegawa, Tadao

    2015-03-01

    Toxic shock syndrome caused by Streptococcus pyogenes (S. pyogenes) is a re-emerging infectious disease. Many virulence-associated proteins play important roles in its pathogenesis and the production of these proteins is controlled by many regulatory factors. CovS is one of the most important two-component sensor proteins in S. pyogenes, and it has been analyzed extensively. Our recent analyses revealed the existence of a transposon between covS and nrdR in several strains, and we speculated that this insertion has some importance. Hence, we examined the significances of the NrdR stand-alone regulator and DnaB, which is encoded by the gene located immediately downstream of nrdR in S. pyogenes infection. We established an nrdR-only knockout strain, and both nrdR and partial dnaB knockout strain. These established knockout strains exhibited a deteriorated response to H2 O2 exposure. nrdR and partial dnaB knockout strain was more easily killed by human polynuclear blood cells, but the nrdR-only knockout strain had no significant difference compared to wild type in contrast to the combined knockout strain. In addition, the mouse infection model experiment illustrated that nrdR and partial dnaB knockout strain, but not the nrdR-only knockout strain, was less virulent compared with the parental strain. These results suggest that DnaB is involved in response to host defense.

  10. P58(IPK: a novel "CIHD" member of the host innate defense response against pathogenic virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan G Goodman

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available To support their replication, viruses take advantage of numerous cellular factors and processes. Recent large-scale screens have identified hundreds of such factors, yet little is known about how viruses exploit any of these. Influenza virus infection post-translationally activates P58(IPK, a cellular inhibitor of the interferon-induced, dsRNA-activated eIF2alpha kinase, PKR. Here, we report that infection of P58(IPK knockout mice with influenza virus resulted in increased lung pathology, immune cell apoptosis, PKR activation, and mortality. Analysis of lung transcriptional profiles, including those induced by the reconstructed 1918 pandemic virus, revealed increased expression of genes associated with the cell death, immune, and inflammatory responses. These experiments represent the first use of a mammalian infection model to demonstrate the role of P58(IPK in the antiviral response. Our results suggest that P58(IPK represents a new class of molecule, a cellular inhibitor of the host defense (CIHD, as P58(IPK is activated during virus infection to inhibit virus-induced apoptosis and inflammation to prolong host survival, even while prolonging viral replication.

  11. Expression patterns of genes involved in the defense and stress response of Spiroplasma citri infected Madagascar Periwinkle Catharanthus roseus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejat, Naghmeh; Vadamalai, Ganesan; Dickinson, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Madagascar periwinkle is an ornamental and a medicinal plant, and is also an indicator plant that is highly susceptible to phytoplasma and spiroplasma infections from different crops. Periwinkle lethal yellows, caused by Spiroplasma citri, is one of the most devastating diseases of periwinkle. The response of plants to S. citri infection is very little known at the transcriptome level. In this study, quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) was used to investigate the expression levels of four selected genes involved in defense and stress responses in naturally and experimentally Spiroplasma citri infected periwinkles. Strictosidine β-glucosidase involved in terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs) biosynthesis pathway showed significant upregulation in experimentally and naturally infected periwinkles. The transcript level of extensin increased in leaves of periwinkles experimentally infected by S. citri in comparison to healthy ones. A similar level of heat shock protein 90 and metallothionein expression was observed in healthy, naturally and experimentally spiroplasma-diseased periwinkles. Overexpression of Strictosidine β-glucosidase demonstrates the potential utility of this gene as a host biomarker to increase the fidelity of S. citri detection and can also be used in breeding programs to develop stable disease-resistance varieties.

  12. Expression Patterns of Genes Involved in the Defense and Stress Response of Spiroplasma citri Infected Madagascar Periwinkle Catharanthus roseus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naghmeh Nejat

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Madagascar periwinkle is an ornamental and a medicinal plant, and is also an indicator plant that is highly susceptible to phytoplasma and spiroplasma infections from different crops. Periwinkle lethal yellows, caused by Spiroplasma citri, is one of the most devastating diseases of periwinkle. The response of plants to S. citri infection is very little known at the transcriptome level. In this study, quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR was used to investigate the expression levels of four selected genes involved in defense and stress responses in naturally and experimentally Spiroplasma citri infected periwinkles. Strictosidine β-glucosidase involved in terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs biosynthesis pathway showed significant upregulation in experimentally and naturally infected periwinkles. The transcript level of extensin increased in leaves of periwinkles experimentally infected by S. citri in comparison to healthy ones. A similar level of heat shock protein 90 and metallothionein expression was observed in healthy, naturally and experimentally spiroplasma-diseased periwinkles. Overexpression of Strictosidine β-glucosidase demonstrates the potential utility of this gene as a host biomarker to increase the fidelity of S. citri detection and can also be used in breeding programs to develop stable disease-resistance varieties.

  13. The macro response Monte Carlo method for electron transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svatos, M M

    1998-09-01

    The main goal of this thesis was to prove the feasibility of basing electron depth dose calculations in a phantom on first-principles single scatter physics, in an amount of time that is equal to or better than current electron Monte Carlo methods. The Macro Response Monte Carlo (MRMC) method achieves run times that are on the order of conventional electron transport methods such as condensed history, with the potential to be much faster. This is possible because MRMC is a Local-to-Global method, meaning the problem is broken down into two separate transport calculations. The first stage is a local, in this case, single scatter calculation, which generates probability distribution functions (PDFs) to describe the electron's energy, position and trajectory after leaving the local geometry, a small sphere or "kugel" A number of local kugel calculations were run for calcium and carbon, creating a library of kugel data sets over a range of incident energies (0.25 MeV - 8 MeV) and sizes (0.025 cm to 0.1 cm in radius). The second transport stage is a global calculation, where steps that conform to the size of the kugels in the library are taken through the global geometry. For each step, the appropriate PDFs from the MRMC library are sampled to determine the electron's new energy, position and trajectory. The electron is immediately advanced to the end of the step and then chooses another kugel to sample, which continues until transport is completed. The MRMC global stepping code was benchmarked as a series of subroutines inside of the Peregrine Monte Carlo code. It was compared to Peregrine's class II condensed history electron transport package, EGS4, and MCNP for depth dose in simple phantoms having density inhomogeneities. Since the kugels completed in the library were of relatively small size, the zoning of the phantoms was scaled down from a clinical size, so that the energy deposition algorithms for spreading dose across 5-10 zones per kugel could

  14. Neuroscience, ethics and legal responsibility: the problem of the insanity defense. Commentary on "The ethics of neuroscience and the neuroscience of ethics: a phenomenological-existential approach".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Steven R

    2012-09-01

    The insanity defense presents many difficult questions for the legal system. It attracts attention beyond its practical significance (it is seldom used successfully) because it goes to the heart of the concept of legal responsibility. "Not guilty by reason of insanity" generally requires that as a result of mental illness the defendant was unable to distinguish right from wrong at the time of the crime. The many difficult and complex questions presented by the insanity defense have led some in the legal community to hope that neuroscience might help resolve some of these problems, but that hope is not likely to be realized.

  15. Shared responsibility for electronic records: governance in perinatal data entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craswell, Alison; Moxham, Lorna; Broadbent, Marc

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents research undertaken as part of a larger research project to examine the factors that influence midwives when entering perinatal data. A grounded theory methodology was used to undertake qualitative interviews with 15 participants from 12 different hospitals across Queensland, Australia using three different systems for perinatal data collection. The findings surrounding accountability are presented revealing that a shift in governance relating to responsibility and accountability is not occurring in midwifery units across Queensland. Without assignation of responsibility for entries and accountability for mistakes or omissions, perinatal data records can be left incomplete or inaccurate. Increasing use of electronic health records and creation of digital hospitals indicates these issues are highly relevant in planning for these services.

  16. RNAi and antiviral defense in Drosophila: setting up a systemic immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlikow, Margot; Goic, Bertsy; Saleh, Maria-Carla

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) controls gene expression in eukaryotic cells and thus, cellular homeostasis. In addition, in plants, nematodes and arthropods it is a central antiviral effector mechanism. Antiviral RNAi has been well described as a cell autonomous response, which is triggered by double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) molecules. This dsRNA is the precursor for the silencing of viral RNA in a sequence-specific manner. In plants, systemic antiviral immunity has been demonstrated, however much less is known in animals. Recently, some evidence for a systemic antiviral response in arthropods has come to light. Cell autonomous RNAi may not be sufficient to reach an efficient antiviral response, and the organism might rely on the spread and uptake of an RNAi signal of unknown origin. In this review, we offer a perspective on how RNAi-mediated antiviral immunity could confer systemic protection in insects and we propose directions for future research to understand the mechanism of RNAi-immune signal sorting, spreading and amplification.

  17. Y chromosomal and sex effects on the behavioral stress response in the defensive burying test in wild house mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluyter, F; Korte, SM; Van Baal, GCM; De Ruiter, AJH; Van Oortmerssen, GA

    1999-01-01

    Genetically selected short attack latency (SAL) and long attack latency (LAL) male wild house mice behave differently in the defensive burying test. When challenged, SAL males respond actively with more time spent on defensive burying, whereas LAL males are more passive with more time remaining immo

  18. RUN1 and REN1 Pyramiding in Grapevine (Vitis vinifera cv. Crimson Seedless) Displays an Improved Defense Response Leading to Enhanced Resistance to Powdery Mildew (Erysiphe necator).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agurto, Mario; Schlechter, Rudolf O; Armijo, Grace; Solano, Esteban; Serrano, Carolina; Contreras, Rodrigo A; Zúñiga, Gustavo E; Arce-Johnson, Patricio

    2017-01-01

    Fungal pathogens are the cause of the most common diseases in grapevine and among them powdery mildew represents a major focus for disease management. Different strategies for introgression of resistance in grapevine are currently undertaken in breeding programs. For example, introgression of several resistance genes (R) from different sources for making it more durable and also strengthening the plant defense response. Taking this into account, we cross-pollinated P09-105/34, a grapevine plant carrying both RUN1 and REN1 pyramided loci of resistance to Erysiphe necator inherited from a pseudo-backcrossing scheme with Muscadinia rotundifolia and Vitis vinifera 'Dzhandzhal Kara,' respectively, with the susceptible commercial table grape cv. 'Crimson Seedless.' We developed RUN1REN1 resistant genotypes through conventional breeding and identified them by marker assisted selection. The characterization of defense response showed a highly effective defense mechanism against powdery mildew in these plants. Our results reveal that RUN1REN1 grapevine plants display a robust defense response against E. necator, leading to unsuccessful fungal establishment with low penetration rate and poor hypha development. This resistance mechanism includes reactive oxygen species production, callose accumulation, programmed cell death induction and mainly VvSTS36 and VvPEN1 gene activation. RUN1REN1 plants have a great potential as new table grape cultivars with durable complete resistance to E. necator, and are valuable germplasm to be included in grape breeding programs to continue pyramiding with other sources of resistance to grapevine diseases.

  19. Ultimate response time of high electron mobility transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudin, Sergey; Rupper, Greg [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, Maryland 20783 (United States); Shur, Michael [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)

    2015-05-07

    We present theoretical studies of the response time of the two-dimensional gated electron gas to femtosecond pulses. Our hydrodynamic simulations show that the device response to a short pulse or a step-function signal is either smooth or oscillating time-decay at low and high mobility, μ, values, respectively. At small gate voltage swings, U{sub 0} = U{sub g} − U{sub th}, where U{sub g} is the gate voltage and U{sub th} is the threshold voltage, such that μU{sub 0}/L < v{sub s}, where L is the channel length and v{sub s} is the effective electron saturation velocity, the decay time in the low mobility samples is on the order of L{sup 2}/(μU{sub 0}), in agreement with the analytical drift model. However, the decay is preceded by a delay time on the order of L/s, where s is the plasma wave velocity. This delay is the ballistic transport signature in collision-dominated devices, which becomes important during very short time periods. In the high mobility devices, the period of the decaying oscillations is on the order of the plasma wave velocity transit time. Our analysis shows that short channel field effect transistors operating in the plasmonic regime can meet the requirements for applications as terahertz detectors, mixers, delay lines, and phase shifters in ultra high-speed wireless communication circuits.

  20. Ultimate response time of high electron mobility transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudin, Sergey; Rupper, Greg; Shur, Michael

    2015-05-01

    We present theoretical studies of the response time of the two-dimensional gated electron gas to femtosecond pulses. Our hydrodynamic simulations show that the device response to a short pulse or a step-function signal is either smooth or oscillating time-decay at low and high mobility, μ, values, respectively. At small gate voltage swings, U0 = Ug - Uth, where Ug is the gate voltage and Uth is the threshold voltage, such that μU0/L < vs, where L is the channel length and vs is the effective electron saturation velocity, the decay time in the low mobility samples is on the order of L2/(μU0), in agreement with the analytical drift model. However, the decay is preceded by a delay time on the order of L/s, where s is the plasma wave velocity. This delay is the ballistic transport signature in collision-dominated devices, which becomes important during very short time periods. In the high mobility devices, the period of the decaying oscillations is on the order of the plasma wave velocity transit time. Our analysis shows that short channel field effect transistors operating in the plasmonic regime can meet the requirements for applications as terahertz detectors, mixers, delay lines, and phase shifters in ultra high-speed wireless communication circuits.

  1. Effect of heavy metals on growth response and antioxidant defense protection in Bacillus cereus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behera, Madhumita; Dandapat, Jagneshwar; Rath, Chandi Charan

    2014-11-01

    Bacterial cells in aerobic environment generate reactive oxygen species which may lead to oxidative stress, induced by a wide range of environmental factors including heavy metals. In the present context an attempt has been made to determine the toxic impact of cadmium and copper on growth performance, oxidative stress, and relative level of antioxidant protection in Bacillus cereus. Outcome of this study suggests that both the metal ions depleted the growth rate in this organism with respect to time and concentration of the metal ions. CdCl2 exposure induced extracellular glutathione (GSH) production, whereas, its level was declined in response to CuSO4. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) content was elevated under CdCl2 stress but the activity of catalase (CAT) was inhibited. In contrast, incubation of bacteria with CuSO4 exhibited decreased SOD activity with concomitant rise in CAT activity and H2 O2 content. We also observed elevation of intracellular GSH level in this bacteria following supplementation of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) in the medium. Overall findings of this study indicated differential toxicity of CdCl2 and CuSO4 in inducing oxidative stress, depleting growth rate and the possible involvement of GSH and CAT in adaptive antioxidant response.

  2. Measurement of Low Energy Electronic Recoil Response and Electronic/Nuclear Recoils Discrimination in XENON100

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jingqiang; Xenon Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The XENON100 detector uses liquid xenon time projection chamber to search for nuclear recoils(NR) caused by hypothetical Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). The backgrounds are mostly electronic recoils(ER), thus it's crucial to distinguish NR from ER. Using high statistical calibration data from tritiated methane, AmBe and other sources in XENON100, the ER/NR discrimination under different electric fields are measured. The Photon yield and recombination fluctuation of low energy electronic recoils under different fields will also be presented and compared to results from NEST and other experiments, which is crucial to understanding the response of liquid xenon detectors in the energy regime of searching dark matter.

  3. Epithelial cells, the “switchboard” of respiratory immune defense responses: effects of air pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Loretta; Jaspers, Ilona

    2015-01-01

    Summary “Epimmunome”, a term introduced recently by Swamy and colleagues, describes all molecules and pathways used by epithelial cells (ECs) to instruct immune cells. Today, we know that ECs are among the first sites within the human body to be exposed to pathogens (such as influenza viruses) and that the release of chemokine and cytokines by ECs is influenced by inhaled agents. The role of the ECs as a switchboard to initiate and regulate immune responses is altered through air pollutant exposure, such as ozone, tobacco smoke and diesel exhaust emissions. The details of the interplay between ECs and immune cells are not yet fully understood and need to be investigated further. Co-culture models, cell specific genetically-modified mice and the analysis of human biopsies provide great tools to gain knowledge about potential mechanisms. Increasing our understanding about the role of ECs in respiratory immunity may yield novel therapeutic targets to modulate downstream diseases. PMID:22851042

  4. Response of enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant defense systems of Polygonum hydropiper to Mn stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨贤均; 邓冬梅; 刘可慧; 于方明

    2016-01-01

    The response of enzyme and non-enzymatic antioxidants of Mn hyperaccumuator,Polygonum hydropiper (P. hydropiper), to Mn stress was studied using hydroponics culture experiments to explore the mechanism of Mn tolerance in this species. Results showed that both chlorophyll and carotenoid contents significantly (p<0.05) decreased with increasing Mn treatment levels (0, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, and 8 mg/L) in hydroponics. The concentrations of malondialdehyde (MDA) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the root and shoot ofP. hydropiper were accumulated under Mn stress. Meanwhile, the anti-oxidative functions of several important enzymes, including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and peroxidase (POD) in plants were stimulated by Mn spike in leaves and roots, especially at low Mn stress; while sulfhydryl group (—SH) and glutathion (GSH) were likely involved in Mn detoxification ofP. hydropiper under high Mn stress.

  5. Ministry of Defense Budged and the Economic Responsibilities as NATO Member

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela Metushaj

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Every four years Albania is confronted with several social issues which demand real and immediate solutions. These issues are often confronted with political implications offering no benefit for the civil society in general, or any of its levels, given the fact that all Albanian citizens are part of it in different levels. The main level affected by these social issues is the poor, women, unemployed, the youth and retired people. Albania is classified as the poorest country in the Balkan Peninsula and overcoming the social challenge of life quality in all social levels is the main challenge. During the last 10 years, the Albanian Governments has undertaken several reforms to meet all the criteria for the European integration. One of the most important criteria is the economical reform affecting the unemployment and the decrease of poverty, as these problems affect a considerable number of families, and in the same time they affect education and health service, two other rings of the social chains that are very important. Becoming a NATO member gave Albania a great encouragement to face the next challenges of the international arena and in this sense the Albanian Government is aware that being part of such an important organization would require availability and involvement of human resources and financial responsibilities, which would be a further burden for the budget. Therefore, it is important to create a suitable ground to implement these fundamental projects for the society. This is another challenge for the Albanian people with requires responsibility and sacrifice to meet the so much hoped ideals of democracy and solidarity, which establish peace, stability and prosperity for our country.

  6. CMOS pixel sensor response to low energy electrons in transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battaglia, Marco [Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)], E-mail: MBattaglia@lbl.gov; Contarato, Devis; Denes, Peter; Doering, Dionisio; Radmilovic, Velimir [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2009-07-01

    This letter presents the results of a study of the response of a test CMOS sensor with a radiation tolerant pixel cell design to 80 and 100 keV electrons. The point spread function is measured to be (13.0{+-}1.7){mu}m at 100 keV and (12.1{+-}1.6){mu}m at 80 keV, for 20{mu}m pixels. Results agree well with values predicted by a Geant-4 and dedicated charge collection simulation.

  7. Interspecific Potato Breeding Lines Display Differential Colonization Patterns and Induced Defense Responses after Ralstonia solanacearum Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Ferreira

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Potato (Solanum tuberosum L. is one of the main hosts of Ralstonia solanacearum, the causative agent of bacterial wilt. This plant pathogen bacteria produce asymptomatic latent infections that promote its global spread, hindering disease control. A potato breeding program is conducted in Uruguay based on the introgression of resistance from the wild native species S. commersonii Dun. Currently, several backcrosses were generated exploiting the high genetic variability of this wild species resulting in advanced interspecific breeding lines with different levels of bacterial wilt resistance. The overall aim of this work was to characterize the interaction of the improved potato germplasm with R. solanacearum. Potato clones with different responses to R. solanacearum were selected, and colonization, dissemination and multiplication patterns after infection were evaluated. A R. solanacearum strain belonging to the phylotype IIB-sequevar 1, with high aggressiveness on potato was genetically modified to constitutively generate fluorescence and luminescence from either the green fluorescence protein gene or lux operon. These reporter strains were used to allow a direct and precise visualization of fluorescent and luminescent cells in plant tissues by confocal microscopy and luminometry. Based on wilting scoring and detection of latent infections, the selected clones were classified as susceptible or tolerant, while no immune-like resistance response was identified. Typical wilting symptoms in susceptible plants were correlated with high concentrations of bacteria in roots and along the stems. Tolerant clones showed a colonization pattern restricted to roots and a limited number of xylem vessels only in the stem base. Results indicate that resistance in potato is achieved through restriction of bacterial invasion and multiplication inside plant tissues, particularly in stems. Tolerant plants were also characterized by induction of anatomical and

  8. Characterization of a variant of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri that triggers a host-specific defense response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiesa, María A; Siciliano, María F; Ornella, Leonardo; Roeschlin, Roxana A; Favaro, María A; Delgado, Natalia Pino; Sendín, Lorena N; Orce, Ingrid G; Ploper, L Daniel; Vojnov, Adrian A; Vacas, José Gadea; Filippone, María P; Castagnaro, Atilio P; Marano, María R

    2013-06-01

    Citrus is an economically important fruit crop that is severely afflicted by Asiatic citrus bacterial canker (CBC), a disease caused by the phytopathogen Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (X. citri). To gain insight into the molecular epidemiology of CBC, 42 Xanthomonas isolates were collected from a range of Citrus spp. across 17 different orchards in Tucumán, Argentina and subjected to molecular, biochemical, and pathogenicity tests. Analysis of genome-specific X. citri markers and DNA polymorphisms based on repetitive elements-based polymerase chain reaction showed that all 42 isolates belonged to X. citri. Interestingly, pathogenicity tests showed that one isolate, which shares >90% genetic similarity to the reference strain X. citri T, has host range specificity. This new variant of X. citri subsp. citri, named X. citri A(T), which is deficient in xanthan production, induces an atypical, noncankerous chlorotic phenotype in Citrus limon and C. paradisi and weak cankerous lesions in C. aurantifolia and C. clementina leaves. In C. limon, suppression of canker development is concomitant with an oxidative burst; xanthan is not implicated in the phenotype induced by this interaction, suggesting that other bacterial factors would be involved in triggering the defense response.

  9. Involvement of the cell-specific pigment genes pks and sult in bacterial defense response of sea urchins Strongylocentrotus intermedius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselev, Konstantin V; Ageenko, Natalya V; Kurilenko, Valeria V

    2013-03-26

    Bacterial infections are one of the most important problems in mass aquaculture, causing the loss of millions of juvenile organisms. We isolated 22 bacterial strains from the cavity fluid of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus pallidus and used phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences to separate the bacterial strains into 9 genera (Aliivibrio, Bizionia, Colwellia, Olleya, Paenibacillus, Photobacterium, Pseudoalteromonas, Shewanella, and Vibrio). Incubating Strongylocentrotus intermedius larvae with a strain from each of the 9 bacterial genera, we investigated the viability of the larvae, the amount of pigment cells, and the level of polyketide synthase (pks) and sulfotransferase (sult) gene expression. Results of the assay on sea urchin development showed that all bacterial strains, except Pseudoalteromonas and Bizionia, suppressed sea urchin development (resulting in retardation of the embryos' development with cellular disorders) and reduced cell viability. We found that pks expression in the sea urchin larvae after incubation with the bacteria of 9 tested genera was significantly increased, while the sult expression was increased only after the treatment with Pseudoalteromonas and Shewanella. Shikimic acid, which is known to activate the biosynthesis of naphthoquinone pigments, increased the tolerance of the sea urchin embryos to the bacteria. In conclusion, we show that the cell-specific pigment genes pks and sult are involved in the bacterial defense response of sea urchins.

  10. Interactive Effects of Elevated [CO2] and Drought on the Maize Phytochemical Defense Response against Mycotoxigenic Fusarium verticillioides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Martha M.; Huffaker, Alisa; Schmelz, Eric A.; Dafoe, Nicole J.; Christensen, Shawn A.; McAuslane, Heather J.; Alborn, Hans T.; Allen, Leon Hartwell; Teal, Peter E. A.

    2016-01-01

    Changes in climate due to rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration ([CO2]) are predicted to intensify episodes of drought, but our understanding of how these combined conditions will influence crop-pathogen interactions is limited. We recently demonstrated that elevated [CO2] alone enhances maize susceptibility to the mycotoxigenic pathogen, Fusarium verticillioides (Fv) but fumonisin levels remain unaffected. In this study we show that maize simultaneously exposed to elevated [CO2] and drought are even more susceptible to Fv proliferation and also prone to higher levels of fumonisin contamination. Despite the increase in fumonisin levels, the amount of fumonisin produced in relation to pathogen biomass remained lower than corresponding plants grown at ambient [CO2]. Therefore, the increase in fumonisin contamination was likely due to even greater pathogen biomass rather than an increase in host-derived stimulants. Drought did not negate the compromising effects of elevated [CO2] on the accumulation of maize phytohormones and metabolites. However, since elevated [CO2] does not influence the drought-induced accumulation of abscisic acid (ABA) or root terpenoid phytoalexins, the effects elevated [CO2] are negated belowground, but the stifled defense response aboveground may be a consequence of resource redirection to the roots. PMID:27410032

  11. Response of antioxidant defense system to laser radiation apical meristem of Isatis indigotica seedlings exposed to UV-B

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    To determine the response of antioxidant defense system to laser radiation apical meristem of Isatis indigotica seedlings, Isatis indigotica seedlings were subjected to UV-B radiation (10.08 kJ m−2) for 8 h day−1 for 8 days (PAR, 220 µmol m−2 s−1) and then exposed to He-Ne laser radiation (633 nm; 5.23 mW mm−2; beam diameter: 1.5 mm) for 5 min each day without ambient light radiation. Changes in free radical elimination systems were measured, the results indicate that: (1) UV-B radiation enhanced the concentration of Malondialdahyde (MDA) and decreased the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and peroxidase (POD) in seedlings compared with the control. The concentration of MDA was decreased and the activities of SOD, CAT and POD were increased when seedlings were subjected to elevated UV-B damage followed by laser; (2) the concentration of UV absorbing compounds and proline were increased progressively with UV-B irradiation, laser irradiation and He-Ne laser irradiation plus UV-B irradiation compared with the control. These results suggest that laser radiation has an active function in repairing UV-B-induced lesions in seedlings. PMID:19820308

  12. Interactive Effects of Elevated [CO2] and Drought on the Maize Phytochemical Defense Response against Mycotoxigenic Fusarium verticillioides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha M Vaughan

    Full Text Available Changes in climate due to rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration ([CO2] are predicted to intensify episodes of drought, but our understanding of how these combined conditions will influence crop-pathogen interactions is limited. We recently demonstrated that elevated [CO2] alone enhances maize susceptibility to the mycotoxigenic pathogen, Fusarium verticillioides (Fv but fumonisin levels remain unaffected. In this study we show that maize simultaneously exposed to elevated [CO2] and drought are even more susceptible to Fv proliferation and also prone to higher levels of fumonisin contamination. Despite the increase in fumonisin levels, the amount of fumonisin produced in relation to pathogen biomass remained lower than corresponding plants grown at ambient [CO2]. Therefore, the increase in fumonisin contamination was likely due to even greater pathogen biomass rather than an increase in host-derived stimulants. Drought did not negate the compromising effects of elevated [CO2] on the accumulation of maize phytohormones and metabolites. However, since elevated [CO2] does not influence the drought-induced accumulation of abscisic acid (ABA or root terpenoid phytoalexins, the effects elevated [CO2] are negated belowground, but the stifled defense response aboveground may be a consequence of resource redirection to the roots.

  13. In the presence of danger:the extracellular matrix defensive response to central nervous system injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lyn B. Jakeman; Kent E. Williams; Bryan Brautigam

    2014-01-01

    Glial cells in the central nervous system (CNS) contribute to formation of the extracellular matrix, which provides adhesive sites, signaling molecules, and a diffusion barrier to enhance efifcient neurotransmission and axon potential propagation. In the normal adult CNS, the extracellular matrix (ECM) is relatively stable except in selected regions characterized by dynamic remodel-ing. However, after trauma such as a spinal cord injury or cortical contusion, the lesion epicenter becomes a focus of acute neuroinlfammation. The activation of the surrounding glial cells leads to a dramatic change in the composition of the ECM at the edges of the lesion, creating a perile-sion environment dominated by growth inhibitory molecules and restoration of the peripheral/central nervous system border. An advantage of this response is to limit the invasion of damaging cells and diffusion of toxic molecules into the spared tissue regions, but this occurs at the cost of inhibiting migration of endogenous repair cells and preventing axonal regrowth. The following review was prepared by reading and discussing over 200 research articles in the ifeld published in PubMed and selecting those with signiifcant impact and/or controversial points. This article highlights structural and functional features of the normal adult CNS ECM and then focuses on the reactions of glial cells and changes in the perilesion border that occur following spinal cord or contusive brain injury. Current research strategies directed at modifying the inhibitory perile-sion microenvironment without eliminating the protective functions of glial cell activation are discussed.

  14. Trichoderma-plant root colonization: escaping early plant defense responses and activation of the antioxidant machinery for saline stress tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotman, Yariv; Landau, Udi; Cuadros-Inostroza, Álvaro; Tohge, Takayuki; Takayuki, Tohge; Fernie, Alisdair R; Chet, Ilan; Viterbo, Ada; Willmitzer, Lothar

    2013-03-01

    Trichoderma spp. are versatile opportunistic plant symbionts which can colonize the apoplast of plant roots. Microarrays analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana roots inoculated with Trichoderma asperelloides T203, coupled with qPCR analysis of 137 stress responsive genes and transcription factors, revealed wide gene transcript reprogramming, proceeded by a transient repression of the plant immune responses supposedly to allow root colonization. Enhancement in the expression of WRKY18 and WRKY40, which stimulate JA-signaling via suppression of JAZ repressors and negatively regulate the expression of the defense genes FMO1, PAD3 and CYP71A13, was detected in Arabidopsis roots upon Trichoderma colonization. Reduced root colonization was observed in the wrky18/wrky40 double mutant line, while partial phenotypic complementation was achieved by over-expressing WRKY40 in the wrky18 wrky40 background. On the other hand increased colonization rate was found in roots of the FMO1 knockout mutant. Trichoderma spp. stimulate plant growth and resistance to a wide range of adverse environmental conditions. Arabidopsis and cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) plants treated with Trichoderma prior to salt stress imposition show significantly improved seed germination. In addition, Trichoderma treatment affects the expression of several genes related to osmo-protection and general oxidative stress in roots of both plants. The MDAR gene coding for monodehydroascorbate reductase is significantly up-regulated and, accordingly, the pool of reduced ascorbic acid was found to be increased in Trichoderma treated plants. 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC)-deaminase silenced Trichoderma mutants were less effective in providing tolerance to salt stress, suggesting that Trichoderma, similarly to ACC deaminase producing bacteria, can ameliorate plant growth under conditions of abiotic stress, by lowering ameliorating increases in ethylene levels as well as promoting an elevated antioxidative capacity.

  15. Trichoderma-Plant Root Colonization: Escaping Early Plant Defense Responses and Activation of the Antioxidant Machinery for Saline Stress Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotman, Yariv; Landau, Udi; Cuadros-Inostroza, Álvaro; Takayuki, Tohge; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Chet, Ilan; Viterbo, Ada; Willmitzer, Lothar

    2013-01-01

    Trichoderma spp. are versatile opportunistic plant symbionts which can colonize the apoplast of plant roots. Microarrays analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana roots inoculated with Trichoderma asperelloides T203, coupled with qPCR analysis of 137 stress responsive genes and transcription factors, revealed wide gene transcript reprogramming, proceeded by a transient repression of the plant immune responses supposedly to allow root colonization. Enhancement in the expression of WRKY18 and WRKY40, which stimulate JA-signaling via suppression of JAZ repressors and negatively regulate the expression of the defense genes FMO1, PAD3 and CYP71A13, was detected in Arabidopsis roots upon Trichoderma colonization. Reduced root colonization was observed in the wrky18/wrky40 double mutant line, while partial phenotypic complementation was achieved by over-expressing WRKY40 in the wrky18 wrky40 background. On the other hand increased colonization rate was found in roots of the FMO1 knockout mutant. Trichoderma spp. stimulate plant growth and resistance to a wide range of adverse environmental conditions. Arabidopsis and cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) plants treated with Trichoderma prior to salt stress imposition show significantly improved seed germination. In addition, Trichoderma treatment affects the expression of several genes related to osmo-protection and general oxidative stress in roots of both plants. The MDAR gene coding for monodehydroascorbate reductase is significantly up-regulated and, accordingly, the pool of reduced ascorbic acid was found to be increased in Trichoderma treated plants. 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC)-deaminase silenced Trichoderma mutants were less effective in providing tolerance to salt stress, suggesting that Trichoderma, similarly to ACC deaminase producing bacteria, can ameliorate plant growth under conditions of abiotic stress, by lowering ameliorating increases in ethylene levels as well as promoting an elevated antioxidative capacity

  16. Salicylic acid binding of mitochondrial alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase E2 affects mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and electron transport chain components and plays a role in basal defense against tobacco mosaic virus in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yangwenke; Tian, Miaoying; Zhang, Huan; Li, Xin; Wang, Yu; Xia, Xiaojian; Zhou, Jie; Zhou, Yanhong; Yu, Jingquan; Shi, Kai; Klessig, Daniel F

    2015-02-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) plays a critical role in plant defense against pathogen invasion. SA-induced viral defense in plants is distinct from the pathways mediating bacterial and fungal defense and involves a specific pathway mediated by mitochondria; however, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. The SA-binding activity of the recombinant tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (Slα-kGDH) E2 subunit of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle was characterized. The biological role of this binding in plant defenses against tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) was further investigated via Slα-kGDH E2 silencing and transient overexpression in plants. Slα-kGDH E2 was found to bind SA in two independent assays. SA treatment, as well as Slα-kGDH E2 silencing, increased resistance to TMV. SA did not further enhance TMV defense in Slα-kGDH E2-silenced tomato plants but did reduce TMV susceptibility in Nicotiana benthamiana plants transiently overexpressing Slα-kGDH E2. Furthermore, Slα-kGDH E2-silencing-induced TMV resistance was fully blocked by bongkrekic acid application and alternative oxidase 1a silencing. These results indicated that binding by Slα-kGDH E2 of SA acts upstream of and affects the mitochondrial electron transport chain, which plays an important role in basal defense against TMV. The findings of this study help to elucidate the mechanisms of SA-induced viral defense.

  17. Defensive engagement and perceptual enhancement

    OpenAIRE

    Keil, Andreas; Bradley, Margaret M; Ihssen, Niklas; Heim, Sabine; Vila, Jaime; Guerra, Pedro; Lang, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    We tested whether visual cortical sensitivity to external cues in the context of an acute defensive reaction is heightened or attenuated. A strong cardiac defense (fear) response was elicited by presenting an abrupt, loud acoustic stimulus following a 10-minute period of quiescence. Electrocortical responses to aversive and neutral pictures following defensive stimulus onset were measured using dense-array EEG. Pictures were flickered at 12.5 Hz to evoke steady-state visual evoked potentials ...

  18. Exposure to trauma-relevant pictures is associated with tachycardia in victims who had experienced an intense peritraumatic defensive response: the tonic immobility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita de Cassia Soares Alves

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Tonic immobility is an involuntary, last-ditch defensive reaction characterized by physical inactivity in a context of inescapable threat that has been described in many species, including humans. The occurrence of this defensive response is a predictor of the severity of psychiatric disorders and may be considered as an index of an intense reaction to a traumatic event. Here, we investigated whether the retrospective reports of peritraumatic tonic immobility reaction in participants exposed to a traumatic event would modify their cardiac responses to pictures related to their trauma. Using a questionnaire of life-threating events, we selected students who experienced violent crime as their most intense trauma and students who had never experienced a violent crime trauma, but experienced other traumatic events. All participants completed a questionnaire that estimated the intensity of tonic immobility during their most intense trauma. Electrocardiographic recordings were collected during exposure to pictures. Participants viewed emotional pictures (human attack with guns and neutral pictures. These emotional stimuli were selected to be trauma-relevant to the violent crime group and non trauma-relevant to the no violent crime trauma group. Violent crime group showed a positive correlation between heart rate changes after viewing trauma-related pictures and tonic immobility scores. We observed that low tonic immobility scores were associated with bradycardia and high scores with tachycardia in response to trauma-relevant pictures. For the no violent crime group, no significant correlation was detected. These results suggest that the relevance of the stimuli and the magnitude of the defensive response during a previous trauma event were important factors triggering more intense defensive responses.

  19. Curdlan β-1,3-glucooligosaccharides induce the defense responses against Phytophthora infestans infection of potato (Solanum tuberosum L. cv. McCain G1) leaf cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Zhu, Li; Lu, Guangxing; Zhan, Xiao-Bei; Lin, Chi-Chung; Zheng, Zhi-Yong

    2014-01-01

    Activation of the innate immune system before the invasion of pathogens is a promising way to improve the resistance of plant against infection while reducing the use of agricultural chemicals. Although several elicitors were used to induce the resistance of potato plant to microbial pathogen infection, the role of curdlan oligosaccharide (CurdO) has not been established. In the current study, the defense responses were investigated at biochemical and proteomic levels to elucidate the elicitation effect of CurdOs in foliar tissues of potato (Solanum tuberosum L. cv. McCain G1). The results indicate that the CurdOs exhibit activation effect on the early- and late-defense responses in potato leaves. In addition, glucopentaose was proved to be the shortest active curdlan molecule based on the accumulation of H₂O₂ and salicylic acid and the activities of phenylalanine amino-lyase, β-1,3-glucanase and chitinase. The 2D-PAGE analysis reveals that CurdOs activate the integrated response reactions in potato cells, as a number of proteins with various functions are up-regulated including disease/defense, metabolism, transcription, and cell structure. The pathogenesis assay shows that the ratio of lesion area of potato leaf decreased from 15.82%±5.44% to 7.79%±3.03% when the plants were treated with CurdOs 1 day before the infection of Phytophthora infestans. Furthermore, the results on potato yield and induction reactions indicate that the defense responses induced by CurdOs lasted for short period of time but disappeared gradually.

  20. An analysis of the U.S. Department of Defense contracting and logistics support during the first 100 hours of the 2010 Haitian disaster response operation

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    MBA Professional Report The devastation caused by the recent earthquake in Haiti dramatically impaired the capabilities of all rapid response efforts. The resulting extreme conditions made it difficult to transport and deliver equipment, materials, supplies, and services to the earthquake victims and the first responders. The objective of this research is to analyze the effectiveness of the contracting and logistics support provided by the Department of Defense (DoD) through its colla...

  1. Curdlan β-1,3-glucooligosaccharides induce the defense responses against Phytophthora infestans infection of potato (Solanum tuberosum L. cv. McCain G1 leaf cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Li

    Full Text Available Activation of the innate immune system before the invasion of pathogens is a promising way to improve the resistance of plant against infection while reducing the use of agricultural chemicals. Although several elicitors were used to induce the resistance of potato plant to microbial pathogen infection, the role of curdlan oligosaccharide (CurdO has not been established. In the current study, the defense responses were investigated at biochemical and proteomic levels to elucidate the elicitation effect of CurdOs in foliar tissues of potato (Solanum tuberosum L. cv. McCain G1. The results indicate that the CurdOs exhibit activation effect on the early- and late-defense responses in potato leaves. In addition, glucopentaose was proved to be the shortest active curdlan molecule based on the accumulation of H₂O₂ and salicylic acid and the activities of phenylalanine amino-lyase, β-1,3-glucanase and chitinase. The 2D-PAGE analysis reveals that CurdOs activate the integrated response reactions in potato cells, as a number of proteins with various functions are up-regulated including disease/defense, metabolism, transcription, and cell structure. The pathogenesis assay shows that the ratio of lesion area of potato leaf decreased from 15.82%±5.44% to 7.79%±3.03% when the plants were treated with CurdOs 1 day before the infection of Phytophthora infestans. Furthermore, the results on potato yield and induction reactions indicate that the defense responses induced by CurdOs lasted for short period of time but disappeared gradually.

  2. Curdlan β-1,3-Glucooligosaccharides Induce the Defense Responses against Phytophthora infestans Infection of Potato (Solanum tuberosum L. cv. McCain G1) Leaf Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Zhu, Li; Lu, Guangxing; Zhan, Xiao-Bei; Lin, Chi-Chung; Zheng, Zhi-Yong

    2014-01-01

    Activation of the innate immune system before the invasion of pathogens is a promising way to improve the resistance of plant against infection while reducing the use of agricultural chemicals. Although several elicitors were used to induce the resistance of potato plant to microbial pathogen infection, the role of curdlan oligosaccharide (CurdO) has not been established. In the current study, the defense responses were investigated at biochemical and proteomic levels to elucidate the elicitation effect of CurdOs in foliar tissues of potato (Solanum tuberosum L. cv. McCain G1). The results indicate that the CurdOs exhibit activation effect on the early- and late-defense responses in potato leaves. In addition, glucopentaose was proved to be the shortest active curdlan molecule based on the accumulation of H2O2 and salicylic acid and the activities of phenylalanine amino-lyase, β-1,3-glucanase and chitinase. The 2D-PAGE analysis reveals that CurdOs activate the integrated response reactions in potato cells, as a number of proteins with various functions are up-regulated including disease/defense, metabolism, transcription, and cell structure. The pathogenesis assay shows that the ratio of lesion area of potato leaf decreased from 15.82%±5.44% to 7.79%±3.03% when the plants were treated with CurdOs 1 day before the infection of Phytophthora infestans. Furthermore, the results on potato yield and induction reactions indicate that the defense responses induced by CurdOs lasted for short period of time but disappeared gradually. PMID:24816730

  3. Structural Basis for Dual Functionality of Isoflavonoid O-Methyltransferases in the Evolution of Plant Defense Responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, C.; Deavours, B; Richard, S; Ferrer, J; Blount, J; Huhman, D; Dixon, R; Noel, J

    2006-01-01

    In leguminous plants such as pea (Pisum sativum), alfalfa (Medicago sativa), barrel medic (Medicago truncatula), and chickpea (Cicer arietinum), 4'-O-methylation of isoflavonoid natural products occurs early in the biosynthesis of defense chemicals known as phytoalexins. However, among these four species, only pea catalyzes 3-O-methylation that converts the pterocarpanoid isoflavonoid 6a-hydroxymaackiain to pisatin. In pea, pisatin is important for chemical resistance to the pathogenic fungus Nectria hematococca. While barrel medic does not biosynthesize 6a-hydroxymaackiain, when cell suspension cultures are fed 6a-hydroxymaackiain, they accumulate pisatin. In vitro, hydroxyisoflavanone 4'-O-methyltransferase (HI4'OMT) from barrel medic exhibits nearly identical steady state kinetic parameters for the 4'-O-methylation of the isoflavonoid intermediate 2,7,4'-trihydroxyisoflavanone and for the 3-O-methylation of the 6a-hydroxymaackiain isoflavonoid-derived pterocarpanoid intermediate found in pea. Protein x-ray crystal structures of HI4'OMT substrate complexes revealed identically bound conformations for the 2S,3R-stereoisomer of 2,7,4'-trihydroxyisoflavanone and the 6aR,11aR-stereoisomer of 6a-hydroxymaackiain. These results suggest how similar conformations intrinsic to seemingly distinct chemical substrates allowed leguminous plants to use homologous enzymes for two different biosynthetic reactions. The three-dimensional similarity of natural small molecules represents one explanation for how plants may rapidly recruit enzymes for new biosynthetic reactions in response to changing physiological and ecological pressures.

  4. Structural Basis for Dual Functionality of Isoflavonoid O-Methyltransferases in the Evolution of Plant Defense Responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, C.-J.; Deavours, B.E.; Richard, S.B.; Ferrer, J.-L.; Blount, J.W.; Huhman, D.; Dixon, R.A.; Noel, J.

    2007-07-10

    In leguminous plants such as pea (Pisum sativum), alfalfa (Medicago sativa), barrel medic (Medicago truncatula), and chickpea (Cicer arietinum), 4'-O-methylation of isoflavonoid natural products occurs early in the biosynthesis of defense chemicals known as phytoalexins. However, among these four species, only pea catalyzes 3-O-methylation that converts the pterocarpanoid isoflavonoid 6a-hydroxymaackiain to pisatin. In pea, pisatin is important for chemical resistance to the pathogenic fungus Nectria hematococca. While barrel medic does not biosynthesize 6a-hydroxymaackiain, when cell suspension cultures are fed 6a-hydroxymaackiain, they accumulate pisatin. In vitro, hydroxyisoflavanone 4'-O-methyltransferase (HI4'OMT) from barrel medic exhibits nearly identical steady state kinetic parameters for the 4'-O-methylation of the isoflavonoid intermediate 2,7,4'-trihydroxyisoflavanone and for the 3-O-methylation of the 6a-hydroxymaackiain isoflavonoid-derived pterocarpanoid intermediate found in pea. Protein x-ray crystal structures of HI4'OMT substrate complexes revealed identically bound conformations for the 2S,3R-stereoisomer of 2,7,4'-trihydroxyisoflavanone and the 6aR,11aR-stereoisomer of 6a-hydroxymaackiain. These results suggest how similar conformations intrinsic to seemingly distinct chemical substrates allowed leguminous plants to use homologous enzymes for two different biosynthetic reactions. The three-dimensional similarity of natural small molecules represents one explanation for how plants may rapidly recruit enzymes for new biosynthetic reactions in response to changing physiological and ecological pressures.

  5. Transglutaminase activity changes during the hypersensitive reaction, a typical defense response of tobacco NN plants to TMV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Duca, Stefano; Betti, Lucietta; Trebbi, Grazia; Serafini-Fracassini, Donatella; Torrigiani, Patrizia

    2007-10-01

    The occurrence of glutamyl polyamines (PAs) and changes in activity and levels of transglutaminase (TGase, EC 2.3.2.13), the enzyme responsible for their synthesis, are reported during the progression of the hypersensitive reaction (HR) of resistant NN tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Samsun) to tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). Mature leaves of tobacco were collected over 0-72 h after inoculation with TMV or phosphate buffer (mock). In vivo synthesis of polyamine glutamyl derivatives (glutamyl PAs), catalyzed by TGase activity, was evaluated after supplying labeled putrescine (Pu, a physiological substrate of TGase) to leaves. Results show that, starting from 24 h, mono-(gamma-glutamyl)-Pu and bis-(gamma-glutamyl)-Sd were recovered in TMV-inoculated samples but not in mock-inoculated ones; 2 days later, in the former, the amount of glutamyl derivatives further increased. An in vitro radiometric assay showed that, in TMV-inoculated leaves, TGase activity increased from 24 h onwards relative to mock controls. An immunoblot analysis with AtPng1p polyclonal antibody detected a 72-kDa protein whose amount increased at 72 h in TMV-inoculated leaves and in the lesion-enriched areas. A biotin-labeled cadaverine incorporation assay showed that TGase activity occurred in S1 (containing soluble proteins), S2 (proteins released by both cell walls and membranes) and S3 (membrane intrinsic proteins) fractions. In S3 fraction, where changes were the most relevant, TGase activity was enhanced in both mock-inoculated and TMV-inoculated samples, but the stimulation persisted only in the latter case. These data are discussed in the light of a possible role of TGase activity and glutamyl PAs in the defense against a viral plant pathogen.

  6. A Rice Gene Homologous to Arabidopsis AGD2-LIKE DEFENSE1 Participates in Disease Resistance Response against Infection with Magnaporthe oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ga Young; Park, Ju Yeon; Choi, Hyo Ju; Yoo, Sung-Je; Park, Jung-Kwon; Jung, Ho Won

    2016-08-01

    ALD1 (ABERRANT GROWTH AND DEATH2 [AGD2]-LIKE DEFENSE1) is one of the key defense regulators in Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana benthamiana. In these model plants, ALD1 is responsible for triggering basal defense response and systemic resistance against bacterial infection. As well ALD1 is involved in the production of pipecolic acid and an unidentified compound(s) for systemic resistance and priming syndrome, respectively. These previous studies proposed that ALD1 is a potential candidate for developing genetically modified (GM) plants that may be resistant to pathogen infection. Here we introduce a role of ALD1-LIKE gene of Oryza sativa, named as OsALD1, during plant immunity. OsALD1 mRNA was strongly transcribed in the infected leaves of rice plants by Magnaporthe oryzae, the rice blast fungus. OsALD1 proteins predominantly localized at the chloroplast in the plant cells. GM rice plants over-expressing OsALD1 were resistant to the fungal infection. The stable expression of OsALD1 also triggered strong mRNA expression of PATHOGENESIS-RELATED PROTEIN1 genes in the leaves of rice plants during infection. Taken together, we conclude that OsALD1 plays a role in disease resistance response of rice against the infection with rice blast fungus.

  7. Ectopic expression of a Ve homolog VvVe gene from Vitis vinifera enhances defense response to Verticillium dahliae infection in tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Juan; Lin, Jing; Yang, Yuwen; Chen, Tianzi; Ling, Xitie; Zhang, Baolong; Chang, Youhong

    2016-01-15

    Verticillium wilt is a soil borne disease that can cause devastating losses to the production of many economically important crops. A Ve1 homologous gene responding to Verticillium dahliae infection was identified in Vitis vinifera cv. "HeiFeng" by semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and was designated as VvVe. The overexpression of VvVe in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants significantly enhanced the resistance to isolate V991 of V. dahliae when compared with the wild type plants. The expressions of defense-related genes including the salicylic acid regulated gene pathogen-related 1 (PR1) but not PR2, the ethylene- and jasmonic acid-regulated genes ethylene response factor 1 (ERF1) and lipoxygenase (LOX) were significantly increased due to over expression of VvVe. And greater accumulation of active oxygen, callose and phenylalanine-ammonia lyase were observed in the leaves of transgenic VvVe tobacco plants than the wild type when under infection by V. dahliae. Moreover, the hypersensitive response mimicking cell death was exclusively occurred in the transgenic VvVe tobacco plants but not in the wild type. Taken together, the VvVe gene is a Ve1 like gene which involves in the signal cascade of salicylic acid, jasmonate, and ethylene defense pathways and enhances defense response to V. dahliae infection in the transgenic tobacco. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A Rice Gene Homologous to Arabidopsis AGD2-LIKE DEFENSE1 Participates in Disease Resistance Response against Infection with Magnaporthe oryzae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ga Young Jung

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ALD1 (ABERRANT GROWTH AND DEATH2 [AGD2]-LIKE DEFENSE1 is one of the key defense regulators in Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana benthamiana. In these model plants, ALD1 is responsible for triggering basal defense response and systemic resistance against bacterial infection. As well ALD1 is involved in the production of pipecolic acid and an unidentified compound(s for systemic resistance and priming syndrome, respectively. These previous studies proposed that ALD1 is a potential candidate for developing genetically modified (GM plants that may be resistant to pathogen infection. Here we introduce a role of ALD1-LIKE gene of Oryza sativa, named as OsALD1, during plant immunity. OsALD1 mRNA was strongly transcribed in the infected leaves of rice plants by Magnaporthe oryzae, the rice blast fungus. OsALD1 proteins predominantly localized at the chloroplast in the plant cells. GM rice plants over-expressing OsALD1 were resistant to the fungal infection. The stable expression of OsALD1 also triggered strong mRNA expression of PATHOGENESIS-RELATED PROTEIN1 genes in the leaves of rice plants during infection. Taken together, we conclude that OsALD1 plays a role in disease resistance response of rice against the infection with rice blast fungus.

  9. Development of a qPCR Strategy to Select Bean Genes Involved in Plant Defense Response and Regulated by the Trichoderma velutinum - Rhizoctonia solani Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Sara; Cominelli, Eleonora; Sparvoli, Francesca; González-López, Oscar; Rodríguez-González, Alvaro; Gutiérrez, Santiago; Casquero, Pedro A

    2016-01-01

    Bean production is affected by a wide diversity of fungal pathogens, among them Rhizoctonia solani is one of the most important. A strategy to control bean infectious diseases, mainly those caused by fungi, is based on the use of biocontrol agents (BCAs) that can reduce the negative effects of plant pathogens and also can promote positive responses in the plant. Trichoderma is a fungal genus that is able to induce the expression of genes involved in plant defense response and also to promote plant growth, root development and nutrient uptake. In this article, a strategy that combines in silico analysis and real time PCR to detect additional bean defense-related genes, regulated by the presence of Trichoderma velutinum and/or R. solani has been applied. Based in this strategy, from the 48 bean genes initially analyzed, 14 were selected, and only WRKY33, CH5b and hGS showed an up-regulatory response in the presence of T. velutinum. The other genes were or not affected (OSM34) or down-regulated by the presence of this fungus. R. solani infection resulted in a down-regulation of most of the genes analyzed, except PR1, OSM34 and CNGC2 that were not affected, and the presence of both, T. velutinum and R. solani, up-regulates hGS and down-regulates all the other genes analyzed, except CH5b which was not significantly affected. As conclusion, the strategy described in the present work has been shown to be effective to detect genes involved in plant defense, which respond to the presence of a BCA or to a pathogen and also to the presence of both. The selected genes show significant homology with previously described plant defense genes and they are expressed in bean leaves of plants treated with T. velutinum and/or infected with R. solani.

  10. Development of a qPCR Strategy to Select Bean Genes Involved in Plant Defense Response and Regulated by the Trichoderma velutinum – Rhizoctonia solani Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Sara; Cominelli, Eleonora; Sparvoli, Francesca; González-López, Oscar; Rodríguez-González, Alvaro; Gutiérrez, Santiago; Casquero, Pedro A.

    2016-01-01

    Bean production is affected by a wide diversity of fungal pathogens, among them Rhizoctonia solani is one of the most important. A strategy to control bean infectious diseases, mainly those caused by fungi, is based on the use of biocontrol agents (BCAs) that can reduce the negative effects of plant pathogens and also can promote positive responses in the plant. Trichoderma is a fungal genus that is able to induce the expression of genes involved in plant defense response and also to promote plant growth, root development and nutrient uptake. In this article, a strategy that combines in silico analysis and real time PCR to detect additional bean defense-related genes, regulated by the presence of Trichoderma velutinum and/or R. solani has been applied. Based in this strategy, from the 48 bean genes initially analyzed, 14 were selected, and only WRKY33, CH5b and hGS showed an up-regulatory response in the presence of T. velutinum. The other genes were or not affected (OSM34) or down-regulated by the presence of this fungus. R. solani infection resulted in a down-regulation of most of the genes analyzed, except PR1, OSM34 and CNGC2 that were not affected, and the presence of both, T. velutinum and R. solani, up-regulates hGS and down-regulates all the other genes analyzed, except CH5b which was not significantly affected. As conclusion, the strategy described in the present work has been shown to be effective to detect genes involved in plant defense, which respond to the presence of a BCA or to a pathogen and also to the presence of both. The selected genes show significant homology with previously described plant defense genes and they are expressed in bean leaves of plants treated with T. velutinum and/or infected with R. solani. PMID:27540382

  11. The effect of water limitation on volatile emission, tree defense response, and brood success of Dendroctonus ponderosae in two pine hosts, lodgepole and jack pine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inka eLusebrink

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The mountain pine beetle (MPB; Dendroctonus ponderosae has recently expanded its range from lodgepole pine forest into the lodgepole × jack pine hybrid zone in central Alberta, within which it has attacked pure jack pine. This study tested the effects of water limitation on tree defense response of mature lodgepole and jack pine (Pinus contorta and Pinus banksiana trees in the field. Tree defense response was initiated by inoculation of trees with the MPB-associated fungus Grosmannia clavigera and measured through monoterpene emission from tree boles and concentration of defensive compounds in phloem, needles, and necrotic tissues. Lodgepole pine generally emitted higher amounts of monoterpenes than jack pine; particularly from fungal-inoculated trees. Compared to non-inoculated trees, fungal inoculation increased monoterpene emission in both species, whereas water treatment had no effect on monoterpene emission. The phloem of both pine species contains (--α-pinene, the precursor of the beetle’s aggregation pheromone, however lodgepole pine contains two times as much as jack pine. The concentration of defensive compounds was 70-fold greater in the lesion tissue in jack pine, but only 10-fold in lodgepole pine compared to healthy phloem tissue in each species, respectively. Water-deficit treatment inhibited an increase of L-limonene as response to fungal inoculation in lodgepole pine phloem. The amount of myrcene in jack pine phloem was higher in water-deficit trees compared to ambient trees. Beetles reared in jack pine were not affected by either water or biological treatment, whereas beetles reared in lodgepole pine benefited from fungal inoculation by producing larger and heavier female offspring. Female beetles that emerged from jack pine bolts contained more fat than those that emerged from lodgepole pine, even though lodgepole pine phloem had a higher nitrogen content than jack pine phloem. These results suggest that jack pine chemistry

  12. Transfer RNA Derived Small RNAs Targeting Defense Responsive Genes Are Induced during Phytophthora capsici Infection in Black Pepper (Piper nigrum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asha, Srinivasan; Soniya, Eppurath V

    2016-01-01

    Small RNAs derived from transfer RNAs were recently assigned as potential gene regulatory candidates for various stress responses in eukaryotes. In this study, we report on the cloning and identification of tRNA derived small RNAs from black pepper plants in response to the infection of the quick wilt pathogen, Phytophthora capsici. 5'tRFs cloned from black pepper were validated as highly expressed during P. capsici infection. A high-throughput systematic analysis of the small RNAome (sRNAome) revealed the predominance of 5'tRFs in the infected leaf and root. The abundance of 5'tRFs in the sRNAome and the defense responsive genes as their potential targets indicated their regulatory role during stress response in black pepper. The 5'Ala(CGC) tRF mediated cleavage was experimentally mapped at the tRF binding sites on the mRNA targets of Non-expresser of pathogenesis related protein (NPR1), which was down-regulated during pathogen infection. Comparative sRNAome further demonstrated sequence conservation of 5'Ala tRFs across the angiosperm plant groups, and many important genes in the defense response were identified in silico as their potential targets. Our findings uncovered the diversity, differential expression and stress responsive functional role of tRNA-derived small RNAs during Phytophthora infection in black pepper.

  13. Plant Defense against Insect Herbivores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fürstenberg-Hägg, Joel; Zagrobelny, Mika; Bak, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Plants have been interacting with insects for several hundred million years, leading to complex defense approaches against various insect feeding strategies. Some defenses are constitutive while others are induced, although the insecticidal defense compound or protein classes are often similar. Insect herbivory induce several internal signals from the wounded tissues, including calcium ion fluxes, phosphorylation cascades and systemic- and jasmonate signaling. These are perceived in undamaged tissues, which thereafter reinforce their defense by producing different, mostly low molecular weight, defense compounds. These bioactive specialized plant defense compounds may repel or intoxicate insects, while defense proteins often interfere with their digestion. Volatiles are released upon herbivory to repel herbivores, attract predators or for communication between leaves or plants, and to induce defense responses. Plants also apply morphological features like waxes, trichomes and latices to make the feeding more difficult for the insects. Extrafloral nectar, food bodies and nesting or refuge sites are produced to accommodate and feed the predators of the herbivores. Meanwhile, herbivorous insects have adapted to resist plant defenses, and in some cases even sequester the compounds and reuse them in their own defense. Both plant defense and insect adaptation involve metabolic costs, so most plant-insect interactions reach a stand-off, where both host and herbivore survive although their development is suboptimal. PMID:23681010

  14. Ab initio phonon coupling and optical response of hot electrons in plasmonic metals

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Ana M; Narang, Prineha; Goddard, William A; Atwater, Harry A

    2016-01-01

    Ultrafast laser measurements probe the non-equilibrium dynamics of excited electrons in metals with increasing temporal resolution. Electronic structure calculations can provide a detailed microscopic understanding of hot electron dynamics, but a parameter-free description of pump-probe measurements has not yet been possible, despite intensive research, because of the phenomenological treatment of electron-phonon interactions. We present ab initio predictions of the electron-temperature dependent heat capacities and electron-phonon coupling coefficients of plasmonic metals. We find substantial differences from free-electron and semi-empirical estimates, especially in noble metals above transient electron temperatures of 2000 K, because of the previously-neglected strong dependence of electron-phonon matrix elements on electron energy. We also present first-principles calculations of the electron-temperature dependent dielectric response of hot electrons in plasmonic metals, including direct interband and phon...

  15. Elicitation of resistance and associated defense responses in Trichoderma hamatum induced protection against pearl millet downy mildew pathogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddaiah, Chandra Nayaka; Satyanarayana, Niranjan Raj; Mudili, Venkataramana; Kumar Gupta, Vijai; Gurunathan, Selvakumar; Rangappa, Shobith; Huntrike, Shekar Shetty; Srivastava, Rakesh Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Endophytic Trichoderma hamatum UoM 13 isolated from pearl millet roots was evaluated for its efficiency to suppress downy mildew disease. Under laboratory conditions, T. hamatum seed treatment significantly enhanced pearl millet seed germination and seedling vigor. T. hamatum seed treatment resulted in systemic and durable immunity against pearl millet downy mildew disease under greenhouse and field conditions. T. hamatum treated seedlings responded to downy mildew infection with high lignification and callose deposition. Analysis of defense enzymes showed that T. hamatum treatment significantly enhanced the activities of glucanase, peroxidase, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, and polyphenol oxidase in comparison to untreated control. RT-PCR analysis revealed differentially expressed transcripts of the defense enzymes and PR-proteins in treated, untreated, and checks, wherein PR-1, PR-5, and cell wall defense HRGPs were significantly over expressed in treated seedlings as against their lower expression in controls. T. hamatum treatment significantly stimulated endogenous salicylic acid (SA) levels and significantly upregulated important SA biosynthesis gene isochorismate synthase. The results indicated that T. hamatum UoM13 treatment induces resistance corresponding to significant over expression of endogenous SA, important defense enzymes, PR-proteins, and HRGPs, suggesting that SA biosynthetic pathway is involved in pearl millet for mounting systemic immunity against downy mildew pathogen. PMID:28322224

  16. Mirl-CP, a novel defense cysteine protease accumulates in maize vascular tissues in response to herbivory

    Science.gov (United States)

    When lepidopteran larvae feed on the insect-resistant maize genotype, Mp708, there is a rapid accumulation of a defensive cysteine protease, Mir1-CP, at the feeding site. Silver-enhanced immunolocalization visualized with both light and transmission microscopy was used to determine the location of M...

  17. Psychiatric care or social defense? The origins of a controversy over the responsibility of the mentally ill in French forensic psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protais, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    While some countries like Belgium chose a penal system clearly inspired by social-defense theories for mentally disturbed criminals, the French law hasn't been consistent and varies from the enlightened classical law and social-defense law. Indeed paragraph 1 of article 122-1 states that people whose discernment or control is abolished by a psychiatric disorder are non-responsible respecting the classical logic of law. On the other hand, Paragraph 2 of Article 122-1 allows the mentally ill to be judged responsible whereas no institution exists to take care about them. Then the system of psychiatric care in prisons present as a solution for professionals wishing to promote a system where people are punished and socially rehabilitated. Thus these forensic psychiatrists don't refer to paragraph 1 of article 122-1 and even people presenting serious mental disorders are considered responsible. Moreover, if a controversy has always existed between psychiatrists who argue a large conception of mental irresponsibility and professionals who defend the right to punish and to conclude that responsibility even for mentally disturbed criminals, the controversy becomes more important in French forensic psychiatry after the Second World War. If until the 1970s the practice of imposing responsibility for mentally ill individuals shows itself as a humanism, it occurs more within a security perspective today.

  18. Salt-tolerant and -sensitive alfalfa (Medicago sativa) cultivars have large variations in defense responses to the lepidopteran insect Spodoptera litura under normal and salt stress condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yunting; Liu, Qing; Hettenhausen, Christian; Cao, Guoyan; Tan, Qing; Zhao, Weiye; Lin, Honghui; Wu, Jianqiang

    2017-01-01

    In nature, plants are often exposed to multiple stress factors at the same time. Yet, little is known about how plants modulate their physiology to counteract simultaneous abiotic and biotic stresses, such as soil salinity and insect herbivory. In this study, insect performance bioassays, phytohormone measurements, quantification of transcripts, and protein determination were employed to study the phenotypic variations of two alfalfa (Medicago sativa) cultivars in response to insect Spodoptera litura feeding under normal and salt stress condition. When being cultivated in normal soil, the salt-tolerant alfalfa cultivar Zhongmu-1 exhibited lower insect resistance than did the salt-sensitive cultivar Xinjiang Daye. Under salinity stress, the defense responses of Xinjiang Daye were repressed, whereas Zhongmu-1 did not show changes in resistance levels. It is likely that salinity influenced the resistance of Xinjiang Daye through suppressing the accumulation of jasmonic acid-isoleucine (JA-Ile), which is the bioactive hormone inducing herbivore defense responses, leading to attenuated trypsin proteinase inhibitor (TPI) activity. Furthermore, exogenous ABA supplementation suppressed the insect herbivory-induced JA/JA-Ile accumulation and levels of JAR1 (jasmonate resistant 1) and TPI, and further decreased the resistance of Xinjiang Daye, whereas Zhongmu-1 showed very little response to the increased ABA level. We propose a mechanism, in which high levels of abscisic acid induced by salt treatment may affect the expression levels of JAR1 and consequently decrease JA-Ile accumulation and thus partly suppress the defense of Xinjiang Daye against insects under salt stress. This study provides new insight into the mechanism by which alfalfa responds to concurrent abiotic and biotic stresses.

  19. Salt-tolerant and -sensitive alfalfa (Medicago sativa) cultivars have large variations in defense responses to the lepidopteran insect Spodoptera litura under normal and salt stress condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yunting; Liu, Qing; Hettenhausen, Christian; Cao, Guoyan; Tan, Qing; Zhao, Weiye; Lin, Honghui

    2017-01-01

    In nature, plants are often exposed to multiple stress factors at the same time. Yet, little is known about how plants modulate their physiology to counteract simultaneous abiotic and biotic stresses, such as soil salinity and insect herbivory. In this study, insect performance bioassays, phytohormone measurements, quantification of transcripts, and protein determination were employed to study the phenotypic variations of two alfalfa (Medicago sativa) cultivars in response to insect Spodoptera litura feeding under normal and salt stress condition. When being cultivated in normal soil, the salt-tolerant alfalfa cultivar Zhongmu-1 exhibited lower insect resistance than did the salt-sensitive cultivar Xinjiang Daye. Under salinity stress, the defense responses of Xinjiang Daye were repressed, whereas Zhongmu-1 did not show changes in resistance levels. It is likely that salinity influenced the resistance of Xinjiang Daye through suppressing the accumulation of jasmonic acid-isoleucine (JA-Ile), which is the bioactive hormone inducing herbivore defense responses, leading to attenuated trypsin proteinase inhibitor (TPI) activity. Furthermore, exogenous ABA supplementation suppressed the insect herbivory-induced JA/JA-Ile accumulation and levels of JAR1 (jasmonate resistant 1) and TPI, and further decreased the resistance of Xinjiang Daye, whereas Zhongmu-1 showed very little response to the increased ABA level. We propose a mechanism, in which high levels of abscisic acid induced by salt treatment may affect the expression levels of JAR1 and consequently decrease JA-Ile accumulation and thus partly suppress the defense of Xinjiang Daye against insects under salt stress. This study provides new insight into the mechanism by which alfalfa responds to concurrent abiotic and biotic stresses. PMID:28719628

  20. Comparative Analysis of Defense Responses in Chocolate Spot-Resistant and -Susceptible Faba Bean (Vicia faba) Cultivars Following Infection by the Necrotrophic Fungus Botrytis fabae

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Komy, Mahmoud H.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, resistance responses were investigated during the interaction of Botrytis fabae with two faba bean cultivars expressing different levels of resistance against this pathogen, Nubaria (resistant) and Giza 40 (susceptible). Disease severity was assessed on leaves using a rating scale from 1 to 9. Accumulation levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, catalase and ascorbate peroxidase) were measured in leaf tissues at different times of infection. The expression profiles of two pathogenesis-related proteins (PRPs) encoded by the genes PR-1 and β-1,3-glucanase were also investigated using reverse transcription RT-PCR analysis. The accumulation of these defense responses was induced significantly in both cultivars upon infection with B. fabae compared with un-inoculated controls. The resistant cultivar showed weaker necrotic symptom expression, less ROS accumulation, a lower rate of lipid peroxidation and higher activity of the enzymatic ROS scavenging system compared with susceptible cultivar. Interestingly, ROS accumulated rapidly in the resistant leaf tissues and peaked during the early stages of infection, whereas accumulation was stronger and more intense in the susceptible tissues in later stages. Moreover, the response of the resistant cultivar to infection was earlier and stronger, exhibiting high transcript accumulation of the PR genes. These results indicated that the induction of oxidant/antioxidant responses and the accumulation of PRPs are part of the faba bean defense mechanism against the necrotrophic fungus B. fabae with a different intensity and timing of induction, depending on the resistance levels. PMID:25506300

  1. Biochemical Plant Responses to Ozone (IV. Cross-Induction of Defensive Pathways in Parsley (Petroselinum crispum L.) Plants).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckey-Kaltenbach, H.; Ernst, D.; Heller, W.; Sandermann, H.

    1994-01-01

    Parsley (Petroselinum crispum L.) is known to respond to ultraviolet irradiation by the synthesis of flavone glycosides, whereas fungal or elicitor stress leads to the synthesis of furanocoumarin phytoalexins. We tested how these defensive pathways are affected by a single ozone treatment (200 nL L-1; 10 h). Assays were performed at the levels of transcripts, for enzyme activities, and for secondary products. The most rapid transcript accumulation was maximal at 3 h, whereas flavone glycosides and furanocoumarins were maximally induced at 12 and 24 h, respectively, after the start of ozone treatment. Ozone acted as a cross-inducer because the two distinct pathways were simultaneously induced. These results are consistent with the previously observed ozone induction of fungal and viral defense reactions in tobacco, spruce, and pine.

  2. Calculation of molecular response properties with the second-order coupled perturbed electron propagator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deleuze, M.S.; Pickup, B.T.; Wilton, D.J.

    2000-04-05

    The authors present the theory of the electron propagator perturbed by an external electric field and show how it can be used to calculate a variety of one-electron linear response properties that are accurate through second order in electron correlation. Some illustrative calculations are discussed.

  3. The U.S. Personnel Recovery Architecture under Chief of Mission Responsibility: Department of State and Department of Defense Coordination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-22

    Tamaulipas (see figure 15). After the storm, Mexico’s Secretariat of National Defense (SEDENA) deployed 800 troops from the 8th Military Zone to... Tamaulipas under Plan DN-III-E to help aid operations (López Acosta 2012). Prior to landfall, the troops enforced mandatory evacuations of residents of...the affected areas. In 72 Tamaulipas , 263,000 people were affected by Hurricane Alix, and 2,260 homes were flooded. Additionally, 80,000 were

  4. Civil Support: DOD Needs to Clarify Its Roles and Responsibilities for Defense Support of Civil Authorities during Cyber Incidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    national and economic security are increasing in frequency, scale, sophistication, and severity of impact. DOD’s 2013 Strategy for Homeland...Cyber threats to U.S. national and economic security are increasing in frequency, scale, sophistication, and severity of impact.1 The Department of...30According to Joint Chiefs of Staff, Joint Publication 1-02, Department of Defense Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms (Nov. 8, 2010

  5. Thermal response of ceramic components during electron beam brazing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voth, T.E.; Gianoulakis, S.E.; Halbleib, J.A.

    1996-03-01

    Ceramics are being used increasingly in applications where high temperatures are encountered such as automobile and gas turbine engines. However, the use of ceramics is limited by a lack of methods capable of producing strong, high temperature joints. This is because most ceramic-ceramic joining techniques, such as brazing, require that the entire assembly be exposed to high temperatures in order to assure that the braze material melts. Alternatively, localized heating using high energy electron beams may be used to selectively heat the braze material. In this work, high energy electron beam brazing of a ceramic part is modeled numerically. The part considered consists of a ceramic cylinder and disk between which is sandwiched an annular washer of braze material. An electron beam impinges on the disk, melting the braze metal. The resulting coupled electron and thermal transport equations are solved using Monte Carlo and finite element techniques. Results indicate that increased electron beam current decreases time to melt as well as required cooling time. Vacuum furnace brazing was also simulated and predicted results indicate increased processing times relative to electron beam brazing.

  6. WRKY8 transcription factor functions in the TMV-cg defense response by mediating both abscisic acid and ethylene signaling in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ligang; Zhang, Liping; Li, Daibo; Wang, Fang; Yu, Diqiu

    2013-05-21

    WRKY transcription factors are key players in the plant immune response, but less is known about their involvement in antiviral defense than about their roles in defense against bacterial or fungi pathogens. Here, we report that Arabidopsis thaliana WRKY DNA-binding protein 8 (WRKY8) has a role in mediating the long-distance movement of crucifer-infecting tobacco mosaic virus (TMV-cg). The expression of WRKY8 was inhibited by TMV-cg infection, and mutation of WRKY8 accelerated the accumulation of TMV-cg in systemically infected leaves. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that the expression of ABA insensitive 4 (ABI4) was reduced and the expression of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid synthase 6 (ACS6) and ethylene response factor 104 (ERF104) was enhanced in the systemically infected leaves of wrky8. Immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that WRKY8 could bind selectively to putative W-boxes of the ABI4, ACS6, and ERF104 promoters. Furthermore, TMV-cg infection enhanced WRKY8 binding to the ABI4 promoter but reduced the binding of WRKY8 to the ACS6 and ERF104 promoters, indicating that regulation of ABI4, ACS6, and ERF104 by WRKY8 is at least partially dependent on TMV-cg. Exogenous applications of abscisic acid (ABA) reduced the systemic accumulation of TMV-cg. Mutations in ABA deficient 1, ABA deficient 2, ABA deficient 3, or abi4 accelerated systemic TMV-cg accumulation. In contrast, exogenous application of aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid enhanced the systemic accumulation of TMV-cg, but mutations in acs6, erf104, or an octuple acs mutant inhibited systemic TMV-cg accumulation. Our results demonstrate that WRKY8 is involved in the defense response against TMV-cg through the direct regulation of the expression of ABI4, ACS6, and ERF104 and may mediate the crosstalk between ABA and ethylene signaling during the TMV-cg-Arabidopsis interaction.

  7. Interacting Electrons in Graphene: Fermi Velocity Renormalization and Optical Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauber, T; Parida, P; Trushin, M; Ulybyshev, M V; Boyda, D L; Schliemann, J

    2017-06-30

    We have developed a Hartree-Fock theory for electrons on a honeycomb lattice aiming to solve a long-standing problem of the Fermi velocity renormalization in graphene. Our model employs no fitting parameters (like an unknown band cutoff) but relies on a topological invariant (crystal structure function) that makes the Hartree-Fock sublattice spinor independent of the electron-electron interaction. Agreement with the experimental data is obtained assuming static self-screening including local field effects. As an application of the model, we derive an explicit expression for the optical conductivity and discuss the renormalization of the Drude weight. The optical conductivity is also obtained via precise quantum Monte Carlo calculations which compares well to our mean-field approach.

  8. Molecular shock response of explosives: electronic absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcgrne, Shawn D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moore, David S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Whitley, Von H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bolme, Cindy A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Eakins, Daniel E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Electronic absorption spectroscopy in the range 400-800 nm was coupled to ultrafast laser generated shocks to begin addressing the question of the extent to which electronic excitations are involved in shock induced reactions. Data are presented on shocked polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) thin films and single crystal pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN). Shocked PMMA exhibited thin film interference effects from the shock front. Shocked PETN exhibited interference from the shock front as well as broadband increased absorption. Relation to shock initiation hypotheses and the need for time dependent absorption data (future experiments) is briefly discussed.

  9. Response of radiation monitoring labels to gamma rays and electrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahim, F. Abdel; Miller, Arne; McLaughlin, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    , and differences in dose rate and radiation type (gamma rays and electron beams) were made on 15 kinds of labels. The results show that, for many types of indicators, diverse effects may give misleading conclusions unless countermeasures are taken. For example, some of the most commonly used labels, which contain...

  10. GLYCINE-RICH RNA-BINDING PROTEIN1 interacts with RECEPTOR-LIKE CYTOPLASMIC PROTEIN KINASE1 and suppresses cell death and defense responses in pepper (Capsicum annuum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae Sung; Kim, Nak Hyun; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2015-01-01

    Plants use a variety of innate immune regulators to trigger cell death and defense responses against pathogen attack. We identified pepper (Capsicum annuum) GLYCINE-RICH RNA-BINDING PROTEIN1 (CaGRP1) as a RECEPTOR-LIKE CYTOPLASMIC PROTEIN KINASE1 (CaPIK1)-interacting partner, based on bimolecular fluorescence complementation and coimmunoprecipitation analyses as well as gene silencing and transient expression analysis. CaGRP1 contains an N-terminal RNA recognition motif and a glycine-rich region at the C-terminus. The CaGRP1 protein had DNA- and RNA-binding activity in vitro. CaGRP1 interacted with CaPIK1 in planta. CaGRP1 and CaGRP1-CaPIK1 complexes were localized to the nucleus in plant cells. CaPIK1 phosphorylated CaGRP1 in vitro and in planta. Transient coexpression of CaGRP1 with CaPIK1 suppressed the CaPIK1-triggered cell death response, accompanied by a reduced CaPIK1-triggered reactive oxygen species (ROS) burst. The RNA recognition motif region of CaGRP1 was responsible for the nuclear localization of CaGRP1 as well as the suppression of the CaPIK1-triggered cell death response. CaGRP1 silencing in pepper conferred enhanced resistance to Xanthomonas campestris pv vesicatoria (Xcv) infection; however, CaPIK1-silenced plants were more susceptible to Xcv. CaGRP1 interacts with CaPIK1 and negatively regulates CaPIK1-triggered cell death and defense responses by suppressing ROS accumulation.

  11. Tensodynamometric and spatial-temporal characteristics of defensive moving reaction of a law-enforcement officer in response to an attack of an armed enemy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RADZIEVSKIY R. M.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to examine the tensodynamometric and spatial-temporal characteristics of a law-enforcement officer’s defensive movements in response to the moving attacking actions of an offender. To identify the efficient ways how to counter the attack of the enemy armed with the firearms. Material: It was surveyed 62 employees of practical units of law enforcement authorities. It was experimented with 15 cadets of Kyiv National Academy of Internal Affairs and 15 employees of Department of the State Guard of Ukraine. Results: As a result it was found out that the participants adapted to true-life armed conflicts with the offender. On the basis of the broadened knowledge about the outer indicators of the menace and spatial-temporal characteristics of the movements of the armed enemy it was created the moving behavior of the law-enforcement officer. Conclusions: In case of an armed enemy’s attack it is recommended to carry out the defensive action lunging aside with the optimum cooperation of supporting reactions and action in response, shooting on account of “muscle memory” of the angle of the pointed gun and the projection of the straight line in accordance with the gun tube, the target and the spatial characteristics.

  12. Identification and Expression Analysis of Candidate Genes Associated with Defense Responses to Phytophthora capsici in Pepper Line “PI 201234”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pingyong Wang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Phytophthora capsici (Leonian, classified as an oomycete, seriously threatens the production of pepper (Capsicum annuum. Current understanding of the defense responses in pepper to P. capsici is limited. In this study, RNA-sequencing analysis was utilized to identify differentially expressed genes in the resistant line “PI 201234”, with 1220 differentially expressed genes detected. Of those genes, 480 were up-regulated and 740 were down-regulated, with 211 candidate genes found to be involved in defense responses based on the gene annotations. Furthermore, the expression patterns of 12 candidate genes were further validated via quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR. These genes were found to be significantly up-regulated at different time points post-inoculation (6 hpi, 24 hpi, and 5 dpi in the resistant line “PI 201234” and susceptible line “Qiemen”. Seven genes were found to be involved in cell wall modification, phytoalexin biosynthesis, symptom development, and phytohormone signaling pathways, thus possibly playing important roles in combating exogenous pathogens. The genes identified herein will provide a basis for further gene cloning and functional verification studies and will aid in an understanding of the regulatory mechanism of pepper resistance to P. capsici.

  13. Dorsal periaqueductal gray stimulation facilitates anxiety-, but not panic-related, defensive responses in rats tested in the elevated T-maze

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camplesi, M. Jr. [Instituto de Patologia Tropical e Saúde Pública, Universidade Federal de Goiás, Goiânia, GO (Brazil); Bortoli, V.C. de [Departamento de Ciências da Saúde, Centro Universitário Norte do Espírito Santo, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, São Mateus, ES (Brazil); Paula Soares, V. de [Departamento de Biofísica e Farmacologia, Centro de Biociências, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, RN (Brazil); Nogueira, R.L. [Laboratório de Psicologia Comparada, Universidade Estácio de Sá, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Zangrossi, H. Jr. [Departamento de Farmacologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2012-08-03

    The escape response to electrical or chemical stimulation of the dorsal periaqueductal gray matter (DPAG) has been associated with panic attacks. In order to explore the validity of the DPAG stimulation model for the study of panic disorder, we determined if the aversive consequences of the electrical or chemical stimulation of this midbrain area can be detected subsequently in the elevated T-maze. This animal model, derived from the elevated plus-maze, permits the measurement in the same rat of a generalized anxiety- and a panic-related defensive response, i.e., inhibitory avoidance and escape, respectively. Facilitation of inhibitory avoidance, suggesting an anxiogenic effect, was detected in male Wistar rats (200-220 g) tested in the elevated T-maze 30 min after DPAG electrical stimulation (current generated by a sine-wave stimulator, frequency at 60 Hz) or after local microinjection of the GABA{sub A} receptor antagonist bicuculline (5 pmol). Previous electrical (5, 15, 30 min, or 24 h before testing) or chemical stimulation of this midbrain area did not affect escape performance in the elevated T-maze or locomotion in an open-field. No change in the two behavioral tasks measured by the elevated T-maze was observed after repetitive (3 trials) electrical stimulation of the DPAG. The results indicate that activation of the DPAG caused a short-lived, but selective, increase in defensive behaviors associated with generalized anxiety.

  14. Response of the antioxidant defense system to tert-butyl hydroperoxide and hydrogen peroxide in a human hepatoma cell line (HepG2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alía, Mario; Ramos, Sonia; Mateos, Raquel; Bravo, Laura; Goya, Luis

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the response of the antioxidant defense system to two oxidative stressors, hydrogen peroxide and tert-butyl hydroperoxide, in HepG2 cells in culture. The parameters evaluated included enzyme activity and gene expression of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and activity of glutathione reductase. Besides, markers of the cell damage and oxidative stress evoked by the stressors such as cell viability, intracellular reactive oxygen species generation, malondialdehyde levels, and reduced glutathione concentration were evaluated. Both stressors, hydrogen peroxide and tert-butyl hydroperoxide, enhanced cell damage and reactive oxygen species generation at doses above 50 microM. The concentration of reduced glutathione decreased, and levels of malondialdehyde and activity of the antioxidant enzymes consistently increased only when HepG2 cells were treated with tert-butyl hydroperoxide but not when hydrogen peroxide was used. A slight increase in the gene expression of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase and catalase with 500 microM tert-butyl hydroperoxide and of catalase with 200 microM hydrogen peroxide was observed. The response of the components of the antioxidant defense system evaluated in this study indicates that tert-butyl hydroperoxide evokes a consistent cellular stress in HepG2.

  15. Expression profile of bio-defense genes in Penaeus monodon gills in response to formalin inactivated white spot syndrome virus vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudheer, N S; Poulose, Gigi; Thomas, Ancy; Viswanath, Kiron; Kulkarni, Amod; Narayanan, R B; Philip, Rosamma; Singh, I S Bright

    2015-05-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is the most devastating pathogen of penaeid shrimp. While developing technology to vaccinate shrimp against WSSV, it is imperative to look into the immune response of the animal at molecular level. However, very little information has been generated in this direction. The present study is an attempt to understand the expression of bio-defense genes in gill tissues of Penaeus monodon in response to formalin inactivated WSSV. A WSSV vaccine with a viral titer of 1×10(9) DNA copies was prepared and orally administered to P. monodon at a rate of 1.75×10(6) DNA copies of inactivated virus preparation (IVP) day(-1) for 7days. The animals were challenged with WSSV on 1st and 5th day post vaccination, and temporal expression of bio-defense genes in gill tissues was studied. Survival of 100% and 50% were observed respectively on 1st and 5th day post vaccination challenge. The humoral immune genes prophenoloxidase (proPO), alpha 2-macroglobulin (α2M), crustin and PmRACK, and the cell mediated immune genes caspase and Rab7 were up regulated in gill tissue upon vaccination and challenge. The expression of humoral gene crustin and cellular gene Rab7 was related to survival in IVP administered shrimp. Results of the study suggest that these genes have roles in protecting shrimp from WSSV on vaccination.

  16. Dynamic response of soldered electronic components under impact loading

    OpenAIRE

    Wood, Andrew Calvin

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this research was to analyze the effects of impact loading on electronic component failure. A standard fiberglass composite printed circuit board (PCB) card was used in two impact tests. The first test consisted of a PCB card with four adhered strain gauges, which were mounted inside an aluminum box fabricated for testing. Impact testing was conducted with weights ranging from 0 to 30 lb., and the corresponding strain values were recorded. For the second set of impact tes...

  17. Hall viscosity and electromagnetic response of electrons in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherafati, Mohammad; Principi, Alessandro; Vignale, Giovanni

    2016-09-01

    We derive an analytic expression for the geometric Hall viscosity of noninteracting electrons in a single graphene layer in the presence of a perpendicular magnetic field. We show that a recently derived formula in C. Hoyos and D. T. Son [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 066805 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.066805], which connects the coefficient of q2 in the wave-vector expansion of the Hall conductivity σx y(q ) of the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) to the Hall viscosity and the orbital diamagnetic susceptibility of that system, continues to hold for graphene, in spite of the lack of Galilean invariance, with a suitable definition of the effective mass. We also show that, for a sufficiently large number of occupied Landau levels in the positive-energy sector, the Hall conductivity of electrons in graphene reduces to that of a Galilean-invariant 2DEG with an effective mass given by ℏ kF/vF (cyclotron mass). Even in the most demanding case, i.e., when the chemical potential falls between the zeroth and the first Landau levels, the cyclotron mass formula gives results accurate to better than 1%. The connection between the Hall conductivity and the viscosity provides a possible avenue to measure the Hall viscosity in graphene.

  18. Integrated Defensive Electronic Countermeasures (IDECM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Estimate: POE Disposal/ Demilitarization Total Cost (BY 2008 $M): Total costs for disposal of all System are 0.7 While these costs are not part of the...372.1 Disposal Estimate Details Date of Estimate: February 01, 2015 Source of Estimate: POE Disposal/ Demilitarization Total Cost (BY 2008 $M

  19. Comparative Analysis of Defense Responses in Chocolate Spot-Resistant and -Susceptible Faba Bean (Vicia faba Cultivars Following Infection by the Necrotrophic Fungus Botrytis fabae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud H. El-Komy

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, resistance responses were investigated during the interaction of Botrytis fabae with two faba bean cultivars expressing different levels of resistance against this pathogen, Nubaria (resistant and Giza 40 (susceptible. Disease severity was assessed on leaves using a rating scale from 1 to 9. Accumulation levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS, lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, catalase and ascorbate peroxidase were measured in leaf tissues at different times of infection. The expression profiles of two pathogenesis-related proteins (PRPs encoded by the genes PR-1 and β-1,3-glucanase were also investigated using reverse transcription RT-PCR analysis. The accumulation of these defense responses was induced significantly in both cultivars upon infection with B. fabae compared with un-inoculated controls. The resistant cultivar showed weaker necrotic symptom expression, less ROS accumulation, a lower rate of lipid peroxidation and higher activity of the enzymatic ROS scavenging system compared with susceptible cultivar. Interestingly, ROS accumulated rapidly in the resistant leaf tissues and peaked during the early stages of infection, whereas accumulation was stronger and more intense in the susceptible tissues in later stages. Moreover, the response of the resistant cultivar to infection was earlier and stronger, exhibiting high transcript accumulation of the PR genes. These results indicated that the induction of oxidant/antioxidant responses and the accumulation of PRPs are part of the faba bean defense mechanism against the necrotrophic fungus B. fabae with a different intensity and timing of induction, depending on the resistance levels.

  20. Study on citrus response to huanglongbing highlights a down-regulation of defense-related proteins in lemon plants upon 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus' infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwugo, Chika C; Duan, Yongping; Lin, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Citrus huanglongbing (HLB) is a highly destructive disease of citrus presumably caused by 'Candidatus Liberibacterasiaticus' (Las), a gram-negative, insect-transmitted, phloem-limited α-proteobacterium. Although almost all citrus plants are susceptible to HLB, reports have shown reduced susceptibility to Las infection in lemon (Citrus limon) plants. The aim of this study is to identify intra-species specific molecular mechanisms associated with Las-induced responses in lemon plants. To achieve this, comparative 2-DE and mass spectrometry, in addition to Inductively Coupled Plasma Spectroscopy (ICPS) analyses, were applied to investigate differences in protein accumulation and the concentrations of cationic elements in leaves of healthy and Las-infected lemon plants. Results showed a differential accumulation of 27 proteins, including an increase in accumulation of starch synthase but decrease in the production of photosynthesis-related proteins in Las-infected lemon plants compared to healthy plants. Furthermore, there was a 6% increase (P > 0.05) in K concentration in leaves of lemon plants upon Las infection, which support results from previous studies and might represent a common response pattern of citrus plants to Las infection. Interestingly, contrary to reports from prior studies, this study showed a general reduction in the production of defense-related pathogen-response proteins but a 128% increase in Zn concentration in lemon plants in response to Las infection. Taken together, this study sheds light on general and intra-species specific responses associated with the response of citrus plants to Las.

  1. Rapid detection of foodborne botulism outbreaks facilitated by epidemiological linking of cases: implications for food defense and public health response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newkirk, Ryan W; Hedberg, Craig W

    2012-02-01

    The main objective of this study was to develop an understanding of the descriptive epidemiology of foodborne botulism in the context of outbreak detection and food defense. This study used 1993-2008 data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Annual Summaries of Notifiable Diseases, 2003-2006 data from the Bacterial Foodborne and Diarrheal Disease National Case Surveillance Annual Reports, and 1993-2008 data from the Annual Listing of Foodborne Disease Outbreaks. Published outbreak investigation reports were identified through a PubMed search of MEDLINE citations for botulism outbreaks. Fifty-eight foodborne botulism outbreaks were reported to CDC between 1993 and 2008. Four hundred sixteen foodborne botulism cases were documented; 205 (49%) were associated with outbreaks. Familial connections and co-hospitalization of initial presenting cases were common in large outbreaks (>5 cases). In these outbreaks, the time from earliest exposure to outbreak recognition varied dramatically (range, 48-216 h). The identification of epidemiologic linkages between foodborne botulism cases is a critical part of diagnostic evaluation and outbreak detection. Investigation of an intentionally contaminated food item with a long shelf life and widespread distribution may be delayed until an astute physician suspects foodborne botulism; suspicion of foodborne botulism occurs more frequently when more than one case is hospitalized concurrently. In an effort to augment national botulism surveillance and antitoxin release systems and to improve food defense and public health preparedness efforts, medical organizations and Homeland Security officials should emphasize the education and training of medical personnel to improve foodborne botulism diagnostic capabilities to recognize single foodborne botulism cases and to look for epidemiologic linkages between suspected cases.

  2. Impact of electron irradiation on particle track etching response in polyallyl diglycol carbonate (PADC)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Mishra; S P Tripathy; A Kulshrestha; A Srivastava; S Ghosh; K K Dwivedi; D T Khathing; M Müller; D Fink

    2000-05-01

    In the present work, attempts have been made to investigate the modification in particle track etching response of polyallyl diglycol carbonate (PADC) due to impact of 2 MeV electrons. PADC samples pre-irradiated to 1, 10, 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100 Mrad doses of 2 MeV electrons were further exposed to 140 MeV 28Si beam and dose-dependent track registration properties of PADC have been studied. Etch-rate values of the PADC irradiated to 100 Mrad dose electron was found to increase by nearly 4 times that of pristine PADC. The electron irradiation has promoted chain scissioning in PADC, thereby converting the polymer into an easily etchable polymer. Moreover, the etching response and the detection efficiency were found to improve by electron irradiation. Scanning electron microscopy of etched samples further revealed the surface damage in these irradiated PADCs

  3. Plant defense against insect herbivores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fürstenberg-Hägg, Joel; Zagrobelny, Mika; Bak, Søren

    2013-01-01

    defense responses. Plants also apply morphological features like waxes, trichomes and latices to make the feeding more difficult for the insects. Extrafloral nectar, food bodies and nesting or refuge sites are produced to accommodate and feed the predators of the herbivores. Meanwhile, herbivorous insects......Plants have been interacting with insects for several hundred million years, leading to complex defense approaches against various insect feeding strategies. Some defenses are constitutive while others are induced, although the insecticidal defense compound or protein classes are often similar....... Insect herbivory induce several internal signals from the wounded tissues, including calcium ion fluxes, phosphorylation cascades and systemic- and jasmonate signaling. These are perceived in undamaged tissues, which thereafter reinforce their defense by producing different, mostly low molecular weight...

  4. Over-expression of rice leucine-rich repeat protein results in activation of defense response, thereby enhancing resistance to bacterial soft rot in Chinese cabbage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young Ho; Choi, Changhyun; Park, Eun Mi; Kim, Hyo Sun; Park, Hong Jae; Bae, Shin Cheol; Ahn, Ilpyung; Kim, Min Gab; Park, Sang Ryeol; Hwang, Duk-Ju

    2012-10-01

    Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum causes soft rot disease in various plants, including Chinese cabbage. The simple extracellular leucine-rich repeat (eLRR) domain proteins have been implicated in disease resistance. Rice leucine-rich repeat protein (OsLRP), a rice simple eLRR domain protein, is induced by pathogens, phytohormones, and salt. To see whether OsLRP enhances disease resistance to bacterial soft rot, OsLRP was introduced into Chinese cabbage by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Two independent transgenic lines over-expressing OsLRP were generated and further analyzed. Transgenic lines over-expressing OsLRP showed enhanced disease resistance to bacterial soft rot compared to non-transgenic control. Bacterial growth was retarded in transgenic lines over-expressing OsLRP compared to non-transgenic controls. We propose that OsLRP confers enhanced resistance to bacterial soft rot. Monitoring expression of defense-associated genes in transgenic lines over-expressing OsLRP, two different glucanases and Brassica rapa polygalacturonase inhibiting protein 2, PDF1 were constitutively activated in transgenic lines compared to non-transgenic control. Taken together, heterologous expression of OsLRP results in the activation of defense response and enhanced resistance to bacterial soft rot.

  5. Pseudomonas fluorescens induces strain-dependent and strain-independent host plant responses in defense networks, primary metabolism, photosynthesis, and fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, David J; Pelletier, Dale A; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Jawdy, Sara S; Lu, Tse-Yuan; Allen, Sara M; Melton, Sarah J; Martin, Madhavi Z; Schadt, Christopher W; Karve, Abhijit A; Chen, Jin-Gui; Yang, Xiaohan; Doktycz, Mitchel J; Tuskan, Gerald A

    2012-06-01

    Colonization of plants by nonpathogenic Pseudomonas fluorescens strains can confer enhanced defense capacity against a broad spectrum of pathogens. Few studies, however, have linked defense pathway regulation to primary metabolism and physiology. In this study, physiological data, metabolites, and transcript profiles are integrated to elucidate how molecular networks initiated at the root-microbe interface influence shoot metabolism and whole-plant performance. Experiments with Arabidopsis thaliana were performed using the newly identified P. fluorescens GM30 or P. fluorescens Pf-5 strains. Co-expression networks indicated that Pf-5 and GM30 induced a subnetwork specific to roots enriched for genes participating in RNA regulation, protein degradation, and hormonal metabolism. In contrast, only GM30 induced a subnetwork enriched for calcium signaling, sugar and nutrient signaling, and auxin metabolism, suggesting strain dependence in network architecture. In addition, one subnetwork present in shoots was enriched for genes in secondary metabolism, photosynthetic light reactions, and hormone metabolism. Metabolite analysis indicated that this network initiated changes in carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism. Consistent with this, we observed strain-specific responses in tryptophan and phenylalanine abundance. Both strains reduced host plant carbon gain and fitness, yet provided a clear fitness benefit when plants were challenged with the pathogen P. syringae DC3000.

  6. Defense Responses to Mycotoxin-Producing Fungi Fusarium proliferatum, F. subglutinans, and Aspergillus flavus in Kernels of Susceptible and Resistant Maize Genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanubile, Alessandra; Maschietto, Valentina; De Leonardis, Silvana; Battilani, Paola; Paciolla, Costantino; Marocco, Adriano

    2015-05-01

    Developing kernels of resistant and susceptible maize genotypes were inoculated with Fusarium proliferatum, F. subglutinans, and Aspergillus flavus. Selected defense systems were investigated using real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to monitor the expression of pathogenesis-related (PR) genes (PR1, PR5, PRm3, PRm6) and genes protective from oxidative stress (peroxidase, catalase, superoxide dismutase and ascorbate peroxidase) at 72 h postinoculation. The study was also extended to the analysis of the ascorbate-glutathione cycle and catalase, superoxide dismutase, and cytosolic and wall peroxidases enzymes. Furthermore, the hydrogen peroxide and malondialdehyde contents were studied to evaluate the oxidation level. Higher gene expression and enzymatic activities were observed in uninoculated kernels of resistant line, conferring a major readiness to the pathogen attack. Moreover expression values of PR genes remained higher in the resistant line after inoculation, demonstrating a potentiated response to the pathogen invasions. In contrast, reactive oxygen species-scavenging genes were strongly induced in the susceptible line only after pathogen inoculation, although their enzymatic activity was higher in the resistant line. Our data provide an important basis for further investigation of defense gene functions in developing kernels in order to improve resistance to fungal pathogens. Maize genotypes with overexpressed resistance traits could be profitably utilized in breeding programs focused on resistance to pathogens and grain safety.

  7. Lumped Parameter Modeling for Rapid Vibration Response Prototyping and Test Correlation for Electronic Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dyke, Michael B.

    2013-01-01

    Present preliminary work using lumped parameter models to approximate dynamic response of electronic units to random vibration; Derive a general N-DOF model for application to electronic units; Illustrate parametric influence of model parameters; Implication of coupled dynamics for unit/board design; Demonstrate use of model to infer printed wiring board (PWB) dynamics from external chassis test measurement.

  8. MMS: An electronic message management system for emergency response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H.B.; Garde, H.; Andersen, V.

    1998-01-01

    This paper outlines the main features of an electronic communication system, MMS, designed to support coordination and exchange of information in connection with emergency management (EM) efforts, The design. of the MMS has been motivated by interviews with EM decision makers and reviews...... of communication and coordination problems observed during EM efforts and exercises, The system involves the use of a small set of message types designed to match the main categories of acts of communication in the domain of EM. Message tokens related to a sequence of message transactions fan he linked, and links......, Thus, users are able to define filters that capture, for instance, "unanswered requests sent out by me today" or "requests from me that have not been answered by an unconditional 'OK.'" Last, ne describe an associated preparedness plan module, which contains, for a given Ehl organization, its...

  9. Transcriptional responses to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-induced stress in Arabidopsis thaliana reveal the involvement of hormone and defense signaling pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colón-Carmona Adán

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs are toxic, widely-distributed, environmentally persistent, and carcinogenic byproducts of carbon-based fuel combustion. Previously, plant studies have shown that PAHs induce oxidative stress, reduce growth, and cause leaf deformation as well as tissue necrosis. To understand the transcriptional changes that occur during these processes, we performed microarray experiments on Arabidopsis thaliana L. under phenanthrene treatment, and compared the results to published Arabidopsis microarray data representing a variety of stress and hormone treatments. In addition, to probe hormonal aspects of PAH stress, we assayed transgenic ethylene-inducible reporter plants as well as ethylene pathway mutants under phenanthrene treatment. Results Microarray results revealed numerous perturbations in signaling and metabolic pathways that regulate reactive oxygen species (ROS and responses related to pathogen defense. A number of glutathione S-transferases that may tag xenobiotics for transport to the vacuole were upregulated. Comparative microarray analyses indicated that the phenanthrene response was closely related to other ROS conditions, including pathogen defense conditions. The ethylene-inducible transgenic reporters were activated by phenanthrene. Mutant experiments showed that PAH inhibits growth through an ethylene-independent pathway, as PAH-treated ethylene-insensitive etr1-4 mutants exhibited a greater growth reduction than WT. Further, phenanthrene-treated, constitutive ethylene signaling mutants had longer roots than the untreated control plants, indicating that the PAH inhibits parts of the ethylene signaling pathway. Conclusions This study identified major physiological systems that participate in the PAH-induced stress response in Arabidopsis. At the transcriptional level, the results identify specific gene targets that will be valuable in finding lead compounds and engineering increased

  10. UV-B irradiation changes specifically the secondary metabolite profile in broccoli sprouts: induced signaling overlaps with defense response to biotic stressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewis, Inga; Schreiner, Monika; Nguyen, Chau Nhi; Krumbein, Angelika; Ulrichs, Christian; Lohse, Marc; Zrenner, Rita

    2012-09-01

    Only a few environmental factors have such a pronounced effect on plant growth and development as ultraviolet light (UV). Concerns have arisen due to increased UV-B radiation reaching the Earth's surface as a result of stratospheric ozone depletion. Ecologically relevant low to moderate UV-B doses (0.3-1 kJ m(-2) d(-1)) were applied to sprouts of the important vegetable crop Brassica oleracea var. italica (broccoli), and eco-physiological responses such as accumulation of non-volatile secondary metabolites were related to transcriptional responses with Agilent One-Color Gene Expression Microarray analysis using the 2×204 k format Brassica microarray. UV-B radiation effects have usually been linked to increases in phenolic compounds. As expected, the flavonoids kaempferol and quercetin accumulated in broccoli sprouts (the aerial part of the seedlings) 24 h after UV-B treatment. A new finding is the specific UV-B-mediated induction of glucosinolates (GS), especially of 4-methylsulfinylbutyl GS and 4-methoxy-indol-3-ylmethyl GS, while carotenoids and Chl levels remained unaffected. Accumulation of defensive GS metabolites was accompanied by increased expression of genes associated with salicylate and jasmonic acid signaling defense pathways and up-regulation of genes responsive to fungal and bacterial pathogens. Concomitantly, plant pre-exposure to moderate UV-B doses had negative effects on the performance of the caterpillar Pieris brassicae (L.) and on the population growth of the aphid Myzus persicae (Sulzer). Moreover, insect-specific induction of GS in broccoli sprouts was affected by UV-B pre-treatment.

  11. Differential transcriptome analysis of leaves of tea plant (Camellia sinensis) provides comprehensive insights into the defense responses to Ectropis oblique attack using RNA-Seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya-Nan; Tang, Lei; Hou, Yan; Wang, Ping; Yang, Hua; Wei, Chao-Ling

    2016-07-01

    Tea is a very popular and healthy nonalcoholic beverage worldwide. As an evergreen woody plant, the cultivation of tea plants (Camellia sinensis) is challenged by biotic stresses, and one of which is feeding of Ectropis oblique. In China, E. oblique infestation causes serious damages in many tea cultivation areas. Tea plants have evolved sophisticated strategies to cope with attack by E. oblique. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms of the response to E. oblique in tea plants, the differential gene expression profiles between the E. oblique damage-induced tea plants and undamaged control using RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) were obtained. A total of 1859 differentially expressed genes were identified, including 949 upregulated and 910 downregulated genes. Overall, 90 signal transduction genes, 100 anti-insect responsive transcription factors, 50 genes related to phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, 41 unigenes related to herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs) biosynthesis, and 8 caffeine biosynthesis genes were found to be differentially regulated. Metabolic pathway analysis indicated that plant secondary metabolites and the signaling pathways may play an important role in defense against insects, and a closer examination at the expression of some crucial genes revealed differential expression patterns after feeding by E. oblique. Furthermore, quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis further confirmed the results of RNA-Seq. Our dataset provides the most comprehensive sequence resource available for studying the resistance to E. oblique in tea, which will benefit our understanding of the overall mechanisms underlying inducible defenses responses, and may be useful to create novel prevention measures against insects to reduce pesticide usage in eco-friendly tea farming.

  12. Ab initio phonon coupling and optical response of hot electrons in plasmonic metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ana M.; Sundararaman, Ravishankar; Narang, Prineha; Goddard, William A.; Atwater, Harry A.

    2016-08-01

    Ultrafast laser measurements probe the nonequilibrium dynamics of excited electrons in metals with increasing temporal resolution. Electronic structure calculations can provide a detailed microscopic understanding of hot electron dynamics, but a parameter-free description of pump-probe measurements has not yet been possible, despite intensive research, because of the phenomenological treatment of electron-phonon interactions. We present ab initio predictions of the electron-temperature dependent heat capacities and electron-phonon coupling coefficients of plasmonic metals. We find substantial differences from free-electron and semiempirical estimates, especially in noble metals above transient electron temperatures of 2000 K, because of the previously neglected strong dependence of electron-phonon matrix elements on electron energy. We also present first-principles calculations of the electron-temperature dependent dielectric response of hot electrons in plasmonic metals, including direct interband and phonon-assisted intraband transitions, facilitating complete theoretical predictions of the time-resolved optical probe signatures in ultrafast laser experiments.

  13. Response of radiation monitoring labels to gamma rays and electrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahim, F. Abdel; Miller, Arne; McLaughlin, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    dyes that indicate changes of pH due to release of halogen from halogenated substrates, have limited shelf life and must be protected from extreme environmental conditions. Some also show a marked rate dependence of response. Readings of color reflection optical densities on labels or long paper strips......Many kinds of coated or impregnated reflecting papers change color or become colored by large radiation doses. Such papers or “labels” do not generally supply dosimetry information, but may give useful inventory information, namely a visual indication of whether or not an industrial product...

  14. A different approach for determining the responsivity of n+p detectors using scanning electron microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Omeime Xerviar Esebamen; G(o)ran Thungstr(o)m; Hans-Erik Nilsson

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores an alternative to the standard method of studying the responsivities(the input-output gain) and other behaviours of detectors at low electron energy The research does not aim to compare the results of differently doped n+p detectors; its purpose is to provide an alternative characterization method (using scanning electron microscopy) to those used in previous studies on the responsivity of n+p doped detectors as a function of the electron radiation energy and other interface parameters.

  15. A Bayesian Network-Based Approach to Selection of Intervention Points in the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Plant Defense Response Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkat, Priya S; Narayanan, Krishna R; Datta, Aniruddha

    2017-04-01

    An important problem in computational biology is the identification of potential points of intervention that can lead to modified network behavior in a genetic regulatory network. We consider the problem of deducing the effect of individual genes on the behavior of the network in a statistical framework. In this article, we make use of biological information from the literature to develop a Bayesian network and introduce a method to estimate parameters of this network using data that are relevant to the biological phenomena under study. Then, we give a novel approach to select significant nodes in the network using a decision-theoretic approach. The proposed method is applied to the analysis of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in the plant defense response to pathogens. Results from applying the method to experimental data show that the proposed approach is effective in selecting genes that play crucial roles in the biological phenomenon being studied.

  16. Atg7 deficiency impairs host defense against Klebsiella pneumoniae by impacting bacterial clearance, survival and inflammatory responses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yan; Li, Xuefeng; Wang, Wenxue; Ouedraogo, Kiswendsida Claude; Li, Yi; Gan, Changpei; Tan, Shirui; Zhou, Xikun; Wu, Min

    2014-09-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae (Kp) is a Gram-negative bacterium that can cause serious infections in humans. Autophagy-related gene 7 (Atg7) has been implicated in certain bacterial infections; however, the role of Atg7 in macrophage-mediated immunity against Kp infection has not been elucidated. Here we showed that Atg7 expression was significantly increased in murine alveolar macrophages (MH-S) upon Kp infection, indicating that Atg7 participated in host defense. Knocking down Atg7 with small-interfering RNA increased bacterial burdens in MH-S cells. Using cell biology assays and whole animal imaging analysis, we found that compared with wild-type mice atg7 knockout (KO) mice exhibited increased susceptibility to Kp infection, with decreased survival rates, decreased bacterial clearance, and intensified lung injury. Moreover, Kp infection induced excessive proinflammatory cytokines and superoxide in the lung of atg7 KO mice. Similarly, silencing Atg7 in MH-S cells markedly increased expression levels of proinflammatory cytokines. Collectively, these findings reveal that Atg7 offers critical resistance to Kp infection by modulating both systemic and local production of proinflammatory cytokines.

  17. Response of antioxidant defense system in copepodCalanus sinicus Brodsky exposed to CO2-acidified seawater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Dajuan; GUO Donghui; WANG Guizhong; LI Shaojing

    2016-01-01

    Marine zooplankton responds sensitively to elevated seawater CO2 concentration. However, the underlying physiological mechanisms have not been studied well. We therefore investigated the effects of elevated CO2 concentration (0.08%, 0.20%, 0.50% and 1.00%) on antioxidant defense components, as well as two detoxification enzymes ofCalanus sinicus (copepod). The results showed that glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity exposed to CO2-acidified seawater was significantly stimulated while other antioxidant components, including glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activity, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity decreased significantly with reduced glutathione (GSH) level and GSH/oxidized glutathione (GSSG) value. CO2-acidified seawater exhibited stimulatory effects on adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) activity and acetylcholinesterase (AchE) activity was inhibited. Moreover, the results of principal component analysis indicated that 75.93% of the overall variance was explained by the first two principal components. The elevated CO2 concentration may affect the metabolism and survivals of copepods through impacts these enzymes activities. Further studies are needed to focus on the synergistic effects of elevated CO2 concentration and other environmental factors on copepods.

  18. Strain-Related Differences on Response of Liver and Kidney Antioxidant Defense System in Two Rat Strains Following Diazinon Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Salehi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Diazinon (DZN is one of the most organophosphates that widely used in agriculture and ectoparasiticide formulations. Its extensive use as an effective pesticide was associated with the environmental deleterious effects on biological systems. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the potency of DZN to affect serum biochemical parameters and the antioxidant defense system in the liver and kidney of two rat strains. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, 30 female Wistar and 30 female Norway rats were randomly divided into control and DZN groups. DZN group was divided into four subgroups: 25, 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg of DZN administered groups by i.p. injection. The parameters were evaluated after 24 hours. Results At higher doses of DZN, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione S-transferase and lactate dehydrogenase activities and glutathione (GSH and malondialdehyde levels in liver and kidney of Wistar rats were higher than Norway rats. At these concentrations, DZN increased some serum biochemical indices such as liver enzymes activities and levels of urea, uric acid and creatinine in Wistar rat. Conclusions DZN at higher doses alters the oxidant-antioxidant balance in liver and kidney of both rat strains and induces oxidative stress, which is associated with a depletion of GSH and increased lipid peroxidation. However, Wistar rats are found to be more sensitive to the toxicity of DZN compared to Norway rats. In addition, the effect of DZN on liver antioxidant system was more than kidney.

  19. Simultaneous determination of electron beam profile and material response using self-consistent iterative method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, Yudhishthir; Denbeaux, Gregory

    2016-08-01

    We develop a novel iterative method to accurately measure electron beam shape (current density distribution) and monotonic material response as a function of position. A common method is to scan an electron beam across a knife edge along many angles to give an approximate measure of the beam profile, however such scans are not easy to obtain in all systems. The present work uses only an electron beam and multiple exposed regions of a thin film of photoresist to measure the complete beam profile for any beam shape, where the material response is characterized externally. This simplifies the setup of new experimental tools. We solve for self-consistent photoresist thickness loss response to dose and the electron beam profile simultaneously by optimizing a novel functional iteratively. We also show the successful implementation of the method in a real world data set corrupted by noise and other experimental variabilities.

  20. Antioxidative defense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevanović Jelka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Free radicals occur constantly during metabolism and take part in numerous physiological processes, such as: intra-cellular and inter-cellular signalization, gene expression, removal of damaged or senescent cells, and control of the tone of blood vessels. However, there is an increased quantity of free radicals in situations of so-called oxidative stress, when they cause serious damage to cellular membranes (peroxidation of their lipids, damage of membrane proteins, and similar, to interior cellular protein molecules, as well as DNA molecules and carbohydrates. This is precisely why the organism has developed numerous mechanisms for removing free radicals and/or preventing their production. Some of these are enzyme-related and include superoxide-dismutase, catalase, glutathione-peroxidase, and others. Other, non-enzyme mechanisms, imply antioxidative activities of vitamins E and C, provitamin A, coenzyme Q, reduced glutation, and others. Since free radicals can leave the cell that has produced them and become dispersed throughout the body, in addition to antioxidative defense that functions within cellular structures, antioxidant extra-cellular defense has also been developed. This is comprised by: transferrin, lactoferrin, haptoglobin, hemopexin, ceruloplasmin, albumins, extra-cellular isoform SOD, extracellular glutathione-peroxidase, glucose, bilirubin, urates, and many other molecules.

  1. Different Reward Structures to Motivate Student Interaction with Electronic Response Systems in Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Len, Patrick M.

    2007-01-01

    Electronic response systems ("clickers") are used in introductory astronomy classes as a real-time assessment tool. Different reward structures for student responses to clicker questions are used to motivate individual participation or group collaboration before responding. The impact of two reward structures on student behavior and learning is…

  2. Exogenous application of methyl jasmonate induces a defense response and resistance against Sclerotinia sclerotiorum in dry bean plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Marília Barros; Junior, Murillo Lobo; Grossi-de-Sá, Maria Fátima; Petrofeza, Silvana

    2015-06-15

    Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary is a necrotrophic fungal pathogen that causes a disease known as white mold, which is a major problem for dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and other crops in many growing areas in Brazil. To investigate the role of methyl jasmonate (MeJA) in defending dry bean plants against S. sclerotiorum, we used suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) of cDNA and identified genes that are differentially expressed during plant-pathogen interactions after treatment. Exogenous MeJA application enhanced resistance to the pathogen, and SSH analyses led to the identification of 94 unigenes, presumably involved in a variety of functions, which were classified into several functional categories, including metabolism, signal transduction, protein biogenesis and degradation, and cell defense and rescue. Using RT-qPCR, some unigenes were found to be differentially expressed in a time-dependent manner in dry bean plants during the interaction with S. sclerotiorum after MeJA treatment, including the pathogenesis-related protein PR3 (chitinase), PvCallose (callose synthase), PvNBS-LRR (NBS-LRR resistance-like protein), PvF-box (F-box family protein-like), and a polygalacturonase inhibitor protein (PGIP). Based on these expression data, the putative roles of differentially expressed genes were discussed in relation to the disease and MeJA resistance induction. Changes in the activity of the pathogenesis-related proteins β-1,3-glucanase, chitinase, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, and peroxidase in plants after MeJA treatment and following inoculation of the pathogen were also investigated as molecular markers of induced resistance. Foliar application of MeJA induced partial resistance against S. sclerotiorum in plants as well as a consistent increase in pathogenesis-related protein activities. Our findings provide new insights into the physiological and molecular mechanisms of resistance induced by MeJA in the P. vulgaris-S. sclerotiorum pathosystem

  3. Study on citrus response to huanglongbing highlights a down-regulation of defense-related proteins in lemon plants upon 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus' infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chika C Nwugo

    Full Text Available Citrus huanglongbing (HLB is a highly destructive disease of citrus presumably caused by 'Candidatus Liberibacterasiaticus' (Las, a gram-negative, insect-transmitted, phloem-limited α-proteobacterium. Although almost all citrus plants are susceptible to HLB, reports have shown reduced susceptibility to Las infection in lemon (Citrus limon plants. The aim of this study is to identify intra-species specific molecular mechanisms associated with Las-induced responses in lemon plants. To achieve this, comparative 2-DE and mass spectrometry, in addition to Inductively Coupled Plasma Spectroscopy (ICPS analyses, were applied to investigate differences in protein accumulation and the concentrations of cationic elements in leaves of healthy and Las-infected lemon plants. Results showed a differential accumulation of 27 proteins, including an increase in accumulation of starch synthase but decrease in the production of photosynthesis-related proteins in Las-infected lemon plants compared to healthy plants. Furthermore, there was a 6% increase (P > 0.05 in K concentration in leaves of lemon plants upon Las infection, which support results from previous studies and might represent a common response pattern of citrus plants to Las infection. Interestingly, contrary to reports from prior studies, this study showed a general reduction in the production of defense-related pathogen-response proteins but a 128% increase in Zn concentration in lemon plants in response to Las infection. Taken together, this study sheds light on general and intra-species specific responses associated with the response of citrus plants to Las.

  4. Study on Citrus Response to Huanglongbing Highlights a Down-Regulation of Defense-Related Proteins in Lemon Plants Upon ‘Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus’ Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwugo, Chika C.; Duan, Yongping; Lin, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Citrus huanglongbing (HLB) is a highly destructive disease of citrus presumably caused by ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (Las), a gram-negative, insect-transmitted, phloem-limited α-proteobacterium. Although almost all citrus plants are susceptible to HLB, reports have shown reduced susceptibility to Las infection in lemon (Citruslimon) plants. The aim of this study is to identify intra-species specific molecular mechanisms associated with Las-induced responses in lemon plants. To achieve this, comparative 2-DE and mass spectrometry, in addition to Inductively Coupled Plasma Spectroscopy (ICPS) analyses, were applied to investigate differences in protein accumulation and the concentrations of cationic elements in leaves of healthy and Las-infected lemon plants. Results showed a differential accumulation of 27 proteins, including an increase in accumulation of starch synthase but decrease in the production of photosynthesis-related proteins in Las-infected lemon plants compared to healthy plants. Furthermore, there was a 6% increase (P > 0.05) in K concentration in leaves of lemon plants upon Las infection, which support results from previous studies and might represent a common response pattern of citrus plants to Las infection. Interestingly, contrary to reports from prior studies, this study showed a general reduction in the production of defense-related pathogen-response proteins but a 128% increase in Zn concentration in lemon plants in response to Las infection. Taken together, this study sheds light on general and intra-species specific responses associated with the response of citrus plants to Las. PMID:23922636

  5. Early Disruption of Maternal–Zygotic Interaction and Activation of Defense-Like Responses in Arabidopsis Interspecific Crosses[C][W][OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkart-Waco, Diana; Ngo, Kathie; Dilkes, Brian; Josefsson, Caroline; Comai, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Seed death resulting from hybridization between Arabidopsis thaliana and Arabidopsis arenosa has complex genetic determination and involves deregulation 5 to 8 d after pollination (DAP) of AGAMOUS-LIKE genes and retroelements. To identify causal mechanisms, we compared transcriptomes of compatible and incompatible hybrids and parents at 3 DAP. Hybrids misexpressed endosperm and seed coat regulators and hyperactivated genes encoding ribosomal, photosynthetic, stress-related, and immune response proteins. Regulatory disruption was more severe in Columbia-0 hybrids than in C24 hybrids, consistent with the degree of incompatibility. Maternal loss-of-function alleles for endosperm growth factor TRANSPARENT TESTA GLABRA2 and HAIKU1 and defense response regulators NON-EXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS RELATED1 and SALICYLIC ACID INDUCTION-DEFICIENT2 increased hybrid seed survival. The activation of presumed POLYCOMB REPRESSIVE COMPLEX (PRC) targets, together with a 20-fold reduction in expression of FERTILIZATION INDEPENDENT SEED2, indicated a PRC role. Proximity to transposable elements affected natural variation for gene regulation, but transposon activation did not differ from controls. Collectively, this investigation provides candidates for multigenic orchestration of the incompatibility response through disruption of endosperm development, a novel role for communication between endosperm and maternal tissues and for pathways previously connected to immunity, but, surprisingly, does not identify a role for transposons. PMID:23898028

  6. Suspended Disbelief: The Role of the Department of Defense in Interagency Foreign Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-21

    Relief: Operation Damayan,” 8. 70 Center For Excellence in Disaster Management and Humanitarian Response ( CFE - DMHR), “Lessons from Civil-Military...74 CFE -DMHR, “Lessons from Civil-Military Disaster Management and Humanitarian Response to Typhoon Haiyan...https://www2.mccll.usmc.mil/index.cfm?disp=COPS/COP_View.cfm& ssiteid=465, 3. 76 CFE -DMHR, “Lessons from Civil-Military Disaster Management and

  7. Nanomaterials for Defense Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turaga, Uday; Singh, Vinitkumar; Lalagiri, Muralidhar; Kiekens, Paul; Ramkumar, Seshadri S.

    Nanotechnology has found a number of applications in electronics and healthcare. Within the textile field, applications of nanotechnology have been limited to filters, protective liners for chemical and biological clothing and nanocoatings. This chapter presents an overview of the applications of nanomaterials such as nanofibers and nanoparticles that are of use to military and industrial sectors. An effort has been made to categorize nanofibers based on the method of production. This chapter particularly focuses on a few latest developments that have taken place with regard to the application of nanomaterials such as metal oxides in the defense arena.

  8. Fire blight disease reactome: RNA-seq transcriptional profile of apple host plant defense responses to Erwinia amylovora pathogen infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamber, Tim; Buchmann, Jan P; Pothier, Joël F; Smits, Theo H M; Wicker, Thomas; Duffy, Brion

    2016-02-17

    The molecular basis of resistance and susceptibility of host plants to fire blight, a major disease threat to pome fruit production globally, is largely unknown. RNA-sequencing data from challenged and mock-inoculated flowers were analyzed to assess the susceptible response of apple to the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora. In presence of the pathogen 1,080 transcripts were differentially expressed at 48 h post inoculation. These included putative disease resistance, stress, pathogen related, general metabolic, and phytohormone related genes. Reads, mapped to regions on the apple genome where no genes were assigned, were used to identify potential novel genes and open reading frames. To identify transcripts specifically expressed in response to E. amylovora, RT-PCRs were conducted and compared to the expression patterns of the fire blight biocontrol agent Pantoea vagans strain C9-1, another apple pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. papulans, and mock inoculated apple flowers. This led to the identification of a peroxidase superfamily gene that was lower expressed in response to E. amylovora suggesting a potential role in the susceptibility response. Overall, this study provides the first transcriptional profile by RNA-seq of the host plant during fire blight disease and insights into the response of susceptible apple plants to E. amylovora.

  9. Cultivar-specific high temperature stress responses in bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) associated with physicochemical traits and defense pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Divya; Shekhar, Shubhendu; Agrawal, Lalit; Chakraborty, Subhra; Chakraborty, Niranjan

    2017-04-15

    The increasing global temperature by 1°C is estimated to reduce the harvest index in a crop by 6%, and this would certainly have negative impact on overall plant metabolism. Wheat is one of the most important crops with global annual production of over 600million tonnes. We investigated an array of physicochemical and molecular indexes to unravel differential response of nine commercial wheat cultivars to high temperature stress (HTS). The reduced rate in relative water content, higher membrane stability, slow chlorophyll degradation and increased accumulation of proline and secondary metabolites ingrained higher thermotolerance in cv. Unnat Halna, among others. The altered expression of several stress-responsive genes, particularly the genes associated with photosynthesis, heat shock proteins and antioxidants impinge on the complexity of HTS-induced responses over different genetic backgrounds and connectivity of adaptive mechanisms. This may facilitate the targeted manipulation of metabolic routes in crops for agricultural and industrial exploitation.

  10. Atomistic modeling of electron relaxation effect on femtosecond laser-induced thermoelastic response of gold films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Q. L.; Tian, X. G.; Lu, T. J.

    2012-07-01

    The thermoelastic response of thin gold films induced by femtosecond laser irradiation is numerically simulated using a modified combined two-temperature model (TTM) and molecular dynamics (MD) method, with focus placed upon the influence of the electron relaxation effect. The validity of the numerical approach is checked against existing experimental results. While the electron relaxation effect is found negligible when the laser duration is much longer than the electron thermal relaxation time, it becomes significant if the laser duration matches the electron relaxation time, especially when the former is much shorter than the latter. The characteristics of thermo-mechanical interaction in the thin film are analyzed, and the influence of temperature-dependent material properties upon the thermoelastic response of the film quantified.

  11. Inflation Adjustments for Defense Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Airframe Total airframe contractor furnished equipment ( CFE ) Total airframe CFE 9 entries (forward fuselage, center fuselage, wing, empennage...etc.) Avionics Total electronics CFE and government- furnished equipment (GFE) Total avionics 16 entries (radar, integrated processor...Relationship CFE Contractor Furnished Equipment CNI Communication, Navigation, Identification DoD Department of Defense FCCM Facilities Capital Cost

  12. Knocking down expression of the auxin-amidohydrolase IAR3 alters defense responses in Solanaceae family plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ippolito, D' Sebastian; Vankova, Radomira; Joosten, Matthieu H.A.J.; Casalongué, Claudia A.; Fiol, Diego F.

    2016-01-01

    In plants, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) amido hydrolases (AHs) participate in auxin homeostasis by releasing free IAA from IAA-amino acid conjugates. We investigated the role of IAR3, a member of the IAA amido hydrolase family, in the response of Solanaceous plants challenged by biotrophic and hemi

  13. Defense Gene Expression Associated with responses during the Biotrophic Phase of Mycosphaerella fjiensis Morelet, Infection in Banana.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez, H.E.; Rodriguez-Arango, E.; Morales, J.; Kema, G.H.J.; Arango, R.E.

    2016-01-01

    Banana black leaf streak, caused by Mycosphaerella fijiensis M. Morelet, is a primary phytosanitary concern in export of this fruit around the world. To develop improved cultivars resistant to this disease, an understanding of host response to infection is necessary. In this study, we obtained

  14. Relative roles of the cellular and humoral responses in the Drosophila host defense against three gram-positive bacterial infections.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nehme, N.T.; Quintin, J.; Cho, J.H.; Lee, J.; Lafarge, M.C.; Kocks, C.; Ferrandon, D.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Two NF-kappaB signaling pathways, Toll and immune deficiency (imd), are required for survival to bacterial infections in Drosophila. In response to septic injury, these pathways mediate rapid transcriptional activation of distinct sets of effector molecules, including antimicrobial pepti

  15. Phytophthora megakarya and P. palmivora, Causal Agents of Black Pod Rot, Induce Similar Plant Defense Responses Late during Infection of Susceptible Cacao Pods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Shahin S.; Shao, Jonathan; Lary, David J.; Strem, Mary D.; Meinhardt, Lyndel W.; Bailey, Bryan A.

    2017-01-01

    Phytophthora megakarya (Pmeg) and Phytophthora palmivora (Ppal) cause black pod rot of Theobroma cacao L. (cacao). Of these two clade 4 species, Pmeg is more virulent and is displacing Ppal in many cacao production areas in Africa. Symptoms and species specific sporangia production were compared when the two species were co-inoculated onto pod pieces in staggered 24 h time intervals. Pmeg sporangia were predominantly recovered from pod pieces with unwounded surfaces even when inoculated 24 h after Ppal. On wounded surfaces, sporangia of Ppal were predominantly recovered if the two species were simultaneously applied or Ppal was applied first but not if Pmeg was applied first. Pmeg demonstrated an advantage over Ppal when infecting un-wounded surfaces while Ppal had the advantage when infecting wounded surfaces. RNA-Seq was carried out on RNA isolated from control and Pmeg and Ppal infected pod pieces 3 days post inoculation to assess their abilities to alter/suppress cacao defense. Expression of 4,482 and 5,264 cacao genes was altered after Pmeg and Ppal infection, respectively, with most genes responding to both species. Neural network self-organizing map analyses separated the cacao RNA-Seq gene expression profiles into 24 classes, 6 of which were largely induced in response to infection. Using KEGG analysis, subsets of genes composing interrelated pathways leading to phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, ethylene and jasmonic acid biosynthesis and action, plant defense signal transduction, and endocytosis showed induction in response to infection. A large subset of genes encoding putative Pr-proteins also showed differential expression in response to infection. A subset of 36 cacao genes was used to validate the RNA-Seq expression data and compare infection induced gene expression patterns in leaves and wounded and unwounded pod husks. Expression patterns between RNA-Seq and RT-qPCR were generally reproducible. The level and timing of altered gene expression was

  16. Functional genomic analysis of constitutive and inducible defense responses to Fusarium verticillioides infection in maize genotypes with contrasting ear rot resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanubile, Alessandra; Ferrarini, Alberto; Maschietto, Valentina; Delledonne, Massimo; Marocco, Adriano; Bellin, Diana

    2014-08-25

    Fusarium verticillioides causes ear rot in maize (Zea mays L.) and accumulation of mycotoxins, that affect human and animal health. Currently, chemical and agronomic measures to control Fusarium ear rot are not very effective and selection of more resistant genotypes is a desirable strategy to reduce contaminations. A deeper knowledge of molecular events and genetic basis underlying Fusarium ear rot is necessary to speed up progress in breeding for resistance. A next-generation RNA-sequencing approach was used for the first time to study transcriptional changes associated with F. verticillioides inoculation in resistant CO441 and susceptible CO354 maize genotypes at 72 hours post inoculation. More than 100 million sequence reads were generated for inoculated and uninoculated control plants and analyzed to measure gene expression levels. Comparison of expression levels between inoculated vs. uninoculated and resistant vs. susceptible transcriptomes revealed a total number of 6,951 differentially expressed genes. Differences in basal gene expression were observed in the uninoculated samples. CO441 genotype showed a higher level of expression of genes distributed over all functional classes, in particular those related to secondary metabolism category. After F. verticillioides inoculation, a similar response was observed in both genotypes, although the magnitude of induction was much greater in the resistant genotype. This response included higher activation of genes involved in pathogen perception, signaling and defense, including WRKY transcription factors and jasmonate/ethylene mediated defense responses. Interestingly, strong differences in expression between the two genotypes were observed in secondary metabolism category: pathways related to shikimate, lignin, flavonoid and terpenoid biosynthesis were strongly represented and induced in the CO441 genotype, indicating that selection to enhance these traits is an additional strategy for improving resistance

  17. Capsicum annuum transcription factor WRKYa positively regulates defense response upon TMV infection and is a substrate of CaMK1 and CaMK2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Sung Un; Lee, Gil-Je; Jung, Ji Hoon; Kim, Yunsik; Kim, Young Jin; Paek, Kyung-Hee

    2015-01-23

    Plants are constantly exposed to pathogens and environmental stresses. To minimize damage caused by these potentially harmful factors, plants respond by massive transcriptional reprogramming of various stress-related genes via major transcription factor families. One of the transcription factor families, WRKY, plays an important role in diverse stress response of plants and is often useful to generate genetically engineered crop plants. In this study, we carried out functional characterization of CaWRKYa encoding group I WRKY member, which is induced during hypersensitive response (HR) in hot pepper (Capsicum annuum) upon Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) infection. CaWRKYa was involved in L-mediated resistance via transcriptional reprogramming of pathogenesis-related (PR) gene expression and affected HR upon TMV-P0 infection. CaWRKYa acts as a positive regulator of this defense system and could bind to the W-box of diverse PR genes promoters. Furthermore, we found Capsicum annuum mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 (CaMK1) and 2 (CaMK2) interacted with CaWRKYa and phosphorylated the SP clusters but not the MAPK docking (D)-domain of CaWRKYa. Thus, these results demonstrated that CaWRKYa was regulated by CaMK1 and CaMK2 at the posttranslational level in hot pepper.

  18. Defense Responses in Grapevine (cv. Mourvèdre) after Inoculation with the Botryosphaeria Dieback Pathogens Neofusicoccum parvum and Diplodia seriata and Their Relationship with Flowering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnolo, Alessandro; Mondello, Vincenzo; Larignon, Philippe; Villaume, Sandra; Rabenoelina, Fanja; Clément, Christophe; Fontaine, Florence

    2017-01-01

    As a result of the increasing economic impact of grapevine trunk diseases on viticulture worldwide, efficient and viable control strategies are urgently needed. However, understanding both plant-pathogen interactions and plant physiological changes related to these diseases is fundamental to such an achievement. In this study, we analyzed the effect of inoculation with the Botryosphaeria dieback fungal agents, Neofusicoccum parvum and Diplodia seriata, with and without inflorescence removal at the onset of G stage (separated clusters), I stage (flowering) and M stage (veraison). A measure of lesion size and real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction-based analysis were carried out. The results clearly show the importance of inflorescences in the development of lesions associated with Botryosphaeria dieback pathogens inoculated on green stems of adult vines, especially at the onset of flowering. At flowering, the biggest necroses were observed with the inflorescences present, as well as an activation of the studied defense responses. Thus, an ineffective response to the pathogen could be consistent with a possible metabolic reprogramming linked to the host phenophase. PMID:28208805

  19. Electronic chemical response indexes at finite temperature in the canonical ensemble

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco-Pérez, Marco, E-mail: qimfranco@hotmail.com, E-mail: jlgm@xanum.uam.mx, E-mail: avela@cinvestav.mx; Gázquez, José L., E-mail: qimfranco@hotmail.com, E-mail: jlgm@xanum.uam.mx, E-mail: avela@cinvestav.mx [Departamento de Química, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, México, D. F. 09340, México (Mexico); Departamento de Química, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados, Av. Instituto Politécnico Nacional 2508, México, D. F. 07360, México (Mexico); Vela, Alberto, E-mail: qimfranco@hotmail.com, E-mail: jlgm@xanum.uam.mx, E-mail: avela@cinvestav.mx [Departamento de Química, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados, Av. Instituto Politécnico Nacional 2508, México, D. F. 07360, México (Mexico)

    2015-07-14

    Assuming that the electronic energy is given by a smooth function of the number of electrons and within the extension of density functional theory to finite temperature, the first and second order chemical reactivity response functions of the Helmholtz free energy with respect to the temperature, the number of electrons, and the external potential are derived. It is found that in all cases related to the first or second derivatives with respect to the number of electrons or the external potential, there is a term given by the average of the corresponding derivative of the electronic energy of each state (ground and excited). For the second derivatives, including those related with the temperature, there is a thermal fluctuation contribution that is zero at zero temperature. Thus, all expressions reduce correctly to their corresponding chemical reactivity expressions at zero temperature and show that, at room temperature, the corrections are very small. When the assumption that the electronic energy is given by a smooth function of the number of electrons is replaced by the straight lines behavior connecting integer values, as required by the ensemble theorem, one needs to introduce directional derivatives in most cases, so that the temperature dependent expressions reduce correctly to their zero temperature counterparts. However, the main result holds, namely, at finite temperature the thermal corrections to the chemical reactivity response functions are very small. Consequently, the present work validates the usage of reactivity indexes calculated at zero temperature to infer chemical behavior at room and even higher temperatures.

  20. 细胞核在植物防御反应中的作用%The Role of the Nucleus in Plant Defense Response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹超; 李梅; 刘昱辉

    2013-01-01

      植物细胞与动物细胞一个基本的共同特征是细胞核与细胞质之间都存在着物质交换。大多数真核生物参与细胞核核膜运输的大分子具有保守性,这些细胞核组分的突变会损害植物体防御信号的传导,因此核质交换在植物先天性免疫中起重要作用。细胞核核膜对于防御调节因子在空间上的相互隔离,以及细胞受到外界刺激后相应调节因子受诱导发生易位进入细胞核,是植物体中相关防御基因表达调控的基础。病原微生物的无毒蛋白多数作用于植物细胞的细胞核;寄主的抗性蛋白、免疫元件、转录因子、转录调控因子等重要成分不断进行核质交换,并且这些寄主成分在细胞核内的积累量对植物防御反应的水平起着决定性的影响。这些实事都进一步说明了植物细胞核对于植物与病原微生物之间的相互作用具有重要影响。本文就细胞核对于植物体与病原微生物之间相互识别的重要性进行了新的论述。%The exchanges of components between the cytoplasm and the nucleus exist in both the plant cells and and animal cells. The macromolecules involved in the nuclear membrane transport are conservative in most eukaryotes. These nuclei components mutations impair the signal transduction of plant defense. It indicates that nucleocytoplasmic exchange plays an important role in plants innate immunity. The spatial isolation of defense regulators by the nuclear envelope and stimulus induced nuclear translocation are of great significance to the defense-associated gene regulation in plants. Lots of effectors from various pathogens are targeted to the cell nucleus of host plants. Additionly,the frequent transport of important host factors,like R proteins, immunity components,transcription factors and transcriptional regulators between the cytoplasm and the nucleus,and their amounts in the nuclear determine the defense response of

  1. Dose response of thin-film dosimeters irradiated with 80-120 keV electrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helt-Hansen, J.; Miller, A.; Sharpe, P.

    2005-01-01

    Thin-film dosimeters (Riso B3 and alanine films) were irradiated at 10 MeV and 80-120 keV electron accelerators, and it has been shown that the radiation response of the dosimeter materials (the radiation chemical yields) are constant at these irradiation energies. However, dose gradients within...... the dosimeters mean that calibration functions at the lower electron energies will be dependent on both irradiation energy and the required effective point of measurement of the dosimeter. These are general effects that apply to any dosimeters that have non-linear response functions and where dose gradients...

  2. Disease interactions in a shared host plant: effects of pre-existing viral infection on cucurbit plant defense responses and resistance to bacterial wilt disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori R Shapiro

    Full Text Available Both biotic and abiotic stressors can elicit broad-spectrum plant resistance against subsequent pathogen challenges. However, we currently have little understanding of how such effects influence broader aspects of disease ecology and epidemiology in natural environments where plants interact with multiple antagonists simultaneously. In previous work, we have shown that healthy wild gourd plants (Cucurbita pepo ssp. texana contract a fatal bacterial wilt infection (caused by Erwinia tracheiphila at significantly higher rates than plants infected with Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV. We recently reported evidence that this pattern is explained, at least in part, by reduced visitation of ZYMV-infected plants by the cucumber beetle vectors of E. tracheiphila. Here we examine whether ZYMV-infection may also directly elicit plant resistance to subsequent E. tracheiphila infection. In laboratory studies, we assayed the induction of key phytohormones (SA and JA in single and mixed infections of these pathogens, as well as in response to the feeding of A. vittatum cucumber beetles on healthy and infected plants. We also tracked the incidence and progression of wilt disease symptoms in plants with prior ZYMV infections. Our results indicate that ZYMV-infection slightly delays the progression of wilt symptoms, but does not significantly reduce E. tracheiphila infection success. This observation supports the hypothesis that reduced rates of wilt disease in ZYMV-infected plants reflect reduced visitation by beetle vectors. We also documented consistently strong SA responses to ZYMV infection, but limited responses to E. tracheiphila in the absence of ZYMV, suggesting that the latter pathogen may effectively evade or suppress plant defenses, although we observed no evidence of antagonistic cross-talk between SA and JA signaling pathways. We did, however, document effects of E. tracheiphila on induced responses to herbivory that may influence host

  3. Disease interactions in a shared host plant: effects of pre-existing viral infection on cucurbit plant defense responses and resistance to bacterial wilt disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Lori R; Salvaudon, Lucie; Mauck, Kerry E; Pulido, Hannier; De Moraes, Consuelo M; Stephenson, Andrew G; Mescher, Mark C

    2013-01-01

    Both biotic and abiotic stressors can elicit broad-spectrum plant resistance against subsequent pathogen challenges. However, we currently have little understanding of how such effects influence broader aspects of disease ecology and epidemiology in natural environments where plants interact with multiple antagonists simultaneously. In previous work, we have shown that healthy wild gourd plants (Cucurbita pepo ssp. texana) contract a fatal bacterial wilt infection (caused by Erwinia tracheiphila) at significantly higher rates than plants infected with Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV). We recently reported evidence that this pattern is explained, at least in part, by reduced visitation of ZYMV-infected plants by the cucumber beetle vectors of E. tracheiphila. Here we examine whether ZYMV-infection may also directly elicit plant resistance to subsequent E. tracheiphila infection. In laboratory studies, we assayed the induction of key phytohormones (SA and JA) in single and mixed infections of these pathogens, as well as in response to the feeding of A. vittatum cucumber beetles on healthy and infected plants. We also tracked the incidence and progression of wilt disease symptoms in plants with prior ZYMV infections. Our results indicate that ZYMV-infection slightly delays the progression of wilt symptoms, but does not significantly reduce E. tracheiphila infection success. This observation supports the hypothesis that reduced rates of wilt disease in ZYMV-infected plants reflect reduced visitation by beetle vectors. We also documented consistently strong SA responses to ZYMV infection, but limited responses to E. tracheiphila in the absence of ZYMV, suggesting that the latter pathogen may effectively evade or suppress plant defenses, although we observed no evidence of antagonistic cross-talk between SA and JA signaling pathways. We did, however, document effects of E. tracheiphila on induced responses to herbivory that may influence host-plant quality for (and

  4. Bayesian coclustering of Anopheles gene expression time series: Study of immune defense response to multiple experimental challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Heard, Nicholas A.; Holmes, Christopher C.; Stephens, David A.; Hand, David J.; Dimopoulos, George

    2005-01-01

    We present a method for Bayesian model-based hierarchical coclustering of gene expression data and use it to study the temporal transcription responses of an Anopheles gambiae cell line upon challenge with multiple microbial elicitors. The method fits statistical regression models to the gene expression time series for each experiment and performs coclustering on the genes by optimizing a joint probability model, characterizing gene coregulation between multiple experiments. We compute the mo...

  5. Department of Defense Homeland Security Joint Operating Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-02-01

    electronic warfare, physical attack and/or destruction, and special information operations, and could include computer network attack.”19 In 2015...electronic warfare, and special information operations. Defensive information operations ensure timely, accurate, and relevant information access while...security, counter-deception, counter- psychological operations, counter-intelligence, electronic warfare, and special information operations. Defensive

  6. Tunable Radiation Response in Hybrid Organic-Inorganic Gate Dielectrics for Low-Voltage Graphene Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Heather N; Cress, Cory D; McMorrow, Julian J; Schmucker, Scott W; Sangwan, Vinod K; Jaber-Ansari, Laila; Kumar, Rajan; Puntambekar, Kanan P; Luck, Kyle A; Marks, Tobin J; Hersam, Mark C

    2016-03-01

    Solution-processed semiconductor and dielectric materials are attractive for future lightweight, low-voltage, flexible electronics, but their response to ionizing radiation environments is not well understood. Here, we investigate the radiation response of graphene field-effect transistors employing multilayer, solution-processed zirconia self-assembled nanodielectrics (Zr-SANDs) with ZrOx as a control. Total ionizing dose (TID) testing is carried out in situ using a vacuum ultraviolet source to a total radiant exposure (RE) of 23.1 μJ/cm(2). The data reveal competing charge density accumulation within and between the individual dielectric layers. Additional measurements of a modified Zr-SAND show that varying individual layer thicknesses within the gate dielectric tuned the TID response. This study thus establishes that the radiation response of graphene electronics can be tailored to achieve a desired radiation sensitivity by incorporating hybrid organic-inorganic gate dielectrics.

  7. Genetic transformation of cotton with a harpin-encoding gene hpaXoo confers an enhanced defense response against different pathogens through a priming mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Congfeng

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The soil-borne fungal pathogen Verticillium dahliae Kleb causes Verticillium wilt in a wide range of crops including cotton (Gossypium hirsutum. To date, most upland cotton varieties are susceptible to V. dahliae and the breeding for cotton varieties with the resistance to Verticillium wilt has not been successful. Results Hpa1Xoo is a harpin protein from Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae which induces the hypersensitive cell death in plants. When hpa1Xoo was transformed into the susceptible cotton line Z35 through Agrobacterium-mediated transformation, the transgenic cotton line (T-34 with an improved resistance to Verticillium dahliae was obtained. Cells of the transgenic T-34, when mixed with the conidia suspension of V. dahliae, had a higher tolerance to V. dahliae compared to cells of untransformed Z35. Cells of T-34 were more viable 12 h after mixing with V. dahliae conidia suspension. Immunocytological analysis showed that Hpa1Xoo, expressed in T-34, accumulated as clustered particles along the cell walls of T-34. In response to the infection caused by V. dahliae, the microscopic cell death and the generation of reactive oxygen intermediates were observed in leaves of T-34 and these responses were absent in leaves of Z35 inoculated with V. dahliae. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis indicated that five defense-related genes, ghAOX1, hin1, npr1, ghdhg-OMT, and hsr203J, were up-regulated in T-34 inoculated with V. dahliae. The up-regulations of these defense-relate genes were not observed or in a less extent in leaves of Z-35 after the inoculation. Conclusions Hpa1Xoo accumulates along the cell walls of the transgenic T-34, where it triggers the generation of H2O2 as an endogenous elicitor. T-34 is thus in a primed state, ready to protect the host from the pathogen. The results of this study suggest that the transformation of cotton with hpa1Xoo could be an effective approach for the development of cotton varieties with the

  8. Responses of antioxidant defense system to polyfluorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PFDDs) exposure in liver of freshwater fish Carassius auratus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chenguang; Qin, Li; Qu, Ruijuan; Sun, Ping; Wang, Zunyao

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we evaluated the toxicity of ten polyfluorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PFDDs) congeners to freshwater fish Carassius auratus, by determining the antioxidative responses and lipid peroxidation in the liver after the fish were injected with two different concentrations (10 and 100 µmol/kg) of individual PFDDs for 3 and 14 days. The results showed that oxidative stress was obviously induced in some PFDDs-treated groups, as implied by the significantly inhibited antioxidants levels (superoxide dismutase, catalase, reduced glutathione, and glutathione S-transferase) and elevated malondialdehyde content. In addition, the oxidative stress inducing ability was variable for different PFDDs congeners, which was related with the substitution number and position of fluorine atom. Based on the calculated integrated biomarker response (IBR) values, the toxicity was ranked as 2,3,7,8-FDD>Octa-FDD>1,2,3,4,7-FDD>1,3,6,8-FDD>1,2,3,4,6,7-FDD>1,2,6,7-FDD>1,2,7-FDD>DD>2,7-FDD>2-FDD. This study can enhance the general understanding of the PFDDs induced oxidative stress in aquatic organisms.

  9. Comparison of gamma- and beta radiation stress responses on anti-oxidative defense system and DNA modifications in Lemna minor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Hoeck, Arne [SCK.CEN, Boeretang 200 2400 Mol (Belgium); University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerpen (Belgium); Horemans, Nele; Van Hees, May; Nauts, Robin; Vandenhove, Hildegarde [SCK.CEN, Boeretang 200 2400 Mol (Belgium); Knapen, Dries; Blust, Ronny [University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerpen (Belgium)

    2014-07-01

    The biological effects and interactions of different radiation types in plants are still far from understood. Additional knowledge on the impact of various kinds of ionizing radiation in plants on individual, biochemical and molecular level is needed to unravel and compare the toxic mode of action. Among different radiation types, external gamma radiation treatments have been mostly studied both in lab and field studies to derive the biological impact of radiation toxicity in organisms. However, environmental relevant studies on chronic low-dose gamma exposures are scarce. The radio-ecologically relevant radionuclide {sup 90}Sr is a pure beta emitting isotope and originates from nuclear activities and accidents. Although this radionuclide is not essential for plant metabolism, it bears a chemical analogy with the essential plant macro-nutrient Ca{sup 2+} thereby taking advantage of Ca{sup 2+} transport systems to contaminate plant organs and tissues. Ones plants are exposed to radiation stress, ionization events can cause an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) and can induce damage to biological material like DNA, lipids and structural proteins. The following work aimed at evaluating individual, biochemical and molecular endpoints to understand and to compare the mode of action of gamma- and beta radiation stress in plants. Having an equal relative biological effectiveness to non-human biota, it is still not clear in how plants differ or overlap in sensing and interpreting highly penetrating electromagnetic radiation with short-range particle radiation. The floating plant Lemna minor was chosen as model system. Following the OECD guidelines Lemna plants were being exposed separately to an external gamma radiation source or to a {sup 90}Sr-contaminated growth medium to obtain single-dose response curves for each type of radiation. In order to acquire accurate dose rate quantifications for beta radiation exposures, {sup 90}Sr uptake and accumulation of root and

  10. Manna from Heaven or "Clickers" from Hell: Experiences with an Electronic Response System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, Jay; Jensen, Murray; Moore, Randy

    2005-01-01

    Instructors used an electronic response system to enhance student-centered learning in large and small college biology classes. The system worked well to engage students in learning the subject matter and to assess their prior knowledge and misconceptions. It provided useful feedback to students as well as instructors. Problems encountered…

  11. The Role of "Talking Physics" in an Undergraduate Physics Class Using an Electronic Audience Response System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Ellen K.; Angell, Carl

    2010-01-01

    The use of electronic audience response systems (ARS) in undergraduate science instruction is increasing. In this article, we argue for combining such a teaching approach with a more active use of student small-group discussions, demonstrating with examples from a Norwegian physics course how "talking physics" is central to the development of…

  12. Examining the Effects of an Electronic Classroom Response System on Student Engagement and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Robert A.; Murphy, Wendy

    2011-01-01

    This experiment examines the causal effect an electronic classroom response system (ECRS) has on students. Previous studies using an ECRS in the classroom indicate improved performance; however, many have confounds typical of classroom studies. To complement these studies, we conducted a laboratory study to minimize these confounds and concentrate…

  13. Beyond the effective mass approximation: predictive theory of the nonlinear optical response of conduction electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Shukai; Talbayev, Diyar

    2016-01-01

    We present an experimental and computational study of the nonlinear optical response of conduction electrons to intense terahertz (THz) electric field. Our observations (saturable absorption and an amplitude-dependent group refractive index) can be understood on the qualitative level as the breakdown of the effective mass approximation. However, a predictive theoretical description of the nonlinearity has been missing. We propose a model based on the semiclassical electron dynamics, a realistic band structure, and the free electron Drude parameters to accurately calculate the experimental observables in InSb. Our results open a path to predictive modeling of the conduction-electron optical nonlinearity in semiconductors, metamaterials, as well as high-field effects in THz plasmonics.

  14. The antimicrobial peptide snakin-2 is upregulated in the defense response of tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum) as part of the jasmonate-dependent signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbel, Vera; Sieber-Frank, Julia; Wink, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are produced by all living organisms and play an important role in innate immunity because they are readily available and non-specific against invading pathogenic microorganisms. Snakin-2 (SN2) from tomato is a short, cationic peptide that forms lethal pores in biomembranes of microbes. In plant cells, SN2 is produced as a prepeptide with a signal sequence for ER targeting and an acidic region to decrease toxicity in the producing organism. Gene expression analysis by qRT-PCR in tomato plants demonstrated that SN2 is constitutively expressed, mostly in leaves and flowers. After fungal infection, wounding, or external application of phytohormones (such as methyl jasmonate, MeJa) operating in the JA-dependent defense response, a systemic reaction with an elevated expression of the SN2 gene is triggered in all parts of tomato plants. Abiotic stress factors like extreme temperatures or dehydration do not affect SN2 expression. Upon wounding, the expression of SN2 and LoxD are strongly enhanced in tomato fruits. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the protein level of bioactive SN2 is also increased upon application of methyl jasmonate in tomato seedlings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. A Solanum lycopersicum × Solanum pimpinellifolium Linkage Map of Tomato Displaying Genomic Locations of R-Genes, RGAs, and Candidate Resistance/Defense-Response ESTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Arun; Zhang, Liping; Niño-Liu, David; Ashrafi, Hamid; Foolad, Majid R.

    2008-01-01

    We have identified an accession (LA2093) within the tomato wild species Solanum pimpinellifolium with many desirable characteristics, including biotic and abiotic stress tolerance and good fruit quality. To utilize the full genetic potential of LA2093 in tomato breeding, we have developed a linkage map based on an F2 population of a cross between LA2093 and a tomato breeding line, using 115 RFLP, 94 EST, and 41 RGA markers. The map spanned 1002.4 cM of the 12 tomato chromosomes with an average marker distance of 4.0 cM. The length of the map and linear order of the markers were in good agreement with the published maps of tomato. The ESTs were chosen based on their sequence similarities with known resistance or defense-response genes, signal-transduction factors, transcriptional regulators, and genes encoding pathogenesis-related proteins. Locations of several ESTs and RGAs coincided with locations of several known tomato resistance genes and quantitative resistance loci (QRLs), suggesting that candidate-gene approach may be effective in identifying and mapping new R genes. This map will be useful for marker-assisted exploitation of desirable traits in LA2093 and other S. pimpinellifolium accessions, and possibly for utilization of genetic variation within S. lycopersicum. PMID:19223983

  16. A truncated NLR protein, TIR-NBS2, is required for activated defense responses in the exo70B1 mutant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available During exocytosis, the evolutionarily conserved exocyst complex tethers Golgi-derived vesicles to the target plasma membrane, a critical function for secretory pathways. Here we show that exo70B1 loss-of-function mutants express activated defense responses upon infection and express enhanced resistance to fungal, oomycete and bacterial pathogens. In a screen for mutants that suppress exo70B1 resistance, we identified nine alleles of TIR-NBS2 (TN2, suggesting that loss-of-function of EXO70B1 leads to activation of this nucleotide binding domain and leucine-rich repeat-containing (NLR-like disease resistance protein. This NLR-like protein is atypical because it lacks the LRR domain common in typical NLR receptors. In addition, we show that TN2 interacts with EXO70B1 in yeast and in planta. Our study thus provides a link between the exocyst complex and the function of a 'TIR-NBS only' immune receptor like protein. Our data are consistent with a speculative model wherein pathogen effectors could evolve to target EXO70B1 to manipulate plant secretion machinery. TN2 could monitor EXO70B1 integrity as part of an immune receptor complex.

  17. Tribolium castaneum immune defense genes are differentially expressed in response to Bacillus thuringiensis toxins sharing common receptor molecules and exhibiting disparate toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Estefanía; Benito-Jardón, María; López-Galiano, M José; Real, M Dolores; Rausell, Carolina

    2015-06-01

    In Tribolium castaneum larvae we have demonstrated by RNA interference knockdown that the Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3Ba toxin receptors Cadherin-like and Sodium solute symporter proteins are also functional receptors of the less active Cry3Aa toxin. Differences in susceptibility to B. thuringiensis infection might not only rely on toxin-receptor interaction but also on host defense mechanisms. We compared the expression of the immune related genes encoding Apolipophorin-III and two antimicrobial peptides, Defensin3 and Defensin2 after B. thuringiensis challenge. All three genes were up-regulated following Cry3Ba spore-crystal intoxication whereas only Defensins gene expression was induced upon Cry3Aa spore-crystal treatment, evidencing a possible association between host immune response and larval susceptibility to B. thuringiensis. We assessed the antimicrobial activity spectra of T. castaneum defensins peptide fragments and found that a peptide fragment of Defensin3 was effective against the human microbial pathogens, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans, being S. aureus the most susceptible one.

  18. Defense Responses in Aspen with Altered Pectin Methylesterase Activity Reveal the Hormonal Inducers of Tyloses1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leśniewska, Joanna; Krzesłowska, Magdalena; Kushwah, Sunita; Sundberg, Björn; Moritz, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Tyloses are ingrowths of parenchyma cells into the lumen of embolized xylem vessels, thereby protecting the remaining xylem from pathogens. They are found in heartwood, sapwood, and in abscission zones and can be induced by various stresses, but their molecular triggers are unknown. Here, we report that down-regulation of PECTIN METHYLESTERASE1 (PtxtPME1) in aspen (Populus tremula × tremuloides) triggers the formation of tyloses and activation of oxidative stress. We tested whether any of the oxidative stress-related hormones could induce tyloses in intact plantlets grown in sterile culture. Jasmonates, including jasmonic acid (JA) and methyl jasmonate, induced the formation of tyloses, whereas treatments with salicylic acid (SA) and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) were ineffective. SA abolished the induction of tyloses by JA, whereas ACC was synergistic with JA. The ability of ACC to stimulate tyloses formation when combined with JA depended on ethylene (ET) signaling, as shown by a decrease in the response in ET-insensitive plants. Measurements of internal ACC and JA concentrations in wild-type and ET-insensitive plants treated simultaneously with these two compounds indicated that ACC and JA regulate each other’s concentration in an ET-dependent manner. The findings indicate that jasmonates acting synergistically with ethylene are the key molecular triggers of tyloses. PMID:27923986

  19. Biotype Characterization, Developmental Profiling, Insecticide Response and Binding Property of Bemisia tabaci Chemosensory Proteins: Role of CSP in Insect Defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guoxia; Ma, Hongmei; Xie, Hongyan; Xuan, Ning; Guo, Xia; Fan, Zhongxue; Rajashekar, Balaji; Arnaud, Philippe; Offmann, Bernard; Picimbon, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Chemosensory proteins (CSPs) are believed to play a key role in the chemosensory process in insects. Sequencing genomic DNA and RNA encoding CSP1, CSP2 and CSP3 in the sweet potato whitefly Bemisia tabaci showed strong variation between B and Q biotypes. Analyzing CSP-RNA levels showed not only biotype, but also age and developmental stage-specific expression. Interestingly, applying neonicotinoid thiamethoxam insecticide using twenty-five different dose/time treatments in B and Q young adults showed that Bemisia CSP1, CSP2 and CSP3 were also differentially regulated over insecticide exposure. In our study one of the adult-specific gene (CSP1) was shown to be significantly up-regulated by the insecticide in Q, the most highly resistant form of B. tabaci. Correlatively, competitive binding assays using tryptophan fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular docking demonstrated that CSP1 protein preferentially bound to linoleic acid, while CSP2 and CSP3 proteins rather associated to another completely different type of chemical, i.e. α-pentyl-cinnamaldehyde (jasminaldehyde). This might indicate that some CSPs in whiteflies are crucial to facilitate the transport of fatty acids thus regulating some metabolic pathways of the insect immune response, while some others are tuned to much more volatile chemicals known not only for their pleasant odor scent, but also for their potent toxic insecticide activity. PMID:27167733

  20. The Transcription Factor IRF3 Triggers “Defensive Suicide” Necrosis in Response to Viral and Bacterial Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson C. Di Paolo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Although molecular components that execute noninflammatory apoptotic cell death are well defined, molecular pathways that trigger necrotic cell death remain poorly characterized. Here, we show that in response to infection with adenovirus or Listeria monocytogenes, macrophages in vivo undergo rapid proinflammatory necrotic death that is controlled by interferon-regulatory factor 3 (IRF3. The transcriptional activity of IRF3 is, surprisingly, not required for the induction of necrosis, and it proceeds normally in mice deficient in all known regulators of necrotic death or IRF3 activation, including RIPK3, caspases 1, 8, or 11, STING, and IPS1/MAVS. Although L. monocytogenes triggers necrosis to promote the infection, IRF3-dependent necrosis is required for reducing pathogen burden in the models of disseminated infection with adenovirus. Therefore, our studies implicate IRF3 as a principal and nonredundant component of a physiologically regulated necrotic cell-death pathway that operates as an effective innate immune mechanism of host protection against disseminated virus infection.

  1. Biotype Characterization, Developmental Profiling, Insecticide Response and Binding Property of Bemisia tabaci Chemosensory Proteins: Role of CSP in Insect Defense.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoxia Liu

    Full Text Available Chemosensory proteins (CSPs are believed to play a key role in the chemosensory process in insects. Sequencing genomic DNA and RNA encoding CSP1, CSP2 and CSP3 in the sweet potato whitefly Bemisia tabaci showed strong variation between B and Q biotypes. Analyzing CSP-RNA levels showed not only biotype, but also age and developmental stage-specific expression. Interestingly, applying neonicotinoid thiamethoxam insecticide using twenty-five different dose/time treatments in B and Q young adults showed that Bemisia CSP1, CSP2 and CSP3 were also differentially regulated over insecticide exposure. In our study one of the adult-specific gene (CSP1 was shown to be significantly up-regulated by the insecticide in Q, the most highly resistant form of B. tabaci. Correlatively, competitive binding assays using tryptophan fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular docking demonstrated that CSP1 protein preferentially bound to linoleic acid, while CSP2 and CSP3 proteins rather associated to another completely different type of chemical, i.e. α-pentyl-cinnamaldehyde (jasminaldehyde. This might indicate that some CSPs in whiteflies are crucial to facilitate the transport of fatty acids thus regulating some metabolic pathways of the insect immune response, while some others are tuned to much more volatile chemicals known not only for their pleasant odor scent, but also for their potent toxic insecticide activity.

  2. Temperature and relative humidity dependence of radiochromic film dosimeter response to gamma electron radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLaughlin, W.L.; Puhl, J.M.; Miller, A.

    1995-01-01

    on some earlier studies, their response functions have been reported to be dependent on the temperature and relative humidity during irradiation. The present study investigates differences in response over practical ranges of temperature, relative humidity, dose, and for different recent batches of films...... of both types. It is observed that for each new batch of film to be used for radiation processing, the effects of such parameters on response to both gamma rays and electrons should be investigated. It is also suggested that the films should be packaged under controlled atmospheric conditions (relative...

  3. 烟粉虱血细胞对白僵菌的防御反应%Defense Response of Hemolymph in Bemisia tabaci to Beauveria bessiana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任洁; 韩雪梅; 刘昭; 雷仲仁

    2013-01-01

    To identify the defense mechanism of Bemisia tabaci hemolymph against Beauveria bassiana,cellular immune responses of the infected 3rd instar nymph was investigated with optics microscope and Giemsa stain.The results showed that the invasion of Beauveria bassiana could bring about changes in the total numbers of host hemocytes.After 36 hours inoculation,the blastospores appeared in B. tabaci and the total numbers of host hemocytes were increased.At the same time, the blastospores were adsorbed to the surface of plamatocyte.60 hours after inoculation,the hyphal bodies were absorbed to the surface of granulocytes.More hyphal bodies were observed to the surface of granulocytes 96 hours after inoculation,and the insect body color had appeared the symptoms of infection,which means that the B. bassiana has broken the defense of B. tabaci.B. tabaci can only inhibit the invasion of B. basiana temporarily.%  为了探讨烟粉虱(Bemisia tabaci)血淋巴对白僵菌(Beauveria bassiana)的防御机制,利用吉姆萨染色法在光学显微镜下观察烟粉虱3龄若虫血细胞感染白僵菌后的免疫反应。结果表明:白僵菌的入侵可导致烟粉虱血细胞数量发生改变。体表接种36 h后,虫体内出现芽生孢子,血细胞数量开始增加,芽生孢子被吸附到浆血细胞表面;接种60 h后菌丝段吸附到粒血细胞表面;接种96 h后粒血细胞表面吸附大量菌丝段,此时昆虫体色已经呈现感染症状,说明真菌已经打破了烟粉虱的防御体系,烟粉虱幼虫血淋巴对白僵菌有短时间抑制。

  4. Trying to Learn Lessons for Response to Extreme Events: Paradigm Shifts Affecting Civil Defense in the Trinational Region of Southwestern Amazonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, G. L. P.

    2015-12-01

    The last ten years have seen several extreme climate events in southwestern Amazonia with historic impacts. The City of Rio Branco, Capital of Acre, Brazil´s westernmost State, suffered its seventh consecutive annual flooding and its worst in March 2015. The city of Tarauacá, also in Acre, registered 12 flooding events between November 2014 and April 2015. The most recent flood of the trinational Acre River in 2015 set historic records for flood stage and number of displaced persons in Cobija, the Capital of Pando, Bolivia. From February to April 2014, floods of the Madeira River disrupted the one highway between Acre and southern Brazil. Puerto Maldonado, the capital in Madre de Dios Region of Peru had its worst flood in 50 years during 2014. In 2005 and 2010, prolonged droughts combined with ignition sources resulted in tens to hundreds of thousands of hectares of fire-damaged rainforests in the Madre de Dios, Acre and Pando (MAP) Region. The Civil Defenses in these three contiguous political units faced several abrupt paradigm shifts that affected their responses: 1) The drought of 2005 showed dramatically that regional rainforests do burn; 2) The recent flooding history, particularly in 2012 and 2015, demolished the cultural icon of a nine-year recurrence interval; 3) What happens outside your territory can be devastating. The Madeira River flood impeded an estimated 200 million dollars from circulating in Acre; 4) The past can be a terrible guide. For Cobija and Rio Branco, the 2015 flood was on the order of a meter higher than any other. Many home dwellers did not evacuate in time because they used past floods as a guide; 5) A collapse in communication - cell phones, land lines, and Internet - can get worse. In 2012, such a collapse occurred in two border towns for 5 days, yet in 2015 it lasted more than 11 days. Research is needed to address how institutions linked to Civil Defense can shift paradigms in time to be more effective.

  5. Measurements of NaI(Tl) electron response: comparison of different samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, Giulia; Choong, Woon-Seng; Moses, William W.; Bizarri, Gregory; Valentine, John D.; Payne, Stephen A.; Cherepy, Nerine J.; Reutter, Bryan W.

    2008-12-10

    This paper measures the sample to sample variation in the light yield proportionality of NaI(Tl), and so explores whether this is an invariant characteristic of the material or whether it depends on the chemical and physical properties of the tested samples. We report on the electron response of nine crystals of NaI(Tl), differing in shape, volume, age, manufacturer and quality. The proportionality has been measured at the SLYNCI facility in the energy range between 3.5 to 460 keV. We observe that while samples produced by the same manufacturer at approximately the same time have virtually identical electron response curves, there are significant sample to sample variations among crystals produced by different manufacturers or at different times. In an effort to correlate changes in the electron response with details of the scintillation mechanism, we characterized other scintillation properties, including the gamma response and the x-ray excited emission spectra and decay times, for the nine crystals. While sample to sample differences in these crystals were observed, we have been unable to identify the underlying fundamental mechanisms that are responsible for these differences.

  6. Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis induces a unique pulmonary inflammatory response: role of bacterial gene expression in temporal regulation of host defense responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathie-Anne Walters

    Full Text Available Pulmonary exposure to Francisella tularensis is associated with severe lung pathology and a high mortality rate. The lack of induction of classical inflammatory mediators, including IL1-β and TNF-α, during early infection has led to the suggestion that F. tularensis evades detection by host innate immune surveillance and/or actively suppresses inflammation. To gain more insight into the host response to Francisella infection during the acute stage, transcriptomic analysis was performed on lung tissue from mice exposed to virulent (Francisella tularensis ssp tularensis SchuS4. Despite an extensive transcriptional response in the lungs of animals as early as 4 hrs post-exposure, Francisella tularensis was associated with an almost complete lack of induction of immune-related genes during the initial 24 hrs post-exposure. This broad subversion of innate immune responses was particularly evident when compared to the pulmonary inflammatory response induced by other lethal (Yersinia pestis and non-lethal (Legionella pneumophila, Pseudomonas aeruginosa pulmonary infections. However, the unique induction of a subset of inflammation-related genes suggests a role for dysregulation of lymphocyte function and anti-inflammatory pathways in the extreme virulence of Francisella. Subsequent activation of a classical inflammatory response 48 hrs post-exposure was associated with altered abundance of Francisella-specific transcripts, including those associated with bacterial surface components. In summary, virulent Francisella induces a unique pulmonary inflammatory response characterized by temporal regulation of innate immune pathways correlating with altered bacterial gene expression patterns. This study represents the first simultaneous measurement of both host and Francisella transcriptome changes that occur during in vivo infection and identifies potential bacterial virulence factors responsible for regulation of host inflammatory pathways.

  7. The response of a radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeter in megavoltage photon and electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araki, Fujio, E-mail: f-araki@kumamoto-u.ac.jp; Ohno, Takeshi [Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, 4-24-1 Kuhonji, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto 862-0976 (Japan)

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: This study investigated the response of a radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeter (RGD) in megavoltage photon and electron beams. Methods: The RGD response was compared with ion chamber measurements for 4–18 MV photons and 6–20 MeV electrons in plastic water phantoms. The response was also calculated via Monte Carlo (MC) simulations with EGSnrc/egs-chamber and Cavity user-codes, respectively. In addition, the response of the RGD cavity was analyzed as a function of field sizes and depths according to Burlin’s general cavity theory. The perturbation correction factor, P{sub Q}, in the RGD cavity was also estimated from MC simulations for photon and electron beams. Results: The calculated and measured RGD energy response at reference conditions with a 10 × 10 cm{sup 2} field and 10 cm depth in photons was lower by up to 2.5% with increasing energy. The variation in RGD response in the field size range of 5 × 5 cm{sup 2} to 20 × 20 cm{sup 2} was 3.9% and 0.7%, at 10 cm depth for 4 and 18 MV, respectively. The depth dependence of the RGD response was constant within 1% for energies above 6 MV but it increased by 2.6% and 1.6% for a large (20 × 20 cm{sup 2}) field at 4 and 6 MV, respectively. The dose contributions from photon interactions (1 − d) in the RGD cavity, according to Burlin’s cavity theory, decreased with increasing energy and decreasing field size. The variation in (1 − d) between field sizes became larger with increasing depth for the lower energies of 4 and 6 MV. P{sub Q} for the RGD cavity was almost constant between 0.96 and 0.97 at 10 MV energies and above. Meanwhile, P{sub Q} depends strongly on field size and depth for 4 and 6 MV photons. In electron beams, the RGD response at a reference depth, d{sub ref}, varied by less than 1% over the electron energy range but was on average 4% lower than the response for 6 MV photons. Conclusions: The RGD response for photon beams depends on both (1 − d) and perturbation effects in the

  8. Dynamic response of electronic systems to shocks and vibrations: Application of analytical (mathematical modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhir E.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Some basic problems of the dynamic response of electronic and photonic (E&P systems to shocks and vibrations are addressed and discussed. The emphasis is on analytical (mathematical modeling, the reliability physics behind the addressed phenomena, and design-for-reliability (DfR issues and challenges. The addressed problems include 1 linear response: effect of viscous damping, shock tests vs. drop tests, role of compliant interfaces, and maximum acceleration and maximum dynamic stress as a suitable reliability criterion; 2 nonlinear response: printed circuit board (PCB experiencing an impact load applied to its support contour and ball-grid-array (BGA testing on the board level; 3 shock protection of portable electronics, including the possible use of nano-wires as a suitable protective “cushion”. The fruitfulness of the probabilistic DfR (PDfR concept to quantify and assure the field (operational reliability of E&P devices and systems is also indicated.

  9. A teleostan homolog of catalase from black rockfish (Sebastes schlegelii): insights into functional roles in host antioxidant defense and expressional responses to septic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvitigala, Don Anushka Sandaruwan; Priyathilaka, Thanthrige Thiunuwan; Whang, Ilson; Nam, Bo-Hye; Lee, Jehee

    2015-05-01

    Antioxidative defense renders a significant protection against environmental stress in organisms and maintains the correct redox balance in cells, thereby supporting proper immune function. Catalase is an indispensable antioxidant in organisms that detoxifies hydrogen peroxides produced in cellular environments. In this study, we sought to molecularly characterize a homolog of catalase (RfCat), identified from black rockfish (Sebastes schlegelii). RfCat consists of a 1581 bp coding region for a protein of 527 amino acids, with a predicted molecular weight of 60 kD. The protein sequence of RfCat harbored similar domain architecture to known catalases, containing a proximal active site signature and proximal heme ligand signature, and further sharing prominent homology with its teleostan counterparts. As affirmed by multiple sequence alignments, most of the functionally important residues were well conserved in RfCat. Furthermore, our phylogenetic analysis indicates its common vertebrate ancestral origin and a close evolutionary relationship with teleostan catalases. Recombinantly expressed RfCat demonstrated prominent peroxidase activity that varied with different substrate and protein concentrations, and protected against DNA damage. RfCat mRNA was ubiquitously expressed among different tissues examined, as detected by qPCR. In addition, RfCat mRNA expression was modulated in response to pathogenic stress elicited by Streptococcus iniae and poly I:C in blood and spleen tissues. Collectively, our findings indicate that RfCat may play an indispensable role in host response to oxidative stress and maintain a correct redox balance after a pathogen invasion.

  10. Metabolic response of Geobacter sulfurreducens towards electron donor/acceptor variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lovley Derek R

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Geobacter sulfurreducens is capable of coupling the complete oxidation of organic compounds to iron reduction. The metabolic response of G. sulfurreducens towards variations in electron donors (acetate, hydrogen and acceptors (Fe(III, fumarate was investigated via 13C-based metabolic flux analysis. We examined the 13C-labeling patterns of proteinogenic amino acids obtained from G. sulfurreducens cultured with 13C-acetate. Results Using 13C-based metabolic flux analysis, we observed that donor and acceptor variations gave rise to differences in gluconeogenetic initiation, tricarboxylic acid cycle activity, and amino acid biosynthesis pathways. Culturing G. sulfurreducens cells with Fe(III as the electron acceptor and acetate as the electron donor resulted in pyruvate as the primary carbon source for gluconeogenesis. When fumarate was provided as the electron acceptor and acetate as the electron donor, the flux analysis suggested that fumarate served as both an electron acceptor and, in conjunction with acetate, a carbon source. Growth on fumarate and acetate resulted in the initiation of gluconeogenesis by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and a slightly elevated flux through the oxidative tricarboxylic acid cycle as compared to growth with Fe(III as the electron acceptor. In addition, the direction of net flux between acetyl-CoA and pyruvate was reversed during growth on fumarate relative to Fe(III, while growth in the presence of Fe(III and acetate which provided hydrogen as an electron donor, resulted in decreased flux through the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Conclusions We gained detailed insight into the metabolism of G. sulfurreducens cells under various electron donor/acceptor conditions using 13C-based metabolic flux analysis. Our results can be used for the development of G. sulfurreducens as a chassis for a variety of applications including bioremediation and renewable biofuel production.

  11. Engineers' Responsibilities for Global Electronic Waste: Exploring Engineering Student Writing Through a Care Ethics Lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Ryan C; Wilson, Denise

    2017-04-01

    This paper provides an empirically informed perspective on the notion of responsibility using an ethical framework that has received little attention in the engineering-related literature to date: ethics of care. In this work, we ground conceptual explorations of engineering responsibility in empirical findings from engineering student's writing on the human health and environmental impacts of "backyard" electronic waste recycling/disposal. Our findings, from a purposefully diverse sample of engineering students in an introductory electrical engineering course, indicate that most of these engineers of tomorrow associated engineers with responsibility for the electronic waste (e-waste) problem in some way. However, a number of responses suggested attempts to deflect responsibility away from engineers towards, for example, the government or the companies for whom engineers work. Still other students associated both engineers and non-engineers with responsibility, demonstrating the distributed/collective nature of responsibility that will be required to achieve a solution to the global problem of excessive e-waste. Building upon one element of a framework for care ethics adopted from the wider literature, these empirical findings are used to facilitate a preliminary, conceptual exploration of care-ethical responsibility within the context of engineering and e-waste recycling/disposal. The objective of this exploration is to provide a first step toward understanding how care-ethical responsibility applies to engineering. We also hope to seed dialogue within the engineering community about its ethical responsibilities on the issue. We conclude the paper with a discussion of its implications for engineering education and engineering ethics that suggests changes for educational policy and the practice of engineering.

  12. Bulk and surface electromagnetic response of metallic metamaterials to convection electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Jin-Kyu; Jang, Kyu-Ha; Park, Gun-Sik; Garcia-Vidal, F. J.

    2011-08-01

    The electromagnetic response of three-dimensional metallic metamaterials with isotropic effective index of refraction to fast-moving electrons is studied by numerical simulations. The considered metamaterials can support Cerenkov radiation [P. A. Cherenkov, Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 2, 451 (1934)], and their effective dielectric behavior is confirmed by the detailed angular dependence of the generated radiation cone on the kinetic energy of electrons. Moreover, in addition to the predicted bulk modes, surface electromagnetic excitation is observed in a specific type of metamaterials and its dispersion is sensitive to the thickness of the subwavelength rods.

  13. Electron dominated thermoelectric response in MNiSn (M: Ti, Zr, Hf) half-Heusler alloys

    KAUST Repository

    Gandi, Appala

    2016-05-09

    We solve the transport equations of the electrons and phonons to understand the thermoelectric behaviour of the technologically important half-Heusler alloys MNiSn (M: Ti, Zr, Hf). Doping is simulated within the rigid band approximation. We clarify the origin of the electron dominated thermoelectric response and determine the carrier concentrations with maximal figures of merit. The phonon mean free path is studied to calculate the grain size below which grain refinement methods can enforce ballistic heat conduction to enhance the figure of merit. © The Owner Societies 2016.

  14. Water-soluble cationic conjugated polymers: response to electron-rich bioanalytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochat, Sébastien; Swager, Timothy M

    2013-11-27

    We report the concise synthesis of a symmetrical monomer that provides a head-to-head pyridine building block for the preparation of cationic conjugated polymers. The obtained poly(pyridinium-phenylene) polymers display appealing properties such as high electron affinity, charge-transport upon n-doping, and optical response to electron-donating analytes. A simple assay for the optical detection of low micromolar amounts of a variety of analytes in aqueous solution was developed. In particular, caffeine could be measured at a 25 μM detection limit. The reported polymers are also suitable for layer-by-layer film formation.

  15. Electron Transport, Energy Transfer, and Optical Response in Single Molecule Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Alexander James

    The last decade has seen incredible growth in the quality of experiments being done on single molecule junctions. Contemporary experimental measurements have expanded far beyond simple electron transport. Measurement of vibronic eects, quantum interference and decoherence eects, molecular optical response (Raman spectroscopy), and molecular spintronics are just some of the continuing areas of research in single molecule junctions. Experimental advancements demand advanced theoretical treatments, which can be used accurately within appropriate physical regimes, in order to understand measured phenomena and predict interesting directions for future study. In this dissertation we will study systems with strong intra-system interactions using a many-body states based approach. We will be focused on three related processes in molecular junctions: electron transport, electronic energy transfer, and molecular excitation. Inelastic electron transport in the regime of strong and nonlinear electron-vibration coupling within and outside of the Born-Oppenheimer regime will be investigated. To understand their appropriateness, we will compare simple semi-classical approximations in molecular redox junctions and electron-counting devices to fully quantum calculations based on many-body system states. The role of coherence and quantum interference in energy and electron transfer in molecular junctions is explored. Experiments that simultaneously measure surface enhanced Raman scattering and electron conduction have revealed a strong interaction between conducting electrons and molecular excitation. We investigate the role of the molecular response to a classical surface plasmon enhanced electric eld considering the back action of the oscillating molecular dipole. Raman scattering is quantum mechanical by nature and involves strong interaction between surface plasmons in the contacts and the molecular excitation. We develop a scheme for treating strong plasmon-molecular excitation

  16. The pepper extracellular xyloglucan-specific endo-β-1,4-glucanase inhibitor protein gene, CaXEGIP1, is required for plant cell death and defense responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyong Woo; Kim, Nak Hyun; Lee, Yeon Kyeong; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2013-01-01

    Plants produce various proteinaceous inhibitors to protect themselves against microbial pathogen attack. A xyloglucan-specific endo-β-1,4-glucanase inhibitor1 gene, CaXEGIP1, was isolated and functionally characterized in pepper (Capsicum annuum) plants. CaXEGIP1 was rapidly and strongly induced in pepper leaves infected with avirulent Xanthomonas campestris pv vesicatoria, and purified CaXEGIP1 protein significantly inhibited the hydrolytic activity of the glycoside hydrolase74 family xyloglucan-specific endo-β-1,4-glucanase from Clostridium thermocellum. Soluble-modified green fluorescent protein-tagged CaXEGIP1 proteins were mainly localized to the apoplast of onion (Allium cepa) epidermal cells. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated overexpression of CaXEGIP1 triggered pathogen-independent, spontaneous cell death in pepper and Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. CaXEGIP1 silencing in pepper conferred enhanced susceptibility to virulent and avirulent X. campestris pv vesicatoria, accompanied by a compromised hypersensitive response and lowered expression of defense-related genes. Overexpression of dexamethasone:CaXEGIP1 in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) enhanced resistance to Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis infection. Comparative histochemical and proteomic analyses revealed that CaXEGIP1 overexpression induced a spontaneous cell death response and also increased the expression of some defense-related proteins in transgenic Arabidopsis leaves. This response was also accompanied by cell wall thickening and darkening. Together, these results suggest that pathogen-inducible CaXEGIP1 positively regulates cell death-mediated defense responses in plants.

  17. Analysis of the thermal response of plasma facing components during a runaway electron impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Robert Cameron

    The generation of runaway electrons during a thermal plasma disruption is a concern for the safe and economical operation of a tokamak power system. Runaway electrons have high energy, 10--300 MeV, and may potentially cause extensive damage to plasma facing components through large temperature increases, melting of metallic components, surface erosion, and possible burnout of coolant tubes. The EPQ code system was developed to simulate the thermal response of plasma facing components to a runaway electron impact. The EPQ code system consists of several parts: UNIX scripts which control the operation of an electron-photon monte carlo code to calculate the interaction of the runaway electrons with the plasma facing materials; a finite difference code to calculate the thermal response, melting, and surface erosion of the materials using the modified heat conduction equation; a code to process, scale, transform, and convert the electron monte carlo data to volumetric heating rates for use in the thermal code; and several minor and auxiliary codes for the manipulation and post-processing of the data. The electron-photon monte carlo code used was the Electron-Gamma-Shower (EGS) code, developed and maintained by the National Research Center of Canada. The other codes were written in C++ for this study. The thermal code, called QTTN, solves the two-dimensional cylindrical modified heat conduction equation using the Quickest third-order accurate and stable explicit finite difference method and is capable of tracking melting or surface erosion. The EPQ code system was validated using a series of analytical solutions and simulations of experiments. QTTN and EPQ was verified and validated as able to calculate the temperature distribution, phase change, and surface erosion successfully. EPQ was then employed in a parametric study to simulate a typical runaway electron disruption impact on the FIRE design's plasma facing components. The results of the FIRE parametric study

  18. An Investigation of Response Bias Associated with Electronically Delivered Risk-Tolerance Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John E. Grable

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available

    A randomized experimental study was designed to compare risk-tolerance scores for those who completed a paper-and-pen risk-tolerance assessment instrument (i.e., the control group to those who answered the same questions using an electronic method. It was hypothesized that the possibility of an electronic bias might be present. Controlling for financial knowledge, which was positively associated with risk tolerance, men were found to report much higher risk-tolerance scores than women when responding to electronically delivered questions. Results suggest that financial therapists ought to consider this possibility as a factor that influences responses to risk assessments, especially as they incorporate additional technological evaluation tools into their practice.

  19. Effects of free-electron-laser field fluctuations on the frequency response of driven atomic resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Nikolopoulos, G M

    2012-01-01

    We study the effects of field fluctuations on the total yields of Auger electrons, obtained in the excitation of neutral atoms to a core-excited state by means of short-wavelength free-electron-laser pulses. Beginning with a self-contained analysis of the statistical properties of fluctuating free-electron-laser pulses, we analyse separately and in detail the cases of single and double Auger resonances, focusing on fundamental phenomena such as power broadening and ac Stark (Autler-Townes) splitting. In certain cases, field fluctuations are shown to influence dramatically the frequency response of the resonances, whereas in other cases the signal obtained may convey information about the bandwidth of the radiation as well as the dipole moment between Auger states.

  20. The Electron Recoil Response of the XENON1T Dark Matter Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shockley, Evan; Xenon1T Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    XENON1T employs a two-phase xenon TPC to search for dark matter by detecting scintillation light produced by nuclear recoils in a 2 ton active volume of liquid xenon. However, nuclear recoils are not the only recoils that can occur since radiogenic electronic recoils are possible. Our only way of differentiating nuclear and electronic recoils is by comparing the relative fraction of scintillation (S1) and ionization (S2) signals. For the first Science Run of XENON1T, we must understand the response of our detector to S1 and S2 signals at the low keV energies where dark matter will present itself. Therefore, I will be discussing the current understanding of our signal and detection mechanisms at these energies. This work includes work using sources such as the Rn220 technique developed by XENON collaborators for understanding our rejection of electronic recoils.

  1. The Inflammasome in Host Defense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Chen

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Nod-like receptors have emerged as an important family of sensors in host defense. These receptors are expressed in macrophages, dendritic cells and monocytes and play an important role in microbial immunity. Some Nod-like receptors form the inflammasome, a protein complex that activates caspase-1 in response to several stimuli. Caspase-1 activation leads to processing and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL-1β and IL-18. Here, we discuss recent advances in the inflammasome field with an emphasis on host defense. We also compare differential requirements for inflammasome activation in dendritic cells, macrophages and monocytes.

  2. Response functions of imaging plates to photons, electrons and 4He particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, T; Comet, M; Denis-Petit, D; Gobet, F; Hannachi, F; Tarisien, M; Versteegen, M; Aléonard, M M

    2013-10-01

    Imaging plates from Fuji (BAS-SR, MS, and TR types) are phosphor films routinely used in ultra high intensity laser experiments. However, few data are available on the absolute IP response functions to ionizing particles. We have previously measured and modeled the IP response functions to protons. We focus here on the determination of the responses to photons, electrons, and (4)He particles. The response functions are obtained on an energy range going from a few tens of keV to a few tens of MeV and are compared to available data. The IP sensitivities to the different ionizing particles demonstrate a quenching effect depending on the particle stopping power.

  3. Pseudomonas fluorescens WCS374r-induced systemic resistance in rice against Magnaporthe oryzae is based on pseudobactin-mediated priming for a salicylic acid-repressible multifaceted defense response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vleesschauwer, David; Djavaheri, Mohammad; Bakker, Peter A H M; Höfte, Monica

    2008-12-01

    Selected strains of nonpathogenic rhizobacteria can reduce disease in foliar tissues through the induction of a defense state known as induced systemic resistance (ISR). Compared with the large body of information on ISR in dicotyledonous plants, little is known about the mechanisms underlying rhizobacteria-induced resistance in cereal crops. Here, we demonstrate the ability of Pseudomonas fluorescens WCS374r to trigger ISR in rice (Oryza sativa) against the leaf blast pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae. Using salicylic acid (SA)-nonaccumulating NahG rice, an ethylene-insensitive OsEIN2 antisense line, and the jasmonate-deficient mutant hebiba, we show that this WCS374r-induced resistance is regulated by an SA-independent but jasmonic acid/ethylene-modulated signal transduction pathway. Bacterial mutant analysis uncovered a pseudobactin-type siderophore as the crucial determinant responsible for ISR elicitation. Root application of WCS374r-derived pseudobactin (Psb374) primed naive leaves for accelerated expression of a pronounced multifaceted defense response, consisting of rapid recruitment of phenolic compounds at sites of pathogen entry, concerted expression of a diverse set of structural defenses, and a timely hyperinduction of hydrogen peroxide formation putatively driving cell wall fortification. Exogenous SA application alleviated this Psb374-modulated defense priming, while Psb374 pretreatment antagonized infection-induced transcription of SA-responsive PR genes, suggesting that the Psb374- and SA-modulated signaling pathways are mutually antagonistic. Interestingly, in sharp contrast to WCS374r-mediated ISR, chemical induction of blast resistance by the SA analog benzothiadiazole was independent of jasmonic acid/ethylene signaling and involved the potentiation of SA-responsive gene expression. Together, these results offer novel insights into the signaling circuitry governing induced resistance against M. oryzae and suggest that rice is endowed with multiple

  4. Knockdown of LjALD1, AGD2-like defense response protein 1, influences plant growth and nodulation in Lotus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Li, Xueliu; Tian, Lu; Wu, Pingzhi; Li, Meiru; Jiang, Huawu; Chen, Yaping; Wu, Guojiang

    2014-11-01

    The discovery of the enzyme L,L-diaminopimelate aminotransferase (LL-DAP-AT, EC 2.6.1.83) uncovered a unique step in the L-lysine biosynthesis pathway in plants. In Arabidopsis thaliana, LL-DAP-AT has been shown to play a key role in plant-pathogen interactions by regulation of the salicylic acid (SA) signaling pathway. Here, a full-length cDNA of LL-DAP-AT named as LjALD1 from Lotus japonicus (Regel) Larsen was isolated. The deduced amino acid sequence shares 67% identity with the Arabidopsis aminotransferase AGD2-LIKE DEFENSE RESPONSE PROTEIN1 (AtALD1) and is predicted to contain the same key elements: a conserved aminotransferase domain and a pyridoxal-5'-phosphate cofactor binding site. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that LjALD1 was expressed in all L. japonicus tissues tested, being strongest in nodules. Expression was induced in roots that had been infected with the symbiotic rhizobium Mesorhizobium loti or treated with SA agonist benzo-(1, 2, 3)-thiadiazole-7-carbothioic acid. LjALD1 Knockdown exhibited a lower SA content, an increased number of infection threads and nodules, and a slight reduction in nodule size. In addition, compared with wild-type, root growth was increased and shoot growth was suppressed in LjALD1 RNAi plant lines. These results indicate that LjALD1 may play important roles in plant development and nodulation via SA signaling in L. japonicus. © 2014 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  5. Knockdown of LjALD1, AGD2-like defense response protein 1, influences plant growth and nodulation in Lotus japonicus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Chen; Xueliu Li; Lu Tian; Pingzhi Wu; Meiru Li; Huawu Jiang; Yaping Chen; and Guojiang Wu

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of the enzyme L,L‐diaminopimelate aminotransferase (LL‐DAP‐AT, EC 2.6.1.83) uncovered a unique step in the L‐lysine biosynthesis pathway in plants. In Arabidopsis thaliana, LL‐DAP‐AT has been shown to play a key role in plant‐pathogen interactions by regulation of the salicylic acid (SA) signaling pathway. Here, a ful‐length cDNA of LL‐DAP‐AT named as LjALD1 from Lotus japonicus (Regel) Larsen was isolated. The deduced amino acid sequence shares 67%identity with the Arabidopsis aminotransferase AGD2‐LIKE DEFENSE RESPONSE PROTEIN1 (AtALD1) and is predicted to contain the same key elements:a conserved aminotransferase domain and a pyridoxal‐5’‐phosphate cofactor binding site. Quantitative real‐time PCR analysis showed that LjALD1 was expressed in al L. japonicus tissues tested, being strongest in nodules. Expression was induced in roots that had been infected with the symbiotic rhizobium Mesorhizobium loti or treated with SA agonist benzo‐(1, 2, 3)‐thiadiazole‐7‐carbothioic acid. LjALD1 Knockdown exhibited a lower SA content, an increased number of infection threads and nodules, and a slight reduction in nodule size. In addition, compared with wild‐type, root growth was increased and shoot growth was suppressed in LjALD1 RNAi plant lines. These results indicate that LjALD1 may play important roles in plant development and nodulation via SA signaling in L. japonicus.

  6. On the response of electronic personal dosimeters in constant potential and pulsed X-ray beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, Margarete C.; Silva, Teogenes; Silva, Claudete R.E., E-mail: margaretecristinag@gmail.com [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Oliveira, Paulo Marcio C. de [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Anatomia e Imagem

    2015-07-01

    Electronic personal dosimeters (EPDs) based on solid state detectors have widely been used but some deficiencies in their response in pulsed radiation beams have been reported. Nowadays, there is not an international standard for pulsed X-ray beams for calibration or type testing of dosimeters. Irradiation conditions for testing the response of EPDs in both the constant potential and pulsed X-ray beams were established in CDTN. Three different types of EPDs were tested in different conditions in similar ISO and IEC X-ray qualities. Results stressed the need of performing additional checks before using EPDs in constant potential or pulsed X-rays. (author)

  7. Hydrodynamic theory for quantum plasmonics: Linear-response dynamics of the inhomogeneous electron gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the hydrodynamic theory of metals, offering systematic studies of the linear-response dynamics for an inhomogeneous electron gas. We include the quantum functional terms of the Thomas-Fermi kinetic energy, the von Weizsa¨cker kinetic energy, and the exchange-correlation Coulomb...... response of complex metallic nanostructures, including quantum effects, by adjusting theory parameters appropriately....... energies under the local density approximation. The advantages, limitations, and possible improvements of the hydrodynamic theory are transparently demonstrated. The roles of various parameters in the theory are identified. We anticipate that the hydrodynamic theory can be applied to investigate the linear...

  8. On the response of electronic personal dosimeters in constant potential and pulsed x- ray beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, M. C.; Silva, C. R. E.; Oliveira, P. M. C.; da Silva, T. A.

    2016-07-01

    Electronic personal dosimeters (EPDs) based on solid state detectors have widely been used but some deficiencies in their response in pulsed radiation beams have been reported. Nowadays, there is not an international standard for pulsed x-ray beams for calibration or type testing of dosimeters. Irradiation conditions for testing the response of EPDs in both the constant potential and pulsed x-ray beams were established in CDTN. Three different types of EPDs were tested in different conditions in similar ISO and IEC x-ray qualities. Results stressed the need of performing additional checks before using EPDs in constant potential or pulsed x-rays.

  9. A perspective on nonresonant and resonant electronic response theory for time-dependent molecular properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Patrick

    2011-12-14

    The development of electronic response theory in quantum chemistry has been reviewed, starting from the early 1970's and reaching the current state-of-the-art. The general theory has been applied to the calculation of a large number of spectroscopic parameters over the years, and it has been implemented for the majority of standard electronic structure methods. Two formulations of response theory, the Ehrenfest expectation value and the quasi-energy derivative formulation, have turned into leading alternatives for the derivation of computationally tractable expressions of response functions, and they are here reviewed with an attempt to, as far as possible, leave out technical details. A set of four steps are identified as common in derivations of response functions, and the two formulations are compared along this series of steps. Particular emphasis is given to the situation when the oscillation of the weak external electromagnetic field is in resonance with a transition frequency of the system. The formation of physically sound response functions in resonance regions of the spectrum is discussed in light of the causality condition and the Kramers-Kronig relations, and it is achieved in wave function theory by means of the introduction of relaxation parameters in a manner that mimics what one sees in density matrix theory. As a working example, equations are illustrated by their application to a two-state model for para-nitroaniline including the ground and the lowest charge-transfer state in the electric dipole approximation.

  10. Bulk and surface electromagnetic response of metallic metamaterials to convection electrons

    OpenAIRE

    So, Jinkyu; Park, Gunsik; García-Vidal, Francisco J.; Jang, Kyu-Ha

    2011-01-01

    The following article appeared in Applied Physics Letters 99.7 (2011): 071106 and may be found at http://scitation.aip.org/content/aip/journal/apl/99/7/10.1063/1.3625952?ver=pdfcov The electromagnetic response of three-dimensional metallic metamaterials with isotropic effective index of refraction to fast-moving electrons is studied by numerical simulations. The considered metamaterials can support Cerenkov radiation [P. A. Cherenkov, Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 2, 451 (1934)], and their effecti...

  11. Precise all-electron dynamical response functions: Application to COHSEX and the RPA correlation energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betzinger, Markus; Friedrich, Christoph; Görling, Andreas; Blügel, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    We present a methodology to calculate frequency and momentum dependent all-electron response functions determined within Kohn-Sham density functional theory. It overcomes the main obstacle in calculating response functions in practice, which is the slow convergence with respect to the number of unoccupied states and the basis-set size. In this approach, the usual sum-over-states expression of perturbation theory is complemented by the response of the orbital basis functions, explicitly constructed by radial integrations of frequency-dependent Sternheimer equations. To an essential extent an infinite number of unoccupied states are included in this way. Furthermore, the response of the core electrons is treated virtually exactly, which is out of reach otherwise. The method is an extension of the recently introduced incomplete-basis-set correction (IBC) [Betzinger et al., Phys. Rev. B 85, 245124 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevB.85.245124; Phys. Rev. B 88, 075130 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevB.88.075130] to the frequency and momentum domain. We have implemented the generalized IBC within the all-electron full-potential linearized augmented-plane-wave method and demonstrate for rocksalt BaO the improved convergence of the dynamical Kohn-Sham polarizability. We apply this technique to compute (a) quasiparticle energies employing the COHSEX approximation for the self-energy of many-body perturbation theory and (b) all-electron RPA correlation energies. It is shown that the favorable convergence of the polarizability is passed over to the COHSEX and RPA calculation.

  12. Synthetic Plant Defense Elicitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasemin eBektas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To defend themselves against invading pathogens plants utilize a complex regulatory network that coordinates extensive transcriptional and metabolic reprogramming. Although many of the key players of this immunity-associated network are known, the details of its topology and dynamics are still poorly understood. As an alternative to forward and reverse genetic studies, chemical genetics-related approaches based on bioactive small molecules have gained substantial popularity in the analysis of biological pathways and networks. Use of such molecular probes can allow researchers to access biological space that was previously inaccessible to genetic analyses due to gene redundancy or lethality of mutations. Synthetic elicitors are small drug like molecules that induce plant defense responses, but are distinct from known natural elicitors of plant immunity. While the discovery of the some synthetic elicitors had already been reported in the 1970s, recent breakthroughs in combinatorial chemical synthesis now allow for inexpensive high-throughput screens for bioactive plant defense-inducing compounds. Along with powerful reverse genetics tools and resources available for model plants and crop systems, comprehensive collections of new synthetic elicitors will likely allow plant scientists to study the intricacies of plant defense signaling pathways and networks in an unparalleled fashion. As synthetic elicitors can protect crops from diseases, without the need to be directly toxic for pathogenic organisms, they may also serve as promising alternatives to conventional biocidal pesticides, which often are harmful for the environment, farmers and consumers. Here we are discussing various types of synthetic elicitors that have been used for studies on the plant immune system, their modes-of-action as well as their application in crop protection.

  13. Tunable graphene micro-emitters with fast temporal response and controllable electron emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Gongtao; Wei, Xianlong; Gao, Song; Chen, Qing; Peng, Lianmao

    2016-05-10

    Microfabricated electron emitters have been studied for half a century for their promising applications in vacuum electronics. However, tunable microfabricated electron emitters with fast temporal response and controllable electron emission still proves challenging. Here, we report the scaling down of thermionic emitters to the microscale using microfabrication technologies and a Joule-heated microscale graphene film as the filament. The emission current of the graphene micro-emitters exhibits a tunability of up to six orders by a modest gate voltage. A turn-on/off time of less than 1 μs is demonstrated for the graphene micro-emitters, indicating a switching speed about five orders of magnitude faster than their bulky counterparts. Importantly, emission performances of graphene micro-emitters are controllable and reproducible through engineering graphene dimensions by microfabrication technologies, which enables us to fabricate graphene micro-emitter arrays with uniform emission performances. Graphene micro-emitters offer an opportunity of realizing large-scale addressable micro-emitter arrays for vacuum electronics applications.

  14. Fast response of electron-scale turbulence to auxiliary heating cessation in National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Y.; Wang, W. X.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Guttenfelder, W.; Kaye, S. M.; Ethier, S.; Mazzucato, E.; Bell, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Lee, K. C. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Domier, C. W. [University of California at Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Smith, D. R. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Yuh, H. [Nova Photonics, Inc., Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    In this letter, we report the first observation of the fast response of electron-scale turbulence to auxiliary heating cessation in National Spherical Torus eXperiment [Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)]. The observation was made in a set of RF-heated L-mode plasmas with toroidal magnetic field of 0.55 T and plasma current of 300 kA. It is observed that electron-scale turbulence spectral power (measured with a high-k collective microwave scattering system) decreases significantly following fast cessation of RF heating that occurs in less than 200 μs. The large drop in the turbulence spectral power has a short time delay of about 1–2 ms relative to the RF cessation and happens on a time scale of 0.5–1 ms, much smaller than the energy confinement time of about 10 ms. Power balance analysis shows a factor of about 2 decrease in electron thermal diffusivity after the sudden drop of turbulence spectral power. Measured small changes in equilibrium profiles across the RF cessation are unlikely able to explain this sudden reduction in the measured turbulence and decrease in electron thermal transport, supported by local linear stability analysis and both local and global nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations. The observations imply that nonlocal flux-driven mechanism may be important for the observed turbulence and electron thermal transport.

  15. Ultrafast electronic response of graphene to a strong and localized electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Elisabeth; Wilhelm, Richard A.; Pétuya, Rémi; Smejkal, Valerie; Kozubek, Roland; Hierzenberger, Anke; Bayer, Bernhard C.; Aldazabal, Iñigo; Kazansky, Andrey K.; Libisch, Florian; Krasheninnikov, Arkady V.; Schleberger, Marika; Facsko, Stefan; Borisov, Andrei G.; Arnau, Andrés; Aumayr, Friedrich

    2016-12-01

    The way conduction electrons respond to ultrafast external perturbations in low dimensional materials is at the core of the design of future devices for (opto)electronics, photodetection and spintronics. Highly charged ions provide a tool for probing the electronic response of solids to extremely strong electric fields localized down to nanometre-sized areas. With ion transmission times in the order of femtoseconds, we can directly probe the local electronic dynamics of an ultrathin foil on this timescale. Here we report on the ability of freestanding single layer graphene to provide tens of electrons for charge neutralization of a slow highly charged ion within a few femtoseconds. With values higher than 1012 A cm-2, the resulting local current density in graphene exceeds previously measured breakdown currents by three orders of magnitude. Surprisingly, the passing ion does not tear nanometre-sized holes into the single layer graphene. We use time-dependent density functional theory to gain insight into the multielectron dynamics.

  16. Alpha-picolinic Acid Activates Diverse Defense Responses of Salicylic Acid-, Jasmonic Acid/Ethylene- and Ca2 -dependent Pathways in Arabidopsis and Rice Suspension Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGHai-Kuo; ZHANGXin; LIQun; HEZu-Hua

    2004-01-01

    Alpha-picolinic acid (PA) is an apoptosis inducer in animal cells, and could elicit hypersensitiv eresponse (HR) in rice, a monocotyledonous model plant. Here we report that PA is an HR inducer in plants. It induced HR in Arabidopsis, a dicotyledonous model plant, including the oxidative burst and cell death. We investigated defense signal transduction activated by PA through marker genes of particular defense pathways in Arabidopsis. The result indicated that both the salicylic acid-dependent and jasmonic acid/ethylene-dependent pathways were activated by PA, in which the marker defense genes PR-1, PR-2 and PDF 1.2 were all induced in dose-dependent and time-course manners. We also observed that the PAinduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in rice suspension cells was Ca2+-dependent. Together with our previous studies of PA-induced defense activation in rice, we conclude that PA acts as a nonspecific elicitor in plant defense and has a potential utilization in cellular model establishment of systemicac quired resistance (SAR) activation.

  17. Children's Use of Defenses and Self-Esteem Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Deborah

    Children's use of defenses to maintain or enhance self-esteem was investigated. Attention was given to four questions: Do children with different levels of self-esteem differ in (1) the frequency with which they employ defenses? (2) kinds of emotions they defend against? (3) the kinds of social situations which elicit their defensive responses?…

  18. 32 CFR 168a.5 - Responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Responsibilities. 168a.5 Section 168a.5 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE DEFENSE CONTRACTING NATIONAL DEFENSE SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS § 168a.5 Responsibilities. (a) The Deputy Director,...

  19. 32 CFR 156.4 - Responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Responsibilities. 156.4 Section 156.4 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE SECURITY DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL SECURITY PROGRAM (DoDPSP) § 156.4 Responsibilities. (a) The Assistant Secretary of Defense for...

  20. 32 CFR 323.4 - Responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Responsibilities. 323.4 Section 323.4 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) PRIVACY PROGRAM DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY PRIVACY PROGRAM § 323.4 Responsibilities. (a) Headquarters Defense Logistics...

  1. Exchange Energy Density Functionals that reproduce the Linear Response Function of the Free Electron Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Aldea, David; Alvarellos, J. E.

    2009-03-01

    We present several nonlocal exchange energy density functionals that reproduce the linear response function of the free electron gas. These nonlocal functionals are constructed following a similar procedure used previously for nonlocal kinetic energy density functionals by Chac'on-Alvarellos-Tarazona, Garc'ia-Gonz'alez et al., Wang-Govind-Carter and Garc'ia-Aldea-Alvarellos. The exchange response function is not known but we have used the approximate response function developed by Utsumi and Ichimaru, even we must remark that the same ansatz can be used to reproduce any other response function with the same scaling properties. We have developed two families of new nonlocal functionals: one is constructed with a mathematical structure based on the LDA approximation -- the Dirac functional for the exchange - and for the second one the structure of the second order gradient expansion approximation is took as a model. The functionals are constructed is such a way that they can be used in localized systems (using real space calculations) and in extended systems (using the momentum space, and achieving a quasilinear scaling with the system size if a constant reference electron density is defined).

  2. Recognizing plant defense priming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinez-Medina, A.; Flors, V.; Heil, M.; Mauch-Mani, B.; Pieterse, C.M.J.; Pozo, M.J.; Ton, J.; Van Dam, N.M.; Conrath, U.

    2016-01-01

    Defense priming conditions diverse plant species for the superinduction of defense, often resulting in enhanced pest and disease resistance and abiotic stress tolerance. Here, we propose a guideline that might assist the plant research community in a consistent assessment of defense priming in plant

  3. Transient optical response of ultrafast nonequilibrium excited metals: Effects of electron-electron contribution to collisional absorption

    CERN Document Server

    Colombier, Jean-Philippe; Audouard, Eric; Stoian, Razvan

    2008-01-01

    Approaching energy coupling in laser-irradiated metals, we point out the role of electron-electron collision as an efficient control factor for ultrafast optical absorption. The high degree of laser-induced electron-ion nonequilibrium drives a complex absorption pattern with consequences on the transient optical properties. Consequently, high electronic temperatures determine largely the collision frequency and establish a transition between absorptive regimes in solid and plasma phases. In particular, taking into account umklapp electron-electron collisions, we performed hydrodynamic simulations of the laser-matter interaction to calculate laser energy deposition during the electron-ion nonequilibrium stage and subsequent matter transformation phases. We observe strong correlations between optical and thermodynamic properties according to the experimental situations. A suitable connection between solid and plasma regimes is chosen in accordance with models that describe the behavior in extreme, asymptotic re...

  4. Electron transport and electron energy distributions within the wurtzite and zinc-blende phases of indium nitride: Response to the application of a constant and uniform electric field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siddiqua, Poppy; Hadi, Walid A.; Salhotra, Amith K.; O' Leary, Stephen K., E-mail: stephen.oleary@ubc.ca [School of Engineering, The University of British Columbia, 3333 University Way, Kelowna, British Columbia V1V 1V7 (Canada); Shur, Michael S. [Department of Electrical, Computer, and Systems Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180-3590 (United States)

    2015-03-28

    Within the framework of an ensemble semi-classical three-valley Monte Carlo electron transport simulation approach, we critically contrast the nature of the electron transport that occurs within the wurtzite and zinc-blende phases of indium nitride in response to the application of a constant and uniform electric field. We use the electron energy distribution and its relationship with the electron transport characteristics in order to pursue this analysis. For the case of zinc-blende indium nitride, only a peak corresponding to the electrons within the lowest energy conduction band valley is observed, this peak being seen to broaden and shift to higher energies in response to increases in the applied electric field strength, negligible amounts of upper energy conduction band valley occupancy being observed. In contrast, for the case of wurtzite indium nitride, in addition to the aforementioned lowest energy conduction band valley peak in the electron energy distribution, and its broadening and shifting to higher energies in response to increases in the applied electric field strength, beyond a certain critical electric field strength, 30 kV/cm for the case of this particular material, upper energy conduction band valley occupancy is observed, this occupancy being further enhanced in response to further increases in the applied electric field strength. Reasons for these results are provided. The potential for device consequences is then commented upon.

  5. AtNFXL1, an Arabidopsis homologue of the human transcription factor NF-X1, functions as a negative regulator of the trichothecene phytotoxin-induced defense response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Tomoya; Masuda, Daisuke; Yasuda, Michiko; Nakashita, Hideo; Kudo, Toshiaki; Kimura, Makoto; Yamaguchi, Kazuo; Nishiuchi, Takumi

    2008-02-01

    Trichothecenes are a closely related family of phytotoxins that are produced by phytopathogenic fungi. In Arabidopsis, expression of AtNFXL1, a homologue of the putative human transcription repressor NF-X1, was significantly induced by application of type A trichothecenes, such as T-2 toxin. An atnfxl1 mutant growing on medium lacking trichothecenes showed no phenotype, whereas a hypersensitivity phenotype was observed in T-2 toxin-treated atnfxl1 mutant plants. Microarray analysis indicated that several defense-related genes (i.e. WRKYs, NBS-LRRs, EDS5, ICS1, etc.) were upregulated in T-2 toxin-treated atnfxl1 mutants compared with wild-type plants. In addition, enhanced salicylic acid (SA) accumulation was observed in T-2 toxin-treated atnfxl1 mutants, which suggests that AtNFXL1 functions as a negative regulator of these defense-related genes via an SA-dependent signaling pathway. We also found that expression of AtNFXL1 was induced by SA and flg22 treatment. Moreover, the atnfxl1 mutant was less susceptible to a compatible phytopathogen, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato strain DC3000 (Pst DC3000). Taken together, these results indicate that AtNFXL1 plays an important role in the trichothecene response, as well as the general defense response in Arabidopsis.

  6. In silico analysis of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 metabolic response to an external electron supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallardo, Roberto; Acevedo, Alejandro; Quintero, Julián; Paredes, Ivan; Conejeros, Raúl; Aroca, Germán

    2016-02-01

    The biological production of butanol has become an important research field and thanks to genome sequencing and annotation; genome-scale metabolic reconstructions have been developed for several Clostridium species. This work makes use of the iCAC490 model of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 to analyze its metabolic capabilities and response to an external electron supply through a constraint-based approach using the Constraint-Based Reconstruction Analysis Toolbox. Several analyses were conducted, which included sensitivity, production envelope, and phenotypic phase planes. The model showed that the use of an external electron supply, which acts as co-reducing agent along with glucose-derived reducing power (electrofermentation), results in an increase in the butanol-specific productivity. However, a proportional increase in the butyrate uptake flux is required. Besides, the uptake of external butyrate leads to the coupling of butanol production and growth, which coincides with results reported in literature. Phenotypic phase planes showed that the reducing capacity becomes more limiting for growth at high butyrate uptake fluxes. An electron uptake flux allows the metabolism to reach the growth optimality line. Although the maximum butanol flux does not coincide with the growth optimality line, a butyrate uptake combined with an electron uptake flux would result in an increased butanol volumetric productivity, being a potential strategy to optimize the production of butanol by C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824.

  7. Response of the CALICE Si-W Electromagnetic Calorimeter Physics Prototype to Electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Adloff, C.; Repond, J.; Yu, J.; Eigen, G.; Hawkes, C.M.; Mikami, Y.; Miller, O.; Watson, N.K.; Wilson, J.A.; Goto, T.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Thomson, M.A.; Ward, D.R.; Yan, W.; Benchekroun, D.; Hoummada, A.; Krim, M.; Benyamna, M.; Boumediene, D.; Brun, N.; Carloganu, C.; Gay, P.; Morisseau, F.; Blazey, G.C.; Chakraborty, D.; Dyshkant, A.; Francis, K.; Hedin, D.; Lima, G.; Zutshi, V.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Morin, L.; D'Ascenzo, N.; Cornett, U.; David, D.; Fabbri, R.; Falley, G.; Gadow, K.; Garutti, E.; Gottlicher, P.; Jung, T.; Karstensen, S.; Korbel, V.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Lutz, B.; Meyer, N.; Morgunov, V.; Reinecke, M.; Sefkow, F.; Smirnov, P.; Vargas-Trevino, A.; Wattimena, N.; Wendt, O.; Feege, N.; Groll, M.; Haller, J.; Heuer, R.-D.; Richter, S.; Samson, J.; Kaplan, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-Ch.; Shen, W.; Tadday, A.; Bilki, B.; Norbeck, E.; Onel, Y.; Kim, E.J.; Baek, N.I.; Kim, D-W.; Lee, K.; Lee, S.C.; Kawagoe, K.; Tamura, Y.; Bowerman, D.A.; Dauncey, P.D.; Magnan, A.-M.; Yilmaz, H.; Zorba, O.; Bartsch, V.; Postranecky, M.; Warren, M.; Wing, M.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Green, M.G.; Salvatore, F.; Bedjidian, M.; Kieffer, R.; Laktineh, I.; Bailey, D.S.; Barlow, R.J.; Kelly, M.; Thompson, R.J.; Danilov, M.; Tarkovsky, E.; Baranova, N.; Karmanov, D.; Korolev, M.; Merkin, M.; Voronin, A.; Frey, A.; Lu, S.; Prothmann, K.; Simon, F.; Bouquet, B.; Callier, S.; Cornebise, P.; Fleury, J.; Li, H.; Richard, F.; de la Taille, Ch.; Poeschl, R.; Raux, L.; Ruan, M.; Seguin-Moreau, N.; Wicek, F.; Anduze, M.; Boudry, V.; Brient, J-C.; Gaycken, G.; Mora de Freitas, P.; Musat, G.; Reinhard, M.; Rouge, A.; Vanel, J-Ch.; Videau, H.; Park, K-H.; Zacek, J.; Cvach, J.; Gallus, P.; Havranek, M.; Janata, M.; Marcisovsky, M.; Polak, I.; Popule, J.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Ruzicka, P.; Sicho, P.; Smolik, J.; Vrba, V.; Zalesak, J.; Belhorma, B.; Belmir, M.; Nam, S.W.; Park, I.H.; Yang, J.; Chai, J.-S.; Kim, J.-T.; Kim, G.-B.; Kang, J.; Kwon, Y.-J.

    2009-01-01

    A prototype Silicon-Tungsten electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) for an International Linear Collider (ILC) detector was installed and tested during summer and autumn 2006 at CERN. The detector had 6480 silicon pads of dimension 1x1 cm^2. Data were collected with electron beams in the energy range 6 to 45 GeV. The analysis described in this paper focuses on electromagnetic shower reconstruction and characterises the ECAL response to electrons in terms of energy resolution and linearity. The detector is linear to within approximately the 1% level and has a relative energy resolution of (16.6 +- 0.1)/ \\sqrt{E(GeV}) + 1.1 +- 0.1 (%). The spatial uniformity and the time stability of the ECAL are also addressed.

  8. Measurements of NaI:Tl Electron Response using SLYNCI: Comparison of Different Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, G; Choong, W; Moses, W W; Bizarri, G; Valentine, J D; Payne, S A; Cherepy, N; Reutter, B W

    2007-11-12

    This paper measures the sample to sample variation in the light yield non-proportionality of NaI:Tl, and so explores whether this is an invariant characteristic of the material or whether it is dependent on the chemical and physical properties of tested sample. In this work we report on the electron response of nine crystals of NaI(Tl), differing in shape, volume, age, manufacturer and quality. The non-proportionality has been measured at the SLYNCI facility in the energy range between 3.5 to 460 keV. The Scintillation Light Yield Non-proportionality Characterization Instrument (SLYNCI) is a next generation Compton Coincidence device, explicitly designed to study the 'non-proportionality' of the electron response in scintillators and the contribution of this effect to the intrinsic energy resolution. We also discuss the gamma response, x-ray excited emission spectra and decay times for the nine crystals, in order to provide a complete characterization of their physical properties and determine whether the mechanism of scintillation varies between samples.

  9. Analysis and Calibration of Sources of Electronic Error in PSD Sensor Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Rodríguez-Navarro

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to obtain very precise measurements of the position of agents located at a considerable distance using a sensor system based on position sensitive detectors (PSD, it is necessary to analyze and mitigate the factors that generate substantial errors in the system’s response. These sources of error can be divided into electronic and geometric factors. The former stem from the nature and construction of the PSD as well as the performance, tolerances and electronic response of the system, while the latter are related to the sensor’s optical system. Here, we focus solely on the electrical effects, since the study, analysis and correction of these are a prerequisite for subsequently addressing geometric errors. A simple calibration method is proposed, which considers PSD response, component tolerances, temperature variations, signal frequency used, signal to noise ratio (SNR, suboptimal operational amplifier parameters, and analog to digital converter (ADC quantitation SNRQ, etc. Following an analysis of these effects and calibration of the sensor, it was possible to correct the errors, thus rendering the effects negligible, as reported in the results section.

  10. Assessing the accommodation response after near visual tasks using different handheld electronic devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aikaterini I. Moulakaki

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: To assess the accommodation response after short reading periods using a tablet and a smartphone as well as determine potential differences in the accommodation response at various stimulus vergences using a Hartmann- Shack aberrometer. Methods: Eighteen healthy subjects with astigmatism of less than 1 D, corrected visual acuity of 20/20 or better, and normal findings in an ophthalmic examination were enrolled. Accommodation responses were obtained under three different conditions: accommodation system of the eye relaxed and visually stressed with a tablet and an smartphone for 10 min, at a distance of 0.25 m from the subject's eyes. Three measurements of accommodation response were monocularly acquired at stimulus vergences ranging from 0 to 4 D (1-D step. Results: No statistically significant differences were found in the accommodation responses among the conditions. A moderate but gradually increasing root mean square, coma-like aberration was found for every condition. Conversely, the spherical aberration decreased as stimulus vergences increased. These outcomes were identified in comparison to the one-to-one ideal accommodation response, implying that a certain lag value was present in all stimulus vergences different from 0 D. Conclusions: The results support the hypothesis that the difference between the ideal and real accommodation responses is mainly attributed to parameters associated with the accommodation process, such as the near visual acuity, depth of focus, pupil diameter, and wavefront aberrations. The wavefront aberrations were dependent on the 3-mm pupil size selected in this study. The accommoda tion response was not dependent on the electronic device employed in each condition, and it was mainly associated with young age and level of amplitude of accommodation of the subjects.

  11. Defensive externality and blame projection following failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochreich, D J

    1975-09-01

    This study focuses upon the relationship between internal-external control and defensive blame projection. Trust was used as a moderator variable for making differential predictions concerning the behavior of two subgroups of externals: defensive externals, whose externality is presumed to reflect primarily a verbal technique of defense, and congruent externals, whose externality reflects a more genuine belief that most outcomes are determined by forces beyond their personal control. As predicted, defensive externals showed a stronger tendency than did congruent externals and internals to resort to blame projection following failure at an achievement task. There were no group differences in attribution following task success. Defensive externals were found to be more responsive to negative feedback than were congruent externals.

  12. Host-specific salivary elicitor(s) of European corn borer induce defenses in tomato and maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Joe; Peiffer, Michelle; Ray, Swayamjit; Luthe, Dawn S; Felton, Gary W

    2013-07-01

    Plants turn on induced defenses upon insect herbivory. In the current study, we evaluated the role of European corn borer (ECB) elicitors (molecules secreted by herbivores) that either induce/suppress defenses in Solanum lycopersicum (tomato) and Zea mays (maize), two very important crop plants that are grown for food and/or fuel throughout the world. We used a combination of molecular, biochemical, confocal and scanning electron microscopy, caterpillar spinneret ablation/cauterization, and conventional insect bioassay methods to determine the role of ECB elicitors in modulating defenses in both tomato and maize crop plants. Our results clearly demonstrate that the components present in the ECB saliva induce defense-related proteinase inhibitors in both tomato (PIN2) and maize (MPI). Presence of glucose oxidase in the ECB saliva induced defenses in tomato, but not in maize. However, ECB saliva induced genes present in the jasmonic acid biosynthesis pathway in both tomato and maize. Although ECB saliva can induce defenses in both tomato and maize, our results suggest that host-specific salivary components are responsible for inducing host plant defenses. Proteomic analysis of ECB salivary elicitors and plant receptors/signaling mechanisms involved in recognizing different ECB elicitors remains to be determined. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  13. Contributions to the second order dielectric response of an electron liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachlechner, Martina E.; Miesenboeck, Helga M.; Macke, Wilhelm

    1988-06-01

    The dielectric response function χ of a uniform electron gas is investigated up to the second order of the Coulomb interaction with different methods. When examining all polarisation diagrams with two interaction lines, it is confirmed that previous work in the Green's function formalism does not contain all second order processes and the importance of the corrections is pointed out. It is further shown, how the evaluation of χ with Green's function can be greatly simplified when taking into account the symmetry of the expressions.

  14. Activation of Reactive Oxygen Species and Defense Responses in Tobacco Cells Treated with Riboflavin%核黄素对烟草悬浮细胞活性氧和防卫反应的激活作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘菲; 魏芳芳; 王蕾; 刘辉; 梁元存; 刘爱新

    2009-01-01

    [Objective] To study the triggering defense responses in tobacco suspension cells after treated with riboflavin,reactive oxygen species (ROS) and defense-related responses were investigated together with their related effects involving in calcium signals and protein kinases.[method]tobacco suspension cells were treated 1 mmol·L~(-1) riboflavin or pretreated with inhibitors including calcium surrogate La~(3+),calcium chelator EGTA and staurosporine which is an inhibitor of serine/threonine protein kinase.A series of dynamic defense responses were then studied with several methods,including semiquantitative RT-PCR (reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction) and HPLC (high performance liquid chromatography) techniques.[Result] It was identified that a series of defense-related responses were induced in tobacco suspension cells after treated with riboflavin,such as an oxidative burst,resulting in alkalization of the extracellular medium,activated the expression of four defense-related genes,and the scopoletin accumulation.And all the tested three inhibitors were shown in suppressing the riboflavin triggered defense responses at difference levels.[Conclusion]These results suggest that riboflavin triggers plant basal defense signal pathway which are also concerned with calcium signal pathway and protein phosphorylation in tobacco cell suspensions as an elicitor.%[目的]研究核黄素处理烟草悬浮细胞后,激活的氧进发和防卫反应,以及钙信号和蛋白激酶对这些事件的影响.[方法]1mmol·L~(-1)核黄素处理烟草悬浮细胞,用半定量RT-PCR(reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction)和高效液相色谱(high performance liquid chromatography,HPLC)等方法测定一系列防卫反应,并用钙离子通道抑制剂LaCl3、钙离子螯合剂EGTA和一种丝氨酸/苏氨酸蛋白激酶抑制剂staurosporine处理细胞,测定防卫反应的变化.[结果]1mmol·L~(-1)核黄素处理悬浮细胞后,产生了氧进发、导致培

  15. Nonlocal Response of Metallic Nanospheres Probed by Light, Electrons, and Atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas; Yan, Wei; Raza, Søren

    2014-01-01

    Inspired by recent measurements on individual metallic nanospheres that cannot be explained with traditional classical electrodynamics, we theoretically investigate the effects of nonlocal response by metallic nanospheres in three distinct settings: atomic spontaneous emission, electron energy loss...... spectroscopy, and light scattering. These constitute two near-field and one far-field measurements, with zero-, one-, and two-dimensional excitation sources, respectively. We search for the clearest signatures of hydrodynamic pressure waves in nanospheres. We employ a linearized hydrodynamic model, and Mie......–Lorenz theory is applied for each case. Nonlocal response shows its mark in all three configurations, but for the two near-field measurements, we predict especially pronounced nonlocal effects that are not exhibited in far-field measurements. Associated with every multipole order is not only a single...

  16. Response of doped alkali iodides measured with gamma-ray absorption and Compton electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swiderski, Lukasz, E-mail: l.swiderski@ncbj.gov.pl [National Centre for Nuclear Research, Soltana 7, 05-400 Otwock–Swierk (Poland); Moszynski, Marek; Czarnacki, Wieslaw; Szawlowski, Marek; Szczesniak, Tomasz [National Centre for Nuclear Research, Soltana 7, 05-400 Otwock–Swierk (Poland); Pausch, Guntram, E-mail: guntram.pausch@flir.com [FLIR Radiation GmbH, Piepersberg 12, 42653 Solingen (Germany); Plettner, Cristina [National Centre for Nuclear Research, Soltana 7, 05-400 Otwock–Swierk (Poland); FLIR Radiation GmbH, Piepersberg 12, 42653 Solingen (Germany); Roemer, Katja [FLIR Radiation GmbH, Piepersberg 12, 42653 Solingen (Germany); Schotanus, Paul, E-mail: scionix@planet.nl [Scionix Holland BV, 3980 CC Bunnik (Netherlands)

    2013-03-21

    Relative light yield and intrinsic energy resolution of NaI:Tl, CsI:Na and CsI:Tl crystals were investigated by means of the wide angle Compton coincidence technique in wide energy range from several keV up to 1 MeV. The experimental setup consisted of a high purity germanium (HPGe) detector and the tested scintillators were put at a close separation from the HPGe detector. The tested samples were cylinders of 25 mm diameter and height coupled to a photomultiplier. Compton electron responses were compared to the results obtained with γ-ray absorption peaks. A correlation between intrinsic resolution of the tested scintillation materials and their nonproportionality was observed. Substantial differences in intrinsic resolution measured for γ-ray absorption peaks and Compton electrons were registered in the energy range between 50 keV and 200 keV. The results were discussed in terms of electron scattering, pointing to δ-ray production as an important contribution for determination of scintillator intrinsic resolution.

  17. Faraday cup with nanosecond response and adjustable impedance for fast electron beam characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jing; Rovey, Joshua L

    2011-07-01

    A movable Faraday cup design with simple structure and adjustable impedance is described in this work. This Faraday cup has external adjustable shunt resistance for self-biased measurement setup and 50 Ω characteristic impedance to match with 50 Ω standard BNC coaxial cable and vacuum feedthroughs for nanosecond-level pulse signal measurements. Adjustable shunt resistance allows self-biased measurements to be quickly acquired to determine the electron energy distribution function. The performance of the Faraday cup is validated by tests of response time and amplitude of output signal. When compared with a reference source, the percent difference of the Faraday cup signal fall time is less than 10% for fall times greater than 10 ns. The percent difference of the Faraday cup signal pulse width is below 6.7% for pulse widths greater than 10 ns. A pseudospark-generated electron beam is used to compare the amplitude of the Faraday cup signal with a calibrated F-70 commercial current transformer. The error of the Faraday cup output amplitude is below 10% for the 4-14 kV tested pseudospark voltages. The main benefit of this Faraday cup is demonstrated by adjusting the external shunt resistance and performing the self-biased method for obtaining the electron energy distribution function. Results from a 4 kV pseudospark discharge indicate a "double-humped" energy distribution.

  18. 41 CFR 102-118.80 - Who is responsible for keeping my agency's electronic commerce transportation billing records?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... keeping my agency's electronic commerce transportation billing records? 102-118.80 Section 102-118.80... Transportation and Transportation Services § 102-118.80 Who is responsible for keeping my agency's electronic commerce transportation billing records? Your agency's internal financial regulations will...

  19. Excitation energies with linear response density matrix functional theory along the dissociation coordinate of an electron-pair bond in N-electron systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Meer, R; Gritsenko, O V; Baerends, E J

    2014-01-14

    Time dependent density matrix functional theory in its adiabatic linear response formulation delivers exact excitation energies ωα and oscillator strengths fα for two-electron systems if extended to the so-called phase including natural orbital (PINO) theory. The Löwdin-Shull expression for the energy of two-electron systems in terms of the natural orbitals and their phases affords in this case an exact phase-including natural orbital functional (PILS), which is non-primitive (contains other than just J and K integrals). In this paper, the extension of the PILS functional to N-electron systems is investigated. With the example of an elementary primitive NO functional (BBC1) it is shown that current density matrix functional theory ground state functionals, which were designed to produce decent approximations to the total energy, fail to deliver a qualitatively correct structure of the (inverse) response function, due to essential deficiencies in the reconstruction of the two-body reduced density matrix (2RDM). We now deduce essential features of an N-electron functional from a wavefunction Ansatz: The extension of the two-electron Löwdin-Shull wavefunction to the N-electron case informs about the phase information. In this paper, applications of this extended Löwdin-Shull (ELS) functional are considered for the simplest case, ELS(1): one (dissociating) two-electron bond in the field of occupied (including core) orbitals. ELS(1) produces high quality ωα(R) curves along the bond dissociation coordinate R for the molecules LiH, Li2, and BH with the two outer valence electrons correlated. All of these results indicate that response properties are much more sensitive to deficiencies in the reconstruction of the 2RDM than the ground state energy, since derivatives of the functional with respect to both the NOs and the occupation numbers need to be accurate.

  20. Excitation energies with linear response density matrix functional theory along the dissociation coordinate of an electron-pair bond in N-electron systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meer, R. van; Gritsenko, O. V. [Faculty of Exact Sciences, Theoretical Chemistry, VU University, Amsterdam (Netherlands); WCU Program, Dep. of Chemistry, Pohang Univ. of Science and Techn., Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Baerends, E. J. [Faculty of Exact Sciences, Theoretical Chemistry, VU University, Amsterdam (Netherlands); WCU Program, Dep. of Chemistry, Pohang Univ. of Science and Techn., Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-01-14

    Time dependent density matrix functional theory in its adiabatic linear response formulation delivers exact excitation energies ω{sub α} and oscillator strengths f{sub α} for two-electron systems if extended to the so-called phase including natural orbital (PINO) theory. The Löwdin-Shull expression for the energy of two-electron systems in terms of the natural orbitals and their phases affords in this case an exact phase-including natural orbital functional (PILS), which is non-primitive (contains other than just J and K integrals). In this paper, the extension of the PILS functional to N-electron systems is investigated. With the example of an elementary primitive NO functional (BBC1) it is shown that current density matrix functional theory ground state functionals, which were designed to produce decent approximations to the total energy, fail to deliver a qualitatively correct structure of the (inverse) response function, due to essential deficiencies in the reconstruction of the two-body reduced density matrix (2RDM). We now deduce essential features of an N-electron functional from a wavefunction Ansatz: The extension of the two-electron Löwdin-Shull wavefunction to the N-electron case informs about the phase information. In this paper, applications of this extended Löwdin-Shull (ELS) functional are considered for the simplest case, ELS(1): one (dissociating) two-electron bond in the field of occupied (including core) orbitals. ELS(1) produces high quality ω{sub α}(R) curves along the bond dissociation coordinate R for the molecules LiH, Li{sub 2}, and BH with the two outer valence electrons correlated. All of these results indicate that response properties are much more sensitive to deficiencies in the reconstruction of the 2RDM than the ground state energy, since derivatives of the functional with respect to both the NOs and the occupation numbers need to be accurate.

  1. Analysis of the response evolution of the CMS electromegnetic calorimeter under electron and pion irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Ghezzi, Alessio; Ragazzi, Stefano; Rovelli, Chiara; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso

    2006-01-01

    The electromagnetic calorimeter of the CMS experiment consists of about 75000 PbWO_4 scintillating crystals. A monitoring system using laser light injection into the crystals is foreseen to follow variations in the light transmission through the crystals due to radiation exposure. The reliability of the monitoring system was demonstrated in the past on a restricted number of PbWO_4 crystals all belonging to the same production batch. To get more insight in the crystal behaviour under different irradiation conditions, during year 2003 additional PbWO_4 crystals in their final configuration were exposed to pion and electron beams providing a radiation dose comparable to the one expected in the ECAL barrel electromagnetic calorimeter at the LHC. The evolution of their response was monitored with a reference electron beam of 120 GeV/c momentum and compared to the response of the laser monitoring system. Here we report the results of the data analysis, which corroborates the reliability of the laser monitoring sho...

  2. Pathogens Inactivated by Low-Energy-Electron Irradiation Maintain Antigenic Properties and Induce Protective Immune Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fertey, Jasmin; Bayer, Lea; Grunwald, Thomas; Pohl, Alexandra; Beckmann, Jana; Gotzmann, Gaby; Casado, Javier Portillo; Schönfelder, Jessy; Rögner, Frank-Holm; Wetzel, Christiane; Thoma, Martin; Bailer, Susanne M; Hiller, Ekkehard; Rupp, Steffen; Ulbert, Sebastian

    2016-11-23

    Inactivated vaccines are commonly produced by incubating pathogens with chemicals such as formaldehyde or β-propiolactone. This is a time-consuming process, the inactivation efficiency displays high variability and extensive downstream procedures are often required. Moreover, application of chemicals alters the antigenic components of the viruses or bacteria, resulting in reduced antibody specificity and therefore stimulation of a less effective immune response. An alternative method for inactivation of pathogens is ionizing radiation. It acts very fast and predominantly damages nucleic acids, conserving most of the antigenic structures. However, currently used irradiation technologies (mostly gamma-rays and high energy electrons) require large and complex shielding constructions to protect the environment from radioactivity or X-rays generated during the process. This excludes them from direct integration into biological production facilities. Here, low-energy electron irradiation (LEEI) is presented as an alternative inactivation method for pathogens in liquid solutions. LEEI can be used in normal laboratories, including good manufacturing practice (GMP)- or high biosafety level (BSL)-environments, as only minor shielding is necessary. We show that LEEI efficiently inactivates different viruses (influenza A (H3N8), porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1)) and bacteria (Escherichia coli) and maintains their antigenicity. Moreover, LEEI-inactivated influenza A viruses elicit protective immune responses in animals, as analyzed by virus neutralization assays and viral load determination upon challenge. These results have implications for novel ways of developing and manufacturing inactivated vaccines with improved efficacy.

  3. Pathogens Inactivated by Low-Energy-Electron Irradiation Maintain Antigenic Properties and Induce Protective Immune Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fertey, Jasmin; Bayer, Lea; Grunwald, Thomas; Pohl, Alexandra; Beckmann, Jana; Gotzmann, Gaby; Casado, Javier Portillo; Schönfelder, Jessy; Rögner, Frank-Holm; Wetzel, Christiane; Thoma, Martin; Bailer, Susanne M.; Hiller, Ekkehard; Rupp, Steffen; Ulbert, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Inactivated vaccines are commonly produced by incubating pathogens with chemicals such as formaldehyde or β-propiolactone. This is a time-consuming process, the inactivation efficiency displays high variability and extensive downstream procedures are often required. Moreover, application of chemicals alters the antigenic components of the viruses or bacteria, resulting in reduced antibody specificity and therefore stimulation of a less effective immune response. An alternative method for inactivation of pathogens is ionizing radiation. It acts very fast and predominantly damages nucleic acids, conserving most of the antigenic structures. However, currently used irradiation technologies (mostly gamma-rays and high energy electrons) require large and complex shielding constructions to protect the environment from radioactivity or X-rays generated during the process. This excludes them from direct integration into biological production facilities. Here, low-energy electron irradiation (LEEI) is presented as an alternative inactivation method for pathogens in liquid solutions. LEEI can be used in normal laboratories, including good manufacturing practice (GMP)- or high biosafety level (BSL)-environments, as only minor shielding is necessary. We show that LEEI efficiently inactivates different viruses (influenza A (H3N8), porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1)) and bacteria (Escherichia coli) and maintains their antigenicity. Moreover, LEEI-inactivated influenza A viruses elicit protective immune responses in animals, as analyzed by virus neutralization assays and viral load determination upon challenge. These results have implications for novel ways of developing and manufacturing inactivated vaccines with improved efficacy. PMID:27886076

  4. Human-Finger Electronics Based on Opposing Humidity-Resistance Responses in Carbon Nanofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Yanlong; Lubineau, Gilles

    2017-03-01

    Carbon nanomaterials have excellent humidity sensing properties. Here, it is demonstrated that multiwalled carbon-nanotube (MWCNT)- and reduced-graphene-oxide (rGO)-based conductive films have opposite humidity/electrical resistance responses: MWCNTs increase their electrical resistance (positive response) and rGOs decrease their electrical resistance (negative response). The authors propose a new phenomenology that describes a "net"-like model for MWCNT films and a "scale"-like model for rGO films to explain these behaviors based on contributions from junction resistances (at interparticle junctions) and intrinsic resistances (of the particles). This phenomenology is accordingly validated via a series of experiments, which complement more classical models based on proton conductivity. To explore the practical applications of the converse humidity/resistance responses, a humidity-insensitive MWCNT/rGO hybrid conductive films is developed, which has the potential to greatly improve the stability of carbon-based electrical device to humidity. The authors further investigate the application of such films to human-finger electronics by fabricating transparent flexible devices consisting of a polyethylene terephthalate substrate equipped with an MWCNT/rGO pattern for gesture recognition, and MWCNT/rGO/MWCNT or rGO/MWCNT/rGO patterns for 3D noncontact sensing, which will be complementary to existing 3D touch technology.

  5. Systemic defense signaling in tomato

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Changbao; SUN Jiaqiang; JIANG Hongling; WU Xiaoyan; LI Chuanyou

    2005-01-01

    The wound-inducible expression of proteinase inhibitors (PIs) genes in tomato provides a powerful model system to elucidate the signal transduction pathway of sys- temic defense response. An increasing body of evidence indi- cates that systemin and jasmonic acid (JA) work in the same signaling pathway to activate the expression of PIs and other defense-related genes. However, little is known about how systemin and JA interact to regulate cell to cell communica- tion over long distances. Genetic analysis of the systemin/JA signaling pathway in tomato plants provides a unique opportunity to dissect the mechanism by which peptide and oxylipin signals interact to coordinate systemic expression of defense-related genes. Previously, it has been proposed that systemin is the long-distance mobile signal for systemic expression of defense related genes. However, recent genetic approach provided new evidence that jasmonic acid, rather than systemin, functions as the systemic wound signal, and that the peptide systemin works to regulate the biosynthesis of JA.

  6. 32 CFR 169a.22 - Responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Responsibilities. 169a.22 Section 169a.22 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE DEFENSE CONTRACTING COMMERCIAL ACTIVITIES PROGRAM PROCEDURES Reporting Requirements § 169a.22 Responsibilities. The responsibilities...

  7. Effective Defense Support for Public Diplomacy (DSPD) with a Sub-Saharan Africa Target Audience: A Case Study of the African Crisis Response Force Proposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    Proquest and Torpedo Ultra database searches of the world news media. Each instance of defense support for the bid from its announcement in...2939-306, ABI/INFORM Global Database , (Document ID: 10235242) (accessed May 11, 2008). 64 George Gedda and Associated Press Writer, "African...Technical Information Center, 1989). 73 Redie Bereketeab, Eritrea: The Making of a Nation (Trenton, NJ: Red Sea Press, 2007), 48; Clement E. Adibe and David

  8. Toxicity evaluation of e-juice and its soluble aerosols generated by electronic cigarettes using recombinant bioluminescent bacteria responsive to specific cellular damages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharadwaj, Shiv; Mitchell, Robert J; Qureshi, Anjum; Niazi, Javed H

    2017-04-15

    Electronic-cigarettes (e-cigarette) are widely used as an alternative to traditional cigarettes but their safety is not well established. Herein, we demonstrate and validate an analytical method to discriminate the deleterious effects of e-cigarette refills (e-juice) and soluble e-juice aerosol (SEA) by employing stress-specific bioluminescent recombinant bacterial cells (RBCs) as whole-cell biosensors. These RBCs carry luxCDABE-operon tightly controlled by promoters that specifically induced to DNA damage (recA), superoxide radicals (sodA), heavy metals (copA) and membrane damage (oprF). The responses of the RBCs following exposure to various concentrations of e-juice/SEA was recorded in real-time that showed dose-dependent stress specific-responses against both the e-juice and vaporized e-juice aerosols produced by the e-cigarette. We also established that high doses of e-juice (4-folds diluted) lead to cell death by repressing the cellular machinery responsible for repairing DNA-damage, superoxide toxicity, ion homeostasis and membrane damage. SEA also caused the cellular damages but the cells showed enhanced bioluminescence expression without significant growth inhibition, indicating that the cells activated their global defense system to repair these damages. DNA fragmentation assay also revealed the disintegration of total cellular DNA at sub-toxic doses of e-juice. Despite their state of matter, the e-juice and its aerosols induce cytotoxicity and alter normal cellular functions, respectively that raises concerns on use of e-cigarettes as alternative to traditional cigarette. The ability of RBCs in detecting both harmful effects and toxicity mechanisms provided a fundamental understanding of biological response to e-juice and aerosols.

  9. Single-electron response and energy resolution of a Micromegas detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zerguerras, T. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire (UMR 8608), CNRS/IN2P3-Universite Paris-Sud, F-91406 Orsay Cedex (France)], E-mail: zerguer@ipno.in2p3.fr; Genolini, B. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire (UMR 8608), CNRS/IN2P3-Universite Paris-Sud, F-91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Lepeltier, V. [LAL, Universite Paris-Sud, CNRS/IN2P3, Orsay (France); Peyre, J.; Pouthas, J.; Rosier, P. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire (UMR 8608), CNRS/IN2P3-Universite Paris-Sud, F-91406 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2009-09-21

    Micro-Pattern Gaseous Detectors (MPGDs) such as Micromegas or GEM are used in particle physics experiments for their capability of particle tracking at high rates. Their excellent position resolutions are well known but their energy characteristics have been less studied. The energy resolution is mainly affected by ionisation processes and gain fluctuations. This paper presents a method to separately measure these two contributions to the energy resolution of a Micromegas detector. The method relies on the injection of a controlled number of primary electrons in the gas. The Micromegas has a 1.6-mm drift zone and a 160-{mu}m amplification gap. It is operated in Ne 95%-iC{sub 4}H{sub 10} 5% at atmospheric pressure. The electrons are generated by non-linear photoelectric emission derived from the photons of a pulsed 337-nm wavelength laser coupled to a focusing system. The single-electron response has been measured at different gains (3.7x10{sup 4}, 5.0x10{sup 4} and 7.0x10{sup 4}) and is fit with good agreement by a Polya distribution. From those fits, a relative gain variance of 0.31{+-}0.02 is deduced. The setup has also been characterised at several voltages by fitting the energy resolution measured as a function of the number of primary electrons, ranging from 5 to 210. An upper limit on the Fano factor (0.37) has been estimated for 5.9 keV X-rays absorbed in a Ne 95%-iC{sub 4}H{sub 10} 5% gas mixture.

  10. Moving Target Defense

    CERN Document Server

    Jajodia, Sushil; Swarup, Vipin; Wang, Cliff; Wang, X Sean

    2011-01-01

    Moving Target Defense: Creating Asymmetric Uncertainty for Cyber Threats was developed by a group of leading researchers. It describes the fundamental challenges facing the research community and identifies new promising solution paths. Moving Target Defense which is motivated by the asymmetric costs borne by cyber defenders takes an advantage afforded to attackers and reverses it to advantage defenders. Moving Target Defense is enabled by technical trends in recent years, including virtualization and workload migration on commodity systems, widespread and redundant network connectivity, instr

  11. Identification of a novel small cysteine-rich protein in the fraction from the biocontrol Fusarium oxysporum strain CS-20 that mitigates Fusarium wilt symptoms and triggers defense responses in tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larisa A. Shcherbakova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The biocontrol effect of the nonpathogenic F. oxysporum strain CS-20 against the tomato wilt pathogen F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (FOL has been previously reported to be primarily plant-mediated. This study shows that CS-20 produces proteins, which elicit defense responses in tomato plants. Three protein-containing fractions were isolated from CS-20 biomass using size exclusion chromatography. Exposure of seedling roots to one of these fractions prior to inoculation with pathogenic FOL strains significantly reduced wilt severity. This fraction initiated an ion exchange response in cultured tomato cells resulting in a reversible alteration of extracellular pH; increased tomato chitinase activity, and induced systemic resistance by enhancing PR-1 expression in tomato leaves. Two other protein fractions were inactive in seedling protection. The main polypeptide (designated CS20EP, which was specifically present in the defense-inducing fraction and was not detected in inactive protein fractions, was identified. The nucleotide sequence encoding this protein was determined, and its complete amino acid sequence was deduced from direct Edman degradation (25 N-terminal amino acid residues and DNA sequencing. The CS20EP was found to be a small basic cysteine-rich protein with a pI of 9.87 and 23.43% of hydrophobic amino acid residues. BLAST search in the NCBI database showed that the protein is new; however, it displays 48% sequence similarity with a hypothetical protein FGSG_10784 from F. graminearum strain PH-1. The contribution of CS20EP to elicitation of tomato defense responses resulting in wilt mitigating is discussed.

  12. Identification of a Novel Small Cysteine-Rich Protein in the Fraction from the Biocontrol Fusarium oxysporum Strain CS-20 that Mitigates Fusarium Wilt Symptoms and Triggers Defense Responses in Tomato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbakova, Larisa A.; Odintsova, Tatyana I.; Stakheev, Alexander A.; Fravel, Deborah R.; Zavriev, Sergey K.

    2016-01-01

    The biocontrol effect of the non-pathogenic Fusarium oxysporum strain CS-20 against the tomato wilt pathogen F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (FOL) has been previously reported to be primarily plant-mediated. This study shows that CS-20 produces proteins, which elicit defense responses in tomato plants. Three protein-containing fractions were isolated from CS-20 biomass using size exclusion chromatography. Exposure of seedling roots to one of these fractions prior to inoculation with pathogenic FOL strains significantly reduced wilt severity. This fraction initiated an ion exchange response in cultured tomato cells resulting in a reversible alteration of extracellular pH; increased tomato chitinase activity, and induced systemic resistance by enhancing PR-1 expression in tomato leaves. Two other protein fractions were inactive in seedling protection. The main polypeptide (designated CS20EP), which was specifically present in the defense-inducing fraction and was not detected in inactive protein fractions, was identified. The nucleotide sequence encoding this protein was determined, and its complete amino acid sequence was deduced from direct Edman degradation (25 N-terminal amino acid residues) and DNA sequencing. The CS20EP was found to be a small basic cysteine-rich protein with a pI of 9.87 and 23.43% of hydrophobic amino acid residues. BLAST search in the NCBI database showed that the protein is new; however, it displays 48% sequence similarity with a hypothetical protein FGSG_10784 from F. graminearum strain PH-1. The contribution of CS20EP to elicitation of tomato defense responses resulting in wilt mitigating is discussed. PMID:26779237

  13. Defense Acquisition Workforce: DOD Has Opportunities to Further Enhance Use and Management of Development Fund

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    and Responsibilities of Key Department of Defense (DOD) Organizations Involved in Defense Acquisition Workforce Development Fund (DAWDF) Management 7...DEFENSE ACQUISITION WORKFORCE DOD Has Opportunities to Further Enhance Use and Management of Development Fund...House of Representatives March 2017 DEFENSE ACQUISITION WORKFORCE DOD Has Opportunities to Further Enhance Use and Management of Development Fund

  14. Dynamic defense workshop :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crosby, Sean Michael; Doak, Justin E.; Haas, Jason Juedes.; Helinski, Ryan; Lamb, Christopher C.

    2013-02-01

    On September 5th and 6th, 2012, the Dynamic Defense Workshop: From Research to Practice brought together researchers from academia, industry, and Sandia with the goals of increasing collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories and external organizations, de ning and un- derstanding dynamic, or moving target, defense concepts and directions, and gaining a greater understanding of the state of the art for dynamic defense. Through the workshop, we broadened and re ned our de nition and understanding, identi ed new approaches to inherent challenges, and de ned principles of dynamic defense. Half of the workshop was devoted to presentations of current state-of-the-art work. Presentation topics included areas such as the failure of current defenses, threats, techniques, goals of dynamic defense, theory, foundations of dynamic defense, future directions and open research questions related to dynamic defense. The remainder of the workshop was discussion, which was broken down into sessions on de ning challenges, applications to host or mobile environments, applications to enterprise network environments, exploring research and operational taxonomies, and determining how to apply scienti c rigor to and investigating the eld of dynamic defense.

  15. Plant defense using toxic inorganic ions: conceptual models of the defensive enhancement and joint effects hypotheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Robert S

    2012-10-01

    The concept of plant defense using toxic mineral elements originated as an explanation for extremely elevated concentrations of some elements (termed hyperaccumulation) in some plant tissues. The Defensive Enhancement Hypothesis suggests that hyperaccumulation evolved because, after an initial defensive benefit accrued from a relatively low initial concentration, increased concentration of an element provided increased plant fitness and drove evolution of higher element concentrations until hyperaccumulation was achieved. The Joint Effects Hypothesis postulates that additive or synergistic effects between element-based defenses, or between toxic element and organic chemical defenses, may have contributed to the evolution of hyperaccumulation. By lessening the concentration of an element necessary to provide an initial defensive benefit to a plant, joint effects could decrease the level of an element that provides an initial defensive benefit, allowing additive or synergistic defensive enhancement to take effect. Recent experimental tests have demonstrated defense at relatively low element concentrations, and tests of metal/metal and metal/organic compound combinations have shown joint effects. These hypotheses suggest how hyperaccumulator plants may have evolved in response to plant-herbivore interactions, and suggest that toxic element levels below those used to define hyperaccumulation may be ecologically effective. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Improving linear accelerator service response with a real- time electronic event reporting system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoisak, Jeremy D P; Pawlicki, Todd; Kim, Gwe-Ya; Fletcher, Richard; Moore, Kevin L

    2014-09-08

    To track linear accelerator performance issues, an online event recording system was developed in-house for use by therapists and physicists to log the details of technical problems arising on our institution's four linear accelerators. In use since October 2010, the system was designed so that all clinical physicists would receive email notification when an event was logged. Starting in October 2012, we initiated a pilot project in collaboration with our linear accelerator vendor to explore a new model of service and support, in which event notifications were also sent electronically directly to dedicated engineers at the vendor's technical help desk, who then initiated a response to technical issues. Previously, technical issues were reported by telephone to the vendor's call center, which then disseminated information and coordinated a response with the Technical Support help desk and local service engineers. The purpose of this work was to investigate the improvements to clinical operations resulting from this new service model. The new and old service models were quantitatively compared by reviewing event logs and the oncology information system database in the nine months prior to and after initiation of the project. Here, we focus on events that resulted in an inoperative linear accelerator ("down" machine). Machine downtime, vendor response time, treatment cancellations, and event resolution were evaluated and compared over two equivalent time periods. In 389 clinical days, there were 119 machine-down events: 59 events before and 60 after introduction of the new model. In the new model, median time to service response decreased from 45 to 8 min, service engineer dispatch time decreased 44%, downtime per event decreased from 45 to 20 min, and treatment cancellations decreased 68%. The decreased vendor response time and reduced number of on-site visits by a service engineer resulted in decreased downtime and decreased patient treatment cancellations.

  17. Microglial responses to free-electron laser incisions in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, M.Z.; Edwards, G.S.; Reinsch, L. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    In the CNS, two distinct populations of ramified glia, microglia and astrocytes, are identified by two Ca{sup ++}-binding proteins, lipocortin 1 (LC1) and S100{beta}, respectively. In some forms of CNS trauma, the responses of these two populations are quite-different. The present study sought to characterize and compare the responses of microglia and astrocytes to cortical incisions made with the free-electron laser (FEL, 6.45 and 4.0 {mu}m wavelength) and with a scalpel. After 3 and 6 days recovery, rats were perfused with acidified glutaraldehyde; the activated glia were identified using immunohistochemistry and quantified using BIOQUANT. In a 200 {mu}m thick zone of gliosis located beneath the damaged necrotic tissue, similar response patterns were observed for both incision types. At either time point, S100-{beta}-positive glia showed only minor shape changes and slight increases relative to astrocytes in control regions. Conversely, the population density of microglia in the reaction zone increased approximately 2- and 3-fold at days 3 and 6, respectively. Mitotic figures are detected among the LC1-positive glia at day 3, indicating that the activated phagocytes arise from proliferating resident microglia rather than from hematogenous invaders. Thus, in this system, the glial response to CNS damage comprises primarily microglia rather than astrocytes. The data also suggest that the anti-inflammatory and immuno-suppressive properties of LC1 may play important roles in recovery from CNS trauma and disease. Preliminary experiment show subdued glial responses to incisions made with FEL at 6.45 versus. 4.0 {mu}m wavelengths, suggesting that tissue damage is wavelength dependent.

  18. Precise response functions in all-electron methods: Application to the optimized-effective-potential approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betzinger, Markus; Friedrich, Christoph; Görling, Andreas; Blügel, Stefan

    2012-06-01

    The optimized-effective-potential method is a special technique to construct local Kohn-Sham potentials from general orbital-dependent energy functionals. In a recent publication [M. Betzinger, C. Friedrich, S. Blügel, A. Görling, Phys. Rev. BPRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.83.045105 83, 045105 (2011)] we showed that uneconomically large basis sets were required to obtain a smooth local potential without spurious oscillations within the full-potential linearized augmented-plane-wave method. This could be attributed to the slow convergence behavior of the density response function. In this paper, we derive an incomplete-basis-set correction for the response, which consists of two terms: (1) a correction that is formally similar to the Pulay correction in atomic-force calculations and (2) a numerically more important basis response term originating from the potential dependence of the basis functions. The basis response term is constructed from the solutions of radial Sternheimer equations in the muffin-tin spheres. With these corrections the local potential converges at much smaller basis sets, at much fewer states, and its construction becomes numerically very stable. We analyze the improvements for rock-salt ScN and report results for BN, AlN, and GaN, as well as the perovskites CaTiO3, SrTiO3, and BaTiO3. The incomplete-basis-set correction can be applied to other electronic-structure methods with potential-dependent basis sets and opens the perspective to investigate a broad spectrum of problems in theoretical solid-state physics that involve response functions.

  19. Nonlocal response of metallic nanospheres probed by light, electrons, and atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Thomas; Yan, Wei; Raza, Søren; Jauho, Antti-Pekka; Mortensen, N Asger; Wubs, Martijn

    2014-02-25

    Inspired by recent measurements on individual metallic nanospheres that cannot be explained with traditional classical electrodynamics, we theoretically investigate the effects of nonlocal response by metallic nanospheres in three distinct settings: atomic spontaneous emission, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and light scattering. These constitute two near-field and one far-field measurements, with zero-, one-, and two-dimensional excitation sources, respectively. We search for the clearest signatures of hydrodynamic pressure waves in nanospheres. We employ a linearized hydrodynamic model, and Mie-Lorenz theory is applied for each case. Nonlocal response shows its mark in all three configurations, but for the two near-field measurements, we predict especially pronounced nonlocal effects that are not exhibited in far-field measurements. Associated with every multipole order is not only a single blueshifted surface plasmon but also an infinite series of bulk plasmons that have no counterpart in a local-response approximation. We show that these increasingly blueshifted multipole plasmons become spectrally more prominent at shorter probe-to-surface separations and for decreasing nanosphere radii. For selected metals, we predict hydrodynamic multipolar plasmons to be measurable on single nanospheres.

  20. Alterations in mitochondrial electron transport system activity in response to warm acclimation, hypoxia-reoxygenation and copper in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sappal, Ravinder [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 4P3 (Canada); Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 4P3 (Canada); MacDougald, Michelle [Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, Health Sciences Centre, Prince Philip Drive, St. John’s, NL, A1B 3V6 (Canada); Fast, Mark [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 4P3 (Canada); Stevens, Don [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 4P3 (Canada); Kibenge, Fred [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 4P3 (Canada); Siah, Ahmed [British Columbia Centre for Aquatic Health Sciences, 871A Island Highway, Campbell River, BC, V9W 2C2 (Canada); Kamunde, Collins, E-mail: ckamunde@upei.ca [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 4P3 (Canada)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Sequential inhibition and activation allows assessment of multiple segments of the electron transport system. • Warm acclimation and hypoxia-reoxygenation have global effects on the electron transport system. • Warm acclimation and hypoxia-reoxygenation sensitize the electron transport system to copper. • Thermal stress, hypoxia-reoxygenation and copper act additively to impair mitochondrial function. - Abstract: Fish expend significant amounts of energy to handle the numerous potentially stressful biotic and abiotic factors that they commonly encounter in aquatic environments. This universal requirement for energy singularizes mitochondria, the primary cellular energy transformers, as fundamental drivers of responses to environmental change. Our study probed the interacting effects of thermal stress, hypoxia-reoxygenation (HRO) and copper (Cu) exposure in rainbow trout to test the prediction that they act jointly to impair mitochondrial function. Rainbow trout were acclimated to 11 (controls) or 20 °C for 2 months. Liver mitochondria were then isolated and their responses in vitro to Cu (0–20 μM) without and with HRO were assessed. Sequential inhibition and activation of mitochondrial electron transport system (ETS) enzyme complexes permitted the measurement of respiratory activities supported by complex I–IV (CI–IV) in one run. The results showed that warm acclimation reduced fish and liver weights but increased mitochondrial protein indicating impairment of energy metabolism, increased synthesis of defense proteins and/or reduced liver water content. Whereas acute rise (11 → 20 °C) in temperature increased mitochondrial oxidation rates supported by CI–IV, warm acclimation reduced the maximal (state 3) and increased the basal (state 4) respiration leading to global uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). HRO profoundly inhibited both maximal and basal respiration rates supported by CI–IV, reduced RCR for all except

  1. Unfolding Green Defense

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kristian Knus

    2015-01-01

    consumption in military operations, defense expenditure, energy security, and global climate change. The report then proceeds to introduce the NATO Green Defence Framework before exploring specific current uses of green technologies and green strategies for defense. The report concludes that a number...

  2. Avian host defense peptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuperus, Tryntsje; Coorens, M.; van Dijk, A.; Haagsman, H.P.

    2013-01-01

    Host defense peptides (HDPs) are important effector molecules of the innate immune system of vertebrates. These antimicrobial peptides are also present in invertebrates, plants and fungi. HDPs display broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities and fulfill an important role in the first line of defense

  3. Defense Mechanisms: A Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrini, D. T.; Pedrini, Bonnie C.

    This bibliography includes studies of defense mechanisms, in general, and studies of multiple mechanisms. Defense mechanisms, briefly and simply defined, are the unconscious ego defendants against unpleasure, threat, or anxiety. Sigmund Freud deserves the clinical credit for studying many mechanisms and introducing them in professional literature.…

  4. PAPP2C Interacts with the Atypical Disease Resistance Protein RPW8.2 and Negatively Regulates Salicylic Acid-Dependent Defense Responses in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Ming Wang; Xian-Feng Ma; Yi Zhang; Ming-Cheng Luo; Guo-Liang Wang; Maria Bellizzi; Xing-Yao Xiong; Shun-Yuan Xiao

    2012-01-01

    Many fungal and oomycete pathogens differentiate a feeding structure named the haustorium to extract nutrition from the plant epidermal cell.The atypical resistance (R) protein RPW8.2 activates salicylic acid (SA)-dependent,haustorium-targeted defenses against Golovinomyces spp.,the causal agents of powdery mildew diseases on multiple plant species.How RPW8.2 activates defense remains uncharacterized.Here,we report that RPW8.2 interacts with the phytochrome-associated protein phosphatase type 2C (PAPP2C) in yeast and in planta as evidenced by coimmunoprecipitation and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays.Down-regulation of PAPP2C by RNA interference (RNAi) in Col-0 plants lacking RPW8.2 leads to leaf spontaneous cell death and enhanced disease resistance to powdery mildew via the SA-dependent signaling pathway.Moreover,down-regulation of PAPP2C by RNAi in the RPW8.2 background results in strong HR-like cell death,which correlates with elevated RPW8.2 expression.We further demonstrate that hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged PAPP2C prepared from tobacco leaf cells transiently transformed with HA-PAPP2C possesses phosphatase activity.In addition,silencing a rice gene (Os04g0452000) homologous to PAPP2C also results in spontaneous cell death in rice.Combined,our results suggest that RPW8.2 is functionally connected with PAPP2C and that PAPP2C negatively regulates SA-dependent basal defense against powdery mildew in Arabidopsis.

  5. Vlasov-Fokker-Planck simulations of fast-electron transport with hydrodynamic plasma response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kingham, R J; Sherlock, M; Ridgers, C P; Evans, R G, E-mail: rj.kingham@imperial.ac.u [Plasma Physics Group, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-01

    We report on kinetic simulations of the transport of laser-produced relativistic electron beams (REB) through solid-density plasma, including the hydrodynamic response of the plasma. We consider REBs with parameters relevant to fast-ignition of compressed inertial confinement fusion capsules. We show that over the 10-20ps timescales required for fast-ignition, thermal pressure (from Ohmic heating) can significantly modify the density which in turn strongly affects the propagation of injected fast-electrons; it allows them to re-collimate into a narrow, intense beam under conditions where they initially undergo beam-hollowing. Similar static-density calculations do not show re-collimation. The re-collimation effect is attributed to PdV cooling in the pressure-induced density-channel, which in turn suppresses defocusing magnetic fields generated by resistivity gradients. These simulations have been carried out using the new 2D-3V Vlasov-Fokker-Planck (VFP) code FIDO running in hybrid mode.

  6. Understanding avalanches in a Micromegas from single-electron response measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zerguerras, T., E-mail: zerguer@ipno.in2p3.fr [Institut de Physique Nucléaire (UMR 8608), CNRS/IN2P3-Université Paris-Sud, F-91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Genolini, B. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire (UMR 8608), CNRS/IN2P3-Université Paris-Sud, F-91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Kuger, F. [University of Würzburg, 97070 Würzburg (Germany); CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Josselin, M.; Maroni, A.; Nguyen-Trung, T.; Pouthas, J.; Rosier, P. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire (UMR 8608), CNRS/IN2P3-Université Paris-Sud, F-91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Şahin, Ö. [Department of Physics, Uludağ University, 16059 Bursa (Turkey); Suzuki, D. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire (UMR 8608), CNRS/IN2P3-Université Paris-Sud, F-91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Veenhof, R. [Department of Physics, Uludağ University, 16059 Bursa (Turkey); RD51 Collaboration, CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2015-02-01

    Avalanche fluctuations set a limit to the energy and position resolutions that can be reached by gaseous detectors. This paper presents a method based on a laser test-bench to measure the absolute gain and the relative gain variance of a Micro-Pattern Gaseous Detector from its single-electron response. A Micromegas detector was operated with three binary gas mixtures, composed of 5% isobutane as a quencher, with argon, neon or helium, at atmospheric pressure. The anode signals were read out by low-noise, high-gain Cremat CR-110 charge preamplifiers to enable single-electron detection down to gain of 5× 10{sup 3} for the first time. The argon mixture shows the lowest gain at a given amplification field together with the lowest breakdown limit, which is at a gain of 2×10{sup 4} an order of magnitude lower than that of neon or helium. For each gas, the relative gain variance f is almost unchanged in the range of amplification field studied. It was found that f is twice higher (f∼0.6) in argon than in the two other mixtures. This hierarchy of gain and relative gain variance agrees with predictions of analytic models, based on gas ionisation yields, and a Monte-Carlo model included in the simulation software Magboltz version 10.1.

  7. High electron mobility, quantum Hall effect and anomalous optical response in atomically thin InSe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandurin, Denis A.; Tyurnina, Anastasia V.; Yu, Geliang L.; Mishchenko, Artem; Zólyomi, Viktor; Morozov, Sergey V.; Kumar, Roshan Krishna; Gorbachev, Roman V.; Kudrynskyi, Zakhar R.; Pezzini, Sergio; Kovalyuk, Zakhar D.; Zeitler, Uli; Novoselov, Konstantin S.; Patanè, Amalia; Eaves, Laurence; Grigorieva, Irina V.; Fal'Ko, Vladimir I.; Geim, Andre K.; Cao, Yang

    2016-11-01

    A decade of intense research on two-dimensional (2D) atomic crystals has revealed that their properties can differ greatly from those of the parent compound. These differences are governed by changes in the band structure due to quantum confinement and are most profound if the underlying lattice symmetry changes. Here we report a high-quality 2D electron gas in few-layer InSe encapsulated in hexagonal boron nitride under an inert atmosphere. Carrier mobilities are found to exceed 103 cm2 V‑1 s‑1 and 104 cm2 V‑1 s‑1 at room and liquid-helium temperatures, respectively, allowing the observation of the fully developed quantum Hall effect. The conduction electrons occupy a single 2D subband and have a small effective mass. Photoluminescence spectroscopy reveals that the bandgap increases by more than 0.5 eV with decreasing the thickness from bulk to bilayer InSe. The band-edge optical response vanishes in monolayer InSe, which is attributed to the monolayer's mirror-plane symmetry. Encapsulated 2D InSe expands the family of graphene-like semiconductors and, in terms of quality, is competitive with atomically thin dichalcogenides and black phosphorus.

  8. High electron mobility, quantum Hall effect and anomalous optical response in atomically thin InSe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandurin, Denis A; Tyurnina, Anastasia V; Yu, Geliang L; Mishchenko, Artem; Zólyomi, Viktor; Morozov, Sergey V; Kumar, Roshan Krishna; Gorbachev, Roman V; Kudrynskyi, Zakhar R; Pezzini, Sergio; Kovalyuk, Zakhar D; Zeitler, Uli; Novoselov, Konstantin S; Patanè, Amalia; Eaves, Laurence; Grigorieva, Irina V; Fal'ko, Vladimir I; Geim, Andre K; Cao, Yang

    2016-11-21

    A decade of intense research on two-dimensional (2D) atomic crystals has revealed that their properties can differ greatly from those of the parent compound. These differences are governed by changes in the band structure due to quantum confinement and are most profound if the underlying lattice symmetry changes. Here we report a high-quality 2D electron gas in few-layer InSe encapsulated in hexagonal boron nitride under an inert atmosphere. Carrier mobilities are found to exceed 10(3) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and 10(4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) at room and liquid-helium temperatures, respectively, allowing the observation of the fully developed quantum Hall effect. The conduction electrons occupy a single 2D subband and have a small effective mass. Photoluminescence spectroscopy reveals that the bandgap increases by more than 0.5 eV with decreasing the thickness from bulk to bilayer InSe. The band-edge optical response vanishes in monolayer InSe, which is attributed to the monolayer's mirror-plane symmetry. Encapsulated 2D InSe expands the family of graphene-like semiconductors and, in terms of quality, is competitive with atomically thin dichalcogenides and black phosphorus.

  9. Optical Response of Metakaolin after Ultraviolet and High Energy Electron Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. T. Cesul

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Metakaolin, which is part of a class of inorganic polymers called geopolymers, is being tested currently for its use as a lightweight mirror material in spacecraft applications. Metakaolin, as with most geopolymers, has the advantages of low initial coefficient of thermal expansion, easy preparation at room temperature and pressure, and high specific strength. Even though metakaolin has been known as a structural material for millennia, it has not been properly vetted for use as a material in spacecraft applications, especially with respect to exposure to its environments. This research highlights one particular aspect of response to the space environment; that is, how do the optical properties of metakaolin change after subjugation to bombardment by ultraviolet and high energy electron radiation? These two radiation sources are common in low earth orbit and a primary cause of degradation of organic polymers in space. Photospectroscopic analysis showed that ultraviolet in combination with high energy electrons causes changes in the metakaolin which need to be accounted for due to their potential impacts on the thermal management of a spacecraft and during application in composite mirror structures.

  10. Engineering the quantum point contact response to single-electron charging in a few-electron quantum-dot circuit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, L.X.; Leburton, J.P.; Hanson, R.; Kouwenhoven, L.P.

    2004-01-01

    We show that the design of a quantum point contact adjacent to a quantum dot can be optimized to produce maximum sensitivity to single-electron charging in the quantum dot. Our analysis is based on the self-consistent solution of coupled three-dimensional Kohn-Sham and Poisson equations for the

  11. If photoinhibition of soybean photosystem II enhances the hypersensitive response, it is not solely due to blockage of electron transfer flow at D1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous studies have suggested that photoinhibition, through inactivation of photosystem II (PSII), could be beneficial to plants during defense to pathogens through enhanced reactive oxygen (ROS), especially during the hypersensitive response (HR). In this study, we addressed this question by focu...

  12. Defense Industry Clusters in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadir Alpaslan Demir

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available All countries strive for a capable national defense supported by a strong national defense industry. Supporting national defense with imported defense systems has many limitations and risks because the terms of arms trade agreements between countries may easily be influenced by the political climate of the signatories. As a result, establishing an independent national defense requires a strong national defense industry. Furthermore, exporting defense systems may be an important source of national income. National defense industries mostly consist of large-scale defense firms that have the resources required for big defense contracts. However, small to medium enterprises (SMEs do not have the necessary resources, therefore they are at a disadvantage. To overcome this handicap and be part of the business, defense industry clusters mostly consisting of SMEs are being established. Provided that there is good national planning and support in this area, defense clusters consisting of SMEs may play a significant role in industry. SMEs have a chance to offer specialized services, special or customized products when needed. As a result, large defense firms subcontract certain portions of defense projects to SMEs. Since 2010, Turkey has shown signs of continuous improvement in defense industry clustering. In parallel with these developments, this study discusses the importance of clustering in the defense industry, briefly presents the state of the Turkish defense industry as highlighted by national statistics, and presents the current status of defense clusters in Turkey. The novelty of this article consists in its assessment of Turkish defense clusters.

  13. Synergistic activation of defense responses in Arabidopsis by simultaneous loss of the GSL5 callose synthase and the EDR1 protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawrzynska, Anna; Rodibaugh, Natalie L; Innes, Roger W

    2010-05-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the EDR1 gene of Arabidopsis confer enhanced resistance to Golovinomyces cichoracearum (powdery mildew). Disease resistance mediated by the edr1 mutation is dependent on an intact salicylic acid (SA) signaling pathway, but edr1 mutant plants do not constitutively express the SA-inducible gene PR-1 and are not dwarfed. To identify other components of the EDR1 signaling network, we screened for mutations that enhanced the edr1 mutant phenotype. Here, we describe an enhancer of edr1 mutant, eed3, which forms spontaneous lesions in the absence of pathogen infection, constitutively expresses both SA- and methyl jasmonate (JA)-inducible defense genes, and is dwarfed. Positional cloning of eed3 revealed that the mutation causes a premature stop codon in GLUCAN SYNTHASE-LIKE 5 (GSL5, also known as POWDERY MILDEW RESISTANT 4), which encodes a callose synthase required for pathogen-induced callose production. Significantly, gsl5 single mutants do not constitutively express PR-1 or AtERF1 (a JA-inducible gene) and are not dwarfed. Thus, loss of both EDR1 and GSL5 function has a synergistic effect. Our data suggest that EDR1 and GSL5 negatively regulate SA and JA production or signaling by independent mechanisms and that negative regulation of defense signaling by GSL5 may be independent of callose production.

  14. GlpC gene is responsible for biofilm formation and defense against phagocytes and imparts tolerance to pH and organic solvents in Proteus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y L; Liu, K S; Yin, X T; Fei, R M

    2015-09-09

    Biofilm-forming bacteria are highly resistant to antibiotics, host immune defenses, and other external conditions. The formation of biofilms plays a key role in colonization and infection. To explore the mechanism of biofilm formation, mutant strains of Proteus vulgaris XC 2 were generated by Tn5 random transposon insertion. Only one biofilm defective bacterial species was identified from among 500 mutants. Inactivation of the glpC gene coding an anaerobic glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase subunit C was identified by sequence analysis of the biofilm defective strain. Differences were detected in the growth phenotypes of the wild-type and mutant strains under pH, antibiotic, and organic solvent stress conditions. Furthermore, we observed an increase in the phagocytosis of the biofilm defective strain by the mouse macrophage RAW264.7 cell line compared to the wild-type strain. This study shows that the glpC gene plays an important role in biofilm formation, in addition to imparting pH, organic solvent, and antibiotic tolerance, and defense against phagocytosis to Proteus sp. The results further clarified the mechanism of biofilm formation at the genomic level, and indicated the importance of the glpC gene in this process. This data may provide innovative therapeutic measures against P. vulgaris infections; furthermore, as an important crocodile pathogen, this study also has important significance in the protection of Chinese alligators.

  15. Oxygen flux and dielectric response study of Mixed Ionic-Electronic Conducting (MIEC) heterogeneous functional materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbi, Fazle

    -50%CFO and 80%GDC-20%CFO mixtures. Material characterization suggests the emergence of a third phase contributing to the behavior. Microstructural studies suggested changes in micro-structure of a given volume fraction for different sintering temperature and sintering time. Flux variation was observed for membranes with the same constituent volume fraction but different micro-structure indicating the effects of the micro-structure on the overall oxygen permeation. To correlate the experimental flux measurement with a standard Wagner's flux equation, different microstructural characteristics were studied to incorporate them into a modified Wagner's flux equation. In-situ broadband dielectric spectroscopy measurements over a temperature range of 850°C-1060°C and frequency range of (0.1Hz-1MHz) of the operating 60%GDC-40%CFO mixture oxygen separation membranes were measured using a NOVOCONTROL dielectric spectroscopy test system. Dielectric response of the operating membrane was studied to identify the charge transfer process in the membrane. A computational model to study the dielectric impedance response of different microstructure was developed using a COMSOL(TM) Multiphysics qasi-static electromagnetic module. This model was validated using model materials with regular geometric shapes. To measure impedance of real micro/nano-structures of the membrane material, domains required for the COMSOL calculation were obtained from actual micro/nano structures by using 3D scans from X-ray nano and micro tomography. Simpleware(TM) software was used to generate 3D domains from image slices obtained from the 3D x-ray scans. Initial voltage distributions on the original microstructure were obtained from the computational model. Similarly, development of a primary model for simulating ionic/electronic species flow inside of an MIEC was also begun. The possibility of using broadband dielectric spectroscopy methods to understand and anticipate the flux capabilities of MIECs to

  16. An ultra-high dose of electron radiation response of Germanium Flat Fiber and TLD-100

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alawiah, A.; Amin, Y. M.; Abdul-Rashid, H. A.; Abdullah, W. S. Wan; Maah, M. J.; Bradley, D. A.

    2017-01-01

    The thermoluminescence (TL) response of Germanium Flat Fiber (GFF) and TLD-100 irradiated with 2.5 MeV electrons for the doses up to 1 MGy were studied and compared. The aim was to evaluate the TL supralinearity response at an ultra-high dose (UHD) range and to investigate the change in kinetic parameters of the glow peaks, as the doses increases up to 1 MGy. It is found that the critical dose limit (CDL) of GFF is 5 times higher as compared to TLD-100. CDL is determined by the dose at the maximum supralinearity, f(D)max. It is also found that annealing the TLD-100 and GFF with temperature more than 400 °C is required to reset it back to its original condition, following radiation doses up to 1 MGy. It is also noticed the strange behavior of Peak 4 (TLD-100), which tends to be invisible at the lower dose (<10 kGy) and starts to be appeared at the critical dose limit of 10 kGy. This result might be an important clue to understand the behavior of TLD-100 at extremely high dose range. For both samples, it is observed that the TL intensity is not saturated within the UHD range studied.

  17. Electronic Structure, Dielectric Response, and Surface Charge Distribution of RGD (1FUV) Peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Puja; Wen, Amy M.; French, Roger H.; Parsegian, V. Adrian; Steinmetz, Nicole F.; Podgornik, Rudolf; Ching, Wai-Yim

    2014-07-01

    Long and short range molecular interactions govern molecular recognition and self-assembly of biological macromolecules. Microscopic parameters in the theories of these molecular interactions are either phenomenological or need to be calculated within a microscopic theory. We report a unified methodology for the ab initio quantum mechanical (QM) calculation that yields all the microscopic parameters, namely the partial charges as well as the frequency-dependent dielectric response function, that can then be taken as input for macroscopic theories of electrostatic, polar, and van der Waals-London dispersion intermolecular forces. We apply this methodology to obtain the electronic structure of the cyclic tripeptide RGD-4C (1FUV). This ab initio unified methodology yields the relevant parameters entering the long range interactions of biological macromolecules, providing accurate data for the partial charge distribution and the frequency-dependent dielectric response function of this peptide. These microscopic parameters determine the range and strength of the intricate intermolecular interactions between potential docking sites of the RGD-4C ligand and its integrin receptor.

  18. 32 CFR 97.5 - Responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Responsibilities. 97.5 Section 97.5 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN RELEASE... Responsibilities. (a) The General Counsel, Department of Defense, shall provide general policy and...

  19. 32 CFR 187.5 - Responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Responsibilities. 187.5 Section 187.5 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE ENVIRONMENT ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS ABROAD OF MAJOR DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE ACTIONS § 187.5 Responsibilities. (a) The Assistant Secretary...

  20. 32 CFR 112.7 - Responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Responsibilities. 112.7 Section 112.7 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN INDEBTEDNESS OF MILITARY PERSONNEL § 112.7 Responsibilities. (a) The Under Secretary of Defense for...