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Sample records for defect model radiographic

  1. Coralline hydroxyapatite bone graft substitutes in a canine metaphyseal defect model: Radiographic-biomechanical correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartoris, D.J.; Resnick, D.; Holmes, R.E.; Tencer, A.F.; Texas Univ., Dallas; Mooney, V.

    1986-01-01

    Radiographic and biomechanical assessment of a new type of bone graft substitute derived from reef-building sea coral was performed in a canine metaphyseal defect model. Blocks of this material and autogenous iliac crest graft were implanted, respectively, into the right and left proximal tibial metaphyses of eight dogs. Qualitative and quantitative radiographic evaluation was performed in the immediate postoperative period and at 6 months after surgery. Biomechanical testing was carried out on all grafts following harvest at 6 months, as well as on nonimplanted coralline hydroxyapatite and autogenous iliac cancellous bone. In contrast to autografts, incorporation of coralline implants was characterized by predictable osseous growth and apposition with preservation of intrinsic architecture. Greater percent increase in radiography density, higher ultimate compressive strength, and lower stiffness with incorporation were documented advantages of coralline hydroxyapatite over autogenous graft. Densitometric measurements correlated moderately with strength for both types of graft material (r=0.65). These promising results have important implications to the clinical application of coralline hydroxyapatite bone graft substitutes as an alternative to autogenous grafting. (orig.)

  2. Defect modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norgett, M.J.

    1980-01-01

    Calculations, drawing principally on developments at AERE Harwell, of the relaxation about lattice defects are reviewed with emphasis on the techniques required for such calculations. The principles of defect modelling are outlined and various programs developed for defect simulations are discussed. Particular calculations for metals, ionic crystals and oxides, are considered. (UK)

  3. Modeling dental radiographic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webber, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    The Bureau of Radiological Health has been actively collaborating with the Clinical Investigations Branch, NIDR, in applied research involving diagnostic use of ionizing radiation in dentistry. This work has centered on the search for alternatives to conventional radiographic systems in an attempt to improve diagnostic performance while reducing the required exposure. The basic approach involves analysis of factors limiting performance of properly defined diagnostic tasks and the modeling alternative systems with an eye toward increasing objective measures of performance. Previous collaborative work involved using a nonlinear model to compare various x-ray spectra. The data were expressed as brightness-contrast versus exposure for simulated tasks of clinical interest. This report supplements these findings by extending the number of parameters under investigation and modifying the mode of data display so that an actual radiographic image can be simulated on a television screen

  4. Dimensions of defects determined by radiographical testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oesterberg, J.

    Normally industrial radiography using x-rays or radionuclides gives information on the existence of defects in welds. These defects may in some instances be harmless, the size of the flaw is important. Radiography may be used for determining the thickness of the defect in many cases, by measuring the blackening of the photographic film used. The report gives a theoretical treatment of the problems and goes on to practical examples of the application. For flaws that have a width of at least 0.3 mm, a thickness of the order 0.1 mm can be determined with sufficient accuracy in materials 40 mm thick.(P.Aa.)

  5. Defects quantization in industrial radiographs by image processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briand, F.Y.; Brillault, B.; Philipp, S.

    1988-01-01

    This paper refers to the industrial application of image processing using Non Destructive Testing by radiography. The various problems involved by the conception of a numerical tool are described. This tool intends to help radiograph experts to quantify defects and to follow up their evolution, using numerical techniques. The sequences of processings that achieve defect segmentation and quantization are detailed. They are based on the thorough knowledge of radiographs formation techniques. The process uses various methods of image analysis, including textural analysis and morphological mathematics. The interface between the final product and users will occur in an explicit language, using the terms of radiographic expertise without showing any processing details. The problem is thoroughly described: image formation, digitization, processings fitted to flaw morphology and finally product structure in progress. 12 refs [fr

  6. Development of tools for radiographic defects scanning in ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipnik, Boris.

    1994-03-01

    This work is concentrated on implementation of the most used non-destructive technique - radiography to quality control of structural ceramics. The present thesis deals with microfocus radiographic evaluation of ceramics produced by slip casting method. Radiographic processes are examined relying on image processing by algorithms expanded from others developed for tomographic images of non ceramics objects. At the first stage experiments aimed for characterization of a real-time microfocus radiographic system were carried out. The question of signal-to-noise ratio referring to a defect's detection limit was explored. Arithmetic image operations were used to correct for the background variations. At the second stage microfocus radiographs of: ceramics were systematically processed and analyzed by means of regularization and 'weak membrane' algorithms. The images were considerably improved and it resulted in identification and dimension extraction of defects as small as 40 pico meter . The usefulness of pseudocoloring methods was explored to obtain a fast assessment of gray level variations and to detect more details in the initial digital image. The potential for practical application was found to be very reasonable. The problems experienced were discussed along with suggestions for further studies and improvement

  7. Automatic delamination defect detection in radiographic sequence of rocket boosters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebuffel, V.; Pires, S.; Caplier, A.; Lamarque, P.

    2003-01-01

    Solid rocket motors are routinely examined in real-time X-ray radioscopic mode. The large and cylindrical boosters are rotating between a high energy source and a two dimensional detector. The purpose of this control is to detect possible defects all through the sample. In the tangential configuration, the part of the object that intersects the X-rays beam is the peripheral one, allowing to detect the delamination defect between the propellant and the external metal envelope. But the defect detectability is very poor due to the strong attenuation of the X-rays through the motors. During the rotation of the booster, the system acquires a sequence of radiographs where the defects are visible over several successive instants. We have previously developed a real-time tomo-synthesis system, processing the radiographs on line, and based on a tomo-synthesis reconstruction algorithm in order to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. This system is installed at the industrial site of Kourou, and is currently used by the operators in charge of the visual inspection of the boosters. In this paper, we present a method that processes the digital images obtained by the system in the purpose of automatically extracting the delamination defects. Due to the size and the poor contrast of the defects, a single image is not sufficient to perform this detection. A spatio-temporal aspect is required for the algorithm to be robust and efficient. In a first step, the proposed method computes the apparent local displacement between the current radiograph and a reference one. This reference image is acquired at the beginning of the rotation, with few noise, and is supposed to be defect free. The apparent displacement is due to the non-perfect rotation positioning. It may be uniform or not, depending on the deformation of the insulation liner of the metallic wall. The images are then registered and compared. On the resulting difference image we apply a smoothed threshold to obtain an

  8. The study of the identification of minimal defects in radiograph, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senda, Tomio; Hirayama, Kazuo; Yokoyama, Keiji; Nakamura, Kazuo.

    1988-01-01

    In the first report, it was discussed in terms of the mass on the detectible limit of such minimal defects of cylindrical defect as a representative of ingot-defect and slit defect as a representative of plate-defect respectively which generally appear on the weld joints, using contrast distribution area of defects on the radiograph. In the second report, an experiment is done to vary the contrast of radiograph by dual exposure system and to vary the radiation by rotating photographing in order to investigate the corresponding relation of defectible limit of defect dimension between cylindrical defect and slit defect. (author)

  9. Influence of the geometrical soft effect on the radiographic detection of artificial defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodson, F.; Launay, J.P.

    1980-11-01

    The influence of the geometrical soft effect on image quality and on the sensitivity to detection of artificial defects has been assessed for radiographies achieved with Ir 192 and Co 60 sources. The results show that the threshold of detectability of defects depends increasingly on the geometrical soft effects as the thickness radiographed becomes greater and that the defects in question are finite. The image quality remains accepable on the whole [fr

  10. Influence of geometrical unsharpness on detection of tight defects by radiographic examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodson, F.; Crescenzo, E.; Thomas, A.

    1983-01-01

    A study was undertaken to evaluate the influence of geometric unsharpness on defects' visibility for radiographic examinations carried out with Iridium 192 and Cobalt 60 sources. This study enabled the authors to demonstrate that, even in the case of highly detrimental implementation conditions (increase in geometric unsharpness obtained via a reduction in the source-to-film distance, when the defect is not in the beam axis), the worsening in defects' visibility was dependent on defect type, nature of material, thickness radiographed, source energy, and geometric exposure conditions (dimension of the source, enlargement of the defect). Without establishing maximum admissible values, they nevertheless assert that these should be determined by taking these parameters into account. In particular it seems possible to accept greater geometric unsharpness values for small thicknesses than for large ones, in the examination of welded joints using Iridium 192 and Cobalt 60

  11. Radiographic detection of artificial intra-bony defects in the edentulous area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Assche, N; Jacobs, R; Coucke, W; van Steenberghe, D; Quirynen, M

    2009-03-01

    Since intra-bony pathologies might jeopardize implant outcome, their preoperative detection is crucial. In sixteen human cadaver bloc sections from upper and lower jaws, artificial defects with progressively increasing size (n=7) have been created. From each respective defect, analogue and digital intra-oral radiographs were taken, the latter processed via a periodontal filter and afterwards presented in black-white as well as in colour, resulting in three sets of 7 images per bloc section. Eight observers were asked to diagnosis an eventual defect on randomly presented radiographs, and at another occasion to rank each set based on the defect size. The clinicians were only able to identify a defect, when the junctional area was involved, except for bony pieces with a very homogeneous structure. For longitudinal evaluation of healing bone (e.g. after tooth extraction), colour digital images can be recommended. These observations indicate that intra-oral radiographs are not always reliable for the detection of any intra-bony defect.

  12. Honey preserved cortical allografts in the repair of diaphyseal femoral defect in dogs: clinical and radiographic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alievi, Marcelo Meller; Wallau Schossler, João Eduardo; Christo de Oliveira, Ana Néri; Almeida Ferreira, Carolina Kist TraeslelIV Patrícia; Dambrósio Guimarães, Luciana

    2007-01-01

    Fourteen adult mongrel dogs were used to evaluate the honey preserved cortical allografts in the repair of diaphyseal femoral defect. The allografts were inserted into a 5cm segmental defect created in the mid-diaphysis of the right femur in each dog. The bones were stabilized with a dynamic compression plate and eight bone screws. Healing was followed clinically and femora were evaluated radiographically, periodically. Nineteen (79.2%) of the twenty-four host-graft interfaces were radiographically incorporated. Average time to allograft incorporation was 67.1 days (range 45 days to 90 days). There was no statistical difference in the allograft incorporation time between proximal and distal host-graft interfaces. Complications observed were nonunion, allograft fracture, and allograft resorption. The conclusion is that despite the complications, honey preserved cortical allografts are a viable option to bone reconstruction [pt

  13. Estimated accuracy of classification of defects detected in welded joints by radiographic tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siqueira, M.H.S.; De Silva, R.R.; De Souza, M.P.V.; Rebello, J.M.A.; Caloba, L.P.; Mery, D.

    2004-01-01

    This work is a study to estimate the accuracy of classification of the main classes of weld defects detected by radiography test, such as: undercut, lack of penetration, porosity, slag inclusion, crack or lack of fusion. To carry out this work non-linear pattern classifiers were developed, using neural networks, and the largest number of radiographic patterns as possible was used as well as statistical inference techniques of random selection of samples with and without repositioning (bootstrap) in order to estimate the accuracy of the classification. The results pointed to an estimated accuracy of around 80% for the classes of defects analyzed. (author)

  14. Estimated accuracy of classification of defects detected in welded joints by radiographic tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siqueira, M.H.S.; De Silva, R.R.; De Souza, M.P.V.; Rebello, J.M.A. [Federal Univ. of Rio de Janeiro, Dept., of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Caloba, L.P. [Federal Univ. of Rio de Janeiro, Dept., of Electrical Engineering, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Mery, D. [Pontificia Unversidad Catolica de Chile, Escuela de Ingenieria - DCC, Dept. de Ciencia de la Computacion, Casilla, Santiago (Chile)

    2004-07-01

    This work is a study to estimate the accuracy of classification of the main classes of weld defects detected by radiography test, such as: undercut, lack of penetration, porosity, slag inclusion, crack or lack of fusion. To carry out this work non-linear pattern classifiers were developed, using neural networks, and the largest number of radiographic patterns as possible was used as well as statistical inference techniques of random selection of samples with and without repositioning (bootstrap) in order to estimate the accuracy of the classification. The results pointed to an estimated accuracy of around 80% for the classes of defects analyzed. (author)

  15. [Evaluation method with radiographic image quality indicator for internal defects of dental casting metallic restoration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y; Zheng, G; Lin, H

    2014-12-18

    To develop a new kind of dental radiographic image quality indicator (IQI) for internal quality of casting metallic restoration to influence on its usage life. Radiographic image quality indicator method was used to evaluate the depth of the defects region and internal quality of 127 casting metallic restoration and the accuracy was compared with that of conventional callipers method. In the 127 cases of casting metallic restoration, 9 were found the thickness less than 0.7 mm and the thinnest thickness only 0.2 mm in 26 casting metallic crowns or bridges' occlusal defects region. The data measured by image quality indicator were consistent with those measured by conventional gauging. Two metal inner crowns were found the thickness less than 0.3 mm in 56 porcelain crowns or bridges. The thickness of casting removable partial denture was more than 1.0 mm, but thinner regions were not found. It was found that in a titanium partial denture, the X-ray image of clasp was not uniform and there were internal porosity defects in the clasp. Special dental image quality indicator can solve the visual error problems caused by different observing backgrounds and estimate the depth of the defects region in the casting.

  16. Optimization of number and signal to noise ratio radiographs for defects 3D reconstruction in industrial control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruandet, J.-P.

    2001-01-01

    Among numerous techniques for non-destructive evaluation (NOE), X-rays systems are well suited to inspect inner objects. Acquiring several radiographs of inspected objects under different points of view enables to recover a three dimensional structural information. In this NOE application, a tomographic testing is considered. This work deals with two tomographic testing optimizations in order to improve the characterization of defects that may occur into metallic welds. The first one consists in the optimization of the acquisition strategy. Because tomographic testing is made on-line, the total duration for image acquisition is fixed, limiting the number of available views. Hence, for a given acquisition duration, it is possible either to acquire a very limited number of radiographs with a good signal to noise ratio in each single acquisition or a larger number of radiographs with a limited signal to noise ratio. The second one consists in optimizing the 3D reconstruction algorithms from a limited number of cone-beam projections. To manage the lack of data, we first used algebraic reconstruction algorithms such as ART or regularized ICM. In terms of acquisition strategy optimization, an increase of the number of projections was proved to be valuable. Taking into account specific prior knowledge such as support constraint or physical noise model in attenuation images also improved reconstruction quality. Then, a new regularized region based reconstruction approach was developed. Defects to reconstruct are binary (lack of material in a homogeneous object). As a consequence, they are entirely described by their shapes. Because the number of defects to recover is unknown and is totally arbitrary, a level set formulation allowing handling topological changes was used. Results obtained with a regularized level-set reconstruction algorithm are optimistic in the proposed context. (author) [fr

  17. Posterior diaphragmatic defect detected on chest CT: the incidence according to age and the lateral chest radiographic appearances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Son Youl; Choi, Yo Won; Jeon, Seok Chol; Heo, Jeong Nam; Park, Choong Ki

    2007-01-01

    We wanted to investigate the incidence of posterior diaphragmatic defect on chest CT in various age groups and its lateral chest radiographic appearances. The chest CT scans of 78 patients of various ages with posterior diaphragmatic defect were selected among 1,991 patients, and they were analyzed for the incidence of defect in various age groups, the defect location and the herniated contents. Their lateral chest radiographs were analyzed for the shape of the posterior diaphragm and the posterior costophrenic sulcus. The patients' ages ranged from 34 to 87 with the tendency of a higher incidence in the older patients. The defect most frequently involved the medial two thirds (n = 49, 50.4%) and middle one third (n = 36, 37%) of the posterior diaphragm. The retroperitoneal fat was herniated into the thorax through the defect in all patients, and sometimes with the kidney (n = 8). Lateral chest radiography showed a normal diaphragmatic contour (n = 51, 49.5%), blunting of the posterior costophrenic sulcus (n = 41, 39.8%), focal humping of the posterior diaphragm (n = 7, 6.8%), or upward convexity (n = 4, 3.9%) of the posterior costophrenic sulcus on the affected side. The posterior diaphragmatic defect discovered in asymptomatic patients who are without a history of peridiaphragmatic disease is most likely acquired, and this malady increases in incidence according to age. An abnormal contour of the posterior diaphragm or the costophrenic sulcus on a lateral chest radiograph may be a finding of posterior diaphragmatic defect

  18. Defect sizing of post-irradiated nuclear fuels using grayscale thresholding in their radiographic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhary, Usman Khurshid; Iqbal, Masood; Ahmad, Munir

    2010-01-01

    Quantification of different types of material defects in a number of reference standard post-irradiated nuclear fuel image samples have been carried out by virtue of developing a computer program that takes radiographic images of the fuel as input. The program is based on user adjustable grayscale thresholding in the regime of image segmentation whereby it selects and counts the pixels having graylevel values less than or equal to the computed threshold. It can size the defects due to chipping in nuclear fuel, cracks, voids, melting, deformation, inclusion of foreign materials, heavy isotope accumulation, non-uniformity, etc. The classes of fuel range from those of research and power reactors to fast breeders and from pellets to annular and vibro-compacted fuel. The program has been validated against ground truth realities of some locally fabricated metallic plates having drilled holes of known sizes simulated as defects in them in which the results indicate that it either correctly selects and quantifies at least 94% of the actual required regions of interest in a given image or it gives less than 8.1% false alarm rate. Also, the developed program is independent of image size.

  19. Defect sizing of post-irradiated nuclear fuels using grayscale thresholding in their radiographic images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudhary, Usman Khurshid, E-mail: ukhurshid@hotmail.co [Department of Physics and Applied Mathematics, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 45650 (Pakistan); Iqbal, Masood, E-mail: masiqbal@hotmail.co [Nuclear Engineering Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 45650 (Pakistan); Ahmad, Munir [Nondestructive Testing Group, Directorate of Technology, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 45650 (Pakistan)

    2010-10-15

    Quantification of different types of material defects in a number of reference standard post-irradiated nuclear fuel image samples have been carried out by virtue of developing a computer program that takes radiographic images of the fuel as input. The program is based on user adjustable grayscale thresholding in the regime of image segmentation whereby it selects and counts the pixels having graylevel values less than or equal to the computed threshold. It can size the defects due to chipping in nuclear fuel, cracks, voids, melting, deformation, inclusion of foreign materials, heavy isotope accumulation, non-uniformity, etc. The classes of fuel range from those of research and power reactors to fast breeders and from pellets to annular and vibro-compacted fuel. The program has been validated against ground truth realities of some locally fabricated metallic plates having drilled holes of known sizes simulated as defects in them in which the results indicate that it either correctly selects and quantifies at least 94% of the actual required regions of interest in a given image or it gives less than 8.1% false alarm rate. Also, the developed program is independent of image size.

  20. X-ray Radiographic Study of Simulated Voids-like Defects in Al-Castings and Welded in Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahrok, M.; Juma, Th.; Saeed, F.

    2013-01-01

    the detection and evaluation of imperfections in internal structures of casting and welded joints by x - ray radiography were studied.Optimum radiography conditions that improved the radiographic detection were attempted.Mathematical equations for radiography were used to calculate the size and depth of defects in casting were tested for validity to a wide range of parameters commonly used in radiography and for variable density and shape of the defects with respect to surrounding.Two kinds of samples are prepared.The first is aluminum casting through which two different sizes of a regular steel spheres are included and then radio graphed from two opposite sides to estimate their dimensional information from the radiographs.The second sample is steel plates which are welded and then radio graphed by x - rays.Imperfections such as incomplete root penetration, undercut and porosity were detected in the radiographs.

  1. Simulated radiographic bone and joint modeling from 3D ankle MRI: feasibility and comparison with radiographs and 2D MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordeck, Shaun M. [University of Texas Southwestern Medical College, Dallas, TX (United States); University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Musculoskeletal Radiology, Dallas, TX (United States); Koerper, Conrad E.; Adler, Aaron [University of Texas Southwestern Medical College, Dallas, TX (United States); Malhotra, Vidur; Xi, Yin [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Musculoskeletal Radiology, Dallas, TX (United States); Liu, George T. [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Orthopaedic Surgery, Dallas, TX (United States); Chhabra, Avneesh [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Musculoskeletal Radiology, Dallas, TX (United States); University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Orthopaedic Surgery, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2017-05-15

    The purpose of this work is to simulate radiographs from isotropic 3D MRI data, compare relationship of angle and joint space measurements on simulated radiographs with corresponding 2D MRIs and real radiographs (XR), and compare measurement times among the three modalities. Twenty-four consecutive ankles were included, eight males and 16 females, with a mean age of 46 years. Segmented joint models simulating radiographs were created from 3D MRI data sets. Three readers independently performed blinded angle and joint space measurements on the models, corresponding 2D MRIs, and XRs at two time points. Linear mixed models and the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was ascertained, with p values less than 0.05 considered significant. Simulated radiograph models were successfully created in all cases. Good agreement (ICC > 0.65) was noted among all readers across all modalities and among most measurements. Absolute measurement values differed between modalities. Measurement time was significantly greater (p < 0.05) on 2D versus simulated radiographs for most measurements and on XR versus simulated radiographs (p < 0.05) for nearly half the measurements. Simulated radiographs can be successfully generated from 3D MRI data; however, measurements differ. Good inter-reader and moderate-to-good intra-reader reliability was observed and measurements obtained on simulated radiograph models took significantly less time compared to measurements with 2D and generally less time than XR. (orig.)

  2. Interproximal periodontal defect model in dogs: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, U-W; Chang, Y-Y; Um, Y-J; Kim, C-S; Cho, K-S; Choi, S-H

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the validity of a surgically created interproximal periodontal defect in dogs. Surgery was performed in the interproximal area between the maxillary second and third premolars in two beagle dogs. Following an incision and reflection of the gingival flap, a 3-mm wide and 5-mm high defect was prepared surgically at the interproximal area. A thorough root planing was performed and the flap was coronally positioned and sutured. The contra-lateral area was served as the control with no surgical intervention. After 8 weeks of healing, the animals were killed and the defect was analysed histometrically and radiographically. The interproximal periodontal defect resembled a naturally occurring defect and mimicked a clinical situation. After healing, the defect showed limited bone (0.89±0.02mm) and cementum regeneration (1.50± 0.48mm). Within the limitations of this pilot study, the interproximal periodontal defect showed limited bone and cementum regeneration. Thus, it can be considered as a standardized, reproducible defect model for testing new biomaterials. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  3. Measurements of simulated periodontal bone defects in inverted digital image and film-based radiograph: an in vitro study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molon, Rafael Scaf; Morais Camillo, Juliana Aparecida Najarro Dearo; Ferreira, Mauricio Goncalves; Loffredo, Leonor Castro Monteiro; Scaf, Gulnara; Sakakura, Celso Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    This study was performed to compare the inverted digital images and film-based images of dry pig mandibles to measure the periodontal bone defect depth. Forty 2-wall bone defects were made in the proximal region of the premolar in the dry pig mandibles. The digital and conventional radiographs were taken using a Schick sensor and Kodak F-speed intraoral film. Image manipulation (inversion) was performed using Adobe Photoshop 7.0 software. Four trained examiners made all of the radiographic measurements in millimeters a total of three times from the cementoenamel junction to the most apical extension of the bone loss with both types of images: inverted digital and film. The measurements were also made in dry mandibles using a periodontal probe and digital caliper. The Student's t-test was used to compare the depth measurements obtained from the two types of images and direct visual measurement in the dry mandibles. A significance level of 0.05 for a 95% confidence interval was used for each comparison. There was a significant difference between depth measurements in the inverted digital images and direct visual measurements (p>|t|=0.0039), with means of 6.29 mm (IC 95% :6.04-6.54) and 6.79 mm (IC 95% :6.45-7.11), respectively. There was a non-significant difference between the film-based radiographs and direct visual measurements (p>|t|=0.4950), with means of 6.64 mm(IC 95% :6.40-6.89) and 6.79 mm(IC 95% :6.45-7.11), respectively. The periodontal bone defect measurements in the inverted digital images were inferior to film-based radiographs, underestimating the amount of bone loss.

  4. Measurements of simulated periodontal bone defects in inverted digital image and film-based radiograph: an in vitro study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molon, Rafael Scaf; Morais Camillo, Juliana Aparecida Najarro Dearo; Ferreira, Mauricio Goncalves; Loffredo, Leonor Castro Monteiro; Scaf, Gulnara [Araraquara Dental School, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Sakakura, Celso Eduardo [Barretos Dental School, Barretos Educational Fundation, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2012-09-15

    This study was performed to compare the inverted digital images and film-based images of dry pig mandibles to measure the periodontal bone defect depth. Forty 2-wall bone defects were made in the proximal region of the premolar in the dry pig mandibles. The digital and conventional radiographs were taken using a Schick sensor and Kodak F-speed intraoral film. Image manipulation (inversion) was performed using Adobe Photoshop 7.0 software. Four trained examiners made all of the radiographic measurements in millimeters a total of three times from the cementoenamel junction to the most apical extension of the bone loss with both types of images: inverted digital and film. The measurements were also made in dry mandibles using a periodontal probe and digital caliper. The Student's t-test was used to compare the depth measurements obtained from the two types of images and direct visual measurement in the dry mandibles. A significance level of 0.05 for a 95% confidence interval was used for each comparison. There was a significant difference between depth measurements in the inverted digital images and direct visual measurements (p>|t|=0.0039), with means of 6.29 mm (IC{sub 95%}:6.04-6.54) and 6.79 mm (IC{sub 95%}:6.45-7.11), respectively. There was a non-significant difference between the film-based radiographs and direct visual measurements (p>|t|=0.4950), with means of 6.64 mm(IC{sub 95%}:6.40-6.89) and 6.79 mm(IC{sub 95%}:6.45-7.11), respectively. The periodontal bone defect measurements in the inverted digital images were inferior to film-based radiographs, underestimating the amount of bone loss.

  5. Radiographic Assessment of Bone Formation Using rhBMP2 at Maxillary Periapical Surgical Defects: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, M Siva; Kumar, M Hari; Vishalakshi, K; Sabitha, H

    2016-04-01

    Periapical cysts are the most common inflammatory odontogenic cysts arising from untreated dental caries with pulp necrosis and periapical infection. The choice of treatment is often influenced by various factors like size, extension of the lesion, proximity to vital structures, systemic condition and compliance of the patient too. The treatment protocol for management of periapical cysts is still under discussion and options vary from conservative treatment by means of endodontic technique to surgical treatment like decompression or a marsupialisation or even to enucleation. Large bony defect secondary to periapical surgery compromising the tooth integrity often requires bone graft to enhance bone formation and thus restoring function at the earliest. The present case series included 10 patients who had established periapical pathology secondary to history of trauma on upper anterior teeth as well patients with history of carious teeth with an apparent failure in root canal therapy. All ten patients were treated with cyst enucleation and apiceotomy along with 1.4cc Recombinant Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 soaked Absorbable Collagen Sponge implantation at surgical defect. Radiographs and clinical examinations were done upto 3 months to evaluate healing. Radiographic and clinical assessments revealed bone regeneration and restoration of the maxillary surgical defects in all 10 patients. No evidence of graft failure was noted. The Recombinant Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 soaked Absorbable Collagen Sponge carrier is thus proved to be a viable option for the treatment of maxillary periapical surgical defects.

  6. Personalized models of bones based on radiographic photogrammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthonnaud, E; Hilmi, R; Dimnet, J

    2009-07-01

    The radiographic photogrammetry is applied, for locating anatomical landmarks in space, from their two projected images. The goal of this paper is to define a personalized geometric model of bones, based uniquely on photogrammetric reconstructions. The personalized models of bones are obtained from two successive steps: their functional frameworks are first determined experimentally, then, the 3D bone representation results from modeling techniques. Each bone functional framework is issued from direct measurements upon two radiographic images. These images may be obtained using either perpendicular (spine and sacrum) or oblique incidences (pelvis and lower limb). Frameworks link together their functional axes and punctual landmarks. Each global bone volume is decomposed in several elementary components. Each volumic component is represented by simple geometric shapes. Volumic shapes are articulated to the patient's bone structure. The volumic personalization is obtained by best fitting the geometric model projections to their real images, using adjustable articulations. Examples are presented to illustrating the technique of personalization of bone volumes, directly issued from the treatment of only two radiographic images. The chosen techniques for treating data are then discussed. The 3D representation of bones completes, for clinical users, the information brought by radiographic images.

  7. Evaluation of moxifloxacin-hydroxyapatite composite graft in the regeneration of intrabony defects: A clinical, radiographic, and microbiological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y V Nagarjuna Reddy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The formation of new connective periodontal attachment is contingent upon the elimination or marked reduction of pathogens at the treated periodontal site. An anti-microbial agent, i.e. moxifloxacin has been incorporated into the bone graft to control infection and facilitate healing during and after periodontal therapy. Materials and Methods: By purposive sampling, 15 patients with at least two contralateral vertical defect sites were selected. The selected sites in each individual were divided randomly into test and control sites according to split-mouth design. Test site received moxifloxacin-hydroxyapatite composite graft and control site received hydroxyapatite-placebo gel composite graft. Probing depth (PD and Clinical attachment level (CAL were assessed at baseline, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. Bone probing depth (BPD and hard tissue parameters such as amount of defect fill, percentage of defect fill, and changes in alveolar crest were assessed at baseline, 6, and 12 months. Changes in subgingival microflora were also assessed by culturing the subgingival plaque samples at baseline and at 3-month follow-up. The clinical, radiographic, and microbiological data obtained were subjected to statistical analysis using descriptive statistics, paired sample t-test, independent t-test, and contingency test. Results: On intragroup comparison at test and control sites, there was a significant improvement in all clinical and radiographic parameters. However, on intergroup comparison of the same, there was no statistically significant difference between test and control sites at any interval. Although test sites showed slightly higher amount of bone fill, it was not statistically significant. There was a significant reduction in the counts of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis at both sites from baseline to 3 months. In addition, there was a significant reduction at test sites as compared to control sites at 3

  8. Digital subtraction radiographic analysis of the combination of bioabsorbable membrane and bovine morphogenetic protein pool in human periodontal infrabony defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria do Carmo Machado Guimarães

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study assessed the bone density gain and its relationship with the periodontal clinical parameters in a case series of a regenerative therapy procedure. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Using a split-mouth study design, 10 pairs of infrabony defects from 15 patients were treated with a pool of bovine bone morphogenetic proteins associated with collagen membrane (test sites or collagen membrane only (control sites. The periodontal healing was clinically and radiographically monitored for six months. Standardized pre-surgical and 6-month postoperative radiographs were digitized for digital subtraction analysis, which showed relative bone density gain in both groups of 0.034 ± 0.423 and 0.105 ± 0.423 in the test and control group, respectively (p>0.05. RESULTS: As regards the area size of bone density change, the influence of the therapy was detected in 2.5 mm² in the test group and 2 mm² in the control group (p>0.05. Additionally, no correlation was observed between the favorable clinical results and the bone density gain measured by digital subtraction radiography (p>0.05. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this study suggest that the clinical benefit of the regenerative therapy observed did not come with significant bone density gains. Long-term evaluation may lead to a different conclusions.

  9. Radiographic assessment of welding connections defectiveness, state of art in Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swiatkowski, R.

    1995-01-01

    The assessment of welding connections defectiveness according to Polish regulations has been performed. The European regulations in interested matter and their relationships to Polish ones have been shown. The differences have been pointed out and discussed from the view point of law adaptation process preceding joining of Poland with the European Community. 12 refs, 7 figs, 2 tabs

  10. Radiographic evaluation of using Persian Gulf coral powder effect on bone healing defects in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Marjani

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: ‍Considering the fact that research on the marine products and creatures, in particular coral, has started just in the past decade and more attentions are focused on the benefits of this material, it has been decided to utilize the coral native to Persian Gulf as oral powder to heal tibia bone defect in rabbit. Methods: In this experimental study 18 New Zealander rabbits weighing 2.5-3 kg were categorized randomly in 3 groups (control, oral calcium powder and oral coral powder group of 6 rabbits. For inducing the defect, the first 3rd part of tibial bone was blunt dissected. A whole with the depth of 0.6-0.8 mm and diameter of 4 mm was produced in all 3 groups in the same style. The Calcium group was treated daily with 1150 mg calcium powder, coral group received 1220 mg of coral powder and control group were kept under standard condition. Course of treatment was 2 months and on days 0,10,20,30,40,50,63 the animals were evaluated for healing criteria such as filling the defects, density, external callus formation and intercortical callus. Results: Radiologic parameters indicates that filling defect, density, external and inter cortical callus and absorption for animals receiving coral is better than that of control and calcium group (P<0/05. Conclusion: In conclusion, by oral administration of Persian Gulf coral powder results increasing the rate of bone formation. Finally for human use, these results must be evaluated more in clinical studies.

  11. Perona Malik anisotropic diffusion model using Peaceman Rachford scheme on digital radiographic image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halim, Suhaila Abd; Razak, Rohayu Abd; Ibrahim, Arsmah; Manurung, Yupiter HP

    2014-01-01

    In image processing, it is important to remove noise without affecting the image structure as well as preserving all the edges. Perona Malik Anisotropic Diffusion (PMAD) is a PDE-based model which is suitable for image denoising and edge detection problems. In this paper, the Peaceman Rachford scheme is applied on PMAD to remove unwanted noise as the scheme is efficient and unconditionally stable. The capability of the scheme to remove noise is evaluated on several digital radiography weld defect images computed using MATLAB R2009a. Experimental results obtained show that the Peaceman Rachford scheme improves the image quality substantially well based on the Peak Signal to Noise Ratio (PSNR). The Peaceman Rachford scheme used in solving the PMAD model successfully removes unwanted noise in digital radiographic image

  12. Perona Malik anisotropic diffusion model using Peaceman Rachford scheme on digital radiographic image

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halim, Suhaila Abd; Razak, Rohayu Abd; Ibrahim, Arsmah [Center of Mathematics Studies, Faculty of Computer and Mathematical Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450 Shah Alam. Selangor DE (Malaysia); Manurung, Yupiter HP [Advanced Manufacturing Technology Excellence Center (AMTEx), Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450 Shah Alam. Selangor DE (Malaysia)

    2014-06-19

    In image processing, it is important to remove noise without affecting the image structure as well as preserving all the edges. Perona Malik Anisotropic Diffusion (PMAD) is a PDE-based model which is suitable for image denoising and edge detection problems. In this paper, the Peaceman Rachford scheme is applied on PMAD to remove unwanted noise as the scheme is efficient and unconditionally stable. The capability of the scheme to remove noise is evaluated on several digital radiography weld defect images computed using MATLAB R2009a. Experimental results obtained show that the Peaceman Rachford scheme improves the image quality substantially well based on the Peak Signal to Noise Ratio (PSNR). The Peaceman Rachford scheme used in solving the PMAD model successfully removes unwanted noise in digital radiographic image.

  13. A comparative evaluation of porous hydroxyapatite bone graft with and without platelet-rich plasma in the treatment of periodontal intrabony osseous defects: A clinico-Radiographic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gouri Bhatia

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Today, regenerative attempts for treatment of periodontal disease focus on the introduction of a filler material into the defect in hope of inducing bone regeneration. The purpose of this study was to clinically and radiographically evaluate the use of porous hydroxyapatite bone graft with and without platelet-rich plasma (PRP in the treatment of intrabony defects. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out in ten patients between 18 and 60 years. Patients with pocket depth ≥5 mm and radiographic evidence of vertical bone loss in the affected site were randomly assigned to treatment with a combination of PRP + Hydroxyapatite (HA (test sites or HA alone (control sites. The parameters were compared at baseline and 6 months postoperatively. Results: There was a statistically significant reduction in probing depth and gain in clinical attachment in both the groups individually (more in experimental group; however, on comparing the two groups, the net reduction was not significant. Radiographic assessment showed a decrease in the defect size in both the groups. Conclusion: PRP in addition to a bone graft in the treatment of intrabony defects is safe and shows improved defect fill as compared to the use of bone graft alone.

  14. Modeling of Powder Bed Manufacturing Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindt, H.-W.; Desmaison, O.; Megahed, M.; Peralta, A.; Neumann, J.

    2018-01-01

    Powder bed additive manufacturing offers unmatched capabilities. The deposition resolution achieved is extremely high enabling the production of innovative functional products and materials. Achieving the desired final quality is, however, hampered by many potential defects that have to be managed in due course of the manufacturing process. Defects observed in products manufactured via powder bed fusion have been studied experimentally. In this effort we have relied on experiments reported in the literature and—when experimental data were not sufficient—we have performed additional experiments providing an extended foundation for defect analysis. There is large interest in reducing the effort and cost of additive manufacturing process qualification and certification using integrated computational material engineering. A prerequisite is, however, that numerical methods can indeed capture defects. A multiscale multiphysics platform is developed and applied to predict and explain the origin of several defects that have been observed experimentally during laser-based powder bed fusion processes. The models utilized are briefly introduced. The ability of the models to capture the observed defects is verified. The root cause of the defects is explained by analyzing the numerical results thus confirming the ability of numerical methods to provide a foundation for rapid process qualification.

  15. Modeling of extended defects in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law, M.E.; Jones, K.S.; Earles, S.K.; Lilak, A.D.; Xu, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    Transient Enhanced Diffusion (TED) is one of the biggest modeling challenges present in predicting scaled technologies. Damage from implantation of dopant ions changes the diffusivities of the dopants and precipitates to form complex extended defects. Developing a quantitative model for the extended defect behavior during short time, low temperature anneals is a key to explaining TED. This paper reviews some of the modeling developments over the last several years, and discusses some of the challenges that remain to be addressed. Two examples of models compared to experimental work are presented and discussed

  16. a Proposed Benchmark Problem for Scatter Calculations in Radiographic Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaenisch, G.-R.; Bellon, C.; Schumm, A.; Tabary, J.; Duvauchelle, Ph.

    2009-03-01

    Code Validation is a permanent concern in computer modelling, and has been addressed repeatedly in eddy current and ultrasonic modeling. A good benchmark problem is sufficiently simple to be taken into account by various codes without strong requirements on geometry representation capabilities, focuses on few or even a single aspect of the problem at hand to facilitate interpretation and to avoid that compound errors compensate themselves, yields a quantitative result and is experimentally accessible. In this paper we attempt to address code validation for one aspect of radiographic modeling, the scattered radiation prediction. Many NDT applications can not neglect scattered radiation, and the scatter calculation thus is important to faithfully simulate the inspection situation. Our benchmark problem covers the wall thickness range of 10 to 50 mm for single wall inspections, with energies ranging from 100 to 500 keV in the first stage, and up to 1 MeV with wall thicknesses up to 70 mm in the extended stage. A simple plate geometry is sufficient for this purpose, and the scatter data is compared on a photon level, without a film model, which allows for comparisons with reference codes like MCNP. We compare results of three Monte Carlo codes (McRay, Sindbad and Moderato) as well as an analytical first order scattering code (VXI), and confront them to results obtained with MCNP. The comparison with an analytical scatter model provides insights into the application domain where this kind of approach can successfully replace Monte-Carlo calculations.

  17. Random defect lines in conformal minimal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeng, M.; Ludwig, A.W.W.

    2001-01-01

    We analyze the effect of adding quenched disorder along a defect line in the 2D conformal minimal models using replicas. The disorder is realized by a random applied magnetic field in the Ising model, by fluctuations in the ferromagnetic bond coupling in the tricritical Ising model and tricritical three-state Potts model (the phi 12 operator), etc. We find that for the Ising model, the defect renormalizes to two decoupled half-planes without disorder, but that for all other models, the defect renormalizes to a disorder-dominated fixed point. Its critical properties are studied with an expansion in ε∝1/m for the mth Virasoro minimal model. The decay exponents X N =((N)/(2))1-((9(3N-4))/(4(m+1) 2 ))+O((3)/(m+1)) 3 of the Nth moment of the two-point function of phi 12 along the defect are obtained to 2-loop order, exhibiting multifractal behavior. This leads to a typical decay exponent X typ =((1)/(2))1+((9)/((m+1) 2 ))+O((3)/(m+1)) 3 . One-point functions are seen to have a non-self-averaging amplitude. The boundary entropy is larger than that of the pure system by order 1/m 3 . As a byproduct of our calculations, we also obtain to 2-loop order the exponent X-tilde N =N1-((2)/(9π 2 ))(3N-4)(q-2) 2 +O(q-2) 3 of the Nth moment of the energy operator in the q-state Potts model with bulk bond disorder

  18. Evaluation of bioactive glass and demineralized freeze dried bone allograft in the treatment of periodontal intraosseous defects: A comparative clinico-radiographic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishore Kumar Katuri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of demineralized freeze dried bone allograft (DFDBA and bioactive glass by clinically and radiographically in periodontal intrabony defects for a period of 12 months. Materials and Methods: Ten systemically healthy patients diagnosed with chronic periodontitis, with radiographic evidence of at least a pair of contralateral vertical osseous defects were included in this study. Defect on one-side is treated with DFDBA and the other side with bioactive glass. Clinical and radiographic measurements were made at baseline 6 month and 12 month after the surgery. Results: Compared to baseline, the 12 month results indicated that both treatment modalities resulted in significant changes in all clinical parameters (gingival index, probing depth, clinical attachment level (CAL and radiographic parameters (bone fill; P < 0.001FNx01. However, sites treated with DFDBA exhibited statistically significantly more changes compared to the bioactive glass in probing depth reduction (2.5 ± 0.1 mm vs. 1.8 ± 0.1 mm CAL gain 2.4 ± 0.1 mm versus 1.7 ± 0.2 mm; ( P < 0.001FNx01. At 12 months, sites treated with bioactive glass exhibited 56.99% bone fill and 64.76% bone fill for DFDBA sites, which is statistically significant ( P < 0.05FNx01. Conclusion: After 12 months, there was a significant difference between the two materials with sites grafted with DFDBA showing better reduction in probing pocket depth, gain in CAL and a greater percentage of bone fill when compared to that of bioactive glass.

  19. A comparative evaluation of freeze dried bone allograft and decalcified freeze dried bone allograft in the treatment of intrabony defects: A clinical and radiographic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajat Gothi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ideal graft material for regenerative procedures is autogenous bone graft but the major disadvantage with this graft is the need for a secondary surgical site to procure donor material and the frequent lack of intraoral donor site to obtain sufficient quantities of autogenous bone for multiple or deep osseous defects. Hence, to overcome these disadvantages, bone allografts were developed as an alternative source of graft material. Materials and Methods: In 10 patients with chronic periodontitis, 20 bilateral infrabony defects were treated with freeze dried bone allograft (FDBA-Group A and decalcified freeze dried bone allograft (DFDBA-Group B. Clinical and radiographic parameters were assessed preoperatively and at 3 months and 6 months postoperatively. Data thus obtained was subjected to statistical analysis. Results: Significant improvement in the reduction in probing depth and relative attachment level (RAL from the baseline to 3 months to baseline to 6 months in group A and group B, which was statistically significant but no statistically significant reduction was seen between 3 months and 6 months. On inter-group comparison, no significant differences were observed at all-time points. In adjunct to the probing depth and RAL, the radiographic area of the defect showed a similar trend in intra-group comparison and no significant difference was seen on inter-group comparison at all-time points. Conclusions: Within the limitations of the current study, it can be concluded that DFDBA did not show any improvement in the clinical and radiographic parameters in the treatment of the intrabony defects as compared to FDBA.

  20. Analysis of fuel-bundle radiographs using modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demuth, H.B.

    1975-07-01

    It was desired to estimate the thickness of gaps imaged on highly degraded radiographs. A powerful mathematical method for estimating gap widths was developed and applied. The problem, the techniques used to solve the problem, and results, conclusions, and suggestions for future work are presented. (U.S.)

  1. A proposed defect tracking model for classifying the inserted defect reports to enhance software quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultan, Torky; Khedr, Ayman E; Sayed, Mostafa

    2013-01-01

    NONE DECLARED Defect tracking systems play an important role in the software development organizations as they can store historical information about defects. There are many research in defect tracking models and systems to enhance their capabilities to be more specifically tracking, and were adopted with new technology. Furthermore, there are different studies in classifying bugs in a step by step method to have clear perception and applicable method in detecting such bugs. This paper shows a new proposed defect tracking model for the purpose of classifying the inserted defects reports in a step by step method for more enhancement of the software quality.

  2. Radiographic Detectability of Retained Neuropatties in a Cadaver Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wangjian Thomas; Almack, Robert; Mawson, John B; Cochrane, David Douglas

    2015-08-01

    Counts are the commonest method used to ensure that all sponges and neuropatties are removed from a surgical site before closure. When the count is not reconciled, plain radiographs of the operative site are taken to determine whether the missing patty has been left in the wound. The purpose of this study was to describe the detectability of commonly used neuropatties in the clinical setting using digital technologies. Neuropatties were implanted into the anterior and posterior cranial fossae and the thoracolumbar extradural space of a mature male cadaver. Four neuropatty sizes were used: 3 × 1 in, 2 × ½ in, ½ × ½ in, and ¼ × ¼ in. Neuropatties, with size and location chosen at random, were placed in the surgical sites and anteroposterior/posterior-anterior and lateral radiographs were taken using standard portable digital radiographic equipment. Six clinicians reviewed the digital images for the presence or absence of neuropatties. The readers were not aware of the number and size of the patties that were included in each image. The detectability of neuropatties is dependent on the size of the neuropatty's radiopaque marker and the operative site. Neuropatties measuring 2 × ½ in and 3 × 1 in were detected reliably regardless of the operative site. ¼ × ¼ in neuropatties were poorly detected by neurosurgeons and radiologists in all three operative sites. Readers of various experience and background were similar in their ability to detect neuropatties under these conditions. Under simulated operating room conditions and using currently available neuropatties and plain radiograph imaging technology, small ¼-in and ½-in neuropatties are poorly visible/detectable on digital images. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Clinical and radiographical evaluation of a bioresorbable collagen membrane of fish origin in the treatment of periodontal intrabony defects: A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santosh Kumar, B B; Aruna, D R; Gowda, Vinayak S; Galagali, Sushama R; Prashanthy, R; Navaneetha, H

    2013-09-01

    Recently, there has been interest in non-mammalian collagen sources such as fish collagen in periodontal regeneration. In the present study, collagen barrier membrane of fish origin was assessed in the treatment of periodontal intrabony defects. Ten systemically healthy chronic periodontitis patients having a paired osseous defect in the mandibular posterior teeth were selected and randomly assigned to receive a collagen membrane (test) or open flap debridement (control) in a split mouth design. Clinical parameters such as Plaque index, Gingival bleeding index, Probing pocket depth, Relative attachment level, and Recession were recorded at baseline, 3, 6, and at 9 months, while radiographic evaluation was done to assess alveolar crestal bone level and percentage of defect fill at 6 and 9 months using autoCAD 2007 software. Student's t test (two-tailed, dependent) was used to find the significance of study parameters on continuous scale. Significance was set at 5% level of significance. Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to find the significance of percentage change of defect fill. The comparison between the two groups did not show any statistically significant differences in the parameters assessed (P > 0.05) but, within each group, clinical parameters showed statistically significant differences from baseline to 9 months (P < 0.05). Within the limits of the study, it can be inferred that no significant differences were found either by using collagen membrane of fish origin or open flap debridement in the treatment of periodontal intrabony defects.

  4. Testing and analysis of internal hardwood log defect prediction models

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Edward Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The severity and location of internal defects determine the quality and value of lumber sawn from hardwood logs. Models have been developed to predict the size and position of internal defects based on external defect indicator measurements. These models were shown to predict approximately 80% of all internal knots based on external knot indicators. However, the size...

  5. Multiscale crystal defect dynamics: A coarse-grained lattice defect model based on crystal microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Dandan; Li, Shaofan

    2017-10-01

    Crystal defects have microstructure, and this microstructure should be related to the microstructure of the original crystal. Hence each type of crystals may have similar defects due to the same failure mechanism originated from the same microstructure, if they are under the same loading conditions. In this work, we propose a multiscale crystal defect dynamics (MCDD) model that models defects by considering its intrinsic microstructure derived from the microstructure or material genome of the original perfect crystal. The main novelties of present work are: (1) the discrete exterior calculus and algebraic topology theory are used to construct a scale-up (coarse-grained) dual lattice model for crystal defects, which may represent all possible defect modes inside a crystal; (2) a higher order Cauchy-Born rule (up to the fourth order) is adopted to construct atomistic-informed constitutive relations for various defect process zones, and (3) an hierarchical strain gradient theory based finite element formulation is developed to support an hierarchical multiscale cohesive (process) zone model for various defects in a unified formulation. The efficiency of MCDD computational algorithm allows us to simulate dynamic defect evolution at large scale while taking into account atomistic interaction. The MCDD model has been validated by comparing of the results of MCDD simulations with that of molecular dynamics (MD) in the cases of nanoindentation and uniaxial tension. Numerical simulations have shown that MCDD model can predict dislocation nucleation induced instability and inelastic deformation, and thus it may provide an alternative solution to study crystal plasticity.

  6. Observer POD for radiographic testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanzler, Daniel; Mueller, Christina; Bertovic, Marija [Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung (BAM), Berlin (Germany); Pitkaenen, Jorma [Posiva Oy, Eurajoki (Finland)

    2013-07-01

    The radiographic testing is an important non-destructive testing method, especially in industrial areas where people could be injured in case of failing of a component. There it is a mighty method to find volumetric defects. As bigger the penetrated length of the defect in the component is, as bigger is the radiographic contrast. The detectability of volumetric defects in its turn is not only depending on the contrast but also on the noise, the defect area and its shape. The currently applied POD approach uses mostly only the contrast and the noise as detection threshold. This does not reflect accurately the results of evaluations by human observers. A new approach is introduced, using the widely applied POD evaluation and additionally a detection threshold depending on the area of the defect. The presentation shows the process of calculating the POD curves with simulated data by the modeling software aRTist and with artificial reference data. This approach was developed within a joint project with the company POSIVA, which is constructing a final depository for high active nuclear fuels in Finland. Radiographic testing is one of the NDT-methods they use to test the electron beam welds of the copper canisters. The copper canisters will be used in the depository as a corrosion barrier within the waste management concept. (Published as a poster session.)

  7. Customization of a generic 3D model of the distal femur using diagnostic radiographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmutz, B; Reynolds, K J; Slavotinek, J P

    2008-01-01

    A method for the customization of a generic 3D model of the distal femur is presented. The customization method involves two steps: acquisition of calibrated orthogonal planar radiographs; and linear scaling of the generic model based on the width of a subject's femoral condyles as measured on the planar radiographs. Planar radiographs of seven intact lower cadaver limbs were obtained. The customized generic models were validated by comparing their surface geometry with that of CT-reconstructed reference models. The overall mean error was 1.2 mm. The results demonstrate that uniform scaling as a first step in the customization process produced a base model of accuracy comparable to other models reported in the literature.

  8. Validation of an internal hardwood log defect prediction model

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Edward. Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The type, size, and location of internal defects dictate the grade and value of lumber sawn from hardwood logs. However, acquiring internal defect knowledge with x-ray/computed-tomography or magnetic-resonance imaging technology can be expensive both in time and cost. An alternative approach uses prediction models based on correlations among external defect indicators...

  9. Radiographic evaluation of bone adaptation adjacent to percutaneous osseointegrated prostheses in a sheep model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeyapalina, Sujee; Beck, James Peter; Bachus, Kent N; Chalayon, Ornusa; Bloebaum, Roy D

    2014-10-01

    Percutaneous osseointegrated prostheses (POPs) are being investigated as an alternative to conventional socket suspension and require a radiographic followup in translational studies to confirm that design objectives are being met. In this 12-month animal study, we determined (1) radiographic signs of osseointegration and (2) radiographic signs of periprosthetic bone hypertrophy and resorption (adaptation) and (3) confirmed them with the histologic evidence of host bone osseointegration and adaptation around a novel, distally porous-coated titanium POP with a collar. A POP device was designed to fit the right metacarpal bone of sheep. Amputation and implantation surgeries (n = 14) were performed, and plane-film radiographs were collected quarterly for 12 months. Radiographs were assessed for osseointegration (fixation) and bone adaptation (resorption and hypertrophy). The cortical wall and medullary canal widths were used to compute the cortical index and expressed as a percentage. Based on the cortical index changes and histologic evaluations, bone adaptation was quantified. Radiographic data showed signs of osseointegration including those with incomplete seating against the collar attachment. Cortical index data indicated distal cortical wall thinning if the collar was not seated distally. When implants were bound proximally, bone resorbed distally and the diaphyseal cortex hypertrophied. Histopathologic evidence and cortical index measurements confirmed the radiographic indications of adaptation and osseointegration. Distal bone loading, through collar attachment and porous coating, limited the distal bone resorption. Serial radiographic studies, in either animal models or preclinical trials for new POP devices, will help to determine which designs are likely to be safe over time and avoid implant failures.

  10. Evaluation of effectiveness of hyaluronic acid in combination with bioresorbable membrane (poly lactic acid-poly glycolic acid for the treatment of infrabony defects in humans: A clinical and radiographic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhumika Sehdev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The combination of biomaterials, bone graft substitutes along with guided tissue regeneration (GTR has been shown to be an effective modality of periodontal regenerative therapy for infrabony defects. Therefore, the present randomized controlled clinical study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of hyaluronic acid (HA in combination with bioresorbable membrane for the treatment of human infrabony defects. Materials and Methods: Twenty four infrabony defects in 20 systemically healthy patients were randomly assigned to test (HA in combination with bioresorbable membrane and control (bioresorbable membrane alone treatment groups. Probing pocket depth (PPD, relative attachment level, and relative gingival margin level were measured with a computerized Florida disc probe at baseline and at 6 months follow-up. Radiographic measurements were also evaluated at baseline and at 6 months of postsurgery. Results: At 6 months, the mean reduction in PPD in test group and control group was 4.52 mm and 2.97 mm, respectively. Significantly higher clinical attachment level with a gain of 2.20 mm was found in the test group as compared to control group. In addition, statistically significant greater reduction of radiographic defect depth was observed in the test group. Conclusion: Regenerative approach using hyaloss in combination with GTR for the treatment of human infrabony defects resulted in a significant added benefit in terms of CAL gains, PPD reductions and radiographic defect fill, as well as LBG, compared to the GTR alone.

  11. Key Questions in Building Defect Prediction Models in Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramler, Rudolf; Wolfmaier, Klaus; Stauder, Erwin; Kossak, Felix; Natschläger, Thomas

    The information about which modules of a future version of a software system are defect-prone is a valuable planning aid for quality managers and testers. Defect prediction promises to indicate these defect-prone modules. However, constructing effective defect prediction models in an industrial setting involves a number of key questions. In this paper we discuss ten key questions identified in context of establishing defect prediction in a large software development project. Seven consecutive versions of the software system have been used to construct and validate defect prediction models for system test planning. Furthermore, the paper presents initial empirical results from the studied project and, by this means, contributes answers to the identified questions.

  12. A comparative clinico-radiographic study of guided tissue regeneration with bioresorbable membrane and a composite synthetic bone graft for the treatment of periodontal osseous defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumedha Srivastava

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim was to evaluate the bonefill in periodontal osseous defects with the help of guided tissue regeneration, bioresorbable membrane (PerioCol + bone graft (Grabio Glascera in combination and with bonegraft (Grabio Glascera alone. Materials and Methods: The study involved total 30 sites in systemically healthy 19 patients. The parameters for evaluation includes plaque index sulcus bleeding index with one or more periodontal osseous defects having (i probing depth (PD of ≥ 5 mm (ii clinical attachment loss (CAL of ≥ 5 mm and (iii ≥3 mm of radiographic periodontal osseous defect (iv bonefill (v crestal bone loss (vi defect resolution. The study involved the three wall and two wall defects which should be either located interproximally or involving the furcation area. The statistical analysis was done using Statistical Package for Social Sciences, the Wilcoxon signed rank statistic W + for Mann-Whitney U-test. Results: The net gain in PD and CAL after 6 months for Group I ([PerioCol] + [Grabio Glascera] and Group II (Grabio Glascera was 3.94 ± 1.81 mm, 3.57 ± 2.21 mm and 3.94 ± 1.81, 3.57 ± 2.21 mm, respectively. The results of the study for Group I and Group II with regards to mean net bonefill, was 3.25 ± 2.32 (58% mm and 5.14 ± 3.84 (40.26 ± 19.14% mm, crestal bone loss − 0.25 ± 0.68 mm and − 0.79 ± 1.19 mm. Defect resolution 3.50 ± 2.34 mm and 5.93 ± 4.01 mm, respectively. Conclusion: On comparing both the groups together after 6 months of therapy, the results were equally effective for combination of graft and membrane versus bone graft alone since no statistical significant difference was seen between above parameters for both the groups. Thus, both the treatment modalities are comparable and equally effective.

  13. A scientific model to determine the optimal radiographer staffing component in a nuclear medicine department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipanga, A.N.; Ellmann, A.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Nuclear medicine in South Africa is developing fast. Much has changed since the constitution of a scientific model for determining an optimum number of radiographer posts in a Nuclear Medicine department in the late 1980's. Aim: The aim of this study was to ascertain whether the number of radiographers required by a Nuclear Medicine department can still be determined according to the norms established in 1988. Methods: A quantitative study using non-experimental evaluation design was conducted to determine the ratios between current radiographer workload and staffing norms. The workload ratios were analysed using the procedures statistics of the Nuclear Medicine department at Tygerberg Hospital. Radiographers provided data about their activities related to patient procedures, including information about the condition of the patients, activities in the radiopharmaceutical laboratory, and patient related administrative tasks. These were factored into an equation relating this data to working hours, including vacation and sick leave. The calculation of Activity Standards and an annual Standard Workload was used to finally calculate the staffing requirements for a Nuclear Medicine department. Results: Preliminary data confirmed that old staffing norms cannot be used in a modern Nuclear Medicine department. Protocols for several types of study have changed, including the additional acquisition of tomographic studies. Interest in the use of time-consuming non-imaging studies has been revived and should be factored Into the equation. Conclusions: All Nuclear Medicine departments In South Africa, where the types of studies performed have changed over the past years, should look carefully at their radiographer staffing ratio to ascertain whether the number of radiographers needed is adequate for the current workload. (author)

  14. Correlation between static radiographic measurements and intersegmental angular measurements during gait using a multisegment foot model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Yeon; Seo, Sang Gyo; Kim, Eo Jin; Kim, Sung Ju; Lee, Kyoung Min; Farber, Daniel C; Chung, Chin Youb; Choi, In Ho

    2015-01-01

    Radiographic examination is a widely used evaluation method in the orthopedic clinic. However, conventional radiography alone does not reflect the dynamic changes between foot and ankle segments during gait. Multiple 3-dimensional multisegment foot models (3D MFMs) have been introduced to evaluate intersegmental motion of the foot. In this study, we evaluated the correlation between static radiographic indices and intersegmental foot motion indices. One hundred twenty-five females were tested. Static radiographs of full-leg and anteroposterior (AP) and lateral foot views were performed. For hindfoot evaluation, we measured the AP tibiotalar angle (TiTA), talar tilt (TT), calcaneal pitch, lateral tibiocalcaneal angle, and lateral talcocalcaneal angle. For the midfoot segment, naviculocuboid overlap and talonavicular coverage angle were calculated. AP and lateral talo-first metatarsal angles and metatarsal stacking angle (MSA) were measured to assess the forefoot. Hallux valgus angle (HVA) and hallux interphalangeal angle were measured. In gait analysis by 3D MFM, intersegmental angle (ISA) measurements of each segment (hallux, forefoot, hindfoot, arch) were recorded. ISAs at midstance phase were most highly correlated with radiography. Significant correlations were observed between ISA measurements using MFM and static radiographic measurements in the same segment. In the hindfoot, coronal plane ISA was correlated with AP TiTA (P foot motion indices at midstance phase during gait measured by 3D MFM gait analysis were correlated with the conventional radiographic indices. The observed correlation between MFM measurements at midstance phase during gait and static radiographic measurements supports the fundamental basis for the use of MFM in analysis of dynamic motion of foot segment during gait. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Clinical and radiographic evaluation of citric acid-based nano hydroxyapatite composite graft in the regeneration of intrabony defects - A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaurasia Priya Dayashankar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Conventional periodontal therapy with various bone grafts has limited scope and the results are not predictable. To improve their utility, the hybridization of bioceramics and biodegradable polymers has been widely adopted to reform the mechanical properties of bone grafts. One such biodegradable polymer is POC (Poly 1,8 octanediol. Secondly, citric acid is considered as the key material in bone mineralization, which is related to the overall stability, strength and fracture resistance of bone. Hence citric acid is incorporated in a polymer and Nano hydroxyapatite to form a composite graft, for periodontal bone regeneration. This study attempts to evaluate the efficacy of citric acid based Nano-hydroxyapatite composite graft for the treatment of intrabony defects in chronic periodontitis patients over 12 months. Methods: A split mouth study, which consists of 10 systemically healthy patients, were randomly treated with Citric acid based Nano hydroxyapatite composite graft (test sites, n=18 or with Nano hydroxyapatite alone (control sites, n=15. Plaque index, gingival index, gingival bleeding index, probing pocket depth (PPD, clinical attachment level (CAL, bone probing depth (BPD and hard tissue parameters such as amount of defect fill, percentage of defect fill, and changes in alveolar crest were assessed over a period of 12 months. Statistical analysis used was student's t-test and One-Way ANOVA. Results: Both test and control sites demonstrated statistically significant reduction of PD, BPD, gain in CAL and radiographic bone fill. Nevertheless the test sites showed Statistically significant improvements in all the parameters as compared to control sites at 12 months. Conclusion: Citric acid based Nano hydroxyapatite composite graft can be considered as a newer material for periodontal regeneration.

  16. Segmentation of lung fields using Chan-Vese active contour model in chest radiographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Kiwon

    2011-03-01

    A CAD tool for chest radiographs consists of several procedures and the very first step is segmentation of lung fields. We develop a novel methodology for segmentation of lung fields in chest radiographs that can satisfy the following two requirements. First, we aim to develop a segmentation method that does not need a training stage with manual estimation of anatomical features in a large training dataset of images. Secondly, for the ease of implementation, it is desirable to apply a well established model that is widely used for various image-partitioning practices. The Chan-Vese active contour model, which is based on Mumford-Shah functional in the level set framework, is applied for segmentation of lung fields. With the use of this model, segmentation of lung fields can be carried out without detailed prior knowledge on the radiographic anatomy of the chest, yet in some chest radiographs, the trachea regions are unfavorably segmented out in addition to the lung field contours. To eliminate artifacts from the trachea, we locate the upper end of the trachea, find a vertical center line of the trachea and delineate it, and then brighten the trachea region to make it less distinctive. The segmentation process is finalized by subsequent morphological operations. We randomly select 30 images from the Japanese Society of Radiological Technology image database to test the proposed methodology and the results are shown. We hope our segmentation technique can help to promote of CAD tools, especially for emerging chest radiographic imaging techniques such as dual energy radiography and chest tomosynthesis.

  17. Modeling of 3-dimensional defects in integrated circuits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pineda de Gyvez, J.; Dani, S.M.

    1992-01-01

    Although the majority of defects found in manufacturing lines have predominantly 2-Dimensional effects, there are many situations in which 2D defect models do not suffice, e.g. tall layer bulks disrupting the continuity of subsequent layers, abrupt surface topologies, extraneous materials embedded

  18. The sine-Gordon model in the presence of defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avan, Jean; Doikou, Anastasia

    2013-01-01

    The sine-Gordon model in the presence of dynamical integrable defects is investigated. This is an application of the algebraic formulation introduced for integrable defects in earlier works. The quantities in involution as well as the associated Lax pairs are explicitly extracted. Integrability i also shown using certain sewing constraints, which emerge as suitable continuity conditions.

  19. Improved radiograph measurement inter-observer reliability by use of statistical shape models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pegg, E.C., E-mail: elise.pegg@ndorms.ox.ac.uk [University of Oxford, Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences, Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, Windmill Road, Oxford OX3 7LD (United Kingdom); Mellon, S.J., E-mail: stephen.mellon@ndorms.ox.ac.uk [University of Oxford, Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences, Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, Windmill Road, Oxford OX3 7LD (United Kingdom); Salmon, G. [University of Oxford, Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences, Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, Windmill Road, Oxford OX3 7LD (United Kingdom); Alvand, A., E-mail: abtin.alvand@ndorms.ox.ac.uk [University of Oxford, Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences, Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, Windmill Road, Oxford OX3 7LD (United Kingdom); Pandit, H., E-mail: hemant.pandit@ndorms.ox.ac.uk [University of Oxford, Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences, Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, Windmill Road, Oxford OX3 7LD (United Kingdom); Murray, D.W., E-mail: david.murray@ndorms.ox.ac.uk [University of Oxford, Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences, Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, Windmill Road, Oxford OX3 7LD (United Kingdom); Gill, H.S., E-mail: richie.gill@ndorms.ox.ac.uk [University of Oxford, Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences, Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, Windmill Road, Oxford OX3 7LD (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-15

    Pre- and post-operative radiographs of patients undergoing joint arthroplasty are often examined for a variety of purposes including preoperative planning and patient assessment. This work examines the feasibility of using active shape models (ASM) to semi-automate measurements from post-operative radiographs for the specific case of the Oxford™ Unicompartmental Knee. Measurements of the proximal tibia and the position of the tibial tray were made using the ASM model and manually. Data were obtained by four observers and one observer took four sets of measurements to allow assessment of the inter- and intra-observer reliability, respectively. The parameters measured were the tibial tray angle, the tray overhang, the tray size, the sagittal cut position, the resection level and the tibial width. Results demonstrated improved reliability (average of 27% and 11.2% increase for intra- and inter-reliability, respectively) and equivalent accuracy (p > 0.05 for compared data values) for all of the measurements using the ASM model, with the exception of the tray overhang (p = 0.0001). Less time (15 s) was required to take measurements using the ASM model compared with manual measurements, which was significant. These encouraging results indicate that semi-automated measurement techniques could improve the reliability of radiographic measurements.

  20. Improved radiograph measurement inter-observer reliability by use of statistical shape models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pegg, E.C.; Mellon, S.J.; Salmon, G.; Alvand, A.; Pandit, H.; Murray, D.W.; Gill, H.S.

    2012-01-01

    Pre- and post-operative radiographs of patients undergoing joint arthroplasty are often examined for a variety of purposes including preoperative planning and patient assessment. This work examines the feasibility of using active shape models (ASM) to semi-automate measurements from post-operative radiographs for the specific case of the Oxford™ Unicompartmental Knee. Measurements of the proximal tibia and the position of the tibial tray were made using the ASM model and manually. Data were obtained by four observers and one observer took four sets of measurements to allow assessment of the inter- and intra-observer reliability, respectively. The parameters measured were the tibial tray angle, the tray overhang, the tray size, the sagittal cut position, the resection level and the tibial width. Results demonstrated improved reliability (average of 27% and 11.2% increase for intra- and inter-reliability, respectively) and equivalent accuracy (p > 0.05 for compared data values) for all of the measurements using the ASM model, with the exception of the tray overhang (p = 0.0001). Less time (15 s) was required to take measurements using the ASM model compared with manual measurements, which was significant. These encouraging results indicate that semi-automated measurement techniques could improve the reliability of radiographic measurements

  1. Clinical and radiographic evaluation of Bio-Gen with biocollagen compared with Bio-Gen with connective tissue in the treatment of class II furcation defects: a randomized clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    JENABIAN, Niloofar; HAGHANIFAR, Sina; MABOUDI, Avideh; BIJANI, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Objective Treatment of furcation defects are thought to be challenging. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical and radiographic parameters of Bio-Gen with Biocollagen compared with Bio-Gen with connective tissue in the treatment of Class II furcation defects. Material and Methods In this clinical trial, 24 patients with Class II furcation defect on a buccal or lingual mandibular molar were recruited. After oral hygiene instruction, scaling and root planing and achievement of acceptable plaque control, the patients were randomly chosen to receive either connective tissue and Bio-Gen (case group) or Biocollagen and Bio-Gen (control group). The following parameters were recorded before the first and re-entry surgery (six months later): vertical clinical attachment level (VCAL), gingival index (GI), plaque index (PI), horizontal probing depth (HPD), vertical probing depth (VPD), gingival recession (GR), furcation vertical component (FVC), furcation to alveolar crest (FAC), fornix to base of defect (FBD), and furcation horizontal component (FHC) were calculated at the time of first surgery and during re-entry. A digital periapical radiograph was taken in parallel before first surgery and re-entry. The radiographs were then analyzed by digital subtraction. The differences with p value <0.05 were considered significant. Results Only the mean changes of FAC, FHC, mean of FHC, FBD in re-entry revealed statistically significant differences between the two groups. HPD, VPD, FBD, FAC, and FHC showed statistically significant differences after 6 months in the case group. However, in the control group, statistically significant differences were found in GR and HPD. We did not observe any significant difference in radiographic changes among the two groups. Conclusion The results of this trial indicate that better clinical outcomes can be obtained with connective tissue grafts in combination with bone material compared with a resorbable barrier with bone material

  2. Clinical and radiographic evaluation of Bio-Gen with biocollagen compared with Bio-Gen with connective tissue in the treatment of class II furcation defects: a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niloofar Jenabian

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Treatment of furcation defects are thought to be challenging. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical and radiographic parameters of Bio-Gen with Biocollagen compared with Bio-Gen with connective tissue in the treatment of Class II furcation defects. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In this clinical trial, 24 patients with Class II furcation defect on a buccal or lingual mandibular molar were recruited. After oral hygiene instruction, scaling and root planing and achievement of acceptable plaque control, the patients were randomly chosen to receive either connective tissue and Bio-Gen (case group or Biocollagen and Bio-Gen (control group. The following parameters were recorded before the first and re-entry surgery (six months later: vertical clinical attachment level (VCAL, gingival index (GI, plaque index (PI, horizontal probing depth (HPD, vertical probing depth (VPD, gingival recession (GR, furcation vertical component (FVC, furcation to alveolar crest (FAC, fornix to base of defect (FBD, and furcation horizontal component (FHC were calculated at the time of first surgery and during re-entry. A digital periapical radiograph was taken in parallel before first surgery and re-entry. The radiographs were then analyzed by digital subtraction. The differences with p value <0.05 were considered significant. RESULTS: Only the mean changes of FAC, FHC, mean of FHC, FBD in re-entry revealed statistically significant differences between the two groups. HPD, VPD, FBD, FAC, and FHC showed statistically significant differences after 6 months in the case group. However, in the control group, statistically significant differences were found in GR and HPD. We did not observe any significant difference in radiographic changes among the two groups. CONCLUSION: The results of this trial indicate that better clinical outcomes can be obtained with connective tissue grafts in combination with bone material compared with a resorbable barrier with bone

  3. Reliable critical sized defect rodent model for cleft palate research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Nesrine Z; Doschak, Michael R; Major, Paul W; Talwar, Reena

    2014-12-01

    Suitable animal models are necessary to test the efficacy of new bone grafting therapies in cleft palate surgery. Rodent models of cleft palate are available but have limitations. This study compared and modified mid-palate cleft (MPC) and alveolar cleft (AC) models to determine the most reliable and reproducible model for bone grafting studies. Published MPC model (9 × 5 × 3 mm(3)) lacked sufficient information for tested rats. Our initial studies utilizing AC model (7 × 4 × 3 mm(3)) in 8 and 16 weeks old Sprague Dawley (SD) rats revealed injury to adjacent structures. After comparing anteroposterior and transverse maxillary dimensions in 16 weeks old SD and Wistar rats, virtual planning was performed to modify MPC and AC defects dimensions, taking the adjacent structures into consideration. Modified MPC (7 × 2.5 × 1 mm(3)) and AC (5 × 2.5 × 1 mm(3)) defects were employed in 16 weeks old Wistar rats and healing was monitored by micro-computed tomography and histology. Maxillary dimensions in SD and Wistar rats were not significantly different. Preoperative virtual planning enhanced postoperative surgical outcomes. Bone healing occurred at defect margin leaving central bone void confirming the critical size nature of the modified MPC and AC defects. Presented modifications for MPC and AC models created clinically relevant and reproducible defects. Copyright © 2014 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Kinetic models for the development of density in photographic and radiographic film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darvell, B.W.; Prince Philip Dental Hospital, Hong Kong)

    1985-01-01

    The behaviour of radiographic and photographic films is usually described in terms of a plot of optical density against log (exposure). This form, based on a desired 'ideal' rather than any theory of the actual process, leads to difficulties of interpretation and arbitrary 'speed' determinations. Data collected have been shown to fit chemical kinetic models of differing order, depending on film and radiation type, with the rate constant providing a rational speed parameter. The order of the model seems to be associated with the number of quantum hits required for grain developability. A rational contrast index is proposed. (author)

  5. Modelling of defects in ingot forging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Peter

    The present report presents an investigation of the ingot forging process with special emphasis on modelling the influence of die geometry on the soundness of the ingot after hot forging. An investigation on how to model damage is also performed. The influence of the lower die angle is quantified...... angle of 130o-140o giving rise to the largest centreline porosity closure regardless of material hardening behaviour applied. Friction was found only to have minor influence on the optimum. Multi stroke forging operations have also been modelled since the ingot forging process consists of many forging...... damage. It is found that when evaluating damage only by relative density; feed size and lower die angle does not influence whether the hot forging process is successful or not. This is in disagreement with the general understanding of the ingot forging process. When evaluating ductile damage...

  6. Photon defects in noncommutative standard model candidates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abel, S.A.; Khoze, V.V.

    2006-06-01

    Restrictions imposed by gauge invariance in noncommutative spaces together with the effects of ultraviolet/infrared mixing lead to strong constraints on possible candidates for a noncommutative extension of the Standard Model. We study a general class of noncommutative models consistent with these restrictions. Specifically we consider models based upon a gauge theory with the gauge group U(N 1 ) x U(N 2 ) x.. x U(N m ) coupled to matter fields transforming in the (anti)-fundamental, bi-fundamental and adjoint representations. We pay particular attention to overall trace-U(1) factors of the gauge group which are affected by the ultraviolet/infrared mixing. Typically, these trace-U(1) gauge fields do not decouple sufficiently fast in the infrared, and lead to sizable Lorentz symmetry violating effects in the low-energy effective theory. In a 4-dimensional theory on a continuous space-time making these effects unobservable would require making the effects of noncommutativity tiny, M NC >> M P . This severely limits the phenomenological prospects of such models. However, adding additional universal extra dimensions the trace-U(1) factors decouple with a power law and the constraint on the noncommutativity scale is weakened considerably. Finally, we briefly mention some interesting properties of the photon that could arise if the noncommutative theory is modified at a high energy scale. (Orig.)

  7. Modeling defect production in high energy collision cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinisch, H.L.; Singh, B.N.

    1993-01-01

    A multi-model approach roach (MMA) to simulating defect production processes at the atomic scale is described that incorporates molecular dynamics (MD), binary collision approximation (BCA) calculations and stochastic annealing simulations. The central hypothesis of the MMA is that the simple, fast computer codes capable of simulating large numbers of high energy cascades (e.g., BCA codes) can be made to yield the correct defect configurations when their parameters are calibrated using the results of the more physically realistic MD simulations. The calibration procedure is investigated using results of MD simulations of 25 keV cascades in copper. The configurations of point defects are extracted from the MD cascade simulations at the end of the collisional phase, similar to the information obtained with a binary collision model. The MD collisional phase defect configurations are used as input to the ALSOME annealing simulation code, and values of the ALSOME quenching parameters are determined that yield the best fit to the post-quenching defect configurations of the MD simulations

  8. A process model in continuing professional development: Exploring diagnostic radiographers' views

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henwood, Suzanne M. [Henwood Associates (South East) Ltd, Coaching and Training, 38 Tudor Crescent, Otford, TN14 5QT, Sevenoaks, Kent (United Kingdom)], E-mail: henwoodassociates@btinternet.com; Taket, Ann [Centre for Health through Action on Social Exclusion (CHASE), School of Health and Social Development, Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences, Deakin University, 221 Burwood Highway, Burwood, Vic 3125 (Australia)], E-mail: ann.taket@deakin.edu.au

    2008-08-15

    This article is based on an exploratory, interpretative grounded theory study that looked at practitioners' perceptions of continuing professional development (CPD) in diagnostic radiography in the UK. Using a combination of in-depth interviews and secondary analysis of published material, a dynamic CPD process model was generated. The study aimed to explore what radiographers understood by the term CPD and whether it was perceived to have any impact on clinical practice. The study aimed to identify and investigate the components of CPD and how they interact with one another, to help to explain what is happening within CPD and what contributes to its effectiveness. The CPD process was shown to be complex, dynamic and centred on the Individual. Supporting components of Facilitation and External Influences were identified as important in maximising the potential impact of CPD. The three main categories were shown to interact dynamically and prior to Participation were shown to have a 'superadditive' effect, where the total effect was greater than the sum of the three individual parts. This study showed that radiographers are generally unaware of the holistic concept of CPD, using instead narrow definitions of CPD with little or no expectation of any impact on practice, focusing predominantly on personal gain. The model produced in the study provided a tool that practitioners reported was helpful in reflecting on their own involvment in CPD.

  9. Synthetic digital radiographs using exposure computer models of Voxels / EGS4 Phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenned, Roberto; Vieira, Jose W.; Lima, Fernando R.A.; Loureiro, Eduardo

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this work is to produce synthetic digital radiographs from synthetic phantoms with the use of a Computational Model of Exposition (MCE). The literature explains a model consisted on a phantom, a Monte Carlo code and an algorithm of a radioactive source. In this work it was used the FAX phantom (Female Adult voXel), besides the EGS4 system code Eletron Shower-range version 4) and an external source, similar to that used in diagnostic radiology. The implementation of MCE creates files with information on external energy deposited in the voxels of fantoma used, here called EnergiaPorVoxel.dat. These files along with the targeted phantom (fax.sgi) worked as data entry for the DIP software (Digital Imaging Processing) to build the synthetic phantoms based on energy and the effective dose. This way you can save each slice that is the stack of pictures of these phantoms synthetics, which have been called synthetic digital radiography. Using this, it is possible to use techniques of emphasis in space to increase the contrast or elineate contours between organs and tissues. The practical use of these images is not only to allow a planning of examinations performed in clinics and hospitals and reducing unnecessary exposure to patients by error of radiographic techniques. (author)

  10. A process model in continuing professional development: Exploring diagnostic radiographers' views

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henwood, Suzanne M.; Taket, Ann

    2008-01-01

    This article is based on an exploratory, interpretative grounded theory study that looked at practitioners' perceptions of continuing professional development (CPD) in diagnostic radiography in the UK. Using a combination of in-depth interviews and secondary analysis of published material, a dynamic CPD process model was generated. The study aimed to explore what radiographers understood by the term CPD and whether it was perceived to have any impact on clinical practice. The study aimed to identify and investigate the components of CPD and how they interact with one another, to help to explain what is happening within CPD and what contributes to its effectiveness. The CPD process was shown to be complex, dynamic and centred on the Individual. Supporting components of Facilitation and External Influences were identified as important in maximising the potential impact of CPD. The three main categories were shown to interact dynamically and prior to Participation were shown to have a 'superadditive' effect, where the total effect was greater than the sum of the three individual parts. This study showed that radiographers are generally unaware of the holistic concept of CPD, using instead narrow definitions of CPD with little or no expectation of any impact on practice, focusing predominantly on personal gain. The model produced in the study provided a tool that practitioners reported was helpful in reflecting on their own involvment in CPD

  11. Compact Models for Defect Diffusivity in Semiconductor Alloys.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Alan F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Nanostructure Physics Department; Modine, Normand A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Nanostructure Physics Department; Lee, Stephen R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Advanced Materials Sciences Department; Foiles, Stephen M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Computational Materials and Data Science Department

    2017-09-01

    Predicting transient effects caused by short - pulse neutron irradiation of electronic devices is an important part of Sandia's mission. For example , predicting the diffusion of radiation - induced point defects is needed with in Sandia's Qualification Alternative to the Sandia Pulsed Reactor (QASPR) pro gram since defect diffusion mediates transient gain recovery in QASPR electronic devices. Recently, the semiconductors used to fabricate radiation - hard electronic devices have begun to shift from silicon to III - V compounds such as GaAs, InAs , GaP and InP . An advantage of this shift is that it allows engineers to optimize the radiation hardness of electronic devices by using alloy s such as InGaAs and InGaP . However, the computer codes currently being used to simulate transient radiation effects in QASP R devices will need to be modified since they presume that defect properties (charge states, energy levels, and diffusivities) in these alloys do not change with time. This is not realistic since the energy and properties of a defect depend on the types of atoms near it and , therefore, on its location in the alloy. In particular, radiation - induced defects are created at nearly random locations in an alloy and the distribution of their local environments - and thus their energies and properties - evolves with time as the defects diffuse through the alloy . To incorporate these consequential effects into computer codes used to simulate transient radiation effects, we have developed procedures to accurately compute the time dependence of defect energies and properties and then formulate them within compact models that can be employed in these computer codes. In this document, we demonstrate these procedures for the case of the highly mobile P interstitial (I P ) in an InGaP alloy. Further dissemination only as authorized to U.S. Government agencies and their contractors; other requests shall be approved by the originating facility or higher DOE

  12. A conceptual model for the fuel oxidation of defective fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgs, J.D.; Lewis, B.J.; Thompson, W.T.; He, Z.

    2007-01-01

    A mechanistic conceptual model has been developed to predict the fuel oxidation behaviour in operating defective fuel elements for water-cooled nuclear reactors. This theoretical work accounts for gas-phase transport and sheath reactions in the fuel-to-sheath gap to determine the local oxygen potential. An improved thermodynamic analysis has also been incorporated into the model to describe the equilibrium state of the oxidized fuel. The fuel oxidation kinetics treatment accounts for multi-phase transport including normal diffusion and thermodiffusion for interstitial oxygen migration in the solid, as well as gas-phase transport in the fuel pellet cracks. The fuel oxidation treatment is further coupled to a heat conduction equation. A numerical solution of the coupled transport equations is obtained by a finite-element technique with the FEMLAB 3.1 software package. The model is able to provide radial-axial profiles of the oxygen-to-uranium ratio and the fuel temperatures as a function of time in the defective element for a wide range of element powers and defect sizes. The model results are assessed against coulometric titration measurements of the oxygen-to-metal profile for pellet samples taken from ten spent defective elements discharged from the National Research Universal Reactor at the Chalk River Laboratories and commercial reactors

  13. Visual simulation of radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laguna, G.

    1985-01-01

    A method for computer simulation of radiographs has been added to the LLNL version of the solid modeler TIPS-1 (Technical Information Processing System-1). This new tool will enable an engineer to compare an actual radiograph of a solid to its computer-generated counterpart. The appearance of discrepancies between the two can be an indication of flaws in the solid object. Simulated radiographs can also be used to preview the placement of x-ray sources to focus on areas of concern before actual radiographs are made

  14. Extracting software static defect models using data mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed H. Yousef

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Large software projects are subject to quality risks of having defective modules that will cause failures during the software execution. Several software repositories contain source code of large projects that are composed of many modules. These software repositories include data for the software metrics of these modules and the defective state of each module. In this paper, a data mining approach is used to show the attributes that predict the defective state of software modules. Software solution architecture is proposed to convert the extracted knowledge into data mining models that can be integrated with the current software project metrics and bugs data in order to enhance the prediction. The results show better prediction capabilities when all the algorithms are combined using weighted votes. When only one individual algorithm is used, Naïve Bayes algorithm has the best results, then the Neural Network and the Decision Trees algorithms.

  15. Microstructural defects modeling in the Al-Mo system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pascuet, Maria I.; Fernandez, Julian R.; Monti, Ana M.

    2006-01-01

    In this work we have utilized computer simulation techniques to study microstructural defects, such as point defects and interfaces, in the Al-Mo alloy. Such alloy is taken as a model to study the Al(fcc)/U-Mo(bcc) interface. The EAM interatomic potential used has been fitted to the formation energy and lattice constant of the AlMo 3 intermetallic. Formation of vacancies for both components Al and Mo and anti-sites, Al Mo and Mo Al , as well as vacancy migration was studied in this structure. We found that the lowest energy defect complex that preserves stoichiometry is the antisite pair Al Mo +Mo Al , in correspondence with other intermetallics of the same structure. Our results also suggest that the structure of the Al(fcc)/Mo(bcc) interface is unstable, while that of the Al(fcc)/Al 5 Mo interface is stable, as observed experimentally. (author) [es

  16. Radiographic evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    The author describes how to: perform a systematic evaluation of a chest radiograph; state the classic radiographic description of hyaline membrane disease; list the conditions that cause hyperaeration and describe the radiologic feature of hyperaeration; describe the radiograph of a patient with a congenital diaphragmatic hernia; identify optimum placement of an endotracheal tube, gastric feeding tube, and umbilical artery catheter on a radiograph; differentiate between pulmonary interstitial air and hyaline membrane disease; select radiographic features that would indicate the presence of a tension pneumothorax; describe a lateral decubitus projection and state the type of problem it is most often used to identify; explain the procedure used in obtaining a lateral neck radiograph and list two problems that may require this view; and describe the radiograph of a patient with cystic fibrosis

  17. Methodological model of chronic stress associated with ligature-induced periodontitis in rats: a radiographic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Semenoff Segundo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the time efficiency of stress associated with ligature-induced periodontitis in rats. Sixty adult Wistar rats, housed in temperature-controlled rooms and receiving water and food ad libitum, were randomly separated into stress (n = 30 or control groups (n = 30. All animals were anesthetized, and nylon ligatures were placed at the gingival margin level of the maxillary right second molars. After the induction of periodontitis, rats in the stress group were subjected to physical restraint for 12 hours daily. The animals were euthanized after 7, 15 and 30 days by anesthetic overdose (10 animals per group per period. The right hemimaxillae were stored in formalin solution for 48 hours. Parallel radiographic images of the hemimaxillae were taken and processed following standard procedures. Radiographic examination was performed by a blinded and previously calibrated investigator. Bone height level was measured, and data were submitted to analysis of variance and post hoc Bonferroni tests (p 0.05. Restraint stress modulates the short-term progression of periodontal disease in rats. Therefore, the 12-hour daily physical restraint stress model in rats applied for up to 15 days is suitable for the investigation of the combined effect of ligation and restraint stress on periodontal degradation.

  18. Modeling the relationships among internal defect features and external Appalachian hardwood log defect indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Edward. Thomas

    2009-01-01

    As a hardwood tree grows and develops, surface defects such as branch stubs and wounds are overgrown. Evidence of these defects remain on the log surface for decades and in many instances for the life of the tree. As the tree grows the defect is encapsulated or grown over by new wood. During this process the appearance of the defect in the tree's bark changes. The...

  19. Accuracy of virtual models in the assessment of maxillary defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamburoglu, Kivanc; Kursun, Sebnem; Kilic, Cenk; Eozen, Tuncer

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the reliability of measurements performed on three-dimensional (3D) virtual models of maxillary defects obtained using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and 3D optical scanning. Mechanical cavities simulating maxillary defects were prepared on the hard palate of nine cadavers. Images were obtained using a CBCT unit at three different fields-of-views (FOVs) and voxel sizes: 1) 60 X 60 mm FOV, 0.125 mm 3 (FOV 60 ); 2) 80 X 80 mm FOV, 0.160 mm 3 (FOV 80 ); and 3) 100 X 100 mm FOV, 0.250 mm 3 (FOV 100 ). Superimposition of the images was performed using software called VRMesh Design. Automated volume measurements were conducted, and differences between surfaces were demonstrated. Silicon impressions obtained from the defects were also scanned with a 3D optical scanner. Virtual models obtained using VRMesh Design were compared with impressions obtained by scanning silicon models. Gold standard volumes of the impression models were then compared with CBCT and 3D scanner measurements. Further, the general linear model was used, and the significance was set to p=0.05. A comparison of the results obtained by the observers and methods revealed the p values to be smaller than 0.05, suggesting that the measurement variations were caused by both methods and observers along with the different cadaver specimens used. Further, the 3D scanner measurements were closer to the gold standard measurements when compared to the CBCT measurements. In the assessment of artificially created maxillary defects, the 3D scanner measurements were more accurate than the CBCT measurements.

  20. Accuracy of virtual models in the assessment of maxillary defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamburoglu, Kivanc [Dept. of Dentomaxillofacial Radiology, Faculty of Dentistry, Ankara University, Ankara (Turkmenistan); Kursun, Sebnem [Division of Dentomaxillofacial Radiology, Ministry of Health, Oral and Dental Health Center, Bolu (Turkmenistan); Kilic, Cenk; Eozen, Tuncer [Gealhane Military Medical Academy, Ankara, (Turkmenistan)

    2015-03-15

    This study aimed to assess the reliability of measurements performed on three-dimensional (3D) virtual models of maxillary defects obtained using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and 3D optical scanning. Mechanical cavities simulating maxillary defects were prepared on the hard palate of nine cadavers. Images were obtained using a CBCT unit at three different fields-of-views (FOVs) and voxel sizes: 1) 60 X 60 mm FOV, 0.125 mm{sup 3} (FOV{sub 60}); 2) 80 X 80 mm FOV, 0.160 mm{sup 3} (FOV{sub 80}); and 3) 100 X 100 mm FOV, 0.250 mm{sup 3} (FOV{sub 100}). Superimposition of the images was performed using software called VRMesh Design. Automated volume measurements were conducted, and differences between surfaces were demonstrated. Silicon impressions obtained from the defects were also scanned with a 3D optical scanner. Virtual models obtained using VRMesh Design were compared with impressions obtained by scanning silicon models. Gold standard volumes of the impression models were then compared with CBCT and 3D scanner measurements. Further, the general linear model was used, and the significance was set to p=0.05. A comparison of the results obtained by the observers and methods revealed the p values to be smaller than 0.05, suggesting that the measurement variations were caused by both methods and observers along with the different cadaver specimens used. Further, the 3D scanner measurements were closer to the gold standard measurements when compared to the CBCT measurements. In the assessment of artificially created maxillary defects, the 3D scanner measurements were more accurate than the CBCT measurements.

  1. Unsupervised segmentation of lung fields in chest radiographs using multiresolution fractal feature vector and deformable models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wen-Li; Chang, Koyin; Hsieh, Kai-Sheng

    2016-09-01

    Segmenting lung fields in a chest radiograph is essential for automatically analyzing an image. We present an unsupervised method based on multiresolution fractal feature vector. The feature vector characterizes the lung field region effectively. A fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm is then applied to obtain a satisfactory initial contour. The final contour is obtained by deformable models. The results show the feasibility and high performance of the proposed method. Furthermore, based on the segmentation of lung fields, the cardiothoracic ratio (CTR) can be measured. The CTR is a simple index for evaluating cardiac hypertrophy. After identifying a suspicious symptom based on the estimated CTR, a physician can suggest that the patient undergoes additional extensive tests before a treatment plan is finalized.

  2. MATERIAL ELEMENT MODEL FOR EXTRINSIC SEMICONDUCTORS WITH DEFECTS OF DISLOCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Paola Mazzeo

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In a previous paper we outlined a geometric model for the thermodynamic description of extrinsic semiconductors with defects of dislocation.Applying a geometrization technique, within the rationalextended irreversible thermodynamics with internal variables, the dynamical system for simple material elements of these media, the expressions of the entropy function and the entropy 1-form were obtained. In this contribution we deepen the study of this geometric model. We give a detailed description of the defective media under consideration and of the dislocation core tensor, we introduce the transformation induced by the process and, applying the closure conditions for the entropy 1-form, we derive the necessary conditions for the existence of the entropy function. These and other results are new in the paper.The derivation of the relevant entropy 1-form is the starting point to introduce an extended thermodynamical phase space.

  3. Double-plating of ovine critical sized defects of the tibia: a low morbidity model enabling continuous in vivo monitoring of bone healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pearce Alexandra

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies using sheep critical sized defect models to test tissue engineered products report high morbidity and complications rates. This study evaluates a large bone defect model in the sheep tibia, stabilized with two, a novel Carbon fibre Poly-ether-ether-ketone (CF-PEEK and a locking compression plate (LCP which could sustain duration for up to 6 month with an acceptable low complication rate. Methods A large bone defect of 3 cm was performed in the mid diaphysis of the right tibia in 33 sheep. The defect was stabilised with the CF - PEEK plate and an LCP. All sheep were supported with slings for 8 weeks after surgery. The study was carried out for 3 months in 6 and for 6 months in 27 animals. Results The surgical procedure could easily be performed in all sheep and continuous in vivo radiographic evaluation of the defect was possible. This long bone critical sized defect model shows with 6.1% a low rate of complications compared with numbers mentioned in the literature. Conclusions This experimental animal model could serve as a standard model in comparative research. A well defined standard model would reduce the number of experimental animals needed in future studies and would therefore add to ethical considerations.

  4. Radiographic testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuster, J.

    1978-01-01

    In view of great differencies in X-ray transmission it is more difficult to get optimum radiographs of plastics and especially of reinforced plastics than for example of metals. A procedure will be reported how to get with little effort optimum radiographs especially also in the range of long wave-length radiation corresponding 10 to 25 kV.P. (orig.) [de

  5. Effects of concomitant use of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 with beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) on the beagle dog 1-wall periodontal defect model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anzai, Jun; Kitamura, Masahiro; Nozaki, Takenori; Nagayasu, Toshie; Terashima, Akio; Asano, Taiji; Murakami, Shinya

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Concomitant use of FGF-2 and β-TCP (an osteo-conductive scaffold) significantly promotes periodontal regeneration in the severe periodontitis model (1-wall defect model) of beagle dog. → FGF-2 enhanced new bone formation via β-TCP at the defects. → In particular, FGF-2 dramatically regenerated new periodontal ligament and cementum formations at the defects, that is one of the most important healing outcomes during the process of periodontal regeneration. → Epithelial downgrowth (undesirable wound healing) was decreased by administration of FGF-2. → This manuscript indicates for the first time that concomitant use of FGF-2 and β-TCP is efficacious in regenerating periodontal tissue following severe destruction of the tissue by progression of periodontitis. -- Abstract: The effects of concomitant use of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) and beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) on periodontal regeneration were investigated in the beagle dog 1-wall periodontal defect model. One-wall periodontal defects were created in the mesial portion of both sides of the mandibular first molars, and 0.3% FGF-2 plus β-TCP or β-TCP alone was administered. Radiographic evaluation was performed at 0, 3, and 6 weeks. At 6 weeks, the periodontium with the defect site was removed and histologically analyzed. Radiographic findings showed that co-administration of FGF-2 significantly increased bone mineral contents of the defect sites compared with β-TCP alone. Histologic analysis revealed that the length of the regenerated periodontal ligament, the cementum, distance to the junctional epithelium, new bone height, and area of newly formed bone were significantly increased in the FGF-2 group. No abnormal inflammatory response or ankylosis was observed in either group. These findings indicate the efficacy of concomitant use of FGF-2 and β-TCP as an osteoconductive material for periodontal regeneration following severe destruction by progressive

  6. Effects of concomitant use of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 with beta-tricalcium phosphate ({beta}-TCP) on the beagle dog 1-wall periodontal defect model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anzai, Jun, E-mail: anzai_jun@kaken.co.jp [Pharmacology Department, Central Research Laboratories, Kaken Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., 14, Shinomiya, Minamigawara-cho, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto 607-8042 (Japan); Department of Periodontology, Osaka University Graduate School of Dentistry, 1-8 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Kitamura, Masahiro, E-mail: kitamura@dent.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Periodontology, Osaka University Graduate School of Dentistry, 1-8 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Nozaki, Takenori, E-mail: tnozaki@dent.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Periodontology, Osaka University Graduate School of Dentistry, 1-8 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Nagayasu, Toshie, E-mail: nagayasu_toshie@kaken.co.jp [Pharmacology Department, Central Research Laboratories, Kaken Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., 14, Shinomiya, Minamigawara-cho, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto 607-8042 (Japan); Terashima, Akio, E-mail: terashima_akio@kaken.co.jp [Pharmacology Department, Central Research Laboratories, Kaken Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., 14, Shinomiya, Minamigawara-cho, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto 607-8042 (Japan); Asano, Taiji, E-mail: asano_taiji@kaken.co.jp [Pharmacology Department, Central Research Laboratories, Kaken Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., 14, Shinomiya, Minamigawara-cho, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto 607-8042 (Japan); Murakami, Shinya, E-mail: ipshinya@dent.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Periodontology, Osaka University Graduate School of Dentistry, 1-8 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2010-12-17

    Research highlights: {yields} Concomitant use of FGF-2 and {beta}-TCP (an osteo-conductive scaffold) significantly promotes periodontal regeneration in the severe periodontitis model (1-wall defect model) of beagle dog. {yields} FGF-2 enhanced new bone formation via {beta}-TCP at the defects. {yields} In particular, FGF-2 dramatically regenerated new periodontal ligament and cementum formations at the defects, that is one of the most important healing outcomes during the process of periodontal regeneration. {yields} Epithelial downgrowth (undesirable wound healing) was decreased by administration of FGF-2. {yields} This manuscript indicates for the first time that concomitant use of FGF-2 and {beta}-TCP is efficacious in regenerating periodontal tissue following severe destruction of the tissue by progression of periodontitis. -- Abstract: The effects of concomitant use of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) and beta-tricalcium phosphate ({beta}-TCP) on periodontal regeneration were investigated in the beagle dog 1-wall periodontal defect model. One-wall periodontal defects were created in the mesial portion of both sides of the mandibular first molars, and 0.3% FGF-2 plus {beta}-TCP or {beta}-TCP alone was administered. Radiographic evaluation was performed at 0, 3, and 6 weeks. At 6 weeks, the periodontium with the defect site was removed and histologically analyzed. Radiographic findings showed that co-administration of FGF-2 significantly increased bone mineral contents of the defect sites compared with {beta}-TCP alone. Histologic analysis revealed that the length of the regenerated periodontal ligament, the cementum, distance to the junctional epithelium, new bone height, and area of newly formed bone were significantly increased in the FGF-2 group. No abnormal inflammatory response or ankylosis was observed in either group. These findings indicate the efficacy of concomitant use of FGF-2 and {beta}-TCP as an osteoconductive material for periodontal

  7. Zirconium - ab initio modelling of point defects diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasca, Petrica

    2010-01-01

    Zirconium is the main element of the cladding found in pressurized water reactors, under an alloy form. Under irradiation, the cladding elongate significantly, phenomena attributed to the vacancy dislocation loops growth in the basal planes of the hexagonal compact structure. The understanding of the atomic scale mechanisms originating this process motivated this work. Using the ab initio atomic modeling technique we studied the structure and mobility of point defects in Zirconium. This led us to find four interstitial point defects with formation energies in an interval of 0.11 eV. The migration paths study allowed the discovery of activation energies, used as entry parameters for a kinetic Monte Carlo code. This code was developed for calculating the diffusion coefficient of the interstitial point defect. Our results suggest a migration parallel to the basal plane twice as fast as one parallel to the c direction, with an activation energy of 0.08 eV, independent of the direction. The vacancy diffusion coefficient, estimated with a two-jump model, is also anisotropic, with a faster process in the basal planes than perpendicular to them. Hydrogen influence on the vacancy dislocation loops nucleation was also studied, due to recent experimental observations of cladding growth acceleration in the presence of this element [fr

  8. Rag defects and thymic stroma: lessons from animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica eMarrella

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Thymocytes and thymic epithelial cells (TECs cross-talk is essential to support T-cell development and preserve thymic architecture and maturation of TECs and Foxp3+ natural regulatory T (nTreg cells. Accordingly, disruption of thymic lymphostromal cross-talk may have major implications on the thymic mechanisms that govern T cell tolerance. Several genetic defects have been described in humans that affect early stages of T cell development (leading to Severe Combined Immune Deficiency, SCID or late stages in thymocyte maturation (resulting in combined immunodeficiency. Hypomorphic mutations in SCID-causing genes may allow for generation of a limited pool of T lymphocytes with a restricted repertoire. These conditions are often associated with infiltration of peripheral tissues by activated T cells and immune dysregulation, as best exemplified by Omenn syndrome (OS. In this review, we will discuss our recent findings on abnormalities of thymic microenvironment in OS with a special focus of defective maturation of TECs, altered distribution of thymic dendritic cells (DCs and impairment of deletional and non-deletional mechanisms of central tolerance. Here, taking advantage of mouse models of OS and atypical SCID, we will discuss how modifications in stromal compartment impact and shape lymphocyte differentiation, and vice versa how inefficient T cell signalling results in defective stromal maturation. These findings are instrumental to understand the extent to which novel therapeutic strategies should act on thymic stroma to achieve full immune reconstitution.

  9. Analysis of variation in calibration curves for Kodak XV radiographic film using model-based parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Shu-Hui; Kulasekere, Ravi; Roberson, Peter L

    2010-08-05

    Film calibration is time-consuming work when dose accuracy is essential while working in a range of photon scatter environments. This study uses the single-target single-hit model of film response to fit the calibration curves as a function of calibration method, processor condition, field size and depth. Kodak XV film was irradiated perpendicular to the beam axis in a solid water phantom. Standard calibration films (one dose point per film) were irradiated at 90 cm source-to-surface distance (SSD) for various doses (16-128 cGy), depths (0.2, 0.5, 1.5, 5, 10 cm) and field sizes (5 × 5, 10 × 10 and 20 × 20 cm²). The 8-field calibration method (eight dose points per film) was used as a reference for each experiment, taken at 95 cm SSD and 5 cm depth. The delivered doses were measured using an Attix parallel plate chamber for improved accuracy of dose estimation in the buildup region. Three fitting methods with one to three dose points per calibration curve were investigated for the field sizes of 5 × 5, 10 × 10 and 20 × 20 cm². The inter-day variation of model parameters (background, saturation and slope) were 1.8%, 5.7%, and 7.7% (1 σ) using the 8-field method. The saturation parameter ratio of standard to 8-field curves was 1.083 ± 0.005. The slope parameter ratio of standard to 8-field curves ranged from 0.99 to 1.05, depending on field size and depth. The slope parameter ratio decreases with increasing depth below 0.5 cm for the three field sizes. It increases with increasing depths above 0.5 cm. A calibration curve with one to three dose points fitted with the model is possible with 2% accuracy in film dosimetry for various irradiation conditions. The proposed fitting methods may reduce workload while providing energy dependence correction in radiographic film dosimetry. This study is limited to radiographic XV film with a Lumisys scanner.

  10. Radiographic, densitometric, and biomechanical effects of recombinant canine somatotropin in an unstable ostectomy gap model of bone healing in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millis, D.L.; Wilkens, B.E.; Daniel, G.B.; Hubner, K.; Mathews, A.; Buonomo, F.C.; Patell, K.R.; Weigel, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effect of recombinant canine somatotropin (STH) on radiographic, densitometric, and biomechanical aspects of bone healing using an unstable ostectomy gap model. Study Design: After an ostectomy of the midshaft radius, bone healing was evaluated over an 8-week period in control dogs (n = 4) and dogs receiving recombinant canine STH (n = 4). Animals Or Sample Population: Eight sexually intact female Beagle dogs, 4 to 5 years old. Methods: Bone healing was evaluated by qualitative and quantitative evaluation of serial radiographs every 2 weeks. Terminal dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and three-point bending biomechanical testing were also performed. Results: Dogs receiving STH had more advanced radiographic healing of ostectomy sites. Bone area, bone mineral content, and bone density were two to five times greater at the ostectomy sites of treated dogs. Ultimate load at failure and stiffness were three and five times greater in dogs receiving STH. Conclusions: Using the ostectomy gap model, recombinant canine STH enhanced the radiographic, densitometric, and biomechanical aspects of bone healing in dogs. Clinical Relevance: Dogs at risk for delayed healing of fractures may benefit from treatment with recombinant canine STH

  11. Model-based vision system for automatic recognition of structures in dental radiographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Raj S.; Samarabandu, Jagath K.; Hausmann, E.; Allen, K. A.

    1991-07-01

    X-ray diagnosis of destructive periodontal disease requires assessing serial radiographs by an expert to determine the change in the distance between cemento-enamel junction (CEJ) and the bone crest. To achieve this without the subjectivity of a human expert, a knowledge based system is proposed to automatically locate the two landmarks which are the CEJ and the level of alveolar crest at its junction with the periodontal ligament space. This work is a part of an ongoing project to automatically measure the distance between CEJ and the bone crest along a line parallel to the axis of the tooth. The approach presented in this paper is based on identifying a prominent feature such as the tooth boundary using local edge detection and edge thresholding to establish a reference and then using model knowledge to process sub-regions in locating the landmarks. Segmentation techniques invoked around these regions consists of a neural-network like hierarchical refinement scheme together with local gradient extraction, multilevel thresholding and ridge tracking. Recognition accuracy is further improved by first locating the easily identifiable parts of the bone surface and the interface between the enamel and the dentine and then extending these boundaries towards the periodontal ligament space and the tooth boundary respectively. The system is realized as a collection of tools (or knowledge sources) for pre-processing, segmentation, primary and secondary feature detection and a control structure based on the blackboard model to coordinate the activities of these tools.

  12. Congenital tracheal defects: embryonic development and animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenab Arooj Sher

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Tracheal anomalies are potentially catastrophic congenital defects. As a newborn begins to breathe, the trachea needs to maintain an appropriate balance of elasticity and rigidity. If the tracheal cartilages are disorganized or structurally weak, the airways can collapse, obstructing breathing. Cartilage rings that are too small or too rigid can also obstruct breathing. These anomalies are frequently associated with craniofacial syndromes, and, despite the importance, are poorly understood. In this review, we summarize the spectrum of pathological phenotypes of the trachea and correlate them with the molecular events uncovered in mouse models.

  13. A Simulation Model of Focus and Radial Servos in Compact Disc Players with Disc Surface Defects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Peter Fogh; Stoustrup, Jakob; Andersen, Palle

    2004-01-01

    Compact Disc players have been on the market in more than two decades.As a consequence most of the control servo problems have been solved. A large remaining problem to solve is the handling of Compact Discs with severe surface defects like scratches and fingerprints. This paper introduces a method...... for making the design of controllers handling surface defects easier. A simulation model of Compact Disc players playing discs with surface defects is presented. The main novel element in the model is a model of the surface defects. That model is based on data from discs with surface defects. This model...

  14. Chesneys' radiographic imaging. 5. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, J.; Price, T.

    1989-01-01

    This new edition of Chesney and Chesney: Radiographic Imaging has been completely written by two new authors. The book reflects the change in emphasis in radiology from photographic processes towards electronic imaging methods. There is new material on image intensifiers and television imaging, digital imaging and digital subtractions. Analyses of the various characteristics of, and defects in, images on radiographs, xeroradiographs and the television screen are included. The methods, equipment and materials used to record the cathode ray tube image are described and there is new material on the principles of alternative diagnostic imaging techniques such as ultrasound, computed tomography and radionuclide imaging which provide cathode ray tube images. The book is primarily for student radiographers studying for the Diploma of the College of Radiographers, but radiographers studying for postdiplomate qualifications such as the Higher Diploma (HDCR) will also find the book helpful. (author)

  15. Radiographic positioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenberg, R.L.; Dennis, C.A.; May, C.

    1989-01-01

    This book concentrates on the routine radiographic examinations commonly performed. It details the wide variety of examinations possible and their place in initial learning and in the radiology department as references for those occasions when an unusual examination is requested. This book provides information ranging from basic terminology to skeletal positioning to special procedures. Positions are discussed and supplemented with a picture of a patient, the resulting radiograph, and a labeled diagram. Immobilization and proper shielding of the patient are also shown

  16. Radiographic Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, H.J; Yang, S.H. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    2002-07-01

    This report contains theory, procedure technique and interpretation of radiographic examination and written for whom preparing radiographic test Level II. To determine this baseline of technical competence in the examination, the individual must demonstrate a knowledge of radiography physics, radiation safety, technique development, radiation detection and measurement, facility design, and the characteristics of radiation-producing devices and their principles of operation. (author) 98 figs., 23 tabs.

  17. Modelling ionising radiation induced defect generation in bipolar oxides with gated diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnaby, H.J.; Cirba, C.; Schrimpf, R.D.; Kosier, St.; Fouillat, P.; Montagner, X.

    1999-01-01

    Radiation-induced oxide defects that degrade electrical characteristics of bipolar junction transistor (BJTs) can be measured with the use of gated diodes. The buildup of defects and their effect on device radiation response are modeled with computer simulation. (authors)

  18. Skull Defects in Finite Element Head Models for Source Reconstruction from Magnetoencephalography Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Stephan; Güllmar, Daniel; Flemming, Lars; Grayden, David B.; Cook, Mark J.; Wolters, Carsten H.; Haueisen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals are influenced by skull defects. However, there is a lack of evidence of this influence during source reconstruction. Our objectives are to characterize errors in source reconstruction from MEG signals due to ignoring skull defects and to assess the ability of an exact finite element head model to eliminate such errors. A detailed finite element model of the head of a rabbit used in a physical experiment was constructed from magnetic resonance and co-registered computer tomography imaging that differentiated nine tissue types. Sources of the MEG measurements above intact skull and above skull defects respectively were reconstructed using a finite element model with the intact skull and one incorporating the skull defects. The forward simulation of the MEG signals reproduced the experimentally observed characteristic magnitude and topography changes due to skull defects. Sources reconstructed from measured MEG signals above intact skull matched the known physical locations and orientations. Ignoring skull defects in the head model during reconstruction displaced sources under a skull defect away from that defect. Sources next to a defect were reoriented. When skull defects, with their physical conductivity, were incorporated in the head model, the location and orientation errors were mostly eliminated. The conductivity of the skull defect material non-uniformly modulated the influence on MEG signals. We propose concrete guidelines for taking into account conducting skull defects during MEG coil placement and modeling. Exact finite element head models can improve localization of brain function, specifically after surgery. PMID:27092044

  19. Gauge turbulence, topological defect dynamics, and condensation in Higgs models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasenzer, Thomas; McLerran, Larry; Pawlowski, Jan M.; Sexty, Dénes

    2014-01-01

    The real-time dynamics of topological defects and turbulent configurations of gauge fields for electric and magnetic confinement are studied numerically within a 2+1D Abelian Higgs model. It is shown that confinement is appearing in such systems equilibrating after a strong initial quench such as the overpopulation of the infrared modes. While the final equilibrium state does not support confinement, metastable vortex defect configurations appearing in the gauge field are found to be closely related to the appearance of physically observable confined electric and magnetic charges. These phenomena are seen to be intimately related to the approach of a non-thermal fixed point of the far-from-equilibrium dynamical evolution, signaled by universal scaling in the gauge-invariant correlation function of the Higgs field. Even when the parameters of the Higgs action do not support condensate formation in the vacuum, during this approach, transient Higgs condensation is observed. We discuss implications of these results for the far-from-equilibrium dynamics of Yang–Mills fields and potential mechanisms of how confinement and condensation in non-Abelian gauge fields can be understood in terms of the dynamics of Higgs models. These suggest that there is an interesting new class of dynamics of strong coherent turbulent gauge fields with condensates

  20. Gauge turbulence, topological defect dynamics, and condensation in Higgs models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasenzer, Thomas [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 16, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, GSI, Planckstraße 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); McLerran, Larry [Physics Department, Bldg. 510A, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); RIKEN BNL Research Center, Bldg. 510A, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Physics Department, China Central Normal University, Wuhan (China); Pawlowski, Jan M.; Sexty, Dénes [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 16, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, GSI, Planckstraße 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    The real-time dynamics of topological defects and turbulent configurations of gauge fields for electric and magnetic confinement are studied numerically within a 2+1D Abelian Higgs model. It is shown that confinement is appearing in such systems equilibrating after a strong initial quench such as the overpopulation of the infrared modes. While the final equilibrium state does not support confinement, metastable vortex defect configurations appearing in the gauge field are found to be closely related to the appearance of physically observable confined electric and magnetic charges. These phenomena are seen to be intimately related to the approach of a non-thermal fixed point of the far-from-equilibrium dynamical evolution, signaled by universal scaling in the gauge-invariant correlation function of the Higgs field. Even when the parameters of the Higgs action do not support condensate formation in the vacuum, during this approach, transient Higgs condensation is observed. We discuss implications of these results for the far-from-equilibrium dynamics of Yang–Mills fields and potential mechanisms of how confinement and condensation in non-Abelian gauge fields can be understood in terms of the dynamics of Higgs models. These suggest that there is an interesting new class of dynamics of strong coherent turbulent gauge fields with condensates.

  1. Animal radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    This chapter presents historical x rays of a wide variety of animals taken within 5 years of the discovery of x radiation. Such photos were used as tests or as illustrations for radiographic publications. Numerous historical photographs are included. 10 refs

  2. Multiscale Modeling of Point and Line Defects in Cubic Lattices

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chung, P. W; Clayton, J. D

    2007-01-01

    .... This multiscale theory explicitly captures heterogeneity in microscopic atomic motion in crystalline materials, attributed, for example, to the presence of various point and line lattice defects...

  3. Radiographic and histological study of perennial bone defect repair in rat calvaria after treatment with blocks of porous bovine organic graft material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marins, Lucele Vieira; Cestari, Tania Mary; Sottovia, André Dotto; Granjeiro, José Mauro; Taga, Rumio

    2004-03-01

    Over the last few years, various bone graft materials of bovine origin to be used in oromaxillofacial surgeries have entered the market. In the present study, we determined the capacity of a block organic bone graft material (Gen-ox, Baumer SA, Brazil) prepared from bovine cancellous bone to promote the repair of critical size bone injuries in rat calvaria. A transosseous defect measuring approximately 8mm in diameter was performed with a surgical trephine in the parietal bone of 25 rats. In 15 animals, the defects were filled with a block of graft material measuring 8mm in diameter and soaked in the animal's own blood, and in the other 10 animals the defects were only filled with blood clots. The calvariae of rats receiving the material were collected 1, 3 and 6 months after surgery, and those of animals receiving the blood clots were collected immediately and 6 months after surgery. During surgery, the graft material was found to be of easy handling and to adapt perfectly to the receptor bed after soaking in blood. The results showed that, in most animals treated, the material was slowly resorbed and served as a space filling and maintenance material, favoring angiogenesis, cell migration and adhesion, and bone neoformation from the borders of the lesion. However, a foreign body-type granulomatous reaction, with the presence of numerous giant cells preventing local bone neoformation, was observed in two animals of the 1-month subgroup and in one animal of the 3-month subgroup. These cases were interpreted as resulting from the absence of demineralization and the lack of removal of potential antigen factors during production of the biomaterial. We conclude that, with improvement in the quality control of the material production, block organic bone matrix will become a good alternative for bone defect repair in the oromaxillofacial region due to its high osteoconductive capacity.

  4. Digitization of conventional radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenz, W.; Buitrago-Tellez, C.; Blum, U.; Hauenstein, K.H.; Gufler, H.; Meyer, E.; Ruediger, K.

    1992-01-01

    The diagnostic value of a digitization system for analogue films based on a charge-coupled-device (CCD) scanner with adjustable resolution of 2.5 or 5 lp/mm was assessed. Some 110 skeletal radiographs, 50 contrast studies, including 25 of patients with Crohn's disease, and 70 abdominal plain films before and after successful lithotripsy for renal stones were digitized. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) studies showed improved detection of cortical and trabecular defects with contrast-optimized digitized films. Edge enhancement algorithms yielded no additional information. Inflammatory lesions of Crohn's disease were detected equally well by conventional films and digitized images. A statistically significant improvement (p [de

  5. Modeling charged defects inside density functional theory band gaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, Peter A.; Edwards, Arthur H.

    2014-01-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) has emerged as an important tool to probe microscopic behavior in materials. The fundamental band gap defines the energy scale for charge transition energy levels of point defects in ionic and covalent materials. The eigenvalue gap between occupied and unoccupied states in conventional DFT, the Kohn–Sham gap, is often half or less of the experimental band gap, seemingly precluding quantitative studies of charged defects. Applying explicit and rigorous control of charge boundary conditions in supercells, we find that calculations of defect energy levels derived from total energy differences give accurate predictions of charge transition energy levels in Si and GaAs, unhampered by a band gap problem. The GaAs system provides a good theoretical laboratory for investigating band gap effects in defect level calculations: depending on the functional and pseudopotential, the Kohn–Sham gap can be as large as 1.1 eV or as small as 0.1 eV. We find that the effective defect band gap, the computed range in defect levels, is mostly insensitive to the Kohn–Sham gap, demonstrating it is often possible to use conventional DFT for quantitative studies of defect chemistry governing interesting materials behavior in semiconductors and oxides despite a band gap problem

  6. Performance of a Deep-Learning Neural Network Model in Assessing Skeletal Maturity on Pediatric Hand Radiographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, David B; Chen, Matthew C; Lungren, Matthew P; Halabi, Safwan S; Stence, Nicholas V; Langlotz, Curtis P

    2018-04-01

    Purpose To compare the performance of a deep-learning bone age assessment model based on hand radiographs with that of expert radiologists and that of existing automated models. Materials and Methods The institutional review board approved the study. A total of 14 036 clinical hand radiographs and corresponding reports were obtained from two children's hospitals to train and validate the model. For the first test set, composed of 200 examinations, the mean of bone age estimates from the clinical report and three additional human reviewers was used as the reference standard. Overall model performance was assessed by comparing the root mean square (RMS) and mean absolute difference (MAD) between the model estimates and the reference standard bone ages. Ninety-five percent limits of agreement were calculated in a pairwise fashion for all reviewers and the model. The RMS of a second test set composed of 913 examinations from the publicly available Digital Hand Atlas was compared with published reports of an existing automated model. Results The mean difference between bone age estimates of the model and of the reviewers was 0 years, with a mean RMS and MAD of 0.63 and 0.50 years, respectively. The estimates of the model, the clinical report, and the three reviewers were within the 95% limits of agreement. RMS for the Digital Hand Atlas data set was 0.73 years, compared with 0.61 years of a previously reported model. Conclusion A deep-learning convolutional neural network model can estimate skeletal maturity with accuracy similar to that of an expert radiologist and to that of existing automated models. © RSNA, 2017 An earlier incorrect version of this article appeared online. This article was corrected on January 19, 2018.

  7. Rabbit Calvarial Defect Model for Customized 3D-Printed Bone Grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang-Gon; Lee, Kang-Sik; Kang, Yu-Jeoung; Hwang, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Se-Hwan; Park, Sang-Hyug; Park, Yongdoo; Cho, Young-Sam; Lee, Bu-Kyu

    2018-05-01

    Bone graft materials are commonly used to regenerate various bone defects, but their application is often limited because of the complex defect shape in various clinical conditions. Hence, customized bone grafts using three-dimensional (3D) printing techniques have been developed. However, conventional simple bone defect models are limited for evaluating the benefits and manufacturing accuracy of 3D-printed customized bone grafts. Thus, the aim of the present study was to develop a complex-shaped bone defect model. We designed an 8-shaped bony defect that consists of two simple circles attached to the rabbit calvarium. To determine the critical-sized defect (CSD) of the 8-shaped defects, 5.6- and 7-mm-diameter trephine burs were tested, and the 7-mm-diameter bur could successfully create a CSD, which was easily reproducible on the rabbit calvarium. The rate of new bone formation was 28.65% ± 8.63% at 16 weeks following creation of the defect. To confirm its efficacy for clinical use, the 8-shaped defect was created on a rabbit calvarium and 3D computed tomography (CT) was performed. A stereolithography file was produced using the CT data, and a 3D-printed polycaprolactone graft was fabricated. Using our 8-shaped defect model, we were able to modify the tolerances of the bone graft and calvarial defect to fabricate a more precise bone graft. Customized characteristics of the bone graft were then used to improve the accuracy of the bone graft. In addition, we confirmed the fitting ability of the 3D-printed graft during implantation of the graft. Our 8-shaped defect model on the rabbit calvarium using a 7.0-mm trephine bur may be a useful CSD model for evaluating 3D-printed graft materials.

  8. Radiographic element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbott, T.I.; Jones, C.G.

    1984-01-01

    Radiographic elements are disclosed comprised of first and second silver halide emulsion layers separated by an interposed support capable of transmitting radiation to which the second image portion is responsive. At least the first imaging portion contains a silver halide emulsion in which thin tubular silver halide grains of intermediate aspect ratios (from 5:1 to 8:1) are present. Spectral sensitizing dye is adsorbed to the surface of the tubular grains. Increased photographic speeds can be realized at comparable levels of crossover. (author)

  9. 3D reconstruction of a patient-specific surface model of the proximal femur from calibrated x-ray radiographs: A validation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Guoyan; Schumann, Steffen

    2009-01-01

    Twenty-three femurs (one plastic bone and twenty-two cadaver bones) with both nonpathologic and pathologic cases were considered to validate a statistical shape model based technique for three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of a patient-specific surface model from calibrated x-ray radiographs. The 3D reconstruction technique is based on an iterative nonrigid registration of the features extracted from a statistically instantiated 3D surface model to those interactively identified from the radiographs. The surface models reconstructed from the radiographs were compared to the associated ground truths derived either from a 3D CT-scan reconstruction method or from a 3D laser-scan reconstruction method and an average error distance of 0.95 mm were found. Compared to the existing works, our approach has the advantage of seamlessly handling both nonpathologic and pathologic cases even when the statistical shape model that we used was constructed from surface models of nonpathologic bones.

  10. Modelling water vapour permeability through atomic layer deposition coated photovoltaic barrier defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elrawemi, Mohamed, E-mail: Mohamed.elrawemi@hud.ac.uk [EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Advanced Metrology, School of Computing and Engineering, University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield (United Kingdom); Blunt, Liam; Fleming, Leigh [EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Advanced Metrology, School of Computing and Engineering, University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield (United Kingdom); Bird, David, E-mail: David.Bird@uk-cpi.com [Centre for Process Innovation Limited, Sedgefield, County Durham (United Kingdom); Robbins, David [Centre for Process Innovation Limited, Sedgefield, County Durham (United Kingdom); Sweeney, Francis [EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Advanced Metrology, School of Computing and Engineering, University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-03

    Transparent barrier films such as Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} used for prevention of oxygen and/or water vapour permeation are the subject of increasing research interest when used for the encapsulation of flexible photovoltaic modules. However, the existence of micro-scale defects in the barrier surface topography has been shown to have the potential to facilitate water vapour ingress, thereby reducing cell efficiency and causing internal electrical shorts. Previous work has shown that small defects (≤ 3 μm lateral dimension) were less significant in determining water vapour ingress. In contrast, larger defects (≥ 3 μm lateral dimension) seem to be more detrimental to the barrier functionality. Experimental results based on surface topography segmentation analysis and a model presented in this paper will be used to test the hypothesis that the major contributing defects to water vapour transmission rate are small numbers of large defects. The model highlighted in this study has the potential to be used for gaining a better understanding of photovoltaic module efficiency and performance. - Highlights: • A model of water vapour permeation through barrier defects is presented. • The effect of the defects on the water vapour permeability is investigated. • Defect density correlates with water vapour permeability. • Large defects may dominate the permeation properties of the barrier film.

  11. Characterisation and modelling of defect formation in direct-chill cast AZ80 alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackie, D.; Robson, J.D.; Withers, P.J. [School of Materials, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Turski, M. [Magnesium Elektron UK, Rake Lane, Manchester, M27 8BF (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-15

    Wrought magnesium alloys for demanding structural applications require high quality defect free cast feedstock. The aim of this study was to first identify and characterise typical defects in direct chill cast magnesium–aluminium–zinc (AZ) alloy billet and then use modelling to understand the origins of these defects so they can be prevented. Defects were first located using ultrasonic inspection and were then characterised using X-ray computed tomography (XCT) and serial sectioning, establishing the presence of oxide films and intermetallic particles Al{sub 8}Mn{sub 5} in all defects. A model was developed to predict the flow patterns and growth kinetics of the intermetallic phases during casting, which influence the formation of defects. Simulation of the growth of the intermetallic particles demonstrated that precipitation from the liquid occurs in the mould. The combination of the entrained oxide films and intermetallic particles recirculates in the liquid metal and continues to grow, until large enough to settle, which is predicted to occur at the centre of the mould where the flow is the slowest. Based on these predictions, strategies to reduce the susceptibility to defect formation are suggested. - Highlights: • Casting defects in magnesium direct chill casting have been imaged and characterised in 3-dimensions. • The occurrences of co-located clusters of particles and oxide films have been characterised and explained. • A coupled model has been developed to help interpret the observed trend for defects located towards the centre of billets.

  12. Characterisation and modelling of defect formation in direct-chill cast AZ80 alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackie, D.; Robson, J.D.; Withers, P.J.; Turski, M.

    2015-01-01

    Wrought magnesium alloys for demanding structural applications require high quality defect free cast feedstock. The aim of this study was to first identify and characterise typical defects in direct chill cast magnesium–aluminium–zinc (AZ) alloy billet and then use modelling to understand the origins of these defects so they can be prevented. Defects were first located using ultrasonic inspection and were then characterised using X-ray computed tomography (XCT) and serial sectioning, establishing the presence of oxide films and intermetallic particles Al 8 Mn 5 in all defects. A model was developed to predict the flow patterns and growth kinetics of the intermetallic phases during casting, which influence the formation of defects. Simulation of the growth of the intermetallic particles demonstrated that precipitation from the liquid occurs in the mould. The combination of the entrained oxide films and intermetallic particles recirculates in the liquid metal and continues to grow, until large enough to settle, which is predicted to occur at the centre of the mould where the flow is the slowest. Based on these predictions, strategies to reduce the susceptibility to defect formation are suggested. - Highlights: • Casting defects in magnesium direct chill casting have been imaged and characterised in 3-dimensions. • The occurrences of co-located clusters of particles and oxide films have been characterised and explained. • A coupled model has been developed to help interpret the observed trend for defects located towards the centre of billets

  13. The negative binomial distribution as a model for external corrosion defect counts in buried pipelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valor, Alma; Alfonso, Lester; Caleyo, Francisco; Vidal, Julio; Perez-Baruch, Eloy; Hallen, José M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Observed external-corrosion defects in underground pipelines revealed a tendency to cluster. • The Poisson distribution is unable to fit extensive count data for these type of defects. • In contrast, the negative binomial distribution provides a suitable count model for them. • Two spatial stochastic processes lead to the negative binomial distribution for defect counts. • They are the Gamma-Poisson mixed process and the compound Poisson process. • A Rogeŕs process also arises as a plausible temporal stochastic process leading to corrosion defect clustering and to negative binomially distributed defect counts. - Abstract: The spatial distribution of external corrosion defects in buried pipelines is usually described as a Poisson process, which leads to corrosion defects being randomly distributed along the pipeline. However, in real operating conditions, the spatial distribution of defects considerably departs from Poisson statistics due to the aggregation of defects in groups or clusters. In this work, the statistical analysis of real corrosion data from underground pipelines operating in southern Mexico leads to conclude that the negative binomial distribution provides a better description for defect counts. The origin of this distribution from several processes is discussed. The analysed processes are: mixed Gamma-Poisson, compound Poisson and Roger’s processes. The physical reasons behind them are discussed for the specific case of soil corrosion.

  14. Model for transport and reaction of defects and carriers within displacement cascades in gallium arsenide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wampler, William R.; Myers, Samuel M.

    2015-01-01

    A model is presented for recombination of charge carriers at evolving displacement damage in gallium arsenide, which includes clustering of the defects in atomic displacement cascades produced by neutron or ion irradiation. The carrier recombination model is based on an atomistic description of capture and emission of carriers by the defects with time evolution resulting from the migration and reaction of the defects. The physics and equations on which the model is based are presented, along with the details of the numerical methods used for their solution. The model uses a continuum description of diffusion, field-drift and reaction of carriers, and defects within a representative spherically symmetric cluster of defects. The initial radial defect profiles within the cluster were determined through pair-correlation-function analysis of the spatial distribution of defects obtained from the binary-collision code MARLOWE, using recoil energies for fission neutrons. Properties of the defects are discussed and values for their parameters are given, many of which were obtained from density functional theory. The model provides a basis for predicting the transient response of III-V heterojunction bipolar transistors to displacement damage from energetic particle irradiation

  15. Use of statistical models based on radiographic measurements to predict oviposition date and clutch size in rock iguanas (Cyclura nubila)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberts, A.C.

    1995-01-01

    The ability to noninvasively estimate clutch size and predict oviposition date in reptiles can be useful not only to veterinary clinicians but also to managers of captive collections and field researchers. Measurements of egg size and shape, as well as position of the clutch within the coelomic cavity, were taken from diagnostic radiographs of 20 female Cuban rock iguanas, Cyclura nubila, 81 to 18 days prior to laying. Combined with data on maternal body size, these variables were entered into multiple regression models to predict clutch size and timing of egg laying. The model for clutch size was accurate to 0.53 ± 0.08 eggs, while the model for oviposition date was accurate to 6.22 ± 0.81 days. Equations were generated that should be applicable to this and other large Cyclura species. © 1995 Wiley-Liss, Inc

  16. Effect of noise on defect chaos in a reaction-diffusion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongli; Ouyang, Qi

    2005-06-01

    The influence of noise on defect chaos due to breakup of spiral waves through Doppler and Eckhaus instabilities is investigated numerically with a modified Fitzhugh-Nagumo model. By numerical simulations we show that the noise can drastically enhance the creation and annihilation rates of topological defects. The noise-free probability distribution function for defects in this model is found not to fit with the previously reported squared-Poisson distribution. Under the influence of noise, the distributions are flattened, and can fit with the squared-Poisson or the modified-Poisson distribution. The defect lifetime and diffusive property of defects under the influence of noise are also checked in this model.

  17. Tissue specific mutagenic and carcinogenic responses in NER defective mouse models.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnhoven, Susan W P; Hoogervorst, Esther M; Waard, Harm de; Horst, Gijsbertus T J van der; Steeg, Harry van

    2007-01-01

    Several mouse models with defects in genes encoding components of the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway have been developed. In NER two different sub-pathways are known, i.e. transcription-coupled repair (TC-NER) and global-genome repair (GG-NER). A defect in one particular NER protein can

  18. Double-bond defect modelling in As-S glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyko, V; Shpotyuk, O; Hyla, M

    2010-01-01

    Ab initio calculations with the RHF/6-311G* basis set are used for geometrical optimization of regular pyramidal and defect quasi-tetrahedral clusters in binary As-S glasses. It is shown that quasi-tetrahedral S=AsS 3/2 structural units are impossible as main network-building blocks in these glasses.

  19. Double-bond defect modelling in As-S glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyko, V; Shpotyuk, O; Hyla, M, E-mail: shpotyuk@novas.lviv.ua

    2010-11-15

    Ab initio calculations with the RHF/6-311G* basis set are used for geometrical optimization of regular pyramidal and defect quasi-tetrahedral clusters in binary As-S glasses. It is shown that quasi-tetrahedral S=AsS{sub 3/2} structural units are impossible as main network-building blocks in these glasses.

  20. WMAP constraints on inflationary models with global defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bevis, Neil; Hindmarsh, Mark; Kunz, Martin

    2004-01-01

    We use the cosmic microwave background angular power spectra to place upper limits on the degree to which global defects may have aided cosmic structure formation. We explore this under the inflationary paradigm, but with the addition of textures resulting from the breaking of a global O(4) symmetry during the early stages of the Universe. As a measure of their contribution, we use the fraction of the temperature power spectrum that is attributed to the defects at a multipole of 10. However, we find a parameter degeneracy enabling a fit to the first-year WMAP data to be made even with a significant defect fraction. This degeneracy involves the baryon fraction and the Hubble constant, plus the normalization and tilt of the primordial power spectrum. Hence, constraints on these cosmological parameters are weakened. Combining the WMAP data with a constraint on the physical baryon fraction from big bang nucleosynthesis calculations and high-redshift deuterium abundance limits the extent of the degeneracy and gives an upper bound on the defect fraction of 0.13 (95% confidence)

  1. Radiographic apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapidus, S.N.

    1979-01-01

    Raytheon Company, U.S.A. have patented an on-line electronic system of normalising the responses from the photomultiplier tubes used in conjunction with a scintillator in an X-ray radiographic camera. A problem with present cameras is that the individual photomultipliers have different intensity responses which also change in time with respect to each other. The individual responses of each photomultiplier tube are measured with a uniform sheet of radioactive material in front of the camera. The associated electronic equipment then calculates scaling factors which give all photomultiplier tubes an identical response and then places these factors in an addressable store. The store is then addressed in an on-line mode to produce a visual display of the transmitted X-rays. (U.K.)

  2. Radiographic apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalton, B.L.

    1984-01-01

    This patent application describes a radiographic apparatus including an array of radiation sensors, a source of radiation for projecting a beam through a body and means for moving one of said source and array relative to the body and for producing an electrical signal representative of the movement of the other of said source and array needed to bring the array into register with the beam. Drive means are arranged to move the other of said source and array in response to the electrical signal. In one embodiment, the source is rotated by an amount measured by a grating and associated electronics. The required movement of the array to maintain registration is calculated and transmitted to a driver. Alternatively, a laser may be mounted with the same and the array driven so that the laser beam continuously impinges on a photocell mounted with the array. (author)

  3. Behaviour of defective CANDU fuel: fuel oxidation kinetic and thermodynamic modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgs, J.

    2005-01-01

    The thermal performance of operating CANDU fuel under defect conditions is affected by the ingress of heavy water into the fuel element. A mechanistic model has been developed to predict the extent of fuel oxidation in defective fuel and its affect on fuel thermal performance. A thermodynamic treatment of such oxidized fuel has been performed as a basis for the boundary conditions in the kinetic model. Both the kinetic and thermodynamic models have been benchmarked against recent experimental work. (author)

  4. Model of defect reactions and the influence of clustering in pulse-neutron-irradiated Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, S. M.; Cooper, P. J.; Wampler, W. R.

    2008-01-01

    Transient reactions among irradiation defects, dopants, impurities, and carriers in pulse-neutron-irradiated Si were modeled taking into account the clustering of the primal defects in recoil cascades. Continuum equations describing the diffusion, field drift, and reactions of relevant species were numerically solved for a submicrometer spherical volume, within which the starting radial distributions of defects could be varied in accord with the degree of clustering. The radial profiles corresponding to neutron irradiation were chosen through pair-correlation-function analysis of vacancy and interstitial distributions obtained from the binary-collision code MARLOWE, using a spectrum of primary recoil energies computed for a fast-burst fission reactor. Model predictions of transient behavior were compared with a variety of experimental results from irradiated bulk Si, solar cells, and bipolar-junction transistors. The influence of defect clustering during neutron bombardment was further distinguished through contrast with electron irradiation, where the primal point defects are more uniformly dispersed

  5. A resorbable antibiotic-eluting polymer composite bone void filler for perioperative infection prevention in a rabbit radial defect model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin D Brooks

    Full Text Available Nearly 1.3 million total joint replacement procedures are performed in the United States annually, with numbers projected to rise exponentially in the coming decades. Although finite infection rates for these procedures remain consistently low, device-related infections represent a significant cause of implant failure, requiring secondary or revision procedures. Revision procedures manifest several-fold higher infection recurrence rates. Importantly, many revision surgeries, infected or not, require bone void fillers to support the host bone and provide a sufficient tissue bed for new hardware placement. Antibiotic-eluting bone void fillers (ABVF, providing both osteoconductive and antimicrobial properties, represent one approach for reducing rates of orthopedic device-related infections. Using a solvent-free, molten-cast process, a polymer-controlled antibiotic-eluting calcium carbonate hydroxyapatite (HAP ceramic composite BVF (ABVF was fabricated, characterized, and evaluated in vivo using a bacterial challenge in a rabbit radial defect window model. ABVF loaded with tobramycin eliminated the infectious burden in rabbits challenged with a clinically relevant strain of Staphylococcus aureus (inoculum as high as 10⁷ CFU. Histological, microbiological, and radiographic methods were used to detail the effects of ABVF on microbial challenge to host bone after 8 weeks in vivo. In contrast to the HAP/BVF controls, which provided no antibiotic protection and required euthanasia 3 weeks post-operatively, tobramycin-releasing ABVF animals showed no signs of infection (clinical, microbiological, or radiographic when euthanized at the 8-week study endpoint. ABVF sites did exhibit fibrous encapsulation around the implant at 8 weeks. Local antibiotic release from ABVF to orthopedic sites requiring bone void fillers eliminated the periprosthetic bacterial challenge in this 8-week in vivo study, confirming previous in vitro results.

  6. Radiographers and trainee radiologists reporting accident radiographs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buskov, L; Abild, A; Christensen, A

    2013-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy and clinical validity of reporting radiographers with that of trainee radiologists whom they have recently joined in reporting emergency room radiographs at Bispebjerg University Hospital....

  7. WHAT IS THE BEST RADIOGRAPHIC VIEW FOR "DIE PUNCH" DISTAL RADIUS FRACTURES? A CADAVER MODEL STUDY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcochio, Diego Figueira; Crepaldi, Bruno Eiras; Trindade, Christiano Augusto; da Costa, Antonio Carlos; Chakkour, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    the aim of this study is try to show the best view for distal radius fractures so called die-punch fractures. There has been used a human cadaver radius bone from the Salvador Arena Tissue Bank. This bone was cleaned up after removing the soft tissues and osteotomies created displaced lunate fossa fractures of 0, 1, 2, 3 and 5 mm. We have fixed this fragment with adhesive tape. Then the joint deviation were significantly increased with step-offs of 1 mm. Radiographs were then taken into 5 different positions: postero-anterior view, lateral view, oblique views and tangencial view for each of the deviations. The resulting lunate fossa depression in each X-ray film was analyzed by the AutoCAD 2010® software. The tangencial view was the best one to see the 1mm and 3mm bone degrees and the second one view to see the 2mm and 5 mm degrees. The pronated oblique view was the best to see the 2mm degrees and the oblique supinated view wasn't able to see the degrees between 1 and 2mm. The tangencial view was the best one to see the 1mm and 3mm bone degrees and the second one view to see the 2mm and 5 mm degrees.

  8. Kinetic model for electric-field induced point defect redistribution near semiconductor surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorai, Prashun; Seebauer, Edmund G.

    2014-07-01

    The spatial distribution of point defects near semiconductor surfaces affects the efficiency of devices. Near-surface band bending generates electric fields that influence the spatial redistribution of charged mobile defects that exchange infrequently with the lattice, as recently demonstrated for pile-up of isotopic oxygen near rutile TiO2 (110). The present work derives a mathematical model to describe such redistribution and establishes its temporal dependence on defect injection rate and band bending. The model shows that band bending of only a few meV induces significant redistribution, and that the direction of the electric field governs formation of either a valley or a pile-up.

  9. Kinetic model for electric-field induced point defect redistribution near semiconductor surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorai, Prashun; Seebauer, Edmund G.

    2014-01-01

    The spatial distribution of point defects near semiconductor surfaces affects the efficiency of devices. Near-surface band bending generates electric fields that influence the spatial redistribution of charged mobile defects that exchange infrequently with the lattice, as recently demonstrated for pile-up of isotopic oxygen near rutile TiO 2 (110). The present work derives a mathematical model to describe such redistribution and establishes its temporal dependence on defect injection rate and band bending. The model shows that band bending of only a few meV induces significant redistribution, and that the direction of the electric field governs formation of either a valley or a pile-up.

  10. Defect trap model of gas behaviour in UO2 fuel during irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szuta, A.

    2003-01-01

    Fission gas behaviour is one of the central concern in the fuel design, performance and hypothetical accident analysis. The report 'Defect trap model of gas behaviour in UO 2 fuel during irradiation' is the worldwide literature review of problems studied, experimental results and solutions proposed in related topics. Some of them were described in details in the report chapters. They are: anomalies in the experimental results; fission gas retention in the UO 2 fuel; microstructure of the UO 2 fuel after irradiation; fission gas release models; defect trap model of fission gas behaviour; fission gas release from UO 2 single crystal during low temperature irradiation in terms of a defect trap model; analysis of dynamic release of fission gases from single crystal UO 2 during low temperature irradiation in terms of defect trap model; behaviour of fission gas products in single crystal UO 2 during intermediate temperature irradiation in terms of a defect trap model; modification of re-crystallization temperature of UO 2 in function of burnup and its impact on fission gas release; apparent diffusion coefficient; formation of nanostructures in UO 2 fuel at high burnup; applications of the defect trap model to the gas leaking fuel elements number assessment in the nuclear power station (VVER-PWR)

  11. Radiographic tales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mussmann, Bo Redder

    Purpose Until now a large number of scientific studies have focused on technological aspects of radiography. This study is a step in another direction which examines the relationship between man and technology within radiography instead of considering man and technology as separate entities. Meth...... of their narrative alertness. Errors and failure to keep the time schedule can, however, lead the radiographers to a change of perspective that makes them displace man from the scene of radiography by playing on the premises of technology.......Purpose Until now a large number of scientific studies have focused on technological aspects of radiography. This study is a step in another direction which examines the relationship between man and technology within radiography instead of considering man and technology as separate entities...... a practice in which the relationship between man and technology is marked by a struggle of domination of one over the other. The struggle expresses itself through two competing plots: A diagnostic plot with a prevailing, but not merely chronological structure mostly composed of events tied to pathology...

  12. A defect model for UO2+x based on electrical conductivity and deviation from stoichiometry measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Philippe; Pizzi, Elisabetta; Dorado, Boris; Andersson, David; Crocombette, Jean-Paul; Martial, Chantal; Baldinozzi, Guido; Siméone, David; Maillard, Serge; Martin, Guillaume

    2017-10-01

    Electrical conductivity of UO2+x shows a strong dependence upon oxygen partial pressure and temperature which may be interpreted in terms of prevailing point defects. A simulation of this property along with deviation from stoichiometry is carried out based on a model that takes into account the presence of impurities, oxygen interstitials, oxygen vacancies, holes, electrons and clusters of oxygen atoms. The equilibrium constants for each defect reaction are determined to reproduce the experimental data. An estimate of defect concentrations and their dependence upon oxygen partial pressure can then be determined. The simulations carried out for 8 different temperatures (973-1673 K) over a wide range of oxygen partial pressures are discussed and resulting defect equilibrium constants are plotted in an Arrhenius diagram. This provides an estimate of defect formation energies which may further be compared to other experimental data or ab-initio and empirical potential calculations.

  13. Bone tissue ultrastructural defects in a mouse model for osteogenesis imperfecta: a Raman spectroscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tsoching; Kozloff, Kenneth M.; Goldstein, Steven A.; Morris, Michael D.

    2004-07-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is genetic defect in which the genes that code for the α1(I) or α2(I) chains of type I collagen are defective. The defects often result in substitution of a bulky amino acid for glycine, causing formation of collagen that can not form the normal triple helix. Depending on the details of the defects, the outcomes range from controllable to lethal. This study focuses on OI type IV, a more common and moderately severe form of the disease. People with the disease have a substantial increase in the risk and rate of fracture. We examine the spectroscopic consequences of these defects, using a mouse model (BRTL) that mimics OI type IV. We compare Raman images from tibial cortical tissue of wild-type mice and BRTL mice with single copy of mutation and show that both mineral to matrix ratios and collagen inter-fibril cross-links are different in wild-type and mutant mice.

  14. Ab-initio modelling of thermodynamics and kinetics of point defects in indium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agoston, Peter; Klein, Andreas; Albe, Karsten; Erhart, Paul

    2008-01-01

    The electrical and optical properties of indium oxide films strongly vary with the processing parameters. Especially the oxygen partial pressure and temperature determine properties like electrical conductivity, composition and transparency. Since this material owes its remarkable properties like the intrinsic n-type conductivity to its defect chemistry, it is important to understand both, the equilibrium defect thermodynamics and kinetics of the intrinsic point defects. In this contribution we present a defect model based on DFT total energy calculations using the GGA+U method. Further, the nudged elastic band method is employed in order to obtain a set of migration barriers for each defect species. Due to the complicated crystal structure of indium oxide a Kinetic Monte-Carlo algorithm was implemented, which allows to determine diffusion coefficients. The bulk tracer diffusion constant is predicted as a function of oxygen partial pressure, Fermi level and temperature for the pure material

  15. Modelling Defects Acceptors And Determination Of Electric Model From The Nyquist Plot And Bode In Thin Film CIGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demba Diallo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The performance of the chalcopyrite material CuInGaSe2 CIGS used as an absorber layer in thin-film photovoltaic devices is significantly affected by the presence of native defects. Multivalent defects e.g. double acceptors or simple acceptor are important immaterial used in solar cell production in general and in chalcopyrite materials in particular. We used the thin film solar cell simulation software SCAPS to enable the simulation of multivalent defects with up to five different charge states.Algorithms enabled us to simulate an arbitrary number of possible states of load. The presented solution method avoids numerical inaccuracies caused by the subtraction of two almost equal numbers. This new modelling facility is afterwards used to investigate the consequences of the multivalent character of defects for the simulation of chalcopyrite based CIGS. The capacitance increase with the evolution of the number of defects C- f curves have found to have defect dependence.

  16. A simple analytical model for electronic conductance in a one dimensional atomic chain across a defect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khater, Antoine; Szczesniak, Dominik

    2011-01-01

    An analytical model is presented for the electronic conductance in a one dimensional atomic chain across an isolated defect. The model system consists of two semi infinite lead atomic chains with the defect atom making the junction between the two leads. The calculation is based on a linear combination of atomic orbitals in the tight-binding approximation, with a single atomic one s-like orbital chosen in the present case. The matching method is used to derive analytical expressions for the scattering cross sections for the reflection and transmission processes across the defect, in the Landauer-Buttiker representation. These analytical results verify the known limits for an infinite atomic chain with no defects. The model can be applied numerically for one dimensional atomic systems supported by appropriate templates. It is also of interest since it would help establish efficient procedures for ensemble averages over a field of impurity configurations in real physical systems.

  17. A harmonic transition state theory model for defect initiation in crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delph, T J; Cao, P; Park, H S; Zimmerman, J A

    2013-01-01

    We outline here a model for the initiation of defects in crystals based upon harmonic transition state theory (hTST). This model combines a previously developed model for zero-temperature defect initiation with a multi-dimensional hTST model that is capable of accurately predicting the effects of temperature and loading rate upon defect initiation. The model has several features that set it apart from previous efforts along these lines, most notably a straightforward method of determining the energy barrier between adjacent equilibrium states that does not depend upon a priori information concerning the nature of the defect. We apply the model to two examples, triaxial stretching of a perfect fcc crystal and nanoindentation of a gold substrate. Very good agreement is found between the predictions of the model and independent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Among other things, the model predicts a strong dependence of the defect initiation behavior upon the loading parameter. A very attractive feature of this model is that it is valid for arbitrarily slow loading rates, in particular loading rates achievable in the laboratory, and suffers from none of the limitations in this regard inherent in MD simulations. (paper)

  18. Osteoinductivity of gelatin/β-tricalcium phosphate sponges loaded with different concentrations of mesenchymal stem cells and bone morphogenetic protein-2 in an equine bone defect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jong-Pil; Tsuzuki, Nao; Haneda, Shingo; Yamada, Kazutaka; Furuoka, Hidefumi; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Sasaki, Naoki

    2014-03-01

    Fracture is one of the most life-threatening injuries in horses. Fracture repair is often associated with unsatisfactory outcomes and is associated with a high incidence of complications. This study aimed to evaluate the osteogenic effects of gelatin/β-tricalcium phosphate (GT) sponges loaded with different concentrations/ratios of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) in an equine bone defect model. Seven thoroughbred horses were used in this study. Eight bone defects were created in the third metatarsal bones of each horse. Then, eight treatments, namely control, GT, GT/M-5, GT/M-6, GT/M-5/B-1, GT/M-5/B-3, GT/M-6/B-1, and GT/M-6/B-3 were applied to the eight different sites in a randomized manner (M-5: 2 × 10(5) MSCs; M-6: 2 × 10(6) MSCs; B-1: 1 μg of BMP-2; B-3: 3 μg of BMP-2). Repair of bone defects was assessed by radiography, quantitative computed tomography (QCT), and histopathological evaluation. Radiographic scores and CT values were significantly lower in the control group than in the other groups, while they were significantly higher in the GT/M-5/B-3 and GT/M-6/B-3 groups than in the other groups. The amount of mature compact bone filling the defects was greater in the GT/M-5/B-3 and GT/M-6/B-3 groups than in the other groups. The present study demonstrated that the GT sponge loaded with MSCs and BMP-2 promoted bone regeneration in an equine bone defect model. The GT/MSC/BMP-2 described here may be useful for treating horses with bone injuries.

  19. 3D modeling of missing pellet surface defects in BWR fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, B.W., E-mail: Benjamin.Spencer@inl.gov; Williamson, R.L.; Stafford, D.S.; Novascone, S.R.; Hales, J.D.; Pastore, G.

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • A global/local analysis procedure for missing pellet surface defects is proposed. • This is applied to defective BWR fuel under blade withdrawal and high power ramp conditions. • Sensitivity of the cladding response to key model parameters is studied. - Abstract: One of the important roles of cladding in light water reactor fuel rods is to prevent the release of fission products. To that end, it is essential that the cladding maintain its integrity under a variety of thermal and mechanical loading conditions. Local geometric irregularities in fuel pellets caused by manufacturing defects known as missing pellet surfaces (MPS) can in some circumstances lead to elevated cladding stresses that are sufficiently high to cause cladding failure. Accurate modeling of these defects can help prevent these types of failures. The BISON nuclear fuel performance code developed at Idaho National Laboratory can be used to simulate the global thermo-mechanical fuel rod behavior, as well as the local response of regions of interest, in either 2D or 3D. In either case, a full set of models to represent the thermal and mechanical properties of the fuel, cladding and plenum gas is employed. A procedure for coupling 2D full-length fuel rod models to detailed 3D models of the region of the rod containing a MPS defect is detailed here. The global and local model each contain appropriate physics and behavior models for nuclear fuel. This procedure is demonstrated on a simulation of a boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel rod containing a pellet with an MPS defect, subjected to a variety of transient events, including a control blade withdrawal and a ramp to high power. The importance of modeling the local defect using a 3D model is highlighted by comparing 3D and 2D representations of the defective pellet region. Parametric studies demonstrate the effects of the choice of gaseous swelling model and of the depth and geometry of the MPS defect on the response of the cladding

  20. Sigma models in the presence of dynamical point-like defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doikou, Anastasia; Karaiskos, Nikos

    2013-01-01

    Point-like Liouville integrable dynamical defects are introduced in the context of the Landau–Lifshitz and Principal Chiral (Faddeev–Reshetikhin) models. Based primarily on the underlying quadratic algebra we identify the first local integrals of motion, the associated Lax pairs as well as the relevant sewing conditions around the defect point. The involution of the integrals of motion is shown taking into account the sewing conditions.

  1. Solution-diffusion with defects model for pressure-assisted forward osmosis

    KAUST Repository

    Duan, Jintang

    2014-11-01

    An osmosis transport model is presented that combines the standard internal and external concentration polarization equations in the forward osmosis (FO) field with the selective layer transport equations first proposed by Sherwood in 1967. The Sherwood model describes water flux as the sum of a solute-selective, diffusive component driven by the sum of osmotic pressure and hydraulic pressure differences, and a nonselective, convective component driven by hydraulic pressure difference only. This solution-diffusion with defects (SDWD) model and the solution-diffusion (SD) model were compared against data collected using polyamide thin-film-composite (PA-TFC) and integrally-skinned asymmetric cellulose triacetate (CTA) membranes, evaluated in various configurations. When tested with pure water on the porous support side and 1.5. M (π=72.7. bar) sodium chloride solution on the selective layer side, applying 1.25. bar of hydraulic pressure to the porous support side increased water flux by an order of magnitude for PA-TFC membranes, but had negligible effect on CTA membrane flux. These large flux variations can be explained by the SDWD model, but not the SD model. To confirm the existence of defects, a PA-TFC membrane was coated with a uniform, highly water-permeable, nonselective polymer. After coating to block convection through defects, the influence of hydraulic pressure on water flux through this membrane essentially disappeared. Water flux through these defects is low (<1% of total water flux for PA-TFC membranes) and of little consequence in practical FO or reverse osmosis (RO) applications. But in pressure-assisted forward osmosis (PAFO) or pressure-retarded osmosis (PRO), convective transport through defects affects the solute concentration difference across the membrane selective layer, increasing or decreasing water flux through defect-free regions. The presence of defects may explain why membrane power density in PRO is lower than that predicted based on

  2. Effect of calcium citrate on bone integration in a rabbit femur defect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Wang, Wei; Chen, Qing-Yu; Lin, Zhong-Qin; Cheng, Shao-Wen; Kou, Dong-Quan; Ying, Xiao-Zhou; Shen, Yue; Cheng, Xiao-Jie; Nie, Peng-Fei; Li, Xiu-Cui; Rompis, Ferdinand An; Huang, Hang; Zhang, Hua; Mu, Zhong-Lin; Peng, Lei

    2012-04-01

    To explore effect of calcium citrate on bone integration in a rabbit femur defect model, and to compare the bone formation with different sizes by radiological and histological study. Twenty-four male Japanese white rabbits were randomly divided into three groups (Group A, B, C) in this study. Under anesthesia, defects of four sizes (1.2, 1.5, 2.0 and 2.5 mm) were created in each of the rabbits. Commercially pure calcium citrate powder was placed inside the medullary compartment of the femur (Experimental), while in the contralateral femur (Control) nothing was implanted. The defects were analyzed using radiography and histological analysis by using Imagepro-Plus 6.0 software after animal was sacrificed at 4th(Group A), 6th(Group B) and 8th(Group C) weeks postoperatively. Four samples were analyzed for each size of defect and each healing period. The histological and the radiologic evaluation were performed after sacrification of all rabbits on postoperative 4th and 6th weeks, It showed significant difference between the experimental group and the control group when these defects were less than or equal to 2.0 mm. No statistical difference was observed when these defects were larger than 2.0 mm at all healing periods except at the 4th week. Calcium citrate affects the early periods of bone defects healing mechanism in Japanese white rabbits positively, especially when the defect is not too large. We suggest further studies on calcium citrate to determine the effects of various dosages, administration ways and the experimental time on the bone defects. Copyright © 2012 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Annealing of radiation-induced defects in silicon in a simplified phenomenological model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazanu, S.; Lazanu, I.

    2001-01-01

    The concentration of primary radiation-induced defects has been previously estimated considering both the explicit mechanisms of the primary interaction between the incoming particle and the nuclei of the semiconductor lattice, and the recoil energy partition between ionisation and displacements, in the frame of the Lindhard theory. The primary displacement defects are vacancies and interstitials that are essentially unstable in silicon. They interact via migration, recombination, annihilation or produce other defects. In the present work, the time evolution of the concentration of defects induced by pions in medium and high resistivity silicon for detectors is modelled, after irradiation. In some approximations, the differential equations representing the time evolution processes could be decoupled. The theoretical equations so obtained are solved analytically in some particular cases, with one free parameter, for a wide range of particle fluences and/or for a wide energy range of incident particles, for different temperatures; the corresponding stationary solutions are also presented

  4. Modelling the development of defects during composite reinforcements and prepreg forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamila, N.; Madeo, A.

    2016-01-01

    Defects in composite materials are created during manufacture to a large extent. To avoid them as much as possible, it is important that process simulations model the onset and the development of these defects. It is then possible to determine the manufacturing conditions that lead to the absence or to the controlled presence of such defects. Three types of defects that may appear during textile composite reinforcement or prepreg forming are analysed and modelled in this paper. Wrinkling is one of the most common flaws that occur during textile composite reinforcement forming processes. The influence of the different rigidities of the textile reinforcement is studied. The concept of ‘locking angle’ is questioned. A second type of unusual behaviour of fibrous composite reinforcements that can be seen as a flaw during their forming process is the onset of peculiar ‘transition zones’ that are directly related to the bending stiffness of the fibres. The ‘transition zones’ are due to the bending stiffness of fibres. The standard continuum mechanics of Cauchy is not sufficient to model these defects. A second gradient approach is presented that allows one to account for such unusual behaviours and to master their onset and development during forming process simulations. Finally, the large slippages that may occur during a preform forming are discussed and simulated with meso finite-element models used for macroscopic forming. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Multiscale modelling of the structural integrity of composite materials’. PMID:27242300

  5. Statistical shape model-based reconstruction of a scaled, patient-specific surface model of the pelvis from a single standard AP x-ray radiograph

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng Guoyan [Institute for Surgical Technology and Biomechanics, University of Bern, Stauffacherstrasse 78, CH-3014 Bern (Switzerland)

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: The aim of this article is to investigate the feasibility of using a statistical shape model (SSM)-based reconstruction technique to derive a scaled, patient-specific surface model of the pelvis from a single standard anteroposterior (AP) x-ray radiograph and the feasibility of estimating the scale of the reconstructed surface model by performing a surface-based 3D/3D matching. Methods: Data sets of 14 pelvises (one plastic bone, 12 cadavers, and one patient) were used to validate the single-image based reconstruction technique. This reconstruction technique is based on a hybrid 2D/3D deformable registration process combining a landmark-to-ray registration with a SSM-based 2D/3D reconstruction. The landmark-to-ray registration was used to find an initial scale and an initial rigid transformation between the x-ray image and the SSM. The estimated scale and rigid transformation were used to initialize the SSM-based 2D/3D reconstruction. The optimal reconstruction was then achieved in three stages by iteratively matching the projections of the apparent contours extracted from a 3D model derived from the SSM to the image contours extracted from the x-ray radiograph: Iterative affine registration, statistical instantiation, and iterative regularized shape deformation. The image contours are first detected by using a semiautomatic segmentation tool based on the Livewire algorithm and then approximated by a set of sparse dominant points that are adaptively sampled from the detected contours. The unknown scales of the reconstructed models were estimated by performing a surface-based 3D/3D matching between the reconstructed models and the associated ground truth models that were derived from a CT-based reconstruction method. Such a matching also allowed for computing the errors between the reconstructed models and the associated ground truth models. Results: The technique could reconstruct the surface models of all 14 pelvises directly from the landmark

  6. An Analytical Model for Prediction of Magnetic Flux Leakage from Surface Defects in Ferromagnetic Tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh V.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an analytical model is proposed to predict magnetic flux leakage (MFL signals from the surface defects in ferromagnetic tubes. The analytical expression consists of elliptic integrals of first kind based on the magnetic dipole model. The radial (Bz component of leakage fields is computed from the cylindrical holes in ferromagnetic tubes. The effectiveness of the model has been studied by analyzing MFL signals as a function of the defect parameters and lift-off. The model predicted results are verified with experimental results and a good agreement is observed between the analytical and the experimental results. This analytical expression could be used for quick prediction of MFL signals and also input data for defect reconstructions in inverse MFL problem.

  7. Modelling of thermal field and point defect dynamics during silicon single crystal growth using CZ technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabanskis, A.; Virbulis, J.

    2018-05-01

    Mathematical modelling is employed to numerically analyse the dynamics of the Czochralski (CZ) silicon single crystal growth. The model is axisymmetric, its thermal part describes heat transfer by conduction and thermal radiation, and allows to predict the time-dependent shape of the crystal-melt interface. Besides the thermal field, the point defect dynamics is modelled using the finite element method. The considered process consists of cone growth and cylindrical phases, including a short period of a reduced crystal pull rate, and a power jump to avoid large diameter changes. The influence of the thermal stresses on the point defects is also investigated.

  8. Model-based wear measurements in total knee arthroplasty : development and validation of novel radiographic techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJsseldijk, van E.A.

    2016-01-01

    The primary aim of this work was to develop novel model-based mJSW measurement methods using a 3D reconstruction and compare the accuracy and precision of these methods to conventional mJSW measurement. This thesis contributed to the development, validation and clinical application of model-based

  9. Combining DFT, Cluster Expansions, and KMC to Model Point Defects in Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modine, N. A.; Wright, A. F.; Lee, S. R.; Foiles, S. M.; Battaile, C. C.; Thomas, J. C.; van der Ven, A.

    In an alloy, defect energies are sensitive to the occupations of nearby atomic sites, which leads to a distribution of defect properties. When radiation-induced defects diffuse from their initially non-equilibrium locations, this distribution becomes time-dependent. The defects can become trapped in energetically favorable regions of the alloy leading to a diffusion rate that slows dramatically with time. Density Functional Theory (DFT) allows the accurate determination of ground state and transition state energies for a defect in a particular alloy environment but requires thousands of processing hours for each such calculation. Kinetic Monte-Carlo (KMC) can be used to model defect diffusion and the changing distribution of defect properties but requires energy evaluations for millions of local environments. We have used the Cluster Expansion (CE) formalism to ``glue'' together these seemingly incompatible methods. The occupation of each alloy site is represented by an Ising-like variable, and products of these variables are used to expand quantities of interest. Once a CE is fit to a training set of DFT energies, it allows very rapid evaluation of the energy for an arbitrary configuration, while maintaining the accuracy of the underlying DFT calculations. These energy evaluations are then used to drive our KMC simulations. We will demonstrate the application of our DFT/MC/KMC approach to model thermal and carrier-induced diffusion of intrinsic point defects in III-V alloys. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE.

  10. Modeling and experimental methods to predict oxygen distribution in bone defects following cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heylman, Christopher M; Santoso, Sharon; Krebs, Melissa D; Saidel, Gerald M; Alsberg, Eben; Muschler, George F

    2014-04-01

    We have developed a mathematical model that allows simulation of oxygen distribution in a bone defect as a tool to explore the likely effects of local changes in cell concentration, defect size or geometry, local oxygen delivery with oxygen-generating biomaterials (OGBs), and changes in the rate of oxygen consumption by cells within a defect. Experimental data for the oxygen release rate from an OGB and the oxygen consumption rate of a transplanted cell population are incorporated into the model. With these data, model simulations allow prediction of spatiotemporal oxygen concentration within a given defect and the sensitivity of oxygen tension to changes in critical variables. This information may help to minimize the number of experiments in animal models that determine the optimal combinations of cells, scaffolds, and OGBs in the design of current and future bone regeneration strategies. Bone marrow-derived nucleated cell data suggest that oxygen consumption is dependent on oxygen concentration. OGB oxygen release is shown to be a time-dependent function that must be measured for accurate simulation. Simulations quantify the dependency of oxygen gradients in an avascular defect on cell concentration, cell oxygen consumption rate, OGB oxygen generation rate, and OGB geometry.

  11. Structure, Raman spectra and defect chemistry modelling of conductive pyrochlore oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, F.W.; Glerup, M.; Holtappels, P.

    2000-01-01

    -O(x) and V-O on the O site, interstitial oxygens O-i", and delocalised electrons and electron holes. Four mass action law expressions govern such a model. The defect model can rationalise why home-valent doping, i.e. substitution of Zr(4+) by Ce(4+), can lead to an increase in ionic conductivity...

  12. Solution-diffusion with defects model for pressure-assisted forward osmosis

    KAUST Repository

    Duan, Jintang; Litwiller, Eric; Pinnau, Ingo

    2014-01-01

    for PA-TFC membranes, but had negligible effect on CTA membrane flux. These large flux variations can be explained by the SDWD model, but not the SD model. To confirm the existence of defects, a PA-TFC membrane was coated with a uniform, highly water

  13. Prenatal cleft lip and maxillary alveolar defect repair in a 2-step fetal lamb model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wenghoefer, M.H.; Deprest, J.; Goetz, W.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.; Bergé, S.J.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: As there is no satisfying animal model simulating the complex cleft lip and palate anatomy in a standardized defect on one hand, and comprising the possibilities for extensive surgical procedures on the other hand, an improved fetal lamb model for cleft surgery was developed. MATERIALS AND

  14. DEFECT MONITORING IN IRON CASTING USING RESIDUES OF AUTOREGRESSIVE MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanusa Andrea Casarin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to monitor the index of general waste irons forecasting nodular and gray using the residues originated from the methodology Box & Jenkins by means of X-bar and R control charts. Search is to find a general class of model ARIMA (p, d, q but as data have autocorrelation is found to the number of residues which allowed the application of charts. The found model was the model SARIMA (0,1,1(0,1,1 . In step of checking the stability of the model was found that some comments are out of control due to temperature and chemical composition.

  15. A Thermal Runaway Failure Model for Low-Voltage BME Ceramic Capacitors with Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teverovsky, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Reliability of base metal electrode (BME) multilayer ceramic capacitors (MLCCs) that until recently were used mostly in commercial applications, have been improved substantially by using new materials and processes. Currently, the inception of intrinsic wear-out failures in high quality capacitors became much greater than the mission duration in most high-reliability applications. However, in capacitors with defects degradation processes might accelerate substantially and cause infant mortality failures. In this work, a physical model that relates the presence of defects to reduction of breakdown voltages and decreasing times to failure has been suggested. The effect of the defect size has been analyzed using a thermal runaway model of failures. Adequacy of highly accelerated life testing (HALT) to predict reliability at normal operating conditions and limitations of voltage acceleration are considered. The applicability of the model to BME capacitors with cracks is discussed and validated experimentally.

  16. Predicting Defects Using Information Intelligence Process Models in the Software Technology Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraj, Manjula Gandhi; Jayabal, Devi Shree; Srinivasan, Thenmozhi; Balasubramanie, Palanisamy

    2015-01-01

    A key differentiator in a competitive market place is customer satisfaction. As per Gartner 2012 report, only 75%-80% of IT projects are successful. Customer satisfaction should be considered as a part of business strategy. The associated project parameters should be proactively managed and the project outcome needs to be predicted by a technical manager. There is lot of focus on the end state and on minimizing defect leakage as much as possible. Focus should be on proactively managing and shifting left in the software life cycle engineering model. Identify the problem upfront in the project cycle and do not wait for lessons to be learnt and take reactive steps. This paper gives the practical applicability of using predictive models and illustrates use of these models in a project to predict system testing defects thus helping to reduce residual defects.

  17. process setting models for the minimization of costs defectives

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Obe

    determine the mean setting so as to minimise the total loss through under-limit complaints and loss of sales and goodwill as well as over-limit losses through excess materials and rework costs. Models are developed for the two types of setting of the mean so that the minimum costs of losses are achieved. Also, a model is ...

  18. Model based defect detection for free stator of ultrasonic motor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amini, Rouzbeh; Mojallali, Hamed; Izadi-Zamanabadi, Roozbeh

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, measurements of admittance magnitude and phase are used to identify the complex values of equivalent circuit model for free stator of an ultrasonic motor. The model is used to evaluate the changes in the admittance and relative changes in the values of equivalent circuit elements. ...

  19. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics modeling of the kinetics of lamellar block copolymer defect annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Andrew J.; Lawson, Richard A.; Nation, Benjamin D.; Ludovice, Peter J.; Henderson, Clifford L.

    2016-01-01

    State-of-the-art block copolymer (BCP)-directed self-assembly (DSA) methods still yield defect densities orders of magnitude higher than is necessary in semiconductor fabrication despite free-energy calculations that suggest equilibrium defect densities are much lower than is necessary for economic fabrication. This disparity suggests that the main problem may lie in the kinetics of defect removal. This work uses a coarse-grained model to study the rates, pathways, and dependencies of healing a common defect to give insight into the fundamental processes that control defect healing and give guidance on optimal process conditions for BCP-DSA. It is found that bulk simulations yield an exponential drop in defect heal rate above χN˜30. Thin films show no change in rate associated with the energy barrier below χN˜50, significantly higher than the χN values found previously for self-consistent field theory studies that neglect fluctuations. Above χN˜50, the simulations show an increase in energy barrier scaling with 1/2 to 1/3 of the bulk systems. This is because thin films always begin healing at the free interface or the BCP-underlayer interface, where the increased A-B contact area associated with the transition state is minimized, while the infinitely thick films cannot begin healing at an interface.

  20. Incorporation of composite defects from ultrasonic NDE into CAD and FE models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingol, Onur Rauf; Schiefelbein, Bryan; Grandin, Robert J.; Holland, Stephen D.; Krishnamurthy, Adarsh

    2017-02-01

    Fiber-reinforced composites are widely used in aerospace industry due to their combined properties of high strength and low weight. However, owing to their complex structure, it is difficult to assess the impact of manufacturing defects and service damage on their residual life. While, ultrasonic testing (UT) is the preferred NDE method to identify the presence of defects in composites, there are no reasonable ways to model the damage and evaluate the structural integrity of composites. We have developed an automated framework to incorporate flaws and known composite damage automatically into a finite element analysis (FEA) model of composites, ultimately aiding in accessing the residual life of composites and make informed decisions regarding repairs. The framework can be used to generate a layer-by-layer 3D structural CAD model of the composite laminates replicating their manufacturing process. Outlines of structural defects, such as delaminations, are automatically detected from UT of the laminate and are incorporated into the CAD model between the appropriate layers. In addition, the framework allows for direct structural analysis of the resulting 3D CAD models with defects by automatically applying the appropriate boundary conditions. In this paper, we show a working proof-of-concept for the composite model builder with capabilities of incorporating delaminations between laminate layers and automatically preparing the CAD model for structural analysis using a FEA software.

  1. Quantifying defects in N-layer graphene via a phenomenological model of Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giro, Ronaldo; Archanjo, Braulio S.; Martins Ferreira, Erlon H.; Capaz, Rodrigo B.; Jorio, Ado; Achete, Carlos A.

    2014-01-01

    We construct a model to obtain the density of point defects in N-layer graphene by combining Raman spectroscopy and the TRIM (Transport Range of Ions in Matter) simulation package. The model relates the intensity (or area) ratio of graphene’s D and G bands to the defect density on each layer due to Ar + bombardment. Our method is effective for ion fluences ranging from 10 11 to ∼10 14 Ar + /cm −2 and it should be in principle extendable to any kind of ion and energy

  2. Quantifying defects in N-layer graphene via a phenomenological model of Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giro, Ronaldo, E-mail: rgiro@br.ibm.com [Divisão de Metrologia de Materiais, Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Qualidade e Tecnologia (Inmetro), Duque de Caxias, RJ 25250-020 (Brazil); Archanjo, Braulio S.; Martins Ferreira, Erlon H. [Divisão de Metrologia de Materiais, Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Qualidade e Tecnologia (Inmetro), Duque de Caxias, RJ 25250-020 (Brazil); Capaz, Rodrigo B. [Divisão de Metrologia de Materiais, Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Qualidade e Tecnologia (Inmetro), Duque de Caxias, RJ 25250-020 (Brazil); Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Caixa Postal 68528, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 21941-972 (Brazil); Jorio, Ado [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG 30123-970 (Brazil); Achete, Carlos A. [Divisão de Metrologia de Materiais, Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Qualidade e Tecnologia (Inmetro), Duque de Caxias, RJ 25250-020 (Brazil); Departamento de Engenharia Metalúrgica e de Materiais, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Caixa Postal 68505, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 21945-970 (Brazil)

    2014-01-15

    We construct a model to obtain the density of point defects in N-layer graphene by combining Raman spectroscopy and the TRIM (Transport Range of Ions in Matter) simulation package. The model relates the intensity (or area) ratio of graphene’s D and G bands to the defect density on each layer due to Ar{sup +} bombardment. Our method is effective for ion fluences ranging from 10{sup 11} to ∼10{sup 14} Ar{sup +}/cm{sup −2} and it should be in principle extendable to any kind of ion and energy.

  3. Large scale Bayesian nuclear data evaluation with consistent model defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnabel, G

    2015-01-01

    The aim of nuclear data evaluation is the reliable determination of cross sections and related quantities of the atomic nuclei. To this end, evaluation methods are applied which combine the information of experiments with the results of model calculations. The evaluated observables with their associated uncertainties and correlations are assembled into data sets, which are required for the development of novel nuclear facilities, such as fusion reactors for energy supply, and accelerator driven systems for nuclear waste incineration. The efficiency and safety of such future facilities is dependent on the quality of these data sets and thus also on the reliability of the applied evaluation methods. This work investigated the performance of the majority of available evaluation methods in two scenarios. The study indicated the importance of an essential component in these methods, which is the frequently ignored deficiency of nuclear models. Usually, nuclear models are based on approximations and thus their predictions may deviate from reliable experimental data. As demonstrated in this thesis, the neglect of this possibility in evaluation methods can lead to estimates of observables which are inconsistent with experimental data. Due to this finding, an extension of Bayesian evaluation methods is proposed to take into account the deficiency of the nuclear models. The deficiency is modeled as a random function in terms of a Gaussian process and combined with the model prediction. This novel formulation conserves sum rules and allows to explicitly estimate the magnitude of model deficiency. Both features are missing in available evaluation methods so far. Furthermore, two improvements of existing methods have been developed in the course of this thesis. The first improvement concerns methods relying on Monte Carlo sampling. A Metropolis-Hastings scheme with a specific proposal distribution is suggested, which proved to be more efficient in the studied scenarios than the

  4. The quantum nonlinear Schroedinger model with point-like defect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caudrelier, V; Mintchev, M; Ragoucy, E

    2004-01-01

    We establish a family of point-like impurities which preserve the quantum integrability of the nonlinear Schroedinger model in 1+1 spacetime dimensions. We briefly describe the construction of the exact second quantized solution of this model in terms of an appropriate reflection-transmission algebra. The basic physical properties of the solution, including the spacetime symmetry of the bulk scattering matrix, are also discussed. (letter to the editor)

  5. Radiographic imaging. 4 ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chesney, D.N.; Chesney, M.O.

    1981-01-01

    This is a revised edition of the textbook previously entitled 'Radiographic Photography' and accords with the current syllabus of training for the Diploma of the Royal College of Radiographers. The aim is a non-mathematical approach to provide a guide for the student to the knowledge and understanding of the theoretical concepts which affect the quality of radiographic image; materials and practices are also reviewed, particularly in relation to the characteristics of the radiographic image, and to processing equipment and processing areas. The subject is dealt with under the following headings: the photographic process, film materials in x-ray departments, sensitometry, storage of film materials and radiographs, intensifying screens and cassettes, film processing, developing, fixing, rinsing, washing, drying, the processing area and equipment, systems for daylight film handling, the radiographic image, management of the quality, presentation of the radiograph, light images and their recording, fluorography, some special imaging processes, e.g. xerography, copying radiographs. (U.K.)

  6. Modelling of shrinkage cavity defects during the wheel and belt casting process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dablement, S; Mortensen, D; Fjaer, H; Lee, M; Grandfield, J; Savage, G; Nguyen, V

    2012-01-01

    Properzi continuous casting is a wheel and belt casting process used for producing aluminium wire rod which is essential to the making of electrical cables and over head lines. One of the main concerns of Properzi process users is to ensure good quality of the final product and to avoid cast defects especially the presence of shrinkage cavity. Numerical models developed with the Alsim software, which allows an automatic calculation of gap dependent heat transfer coefficients at the metal-mould interface due to thermal deformation, are used in order to get a better understanding on the shrinkage cavity formation. Models show the effect of process parameters on the cavity defect development and provide initial guidance for users in order to avoid this kind of casting defect.

  7. Radiographic features of appendiceal colic in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schisgall, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    The concept of appendiceal colic was introduced in 1980 to explain the common problem of recurrent crampy abdominal pain (RAP) in children. Children with appendiceal colic often have inspissated casts of stool as foreign bodies of the appendix. The radiographic findings of 115 children operated upon for appendiceal colic have been reviewed. The radiographic features of this syndrom have included: filling defects of the appendix (83% incidence of inspissated casts of stool within the appendix); partial filling of the appendix (44% incidence of fecal casts); retained barium behind 72 h (92% incidence of fecal casts blocking egress of barium); non-visualization of the appendix (42% incidence of fecal casts); and distention of the appendix (100% incidence of fecal casts). The correlation of radiographic and operative findings will be presented. A rational approach to the radiographic workup of a child with RAP will be presented. (orig.)

  8. Scapular flap for maxillectomy defect reconstruction and preliminary results using three-dimensional modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modest, Mara C; Moore, Eric J; Abel, Kathryn M Van; Janus, Jeffrey R; Sims, John R; Price, Daniel L; Olsen, Kerry D

    2017-01-01

    Discuss current techniques utilizing the scapular tip and subscapular system for free tissue reconstruction of maxillary defects and highlight the impact of medical modeling on these techniques with a case series. Case review series at an academic hospital of patients undergoing maxillectomy + thoracodorsal scapula composite free flap (TSCF) reconstruction. Three-dimensional (3D) models were used in the last five cases. 3D modeling, surgical, functional, and aesthetic outcomes were reviewed. Nine patients underwent TSCF reconstruction for maxillectomy defects (median age = 43 years; range, 19-66 years). Five patients (55%) had a total maxillectomy (TM) ± orbital exenteration, whereas four patients (44%) underwent subtotal palatal maxillectomy. For TM, the contralateral scapula tip was positioned with its natural concavity recreating facial contour. The laterally based vascular pedicle was ideally positioned for facial vessel anastomosis. For subtotal-palatal defect, an ipsilateral flap was harvested, but inset with the convex surface facing superiorly. Once 3D models were available from our anatomic modeling lab, they were used for intraoperative planning of the last five patients. Use of the model intraoperatively improved efficiency and allowed for better contouring/plating of the TSCF. At last follow-up, all patients had good functional outcomes. Aesthetic outcomes were more successful in patients where 3D-modeling was used (100% vs. 50%). There were no flap failures. Median follow-up >1 month was 5.2 months (range, 1-32.7 months). Reconstruction of maxillectomy defects is complex. Successful aesthetic and functional outcomes are critical to patient satisfaction. The TSCF is a versatile flap. Based on defect type, choosing laterality is crucial for proper vessel orientation and outcomes. The use of internally produced 3D models has helped refine intraoperative contouring and flap inset, leading to more successful outcomes. 4. Laryngoscope, 127:E8-E14

  9. In vivo micro-CT analysis of bone remodeling in a rat calvarial defect model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umoh, Joseph U; Holdsworth, David W [Pre-Clinical Imaging Research Centre, Robarts Research Institute, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Western Ontario, PO Box 5015, 100 Perth Drive, London, ON N6A 5K8 (Canada); Sampaio, Arthur V; Underhill, T Michael [Laboratory of Molecular Skeletogenesis, Department of Cellular and Physiological Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Welch, Ian [Animal Care and Veterinary Services, University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada); Pitelka, Vasek; Goldberg, Harvey A [CIHR Group in Skeletal Development and Remodelling, University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada)], E-mail: jumoh@imaging.robarts.ca, E-mail: asampaio@interchange.ubc.ca, E-mail: tunderhi@interchange.ubc.ca, E-mail: iwelch@uwo.ca, E-mail: vasek.pitelka@schulich.uwo.ca, E-mail: hagoldbe@uwo.ca, E-mail: david.holdsworth@imaging.robarts.ca

    2009-04-07

    The rodent calvarial defect model is commonly used to investigate bone regeneration and wound healing. This study presents a micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) methodology for measuring the bone mineral content (BMC) in a rat calvarial defect and validates it by estimating its precision error. Two defect models were implemented. A single 6 mm diameter defect was created in 20 rats, which were imaged in vivo for longitudinal experiments. Three 5 mm diameter defects were created in three additional rats, which were repeatedly imaged ex vivo to determine precision. Four control rats and four rats treated with bone morphogenetic protein were imaged at 3, 6, 9 and 12 weeks post-surgery. Scan parameters were 80 kVp, 0.45 mA and 180 mAs. Images were reconstructed with an isotropic resolution of 45 {mu}m. At 6 weeks, the BMC in control animals (4.37 {+-} 0.66 mg) was significantly lower (p < 0.05) than that in treated rats (11.29 {+-} 1.01 mg). Linear regression between the BMC and bone fractional area, from 20 rats, showed a strong correlation (r{sup 2} = 0.70, p < 0.0001), indicating that the BMC can be used, in place of previous destructive analysis techniques, to characterize bone growth. The high precision (2.5%) of the micro-CT methodology indicates its utility in detecting small BMC changes in animals.

  10. Calibrating a multi-model approach to defect production in high energy collision cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinisch, H.L.; Singh, B.N.; Diaz de la Rubia, T.

    1994-01-01

    A multi-model approach to simulating defect production processes at the atomic scale is described that incorporates molecular dynamics (MD), binary collision approximation (BCA) calculations and stochastic annealing simulations. The central hypothesis is that the simple, fast computer codes capable of simulating large numbers of high energy cascades (e.g., BCA codes) can be made to yield the correct defect configurations when their parameters are calibrated using the results of the more physically realistic MD simulations. The calibration procedure is investigated using results of MD simulations of 25 keV cascades in copper. The configurations of point defects are extracted from the MD cascade simulations at the end of the collisional phase, thus providing information similar to that obtained with a binary collision model. The MD collisional phase defect configurations are used as input to the ALSOME annealing simulation code, and values of the ALSOME quenching parameters are determined that yield the best fit to the post-quenching defect configurations of the MD simulations. ((orig.))

  11. In vivo micro-CT analysis of bone remodeling in a rat calvarial defect model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umoh, Joseph U.; Sampaio, Arthur V.; Welch, Ian; Pitelka, Vasek; Goldberg, Harvey A.; Underhill, T. Michael; Holdsworth, David W.

    2009-04-01

    The rodent calvarial defect model is commonly used to investigate bone regeneration and wound healing. This study presents a micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) methodology for measuring the bone mineral content (BMC) in a rat calvarial defect and validates it by estimating its precision error. Two defect models were implemented. A single 6 mm diameter defect was created in 20 rats, which were imaged in vivo for longitudinal experiments. Three 5 mm diameter defects were created in three additional rats, which were repeatedly imaged ex vivo to determine precision. Four control rats and four rats treated with bone morphogenetic protein were imaged at 3, 6, 9 and 12 weeks post-surgery. Scan parameters were 80 kVp, 0.45 mA and 180 mAs. Images were reconstructed with an isotropic resolution of 45 µm. At 6 weeks, the BMC in control animals (4.37 ± 0.66 mg) was significantly lower (p small BMC changes in animals.

  12. Low-dose ionizing radiation alleviates Aβ42-induced defective phenotypes in Drosophila Alzheimer's disease models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, SooJin; Jeong, Hae Min; Nam, Seon Young

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by amyloid plaques, progressive neuronal loss, and gradual deterioration of memory. Amyloid imaging using positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers have been developed and approved for clinical use in the evaluation of suspected neurodegenerative disease, including AD. Particularly, previous studies involving low-dose ionizing radiation on Aβ 42-treated mouse hippocampal neurons have suggested a potential role for low-dose ionizing radiation in the treatment of AD. However, associated in vivo studies involving the therapy effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on AD are still insufficient. As a powerful cell biological system, Drosophila AD models have been generated and established a useful model organism for study on the etiology of human AD. In this study, we investigated the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on Drosophila AD models. Our results suggest that low-dose ionizing radiation have the beneficial effects on not only the Aβ42-induced developmental defective phenotypes but also motor defects in Drosophila AD models. These results might be due to a regulation of apoptosis, and provide insight into the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. Our results suggest that low-dose ionizing radiation have the beneficial effects on not only the Aβ42-induced developmental defective phenotypes but also motor defects in Drosophila AD models. These results might be due to a regulation of apoptosis, and provide insight into the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation.

  13. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics modeling of the kinetics of lamellar BCP defect annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Andrew J.; Lawson, Richard A.; Nation, Benjamin D.; Ludovice, Peter J.; Henderson, Clifford L.

    2015-03-01

    Directed self-assembly of block copolymers (BCPs) is a process that has received great interest in the field of nanomanufacturing in the past decade, and great strides towards forming high quality aligned patterns have been made. But state of the art methods still yield defectivities orders of magnitude higher than is necessary in semi-conductor fabrication even though free energy calculations suggest that equilibrium defectivities are much lower than is necessary for economic semi-conductor fabrication. This disparity suggests that the main problem may lie in the kinetics of defect removal. This work uses a coarse-grained model to study the rates, pathways, and dependencies of healing a common defect to give insight into the fundamental processes that control defect healing and give guidance on optimal process conditions for BCP-DSA. It is found that infinitely thick films yield an exponential drop in defect heal rate above χN ~ 30. Below χN ~ 30, the rate of transport was similar to the rate at which the transition state was reached so that the overall rate changed only slightly. The energy barrier in periodic simulations increased with 0.31 χN on average. Thin film simulations show no change in rate associated with the energy barrier below χN ~ 50, and then show an increase in energy barrier scaling with 0.16χN. Thin film simulations always begin to heal at either the free interface or the BCP-underlayer interface where the increased A-B contact area associated with the transition state will be minimized, while the infinitely thick films must start healing in the bulk where the A-B contact area is increased. It is also found that cooperative chain movement is required for the defect to start healing.

  14. Electrospun biodegradable microfibers induce new collagen formation in a rat abdominal wall defect model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarpø, Cecilie Lærke Glindtvad; Chen, Menglin; Nygaard, Jens Vinge

    2018-01-01

    and effect on collagen and elastin production of a degradable mesh releasing basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Implantation of biodegradable mesh with or without bFGF in their core has been conducted in 40 rats in an abdominal wall defect model. Samples were explanted after 4, 8, and 24 weeks...

  15. Study on non-universal critical behaviour in Ising model with defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guimaraes, L.G.

    1986-01-01

    One-dimensional quantum analogous of two-dimensional Ising models with line and step type linear defects are studied. The phenomenological renormalization group was approached using conformal invariance for relating critical exponent N sup(*) sub(H). Aiming to obtain the Hamiltonian diagonal, Lanczos tridiagonal method was used. (H.C.K.)

  16. Stringy models of modified gravity: space-time defects and structure formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mavromatos, Nick E.; Sakellariadou, Mairi; Yusaf, Muhammad Furqaan

    2013-01-01

    Starting from microscopic models of space-time foam, based on brane universes propagating in bulk space-times populated by D0-brane defects (''D-particles''), we arrive at effective actions used by a low-energy observer on the brane world to describe his/her observations of the Universe. These actions include, apart from the metric tensor field, also scalar (dilaton) and vector fields, the latter describing the interactions of low-energy matter on the brane world with the recoiling point-like space-time defect (D-particle). The vector field is proportional to the recoil velocity of the D-particle and as such it satisfies a certain constraint. The vector breaks locally Lorentz invariance, which however is assumed to be conserved on average in a space-time foam situation, involving the interaction of matter with populations of D-particle defects. In this paper we clarify the role of fluctuations of the vector field on structure formation and galactic growth. In particular we demonstrate that, already at the end of the radiation era, the (constrained) vector field associated with the recoil of the defects provides the seeds for a growing mode in the evolution of the Universe. Such a growing mode survives during the matter dominated era, provided the variance of the D-particle recoil velocities on the brane is larger than a critical value. We note that in this model, as a result of specific properties of D-brane dynamics in the bulk, there is no issue of overclosing the brane Universe for large defect densities. Thus, in these models, the presence of defects may be associated with large-structure formation. Although our string inspired models do have (conventional, from a particle physics point of view) dark matter components, nevertheless it is interesting that the role of ''extra'' dark matter is also provided by the population of massive defects. This is consistent with the weakly interacting character of the D-particle defects, which predominantly interact only

  17. Phenomenological Model Describing the Formation of Peeling Defects on Hot-Rolled Duplex Stainless Steel 2205

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong-jun, Zhang; Hui, Zhang; Jing-tao, Han

    2017-05-01

    The chemical composition, morphology, and microstructure of peeling defects formed on the surface of sheets from steel 2205 under hot rolling are studied. The microstructure of the surface is analyzed using scanning electron and light microscopy. The zones affected are shown to contain nonmetallic inclusions of types Al2O3 and CaO - SiO2 - Al2O3 - MgO in the form of streak precipitates and to have an unfavorable content of austenite, which causes decrease in the ductility of the area. The results obtained are used to derive a five-stage phenomenological model of formation of such defects.

  18. Automatic Fabric Defect Detection with a Multi-Scale Convolutional Denoising Autoencoder Network Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Shuang; Wang, Yudan; Wen, Guojun

    2018-04-02

    Fabric defect detection is a necessary and essential step of quality control in the textile manufacturing industry. Traditional fabric inspections are usually performed by manual visual methods, which are low in efficiency and poor in precision for long-term industrial applications. In this paper, we propose an unsupervised learning-based automated approach to detect and localize fabric defects without any manual intervention. This approach is used to reconstruct image patches with a convolutional denoising autoencoder network at multiple Gaussian pyramid levels and to synthesize detection results from the corresponding resolution channels. The reconstruction residual of each image patch is used as the indicator for direct pixel-wise prediction. By segmenting and synthesizing the reconstruction residual map at each resolution level, the final inspection result can be generated. This newly developed method has several prominent advantages for fabric defect detection. First, it can be trained with only a small amount of defect-free samples. This is especially important for situations in which collecting large amounts of defective samples is difficult and impracticable. Second, owing to the multi-modal integration strategy, it is relatively more robust and accurate compared to general inspection methods (the results at each resolution level can be viewed as a modality). Third, according to our results, it can address multiple types of textile fabrics, from simple to more complex. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed model is robust and yields good overall performance with high precision and acceptable recall rates.

  19. Automatic Fabric Defect Detection with a Multi-Scale Convolutional Denoising Autoencoder Network Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Mei

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Fabric defect detection is a necessary and essential step of quality control in the textile manufacturing industry. Traditional fabric inspections are usually performed by manual visual methods, which are low in efficiency and poor in precision for long-term industrial applications. In this paper, we propose an unsupervised learning-based automated approach to detect and localize fabric defects without any manual intervention. This approach is used to reconstruct image patches with a convolutional denoising autoencoder network at multiple Gaussian pyramid levels and to synthesize detection results from the corresponding resolution channels. The reconstruction residual of each image patch is used as the indicator for direct pixel-wise prediction. By segmenting and synthesizing the reconstruction residual map at each resolution level, the final inspection result can be generated. This newly developed method has several prominent advantages for fabric defect detection. First, it can be trained with only a small amount of defect-free samples. This is especially important for situations in which collecting large amounts of defective samples is difficult and impracticable. Second, owing to the multi-modal integration strategy, it is relatively more robust and accurate compared to general inspection methods (the results at each resolution level can be viewed as a modality. Third, according to our results, it can address multiple types of textile fabrics, from simple to more complex. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed model is robust and yields good overall performance with high precision and acceptable recall rates.

  20. Imaging techniques for visualizing and phenotyping congenital heart defects in murine models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoqin; Tobita, Kimimasa; Francis, Richard J B; Lo, Cecilia W

    2013-06-01

    Mouse model is ideal for investigating the genetic and developmental etiology of congenital heart disease. However, cardiovascular phenotyping for the precise diagnosis of structural heart defects in mice remain challenging. With rapid advances in imaging techniques, there are now high throughput phenotyping tools available for the diagnosis of structural heart defects. In this review, we discuss the efficacy of four different imaging modalities for congenital heart disease diagnosis in fetal/neonatal mice, including noninvasive fetal echocardiography, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), micro-magnetic resonance imaging (micro-MRI), and episcopic fluorescence image capture (EFIC) histopathology. The experience we have gained in the use of these imaging modalities in a large-scale mouse mutagenesis screen have validated their efficacy for congenital heart defect diagnosis in the tiny hearts of fetal and newborn mice. These cutting edge phenotyping tools will be invaluable for furthering our understanding of the developmental etiology of congenital heart disease. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Incorporation of defects into the central atoms model of a metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lass, Eric A.; Zhu Aiwu; Shiflet, G.J.; Joseph Poon, S.

    2011-01-01

    The central atoms model (CAM) of a metallic glass is extended to incorporate thermodynamically stable defects, similar to vacancies in a crystalline solid, within the amorphous structure. A bond deficiency (BD), which is the proposed defect present in all metallic glasses, is introduced into the CAM equations. Like vacancies in a crystalline solid, BDs are thermodynamically stable entities because of the increase in entropy associated with their creation, and there is an equilibrium concentration present in the glassy phase. When applied to Cu-Zr and Ni-Zr binary metallic glasses, the concentration of thermally induced BDs surrounding Zr atoms reaches a relatively constant value at the glass transition temperature, regardless of composition within a given glass system. Using this 'critical' defect concentration, the predicted temperatures at which the glass transition is expected to occur are in good agreement with the experimentally determined glass transition temperatures for both alloy systems.

  2. Quality of radiograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Nassir Ibrahim; Azali Muhammad; Ab. Razak Hamzah; Abd. Aziz Mohamed; Mohamad Pauzi Ismail

    2008-01-01

    This chapter discussed on how to get a good radiograph. There are several factors that can make good radiograph such as density of radiograph, the contrast of radiograph, definition of radiograph, the present of artifact and backscattering. All of this factor will discuss detailed on each unit of chapter with some figure, picture to make the reader understand more when read this book. And at the end, the reader will introduce with penetrameter, one of device to determine the level of quality of the radiograph. There are two type of penetrameter like wire type or holes type. This standard must be followed by all the radiographer around the world to produce the good result that is standard and more reliable.

  3. VIRTUAL 3-D MODELLING OF AIRWAYS IN CONGENITAL HEART DEFECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Speggiorin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The involvement of the airway is not uncommon in the presence of complex cardiovascular malformations. In these cases, a careful inspection of the relationship between the airway and the vasculature is paramount to plan the surgical procedure. Three-dimentional printing enhanced the visualization of the cardio-vascualr structure. Unfortunately IT does not allow to remove selected anatomy to improve the visualization of the surrounding ones. Computerized modelling (CM of has the potential to fill this gap by allowing a dynamic handling of different anatomies, increasing the exposure of vessels or bronchi to show their relationship.. We started to use this technique to plan the surgical repair in these complex cases where the airway is affected. This technique is routinely used in our Institution as an additional tool in the pre-surgical assessment. We report 4 cases in which the airways were compressed by vascular structures : ascending aorta in 1, left pulmonary artery sling in 1, Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA in 1 and major aorto-pulmonary collateral artery in 1. We believe this technique can enhance the understanding of the causes of airway involvement and facilitate the creation of an appropriate surgical plan.

  4. A Modified Rabbit Ulna Defect Model for Evaluating Periosteal Substitutes in Bone Engineering: A Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Backly, Rania M. [DIMES, University of Genova, Genova (Italy); IRCCS AOU San Martino–IST Istituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul Cancro, Genova (Italy); Faculty of Dentistry, Alexandria University, Alexandria (Egypt); Chiapale, Danilo [IRCCS AOU San Martino–IST Istituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul Cancro, Genova (Italy); Muraglia, Anita [Biorigen S.R.L., Genova (Italy); Tromba, Giuliana [Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.P.A., Trieste (Italy); Ottonello, Chiara [Biorigen S.R.L., Genova (Italy); Santolini, Federico [IRCCS AOU San Martino–IST Istituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul Cancro, Genova (Italy); Cancedda, Ranieri; Mastrogiacomo, Maddalena, E-mail: maddalena.mastrogiacomo@unige.it [DIMES, University of Genova, Genova (Italy); IRCCS AOU San Martino–IST Istituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul Cancro, Genova (Italy)

    2015-01-06

    The present work defines a modified critical size rabbit ulna defect model for bone regeneration in which a non-resorbable barrier membrane was used to separate the radius from the ulna to create a valid model for evaluation of tissue-engineered periosteal substitutes. Eight rabbits divided into two groups were used. Critical defects (15 mm) were made in the ulna completely eliminating periosteum. For group I, defects were filled with a nanohydroxyapatite poly(ester urethane) scaffold soaked in PBS and left as such (group Ia) or wrapped with a tissue-engineered periosteal substitute (group Ib). For group II, an expanded-polytetrafluoroethylene (e-PTFE) (GORE-TEX{sup ®}) membrane was inserted around the radius then the defects received either scaffold alone (group IIa) or scaffold wrapped with periosteal substitute (group IIb). Animals were euthanized after 12–16 weeks, and bone regeneration was evaluated by radiography, computed microtomography (μCT), and histology. In the first group, we observed formation of radio-ulnar synostosis irrespective of the treatment. This was completely eliminated upon placement of the e-PTFE (GORE-TEX{sup ®}) membrane in the second group of animals. In conclusion, modification of the model using a non-resorbable e-PTFE membrane to isolate the ulna from the radius was a valuable addition allowing for objective evaluation of the tissue-engineered periosteal substitute.

  5. A Modified Rabbit Ulna Defect Model for Evaluating Periosteal Substitutes in Bone Engineering: A Pilot Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Backly, Rania M.; Chiapale, Danilo; Muraglia, Anita; Tromba, Giuliana; Ottonello, Chiara; Santolini, Federico; Cancedda, Ranieri; Mastrogiacomo, Maddalena

    2015-01-01

    The present work defines a modified critical size rabbit ulna defect model for bone regeneration in which a non-resorbable barrier membrane was used to separate the radius from the ulna to create a valid model for evaluation of tissue-engineered periosteal substitutes. Eight rabbits divided into two groups were used. Critical defects (15 mm) were made in the ulna completely eliminating periosteum. For group I, defects were filled with a nanohydroxyapatite poly(ester urethane) scaffold soaked in PBS and left as such (group Ia) or wrapped with a tissue-engineered periosteal substitute (group Ib). For group II, an expanded-polytetrafluoroethylene (e-PTFE) (GORE-TEX ® ) membrane was inserted around the radius then the defects received either scaffold alone (group IIa) or scaffold wrapped with periosteal substitute (group IIb). Animals were euthanized after 12–16 weeks, and bone regeneration was evaluated by radiography, computed microtomography (μCT), and histology. In the first group, we observed formation of radio-ulnar synostosis irrespective of the treatment. This was completely eliminated upon placement of the e-PTFE (GORE-TEX ® ) membrane in the second group of animals. In conclusion, modification of the model using a non-resorbable e-PTFE membrane to isolate the ulna from the radius was a valuable addition allowing for objective evaluation of the tissue-engineered periosteal substitute.

  6. Evaluation of pipeline defect's characteristic axial length via model-based parameter estimation in ultrasonic guided wave-based inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xiaojuan; Tse, Peter W; Dordjevich, Alexandar

    2011-01-01

    The reflection signal from a defect in the process of guided wave-based pipeline inspection usually includes sufficient information to detect and define the defect. In previous research, it has been found that the reflection of guided waves from even a complex defect primarily results from the interference between reflection components generated at the front and the back edges of the defect. The respective contribution of different parameters of a defect to the overall reflection can be affected by the features of the two primary reflection components. The identification of these components embedded in the reflection signal is therefore useful in characterizing the concerned defect. In this research, we propose a method of model-based parameter estimation with the aid of the Hilbert–Huang transform technique for the purpose of decomposition of a reflection signal to enable characterization of the pipeline defect. Once two primary edge reflection components are decomposed and identified, the distance between the reflection positions, which closely relates to the axial length of the defect, could be easily and accurately determined. Considering the irregular profiles of complex pipeline defects at their two edges, which is often the case in real situations, the average of varied axial lengths of such a defect along the circumference of the pipeline is used in this paper as the characteristic value of actual axial length for comparison purpose. The experimental results of artificial defects and real corrosion in sample pipes were considered in this paper to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method

  7. Non-probabilistic defect assessment for structures with cracks based on interval model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Qiao; Zhou, Changyu; Peng, Jian; Chen, Xiangwei; He, Xiaohua

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Non-probabilistic approach is introduced to defect assessment. • Definition and establishment of IFAC are put forward. • Determination of assessment rectangle is proposed. • Solution of non-probabilistic reliability index is presented. -- Abstract: Traditional defect assessment methods conservatively treat uncertainty of parameters as safety factors, while the probabilistic method is based on the clear understanding of detailed statistical information of parameters. In this paper, the non-probabilistic approach is introduced to the failure assessment diagram (FAD) to propose a non-probabilistic defect assessment method for structures with cracks. This novel defect assessment method contains three critical processes: establishment of the interval failure assessment curve (IFAC), determination of the assessment rectangle, and solution of the non-probabilistic reliability degree. Based on the interval theory, uncertain parameters such as crack sizes, material properties and loads are considered as interval variables. As a result, the failure assessment curve (FAC) will vary in a certain range, which is defined as IFAC. And the assessment point will vary within a rectangle zone which is defined as an assessment rectangle. Based on the interval model, the establishment of IFAC and the determination of the assessment rectangle are presented. Then according to the interval possibility degree method, the non-probabilistic reliability degree of IFAC can be determined. Meanwhile, in order to clearly introduce the non-probabilistic defect assessment method, a numerical example for the assessment of a pipe with crack is given. In addition, the assessment result of the proposed method is compared with that of the traditional probabilistic method, which confirms that this non-probabilistic defect assessment can reasonably resolve the practical problem with interval variables

  8. Non-probabilistic defect assessment for structures with cracks based on interval model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Qiao; Zhou, Changyu, E-mail: changyu_zhou@163.com; Peng, Jian; Chen, Xiangwei; He, Xiaohua

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • Non-probabilistic approach is introduced to defect assessment. • Definition and establishment of IFAC are put forward. • Determination of assessment rectangle is proposed. • Solution of non-probabilistic reliability index is presented. -- Abstract: Traditional defect assessment methods conservatively treat uncertainty of parameters as safety factors, while the probabilistic method is based on the clear understanding of detailed statistical information of parameters. In this paper, the non-probabilistic approach is introduced to the failure assessment diagram (FAD) to propose a non-probabilistic defect assessment method for structures with cracks. This novel defect assessment method contains three critical processes: establishment of the interval failure assessment curve (IFAC), determination of the assessment rectangle, and solution of the non-probabilistic reliability degree. Based on the interval theory, uncertain parameters such as crack sizes, material properties and loads are considered as interval variables. As a result, the failure assessment curve (FAC) will vary in a certain range, which is defined as IFAC. And the assessment point will vary within a rectangle zone which is defined as an assessment rectangle. Based on the interval model, the establishment of IFAC and the determination of the assessment rectangle are presented. Then according to the interval possibility degree method, the non-probabilistic reliability degree of IFAC can be determined. Meanwhile, in order to clearly introduce the non-probabilistic defect assessment method, a numerical example for the assessment of a pipe with crack is given. In addition, the assessment result of the proposed method is compared with that of the traditional probabilistic method, which confirms that this non-probabilistic defect assessment can reasonably resolve the practical problem with interval variables.

  9. Defects in boron carbide: First-principles calculations and CALPHAD modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saengdeejing, Arkapol; Saal, James E.; Manga, Venkateswara Rao; Liu Zikui

    2012-01-01

    The energetics of defects in B 4+x C boron carbide and β-boron are studied through first-principles calculations, the supercell phonon approach and the Debye–Grüneisen model. It is found that suitable sublattice models for β-boron and B 4+x C are B 101 (B,C) 4 and B 11 (B,C) (B,C,Va) (B,Va) (B,C,Va), respectively. The thermodynamic properties of B 4+x C, β-boron, liquid and graphite are modeled using the CALPHAD approach based on the thermochemical data from first-principles calculations and experimental phase equilibrium data in the literature. The concentrations of various defects are then predicted as a function of carbon composition and temperature.

  10. Thermodynamic and kinetic modelling of fuel oxidation behaviour in operating defective fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, B.J.; Thompson, W.T.; Akbari, F.; Thompson, D.M.; Thurgood, C.; Higgs, J.

    2004-01-01

    A theoretical treatment has been developed to predict the fuel oxidation behaviour in operating defective nuclear fuel elements. The equilibrium stoichiometry deviation in the hyper-stoichiometric fuel has been derived from thermodynamic considerations using a self-consistent set of thermodynamic properties for the U-O system, which emphasizes replication of solubilities and three-phase invariant conditions displayed in the U-O binary phase diagram. The kinetics model accounts for multi-phase transport including interstitial oxygen diffusion in the solid and gas-phase transport of hydrogen and steam in the fuel cracks. The fuel oxidation model is further coupled to a heat conduction model to account for the feedback effect of a reduced thermal conductivity in the hyper-stoichiometric fuel. A numerical solution has been developed using a finite-element technique with the FEMLAB software package. The model has been compared to available data from several in-reactor X-2 loop experiments with defective fuel conducted at the Chalk River Laboratories. The model has also been benchmarked against an O/U profile measurement for a spent defective fuel element discharged from a commercial reactor

  11. Radiographic signs and diagnosis of dental disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellows, J.

    1993-01-01

    Dental radiographs are critical for the complete assessment and treatment of dental diseases. Dental radiography is commonly used to evaluate congenital dental defects, periodontal disease, orthodontic manipulations, oral tumors, endodontic treatments, oral trauma, and any situation where an abnormality is suspected. Although standard radiographic equipment and film can be used to produce dental radiographs, dental X-ray equipment and film provide superior quality images and greater convenience of animal patient positioning. An understanding of normal dental radiographic anatomy is important when interpreting dental radiographs. Stage III periodontitis is the earliest stage of periodontal disease at which radiographic abnormalities become apparent. Bone loss associated with periodontal disease can be classified as either horizontal or vertical. Periapical radiolucencies can represent granulomas, cysts, or abscesses, whereas periapical radiodensities may represent sclerotic bone or condensing osteitis. Lytic lesions of the bone of the jaw often represent oral neoplasms. Neoplasms also can displace or disrupt teeth in the dental arch. Resorptive lesions can be external or internal and appear as radiolucent areas involving the external surface of the root or the pulp cavity, respectively. Feline dental resorptive lesions, also known as odontoclastic resorptions, are a specific form of dental resorptive lesions unique to cats

  12. Fast radiographic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domanus, J.C.

    1984-08-01

    Industrial radiography can be performed with shorter exposure times, when instead of X-ray film with lead intensifying screens the radiographic paper with fluorescent screen is used. With paper radiography one can obtain lower material, equipment, and labor costs, shorter exposure and processing times, and easier radiation protection. The speed of the radiographic inspection can also be increased by the use of fluorometallic intensifying screens together with a special brand of X-ray film. Before accepting either of the two fast radiographic systems one must be sure that they can produce radiographs of adequate image quality. Therefore an investigation was performed on that subject using ISO wire IQI's and ASTM penetrameters. The radiographic image quality was tested for aluminium and steel up to 30 mm thick using various brands of radiographic paper and X-ray film with fluorometallic screens and comparing them with fast X-ray films with lead screens. Both systems give satisfactory results. (author)

  13. Contribution to identification of factors causing radiographic image unsharpness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Branzan, C.; Popescu, A.; Radu, R.

    1995-01-01

    Radiographic image quality is crucial for the ability of the radiographic method to give us a maximum information about the macroscopic structure of materials and pieces, investigated by penetrating radiation. Radiographic image quality depends on several factors. A high quality image is able to show small and typical defects. One of the most important factor affecting radiographic image is unsharpness. The total effective unsharpness of the film must be some function of several factors and their contribution is taken into account by summing up different kinds of unsharpness: geometric unsharpness, internal unsharpness, screen unsharpness, and accidental unsharpness. This work analyses the weight of the radiographic image unsharpness and the possibilities for determining its influence on the quality of the radiographic image. (author)

  14. Effects of Hydroxyapatite on Bone Graft Resorption in an Experimental Model of Maxillary Alveolar Arch Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgur Pilanci

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Most commonly used treatments use autologous bone grafts to address bony defects in patients with cleft palate. Major disadvantages of autogenous bone grafts include donor site morbidity and resorption. Suggestions to overcome such problems include biomaterials that can be used alone or in combination with bone. We examined the effect of hydroxyapatite cement on bone graft resorption in a rabbit maxillary alveolar defect model. We divided 16 young adult albino New Zealand rabbits into two groups. A defect 1 cm wide was created in each rabbit's maxillary arch. In Group 1, the removed bone was disrupted, and the pieces were replaced in the defect. In the other group, the pieces were replaced after mixing (1:1 with hydroxyapatite cement. Quantitative computed tomographic evaluation of these grafts was performed in axial and coronal planes for each rabbit at 2 and 12 weeks. In axial images at 12 weeks, the group without cement showed mean bone resorption of 15%. In the cement group, a mean volumetric increase of 68% was seen. No resorption occurred when bone grafts were mixed with hydroxyapatite cement. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2013; 2(3.000: 170-175

  15. Quantitative assessment of bone defect healing by multidetector CT in a pig model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riegger, Carolin; Kroepil, Patric; Lanzman, Rotem S.; Miese, Falk R.; Antoch, Gerald; Scherer, Axel; Jungbluth, Pascal; Hakimi, Mohssen; Wild, Michael; Hakimi, Ahmad R.

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate multidetector CT volumetry in the assessment of bone defect healing in comparison to histopathological findings in an animal model. In 16 mini-pigs, a circumscribed tibial bone defect was created. Multidetector CT (MDCT) of the tibia was performed on a 64-row scanner 42 days after the operation. The extent of bone healing was estimated quantitatively by MDCT volumetry using a commercially available software programme (syngo Volume, Siemens, Germany).The volume of the entire defect (including all pixels from -100 to 3,000 HU), the nonconsolidated areas (-100 to 500 HU), and areas of osseous consolidation (500 to 3,000 HU) were assessed and the extent of consolidation was calculated. Histomorphometry served as the reference standard. The extent of osseous consolidation in MDCT volumetry ranged from 19 to 92% (mean 65.4 ± 18.5%). There was a significant correlation between histologically visible newly formed bone and the extent of osseous consolidation on MDCT volumetry (r = 0.82, P < 0.0001). A significant negative correlation was detected between osseous consolidation on MDCT and histological areas of persisting defect (r = -0.9, P < 0.0001). MDCT volumetry is a promising tool for noninvasive monitoring of bone healing, showing excellent correlation with histomorphometry. (orig.)

  16. Quantitative assessment of bone defect healing by multidetector CT in a pig model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riegger, Carolin; Kroepil, Patric; Lanzman, Rotem S.; Miese, Falk R.; Antoch, Gerald; Scherer, Axel [University Duesseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Duesseldorf (Germany); Jungbluth, Pascal; Hakimi, Mohssen; Wild, Michael [University Duesseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Traumatology and Hand Surgery, Duesseldorf (Germany); Hakimi, Ahmad R. [Universtity Duesseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Oral Surgery, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2012-05-15

    To evaluate multidetector CT volumetry in the assessment of bone defect healing in comparison to histopathological findings in an animal model. In 16 mini-pigs, a circumscribed tibial bone defect was created. Multidetector CT (MDCT) of the tibia was performed on a 64-row scanner 42 days after the operation. The extent of bone healing was estimated quantitatively by MDCT volumetry using a commercially available software programme (syngo Volume, Siemens, Germany).The volume of the entire defect (including all pixels from -100 to 3,000 HU), the nonconsolidated areas (-100 to 500 HU), and areas of osseous consolidation (500 to 3,000 HU) were assessed and the extent of consolidation was calculated. Histomorphometry served as the reference standard. The extent of osseous consolidation in MDCT volumetry ranged from 19 to 92% (mean 65.4 {+-} 18.5%). There was a significant correlation between histologically visible newly formed bone and the extent of osseous consolidation on MDCT volumetry (r = 0.82, P < 0.0001). A significant negative correlation was detected between osseous consolidation on MDCT and histological areas of persisting defect (r = -0.9, P < 0.0001). MDCT volumetry is a promising tool for noninvasive monitoring of bone healing, showing excellent correlation with histomorphometry. (orig.)

  17. Radiographic constant exposure technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanus, Joseph Czeslaw

    1985-01-01

    The constant exposure technique has been applied to assess various industrial radiographic systems. Different X-ray films and radiographic papers of two producers were compared. Special attention was given to fast film and paper used with fluorometallic screens. Radiographic image quality...... was tested by the use of ISO wire IQI's and ASTM penetrameters used on Al and Fe test plates. Relative speed and reduction of kilovoltage obtained with the constant exposure technique were calculated. The advantages of fast radiographic systems are pointed out...

  18. Open die forging of large shafts with porosity defects – physical and numerical modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Peter; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Bay, Niels

    2013-01-01

    The aim and scope of this paper is centered to analyze the influence of the geometry of V-shaped dies on the closure of internal centerline porosity defects in ingots during multistep open-die forging. The investigation is performed with small scale physical models made from lead using V-shaped d......The aim and scope of this paper is centered to analyze the influence of the geometry of V-shaped dies on the closure of internal centerline porosity defects in ingots during multistep open-die forging. The investigation is performed with small scale physical models made from lead using V......-shaped dies with 90o and 120o and a reference pair of flat parallel platens. Holes drilled through the center of these preforms are produced to mimic centerline porosity in full scale cast ingots and intermediate rotation of the preforms replicate a multi-stage forging sequence under laboratory testing...

  19. Analysis of electronic models for solar cells including energy resolved defect densities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glitzky, Annegret

    2010-07-01

    We introduce an electronic model for solar cells including energy resolved defect densities. The resulting drift-diffusion model corresponds to a generalized van Roosbroeck system with additional source terms coupled with ODEs containing space and energy as parameters for all defect densities. The system has to be considered in heterostructures and with mixed boundary conditions from device simulation. We give a weak formulation of the problem. If the boundary data and the sources are compatible with thermodynamic equilibrium the free energy along solutions decays monotonously. In other cases it may be increasing, but we estimate its growth. We establish boundedness and uniqueness results and prove the existence of a weak solution. This is done by considering a regularized problem, showing its solvability and the boundedness of its solutions independent of the regularization level. (orig.)

  20. Modeling of extrinsic extended defect evolution in ion-implanted silicon upon thermal annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz, C.J.; Cristiano, F.; Colombeau, B.; Claverie, A.; Cowern, N.E.B.

    2004-01-01

    A physically motivated model that accounts for the spatial and temporal evolution of extended defect distribution in ion-implanted Si is presented. Free physical parameters are extracted from experimental data and by means of a genetic algorithm (GA). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) data and self-interstitial oversaturation measurements are combined in the same fitting procedure to eliminate unphysical solutions and find the optimum set of parameters. The calibration of parameters shows that binding energies of small self-interstitial clusters exhibit strong minima, as reported in other investigations. It is demonstrated that the calibrated model we propose is able to predict a wide variety of physical phenomena, from the oversaturation of self-interstitials via the mean-size distribution of {1 1 3} defects to the depth distribution of the density of the latter

  1. Mathematical modelling of ultrasonic testing of components with defects close to a non-planar surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westlund, Jonathan; Bostroem, Anders

    2011-05-01

    Nondestructive testing with ultrasound is a standard procedure in the nuclear power industry. To develop and qualify the methods extensive experimental work with test blocks is usually required. This can be very time-consuming and costly and it also requires a good physical intuition of the situation. A reliable mathematical model of the testing situation can, therefore, be very valuable and cost-effective as it can reduce experimental work significantly. A good mathematical model enhances the physical intuition and is very useful for parametric studies, as a pedagogical tool, and for the qualification of procedures and personnel. The aim of the present report is to describe work that has been performed to model ultrasonic testing of components that contain a defect close to a nonplanar surface. For nuclear power applications this may be a crack or other defect on the inside of a pipe with a diameter change or connection. This is an extension of the computer program UTDefect, which previously only admits a planar back surface (which is often applicable also to pipes if the pipe diameter is large enough). The problems are investigated in both 2D and 3D, and in 2D both the simpler anti-plane (SH) and the in-plane (P-SV) problem are studied. The 2D investigations are primarily solved to get a 'feeling' for the solution procedure, the discretizations, etc. In all cases an integral equation approach with a Green's function in the kernel is taken. The nonplanar surface is treated by the boundary element method (BEM) where a division of the surface is made in small elements. The defects are mainly cracks, strip-like (in 2D) or rectangular (in 3D), and these are treated with more analytical methods. In 2D also more general defects are treated with the help of their transition (T) matrix. As in other parts of UTDefect the ultrasonic probes in transmission and reception are included in the model. In 3D normalization by a side drilled hole is possible. Some numerical results

  2. Defects spectroscopy by means of the simple trapping model of the Fe78Si9B13 alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez M, A.; Cabral P, A.; Garcia S, S.F.

    2007-01-01

    In this work it is analyzed quantitatively the results of the positron annihilation in the Fe 78 Si 9 B 13 alloy by means of the simple trapping model. From this analysis its are derived: a reason of positron trapping in the defects (K), the defects concentration (C d ) and the electronic density associated to the defect (n d ); both first parameters, (K, C d ) its increase and n d diminishes when increasing the alloy temperature. From this analysis it is also inferred that the defect consists of a multi vacancy of between 15 and 20 mono vacancies. (Author)

  3. Modelling NDE pulse-echo inspection of misorientated planar rough defects using an elastic finite element method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettit, J. R.; Lowe, M. J. S. [UK Research Centre for NDE, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Walker, A. E. [Rolls-Royce Nuclear, PO BOX 2000, Derby, DE21 7XX (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-31

    Pulse-echo ultrasonic NDE examination of large pressure vessel forgings is a design and construction code requirement in the power generation industry. Such inspections aim to size and characterise potential defects that may have formed during the forging process. Typically these defects have a range of orientations and surface roughnesses which can greatly affect ultrasonic wave scattering behaviour. Ultrasonic modelling techniques can provide insight into defect response and therefore aid in characterisation. However, analytical approaches to solving these scattering problems can become inaccurate, especially when applied to increasingly complex defect geometries. To overcome these limitations a elastic Finite Element (FE) method has been developed to simulate pulse-echo inspections of embedded planar defects. The FE model comprises a significantly reduced spatial domain allowing for a Monte-Carlo based approach to consider multiple realisations of defect orientation and surface roughness. The results confirm that defects aligned perpendicular to the path of beam propagation attenuate ultrasonic signals according to the level of surface roughness. However, for defects orientated away from this plane, surface roughness can increase the magnitude of the scattered component propagating back along the path of the incident beam. This study therefore highlights instances where defect roughness increases the magnitude of ultrasonic scattered signals, as opposed to attenuation which is more often assumed.

  4. Using Bayesian Models to Assess the Effects of Under-reporting of Cannabis Use on the Association with Birth Defects, National Birth Defects Prevention Study, 1997–2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gelder, Marleen M. H. J.; Rogier, A.; Donders, T.; Devine, Owen; Roeleveld, Nel; Reefhuis, Jennita

    2015-01-01

    Background Studies on associations between periconceptional cannabis exposure and birth defects have mainly relied on self-reported exposure. Therefore, the results may be biased due to underreporting of the exposure. The aim of this study was to quantify the potential effects of this form of exposure misclassification. Methods Using multivariable logistic regression, we re-analyzed associations between periconceptional cannabis use and 20 specific birth defects using data from the National Birth Defects Prevention Study from 1997–2005 for 13 859 case infants and 6556 control infants. For seven birth defects, we implemented four Bayesian models based on various assumptions concerning the sensitivity of self-reported cannabis use to estimate odds ratios (ORs), adjusted for confounding and underreporting of the exposure. We used information on sensitivity of self-reported cannabis use from the literature for prior assumptions. Results The results unadjusted for underreporting of the exposure showed an association between cannabis use and anencephaly (posterior OR 1.9 [95% credible interval (CRI) 1.1, 3.2]) which persisted after adjustment for potential exposure misclassification. Initially, no statistically significant associations were observed between cannabis use and the other birth defect categories studied. Although adjustment for underreporting did not notably change these effect estimates, cannabis use was associated with esophageal atresia (posterior OR 1.7 [95% CRI 1.0, 2.9]), diaphragmatic hernia (posterior OR 1.8 [95% CRI 1.1, 3.0]) and gastroschisis (posterior OR 1.7 [95% CRI 1.2, 2.3]) after correction for exposure misclassification. Conclusions Underreporting of the exposure may have obscured some cannabis-birth defect associations in previous studies. However, the resulting bias is likely to be limited. PMID:25155701

  5. Using bayesian models to assess the effects of under-reporting of cannabis use on the association with birth defects, national birth defects prevention study, 1997-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gelder, Marleen M H J; Donders, A Rogier T; Devine, Owen; Roeleveld, Nel; Reefhuis, Jennita

    2014-09-01

    Studies on associations between periconceptional cannabis exposure and birth defects have mainly relied on self-reported exposure. Therefore, the results may be biased due to under-reporting of the exposure. The aim of this study was to quantify the potential effects of this form of exposure misclassification. Using multivariable logistic regression, we re-analysed associations between periconceptional cannabis use and 20 specific birth defects using data from the National Birth Defects Prevention Study from 1997-2005 for 13 859 case infants and 6556 control infants. For seven birth defects, we implemented four Bayesian models based on various assumptions concerning the sensitivity of self-reported cannabis use to estimate odds ratios (ORs), adjusted for confounding and under-reporting of the exposure. We used information on sensitivity of self-reported cannabis use from the literature for prior assumptions. The results unadjusted for under-reporting of the exposure showed an association between cannabis use and anencephaly (posterior OR 1.9 [95% credible interval (CRI) 1.1, 3.2]) which persisted after adjustment for potential exposure misclassification. Initially, no statistically significant associations were observed between cannabis use and the other birth defect categories studied. Although adjustment for under-reporting did not notably change these effect estimates, cannabis use was associated with esophageal atresia (posterior OR 1.7 [95% CRI 1.0, 2.9]), diaphragmatic hernia (posterior OR 1.8 [95% CRI 1.1, 3.0]), and gastroschisis (posterior OR 1.7 [95% CRI 1.2, 2.3]) after correction for exposure misclassification. Under-reporting of the exposure may have obscured some cannabis-birth defect associations in previous studies. However, the resulting bias is likely to be limited. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Radiographic findings in tuberculosis of the calvarium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patankar, T.; Varma, R.; Krishnan, A.; Prasad, S. [Dept. of Radiology, King Edward Memorial Hospital, Parel, Bombay (India); Desai, K. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, King Edward Memorial Hospital, Bombay (India); Castillo, M. [Dept. of Radiology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2000-07-01

    We reviewed the pattern of involvement of the calvarium by tuberculosis (TB) in five patients and the role of imaging in its management. Four patients presented with localised scalp swelling and one with generalized seizures. Radiographs revealed lucent lesions with minimal surrounding sclerosis in the frontal (2), parietal (2) and occipital (1) bones. CT showed lesions involving the entire thickness of the calvarium and accompanying contrast-enhancing soft tissue. The patient presenting with seizures had a ring-enhancing lesion in the parietal lobe in addition to the extra-axial lesions. Although radiographs in all cases demonstrated calvarial TB, CT showed the extent of the defect, involvement of adjacent soft tissues, and in one case an intra-axial lesion. Radiographs suffice for follow-up of these patients. (orig.)

  7. Legalities of the radiograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bundy, A.L.

    1988-01-01

    The radiograph itself plays a major role in medical malpractice cases. Also, many questions arise concerning the rights to and storage of x-ray films. These issues are addressed in this chapter. To keep the terminology simple, the word radiograph represents all imaging documentation on hard copy film (x-rays, nuclear medicine, computer-assisted studies, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging)

  8. Initial stability of a highly porous titanium cup in an acetabular bone defect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimoto, Kensei; Nakashima, Yasuharu; Wakiyama, Miyo; Hara, Daisuke; Nakamura, Akihiro; Iwamoto, Mikio

    2018-04-12

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the initial stability of a highly porous titanium cup using an acetabular bone defect model. The maximum torque of a highly porous titanium cup, with a pore size of 640 μm and porosity of 60%, was measured using rotational and lever-out torque testing and compared to that of a titanium-sprayed cup. The bone models were prepared using a polyurethane foam block and had three levels of bone coverage: 100, 70, and 50%. The highly porous titanium cup demonstrated significantly higher maximum torque than the titanium-sprayed cups in the three levels of bone defects. On rotational torque testing, it was found to be 1.5, 1.3, and 1.3 times stronger than the titanium-sprayed cups with 100, 70 and 50% bone coverage, respectively. Furthermore, it was found to be 2.2, 2.3, and 1.5 times stronger on lever-out testing than the titanium-sprayed cup. No breakage in the porous layers was noted during the testing. This study provides additional evidence of the initial stability of highly porous titanium cup, even in the presence of acetabular bone defects. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Intrinsic point defects in zinc oxide. Modeling of structural, electronic, thermodynamic and kinetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erhart, P.

    2006-07-01

    The present dissertation deals with the modeling of zinc oxide on the atomic scale employing both quantum mechanical as well as atomistic methods. The first part describes quantum mechanical calculations based on density functional theory of intrinsic point defects in ZnO. To begin with, the geometric and electronic structure of vacancies and oxygen interstitials is explored. In equilibrium oxygen interstitials are found to adopt dumbbell and split interstitial configurations in positive and negative charge states, respectively. Semi-empirical self-interaction corrections allow to improve the agreement between the experimental and the calculated band structure significantly; errors due to the limited size of the supercells can be corrected by employing finite-size scaling. The effect of both band structure corrections and finite-size scaling on defect formation enthalpies and transition levels is explored. Finally, transition paths and barriers for the migration of zinc as well as oxygen vacancies and interstitials are determined. The results allow to interpret diffusion experiments and provide a consistent basis for developing models for device simulation. In the second part an interatomic potential for zinc oxide is derived. To this end, the Pontifix computer code is developed which allows to fit analytic bond-order potentials. The code is subsequently employed to obtain interatomic potentials for Zn-O, Zn-Zn, and O-O interactions. To demonstrate the applicability of the potentials, simulations on defect production by ion irradiation are carried out. (orig.)

  10. Multiscale modeling for the prediction of casting defects in investment cast aluminum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, R.W.; See, D.; Butler, S.; Lee, P.D.

    2003-01-01

    Macroscopic modeling of heat transfer and fluid flow is now routinely used for the prediction of macroscopic defects in castings, while microscopic models are used to investigate the effects of alloy changes on typical microstructures. By combining these two levels of modeling it is possible to simulate the casting process over a wider range of spatial and temporal scales. This paper presents a multiscale model where micromodels for dendrite arm spacing and microporosity are incorporated into a macromodel of heat transfer and in order to predict the as cast microstructure and prevalence of microscopic defects, specifically porosity. The approach is applied to aluminum alloy (L169) investment castings. The models are compared with results obtained by optical image analysis of prepared slices, and X-ray tomography of volume samples from the experiments. Multiscale modeling is shown to provide the designer with a useful tool to improve the properties of the final casting by testing how altering the casting process affects the final microstructure including porosity

  11. An Applied Image Processing for Radiographic Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratchason, Surasak; Tuammee, Sopida; Srisroal Anusara

    2005-10-01

    An applied image processing for radiographic testing (RT) is desirable because it decreases time-consuming, decreases the cost of inspection process that need the experienced workers, and improves the inspection quality. This paper presents the primary study of image processing for RT-films that is the welding-film. The proposed approach to determine the defects on weld-images. The BMP image-files are opened and developed by computer program that using Borland C ++ . The software has five main methods that are Histogram, Contrast Enhancement, Edge Detection, Image Segmentation and Image Restoration. Each the main method has the several sub method that are the selected options. The results showed that the effective software can detect defects and the varied method suit for the different radiographic images. Furthermore, improving images are better when two methods are incorporated

  12. Model-Based Least Squares Reconstruction of Coded Source Neutron Radiographs: Integrating the ORNL HFIR CG1D Source Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos-Villalobos, Hector J [ORNL; Gregor, Jens [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Bingham, Philip R [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    At the present, neutron sources cannot be fabricated small and powerful enough in order to achieve high resolution radiography while maintaining an adequate flux. One solution is to employ computational imaging techniques such as a Magnified Coded Source Imaging (CSI) system. A coded-mask is placed between the neutron source and the object. The system resolution is increased by reducing the size of the mask holes and the flux is increased by increasing the size of the coded-mask and/or the number of holes. One limitation of such system is that the resolution of current state-of-the-art scintillator-based detectors caps around 50um. To overcome this challenge, the coded-mask and object are magnified by making the distance from the coded-mask to the object much smaller than the distance from object to detector. In previous work, we have shown via synthetic experiments that our least squares method outperforms other methods in image quality and reconstruction precision because of the modeling of the CSI system components. However, the validation experiments were limited to simplistic neutron sources. In this work, we aim to model the flux distribution of a real neutron source and incorporate such a model in our least squares computational system. We provide a full description of the methodology used to characterize the neutron source and validate the method with synthetic experiments.

  13. Laser-damage susceptibility of nodular defects in dielectric mirror coatings: AFM measurements and electric-field modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlowski, M.R.; DeFord, J.F.; Staggs, M.C.

    1993-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and electromagnetic field modeling were used to study the influence of nodular coating defects on laser-induced damage of multilayer dielectric coatings. In studies of HfO 2 /SiO 2 mirrors with 1.06 μm illumination, AFM results showed that nodular defects with high dome heights (>0.6 μm) were most susceptible to laser damage. Crater defects, formed by nodules ejected from the coating prior to illumination, were not damaged when illuminated over the same range of fluences. A finite-difference time-domain electromagnetic modeling code was used to study the influence of 3-D nodule defects on the E-field distribution within the interference coating. The modeling results show that Enfield enhancements as large as a factor of 4 can be present at the defects. Crater defects, however, result in minimal enhancement of the E-fields within the coating. These modeling results are consistent with the AFM experimental data, indicating that E-field enhancement is a contributing mechanism in defect-dominated laser damage of optical coatings

  14. Antisite Defects of the L12 Structure Determined by the Phase Field Microelasticity Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing, Zhang; Zheng, Chen; Yan-Li, Lu; Yong-Xin, Wang; Yan, Zhao

    2009-01-01

    A phase field microelasticity simulation is performed to examine the antisite defect of L1 2 -Ni 3 Al in Ni 75 Al 5.3 V 19.7 ternary alloy. Combinimg strain energy with the phase field model leads to an atom configuration change as time proceeds. For the Ni sublattice, the antisite defect Al Ni , the equilibrium occupancy probability (OP) of which declines, precedes Ni Ni and V Ni in reaching equilibrium; subsequently, Ni Ni and V Ni present a phenomenon of symmetrical rise and decline individually. Similarly, for the Al sublattice, the antisite defect Ni Al , the OP of which eventually rises, takes fewer time steps than Al Ai and V Al to attain equilibrium. Thereafter, Al Al rises while V Al declines symmetrically at the axes of the Ni Al MAI curve. Furthermore, the OP for the Al sublattice is much more sensitive to strain energy than that for the Ni sublattice. (condensed matter: structure, mechanical and thermal properties)

  15. Description of radiation damage in diamond sensors using an effective defect model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassel, Florian [Institute for Experimental Nuclear Physics (IEKP), KIT, Karlsruhe (Germany); CERN, Meyrin (Switzerland); Guthoff, Moritz; Dabrowski, Anne [CERN, Meyrin (Switzerland); Boer, Wim de [Institute for Experimental Nuclear Physics (IEKP), KIT, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    The Beam Condition Monitoring Leakage (BCML) system is a beam monitoring device in the CMS experiment at the LHC consisting of 32 poly-crystalline (pCVD) diamond sensors. The BCML sensors, located in rings around the beam, are exposed to high particle rates originating from the colliding beams. These particles cause lattice defects, which act as traps for the ionized charge carrier leading to a reduced charge collection efficiency (CCE). The radiation induced CCE degradation was, however, much more severe than expected from low rate laboratory measurements. Measurement and simulations presented in this paper show that this discrepancy is related to the rate of incident particles. At high particle rates, the trapping rate of the ionization is strongly increased compared to the detrapping rate leading to an increased build-up of space charge. This space charge locally reduces the internal electric field increasing the trapping rate and hence reducing the CCE even further. In order to connect these macroscopic measurements with the microscopic defects acting as traps for the ionization charge, the TCAD simulation program SILVACO was used. It allows to introduce the defects as effective donor and acceptor levels, and can calculate the electric field from Transient Current Technique (TCT) signals and CCE as a function of the effective trap properties, like density, energy level, and trapping cross section. After each irradiation step, these properties were fitted to the data on the electric field from the TCT signals and CCE. Two effective acceptor and donor levels were needed to fit the data after each step. It turned out that the energy levels and cross sections could be kept constant and the trap density was proportional to the cumulative fluence of the irradiation steps. The highly non-linear rate dependent diamond polarization and the resulting signal loss can be simulated using this effective defect model and is in agreement with the measurement results

  16. Description of radiation damage in diamond sensors using an effective defect model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassel, Florian; Guthoff, Moritz; Dabrowski, Anne; Boer, Wim de

    2017-01-01

    The Beam Condition Monitoring Leakage (BCML) system is a beam monitoring device in the CMS experiment at the LHC consisting of 32 poly-crystalline (pCVD) diamond sensors. The BCML sensors, located in rings around the beam, are exposed to high particle rates originating from the colliding beams. These particles cause lattice defects, which act as traps for the ionized charge carrier leading to a reduced charge collection efficiency (CCE). The radiation induced CCE degradation was, however, much more severe than expected from low rate laboratory measurements. Measurement and simulations presented in this paper show that this discrepancy is related to the rate of incident particles. At high particle rates, the trapping rate of the ionization is strongly increased compared to the detrapping rate leading to an increased build-up of space charge. This space charge locally reduces the internal electric field increasing the trapping rate and hence reducing the CCE even further. In order to connect these macroscopic measurements with the microscopic defects acting as traps for the ionization charge, the TCAD simulation program SILVACO was used. It allows to introduce the defects as effective donor and acceptor levels, and can calculate the electric field from Transient Current Technique (TCT) signals and CCE as a function of the effective trap properties, like density, energy level, and trapping cross section. After each irradiation step, these properties were fitted to the data on the electric field from the TCT signals and CCE. Two effective acceptor and donor levels were needed to fit the data after each step. It turned out that the energy levels and cross sections could be kept constant and the trap density was proportional to the cumulative fluence of the irradiation steps. The highly non-linear rate dependent diamond polarization and the resulting signal loss can be simulated using this effective defect model and is in agreement with the measurement results

  17. Producing quality radiographic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullinan, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    This book gives an overview of physics, equipment, imaging, and quality assurance in the radiology department. The chapters are laid out with generous use of subheads to allow for quick reference, Points are illustrated with clear, uncluttered line diagrams and well-produced images. The accompanying explanations are miniature lessons by themselves. Inserted at various points throughout the text are important notes that highlight key concepts. The chapter ''Image Evaluation and Application of Radiographic Principles'' present a systematic approach to evaluating radiographs and contains several sample radiographs to illustrate the points made

  18. Dose, image quality and spine modeling assessment of biplanar EOS micro-dose radiographs for the follow-up of in-brace adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, Baptiste; Moueddeb, Sonia; Blondiaux, Eleonore; Richard, Stephen; Bachy, Manon; Vialle, Raphael; Ducou Le Pointe, Hubert

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the radiation dose, image quality and 3D spine parameter measurements of EOS low-dose and micro-dose protocols for in-brace adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) patients. We prospectively included 25 consecutive patients (20 females, 5 males) followed for AIS and undergoing brace treatment. The mean age was 12 years (SD 2 years, range 8-15 years). For each patient, in-brace biplanar EOS radiographs were acquired in a standing position using both the conventional low-dose and micro-dose protocols. Dose area product (DAP) was systematically recorded. Diagnostic image quality was qualitatively assessed by two radiologists for visibility of anatomical structures. The reliability of 3D spine modeling between two operators was quantitatively evaluated for the most clinically relevant 3D radiological parameters using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The mean DAP for the posteroanterior and lateral acquisitions was 300 ± 134 and 433 ± 181 mGy cm 2 for the low-dose radiographs, and 41 ± 19 and 81 ± 39 mGy cm 2 for micro-dose radiographs. Image quality was lower with the micro-dose protocol. The agreement was "good" to "very good" for all measured clinical parameters when comparing the low-dose and micro-dose protocols (ICC > 0.73). The micro-dose protocol substantially reduced the delivered dose (by a factor of 5-7 compared to the low-dose protocol) in braced children with AIS. Although image quality was reduced, the micro-dose protocol proved to be adapted to radiological follow-up, with adequate image quality and reliable clinical measurements. These slides can be retrieved under Electronic Supplementary Material.

  19. Ordering Cost Reduction in Inventory Model with Defective Items and Backorder Price Discount

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karuppuchamy Annadurai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the real market, as unsatisfied demands occur, the longer the length of lead time is, the smaller the proportion of backorder would be. In order to make up for the inconvenience and even the losses of royal and patient customers, the supplier may offer a backorder price discount to secure orders during the shortage period. Also, ordering policies determined by conventional inventory models may be inappropriate for the situation in which an arrival lot contains some defective items. To compensate for the inconvenience of backordering and to secure orders, the supplier may offer a price discount on the stockout item. The purpose of this study is to explore a coordinated inventory model including defective arrivals by allowing the backorder price discount and ordering cost as decision variables. There are two inventory models proposed in this paper, one with normally distributed demand and another with distribution free demand. A computer code using the software Matlab 7.0 is developed to find the optimal solution and present numerical examples to illustrate the models. The results in the numerical examples indicate that the savings of the total cost are realized through ordering cost reduction and backorder price discount.

  20. Evaluation of Osteoconductive and Osteogenic Potential of a Dentin-Based Bone Substitute Using a Calvarial Defect Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Hussain

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the osteoconductive and osteogenic properties of processed bovine dentin using a robust rabbit calvarial defect model. In total, 16 New Zealand White rabbits were operated to create three circular defects in the calvaria. One defect was left unfilled, one filled with collected autogenous bone, and the third defect was filled with the dentin-based bone substitute. Following surgery and after a healing period of either 1 or 6 weeks, a CT scan was obtained. Following sacrificing, the tissues were processed for histological examination. The CT data showed the density in the area grafted with the dentin-based material was higher than the surrounding bone and the areas grafted with autologous bone after 1 week and 6 weeks of healing. The area left unfilled remained an empty defect after 1 week and 6 weeks. Histological examination of the defects filled with the dentin product after 6 weeks showed soft tissue encapsulation around the dentin particles. It can be concluded that the rabbit calvarial model used in this study is a robust model for the assessment of bone materials. Bovine dentin is a biostable material; however, it may not be suitable for repairing large 4-wall defects.

  1. In silico Mechano-Chemical Model of Bone Healing for the Regeneration of Critical Defects: The Effect of BMP-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico O Ribeiro

    Full Text Available The healing of bone defects is a challenge for both tissue engineering and modern orthopaedics. This problem has been addressed through the study of scaffold constructs combined with mechanoregulatory theories, disregarding the influence of chemical factors and their respective delivery devices. Of the chemical factors involved in the bone healing process, bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2 has been identified as one of the most powerful osteoinductive proteins. The aim of this work is to develop and validate a mechano-chemical regulatory model to study the effect of BMP-2 on the healing of large bone defects in silico. We first collected a range of quantitative experimental data from the literature concerning the effects of BMP-2 on cellular activity, specifically proliferation, migration, differentiation, maturation and extracellular matrix production. These data were then used to define a model governed by mechano-chemical stimuli to simulate the healing of large bone defects under the following conditions: natural healing, an empty hydrogel implanted in the defect and a hydrogel soaked with BMP-2 implanted in the defect. For the latter condition, successful defect healing was predicted, in agreement with previous in vivo experiments. Further in vivo comparisons showed the potential of the model, which accurately predicted bone tissue formation during healing, bone tissue distribution across the defect and the quantity of bone inside the defect. The proposed mechano-chemical model also estimated the effect of BMP-2 on cells and the evolution of healing in large bone defects. This novel in silico tool provides valuable insight for bone tissue regeneration strategies.

  2. [ESTABLISHMENT OF A NEW RADIUS DEFECT MODEL BASED ON ULNA ANATOMICAL MEASUREMENT IN RABBITS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hanjiang; Guo, Ying; Mei, Wei

    2016-02-01

    To introduce a new bone defect model based on the anatomical measurement of radius and ulna in rabbits for offering a standard model for further tissue engineering research. Fifteen healthy 4-month-old New Zealand rabbits were selected for anatomic measurement and radiological measurement of the radius and ulna. Another 30 healthy 4-month-old New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into groups A, B, and C (n=10). The radius bone defect was created bilaterally in 3 groups. In group A, the periosteum and interosseous membranes were fully removed with jig-saw by approach between extensor carpi radialis muscle and musculus extensor digitorum. The periosteum and interosseous membranes were fully removed in group B, and only periosteum was removed in group C with electric-saw by approach between extensor carpi radialis muscle and flexor digitorum profundus based on anatomical analysis results of ulnar and radial measurement. The gross observation, X-ray, micro-CT three-dimensional reconstruction, bone mineral density (BMD), and bone mineral content (BMC) were observed and recorded at immediate and 15 weeks after operation. HE staining and Masson staining were performed to observe bone formation in the defect areas. Blood vessel injury (1 rabbit), tendon injury (2 rabbits), postoperative hematoma (1 rabbit), and infection (1 rabbit) occurred in group A, postoperative infection (1 rabbit) in group C, and no postoperative complications in group B; the complication rate of group A (50%) was significantly higher than that of groups B (0%) and C (10%) (P0.05). HE staining and Masson staining results showed bone formation in group A, with structure disturbance and sclerosis. New bone formed in groups B and C, cartilage cells were observed in the center of bone cells. The radius bone defect model established by approach between extensor carpi radialis muscle and flexor digitorum profundus is an ideal model because of better exposures, less intra-operative blood loss, less

  3. Modelling of dielectric hysteresis loops in ferroelectric semiconductors with charged defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozovska, Anna N; Eliseev, Eugene A

    2004-01-01

    We have proposed the phenomenological description of dielectric hysteresis loops in ferroelectric semiconductors with charged defects and prevailing extrinsic conductivity. We have modified the Landau-Ginsburg approach and shown that the macroscopic state of the aforementioned inhomogeneous system can be described by three coupled equations for three order parameters. Both the experimentally observed coercive field values well below the thermodynamic values and the various hysteresis-loop deformations (constricted and double loops) have been obtained in the framework of our model. The obtained results quantitatively explain the ferroelectric switching in such ferroelectric materials as thick PZT films

  4. Periodontal Defects in the A116T Knock-in Murine Model of Odontohypophosphatasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, B L; Sheen, C R; Hatch, N E; Liu, J; Cory, E; Narisawa, S; Kiffer-Moreira, T; Sah, R L; Whyte, M P; Somerman, M J; Millán, J L

    2015-05-01

    Mutations in ALPL result in hypophosphatasia (HPP), a disease causing defective skeletal mineralization. ALPL encodes tissue nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (ALP), an enzyme that promotes mineralization by reducing inorganic pyrophosphate, a mineralization inhibitor. In addition to skeletal defects, HPP causes dental defects, and a mild clinical form of HPP, odontohypophosphatasia, features only a dental phenotype. The Alpl knockout (Alpl (-/-)) mouse phenocopies severe infantile HPP, including profound skeletal and dental defects. However, the severity of disease in Alpl (-/-) mice prevents analysis at advanced ages, including studies to target rescue of dental tissues. We aimed to generate a knock-in mouse model of odontohypophosphatasia with a primarily dental phenotype, based on a mutation (c.346G>A) identified in a human kindred with autosomal dominant odontohypophosphatasia. Biochemical, skeletal, and dental analyses were performed on the resulting Alpl(+/A116T) mice to validate this model. Alpl(+/A116T) mice featured 50% reduction in plasma ALP activity compared with wild-type controls. No differences in litter size, survival, or body weight were observed in Alpl(+/A116T) versus wild-type mice. The postcranial skeleton of Alpl(+/A116T) mice was normal by radiography, with no differences in femur length, cortical/trabecular structure or mineral density, or mechanical properties. Parietal bone trabecular compartment was mildly altered. Alpl(+/A116T) mice featured alterations in the alveolar bone, including radiolucencies and resorptive lesions, osteoid accumulation on the alveolar bone crest, and significant differences in several bone properties measured by micro-computed tomography. Nonsignificant changes in acellular cementum did not appear to affect periodontal attachment or function, although circulating ALP activity was correlated significantly with incisor cementum thickness. The Alpl(+/A116T) mouse is the first model of odontohypophosphatasia

  5. Rapidly processable radiographic material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brabandere, L.A. de; Borginon, H.A.; Pattyn, H.A.; Pollet, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    A new rapidly processable radiographic silver halide material is described for use in mammography and non-destructive testing of industrial materials. The radiographic material is used for direct exposure to penetrating radiation without the use of fluorescent-intensifying screens. It consists of a transparent support with a layer of hydrophilic colloid silver halide emulsion on one or both sides. Examples of the preparation of three different silver halide emulsions are given including the use of different chemical sensitizers. These new radiographic materials have good resistance to the formation of pressure marks in rapid processing apparatus and they have improved sensitivity for direct exposure to penetrating radiation compared to conventional radiographic emulsions. (U.K.)

  6. An overview of erosion corrosion models and reliability assessment for corrosion defects in piping system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srividya, A.; Suresh, H.N.; Verma, A.K.; Gopika, V.; Santosh

    2006-01-01

    Piping systems are part of passive structural elements in power plants. The analysis of the piping systems and their quantification in terms of failure probability is of utmost importance. The piping systems may fail due to various degradation mechanisms like thermal fatigue, erosion-corrosion, stress corrosion cracking and vibration fatigue. On examination of previous results, erosion corrosion was more prevalent and wall thinning is a time dependent phenomenon. The paper is intended to consolidate the work done by various investigators on erosion corrosion in estimating the erosion corrosion rate and reliability predictions. A comparison of various erosion corrosion models is made. The reliability predictions based on remaining strength of corroded pipelines by wall thinning is also attempted. Variables in the limit state functions are modelled using normal distributions and Reliability assessment is carried out using some of the existing failure pressure models. A steady state corrosion rate is assumed to estimate the corrosion defect and First Order Reliability Method (FORM) is used to find the probability of failure associated with corrosion defects over time using the software for Component Reliability evaluation (COMREL). (author)

  7. Mathematical Modeling of Radiant Heat Transfer in Mirror Systems Considering Deep Reflecting Surface Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Leonov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available When designing large-sized mirror concentrating systems (MCS for high-temperature solar power plants, one must have at disposal reasonably reliable and economical methods and tools, making it possible to analyze its characteristics, to predict them depending on the operation conditions and accordingly to choose the most suitable system for the solution of particular task.Experimental determination of MCS characteristics requires complicated and expensive experimentation, having significant limitations on interpretation of the results, as well as limitations imposed due to the size of the structure. Therefore it is of particular interest to develop a mathematical model capable of estimating power characteristics of MCS considering the influence of operating conditions, design features, roughness and other surface defects.For efficient solution of the tasks the model must ensure simulation of solar radiant flux as well as simulation of geometrical and optical characteristics of reflection surface and their interaction. In this connection a statistical mathematical model of radiation heat exchange based on use of Monte Carlo methods and Finite Element Method was developed and realized in the software complex, making it possible to determine main characteristics of the MCS.In this paper the main attention is given to definition of MCS radiation characteristics with account for deep reflecting surface defects (cavities, craters. Deep cavities are not typical for MCS, but their occurrence is possible during operation as a result of erosion or any physical damage. For example, for space technology it is primarily micrometeorite erosion.

  8. Engraftment of Prevascularized, Tissue Engineered Constructs in a Novel Rabbit Segmental Bone Defect Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Kaempfen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The gold standard treatment of large segmental bone defects is autologous bone transfer, which suffers from low availability and additional morbidity. Tissue engineered bone able to engraft orthotopically and a suitable animal model for pre-clinical testing are direly needed. This study aimed to evaluate engraftment of tissue-engineered bone with different prevascularization strategies in a novel segmental defect model in the rabbit humerus. Decellularized bone matrix (Tutobone seeded with bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells was used directly orthotopically or combined with a vessel and inserted immediately (1-step or only after six weeks of subcutaneous “incubation” (2-step. After 12 weeks, histological and radiological assessment was performed. Variable callus formation was observed. No bone formation or remodeling of the graft through TRAP positive osteoclasts could be detected. Instead, a variable amount of necrotic tissue formed. Although necrotic area correlated significantly with amount of vessels and the 2-step strategy had significantly more vessels than the 1-step strategy, no significant reduction of necrotic area was found. In conclusion, the animal model developed here represents a highly challenging situation, for which a suitable engineered bone graft with better prevascularization, better resorbability and higher osteogenicity has yet to be developed.

  9. A Finite Element Model to Simulate Defect Formation during Friction Stir Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Zhu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a 3D coupled thermo-mechanical finite element model is developed to predict and analyze the defect formation during friction stir welding based on coupled Eulerian Lagrangian method. The model is validated by comparing the estimated welding temperature, processed zone shape and void size with those obtained experimentally. The results compared indicate that the simulated temperature and the data measured are in good agreement with each other. In addition, the model can predict the plasticized zone shape and the presence of a void in the weld quite accurately. However, the void size is overestimated. The effects of welding parameters and tool pin profile are also analyzed. The results reveal that welding at low welding speed or high tool rotational speed could produce a smaller void. Moreover, compared to a smooth tool pin, a featured tool pin can enhance plastic flow in the weld and achieve defect-free weldment. The results are helpful for the optimization of the welding process and the design of welding tools.

  10. Radiographic manifestations of hypochondroplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heselson, N G; Cremin, B J [Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town (South Africa); Beighton, P

    1979-01-01

    Hypochrondroplasia is an inherited skeletal dysplasia that resembles achondroplasia in mild degree. Radiographic manifestations encountered in 12 affected individuals in South Africa include slight shortening of all segments of the tubular bones, moderate caudal diminution of the lumbar interpedicular distances, increased lumbar lordosis with cacral tilt and distal prolongation of the fibular. Hypochondroplasia can be distinguished from other osteochondrodystrophies such as achondroplasia, pseudo-achondroplasia and metaphyseal chondroplasia by the recognition of it clinical and radiographic manifestations.

  11. A global conformance quality model. A new strategic tool for minimizing defects caused by variation, error, and complexity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinckley, C. Martin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    1994-01-01

    The performance of Japanese products in the marketplace points to the dominant role of quality in product competition. Our focus is motivated by the tremendous pressure to improve conformance quality by reducing defects to previously unimaginable limits in the range of 1 to 10 parts per million. Toward this end, we have developed a new model of conformance quality that addresses each of the three principle defect sources: (1) Variation, (2) Human Error, and (3) Complexity. Although the role of variation in conformance quality is well documented, errors occur so infrequently that their significance is not well known. We have shown that statistical methods are not useful in characterizing and controlling errors, the most common source of defects. Excessive complexity is also a root source of defects, since it increases errors and variation defects. A missing link in the defining a global model has been the lack of a sound correlation between complexity and defects. We have used Design for Assembly (DFA) methods to quantify assembly complexity and have shown that assembly times can be described in terms of the Pareto distribution in a clear exception to the Central Limit Theorem. Within individual companies we have found defects to be highly correlated with DFA measures of complexity in broad studies covering tens of millions of assembly operations. Applying the global concepts, we predicted that Motorola`s Six Sigma method would only reduce defects by roughly a factor of two rather than orders of magnitude, a prediction confirmed by Motorola`s data. We have also shown that the potential defects rates of product concepts can be compared in the earliest stages of development. The global Conformance Quality Model has demonstrated that the best strategy for improvement depends upon the quality control strengths and weaknesses.

  12. 3D Volumetric Modeling and Microvascular Reconstruction of Irradiated Lumbosacral Defects After Oncologic Resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio Garcia-Tutor

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Locoregional flaps are sufficient in most sacral reconstructions. However, large sacral defects due to malignancy necessitate a different reconstructive approach, with local flaps compromised by radiation and regional flaps inadequate for broad surface areas or substantial volume obliteration. In this report, we present our experience using free muscle transfer for volumetric reconstruction in such cases, and demonstrate 3D haptic models of the sacral defect to aid preoperative planning.Methods: Five consecutive patients with irradiated sacral defects secondary to oncologic resections were included, surface area ranging from 143-600cm2. Latissimus dorsi-based free flap sacral reconstruction was performed in each case, between 2005 and 2011. Where the superior gluteal artery was compromised, the subcostal artery was used as a recipient vessel. Microvascular technique, complications and outcomes are reported. The use of volumetric analysis and 3D printing is also demonstrated, with imaging data converted to 3D images suitable for 3D printing with Osirix software (Pixmeo, Geneva, Switzerland. An office-based, desktop 3D printer was used to print 3D models of sacral defects, used to demonstrate surface area and contour and produce a volumetric print of the dead space needed for flap obliteration. Results: The clinical series of latissimus dorsi free flap reconstructions is presented, with successful transfer in all cases, and adequate soft-tissue cover and volume obliteration achieved. The original use of the subcostal artery as a recipient vessel was successfully achieved. All wounds healed uneventfully. 3D printing is also demonstrated as a useful tool for 3D evaluation of volume and dead-space.Conclusion: Free flaps offer unique benefits in sacral reconstruction where local tissue is compromised by irradiation and tumor recurrence, and dead-space requires accurate volumetric reconstruction. We describe for the first time the use of

  13. Radiographic cup anteversion measurement corrected from pelvic tilt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liao; Thoreson, Andrew R; Trousdale, Robert T; Morrey, Bernard F; Dai, Kerong; An, Kai-Nan

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a novel technique to improve the accuracy of radiographic cup anteversion measurement by correcting the influence of pelvic tilt. Ninety virtual total hip arthroplasties were simulated from computed tomography data of 6 patients with 15 predetermined cup orientations. For each simulated implantation, anteroposterior (AP) virtual pelvic radiographs were generated for 11 predetermined pelvic tilts. A linear regression model was created to capture the relationship between radiographic cup anteversion angle error measured on AP pelvic radiographs and pelvic tilt. Overall, nine hundred and ninety virtual AP pelvic radiographs were measured, and 90 linear regression models were created. Pearson's correlation analyses confirmed a strong correlation between the errors of conventional radiographic cup anteversion angle measured on AP pelvic radiographs and the magnitude of pelvic tilt (P cup anteversion angle from the influence of pelvic tilt. The current method proposes to measure the pelvic tilt on a lateral radiograph, and to use it as a correction for the radiographic cup anteversion measurement on an AP pelvic radiograph. Thus, both AP and lateral pelvic radiographs are required for the measurement of pelvic posture-integrated cup anteversion. Compared with conventional radiographic cup anteversion, the errors of pelvic posture-integrated radiographic cup anteversion were reduced from 10.03 (SD = 5.13) degrees to 2.53 (SD = 1.33) degrees. Pelvic posture-integrated cup anteversion measurement improves the accuracy of radiographic cup anteversion measurement, which shows the potential of further clarifying the etiology of postoperative instability based on planar radiographs. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Ball bearing defect models: A study of simulated and experimental fault signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, C.; Samantaray, A. K.; Chakraborty, G.

    2017-07-01

    Numerical model based virtual prototype of a system can serve as a tool to generate huge amount of data which replace the dependence on expensive and often difficult to conduct experiments. However, the model must be accurate enough to substitute the experiments. The abstraction level and details considered during model development depend on the purpose for which simulated data should be generated. This article concerns development of simulation models for deep groove ball bearings which are used in a variety of rotating machinery. The purpose of the model is to generate vibration signatures which usually contain features of bearing defects. Three different models with increasing level-of-complexity are considered: a bearing kinematics based planar motion block diagram model developed in MATLAB Simulink which does not explicitly consider cage and traction dynamics, a planar motion model with cage, traction and contact dynamics developed using multi-energy domain bond graph formalism in SYMBOLS software, and a detailed spatial multi-body dynamics model with complex contact and traction mechanics developed using ADAMS software. Experiments are conducted using Spectra Quest machine fault simulator with different prefabricated faulted bearings. The frequency domain characteristics of simulated and experimental vibration signals for different bearing faults are compared and conclusions are drawn regarding usefulness of the developed models.

  15. Maximising profits for an EPQ model with unreliable machine and rework of random defective items

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Brojeswar; Sankar Sana, Shib; Chaudhuri, Kripasindhu

    2013-03-01

    This article deals with an economic production quantity (EPQ) model in an imperfect production system. The production system may undergo in 'out-of-control' state from 'in-control' state, after a certain time that follows a probability density function. The density function varies with reliability of the machinery system that may be controlled by new technologies, investing more costs. The defective items produced in 'out-of-control' state are reworked at a cost just after the regular production time. Occurrence of the 'out-of-control' state during or after regular production-run time is analysed and also graphically illustrated separately. Finally, an expected profit function regarding the inventory cost, unit production cost and selling price is maximised analytically. Sensitivity analysis of the model with respect to key parameters of the system is carried out. Two numerical examples are considered to test the model and one of them is illustrated graphically.

  16. Radiographic examination of the equine foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    A complete radiographic examination of the equine foot consists of properly exposed, processed, and positioned radiographs. For radiographic interpretation, in addition to knowing radiographic signs of disease, a knowledge of normal radiographic anatomy and possible insignificant anatomic variations is necessary

  17. Neutron radiographic findings in light water reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domanus, J.C.

    1979-06-01

    The assessment of neutron radiographs of nuclear fuel elements can be much easier, faster and simpler if reference can be made to typical defects, which can be revealed by neutron radiography. In other fields of industrial radiography collections of reference radiographs, showing typical defects in welding, or casting have been completed and published long ago. Since 1974 neutron radiography is routinely used at Risoe National Laboratory, Denmark, for the quality and performance control of nuclear fuel. About 2000 neutron radiographs were taken, mainly during the post irradiation examination of light water reactor fuel. During assessment of neutron radiographs some typical defects of the fuel were found and it was felt that a classification of such defects will help to speed up the assessment procedure. Therefore an attempt was made to establish such a classification, which is currently used at Risoe now. This classification is presented in this atlas, which contains 36 neutron radiographs reproduced on film (in original size) and on paper (twice enlarged). (author)

  18. Defect evolution in cosmology and condensed matter quantitative analysis with the velocity-dependent one-scale model

    CERN Document Server

    Martins, C J A P

    2016-01-01

    This book sheds new light on topological defects in widely differing systems, using the Velocity-Dependent One-Scale Model to better understand their evolution. Topological defects – cosmic strings, monopoles, domain walls or others - necessarily form at cosmological (and condensed matter) phase transitions. If they are stable and long-lived they will be fossil relics of higher-energy physics. Understanding their behaviour and consequences is a key part of any serious attempt to understand the universe, and this requires modelling their evolution. The velocity-dependent one-scale model is the only fully quantitative model of defect network evolution, and the canonical model in the field. This book provides a review of the model, explaining its physical content and describing its broad range of applicability.

  19. Middle cranial fossa approach to repair tegmen defects assisted by three-dimensionally printed temporal bone models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Sameer; VanKoevering, Kyle K; Kline, Stephanie; Green, Glenn E; Arts, H Alexander

    2017-10-01

    To explore the perioperative utility of three-dimensionally (3D)-printed temporal bone models of patients undergoing repair of lateral skull base defects and spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks with the middle cranial fossa approach. Case series. 3D-printed temporal bone models-based on patient-specific, high-resolution computed tomographic imaging-were constructed using inexpensive polymer materials. Preoperatively, the models demonstrated the extent of temporal lobe retraction necessary to visualize the proposed defects in the lateral skull base. Also preoperatively, Silastic sheeting was arranged across the modeled tegmen, marked, and cut to cover all of the proposed defect sites. The Silastic sheeting was then sterilized and subsequently served as a precise intraoperative template for a synthetic dural replacement graft. Of note, these grafts were customized without needing to retract the temporal lobe. Five patients underwent the middle cranial fossa approach assisted by 3D-printed temporal bone models to repair tegmen defects and spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks. No complications were encountered. The prefabricated dural repair grafts were easily placed and fit precisely onto the middle fossa floor without any additional modifications. All defects were covered as predicted by the 3D temporal bone models. At their postoperative visits, all five patients maintained resolution of their spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks. Inexpensive 3D-printed temporal bone models of tegmen defects can serve as beneficial adjuncts during lateral skull base repair. The models provide a panoramic preoperative view of all tegmen defects and allow for custom templating of dural grafts without temporal lobe retraction. 4 Laryngoscope, 127:2347-2351, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  20. The Ptch1DL mouse: a new model to study lambdoid craniosynostosis and basal cell nevus syndrome associated skeletal defects

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Weiguo; Choi, Irene; Clouthier, David E.; Niswander, Lee; Williams, Trevor

    2013-01-01

    Mouse models provide valuable opportunities for probing the underlying pathology of human birth defects. Employing an ENU-based screen for recessive mutations affecting craniofacial anatomy we isolated a mouse strain, Dogface-like (DL), with abnormal skull and snout morphology. Examination of the skull indicated that these mice developed craniosynostosis of the lambdoid suture. Further analysis revealed skeletal defects related to the pathology of basal cell nevus syndrome (BCNS) including de...

  1. Valor da avaliação radiográfica pré-operatória dos defeitos ósseos no joelho nas revisões de artroplastia Value of preoperative radiographic evaluations on knee bone defects for revision arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Masasi Iamaguchi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar o valor da avaliação radiográfica pré-operatória nas revisões de artroplastias totais do joelho. MÉTODOS: Trinta e um joelhos operados no período de 2006 a 2008 em uma série consecutiva de casos de cirurgia de revisão de artroplastia total de joelho foram analisados retrospectivamente. CRITÉRIOS ANALISADOS: número de cunhas ou enxertos ósseos estruturados utilizados para preenchimento dos defeitos ósseos; localização das cunhas e enxertos ósseos utilizados e espessura média do polietileno utilizada. A classificação AORI era estabelecida previamente através de radiografias pré-operatórias segundo critérios preestabelecidos. Após a análise, os joelhos foram divididos em quatro grupos (I, IIA, IIB e III. RESULTADOS: O número médio de cunhas ou enxertos ósseos utilizados em cada joelho variou de maneira crescente entre os grupos (grupo I: 1,33; grupo IIA: 2; grupo IIB: 4,33; grupo III: 4,83 (P = 0,0012. As localizações mais comuns foram: medial na tíbia e posteromedial no fêmur. Não houve diferença estatisticamente significante na espessura do polietileno utilizado. CONCLUSÃO: A classificação AORI para defeitos ósseos no joelho baseada em radiografias pré-operatórias mostrou correlação crescente com a necessidade de utilização de cunhas e/ou enxertos estruturados na revisão de artroplastia total do joelho. Porém, até 46% dos joelhos dos grupos I e IIA apresentaram falhas ósseas de até 5mm não diagnosticadas através das radiografias pré-operatórias.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the value of preoperative radiographic evaluations for total knee arthroplasty (TKA revision. METHODS: Thirty-one knees that were operated between 2006 and 2008, in a consecutive series of cases of TKA revision surgery were analyzed retrospectively. THE FOLLOWING CRITERIA WERE EVALUATED: number of wedges or structured bone grafts used for filling the bone defects; locations of the wedges and bone grafts used; and

  2. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis for the 'initial defect in the canister' reference model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cormenzana, J. L.

    2013-08-01

    In Posiva Oy's Safety Case 'TURVA-2012' the repository system scenarios leading to radionuclide releases have been identified in Formulation of Radionuclide Release Scenarios. Three potential causes of canister failure and radionuclide release are considered: (i) the presence of an initial defect in the copper shell of one canister that penetrates the shell completely, (ii) corrosion of the copper overpack, that occurs more rapidly if buffer density is reduced, e.g. by erosion, (iii) shear movement on fractures intersecting the deposition hole. All three failure modes are analysed deterministically in Assessment of Radionuclide Release Scenarios, and for the 'initial defect in the canister' reference model a probabilistic sensitivity analysis (PSA) has been carried out. The main steps of the PSA have been: quantification of the uncertainties in the model input parameters through the creation of probability density distributions (PDFs), Monte Carlo simulations of the evolution of the system up to 106 years using parameters values sampled from the previous PDFs. Monte Carlo simulations with 10,000 individual calculations (realisations) have been used in the PSA, quantification of the uncertainty in the model outputs due to uncertainty in the input parameters (uncertainty analysis), and identification of the parameters whose uncertainty have the greatest effect on the uncertainty in the model outputs (sensitivity analysis) Since the biosphere is not included in the Monte Carlo simulations of the system, the model outputs studied are not doses, but total and radionuclide-specific normalised release rates from the near-field and to the biosphere. These outputs are calculated dividing the activity release rates by the constraints on the activity fluxes to the environment set out by the Finnish regulator. Two different cases are analysed in the PSA: (i) the 'hole forever' case, in which the small hole through the copper overpack remains unchanged during the assessment

  3. Implementation of Chaotic Gaussian Particle Swarm Optimization for Optimize Learning-to-Rank Software Defect Prediction Model Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchari, M. A.; Mardiyanto, S.; Hendradjaya, B.

    2018-03-01

    Finding the existence of software defect as early as possible is the purpose of research about software defect prediction. Software defect prediction activity is required to not only state the existence of defects, but also to be able to give a list of priorities which modules require a more intensive test. Therefore, the allocation of test resources can be managed efficiently. Learning to rank is one of the approach that can provide defect module ranking data for the purposes of software testing. In this study, we propose a meta-heuristic chaotic Gaussian particle swarm optimization to improve the accuracy of learning to rank software defect prediction approach. We have used 11 public benchmark data sets as experimental data. Our overall results has demonstrated that the prediction models construct using Chaotic Gaussian Particle Swarm Optimization gets better accuracy on 5 data sets, ties in 5 data sets and gets worse in 1 data sets. Thus, we conclude that the application of Chaotic Gaussian Particle Swarm Optimization in Learning-to-Rank approach can improve the accuracy of the defect module ranking in data sets that have high-dimensional features.

  4. Autogenous bone particle/titanium fiber composites for bone regeneration in a rabbit radius critical-size defect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Huanxin; Ji, Ye; Tian, Qi; Wang, Xintao; Zhang, Nan; Zhang, Yicai; Xu, Jun; Wang, Nanxiang; Yan, Jinglong

    2017-11-01

    To explore the effects of autogenous bone particle/titanium fiber composites on repairing segmental bone defects in rabbits. A model of bilateral radial bone defect was established in 36 New Zealand white rabbits which were randomly divided into 3 groups according to filling materials used for bilaterally defect treatment: in group C, 9 animal bone defect areas were prepared into simple bilateral radius bone defect (empty sham) as the control group; 27 rabbits were used in groups ABP and ABP-Ti. In group ABP, left defects were simply implanted with autogenous bone particles; meanwhile, group ABP-Ti animals had right defects implanted with autogenous bone particle/titanium fiber composites. Animals were sacrificed at 4, 8, and 12 weeks, respectively, after operation. Micro-CT showed that group C could not complete bone regeneration. Bone volume to tissue volume values in group ABP-Ti were better than group ABP. From histology and histomorphometry Groups ABP and ABP-Ti achieved bone repair, the bone formation of group ABP-Ti was better. The mechanical strength of group ABP-Ti was superior to that of other groups. These results confirmed the effectiveness of autologous bone particle/titanium fiber composites for promoting bone regeneration and mechanical strength.

  5. Prediction of power ramp defects - development of a physically based model and evaluation of existing criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notley, M.J.F.; Kohn, E.

    2001-01-01

    Power-ramp induced fuel failure is not a problem in the present CANDU reactors. The current empirical correlations that define probability of failure do not agree one-with-another and do not allow extrapolation outside the database. A new methodology, based on physical processes, is presented and compared to data. The methodology calculates the pre-ramp sheath stress and the incremental stress during the ramp, and whether or not there is a defect is predicted based on a failure threshold stress. The proposed model confirms the deductions made by daSilva from an empirical 'fit' to data from the 1988 PNGS power ramp failure incident. It is recommended that daSilvas' correlation be used as reference for OPG (Ontario Power Generation) power reactor fuel, and that extrapolation be performed using the new model. (author)

  6. Establishment of a mouse model with misregulated chromosome condensation due to defective Mcph1 function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Trimborn

    Full Text Available Mutations in the human gene MCPH1 cause primary microcephaly associated with a unique cellular phenotype with premature chromosome condensation (PCC in early G2 phase and delayed decondensation post-mitosis (PCC syndrome. The gene encodes the BRCT-domain containing protein microcephalin/BRIT1. Apart from its role in the regulation of chromosome condensation, the protein is involved in the cellular response to DNA damage. We report here on the first mouse model of impaired Mcph1-function. The model was established based on an embryonic stem cell line from BayGenomics (RR0608 containing a gene trap in intron 12 of the Mcph1 gene deleting the C-terminal BRCT-domain of the protein. Although residual wild type allele can be detected by quantitative real-time PCR cell cultures generated from mouse tissues bearing the homozygous gene trap mutation display the cellular phenotype of misregulated chromosome condensation that is characteristic for the human disorder, confirming defective Mcph1 function due to the gene trap mutation. While surprisingly the DNA damage response (formation of repair foci, chromosomal breakage, and G2/M checkpoint function after irradiation appears to be largely normal in cell cultures derived from Mcph1(gt/gt mice, the overall survival rates of the Mcph1(gt/gt animals are significantly reduced compared to wild type and heterozygous mice. However, we could not detect clear signs of premature malignant disease development due to the perturbed Mcph1 function. Moreover, the animals show no obvious physical phenotype and no reduced fertility. Body and brain size are within the range of wild type controls. Gene expression on RNA and protein level did not reveal any specific pattern of differentially regulated genes. To the best of our knowledge this represents the first mammalian transgenic model displaying a defect in mitotic chromosome condensation and is also the first mouse model for impaired Mcph1-function.

  7. Establishment of a mouse model with misregulated chromosome condensation due to defective Mcph1 function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimborn, Marc; Ghani, Mahdi; Walther, Diego J; Dopatka, Monika; Dutrannoy, Véronique; Busche, Andreas; Meyer, Franziska; Nowak, Stefanie; Nowak, Jean; Zabel, Claus; Klose, Joachim; Esquitino, Veronica; Garshasbi, Masoud; Kuss, Andreas W; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; Mueller, Susanne; Poehlmann, Charlotte; Gavvovidis, Ioannis; Schindler, Detlev; Sperling, Karl; Neitzel, Heidemarie

    2010-02-16

    Mutations in the human gene MCPH1 cause primary microcephaly associated with a unique cellular phenotype with premature chromosome condensation (PCC) in early G2 phase and delayed decondensation post-mitosis (PCC syndrome). The gene encodes the BRCT-domain containing protein microcephalin/BRIT1. Apart from its role in the regulation of chromosome condensation, the protein is involved in the cellular response to DNA damage. We report here on the first mouse model of impaired Mcph1-function. The model was established based on an embryonic stem cell line from BayGenomics (RR0608) containing a gene trap in intron 12 of the Mcph1 gene deleting the C-terminal BRCT-domain of the protein. Although residual wild type allele can be detected by quantitative real-time PCR cell cultures generated from mouse tissues bearing the homozygous gene trap mutation display the cellular phenotype of misregulated chromosome condensation that is characteristic for the human disorder, confirming defective Mcph1 function due to the gene trap mutation. While surprisingly the DNA damage response (formation of repair foci, chromosomal breakage, and G2/M checkpoint function after irradiation) appears to be largely normal in cell cultures derived from Mcph1(gt/gt) mice, the overall survival rates of the Mcph1(gt/gt) animals are significantly reduced compared to wild type and heterozygous mice. However, we could not detect clear signs of premature malignant disease development due to the perturbed Mcph1 function. Moreover, the animals show no obvious physical phenotype and no reduced fertility. Body and brain size are within the range of wild type controls. Gene expression on RNA and protein level did not reveal any specific pattern of differentially regulated genes. To the best of our knowledge this represents the first mammalian transgenic model displaying a defect in mitotic chromosome condensation and is also the first mouse model for impaired Mcph1-function.

  8. WHAT IS THE BEST RADIOGRAPHIC VIEW FOR “DIE PUNCH” DISTAL RADIUS FRACTURES? A CADAVER MODEL STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcochio, Diego Figueira; Crepaldi, Bruno Eiras; Trindade, Christiano Augusto; da Costa, Antonio Carlos; Chakkour, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: the aim of this study is try to show the best view for distal radius fractures so called die-punch fractures. Methods: There has been used a human cadaver radius bone from the Salvador Arena Tissue Bank. This bone was cleaned up after removing the soft tissues and osteotomies created displaced lunate fossa fractures of 0, 1, 2, 3 and 5 mm. We have fixed this fragment with adhesive tape. Then the joint deviation were significantly increased with step-offs of 1 mm. Radiographs were then taken into 5 different positions: postero-anterior view, lateral view, oblique views and tangencial view for each of the deviations. The resulting lunate fossa depression in each X-ray film was analyzed by the AutoCAD 2010® software. Results: The tangencial view was the best one to see the 1mm and 3mm bone degrees and the second one view to see the 2mm and 5 mm degrees. The pronated oblique view was the best to see the 2mm degrees and the oblique supinated view wasn't able to see the degrees between 1 and 2mm. Conclusion: The tangencial view was the best one to see the 1mm and 3mm bone degrees and the second one view to see the 2mm and 5 mm degrees. PMID:27027079

  9. Multi-physics modeling of single/multiple-track defect mechanisms in electron beam selective melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Wentao; Ge, Wenjun; Qian, Ya; Lin, Stephen; Zhou, Bin; Liu, Wing Kam; Lin, Feng; Wagner, Gregory J.

    2017-01-01

    Metallic powder bed-based additive manufacturing technologies have many promising attributes. The single track acts as one fundamental building unit, which largely influences the final product quality such as the surface roughness and dimensional accuracy. A high-fidelity powder-scale model is developed to predict the detailed formation processes of single/multiple-track defects, including the balling effect, single track nonuniformity and inter-track voids. These processes are difficult to observe in experiments; previous studies have proposed different or even conflicting explanations. Our study clarifies the underlying formation mechanisms, reveals the influence of key factors, and guides the improvement of fabrication quality of single tracks. Additionally, the manufacturing processes of multiple tracks along S/Z-shaped scan paths with various hatching distance are simulated to further understand the defects in complex structures. The simulations demonstrate that the hatching distance should be no larger than the width of the remelted region within the substrate rather than the width of the melted region within the powder layer. Thus, single track simulations can provide valuable insight for complex structures.

  10. Atomic scale modeling of defect production and microstructure evolution in irradiated metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz de la Rubia, T.; Soneda, N.; Shimomura, Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Irradiation effects in materials depend in a complex way on the form of the as-produced primary damage state and its spatial and temporal evolution. Thus, while collision cascades produce defects on a time scale of tens of picosecond, diffusion occurs over much longer time scales, of the order of seconds, and microstructure evolution over even longer time scales. In this report the authors present work aimed at describing damage production and evolution in metals across all the relevant time and length scales. They discuss results of molecular dynamics simulations of displacement cascades in Fe and V. They show that interstitial clusters are produced in cascades above 5 keV, but not vacancy clusters. Next, they discuss the development of a kinetic Monte Carlo model that enables calculations of damage evolution over much longer time scales (1000`s of s) than the picosecond lifetime of the cascade. They demonstrate the applicability of the method by presenting predictions on the fraction of freely migrating defects in {alpha}Fe during irradiation at 600 K.

  11. A ketogenic diet rescues hippocampal memory defects in a mouse model of Kabuki syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Joel S; Pilarowski, Genay O; Carosso, Giovanni A; Zhang, Li; Huso, David L; Goff, Loyal A; Vernon, Hilary J; Hansen, Kasper D; Bjornsson, Hans T

    2017-01-03

    Kabuki syndrome is a Mendelian intellectual disability syndrome caused by mutations in either of two genes (KMT2D and KDM6A) involved in chromatin accessibility. We previously showed that an agent that promotes chromatin opening, the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) AR-42, ameliorates the deficiency of adult neurogenesis in the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus and rescues hippocampal memory defects in a mouse model of Kabuki syndrome (Kmt2d +/βGeo ). Unlike a drug, a dietary intervention could be quickly transitioned to the clinic. Therefore, we have explored whether treatment with a ketogenic diet could lead to a similar rescue through increased amounts of beta-hydroxybutyrate, an endogenous HDACi. Here, we report that a ketogenic diet in Kmt2d +/βGeo mice modulates H3ac and H3K4me3 in the granule cell layer, with concomitant rescue of both the neurogenesis defect and hippocampal memory abnormalities seen in Kmt2d +/βGeo mice; similar effects on neurogenesis were observed on exogenous administration of beta-hydroxybutyrate. These data suggest that dietary modulation of epigenetic modifications through elevation of beta-hydroxybutyrate may provide a feasible strategy to treat the intellectual disability seen in Kabuki syndrome and related disorders.

  12. Atomic scale modeling of defect production and microstructure evolution in irradiated metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz de la Rubia, T.; Soneda, N.; Shimomura, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Irradiation effects in materials depend in a complex way on the form of the as-produced primary damage state and its spatial and temporal evolution. Thus, while collision cascades produce defects on a time scale of tens of picosecond, diffusion occurs over much longer time scales, of the order of seconds, and microstructure evolution over even longer time scales. In this report the authors present work aimed at describing damage production and evolution in metals across all the relevant time and length scales. They discuss results of molecular dynamics simulations of displacement cascades in Fe and V. They show that interstitial clusters are produced in cascades above 5 keV, but not vacancy clusters. Next, they discuss the development of a kinetic Monte Carlo model that enables calculations of damage evolution over much longer time scales (1000's of s) than the picosecond lifetime of the cascade. They demonstrate the applicability of the method by presenting predictions on the fraction of freely migrating defects in αFe during irradiation at 600 K

  13. Combining in situ transmission electron microscopy irradiation experiments with cluster dynamics modeling to study nanoscale defect agglomeration in structural metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Donghua; Wirth, Brian D.; Li Meimei; Kirk, Marquis A.

    2012-01-01

    We present a combinatorial approach that integrates state-of-the-art transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in situ irradiation experiments and high-performance computing techniques to study irradiation defect dynamics in metals. Here, we have studied the evolution of visible defect clusters in nanometer-thick molybdenum foils under 1 MeV krypton ion irradiation at 80 °C through both cluster dynamics modeling and in situ TEM experiments. The experimental details are reported elsewhere; we focus here on the details of model construction and comparing the model with the experiments. The model incorporates continuous production of point defects and/or small clusters, and the accompanying interactions, which include clustering, recombination and loss to the surfaces that result from the diffusion of the mobile defects. To account for the strong surface effect in thin TEM foils, the model includes one-dimensional spatial dependence along the foil depth, and explicitly treats the surfaces as black sinks. The rich amount of data (cluster number density and size distribution at a variety of foil thickness, irradiation dose and dose rate) offered by the advanced in situ experiments has allowed close comparisons with computer modeling and permitted significant validation and optimization of the model in terms of both physical model construct (damage production mode, identities of mobile defects) and parameterization (diffusivities of mobile defects). The optimized model exhibits good qualitative and quantitative agreement with the in situ TEM experiments. The combinatorial approach is expected to bring a unique opportunity for the study of radiation damage in structural materials.

  14. Radiographic detection of single-leg fracture in Björk-Shiley Convexo-Concave prosthetic valves: a phantom model study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilchrist, I C; Cardella, J F; Fox, P S; Pae, W E; el-Ghamry Sabe, A A; Landis, J R; Localio, A R; Kunselman, A R; Hopper, K D

    1997-02-01

    Cineradiography can identify patients with single-leg fractured Björk-Shiley Convexo-Concave valves, although little is known about the sensitivity and specificity of this technique. We evaluated three normal and six (0 microm gap) single-leg fractured Björk-Shiley valves that were placed in a working phantom model. Valves were randomly imaged a total of 33 times and duplicated into a 120-valve series with a 1:9 ratio of abnormal/normal valves. Six reviewers independently graded each valve and demonstrated markedly different rates of identifying the fractured valves. Average sensitivity at the grade that clinically results in valve explanation was 47%. Among the normal valves, a correct identification was made 96% (range 91% to 99%) of the time. Present radiographic technology may have significant difficulty in identifying true single-leg fracture in Björk-Shiley valves with limb separations that are common among clinically explanted valves.

  15. Effect of Hydroxyapatite on Bone Integration in a Rabbit Tibial Defect Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Sung-Keun; Kim, Kyung-Taek; Kim, Chul-Hong; Ahn, Hee-Bae; Rho, Mee-Sook; Jeong, Min-Ho; Sun, Sang-Kyu

    2010-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to prepare hydroxyapatite (HA) and then characterize its effect on bone integration in a rabbit tibial defect model. The bone formation with different designs of HA was compared and the bony integration of several graft materials was investigated qualitatively by radiologic and histologic study. Methods Ten rabbits were included in this study; two holes were drilled bilaterally across the near cortex and the four holes in each rabbit were divided into four treatment groups (HAP, hydroxyapatite powder; HAC, hydroxyapatite cylinder; HA/TCP, hydroxyapatite/tri-calcium phosphate cylinder, and titanium cylinder). The volume of bone ingrowth and the change of bone mineral density were statistically calculated by computed tomography five times for each treatment group at 0, 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks after grafting. Histologic analysis was performed at 8 weeks after grafting. Results The HAP group showed the most pronounced effect on the bone ingrowth surface area, which seen at 4, 6, and 8 weeks after graft (p 0.05). On histological examination, the HAP group revealed well-recovered cortical bone, but the bone was irregularly thickened and haphazardly admixed with powder. The HAC group showed similar histological features to those of the HA/TCP group; the cortical surface of the newly developed bone was smooth and the bone matrix on the surface of the cylinder was regularly arranged. Conclusions We concluded that both the hydroxyapatite powder and cylinder models investigated in our study may be suitable as a bone substitute in the rabbit tibial defect model, but their characteristic properties are quite different. In contrast to hydroxyapatite powder, which showed better results for the bone ingrowth surface, the hydroxyapatite cylinder showed better results for the sustained morphology. PMID:20514266

  16. Gamma-Ray Emission Tomography: Modeling and Evaluation of Partial-Defect Testing Capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobsson Svard, S.; Jansson, P.; Davour, A.; Grape, S.; White, T.A.; Smith, L.E.; Deshmukh, N.; Wittman, R.S.; Mozin, V.; Trellue, H.

    2015-01-01

    Gamma emission tomography (GET) for spent nuclear fuel verification is the subject for IAEA MSP project JNT1955. In line with IAEA Safeguards R&D plan 2012-2023, the aim of this effort is to ''develop more sensitive and less intrusive alternatives to existing NDA instruments to perform partial defect test on spent fuel assembly prior to transfer to difficult to access storage''. The current viability study constitutes the first phase of three, with evaluation and decision points between each phase. Two verification objectives have been identified; (1) counting of fuel pins in tomographic images without any a priori knowledge of the fuel assembly under study, and (2) quantitative measurements of pinby- pin properties, e.g., burnup, for the detection of anomalies and/or verification of operator-declared data. Previous measurements performed in Sweden and Finland have proven GET highly promising for detecting removed or substituted fuel rods in BWR and VVER-440 fuel assemblies even down to the individual fuel rod level. The current project adds to previous experiences by pursuing a quantitative assessment of the capabilities of GET for partial defect detection, across a broad range of potential IAEA applications, fuel types and fuel parameters. A modelling and performance-evaluation framework has been developed to provide quantitative GET performance predictions, incorporating burn-up and cooling-time calculations, Monte Carlo radiation-transport and detector-response modelling, GET instrument definitions (existing and notional) and tomographic reconstruction algorithms, which use recorded gamma-ray intensities to produce images of the fuel's internal source distribution or conclusive rod-by-rod data. The framework also comprises image-processing algorithms and performance metrics that recognize the inherent tradeoff between the probability of detecting missing pins and the false-alarm rate. Here, the modelling and analysis framework is

  17. Oxygen Nonstoichiometry and Defect Chemistry Modeling of Ce0.8Pr0.2O2-delta

    OpenAIRE

    Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Hendriksen, Peter Vang

    2010-01-01

    The oxygen nonstoichiometry (delta) of Ce0.8Pr0.2O2−delta has been measured as a function of PO2 at temperatures between 600 and 900°C by coulometric titration and thermogravimetry. An ideal solution defect model, a regular solution model, and a defect association model, taking into account the association of reduced dopant species and oxygen vacancies, were unable to reproduce the experimental results. However, excellent agreement with the experimentally determined oxygen nonstoichiometry co...

  18. Radiographic aspects of xeroradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, G.U.V.; Fatouros, P.P.

    1980-01-01

    The quality of a conventional radiographic image can be characterized in terms of five basic parameters; density, contrast, latitude, resolution and noise. Since xeroradiographic images exhibit very limited broad area contrasts, and image formation is predominantly due to edge enhancement, a straightforward description of image quality using the same five parameters is not adequate. A detailed study was made of the radiographic aspects of xeroradiography with special reference to mammography, and a summary of major findings to date with appropriate references to published papers is presented

  19. A model for the formation of lattice defects at silicon oxide precipitates in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanhellemont, J.; Gryse, O. de; Clauws, P.

    2003-01-01

    The critical size of silicon oxide precipitates and the formation of lattice defects by the precipitates are discussed. An expression is derived allowing estimation of self-interstitial emission by spherical precipitates as well as strain build-up during precipitate growth. The predictions are compared with published experimental data. A model for stacking fault nucleation at oxide precipitates is developed based on strain and self-interstitial accumulation during the thermal history of the wafer. During a low-temperature treatment high levels of strain develop. During subsequent high-temperature treatment, excess strain energy in the precipitate is released by self-interstitial emission leading to favourable conditions for stacking fault nucleation

  20. Point Defects in 3D and 1D Nanomaterials: The Model Case of Titanium Dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knauth, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Titanium dioxide is one of the most important oxides for applications in energy and environment, such as solar cells, photocatalysis, lithium-ion batteries. In recent years, new forms of titanium dioxide with unusual structure and/or morphology have been developed, including nanocrystals, nanotubes or nanowires. We have studied in detail the point defect chemistry in nanocrystalline TiO 2 powders and ceramics. There can be a change from predominant Frenkel to Schottky disorder, depending on the experimental conditions, e.g. temperature and oxygen partial pressure. We have also studied the local environment of various dopants with similar ion radius, but different ion charge (Zn 2+ , Y 3+ , Sn 4+ , Zr 4+ , Nb 5+ ) in TiO 2 nanopowders and nanoceramics by Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) Spectroscopy. Interfacial segregation of acceptors was demonstrated, but donors and isovalent ions do not segregate. An electrostatic 'space charge' segregation model is applied, which explains well the observed phenomena.

  1. A systematic study of ball passing frequencies based on dynamic modeling of rolling ball bearings with localized surface defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Linkai; Cao, Hongrui; He, Zhengjia; Li, Yamin

    2015-11-01

    Ball passing frequencies (BPFs) are very important features for condition monitoring and fault diagnosis of rolling ball bearings. The ball passing frequency on outer raceway (BPFO) and the ball passing frequency on inner raceway (BPFI) are usually calculated by two well-known kinematics equations. In this paper, a systematic study of BPFs of rolling ball bearings is carried out. A novel method for accurately calculating BPFs based on a complete dynamic model of rolling ball bearings with localized surface defects is proposed. In the used dynamic model, three-dimensional motions, relative slippage, cage effects and localized surface defects are all considered. Moreover, localized surface defects are modeled accurately with consideration of the finite size of the ball, the additional clearance due to material absence, and changes of contact force directions. The reasonability of the proposed method for the prediction of dynamic behaviors of actual ball bearings with localized surface defects and for the calculation of BPFs is discussed by investigating the motion characteristics of a ball when it rolls through a defect. Parametric investigation shows that the shaft speed, external loads, the friction coefficient, raceway groove curvature factors, the initial contact angle, and defect sizes have great effects on BPFs. For a loaded ball bearing, the combination of rolling and sliding in contact region occurs, and the BPFs calculated by simple kinematical relationships are inaccurate, especially for high speed, low external load, and large initial contact angle conditions where severe skidding occurs. The hypothesis that the percentage variation of the spacing between impulses in a defective ball bearing was about 1-2% reported in previous investigations can be satisfied only for the conditions where the skidding effect in a bearing is slight. Finally, the proposed method is verified with two experiments.

  2. A novel tool for automated evaluation of radiographic weld images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajagopalan, C.; Venkatraman, B.; Jayakumar, T.; Kalyanasundaram, P.; Raj, B.

    2004-01-01

    Radiography is one of the oldest and the most widely used NDT method for the detection of volumetric defects in welds and castings. Once a radiograph of a weld or a casting or an assembly is taken, the radiographer examines the same. The task of the radiographer consists of identifying the defects and quantitatively evaluating the same based on codes and specifications. Radiographic interpretation primarily depends on the expertise of the individual radiographer. To overcome the subjectivity involved in human interpretation, it is thus desirable to develop a computer based automated system to aid in the interpretation of radiographs. Towards this goal, the authors have developed a flowchart chalking out the various stages involved. Typical weld images of tube to tubesheet weld joints were digitised using high resolution digitiser. The images were segmented and 52 invariant moments were computed to be used as features. The results of these are presented in this paper. Once the features (invariant moments) are extracted and ranked, a neural network classifier based on error back-propagation has to classify the (top ranking) features and evaluate the image for acceptance or rejection. (author)

  3. Rolling Process Modeling Report: Finite-Element Prediction of Roll Separating Force and Rolling Defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soulami, Ayoub [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lavender, Curt A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Paxton, Dean M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Burkes, Douglas [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-04-23

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been investigating manufacturing processes for the uranium-10% molybdenum (U-10Mo) alloy plate-type fuel for the U.S. high-performance research reactors. This work supports the Convert Program of the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) Global Threat Reduction Initiative. This report documents modeling results of PNNL’s efforts to perform finite-element simulations to predict roll separating forces and rolling defects. Simulations were performed using a finite-element model developed using the commercial code LS-Dyna. Simulations of the hot rolling of U-10Mo coupons encapsulated in low-carbon steel have been conducted following two different schedules. Model predictions of the roll-separation force and roll-pack thicknesses at different stages of the rolling process were compared with experimental measurements. This report discusses various attributes of the rolled coupons revealed by the model (e.g., dog-boning and thickness non-uniformity).

  4. Porosity Defect Remodeling and Tensile Analysis of Cast Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linfeng Sun

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Tensile properties on ASTM A216 WCB cast steel with centerline porosity defect were studied with radiographic mapping and finite element remodeling technique. Non-linear elastic and plastic behaviors dependent on porosity were mathematically described by relevant equation sets. According to the ASTM E8 tensile test standard, matrix and defect specimens were machined into two categories by two types of height. After applying radiographic inspection, defect morphologies were mapped to the mid-sections of the finite element models and the porosity fraction fields had been generated with interpolation method. ABAQUS input parameters were confirmed by trial simulations to the matrix specimen and comparison with experimental outcomes. Fine agreements of the result curves between simulations and experiments could be observed, and predicted positions of the tensile fracture were found to be in accordance with the tests. Chord modulus was used to obtain the equivalent elastic stiffness because of the non-linear features. The results showed that elongation was the most influenced term to the defect cast steel, compared with elastic stiffness and yield stress. Additional visual explanations on the tensile fracture caused by void propagation were also given by the result contours at different mechanical stages, including distributions of Mises stress and plastic strain.

  5. Nondestructive examination - radiographic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maier, H.J.

    1980-01-01

    First the basic principles of radiography are to be treated, especially the different radiation sources (X-ray, gamma-ray, neutrons, heat). In the second part those radiographic methods are shown, which are in common use for technical purposes, especially under the aspect of flaw recognition. (orig./RW)

  6. Matching hand radiographs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kauffman, J.A.; Slump, Cornelis H.; Bernelot Moens, H.J.

    2005-01-01

    Biometric verification and identification methods of medical images can be used to find possible inconsistencies in patient records. Such methods may also be useful for forensic research. In this work we present a method for identifying patients by their hand radiographs. We use active appearance

  7. Stabilized radiographic scanning agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fawzi, M.B.

    1979-01-01

    A stable composition useful in preparation of technetium-99m-based radiographic scanning agents has been developed. The composition contains a stabilizing amount of gentisate stabilizer selected from gentisic acid and its soluble pharmaceutically-acceptable salts and esthers. (E.G.)

  8. Radiographic scanning agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tofe, A.J.

    1976-01-01

    A stable radiographic scanning agent on a sup(99m)Tc basis has been developed. The substance contains a pertechnetate reduction agent, tin(II)-chloride, chromium(II)-chloride, or iron(II)-sulphate, as well as an organospecific carrier and ascorbic acid or a pharmacologically admissible salt or ester of ascorbic acid. (VJ) [de

  9. Computed tomography for radiographers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooker, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    This book is directed towards giving radiographers an introduction to and basic knowledge of computerized tomography. The technical section discusses gantries and x-ray production, computer and disc drive image display, storage, artefacts quality assurance and design of departments. The clinical section includes patient preparation, radiotherapy planning, and interpretation of images from various areas of the anatomy. (U.K.)

  10. Transplantation of dedifferentiated fat cell-derived micromass pellets contributed to cartilage repair in the rat osteochondral defect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Manabu; Matsumoto, Taro; Kikuta, Shinsuke; Ohtaki, Munenori; Kano, Koichiro; Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Saito, Shu; Nagaoka, Masahiro; Tokuhashi, Yasuaki

    2018-03-20

    Mature adipocyte-derived dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells possesses the ability to proliferate effectively and the potential to differentiate into multiple linages of mesenchymal tissue; similar to adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs). The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of DFAT cell transplantation on cartilage repair in a rat model of osteochondral defects. Full-thickness osteochondral defects were created in the knees of Sprague-Dawley rats bilaterally. Cartilage-like micromass pellets were prepared from green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled rat DFAT cells and subsequently transplanted into the affected right knee of these rats. Defects in the left knee were used as a control. Macroscopic and microscopic changes of treated and control defects were evaluated up to 12 weeks post-treatment with DFAT cells. To observe the transplanted cells, sectioned femurs were immunostained for GFP and type II collagen. DFAT cells formed micromass pellets expressing characteristics of immature cartilage in vitro. In the DFAT cell-transplanted limbs, the defects were completely filled with white micromass pellets as early as 2 weeks post-treatment. These limbs became smooth at 4 weeks. Conversely, the defects in the control limbs were still not repaired by 4 weeks. Macroscopic ICRS scores at 2 and 4 weeks were significantly higher in the DFAT cells-transplanted limbs compared to those of the control limbs. The modified O'Driscol histological scores for the DFAT cell-transplanted limbs were significantly higher than those of the control limbs at corresponding time points. GFP-positive DAFT cells were detected in the transplanted area at 2 weeks but hardly visible at 12 weeks post-operation. Transplantation of DFAT cell-derived micromass pellets contribute to cartilage repair in a rat osteochondral defect model. DFAT cell transplantation may be a viable therapeutic strategy for the repair of osteochondral injuries. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by

  11. Advanced radiographic scanning, enhancement and electronic data storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savoie, C.; Rivest, D.

    2003-01-01

    It is a well-known fact that radiographs deteriorate with time. Substantial cost is attributed to cataloguing and storage. To eliminate deterioration issues and save time retrieving radiographs, laser scanning techniques were developed in conjunction with viewing and enhancement software. This will allow radiographs to be successfully scanned and stored electronically for future reference. Todays radiographic laser scanners are capable Qf capturing images with an optical density of up to 4.1 at 256 grey levels and resolutions up to 4096 pixels per line. An industrial software interface was developed for the nondestructive testing industry so that, certain parameters such as scan resolution, number of scans, file format and location to be saved could be adjusted as needed. Once the radiographs have been scanned, the tiff images are stored, or retrieved into Radiance software (developed by Rivest Technologies Inc.), which will help to properly interpret the radiographs. Radiance was developed to allow the user to quickly view the radiographs correctness or enhance its defects for comparison and future evaluation. Radiance also allows the user to zoom, measure and annotate areas of interest. Physical cost associated with cataloguing, storing and retrieving radiographs can be eliminated. You can now successfully retrieve and view your radiographs from CD media or dedicated hard drive at will. For continuous searches and/or field access, dedicated hard drives controlled by a server would be the media of choice. All scanned radiographs will be archived to CD media (CD-R). Laser scanning with a proper acquisition interface and easy to use viewing software will permit a qualified user to identify areas of interest and share this information with his/her colleagues via e-mail or web data access. (author)

  12. A computational model for reliability calculation of steam generators from defects in its tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivero, Paulo C.M.; Melo, P.F. Frutuoso e

    2000-01-01

    Nowadays, probability approaches are employed for calculating the reliability of steam generators as a function of defects in their tubes without any deterministic association with warranty assurance. Unfortunately, probability models produce large failure values, as opposed to the recommendation of the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, that is, failure probabilities must be as small as possible In this paper, we propose the association of the deterministic methodology with the probabilistic one. At first, the failure probability evaluation of steam generators follows a probabilistic methodology: to find the failure probability, critical cracks - obtained from Monte Carlo simulations - are limited to have length's in the interval defined by their lower value and the plugging limit one, so as to obtain a failure probability of at most 1%. The distribution employed for modeling the observed (measured) cracks considers the same interval. Any length outside the mentioned interval is not considered for the probability evaluation: it is approached by the deterministic model. The deterministic approach is to plug the tube when any anomalous crack is detected in it. Such a crack is an observed one placed in the third region on the plot of the logarithmic time derivative of crack lengths versus the mode I stress intensity factor, while for normal cracks the plugging of tubes occurs in the second region of that plot - if they are dangerous, of course, considering their random evolution. A methodology for identifying anomalous cracks is also presented. (author)

  13. An improved PSO-SVM model for online recognition defects in eddy current testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Baoling; Hou, Dibo; Huang, Pingjie; Liu, Banteng; Tang, Huayi; Zhang, Wubo; Chen, Peihua; Zhang, Guangxin

    2013-12-01

    Accurate and rapid recognition of defects is essential for structural integrity and health monitoring of in-service device using eddy current (EC) non-destructive testing. This paper introduces a novel model-free method that includes three main modules: a signal pre-processing module, a classifier module and an optimisation module. In the signal pre-processing module, a kind of two-stage differential structure is proposed to suppress the lift-off fluctuation that could contaminate the EC signal. In the classifier module, multi-class support vector machine (SVM) based on one-against-one strategy is utilised for its good accuracy. In the optimisation module, the optimal parameters of classifier are obtained by an improved particle swarm optimisation (IPSO) algorithm. The proposed IPSO technique can improve convergence performance of the primary PSO through the following strategies: nonlinear processing of inertia weight, introductions of the black hole and simulated annealing model with extremum disturbance. The good generalisation ability of the IPSO-SVM model has been validated through adding additional specimen into the testing set. Experiments show that the proposed algorithm can achieve higher recognition accuracy and efficiency than other well-known classifiers and the superiorities are more obvious with less training set, which contributes to online application.

  14. Radiographic appearance of the navicular bone in sound horses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaser-Hotz, B.; Ueltschi, G.

    1992-01-01

    Radiographs of the navicular bone in 523 sound horses were reviewed. Detailed evaluation criteria were used. The incidence of radiographic changes and variations in normal horses were recorded. Results were tested for right-left limb difference and for age relationship. Variation in shape and bone structure was commonly seen in the navicular bone. Radiographic changes with an incidence of less than 2% included flexor cortex defects and calcification on the flexor surface. Fragments at the distal navicular bone border, calcification in the impar ligament and enthesiophytes at the proximal border were radiographic findings with an incidence of 2% to 10%. Abnormal canals at the distal border were found in 11% horses. Elongation of the lateral proximal extremity was commonly found. The mean width of the flexor cortex was 3.6 mm

  15. Low-dose ionizing radiation alleviates Aβ42-induced defective phenotypes in Drosophila Alzheimer's disease models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, SooJin; Jeong, Hae Min; Nam, Seon Young [Low-dose Radiation Research Team, Radiation Health Institute, Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power Co. Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by amyloid plaques, progressive neuronal loss, and gradual deterioration of memory. Amyloid imaging using positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers have been developed and approved for clinical use in the evaluation of suspected neurodegenerative disease, including AD. Particularly, previous studies involving low-dose ionizing radiation on Aβ 42-treated mouse hippocampal neurons have suggested a potential role for low-dose ionizing radiation in the treatment of AD. However, associated in vivo studies involving the therapy effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on AD are still insufficient. As a powerful cell biological system, Drosophila AD models have been generated and established a useful model organism for study on the etiology of human AD. In this study, we investigated the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on Drosophila AD models. Our results suggest that low-dose ionizing radiation have the beneficial effects on not only the Aβ42-induced developmental defective phenotypes but also motor defects in Drosophila AD models. These results might be due to a regulation of apoptosis, and provide insight into the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. Our results suggest that low-dose ionizing radiation have the beneficial effects on not only the Aβ42-induced developmental defective phenotypes but also motor defects in Drosophila AD models. These results might be due to a regulation of apoptosis, and provide insight into the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation.

  16. Radiographic progession of rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siozos, C.D.

    1981-01-01

    The radiographic progression of rheumatoid arthritis can be graded on a 0-IV scala. For this purpose five objective criteria are used: a) destruction, b) osteoporosis, c) narrowing of joint space, d) luxation and e) ankylosis. The grading of the radiographic progression is defined by the extent and the number of the measured alterations. The radiographic progression can be registered yearly. (orig.) [de

  17. Revolutionizing radiographic diagnostic accuracy in periodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brijesh Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective diagnostic accuracy has in some way been the missing link between periodontal diagnosis and treatment. Most of the clinicians rely on the conventional two-dimensional (2D radiographs. But being a 2D image, it has its own limitations. 2D images at times can give an incomplete picture about the severity or type of disease and can further affect the treatment plan. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT has a better potential for detecting periodontal bone defects with accuracy. The purpose here is to describe how CBCT imaging is beneficial in accurate diagnosis and will lead to a precise treatment plan.

  18. Three-dimensional hindfoot alignment measurements based on biplanar radiographs: comparison with standard radiographic measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutter, Reto; Pfirrmann, Christian W.A.; Buck, Florian M.; Espinosa, Norman

    2013-01-01

    To establish a hindfoot alignment measurement technique based on low-dose biplanar radiographs and compare with hindfoot alignment measurements on long axial view radiographs, which is the current reference standard. Long axial view radiographs and low-dose biplanar radiographs of a phantom consisting of a human foot skeleton embedded in acrylic glass (phantom A) and a plastic model of a human foot in three different hindfoot positions (phantoms B1-B3) were imaged in different foot positions (20 internal to 20 external rotation). Two independent readers measured hindfoot alignment on long axial view radiographs and performed 3D hindfoot alignment measurements based on biplanar radiographs on two different occasions. Time for three-dimensional (3D) measurements was determined. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were calculated. Hindfoot alignment measurements on long axial view radiographs were characterized by a large positional variation, with a range of 14 /13 valgus to 22 /27 varus (reader 1/2 for phantom A), whereas the range of 3D hindfoot alignment measurements was 7.3 /6.0 to 9.0 /10.5 varus (reader 1/2 for phantom A), with a mean and standard deviation of 8.1 ± 0.6/8.7 ± 1.4 respectively. Interobserver agreement was high (ICC = 0.926 for phantom A, and ICC = 0.886 for phantoms B1-B3), and agreement between different readouts was high (ICC = 0.895-0.995 for reader 1, and ICC = 0.987-0.994 for reader 2) for 3D measurements. Mean duration of 3D measurements was 84 ± 15/113 ± 15 s for reader 1/2. Three-dimensional hindfoot alignment measurements based on biplanar radiographs were independent of foot positioning during image acquisition and reader independent. In this phantom study, the 3D measurements were substantially more precise than the standard radiographic measurements. (orig.)

  19. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Models of Progranulin-Deficient Frontotemporal Dementia Uncover Specific Reversible Neuronal Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Almeida

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenic mechanisms of frontotemporal dementia (FTD remain poorly understood. Here we generated multiple induced pluripotent stem cell lines from a control subject, a patient with sporadic FTD, and an FTD patient with a novel heterozygous GRN mutation (progranulin [PGRN] S116X. In neurons and microglia differentiated from PGRN S116X induced pluripotent stem cells, the levels of intracellular and secreted PGRN were reduced, establishing patient-specific cellular models of PGRN haploinsufficiency. Through a systematic screen of inducers of cellular stress, we found that PGRN S116X neurons, but not sporadic FTD neurons, exhibited increased sensitivity to staurosporine and other kinase inhibitors. Moreover, the serine/threonine kinase S6K2, a component of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, was specifically downregulated in PGRN S116X neurons. Both increased sensitivity to kinase inhibitors and reduced S6K2 were rescued by PGRN expression. Our findings identify cell-autonomous, reversible defects in patient neurons with PGRN deficiency, and provide a compelling model for studying PGRN-dependent pathogenic mechanisms and testing potential therapies.

  20. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Models of Progranulin-Deficient Frontotemporal Dementia Uncover Specific Reversible Neuronal Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Sandra; Zhang, Zhijun; Coppola, Giovanni; Mao, Wenjie; Futai, Kensuke; Karydas, Anna; Geschwind, Michael D.; Tartaglia, M. Carmela; Gao, Fuying; Gianni, Davide; Sena-Esteves, Miguel; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Miller, Bruce L.; Farese, Robert V.; Gao, Fen-Biao

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The pathogenic mechanisms of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) remain poorly understood. Here we generated multiple induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines from a control subject, a patient with sporadic FTD, and an FTD patient with a novel GRN mutation (PGRN S116X). In neurons and microglia differentiated from PGRN S116X iPSCs, the levels of intracellular and secreted progranulin were reduced, establishing patient-specific cellular models of progranulin haploinsufficiency. Through a systematic screen of inducers of cellular stress, we found that PGRN S116X neurons, but not sporadic FTD neurons, exhibited increased sensitivity to staurosporine and other kinase inhibitors. Moreover, the serine/threonine kinase S6K2, a component of the PI3K and MAPK pathways, was specifically downregulated in PGRN S116X neurons. Both increased sensitivity to kinase inhibitors and reduced S6K2 were rescued by progranulin expression. Our findings identify cell-autonomous, reversible defects in patient neurons with progranulin deficiency and provide a new model for studying progranulin-dependent pathogenic mechanisms and testing potential therapies. PMID:23063362

  1. Modeling Defects, Shape Evolution, and Programmed Auto-origami in Liquid Crystal Elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konya, Andrew; Gimenez-Pinto, Vianney; Selinger, Robin

    2016-06-01

    Liquid crystal elastomers represent a novel class of programmable shape-transforming materials whose shape change trajectory is encoded in the material’s nematic director field. Using three-dimensional nonlinear finite element elastodynamics simulation, we model a variety of different actuation geometries and device designs: thin films containing topological defects, patterns that induce formation of folds and twists, and a bas-relief structure. The inclusion of finite bending energy in the simulation model reveals features of actuation trajectory that may be absent when bending energy is neglected. We examine geometries with a director pattern uniform through the film thickness encoding multiple regions of positive Gaussian curvature. Simulations indicate that heating such a system uniformly produces a disordered state with curved regions emerging randomly in both directions due to the film’s up/down symmetry. By contrast, applying a thermal gradient by heating the material first on one side breaks up/down symmetry and results in a deterministic trajectory producing a more ordered final shape. We demonstrate that a folding zone design containing cut-out areas accommodates transverse displacements without warping or buckling; and demonstrate that bas-relief and more complex bent/twisted structures can be assembled by combining simple design motifs.

  2. Modeling Defects, Shape Evolution, and Programmed Auto-origami in Liquid Crystal Elastomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew eKonya

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Liquid crystal elastomers represent a novel class of programmable shape-transforming materials whose shape change trajectory is encoded in the material’s nematic director field. Using three-dimensional nonlinear finite element elastodynamics simulation, we model a variety of different actuation geometries and device designs: thin films containing topological defects, patterns that induce formation of folds and twists, and a bas-relief structure. The inclusion of finite bending energy in the simulation model reveals features of actuation trajectory that may be absent when bending energy is neglected. We examine geometries with a director pattern uniform through the film thickness encoding multiple regions of positive Gaussian curvature. Simulations indicate that heating such a system uniformly produces a disordered state with curved regions emerging randomly in both directions due to the film’s up/down symmetry. By contrast, applying a thermal gradient by heating the material first on one side breaks up/down symmetry and results in a deterministic trajectory producing a more ordered final shape. We demonstrate that a folding zone design containing cut-out areas accommodates transverse displacements without warping or buckling; and demonstrate that bas-relief and more complex bent/twisted structures can be assembled by combining simple design motifs.

  3. 3D imaging acquisition, modeling, and prototyping for facial defects reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansoni, Giovanna; Trebeschi, Marco; Cavagnini, Gianluca; Gastaldi, Giorgio

    2009-01-01

    A novel approach that combines optical three-dimensional imaging, reverse engineering (RE) and rapid prototyping (RP) for mold production in the prosthetic reconstruction of facial prostheses is presented. A commercial laser-stripe digitizer is used to perform the multiview acquisition of the patient's face; the point clouds are aligned and merged in order to obtain a polygonal model, which is then edited to sculpture the virtual prothesis. Two physical models of both the deformed face and the 'repaired' face are obtained: they differ only in the defect zone. Depending on the material used for the actual prosthesis, the two prototypes can be used either to directly cast the final prosthesis or to fabricate the positive wax pattern. Two case studies are presented, referring to prostetic reconstructions of an eye and of a nose. The results demonstrate the advantages over conventional techniques as well as the improvements with respect to known automated manufacturing techniques in the mold construction. The proposed method results into decreased patient's disconfort, reduced dependence on the anaplasthologist skill, increased repeatability and efficiency of the whole process.

  4. Astrocyte-secreted thrombospondin-1 modulates synapse and spine defects in the fragile X mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Connie; Lau, Sally K M; Doering, Laurie C

    2016-08-02

    Astrocytes are key participants in various aspects of brain development and function, many of which are executed via secreted proteins. Defects in astrocyte signaling are implicated in neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by abnormal neural circuitry such as Fragile X syndrome (FXS). In animal models of FXS, the loss in expression of the Fragile X mental retardation 1 protein (FMRP) from astrocytes is associated with delayed dendrite maturation and improper synapse formation; however, the effect of astrocyte-derived factors on the development of neurons is not known. Thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) is an important astrocyte-secreted protein that is involved in the regulation of spine development and synaptogenesis. In this study, we found that cultured astrocytes isolated from an Fmr1 knockout (Fmr1 KO) mouse model of FXS displayed a significant decrease in TSP-1 protein expression compared to the wildtype (WT) astrocytes. Correspondingly, Fmr1 KO hippocampal neurons exhibited morphological deficits in dendritic spines and alterations in excitatory synapse formation following long-term culture. All spine and synaptic abnormalities were prevented in the presence of either astrocyte-conditioned media or a feeder layer derived from FMRP-expressing astrocytes, or following the application of exogenous TSP-1. Importantly, this work demonstrates the integral role of astrocyte-secreted signals in the establishment of neuronal communication and identifies soluble TSP-1 as a potential therapeutic target for Fragile X syndrome.

  5. CARTILAGE CONSTRUCTS ENGINEERED FROM CHONDROCYTES OVEREXPRESSING IGF-I IMPROVE THE REPAIR OF OSTEOCHONDRAL DEFECTS IN A RABBIT MODEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madry, Henning; Kaul, Gunter; Zurakowski, David; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Cucchiarini, Magali

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering combined with gene therapy is a promising approach for promoting articular cartilage repair. Here, we tested the hypothesis that engineered cartilage with chondrocytes over expressing a human insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) gene can enhance the repair of osteochondral defects, in a manner dependent on the duration of cultivation. Genetically modified chondrocytes were cultured on biodegradable polyglycolic acid scaffolds in dynamic flow rotating bioreactors for either 10 or 28 d. The resulting cartilaginous constructs were implanted into osteochondral defects in rabbit knee joints. After 28 weeks of in vivo implantation, immunoreactivity to ß-gal was detectable in the repair tissue of defects that received lacZ constructs. Engineered cartilaginous constructs based on IGF-I-over expressing chondrocytes markedly improved osteochondral repair compared with control (lacZ) constructs. Moreover, IGF-I constructs cultivated for 28 d in vitro significantly promoted osteochondral repair vis-à-vis similar constructs cultivated for 10 d, leading to significantly decreased osteoarthritic changes in the cartilage adjacent to the defects. Hence, the combination of spatially defined overexpression of human IGF-I within a tissue-engineered construct and prolonged bioreactor cultivation resulted in most enhanced articular cartilage repair and reduction of osteoarthritic changes in the cartilage adjacent to the defect. Such genetically enhanced tissue engineering provides a versatile tool to evaluate potential therapeutic genes in vivo and to improve our comprehension of the development of the repair tissue within articular cartilage defects. Insights gained with additional exploration using this model may lead to more effective treatment options for acute cartilage defects. PMID:23588785

  6. Cartilage constructs engineered from chondrocytes overexpressing IGF-I improve the repair of osteochondral defects in a rabbit model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Madry

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering combined with gene therapy is a promising approach for promoting articular cartilage repair. Here, we tested the hypothesis that engineered cartilage with chondrocytes overexpressing a human insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I gene can enhance the repair of osteochondral defects, in a manner dependent on the duration of cultivation. Genetically modified chondrocytes were cultured on biodegradable polyglycolic acid scaffolds in dynamic flow rotating bioreactors for either 10 or 28 d. The resulting cartilaginous constructs were implanted into osteochondral defects in rabbit knee joints. After 28 weeks of in vivo implantation, immunoreactivity to ß-gal was detectable in the repair tissue of defects that received lacZ constructs. Engineered cartilaginous constructs based on IGF-I-overexpressing chondrocytes markedly improved osteochondral repair compared with control (lacZ constructs. Moreover, IGF-I constructs cultivated for 28 d in vitro significantly promoted osteochondral repair vis-à-vis similar constructs cultivated for 10 d, leading to significantly decreased osteoarthritic changes in the cartilage adjacent to the defects. Hence, the combination of spatially defined overexpression of human IGF-I within a tissue-engineered construct and prolonged bioreactor cultivation resulted in most enhanced articular cartilage repair and reduction of osteoarthritic changes in the cartilage adjacent to the defect. Such genetically enhanced tissue engineering provides a versatile tool to evaluate potential therapeutic genes in vivo and to improve our comprehension of the development of the repair tissue within articular cartilage defects. Insights gained with additional exploration using this model may lead to more effective treatment options for acute cartilage defects.

  7. Quantitative trait loci affecting phenotypic variation in the vacuolated lens mouse mutant, a multigenic mouse model of neural tube defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korstanje, Ron; Desai, Jigar; Lazar, Gloria; King, Benjamin; Rollins, Jarod; Spurr, Melissa; Joseph, Jamie; Kadambi, Sindhuja; Li, Yang; Cherry, Allison; Matteson, Paul G.; Paigen, Beverly; Millonig, James H.

    Korstanje R, Desai J, Lazar G, King B, Rollins J, Spurr M, Joseph J, Kadambi S, Li Y, Cherry A, Matteson PG, Paigen B, Millonig JH. Quantitative trait loci affecting phenotypic variation in the vacuolated lens mouse mutant, a multigenic mouse model of neural tube defects. Physiol Genomics 35:

  8. Oxygen Nonstoichiometry and Defect Chemistry Modeling of Ce0.8Pr0.2O2-delta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Hendriksen, Peter Vang

    2010-01-01

    (DeltaHPrexc=aHdelta) and a completely random distribution of defects (referred to as “delta-linear”), or a “generalized delta-linear” solution model, where the excess Gibbs energy change in the reduction reaction of the dopant linearly varies with delta (DeltaGPrexc=aGdelta). A comparison of the partial...

  9. Birth Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    A birth defect is a problem that happens while a baby is developing in the mother's body. Most birth defects happen during the first 3 months of ... in the United States is born with a birth defect. A birth defect may affect how the ...

  10. Radiographic Co-60 in component of heavy equipment casting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djoli Soembogo, Harun Al Rasyid R dan Namad Sianta

    2016-01-01

    The application of radiography using isotope Co-60 source has been used on component of heavy equipment such as component of heavy equipment casting. Components of heavy equipment casting made through metal casting of carbon steel. This study tried applying digital radiography are using isotope Co-60 sources and using scanning positive film media of Epson V700 for digitization results of conventional radiographic films. This radiography is using film AGFA D7 and Fuji 100 to obtain a contrast medium, medium sensitivity and image quality is good. The purpose radiographic Co-60 at a component of heavy equipment casting is detecting indications of the shape and type casting defects of component of heavy equipment casting thus fit for use. Radiographic test of Co-60 has been carried out on component of heavy equipment casting with single wall single image method and the results of radiographic films digitization using scanning positive film media of Epson V700 with observation parameters casting defects. Time exposure of Co-60 radiation was 10 and 15 minutes hours for metal castings of carbon steel for thickness 20.00-50.00 mm by using activity 30.05 Ci and the perpendicular distance to the source of the film is 820 mm. Scanner positive film results in the form of digital radiography which allow for the transfer of digital data or digital computerized data storage. Radiographic test results on component of heavy equipment casting with single wall single image method produce the parameter casting defect of component of heavy equipment casting in position of critical area is found shrinkage that should be repaired and in position of safety area is not found defect indication so casting defect of component of heavy equipment casting are not acceptable according to standards referenced. (author)

  11. Embedded defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barriola, M.; Vachaspati, T.; Bucher, M.

    1994-01-01

    We give a prescription for embedding classical solutions and, in particular, topological defects in field theories which are invariant under symmetry groups that are not necessarily simple. After providing examples of embedded defects in field theories based on simple groups, we consider the electroweak model and show that it contains the Z string and a one-parameter family of strings called the W(α) string. It is argued that although the members of this family are gauge equivalent when considered in isolation, each member becomes physically distinct when multistring configurations are considered. We then turn to the issue of stability of embedded defects and demonstrate the instability of a large class of such solutions in the absence of bound states or condensates. The Z string is shown to be unstable for all values of the Higgs boson mass when θ W =π/4. W strings are also shown to be unstable for a large range of parameters. Embedded monopoles suffer from the Brandt-Neri-Coleman instability. Finally, we connect the electroweak string solutions to the sphaleron

  12. Modeling electronic defects in La2CuO4 and LiCl using embedded quantum cluster methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimes, R.W.; Shluger, A.L.; Baetzold, R.; Catlow, C.R.A.

    1991-01-01

    By exploiting recent developments in computer simulation methods the authors modeled the behavior of hole states in La 2 CuO 4 and excited state defects such as the exciton in LiCl. The authors methodology employs a Hartree-Fock cluster embedded in a classical surround. Although the method is discussed with respect to the hole and exciton defects in particular, the scope of the talk includes other material problems currently being investigated by this method. Thus, the types of problems for which the method are appropriate are illustrated and the present limitations are discussed

  13. Pocket atlas of radiographic anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, T.B.; Reif, E.; Stark, P.

    1993-01-01

    The 'Pocket Atlas of Radiographic Anatomy' presents 170 radiographs of the various body regions of adults, showing only the normal radiographic anatomy. Each radiograph is supplemented on the opposite page by a drawing of the particular body region. There is no commenting text, but the drawings are provided with captions in English. The atlas is a useful guide for interpreting radiographs. The pictures are arranged in chapters entitled as follows: Skeletal Imaging (skull, spine, upper extremity), lower extremity; Miscellaneous Plain Films (chest, mammogram, trachea, lung tomograms); Contrast Examinations (gastrointestinal tract, intravenous contrast examinations, arthrography, angiography); Special Examinations (myelograms, lymphangiograms, bronchograms, sialograms). (UWA). 348 figs [de

  14. Thermodynamic properties of nonstoichiometric H-Nb2 Osub(5-x) derived from a statistical model of its defect structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schilling, O.F.

    1986-01-01

    A statistical method for the treatment of the defect structure of oxides is applied to H-Nb 2 Osub(5-x) and its thermodynamic properties are derived as a function of x and temperature. The results based on a model of Nb O 3 vacancy clusters located at the tetrahedral columns of the structure presented very good agreement with experimental data in the literature [2]. Further, the predicted arrangement of the clusters of vacancies along the columns at the limiting composition of the H-Nb 2 O 5 phase indicates, according to recent electron microscopy experiments [18, 19], that the initial step of the transformation is the collapse of the structure around rows of defective sites along the columns, involving Andersson and Wadsley's [20] cooperative migration of atoms. The limiting compositions of the H-Nb 2 O 5 and Nb 53 O 132 phases are also correctly predicted on the basis of electrostatic interactions among defect units only. Thus elastic interactions among planar defects appear to affect only the arrangement of such defects, and not the compositions of the initial and final compounds. (author)

  15. PyCDT: A Python toolkit for modeling point defects in semiconductors and insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broberg, Danny; Medasani, Bharat; Zimmermann, Nils E. R.; Yu, Guodong; Canning, Andrew; Haranczyk, Maciej; Asta, Mark; Hautier, Geoffroy

    2018-05-01

    Point defects have a strong impact on the performance of semiconductor and insulator materials used in technological applications, spanning microelectronics to energy conversion and storage. The nature of the dominant defect types, how they vary with processing conditions, and their impact on materials properties are central aspects that determine the performance of a material in a certain application. This information is, however, difficult to access directly from experimental measurements. Consequently, computational methods, based on electronic density functional theory (DFT), have found widespread use in the calculation of point-defect properties. Here we have developed the Python Charged Defect Toolkit (PyCDT) to expedite the setup and post-processing of defect calculations with widely used DFT software. PyCDT has a user-friendly command-line interface and provides a direct interface with the Materials Project database. This allows for setting up many charged defect calculations for any material of interest, as well as post-processing and applying state-of-the-art electrostatic correction terms. Our paper serves as a documentation for PyCDT, and demonstrates its use in an application to the well-studied GaAs compound semiconductor. We anticipate that the PyCDT code will be useful as a framework for undertaking readily reproducible calculations of charged point-defect properties, and that it will provide a foundation for automated, high-throughput calculations.

  16. Development of radiographic technique for examining k-type butt weld

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barui, K.L.; Bhattacharyya, B.

    1983-01-01

    An attempt is made to develop a radiographic technique for examining K-type full penetration butt joints in heavy duty crane girders. The existing standard techniques of radiographic examination is found to be unsuitable to assess the internal defects properly. The examination technique reported here is successful in detecting not only the nature of the internal defects but also their degree of severities - from which clues for avoiding the most probable defects can be found out. The results of radiographic examination applied on the K-type butt joints of heavy duty crane girders have been discussed and it is specified that the acceptable limit of the defects must lie between 'blue' and 'green' according to the IIW colour code. Much work is yet to be done before standard specifications regarding the acceptibility of the defects in the actual job can be formulated. (author)

  17. Radiographic findings in immunodeficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obregon, R.; Lynch, D.A.; Cink, T.M.; Newell, J.D.; Kirkpatrick, C.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reviews the chest radiographs and high-resolution CT (HRCT) scans in patients with immunodeficiency disorders and define the role of HRCT. Thirty-three cases were retrospectively graded according to the consensus of two radiologists. Patients with HIV seropositivity and asthma were excluded. HRCT was performed in 12 cases with standard techniques. Diagnoses included common variable hypogammaglobulinemia (n = 19), X-linked agammaglobulinemia (n = 4), chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (n = 4), and selective immunoglobulin g deficiencies (n = 2). Chest radiographs showed bronchiectasis in 11 of 33 cases with a predominant lower lobe distribution (82%). Nodules were present in six cases and mucus plugs in four cases. HRCT showed bronchiectasis in nine of 12 cases; in five of these nine cases, bronchiectasis was not apparent on chest radiographs. Other HRCT findings included segmental air trapping (four of 12), mucus plugs (three of 12), hazy consolidation (four of 12), nodules (five of 12), and bronchiolectasis (two of 12). Therapy was altered in seven of 12 cases in which HRCT was performed. Most pertinent to clinical management were the presence of a thymoma (n = 1) and severe focal of diffuse bronchiectasis

  18. Large Format Radiographic Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohrer, J. S.; Stewart, Lacey; Wilke, M. D.; King, N. S.; Baker A, S.; Lewis, Wilfred

    1999-01-01

    Radiographic imaging continues to be a key diagnostic in many areas at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Radiographic recording systems have taken on many form, from high repetition-rate, gated systems to film recording and storage phosphors. Some systems are designed for synchronization to an accelerator while others may be single shot or may record a frame sequence in a dynamic radiography experiment. While film recording remains a reliable standby in the radiographic community, there is growing interest in investigating electronic recording for many applications. The advantages of real time access to remote data acquisition are highly attractive. Cooled CCD camera systems are capable of providing greater sensitivity with improved signal-to-noise ratio. This paper begins with a review of performance characteristics of the Bechtel Nevada large format imaging system, a gated system capable of viewing scintillators up to 300 mm in diameter. We then examine configuration alternatives in lens coupled and fiber optically coupled electro-optical recording systems. Areas of investigation include tradeoffs between fiber optic and lens coupling, methods of image magnification, and spectral matching from scintillator to CCD camera. Key performance features discussed include field of view, resolution, sensitivity, dynamic range, and system noise characteristics

  19. Radiographic testing of wood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osterloh, K.; Zscherpel, U.; Raedel, C.; Weidemann, G.; Meinel, D.; Goebbels, J.; Ewert, U.; Hasenstab, A.; Buecherl, T.

    2007-01-01

    Wood is an old and established consumption and construction material. It is still the most common material for constructing furniture, roofs, playgrounds and mine supports. In contrast to steel and concrete, wood warns of extreme loads by creaking. Its mechanical stability is more influenced by decay than by peripheral cracks. While external cracks are visible, internal decay by fungus growth is undetectable from outside. This may be a safety problem in supporting structures. The best analysis of the internal structure is provided by computed tomography, but this is also the most complex method, much more so than simple radiographic testing. However, the latter is made inaccurate by scattered radiation resulting from internal moisture. With the image processing options of digital radiographic techniques, the structural information can be separated effectively from noise. In contrast to X-ray and gamma radiography, neutron radiography provides information on the spatial distribution of moisture. In healthy wood, water is conducted in the sapwood while the hardwood is dry. Moisture in hardwood is caused by infestations, e.g. fungus growth. The contribution presents a comparative analysis of the available radiographic methods. (orig.)

  20. Radiograph identifying means

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheldon, A.D.

    1983-01-01

    A flexible character-indentable plastics embossing tape is backed by and bonded to a lead strip, not more than 0.025 inches thick, to form a tape suitable for identifying radiographs. The lead strip is itself backed by a relatively thin and flimsy plastics or fabric strip which, when removed, allows the lead plastic tape to be pressure-bonded to the surface to be radiographed. A conventional tape-embossing gun is used to indent the desired characters in succession into the lead-backed tape, without necessarily severing the lead; and then the backing strip is peeled away to expose the layer of adhesive which pressure-bonds the indented tape to the object to be radiographed. X-rays incident on the embossed tape will cause the raised characters to show up dark on the subsequently-developed film, whilst the raised side areas will show up white. Each character will thus stand out on the developed film. (author)

  1. Long-term Observation of Regenerated Periodontium Induced by FGF-2 in the Beagle Dog 2-Wall Periodontal Defect Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Anzai

    Full Text Available The long-term stability and qualitative characteristics of periodontium regenerated by FGF-2 treatment were compared with normal physiological healing tissue controls in a Beagle dog 2-wall periodontal defect model 13 months after treatment by assessing tissue histology and three-dimensional microstructure using micro-computed tomography (μCT. After FGF-2 (0.3% or vehicle treatment at the defect sites, serial changes in the bone mineral content (BMC were observed using periodic X-ray imaging. Tissues were harvested at 13 months, evaluated histomorphometrically, and the cortical bone volume and trabecular bone structure of the newly formed bone were analyzed using μCT. FGF-2 significantly increased the BMC of the defect area at 2 months compared with that of the control group, and this difference was unchanged through 13 months. The cortical bone volume was significantly increased by FGF-2, but there was no difference between the groups in trabecular bone structure. Bone maturation was occurring in both groups because of the lower cortical volume and denser trabecular bone than what is found in intact bone. FGF-2 also increased the area of newly formed bone as assessed histomorphometrically, but the ratios of trabecular bone in the defect area were similar between the control and FGF-2 groups. These results suggest that FGF-2 stimulates neogenesis of alveolar bone that is of similar quality to that of the control group. The lengths of the regenerated periodontal ligament and cementum, measured as the distance from the defect bottom to the apical end of the gingival epithelium, and height and area of the newly formed bone in the FGF-2 group were larger than those in the control group. The present study demonstrated that, within the limitation of artificial periodontal defect model, the periodontal tissue regenerated by FGF-2 was maintained for 13 months after treatment and was qualitatively equivalent to that generated through the physiological

  2. Self-expanding nanoplatinum-coated nitinol devices for atrial septal defect and patent ductus arteriosus closure: a swine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lertsapcharoen, Pornthep; Khongphatthanayothin, Apichai; La-orkhun, Vidhavas; Supachokchaiwattana, Pentip; Charoonrut, Phingphol

    2006-01-01

    Our purpose was to evaluate self-expanding nanoplatinum-coated nitinol devices for transcatheter closure of atrial septal defects and patent ductus arteriosus in a swine model. The devices were braided from platinum-activated nitinol wires and filled with polyester to enhance thrombogenicity. The platinum activation of the nitinol wires was carried out with the help of Nanofusion technology. The coating of platinum covers the exposed surface of the nitinol wires and prevents the release of nickel into the blood stream after the implantation of the device but does not affect its shape memory, which makes the device self-expanding after it is loaded from the catheter. Atrial septal defects were created in 12 piglets by balloon dilation of the patent foramen ovale. The size of the device was selected on the basis of the diameter of the balloon and the size of the defect, measured by transthoracic echocardiography. The devices were successfully deployed in all 12 piglets under fluoroscopic study. Transthoracic color Doppler echocardiograms showed complete closure of the atrial septal defect within 15 minutes of device implantation. Twelve patent ductus arteriosus closure devices were deployed in the right or left subclavian arteries in 10 piglets. Angiograms showed complete occlusion of the subclavian arteries within a few minutes of device deployment. In the atrial septal defect cases, the autopsy findings showed complete organizing fibrin thrombus formation and complete neo-endothelialization on the outer surface of the devices within one week and six weeks of implantation, respectively. The use of self-expanding nanoplatinum-coated nitinol devices for the transcatheter closure of atrial septal defects and patent ductus arteriosus is feasible. The excellent occlusion result and complete neo-endothelialization of the devices in the swine model is an indication of the potential of these devices in human application.

  3. Integrated Supply Chain Cooperative Inventory Model with Payment Period Being Dependent on Purchasing Price under Defective Rate Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Feng Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In most commercial transactions, the buyer and vendor may usually agree to postpone payment deadline. During such delayed period, the buyer is entitled to keep the products without having to pay the sale price. However, the vendor usually hopes to receive full payment as soon as possible, especially when the transaction involves valuable items; yet, the buyer would offer a higher purchasing price in exchange of a longer postponement. Therefore, we assumed such permissible delayed period is dependent on the purchasing price. As for the manufacturing side, defective products are inevitable from time to time, and not all of those defective products can be repaired. Hence, we would like to add defective production and repair rate to our proposed model and discuss how these factors may affect profits. In addition, holding cost, ordering cost, and transportation cost will also be considered as we develop the integrated inventory model with price-dependent payment period under the possible condition of defective products. We would like to find the maximum of the joint expected total profit for our model and come up with a suitable inventory policy accordingly. In the end, we have also provided a numerical example to clearly illustrate possible solutions.

  4. Rapid-prototyped PLGA/β-TCP/hydroxyapatite nanocomposite scaffolds in a rabbit femoral defect model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jinku; McBride, Sean; Alvarez-Urena, Pedro; Song, Young-Hye; Hollinger, Jeffrey O; Tellis, Brandi; Dean, David D; Sylvia, Victor L; Elgendy, Hoda; Ong, Joo

    2012-01-01

    Bone tissue engineering scaffolds composed of poly(d,l-lactide:glycolide) (DL-PLGA) and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) nanocomposites were prepared and characterized. Scaffolds with two specific architectures were produced via fused deposition modeling (FDM), a type of extrusion freeform fabrication. Microfilaments deposited at angles of 0° and 90° were designated as the ‘simple’ scaffold architecture, while those deposited at angles alternating between 0°, 90°, 45° and −45° were designated as the ‘complex’ scaffold architecture. In addition, the simple and complex scaffolds were coated with hydroxyapatite (HA). The surface morphology of the scaffolds was assessed before and after HA coating and uniform distribution of HA coating on the surface was observed by scanning electron microscopy. The scaffolds were implanted into rabbit femoral unicortical bone defects according to four treatment groups based on pore structure and HA coating. After 6 and 12 weeks, scaffolds and host bone were recovered and processed for histology. Data suggest that all configurations of the scaffolds integrated with the host bone and were biocompatible and thus may offer an exciting new scaffold platform for delivery of biologicals for bone regeneration. (paper)

  5. Synaptic defects in the spinal and neuromuscular circuitry in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen K Y Ling

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a major genetic cause of death in childhood characterized by marked muscle weakness. To investigate mechanisms underlying motor impairment in SMA, we examined the spinal and neuromuscular circuitry governing hindlimb ambulatory behavior in SMA model mice (SMNΔ7. In the neuromuscular circuitry, we found that nearly all neuromuscular junctions (NMJs in hindlimb muscles of SMNΔ7 mice remained fully innervated at the disease end stage and were capable of eliciting muscle contraction, despite a modest reduction in quantal content. In the spinal circuitry, we observed a ∼28% loss of synapses onto spinal motoneurons in the lateral column of lumbar segments 3-5, and a significant reduction in proprioceptive sensory neurons, which may contribute to the 50% reduction in vesicular glutamate transporter 1(VGLUT1-positive synapses onto SMNΔ7 motoneurons. In addition, there was an increase in the association of activated microglia with SMNΔ7 motoneurons. Together, our results present a novel concept that synaptic defects occur at multiple levels of the spinal and neuromuscular circuitry in SMNΔ7 mice, and that proprioceptive spinal synapses could be a potential target for SMA therapy.

  6. Metformin Ameliorates Uterine Defects in a Rat Model of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuehui Zhang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Adult rats treated concomitantly with insulin and human chorionic gonadotropin exhibit endocrine, metabolic, and reproductive abnormalities that are very similar to those observed in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS patients. In this study, we used this rat model to assess the effects of metformin on PCOS-related uterine dysfunction. In addition to reducing androgen levels, improving insulin sensitivity, and correcting the reproductive cycle, metformin treatment induced morphological changes in the PCOS-like uterus. At the molecular and cellular levels, metformin normalized the androgen receptor-mediated transcriptional program and restored epithelial–stromal interactions. In contrast to glucose transport, uterine inflammatory gene expression was suppressed through the PI3K–Akt–NFκB network, but without affecting apoptosis. These effects appeared to be independent of AMPK subunit and autophagy-related protein regulation. We found that when metformin treatment partially restored implantation, several implantation-related genes were normalized in the PCOS-like rat uterus. These results improve our understanding of how metformin rescues the disruption of the implantation process due to the uterine defects that result from hyperandrogenism and insulin resistance. Our data provide insights into the molecular and functional clues that might help explain, at least in part, the potential therapeutic options of metformin in PCOS patients with uterine dysfunction.

  7. Modeling of excimer laser radiation induced defect generation in fluoride phosphate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natura, U.; Ehrt, D.

    2001-01-01

    Fluoride phosphate (FP) glasses with low phosphate content are high-transparent in the deep ultraviolet (UV) range and attractive candidates for UV-optics. Their optical properties are complementary to fluoride crystals. The anomalous partial dispersion makes them desirable for optical lens designs to reduce the secondary spectrum. Their UV transmission is limited by trace impurities introduced by raw materials and decreases when exposed to UV-radiation (lamps, lasers). The experiments of the paper published previously in this journal were used in order to separate radiation induced absorption bands in the fluoride phosphate glass FP10. In this paper the generation mechanism of the phosphorus-oxygen related hole center POHC 2 is investigated in detail in glasses of various compositions (various phosphate and impurity contents) in order to predict the transmission loss in case of long-time irradiation. Experiments were carried out using ArF- and KrF-excimer lasers (ns-pulses). POHC 2 generation strongly depends on the phosphate content and on the content of Pb 2+ . A model was developed on these terms. Rate equations are formulated, incorporating the influence of the Pb 2+ -content on the defect generation, a two-step creation term including an energy transfer process and a one-photon bleaching term. This results in a set of coupled nonlinear differential equations. Absorption coefficients and lifetimes of the excited states were calculated as well. Experimental results compared well with the numerical analysis of the theoretical rate equations

  8. Use of a Three-Dimensional Model to Optimize a MEDPOR Implant for Delayed Reconstruction of a Suprastructure Maxillectomy Defect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echo, Anthony; Wolfswinkel, Erik M.; Weathers, William; McKnight, Aisha; Izaddoost, Shayan

    2013-01-01

    The use of a three-dimensional (3-D) model has been well described for craniomaxillofacial reconstruction, especially with the preoperative planning of free fibula flaps. This article reports the application of an innovative 3-D model approach for the calculation of the exact contours, angles, length, and general morphology of a prefabricated MEDPOR 2/3 orbital implant for reconstruction of a suprastructure maxillectomy defect. The 3-D model allowed intraoperative modification of the MEDPOR implant which decreased the risk of iatrogenic harm, contamination while also improving aesthetic results and function. With the aid of preoperative 3-D models, porous polypropylene facial implants can be contoured efficiently intraoperatively to precisely reconstruct complex craniomaxillofacial defects. PMID:24436774

  9. Investigation of the impact of defect models on Monte Carlo simulations of RBS/C spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovac, D.; Hobler, G.

    2006-01-01

    We compare the impact on the RBS/C spectra of defect configurations in silicon obtained from either empirical interatomic potentials or ab initio calculations. Using the Tersoff potential as the empirical potential and the VASP code for ab initio calculations we have determined the coordinates of the split- interstitial, of the di-, tri- and four-interstitial cluster, and of the tetrahedral interstitial as well as the strain on neighboring atoms induced by the presence of these defects. Using these coordinates in binary collision RBS/C simulations we find differences in the RBS/C yields of up to 30%. The dependence of the backscattering yield on the assumed defect type is larger with the defect coordinates obtained by the empirical potential than by the ab initio calculations

  10. A theoretical model predicting the intensity of emitted light per unit of x-ray exposure in radiographic screens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsoukos, S; Kateris, A; Kalivas, N; Spyrou, G; Panayiotakis, G [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, University of Patras, 265 00 pAtras (Greece); Kandarakis, I; Gavouras, D [Department of Medical Instrumentation Technology, Technological Educational Institution of Athens (Greece)

    1999-12-31

    A theoretical model predicting the intensity of light emitted by x-ray imaging phosphor screens per unit of area and time over incident x-ray flux (absolute efficiency) was developed. The model takes into account : A) the structure of the screens which consists of luminescent grains embedded in a binding matrix. B) the direct deposition of energy by x-ray absorption effects.. C) the re-absorption of K fluorescence characteristic x-rays produced when the x-ray energy exceeds the energy of the K absorption edge of the phosphor material. To test the model a set of (Gd,La)2O2S:Tb phosphor screens was prepared by sedimentation in the laboratory. Experimental absolute efficiency data were obtained at x-ray tube voltage range from 40 to 160 kVp. The coincidence between experimental and theoretical results were satisfactory. (authors) 7 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Mouse Models for Investigating the Developmental Bases of Human Birth Defects

    OpenAIRE

    MOON, ANNE M.

    2006-01-01

    Clinicians and basic scientists share an interest in discovering how genetic or environmental factors interact to perturb normal development and cause birth defects and human disease. Given the complexity of such interactions, it is not surprising that 4% of human infants are born with a congenital malformation, and cardiovascular defects occur in nearly 1%. Our research is based on the fundamental hypothesis that an understanding of normal and abnormal development will permit us to generate ...

  12. Phase-field models of microstructure evolution in a system with elastic inhomogeneity and defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shenyang

    In this thesis, the phase-field approach is employed to study the effect of elastic inhomogeneity and structural defects on phase separation kinetics and morphological evolution in bulk and film systems, the precipitation of theta ' phase (Al2Cu) in Al-Cu alloys, and solute strengthening of alloys. By combining the iteration method for calculating the elastic energy and a semi-implicit spectral method for solving the Cahn-Hilliard equation an extremely efficient phase-field model is developed for studying morphological evolution in coherent systems with large elastic inhomogeneity. Spinodal decomposition in a thin film with periodically distributed arrays of interfacial dislocations is simulated. The results show that the periodic stress field associated with the array of interfacial dislocations leads to a directional phase separation and the formation of ordered microstructures. The metastable theta' (Al2Cu) precipitates are one of the primary strengthening precipitates in Al-Cu alloys. They are of a plate-like shape with strong interfacial energy and mobility anisotropies. A phase-field model which can automatically incorporate the thermodynamic and kinetic information from databases is developed. The relationships between phase-field model parameters and material thermodynamic and kinetic properties are established. Systematic simulations of theta' growth in 1D, 2D and 3D are carried out. The growth of a single theta ' precipitate in 1D exactly reproduces the results from analytical solutions. The phase-filed model can serve as a basis for quantitative understanding of the influence of elastic energy, interface energy anisotropy and interface mobility anisotropy on the precipitation of theta' in Al-Cu alloys. Precipitates and solutes are commonly used to strengthen alloys. A phase field model of dislocation dynamics, which employs 12 order parameter fields to describe the dislocation distribution in a single fcc crystal, and one composition field to describe

  13. Efficacy and safety of small intestinal submucosa in dural defect repair in a canine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Shu-kun [Laboratory of Stem Cell and Tissue Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Department of Orthopedics, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, 610041 (China); Guo, Jin-hai [Laboratory of Stem Cell and Tissue Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Department of Orthopedics, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, 610041 (China); Department of Orthopedics, The Third People' s Hospital of Chengdu, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); Wang, Zhu-le [Laboratory of Stem Cell and Tissue Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Department of Orthopedics, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, 610041 (China); Zhang, Yi [Laboratory of Stem Cell and Tissue Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Tu, Yun-hu [Department of Neurosurgery, Chengdu Military General Hospital, Chengdu, Sichuan 610083 (China); Wu, Shi-zhou [Laboratory of Stem Cell and Tissue Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Department of Orthopedics, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, 610041 (China); Huang, Fu-guo [Department of Orthopedics, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, 610041 (China); Xie, Hui-qi, E-mail: xiehuiqi@scu.edu.cn [Laboratory of Stem Cell and Tissue Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2017-04-01

    Dural defects are a common problem, and inadequate dural closure can lead to complications. Several types of dural substitute materials have recently been discarded or modified owing to poor biocompatibility or mechanical properties and adverse reactions. The small intestinal submucosa (SIS) is a promising material used in a variety of applications. Based on the limitations of previous studies, we conducted an animal study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the SIS in preclinical trials. Twenty-four male beagle dogs were subjected to surgical resection to produce dural defects. SIS or autologous dural mater was patched on the dural defect. Gross and histological evaluations were carried out to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the therapy. Our findings demonstrated that the SIS, which stimulated connective and epithelial tissue responses for dural regeneration and functional recovery without immunological rejection, could provide prolonged defect repair and prevent complications. The mechanical properties of the SIS could be adjusted by application of multiple layers, and the biocompatibility of the material was appropriate. Thus, our data suggested that this material may represent an alternative option for clinical treatment of dural defects. - Highlights: • SIS stimulates dura regeneration without immunological rejection. • SIS has adjustable mechanical properties and appropriate biocompatibility. • SIS may be an effective alternative option for clinical treatment of dural defects.

  14. Efficacy and safety of small intestinal submucosa in dural defect repair in a canine model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Shu-kun; Guo, Jin-hai; Wang, Zhu-le; Zhang, Yi; Tu, Yun-hu; Wu, Shi-zhou; Huang, Fu-guo; Xie, Hui-qi

    2017-01-01

    Dural defects are a common problem, and inadequate dural closure can lead to complications. Several types of dural substitute materials have recently been discarded or modified owing to poor biocompatibility or mechanical properties and adverse reactions. The small intestinal submucosa (SIS) is a promising material used in a variety of applications. Based on the limitations of previous studies, we conducted an animal study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the SIS in preclinical trials. Twenty-four male beagle dogs were subjected to surgical resection to produce dural defects. SIS or autologous dural mater was patched on the dural defect. Gross and histological evaluations were carried out to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the therapy. Our findings demonstrated that the SIS, which stimulated connective and epithelial tissue responses for dural regeneration and functional recovery without immunological rejection, could provide prolonged defect repair and prevent complications. The mechanical properties of the SIS could be adjusted by application of multiple layers, and the biocompatibility of the material was appropriate. Thus, our data suggested that this material may represent an alternative option for clinical treatment of dural defects. - Highlights: • SIS stimulates dura regeneration without immunological rejection. • SIS has adjustable mechanical properties and appropriate biocompatibility. • SIS may be an effective alternative option for clinical treatment of dural defects.

  15. Dental radiographic units - radiation safety and patient doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagpal, J.S.; Varadharajan, Geetha

    2001-01-01

    Three models of dental radiographic machines have been examined for radiation safety. Using TL dosemeters, doses received by the patients at chest level and the gonads have been estimated. Care should be taken to shield gonads during dental radiographic examinations. (author)

  16. Comparison of two models for phonon assisted tunneling field enhanced emission from defects in Ge measured by DLTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pienaar, J., E-mail: jac_pienaar@hotmail.com [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa); Meyer, W.E.; Auret, F.D.; Coelho, S.M.M. [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa)

    2012-05-15

    Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) was used to measure the field enhanced emission rate from a defect introduced in n-type Ge. The defect was introduced through low energy ({+-}80 eV) inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching using Ar. The defect, named EP{sub 0.31}, had an energy level 0.31 eV below the conduction band. Models of Pons and Makram-Ebeid (1979) and Ganichev and Prettl (1997) , which describe emission due to phonon assisted tunneling, were fitted to the observed electric field dependence of the emission rate. The model of Pons and Makram-Ebeid fitted the measured emission rate more accurately than Ganichev and Prettl. However the model of Ganichev and Prettl has only two parameters, while the model of Pons and Makram-Ebeid has four. Both models showed a transition in the dominant emission mechanism from a weak electron-phonon coupling below 152.5 K to a strong electron-phonon coupling above 155 K. After the application of a {chi}{sup 2} goodness of fit test, it was determined that the model of Pons and Makram-Ebeid describes the data well, while that of Ganichev and Prettl does not.

  17. BMP9 ameliorates amyloidosis and the cholinergic defect in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Rebecca M; Norman, Timothy A; Haydar, Tarik F; Slack, Barbara E; Leeman, Susan E; Blusztajn, Jan Krzysztof; Mellott, Tiffany J

    2013-11-26

    Bone morphogenetic protein 9 (BMP9) promotes the acquisition of the cholinergic phenotype in basal forebrain cholinergic neurons (BFCN) during development and protects these neurons from cholinergic dedifferentiation following axotomy when administered in vivo. A decline in BFCN function occurs in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and contributes to the AD-associated memory deficits. We infused BMP9 intracerebroventricularly for 7 d in transgenic AD model mice expressing green fluorescent protein specifically in cholinergic neurons (APP.PS1/CHGFP) and in wild-type littermate controls (WT/CHGFP). We used 5-mo-old mice, an age when the AD transgenics display early amyloid deposition and few cholinergic defects, and 10-mo-old mice, by which time these mice exhibit established disease. BMP9 infusion reduced the number of Aβ42-positive amyloid plaques in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex of 5- and 10-mo-old APP.PS1/CHGFP mice and reversed the reductions in choline acetyltransferase protein levels in the hippocampus of 10-mo-old APP.PS1/CHGFP mice. The treatment increased cholinergic fiber density in the hippocampus of both WT/CHGFP and APP.PS1/CHGFP mice at both ages. BMP9 infusion also increased hippocampal levels of neurotrophin 3, insulin-like growth factor 1, and nerve growth factor and of the nerve growth factor receptors, tyrosine kinase receptor A and p75/NGFR, irrespective of the genotype of the mice. These data show that BMP9 administration is effective in reducing the Aβ42 amyloid plaque burden, reversing cholinergic neuron abnormalities, and generating a neurotrophic milieu for BFCN in a mouse model of AD and provide evidence that the BMP9-signaling pathway may constitute a therapeutic target for AD.

  18. Repair of articular cartilage defects in the knee with autologous iliac crest cartilage in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Lizhong; Zhang, Jiying; Leng, Huijie; Guo, Qinwei; Hu, Yuelin

    2015-04-01

    To demonstrate that iliac crest cartilage may be used to repair articular cartilage defects in the knees of rabbits. Full-thickness cartilage defects were created in the medial femoral condyle on both knees of 36 New Zealand white rabbits. The 72 defects were randomly assigned to be repaired with ipsilateral iliac crest cartilage (Group I), osteochondral tissues removed at defect creation (Group II), or no treatment (negative control, Group III). Animals were killed at 6, 12, and 24 weeks post-operatively. The repaired tissues were harvested for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), histological studies (haematoxylin and eosin and immunohistochemical staining), and mechanical testing. At 6 weeks, the iliac crest cartilage graft was not yet well integrated with the surrounding articular cartilage, but at 12 weeks, the graft deep zone had partial ossification. By 24 weeks, the hyaline cartilage-like tissue was completely integrated with the surrounding articular cartilage. Osteochondral autografts showed more rapid healing than Group I at 6 weeks and complete healing at 12 weeks. Untreated defects were concave or partly filled with fibrous tissue throughout the study. MRI showed that Group I had slower integration with surrounding normal cartilage compared with Group II. The mechanical properties of Group I were significantly lower than those of Group II at 12 weeks, but this difference was not significant at 24 weeks. Iliac crest cartilage autografts were able to repair knee cartilage defects with hyaline cartilage and showed comparable results with osteochondral autografts in the rabbit model.

  19. Annealing Kinetic Model Using Fast and Slow Metastable Defects for Hydrogenated-Amorphous-Silicon-Based Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Yeop Myong

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The two-component kinetic model employing “fast” and “slow” metastable defects for the annealing behaviors in pin-type hydrogenated-amorphous-silicon- (a-Si:H- based solar cells is simulated using a normalized fill factor. Reported annealing data on pin-type a-Si:H-based solar cells are revisited and fitted using the model to confirm its validity. It is verified that the two-component model is suitable for fitting the various experimental phenomena. In addition, the activation energy for annealing of the solar cells depends on the definition of the recovery time. From the thermally activated and high electric field annealing behaviors, the plausible microscopic mechanism on the defect removal process is discussed.

  20. Phenomenological model of photoluminescence degradation and photoinduced defect formation in silicon nanocrystal ensembles under singlet oxygen generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gongalsky, Maxim B., E-mail: mgongalsky@gmail.com; Timoshenko, Victor Yu. [Faculty of Physics, Moscow State M.V. Lomonosov University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-28

    We propose a phenomenological model to explain photoluminescence degradation of silicon nanocrystals under singlet oxygen generation in gaseous and liquid systems. The model considers coupled rate equations, which take into account the exciton radiative recombination in silicon nanocrystals, photosensitization of singlet oxygen generation, defect formation on the surface of silicon nanocrystals as well as quenching processes for both excitons and singlet oxygen molecules. The model describes well the experimentally observed power law dependences of the photoluminescence intensity, singlet oxygen concentration, and lifetime versus photoexcitation time. The defect concentration in silicon nanocrystals increases by power law with a fractional exponent, which depends on the singlet oxygen concentration and ambient conditions. The obtained results are discussed in a view of optimization of the photosensitized singlet oxygen generation for biomedical applications.

  1. Radiographic evaluation of osteosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller-Miny, H.; Erlemann, R.; Roos, N.; Peters, P.E.; Baranowski, D.

    1991-01-01

    Surgeons, orthopedic surgeons, and neurosurgeons employ a wide variety of different osteosynthetic devices in the treatment of fractures and in spinal surgery. In order to assess these instruments correctly, the radiologist should be aware of their purpose and normal apperance. The complications should be identified, such as delayed union, pseudarthrosis, dislocation, device loosening, fracture of the device, osteomyelitis, and refracture. To evaluate the fixation device adequately two plain radiographs are mandatory. An normal fracture healing and the most commonly used fixation devices, the abnormalities of fracture healing and their complications are discussed. (orig.) [de

  2. Radiographic scanning agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bevan, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    This invention relates to radiodiagnostic agents and more particularly to a composition and method for preparing a highly effective technetium-99m-based bone scanning agent. One deficiency of x-ray examination is the inability of that technique to detect skeletal metastases in their incipient stages. It has been discovered that the methanehydroxydiphosphonate bone mineral-seeking agent is unique in that it provides the dual benefits of sharp radiographic imaging and excellent lesion detection when used with technetium-99m. This agent can also be used with technetium-99m for detecting soft tissue calcification in the manner of the inorganic phosphate radiodiagnostic agents

  3. Radiographic film digitizing devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFee, W.H.

    1988-01-01

    Until recently, all film digitizing devices for use with teleradiology or picture archiving and communication systems used a video camera to capture an image of the radiograph for subsequent digitization. The development of film digitizers that use a laser beam to scan the film represents a significant advancement in digital technology, resulting in improved image quality compared with video scanners. This paper discusses differences in resolution, efficiency, reliability, and the cost between these two types of devices. The results of a modified receiver operating characteristic comparison study of a video scanner and a laser scanner manufactured by the same company are also discussed

  4. Radiographic diagnoses and treatment decisions on approximal caries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espelid, I.

    1987-01-01

    Mineral loss which represents a threshold value for radiographic diagnosis, cannot be defined exactly. For clinical use 10% mineral loss in the direction of the X-ray beam may constitute a border line lesion for radiographic detection, and caries lesions without cavitation seemed to be beyond this diagnostic threshold. The degree of caries estimated by using radiographs is fairly closely related to the depth of the tissue changes recorded in the prepared cavity. Radiographic examinations more often lead to underestimation than overestimation of the degree of caries. Radiographic caries diagnoses made at different degrees of penetration toward the pulp showed insignificant variations with respect to quality, but the observers were more confident of caries being present (used more strict criterion) when they scored caries in inner dentin. Consensus on diagnostic criteria and improved diagnostic quality are considerably more important to the quality of therapeutic decisions on approximal caries than viewing conditions and film density. A semi-radiopaque material in Class II fillings seems to offer advantages compared to amalgam in respect of the diagnosis of secondary caries and marginal defects. There is a danger that dentists will restore approximal caries lesions too early and before these can be diagnosed in dentin radiographically

  5. Investigation of a pre-clinical mandibular bone notch defect model in miniature pigs: clinical computed tomography, micro-computed tomography, and histological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlisle, Patricia L; Guda, Teja; Silliman, David T; Lien, Wen; Hale, Robert G; Brown Baer, Pamela R

    2016-02-01

    To validate a critical-size mandibular bone defect model in miniature pigs. Bilateral notch defects were produced in the mandible of dentally mature miniature pigs. The right mandibular defect remained untreated while the left defect received an autograft. Bone healing was evaluated by computed tomography (CT) at 4 and 16 weeks, and by micro-CT and non-decalcified histology at 16 weeks. In both the untreated and autograft treated groups, mineralized tissue volume was reduced significantly at 4 weeks post-surgery, but was comparable to the pre-surgery levels after 16 weeks. After 16 weeks, CT analysis indicated that significantly greater bone was regenerated in the autograft treated defect than in the untreated defect (P=0.013). Regardless of the treatment, the cortical bone was superior to the defect remodeled over 16 weeks to compensate for the notch defect. The presence of considerable bone healing in both treated and untreated groups suggests that this model is inadequate as a critical-size defect. Despite healing and adaptation, the original bone geometry and quality of the pre-injured mandible was not obtained. On the other hand, this model is justified for evaluating accelerated healing and mitigating the bone remodeling response, which are both important considerations for dental implant restorations.

  6. Tyrosine-derived polycarbonate scaffolds for bone regeneration in a rabbit radius critical-size defect model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jinku; McBride, Sean; Donovan, Amy; Hollinger, Jeffrey O; Darr, Aniq; Magno, Maria Hanshella R

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine bone regeneration in a rabbit radius critical-size defect (CSD) model using a specific polymer composition (E1001(1k)) from a library of tyrosine-derived polycarbonate scaffolds coated with a calcium phosphate (CP) formulation (E1001(1k) + CP) supplemented with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2). Specific doses of rhBMP-2 (0, 17, and 35 μg/scaffold) were used. E1001(1k) + CP scaffolds were implanted in unilateral segmental defects (15 mm length) in the radial diaphyses of New Zealand White rabbits. At 4 and 8 weeks post-implantation, bone regeneration was determined using micro-computed tomography (µCT), histology, and histomorphometry. The quantitative outcome data suggest that E1001(1k) + CP scaffolds with rhBMP-2 were biocompatible and promoted bone regeneration in segmental bone defects. Histological examination of the implant sites showed that scaffolds made of E1001(1k) + CP did not elicit adverse cellular or tissue responses throughout test periods up to 8 weeks. Noteworthy is that the incorporation of a very small amount of rhBMP-2 into the scaffolds (as low as 17 μg/defect site) promoted significant bone regeneration compared to scaffolds consisting of E1001(1k) + CP alone. This finding indicates that E1001(1k) + CP may be an effective platform for bone regeneration in a critical size rabbit radius segmental defect model, requiring only a minimal dose of rhBMP-2. (paper)

  7. Study of defect characteristics essential for NDT testing methods ET, UT and RT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirdelius, H.; Oesterberg, Elena

    2000-10-01

    This paper presents results from a literature review of defect characteristics essential for nondestructive testing (NDT). Most of the major NDT methods are included in the study - ultrasonic testing (UT), radiography (RT) and eddy current testing (ET). The study was performed by means of searching in scientific databases, technical journals, conference proceedings etc. Mainly the following databases were used: CHANS (Chalmers database), INSPEC, NTIS, Ei Compendex, World Surface Coating Abs, METADEX, JICST-Eplus, Aerospace database, Pascal, Eng Materials, SciSearch and Weldasearch. It is concluded that for eddy current testing, the defect geometry, the defect size and the defect orientation influence the outcome signal. A number of investigations address the relationships between the defect parameters like defect depth, length and width and the outcome signal parameters like amplitude, phase and signal shape. Also the phenomena of the electrical contacts between the defect surfaces (for a crack) was studied. Defect parameters that are essential to the quality of ultrasonic testing are defect position in the object (includes the depth), orientation, size, crack surface roughness, closure and tip radius. This investigation has been focused on those parameters that are not that easy to reconstruct and only briefly discussed the influence on the signal response due to defect position, orientation and size. When it comes to radiographic techniques, the most important defect related parameters that influence the quality are the difference in radio opacity of the specimen and defect and the angle between the volumetric extension of the defect and the direction of projection. The defect gape and the morphology of the crack are also very essential parameters. A very simple model of the detectability as a function of depth, width and misorientation (angle to the radiation beam) has been validated and to some extent also verified in a number of papers. Even for defects with

  8. Interpreting radiographs. 4. The carpus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burguez, P.N.

    1984-01-01

    The complexity of the carpus which has three major joints, seven or eight carpal bones and five adjacent bones, each of which articulates with one or more of the carpal elements, necessitates good quality radiographs for definitive radiographic interpretation may be extremely difficult because of the disparity between radiographic changes and obvious clinical signs and, therefore, must be discussed in the light of a thorough clinical assessment

  9. In vivo performance of combinations of autograft, demineralized bone matrix, and tricalcium phosphate in a rabbit femoral defect model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jinku; McBride, Sean; Hollinger, Jeffrey O; Dean, David D; Sylvia, Victor L; Doll, Bruce A

    2014-01-01

    Large bone defects may be treated with autologous or allogeneic bone preparations. Each treatment has advantages and disadvantages; therefore, a clinically viable option for treating large (e.g., gap) bone defects may be a combination of the two. In the present study, bone repair was determined with combinations of autografts, allografts, and synthetic bone grafts using an established rabbit femoral defect model. Bilateral unicortical femoral defects were surgically prepared and treated with combinatorial bone grafts according to one of seven treatment groups. Recipient sites were retrieved at six weeks. Cellular/tissue responses and new bone formation were assessed by histology and histomorphometry. Histological analysis images indicated neither evidence of inflammatory, immune responses, tissue necrosis, nor osteolysis. Data suggested co-integration of implanted agents with host and newly formed bone. Finally, the histomorphometric data suggested that the tricalcium phosphate-based synthetic bone graft substitute allowed new bone formation that was similar to the allograft (i.e., demineralized bone matrix, DBM). (paper)

  10. An improved method for simulating radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laguna, G.W.

    1986-01-01

    The parameters involved in generating actual radiographs and what can and cannot be modeled are examined in this report. Using the spectral distribution of the radiation source and the mass absorption curve for the material comprising the part to be modeled, the actual amount of radiation that would pass through the part and reach the film is determined. This method increases confidence in the results of the simulation and enables the modeling of parts made of multiple materials

  11. Optimization of Soft Tissue Management, Spacer Design, and Grafting Strategies for Large Segmental Bone Defects using the Chronic Caprine Tibial Defect Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    for this animal revealed an abscess at the defect site with cultures identifying Staphylococcus aureus infection . Another animal (15G11) developed...foreign body reaction and expose a bleeding vascular surface significantly increased bone formation in the defect site. Adding texture to a smooth...ACHIEVEMENTS: Nothing to report 10. REFERENCES: 1. Johnson, E.N., et al., Infectious complications of open type III tibial fractures among combat

  12. On correction of model of stabilization of distribution of concentration of radiation defects in a multilayer structure with account experiment data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankratov, E. L.

    2018-05-01

    We introduce a model of redistribution of point radiation defects, their interaction between themselves and redistribution of their simplest complexes (divacancies and diinterstitials) in a multilayer structure. The model gives a possibility to describe qualitatively nonmonotonicity of distributions of concentrations of radiation defects on interfaces between layers of the multilayer structure. The nonmonotonicity was recently found experimentally. To take into account the nonmonotonicity we modify recently used in literature model for analysis of distribution of concentration of radiation defects. To analyze the model we used an approach of solution of boundary problems, which could be used without crosslinking of solutions on interfaces between layers of the considered multilayer structures.

  13. Fitting a defect non-linear model with or without prior, distinguishing nuclear reaction products as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgesson, P; Sjöstrand, H

    2017-11-01

    Fitting a parametrized function to data is important for many researchers and scientists. If the model is non-linear and/or defect, it is not trivial to do correctly and to include an adequate uncertainty analysis. This work presents how the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm for non-linear generalized least squares fitting can be used with a prior distribution for the parameters and how it can be combined with Gaussian processes to treat model defects. An example, where three peaks in a histogram are to be distinguished, is carefully studied. In particular, the probability r 1 for a nuclear reaction to end up in one out of two overlapping peaks is studied. Synthetic data are used to investigate effects of linearizations and other assumptions. For perfect Gaussian peaks, it is seen that the estimated parameters are distributed close to the truth with good covariance estimates. This assumes that the method is applied correctly; for example, prior knowledge should be implemented using a prior distribution and not by assuming that some parameters are perfectly known (if they are not). It is also important to update the data covariance matrix using the fit if the uncertainties depend on the expected value of the data (e.g., for Poisson counting statistics or relative uncertainties). If a model defect is added to the peaks, such that their shape is unknown, a fit which assumes perfect Gaussian peaks becomes unable to reproduce the data, and the results for r 1 become biased. It is, however, seen that it is possible to treat the model defect with a Gaussian process with a covariance function tailored for the situation, with hyper-parameters determined by leave-one-out cross validation. The resulting estimates for r 1 are virtually unbiased, and the uncertainty estimates agree very well with the underlying uncertainty.

  14. Fitting a defect non-linear model with or without prior, distinguishing nuclear reaction products as an example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgesson, P.; Sjöstrand, H.

    2017-11-01

    Fitting a parametrized function to data is important for many researchers and scientists. If the model is non-linear and/or defect, it is not trivial to do correctly and to include an adequate uncertainty analysis. This work presents how the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm for non-linear generalized least squares fitting can be used with a prior distribution for the parameters and how it can be combined with Gaussian processes to treat model defects. An example, where three peaks in a histogram are to be distinguished, is carefully studied. In particular, the probability r1 for a nuclear reaction to end up in one out of two overlapping peaks is studied. Synthetic data are used to investigate effects of linearizations and other assumptions. For perfect Gaussian peaks, it is seen that the estimated parameters are distributed close to the truth with good covariance estimates. This assumes that the method is applied correctly; for example, prior knowledge should be implemented using a prior distribution and not by assuming that some parameters are perfectly known (if they are not). It is also important to update the data covariance matrix using the fit if the uncertainties depend on the expected value of the data (e.g., for Poisson counting statistics or relative uncertainties). If a model defect is added to the peaks, such that their shape is unknown, a fit which assumes perfect Gaussian peaks becomes unable to reproduce the data, and the results for r1 become biased. It is, however, seen that it is possible to treat the model defect with a Gaussian process with a covariance function tailored for the situation, with hyper-parameters determined by leave-one-out cross validation. The resulting estimates for r1 are virtually unbiased, and the uncertainty estimates agree very well with the underlying uncertainty.

  15. Radiographer interpretation of trauma radiographs: Issues for radiography education providers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, Maryann; Snaith, Beverly

    2009-01-01

    Background: The role of radiographers with respect to image interpretation within clinical practice is well recognised. It is the expectation of the professional, regulatory and academic bodies that upon qualification, radiographers will possess image interpretation skills. Additionally, The College of Radiographers has asserted that its aspiration is for all radiographers to be able to provide an immediate written interpretation on skeletal trauma radiographs by 2010. This paper explores the readiness of radiography education programmes in the UK to deliver this expectation. Method: A postal questionnaire was distributed to 25 Higher Education Institutions in the UK (including Northern Ireland) that provided pre-registration radiography education as identified from the Society and College of Radiographers register. Information was sought relating to the type of image interpretation education delivered at pre- and post-registration levels; the anatomical range of image interpretation education; and education delivery styles. Results: A total of 19 responses (n = 19/25; 76.0%) were received. Image interpretation education was included as part of all radiographer pre-registration programmes and offered at post-registration level at 12 academic centres (n = 12/19; 63.2%). The anatomical areas and educational delivery methods varied across institutions. Conclusion: Radiography education providers have embraced the need for image interpretation education within both pre- and post-registration radiography programmes. As a result, UK education programmes are able to meet the 2010 College of Radiographers aspiration.

  16. Femoral and tibial torsion measurements in children and adolescents: comparison of MRI and 3D models based on low-dose biplanar radiographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosskopf, Andrea B.; Buck, Florian M.; Pfirrmann, Christian W.A. [University Hospital Balgrist, Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Zurich, Faculty of Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); Ramseier, Leonhard E. [University of Zurich, Faculty of Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); University Hospital Balgrist, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2017-04-15

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the reliability and interchangeability of femoral (FT) and tibial torsion (TT) measurements in children using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging compared to measurements on 3D models based on biplanar radiographs (BPR). FT and TT were measured in 60 children (mean age 10.1 years; range 6.2-16.2 years; 28 female) using axial MR images by two readers. MR measurements were compared to measurements based on BPR-3D models by two separate independent readers. Interreader and intermethod agreements were calculated using descriptive statistics, the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), and Bland-Altman analysis. FT/TT was -8.4 -54.1 /0 -45.9 on MR images and -13 -63 /4 -52 for measurements on BPR-3D models. The median of difference between the two methods was -0.18 (range -13.6 -19.1 ) for FT and -0.20 (range -18.4 -9.5 ) for TT, respectively. Interreader agreement (ICC) of FT/TT measurements was 0.98/0.96 on MR images and 0.98/0.94 on BPR 3D models. Intermethod agreement (ICC) for MR measurements was 0.95 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.93-0.96] for FT and of 0.86 (CI, 0.24-0.95) for TT. Mean interreader differences at MR were 3.1 (0.0 -8.0 ) for FT and 3.2 (0.1 -9.5 ) for TT. On Bland-Altman plots all measurements were within the 95% limit of agreement (-10.8 ; 11.5 for FT; -14.6 ; 4.2 ) for TT - except for five measurements of FT and six measurements of TT. FT measurements on MR images are comparable to measurements using BPR-3D models. TT measurements differ between the two modalities, but the discrepancy is comparable to measurement variations between CT and BPR. (orig.)

  17. Warning About the Use of Critical-Size Defects for the Translational Study of Bone Repair: Analysis of a Sheep Tibial Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammens, Johan; Maréchal, Marina; Geris, Lisbet; Van der Aa, Joshua; Van Hauwermeiren, Hadewych; Luyten, Frank P; Delport, Hendrik

    2017-11-01

    The repair of large long bone defects requires complex surgical procedures as the bone loss cannot simply be replaced by autologous grafts due to an insufficient bone stock of the human body. Tissue engineering strategies and the use of Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products (ATMPs) for these reconstructions remain a considerable challenge, in particular since robust outcomes in well-defined large animal models are lacking. To be suitable as a model for treatment of human sized bone defects, we developed a large animal model in both skeletally immature and mature sheep and made close observations on the spontaneous healing of defects. We warn for the spontaneous repair of large defects in immature animals, which can mask the (in)effectiveness of ATMP therapies, and propose the use of large 4.5 cm defects that are pretreated with a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) spacer in skeletally mature animals.

  18. Evaluation of an injectable bioactive borate glass cement to heal bone defects in a rabbit femoral condyle model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Xu [Institute of Bioengineering and Information Technology Materials, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Center for Human Tissues and Organs Degeneration, Shenzhen Institute of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Science, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Huang, Wenhai [Institute of Bioengineering and Information Technology Materials, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Zhang, Yadong, E-mail: zhangyadong6@126.com [Department of Spine Surgery, Shanghai East Hospital, School of Medicine, Tongji University, Shanghai 200120 (China); Huang, Chengcheng; Yu, Zunxiong; Wang, Lei; Liu, Wenlong; Wang, Ting [Center for Human Tissues and Organs Degeneration, Shenzhen Institute of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Science, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Zhou, Jie; Wang, Hui; Zhou, Nai; Wang, Deping [Institute of Bioengineering and Information Technology Materials, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Pan, Haobo, E-mail: hb.pan@siat.ac.cn [Center for Human Tissues and Organs Degeneration, Shenzhen Institute of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Science, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Rahaman, Mohamed N., E-mail: rahaman@mst.edu [Department of Spine Surgery, Shanghai East Hospital, School of Medicine, Tongji University, Shanghai 200120 (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409-0340 (United States)

    2017-04-01

    There is a need for synthetic biomaterials to heal bone defects using minimal invasive surgery. In the present study, an injectable cement composed of bioactive borate glass particles and a chitosan bonding solution was developed and evaluated for its capacity to heal bone defects in a rabbit femoral condyle model. The injectability and setting time of the cement in vitro decreased but the compressive strength increased (8 ± 2 MPa to 31 ± 2 MPa) as the ratio of glass particles to chitosan solution increased (from 1.0 g ml{sup −1} to 2.5 g ml{sup −1}). Upon immersing the cement in phosphate-buffered saline, the glass particles reacted and converted to hydroxyapatite, imparting bioactivity to the cement. Osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells showed enhanced proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity when incubated in media containing the soluble ionic product of the cement. The bioactive glass cement showed a better capacity to stimulate bone formation in rabbit femoral condyle defects at 12 weeks postimplantation when compared to a commercial calcium sulfate cement. The injectable bioactive borate glass cement developed in this study could provide a promising biomaterial to heal bone defects by minimal invasive surgery. - Highlights: • New class of injectable bone cement composed of bioactive borate glass particles and chitosan bonding phase was created. • The cement is biocompatible and bioactive, and has a much lower temperature increase during setting than PMMA cement. • The cement has a more controllable degradation rate and higher strength over a longer time than calcium sulfate cement. • The cement showed a better ability to heal bone defects than calcium sulfate over a twelve-week implantation period.

  19. Frenkel defect absorption on dislocations and dislocation discharge rate. Modeling determination of the absorption zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhlin, Eh.Ya.

    1988-01-01

    A situation connected with the fact that evaluations of dislocation discharge strength which somehow or other are based on the elasticity theory in the dislocation nucleus or near it, do not lead to results complying with experimental data, is discussed. Bases of the alternative approach to this problem consisting in direct investigation into the process of Frenkel defect absorption on dislocation by its computerized simulation at the microscopic level are also presented. Methods of investigation and results are described using α dislocation in iron-alpha as an example. The concept of zones of vacancy and interstitial atom absorption on dislocation is discussed. It is shown that a spontaneous transition, performed by any of these defects near a dislocation is not always identical to absorption and usually appears to be only a part of a multistage process leading to the defect disappearance. Potential relief characteristics for vacancy movement near the dislocation are found. An area wide enough in a transverse direction is found around the dislocation. Vacncies reaching this area can be easily transported to places of their disappearance. Therefore the vacancy entry to this area is equivalent to the absorption. the procedure of simulating the atomic structure of a crystallite containing a dislocation with a step is described. Positions from which these defects perform spontaneous transitions, reaching the disappearance places are found on the dislocation near the step

  20. Nondestructive testing: a bidimensional model for defect detection by eddy current testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, C.

    1982-09-01

    The program presented in this paper calculates the induced e.m.f in the two coils of the probe moving inside the tube of a steam generator. The difference between these two e.m.f shows a defect, a modification of the tube geometry or the presence of the end plate [fr

  1. Coupling reducing k-points for supercell models of defects in three-dimensional photonic crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægsgaard, Jesper; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    2004-01-01

    The optimum choice of k-point for supercell calculations of defect states in a three-dimensional photonic crystal is investigated for the case of a supercell with a simple cubic (SC) structure. By using the k-point (1/4,1/4,1/4) it is possible to eliminate the symmetric part of the repeated...

  2. Presentation of a novel model of chitosan- polyethylene oxide-nanohydroxyapatite nanofibers together with bone marrow stromal cells to repair and improve minor bone defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asgar Emamgholi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:Various methods for repairing bone defects are presented. Cell therapy is one of these methods. Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs seem to be suitable for this purpose. On the other hand, lots of biomaterials are used to improve and repair the defect in the body, so in this study we tried to produce a similar structure to the bone by the chitosan and hydroxyapatite. Materials and Methods: In this study, the solution of chitosan-nanohydroxyapatite-polyethylene oxide (PEO Nanofibers was produced by electrospinning method, and then the BMSCs were cultured on this solution. A piece of chitosan-nanohydroxyapatite Nanofibers with BMSCs was placed in a hole with the diameter of 1 mm at the distal epiphysis of the rat femur. Then the biomechanical and radiographic studies were performed. Results: Biomechanical testing results showed that bone strength was significantly higher in the Nanofiber/BMSCs group in comparison with control group. Also the bone strength in nanofiber/BMSCs group was significant, but in nanofiber group was nearly significant. Radiographic studies also showed that the average amount of callus formation (radio opacity in nanofiber and control group was not significantly different. The callus formation in nanofiber/BMSCs group was increased compared to the control group, and it was not significant in the nanofiber group. Conclusion: Since chitosan-nanohydroxyapatite nanofibers with BMSCs increases the rate of bone repair, the obtained cell-nanoscaffold shell can be used in tissue engineering and cell therapy, especially for bone defects.

  3. Numerical modeling of mechanical behavior of multilayered composite plates with defects under static loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korepanov, V. V.; Serovaev, G. S.

    2017-06-01

    Evaluation of the mechanical state of a structure or its components in the process of operation based on detection of internal damages (damage detection) becomes especially important in such rapidly developing spheres of production as machine building, aerospace industry, etc. One of the most important features of these industries is the application of new types of materials among which polymer based composite materials occupy a significant position. Hence, they must have sufficient operational rigidity and strength. However, defects of various kinds may arise during the manufacture. Delamination is the most common defect in structures made from composite materials and represents a phenomenon that involves the complex fracture of layers and interlayer compounds. Among the reasons of delamination occurrence are: disposition of anti-adhesive lubricants, films; insufficient content of binder, high content of volatile elements; violation of the molding regime; poor quality of anti-adhesive coating on the surface of the tooling. One of the effective methods for analyzing the influence of defects is numerical simulation. With the help of numerical methods, it is possible to track the evolution of various parameters when the defect size and quantity change. In the paper, a multilayered plate of an equally resistant carbon fiber reinforced plastic was considered, with a thickness of each layer equal to 0.2 mm. Various static loading cases are studied: uniaxial tension, three and four-point bending. For each type of loading, a numerical calculation of the stress-strain state was performed for healthy and delaminated plates, with different number and size of the defects. Contact interaction between adjacent surfaces in the zone of delamination was taken into account.

  4. Radiographically detectable intracortical porosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meema, H.E.

    1986-01-01

    Since the measurement of intracortical resorptive spaces by histologic methods is difficult and very few data are available in normal humans, we have measured their lengths and widths and calculated the intracortical porosity in metacarpals and phalanges of 79 normal women and 69 normal men, using fine-detail radiographs of the hands and a computerized semi-automatic image analysis system (Zeiss MOP-3), this being the first study of this kind. Several methodological problems were solved satisfactorily, and the results of this study could serve as a data bank for further investigations concerned with intracortical resorption. Significant differences were found between age and sex versus several intracortical resorptive parameters; also significant correlations were found with age in some cases. Normal intracortical porosity was found to be about three times greater in the proximal phalanges than in the metacarpals. It is concluded that this methodology could be used for further studies of intracortical resorption in osteoporosis and other metabolic bone diseases. (orig.)

  5. Odontogenic keratocyst radiographic features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nartey, N. O.; Saini, T.

    1990-01-01

    The clinical features often patients with odontogenic keratocysts were studied. One patient had Gorlin-GoJtz syndrome. A total of fourteen radiolucent lesions were observed on radiographic examination. All the fourteen lesions were diagnosed as odontogenic keratocyst after histopathclogical examination of biopsied tissue from the patients. The age at diagnosis ranged from 25-72 years with a mean age of 37.6 years. The male : female ratio was 2.3:1. Thirteen of these lesions occurred in the mandible, nine involved the mandibular third molar region. Involvement of the ramus of the mandible produced a sausage-shaped radiolucency. Cystic lesions which have been present for long periods of time showed scalloped margins, due to the regional resorption of the surrounding bone. The bony ledges present on the cortical bones simulated multilocular appearance in such cases. It was also observed that the lesions in older individuals perforated the cortical plates rather than eliciting a periostally induced bony expansion. (author)

  6. A radiographic examination system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cable, A.P.; Cable, W.S.

    1983-01-01

    A system for performing radiographic examination, particularly of large items such as international container units is disclosed. The system is formed as an installation comprising housings for respective linear accelerators transmitting a beam of radiation across the path of a conveyor along which the units can be displaced continuously or incrementally. On either end of the installation are container handling areas including roller conveyors with drag chains and transverse manipulators, and the whole installation is secured within automatically operated doors which seal the high energy region when a container on the conveyor is being subjected to examination. The radiation transmitted through a container is detected in a detector system incorporating a fluoroscopic screen light output from which is detected in a camera system such as a television camera, and transmitted as coded pulsed signals by a coding transfer unit to display screens where an image of the transmitted information can be displayed and/or recorded for further use. (author)

  7. Radiographic contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golman, K.; Holtz, E.; Almen, T.

    1987-01-01

    Contrast media are used in diagnostic radiology to enhance the X-ray attenuation between a body structure of interest and the surrounding tissue. A detail becomes perceptible on a roentgenogram only when its contrast exceeds a minimum value in relation to the background. Small areas of interest must have higher contrast than the background. The contrast effect depends on concentration of the contrast media with the body. A high contrast media concentration difference thus gives rise to more morphological details in the radiographs. Contrast media can be divided into negative contrast media such as air and gas which attenuate X-rays less than the body tissues, and positive contrast materials which attenuate X-rays more than the body tissues. The positive contrast media all contain either iodine (atomic number 53) or barium (atomic number 56) and can be divided into water-insoluble and water-soluble contrast media

  8. Repair of Achilles tendon defect with autologous ASCs engineered tendon in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Dan; Wang, Wenbo; Wang, Bin; Zhang, Peihua; Zhou, Guangdong; Zhang, Wen Jie; Cao, Yilin; Liu, Wei

    2014-10-01

    Adipose derived stem cells (ASCs) are an important cell source for tissue regeneration and have been demonstrated the potential of tenogenic differentiation in vitro. This study explored the feasibility of using ASCs for engineered tendon repair in vivo in a rabbit Achilles tendon model. Total 30 rabbits were involved in this study. A composite tendon scaffold composed of an inner part of polyglycolic acid (PGA) unwoven fibers and an outer part of a net knitted with PGA/PLA (polylactic acid) fibers was used to provide mechanical strength. Autologous ASCs were harvested from nuchal subcutaneous adipose tissues and in vitro expanded. The expanded ASCs were harvested and resuspended in culture medium and evenly seeded onto the scaffold in the experimental group, whereas cell-free scaffolds served as the control group. The constructs of both groups were cultured inside a bioreactor under dynamic stretch for 5 weeks. In each of 30 rabbits, a 2 cm defect was created on right side of Achilles tendon followed by the transplantation of a 3 cm cell-seeded scaffold in the experimental group of 15 rabbits, or by the transplantation of a 3 cm cell-free scaffold in the control group of 15 rabbits. Animals were sacrificed at 12, 21 and 45 weeks post-surgery for gross view, histology, and mechanical analysis. The results showed that short term in vitro culture enabled ASCs to produce matrix on the PGA fibers and the constructs showed tensile strength around 50 MPa in both groups (p > 0.05). With the increase of implantation time, cell-seeded constructs gradually form neo-tendon and became more mature at 45 weeks with histological structure similar to that of native tendon and with the presence of bipolar pattern and D-periodic structure of formed collagen fibrils. Additionally, both collagen fibril diameters and tensile strength increased continuously with significant difference among different time points (p tendon tissue with fibril structure observable only at 45 weeks

  9. Radiographic enhancement and analysis system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlosser, M.S.

    1981-01-01

    Radiographic image enhancement and analysis techniques are discussed as they apply to nondestructive inspection. A system is described which has been developed to enhance and quantitatively evaluate radiographic images using digital computer techniques. Some examples of typical applications are also presented as an introduction to this new inspection technique. (author)

  10. Influence of the formation- and passivation rate of boron-oxygen defects for mitigating carrier-induced degradation in silicon within a hydrogen-based model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallam, Brett; Abbott, Malcolm; Nampalli, Nitin; Hamer, Phill; Wenham, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    A three-state model is used to explore the influence of defect formation- and passivation rates of carrier-induced degradation related to boron-oxygen complexes in boron-doped p-type silicon solar cells within a hydrogen-based model. The model highlights that the inability to effectively mitigate carrier-induced degradation at elevated temperatures in previous studies is due to the limited availability of defects for hydrogen passivation, rather than being limited by the defect passivation rate. An acceleration of the defect formation rate is also observed to increase both the effectiveness and speed of carrier-induced degradation mitigation, whereas increases in the passivation rate do not lead to a substantial acceleration of the hydrogen passivation process. For high-throughput mitigation of such carrier-induced degradation on finished solar cell devices, two key factors were found to be required, high-injection conditions (such as by using high intensity illumination) to enable an acceleration of defect formation whilst simultaneously enabling a rapid passivation of the formed defects, and a high temperature to accelerate both defect formation and defect passivation whilst still ensuring an effective mitigation of carrier-induced degradation

  11. The interpretation of plain film radiographs in infants and children with cardiac and vascular malformations. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rautenburg, H.W.

    1987-01-01

    Chest survey radiographs frequently suffice for a differentiation of congenital defects of the heart and the vessels. Finally, angiocardiography will allow exact differentiation of the pathological findings in complex angiocardiopathies. (orig.) [de

  12. Modeling and simulation of defects detection in conductive multi-layered pieces by the eddy current technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennoud, S; Zergoug, M

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown that the eddy current method is one of the most effective techniques for the detection and characterization of surface and near-surface defects in conductive mediums especially in aluminum alloy. It is one of the most applied methods in industries which require a maximum of reliability and security (aerospace, aeronautics, nuclear, Etc). In this study, a code to solve electromagnetic problems by employing the finite element method is developed. The suggested model can simulate the probe response to the presence of a defect hidden in a multi-layered structure or a riveted structure on aluminum alloy. The developed code is based on the discretization in three dimensions of the Maxwell's equations in harmonic mode by the finite element method based on the combined potential formulations. That will enable us to interpret the results, to present them in graphical form and to carry out simulations for various applications

  13. Interpretation and digestion of radiograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Nassir Ibrahim; Azali Muhammad; Ab. Razak Hamzah; Abd. Aziz Mohamed; Mohamad Pauzi Ismail

    2008-01-01

    Radiography digestion is final test for the radiography to make sure that radiograph produced will inspect their quality of the image before its interpreted. This level is critical level where if there is a mistake, all of the radiography work done before will be unaccepted. So as mention earlier, it can waste time, cost and more worst it can make the production must shut down. So, this step, level two radiographers or interpreter must evaluate the radiograph carefully. For this purpose, digestion room and densitometer must used. Of course all the procedure must follow the specification that mentioned in document. There are several needs must fill before we can say the radiograph is corrected or not like the location of penetrameter, number of penetrameter that showed, the degree of density of film, and usually there is no problem in this step and the radiograph can go to interpretation and evaluation step as will mentioned in next chapter.

  14. UT simulation using a fully automated 3D hybrid model: Application to planar backwall breaking defects inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imperiale, Alexandre; Chatillon, Sylvain; Darmon, Michel; Leymarie, Nicolas; Demaldent, Edouard

    2018-04-01

    The high frequency models gathered in the CIVA software allow fast computations and provide satisfactory quantitative predictions in a wide range of situations. However, the domain of validity of these models is limited since they do not accurately predict the ultrasound response in configurations involving subwavelength complex phenomena. In addition, when modelling backwall breaking defects inspection, an important challenge remains to capture the propagation of the creeping waves that are generated at the critical angle. Hybrid models combining numerical and asymptotic methods have already been shown to be an effective strategy to overcome these limitations in 2D [1]. However, 3D simulations remain a crucial issue for industrial applications because of the computational cost of the numerical solver. A dedicated three dimensional high order finite element model combined with a domain decomposition method has been recently proposed to tackle 3D limitations [2]. In this communication, we will focus on the specific case of planar backwall breaking defects, with an adapted coupling strategy in order to efficiently model the propagation of creeping waves. Numerical and experimental validations will be proposed on various configurations.

  15. On defects of the volume and curvature of the Robertson-Walker metric and construction of cosmological models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gackstatter, F.

    1987-01-01

    For the Robertson-Walker metric (RWM) normal coordinates are constructed and the Riemann curvature tensor is determined. Then results on the defects of the volume and curvature, derived formerly, are applied to the RWM and to cosmological models. Finally cosmological models are constructed, they describe different states of the development of the cosmos: p ∼ 0, 1/3u, 2/3u, in a unified form. A Laurent expansion of the density of energy u and pressure p is used to solve the Friedmann equations. (author)

  16. Improved Healing of Large, Osseous, Segmental Defects by Reverse Dynamization: Evaluation in a Sheep Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    project: mechanical testing Name: Miguel Trujillo, PhD Project role: Research Scientist Nearest person month worked: 2 Contribution to project...formation and maturation. This article describes a novel strat- egy in which the defect is first stabi- lized at low axial stiffness, with subsequent...in a commercial company or institution related directly or indirectly to the subject of this article . J Am Acad Orthop Surg 2016;24: e60-e61 http

  17. Radiological Assessment of Bioengineered Bone in a Muscle Flap for the Reconstruction of Critical-Size Mandibular Defect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Fotawei, Randa; Ayoub, Ashraf F.; Heath, Neil; Naudi, Kurt B.; Tanner, K. Elizabeth; Dalby, Matthew J.; McMahon, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    This study presents a comprehensive radiographic evaluation of bone regeneration within a pedicled muscle flap for the reconstruction of critical size mandibular defect. The surgical defect (20 mm×15 mm) was created in the mandible of ten experimental rabbits. The masseter muscle was adapted to fill the surgical defect, a combination of calcium sulphate/hydroxyapatite cement (CERAMENT™ |SPINE SUPPORT), BMP-7 and rabbit mesenchymal stromal cells (rMSCs) was injected inside the muscle tissue. Radiographic assessment was carried out on the day of surgery and at 4, 8, and 12 weeks postoperatively. At 12 weeks, the animals were sacrificed and cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT) scanning and micro-computed tomography (µ-CT) were carried out. Clinically, a clear layer of bone tissue was identified closely adherent to the border of the surgical defect. Sporadic radio-opaque areas within the surgical defect were detected radiographically. In comparison with the opposite non operated control side, the estimated quantitative scoring of the radio-opacity was 46.6% ±15, the mean volume of the radio-opaque areas was 63.4% ±20. Areas of a bone density higher than that of the mandibular bone (+35% ±25%) were detected at the borders of the surgical defect. The micro-CT analysis revealed thinner trabeculae of the regenerated bone with a more condensed trabecular pattern than the surrounding native bone. These findings suggest a rapid deposition rate of the mineralised tissue and an active remodelling process of the newly regenerated bone within the muscle flap. The novel surgical model of this study has potential clinical application; the assessment of bone regeneration using the presented radiolographic protocol is descriptive and comprehensive. The findings of this research confirm the remarkable potential of local muscle flaps as local bioreactors to induce bone formation for reconstruction of maxillofacial bony defects. PMID:25226170

  18. Radiological assessment of bioengineered bone in a muscle flap for the reconstruction of critical-size mandibular defect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randa Al-Fotawei

    Full Text Available This study presents a comprehensive radiographic evaluation of bone regeneration within a pedicled muscle flap for the reconstruction of critical size mandibular defect. The surgical defect (20 mm × 15 mm was created in the mandible of ten experimental rabbits. The masseter muscle was adapted to fill the surgical defect, a combination of calcium sulphate/hydroxyapatite cement (CERAMENT™ |SPINE SUPPORT, BMP-7 and rabbit mesenchymal stromal cells (rMSCs was injected inside the muscle tissue. Radiographic assessment was carried out on the day of surgery and at 4, 8, and 12 weeks postoperatively. At 12 weeks, the animals were sacrificed and cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT scanning and micro-computed tomography (µ-CT were carried out. Clinically, a clear layer of bone tissue was identified closely adherent to the border of the surgical defect. Sporadic radio-opaque areas within the surgical defect were detected radiographically. In comparison with the opposite non operated control side, the estimated quantitative scoring of the radio-opacity was 46.6% ± 15, the mean volume of the radio-opaque areas was 63.4% ± 20. Areas of a bone density higher than that of the mandibular bone (+35% ± 25% were detected at the borders of the surgical defect. The micro-CT analysis revealed thinner trabeculae of the regenerated bone with a more condensed trabecular pattern than the surrounding native bone. These findings suggest a rapid deposition rate of the mineralised tissue and an active remodelling process of the newly regenerated bone within the muscle flap. The novel surgical model of this study has potential clinical application; the assessment of bone regeneration using the presented radiolographic protocol is descriptive and comprehensive. The findings of this research confirm the remarkable potential of local muscle flaps as local bioreactors to induce bone formation for reconstruction of maxillofacial bony defects.

  19. Ceramic-polylactide composite material used in a model of healing of osseous defects in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myciński, Paweł; Zarzecka, Joanna; Skórska-Stania, Agnieszka; Jelonek, Agnieszka; Okoń, Krzysztof; Wróbel, Maria

    The growing demand for various kinds of bone regeneration material has in turn increased the desire to find materials with optimal physical, chemical, and biological properties. The objective of the present study was to identify the proportions of ceramic and polylactide components in a bone substitute material prepared in collaboration with the Crystal Chemistry of Drugs Team of the Faculty of Chemistry at the Jagiellonian University, which would be optimal for bone regeneration processes. Another goal was to provide a histological analysis of the influence of a ceramic-polylactide composite on the healing of osseous defects in rabbits. The study was performed on laboratory animals (18 New Zealand White rabbits). The following study groups were formed: - group A (study group, 9 animals) - in this group we performed a histological analysis of healing with a ceramic-polylactide composite based on an 80/20 mix of hydroxyapatite and polylactide; - group B (study group, 9 animals) - in this group we performed a histological analysis of healing with a ceramic-polylactide composite with a reduced amount of hydroxyapatite compared to the previous group, i.e. in a ratio of 61/39; - group K (control, 18 animals) - the control group comprised self-healing, standardised osseous defects prepared in the calvarial bone of the rabbits on the contralateral side. In the assessment of histological samples, we were also able to eliminate individual influences that might have led to differentiation in wound healing. The material used in the histological analysis took the form of rabbit bone tissue samples, containing both defects, with margins of around 0.5 cm, taken 1, 3, and 6 months after the experiment. The osseous defects from groups A and B filled with ceramic-polylactide material healed with less inflammatory infiltration than was the case with control group K. They were also characterised by faster regression, and no resorption or osteonecrosis, which allowed for better

  20. Using bayesian models to assess the effects of under-reporting of cannabis use on the association with birth defects, national birth defects prevention study, 1997-2005

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gelder, M.M.H.J. van; Donders, A.R.T.; Devine, O.; Roeleveld, N.; Reefhuis, J.; Prevention, S. National Birth

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies on associations between periconceptional cannabis exposure and birth defects have mainly relied on self-reported exposure. Therefore, the results may be biased due to under-reporting of the exposure. The aim of this study was to quantify the potential effects of this form of

  1. Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration: altered mitochondria membrane potential and defective respiration in Pank2 knock-out mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunetti, Dario; Dusi, Sabrina; Morbin, Michela; Uggetti, Andrea; Moda, Fabio; D'Amato, Ilaria; Giordano, Carla; d'Amati, Giulia; Cozzi, Anna; Levi, Sonia; Hayflick, Susan; Tiranti, Valeria

    2012-12-15

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) comprises a group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by high brain content of iron and presence of axonal spheroids. Mutations in the PANK2 gene, which encodes pantothenate kinase 2, underlie an autosomal recessive inborn error of coenzyme A metabolism, called pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN). PKAN is characterized by dystonia, dysarthria, rigidity and pigmentary retinal degeneration. The pathogenesis of this disorder is poorly understood and, although PANK2 is a mitochondrial protein, perturbations in mitochondrial bioenergetics have not been reported. A knock-out (KO) mouse model of PKAN exhibits retinal degeneration and azoospermia, but lacks any neurological phenotype. The absence of a clinical phenotype has partially been explained by the different cellular localization of the human and murine PANK2 proteins. Here we demonstrate that the mouse Pank2 protein localizes to mitochondria, similar to its human orthologue. Moreover, we show that Pank2-defective neurons derived from KO mice have an altered mitochondrial membrane potential, a defect further corroborated by the observations of swollen mitochondria at the ultra-structural level and by the presence of defective respiration.

  2. Alveolar bone-loss area localization in periodontitis radiographs based on threshold segmentation with a hybrid feature fused of intensity and the H-value of fractional Brownian motion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, P L; Huang, P W; Huang, P Y; Hsu, H C

    2015-10-01

    Periodontitis involves progressive loss of alveolar bone around the teeth. Hence, automatic alveolar bone-loss (ABL) measurement in periapical radiographs can assist dentists in diagnosing such disease. In this paper, we propose an effective method for ABL area localization and denote it as ABLIfBm. ABLIfBm is a threshold segmentation method that uses a hybrid feature fused of both intensity and texture measured by the H-value of fractional Brownian motion (fBm) model, where the H-value is the Hurst coefficient in the expectation function of a fBm curve (intensity change) and is directly related to the value of fractal dimension. Adopting leave-one-out cross validation training and testing mechanism, ABLIfBm trains weights for both features using Bayesian classifier and transforms the radiograph image into a feature image obtained from a weighted average of both features. Finally, by Otsu's thresholding, it segments the feature image into normal and bone-loss regions. Experimental results on 31 periodontitis radiograph images in terms of mean true positive fraction and false positive fraction are about 92.5% and 14.0%, respectively, where the ground truth is provided by a dentist. The results also demonstrate that ABLIfBm outperforms (a) the threshold segmentation method using either feature alone or a weighted average of the same two features but with weights trained differently; (b) a level set segmentation method presented earlier in literature; and (c) segmentation methods based on Bayesian, K-NN, or SVM classifier using the same two features. Our results suggest that the proposed method can effectively localize alveolar bone-loss areas in periodontitis radiograph images and hence would be useful for dentists in evaluating degree of bone-loss for periodontitis patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Periapical multilocular osteoporotic bone marrow defect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Yun Hoa; Cho, Bong Hae; Nah, Kyung Soo

    2005-01-01

    A case of osteoporotic bone marrow defect, which appeared as a well-defined multilocular radiolucency overlapping the roots of mandibular right second molar, was reported. On periapical radiograph, a daughter cyst-like radiolucency was seen at the anterior margin of the lesion making it difficult to rule out odontogenic keratocyst.

  4. Periapical multilocular osteoporotic bone marrow defect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Yun Hoa; Cho, Bong Hae; Nah, Kyung Soo [Pusan National University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-12-15

    A case of osteoporotic bone marrow defect, which appeared as a well-defined multilocular radiolucency overlapping the roots of mandibular right second molar, was reported. On periapical radiograph, a daughter cyst-like radiolucency was seen at the anterior margin of the lesion making it difficult to rule out odontogenic keratocyst.

  5. Consultant radiographer leadership - A discussion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogg, Peter; Hogg, Dianne; Henwood, Suzanne

    2008-01-01

    Effective leadership can be defined in many ways and is an essential element of successful organisations; poor leadership can result in problems such as low staff morale, high staff turnover and reduced productivity. Effective leadership behaviours are well documented in the literature and various leadership models have been proposed that illustrate these behaviours. This discussion paper does not focus on any particular model. Instead it considers the 'Leadership Qualities Framework' which was developed specifically for use within the UK National Health Service. This framework draws upon a range of leadership models and as such it gives a broad indication of leadership behaviours. The framework comprises three components - 'personal qualities', 'setting direction' and 'delivering the service'. This paper commences with an argument as to why effective leadership is important in organisations generally, and specifically within healthcare organisations. Various examples of leadership are illustrated from within and outside the NHS in order to demonstrate effective leadership behaviours. The Leadership Qualities Framework is then examined, along with scenarios to illustrate effective leadership behaviours in context (i.e. within a healthcare organisation). Subsequent reflections on the scenarios aim to identify leadership behaviours that are explained within the framework. The final element of this paper draws on [limited] published evidence of where consultant radiographers have demonstrated effective leadership behaviours. In this section the published evidence is examined and reflected upon. At the end of the article we indicate additional reading for those who wish to further develop their theoretical and practical leadership skills

  6. Radiographic scanner apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wake, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    The preferred embodiment of this invention includes a hardware system, or processing means, which operates faster than software. Moreover the computer needed is less expensive and smaller. Radiographic scanner apparatus is described for measuring the intensity of radiation after passage through a planar region and for reconstructing a representation of the attenuation of radiation by the medium. There is a source which can be rotated, and detectors, the output from which forms a data line. The detectors are disposed opposite the planar region from the source to produce a succession of data lines corresponding to the succession of angular orientations of the source. There is a convolver means for convolving each of these data lines, with a filter function, and a means of processing the convolved data lines to create the representation of the radiation attenuation in the planar region. There is also apparatus to generate a succession of data lines indicating radiation attenuation along a determinable path with convolver means. (U.K.)

  7. Automatic classification of defects in weld pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anuar Mikdad Muad; Mohd Ashhar Hj Khalid; Abdul Aziz Mohamad; Abu Bakar Mhd Ghazali; Abdul Razak Hamzah

    2000-01-01

    With the advancement of computer imaging technology, the image on hard radiographic film can be digitized and stored in a computer and the manual process of defect recognition and classification may be replace by the computer. In this paper a computerized method for automatic detection and classification of common defects in film radiography of weld pipe is described. The detection and classification processes consist of automatic selection of interest area on the image and then classify common defects using image processing and special algorithms. Analysis of the attributes of each defect such as area, size, shape and orientation are carried out by the feature analysis process. These attributes reveal the type of each defect. These methods of defect classification result in high success rate. Our experience showed that sharp film images produced better results

  8. Automatic classification of defects in weld pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anuar Mikdad Muad; Mohd Ashhar Khalid; Abdul Aziz Mohamad; Abu Bakar Mhd Ghazali; Abdul Razak Hamzah

    2001-01-01

    With the advancement of computer imaging technology, the image on hard radiographic film can be digitized and stored in a computer and the manual process of defect recognition and classification may be replaced by the computer. In this paper, a computerized method for automatic detection and classification of common defects in film radiography of weld pipe is described. The detection and classification processes consist of automatic selection of interest area on the image and then classify common defects using image processing and special algorithms. Analysis of the attributes of each defect such area, size, shape and orientation are carried out by the feature analysis process. These attributes reveal the type of each defect. These methods of defect classification result in high success rate. Our experience showed that sharp film images produced better results. (Author)

  9. Modeling of punctual defects in UAL4 from the U-Al system: Combination of CALPHAD method with first principles calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kniznik, L; Alonso, P.R; Gargano, P.H; Rubiolo, G.H.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the point defect structure of oI20 UAl 4 in order to study aluminum diffusion. We performed ab initio calculations within a pseudopotentials method implemented in the Vienna Ab initio Simulation Package (VASP) to obtain point defect formation energies: vacancies (V U and V A l ) and antisites (Al U and U A l). Using a statistical-thermodynamic model we calculated defects concentrations as function of temperature and deviation from stoichiometry. For stoichiometric UAl 4 antisites are the dominant thermal defects. In off-stoichiometric UAl 4 , antisites are the constitutional defects. For U-rich UAl 4 , the thermal defect is called Entre Ramas, where one antisite U atom is replaced by five Al vacancies. For Al-rich UAl 4 , the thermal defect is also an Entre Ramas, where four antisite Al atoms are replaced by five U vacancies. Our first principles results were used to model UAl 4 intermediate phase with a two sublattices Wagner-Schottky model. The Thermocalc data bases previously used were modified, including antisites and vacancies in both sublattices of the UAl 4 intermediate phase: (U,Al,VA) 0.2 : (Al,U,VA) 0.8 . We obtained a consistent thermodynamic database able to reproduce the entire U-Al equilibrium phase diagram (author)

  10. Physical models and codes for prediction of activity release from defective fuel rods under operation conditions and in leakage tests during refuelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Likhanskii, V.; Evdokimov, I.; Khoruzhii, O.; Sorokin, A.; Novikov, V.

    2003-01-01

    It is appropriate to use the dependences, based on physical models, in the design-analytical codes for improving of reliability of defective fuel rod detection and for determination of defect characteristics by activity measuring in the primary coolant. In the paper the results on development of some physical models and integral mechanistic codes, assigned for prediction of defective fuel rod behaviour are presented. The analysis of mass transfer and mass exchange between fuel rod and coolant showed that the rates of these processes depends on many factors, such as coolant turbulent flow, pressure, effective hydraulic diameter of defect, fuel rod geometric parameters. The models, which describe these dependences, have been created. The models of thermomechanical fuel behaviour, stable gaseous FP release were modified and new computer code RTOP-CA was created thereupon for description of defective fuel rod behaviour and activity release into the primary coolant. The model of fuel oxidation in in-pile conditions, which includes radiolysis and RTOP-LT after validation of physical models are planned to be used for prediction of defective fuel rods behaviour

  11. The radiographic image: A cultural artefact?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strudwick, Ruth M.

    2014-01-01

    This article looks at the role of the radiographic images produced by diagnostic radiographers. An ethnographic study of the workplace culture in one diagnostic imaging department was undertaken using participant observation for four months and semi-structured interviews with ten key informants. One of the key themes; that of the radiographic image as a cultural artefact, is explored in this article. The radiographic image is a cultural artefact which radiographers are protective of and take ownership of. Radiographers are conscious of the quality of their images and the images are an important aspect of their work. Radiographers take criticism of their images personally. The radiographic image is a record of the interaction that occurs between the radiographer and the patient. The way in which radiographic images are viewed, used and judged is an important aspect of the role of diagnostic radiographer

  12. L-leucine partially rescues translational and developmental defects associated with zebrafish models of Cornelia de Lange syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Baoshan; Sowa, Nenja; Cardenas, Maria E; Gerton, Jennifer L

    2015-03-15

    Cohesinopathies are human genetic disorders that include Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) and Roberts syndrome (RBS) and are characterized by defects in limb and craniofacial development as well as mental retardation. The developmental phenotypes of CdLS and other cohesinopathies suggest that mutations in the structure and regulation of the cohesin complex during embryogenesis interfere with gene regulation. In a previous project, we showed that RBS was associated with highly fragmented nucleoli and defects in both ribosome biogenesis and protein translation. l-leucine stimulation of the mTOR pathway partially rescued translation in human RBS cells and development in zebrafish models of RBS. In this study, we investigate protein translation in zebrafish models of CdLS. Our results show that phosphorylation of RPS6 as well as 4E-binding protein 1 (4EBP1) was reduced in nipbla/b, rad21 and smc3-morphant embryos, a pattern indicating reduced translation. Moreover, protein biosynthesis and rRNA production were decreased in the cohesin morphant embryo cells. l-leucine partly rescued protein synthesis and rRNA production in the cohesin morphants and partially restored phosphorylation of RPS6 and 4EBP1. Concomitantly, l-leucine treatment partially improved cohesinopathy embryo development including the formation of craniofacial cartilage. Interestingly, we observed that alpha-ketoisocaproate (α-KIC), which is a keto derivative of leucine, also partially rescued the development of rad21 and nipbla/b morphants by boosting mTOR-dependent translation. In summary, our results suggest that cohesinopathies are caused in part by defective protein synthesis, and stimulation of the mTOR pathway through l-leucine or its metabolite α-KIC can partially rescue development in zebrafish models for CdLS. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  13. arXiv Description of radiation damage in diamond sensors using an effective defect model

    CERN Document Server

    Kassel, Florian; Dabrowski, Anne; De Boer, Wim

    The BCML system is a beam monitoring device in the CMS experiment at the LHC. As detectors poly-crystalline diamond sensors are used. Here high particle rates occur from the colliding beams scattering particles outside the beam pipe. These particles cause defects, which act as traps for the ionization, thus reducing the CCE. However, the loss in CCE was much more severe than expected. The reason why in real experiments the CCE is so much worse than in laboratory experiments is related to the rate of incident particles. At high particle rates the trapping rate of the ionization is so high compared with the detrapping rate, that space charge builds up. This space charge reduces locally the internal electric field, which in turn increases the trapping rate and hence reduces the CCE even further. In order to connect these macroscopic measurements with the microscopic defects acting as traps for the ionization charge the TCAD simulation program SILVACO was used. Two effective acceptor and donor levels were needed ...

  14. Radiographic film cassette unloading apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stievenart, E.F.; Plessers, H.S.; Neujens, G.J.

    1980-01-01

    Apparatus for unloading cassettes, containing exposed radiographic films, has means for unfastening the cassettes, an inclined pathway for gravity feeding and rotating feed members (rollers or belts) to propel the films into the processor. (UK)

  15. Cell compaction influences the regenerative potential of passaged bovine articular chondrocytes in an ex vivo cartilage defect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmutzer, Michael; Aszodi, Attila

    2017-04-01

    The loss and degradation of articular cartilage tissue matrix play central roles in the process of osteoarthritis (OA). New models for evaluating cartilage repair/regeneration are thus of great value for transferring various culture systems into clinically relevant situations. The repair process can be better monitored in ex vivo systems than in in vitro cell cultures. I have therefore established an ex vivo defect model prepared from bovine femoral condyles for evaluating cartilage repair by the implantation of cells cultured in various ways, e.g., monolayer-cultured cells or suspension or pellet cultures of articular bovine chondrocytes representing different cell compactions with variable densities of chondrocytes. I report that the integrin subunit α10 was significantly upregulated in suspension-cultured bovine chondrocytes at passage P2 compared with monolayer-cultured cells at P1 (p = 0.0083) and P2 (p innovation of this system over in vitro differentiation (e.g., micromass, pellet) assays is the possibility of examining and evaluating cartilage regeneration in an environment in which implanted cells are embedded within native surrounding tissue at the defect site. Such ex vivo explants might serve as a better model system to mimic clinical situations. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Volumetric Analysis of Alveolar Bone Defect Using Three-Dimensional-Printed Models Versus Computer-Aided Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Fengzhou; Li, Binghang; Yin, Ningbei; Cao, Yilin; Wang, Yongqian

    2017-03-01

    Knowing the volume of a graft is essential in repairing alveolar bone defects. This study investigates the 2 advanced preoperative volume measurement methods: three-dimensional (3D) printing and computer-aided engineering (CAE). Ten unilateral alveolar cleft patients were enrolled in this study. Their computed tomographic data were sent to 3D printing and CAE software. A simulated graft was used on the 3D-printed model, and the graft volume was measured by water displacement. The volume calculated by CAE software used mirror-reverses technique. The authors compared the actual volumes of the simulated grafts with the CAE software-derived volumes. The average volume of the simulated bone grafts by 3D-printed models was 1.52 mL, higher than the mean volume of 1.47 calculated by CAE software. The difference between the 2 volumes was from -0.18 to 0.42 mL. The paired Student t test showed no statistically significant difference between the volumes derived from the 2 methods. This study demonstrated that the mirror-reversed technique by CAE software is as accurate as the simulated operation on 3D-printed models in unilateral alveolar cleft patients. These findings further validate the use of 3D printing and CAE technique in alveolar defect repairing.

  17. Method for taking X radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orth, G.

    1983-01-01

    The method is aimed at obtaining X radiographs of any human organ with the aid of an X-ray-shadowless radiation detector of a dose measuring device, which is arranged between patient and imaging system, and of a controlling microprocessor system, so that the image-forming parameters are automatically adjusted to the specific properties of the patient. This procedure minimices the efforts in preparing the radiograph and the radiation exposure of the patient

  18. Film holder for radiographing tubing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, E.V.; Foster, B.E.

    1976-01-01

    A film cassette is described which may be easily placed about tubing or piping and readily held in place while radiographic inspection is performed. A pair of precurved light-impervious semi-rigid plastic sheets, hinged at one edge, enclose sheet film together with any metallic foils or screens. Other edges are made light-tight with removable caps, and the entire unit is held securely about the object to be radiographed with a releasable fastener such as a strip of Velcro

  19. The radiographic manifestations of hypochondroplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heselson, N.G.; Cremin, B.J.; Beighton, P.

    1979-01-01

    Hypochrondroplasia is an inherited skeletal dysplasia that resembles achondroplasia in mild degree. Radiographic manifestations encountered in 12 affected individuals in South Africa include slight shortening of all segments of the tubular bones, moderate caudal diminution of the lumbar interpedicular distances, increased lumbar lordosis with cacral tilt and distal prolongation of the fibular. Hypochondroplasia can be distinguished from other osteochondrodystrophies such as achondroplasia, pseudo-achondroplasia and metaphyseal chondroplasia by the recognition of it clinical and radiographic manifestations. (author)

  20. Film holder for radiographing tubing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Earl V.; Foster, Billy E.

    1976-01-01

    A film cassette is provided which may be easily placed about tubing or piping and readily held in place while radiographic inspection is performed. A pair of precurved light-impervious semi-rigid plastic sheets, hinged at one edge, enclose sheet film together with any metallic foils or screens. Other edges are made light-tight with removable caps, and the entire unit is held securely about the object to be radiographed with a releasable fastener such as a strip of Velcro.

  1. Combining the 3D model generated from point clouds and thermography to identify the defects presented on the facades of a building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yishuo; Chiang, Chih-Hung; Hsu, Keng-Tsang

    2018-03-01

    Defects presented on the facades of a building do have profound impacts on extending the life cycle of the building. How to identify the defects is a crucial issue; destructive and non-destructive methods are usually employed to identify the defects presented on a building. Destructive methods always cause the permanent damages for the examined objects; on the other hand, non-destructive testing (NDT) methods have been widely applied to detect those defects presented on exterior layers of a building. However, NDT methods cannot provide efficient and reliable information for identifying the defects because of the huge examination areas. Infrared thermography is often applied to quantitative energy performance measurements for building envelopes. Defects on the exterior layer of buildings may be caused by several factors: ventilation losses, conduction losses, thermal bridging, defective services, moisture condensation, moisture ingress, and structure defects. Analyzing the collected thermal images can be quite difficult when the spatial variations of surface temperature are small. In this paper the authors employ image segmentation to cluster those pixels with similar surface temperatures such that the processed thermal images can be composed of limited groups. The surface temperature distribution in each segmented group is homogenous. In doing so, the regional boundaries of the segmented regions can be identified and extracted. A terrestrial laser scanner (TLS) is widely used to collect the point clouds of a building, and those point clouds are applied to reconstruct the 3D model of the building. A mapping model is constructed such that the segmented thermal images can be projected onto the 2D image of the specified 3D building. In this paper, the administrative building in Chaoyang University campus is used as an example. The experimental results not only provide the defect information but also offer their corresponding spatial locations in the 3D model.

  2. The calculated modelling of a local thinning of a pipe fragment subjected to erosive-corrosive wear to definition of a stress state of construction at the defect zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shugajlo, O.P.; Krits'kij, V.B.; Lugovoj, P.Z.

    2005-01-01

    The models of a defect-thinning of pipes fragment as an ellipse, elliptic paraboloid and elliptic cone are developed in order to analyze their impact on a stress state of a construction at the defect zone

  3. Nonhomologous recombination between defective poliovirus and coxsackievirus genomes suggests a new model of genetic plasticity for picornaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmblat, Barbara; Jégouic, Sophie; Muslin, Claire; Blondel, Bruno; Joffret, Marie-Line; Delpeyroux, Francis

    2014-08-05

    Most of the circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses (cVDPVs) implicated in poliomyelitis outbreaks in Madagascar have been shown to be recombinants between the type 2 poliovirus (PV) strain of the oral polio vaccine (Sabin 2) and another species C human enterovirus (HEV-C), such as type 17 coxsackie A virus (CA17) in particular. We studied intertypic genetic exchanges between PV and non-PV HEV-C by developing a recombination model, making it possible to rescue defective type 2 PV RNA genomes with a short deletion at the 3' end by the cotransfection of cells with defective or infectious CA17 RNAs. We isolated over 200 different PV/CA17 recombinants, using murine cells expressing the human PV receptor (PVR) and selecting viruses with PV capsids. We found some homologous (H) recombinants and, mostly, nonhomologous (NH) recombinants presenting duplications of parental sequences preferentially located in the regions encoding proteins 2A, 2B, and 3A. Short duplications appeared to be stable, whereas longer duplications were excised during passaging in cultured cells or after multiplication in PVR-transgenic mice, generating H recombinants with diverse sites of recombination. This suggests that NH recombination events may be a transient, intermediate step in the generation and selection of the fittest H recombinants. In addition to the classical copy-choice mechanism of recombination thought to generate mostly H recombinants, there may also be a modular mechanism of recombination, involving NH recombinant precursors, shaping the genomes of recombinant enteroviruses and other picornaviruses. Importance: The multiplication of circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses (cVDPVs) in poorly immunized human populations can render these viruses pathogenic, causing poliomyelitis outbreaks. Most cVDPVs are intertypic recombinants between a poliovirus (PV) strain and another human enterovirus, such as type 17 coxsackie A viruses (CA17). For further studies of the genetic exchanges

  4. Excessive activity of cathepsin K is associated with cartilage defects in a zebrafish model of mucolipidosis II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron C. Petrey

    2012-03-01

    The severe pediatric disorder mucolipidosis II (ML-II; also known as I-cell disease is caused by defects in mannose 6-phosphate (Man-6-P biosynthesis. Patients with ML-II exhibit multiple developmental defects, including skeletal, craniofacial and joint abnormalities. To date, the molecular mechanisms that underlie these clinical manifestations are poorly understood. Taking advantage of a zebrafish model of ML-II, we previously showed that the cartilage morphogenesis defects in this model are associated with altered chondrocyte differentiation and excessive deposition of type II collagen, indicating that aspects of development that rely on proper extracellular matrix homeostasis are sensitive to decreases in Man-6-P biosynthesis. To further investigate the molecular bases for the cartilage phenotypes, we analyzed the transcript abundance of several genes in chondrocyte-enriched cell populations isolated from wild-type and ML-II zebrafish embryos. Increased levels of cathepsin and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP transcripts were noted in ML-II cell populations. This increase in transcript abundance corresponded with elevated and sustained activity of several cathepsins (K, L and S and MMP-13 during early development. Unlike MMP-13, for which higher levels of protein were detected, the sustained activity of cathepsin K at later stages seemed to result from its abnormal processing and activation. Inhibition of cathepsin K activity by pharmacological or genetic means not only reduced the activity of this enzyme but led to a broad reduction in additional protease activity, significant correction of the cartilage morphogenesis phenotype and reduced type II collagen staining in ML-II embryos. Our findings suggest a central role for excessive cathepsin K activity in the developmental aspects of ML-II cartilage pathogenesis and highlight the utility of the zebrafish system to address the biochemical underpinnings of metabolic disease.

  5. Chesneys' radiographic imaging: revised and edited by John Ball and Tony Price. 5. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chesney, D.N.

    1989-01-01

    This book (5th edition) reflects the change in emphasis in radiology from photographic processes towards electronic imaging methods. There is new material on image intensifiers and television imaging, digital imaging and digital subtractions. Analyses of the characteristics of, and defects in, images on radiographs, xeroradiographs and the television on screen are included. Methods, equipment and materials used to record the cathode ray tube image are described and there is new material on the principles of alternative diagnostic imaging techniques such as ultrasound, computed tomography and radionuclide imaging which provide cathode ray tube images. The book is primarily for student radiographers and radiographers studying for postdiplomate qualifications. (author)

  6. Modeling of Semiconductors and Correlated Oxides with Point Defects by First Principles Methods

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hao

    2014-06-15

    Point defects in silicon, vanadium dioxide, and doped ceria are investigated by density functional theory. Defects involving vacancies and interstitial oxygen and carbon in silicon are after formed in outer space and significantly affect device performances. The screened hybrid functional by Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof is used to calculate formation energies, binding energies, and electronic structures of the defective systems because standard density functional theory underestimates the bang gap of silicon. The results indicate for the A-center a −2 charge state. Tin is proposed to be an effective dopant to suppress the formation of A-centers. For the total energy difference between the A- and B-type carbon related G-centers we find close agreement with the experiment. The results indicate that the C-type G-center is more stable than both the A- and B-types. The electronic structures of the monoclinic and rutile phases of vanadium dioxide are also studied using the Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof functional. The ground states of the pure phases obtained by calculations including spin polarization disagree with the experimental observations that the monoclinic phase should not be magnetic, the rutile phase should be metallic, and the monoclinic phase should have a lower total energy than the rutile phase. By tuning the Hartree-Fock fraction α to 10% the agreement with experiments is improved in terms of band gaps and relative energies of the phases. A calculation scheme is proposed to simulate the relationship between the transition temperature of the metal-insulator transition and the dopant concentration in tungsten doped vanadium dioxide. We achieve good agreement with the experimental situation. 18.75% and 25% yttrium, lanthanum, praseodymium, samarium, and gadolinium doped ceria supercells generated by the special quasirandom structure approach are employed to investigate the impact of doping on the O diffusion. The experimental behavior of the conductivity for the

  7. Modeling of Semiconductors and Correlated Oxides with Point Defects by First Principles Methods

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hao

    2014-01-01

    Point defects in silicon, vanadium dioxide, and doped ceria are investigated by density functional theory. Defects involving vacancies and interstitial oxygen and carbon in silicon are after formed in outer space and significantly affect device performances. The screened hybrid functional by Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof is used to calculate formation energies, binding energies, and electronic structures of the defective systems because standard density functional theory underestimates the bang gap of silicon. The results indicate for the A-center a −2 charge state. Tin is proposed to be an effective dopant to suppress the formation of A-centers. For the total energy difference between the A- and B-type carbon related G-centers we find close agreement with the experiment. The results indicate that the C-type G-center is more stable than both the A- and B-types. The electronic structures of the monoclinic and rutile phases of vanadium dioxide are also studied using the Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof functional. The ground states of the pure phases obtained by calculations including spin polarization disagree with the experimental observations that the monoclinic phase should not be magnetic, the rutile phase should be metallic, and the monoclinic phase should have a lower total energy than the rutile phase. By tuning the Hartree-Fock fraction α to 10% the agreement with experiments is improved in terms of band gaps and relative energies of the phases. A calculation scheme is proposed to simulate the relationship between the transition temperature of the metal-insulator transition and the dopant concentration in tungsten doped vanadium dioxide. We achieve good agreement with the experimental situation. 18.75% and 25% yttrium, lanthanum, praseodymium, samarium, and gadolinium doped ceria supercells generated by the special quasirandom structure approach are employed to investigate the impact of doping on the O diffusion. The experimental behavior of the conductivity for the

  8. A neural network approach for radiographic image classification in NDT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavayssiere, B.

    1993-05-01

    Radiography is used by EDF for pipe inspection in nuclear power plants in order to detect defects. The radiographs obtained are then digitized in a well-defined protocol. The aim of EDF consists of developing a non destructive testing system for recognizing defects. In this note, we describe the recognition procedure of areas with defects. We first present the digitization protocol, specifies the poor quality of images under study and propose a procedure to enhance defects. We then examine the problem raised by the choice of good features for classification. After having proved that statistical or standard textural features such as homogeneity, entropy or contrast are not relevant, we develop a geometrical-statistical approach based on the cooperation between signal correlations study and regional extrema analysis. The principle consists of analysing and comparing for areas with defects and without any defect, the evolution of conditional probabilities matrices for increasing neighbourhood sizes, the shape of variograms and the location of regional minima. We demonstrate that anisotropy and surface of series of 'comet tails' associated with probability matrices, variograms slope and statistical indices, regional extrema location, are features able to discriminate areas with defects from areas without any. The classification is then realized by a neural network, which structure, properties and learning mechanisms are detailed. Finally we discuss the results. (author). 5 figs., 21 refs

  9. The radiographic features of familial expansile osteolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crone, M.D.; Wallace, R.G.H.

    1990-01-01

    The radiographic features of a unique autosomal dominant bone dysplasia are presented. The features are classified as generalised and/or focal. Generalised features are either altered trabecular pattern or modelling abnormalities. Focal features comprise lytic areas which progressively enlarge, producing expansion of the bone and eventual disintegration due to fibrous and finally fatty replacement of the normal medulla. Almost 90% of these lesions occur in the appendicular skeleton. Clinically, hearing loss is the earliest manifestation of the disease, presenting sometimes as early as 4 years of age. Apical and cervical resorption of teeth is extremely common, resulting in premature loss of teeth. Radiologically, the differential diagnosis refers to Paget's disease, polyostotic fibrous dysplasia, and osteofibrous dysplasia. The progressive destruction of the bone is similar to massive osteolysis (Gorham's disease). The radiographic features in combination with the histopathology render the condition unique. (orig.)

  10. Evaluation of injectable silica-embedded nanohydroxyapatite bone substitute in a rat tibia defect model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu W

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Weiguo Xu1, Cornelia Ganz2, Ulf Weber2, Martin Adam2, Gerd Holzhüter2, Daniel Wolter3, Bernhard Frerich3, Brigitte Vollmar1, Thomas Gerber21Institute for Experimental Surgery, 2Institute of Physics, 3Department of Oral, Maxillofacial and Plastic Surgery, University of Rostock, Rostock, GermanyAbstract: In clinical practice, vertebral compression fractures occur after trauma and osteoporosis. Kyphoplasty is a minimally invasive procedure using bone filler material for the treatment of such fractures. A full synthetic injectable bone substitute (SIBS was manufactured by means of spray drying. The aim of this study was to characterize the SIBS and to analyze the remodelling process during degradation of the biomaterial and new bone formation after implantation. SIBS is an aqueous suspension of donut-like microparticles. These microparticles consist of nanocrystallites of synthetic hydroxyapatite embedded in amorphous silica gel. After implantation of SIBS in a proximal tibial diaphyseal defect in 52 rats, grafts were harvested for subsequent analysis on different days. Newly formed bone originating from endosteum was observed on day 6. Hematomas in the medullary space and cortical wounds disappeared on day 12. The wound region was completely replaced by a composite of newly formed cancellous bone, extracellular matrix, and SIBS. At day 63 the cortical defect was fully healed by bone, while newly formed bone in the medullary space almost disappeared and was replaced with bone marrow. In conclusion, SIBS demonstrated a unique structure with osteoinductive and bioresorbable properties, which induced fast bone regeneration. Therefore, a clinical application of SIBS for kyphoplasty is promising.Keywords: bone remodelling, electron microscopy, histomorphometry, nanotechnology, tissue engineering

  11. A spontaneous and novel Pax3 mutant mouse that models Waardenburg syndrome and neural tube defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Tetsuo; Miura, Ikuo; Ohba, Hisako; Shimamoto, Chie; Iwayama, Yoshimi; Wakana, Shigeharu; Yoshikawa, Takeo

    2017-04-05

    Genes responsible for reduced pigmentation phenotypes in rodents are associated with human developmental defects, such as Waardenburg syndrome, where patients display congenital deafness along with various abnormalities mostly related to neural crest development deficiency. In this study, we identified a spontaneous mutant mouse line Rwa, which displays variable white spots on mouse bellies and white digits and tail, on a C57BL/6N genetic background. Curly tail and spina bifida were also observed, although at a lower penetrance. These phenotypes were dominantly inherited by offspring. We searched for the genetic mechanism of the observed phenotypes. We harnessed a rapid mouse gene mapping system newly developed in our laboratories to identify a responsible gene. We detected a region within chromosome 1 as a probable locus for the causal mutation. Dense mapping using interval markers narrowed the locus down to a 670-kbp region, containing four genes including Pax3, a gene known to be implicated in the types I and III Waardenburg syndrome. Extensive mutation screening of Pax3 detected an 841-bp deletion, spanning the promoter region and intron 1 of the gene. The defective allele of Pax3, named Pax3 Rwa , lacked the first coding exon and co-segregated perfectly with the phenotypes, confirming its causal nature. The genetic background of Rwa mice is almost identical to that of inbred C57BL/6N. These results highlight Pax3 Rwa mice as a beneficial tool for analyzing biological processes involving Pax3, in particular the development and migration of neural crest cells and melanocytes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Molecular dynamics study of vacancy-like defects in a model glass : static behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaye, J. M.; Limoge, Y.

    1993-10-01

    The possibility of defining vacancy-like defects in a Lennard-Jones glass is searched for in a systematic manner. Considering different relaxation levels of the same system, as well as different external pressures, we use a Molecular Dynamics simulation method, to study at constant volume or external pressure, the relaxation of a “piece” of glass, after the sudden removal of an atom. Three typical kinds of behaviour can be observed: the persistence of the empty volume left by the missing atom, its migration by clearly identifiable atomic jumps and the dissipation “on the spot”. A careful analysis of the probabilities of these three kinds of behaviour shows that a meaningful definition of vacancy-like defects can be given in a Lennard-Jones glass. Dans cet article, nous nous penchons de façon systématique sur la possibilité de définir des défauts de type lacunaire dans un verre de Lennard-Jones, à différents niveaux de relaxation et de pression, par une méthode de simulation numérique en dynamique moléculaire à volume ou à pression constants. Le défaut est créé en supprimant un atome et en suivant la réponse du système. Nous observons trois comportements typiques : la persistance sur place du “trou” laissé par l'atome supprimé, sa migration par des sauts atomiques clairement identifiés et enfin sa dissipation sur place. Une analyse détaillée de ces trois comportements montre qu'il est possible dans un verre de Lennard-Jones de définir des défauts de type lacunaire.

  13. Arsenate-induced maternal glucose intolerance and neural tube defects in a mouse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, Denise S.; Wlodarczyk, Bogdan J.; Mitchell, Laura E.; Finnell, Richard H.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Epidemiological studies have linked environmental arsenic (As) exposure to increased type 2 diabetes risk. Periconceptional hyperglycemia is a significant risk factor for neural tube defects (NTDs), the second most common structural birth defect. A suspected teratogen, arsenic (As) induces NTDs in laboratory animals. Objectives: We investigated whether maternal glucose homeostasis disruption was responsible for arsenate-induced NTDs in a well-established dosing regimen used in studies of arsenic's teratogenicity in early neurodevelopment. Methods: We evaluated maternal intraperitoneal (IP) exposure to As 9.6 mg/kg (as sodium arsenate) in LM/Bc/Fnn mice for teratogenicity and disruption of maternal plasma glucose and insulin levels. Selected compounds (insulin pellet, sodium selenate (SS), N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), L-methionine (L-Met), N-tert-Butyl-α-phenylnitrone (PBN)) were investigated for their potential to mitigate arsenate's effects. Results: Arsenate caused significant glucose elevation during an IP glucose tolerance test (IPGTT). Insulin levels were not different between arsenate and control dams before (arsenate, 0.55 ng/dl; control, 0.48 ng/dl) or after glucose challenge (arsenate, 1.09 ng/dl; control, 0.81 ng/dl). HOMA-IR index was higher for arsenate (3.9) vs control (2.5) dams (p = 0.0260). Arsenate caused NTDs (100%, p < 0.0001). Insulin pellet and NAC were the most successful rescue agents, reducing NTD rates to 45% and 35%. Conclusions: IPGTT, insulin assay, and HOMA-IR results suggest a modest failure of glucose stimulated insulin secretion and insulin resistance characteristic of glucose intolerance. Insulin's success in preventing arsenate-induced NTDs provides evidence that these arsenate-induced NTDs are secondary to elevated maternal glucose. The NAC rescue, which did not restore maternal glucose or insulin levels, suggests oxidative disruption plays a role.

  14. Cold neutron radiographic apparatus and method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    Cold neutron radiography may be improved by matching neutron temperature to the specific material to be analyzed. It is possible to bombard the material with neutrons having the precise average temperature necessary to realize the minimum attenuation coefficient, or to choose a neutron temperature that would increase the attenuation by inclusions, defects, etc., or to choose a neutron temperature that provides a good balance between sample transmission and defect attenuation. Other neutron temperatures might also be chosen for other reasons. This may be done by having a source of neutrons embedded in a moderator material, such as solid methane, and cooling the moderator material to the desired temperature by a cryogenic refrigerator. In another embodiment, neutrons from a nuclear reactor are passed through a moderator cooled by a cryogenic refrigerator. Since the neutron temperature is matched to the material being radiographically inspected, improved contrast and resolution can be obtained through thicker materials than it has heretofore been possible to analyze by cold neutron radiography. More optimum filtering of a neutron beam is also achieved by using a cryogenic refrigerator to cool the neutron beam filter. (auth)

  15. Radiographic examination of the equine head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, R.D.

    1993-01-01

    Radiographic examinations of the equine head can be performed with portable x-ray machines. The views comprising the examination depend on the area of the head being examined. With a knowledge of radiographic anatomy and radiographic signs of disease, valuable diagnostic information can be obtained from the radiographic examination. In addition, the radiographic information can also be used to develop a prognosis and determine the most appropriate therapy

  16. Radiographic testing at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossi, R.H.

    1982-01-01

    Radiographic testing is a nondestructive inspection technique which uses penetrating radiation. The Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Section at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has a broad spectrum of equipment and techniques for radiographic testing. These resources include low-energy vacuum systems, low- and mid-energy cabinet and cell radiographic systems, high-energy linear accelerators, portable x-ray machines and radioisotopes for radiographic inspections. For diagnostic testing the NDE Section also has real-time and flash radiographic equipment

  17. Reproductive health of male radiographers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakhatreh, Farouk M.

    2001-01-01

    To compare certain reproductive health problems reported in 2 groups of males, one of which was exposed to x-ray radiation (radiographers) and the other group that was not exposed to x-ray radiation. The reproductive health problems were miscarriage, congenital anomalies, still births and infertility. Two groups of men were selected (90 in each group). The first group consisted of radiographers and the other groups consisted of men not exposed to x-ray radiation. The 2 groups were matched for age and source. Relative risk, attributable risk percentage and level of significance were calculated. Incidence rate of reproductive health problems was increasing with the increase in duration of exposure to x-ray radiation ranging between 17% (for those exposed for 1-5 years) to 91% (for those exposed for more than 15 years). There were significant associations between exposure to radiation and miscarriage (relative risk = 1.67, attributable risk percentage = 40%), congenital anomalies (relative risk = 10, attributable risk percentage 90%), still birth (relative risk = 7, attributable risk percentage = 86%), and infertility (relative risk = 4.5, attributable risk = 78%). The incidence rates of reproductive health problems reported by male radiographers were significantly higher than that reported by the non exposed group and higher than the incidence rates reported in community-based studies in Jordan. The incidence rates of fetal death (miscarriage and stillbirth together) and infertility reported by our radiographers were higher than had been reported by the British radiographers. An immediate plan of action is needed to protect our radiographers. Further studies are needed in this field taking into account all extraneous variables that may affect the reproductive health of radiographers. (author)

  18. Consultant radiographer leadership - A discussion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogg, Peter [Directorate of Radiography, University of Salford, Allerton Building, Frederick Road, Salford, Greater Manchester M6 6PU (United Kingdom)], E-mail: p.hogg@salford.ac.uk; Hogg, Dianne [Henwood Associates (South East) Ltd, Company Number: 513796, Registered Office: 2 Lakeview Stables, Lower St Clere, Kemsing, Kent, TN15 6NL (United Kingdom); Henwood, Suzanne [East Lancashire Primary Care Trust, Linden Business Centre, Linden Road, Colne. BB8 9BA (United Kingdom)

    2008-12-15

    Effective leadership can be defined in many ways and is an essential element of successful organisations; poor leadership can result in problems such as low staff morale, high staff turnover and reduced productivity. Effective leadership behaviours are well documented in the literature and various leadership models have been proposed that illustrate these behaviours. This discussion paper does not focus on any particular model. Instead it considers the 'Leadership Qualities Framework' which was developed specifically for use within the UK National Health Service. This framework draws upon a range of leadership models and as such it gives a broad indication of leadership behaviours. The framework comprises three components - 'personal qualities', 'setting direction' and 'delivering the service'. This paper commences with an argument as to why effective leadership is important in organisations generally, and specifically within healthcare organisations. Various examples of leadership are illustrated from within and outside the NHS in order to demonstrate effective leadership behaviours. The Leadership Qualities Framework is then examined, along with scenarios to illustrate effective leadership behaviours in context (i.e. within a healthcare organisation). Subsequent reflections on the scenarios aim to identify leadership behaviours that are explained within the framework. The final element of this paper draws on [limited] published evidence of where consultant radiographers have demonstrated effective leadership behaviours. In this section the published evidence is examined and reflected upon. At the end of the article we indicate additional reading for those who wish to further develop their theoretical and practical leadership skills.

  19. Defects and defect processes in nonmetallic solids

    CERN Document Server

    Hayes, W

    2004-01-01

    This extensive survey covers defects in nonmetals, emphasizing point defects and point-defect processes. It encompasses electronic, vibrational, and optical properties of defective solids, plus dislocations and grain boundaries. 1985 edition.

  20. A radiographic study of mental foramen in intraoral radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohn, Jeong Ick; Choi, Karp Shik

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the position and shape of mental foramen in periapical radiographs. For this study, periapical radiographs of premolar areas were obtained from the 200 adults. Accordingly, the positional and shape changes of mental foramen were evaluated. The authors obtained radiographs according to changes in radiation beam direction in periapical radiographs of premolar areas, and then evaluated the positional and shape changes of mental foramen. The following results were obtained: 1. Shapes of mental foramen were observed elliptical (34.3%), round or oval (28.0%), unidentified (25.5%) and diffuse (12.2%) type in descending order of frequency. 2, Horizontal positions of mental foramen were most frequently observed at the 2nd premolar area (55.3%), the area between the 1st premolar and 2nd premolar (39.6%), the area between the 2nd premolar and 1st molar (3.4%), the 1st premolar area (1.0%), the area between the canine and 1st premolar (0.7%) in descending order of frequency. 3. Vertical positions of mental foramen were most frequently observed at the inferior to apex (67.1%), and at apex (24.8%), overlap with apex (6.4%), superior to apex (1.7%) in descending order of frequency. 4. Shapes of mental foramen were more obviously observed at the upward 10 degree positioned periapical radiographs. And according to the changes of horizontal and vertical position, they were observed similar to normally positioned periapical radiographs.

  1. Attitudes of radiographers to radiographer-led discharge: A survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lumsden, Laura; Cosson, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Background: The traditional role of the Diagnostic Radiographer in image acquisition has gradually been extended through skill-mix, particularly to include abnormality detection. Aims: This research focused on the attitudes of Radiographers to Radiographer-led Discharge (RLD), where Radiographers discharge patients with minor injuries and perform tasks previously undertaken by Accident and Emergency staff. The effects of job role, hospital type, experience and whether RLD was used in the participant's trust were examined. Method: A multiple-indicator online questionnaire assessed attitudes to RLD. Snowball sampling was used with advertisement via emails, posters and cards, containing Quick Response (QR) codes. Statement responses were coded, with reverse coding for negative statements and total scores were calculated. A higher score represented a more positive attitude. Results: 101 questionnaires were completed (an estimated 30% response rate) and the mean total score was 84/115. 95% of participants supported radiographer involvement in abnormality detection, with 46.5% selecting RLD as the preferred system for minor injuries patients vs 48.5% preferring commenting alone. Discussion: Participants were positive about extending their role through RLD and felt confident in their image interpretation abilities, though expressed concern for the legal consequences of the role and adequate pay. Generalization of the results is limited due to the possible low response rate. Conclusion: Overall, participants demonstrated positive attitudes towards RLD but they also indicate the need for appropriate payment for any additional responsibility. These findings are promising for successful implementation of RLD, though larger-scale research including radiologists, business managers, A and E staff and patients would be beneficial. - Highlights: • 101 questionnaires were completed (an estimated 30% response rate). • 95% of participants supported radiographer involvement

  2. Formation of topological defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vachaspati, T.

    1991-01-01

    We consider the formation of point and line topological defects (monopoles and strings) from a general point of view by allowing the probability of formation of a defect to vary. To investigate the statistical properties of the defects at formation we give qualitative arguments that are independent of any particular model in which such defects occur. These arguments are substantiated by numerical results in the case of strings and for monopoles in two dimensions. We find that the network of strings at formation undergoes a transition at a certain critical density below which there are no infinite strings and the closed-string (loop) distribution is exponentially suppressed at large lengths. The results are contrasted with the results of statistical arguments applied to a box of strings in dynamical equilibrium. We argue that if point defects were to form with smaller probability, the distance between monopoles and antimonopoles would decrease while the monopole-to-monopole distance would increase. We find that monopoles are always paired with antimonopoles but the pairing becomes clean only when the number density of defects is small. A similar reasoning would also apply to other defects

  3. Turmeric Extract Rescues Ethanol-Induced Developmental Defect in the Zebrafish Model for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, Pooja; Connors, Craig T; Mohammed, Arooj S; Sarmah, Swapnalee; Marrs, Kathleen; Marrs, James A; Chism, Grady W

    2017-09-01

    Prenatal ethanol exposure causes the most frequent preventable birth disorder, fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). The effect of turmeric extracts in rescuing an ethanol-induced developmental defect using zebrafish as a model was determined. Ethanol-induced oxidative stress is one of the major mechanisms underlying FASD. We hypothesize that antioxidant inducing properties of turmeric may alleviate ethanol-induced defects. Curcuminoid content of the turmeric powder extract (5 mg/mL turmeric in ethanol) was determined by UPLC and found to contain Curcumin (124.1 ± 0.2 μg/mL), Desmethoxycurcumin (43.4 ± 0.1 μg/mL), and Bisdemethoxycurcumin (36.6 ± 0.1 μg/mL). Zebrafish embryos were treated with 100 mM (0.6% v/v) ethanol during gastrulation through organogenesis (2 to 48 h postfertilization (hpf)) and supplemented with turmeric extract to obtain total curcuminoid concentrations of 0, 1.16, 1.72, or 2.32 μM. Turmeric supplementation showed significant rescue of the body length at 72 hpf compared to ethanol-treated embryos. The mechanism underlying the rescue remains to be determined. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  4. Defective pulmonary innate immune responses post-stem cell transplantation; review and results from one model system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Racquel eDomingo-Gonzalez

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Infectious pulmonary complications limit the success of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT as a therapy for malignant and nonmalignant disorders. Susceptibility to pathogens in both autologous and allogeneic HSCT recipients persists despite successful immune reconstitution. As studying the causal effects of these immune defects in the human population can be limiting, a bone marrow transplant (BMT mouse model can be used to understand the defect in mounting a productive innate immune response post-transplantation. When syngeneic BMT is performed, this system allows the study of BMT-induced alterations in innate immune cell function that are independent of the confounding effects of immunosuppressive therapy and graft-versus-host disease. Studies from several laboratories, including our own show that pulmonary susceptibility to bacterial infections post-BMT are largely due to alterations in the lung alveolar macrophages. Changes in these cells post-BMT include cytokine and eicosanoid dysregulations, scavenger receptor alterations, changes in micro RNA profiles, and alterations in intracellular signaling molecules that limit bacterial phagocytosis and killing. The changes that occur highlight mechanisms that promote susceptibility to infections commonly afflicting HSCT recipients and provide insight into therapeutic targets that may improve patient outcomes post-HSCT.

  5. Radiographic markers for measuring tibial rotation based on CT-reconstructed radiographs. An accuracy and feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakimian, David; Khoury, Amal; Mosheiff, Rami; Liebergall, Meir; Weil, Yoram A.

    2018-01-01

    Malreduction in the axial plane (malrotation) following tibial fracture surgery is often undiagnosed. A few clinical and radiographic methods have been proposed for measuring tibial rotation intraoperatively, yet have failed to match the accuracy of computed tomography (CT). The aim of this study was to develop radiographic tools for future intraoperative assessment of the tibial shaft rotation profile. The setting was a laboratory computerized analysis. Twenty lower limb CT scans were used to construct a three-dimensional (3D) model using AMIRA copyright software. A virtual 3D cylinder was implanted in the posterior condylar line and in the transmalleolar axis. The 3D models were used to simulate four standard knee and ankle plain radiographs. On each radiograph, four landmarks were depicted by two observers and their relation with the cylinder was measured and analyzed for accuracy and reproducibility. A cadaveric lower leg was implanted with two Kirschner wires. A CT scan was performed in addition to 2D fluoroscopy. The simulated radiographs and the fluoroscopy were compared for accuracy. Measurement of the landmarks showed reliability in most of the knee anteroposterior and ankle mortise radiographs (coefficients of variation < 0.01 and = 0.01) respectively. Cadaveric measurement of the landmarks using real fluoroscopy and simulated radiographs were similar. To date, no reliable and common methods have been reported for the evaluation of tibial axial rotation. We propose a model in which simple radiographic landmarks can be used to calculate a 3D coordinate system that accurately assesses the axial rotation angle of the tibial shaft. (orig.)

  6. Radiographic markers for measuring tibial rotation based on CT-reconstructed radiographs. An accuracy and feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakimian, David; Khoury, Amal; Mosheiff, Rami; Liebergall, Meir; Weil, Yoram A. [Hadassah Hebrew University Hospital, Department of Orthopaedics, Jerusalem (Israel)

    2018-04-15

    Malreduction in the axial plane (malrotation) following tibial fracture surgery is often undiagnosed. A few clinical and radiographic methods have been proposed for measuring tibial rotation intraoperatively, yet have failed to match the accuracy of computed tomography (CT). The aim of this study was to develop radiographic tools for future intraoperative assessment of the tibial shaft rotation profile. The setting was a laboratory computerized analysis. Twenty lower limb CT scans were used to construct a three-dimensional (3D) model using AMIRA copyright software. A virtual 3D cylinder was implanted in the posterior condylar line and in the transmalleolar axis. The 3D models were used to simulate four standard knee and ankle plain radiographs. On each radiograph, four landmarks were depicted by two observers and their relation with the cylinder was measured and analyzed for accuracy and reproducibility. A cadaveric lower leg was implanted with two Kirschner wires. A CT scan was performed in addition to 2D fluoroscopy. The simulated radiographs and the fluoroscopy were compared for accuracy. Measurement of the landmarks showed reliability in most of the knee anteroposterior and ankle mortise radiographs (coefficients of variation < 0.01 and = 0.01) respectively. Cadaveric measurement of the landmarks using real fluoroscopy and simulated radiographs were similar. To date, no reliable and common methods have been reported for the evaluation of tibial axial rotation. We propose a model in which simple radiographic landmarks can be used to calculate a 3D coordinate system that accurately assesses the axial rotation angle of the tibial shaft. (orig.)

  7. Defect pin behaviour in the DFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sloss, W.M.; Bagley, K.Q.; Edmonds, E.; Potter, P.E.

    1979-01-01

    A program of defective fuel pin irradiations has been carried out in the DFR. This program employed fuel pins which had failed during previous irradiations (natural defects) and pins in which simulated failures (artificial defects) had been induced prior to irradiation or during an intermediate examination stage at moderate or substantial burnups. The artificial defects simulated longitudinal ruptures and were normally located at positions near the top, middle and bottom of the pin where clad temperatures were 450, 540 and 630 0 C respectively. The fuel was mixed U-Pu oxide, and fuel form, stoichiometry, clad type, pin diameter, linear rating, and burnup were among the variables examined. The defect pin tests were normally carried out in single pin or trefoil type vehicles. After irradiation all the pins were subjected to the normal nondestructive examination procedures and the visual, radiographic, gamma-scanning, and dimensional change results are presented. Several pins were destructively examined and the metallographic data are discussed

  8. Pluripotent cell models of fanconi anemia identify the early pathological defect in human hemoangiogenic progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Naoya M; Niwa, Akira; Yabe, Miharu; Hira, Asuka; Okada, Chihiro; Amano, Naoki; Watanabe, Akira; Watanabe, Ken-Ichiro; Heike, Toshio; Takata, Minoru; Nakahata, Tatsutoshi; Saito, Megumu K

    2015-04-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a disorder of genomic instability characterized by progressive bone marrow failure (BMF), developmental abnormalities, and an increased susceptibility to cancer. Although various consequences in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells have been attributed to FA-BMF, the quest to identify the initial pathological event is still ongoing. To address this issue, we established induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from fibroblasts of six patients with FA and FANCA mutations. An improved reprogramming method yielded iPSC-like colonies from all patients, and iPSC clones were propagated from two patients. Quantitative evaluation of the differentiation ability demonstrated that the differentiation propensity toward the hematopoietic and endothelial lineages is already defective in early hemoangiogenic progenitors. The expression levels of critical transcription factors were significantly downregulated in these progenitors. These data indicate that the hematopoietic consequences in FA patients originate from the early hematopoietic stage and highlight the potential usefulness of iPSC technology for elucidating the pathogenesis of FA-BMF. ©AlphaMed Press.

  9. Enzyme replacement therapy prevents dental defects in a model of hypophosphatasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, M D; Nakano, Y; Masica, D L; Gray, J J; Lemire, I; Heft, R; Whyte, M P; Crine, P; Millán, J L

    2011-04-01

    Hypophosphatasia (HPP) occurs from loss-of-function mutation in the tissue-non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNALP) gene, resulting in extracellular pyrophosphate accumulation that inhibits skeletal and dental mineralization. TNALP-null mice (Akp2(-/-)) phenocopy human infantile hypophosphatasia; they develop rickets at 1 week of age, and die before being weaned, having severe skeletal and dental hypomineralization and episodes of apnea and vitamin B(6)-responsive seizures. Delay and defects in dentin mineralization, together with a deficiency in acellular cementum, are characteristic. We report the prevention of these dental abnormalities in Akp2(-/-) mice receiving treatment from birth with daily injections of a mineral-targeting, human TNALP (sALP-FcD(10)). sALP-FcD(10) prevented hypomineralization of alveolar bone, dentin, and cementum as assessed by micro-computed tomography and histology. Osteopontin--a marker of acellular cementum--was immuno-localized along root surfaces, confirming that acellular cementum, typically missing or reduced in Akp2(-/-) mice, formed normally. Our findings provide insight concerning how acellular cementum is formed on tooth surfaces to effect periodontal ligament attachment to retain teeth in their osseous alveolar sockets. Furthermore, they provide evidence that this enzyme-replacement therapy, applied early in post-natal life--where the majority of tooth root development occurs, including acellular cementum formation--could prevent the accelerated tooth loss seen in individuals with HPP.

  10. Finite-element model to predict roll-separation force and defects during rolling of U-10Mo alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulami, Ayoub; Burkes, Douglas E.; Joshi, Vineet V.; Lavender, Curt A.; Paxton, Dean

    2017-10-01

    A major goal of the Convert Program of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) is to enable high-performance research reactors to operate with low-enriched uranium rather than the high-enriched uranium currently used. To this end, uranium alloyed with 10 wt% molybdenum (U-10Mo) represents an ideal candidate because of its stable gamma phase, low neutron caption cross section, acceptable swelling response, and predictable irradiation behavior. However, because of the complexities of the fuel design and the need for rolled monolithic U-10Mo foils, new developments in processing and fabrication are necessary. This study used a finite-element code, LS-DYNA, as a predictive tool to optimize the rolling process. Simulations of the hot rolling of U-10Mo coupons encapsulated in low-carbon steel were conducted following two different schedules. Model predictions of the roll-separation force and roll pack thicknesses at different stages of the rolling process were compared with experimental measurements. The study reported here discussed various attributes of the rolled coupons revealed by the model (e.g., waviness and thickness non-uniformity like dog-boning). To investigate the influence of the cladding material on these rolling defects, other cases were simulated: hot rolling with alternative can materials, namely, 304 stainless steel and Zircaloy-2, and bare-rolling. Simulation results demonstrated that reducing the mismatch in strength between the coupon and can material improves the quality of the rolled sheet. Bare-rolling simulation results showed a defect-free rolled coupon. The finite-element model developed and presented in this study can be used to conduct parametric studies of several process parameters (e.g., rolling speed, roll diameter, can material, and reduction).

  11. Caries detection in dental radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, S.M.

    1987-01-01

    Caries, or the decay of teeth are difficult to automatically detect in dental radiographs because of the small area of the image that is occupied by the decay. Images of dental radiographs has distinct regions of homogeneous gray levels, and therefore naturally lead to a segmentation based automatic caries detection algorithm. This paper describes a method for caries detection based on a multiclass, area independent thresholding and segmenting scheme. This multiclass thresholding algorithm is an extension of the uniform error threshold, an area independent, distribution free thresholding method used for images of only two classes of objects. The authors first consider the problem of caries detection and the image features that characterize the presence of caries. Next, the uniform error threshold is reviewed, and the general multiclass uniform error threshold algorithm is presented. This algorithm is used to automatically detect caries in dental radiographs

  12. Interpretation and evaluation of radiograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Nassir Ibrahim; Azali Muhammad; Ab. Razak Hamzah; Abd. Aziz Mohamed; Mohamad Pauzi Ismail

    2008-01-01

    After digestion, the interpreter must interpreted and evaluate the image on film, usually many radiograph stuck in this step, if there is good density, so there are no problem. This is a final stage of radiography work and this work must be done by level two or three radiographer. This is a final stages before the radiographer give a result to their customer for further action. The good interpreter must know what kind of artifact, is this artifact are dangerous or not and others. In this chapter, the entire artifact that usually showed will be discussed briefly with the good illustration and picture to make the reader understand and know the type of artifact that exists.

  13. Industrial radiography on radiographic paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domanus, J.C.

    1977-11-01

    An investigation was performed to compare the quality of radiographic paper with that of X-ray film, after a review had been made of the rather scarce literature on the subject. The equipment used throughout the investigation is described, and characteristic curves for Agfa-Gevaert and Kodak papers exposed with different intensifying screens in the low and intermediate voltage range are reproduced. The relative speed, contrast and exposure latitude were computed from these curves. The quality of the radiographic image was checked on U/Al blocks and plates, Al and Fe blocks, and fiber-reinforced composites. Exposure charts for Al and Fe were made for various paper and screen combinations. Both the sharpness of the radiographic image as well as the influence of processing on speed and contrast were checked. Examples are given of the practical application of the paper for radiography of castings, weldings, solderings, assemblies, etc. (author)

  14. Digital image analysis of NDT radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graeme, W.A. Jr.; Eizember, A.C.; Douglass, J.

    1989-01-01

    Prior to the introduction of Charge Coupled Device (CCD) detectors the majority of image analysis performed on NDT radiographic images was done visually in the analog domain. While some film digitization was being performed, the process was often unable to capture all the usable information on the radiograph or was too time consuming. CCD technology now provides a method to digitize radiographic film images without losing the useful information captured in the original radiograph in a timely process. Incorporating that technology into a complete digital radiographic workstation allows analog radiographic information to be processed, providing additional information to the radiographer. Once in the digital domain, that data can be stored, and fused with radioscopic and other forms of digital data. The result is more productive analysis and management of radiographic inspection data. The principal function of the NDT Scan IV digital radiography system is the digitization, enhancement and storage of radiographic images

  15. Application of the integral method to modelling the oxidation of defected fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolar, M.

    1995-06-01

    The starting point for this report is the discrepancy reported in previous work between the reaction-diffusion calculations and the CEX-1 experiment, which involves storage of defected fuel elements in air at 150 deg C. This discrepancy is considerably diminished here by a more critical choice of theoretical parameters, and by taking into account the fact that different CEX-1 fuel elements were oxidized at very different rates and that the fuel element used previously for comparison with theoretical calculations actually underwent two limited-oxygen-supply cycles. Much better agreement is obtained here between the theory and the third, unlimited-air, storage period of the CEX-1 experiment. The approximate integral method is used extensively for the solution of the one-dimensional diffusion moving-boundary problems that may describe various storage periods of the CEX-1 experiment. In some cases it is easy to extend this method to arbitrary precision by using higher moments of the diffusion equation. Using this method, the validity of quasi-steady-state approximation is verified. Diffusion-controlled oxidation is also studied. In this case, for the unlimited oxygen supply, the integral method leads to an exact analytical solution for linear geometry, and to a good analytical approximation of the solution for the spherically symmetric geometry. These solutions may have some application in the analysis of experiments on the oxidation of small UO 2 fragments or powders when the individual UO 2 grains may be considered to be approximately spherical. (author). 23 refs., 5 tabs., 11 figs

  16. PACS influence the radiographer's work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fridell, Kent; Aspelin, Peter; Edgren, Lars; Lindskoeld, Lars; Lundberg, Nina

    2009-01-01

    Radiological departments are changing rapidly due to the implementation of digital images and PACS (Picture Archiving and Communication Systems). The introduction of new technology seems to dissolve boundaries between the professions in the work environment where the technology is introduced. This process tends to change the organization and its routines. The aim of this qualitative study is to explore changes in radiographers' work with regard to skills, work practice and technology. The study used open-ended interviews to explore the radiographers' perceptions of such changes, and to identify problems and solutions pertaining to work practice. Inspiration is taken from grounded theory to explain the changes in work that were found. Respondents were selected from a total of 133 potential participants as a theoretical or purposive sample. The changing trends within the professional role indicated that radiographers, as image producers, shifted their focus from the ability to set the optimal exposure parameters in order to obtain the optimal image for diagnosis to become expert in exposure parameters, projection techniques and diagnostic practice, having multifaceted skills, as being the jack of all trades. When implementing PACS there was an obvious change in image production. At the start there were visions of new routines, and therefore the radiographers became early adopters to the new technology; in practice the organization was stacked in old routines, as the routines were inflexible and PACS work was pushed into old work routines. Although inflexible, this does not mean that they cannot change, and obviously in 2006 new routines had been implemented making it possible for the radiographers in finding new ways for collaborating with colleagues. The new technology immediately created a vision of improved service to the clinicians. In order to optimize the service the radiographers developed an insight into the need for a more comprehensive change in work using

  17. A point defect model for the general and pitting corrosion on iron-oxide-electrolyte interface deduced from current oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Pagitsas, M; Sazou, D

    2003-01-01

    Analysis of the passive-active oscillatory region of the Fe-0.75 M H sub 2 SO sub 4 system, perturbed by adding small amounts of halide species, allow the distinction between pitting and general corrosion. Complex periodic and aperiodic current oscillations characterize pitting corrosion whereas monoperiodic oscillations of a relaxation type indicate general corrosion. A point defect model (PDM) is considered for the microscopic description of the growth and breakdown of the iron oxide film. The physicochemical processes leading to different types of corrosion can be clarified in terms of the PDM. Occupation of an anion vacancy by a halide ion results in the localized attack of the passive oxide and pitting corrosion. On the other hand, the formation of surface soluble iron complexes is related to the uniform dissolution of the passive oxide and general corrosion.

  18. Computational procedure of optimal inventory model involving controllable backorder rate and variable lead time with defective units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wen-Chuan; Wu, Jong-Wuu; Tsou, Hsin-Hui; Lei, Chia-Ling

    2012-10-01

    This article considers that the number of defective units in an arrival order is a binominal random variable. We derive a modified mixture inventory model with backorders and lost sales, in which the order quantity and lead time are decision variables. In our studies, we also assume that the backorder rate is dependent on the length of lead time through the amount of shortages and let the backorder rate be a control variable. In addition, we assume that the lead time demand follows a mixture of normal distributions, and then relax the assumption about the form of the mixture of distribution functions of the lead time demand and apply the minimax distribution free procedure to solve the problem. Furthermore, we develop an algorithm procedure to obtain the optimal ordering strategy for each case. Finally, three numerical examples are also given to illustrate the results.

  19. The Simplest Quantum Model Supporting the Kibble-Zurek Mechanism of Topological Defect Production: Landau-Zener Transitions from a New Perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damski, Bogdan

    2005-01-01

    It can be shown that the dynamics of the Landau-Zener model can be accurately described in terms of the Kibble-Zurek theory of the topological defect production in nonequilibrium phase transitions. The simplest quantum model exhibiting the Kibble-Zurek mechanism is presented. A new intuitive description of Landau-Zener dynamics is found

  20. Global developmental gene expression and pathway analysis of normal brain development and mouse models of human neuronal migration defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziano Pramparo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Heterozygous LIS1 mutations are the most common cause of human lissencephaly, a human neuronal migration defect, and DCX mutations are the most common cause of X-linked lissencephaly. LIS1 is part of a protein complex including NDEL1 and 14-3-3ε that regulates dynein motor function and microtubule dynamics, while DCX stabilizes microtubules and cooperates with LIS1 during neuronal migration and neurogenesis. Targeted gene mutations of Lis1, Dcx, Ywhae (coding for 14-3-3ε, and Ndel1 lead to neuronal migration defects in mouse and provide models of human lissencephaly, as well as aid the study of related neuro-developmental diseases. Here we investigated the developing brain of these four mutants and wild-type mice using expression microarrays, bioinformatic analyses, and in vivo/in vitro experiments to address whether mutations in different members of the LIS1 neuronal migration complex lead to similar and/or distinct global gene expression alterations. Consistent with the overall successful development of the mutant brains, unsupervised clustering and co-expression analysis suggested that cell cycle and synaptogenesis genes are similarly expressed and co-regulated in WT and mutant brains in a time-dependent fashion. By contrast, focused co-expression analysis in the Lis1 and Ndel1 mutants uncovered substantial differences in the correlation among pathways. Differential expression analysis revealed that cell cycle, cell adhesion, and cytoskeleton organization pathways are commonly altered in all mutants, while synaptogenesis, cell morphology, and inflammation/immune response are specifically altered in one or more mutants. We found several commonly dysregulated genes located within pathogenic deletion/duplication regions, which represent novel candidates of human mental retardation and neurocognitive disabilities. Our analysis suggests that gene expression and pathway analysis in mouse models of a similar disorder or within a common pathway can

  1. Improved Healing of Large, Osseous, Segmental Defects by Reverse Dynamization: Evaluation in a Sheep Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    housing pen, animal 2 ceased breathing and did not recover. Below are the attending veterinarian’s notes summarizing the incident and subsequent...in model ‘steps’. Steps 1-4 correspond to model bolt pre- tension . Steps 4-8 show theoretical mechanical testing (500N vertically applied to tibial

  2. The use of guided tissue regeneration principles in endodontic surgery for induced chronic periodontic-endodontic lesions: a clinical, radiographic, and histologic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britain, Steven K; Arx, Thomas von; Schenk, Robert K; Buser, Daniel; Nummikoski, Pirkka; Cochran, David L

    2005-03-01

    Chronic periodontic-endodontic lesions are not uncommon in clinical practice and their regenerative capacity has long been questioned. However, there are no published studies investigating the application of guided tissue regeneration techniques in combination with endodontic surgery using an induced perio-endo defect model. This study evaluated the clinical, radiographic, and histologic outcomes of three surgical procedures used to treat induced perio-endo lesions. Pulpal necrosis was induced in foxhounds along with surgical removal of radicular buccal bone. After 4 weeks, chronic lesions were clinically and radiographically assessed. Treatment surgery consisted of apicoectomy, root canal instrumentation, and retrofilling with mineral trioxide aggregate. Teeth were then assigned to one of the following treatment groups: open flap debridement only (OFD), OFD with bioabsorbable porcine-derived collagen membrane (BG), or OFD with BG and anorganic bovine bone matrix (BO/BG). Clinical parameters and standardized radiographs were assessed at defect creation; treatment surgery; and at 1, 2, 4, and 6 months. Animals were sacrificed at 6 months and specimens prepared for histometric analysis. Clinical and radiographic conditions improved during the study period. Mean epithelial attachment was similar between all groups. Mean connective tissue attachment for groups OFD, BG, and BO/BG was 3.79 mm, 2.63 mm, and 1.75 mm, respectively, and mean radicular bone height was 2.16 mm, 3.24 mm, and 3.45 mm, respectively. Statistically significant increases in the amount of new cementum were observed in groups BG and BO/BG when compared with OFD (P periodontal ligament, and significant increases in the amount of new cementum when compared to open flap debridement in a canine model.

  3. Clinical and radiographic characteristics of ureteral polyps in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu Zhibing; Wang Changlin; Yang Qi; Hou Ying

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the clinical and radiographic characterstics of ureteral polyps with hydronephrosis in children. Methods: Thirteen patients with ureteral polyps and hydronephrosis were studied retrospectively. All patients underwent abdominal plain film, intravenous pyelogram (IVP) and ultrasound (US) examinations,contrast-enhanced CT scan was performed in 10 cases. Results: Intermittent or recurrent abdominal pain with painless hematuria was presented in most cases. Hydronephrosis was demonstrated in radiographic images. IVP delineated the dilatation of the ureter and filling defects within the ureteral lumen in 5 cases. Computed tomography (CT) showed all abnormal changes of ureter and irregular intraluminal soft tissue masses in 6 cases. Moderate and low echoic structures were showed in ureters by US in 2 cases. Conclusion: US and CT, as an important imaging modalities, can improve the diagnostic accuracy for ureteral polyps. (authors)

  4. Radiographic testing in concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, D. de

    1987-01-01

    The radiographic testing done in concrete structures is used to analyse the homogeneity, position and corrosion of armatures and to detect discontinuity in the concrete such as: gaps, cracks and segregations. This work develops a Image quality Indicator (IQI) with an adequated sensibility to detect discontinuites based on BS4408 norm. (E.G.) [pt

  5. The establishment of atrial septal defect model with interventional management canine: its applied anatomy and technical points

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Yufeng; Huang Xinmiao; Bei Yuan; Wang Wei; Hu Jianqiang; Qin Yongwen

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To provide the relevant applied anatomic information for the preparation of atrial septal defect (ASD) model with transcatheter management in canine,and to discuss the technical points in making ASD model under DSA guidance. Methods: Anatomical measurements of the heart specimens,which were obtained from 15 healthy adult hybrid dogs (9 males and 6 females), were performed, from which the relevant anatomic parameters of the atrial septum were calculated. Cardiac 3D reconstruction with 64-sliced spiral CT scan was carried out in 5 dogs and the results were analyzed. According to the trans-illuminated position and angle obtained from 3D reconstruction images both the puncturing of the atrial septum with Brokenbrough needle and the balloon dilatation under fluoroscopic guidance were conducted in 20 dogs (body weight 17 -22 kg) to prepare ASD model. Results: The length and the width of the interauricular septum were (17.8 ± 4.3) mm and (14.5 ± 3.8) mm, respectively. The oval fossa was (11.2 ± 2.7) mm long and (8.7±1.9) mm wide. The distance from the central point of oval fossa to the central point of the orifice of coronary sinus was (7.2 ± 1.3) mm, which was (9.9 ± 1.5) mm to the center of the membranous atrial septum, (13.6 ± 3.1) mm to the middle point of septal tricuspid valve, (12.1 ± 2.3) mm to the central point of the bottom of aortic eminence and (11.3 ± 1.9) mm to the middle point of anterior bicuspid valve. The angle between atrial septal plane and sagittal plane was 15 degree ± 5 degree, and the angle between atrial septal plane and coronal plane was 75 degree ± 5 degree. Thus, the puncture of the interauricular septum was carried out with the dog in right anterior oblique position at 75 degree ± 5 degree. Of the total 20 dogs, ASD model was successfully established in 18, failure of the puncturing occurred in the remaining two, of which one died of cardiac tamponade after the procedure and the other one died of mistakenly puncturing

  6. Bioenergetic Defects and Oxidative Damage in Transgenic Mouse Models of Neurodegenerative Disorders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Browne, Susan E

    2004-01-01

    ... Generation in Parkinson's Disease", which was appended to the original grant number. This project is to assess in vivo whether mitochondria are the source of free radical generation in animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD...

  7. Bioenergetic Defects and Oxidative Damage in Transgenic Mouse Models of Neurodegenerative Disorders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brown, Susan

    1999-01-01

    ... (HE) and familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS), using transgenic mouse models. Studies in this first year employed C-14-2-deoxyglucose in vivo autoradiography and spectrophotometric metabolic enzyme assays...

  8. An experimental model to mimic the mechanical behavior of a scaffold in a cartilage defect

    OpenAIRE

    VIKINGSSON, LINE KARINA ALVA

    2015-01-01

    [EN] Abstract The main purpose of this thesis is the design and characterization of an experimental articular cartilage model. The in vitro model is composed of a macro and micro- porous Polycaprolactone scaffold with a Poly(Vinyl Alcohol) filling. The scaffold/hydrogel construct has been subjected to repeating number of freezing and thawing cycles in order to crosslink the hydrogel inside the scaffold's pores. The Poly(Vinyl Alcohol) resembles the growing cartilaginous tissue inside the ...

  9. Defects in the medial entorhinal cortex and dentate gyrus in the mouse model of Sanfilippo syndrome type B.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro Ohmi

    Full Text Available Sanfilippo syndrome type B (MPS IIIB is characterized by profound mental retardation in childhood, dementia and death in late adolescence; it is caused by deficiency of α-N-acetylglucosaminidase and resulting lysosomal storage of heparan sulfate. A mouse model, generated by homologous recombination of the Naglu gene, was used to study pathological changes in the brain. We found earlier that neurons in the medial entorhinal cortex (MEC and the dentate gyrus showed a number of secondary defects, including the presence of hyperphosphorylated tau (Ptau detected with antibodies raised against Ptau in Alzheimer disease brain. By further use of immunohistochemistry, we now show staining in neurons of the same area for beta amyloid, extending the resemblance to Alzheimer disease. Ptau inclusions in the dentate gyrus of MPS IIIB mice were reduced in number when the mice were administered LiCl, a specific inhibitor of Gsk3β. Additional proteins found elevated in MEC include proteins involved in autophagy and the heparan sulfate proteoglycans, glypicans 1 and 5, the latter closely related to the primary defect. The level of secondary accumulations was associated with elevation of glypican, as seen by comparing brains of mice at different ages or with different mucopolysaccharide storage diseases. The MEC of an MPS IIIA mouse had the same intense immunostaining for glypican 1 and other markers as MPS IIIB, while MEC of MPS I and MPS II mice had weak staining, and MEC of an MPS VI mouse had no staining at all for the same proteins. A considerable amount of glypican was found in MEC of MPS IIIB mice outside of lysosomes. We propose that it is the extralysosomal glypican that would be harmful to neurons, because its heparan sulfate branches could potentiate the formation of Ptau and beta amyloid aggregates, which would be toxic as well as difficult to degrade.

  10. Nonhomologous Recombination between Defective Poliovirus and Coxsackievirus Genomes Suggests a New Model of Genetic Plasticity for Picornaviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmblat, Barbara; Jégouic, Sophie; Muslin, Claire; Blondel, Bruno; Joffret, Marie-Line

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Most of the circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses (cVDPVs) implicated in poliomyelitis outbreaks in Madagascar have been shown to be recombinants between the type 2 poliovirus (PV) strain of the oral polio vaccine (Sabin 2) and another species C human enterovirus (HEV-C), such as type 17 coxsackie A virus (CA17) in particular. We studied intertypic genetic exchanges between PV and non-PV HEV-C by developing a recombination model, making it possible to rescue defective type 2 PV RNA genomes with a short deletion at the 3′ end by the cotransfection of cells with defective or infectious CA17 RNAs. We isolated over 200 different PV/CA17 recombinants, using murine cells expressing the human PV receptor (PVR) and selecting viruses with PV capsids. We found some homologous (H) recombinants and, mostly, nonhomologous (NH) recombinants presenting duplications of parental sequences preferentially located in the regions encoding proteins 2A, 2B, and 3A. Short duplications appeared to be stable, whereas longer duplications were excised during passaging in cultured cells or after multiplication in PVR-transgenic mice, generating H recombinants with diverse sites of recombination. This suggests that NH recombination events may be a transient, intermediate step in the generation and selection of the fittest H recombinants. In addition to the classical copy-choice mechanism of recombination thought to generate mostly H recombinants, there may also be a modular mechanism of recombination, involving NH recombinant precursors, shaping the genomes of recombinant enteroviruses and other picornaviruses. PMID:25096874

  11. A preclinical evaluation of alternative synthetic biomaterials for fascial defect repair using a rat abdominal hernia model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Ulrich

    Full Text Available Fascial defects are a common problem in the abdominal wall and in the vagina leading to hernia or pelvic organ prolapse that requires mesh enhancement to reduce operation failure. However, the long-term outcome of synthetic mesh surgery may be unsatisfactory due to post-surgical complications. We hypothesized that mesh fabricated from alternative synthetic polymers may evoke a different tissue response, and provide more appropriate mechanical properties for hernia repair. Our aim was to compare the in vivo biocompatibility of new synthetic meshes with a commercial mesh.We have fabricated 3 new warp-knitted synthetic meshes from different polymers with different tensile properties polyetheretherketone (PEEK, polyamide (PA and a composite, gelatin coated PA (PA+G. The rat abdominal hernia model was used to implant the meshes (25 × 35 mm, n = 24/ group. After 7, 30, 60, 90 days tissues were explanted for immunohistochemical assessment of foreign body reaction and tissue integration, using CD31, CD45, CD68, alpha-SMA antibodies. The images were analysed using an image analysis software program. Biomechanical properties were uniaxially evaluated using an Instron Tensile® Tester.This study showed that the new meshes induced complex differences in the type of foreign body reaction over the time course of implantation. The PA, and particularly the composite PA+G meshes, evoked a milder early inflammatory response, and macrophages were apparent throughout the time course. Our meshes led to better tissue integration and new collagen deposition, particularly with the PA+G meshes, as well as greater and sustained neovascularisation compared with the PP meshes.PA, PA+G and PEEK appear to be well tolerated and are biocompatible, evoking an overlapping and different host tissue response with time that might convey mechanical variations in the healing tissue. These new meshes comprising different polymers may provide an alternative option for future treatment

  12. Markov model of fatigue of a composite material with the poisson process of defect initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramonov, Yu.; Chatys, R.; Andersons, J.; Kleinhofs, M.

    2012-05-01

    As a development of the model where only one weak microvolume (WMV) and only a pulsating cyclic loading are considered, in the current version of the model, we take into account the presence of several weak sites where fatigue damage can accumulate and a loading with an arbitrary (but positive) stress ratio. The Poisson process of initiation of WMVs is considered, whose rate depends on the size of a specimen. The cumulative distribution function (cdf) of the fatigue life of every individual WMV is calculated using the Markov model of fatigue. For the case where this function is approximated by a lognormal distribution, a formula for calculating the cdf of fatigue life of the specimen (modeled as a chain of WMVs) is obtained. Only a pulsating cyclic loading was considered in the previous version of the model. Now, using the modified energy method, a loading cycle with an arbitrary stress ratio is "transformed" into an equivalent cycle with some other stress ratio. In such a way, the entire probabilistic fatigue diagram for any stress ratio with a positive cycle stress can be obtained. Numerical examples are presented.

  13. Automatic segmentation of vertebrae from radiographs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mysling, Peter; Petersen, Peter Kersten; Nielsen, Mads

    2011-01-01

    Segmentation of vertebral contours is an essential task in the design of automatic tools for vertebral fracture assessment. In this paper, we propose a novel segmentation technique which does not require operator interaction. The proposed technique solves the segmentation problem in a hierarchical...... is constrained by a conditional shape model, based on the variability of the coarse spine location estimates. The technique is evaluated on a data set of manually annotated lumbar radiographs. The results compare favorably to the previous work in automatic vertebra segmentation, in terms of both segmentation...

  14. General-purpose radiographic and fluoroscopic table

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizaki, Noritaka

    1982-01-01

    A new series of diagnostic tables, Model DT-KEL, was developed for general-purpose radiographic and fluoroscopic systems. Through several investigations, the table was so constructed that the basic techniques be general radiography and GI examination, and other techniques be optionally added. The diagnostic tables involve the full series of the type for various purposes and are systematized with the surrounding equipment. A retractable mechanism of grids was adopted first for general use. The fine grids with a density of 57 lines per cm, which was adopted in KEL-2, reduced the X-ray doses by 16 percent. (author)

  15. Model of the Evolution of Deformation Defects and Irreversible Strain at Thermal Cycling of Stressed TiNi Alloy Specimen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volkov Aleksandr E.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This microstructural model deals with simulation both of the reversible and irreversible deformation of a shape memory alloy (SMA. The martensitic transformation and the irreversible deformation due to the plastic accommodation of martensite are considered on the microscopic level. The irreversible deformation is described from the standpoint of the plastic flow theory. Isotropic hardening and kinematic hardening are taken into account and are related to the densities of scattered and oriented deformation defects. It is supposed that the phase transformation and the micro plastic deformation are caused by the generalized thermodynamic forces, which are the derivatives of the Gibbs’ potential of the two-phase body. In terms of these forces conditions for the phase transformation and for the micro plastic deformation on the micro level are formulated. The macro deformation of the representative volume of the polycrystal is calculated by averaging of the micro strains related to the evolution of the martensite Bain’s variants in each grain comprising this volume. The proposed model allowed simulating the evolution of the reversible and of the irreversible strains of a stressed SMA specimen under thermal cycles. The results show a good qualitative agreement with available experimental data. Specifically, it is shown that the model can describe a rather big irreversible strain in the first thermocycle and its fast decrease with the number of cycles.

  16. Voluminator 2.0 - Speeding up the Approximation of the Volume of Defective 3d Building Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindram, M.; Machl, T.; Steuer, H.; Pültz, M.; Kolbe, T. H.

    2016-06-01

    Semantic 3D city models are increasingly used as a data source in planning and analyzing processes of cities. They represent a virtual copy of the reality and are a common information base and source of information for examining urban questions. A significant advantage of virtual city models is that important indicators such as the volume of buildings, topological relationships between objects and other geometric as well as thematic information can be derived. Knowledge about the exact building volume is an essential base for estimating the building energy demand. In order to determine the volume of buildings with conventional algorithms and tools, the buildings may not contain any topological and geometrical errors. The reality, however, shows that city models very often contain errors such as missing surfaces, duplicated faces and misclosures. To overcome these errors (Steuer et al., 2015) have presented a robust method for approximating the volume of building models. For this purpose, a bounding box of the building is divided into a regular grid of voxels and it is determined which voxels are inside the building. The regular arrangement of the voxels leads to a high number of topological tests and prevents the application of this method using very high resolutions. In this paper we present an extension of the algorithm using an octree approach limiting the subdivision of space to regions around surfaces of the building models and to regions where, in the case of defective models, the topological tests are inconclusive. We show that the computation time can be significantly reduced, while preserving the robustness against geometrical and topological errors.

  17. Apparatus and method for gaining the whole information content of radiographic pictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasdi, A.

    1978-01-01

    Methods for depth size determination of welding errors from radiographic films are reviewed. Based on information theory the processes of exposure, development and evaluation were studied. The density function of the radiographic film is considered to be the critical filter of the system. A model of a high resolution electronic density meter is introduced. The nonlinearity of the density function was compensated by electronic filtering. The development of a new type radiographic instrument using video technique is proposed. (R.J.)

  18. Importance of radiographic monitoring of endoscopic sphincterotomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenberg, H.M.; Goldberg, H.I.; Shapiro, H.A.

    1981-01-01

    The radiographic features of endoscopic sphincterotomies performed in 44 patients were evaluated. Radiographic landmarks aided in proper sphincterotome placement and also disclosed conditions and anatomic variations that made catheter placement difficult. Fluoroscopic and radiographic monitoring not only assisted the performance of endoscopic sphincterotomy, but also confirmed successful results and revealed reasons for failure. Radiographic changes in the biliary tract after sphincterotomy, as well as potential complications of sphincterotomy, are discussed and illustrated

  19. Comparison of using different bridge prosthetic designs for partial defect restoration through mathematical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styranivska, Oksana; Kliuchkovska, Nataliia; Mykyyevych, Nataliya

    2017-01-01

    To analyze the stress-strain states of bone and abutment teeth during the use of different prosthetic designs of fixed partial dentures with the use of relevant mathematical modeling principles. The use of Comsol Multiphysics 3.5 (Comsol AB, Sweden) software during the mathematical modeling of stress-strain states provided numerical data for analytical interpretation in three different clinical scenarios with fixed dentures and different abutment teeth and demountable prosthetic denture with the saddle-shaped intermediate part. Microsoft Excel Software (Microsoft Office 2017) helped to evaluate absolute mistakes of stress and strain parameters of each abutment tooth during three modeled scenarios and normal condition and to summarize data into the forms of tables. In comparison with the fixed prosthetic denture supported by the canine, first premolar, and third molar, stresses at the same abutment teeth with the use of demountable denture with the saddle-shaped intermediate part decreased: at the mesial abutment tooth by 2.8 times, at distal crown by 6.1 times, and at the intermediate part by 11.1 times, respectively, the deformation level decreased by 3.1, 1.9, and 1.4 times at each area. The methods of mathematical modeling proved that complications during the use of fixed partial dentures based on the overload effect of the abutment teeth and caused by the deformation process inside the intermediate section of prosthetic construction.

  20. The impact of mobile point defect clusters in a kinetic model of pressure vessel embrittlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoller, R.E.

    1998-05-01

    The results of recent molecular dynamics simulations of displacement cascades in iron indicate that small interstitial clusters may have a very low activation energy for migration, and that their migration is 1-dimensional, rather than 3-dimensional. The mobility of these clusters can have a significant impact on the predictions of radiation damage models, particularly at the relatively low temperatures typical of commercial, light water reactor pressure vessels (RPV) and other out-of-core components. A previously-developed kinetic model used to investigate RPV embrittlement has been modified to permit an evaluation of the mobile interstitial clusters. Sink strengths appropriate to both 1- and 3-dimensional motion of the clusters were evaluated. High cluster mobility leads to a reduction in the amount of predicted embrittlement due to interstitial clusters since they are lost to sinks rather than building up in the microstructure. The sensitivity of the predictions to displacement rate also increases. The magnitude of this effect is somewhat reduced if the migration is 1-dimensional since the corresponding sink strengths are lower than those for 3-dimensional diffusion. The cluster mobility can also affect the evolution of copper-rich precipitates in the model since the radiation-enhanced diffusion coefficient increases due to the lower interstitial cluster sink strength. The overall impact of the modifications to the model is discussed in terms of the major irradiation variables and material parameter uncertainties

  1. Synthesis, structuring and characterization of rare earth oxide thin films: Modeling of the effects of stress and defects on the phase stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaboriaud, R.J.; Paumier, F.; Lacroix, B.

    2014-01-01

    This work studies the effects of the deposition parameters on the microstructure and the related residual stress in a rare earth oxide thin film. This study is focused on the yttrium sesquioxide (Y 2 O 3 ) thin films deposited on Si (100) substrates using the ion beam sputtering technique. This technique allows the control of the microstructure and the related residual stress in the thin films by monitoring the energy of the argon beam used in the deposition process. Measurements of the stresses within the oxide layer were performed by the X-ray diffraction-sin 2 Ψ method. The results show that the classic model of a pure biaxial in-plane model of stress, generally proposed in thin films, is not satisfying. A model that includes a hydrostatic stress due to the crystalline defects generated during the deposition process and a biaxial stress called a fixation stress, gives a good agreement with the experimental results. This modeling of the residual stress, based on nanometer-scale inclusions (point, extended defects) inducing a hydrostatic stress field, leads to a quantitative analysis of the nature and the concentration of the defects. This work shows results that establish a relationship between residual stress, defects and non-equilibrium phase stabilization during growth. - Highlights: • Microstructure of Y 2 O 3 thin films • Measurements of residual stresses in the thin films • Modeling of a triaxial residual stress state • Stress-induced stabilization of non-equilibrium phase

  2. Modelling of the ultrasonic inspection of steel tubes with longitudinal defects; Modelisation du controle ultrasonore de tubes d`acier presentant des defauts de type ``entaille longitudinale``

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mephane, M

    1998-12-31

    A model has been developed in order to simulate the ultrasonic inspection of steel tubes in the Vallourec control configuration. The model permits to simulate the control of steel tubes showing longitudinal defects located near the internal or external surface of tubes which appear during the rolling process. To detect this kind of defect, the probe is placed in an incident place perpendicular to the tube`s axis. The probe is in front of the external surface of the tube. The main characteristics of the model is to assume that the field radiated in the material does not depend on the probe`s position. This assumption permits to treat separately the field retracted in the material and the interaction between the defect and the ultrasonic beam. The focal plane is located in the material, so the plane waves approximation is applied where the waves front are assumed plane and parallel. The parallel refracted beam becomes divergent after reflection on the internal surface of tube. To treat the beam divergence, an amplitude weighting coefficient is then calculated by mean of the energy conservation of a tube of rays before and after reflection, following the Snell laws. This model can predict the edge diffraction echoes, the echoes issued from the corner effect, and also the mode conversion echoes. It has been validated on artificial notches, and on some natural defects. A comparison between experimental and modelling results shows a good agreement. (author) 39 refs.

  3. 21 CFR 892.1840 - Radiographic film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radiographic film. 892.1840 Section 892.1840 Food... DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1840 Radiographic film. (a) Identification. Radiographic film is a device that consists of a thin sheet of radiotransparent material coated on one or both...

  4. A novel in vitro bovine cartilage punch model for assessing the regeneration of focal cartilage defects with biocompatible bacterial nanocellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Current therapies for articular cartilage defects fail to achieve qualitatively sufficient tissue regeneration, possibly because of a mismatch between the speed of cartilage rebuilding and the resorption of degradable implant polymers. The present study focused on the self-healing capacity of resident cartilage cells in conjunction with cell-free and biocompatible (but non-resorbable) bacterial nanocellulose (BNC). This was tested in a novel in vitro bovine cartilage punch model. Methods Standardized bovine cartilage discs with a central defect filled with BNC were cultured for up to eight weeks with/without stimulation with transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1. Cartilage formation and integrity were analyzed by histology, immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. Content, release and neosynthesis of the matrix molecules proteoglycan/aggrecan, collagen II and collagen I were also quantified. Finally, gene expression of these molecules was profiled in resident chondrocytes and chondrocytes migrated onto the cartilage surface or the implant material. Results Non-stimulated and especially TGF-β1-stimulated cartilage discs displayed a preserved structural and functional integrity of the chondrocytes and surrounding matrix, remained vital in long-term culture (eight weeks) without signs of degeneration and showed substantial synthesis of cartilage-specific molecules at the protein and mRNA level. Whereas mobilization of chondrocytes from the matrix onto the surface of cartilage and implant was pivotal for successful seeding of cell-free BNC, chondrocytes did not immigrate into the central BNC area, possibly due to the relatively small diameter of its pores (2 to 5 μm). Chondrocytes on the BNC surface showed signs of successful redifferentiation over time, including increase of aggrecan/collagen type II mRNA, decrease of collagen type I mRNA and initial deposition of proteoglycan and collagen type II in long-term high-density pellet cultures

  5. Topological defects in extended inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copeland, E.J.; Kolb, E.W.; Chicago Univ., IL; Liddle, A.R.

    1990-04-01

    We consider the production of topological defects, especially cosmic strings, in extended inflation models. In extended inflation, the Universe passes through a first-order phase transition via bubble percolation, which naturally allows defects to form at the end of inflation. The correlation length, which determines the number density of the defects, is related to the mean size of bubbles when they collide. This mechanism allows a natural combination of inflation and large-scale structure via cosmic strings. 18 refs

  6. Topological defects in extended inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copeland, E.J.; Kolb, E.W.; Liddle, A.R.

    1990-01-01

    We consider the production of topological defects, especially cosmic strings, in extended-inflation models. In extended inflation, the Universe passes through a first-order phase transition via bubble percolation, which naturally allows defects to form at the end of inflation. The correlation length, which determines the number density of the defects, is related to the mean size of the bubbles when they collide. This mechanism allows a natural combination of inflation and large-scale structure via cosmic strings

  7. The effect of a combined glenoid and Hill-Sachs defect on glenohumeral stability: a biomechanical cadaveric study using 3-dimensional modeling of 142 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arciero, Robert A; Parrino, Anthony; Bernhardson, Andrew S; Diaz-Doran, Vilmaris; Obopilwe, Elifho; Cote, Mark P; Golijanin, Petr; Mazzocca, Augustus D; Provencher, Matthew T

    2015-06-01

    Bone loss in anterior glenohumeral instability occurs on both the glenoid and the humerus; however, existing biomechanical studies have evaluated glenoid and humeral head defects in isolation. Thus, little is known about the combined effect of these bony lesions in a clinically relevant model on glenohumeral stability. The purpose of this study was to determine the biomechanical efficacy of a Bankart repair in the setting of bipolar (glenoid and humeral head) bone defects determined via computer-generated 3-dimensional (3D) modeling of 142 patients with recurrent anterior shoulder instability. The null hypothesis was that adding a bipolar bone defect will have no effect on glenohumeral stability after soft tissue Bankart repair. Controlled laboratory study. A total of 142 consecutive patients with recurrent anterior instability were analyzed with 3D computed tomography scans. Two Hill-Sachs lesions were selected on the basis of volumetric size representing the 25th percentile (0.87 cm(3); small) and 50th percentile (1.47 cm(3); medium) and printed in plastic resin with a 3D printer. A total of 21 cadaveric shoulders were evaluated on a custom shoulder-testing device permitting 6 degrees of freedom, and the force required to translate the humeral head anteriorly 10 mm at a rate of 2.0 mm/s with a compressive load of 50 N was determined at 60° of glenohumeral abduction and 60° of external rotation. All Bankart lesions were made sharply from the 2- to 6-o'clock positions for a right shoulder. Subsequent Bankart repair with transosseous tunnels using high-strength suture was performed. Hill-Sachs lesions were made in the cadaver utilizing a plastic mold from the exact replica off the 3D printer. Testing was conducted in the following sequence for each specimen: (1) intact, (2) posterior capsulotomy, (3) Bankart lesion, (4) Bankart repair, (5) Bankart lesion with 2-mm glenoid defect, (6) Bankart repair, (7) Bankart lesion with 2-mm glenoid defect and Hill-Sachs lesion

  8. Qualification of a digital radiographic equipment for thin weld inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulanger, G.; Furlan, J.

    1988-04-01

    The level of quality asked for welding plugs to fuel pins requires to test all the welds, that is to say about 200 000 welds of the fuel assemblies of the fast reactor Super-Phenix. X-ray radiography is one of the tests. Before the operation was done on a film by the personnel automatic selection of tested material and image processing are substituted to the film in the digital radiographic equipment IRENE. Main advantages are: elimination of human factor in defect appreciation, reliability of image processing and instant availability. On 1000 welds a good correlation is obtained between results on films and those of image processing [fr

  9. Reliability in NDT: ROC study of radiographic weld inspections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nockemann, C.; Heidt, H.; Thomsen, N.

    1991-01-01

    The complexity of modern nondestructive testing (NDT) equipment as well as the demand for high reliability in many industries makes it necessary to have a tool to assess different NDT techniques and devices quickly. As for cost benefit considerations, a measure of accuracy has to include not only the number of correctly detected defects but also the corresponding number of false indications. In order to satisfy a variety of security demands this ratio of true and false indications must be known for a wide range of defect dimensions to be included in the defect count. This information will be provided by only one ROC (relative operating characteristic) study of inspection data using the rating confidence method. An expanded ROC version also yields an assessment of the accuracy of the defect classification and of the correctness of the indicated defect importance. All these measures of performance can also be called up for each individual inspector. For demonstrating the power of the method it is applied to ascertain the difference in detection performance of three distinct experimental modalities in the radiographic testing of welded joints. In order to be capable of drawing conclusions reliably, the study is completed by statistical significance tests. The paper shows the usefulness of ROC for performance assessment in NDT and gives an illustration of what can be done with which effort. (Author)

  10. Finite-element model to predict roll-separation force and defects during rolling of U-10Mo alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soulami, Ayoub; Burkes, Douglas E.; Joshi, Vineet V.; Lavender, Curt A.; Paxton, Dean

    2017-10-01

    This study used a finite element code, LSDYNA, as a predictive tool to optimize the rolling process. Simulations of the hot rolling of U-10Mo coupons encapsulated in low-carbon steel were conducted following two different schedules. Model predictions of the roll-separation force and roll pack thicknesses at different stages of the rolling process were compared with experimental measurements. The study reported here discussed various attributes of the rolled coupons revealed by the model (e.g., waviness and thickness non-uniformity like dog boning). To investigate the influence of the cladding material on these rolling defects, other cases were simulated:  hot rolling with alternative can materials, namely, 304 stainless steel and Zircaloy-2, and bare-rolling.

  11. Paediatric post-traumatic cortical defects of the distal radius

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roach, Richard T.; Summers, Bruce N.; Cassar-Pullicino, Victor

    2002-01-01

    Paediatric post-traumatic cortical defects, although rare, are predominately seen affecting the distal radius following a greenstick or torus fracture. We review the literature and present a further two cases supported by CT and MRI. Images from an acute greenstick fracture are also presented to help understand the pathogenesis. Defects are typically solitary on plain radiographs and are usually noticed late, proximal to the site of compression. They are non-expansile in an otherwise healthy child. CT and MRI may reveal smaller multiple subperiosteal defects. Typical defects require no further management other than reassurance and advice that they may occasionally cause discomfort but resolve with time. (orig.)

  12. CT appearance of congenital defect resembling the Hangman's fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.P. III; Baker, D.H.; Miller, W.A.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose. Congenital defects of C2 are rare and can be confused with Hangman's fractures. CT has been advocated as aiding in differentiation between an acute fracture and congenital defects. Methods. We present a case of a 2-year-old recent accident victim, who was erroneously diagnosed by plain film and CT as having a Hangman's fracture. Results. The CT demonstrated an atypical appearance of a congenital defect. Conclusion. This case shows that the radiographic differentiation between a Hangman's fracture and a congenital defect is more difficult than previously described. (orig.)

  13. Cluster modeling of solid state defects and adsorbates: Beyond the Hartree-Fock level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunz, A.B.

    1990-01-01

    The use of finite clusters of atoms to represent the physically interesting portion of a condensed matter system has been an accepted technique for the past two decades. Physical systems have been studied in this way using both density functional and Hartree-Fock methodologies, as well as a variety of empirical or semiempirical techniques. In this article, the author concentrates on the Hartree-Fock based methods. The attempt here is to construct a theoretical basis for the inclusion of correlation corrections in such an approach, as well as a strategy by which the limits of a finite cluster may be transcended in such a study. The initial appeal will be to a modeling approach, but methods to convert the model to a self-contained theory will be described. It will be seen for the case of diffusion of large ions in solids that such an approach is quite useful. A further study of the case of adsorption of rare gas atoms on simple metals will demonstrate the value of inclusion of electron correlation

  14. Osteochondral defect repair using bilayered hydrogels encapsulating both chondrogenically and osteogenically pre-differentiated mesenchymal stem cells in a rabbit model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lam, J.; Lu, S.; Lee, E.J.; Trachtenberg, J.E.; Meretoja, V.V.; Dahlin, R.L.; van den Beucken, J.J.; Tabata, Y.; Wong, M.E.; Jansen, J.A.; Mikos, A.G.; Kasper, F.K.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the ability of cell-laden bilayered hydrogels encapsulating chondrogenically and osteogenically (OS) pre-differentiated mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to effect osteochondral defect repair in a rabbit model. By varying the period of chondrogenic pre-differentiation from 7

  15. Vascular defects and sensorineural deafness in a mouse model of Norrie disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehm, Heidi L; Zhang, Duan-Sun; Brown, M Christian; Burgess, Barbara; Halpin, Chris; Berger, Wolfgang; Morton, Cynthia C; Corey, David P; Chen, Zheng-Yi

    2002-06-01

    Norrie disease is an X-linked recessive syndrome of blindness, deafness, and mental retardation. A knock-out mouse model with an Ndp gene disruption was studied. We examined the hearing phenotype, including audiological, histological, and vascular evaluations. As is seen in humans, the mice had progressive hearing loss leading to profound deafness. The primary lesion was localized to the stria vascularis, which houses the main vasculature of the cochlea. Fluorescent dyes showed an abnormal vasculature in this region and eventual loss of two-thirds of the vessels. We propose that one of the principal functions of norrin in the ear is to regulate the interaction of the cochlea with its vasculature.

  16. Modeling defect and fission gas properties in U-Si fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Anders David Ragnar [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Stanek, Christopher Richard [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Noordhoek, Mark [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Besmann, Theodore [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Middleburgh, Simon C. [Westinghouse Electric Sweden, Vasteras (Sweden); Lahoda, E. J. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Cranberry Woods, PA (United States); Chernatynskiy, Aleksandr [Missouri University of Science and Technology; Grimes, Robin W. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-27

    Uranium silicides, in particular U3Si2, are being explored as an advanced nuclear fuel with increased accident tolerance as well as competitive economics compared to the baseline UO2 fuel. They benefit from high thermal conductivity (metallic) compared to UO2 fuel (insulator or semi-conductor) used in current Light Water Reactors (LWRs). The U-Si fuels also have higher fissile density. In order to perform meaningful engineering scale nuclear fuel performance simulations, the material properties of the fuel, including the response to irradiation environments, must be known. Unfortunately, the data available for USi fuels are rather limited, in particular for the temperature range where LWRs would operate. The ATF HIP is using multi-scale modeling and simulations to address this knowledge gap.

  17. Modeling defect and fission gas properties in U-Si fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Anders David Ragnar [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Stanek, Christopher Richard [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Noordhoek, Mark J. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Besmann, Theodore M. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Middleburgh, Simon C. [Westinghouse Electric Sweden, Vasteras (Sweden); Lahoda, E. J. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Cranberry Woods, PA (United States); Chernatynskiy, Aleksandr [Missouri Univ. of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO (United States); Grimes, Robin W. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-14

    Uranium silicides, in particular U3Si2, are being explored as an advanced nuclear fuel with increased accident tolerance as well as competitive economics compared to the baseline UO2 fuel. They benefit from high thermal conductivity (metallic) compared to UO2 fuel (insulator or semi-conductor) used in current Light Water Reactors (LWRs). The U-Si fuels also have higher fissile density. In order to perform meaningful engineering scale nuclear fuel performance simulations, the material properties of the fuel, including the response to irradiation environments, must be known. Unfortunately, the data available for USi fuels are rather limited, in particular for the temperature range where LWRs would operate. The ATF HIP is using multi-scale modeling and simulations to address this knowledge gap.

  18. Atomistic modeling of defect evolution in Si for amorphizing and subamorphizing implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, Pedro; Pelaz, Lourdes; Marques, Luis A.; Santos, Ivan; Aboy, Maria; Barbolla, Juan

    2004-01-01

    Solid phase epitaxial regrowth of pre-amorphizing implants has received significant attention as a method to achieve high dopant activation with minimal diffusion at low implant temperatures and suppress channelling. Therefore, a good understanding of the amorphization and regrowth mechanisms is required in process simulators. We present an atomistic amorphization and recrystallization model that uses the interstitial-vacancy (I-V) pair as a building block to describe the amorphous phase. I-V pairs are locally characterized by the number of neighbouring I-V pairs. This feature captures the damage generation and the dynamical annealing during ion implantation, and also explains the annealing behaviour of amorphous layers and amorphous pockets

  19. Hydrodynamics of defects in the Abelian-Higgs model: An application to nematic liquid crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurz, Guenter; Sarkar, Sarben

    2000-01-01

    The Abelian-Higgs model is the basis for a gauge covariant form of the distortion free energy for nematic liquid crystals. This is used to derive a new form of the Ericksen-Leslie equations incorporating the dynamics of disclinations in nematic films. The zero liquid flow case is treated in detail for simplicity. The equations are reduced to dynamic equations for disclination points in moduli space for a small deviation from the Bogomol'nyi limit. We are able to derive analytically the dynamics of disclinations with winding numbers of the same sign. A set of such disclinations close to one another, i.e., with overlapping cores, can result from the disintegration of a larger disclination, and they repel one another. For a pair of such dis- clinations far apart from one another we find that they move on a straight line where their separation increases logarithmically over time

  20. Early-onset sleep defects in Drosophila models of Huntington's disease reflect alterations of PKA/CREB signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Erin D.; Tanenhaus, Anne K.; Zhang, Jiabin; Chaffee, Ryan P.; Yin, Jerry C.P.

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a progressive neurological disorder whose non-motor symptoms include sleep disturbances. Whether sleep and activity abnormalities are primary molecular disruptions of mutant Huntingtin (mutHtt) expression or result from neurodegeneration is unclear. Here, we report Drosophila models of HD exhibit sleep and activity disruptions very early in adulthood, as soon as sleep patterns have developed. Pan-neuronal expression of full-length or N-terminally truncated mutHtt recapitulates sleep phenotypes of HD patients: impaired sleep initiation, fragmented and diminished sleep, and nighttime hyperactivity. Sleep deprivation of HD model flies results in exacerbated sleep deficits, indicating that homeostatic regulation of sleep is impaired. Elevated PKA/CREB activity in healthy flies produces patterns of sleep and activity similar to those in our HD models. We were curious whether aberrations in PKA/CREB signaling were responsible for our early-onset sleep/activity phenotypes. Decreasing signaling through the cAMP/PKA pathway suppresses mutHtt-induced developmental lethality. Genetically reducing PKA abolishes sleep/activity deficits in HD model flies, restores the homeostatic response and extends median lifespan. In vivo reporters, however, show dCREB2 activity is unchanged, or decreased when sleep/activity patterns are abnormal, suggesting dissociation of PKA and dCREB2 occurs early in pathogenesis. Collectively, our data suggest that sleep defects may reflect a primary pathological process in HD, and that measurements of sleep and cAMP/PKA could be prodromal indicators of disease, and serve as therapeutic targets for intervention. PMID:26604145

  1. Strategic production modeling for defective items with imperfect inspection process, rework, and sales return under two-level trade credit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditi Khanna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Quality decisions are one of the major decisions in inventory management. It affects customer’s demand, loyalty and customer satisfaction and also inventory costs. Every manufacturing process is inherent to have some chance causes of variation which may lead to some defectives in the lot. So, in order to cater the customers with faultless products, an inspection process is inevitable, which may also be prone to errors. Thus for an operations manager, maintaining the quality of the lot and the screening process becomes a challenging task, when his objective is to determine the optimal order quantity for the inventory system. Besides these operational tasks, the goal is also to increase the customer base which eventually leads to higher profits. So, as a promotional tool, trade credit is being offered by both the retailer and supplier to their respective customers to encourage more frequent and higher volume purchases. Thus taking into account of these facts, a strategic production model is formulated here to study the combined effects of imperfect quality items, faulty inspection process, rework process, sales return under two level trade credit. The present study is a general framework for many articles and classical EPQ model. An analytical method is employed which jointly optimizes the retailer’s credit period and order quantity, so as to maximize the expected total profit per unit time. To study the behavior and application of the model, a numerical example has been cited and a comprehensive sensitivity analysis has been performed. The model can be widely applicable in manufacturing industries like textile, footwear, plastics, electronics, furniture etc.

  2. Radiographic evaluation of maxillofacial fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litwan, M.; Fliegel, C.

    1986-01-01

    The course and configuration of typical maxillofacial fractures (type Le Fort I-III) and lateral maxillary fractures including the zygomatic arch were reconstructed in detail by application of barium paste on a bony skull and radiogrpahs in standard projections were performed and evaluated. It was obvious from the resulting radiographs that for most maxillofacial fractures a half axial or Water's view was most helpful. Lateral views only give additional information when there is a considerable degree of dislocation of fragments. Comparison with a prediatric skull of 8 years of age demonstrated that fractures of the zygomatic arch in this age group cannot be demonstrated by the typical submento-vertical view, but are shown on a Towne projection. The radiographic appearance of important maxillofacial fractures is demonstrated. The necessity of further studies in cases where reconstructive surgery appears necessary is discussed and CT rather then conventional tomography is advocated. (orig.) [de

  3. The illustrated brief application of defect distribution model for heterojunction device by admittance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oylumluoglu, Gorkem; Kavasoglu, A. Sertap; Kavasoglu, Nese

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Admittance data are used to determine shallow or deep energy levels in heterojunction device. ► We have suggested new equivalent circuit for heterojunction device to mimic the traps. ► The used analytical model is good formulation for display exact energetic location of traps. - Abstract: The dielectric properties of the devices can be studied by using admittance spectroscopy (AS). Majority carrier traps are experimentally analyzed without sophisticated mathematical manipulation. Experimental evidence obtained from AS of the devices may display several features that cannot be explained by the usual single RC circuits representing a depleted junction region and undepleted bulk elements. In this study, ac behavior of typical pn junction diode is simulated using temperature depended AS in a broad frequency range (5 Hz to 13 MHz). The frequency-dependent admittance data of typical pn junction has been discussed based on a discrete deep or shallow trap model. The analytically obtained frequency depended −dC/dω and tan δ (loss tangent) curves are peaks function. The position of the peak depends on the temperature and dc-bias. This peak position gives us information about deep or shallow trap states. The trapping time and trap energy levels can be deduced from −dC/dω versus ω or tan δ versus ω curves. This investigation shows that suitable complex admittance measurement data obtained during the capacitance–voltage measurement process are used to calculate the trapping time and energetic position of the traps. A theoretical analysis and computer simulation are presented in order to illustrate the nature of the trap and the technique by which accurate trapping time and energy position of the trap state can be obtained.

  4. Neutron radiographic techniques, facilities and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domanus, J.C.

    1984-08-01

    This is a collection of three papers, written for presentation on two international conferences. The first paper: ''Neutron radiography. Techniques and facilities'', written by J.P. Barton of N-Ray Engineering Co. La Jolla, CA., USA and J.C. Domanus was presented at the International Symposium on the Use and Development of Low and Medium Flux Research Reactors at the Massachusets Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Mass., USA, 16-19 October 1983. The second paper: ''Neutron radiography with the DR-1 reactor at Risoe National Laboratory'', written by J.C. Domanus, was presented at the same Symposium. The third paper: ''Defects in nuclear fuel revealed by neutron radiography'', written by J.C. Domanus is accepted for presentation on 18 October 1984 to the 3rd European Conference on Nondestructive Testing, Florence, Italy, 15-18 October 1984. While the first paper describes the principles of neutron radiographic techniques and facilities, the second one describes an example of such facility and the third gives an example of application of neutron radiography in the field of nuclear fuel. (author)

  5. The Axolotl Fibula as a Model for the Induction of Regeneration across Large Segment Defects in Long Bones of the Extremities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoping; Song, Fengyu; Jhamb, Deepali; Li, Jiliang; Bottino, Marco C.; Palakal, Mathew J.; Stocum, David L.

    2015-01-01

    We tested the ability of the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) fibula to regenerate across segment defects of different size in the absence of intervention or after implant of a unique 8-braid pig small intestine submucosa (SIS) scaffold, with or without incorporated growth factor combinations or tissue protein extract. Fractures and defects of 10% and 20% of the total limb length regenerated well without any intervention, but 40% and 50% defects failed to regenerate after either simple removal of bone or implanting SIS scaffold alone. By contrast, scaffold soaked in the growth factor combination BMP-4/HGF or in protein extract of intact limb tissue promoted partial or extensive induction of cartilage and bone across 50% segment defects in 30%-33% of cases. These results show that BMP-4/HGF and intact tissue protein extract can promote the events required to induce cartilage and bone formation across a segment defect larger than critical size and that the long bones of axolotl limbs are an inexpensive model to screen soluble factors and natural and synthetic scaffolds for their efficacy in stimulating this process. PMID:26098852

  6. The Axolotl Fibula as a Model for the Induction of Regeneration across Large Segment Defects in Long Bones of the Extremities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoping Chen

    Full Text Available We tested the ability of the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum fibula to regenerate across segment defects of different size in the absence of intervention or after implant of a unique 8-braid pig small intestine submucosa (SIS scaffold, with or without incorporated growth factor combinations or tissue protein extract. Fractures and defects of 10% and 20% of the total limb length regenerated well without any intervention, but 40% and 50% defects failed to regenerate after either simple removal of bone or implanting SIS scaffold alone. By contrast, scaffold soaked in the growth factor combination BMP-4/HGF or in protein extract of intact limb tissue promoted partial or extensive induction of cartilage and bone across 50% segment defects in 30%-33% of cases. These results show that BMP-4/HGF and intact tissue protein extract can promote the events required to induce cartilage and bone formation across a segment defect larger than critical size and that the long bones of axolotl limbs are an inexpensive model to screen soluble factors and natural and synthetic scaffolds for their efficacy in stimulating this process.

  7. Pulmonary edema: radiographic differential diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Dong Soo; Choi, Young Hi; Kim, Seung Cheol; An, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jee Young; Park, Hee Hong

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of using chest radiography to differentiate between three different etiologies of pulmonary edema. Plain chest radiographs of 77 patients, who were clinically confirmed as having pulmonary edema, were retrospectively reviewed. The patients were classified into three groups : group 1 (cardiogenic edema : n = 35), group 2 (renal pulmonary edema : n = 16) and group 3 (permeability edema : n = 26). We analyzed the radiologic findings of air bronchogram, heart size, peribronchial cuffing, septal line, pleural effusion, vascular pedicle width, pulmonary blood flow distribution and distribution of pulmonary edema. In a search for radiologic findings which would help in the differentiation of these three etiologies, each finding was assessed. Cardiogenic and renal pulmonary edema showed overlapping radiologic findings, except for pulmonary blood flow distribution. In cardiogenic pulmonary edema (n=35), cardiomegaly (n=29), peribronchial cuffing (n=29), inverted pulmonary blood flow distribution (n=21) and basal distribution of edema (n=20) were common. In renal pulmonary edema (n=16), cardiomegaly (n=15), balanced blood flow distribution (n=12), and central (n=9) or basal distribution of edema (n=7) were common. Permeability edema (n=26) showed different findings. Air bronchogram (n=25), normal blood flow distribution (n=14) and peripheral distribution of edema (n=21) were frequent findings, while cardiomegaly (n=7), peribronchial cuffing (n=7) and septal line (n=5) were observed in only a few cases. On plain chest radiograph, permeability edema can be differentiated from cardiogenic or renal pulmonary edema. The radiographic findings which most reliably differentiated these two etiologies were air bronchogram, distribution of pulmonary edema, peribronchial cuffing and heart size. Only blood flow distribution was useful for radiographic differentiation of cardiogenic and renal edema

  8. Occupational health and the radiographer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stronach, T.

    1990-01-01

    This paper identifies some of the occupational health hazards faced by radiographers in the hospital environment. There has been very little work done in this area in the past, and as the subject is so large this paper can do little other than raise some of the issues . The hazards addressed include: radiation, ergonomics, chemical, environmental, biological, occupational injury and accident, stress. 14 refs., 2 figs

  9. Automating the radiographic NDT process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aman, J.K.

    1986-01-01

    Automation, the removal of the human element in inspection, has not been generally applied to film radiographic NDT. The justication for automating is not only productivity but also reliability of results. Film remains in the automated system of the future because of its extremely high image content, approximately 8 x 10 9 bits per 14 x 17. The equivalent to 2200 computer floppy discs. Parts handling systems and robotics applied for manufacturing and some NDT modalities, should now be applied to film radiographic NDT systems. Automatic film handling can be achieved with the daylight NDT film handling system. Automatic film processing is becoming the standard in industry and can be coupled to the daylight system. Robots offer the opportunity to automate fully the exposure step. Finally, computer aided interpretation appears on the horizon. A unit which laser scans a 14 x 17 (inch) film in 6 - 8 seconds can digitize film information for further manipulation and possible automatic interrogations (computer aided interpretation). The system called FDRS (for Film Digital Radiography System) is moving toward 50 micron (*approx* 16 lines/mm) resolution. This is believed to meet the need of the majority of image content needs. We expect the automated system to appear first in parts (modules) as certain operations are automated. The future will see it all come together in an automated film radiographic NDT system (author) [pt

  10. A Radiographic Study of Odontoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyung Ho; Choi, Karp Shik [Dept. of Dental Radiology, College of Dentistry, Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to obtain information on the clinical and radiographic features of the odontomas in the jaws. For this study, the authors examined and analyzed the clinical records and radiographs of 119 patients who had lesion of odontoma diagnosed by clinical and radiographic examinations. The obtained results were as follows: 1. Odontoma occurred the most frequently in the 2nd decade (45.4%) and occurred more frequently in males (60.5%) than in females (39.5%). 2. The most common clinical symptom was the delayed eruption of the teeth (34.2%). 3. The type of lesions was mainly observed as compound odontoma (80.8%), and internal pattern of the complex odontoma was unevenly radiopaque (73.9%). 4. The compound odontoma frequently occurred in anterior portion of the maxilla (57.7%) and mandible (30.9%), and complex odontoma frequently occurred in anterior portion of maxilla (34.8%) and posterior portion of mandible (30.5%). 5. The effects on adjacent teeth were impaction of teeth (71.7%) and prolonged retention of deciduous teeth (31.7%). 6. The impaction of the teeth occurred in anterior portion of maxilla (44.2%) amd mandible (19.2%), but root resorption of the adjacent teeth were not seen. 7. The boundary to adjacent structure was well-defined , the lesions appear as radiopaque mass with radiolucent rim.

  11. Cervical spine motion: radiographic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, J.P.; Miyabayashi, T.; Choy, S.

    1986-01-01

    Knowledge of the acceptable range of motion of the cervical spine of the dog is used in the radiographic diagnosis of both developmental and degenerative diseases. A series of radiographs of mature Beagle dogs was used to identify motion within sagittal and transverse planes. Positioning of the dog's head and neck was standardized, using a restraining board, and mimicked those thought to be of value in diagnostic radiology. The range of motion was greatest between C2 and C5. Reports of severe disk degeneration in the cervical spine of the Beagle describe the most severely involved disks to be C4 through C7. Thus, a high range of motion between vertebral segments does not seem to be the cause for the severe degenerative disk disease. Dorsoventral slippage between vertebral segments was seen, but was not accurately measured. Wedging of disks was clearly identified. At the atlantoaxio-occipital region, there was a high degree of motion within the sagittal plane at the atlantoaxial and atlanto-occipital joints; the measurement can be a guideline in the radiographic diagnosis of instability due to developmental anomalies in this region. Lateral motion within the transverse plane was detected at the 2 joints; however, motion was minimal, and the measurements seemed to be less accurate because of rotation of the cervical spine. Height of the vertebral canal was consistently noted to be greater at the caudal orifice, giving some warning to the possibility of overdiagnosis in suspected instances of cervical spondylopathy

  12. Visual defects in a mouse model of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz, Crystal L; Pulimood, Nisha S; Rodrigues-Junior, Wandilson S; Chen, Ching-Kang; Manhaes, Alex C; Kalatsky, Valery A; Medina, Alexandre Esteves

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol consumption during pregnancy can lead to a multitude of neurological problems in offspring, varying from subtle behavioral changes to severe mental retardation. These alterations are collectively referred to as Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD). Early alcohol exposure can strongly affect the visual system and children with FASD can exhibit an amblyopia-like pattern of visual acuity deficits even in the absence of optical and oculomotor disruption. Here, we test whether early alcohol exposure can lead to a disruption in visual acuity, using a model of FASD to mimic alcohol consumption in the last months of human gestation. To accomplish this, mice were exposed to ethanol (5 g/kg i.p.) or saline on postnatal days (P) 5, 7, and 9. Two to three weeks later we recorded visually evoked potentials to assess spatial frequency detection and contrast sensitivity, conducted electroretinography (ERG) to further assess visual function and imaged retinotopy using optical imaging of intrinsic signals. We observed that animals exposed to ethanol displayed spatial frequency acuity curves similar to controls. However, ethanol-treated animals showed a significant deficit in contrast sensitivity. Moreover, ERGs revealed a market decrease in both a- and b-waves amplitudes, and optical imaging suggest that both elevation and azimuth maps in ethanol-treated animals have a 10-20° greater map tilt compared to saline-treated controls. Overall, our findings suggest that binge alcohol drinking restricted to the last months of gestation in humans can lead to marked deficits in visual function.

  13. Metastable gravity on classical defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringeval, Christophe; Rombouts, Jan-Willem

    2005-01-01

    We discuss the realization of metastable gravity on classical defects in infinite-volume extra dimensions. In dilatonic Einstein gravity, it is found that the existence of metastable gravity on the defect core requires violation of the dominant energy condition for codimension N c =2 defects. This is illustrated with a detailed analysis of a six-dimensional hyperstring minimally coupled to dilaton gravity. We present the general conditions under which a codimension N c >2 defect admits metastable modes, and find that they differ from lower codimensional models in that, under certain conditions, they do not require violation of energy conditions to support quasilocalized gravity

  14. Persistent short-term memory defects following sleep deprivation in a drosophila model of Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seugnet, Laurent; Galvin, James E; Suzuki, Yasuko; Gottschalk, Laura; Shaw, Paul J

    2009-08-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder in the United States. It is associated with motor deficits, sleep disturbances, and cognitive impairment. The pathology associated with PD and the effects of sleep deprivation impinge, in part, upon common molecular pathways suggesting that sleep loss may be particularly deleterious to the degenerating brain. Thus we investigated the long-term consequences of sleep deprivation on shortterm memory using a Drosophila model of Parkinson disease. Transgenic strains of Drosophila melanogaster. Using the GAL4-UAS system, human alpha-synuclein was expressed throughout the nervous system of adult flies. Alpha-synuclein expressing flies (alpha S flies) and the corresponding genetic background controls were sleep deprived for 12 h at age 16 days and allowed to recover undisturbed for at least 3 days. Short-term memory was evaluated using aversive phototaxis suppression. Dopaminergic systems were assessed using mRNA profiling and immunohistochemistry. MEASURMENTS AND RESULTS: When sleep deprived at an intermediate stage of the pathology, alpha S flies showed persistent short-term memory deficits that lasted > or = 3 days. Cognitive deficits were not observed in younger alpha S flies nor in genetic background controls. Long-term impairments were not associated with accelerated loss of dopaminergic neurons. However mRNA expression of the dopamine receptors dDA1 and DAMB were significantly increased in sleep deprived alpha S flies. Blocking D1-like receptors during sleep deprivation prevented persistent shortterm memory deficits. Importantly, feeding flies the polyphenolic compound curcumin blocked long-term learning deficits. These data emphasize the importance of sleep in a degenerating/reorganizing brain and shows that pathological processes induced by sleep deprivation can be dissected at the molecular and cellular level using Drosophila genetics.

  15. Comparison of ossification of demineralized bone, hydroxyapatite, Gelfoam, and bone wax in cranial defect repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papay, F A; Morales, L; Ahmed, O F; Neth, D; Reger, S; Zins, J

    1996-09-01

    Demineralized bone allografts in the repair of calvarial defects are compared with other common bone fillers. This study uses a video-digitizing radiographic analysis of calvarial defect ossification to determine calcification of bone defects and its relation to postoperative clinical examination and regional controls. The postoperative clinical results at 3 months demonstrated that bony healing was greatest in bur holes filled with demineralized bone and hydroxyapatite. Radiographic analysis demonstrated calcification of demineralized bone-filled defects compared to bone wax- and Gelfoam-filled regions. Hydroxyapatite granules are radiographically dense, thus not allowing accurate measurement of true bone healing. The results suggest that demineralized bone and hydroxyapatite provide better structural support via bone healing to defined calvarial defects than do Gelfoam and bone wax.

  16. Study on transcatheter ASD occlusion using modified atrial septal defect occluder with no stainless steel screw in canine model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xuan Bin; Qin Yongwen; Hu Jianqiang; Wu Hong

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the safety, biocompatibility and efficacy of transcatheter closure of atrial septal defect (ASD) with no stainless-steel-screw occluder in canine model. Methods: The device was constructed from superelastic Nitinol wires tightly woven into two flat disks and sewed with polyester fibers inside, with a pliable loop on the right-atrial-disk of the device, connecting to the delivery cable. ASD was created by transcatheter puncture and balloon dilatation and then closed by occluder under fluoroscopy in the catheterization laboratory. the location and the influence of the implanted device on function of tricuspid valve and mitral valve were evaluated by echocardiography. At 1, 2, 3 and 6 months after the operation, the animals were killed and autopsy was conducted. Results: Eight dogs with puncture-produced ASD underwent ASD closing procedure successfully. the occluder showed no influence on the function of MV and AV demonstrated by echocardiogram. The two disks of the implanted device were covered with a smooth intact neogenesis layer in all dogs. Endocardial cells fully covered the surface of the two disk without inflammating reaction 3 months later. There was no evidence of corrosion on the surface of the nitinol wire removed from the dog after 6 months. Light microscopic examination of the liver, kidney, lung and spleen showed no evidence of embolization and inflammation. Conclusion: Transcatheter ASD occlusion with new-type occluder is safe, feasible, effective and good biocompatibility with a good prospective clinical application. (authors)

  17. Yeast as a model host to study replication and recombination of defective interfering RNA of Tomato bushy stunt virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panavas, Tadas; Nagy, Peter D.

    2003-01-01

    Defective interfering (DI) RNA associated with Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV), which is a plus-strand RNA virus, requires p33 and p92 proteins of TBSV or the related Cucumber necrosis virus (CNV), for replication in plants. To test if DI RNA can replicate in a model host, we coexpressed TBSV DI RNA and p33/p92 of CNV in yeast. We show evidence for replication of DI RNA in yeast, including (i) dependence on p33 and p92 for DI replication; (ii) presence of active CNV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase in isolated membrane-containing preparations; (iii) increasing amount of DI RNA(+) over time; (iv) accumulation of (-)stranded DI RNA; (v) presence of correct 5' and 3' ends in DI RNA; (vi) inhibition of replication by mutations in the replication enhancer; and (vii) evolution of DI RNA over time, as shown by sequence heterogeneity. We also produced evidence supporting the occurrence of DI RNA recombinants in yeast. In summary, development of yeast as a host for replication of TBSV DI RNA will facilitate studies on the roles of viral and host proteins in replication/recombination

  18. Improvement of quality of 3D printed objects by elimination of microscopic structural defects in fused deposition modeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeniy G Gordeev

    Full Text Available Additive manufacturing with fused deposition modeling (FDM is currently optimized for a wide range of research and commercial applications. The major disadvantage of FDM-created products is their low quality and structural defects (porosity, which impose an obstacle to utilizing them in functional prototyping and direct digital manufacturing of objects intended to contact with gases and liquids. This article describes a simple and efficient approach for assessing the quality of 3D printed objects. Using this approach it was shown that the wall permeability of a printed object depends on its geometric shape and is gradually reduced in a following series: cylinder > cube > pyramid > sphere > cone. Filament feed rate, wall geometry and G-code-defined wall structure were found as primary parameters that influence the quality of 3D-printed products. Optimization of these parameters led to an overall increase in quality and improvement of sealing properties. It was demonstrated that high quality of 3D printed objects can be achieved using routinely available printers and standard filaments.

  19. Repair of facial nerve defects with decellularized artery allografts containing autologous adipose-derived stem cells in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fei; Zhou, Ke; Mi, Wen-Juan; Qiu, Jian-Hua

    2011-07-20

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a decellularized artery allograft containing autologous adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) on an 8-mm facial nerve branch lesion in a rat model. At 8 weeks postoperatively, functional evaluation of unilateral vibrissae movements, morphological analysis of regenerated nerve segments and retrograde labeling of facial motoneurons were all analyzed. Better regenerative outcomes associated with functional improvement, great axonal growth, and improved target reinnervation were achieved in the artery-ADSCs group (2), whereas the cut nerves sutured with artery conduits alone (group 1) achieved inferior restoration. Furthermore, transected nerves repaired with nerve autografts (group 3) resulted in significant recovery of whisking, maturation of myelinated fibers and increased number of labeled facial neurons, and the latter two parameters were significantly different from those of group 2. Collectively, though our combined use of a decellularized artery allograft with autologous ADSCs achieved regenerative outcomes inferior to a nerve autograft, it certainly showed a beneficial effect on promoting nerve regeneration and thus represents an alternative approach for the reconstruction of peripheral facial nerve defects. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Mesenchymal stem cells and their conditioned medium can enhance the repair of uterine defects in a rat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Hong Ho

    2018-03-01

    Conclusion: This study demonstrated that transplantation of MSCs could enhance uterine defect repair by paracrine effects involving IL-6, which are findings that may be applied to facilitate uterine wound healing in the removal of huge intramural masses.

  1. Multiple epiphyseal dysplasia: radiographic abnormalities correlated with genotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unger, S.L. [Ahmanson Department of Pediatrics, Steven Spielberg Pediatric Research Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Briggs, M.D.; Holden, P. [Wellcome Trust Centre for Cell-Matrix Research, University of Manchester (United Kingdom); Zabel, B. [Children' s Hospital, Univ. of Mainz (Germany); Ala-Kokko, L.; Paassilta, P.; Lohiniva, J. [Dept. of Medical Biochemistry, Univ. of Oulu (Finland); Rimoin, D.L. [Ahmanson Department of Pediatrics, Steven Spielberg Pediatric Research Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Department of Pediatrics, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Lachman, R.S. [Ahmanson Department of Pediatrics, Steven Spielberg Pediatric Research Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Department of Pediatrics, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Department of Radiology, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Cohn, D.H. [Ahmanson Department of Pediatrics, Steven Spielberg Pediatric Research Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Department of Human Genetics, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED) is an osteochondrodysplasia characterized clinically by mild short stature and early-onset degenerative joint disease and radiographically by epiphyseal hypoplasia/dysplasia. MED is genetically heterogeneous, with autosomal dominant cases resulting from mutations in at least three genes: the cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) gene (EDM1) and the COL9A2 (EDM2) and COL9A3 (EDM3) genes of type IX procollagen. We present here a comparison of the radiographic phenotypes of MED patients with type IX collagen gene mutations and those with COMP gene mutations. We reviewed radiographs from two patients with MED produced by COMP mutations, two families with COL9A2 mutations, and one family with a mutation in COL9A3. The data demonstrated that the patients with type IX collagen defects had more severe joint involvement at the knees and relative hip sparing, while the patients with COMP mutations had significant involvement at the capital femoral epiphyses and irregular acetabuli. This pattern of joint involvement was consistent regardless of overall degree of severity of the phenotype. (orig.)

  2. Radiographic appearances in Crohn's disease. I. Accuracy of radiographic methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hildell, J; Lindstroem, C; Wenckert, A [Departments of Diagnostic Radiology, Pathology and Surgery, Malmoe Allmaenna Sjukhus, Malmoe, Sweden

    1979-01-01

    Preoperative films of 176 patients operated upon for Crohn's disease were reviewed and compared with microscopic findings in the resected specimens in order to assess the accuracy of the radiographic techniques used. It was found that a diagnosis of the presence and the extent of the disease was often dependent on the demonstration of minor mucosal ulcers and less marked submucosal edema. These lesions were not adequately demonstrated by any of the techniques used for small bowel examination, but were consistently revealed by the double-contrast technique used for examination of the colon.

  3. Monte Carlo simulation for radiographic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tillack, G.R.; Bellon, C.

    2003-01-01

    Standard radiography simulators are based on the attenuation law complemented by built-up-factors (BUF) to describe the interaction of radiation with material. The assumption of BUF implies that scattered radiation reduces only the contrast in radiographic images. This simplification holds for a wide range of applications like weld inspection as known from practical experience. But only a detailed description of the different underlying interaction mechanisms is capable to explain effects like mottling or others that every radiographer has experienced in practice. The application of Monte Carlo models is capable to handle primary and secondary interaction mechanisms contributing to the image formation process like photon interactions (absorption, incoherent and coherent scattering including electron-binding effects, pair production) and electron interactions (electron tracing including X-Ray fluorescence and Bremsstrahlung production). It opens up possibilities like the separation of influencing factors and the understanding of the functioning of intensifying screen used in film radiography. The paper discusses the opportunities in applying the Monte Carlo method to investigate special features in radiography in terms of selected examples. (orig.) [de

  4. Transient exposure to ethanol during zebrafish embryogenesis results in defects in neuronal differentiation: an alternative model system to study FASD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Joya

    Full Text Available The exposure of the human embryo to ethanol results in a spectrum of disorders involving multiple organ systems, including the impairment of the development of the central nervous system (CNS. In spite of the importance for human health, the molecular basis of prenatal ethanol exposure remains poorly understood, mainly to the difficulty of sample collection. Zebrafish is now emerging as a powerful organism for the modeling and the study of human diseases. In this work, we have assessed the sensitivity of specific subsets of neurons to ethanol exposure during embryogenesis and we have visualized the sensitive embryonic developmental periods for specific neuronal groups by the use of different transgenic zebrafish lines.In order to evaluate the teratogenic effects of acute ethanol exposure, we exposed zebrafish embryos to ethanol in a given time window and analyzed the effects in neurogenesis, neuronal differentiation and brain patterning. Zebrafish larvae exposed to ethanol displayed small eyes and/or a reduction of the body length, phenotypical features similar to the observed in children with prenatal exposure to ethanol. When neuronal populations were analyzed, we observed a clear reduction in the number of differentiated neurons in the spinal cord upon ethanol exposure. There was a decrease in the population of sensory neurons mainly due to a decrease in cell proliferation and subsequent apoptosis during neuronal differentiation, with no effect in motoneuron specification.Our investigation highlights that transient exposure to ethanol during early embryonic development affects neuronal differentiation although does not result in defects in early neurogenesis. These results establish the use of zebrafish embryos as an alternative research model to elucidate the molecular mechanism(s of ethanol-induced developmental toxicity at very early stages of embryonic development.

  5. Dependence of radiation damage accumulation in iron on underlying models of displacement cascades and subsequent defect migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souidi, A.; Becquart, C.S.; Domain, C.; Terentyev, D.; Malerba, L.; Calder, A.F.; Bacon, D.J.; Stoller, R.E.; Osetsky, Yu. N.; Hou, M.

    2006-01-01

    Groups of displacement cascades calculated independently with different simulation models and computer codes are compared on a statistical basis. The parameters used for this comparison are the number of Frenkel pairs (FP) produced, the percentages of vacancies and self-interstitial atoms (SIAs) in clusters, the spatial extent and the aspect ratio of the vacancies and the SIAs formed in each cascade. One group of cascades was generated in the binary collision approximation (BCA) and all others by full molecular dynamics (MD). The MD results differ primarily due to the empirical interatomic potentials used and, to some extent, in code strategies. Cascades were generated in simulation boxes at different initial equilibrium temperatures. Only modest differences in the predicted numbers of FP are observed, but the other cascade parameters may differ by more than 100%. The consequences of these differences on long-term cluster growth in a radiation environment are examined by means of object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) simulations. These were repeated with three different parameterizations of SIA and SIA cluster mobility. The differences encompassed low to high mobility, one- and three-dimensional migration of clusters, and complete immobility of large clusters. The OKMC evolution was followed until 0.1 dpa was reached. With the range of OKMC parameters used, cluster populations after 0.1 dpa differ by orders of magnitude. Using the groups of cascades from different sources induced no difference larger than a factor of 2 in the OKMC results. No correlation could be identified between the cascade parameters considered and the number densities of vacancies and SIAs predicted by OKMC to cluster in the long term. However, use of random point defect distributions instead of those obtained for displacement cascades as input for the OKMC modeling led to significantly different results. It is therefore suggested that although the displacement cascade characteristics considered

  6. Transient Exposure to Ethanol during Zebrafish Embryogenesis Results in Defects in Neuronal Differentiation: An Alternative Model System to Study FASD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joya, Xavier; Garcia-Algar, Oscar; Vall, Oriol; Pujades, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Background The exposure of the human embryo to ethanol results in a spectrum of disorders involving multiple organ systems, including the impairment of the development of the central nervous system (CNS). In spite of the importance for human health, the molecular basis of prenatal ethanol exposure remains poorly understood, mainly to the difficulty of sample collection. Zebrafish is now emerging as a powerful organism for the modeling and the study of human diseases. In this work, we have assessed the sensitivity of specific subsets of neurons to ethanol exposure during embryogenesis and we have visualized the sensitive embryonic developmental periods for specific neuronal groups by the use of different transgenic zebrafish lines. Methodology/Principal Findings In order to evaluate the teratogenic effects of acute ethanol exposure, we exposed zebrafish embryos to ethanol in a given time window and analyzed the effects in neurogenesis, neuronal differentiation and brain patterning. Zebrafish larvae exposed to ethanol displayed small eyes and/or a reduction of the body length, phenotypical features similar to the observed in children with prenatal exposure to ethanol. When neuronal populations were analyzed, we observed a clear reduction in the number of differentiated neurons in the spinal cord upon ethano